Page 1

THE DOTS Showcasing all Dutch presentations at the Milan Design Week 2010

connecting

150 Dutch designers in Milan detailed maps and cocktail guide Gijs Bakker A Career in Chapters p12 Alessandra Salici Celebrates 10 years of ZonaTortona p44 Richard Hutten Thinks Inside the Box p49

Published by Tuttobene, commissioned by Agency NL, Ministry of Economic Affairs


Rado’s online design initiative radostar.com

From 1957 Rado’s founder Dr. Paul Lßthi pioneered new markets like China and India. Since then, Rado has followed this pioneering spirit and built up a worldwide unique brand. Today, people all over the globe associate the name Rado with watches of iconic design and innovative materials. Rado is famous for its search for and use of new materials such as hightech ceramics and sapphire crystal, making those innovations a standard in the watchmaking industry. The challenges in using innovative materials were met with pure, timeless and simply iconic designs, always with wearing comfort and functionality in mind. Being a future-oriented design brand, Rado commits itself to supporting young design talents of tomorrow. Their latest initiative is the online design community platform radostar.com. Radostar.com In April 2009, Rado introduced the online design community platform Radostar.com during the Salone del

Mobile in Milano. This new digital platform has been conceptualized and produced purely with young creatives and international design students in mind. This community is renowned for being both inspirational and aspirational and radostar.com aims to be their modern online destination. One of the key features of radostar. com is the ability to give its community exposure as well as recognition by allowing them to publish and share their work, not only to peers but also to potential employers. The group element of the site allows creatives of all design disciplines to discuss ideas, interact and share thoughts. In addition to this, well know names from the world of art and design will be featured as guest editors. Among radostar.com, Rado partners international design festivals and all over the world, such as 100% Design Shanghai, Dutch Design Award Eindhoven, Lodz Design Festival Poland, Elle Deco Design Award UK or the Vienna Design Week.


www.rado.com

Hoofdsponsor Dutch Design Awards

R5.5 by Jasper Morrison For information; www.info.rado.nl

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Maria van der Hoeven Minister of Economic Affairs of The Netherlands

Diversity Connects the Dutch

Colophon Connecting the Dots A magazine representing all Dutch presentations during the Milan Design Week 14-19 April 2010 The magazine Connecting the Dots is published by Tuttobene A one-time issue with the ambition to continue Tuttobene, Damrak 70 - studio 5.63, 1012 LM, Amsterdam, The Netherlands www.thedots.nl connecting@thedots.nl +31 (0)208932886

Editor in Chief David Heldt david@thedots.nl +31 (0)615510727 Translator/Copyeditor Caitlan Kennedy www.bureaukennedy.com Graphic design Koehorst in ‘t Veld www.koehorstintveld.nl Photo-editor reportage Victor le Noble Contributing photographers Roos Kroes, Ilco Kemmere, Simone Desiato, Valentina Zanobelli, Raoul Kramer Printed by VNV Mediaprinting www.vnvmediaprinting.com Communication & Press Bureau Deleau Luc Deleau luc@thedots.nl +31(0)652472990 Advertising Victor le Noble

Commissioned by Agency NL, Ministry of Economic Affairs Supporting partners BNO - Association of Dutch Designers DesignPartners (Milan) © Tuttobene 2010 All rights reserved. Copyrights on the photographs, illustrations, drawings, and written material in this publication are owned by the respective photographer(s), the designer(s) and the author(s). No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying or otherwise, without permission of the publisher and designers, photographers and authors involved.

What is it that connects designers who have set up their company within the borders of the Netherlands? Is there a Dutch-designers-Higgs particle? And if we knew what that was, would we know what makes Dutch designers so diverse? 300 km from Milan, in Geneva, research is being conducted on the smallest particle of our universe: the so-called Higgs particle. Scientists believe that everything may be made up of these particles; we ourselves, the earth, and our furniture. It is an all-connecting element. I was reminded of this, when thinking about the nature of the common factor of successful Dutch designers. There may not be a particle accelerator that can uncover this Dutch-designer-Higgs particle, but the magazine Connecting the Dots makes a good attempt. The landscape of Dutch design has changed a great deal of late. One example: the founders of Droog Design, Gijs Bakker and Renny Ramakers, have ended their successful collaboration after 15 years. In the interview on page 12 Gijs Bakker says: “Every generation has the right to express itself and to design their own products or environment.” Can we conclude from this that a new movement is forming in the design landscape?

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Colophon

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How this new generation will distinguish themselves, remains to be seen from their work. In any event, the importance of development and renewal is apparent. As Minister of Economic Affairs, I believe value only truly increases when these renewed designs are taken into production. That is what I call the ‘value of creation’. The design process brings together disciplines and qualities in which the Netherlands excels. That is why Milan Design Week means so much for Dutch designers, especially now that we are looking for solutions to current the economic and ecological issues. For a small country like ours, the diversity in Dutch design is immense. In this magazine you will see this diversity with your own eyes. Even better is to see it live in Milan, and to experience it. I wish each company and every individual designer the greatest success in the sale of their creations, in making contacts, and in contributing to the diversity of Dutch design.

Minister Van der Hoeven © Ministerie van Economische Zaken

foreword


Maps

Schedules

Presentations

Map Fuori Salone inside front cover

Schedule Wednesday p60

Index list Dutch Presentations p66

by Maria van der Hoeven

Map Zona Tortona p1

Schedule Thursday p61

Presentations Zona Tortona p68-82

— A Career in Chapters

— The Age of Maturity

Interview with

Interview with

Gijs Bakker

Alessandra Salici

by Annemiek van Grondel

by Maria Serra

p12

p44

Column

Column

Sheila Ruiz p20

Victor le Noble p50

Map Zona Lambrate p112

Schedule Friday p62

Presentations Zona Lambrate p82 - 95

Map Underground inside back cover

Schedule Saturday p63

Presentations Fuori Salone p95 - 103

Schedule Sunday p64

Presentations Fiera p104 - 108

Schedule Monday p65

Frederike Top p19 Jo Meesters p28

Onno Schelling and Marjolijn Borsboom p40 Pieke Bergmans p41 rENs p48

Kiki van Eijk and Joost van Bleiswijk p29

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CONTENTS

Foreword

Going Green by Eva Olde Monnikhof

p7

p37

— Foreign Designers who call Holland Home

— Holland as a Design System

by Jeanne Tan

by Erik Hesseling

p22

p52

Column

Column

Rory Dodd p30

Miss Salone Socialite p58

Photo Documentary ‘Designers at Work’ by Roos Kroes Bo Reudler p18

Articles & Columns

Richard Hutten p49 Floris Schoonderbeek and Dick van Hoff p56 Niels van Eijk and Mirjam van der Lubbe p57

— Sustainable Design in The Netherlands

Colophon p6

by O2 Nederland

p32 9

CONTENTS


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Text Annemiek van Grondel — Photography Ilco Kemmere

He could be called one of the godfathers of Dutch Design and certainly the one who put Dutch Design on the map. Gijs Bakker (1942), co-founder of Droog Design, is levelheaded about it all. Last year he left the ever-successful design platform after 15 years. Time for a new creative chapter. “Starting out in the middle of a financial crisis is fantastic”

Gijs Bakker FS08•

A Career in Chapters•

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“Vienna, 1980. My wife, my son, and I were visiting a jewellery symposium there. There were posters in all the trams with the slogan: ‘Design is unsichtbar‘. They were referring to an exposition in Linz. We visited it on the way back. An enormous white tent on the bank of the Donau, crammed with design in the broadest sense of the word; post-modern architecture, car design, performance art, fashion, visual arts… One section with design pieces by Ettore Sottsass. Carpet made up of classic parquet flooring, finished with a chromeplated steel border and placed under insipid formica chairs in the

Gijs Bakker

(1942, Amersfoort) • e arly ‘60s Rietveld Academy and Konstfack Skolen, Stockholm • 1965 collaboration with Emmy van Leersum (1966 marriage) • 1993 Droog Design with design critic and historian Renny Ramakers • 1996 Chi ha paura...? with Marijke Vallanzasca • Design from jewellery, interiors, furniture, household appliances and items, to public spaces and exhibitions. For Polaroid, Artifort, VKB and Eno Studio, among others. His work is collected throughout the world and has received many awards since 1965, the last of which was the Benno Premsela Award in 2007, for his work at Droog Design. • Since 1968 Teacher at the Delft University of Technology and the Design Academy, among others. • N  ow guest-curator, jury member, lecturer, and head of the Masters Department (IM) of the Design Academy, Eindhoven.

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most varied patterns. A lamp with a myriad of bulbs. A bookcase from the Memphis collection that would later become an icon… The audacity! Fantastic! That kind of shock stays with you forever.” He sighs. The exhibition meant a turning point for Gijs Bakker, conceptual artist and designer, and a cautious prelude to Droog Design, the design platform he would later start with Renny Ramakers. Droog Design is everything the cutting edge of that time, Italian design by Studio Alchimia and Memphis Group, wasn’t: a return to the idea, the concept, averse from unnecessary decoration and exaggeration, but with an emphasis on originality and reclamation, all with a touch of irony. It was a new style that set off a shock wave in 1993 at the Salone in Milan, similar to the one Memphis caused at this Forum Design exhibition in Linz. Intuition Bakker is characterized by a curious mixture of level-headedness and absent-mindedness. These elements come back again and again, both in his personality and in his work. He approaches life with an almost childlike curiosity, despite his vast experience and all but encyclopaedic knowledge of art and design. His home-cum-studio, a canal-side house purchased from another Dutch design celebrity, Benno Premsela, is a striking example of the diversity of his interests: a jumble of styles, all tastefully arranged. “Benno had a fantastic, free, and open spirit!” he calls from the kitchen with enthusiasm. “In the eighties he had a kind of home-gallery in this room. Look at the cotton carpet you are sitting on. That was revolutionary in those days!“ Besides being a designer, Bakker is also a cultural entrepreneur and mentor. He was and is a decisive influence on the international promotion of Dutch design, though both his designs (jewellery, interior and industrial design) and his role as teacher and guest-curator (as early as 1980 he organized the exhibition Design from the Netherlands in Stuttgart, which toured Europe for four years, A Career in Chapters

commissioned by the Office of Fine Arts Abroad, in Amsterdam) as well as his collaboration projects. His first collaboration was with his wife, Emmy van Leersum, whom he met in the early sixties at the Rietveld Academy in Amsterdam, where they both studied jewellery design. Their conceptual outlook and raising the fundamental level of jewellery design made G+E (Gijs and Emmy) pioneers. Bakker: “We were very different. She was functional and analytical in the step-by-step development of ideas, whereas I have a more intuitive approach. An excellent combination.” Van Leersum passed away in 1984, when their son Aldo, now also a designer, was 13 years old. Bakker is keeping her legacy alive. ‘Last year I organized a retrospective of our work and placed a series of sixteen aluminium bracelets, all slightly different, in a display case,’ Bakker says. ‘It felt as if she was looking over my shoulder and knowingly whispering: “Shouldn’t you turn that bracelet the other way around?” ‘ Droog Design A second important collaboration was with art historian and design critic Renny Ramakers. High-profile projects and exhibitions led their design platform Droog Design to become the driving force behind the movement that later became internationally synonymous with Dutch design. Bakker and Ramakers decided on collaboration during a group exhibition in pop temple Paradiso in Amsterdam. An upstairs gallery, on a regular Sunday afternoon, in early ‘93. Bakker was one of the exhibitors, Ramakers organized the event. “It was snowing and it was cold, but all of Amsterdam was there”, Bakker recounts. “The time was ripe, responses were good. I was planning on focussing public attention on some former students in a shop/ gallery in the Via Serva in Milan, with ceramics, textiles and jewellery. Renny and I rashly decided to combine this idea with what was being shown in Paradiso.”

They didn’t harbour any illusions, but expected to see mainly ‘indifferent‘ Dutch furniture ‘salesmen‘, as Bakker puts it. Dutch design didn’t ‘exist‘ after all. But fate had something else in mind. With the arrival of Andrea Branzi – a group of young designers and press people in his wake – the exposition gained attention. The last three days there was quite a rush.

A career in chapters In spite of the diversity of his activities – design, teaching, lecturing, organizing exhibitions – Gijs Bakker’s life is divided into clear-cut chapters of 15 years. Admittedly, they run more of less parallel to each other, but it is remarkable nonetheless: this marriage to Emmy van Leersum; the period of time he was busy with Droog Design; the working relationship and romance he had with Italian gallery owner Marijke Vallanzasca, with whom he started the successful jewellery label Chi ha paura…? in 1996. He is currently working on a long-term project in Taiwan. At the request of the Taiwanese Craft Research and Development Institute, he is developing a native design culture for the Taiwanese craft-industry, together Within a few years Droog Design as with 17 young Taiwanese designers. a brand put the Netherlands on the Could this be an indication of what is map, with its razor-shape sense of to come for the next 15 years? the spirit of the times and its selection and later in-house production of unconventional, conceptual work with a interpretive twist. And done by a new generation that gave renewed meaning to design with clever use of combinations and recycling. World-famous designers like Richard Hutten, Marcel Wanders, Jurgen Bey, and Hella Jongerius all started out with Droog. The differences between the Bakker now considers Droog Northern European and Asian views Design’s current position as less of design fascinate him immensely. influential. Last June, he decided to Here, as with Droog Design and at withdraw from the fifteen-year the Design Academy, he comes into collaboration with Ramakers, to the contact with global thinking, somedismay of many. thing that has little to do with With the opening of a prestigbringing Dutch character to ious store in New York, he came to Taiwanese design. What does it believe commercial considerations involve? A conceptual approach. Or would push content further into the rather, as Bakker puts it: “conceptual background. design in context”. Here the context The designer is glad it is behind is Taiwanese culture. His findings are him. “I am working on a lot of new being presented in the Triennale in projects. Life is fantastic. I don’t want Milan, under the label yii (see page that to be ruined by something that is 103), featuring products made of obsolete. Droog Design is over. bamboo, porcelain, and even brick, Something receives attention for a material that the Dutch brought to some ten years and then is irrevoca- Taiwan in the seventeenth century. bly surpassed by the next idea. Bakker: “One young man built That’s fine; it gives young people sculptural, organic implements out of space. Every generation has the it. Beautiful and innovative.” right to express itself and to design One exception to his ‘career in their own products or environment.” chapters’ is the number of years the designer has been teaching: more than forty years. For some time now,

“Design is still all about flexibility and an open mind just like in the sixties.”

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he has been head of the department of Masters of IM at the Design Academy in Eindhoven, a study programme that also has a strong impact on Dutch Design and for which there is fierce competition from students from all over the world. “A lot is happening here, especially in the field of research. The market is changing; it demands more from designers than just a product.” he explains. “This can limit them, but it can also stimulate and inspire. The majority of the foreign designers we’ve attracted, both in Eindhoven and at Droog, have stayed in The Netherlands, because they’ve found a cultural and economic climate here that is without equal anywhere in the world. For the arts, this has traditionally meant that the government has found it its mission to instruct the masses and impart culture to them. Graphic design and architecture flourished in the 1920s and ‘30s, thanks to the active part the government played as patron. But product design was not yet of importance. Up until the ‘60s and ‘70s it was seen as nothing more than embellishment, strictly for marketing but without further purpose.”

Think global Bakker was one of the first in The Netherlands to realize that differences between art, design, and other disciplines could be done away with. And besides pioneer, he was also an advocate of ‘the concept‘. To say that he, as teacher and lecturer, could help the Dutch design world advance even further by propagating the ‘think global‘ concept, he finds too bold a statement. “Precisely because we live in such a ‘global‘ world, the identity of the group you are a part of, in this case the Netherlands, has to be


defined meticulously. And you have to keep working at being of international significance. It is important that the next generation of designers doesn’t casually assume the reputation of Dutch Design, but that they use it in a positive sense by further developing the quality of the work, such as making an even more creative response to technological developments. So much is about to happen! According to Tal, one of the IM Master students, everyone will have their own 3D-printer in a few years. What does that mean for the ordinary consumer? If I throw a party tomorrow and want to design my own cutlery and tableware, I can do that. That means is that every

Tom, Dick, and Harry cannot only design, but can actually make their own product. Furthermore, the synthetics used for these 3D-shapes will be recyclable. So my party-ware can be reused as a base material for something else. “The consequence? Designers have to become even more inventive and think even more conceptually, because the context of our existence is changing. It’s insane! Because if you forget that context, you become inflexible, you get sidetracked and then eventually it’s all over. Future designers need to be aware of that. Dutch designers have an advantage: The Netherlands has made a name for itself in terms of design. In the past, I had to plead with manufacturers to get things done; now the door is wide open. Both domestic and foreign companies come here to shop for talent. This does mean that the next generation really has to know what’s going on in the world. It’s still all about flexibility and an open mind, just like in the sixties.

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About a high degree of curiosity and an almost professional development of your intuition. You have to listen to this intuition, to feel it, and to follow it, but also to cultivate it. It’s a big job for the next generation of designers: to improve yourself, to improve your mind. But above all, to see, to see consciously.” According to Bakker, the history of Dutch design is not the only advantage. He also considers the recent economic recession to be a blessing. “Starting out in the middle of a financial crisis is fantastic!“ he shouts. “Everything is upside down! Two years ago there was no end to the insane amounts of money being handed out for design. That has a paralyzing effect on young people who have yet to start out in the design profession. But that has all been straightened out now. Things are now being looked at much more critically, and rightly so. This makes way for new creativity. Other, no less magnificent things are bound to happen.”

The retrospective Designers on Jewellery can be seen in the San Francisco Museum of Craft and Design (SFMC+D): twelve years of Chi ha paura…?, containing around eighty pieces by, among others, Ron Arad, Marc Newson and Gijs Bakker himself. Until May of this year.

www.gijsbakker.com www.chihapaura.com

A Career in Chapters

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Bo Reudler ZT18•

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Frederike Top ZT18• ZT23•

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Sheila Ruiz

Designing Reality Everything we do in life has consequences. This may seem like an obvious statement, but at the same time we don’t seem to realize it. Because of the individualism and over-specialization of our society, we have lost our interconnection with the environment. We identify only with a name and a career path, but we are so much more than that. We are an integral part of the environment we seem to be forgetting about: we depend on it and we are constantly modifying it. We are aware of the design industry’s impact on nature, but this awareness has come only now that the damage has already been done. Such is the influence of this narrow perspective we have on our actions. Why say this in a design magazine? Because I’m just doing my part. Of course I identify with my name and my chosen career path, but I am also conscious of the power of my actions. Every action, no matter how small, impacts the system as a whole and this is certainly the case in the world of design. Although the consequences cannot always be foreseen, designers affect both everyday lives and the environment. Through their work, designers have the ability to directly alter reality. And with this influence comes great responsibility. Designers must concentrate on this all-important question: what kind of reality do we want to create? Unfortunately, it is not as simple as that. A new eco-conscientiousness has emerged within the world of design, but these new ideas don’t always fit into the requirements set by market and industry. This makes it difficult for designers to make a living creating within these parameters, while at the same time being conscious of their ability to influence reality. But what can we do when we are facing an entire industrial and economic system that sees to be stuck in the mud? It makes it hard but at the same time any attempt at movement towards an environmental balance, and with it our own balance, is laudable. Let me tell you a little story: there once was a village where everyone was sick because a mountain was blocking out the sunlight. One day, the oldest of the village elders took a spoon and began to make his way towards the mountain. A young man stopped him and asked him where he was going. The old man said: “I am going to move the mountain with this spoon.” The young man laughed at him: “You can’t move a mountain with a spoon!” The old man replied: “Yes, I know. But we must start somewhere.” We cannot change the world, but we can try. Milan Design Week presents a great opportunity to analyze the magnitude of the mountain we are facing and the number of spoons it will take to move it. It is a chance for designers to unite with other creative minds and let their collective imagination flow. It is the perfect occasion to make new connections and to contemplate the meaning of design in this new decade. What mountains are we facing? Let’s find the answers together. A lot of work is still to be done.

“Every action has its consequence”

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COLUMN

Sheila Ruiz


Text Jeanne Tan — Raoul Kramer/Collective Exposure

Perhaps you’ve noticed that the face of design from The Netherlands has gradually been changing over the past few years. Literally. Alongside surnames of Dutch designers containing numerous unpronounceable syllables and guttural Gs, you’ll find surnames of designers hailing from all corners of the globe: these days more and more foreign designers are deciding to call Holland home. Some of these names might ring a bell: Khodi Feiz, Satyendra Pakhalé, Tomás Gabzdil Libertiny, Nacho Carbonell, Minale-Maeda, Julien Carretero or perhaps the CEO and Chief Creative Director of Philips Design, Stefano Marzano.

Foreign Designers who call Holland Home•

Back row L » R Andrea Trimarchi and Simone Farresin (Italy) – FormaFantasma; Sayaka Yamamoto (Japan) and Boaz Cohen (Israel) – BCXSY; Mario Minale (Italy/Germany) and Kuniko Maeda (Japan) – MinaleMaeda Front row L » R Janne Kyttanen (Finland) – Freedom of Creation; Mara Skujeniece (Latvia); Doreen Westphal (Germany); Nikola Nikolov (Bulgaria) – Studio-ReCreation

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Article

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International designers usually end up in The Netherlands for work, study, or love and some end up staying long term to establish a design practice. The land of the Low Skies is renowned for its liberal nature and international outlook and for an expat living in The Netherlands, it’s an accommodating environment. Most importantly, Dutch design receives strong cultural recognition and international attention, making this the biggest benefit of working here. Despite recent political conservatism that sees The Netherlands, and much of (Western) Europe for that matter,

manufacturers and assisted by initiatives supporting creative industries and some cultural funding, designers, if they choose to, are able to run their practices autonomously. This isn’t an environment that suits all designers, and is supportive particularly of those with an experimental approach, strongly favouring self-production. Latvian-born designer Mara Skujeniece relates it to one of The Netherlands’ bestmanufacturing industry, we can still loved symbols: the bicycle. “Theoretically, if your car or the train play a global role in the design doesn’t work, then you can always world.” In this creative climate, openness in design thinking charac- bike! In the design process here, it works like this too. You have the terizes the education. “The Dutch system has little hierarchy, so design- freedom to move using your own force, (only don’t get a flat tyre!) but ers here are taught to think as you can still move. You’re your own 1 individuals, which is in contrast to many other parts of the world, engine.” Young designers are especially Asia,” Bakker continues. respected in The Netherlands, which is a major difference with many of “In The Netherlands, there is much more debate around what design is, the designers’ home countries. could be, and will be,” says Andrea Farresin and Trimarchi add, “If you work in your home country you can Trimarchi from Italian design duo FormaFantasma. “In Italy because of of course more easily create your the past success of Italian design, own network. Despite this, here we feel free to do what we like. 2 people seem to know what good and bad design is based on the Sometimes we think people don’t criteria of last century.” Simone understand how special it is that so many designers are working as Farresin, the other half of the duo, independent designers in The comments, “On the other hand, in Italy there are better manufacturers Netherlands.” It could be expected that the with more knowledge and experience. You can easily find craftspeo- international designers would ple and companies to help develop congregate in Amsterdam. your projects just by looking around Surprisingly, partly due to reasons of the neighbourhood you live in.” This economy and space, they’re based in lose some of its liberalness, the Dutch is the third year the duo have been various cities including Eindhoven, design community – spanning working in Eindhoven, which is where design, graphic design and fashion they established their studio after – continues to celebrate its opengraduating from the DAE IM Masters 4 ness: no design integration test program. required here. Dutch design institutions like The Rietveld Academy or Design Academy Eindhoven (DAE) are magnets for international designers - in 2009 there were 42 nationalities represented at DAE. “In the last decade, The Netherlands has become a very popular destination FormaFantasma for foreign designers,” says Gijs Bakker, who heads the IM Master 5 program at DAE. “We don’t have a deep tradition in manufacturing. Complementing openness in design However what we do have is a thinking is the possibility to work strong creative climate and a supindependently. Without having to portive government. Even without the rely on the commissions from 3

“Identity is not defined only by geographical factors anymore.”

Rotterdam, and Utrecht. What’s most interesting about this situation is the cultural exchange and impact that operating in a Dutch society has on the designers’ work. “The Dutch are very critical and question every-

O’Sullivan, who has French/Irish roots. “As a consequence I think that Dutch designers don’t always learn as much from their foreign counterparts as the other way around. From what I’ve observed over the years teaching at DAE, the things they may pick up are: from Icelandic students, a form of quirkiness; from Israeli 6 students, dedication; and from Japanese students, humility.” Geographic factors have a surprising impact on design. Living in a country with a very small footprint and one of the world’s highest population density rates means also having the highest density rate of designers in the world. “I don’t feel like I have to be competitive because I’m not Dutch, so I can just do my own 7 thing more easily,” comments Skujeniece. However every disadvantage has its advantage. “There’s just no space here!” remarks German-born designer Doreen Westphal. “In Germany it feels like things happen further apart and design is more serious, intellectual. The Dutch ‘scene’ is more condensed but that has to do with how little space there is. And because everything is closer together, everything influences everything else much thing,” says industrial designer Khodi faster, so it’s easier to incorporate Feiz. “They love to work hard, and are not easily satisfied. As a result, I’ve learnt to be much more selfcritical in my work. It keeps me on my toes!” Iranian born/US-educated Feiz relocated to The Netherlands to work for Philips in the early ‘90s, thinking his stay would last only a little while - it’s been 19 years since. “I like the confidence of the Dutch people, not in an arrogant way,” continues Skujeniece. “Being here Gijs Bakker has given me the confidence and curiosity to explore, and the freedom to experiment. In Latvia, it’s more about following the rules.” Skujeniece came to study at DAE in other disciplines into your work.” the mid ‘90s as there was no design What’s less conducive to creativity is course in Latvia, and has remained the flat, monotonous Dutch landever since. Thinking the other way scape. “When there’s literally less around, what can Dutch designers variety in the visual input around learn from their international colyou, anywhere you go, it slightly leagues? “It’s of course much easier numbs the mind in a way,” observe to learn from another culture when Boaz Cohen and Sayaka Yamamoto you experience these cultural from Eindhoven-based BCXSY. The differences first hand,” says Damian accessible location in Western

"Even without the manufacturing industry, we can still play a global role in the design world."

Europe is however a big plus for the duo. “Both Israel and Japan are quite isolated from the rest of the world. Going, for example, to exhibit in Milan is much more complex from there than it is from The 8

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Netherlands.” Israeli-born Cohen - who has Dutch roots - and Japanese-born Yamamoto are also both graduates of DAE. So what do the designers prefer to be called? “I don’t mind. My Czech grandmother lived in Poland before she moved to Germany. I grew up in East Germany and lived in the UK for five years before moving to The Netherlands,” continues Westphal. “I feel European with the need to connect to my local environment. For the last few weeks that environment is Eindhoven.” Damian O’Sullivan echoes the sentiment. “I identify most strongly with being a European designer, although that’s clearly not an easy label to wear. I prefer the work to bear that out.” Mario Minale and Kuniko Maeda from Rotterdambased studio Minale-Maeda: “Sometimes we get called Dutch and it doesn’t bother us but we both carry our baggage, so it might be more appropriate to call us Dutch-based or otherwise Japanese-Italian, although it’s slightly complicated as Mario grew up in Germany.” According to FormaFantasma, “People are obsessed by the idea of national identity while things are ¥

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foreign designers who call holland home

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much more complex: our graduation project (Moulding Tradition) is about cultural ambiguity. Sometimes we’re defined as ‘Young Italian designers’, other times as ‘Dutch designers.’ These definitions are simplifying a more complex scenario where identity is not defined anymore only by geographical factors.” Geography does play a role however in the ability of the designers to stay in The Netherlands long term: the design community might welcome designers of all nationalities, but Dutch immigration policy, which

favours the EU, complicates the situation. For now, the designers feel completely at home in The Netherlands - the only major drawback being missing the food from their home countries. But if they were ever to leave, what would they take with them? Minale-Maeda sum it up best: “For sure the openness in design and thinking and the Dutch working mentality and method - the approach that nothing is ever impossible that you get when you create the land yourself.” •

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“I think that Dutch designers don’t always learn as much from their foreign counterparts as the other way around. […] the things they may pick up are: from Icelandic students, a form of quirkiness; from Israeli students, dedication; and from Japanese students, humility." Damian O’Sullivan (Irish/ French Dutch designer)

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1 Barn, Mara Skujeniece 2 Made by Bees vase, Studio Libertiny, photography — Raoul Kramer/Collective Exposure 3 Red Blue Lego Chair , Minale Maeda 4 The White Rabbit, Studio-Re-Creation 5 Skin collection, Nacho Carbonell 6 Drag collection, Julien Careterro, photography — Raoul Kramer/ Collective Exposure 7 The Archetypical Vase, Joana Meroz and Andrea Bandoni, photography: Suzana Camara Leret

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8 Baked, FormaFantasma 9 CHANGE!, BCXSY 10 TAK floor lamp, Khodi Feiz 11 Solar Lampion, Damian O’Sullivan 12 Concrete mug, Doreen Westphal, photography — Jeroen van der Wielen 13 Spool vases, Mara Skujeniece

foreign designers who call holland home

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Jo Meesters ZL10 • FS01• F04•

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Kiki van Eijk and Joost Bleiswijk ZL12• ZL13•

Studio

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Studio


Rory Dodd

How not to be a designer Welcome to Milano 2010. What are you here for? After all these years and after all these new events and festivals, in all these different countries and cities, why is this particular week in Milano still the most important occasion on the design calendar? Why is it still the one that everybody has to be at, to show at and to visit, again and again and again? This is our lucky 13th year here and the 10th year of showing at the Salone. I’m here for the scary stuff: to find it, to work with it and to tell people about it. The scary stuff is our code, our term to describe the design gold that we gather in Milan, that we come here to discover and experience, a term coined by very good friend and long time supporter of Designersblock, the talented Mr Simon Waterfall. If you don’t know him, then google and enjoy. He went to the Salone a few years back and said that there was no scary stuff. For me, some of the scariest stuff has consistently been the output of the designers, companies and schools from the Netherlands. It was a major motivating factor for us to begin doing what we have been doing for the last dozen years or so. The work and the ideas of the Dutch are ones you really don’t expect, things that you cannot fully understand but that will thrill, provoke and inspire you for years. The quality of thinking and the ambition of Dutch design has always been a datum for us. The other reason I am here, is the same reason this column is called ‘How not to be a designer.’ When Designersblock came about in 1998, we introduced a group of Dutch designers and companies to the UK. People who were little known then, but many of whom are established and famous now. Hella Jongerius, Ineka Hans, Richard Hutten, Casper Vissers, DMD, JKN Arnhem and others too numerous to include here, all took part in the first Designersblock in ’98 at the Truman Brewery in East London. To me the most interesting person in that first show was Teake Bulstra, founder of D.M.D. He was the one that went to college and decided not to be a designer. He was the one who set up a company that made it possible for mere mortals to have a little or big piece by Droog Design in their everyday worlds. He got it manufactured, packaged and distributed to retailers around the globe. Not all design needs to be owned but it does need to be available, otherwise what is the point? Teake made it available and for me that was my first glimpse into design infrastructure. In the insane, drink fuelled hurly-burly of this Milano week, it’s easy to stumble past them without noticing. But these ladies and gentlemen who join the dots, see the patterns, take the risks and do their thing are important. Just like designers, they work with possibilities, imagine a future and make it happen. Look after them and they’ll look after you. Rory Dodd, Co-founder of Designersblock Location FuoriSalone 2010 Revel Scalo d’Isola, Via Thaon De Reve 3, Milano (Zona Isola)

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COLUMN

Rory Dodd

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Text Thies Timmermans, CornĂŠ Wentink and Judith van den Goor (a contribution by O2 Nederland: Creative Network for Sustainability)

In the past, The Netherlands has been a trendsetter in the field of sustainable product design. Many projects and individual designers have contributed to sustainable products and the development of the field. What is the current status of sustainable product design in the Netherlands and what can we expect in the future? With these questions in mind, we asked four major players in the field for their opinion.

Sustainable Design in The Netherlands•

The Wattcher by Marcel Wanders & Innovaders

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The four experts Siem Haffmans Social entrepreneur and founder of the Dutch sustainable design studio IDEAL&CO. Also the creative brain behind the Ragbag®, a trendy bag made of recycled plastic collected by ragpickers in India. Andy van den Dobbelsteen Professor of Climate Design & Sustainability at the Faculty of Architecture at the Delft University of Technology. He is also expert for and author of the website www. duurzaamgebouwd.nl and editor and translator of Jón Kristinsson’s book ‘Integrated Design Holistic architecture.’ Conny Bakker University lecturer at the Faculty of Architecture at the Delft University of Technology and originator of the unique minor ‘Sustainable Design Engineering,’ which will be offered coming year for the third consecutive year, in collaboration with Wubbo Ockels, professor of Sustainable Technology (ASSET). Piet Hein Eek Designer and founder of design studio ‘Eek & Ruijgrok’ and the one-man business ‘Piet Hein Eek.’ Here he concentrates on the design of small furniture series in which he combines the use of unusual materials and uncommon, but simple production processes.

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The development of sustainable design According to Andy van den Dobbelsteen, the Netherlands has seen three distinct waves of sustainability. The first wave began in the ‘70s as a result of statements made by the Club of Rome. The Brundtland Report caused the second wave, which began in the Netherlands around 1990 and resulted in vigorous implementation of sustainability in government policy. This period also saw the onset of considerations of sustainability in industrial product development. In Conny Bakker’s opinion, industrial designers became convinced at the beginning of this second wave that designers could make a difference when it came to sustainability. Van den Dobbelsteen, himself a child of the second wave, is educating the students of the third wave. This wave was ushered in around 2006 in the Netherlands, by Al Gore and the broadcasting of a documentary on Cradle to Cradle on Dutch television.

for instance, has an internal think tank: ‘GreenReSeARCH.’ This think tank conducts research into sustainable techniques and concepts, such as energy labels, zero-energy principles, cradle to cradle, and sustainability of materials.

M  arket introduction of sustainable products It is notable that in the current period, sustainability is far better received by the market. According to Siem Haffmans, sustainability is now seen as a mark of quality, but it will be taken for granted by consumers of the future. That is why many Dutch companies are working on sustainability. Philips has stated that 40% of its turnover is made up of green and/ or energy-saving products. TNT is working on carbon-neutral transport and DSM is developing a water filter. To say nothing of the LED-lamp that has been marketed by Lemnis. Piet Hein Eek also believes sustainability should be self-evident in the design and purchase of products. In his view, we cannot continue plundering the natural resources the earth has given us. In terms of architecture and urban development, any self-respecting Dutch architectural firm involves sustainability in its design process, according to Andy van den Dobbelsteen. A few examples of companies at the forefront: Thomas Rau, SeARCH, Paul de Ruiter, opMAAT, and Kristinsson. SeARCH,

Once designers develop even a small sense of awareness concerning sustainability, it will not let them go. Like a kind of ineradicable virus.

Conny Bakker thinks it is a shame there are few new trends and developments relating to sustainability in the Netherlands, as of late. There are mainly a great deal of ‘paper projects’ with a visionary aura (for example the 360 Paper Bottle), but they rarely reach the marketplace. Those that do reach the market are generally invisible. She calls it ‘Silent Green’: sustainable activities that take place in the background, that are hardly visible to the consumer, or barely acknowledged by the business community. Siem Haffmans believes, however, that businesses are proud of their sustainable activities and style themselves accordingly.

Andy van den Dobbelsteen

There is even a question of whether companies apply sustainability correctly in their products. Piet Hein Eek observes that sustainable products that are thrown away after only a few years will do little to improve the environment. Conny Bakker mentions IKEA’s solar cell powered lamp, the Sunnan. After calculation of its environmental impact, this product is shown not to be sustainable at all.

Sustainable design in the Netherlands

The role of the designer The interviewees are of one mind when it comes to the on the role of the designer. They agree that the designer should put his creativity and his ability to come up with new things, to use in the transition to a sustainable society. To this purpose aesthetically pleasing products should be designed, based on new techniques, so that they will be accepted by the market and by the consumer. To do this, Siem Haffmans notes, it is important that the designer think more strategically, not on the product level, but on the social level. The designer will need to become familiar with the subject matter, seeing as he will be working in a team of scientists, engineers, and other specialist. There should be a shift from ego-designers, to ecodesigners. No design gods like Marcel Wanders or Philip Starck, but social, sustainable designers like Piet Hein Eek or Trevor Baylis. It should be noted that Marcel Wanders seems to have taken a first step in this direction. Conny Bakker points out the Wattcher as a product that contributes to a change in consumer lifestyle. This product was designed by Marcel Wanders in collaboration with Innovaders. Marcel Wanders says about the product: “The Wattcher is designed to be the ticking heart of the home. The design is very clean and has urgency in pointing out your energy consumption. Wattcher is more than just a product; it is a strategy that stimulates awareness.” According to Conny Bakker, this type of product requires more of the designer than the use of the right materials; it also involves a bit of psychology. Siem Haffmans notes that Dutch designers, who concern themselves with sustainability, return to the source and in doing so use original, natural materials (see box). They are not afraid to take a different road than the cheapest or the easiest, a trend set earlier by Piet Hein Eek. Andy van den Dobbelsteen has noticed that once designers develop even a small sense of awareness concerning sustainability, it will not let them go. Like a kind of ineradicable virus, you start to use it in an amusing way. • 35

Piet Hein Eek

Piet Hein Eek

This article was compiled by the editors of O2 Magazine, part of O2 Nederland. O2 Nederland is an association of designers that deal with sustainability in a professional occupation. O2 Nederland has been facilitating meetings and organizing events since 1993. Within our network of motivated professionals we have an extensive and profound knowledge base. For instance, O2 members laid the groundwork for Ecodesign. We share this knowledge with each other and apply it to diverse sustainability issues. O2 Nederland publishes its own magazine and is part of O2 Global Network, which is active in more than 50 countries. See www. o2nederland.org for more information.


Text Eva Olde Monnikhof, project manager Creative Industries at Creative Amsterdam

Young Dutch designers Many young, up-and-coming designers fall into the ‘sustainable’ category. It seems like a trend to return to the pure crafts as a designer, and to communicate this plainly. See for example the product series ‘Drawn from the clay’ by Atelier NL, the Flax product series by Christien Meindertsma, or the wall and floor decorations by Claudy Jongstra. These are projects that draw on a craft and from that yield beautiful products. And because crafts are an old art form, the materials and the process that enters into it are often natural. No environmentally polluting additives and machines are necessary, because they didn’t have them in ‘the old days’ either. You know which sheep your sweater comes from and from which clay your mug is made, because products are produced locally. This trend produces sustainable products in a natural way. It is questionable whether sustainability is an underlying principle, but at least it is a result and that is a welcome bonus. And whether or not sustainability is a basic principle, at least there is an awareness among the majority of the new generation of designers. They no longer carelessly fling plastic objects into the world. They consider processes and consequences.

Just a quick peek in my shopping bag: muesli, soy milk, organic vegetables and eco-friendly fish. Just a glance at my house: some second-hand furniture from Martin Visser for Rietveld, a new piece by Marcel Wanders, a few Thonet chairs rescued from a dumpster, and a lot of unknown thirties and fifties designs. All bought at the local “recycle store.” I am the dream consumer of anything biological, eco-friendly, cradle-to-cradle, and more. Since the nineties, when money was no object, sustainable or ecofriendly design has become the trend for modern-day yuppies. As so many of this generation, I want my house to be authentic and my food to be honest but my lifestyle to be glamorous. I pay for what I consider to be quality and one of the standards for quality is responsibility. Sustainable design fits this need. ¥

Going Green•

Rag-bag

The trend Piet Hein Eek started in the ‘90s by building scrap-wood furniture is now frequently copied in economy brand stores. At Xenos and Blokker you can’t help but trip over cupboards, fruit bowls, and stools made of ‘old wood.’ Here you’ll find the interpretation of Piet Hein Eek’s ‘design’ furniture in dark wood, preferably with a bit of peeling paint. Purely aesthetic and of little substance, because whether this is truly old and/or used wood remains to be seen if. And the products aren’t very sustainable; these stores are merely capitalizing on a trend for furniture with a used look. The same is true for Christien Meindertsma’s products. Her hand knitted, woollen pouf is a beautiful seating element. Furthermore, it is a sustainable product, so it is a very good example of how a sustainable product can be appealing and high in quality. This was also noticed by the other players in the market and within no time similar poufs were for sale everywhere. Not quite sustainable, not quite 100% wool, a little cheaper, and a whole lot uglier.

Christien Meindertsma

The White Rabbit, Studio Re-Creation

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Sustainable design in the Netherlands

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Sustainable design, however, is something that did not emerge as a trend. The wish to create objects, buildings or services that comply with the principles of economic, social, and ecological sustainability, is a logical response towards the over-consuming society. But it is not logical that the first response to this society came from the sector that thrives on consumption: Design. The opening statement of Victor Papanek’s “Design for the real world,” published in 1970 in Sweden, says it all. Industrial designers have a profession that is harmful to the world. Designers create products that people seldom need, but their clever designs make them desirable. Luckily enough some of the design professionals are thoroughly aware of their difficult position and come up with solutions. Good practices in the current design world can be found in all types of design companies all over the world with some focal points in Scandinavia, the UK, Germany, and the Netherlands. In the Netherlands big boys such as Ahrend and Droog Design have been involved in sustainable solutions since the beginning of the nineties, spending R&D funds and public money to become “green”. But rookies such as Bo Reudler, Doreen Westphal and Studio Re-Creation also show that sustainable solutions do not necessarily require deep pockets. Intriguingly enough, all the examples mentioned here have a different take on sustainability. While Reudler’s work is that of a craftsman (hand-made of natural products), Westphal is eagerly searching for new types of materials and production techniques in collaboration with the regular industry. Finally, Studio Re-Creation is the epitome of recycling glamour. Their last project involved creating two lamps out of two Eames Chairs. With so many different ways of making sustainable design, the question can be raised whether all Western designers are being sustainable in some way. Producing in your own Western country is considered to be

same story. They both realise that we are wasting our resources and that we need to come up with alternatives in order to maintain the lifestyle we prefer: responsible, yet glamorous. The one part of the definition that I left out in the overview above is the one causing confusion. It’s the social aspect of sustainability. As an outsider, I am surprised by the fact that only taking care of people or a community could be enough to rank as sustainable. Even asking nothing more than socially relevant questions through art or design is sometimes marked as social sustainability. But when I think about the Hosting Parasites jewellery by Kathy Ludwig, I have to disagree. This would mean that all good art is sustainable.

Bo Reudler

soy milk comes all the way from Asia, while you live in the biggest milk producing country in the world. It is buying presents that your friends really want, instead of something they’ll throw in the bin. And it does not matter whether you act from an economic perspective or from an idealistic/ecological perspective. The outcome will be the same. And yes, sometimes sustainability is buying a beautiful piece of absolutely unnecessary design, with no function at all that you will love and cherish for the rest of your life. As long as your children take it to a second-hand shop after you passed away. •

I want my house to be authentic, my food to be honest but my lifestyle to be glamorous Eva Olde Monnikhof

sustainable, but producing near your market is considered equally so. But what if your main market is in a country that has a different take on dealing with waste? Or paying wages? Or treating staff? Isn’t the real question whether or not every company can be sustainable because the definition gets interpreted any way we like it and not because we do something about our footprint? In order to find an answer to this rather cynical question we have to go back to the idealists. What did E.F. Shumacher say in his “Small is beautiful” (1973), and what is it that Michael Braungart (2002) is striving for? Different things so it seems. Schumacher looks at sustainability from an economic perspective. He realised, long before Al Gore did in 2006, that there will come a time when all natural resources are depleted. From an economic

perspective that is both a good and a bad thing. The good is that scarce resources are worth a lot of money, the bad is that scarce resources create an unstable situation that is likely to end in war. The end of civilisation as we know it. And, though it might have something to do with Shumacher being an English gentleman, the end of civilisation was not something he had fancied. Therefore, he proposed that we should be careful with our natural resources. Braungart on the other hand looks at things from a material perspective. As a chemist it is logical to think of materials, to think of alternatives, to think of re-using old materials as new materials. Hence the concept of cradle-to-cradle was born. Though their ways of looking at things might be different, Braungart and Shumacher are two sides of the

In my opinion, social sustainability should be an additional requirement to the economic and/or the ecological part of the definition. Merely a social aspect is not enough. Daring the observer to change his mind with respect to beauty is an useful and socially relevant task for artists and designers, but does it make the work sustainable? If the design is made out of natural resources, by hand, it just might. Sustainability is re-using old materials or looking for new ones that are non-toxic. It is growing your own vegetables in your own garden without spraying them with pesticides. It is buying your clothes at a second-hand shop, or at least taking your old ones there. It is borrowing your books from the library or from friends. It is bringing your own mug to work, instead of using 10 plastic cups a day. It is realising that your Doreen Westphal

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Going Green

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Onno Schelling and Marjolijn Borsboom ZL03•

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Pieke Bergmans ZT10•

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Dutch Design Week 23/31 October 2010 Eindhoven > > > > > >

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The largest design event in the Netherlands! More than 1500 participating professionals! 290 different exhibitions, workshops, seminars and lectures! 60 locations in the centre of the city and former industrial buildings! More than 115.000 visitors! Check www.ddw.nl for more info!

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An interview with Alessandra Salici, ZonaTortona Project Manager By Maria Serra — Photography Valentina Zanobelli

Growing old brings its own rewards. Especially if you are a “young” designer, or a junior design event that started off on a small scale and turned into a giant, a decade later. According to Alessandra Salici, ZonaTortona Project Manager, the time is now ripe to gather the fruits and plant new seeds. Borrowing her pragmatism from the Dutch, she sets the metaphor aside and looks back over the past 10 years of Dutch design in the ZonaTortona, with a clear vision of what is going to happen next. “Many designers and companies came here and stayed, others just tested the waters for a season or two”, she recollects, “but those who succeeded were the ones with a real story to tell.”

The Age of Maturity•

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When did the Dutch first come to the ZonaTortona? As soon as the FuoriSalone reached ZL02 • an international audience, I would say. It all started out in the year 2000 with our first event at Superstudio, which received prominent media coverage. The year after, many foreign companies and designers wanted to be included, as it was an outstanding and groundbreaking venue available at a reasonable price. At the same time, they started asking for other venues in the area with a similar post-industrial feel. It has to be said that while the creative conversion of former industrial sites was common practice in other European cities, in Milan it was quite a novelty at that time. When we started working with superstudio at the end of the nineties there were still machinery in operation and the entire neighbourhood was in the process of transformation. The Dutch were undoubtedly among the first to spot this opportunity and they arrived in droves at the ZonaTortona.

majority of them are extremely well organized, both practically and mentally. In my experience, the Dutch have two main characteristics: they are easy-going, as I said, but What was their attitude also very determined, with a keen at that time? sense of business awareness. Even Above all, very informal and the very young ones have identified open-minded. I believe their general their goals and know how to pursue attitude towards people and life in them. general has always been reflected in their way of working. Starting with Wanders, whom I got on well with right from the start, I have always felt at ease with the Dutch and appreciate their easy-going outlook. However, what struck me most was seeing so many designers turning up in their little vans and setting everything up with their own hands so fast and efficiently! I was impressed by their pragmatic way of dealing with problems and by their hands on approach. Soon afterwards many of Apart from the “domino effect”, them became very well known, some why do you think the even famous, but nevertheless they ZonaTortona was so attractive have held on to this quality. to the Dutch? I think they were drawn to the opportunity to operate in a postindustrial context that had a particularly decadent flair. They were Who were the pioneers? inspired by the urban and social The very first designer to come to makeup of the district and it was this ZT17 • Superstudio was Marcel Wanders ZT17 that encouraged them to return in in 2001. Actually, he had already increasing numbers year after year. “colonized” Cappellini’s venue the year I can also say that the ZonaTortona before, showcasing a selection of his Alessandra Salici offered various unusual venues to personal works together with some rent at very low prices, especially in pieces edited by Cappellini itself. When the early years. In most cases, these he first came to Superstudio he was a Did they become were off-the-cuff spaces such as young, enthusiastic and talented more arrogant? former artisan workshops, shops, designer already fairly established in No, not really. Not even Wanders, offices, garages. In that period the his niche. He gave a very successful despite being regarded now as a area was not strictly regulated and small-scale show, presenting what was design superstar. He is one of the this allowed for a more spontaneous most well-established figures in the form of communication, although a ZT17 • set to become his first Moooi ZT17 collection. From that moment on, our ZonaTortona, yet his relations with little chaotic and somehow “naïve” paths overlapped for a while. He set a us and with the public are still warm at the same time. benchmark for other designers and we and friendly. The same is true of gained increasing recognition on the other big names such as Maarten Since then, they seem to have clung to these kind of FS06 • international design scene. We worked Baas. FS06 very well together, sharing impressions unconventional spots, but in and ideas. Several companies then You said they were welldifferent ways. How have their joined in at his suggestion, and within a organized from the beginning, needs changed along the way? short period of time the ZonaTortona from a practical point of After about 2007, the rents inwas teeming with Dutch designers. This view... Were their goals creased but the designers did not was actually made possible by the similarly effective? want to lose the ZonaTortona Dutch government and by Dutch They were, indeed. We Italians, at a audience. Basically, I noticed two institutions, who did and indeed to this first glance, tend to underestimate different trends – there were designday continue to do a remarkable job young designers, because we think ers who wanted to get maximum providing first-rate higher education they are not ready to manage exposure and ones who avoided it and supporting young designers complex projects. But in fact, the favouring a more intimate 46

financially. At that time, a lot of interesting and promising names came out of the Droog Design collective and the Eindhoven School. ZL02

It was the Dutch who turned cocktail parties into musthave events.

the age of maturity

atmosphere instead. In the latter group, there was Kiki and Joost. ZL13 They were very young and fairly unknown at the time but they literally burst onto the art design scene. They took a cosy little loft with a mezzanine bedroom which also functioned as their home. They cooked and slept there while at the same time exhibiting their really very refined collection including an amazing hand-made bedspread. On the other hand, the more attention seeking elements came up with new open air solutions, like the designers from Design Express, who parked their own brightly decorated caravans right on the street. Unusual communications strategies have been adopted as well by some who chose to remain in the more crowded, trendier location like Superstudio. A good example is the duo Niels van Eijk and Mirjam van der Lubbe, ZL09 who presented a project sponsored by the Dutch Flower Council. I still have a delightful memory of them inviting visitors to try on their clothes made entirely of flowers. They really created the most stunning living sculptures. By the way, I believe that Dutch designers in general have always had a knack for arousing surprise. They always want to leave a strong impression on the audience, but at the same time they never overdo it. Moooi is very much the same and has always had bright ideas, including welcoming the press with tea and biscuits served by staff dressed in traditional Dutch costume. This gave people something to talk about, but they were never considered too flamboyant.

all wanted to find a solution, because we loved the venue. In the end, someone volunteered to carry out a “kamikaze” mission. He climbed up to the ceiling on a 10-metre ladder and managed to fasten a net over the whole space! From a personal point of view, I learned a lot from that experience. I can honestly say it was like a practice run for me. Some outdoor events were quite problematic as well, like the Design Express. Certain companies were not too impressed by “noisy” neighbours, pumping up the music and drinking beer close to their more institutional venues. I remember they were quite bothered by that. I really saw two opposite worlds colliding on that occasion, but, in some respects, it was thanks to these young designers that even the more traditional companies started to experiment with other approaches. The designers dragged them out of the Salone del Mobile and brought them to the Fuorisalone. It was a big challenge for them to open up to the audience. In most cases, they took the opportunity to update their brand image and broaden their appeal.

I expect a brand new generation of designers, eager to develop ideas and products that matter.

very influential and it soon became something of a trademark for the ZL13 • whole ZonaTortona. It was the Dutch who turned cocktail parties into must-have events, giving the same importance to socialising as to product display. My impression is that this aspect has sometimes overshadowed the rest and got out-of-hand in more recent years, but we have now succeeded in bringing it back to a reasonable level. What do you see as the future of Dutch design? I expect a brand new generation of designers, eager to develop ideas and products that matter. Having strengthened its reputation and reliability, Dutch design like the ZonaTortona itself, has now reached maturity. It is ready to take on the challenges of a new era. Perhaps by leaving behind some of its more ZL09 • “commercial” aspects and bringing the product to the foreground. Unfortunately, in the last two years there has been a significant decline in the number of Dutch designers in the ZonaTortona and I think that many firms have suffered severely from the financial crisis, especially the smaller ones with fewer resources. However, my hope is that this situation will not damage those designers who have decided to follow a more research-focused path.

What about ZonaTortona? What is going to be your next step? At the moment, we are focusing mainly on international communicaAlessandra Salici tions. ZonaTortona’s alchemy is very much one of a kind, because its success was the result of a combina Have things always gone smoothly? Has this had an influence on the tion of peculiar and extremely Yes, most of the time. But, of course, atmosphere in the ZonaTortona? favourable historical circumstances. every now and then some unforeYes, it has. It definitely set a trend. Our main difficulties arise from seen “problems” occurred, espeThe Dutch, as well as Giulio operating in a territory that is not cially when an out-of-the-ordinary Cappellini, paved the way for a new easy to control. We need to widen venue had been chosen. For instyle of self-promotion. Instead of our reach if we want to overcome stance, I have a funny anecdote straightforward product presentathis. Our aim is not to replicate the about Tuttobene ZT18 and us fighting tion, they prompted companies to ZonaTortona experiment, but rather ZT18 • a bunch of unwanted “guests”: a switch to intangible values, pioneer- to build on our experience in order whole lot of pigeons had colonised ing the communication of an image to promote new design events in the the abandoned warehouse where or a philosophy. Their party-going future, whether in other areas of they were exhibiting. On that spirit, which they shared with other Milan or elsewhere. occasion, we had quite a hard time designers from similar countries, trying to chase the birds away. We particularly Belgium, has also been • 47


rENs ZL01•

Richard Hutten FS04• ZT09•

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Victor le Noble, Co-founder of Tuttobene

It’s 2010 already?! A new year, a new fair, new people, and new projects. Things are moving fast and the design business is definitely one of them. I first came to Milan 11 years ago. It was January and I was here to study for 6 months. After an intense period of getting to know the city and all its possibilities, I decided to visit university. Soon I learned about Italian design, about its history, and its importance. Names of great designers from the past appeared on my class schedule. Names that I only knew from the captions below pictures of their designs in my books. Now I learned they were still alive! Around that same time the Milan Furniture Fair took place and I went to visit the Fair and numerous spots around the city. I saw presentations from famous brands like Cappellini and Edra, but I also saw the Dutch Individuals, Droog, and Designersblock. Wow! What was that? Slowly the world of design was revealing itself to me. I realized that what I was learning about at university actually was part of a real world, with real people, design studios, and products. All this made me think. In a way, I was part of it too, but in what way? Was I supposed to become a designer too? Should I be showing my products here in Milan one day too? As an exchange student I felt quite privileged. I was a guest in Milan and had the opportunity of focussing on my own ideas and artistic DNA. The Milanese university wasn’t exactly breathing down my neck with engineering classes and other university bureaucracy and demands, so I wasn’t distracted by them. When I thought about it, I realized that there was quite a big difference in the way my fellow students and I approached design. I believed things needed to be practical, logical and, technically sound. They believed a design needed to be personal, first and foremost. At least that’s what I think they believed. After returning to Holland and graduating on the design of 2 chairs, I started to work in the furniture industry. As soon as I could, I convinced my boss we needed to take a business trip to Milan, for inspiration. It was wonderful to see how much had changed in those 3 years! The next year we started Tuttobene. Since then, 7 years have passed and we will have our 7th Tuttobene presentation at this edition of the Salone. And although I have now become a small part of the world of design, I still feel like that observing student who wants to understand what is going on. So, a new year, a new fair, new people, and new projects. What do I expect? First of all, I have to admit I still love logic and practicality, but through the years I have learned to appreciate the personal side of products more and more. I even think the best products tell the most personal stories. So I expect little, but I hope to find beautiful stories and to find some time to learn about their true value and intrinsic quality, and to slow down a bit.

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victor le noble

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Text Erik Hesseling — Photography Simone Desiato

This article is an abstract of a comprehensive study entitled “Designers from the Netherlands in Italy; a research on strategy to successfully enter the Italian market”. This study was commissioned by the Royal Dutch Embassy in Rome, in collaboration with the Delft University of Technology. 25 interviews with leading designers and design critics in the Netherlands and Italy form the basis for the answers to the research questions. The research was conducted by Erik Hesseling as a final project at the TU Delft.

Holland as a Design System•

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Many influential designers are born in the Netherlands. They create products that amaze the world and have been awarded many important design prizes in recognition of their achievements. This recognition takes them everywhere. The Dutch invasion is inevitably present at the Milano Design Week or Salone del Mobile, one of the most important and inspiring design fairs in the world. When wandering round the Salone, hopefully you will realize the person standing next to you could be Marcel Wanders, Maarten Baas or the next world-famous designer. These designers may have been born in the Netherlands, but their talent was cultivated in Milan and they became famous around the world. There seems to be some kind of magical soil in the Netherlands from which these creative fruits spring. Unquestionably these fruits were watered by government assistance. Some of the biggest, juiciest melons were called Dutch Design and were pampered even more. But what about the rest of the fruit growing in the same field? Milan, the economic centre of Italy, has been known as the capital of design for many years now. The three main pillars of the Italian design economy are widely represented in Milan; Food, Furniture and Fashion are without a doubt connected to this city, with its fancy restaurants, its fashion shows and its design fairs. In the rest of Italy however, design activities seem to be limited. This raises the question of whether Italy, with its world famous reputation as a design country, is really as interesting as Milan itself. As mentioned before, the Netherlands has been a breeding ground for several revolutionary movements in design, such as “De Stijl” at the beginning of the twentieth century. Mondriaan, Koolhaas and Van Doesburg became worldfamous because of the impact of their unconventional approach. 15 years ago a new, avant-garde movement was born in the Netherlands and is still very much alive today: the Dutch Design movement, representing designers with highly developed commercial skills and a talent for thinking out of 54

the box. Ironically one of the designers of this movement literally burnt a chair from “De Stijl”, marking the beginning of the new era, irony being one of the key selling points for Dutch Design products. In Italy, the Dutch Designers are also well-known and are actively involved in design activities. But does this mean the Dutch Design movement has opened Italy’s doors to other designers from the Netherlands, not directly connected with the Dutch Design movement?

architects, making it difficult to find a job. Rather than fight for assignments, many of them started looking for other kinds of employment, which usually had nothing to do with architecture. The architectural approach to product design became one of the strengths of Italian design. This approach focuses more on context, rather than on actual user needs. Products by Alessi (form follows fiction), Kartell (Bookworm) and Artemide (Yang lamp) became icons because of their innovative design perspective and their specific Italian approach. If Artemide had designed the Yang lamp from a user’s perspective, it would not have been the innovative product it is. A user does not ask for a lamp to change the mood in a room. The popularity of this contextual approach to design explains why it was not a coincidence that designers from the Netherlands, who employed just such an approach, became famous in Italy. Italians understood their products as they did their own and embraced the Dutch Designers. And the Dutch Designers embraced Italy. In this vibrant, dynamic yet fundamentally unchanging country, Dutch Designers found their capital: To find answers to these questions a Milano. Its international orientation, better understanding of Italy’s design the clusters of craftsmanship in the culture is necessary. north and the yearly Milano Design A country like Italy has an Week are just some of the factors enormous power of attraction. Many that make Milan perfectly suitable designers, myself included, feel a for Dutch Design activities. Many need to experience first-hand what designers from the Netherlands have Italy has to offer, both on an artistic found and can still find scores of and on a financial level. Artistically, opportunities here. Italy is an inexhaustible source of So, is the rest of Italy as interesting inspiration and action. There is for design activities as Milan? This history around every corner and question can be answered quickly. “even old ladies on the street seem to Italy is a very fragmented country. have an opinion about the design of Milan is nothing like Rome and Rome the renewed Fiat Cinquecento.” Still, is certainly nothing like Naples. life as a designer in Italy is hard, Design is not as important in Palermo many of my interviewees stated. as it is in Milan. The differences are Designers live from day-to-day, quite extraordinary. Therefore the taking any assignment they can get focus on Milan as centre for design their hands on, even if it is not within activities is both obvious and their area of expertise. “Carpe justified. Diem” is still a motto for many Italian This then raises the question of product designers. Ironically, this which steps to take, in and around attitude is one of the reasons Italian Milan, as a designer from the design has achieved its current Netherlands, in order to successfully status. In the 1950s and 60s Italy exploit design activities. To be was home to a vast group of honest, if I knew exactly, I would be

If Artemide had designed the Yang lamp from a user’s perspective, it would not have been the innovative product it is. A user does not ask for a lamp to change the mood in a room.

holland as a design system

doing just that: applying these steps to the exploitation of my design business in Italy, and I would not just be writing this article. But in my research, I found quite a few clues. Italy is home to some of the worlds finest production companies, using the finest techniques. This high-quality production capability is one of the keys to Italy’s success. Production companies can be found in various material-based clusters, surrounding Milan. The Veneto region has its plastics, the Omegna region has its metal. Any shape imaginable can be made by these production companies, with the utmost respect for the design. “The Dutch approach would be: how do we make this product designable? The Italian approach is: How do we make a design producible?” This is one of the reasons Italian techniques are further developed and Italian craftsmen are more skilled than most of their Dutch colleagues. However, the Italian industry is under a lot of pressure today. Production prices are on the rise, and exporting production - the mainstay of Italian design fame - to Asian countries is becoming a viable alternative. The industry is aware of these changes and they are arming themselves with a new strategy, outlined in “Il primo rapporto osservatorio nazionale distretti Italiani” (The first national observational report on the Italian clusters). An improved infrastructure, internationalisation of the clusters and a focus on R&D are the main components of this new strategy, according to the report. Italy will no longer be where designers produce their mass series, but will specialize in the production of highly advanced prototypes.

discover and develop their talents. Designers from the Netherlands come from this system, a system perfectly suited for the growth of design talent. So has the Dutch Design movement opened doors for other designers? This is not an easy question to answer. Having completed this research, I believe I am able to state that, initially, the Dutch Design movement did open doors for different designers from the Netherlands, because their typical Dutch approach was recognized and appreciated. However, if the government’s current promotion policy continues to focus solely on this group of already well-known designers, the revolving door will close. To answer the primary question in this article: the focus should not be These keys to success I have menon merely watering the biggest fruits tioned, are appealing to designers in the field, but rather on the condifrom the Netherlands, better known tion of the soil, which yields other in Italy as Dutch Designers. Dutch fruit as well. The movements “De Design became a movement from the Stijl” and “Dutch Design” were the moment Droog arrived in Milan. It result of a fundamentally different was a huge success and in a short background, which should not be period of time many of these Dutch forgotten. One of the conclusions of Designers became stars. This did not my research is that the Dutch governgo unnoticed by the Dutch government should concentrate on promotment and they were supported ing the background, or system, financially. Everyone was so amazed instead of the Dutch Design moveby this new phenomenon that they ment, which is already losing populost sight of the fundamental values larity. The final products that came of design from the Netherlands. The from the various famous movements Dutch have a business mentality, a are no more than a result of careful conceptual way of thinking. We are planning and organizing design born critics, but equally able to turn activities. that critical eye on ourselves. The Dutch design promotion should Dutch do not like to show off and we focus on its roots and it should be are certainly not a production based on the Netherlands as a country. There are many opportuni- design system. Once again it is time ties in our design climate, where for change, time to set something everything is possible and infrastruc- alight. This time we should not just ture is good. Current legislation burn a chair, but demolish this makes it easy to start your own wrongly developed image that, in design studio and grants are availthe long run, will destroy all those Another of the keys to success in able from different institutes. The opportunities that have already Italy, which I myself have already Design Academy in Eindhoven was been created. taken up: Italians like their own called the “School of Cool” not just culture and love to speak their own because it sounds nice, but because Erik Hesseling language, so learn the language and of fundamental ways of organizing e.a.c.hesseling@gmail.com speak it a lot. Go out for drinks, to freedom in design thinking. Other dinners and aperitivo’s. Build design schools are also very well • networks. “Find an Italian girlfriend organized, such as the Delft or boyfriend to teach you how to University of Technology, and they speak, eat, design, live and love.” Try arm students with the tools necessary to get some sense of Italy into your to sell their products to the world. DNA. Become a part of the family People are given the space to 55

and Italy will be a warm blanket, manufacturing the products of your dreams. This approach might seems radical, but it is just part of the process of growing as a designer.

The focus should not be on merely watering the biggest fruits in the field, but rather on the condition of the soil, which yields other fruit as well.


Floris Schoonderbeek and Dick van Hoff ZL01•

56

Niels van Eijk and Mirjam van der Lubbe ZT09•

57


Miss Salone Socialite

Diary of a Salone Socialite Invitations: check. Business cards: check. What would the Milan Furniture Fair be without the plethora of openings every night? As much as the week is about presenting the latest designs, it’s equally about making contacts over cocktails. Here we see Miss Salone Socialite in action as she air-kisses her way around Milan’s design festivities… Day 1 Before boarding plane, check if all party invitations are packed. Plane is full of designers heading to Salone. Get talking to photographer acquaintance who’s having book launch. Another one for the diary! Arrival in Milan: smell the champagne! (and pollution). Pick up Interni Guide to see if I’ve missed any parties. Take it easy on preview day. First up, installation in church: great works but cheap wine and no food! Next, celebrity launch of new Italian label. Fabulous cocktails, delectable nibbles: no credit crunch here. Meet intern from famous UK designer, got the goss about his boss (my lips are sealed). Where to end the night? Bar Basso! Taxi driver doesn’t understand the fuss about Bar Basso: when DID this tradition actually begin? After more Camparis and no dinner, stumble into cab back to hotel. It’s going to be a long week. Day 2 Start evening by lining stomach with pizza slices. Delicious! Kick off with sneaker launch of so-hot-right-now Dutch friend. Walking down stairs, my heel breaks! Designer friend to rescue: he gives me a pair of his limited edition shoes. I am officially a trendsetter. Head to magazine soiree: dead boring. Move onto posh opening at ANOTHER church (is there a hidden message in this?). Drinks flowing but no mingling. Decide to save energy for tomorrow. Outside, bump into friends who twist my arm to crash VIP party at exclusive hotel. After convincing bouncers that we were famous Norwegian all-girl design quintet, we strutted in. Inside, it was designer-spotting heaven. After guzzling champagne and checking out which designer was trying to hit on whom, it’s time to leave. At entrance, bouncers weren’t letting in real Norwegian all-girl quartet who didn’t have invites. We make beeline for back exit! Day 3 Why are all the best parties on the same evening? Start at book launch. Famous US designer is trying to DJ music he made himself: bad idea. Spot hot Spanish designer who I’ve always had crush on and get talking. Thought hitting it off until his boyfriend arrives! Sign to disappear. Massive queue at next event, absolutely everyone – even those with invites – will have to wait their turn. Despicable big name designer turns up with entourage. All waived in immediately! It starts to rain. Finally inside. Everyone swans around pretentiously. We’re just here for the expensive champagne anyway. Next party: saved the best for last. Bypassed enormous queue (yay for invitations), photographed on red carpet wearing trendsetting sneakers. Party in full swing! Going to dance floor, see über famous fashion designer. Plucked up courage to ask for photo with her. Fashion friends back home will be green with envy! After dancing the night away, finally decide to call it a night. Friends in cab change minds at last minute and we head to underground party of young designers: it’s in an empty swimming pool! Danced even more, then gobble pizza on the way back. Oh my sore feet! (and liver) No more partying. Well, until the next Salone. Ciao for now! 58

COlumn

miss salone socialite

59


Wednesday 14 April  Opening hours and cocktail agenda 8 :00

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Thursday 15 April  Opening hours and cocktail agenda 18 :00 19 :00

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Zl01 • autofficina • Via Privata Massimi 23 • Zl02 • design academy • Via Ventura 6 • Zl03 • dominocabinet • Via Ventura 6 • Zl04 • Frederik Roijé • Via Ventura 6 • Zl05 • WISE people - Geke Lensink • Via Ventura 5 • Zl06 • Gronicles • via Ventura 15 • Zl07 • jesse visser • Via Ventura 5 • Zl08 • made in arnhem • Via Privata Cletto Arrighi 16 • Zl09 • subjects - Van Eijk & Van der Lubbe • Via Ventura 6 • Zl10 • brh+ - Jo Meesters, FormaFantasma, Anke Weiss • Via Ventura 6 • 17—23 hrs Zl11 • the urushi project - aldo bakker Cocktails • Via Ventura 6• Zl12 • total table design • Via Ventura 6 • Zl13 • zuiderzeemuseum - k. van eijk j. van bleiswijk • Via

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FUORI SALONE

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FS01 • Dutch Invertuals - Studio WND • Via Varese 1 • Cocktails from FS02 • meet my project • Via Giovanni Durando 3017—20 • hrs FS03 • Pastoe - Vincent Van Duysen • Via Vares 20 • FS04 • richard hutten • Corner of Via PonFS06 • Rossana Orlandi • Via Matteo Bandello 14 • FS07 • Scholten & Baijings • Established & FS07 • Scholten & Baijings • karimoku • Via San FS08 • YII - GIJS BAKKER • Via Emilio Alemagna 6 • FS09 • Droog design • Via Alserio 22 • Zt10 • pieke bergmans • Galleria Dilmos Piazza San Marco 1 • F03 • ineke hans • Via gesú 5 • F01 • Arco • Pavilion 8, stand B33 • F02 • ARTIFORT • Pavilion 12 F26 • F03 • Ineke Hans • offecct • Pavilion 8 e43 • F04 • LEOLUX • Hall 10, stand A07 • F05 • WET - Jan Puylaert • padiglione 24 stand F18 • Zt12 • Reflections • hall 8 stand E 45 •

F01 • Arco • Pavilion 8, stand B33 • F02 • ARTIFORT • Pavilion 12 F26 • F03 • Ineke Hans • offecct • Pavilion 8 e43 • F04 • LEOLUX • Hall 10, stand A07 • F05 • WET - Jan Puylaert • padiglione 24 stand F18 • Zt12 • Reflections • hall 8 stand E 45 • 9 :00

12:00 13 :00 14 :00 15 :00 16 :00 17:00

Zl01 • autofficina • Via Privata Massimi 23 • Zl02 • design academy • Via Ventura 6 • Zl03 • dominocabinet • Via Ventura 6 • Zl04 • Frederik Roijé • Via Ventura 6 • Zl05 • WISE people - Geke Lensink • Via Ventura 5 • Zl06 • Gronicles • via Ventura 15 • Zl07 • jesse visser • Via Ventura 5 • Cocktails16 from Zl08 • made in arnhem • Via Privata Cletto Arrighi • 18—21 hrs Cocktails from 18—23 hrs Zl09 • subjects - Van Eijk & Van der Lubbe - • Zl10 • brh+ - Jo Meesters, FormaFantasma, Anke Weiss • Zl11 • the urushi project - aldo bakker • Via Ventura 6 • Zl12 • total table design • Via Ventura 6 • Zl13 • zuiderzeemuseum - k. van eijk j. van bleiswijk •Cocktails Via from 19—22 hrrs

FS01 • Dutch Invertuals - Studio WND • Via Varese 1 • FS02 • meet my project • Via Giovanni Durando 30 • FS03 • Pastoe - Vincent Van Duysen • Via VaresCocktails 20 • from 18—22 hrs from 19hutten hrs FS04 • Cocktails richard FS05 • studio job • Via Santo Spirito 10 • FS05 • studio job • Via delio tessa 1 • FS06 • Rossana Orlandi • Via Matteo Bandello 14 • FS07 • Scholten & Baijings • Established & FS07 • Scholten & Baijings • karimoku • Via FS08 • YII - GIJS BAKKER • Via Emilio Alemagna 6 • FS09 • Droog design • Via Alserio 22 • 18—22 hrs Zt10 •Cocktails piekefrom bergmans • Galleria Dilmos PiF03 • ineke hans • Via gesú 5 •

fiera 8 :00

10 :00 11:00

ZT01 •alexander pelikan - ARPA • Via Forcella 7 • ZT02 • fiona de bell + CASCOLAND • Piazzale Porta Genova • ZT03 • fatboy • Via tortona 27 • ZT04 • JOINE • Via tortona 12 • ZT05 • la bolleur • Via Voghera 11 • Zt06 • Paola Navone - LINTELOO • Via Tortona 37 • Zt07 • Men at Work • Via Voghera 11 • Zt08 • Mosa • Via Tortona 27 • ZT09 • palau • Via tortona 27 • Zt10 • pieke bergmans • via tortona 12 • ZT11 • PIET BOON • Via Savona 43 • Zt12 • Reflections • Via Savona 45 • Zt13 • Royal Academy of Art • Via Voghera 11b • ZT14 • royal goedewaagen • Via Tortona 27 • Zt15 • senz umbrellas • Via Tortona 31 • ZT16 • swarovski • Via Tortona 32 • Zt17 • MOOOI - The unexpected Welcome • Via Tortona 37 • Cocktails from 21—1 hrs Zt18 • tuttobene • Via Savona 18 • Zt19 • Werner Neumann - Birchwood • Zt20 • willem de kooning academy • Via savona 19 • Zt21 • windesheim university • Via savona 18 • Zt22 • Koning Willem I College • Via tortona 12 Zt23 • zuiver • Via tortona 54 •

ZT03 • fatboy • Via tortona 27 • ZT04 • JOINE • Via tortona 12 • ZT05 • la bolleur • Via Voghera 11 • Zt06 • Paola Navone for LINTELOO • Via Tortona 37 • Zt07 • D. Slootweg, T. de Ruiter Men at Work • Via Voghera 11 • Zt08 • Mosa • Via Tortona 27 ZT09 • palau • Via tortona 27 • from 18 hrs Zt10Cocktails • ZT11 • PIET BOON • Via Savona 43 • Zt12 • Reflections • Via Savona 45 • Zt13 • Royal Academy of Art • Via ZT14 • royal goedewaagen • Via Tortona 27 • Zt15 • senz umbrellas • Via Tortona 31 • ZT16 • swarovski • Via Tortona 32 • Zt17 • MOOOI - The unexpected Welcome • Via Tortona 37 • Zt18 • tuttobene • Via Savona 18 • Zt19 • Werner Neumann - Birchwood • Zt20 • willem de kooning academy • Via savona 19 • Zt21 • windesheim university • Via savona 18 • Cocktails 15—20 hrs 12 • Zt22 • Koning Willem I College • Via from tortona Zt23 • zuiver • Via tortona 54 •

ZONA LAMBRATE

ZONA TORTONA

ZT01 • alexander pelikan - ARPA • Via Forcella 7 •

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Friday 16 April  Opening hours and cocktail agenda 8 :00

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Saturday 17 April  Opening hours and cocktail agenda 18 :00 19 :00

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ZT01 •alexander pelikan - ARPA • Via Forcella 7 • ZT02 • fiona de bell + CASCOLAND • Piazzale Porta Genova • ZT03 • fatboy • Via tortona 27 •

ZT01 •alexander pelikan - ARPA • Via Forcella 7 •

ZT05 • la bolleur • Via Voghera 11 • Zt06 • Paola Navone for LINTELOO • Via Tortona 37 • Zt07 • D. Slootweg, T. de Ruiter Men at Work • Via Voghera 11 • Zt08 • Mosa • Via Tortona 27 • ZT09 • palau • Via tortona 27 • Zt10 • pieke bergmans • via tortona 12 • ZT11 • PIET BOON • Via Savona 43 • Zt12 • Reflections • Via Savona 45 • Zt13 • Royal Academy of Art • Via Voghera 11B • ZT14 • royal goedewaagen • Via Tortona 27 • Zt15 • senz umbrellas • Via Tortona 31 • ZT16 • swarovski • Via Tortona 32 • Zt17 • MOOOI - The unexpected Welcome • Via Tortona 37 • Zt18 • tuttobene • Via Savona 18 • Cocktails from Voghera 17—21 hrs Zt19 • Werner Neumann - Birchwood • Via 11 • Zt20 • willem de kooning academy • Via savona 19 • Zt21 • windesheim university • Via savona 18 • Zt22 • Koning Willem I College • Via tortona 12 Zt23 • zuiver • Via tortona 54 •

ZT05 • la bolleur • Via Voghera 11 • Zt06 • Paola Navone - LINTELOO • Via Tortona 37 • Zt07 • Men at Work • Via Voghera 11 • Zt08 • Mosa • Via Tortona 27 • ZT09 • palau • Via tortona 27 • Zt10 • pieke bergmans • via tortona 12 • ZT11 • PIET BOON • Via Savona 43 • Zt12 • Reflections • Via Savona 45 • Zt13 • Royal Academy of Art • Via Voghera 11B • ZT14 • royal goedewaagen • Via Tortona 27 • Zt15 • senz umbrellas • Via Tortona 31 • ZT16 • swarovski • Via Tortona 32 • Zt17 • MOOOI - The unexpected Welcome • Via Tortona 37 • Zt18 • tuttobene • Via Savona 18 • Zt19 • Werner Neumann - Birchwood • Zt20 • willem de kooning academy • Via savona 19 • Zt21 • windesheim university • Via savona 18 • Zt22 • Koning Willem I College • Via tortona 12 Zt23 • zuiver • Via tortona 54 •

Zl01 • autofficina • Via Privata Massimi 23 • Zl02 • design academy • Via Ventura 6 • Zl03 • dominocabinet • Via Ventura 6 • Zl04 • Frederik Roijé • Via Ventura 6 • Zl05 • WISE people - Geke Lensink • Via Ventura 5 • Zl06 • Gronicles • via Ventura 15 • Zl07 • jesse visser • Via Ventura 5 • Zl08 • made in arnhem • Via Privata Cletto Arrighi 16 • Zl09 • subjects - Van Eijk & Van der Lubbe • Via Ventura 5 Zl10 • brh+ - Jo Meesters, FormaFantasma, Anke Weiss • Zl11 • the urushi project - aldo bakker • Via Ventura 6 • Zl12 • total table design • Via Ventura 6 • Zl13 • zuiderzeemuseum - k. van eijk j. van bleiswijk • Via

Zl01 • autofficina • Via Privata Massimi 23 • Zl02 • design academy • Via Ventura 6 • Zl03 • dominocabinet • Via Ventura 6 • Zl04 • Frederik Roijé • Via Ventura 6 • Zl05 • WISE people - Geke Lensink • Via Ventura 5 • Zl06 • Gronicles • via Ventura 15 • Zl07 • jesse visser • Via Ventura 5 • Zl08 • made in arnhem • Via Privata Cletto Arrighi 16 • Zl09 • subjects - Van Eijk & Van der Lubbe • Via Ventura 5 Zl10 • brh+ - Jo Meesters, FormaFantasma, Anke Weiss • Zl11 • the urushi project - aldo bakker • Via Ventura 6 • Zl12 • total table design • Via Ventura 6 • Zl13 • zuiderzeemuseum - k. van eijk j. van bleiswijk • Via

ZT03 • fatboy • Via tortona 27 •

FS01 • Dutch Invertuals - Studio WND • Via Varese 1 • FS02 • meet my project • Via Giovanni Durando 30 • FS03 • Pastoe - Vincent Van Duysen • Via Vares 20 • FS04 • richard hutten • Corner of Via Pon-

8 :00

9 :00

FS01 • Dutch Invertuals - Studio WND • Via Varese 1 • FS02 • meet my project • Via Giovanni Durando 30 • FS03 • Pastoe - Vincent Van Duysen • Via Vares 20 • FS04 • richard hutten • Corner of Via Pon-

Cocktails 20—0 hrs

FS06 • Rossana Orlandi • Via Matteo Bandello 14 • FS07 • Scholten & Baijings • Established & Sons London FS07 • Scholten & Baijings • karimoku • Cocktails Via from 18—20 hrs FS08 • YII - GIJS BAKKER • Via Emilio Alemagna 6 • FS09 • Droog design • Via Alserio 22 • Zt10 • pieke bergmans Galleria Dilmos Piazza San Marco 1 • F03 • ineke hans • Via gesú 5 •

FS06 • Rossana Orlandi • Via Matteo Bandello 14 • FS07 • Scholten & Baijings • Established & Sons London FS07 • Scholten & Baijings • karimoku • Via FS08 • YII - GIJS BAKKER • Via Emilio Alemagna 6 • FS09 • Droog design • Via Alserio 22 • Zt10 • pieke bergmans Galleria Dilmos Piazza San Marco 1 • F03 • ineke hans • Via gesú 5 •

F01 • Arco • Pavilion 8, stand B33 • F02 • ARTIFORT • Pavilion 12 F26 • F03 • Ineke Hans • offecct • Pavilion 8 e43 • F04 • LEOLUX • Hall 10, stand A07 • F05 • WET - Jan Puylaert • padiglione 24 stand F18 • Zt12 • Reflections • hall 8 stand E 45 •

F01 • Arco • Pavilion 8, stand B33 • F02 • ARTIFORT • Pavilion 12 F26 • F03 • Ineke Hans • offecct • Pavilion 8 e43 • F04 • LEOLUX • Hall 10, stand A07 • F05 • WET - Jan Puylaert • padiglione 24 stand F18 • Zt12 • Reflections • hall 8 stand E 45 •

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Sunday 18 April  Opening hours and cocktail agenda 8 :00

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Monday 19 April  Opening hours and cocktail agenda 18 :00 19 :00

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9 :00

ZT01 •alexander pelikan - ARPA • Via Forcella 7 •

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ZT01 •alexander pelikan - ARPA • Via Forcella 7 •

ZT03 • fatboy • Via tortona 27 • ZT05 • la bolleur • Via Voghera 11 • Zt06 • Paola Navone for LINTELOO • Via Tortona 37 • Zt07 • D. Slootweg, T. de Ruiter Men at Work • Via Voghera 11 • Zt08 • Mosa • Via Tortona 27 • ZT09 • palau • Via tortona 27 • Zt10 • pieke bergmans • via tortona 12 • ZT11 • PIET BOON • Via Savona 43 • Zt12 • Reflections • Via Savona 45 • Zt13 • Royal Academy of Art • Via ZT14 • royal goedewaagen • Via Tortona 27 • Zt15 • senz umbrellas • Via Tortona 31 • ZT16 • swarovski • Via Tortona 32 • Zt17 • MOOOI - The unexpected Welcome • Via Tortona 37 • Zt18 • tuttobene • Via Savona 18 • Zt19 • Werner Neumann - Birchwood • Zt20 • willem de kooning academy • Via savona 19 • Zt21 • windesheim university • Via savona 18 •

Zt06 • Paola Navone - LINTELOO • Via Tortona 37 • Zt07 • Men at Work • Via Voghera 11 • Zt08 • Mosa • Via Tortona 27 • ZT09 • palau • Via tortona 27 • Zt10 • pieke bergmans • via tortona 12 • Zt12 • Reflections • Via Savona 45 • ZT14 • royal goedewaagen • Via Tortona 27 • Zt15 • senz umbrellas • Via Tortona 31 • ZT16 • swarovski • Via Zt17 • MOOOI - The unexpected Welcome • Via Tortona 37 • Zt18 • tuttobene • Zt19 • Werner Neumann - Birchwood • Zt20 • willem de kooning academy • Via savona 19 • Zt21 • windesheim

Zt23 • zuiver • Via tortona 54 •

Zt23 • zuiver • Via tortona 54 •

Zl01 • autofficina • Via Privata MassimiZl02 • design academy • Via Ventura 6 • Zl03 • dominocabinet • Via Ventura 6 • Zl04 • Frederik Roijé • Via Ventura 6 • Zl05 • WISE people - Geke Lensink • Zl06 • Gronicles • via Ventura 15 • Zl07 • jesse visser • Via Ventura 5 • Zl08 • made in arnhem • Via Privata Cletto Arrighi 16 • Zl09 • subjects - Van Eijk & Van der Zl10 • brh+ - Jo Meesters, FormaFantasma, Anke Weiss • Zl11 • the urushi project - aldo bakker • Via Ventura 6 • Zl12 • total table design • Via VenZl13 • zuiderzeemuseum - k. van eijk j. van bleiswijk • Via

Zl02 • design academy • Via Ventura 6 • Zl03 • dominocabinet • Via Ventura 6 • Zl06 • Gronicles • via Ventura 15 • Zl08 • made in arnhem • Via Privata Cletto Arrighi 16 •

Zl13 • zuiderzeemuseum - k. van eijk j. van bleiswijk • Via

FS01 • Dutch Invertuals - Studio WND • Via Varese 1 • FS02 • meet my project • Via Giovanni Durando 30 • FS03 • Pastoe - Vincent Van Duysen • Via Vares 20 • FS04 • richard hutten • Corner of Via Pon-

8 :00

9 :00

FS01 • Dutch Invertuals - Studio WND • Via Varese 1 FS02 • meet my project • Via Giovanni Durando 30 • FS03 • Pastoe - Vincent Van Duysen • Via Vares 20 •

FS06 • Rossana Orlandi • Via Matteo Bandello 14 • FS07 • Scholten & Baijings • Established & FS07 • Scholten & Baijings • karimoku • Via FS08 • YII - GIJS BAKKER • Via Emilio Alemagna 6 • FS09 • Droog design • Via Alserio 22 • Zt10 • pieke bergmans • Galleria Dilmos Piazza San Marco 1 • F03 • ineke hans • Via gesú 5 •

FS06 • Rossana Orlandi • Via Matteo Bandello 14 •

F01 • Arco • Pavilion 8, stand B33 • F02 • ARTIFORT • Pavilion 12 F26 • F03 • Ineke Hans • offecct • Pavilion 8 e43 • F04 • LEOLUX • Hall 10, stand A07 • F05 • WET - Jan Puylaert • padiglione 24 stand F18 • Zt12 • Reflections • hall 8 stand E45 •

F01 • Arco • Pavilion 8, stand B33 • F02 • ARTIFORT • Pavilion 12 F26 • F03 • Ineke Hans • offecct • Pavilion 8 e43 • F04 • LEOLUX • Hall 10, stand A07 • F05 • WET - Jan Puylaert • padiglione 24 stand F18 • Zt12 • Reflections • hall 8 stand E 45 •

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FS08 • YII - GIJS BAKKER • Via Emilio Alemagna 6 • Zt10 • pieke bergmans • Galleria Dilmos Piazza San Marco 1 •

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Wednesday 14 April  Opening hours and cocktail agenda 8 :00

9 :00

10 :00 11:00

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Thursday 15 April  Opening hours and cocktail agenda 18 :00 19 :00

20 :00 21:00 22:00 23 :00 0 :00

8 :00

Zl01 • autofficina • Via Privata Massimi 23 • Zl02 • design academy • Via Ventura 6 • Zl03 • dominocabinet • Via Ventura 6 • Zl04 • Frederik Roijé • Via Ventura 6 • Zl05 • WISE people - Geke Lensink • Via Ventura 5 • Zl06 • Gronicles • via Ventura 15 • Zl07 • jesse visser • Via Ventura 5 • Zl08 • made in arnhem • Via Privata Cletto Arrighi 16 • Zl09 • subjects - Van Eijk & Van der Lubbe • Via Ventura 6 • Zl10 • brh+ - Jo Meesters, FormaFantasma, Anke Weiss • Via Ventura 6 • 17—23 hrs Zl11 • the urushi project - aldo bakker Cocktails • Via Ventura 6• Zl12 • total table design • Via Ventura 6 • Zl13 • zuiderzeemuseum - k. van eijk j. van bleiswijk • Via

10 :00 11:00

12:00 13 :00 14 :00 15 :00 16 :00 17:00

18 :00 19 :00

FUORI SALONE

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FS01 • Dutch Invertuals - Studio WND • Via Varese 1 • Cocktails from FS02 • meet my project • Via Giovanni Durando 3017—20 • hrs FS03 • Pastoe - Vincent Van Duysen • Via Vares 20 • FS04 • richard hutten • Corner of Via PonFS06 • Rossana Orlandi • Via Matteo Bandello 14 • FS07 • Scholten & Baijings • Established & FS07 • Scholten & Baijings • karimoku • Via San FS08 • YII - GIJS BAKKER • Via Emilio Alemagna 6 • FS09 • Droog design • Via Alserio 22 • Zt10 • pieke bergmans • Galleria Dilmos Piazza San Marco 1 • F03 • ineke hans • Via gesú 5 • F01 • Arco • Pavilion 8, stand B33 • F02 • ARTIFORT • Pavilion 12 F26 • F03 • Ineke Hans • offecct • Pavilion 8 e43 • F04 • LEOLUX • Hall 10, stand A07 • F05 • WET - Jan Puylaert • padiglione 24 stand F18 • Zt12 • Reflections • hall 8 stand E 45 •

F01 • Arco • Pavilion 8, stand B33 • F02 • ARTIFORT • Pavilion 12 F26 • F03 • Ineke Hans • offecct • Pavilion 8 e43 • F04 • LEOLUX • Hall 10, stand A07 • F05 • WET - Jan Puylaert • padiglione 24 stand F18 • Zt12 • Reflections • hall 8 stand E 45 • 9 :00

12:00 13 :00 14 :00 15 :00 16 :00 17:00

Zl01 • autofficina • Via Privata Massimi 23 • Zl02 • design academy • Via Ventura 6 • Zl03 • dominocabinet • Via Ventura 6 • Zl04 • Frederik Roijé • Via Ventura 6 • Zl05 • WISE people - Geke Lensink • Via Ventura 5 • Zl06 • Gronicles • via Ventura 15 • Zl07 • jesse visser • Via Ventura 5 • Cocktails16 from Zl08 • made in arnhem • Via Privata Cletto Arrighi • 18—21 hrs Cocktails from 18—23 hrs Zl09 • subjects - Van Eijk & Van der Lubbe - • Zl10 • brh+ - Jo Meesters, FormaFantasma, Anke Weiss • Zl11 • the urushi project - aldo bakker • Via Ventura 6 • Zl12 • total table design • Via Ventura 6 • Zl13 • zuiderzeemuseum - k. van eijk j. van bleiswijk •Cocktails Via from 19—22 hrrs

FS01 • Dutch Invertuals - Studio WND • Via Varese 1 • FS02 • meet my project • Via Giovanni Durando 30 • FS03 • Pastoe - Vincent Van Duysen • Via VaresCocktails 20 • from 18—22 hrs from 19hutten hrs FS04 • Cocktails richard FS05 • studio job • Via Santo Spirito 10 • FS05 • studio job • Via delio tessa 1 • FS06 • Rossana Orlandi • Via Matteo Bandello 14 • FS07 • Scholten & Baijings • Established & FS07 • Scholten & Baijings • karimoku • Via FS08 • YII - GIJS BAKKER • Via Emilio Alemagna 6 • FS09 • Droog design • Via Alserio 22 • 18—22 hrs Zt10 •Cocktails piekefrom bergmans • Galleria Dilmos PiF03 • ineke hans • Via gesú 5 •

fiera 8 :00

10 :00 11:00

ZT01 •alexander pelikan - ARPA • Via Forcella 7 • ZT02 • fiona de bell + CASCOLAND • Piazzale Porta Genova • ZT03 • fatboy • Via tortona 27 • ZT04 • JOINE • Via tortona 12 • ZT05 • la bolleur • Via Voghera 11 • Zt06 • Paola Navone - LINTELOO • Via Tortona 37 • Zt07 • Men at Work • Via Voghera 11 • Zt08 • Mosa • Via Tortona 27 • ZT09 • palau • Via tortona 27 • Zt10 • pieke bergmans • via tortona 12 • ZT11 • PIET BOON • Via Savona 43 • Zt12 • Reflections • Via Savona 45 • Zt13 • Royal Academy of Art • Via Voghera 11b • ZT14 • royal goedewaagen • Via Tortona 27 • Zt15 • senz umbrellas • Via Tortona 31 • ZT16 • swarovski • Via Tortona 32 • Zt17 • MOOOI - The unexpected Welcome • Via Tortona 37 • Cocktails from 21—1 hrs Zt18 • tuttobene • Via Savona 18 • Zt19 • Werner Neumann - Birchwood • Zt20 • willem de kooning academy • Via savona 19 • Zt21 • windesheim university • Via savona 18 • Zt22 • Koning Willem I College • Via tortona 12 Zt23 • zuiver • Via tortona 54 •

ZT03 • fatboy • Via tortona 27 • ZT04 • JOINE • Via tortona 12 • ZT05 • la bolleur • Via Voghera 11 • Zt06 • Paola Navone for LINTELOO • Via Tortona 37 • Zt07 • D. Slootweg, T. de Ruiter Men at Work • Via Voghera 11 • Zt08 • Mosa • Via Tortona 27 ZT09 • palau • Via tortona 27 • from 18 hrs Zt10Cocktails • ZT11 • PIET BOON • Via Savona 43 • Zt12 • Reflections • Via Savona 45 • Zt13 • Royal Academy of Art • Via ZT14 • royal goedewaagen • Via Tortona 27 • Zt15 • senz umbrellas • Via Tortona 31 • ZT16 • swarovski • Via Tortona 32 • Zt17 • MOOOI - The unexpected Welcome • Via Tortona 37 • Zt18 • tuttobene • Via Savona 18 • Zt19 • Werner Neumann - Birchwood • Zt20 • willem de kooning academy • Via savona 19 • Zt21 • windesheim university • Via savona 18 • Cocktails 15—20 hrs 12 • Zt22 • Koning Willem I College • Via from tortona Zt23 • zuiver • Via tortona 54 •

ZONA LAMBRATE

ZONA TORTONA

ZT01 • alexander pelikan - ARPA • Via Forcella 7 •

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Friday 16 April  Opening hours and cocktail agenda 8 :00

9 :00

10 :00 11:00

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Saturday 17 April  Opening hours and cocktail agenda 18 :00 19 :00

20 :00 21:00 22:00 23 :00 0 :00

8 :00

9 :00

10 :00 11:00

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ZT01 •alexander pelikan - ARPA • Via Forcella 7 • ZT02 • fiona de bell + CASCOLAND • Piazzale Porta Genova • ZT03 • fatboy • Via tortona 27 •

ZT01 •alexander pelikan - ARPA • Via Forcella 7 •

ZT05 • la bolleur • Via Voghera 11 • Zt06 • Paola Navone for LINTELOO • Via Tortona 37 • Zt07 • D. Slootweg, T. de Ruiter Men at Work • Via Voghera 11 • Zt08 • Mosa • Via Tortona 27 • ZT09 • palau • Via tortona 27 • Zt10 • pieke bergmans • via tortona 12 • ZT11 • PIET BOON • Via Savona 43 • Zt12 • Reflections • Via Savona 45 • Zt13 • Royal Academy of Art • Via Voghera 11B • ZT14 • royal goedewaagen • Via Tortona 27 • Zt15 • senz umbrellas • Via Tortona 31 • ZT16 • swarovski • Via Tortona 32 • Zt17 • MOOOI - The unexpected Welcome • Via Tortona 37 • Zt18 • tuttobene • Via Savona 18 • Cocktails from Voghera 17—21 hrs Zt19 • Werner Neumann - Birchwood • Via 11 • Zt20 • willem de kooning academy • Via savona 19 • Zt21 • windesheim university • Via savona 18 • Zt22 • Koning Willem I College • Via tortona 12 Zt23 • zuiver • Via tortona 54 •

ZT05 • la bolleur • Via Voghera 11 • Zt06 • Paola Navone - LINTELOO • Via Tortona 37 • Zt07 • Men at Work • Via Voghera 11 • Zt08 • Mosa • Via Tortona 27 • ZT09 • palau • Via tortona 27 • Zt10 • pieke bergmans • via tortona 12 • ZT11 • PIET BOON • Via Savona 43 • Zt12 • Reflections • Via Savona 45 • Zt13 • Royal Academy of Art • Via Voghera 11B • ZT14 • royal goedewaagen • Via Tortona 27 • Zt15 • senz umbrellas • Via Tortona 31 • ZT16 • swarovski • Via Tortona 32 • Zt17 • MOOOI - The unexpected Welcome • Via Tortona 37 • Zt18 • tuttobene • Via Savona 18 • Zt19 • Werner Neumann - Birchwood • Zt20 • willem de kooning academy • Via savona 19 • Zt21 • windesheim university • Via savona 18 • Zt22 • Koning Willem I College • Via tortona 12 Zt23 • zuiver • Via tortona 54 •

Zl01 • autofficina • Via Privata Massimi 23 • Zl02 • design academy • Via Ventura 6 • Zl03 • dominocabinet • Via Ventura 6 • Zl04 • Frederik Roijé • Via Ventura 6 • Zl05 • WISE people - Geke Lensink • Via Ventura 5 • Zl06 • Gronicles • via Ventura 15 • Zl07 • jesse visser • Via Ventura 5 • Zl08 • made in arnhem • Via Privata Cletto Arrighi 16 • Zl09 • subjects - Van Eijk & Van der Lubbe • Via Ventura 5 Zl10 • brh+ - Jo Meesters, FormaFantasma, Anke Weiss • Zl11 • the urushi project - aldo bakker • Via Ventura 6 • Zl12 • total table design • Via Ventura 6 • Zl13 • zuiderzeemuseum - k. van eijk j. van bleiswijk • Via

Zl01 • autofficina • Via Privata Massimi 23 • Zl02 • design academy • Via Ventura 6 • Zl03 • dominocabinet • Via Ventura 6 • Zl04 • Frederik Roijé • Via Ventura 6 • Zl05 • WISE people - Geke Lensink • Via Ventura 5 • Zl06 • Gronicles • via Ventura 15 • Zl07 • jesse visser • Via Ventura 5 • Zl08 • made in arnhem • Via Privata Cletto Arrighi 16 • Zl09 • subjects - Van Eijk & Van der Lubbe • Via Ventura 5 Zl10 • brh+ - Jo Meesters, FormaFantasma, Anke Weiss • Zl11 • the urushi project - aldo bakker • Via Ventura 6 • Zl12 • total table design • Via Ventura 6 • Zl13 • zuiderzeemuseum - k. van eijk j. van bleiswijk • Via

ZT03 • fatboy • Via tortona 27 •

FS01 • Dutch Invertuals - Studio WND • Via Varese 1 • FS02 • meet my project • Via Giovanni Durando 30 • FS03 • Pastoe - Vincent Van Duysen • Via Vares 20 • FS04 • richard hutten • Corner of Via Pon-

8 :00

9 :00

FS01 • Dutch Invertuals - Studio WND • Via Varese 1 • FS02 • meet my project • Via Giovanni Durando 30 • FS03 • Pastoe - Vincent Van Duysen • Via Vares 20 • FS04 • richard hutten • Corner of Via Pon-

Cocktails 20—0 hrs

FS06 • Rossana Orlandi • Via Matteo Bandello 14 • FS07 • Scholten & Baijings • Established & Sons London FS07 • Scholten & Baijings • karimoku • Cocktails Via from 18—20 hrs FS08 • YII - GIJS BAKKER • Via Emilio Alemagna 6 • FS09 • Droog design • Via Alserio 22 • Zt10 • pieke bergmans Galleria Dilmos Piazza San Marco 1 • F03 • ineke hans • Via gesú 5 •

FS06 • Rossana Orlandi • Via Matteo Bandello 14 • FS07 • Scholten & Baijings • Established & Sons London FS07 • Scholten & Baijings • karimoku • Via FS08 • YII - GIJS BAKKER • Via Emilio Alemagna 6 • FS09 • Droog design • Via Alserio 22 • Zt10 • pieke bergmans Galleria Dilmos Piazza San Marco 1 • F03 • ineke hans • Via gesú 5 •

F01 • Arco • Pavilion 8, stand B33 • F02 • ARTIFORT • Pavilion 12 F26 • F03 • Ineke Hans • offecct • Pavilion 8 e43 • F04 • LEOLUX • Hall 10, stand A07 • F05 • WET - Jan Puylaert • padiglione 24 stand F18 • Zt12 • Reflections • hall 8 stand E 45 •

F01 • Arco • Pavilion 8, stand B33 • F02 • ARTIFORT • Pavilion 12 F26 • F03 • Ineke Hans • offecct • Pavilion 8 e43 • F04 • LEOLUX • Hall 10, stand A07 • F05 • WET - Jan Puylaert • padiglione 24 stand F18 • Zt12 • Reflections • hall 8 stand E 45 •

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8 :00

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Sunday 18 April  Opening hours and cocktail agenda 8 :00

9 :00

10 :00 11:00

12:00 13 :00 14 :00 15 :00 16 :00 17:00

Monday 19 April  Opening hours and cocktail agenda 18 :00 19 :00

20 :00 21:00 22:00 23 :00 0 :00

8 :00

9 :00

ZT01 •alexander pelikan - ARPA • Via Forcella 7 •

10 :00 11:00

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ZT01 •alexander pelikan - ARPA • Via Forcella 7 •

ZT03 • fatboy • Via tortona 27 • ZT05 • la bolleur • Via Voghera 11 • Zt06 • Paola Navone for LINTELOO • Via Tortona 37 • Zt07 • D. Slootweg, T. de Ruiter Men at Work • Via Voghera 11 • Zt08 • Mosa • Via Tortona 27 • ZT09 • palau • Via tortona 27 • Zt10 • pieke bergmans • via tortona 12 • ZT11 • PIET BOON • Via Savona 43 • Zt12 • Reflections • Via Savona 45 • Zt13 • Royal Academy of Art • Via ZT14 • royal goedewaagen • Via Tortona 27 • Zt15 • senz umbrellas • Via Tortona 31 • ZT16 • swarovski • Via Tortona 32 • Zt17 • MOOOI - The unexpected Welcome • Via Tortona 37 • Zt18 • tuttobene • Via Savona 18 • Zt19 • Werner Neumann - Birchwood • Zt20 • willem de kooning academy • Via savona 19 • Zt21 • windesheim university • Via savona 18 •

Zt06 • Paola Navone - LINTELOO • Via Tortona 37 • Zt07 • Men at Work • Via Voghera 11 • Zt08 • Mosa • Via Tortona 27 • ZT09 • palau • Via tortona 27 • Zt10 • pieke bergmans • via tortona 12 • Zt12 • Reflections • Via Savona 45 • ZT14 • royal goedewaagen • Via Tortona 27 • Zt15 • senz umbrellas • Via Tortona 31 • ZT16 • swarovski • Via Zt17 • MOOOI - The unexpected Welcome • Via Tortona 37 • Zt18 • tuttobene • Zt19 • Werner Neumann - Birchwood • Zt20 • willem de kooning academy • Via savona 19 • Zt21 • windesheim

Zt23 • zuiver • Via tortona 54 •

Zt23 • zuiver • Via tortona 54 •

Zl01 • autofficina • Via Privata MassimiZl02 • design academy • Via Ventura 6 • Zl03 • dominocabinet • Via Ventura 6 • Zl04 • Frederik Roijé • Via Ventura 6 • Zl05 • WISE people - Geke Lensink • Zl06 • Gronicles • via Ventura 15 • Zl07 • jesse visser • Via Ventura 5 • Zl08 • made in arnhem • Via Privata Cletto Arrighi 16 • Zl09 • subjects - Van Eijk & Van der Zl10 • brh+ - Jo Meesters, FormaFantasma, Anke Weiss • Zl11 • the urushi project - aldo bakker • Via Ventura 6 • Zl12 • total table design • Via VenZl13 • zuiderzeemuseum - k. van eijk j. van bleiswijk • Via

Zl02 • design academy • Via Ventura 6 • Zl03 • dominocabinet • Via Ventura 6 • Zl06 • Gronicles • via Ventura 15 • Zl08 • made in arnhem • Via Privata Cletto Arrighi 16 •

Zl13 • zuiderzeemuseum - k. van eijk j. van bleiswijk • Via

FS01 • Dutch Invertuals - Studio WND • Via Varese 1 • FS02 • meet my project • Via Giovanni Durando 30 • FS03 • Pastoe - Vincent Van Duysen • Via Vares 20 • FS04 • richard hutten • Corner of Via Pon-

8 :00

9 :00

FS01 • Dutch Invertuals - Studio WND • Via Varese 1 FS02 • meet my project • Via Giovanni Durando 30 • FS03 • Pastoe - Vincent Van Duysen • Via Vares 20 •

FS06 • Rossana Orlandi • Via Matteo Bandello 14 • FS07 • Scholten & Baijings • Established & FS07 • Scholten & Baijings • karimoku • Via FS08 • YII - GIJS BAKKER • Via Emilio Alemagna 6 • FS09 • Droog design • Via Alserio 22 • Zt10 • pieke bergmans • Galleria Dilmos Piazza San Marco 1 • F03 • ineke hans • Via gesú 5 •

FS06 • Rossana Orlandi • Via Matteo Bandello 14 •

F01 • Arco • Pavilion 8, stand B33 • F02 • ARTIFORT • Pavilion 12 F26 • F03 • Ineke Hans • offecct • Pavilion 8 e43 • F04 • LEOLUX • Hall 10, stand A07 • F05 • WET - Jan Puylaert • padiglione 24 stand F18 • Zt12 • Reflections • hall 8 stand E45 •

F01 • Arco • Pavilion 8, stand B33 • F02 • ARTIFORT • Pavilion 12 F26 • F03 • Ineke Hans • offecct • Pavilion 8 e43 • F04 • LEOLUX • Hall 10, stand A07 • F05 • WET - Jan Puylaert • padiglione 24 stand F18 • Zt12 • Reflections • hall 8 stand E 45 •

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18 :00 19 :00

20 :00 21:00 22:00 23 :00 0 :00

FS08 • YII - GIJS BAKKER • Via Emilio Alemagna 6 • Zt10 • pieke bergmans • Galleria Dilmos Piazza San Marco 1 •

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Name  —  Code  —  Page number

Code  — Name  —  Page number

Designer  —  Code  —  Page number

Designer  —  Code  —  Page number

Designer  —  Code  —  Page number

Company  —  Code  —  Page number

Zona Tortona ARPA  —  ZT01  —  68 Cascoland  —  ZT02  —  69 Fatboy  —  ZT03  —  70 JOINE  —  ZT04  —  70 La Bolleur  —  ZT05  —  71 Linteloo  —  ZT06  —  71 Men at Work  —  ZT07  —  72 Mosa  —  ZT08  —  73 Palau  —  ZT09  —  73 Pieke Bergmans  —  ZT10  —  74 Piet Boon  —  ZT11  —  74 Reflections  —  ZT12  —  75 Royal Academy of Arts  —  ZT13  —  75 Royal Goedewaagen  —  ZT14  —  76 Senz  —  ZT15  —  76 Swarovski  —  ZT16  —  77 The Unexpected Welcome  —  ZT17  —  77 Tuttobene Milan 2010  —  ZT18  —  78 Werner Neumann  —  ZT19  —  80 Willem de Kooning Academy  —  ZT20  —  80 Windesheim  —  ZT21  —  81 Koning Willem I College  —  ZT22  —  81 Zuiver  —  ZT23  —  82

Zona Tortona ZT01 — ARPA  —  68 ZT02 — Cascoland  —  69 ZT03 — Fatboy  —  70 ZT04 — JOINE  —  70 ZT05 — La Bolleur  —  71 ZT06 — Linteloo  —  71 ZT07 — Men at Work  —  72 ZT08 — Mosa  —  73 ZT09 — Palau  —  73 ZT10 — Pieke Bergmans  —  74 ZT11 — Piet Boon  —  74 ZT12 — Reflections  —  75 ZT13 — Royal Academy of Arts  —  75 ZT14 — Royal Goedewaagen  —  76 ZT15 — Senz  —  76 ZT16 — Swarovski  —  77 ZT17 — The Unexpected Welcome  —  77 ZT18 — Tuttobene Milan 2010  —  78 ZT19 — Werner Neumann  —  80 ZT20 — Willem de Kooning Academy  —  80 ZT21 — Windesheim  —  81 ZT22 — Koning Willem I College  —  81 ZT23 — Zuiver  —  82

Zona Lambrate Autofficina  —  ZL01  —  83 Design Academy Eindhoven  —  ZL02  —  84 Dominocabinet  —  ZL03  —  86 Frederik Roijé  —  ZL04  —  86 Geke Lensink  —  ZL05  —  87 Gronicles  —  ZL06  —  88 Jesse Visser  —  ZL07  —  89 Made in Arnhem  —  ZL08  —  90 Subjects  —  ZL09  —  92 Ten Small Atlases  —  ZL10  —  92 The Urshi Project  —  ZL11  —  93 Total Table Design  —  ZL12  —  94 Zuiderzeemuseum  —  ZL13  —  95

Zona Lambrate ZL01 — Autofficina  —  83 ZL02 — Design Academy Eindhoven  —  84 ZL03 — Dominocabinet  —  86 ZL04 — Frederik Roijé  —  86 ZL05 — Geke Lensink  —  87 ZL06 — Gronicles  —  88 ZL07 — Jesse Visser  —  89 ZL08 — Made in Arnhem  —  90 ZL09 — Subjects  —  92 ZL10 — Ten Small Atlases  —  92 ZL11 — The Urshi Project  —  93 ZL12 — Total Table Design  —  94 ZL13 — Zuiderzeemuseum  —  95 Fuori Salone FS01 — Dutch Invertuals  —  96 FS02 — Meet My Project  —  97 FS03 — Pastoe  —  97 FS04 — Richard Hutten  —  98 FS05 — Studio Job  —  99 FS06 — Rossana Orlandi  —  100 FS07 — Scholten & Baijings  —  102 FS08 — Yii  —  103

Fiera (Salone Internazionale del Mobile) Arco  —  F01  —  104 Artifort  —  F02  —  104 Ineke Hans  —  F03  —  105 Leolux  —  F04  —  106 Wet  —  F05  —  106

Fiera (Salone Internazionale del Mobile) F01 — Arco  —  104 F02 — Artifort  —  104 F03 — Ineke Hans  —  105 F04 — Leolux  —  106 F05 — Wet  —  106

Job Smeets   —  ZT10, FS05  —  74, 99 Jon Stam  —  FS01  —  96 Jonas Trampedach  —  F01  —  104 Jonathan Prestwich  —  F01  —  104 Joop Peels  —  ZT22  —  81 Joost Swarte  —  ZT14  —  76 Joost van Bleiswijk   —  ZL13  —  95 Jorre van Ast  —  F01  —  104 Jos Kranen  —  ZT23  —  82 Jukka Setala  —  ZT03  —  70 Karim Rashid  —  ZT12  —  75 Karin Boon  —  ZT11  —  74 Kathy Ludwig  —  ZT18  —  78 Kiki van Eijk  —  ZL12, ZL13  —  94, 95 Lambert Kamps  —  ZL06  —  88 Laurens Manders  —  FS01  —  96 Leolux Creative Design Team  —  F04  —  106 Maarten Baas  —  FS06, ZT17  —  96, 77 Maarten Baptist  —  ZT04  —  70 Marcel Wanders  —  ZT17, ZL08  —  77, 90 Marcus Petstra  —  ZL06  —  88 Margriet Foolen  —  ZT23  —  82 Marianne Kemp  —  ZT18  —  78 Marjan van Aubel  —  ZT18  —  78 Marjolijn Borsboom  —  ZL03  —  86 Mark van Gennip  —  ZT05  —  71 Marko Macura  —  ZT12  —  75 Michaël Kruijne  —  ZT23  —  82 Michiel van der Kley  —  F01, F02  —  104 Mieke Meijer  —  FS01  —  96 Mireille Knaap  —  ZT22  —  81 Mosa Designteam  —  ZT08  —  73 Nacho Carbonell  —  FS06  —  100 Niek van der Heijden  —  FS06  —  100 Niels & Sven  —  ZT23  —  82 Nikola Nikolov  —  ZT18  —  78 Nynke Tynagel  —  ZT10, FS05  —  74, 99 Onno Schelling  —  ZL03  —  86 Paola Navone  —  ZT06  —  71 Patrick Norguet  —  F02  —  104 Paul Kuipers  —  ZT18  —  78 Peter van de Water  —  ZT23  —  82 Pieke Bergmans  —  ZT10, FS05, ZL10  —  74, 99, 93 Pierre Paulin  —  F02  —  104 Piet Boon  —  ZT11  —  74 Piet Hein Eek  —  FS06  —  100 Pili Wu  —  FS08  —  103 Raimond Puts  —  ZT17  —  77 Raw Color  —  FS01  —  96 Reinier de Jong  —  ZL01  —  83 René Holten  —  F02  —  104 Renee Mennen  —  ZL01  —  83 Richard Hutten  —  FS04, ZT09  —  98, 73 Robert Bronwasser  —  ZT09, ZT14  —  73, 76 Rock Wang  —  FS08  —  103 Roderick Vos  —  ZT06  —  71 Rogier van der Heide  —  ZT16  —  77 Sander Alblas  —  ZT14  —  Sander Luske  —  ZL08  —  Scholten & Baijings  —  ZL12, FS06, FS07  —  94, 100, 102 Shay Alkalay  —  F01  —  76 Sjoerd Jonkers  —  ZT18  —  78 Stefan Scholten  —  FS07, ZL12  —  102, 94 Stefanie van Keijsteren  —  ZL01  —  83 Steie van Vugt  —  ZT05  —  71 Stephan Siepermann  —  ZT23  —  82

Students for Collectie Arnhem  —  ZL08  —  90 Students Design Academy Eindhoven  —  ZL02  —  84 Students Royal Academy of Art  —  ZT13  —  75 Students Willem de Kooning Academy  —  ZT20  —  80 Students of Windesheim University  —  ZT21  —  81 Tal Erez  —  ZT18  —  78 T.E. Thomas Eyck  —  FS06  —  100 The Cascoland netwerk  —  ZT02  —  69 Tiddo de Ruiter  —  ZT07  —  72 Timon van der Hijden  —  ZT05  —  71 Tjeerd Veenhoven  —  ZT23  —  82 Trine Kornum  —  ZT23  —  82 Van Eijk & Van der Lubbe  —  ZL09  —  92 Verger  —  FS01  —  96 Vincent Van Duysen  —  FS03  —  97 Wannes Royaards  —  ZT23  —  82 Wendy Plomp  —  FS01  —  96 Werner Neumann  —  ZT19  —  80 Willem de Ridder  —  ZL01  —  83 Willem van Ast  —  F01  —  104 Yu Fen Lo  —  FS08  —  103 Yu-cheng Yao  —  FS08  —  103 Yu-jui Chou  —  FS08  —  103 Zowie Jannink  —  ZT05  —  71

Fuori Salone Dutch Invertuals  —  FS01  —  96 Meet My Project  —  FS02  —  97 Pastoe  —  FS03  —  97 Richard Hutten  —  FS04  —  98 Studio Job  —  FS05  —  99 Rossana Orlandi  —  FS06  —  100 Scholten & Baijings  —  FS07  —  102 Yii  —  FS08  —  103

Aldo Bakker  —  ZL11, FS06  —  93, 100 Alexander Pelikan   —  ZT01  —  68 Alexander van Slobbe  —  ZL08  —  90 Alissia Melka-Teichroew  —  FS02  —  97 Anieke Branderhorst   —  ZL01  —  83 Anke Weiss  —  ZL10  —  92 Arjan van Raadshooven  —  ZL01  —  83 Arnoud Visser  —  ZL08  —  90 Bas van Raay  —  ZL01  —  83 BCXSY  —  FS06  —  100 Ben van Opstal  —  ZT23  —  82 bERT & dENNIS  —  ZT23  —  82 Bertjan Pot  —  F01  —  104 Bo Reudler  —  ZT18  —  78 Bram Burger  —  ZT05  —  71 Burkhard Vogtherr   —  F01  —  104 Carole Baijings  —  ZL12, FS06, FS07  —  94, 100, 102 Chen-hsu Liu  —  FS08  —  103 Chia-en Lu  —  FS08  —  103 Ching-ting Hsu  —  FS08  —  103 Christian Kocx  —  ZT23  —  82 Chun-chieh Weng  —  FS08  —  103 Chung-miao Hsu  —  FS08  —  103 Chung-tang Ho  —  FS08  —  103 Corné van de Laar   —  ZT22  —  81 Cris Bartels  —  ZT05  —  71 Daphna Isaacs Burggraaf   —  FS01  —  96 David Derksen  —  ZL01  —  83 Debbie Wijskamp  —  FS06  —  100 Dennis Slootweg  —  ZT07  —  72 Dick Spierenburg  —  F01  —  104 Dick van Hoff  —  ZL08  —  90 Doreen Westphal  —  ZT23, ZT18  —  82, 78 Edhv  —  FS01  —  96 Emma Klinkenberg  —  ZT18  —  78 Ennio Vicenzoni  —  ZT23  —  82 Esther Derkx  —  ZT02, ZT14  —  69, 76 Fiona de Bell  —  ZT02  —  69 Florian Kräutli  —  ZT18  —  78 Floris Schoonderbeek  —  ZL08  —  90 FormaFantasma  —  ZL10, F06  —  92, 100 Frank Winnubst  —  ZT05  —  71 Frans Willigers  —  ZT18  —  78 Frederik Roijé  —  ZL04  —  86 Frederike Top  —  ZT18, ZT23  —  78, 82 Garth Roberts  —  ZT12  —  75 Geke Lensink  —  ZL05, ZL07  —  87, 89 Gerwin Hoogendoorn  —  ZT15  —  76 Gijs Bakker  —  FS08  —  103 Gionata Gatto  —  FS06  —  100 Herman Verkerk  —  ZT18  —  78 Hsiao-ying Lin  —  FS08  —  103 Hung-pin Hsueh  —  FS08  —  103 Idee Liu  —  FS08  —  103 Ineke Hans  —  F01, F03, ZL08  —  104, 105, 90 Inge de Jager  —  ZT23  —  82 Ivo J. Daniëls  —  ZT05  —  71 Ivo Leemans  —  ZT22  —  81 Jacco Bregonje  —  ZT12  —  75 Jack Brandsma  —  FS06, ZL06  —  100, 88 Jan Puylaert  —  F05  —  106 Jasper Ruijs  —  ZT22  —  81 Jen-feng Chen  —  FS08  —  103 Jeroen Wesselink  —  ZT23  —  82 Jesse Visser  —  ZL05, ZL07  —  87, 89 Jo Meesters  —  F04, FS01, ZL10—  106, 96, 92

Jesse Visser Designprojects  —  ZL07  —  89 JOINE office for design  —  ZT04  —  70 Karimoku  —  FS07  —  102 KLFK  —  ZT18  —  78 Koning Willem I College  —  ZT22  —  81 La Bolleur  —  ZT05  —  71 Leolux  —  F04  —  106 Linteloo  —  ZT06  —  71 Maarten Baas  —  FS06  —  100 Made in Arnhem  —  ZL08  —  90 MAGIS  —  F03  —  105 Marianne Kemp Horsehairweaving  —  ZT18  —  78 Marjan van Aubel  —  ZT18  —  78 MOOOI  —  ZT17, FS05  —  77, 99 Nacho Carbonell  —  FS06  —  100 Niek van der Heijden  —  FS06  —  100 Nodus  —  FS05  —  99 Nora Morton projects/Europe  —  FS08  —  103 OFFECCT  —  F03  —  105 Onion Design Associates  —  FS08  —  103 OTE communications/Taiwan  —  FS08  —  103 Palau  —  ZT09  —  73 Particles Gallery  —  ZL11  —  93 Pastoe  —  FS03  —  97 PeLiDesign  —  ZT02  —  69 Pieke Bergmans  —  ZT10, FS05  —  74, 99 Piet Boon  —  ZT11  —  74 Piet Hein Eek  —  FS06  —  100 Reinier de Jong  —  ZL01  —  83 Richard Hutten Studio  —  FS04  —  98 Rotterdam University  —  ZT20  —  80 Royal Academy of Art  —  ZT13  —  75 Royal Goedewaagen  —  ZT14  —  76 Royal Leerdam Crystal  —  ZL12  —  94 Royal Mosa  —  ZT08  —  73 Scholten and Baijings  —  ZL12, FS06, FS07  —  94, 100, 102 senz° umbrellas  —  ZT15  —  76 Studio Job  —  ZT10, FS05  —  74, 99 Studio’s Muller & Van Tol  —  FS08  —  103 Studio-Re-Creation  —  ZT18  —  78 Studio rENs  —  ZL01  —  83 Studio Sjoerd Jonkers  —  ZT18  —  78 Studio WND  —  FS01  —  96 Swarovski  —  ZT16  —  77 Taiwan Craft Research Institute  —  FS08  —  103 T.E. Thomas Eyck  —  FS06  —  100 Van Eijk & Van der Lubbe  —  ZL09  —  92 Van Kempen & Begeer  —  ZL12  —  94 Venini  —  FS05  —  100 Weltevree  —  ZL08  —  90 WET  —  F05  —  106 Willem de Kooning Academy  —  ZT20  —  80 Windesheim University  —  ZT21  —  81 WISE people  —  ZL05  —  87 Zuiderzee Museum  —  ZL13  —  95 Zuiver  —  ZT23  —  82

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Index

67

Company  —  Code  —  Page number Antique Mirror Srl Felicerossi  —  ZT12  —  75 Arco Contemporary Furniture  —  F01  —  104 ARPA Industriale  —  ZT01  —  68 Artifort  —  F02  —  104 Atelier Schelling & Borsboom  —  ZL03  —  86 Audax Textile Museum Tilburg  —  ZL12  —  94 BCXSY  —  FS06  —  100 Bo Reudler Studio  —  ZT18  —  78 byAMT Studio  —  FS02  —  97 Cascoland  —  ZT02  —  69 Collectie Arnhem by ArtEZ  —  ZL08  —  90 Coming Soon by ArtEZ  —  ZL08  —  90 David Derksen  —  ZL01  —  83 Debbie Wijskamp  —  FS06  —  100 DeridderDesignstudio  —  ZL01  —  83 Design Academy Eindhoven  —  ZL02  —  84 Design Studio Vraay  —  ZL01  —  83 Design Virus  —  ZT10  —  74 designlabel Vij5  —  ZL01  —  83 Dilmos  —  FS05  —  99 Doreen Westphal Studio  —  ZT18  —  78 Du Parc Residence  —  ZL10  —  92 Emma product design  —  ZT18  —  78 Established & Sons  —  FS07  —  102 Event Architectuur  —  ZT18  —  78 Fatboy the original  —  ZT03  —  70 Formafantasma  —  FS06, ZL10  —  100, 92 Frans Willigers Ruimtelijk Ontwerpen  —  ZT18  —  78 Frederike Top Ontwerp  —  ZT18  —  78 Gionata Gatto  —  FS06  —  100 Gronicles  —  ZL06  —  88 Jack Brandsma  —  FS06, ZL06  —  100, 88

Index


ZT02•  Cascoland, an interdisciplinary intervention in public space Cascoland Esther Derkx, Fiona de Bell, The Cascoland network Company 

Designers 

The public space of Piazzale Porta Genova, Milan

Location 

www cascoland.com

Cascoland c/o Roel Schoenmakers, Van Beuningenplein 3 –IV, 1051 VS, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Contact 

t +31 (0) 612995763 e info@cascoland.com

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Index

ZONA TORTONA

ZT01• Alexander Pelikan for ARPA Company  Designer 

ARPA Industriale, PeLiDesign Alexander Pelikan

Location 

Via Forcella 7, 20144, Milan

www arpaindustriale.com www pelidesign.com

Alexander Pelikan Sint Gerardusplein 17, 5644 NG, Eindhoven, The Netherlands

Press  

e  peli@pelidesign.com

e g.perona@arpaindustriale.com

Contact 

t  +31 (0)641403687

About ARPA Industriale, a leading producer of laminates, presents the “ARPA for Kitchen” collection and the sustainable plate material “Naturalia”. PeLiDesign is a Dutch design studio bridging the field of craft and technology. Presentation In a setting created by PeLiDesign, ARPA will show its “ARPA for Kitchen” collection and the “Curiosity Kitchen”, taste-testing furniture made from Naturalia, a new and sustainable material. We welcome you to taste the difference.

ZT01•

68

Index

ZONA TORTONA

ARPA Industriale c/o Giorgia Perona

t +390172436286

About Cascoland is a network of artists, architects, designers and performers who initiate interdisciplinary interventions in public spaces. Cascoland activates public space through artistic actions, public design, the construction of architectural structures, the use of performance and new media, and most essentially, audience participation. Audiences are mobilized to participate in the shaping of their public space. The Cascoland projects/artwork can be seen as tools to be used by participants and audiences rather than artworks to be exhibited. The aim is to change and challenge perceptions and to create awareness of the use and design of public space.

ZT02 •

69

Presentation As part of the Public Design Festival, organized by Esterni and taking place in the public spaces of Via Vigevano and Piazzale Stazione Porta Genova during the Salone, Cascoland will execute interdisciplinary interventions on the Piazzale. These actions, unexpected events/objects in striking locations, address and challenge behavioural patterns and conventions around the use of public space in a positive and creative framework.

Index

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ZT03•  Fatboy the original Company  Designer 

Fatboy the original Jukka Setala

ZT05•  La Bolleur Mini-Golf

Superstudio, Stand nr. 7, Via Tortona 27, 20144, Milan

Location 

www fatboy.com

Fatboy the original c/o Denise Bruens, De Steenbok 19-21, 5215 MG, ‘s Hertogenbosch, The Netherlands

Contact 

e  denise@fatboy.com

La Bolleur Bram Burger, Cris Bartels, Frank Winnubst, Ivo J. Daniëls, Mark van Gennip, Steie van Vugt, Timon van der Hijden, Zowie Jannink

Via Voghera 11, 20144, Milan

Company 

Location 

Designers 

www labolleur.com

e  zowie@labolleur.com

t  +31 (0)736154200

About Fatboy is all about ‘so much nothing to do’.

ZT03 •

70

Index

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ZT04•  JOINE Company  Designer 

JOINE office for design Maarten Baptist

t  +31 (0)643757523

About After Timon van der Hijden, Zowie Jannink and Steie van Vugt decided to change the scene at La Bolleur, a former brothel in the city of Eindhoven, they literally transformed this inglorious lounge with their major innovations. La Bolleur was revived and instantly became a honourable cultural meeting place where people could get together. The atmosphere was set by establishing numerous creative projects, before this re-established lounge was demolished. Meanwhile Van der Hijden, Jannink, and Van Vugt formed a multidisciplinary collective with a sense of fun and of dignity, and with five new members: Cris Bartels, Bram Burger, Ivo J. Daniëls, Mark van Gennip and Frank Winnubst.

Presentation Fatboy presents an oversized playing field that is dominated by a Fatboy carousel. The Fatboy carousel is a Fatboy world that is spinning around with a product presentation downstairs and a place to relax, have a drink, and spot other visitors upstairs. This way Fatboy combines a showroom of all new Fatboy products with a place for visitors of the Expo to experience the ultimate ‘so much nothing to do’.

La Bolleur c/o Zowie Jannink Joris van Andringastraat 25I, 1055 VB, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Contact 

ZT05 •

Presentation Today La Bolleur is more visible than ever, especially after winning a Dutch Design Award in October 2009 for the excellent method in which they communicate their brand. In Milan they will present themselves as a mini-golf club, which will appeal to many people and is proof again that they can serve a broader and more diverse audience. It comes as no surprise that this collective, with their ‘hands-on‘ mentality, is often present at events all over the Netherlands. They are continually organizing events that seem out of their league, but in the end La Bolleur always succeeds in bringing people together and creating something that you have never experienced before.

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Index

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ZT06•  Linteloo presents a new collection by Paula Navone Via Tortona 12, Milan Coffee bar. I will be sitting there drinking espresso. Please JOINE me on 13 and 14 April.

Contact 

t +31 (0)624731537

Linteloo c/o Lars Nikolajsen Johannes Postlaan 6, 3705 LN, ZEIST, The Netherlands

www joine.nl

e maarten@joine.nl

t +31 (0)302122110

Location 

Maarten Baptist Kanaalstraat 8, 5611 CT, Eindhoven, The Netherlands

Company 

Linteloo Paola Navone, Roderick Vos

Designers 

Location 

Via Tortona 37, 20144, Milan

www linteloo.com

Contact 

e lars@linteloo.com

About JOINE creates a world for you to use and designs products for everyday sceneries, interiors and exhibitions. These products, such as cutlery, dinner services, glasswork, coat stands, room dividers, and sofas, are related particularly to food and interior, and can be mass-produced, either on commission or on our own initiative. JOINE links people from different disciplines and is always interested in being introduced to and working with new people, talents and techniques. JOINE collaborates with customers, producers, technicians, craftspeople and design colleagues. JOINE enjoys an inspiring design process and intuitively and playfully creates its own vision of the world around us: authentic

ZT04 •

70

About Linteloo: company for life, furniture for nice people. Linteloo successfully translates this basic philosophy into diverse collections. With an ongoing development in our choice of designers, materials, and themes, our quality brand appeals to many tastes and styles. Yet every new collection is unmistakably Linteloo. Customers all over the world recognize and appreciate our innovative style.

products and projects, contemporary and full of character, close to the user, beautiful and with substance. Presentation Sleeping… Lounging… Relaxing… A sofa is far more than just for sitting; it’s your living room within the living room. We don’t just sit on it, we stretch out on it; we fling ourselves down on it and dangle limply over the armrest; we may assume an alert conversational attitude or kick off our shoes and curl up side by side. Maarten Baptist has come up with the perfect sofa by taking all these different uses as his starting point in designing the Single Sofa – the first sofa that combines the classic seating functions of a sofa with a chaise longue and day bed.

At the Linteloo headquarters in The Netherlands, Dutch designers and European craftsmen are brought together to create contemporary furniture that lasts for years, both in style and quality. Our small team of passionate professionals takes good care of marketing and sales, including the expanding Linteloo dealer network. Presentation We will present a special project by Paola Navone.

Photo — Lisa Klappe RED DOT 2010

© Jeroen Junte

Index

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ZT06 •

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Index

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ZT07•  Men at Work Designers 

Dennis Slootweg, Tiddo de

Ruiter

Location 

ZT08•  Ceramic Mosa surface innovations Via Voghera 11, 20144, Milano

www dennisslootweg.nl / www tiddoderuiter.nl

Tiddo de Ruiter Saturnusstraat 91, 2516 AG, Den Haag, The Netherlands Contact 

Superstudio Più Via Tortona 27, 20144, Milan

Location 

www mosa.nl

t  +31 (0)624546045

Mosa Sales Support Meerssenerweg 358, 6224 AL, Maastricht, The Netherlands

Contact 

t  +31 (0)618085791

t  +31 (0)433689229

Photo's — Ricki van der Tas

Index

Designers 

e  info@mosa.nl

Presentation Men at Work: craftsmanship with character - Tiddo de Ruiter and Dennis Slootweg are Men at Work: two self-producing furniture designers from The Hague. Each designer’s work enhance the other’s by the attention paid to materials (particularly metal and wood), their traditional methods (the making of prototypes in their atelier and adjoining workshop and the meticulous implementation and skilful production), their aversion to trends, and their passion for industrial quotations and detailing. And: the literal sustainability of their products. In Milan, variants of their successful, existing collections will be presented, as well as new designs, with new materials and techniques. Men at Work: a presentation in which distinctive materials and modern craftsmanship take centre stage.

72

Royal Mosa Mosa Designteam

Company 

e  info@dennisslootweg.nl

e  info@tiddoderuiter.nl

About Functional eye-catchers - Dennis Slootweg makes eye catchers that have a practical functionality, often as single copies or in limited editions. His awareness of materials, craftsmanship and experimentation result in a language of forms that is both subdued and monumental, and in pieces of furniture with a clear and recognizable signature. The aesthetics of simplicity - Tiddo de Ruiter is a furniture designer who reveals the essence of a piece of furniture in his designs. His pieces have nothing to hide: they are true utensils that are characterized by the simplicity of their form and the clearness of their construction.

ZT07•

  Dennis Slootweg

Press

ZONA TORTONA

About Devoting attention to innovation and design are important values for Mosa. Mosa plays a leading role in the architectural designs of today and tomorrow, with distinctive, beautiful, high-quality, sustainable tiles. The company frequently works alongside architects in this regard, producing Custom Design tiles. The Xtreme, LED Series, Terra XXL, Mosa Matt Collection® and Beige & Brown Planks and Colour Mix have won numerous international design prizes in 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2009, including the Red Dot Awards, the iF Awards, and the Design Plus Award, and were also nominated for the Deutsche Designpreis and the Dutch Design Awards.

ZT08 •

Presentation A new location and new concepts: Mosa presents new ceramic tile collections in an artistic installation to inspire the sensory perception.

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Index

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ZT09•  Palau Palau Richard Hutten, Robert Bronwasser Company 

Designers 

Location 

Superstudio Museum - Selected Objects Superstudio, Via Tortona 27, 20144, Milan

Contact 

Palau c/o Rolf Voorhuis Gierstraat 30, 2011 GE, Haarlem, The Netherlands

www palau.nl

t +31 (0)650621603 e rolf@palau.nl

Presentation Palau presents new collections by Richard Hutten and Robert Bronwasser. Bricks, a new series by Robert Bronwasser, will be presented for home and commercial use. Bricks is a smart, modular system that facilitates architect and consumer in creating a solution for every space and every function. Materials are chosen according to Palau’s new eco guidelines. Bricks was originally designed for the new-business environment. Now a home and restaurant version is introduced, offering the same flexible solutions. Richard Hutten already designed the Boris chair for Palau. He will now introduce his new organic pouf for Palau in Milan.

ZT09 •

73

Ethical distinction Palau’s mission is to make durable, upholstered products, produced environmentally friendly and involving a minimum amount of transport. To make a durable product, timeless design is as important as quality. This is reflected in the selection of our designers and in our product development. Our responsibility is to search for ecological improvements everyday, in production and materials. We motivate our suppliers to do the same and develop eco-products.

Index

ZONA TORTONA

Press 

Wadia Khabthani

e  press@mosa.nl t  +31 (0)433689583


ZT10 •  Pieke Bergmans Design Virus, Studio Job Pieke Bergmans, Job Smeets, Nynke Tynagel Location 1  Galleria Design Virus Via Tortona 12, 20144, Milan Companies 

Two different presentations

Monsters – designed with ‘Stretch Textiles’ fabrics by Innofa (Galleria Design Virus) Wonderlamp – designed in collaboration with Studio Job (Galleria Dilmos)

About Pieke Bergmans is an autonomous designer from the Netherlands. She works on a large variety of projects around the globe. Her favourite modus operandi is to alter existing production processes to come to new forms and functions. She aims to combine function, form, and message in a single elegant gesture. Whether working with porcelain, plastic, or glass, she always creates objects that are of a pure and natural beauty. “My designs depend on what I find along the way. I have an unstoppable curiosity for new ways to find and create form.”

ZT10 •

ZT12•  Presentations Reflections

Designers 

Location 2  Galleria Dilmos Piazza San Marco 1, 20121, Milan Location 3  Ten Small Atlases, page 92

Contact 

Studio Design Virus Sint Annenstraat 6, 1012 HE, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

www piekebergmans.com / ww studiojob.nl

e  info@piekebergmans.com

www innofa.com

t  +31 (0)652070697

Presentations Presentation 1 Monsters - A collection of seating objects with Stretch Textiles – made by Innofa. The Monsters are happy to meet you… Presentation 2 Wonderlamp - Realized in collaboration with Dilmos: a collection of 7 light objects. Bronze objects by Studio Job & Light Blubs by Pieke Bergmans. “Obvious - That is the first thought that comes to mind when considering a collaborative effort between Studio Job and Pieke Bergmans. Obvious, since both designers work with archetypal materials that take their form via coagulation. Studio Job makes monumental objects of cast bronze. In recent

74

Piet Boon Karin Boon, Piet Boon

years, Bergmans made a name for herself with mouth-blown crystal that coagulates into fluid forms. The Bergmans’s light giving ‘blubs‘ are linked to seven bronze objects from Studio Job. The unique style of both designers remains intact with these Wonderlamps. At the same time, an

Index

Antique Mirror Srl Felicerossi Jacco Bregonje, Marko Macura, (Karim Rashid, Garth Roberts)

Via Savona 45, 20144, Milan Salone Internazionale del Mobile, Fiera Rho, hall 8 stand E 45

Contact 

Location 2 

Jacco Bregonje Via Mottarona 2, 21018, Lisanza / Sesto Calende, Italy

www antiquemirror.it / www hp.com

t +39 3496029970

www metalspot.com / www felicerossi.it

e jacco@bregonjedesign.com

alienating object is created with an unexpected function: ‘giving light‘.” Jeroen Junte©

ZONA TORTONA

About Jacco Bregonje established ‘Bregonje Design‘ in 2001. His combined corporate and freelance experience allows him to relate to the best of both worlds, from inside out and outside in. The studio is a small organization, with clients ranging from multinationals to small expanding companies. The designers at Bregonje Design relate more to crossovers than to any particular speciality, as they like moving freely between disciplines and the ability to link them together. Their focus is on improving the human experience related to our surroundings. The studio is located in Italy and enjoys a partnership with Effactive in the Netherlands.

ZT12 •

Presentations Presentation 1 AntiqueMirror-Reflections The presentation introduces you to the imaginative world of ‘Antique Mirror‘. Antique Mirror is a Tuscany-based glass company that produces magical mirrors through a unique procedure. The furnishing collection AMLab is their showroom and laboratory in which they experiment with combining glass and mirrors with other precious materials. Through the entrepreneurial passion of Massimo Borgna and under the creative direction of Jacco Bregonje, superbly designed furniture and lighting objects are created, using Italian craftsmanship. Set in a beautiful location, Antique Mirror presents reflections of Marko Macura, Jacco Bregonje,

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Via Savona 43, 20144, Milan

www pietboon.com

Piet Boon c/o Sandra Ajanaku (Global Brand Marketing Manager), Ambacht 6, 1511 JZ, Oostzaan, The Netherlands

Contact 

Press  

Kerrie Finch

t +31 (0)628155769 e kerrie@finchfactor.com

Royal Academy of Art Work of students from the departments of ArtScience, Textile & Fashion and Interior Design Company 

Designers 

Studio Iroko Via Voghera 11b, 20144, Milan

Location 

www kabk.nl

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ZONA TORTONA

t  +31 (0)703154729 / +31 (0)641950244

beach and holiday homes, metropolitan living and smaller urban spaces. Presentation This leading Dutch design company showcases the iconic Piet Boon experience in the heart of the Zona Tortona district. In a departure from previous years, iconic Piet Boon® furniture designs and new product launches are connected in a series of fully styled living spaces, bringing the distinctive flair and quiet confidence of the brand’s mode to life. An art gallery space spotlights both iconic and new pieces from the collection, profiling the craftsmanship involved in the company’s furniture making, whilst living and dining areas offer diverse visions of contemporary living.

Index

HEIT swivel chair Photography — Denise Bonenti / Vega MG Styling — Rianne Landstra

ZONA TORTONA

Royal Academy of Art c/o Judith van Doorn Prinsessegracht 4, 2514 AN, Den Haag, The Netherlands

Contact 

e  j.vandoorn@kabk.nl

t  +31 (0)756559000

ZT11•

Presentation 2 Felicerossi Taken as an ensemble of curves and surfaces, the Divina is a sculpture of pure form. In its use, every detail becomes necessary; it fits the body like pure function. The setting transforms it from a sculpture into a piece of furniture or a functional tool. In the Netherlands, the Divina was voted New Dutch Design Classic. In addition, both The Vitra Design Museum and San Francisco Museum Of Modern Arts (SFMOMA) recognize the Divina as an expression of our social habits. During the 2010 Milan furniturefair the new left-armed version will

Index

e  s.ajanaku@pietboon.com

About Established in 1983 by Dutch master craftsman Piet Boon, the international design company has expanded to become a global luxury lifestyle brand, with both private and corporate clients in 35 countries worldwide. Together with his wife and business partner Karin, Piet Boon leads a dynamic team of designers, artisans and architects responsible for a versatile range of projects. These include private homes, public spaces, beach houses on Bonaire, and a limited edition Range Rover Sport. Marrying functional, timeless design and natural materials with distinguishing signature details, Piet Boon® furniture, design and styling is tailored to your individual life and personality. Piet Boon® focuses on four key areas: classic Piet Boon,

Karim Rashid and Garth Roberts. be presented, including an Hewlett Packard, Metalspot and innovative high-gloss lacquer finish. Felicerossi are supporting partners.

ZT13• Royal Academy of Art on the Edge Location 

Designers 

Location 1 

Designers 

www bregonjedesign.com / www effactive.com

ZT11•  Piet Boon Company 

Company 

iconic DIEKE sofa

About The Royal Academy of Art in The Hague, teaches its students to be confident artists and designers, who offer a meaningful contribution to their discipline and to society by being passionate, having an in-depth ability and an experimental mentality. Five core values determine the course of our educational programmes. We stand for creativity, content, independence, affinity, and vision. With these values in hand, we have opted for an inquisitive position in the art of the future, from a viewpoint of engaged autonomy. In the coming years we plan to continue expanding to become an inspirational community where students, visual artists, and designers from many countries can come together to debate and collaborate.

ZT13 •

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Presentation Experience the intersection between physical and virtual worlds, which becomes apparent in the presentations and performances by the research students of different departments of The Royal Academy of Art in The Hague. They offer a meaningful contribution to society by being passionate, having an in-depth ability, and an experimental and visionary mentality.

Photo — Dorith Sjardijn

Index

ZONA TORTONA


ZT14•  Tomorrow’s Design since 1610 Royal Goedewaagen Esther Derkx, Joost Swarte, Robert Bronwasser, Sander Alblas Company 

Designers 

ZT16•  Swarovski Crystal Palace

Temporary Museum for New Design 2010 Superstudio PIU , Via Tortona 27, 20144, Milan

Contact 

www goedewaagen.nl

t +31 (0)599616090

Rogier van der Heide, Chief Design Officer at Philips Lighting c/o Ange Dunselman Postbus 90050, 5600 PB, Eindhoven, The Netherlands

e info@goedewaagen.nl

e  ange.dunselman@philips.com

Location 

Royal Goedewaagen c/o Yvonne Hendriks Glaslaan 29a, 9520 AB, NieuwBuinen, The Netherlands

Swarovski Rogier van der Heide and many others Company 

Designers 

Swarovski Crystal Palace Via Tortona 32, 20144, Milan

Location 

www rogiervanderheide.com www swarovskicrystalpalace.com

Contact 

Press  Swarovski Kathrin Wesonig (Swarovski Communication Unit) e  kathrin.wesonig@swarovski.com t  +44 (0) 207 255 8443

t  +31 (0)402791111

About For almost 400 years, Royal Goedewaagen has manufactured ceramics with a passion; passion for innovative designs, traditional forms, and detailed craftsmanship; passion for our customers and from our employees. In essence, a passion for stylish products made from high quality ceramics in all their extraordinary forms. Presentation During the Salone del Mobile in Milan, Royal Goedewaagen presents the new DSGN-collection: a combination of modern designs and traditional decoration techniques. Art Director and Designer Robert Bronwasser developed a collection of functional and decorative products in modern

ZT14 •

colour schemes with a sense of tradition. The new Lightdrops make up part of this collection; LED-lights in a ceramic housing, developed in collaboration with Silverled and CLA. Bronwasser also selected a series of products from the traditional collection on which a variety of decoration techniques were applied. With this

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New Traditionals collection, authentic shapes are taken from the past into the present. The collection includes further designs by Sander Alblas and Esther Derkx. To celebrate the history and craftsmanship of Royal Goedewaagen, special decorations have been designed by a few Dutch illustrators including Joost Swarte. Royal Goedewaagen will also present the results of its collaboration with the Willem de Kooning Academy: new concepts and prototypes for ceramic gifts.

Index

ZONA TORTONA

ZT15•  senz° umbrellas Company  Designer 

senz° umbrellas Gerwin Hoogendoorn

Officina 1 Via Tortona 31, 20144, Milan

www senzumbrellas.com

ZT15 •

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ZT16 •

projects all over the world. Van der Heide is internationally recognized as one of the leading architectural lighting design specialists and has been awarded many of the industry’s most prestigious awards, including the Lighting Designer of the Year Award 1998 and the International Lighting Design Award of Excellence in 2005 and 2006. Until recently, he was Director at Arup and Global Business Leader Lighting Design of Arup Lighting.

shimmering quality of the crystals, lit with narrow beams of moonlight. Rogier van der Heide comments: “I present Swarovski Crystal Palace in Milan as a dreamy cloud of crystals, a three-dimensional sculpture that expresses the natural, the magical, the imaginative, and the beautiful. “Dream Cloud” consists of thousands of pure, untreated small crystals, floating in the air, transforming a black space by giving it a point of gravity: the epicentre of the visitor’s attention. Presentation And on the floor, moving clouds Van der Heide’s installation is an form a surreal, magical carpet. interpretation of the crystals’ Guests wander through and purest, most intrinsic features: the realise that Swarovski elevates way they spark our imagination, them above the clouds, where the and make our dreams come true. shimmering crystals, bathing in Guests wander through a magical cool blue moonlight, make a landscape: below them, clouds are dream come true.” moving by, above them, the

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ZONA TORTONA

ZT17•  The Unexpected Welcome

Location 

About Three TU Delft friends have designed the ultimate umbrella. One that doesn’t turn inside out, is comfortable and withstands 100 km/h winds. senz° is designed to protect you against all weather conditions. By understanding the laws of aerodynamics senz° outsmarted the establishment with a sustainable solution. After 3000 years, time has come to free the world of all well-known umbrella struggles with the umbrella of the future. For its outstanding performance the senz° original storm umbrella has been awarded all major design awards. Being out in the rain should be fun again! Enjoy the weather!

About Swarovski Crystal Palace has been internationally acclaimed as one of the most imaginative contemporary design projects since its inception seven years ago. Each year Crystal Palace invites a diverse group of the best emerging and established talent from the worlds of architecture, art, fashion, and interior design to create signature interpretations of light and design using the emotive medium of cut crystal, blurring the boundaries between art and function, whilst addressing the mythic illuminating power of crystal and the latest technology. Rogier van der Heide is an architectural lighting designer and Chief Design Officer for Philips Lighting. Rogier has been responsible for innovative, creative, and well-executed

senz° umbrellas c/o Marcia Winnubst Mijnbouwstraat 120, 2628 RX, Delft, The Netherlands

Contact 

Designers 

Showroom Moooi Via Tortona 37, 20144, Milan

Location 

www moooi.com

Moooi Sales Department Moooi Minervum 7003, 4817 ZL, Breda, The Netherlands Contact 

t +31 (0)152855022 / +31 (0)651746190

e  info@moooi.com

e marcia@senzumbrellas.com

t  +31 (0)765784444

About This year Moooi will show its latest products in the brand new Moooi showroom located right in the heart of Zona Tortona. Its doors will open for the first time for a press preview on the 13th of April and the showroom will certainly be up and running to receive its many visitors during the Salone del Mobile. Therefore this year Moooi’s ‘Unexpected Welcome‘ also takes place in an unexpected location: via Tortona 37. The showroom encloses the perfect ambience to present the latest designs in style, while introducing the public to the entire world and meaning of the Moooi brand.

Presentation The Officina 1 location at via Tortona 31 will be the epicenter of the senz° test facility. It will allow Salone del Mobile visitors to get a real taste of the true senz° experience within the Zona Tortona district. We have tested our original storm umbrellas extensively, jumped out of planes, taken rides on motorcycles and have made sure your senz° will withstand winds of 100 km/h. Curious? You are welcome to try it yourself. Feel the force and be inspired.

Index

MOOOI Maarten Baas, Marcel Wanders, Raimond Puts, Studio Job Company 

ZONA TORTONA

ZT17•

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Presentation Every year Moooi likes to surprise spectators with its new products by keeping them secret until the Salone del Mobile, creating a feeling of mystery and expectation. What Moooi can proudly reveal are the names of the designers, who will be present with their new creations, and also a small glimpse of what viewers can expect. The public will be faced with the versatility and geometrical complexity of Miyake’s new ingenious design, the tenderness and grace of Nika’s creation, the exotic elegance of a new product by Neri & Hu, and extensions to product lines by Marcel Wanders, Maarten Baas, Raimond Puts, Fresh West & more. All an irresistible mix of different cultures and creative minds.

Index

ZONA TORTONA

Press 

Marika Boso

e  marika@moooi.com t  +31 (0)765784444


ZT18•  Tuttobene Milan 2010 Bo Reudler Studio, Doreen Westphal Studio, Emma product design, Event Architectuur, Frans Willigers Ruimtelijk Ontwerpen, Frederike Top Ontwerp, KLFK, Marianne Kemp Horsehairweaving, Marjan van Aubel, Studio Re-creation, Studio Sjoerd Jonkers Designers  Bo Reudler, Doreen Westphal, Emma Klinkenberg, Florian Kräutli, Frans Willigers, Frederike Top, Herman Verkerk, Kathy Ludwig, Marianne Kemp, Marjan van Aubel, Nikola Nikolov, Paul Kuipers, Sjoerd Jonkers, Tal Erez Companies

www boreudler.com / www sjoerdjonkers.com

Tuttobene c/o Victor le Noble Damrak 70, 1012 LM, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

www frederiketop.nl / www studio-re-creation.com

t +31 (0)206685505

www doreenwestphal.com / www klfk.nl

e victor@tuttobene.nl

Location 

Via Savona 18, 20144, Milan

www tuttobene.nl www marjanvanaubel.com / www willigers.com

Contact 

Press 

Luc Deleau

t +31(0)652472990 e press@tuttobene.nl

www horsehairweaving.com / www emma.nl www eventarchitectuur.nl

About Tuttobene works on a variety of design projects. Projects vary from a presentation of young talented designers in Milan to interior design and other commercial projects. In all their projects the people behind Tuttobene focus strongly on the ecological or social effects of the decisions they make. Tuttobene sells products through its webshop www.tuttobenedesignshop.com. Here you can find unique products that you will not yet find in most stores. Tuttobene is also initiator and publisher of ‘Connecting the Dots‘ magazine.

Bo Reudler

Porcelain cupboard, Marjan van Aubel

Presentation Tuttobene presents a selection of 11 young Dutch designers and their newest designs. They show tables, chairs, lighting, and accessories. Their ecological or social vision on design plays an important role in their work. Tuttobene supports sustainable design. We believe that the design industry has an important responsibility to help set the rules for sustainable consumption. Making sure that what you produce contributes to a sustainable development of our society, rather than obstructing it, should become the default for the whole industry.

Frans Willigers

Doreen Westphal

Sjoerd Jonkers Transformer, Studio-Re-Creation

ZT18 •

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Index

ZONA TORTONA


ZT19•  Werner Neumann presents Birchwood Designer 

Werner Neumann

OCAP Via Voghera 11, 20144, Milan

Location 

www wernerneumann.nl

Werner Neumann Gagelstraat 88, 5616 RS, Eindhoven, The Netherlands

Contact 

ZT21•  School of Design & Engineering Press  

Kerrie Finch

t +31 (0)628155769 e kerrie@finchfactor.com

e  werner.neumann@planet.nl

Company  Windesheim University of Location  That’s Design Applied Sciences, School of Design & Via Savona 18, 20144, Milan www windesheim.nl Engineering Designers  Various students

t  +31 (0)652460337

Windesheim c/o Ton van Raamsdonk Campus 2-6, 8017 CA, Zwolle, The Netherlands

Contact 

Press 

Alexandra van den Pauert

e  A.vanden.pauwert@windesheim.nl t  +31 (0)384699845

e  ajw.van.raamsdonk@windesheim.nl t  +31 (0)384699817

About Werner Neumann, born in 1966 in Eindhoven, started as a furniture designer in 2007. His strength lies in his knowledge of structures and materials and how to use them. Werner Neumann has an eye for detail; the entire process of developing a product is in his own hands, from beginning to end. Before he started as a designer he was an upholsterer and as such worked together with many designers. He always found solutions that enabled them to realize their designs. He also made prototypes for Maarten Baas and Piet Hein Eek.

ZT19 •

Presentation For his new collection Werner took his inspiration from nature. Werner sees the symmetry in nature and uses that in his designs. Also he works with different natural materials he finds in nature. Often he goes to places far from civilization to find inspiration. His presentation in Milan consists of furniture covered with birch bark and flowered sofas. He has used natural materials for his products. The work of Werner Neumann is characterized by a combination of surprising design and quality craftsmanship.

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About Windesheim University of Applied Sciences, School of Design and Engineering, offers a balanced programme, based on four main themes: marketing, technology, aesthetics, and human technology. Our collaboration with various companies in the Dutch industry keeps our view open and up to date. Our projects are varied and interesting in many ways. We are good at what we do, open-minded and curious. And, since we are situated near the geographical centre of the Netherlands, everything is within reach. Our international semester “Minor All-Round Design” is supported by the Erasmus programme and accessible for students from many other universities.

Index

ZONA TORTONA

ZT21•

ZT20 • Nothing is impossible, Better City, Better Life Willem de Kooning Academy, Rotterdam University Designers  Interior Architecture and Fashion Design Dutch students Companies 

That’s Design Via Savona 18, 20144, Milan

Location 

www wdka.nl

Willem de Kooning Academy c/o Myrna v.d. Water Blaak 10, 3011 TA, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Contact 

Press 

Carmen de Groot

Presentation We proudly present five of our most recent projects: 1st: a rescue buoy, innovative use of the material EPP, easily linked together for better visibility and stability for shipwrecked persons 2nd: park lighting, fully integrated in the trees. The use of solar cells, wood, and LEDs are a friendly and sustainable solution. 3rd: first milling machine of a new series. A functional styling project. 4th: energy-chair for hyperactive children. An answer to a social question: ADHD and how to live with it? The child can bounce and move while, for example, doing schoolwork; the energy is stored within the chair. 5th: city-lamppost with bike standard. Laminated wood, solar cells, and LED lights. Security and perception.

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ZONA TORTONA

ZT22 •  Students Furniture Design of Koning Willem I College Design competition prizewinners

t + 31 (0) 10 794 4790 e c.m.f.w.de.groot@hro.nl

Koning Willem I College Mireille Knaap, Corné van de Laar, Ivo Leemans, Joop Peels, Jasper Ruijs

Location  Ella’s Boutique Via Tortona 12, 20144, Milan

About A few months ago the Dutch Koning Willem I College presented its Furniture Design students in with a daring challenge:

Presentation Here at Milan Design Week visitors can admire the five winning contestants and their designs. These exceptionally talented youngsters are:

Company 

t +31 (0)629501779

Designers 

e m.van.de.water@hro.nl

www kw1c.nl

Koning Willem I College c/o Raymond Hilhorst Onderwijs Boulevard 3, 5223 DE, Den Bosch, The Netherlands Contact 

t +31 (0)651000 823

About Willem de Kooning Academy (Media Art Design Education) provides bachelor’s and master’s degree courses in Fine Art, Media & Design and Education in Art & Design. Our courses are geared to an international level that sets the standards in these fields. We encourage an approach that is conceptual, interdisciplinary, innovative, and practice-based. Our faculty members are professionals from the Dutch art and design world, acclaimed worldwide as innovative, experimental, and original.

Presentation Willem de Kooning Academy Rotterdam University is proud to present work by the next generation of young Dutch 3D designers at That’s Design! during Salone Internazionale del Mobile 2010. Young designers have combined their disciplines and crossed the boundaries of art and design, high and low art, and technology and craftsmanship. At Savona 18, our Interior Architecture and Fashion Design students present work they have made for the Rotterdam Water City Pavilion. Through this pavilion - designed by Willem de Kooning Academy - the city of Rotterdam will showcase itself at the World Expo Shanghai 2010 from May 1 to October 31.

‘Design a piece of furniture within the theme ‘Recycle‘. Feel completely free to interpret the theme in your own personal style.‘

Elise Zoetmulder

ZT20 •

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Index

The students who accepted the challenge could make use of recycled materials if they wanted to, but they could also recycle existing designs or concepts. They all took part in a competition. A select group of experts, along with the famous international topdesigner Maarten Baas (‘Designer of the year‘, Miami 2009), then judged the designs.

Danielle Linscheer

ZONA TORTONA

Joyce Brouwer

ZT22 •

81

e r.hilhorst@kw1c.nl

Jasper Ruijs with his ‘Bottle chair‘ (overall winner) Joop Peels with ‘The piano table‘ Mireille Knaap with ‘Woollight‘ Corné van de Laar with ‘Old army sofa‘ Ivo Leemans with ‘Ivlis tavolo‘ Koning Willem I College, from the historic city of ’s-Hertogenbosch in The Netherlands, is the only ROC in the country where it is possible to study Furniture Design with the subjects Design and Realization within one and the same department.

Index

Bottle chair, Jasper Ruijs

ZONA TORTONA

Press 

Josje Vierhout

t +31 (0)736249643 e j.vierhout@kw1c.nl


ZT23• Origin of stars

ZL01• Autofficina – A still life composition

Zuiver Ben van Opstal, bERT & dENNIS, Christian Kocx, Doreen Westphal, Ennio Vicenzoni, Frederike Top, Inge de Jager, Jeroen Wesselink, Jos Kranen, Margriet Foolen, Michaël Kruijne, Niels & Sven, Peter van de Water, Stephan Siepermann, Tjeerd Veenhoven, Trine Kornum, Wannes Royaards

Location 

About The brand Zuiver is a platform for designers: creative minds, mostly young and Dutch. Each design selected by Zuiver is pure and unique and has to have the special Zuiver-“twist”, either in form, function, use of materials or techniques, or maybe even in the originality of the idea that led to the design. The young design label Zuiver works together with their designers to develop and realize a marketable product of the initial design. They handle production, marketing and sales of the designs. By branding these designs with the name Zuiver, they add to and become part of a collection with international presence.

Presentation Origin of stars - Holland is well known as a breeding ground for young designers who creating beautiful and unique designs. Zuiver selects the talented ones, puts the individual designs in the spotlight and connects them by showing their origin and pureness. The power of all these united design(er)s reinforced by Zuiver makes them visible and shine bright like stars!

Company 

Designers 

ZT23 •

82

Face to Superstudio Più Via Tortona 54, 20144, Milan

www zuiver.com

Zuiver c/o Carla Verhagen Rak 20, 1551 NA, Westzaan, The Netherlands

Companies  rENs, designlabel Vij5, DeridderDesignstudio, studio Vraay, Reinier de Jong and David Derksen Designers  Anieke Branderhorst, Arjan van Raadshooven, Bas van Raay, David Derksen, Reinier de Jong, Renee Mennen, Stefanie van Keijsteren, Willem de Ridder

Contact 

e  carla@zuiver.nl t  +31 (0)634489544

Contact 

Arjan van Raadshooven

e  info@autofficina-expo.nl t  +31 (0)624527531

www autofficina-expo.nl  www vij5.nl www davidderksen.nl  www reinierdejong.com www madebyrens.nl  www vraay.com www deridderdesignstudio.com

About A moment of contemplation, an invitation to stand still and observe. Visiting the exhibition “Autofficina” is like walking into a storyline that just came to a pause. A group of young Dutch Designers is fascinated by the keen attention for detail and composition originated from still life paintings. During the Salone del Mobile 2010 in Milan, they create their own composition as a one-time setting in a decayed Italian car garage. A still life projected not on canvas but on one’s retina.

Alu stool - Niels & Sven

Index

Autofficina Via Privata Massimiano 23, 20134, Milan

Location 

ZONA TORTONA

Muscle - Jos Kranen

Presentation The conceptual focus of DeridderDesignstudio is on existing mass-produced items and the way people treat them. The world is a fountainhead according to Bas van Raay, founder of Studio Vraay. A place in which he creates, combines, mutates or alters things that are already there. Arjan van Raadshooven and Anieke Branderhorst are founders of the young Dutch designlabel Vij5. Their design of the FlexVase recently won a Dutch Design Award.

Zona Lambrate 82

Index

ZONA lambrate

Reinier de Jong’s work combines contrasting qualities. It is lucid yet intriguing, contemporary yet timeless. The work of Renee Mennen and Stefanie van Keijsteren, rENs, attempts to change your perspective and challenges you to look at the world in a different way. Construction and materials are David Derksen’s main source of inspiration. He creates something new through unconventional applications.

ZL01•

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Index

ZONA lambrate


ZL02•  Design Academy Eindhoven Design Academy Eindhoven Exhibition with a selection of the latest graduate work of Design Academy Eindhoven Company 

Designers 

Undai Galleries Ventura Lambrate, Via Giovanni Ventura 6, 20134 Milan

Location 

www designacademy.nl

Contact  Design Academy Eindhoven c/o Antoinette Klawer PO Box 2125, 5600 CC, Eindhoven, The Netherlands

Press  

Ingrid Swinkels

t +31 (0)402393964 / +31 (0)646597971 e ingrid.swinkels@designacademy.nl

t +31 (0) 402393939 e antoinette.klawer@designacademy.nl

About What questions are we facing? What is the role of the designer today? What are the future roles of the designer? What are we focusing on? Questions are the start of everything. Exhibition ‘The Questions’ A show about some of the questions Design Academy Eindhoven is asking now.

Digna Kosse, Minimal Dress Department and year of graduation: Man and Leisure, 2009. Photographer: Lisa Klappe

Yoeri Treffers, Inflatable Void Department and year of graduation: Man and Well-Being, 2009. Photographer: René van der Hulst

ZL02 •

84

Index

Anna van der Lei, BadKast Department and year of graduation: Man and Well-Being, 2009. Photographer: René van der Hulst

ZONA lambrate

ZL02 •

85

Index

ZONA lambrate


ZL03•  dominocabinet Atelier Schelling & Borsboom Marjolijn Borsboom, Onno Schelling Company 

Designers 

ZL05•  Geke Lensink

Plusdesign Gallery Via Ventura 6, 20134 Lambrate, Milan

Location 

www schellingborsboom.nl

Onno Schelling Bontekoekade 19, 2516 LA, Den Haag, The Netherlands

Contact 

Company  Designer 

WISE people Geke Lensink

e  info@schellingborsboom.nl

Location 

Ventura Lambrate, Galleria Pianissimo 1, Via Ventura 5, 20134, Milan

Contact 

www gekelensink.nl

t +31 (0)650207439 e geke@wisepeople.nl

t  +31 (0)644264876

About Schelling & Borsboom is a small company based in The Hague, specialized in producing prototypes and special furniture for different companies, artists and designers, as well as in autonomous designs by Onno Schelling, who is inspired by historic designs. ‘Because my time on earth is limited, my work is limited too,‘ a statement by Onno Schelling, who is involved in every aspect of design as well as construction, believing a holistic attitude adds to the identity of the work. This approach to production allows room for difference and individuality in each edition, as long it fits the concept of the edition.

About After her study at the ArtEZ Institute of the Arts, Geke has continually worked as an independent designer. Now, in collaboration with other designers, she works under the name ‘WISE people,‘ fulfilling assignments for various clients. Nearly two years ago Geke Lensink started working on an autonomous collection. These various furniture pieces and products have already been shown at an exhibition during Dutch Design Week, at Designhuis Eindhoven, at Gallery Vivid Rotterdam and are currently showing in Milan.

Presentation Dominocabinet no. 3, from an series of 6, is furnished with an interior inspired by historic architectural cabinets on stand.

Presentation In 2008, driven by the idea that our world is getting more complicated, designer Geke Lensink

ZL03 •

Photo — David Zanardi

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Index

Geke Lensink KNSM laan 191, 1019 LC, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

ZONA lambrate

ZL05 •

began a new collection of products materials and designing something using her own interpretation of the that revealed the vision and subject. Using the name ‘Forward signature of each designer. to Basic‘ she began a search for the essential value of a product and its development from the source. Also, by simplifying the production process, Geke Lensink has found originality in design again. The presentation consists of a group of products in which new ideas and traditional processes, high tech and (s)low tech are combined. The collection ‘Forward to Basic‘ consists of various furniture pieces and porcelain tableware. Geke Lensink has also designed the TM collection together with Jesse Visser. It is a distinct collection in which both took up the challenge of working with new

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ZONA lambrate

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Index

ZONA lambrate

ZL04•  Frederik Roijé Designer 

Frederik Roijé

Gallery 4a Via Privata Giovanni Ventura 6, 20134, Milan

Contact 

www roije.com

e  info@roije.com

Location 

Frederik Roijé Industrieweg 29, 1115 AD, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Press 

Renske Rademaker

e  press@roije.com

t  +31 (0)204165706

About Frederik Roijé is an international design agency. Our approach is to reach a new level in product or space. Furniture, lightning, interior, and industrial design are part and parcel of the services we provide. We welcome new clients who are willing to cross borders and distinguish themselves by exclusive and innovative design. Besides working for clients we create our own collection of furniture designs, which we sell and distribute worldwide under the name Frederik Roijé. The collection is successful and growing. Always willing to expand we are constantly developing new products and contacts that will increase our success and sales.

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Presentation During the Salone del Mobile 2010 in Milan Frederik Roijé presents his latest product: Metrobowl. Fascinated by the beauty of geographical forms, Frederik Roijé has put the world’s largest and finest metropolises to scale. Beside the Metrobowl, we will present the impressive release of a new project designed by Frederik Roijé. Please visite our gallery in Milan during the Salone to discover this work.

Index

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ZL06•  Gronicles #2, furniture facts Gronicles Jack Brandsma MA(RCA), Lambert Kamps, Marcus Petstra Company 

Designers 

ZL07•  Jesse Visser

Location 1  Scuola Politecnica di Design (SPD), Via Ventura 15, 20134 Milan Location 2  Spazio Rossana Orlandi, page 100

Contact 

Jack Brandsma Dorpsweg 37, 9798 PC, Garmerwolde, The Netherlands

www gronicles.nl / www jackbrandsma.com

t  +31 (0)614371031

Company  Designer 

Jesse Visser Designprojects Jesse Visser

e  jack@jackbrandsma.com

Location 

Ventura Lambrate, Galleria Pianissimo 2, Via Ventura 5, 20134, Milan

Contact 

Jesse Visser Westerdoksdijk 213, 1013 AD, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

www jessevisser.com

t +31 (0)626168456 e info@jessevisser.com

www lambertkamps.com / wwwmarcusmaakt.com www scuoladesign.com

About Jack Brandsma, product & interior designer, visiting tutor at SPD Jack designs custom interiors, furniture and products, as well as special pieces for market (re) production and art commissions. Jack welcomes and is open to collaboration with design manufacturers, as well as architects and artists.

About Jesse Visser (1974) received his BA in 3D Design at the Utrecht School of Product Design in 1999. That same year, he set up his own design studio. In 2003, he enrolled in the Retail & Interior Design Masters programme at the Piet Zwart Institute in Rotterdam, to further develop his interests. From his Amsterdam-based studio, Jesse Visser works on a variety of projects including furniture, lighting, products, interior design, as well as on self-initiated projects. His work has been exhibited in Milan, Cologne, London, Frankfurt, Tallin, Solothurn (Switserland) and of course in the Netherlands.

Lambert Kamps, artist & designer Lambert studied fashion and design before attending the School of Fine Arts in Groningen. His work is known for blurring boundaries between art, architecture, and design. Marcus Petstra (MarcusMaakt), interior designer - Marcus designs and builds furniture and interiors on demand, while also working on furniture products of his own. Both the interactive element and the relation to the surrounding space are common features in many of his own works. Presentation Table talk and light conversations about obese objects, tightening sessions and waffle bakers – the furniture and related objects created by three Dutch designers and artists from Groningen, evolved from there. Jack Brandsma, Lambert Kamps and Marcus Petstra are organizing a joint exhibition of their individual work at Fuori Salone, on invitation of Scuola Politecnica di Design (SPD).

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Sphaera. Photo —Tijl dhe Nije

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Index

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Jack Brandsma collection. Photo — Harold Koopmans

Lambert Kamps obese objects. Photo — Lambert Kamps

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Presentation Jesse Visser’s latest designs in furniture and lighting are presented at Salone del Mobile. Distinct design and innovative use of material subtly challenge the designer to analyze the product. Using this interaction, trivial objects like tables and chairs become bearers of meaning and go further than we suppose in everyday use. The fine details add to a series of distinctive products. The TM collection, a result of collaboration with Geke Lensink, is being presented to the international public for the first time. The TM collection is a characteristic, durable yet light series of furniture that has been independently designed, developed and produced.

Index

Marcus Petstra-spin-off. Photo — Lambert Kamps

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Marcus Petstra tightening session. Photo — Patrick Ruiter


ZL08•  Made in Arnhem Made in Arnhem, Collectie Arnhem by ArtEZ, Weltevree, Coming Soon by ArtEZ Designers  Alexander van Slobbe, Arnoud Visser, Collectie Arnhem made by third year students, Dick van Hoff, Floris Schoonderbeek, Ineke Hans, Marcel Wanders, Sander Luske and many more Companies 

Minerva, Via Privata Cletto Arrighi 16, 20134, Milan

Location 

Contact 

Made in Arnhem

e  press@madeinarnhem.org

www madeinarhem.org www collectiearnhemproduct.nl / www weltevree.info www arnhemcomingsoon.nl

About An old desolate factory hall is the temporary home for an original, creative and refreshing Dutch landscape. This is not just a presentation of concepts, prototypes, designers or a selection of loose products. Made in Arnhem presents the design cycle, a true reflection of the creative production line in the Dutch city of Arnhem. Presentation Man-size blades of grass exhibited in a gallery-like fashion, designed by Floris Schoonderbeek, make up the exciting decor in which products by the designers of Collection Arnhem by ArtEZ and by product label Weltevree can be observed. Visitors will be led through a mesmerizing landscape in which proportion reveals the tension in the relationship between the presented objects. The visitors will then be led back to the exceptional reality of everyday through the last link in the design cycle: the Coming Soon pop-up-store, which will be selling products by designers educated or working in Arnhem. It is an exploration through the ‘mind’ of the designer, as well as through the execution of the idea. On this occasion education (ArtEZ), local authority (the City of Arnhem), and industry (Weltevree) present this creative spirit of enterprise under the title Made in Arnhem. Collection Arnhem is the beginning of a professional future for Product Design students at ArtEZ. During their third year, students develop and realize a collection within a general concept that is suitable for commercial production and a shop environment. Collection Arnhem 2010 will be presented in Milan under the title RE-THINK/ RE-MODEL.

Coming Soon by Artez

Weltevree Designers Dick van Hoff and Floris Schoonderbeek have joined forces to create accessible innovative designs. Weltevree develops and manufactures original products for everyday living, according to their own design or by other designers. The Stonestove, the Axechair and the Dutch Tub are only a few examples. Coming Soon is a podium and shop concept in which Dutch designs by both Fashion and Product Design students are sold, along with products by other internationally established Dutch designers. Here ArtEZ, as the founder of ‘Coming Soon,’ has created an environment in which students connect with the commercial reality at an early stage of their career. Collection Arnhem by Artez

Weltevree

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ZL09•  SUBJECTS   Van Eijk & Van der Lubbe Van Eijk & Van der Lubbe

Company

Designers 

ZL11•  The Urushi Project Ventura Lambrate / Undai Building Via Ventura 6, 20134, Milan

Location 

www ons-adres.nl

Van Eijk & Van der Lubbe c/o Maureen van Dijk, De Raadstraat 28K, 5666 EA, Geldrop, The Netherlands Contact 

Company  Designer 

Particles Gallery Aldo Bakker

Ventura Lambrate, Via Ventura 6, 20134, Milan

Location 

www particlesgallery.com

Particles Gallery Wilpert Dreesmann, Damrak 70, 1012 LM, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Contact 

t +31 (0)648119616 e wilpert@particlesgallery.com

e  maureen@ons-adres.nl t  +31 (0)402868636

About “Our designs raise questions; we work with common forms and products and add certain benefits to them to bring them up-to-date, without loosing their own characteristics. These products make you change your perspective on things and challenge the way you to look at the world around you.” Presentation During the Milan Furniture Fair, Van Eijk & Van der Lubbe will organize the exhibition Subjects for an international audience, in the upcoming area of Lambrate. This exhibition will consists of an overview of design works from 1998 to 2010, as well as new works. They will also give their audience a behind the scenes look, by including many models,

ZL09 •

sketches, concept drawings and experiments. Over the past years, Van Eijk & Van der Lubbe have worked for many clients, such as Habitat, Droog, Friedman Gallery New York, Skitch, Moooi, Fleurop Interflora, Philips, Fortis, Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam and many more. Coinciding with the exhibition an extensive oeuvre publication of the work of Van Eijk & Van der Lubbe, will be published by 010 Publishers.

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About Particles promotes exclusive functional objects by exhibiting at fairs and collaborating with galleries and museums. Particles commissions works from designers who create characteristic and intriguing objects, in which form and idea are in balance. Particles’ objects are produced using both state of the art techniques and centuries old craftsmanship. These objects will last for generations, when treated with care.

Index

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ZL10 •  Ten Small Atlases | Ten Processes Behind Ten Objects Du Parc Residence Anke Weiss, FormaFantasma, Jo Meesters, Pieke Bergmans Company 

Designers 

About IN Residence | Design Dialogues is a project that looks at design culture, meaning a process that organizes useful creative resources to generate innovative ideas and convey solutions that spread benefits and transmit emotions. IN Residence has a simple purpose: to make everything gravitate around the key word “dialogue,” which presumes meeting and consequential interaction, letting us suppose that this feeds the exchange of opinions and visions. IN Residence is an articulated project made up of strictly correlated components: the annual general program, as well as the main event of the theme workshop, a collective exhibition, a string of publications, and a website.

Presentation

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Ventura Lambrate Via Giovanni Ventura 6, 20134, Milan

www jomeesters.nl / wwwankeweiss.com

Marco Raino & Barbara Brondi Via Valprato, 70 Docks Dora, 10155, Torino, Italy

wwwformafantasma.com / www brh.it

e  studio@brh.it

wwwpiekebergmans.com

t  +39 011 2386119

TEN SMALL ATLASES is an exhibition that shows the experience of the IN Residence project, a thematic workshop that involves young international designers of recognised talent and even younger students, held in Torino every year since 2008 in the Residence Du Parc. The exhibition focus is the design process, the way things come to be made. Ten designers will show their visual vocabularies, creative strategies and dictionary of allusions based on which are conceived their displayed works. Each designer is given a space to display hers/his work and a collection of other objects, writings, drawings, images that influenced, inspired, compelled and encouraged the designer in creating the work. Ten dedicated

small areas will collect thoughts that will show the creative process and tell the story about the conceiving of each designer’s work and therefore will appear like ‘ten small atlases‘.

Location 

Index

Presentation The Urushi Series Our present society is characterized by a collectively imaginary lack of time. Aldo Bakker’s designs are an attempt to encourage the opposite: they demand slowness and awareness, time and attention. These remarkable furniture pieces are captured in 30 layers of Urushi lacquer, extracted from the Japanese Urushi tree. Its finish has an elusive, heavenly quality, a great depth and an almost unreal result. All pieces in a limited edition of 7.

Contact 

Stool Stool is composed of a volume, a flat surface and a line. The unique pieces are hand finished and lacquered with a glasslike varnish that magnifies the beauty of the carefully selected wood used in each piece. Stool is exclusively produced by Particles. Limited edition of 15.

Photo's — Erik en Petra Hesmerg

Photo — FormaFantasma

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Index

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ZL12•  Total Table Design Audax Textile Museum Tilburg, Royal Leerdam Crystal, Van Kempen & Begeer Designers  Kiki van Eijk, Scholten & Baijings Companies 

ZL13•  Kiki van Eijk & Joost van Bleiswijk for Zuiderzee Museum

Ventura Lambrate, Via Ventura 6, 20134, Milan

www kempen-begeer.nl / www kikiworld.nl /

Audax Textile Museum Tilburg c/o Suzan Russeler (Manager Total Table Design) / Goirkestraat 96, 5046 GN, Tilburg, The Netherlands

www scholtenbaijings.com

t +31 (0)135494594

e  heliante.moningka@zuiderzeemuseum.nl

e suzan.russeler@mommerskwartier.nl

t  +31 (0)228351120

Location 

www textielmuseum.nl / www royalleerdamcrystal.com

Contact 

t +31 (0)135494508

Designers 

Galleria Klerkx Via Massimiano 25, 20134, Milan

e communicatie@textielmuseum.nl

Eijk

www kikiworld.nl / www projectjoost.com

Press  

Mirian Dekker-Van Eijk

Company 

Zuiderzee Museum Joost van Bleiswijk, Kiki van

Location 

www zuiderzeemuseum.nl

About The Dutch Zuiderzee Museum centres on the past, present and future of the IJsselmeer. The Zuiderzee was dammed by means of the IJsselmeer Dam in 1932 and thus became the IJsselmeer. Focus is on communities, crafts, and water. Each year the Museum commissions prominent artists and designers to visualize their views of the collection and the Museum. Through their contemporary interpretations, the story of the Zuiderzee is retold. In the past few years, commissions were given to Studio Job, Maarten Baas, Atelier van Lieshout, Hugo Kaagman, Scholten and Baijings, Christien Meindertsma, Aldo Bakker and Zoro Feigl.

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Presentation This year the Zuiderzee Museum presents two projects at the Milan Design Week: Zuiderzee Settings by Kiki van Eijk and The Poor Man’s Gold by Joost van Bleiswijk. Zuiderzee Settings is a ‘soft‘ installation based on the history of the Zuiderzee. Kiki has designed new objects with reference to everyday domestic customs and crafts. The cupboards and ceramics have been manufactured by the most reputable Dutch firms, using traditional methods.

Index

Zuiderzee Museum c/o Heliante Moningka Wierdijk 17, 1601 LA, Enkhuizen, The Netherlands

Contact 

The Poor Man’s Gold is a series of treasure chests based on the travels of the Dutch East India Company. As a rule these trade missions sailed from Enkhuizen, the home base of the Zuiderzee Museum. Themes used in creating the chests are the battle of good and evil, prosperity and poverty, and robbing or being robbed.

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Scholten & Baijings, Paper Table. Photo — Scheltens & Abbenes

About Stefan Scholten (1972) and Carole Baijings (1973) established Scholten & Baijings, Studio for Design in 2000. Kiki van Eijk (1978) graduated cum laude in 2000 from the Design Academy Eindhoven. Both Scholten & Baijings and Kiki van Eijk are working on their own design collection, which is presented in galleries and museums and sold worldwide. They also work for companies and institutions in the Netherlands and abroad. Royal Leerdam Crystal is the design branch of the Leerdambased glassworks that was established in 1878. The firm

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produces a wide range of household and decorative glassware, either realized by artisans or made mechanically. Over the last few years the company has been working with a diverse group of both up-coming and established designers. Koninklijke Van Kempen & Begeer distinguishes itself with a range of products for the ‘world of fine dining’. Based in Zoetermeer since 1985, the company’s history can be traced back to 1789. In recent years, Koninklijke Van Kempen & Begeer has collabo­ rated with several renowned Dutch designers, including Gijs Bakker and Ineke Hans.

Index

The Audax Textile Museum Tilburg, its name since 2008, was established as the Textile Museum in 1958 and has been located at a former Tilburg textile mill since 1986. The Audax Textile Museum Tilburg presents itself as a unique and creative ‘working museum’. In the TextileLab, an integral part of the museum, designers can have their designs realized on computer-controlled machinery under the supervision of textile specialists. Presentation In the Total Table Design project Dutch designers Scholten & Baijings and Kiki van Eijk present their vision of the art of dining.

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Total Table Design presents table linen, glassware, crockery and cutlery. To realize this project, the Audax Textile Museum Tilburg (table linen), Royal Leerdam Crystal (glassware), and Koninklijke Van Kempen & Begeer (cutlery) joined forces. These Dutch institutions and businesses share a passion for traditional craftsmanship, experimentation and innovation. They regularly work in conjunction with a select group of designers, both from the Netherlands and beyond. The crockery was developed at Cor Unum and at the European Ceramic Workcentre (EKWC).

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Index

Fuori salone

Press 

Niels Lauwers

e  niels.lauwers@zuiderzeemuseum.nl t  +31 (0)228351125


FS01•  Dutch Invertuals Studio WND Daphna Isaacs Burggraaf, Edhv, Jo Meesters, Jon Stam, Laurens Manders, Mieke Meijer, Raw Color, Verger, Wendy Plomp

FS02•  Meet My Project

Via Varese 1, 20121, Milan

Company 

Location 

Designers 

www dutchinvertuals.nl

Studio WND c/o Wendy Plomp Lijsterbesstraat 153, 5616 LE, Eindhoven, The Netherlands

Contact 

Company  Designer 

byAMT Studio Alissia Melka-Teichroew

Location 

At SPAZIO IDA MILANO Zona Bovisa, Via Giovanni Durando 30, 20158, Milan

Contact 

Alissia Melka-Teichroew 666 Broadway, #410, New York, NY 10012, USA

www byamt.com / www meetmyproject.com

t +1 401 286 7803 e info@byamt.com

e  wendy@wnd.nu t  +31 (0)641555883

About Last year, designer Wendy Plomp initiated design collective Dutch Invertuals, born from the idea that a dynamic group of individuals can create a wonderfully unexpected world in which different disciplines such as graphic, material, spatial, and textile design reflect the multi-faceted nature of design. Dutch Invertuals came to life during last year’s Salone del Mobile, where their first exhibition was presented with great success.

About Alissia Melka-Teichroew, founder and creative director of byAMT Studio, is a New World-Old World mash-up. Daughter of a French mother and American father, she was born and raised in The Netherlands. A Design Academy Eindhoven graduate, she also holds a Masters from Rhode Island School of Design. After stints in Paris, San Francisco, and Boston, she now works in New York. While developing her own projects, she also worked at IDEO and Puma. Alissia’s transcontinental background is reflected in the fluidity and fluency of her designs.

Presentation This year, during the Salone del Mobile, the Dutch Invertuals exhibition will feature both new and evolved pieces of work. The exhibition takes place at the brand new space and restaurant of fashion label Verger. The presented collection by Dutch Invertuals is more than just a selection of random objects. The pieces of work reflect the individuality of the designers and the experimental process of production, essential to the concept behind Dutch Invertuals. For this presentation an intriguing and surprising décor will transform the high standard exhibition venue into a surreal world.

FS02 •

Presentations Inspired by a Milk Stool The image of crooked slats in a weathered picket fence impelled Alissia Melka Teichroew to explore the idea of asymmetrical pieces supporting each other. She found a similar kind of irregularity and balancing act in the old-fashioned one-legged milk stool. She merged the two concepts into this playful and innovative series. Jointed Jewels With Jointed Jewels (a part of Jointed Pieces Collection), Alissia Melka Teichroew launches the concept of using 3-D printing as a way of manufacturing complex forms. The project is based on the idea of making a ball joint from one single piece. Conventional techniques, like injection-moulded

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plastics or ceramics, require the joint to be made with separately molded pieces. 3-D printing makes the creation of one continuous joint possible, thus making a familiar shape seem slightly surreal. Taped Linens - (for Functionals.eu) This line of kitchen and table linens originated from Alissia Melka Teichroew’s thoughts about of the meaning of boundaries. She questioned why drawn lines can seal off an area even though there is nothing physically stopping us from crossing them. Alissia began experimenting with masking tape, creating networks of patterns. She superimposed the tape pieces’ jagged and imprecise shapes over the traditional checked patterns of woven damask. The result is simultaneously elegant and edgy.

Index

Fuori salone

FS03•  Pastoe meets Vincent Van Duysen Company  Designer 

Pastoe Vincent Van Duysen

Location 

Understate Via Vares 20, corner Viale Francesco Crispi, 20121, Milan

Contact 

Pastoe Rotsoord 3, 3523 CL, Utrecht, The Netherlands

www pastoe.com

e  info@pastoe.com t  +31 (0)302585555

Presentation In Milan, Dutch furniture manufacturer Pastoe presents the new Totem cabinet by Belgian architect Vincent Van Duysen. One of the features of the cabinet is the bodies, which can be turned independently and are available in a range of layouts and colours. “Totem is an object you can look at from all angles,” says Van Duysen.

With Totem, Van Duysen wanted to bring dynamism to the Pastoe collection. Totem is constructed of separate square bodies. They can be open or closed on one side. You can put horizontal shelves in them. Furthermore, it’s possible to place a vertical partition down the centre, which allows one to just barely see through the body. Van Duysen: “I was looking for an item of furniture that changes with use. Furniture that functions as The bodies can be turned in autonomous sculpture in a space is relation to each other. In this way, part of Pastoe’s design vision. “Vin- the furniture doesn’t just create cent has had our attention for new functions; it also changes in some time,” says Remco van der colour and shape.” Voort, General Manager of Pastoe. “His furniture and architecture are characterised by simplicity and a refined interplay of lines.”

Photo's — Raw Color

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Index

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Index

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FS04• Richard Hutten Company 

Richard Hutten Studio

FS05•  Studio Job

Stadio Arredamenti Corner of Via Pontaccio and Via Solferino, 20121, Milan

Contact 

www richardhutten.com

e  info@richardhutten.com

Location 

Richard Hutten Marconistraat 52, 3029 AK, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

t  +31 (0)104770665

About Richard Hutten is one of the most famous Dutch designers, and surely one of the most unconventional. From his studio in Rotterdam he works for clients around the globe on projects varying from stamps for the Dutch post, to furniture, to complete interiors. His work can be found in the collections of all the major museums, including the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, MoMA New York, and V&A London. Presentation During this year’s Milan Salone, Richard Hutten will show new additions to his Layer collection, including the Book-chair, as well as new carpets from the ‘Playing with tradition‘ series for I+I.

Richard Hutten, Playing with tradition

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Index

Press 

David Schaeublin

e  david@richardhutten.nl t  +31 (0)104770665

Presentations  Arnolfini (for Venini) Wonderlamp – designed in collaboration with r Bergmans (Galleria Dilmos, see page 72 Perished Persian / Barbed Wire Carpet (for Nodus) The Unexpected Welcome (for Moooi, see page 75) Companies  Dilmos, Moooi, Nodus, Pieke Bergmans, Studio Job, Venini Designers  Job Smeets, Nynke Tynagel, Pieke Bergmans

Location 1 

Arnofini, Museo Bagatti Valsecchi, Via Santo Spirito 10, 20121, Milan Location 2  Wonderlamp, see page 72 Location 3  Perished Persian / Barbed Wire Carpet for Nodus, Il Piccolo, Via Delio Tessa 1, 20121 Milan, Italy (corner Corso Garibaldi)

Location 4  The Unexpected Welcome, for Moooi, see page 75

About Job Smeets and Nynke Tynagel form Studio Job. From the beginning, their collaboration resulted in highly expressive, usually one-off or limited-edition works, often sculpted in bronze, cast in ceramics or finely constructed in marquetry. Their work is exhibited and collected worldwide.

Presentations Presentation 1 Arnolfini - After two years of preparation, Venini and Studio Job will launch a monumental chandelier at Museo Bagatti Valsecchi.

Presentation 3 Perished Persian / Barbed Wire Carpet - Launch of the carpets Perished Persian and Barbed Wire designed by Studio Job. Their body of work can be seen as a precisely directed scenery wherein every object or collection has its own position. Carpets published by Nodus.

Presentation 2 Wonderlamp - Studio Job and Pieke Bergmans realize a collection of 7 light objects made in bronze, in collaboration with gallery Dilmos.

www studiojob.nl / www venini.it www piekebergmans.com / www nodusrug.it

e  office@studiojob.nl t  +32 (0)32322515

Presentation 4 The Unexpected Welcome by Moooi

Studio Job, Perished Persian (drawing), published by Nodus

fuori salone

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Index

Studio Job c/o Maarten Statius Muller Paardeweide 44, 4824 EH, Breda, The Netherlands

Contact 

fuori salone


FS06• Rossana Orlandi Fuori Salone BCXSY, Debbie Wijskamp, Formafantasma, Gionata Gatto, Jack Brandsma, Maarten Baas, Nacho Carbonell, Niek van der Heijden, Piet Hein Eek, Scholten & Baijings, T.E. Thomas Eyck

Designers 

Spazio Rossana Orlandi Via Matteo Bandello 14, 20123, Milan

www pietheineek.nl / www formafantasma.com

Rossana Orlandi c/o Marco Tabasso Via Matteo Bandello 14, 20123, Milan, Italy

www bcxsy.com / www scholtenbaijings.com

e  marco.tabasso@rossanaorlandi.com

www atuppertu.com / www nachocarbonell.com

t  +39 (0)2467447244

Location 

www galleriarossanaorlandi.com

Contact 

www maartenbaas.com / www jackbrandsma.com www debbiewijskamp.com / www thomaseyck.com

About Established in 2003, Galleria Rossana Orlandi showcases young and emerging designers from all over the world, with particular paid attention to The Netherlands and North European countries. Presentation Rossana Orlandi has selected a group of both emerging and established designers and invited them to each give a presentation in one of her rooms, to create a path through the most interesting new design projects she has lately come across.

Hang on, Jack Brandsma

Son of Edi, Jack Brandsma

Handknit Texelaar Rug, Christien Meindertsma for Thomas Eyck

Glimstoel, Piet Hein Eek

Rhubarb, Scholten & Baijings

Origin Part I Join, BCXSY Watering Can, Aldo Bakker for Thomas Eyck

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Index

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FS07•  Scholten & Baijings

FS08•  Yii

Established & Sons London La Pelota, Via Palermo 10, 20121, Milan Location 2  Karimoku New Standard Japan, Galleria Suzy Shammah, Via San Fermo / via Moscova 25, 20121 Milan Location 3  Spazio Rossana Orlandi, page 96 Location 4  Total Table Design, page 92

www scholtenbaijings.com

In their designs they make use of grids, light effects, colour, transparency, and layered patterns. In addition, minimal design and a keen eye for detail characterize their work. Their work is published in magazines such as Wallpaper, Frame, Elle Deco, New York Times, Vogue, Surface, and in The International Design Year Book.

Presentations New Scholten & Baijings products will be presented by four companies at four different locations.

Location 1 

Four different presentations

4 new products (Established & Sons) Colour Wood (Karimoku) Paper Table (Total Table Design, see page 92) Vegatables & Colour Wood (Spazi Rossana Orlandi, see page 98) Designers  Carole Baijings, Stefan Scholten

About Stefan Scholten (1972) and Carole Baijings (1973) established Scholten & Baijings, Studio for Design, in 2000. Scholten & Baijings produce both independent and commissioned work, which is presented in galleries and museums and sold worldwide. Besides their own collection they work for companies and institutions such as The National Historical Museum, Zuiderzee Museum, Amsterdam Historical Museum, Royal Crystal Leerdam, t.e. Thomas Eyck and many more.

www karimoku-newstandard.jp www establishedandsons.com

Carole Baijings Westerdoksdijk 597, 1013 BX, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Contact 

e  info@scholtenbaijings.com t  +31 (0)204208940

Presentation 1 Established & Sons London will launch several new products including the Butte. The Butte is an age-old Dutch wooden travel case. Scholten & Baijings have developed new production techniques to translate the handcrafted cases into attractive storage boxes. Presentation 2 For the new brand Karimoku New Standard Japan, Scholten & Baijings have designed three side tables in thinned wood. Presentation 3

Companies  Taiwan Craft Research Institute, Exhibition organization: Nora Morton projects/Europe, OTE communications/Taiwan Curator  Gijs Bakker

  Chen-hsu Liu, Chia-en Lu, Ching-ting Hsu, Chun-chieh Weng, Chung-miao Hsu, Chung-tang Ho, Hsiao-ying Lin, Hung-pin Hsueh, Idee Liu, Jen-feng Chen, Pili Wu, Po-ching Liao, Rock Wang, Yu Fen Lo, Yu-cheng Yao,Yu-jui Chou Studio’s Muller & Van Tol (Exhibition design), Onion Design Associates (Graphic design)

Participating designers

Location  Triennale Design Museum Via Emilio Alemagna 6, 20121, Milan www gijsbakker.com / www yiidesign.com

e  press@noramorton.nl t  +39 3473519334

Spazio Rossana Orlandi Italy will present the design duo’s ‘Vegetables‘ made of textile. This work is all about the intensity of colour and craftsmanship. Presentation 4 Total Table Design - ´Paper table´ combines subtlety with elegance. The folded cardboard models created for the crockery are translated into light grey, unglazed porcelain cups and plates that delicately play with the suggestion of cardboard.

About The exhibited works are the result of Yii design projects in 2009 and 2010, for which Gijs Bakker was invited as curator. Focused on the revival of increasingly extinct Taiwanese crafts in contemporary design, the project researched the harmonious relationship between man and nature. Bamboo work, woodcarving, ceramic, lacquer ware, fine silver works, and other ancient crafts were included in the process. The choice of “green” manufacturing methods assured both sustainability and high production quality, and also the authenticity of the prototypes. Presentation Yii - reads like [i] - derives from “yi”, which means “change and transformation” in Taiwanese philosophy and is believed to be the underlying law of Nature. The brand was conceived by the Taiwan Craft Research Institute. It aims to transform traditional Taiwanese crafts in contemporary context through design, in order to bring extraordinary objects to the

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Nora Morton Projects c/o Olga Zhuravleva Silodam 31, 1013 AL, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Contact 

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immensely impersonal modern environment. Yii commissioned 15 Taiwanese professional designers to work with local master craftsmen, enriching the creative process with progressive design ideas and ancient craft secrets. The Taiwan Craft Research Institute is an agency under the Council for Cultural Affairs. The Institute promotes unique local crafts, design, innovation, and the development of the culture industry. Its primary goals are the encouragement of Taiwan’s people to cultivate a greater appreciation of crafts, to bring beauty into life, and to seek greater international exchanges related to crafts. Gijs Bakker (the Netherlands) is a designer, co-founder of Droog Design and Chi ha paura...?, and the head of the IM Master department at the Design Academy Eindhoven.


F01• Arco Contemporary Furniture Location  Salone Internazionale del Arco Contemporary Furniture Mobile, Pavilion 8, stand B33 Bertjan Pot, Burkhard www arco.nl Vogtherr, Dick Spierenburg, Ineke Hans, Jonas Trampedach, Jonathan Prestwich, Jorre van Ast, Shay Alkalay, Willem van Ast Company 

Designers 

F03•  Ineke Hans Arco Contemporary Furniture Agerta Bokking (sales manager) Parallelweg 2, 7102 DE, Winterswijk The Netherlands Contact 

e  a.bokking@arco.nl t  +31 (0)543546575

Press  

Mirian Dekker-Van Eijk

t +31 (0)135494508 e communicatie@textielmuseum.nl

OFFECCT, Salone Internazionale del Mobile, Pavillion 8, stand E43 Location 2  Unexpected Guests - Homes of Yesterday, design of Today (Cosmit), Bagatti Valsecchi Museum, Via Gesù 5, 20121, Milan Location 3  Made in Arnhem, page 88 Location 1 

Four different presentations

OFFECCT MAGIS Unexpected Guests - Homes of Yesterday, design of Today (Cosmit) Made in Arnhem, see page 88 Designer  Ineke Hans

Press

www magisdesign.com / www cosmit.it

t +46 (0) 504-415 00

www madeinarhem.org

e ulrika.darheden@offecct.se

Ineke Hans c/o Sanne van Engen Burgemeester Weertsstraat 132, 6814 HT, Arnhem, The Netherlands

Contact 

t +31 (0)263893892

About Arco Contemporary Furniture has over one hundred years of experience creating and manufacturing beautiful furniture in the Netherlands. The company recently came under new management. Willem van Ast passed the torch on to his son Jorre, who entered the company as Creative Director. In recent decades, Arco has emerged as a leading player in the field of contemporary design furniture, both for the home and for working and public environments. After celebrating its centenary in 2005, the company began collaborating with the Dutch designers Bertjan Pot, Ineke Hans, Mirjam van der Lubbe and Michiel van der Kley.

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Presentation required, making it possible to Table series TRE, designed by create a unique, functional piece Jonas Trampedach - Tre is a series of furniture for any situation. of playful pieces of furniture (real domestic utensils) that can be installed anywhere, as handy occasional tables – either individually or as a group. Chair Sketch, designed by Burkhard Vogtherr and Jonathan Prestwich - The new Sketch chair is a slim, contemporary version of the classic bucket seat that will look good anywhere. The clear lines, pure shapes and understated style make for a refined look. Cabinet system Scene, designed by Dick Spierenburg - A light and open cabinet system that consists of horizontal frames and insert units that ‘divide, support and define character.‘ The insert units can be positioned as

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F02• Artifort Artifort Michiel van der Kley, Patrick Norguet, Pierre Paulin, René Holten and others Company 

Designers 

Salone Internazionale del Mobile, Pavilion 12 F26

Location 

www artifort.com

Artifort c/o Marloes Bomer, Postbus 115, 5480 AC Schijndel, The Netherlands

Contact 

e sanne@inekehans.com

About Ineke Hans and a small team work from Holland on 3D projects: furniture, design products, jewellery, and architectural projects that come as one-offs, in small series or as mass-produced items. Her work centres on pictograms and archetypes, and is clear and almost graphical. It has evolved in many ways, clearly acquiring the identity of a designer, with the impulses of a sculptor, and the industrial experience needed for commercial viability. The emphasis is on intelligent use of materials and techniques, innovation, and connecting human habits, functionality, poetry, and historical contexts. Among her clients are Royal VKB, Cappellini, Ahrend, and Lensvelt.

Presentations Presentation 1 OFFECCT - For this Swedish company Ineke Hans designed the sound panel GEO, which works like 3D wallpaper. The panels are made of recycled PET. Presentation 2 Unexpected Guests – Homes of Yesterday, design of Today The city of Milan has set up four exhibitions in the unique Milan Historic House Museums and invited international designers as guests. Presentation 3 Made in Arnhem An exhibition on designers, design platforms in Arnhem (NL), and graduates of Art Academy Artez e.g. Pieke Bergmans, Marcel Wanders, Dick van Hoff.

t +31 (0)736580020 e mbomer@artifort.com

About Artifort became a celebrated name during the sixties and seventies thanks to such designers as Kho Liang Ie, Pierre Paulin and Geoffrey Harcourt. Today Artifort is still a celebrated name due to its tradition of timeless design, a tradition that is honoured in an innovative way by the current design generation: René Holten, Michiel van der Kley, Khodi Feiz and Patrick Norguet, among others. Presentation During Milan 2010 we will introduce an inspiring new star in the Artifort firmament and we will celebrate our most beloved classics. Come check it out and be surprised!

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  Ulrika Darheden

www inekehans.com / www offecct.se

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F04•  Leolux Leolux Leolux Creative Design Team Jo Meesters Company 

Designers 

Salone Internazionale del Mobile di Milano, Hall 10, stand A07

Location 

www leolux.com

Leolux Meubelfabriek BV, PO Box 3076, 5902 RB, Venlo, The Netherlands

Contact 

Press  

Mr. Antal Németh

t +31 (0)773877297 e ane@leolux.nl

e  info@leolux.nl t  +31 (0)773877297

About Leolux is the largest Dutch manufacturer of contemporary furniture and forms the perfect combination of traditional craftsmanship and high-tech. The collection, created by an international group of freelance designers, is divided into three spheres, each with its own audience. All Leolux designs are made to order, thus enabling fans to create their personal Leolux creation. Presentation A bigger stand and strong new designs: Leolux is presenting itself for the 4th time at the “Salone Internazionale del Mobile” and doing it in style. Dutch designer/ artist Jo Meesters created objects that are larger than life for the Leolux stand. This year, the focus

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F05•  DRESSED & Mr.BIG Company  Designer 

WET Jan Puylaert

Salone Internazionale del Mobile, Pavilion 24, stand F18

Location 

www wet.co.it

Jan Puylaert Via Altipiano 11, 21010, Porto Valtravaglia, Italia

Contact 

t +39 3479603022 e wet@wet.co.it

About WET® makes (bathroom) products because we like that. Presentation What happens when a simple washbasin becomes higher? Not just a few centimetres, but up to 110 cm higher. The average washbasin height is 86 cm, whereas Mr.BIG is the height of a bar. This is not a question of ergonomics; it is a cultural change, similar to Japanese tables. Theirs are 20 cm high, whereas ours are 75 cm high. Try to imagine brushing your teeth in an upright position. It makes you feel different.

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will be on generously dimensioned furniture, made of leather with exclusive new qualities. In addition, Leolux will focus on a range of dining room tables and chairs that greatly vary in terms of both atmosphere and materials. Ethical distinction Leolux knows how to combine craftsmanship and high-tech. Authentic products created by experts, made to order for people with their own tastes. In our work, we believe in respect for one another, our suppliers and our customers, and also respect for the world around us. Leolux has chosen long-term values, with sustainability as a high priority, thus producing timeless products with a long life expectancy


www  tuttobenedesignshop.com

Tuttobene Design Shop selects products that not only contribute to a healthier environment, but also stimulate known and (as yet) lesserknown designers to develop new work. The products are directly purchased from the designers, avoiding expensive storage and shop space. This allows the designers to obtain a fair price of the sold items. A large variety of designs such as furniture, lamps, accessories, and jewellery make up the collec-

tion. The webshop contains many products that are exclusively sold through the Tuttobene Design Shop. Check out the site for an overview of all participating designers and their designs.

design

fashion

architecture

Items can be purchased using various credit cards and iDeal Initiative of Tuttobene Damrak 70, 1011 ET Amsterdam, The Netherlands info@tuttobenedesignshop.com

Design Shop

juNE 27 sEptEmbEr 5

Mind-Set ineke HAnS

Common sense, vernacular, colours, sustainability and decoration

G-Star MVRDV Dick Bruna Philips Joost Grootens Alexander van Slobbe Benthem Crouwel Architects

Jurgen Bey 2012Architects Willem van der Sluis Claudy Jongstra Ted Noten Carver Tichelaar

Dutch Profiles is a series of short documentaries about architects, graphic, product and fashion designers in the Netherlands. Dutch Profiles focuses on the conceptual and research-based background of well-known icons of Dutch design. Dutch Profiles has been commissioned as part of the Dutch Design Fashion Architecture programme, which aims to strengthen the international position of these sectors through a joined-up approach.

www.dutchprofiles.com museum of modern art arnhem • utrechtseweg 87 arnhem the netherlands • +31(0)26 377 53 00 • www.mmk arnhem.nl

Gerard Unger NL Architects Paul Mijksenaar Marlies Dekkers Vlisco Hella Jongerius more to come


ThinkTank The Floor is Yours

Designers of today, design of the future

ED T N E GY PAT NOLO H TEC

Designing is thinking ahead, and thinking ahead is a promise to the future. How do designers anticipate a new reality? How is today’s design method fit into the world of tomorrow? A design exhibition curated by Tuttobene for KunstFort Asperen. 9 designers give insight into their unique way of working, illustrated with interviews and their latest work.

Museum Fort Asperen Langendijk 60 4151 BR Acquoy The Netherlands Open Summer 2010 6 June - 30 September

Anke Bernotat Lotte van Laatum Christien Meindertsma Joana Meroz Nikola Nikolov Damian O’Sullivan Bo Reudler Celia Sluijter Arnout Visser

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DESSO AirMaster® The carpet that cleans the air Indoor air quality plays a major role in our health and well-being, since we spend on average more than 90% of our time indoors. Extensive evidence from the World Health Organization indicates that in most cities in developed countries around the world indoor air quality results in serious health risks, for a great deal caused by the presence of airborne fine dust. DESSO AirMaster®, with its patented* technology, has been specially developed to remove fine dust from the air more effectively than any other flooring solution. With DESSO AirMaster® you can rely on the proven solution that captures and retains harmful fine dust.

www.dnktnk.nl

www.desso.com


Bureau Deleau

Connecting the Dots - Milan 2010  

#1 April 2010 Milan, distributed during the Milan Design Week 2010