Annual Report 2016-17

Page 1

annual report

May 1, 2016–April 30, 2017


Preparing young people for responsible citizenship

in our global community since 1961. NATIONAL ADVISORY COUNCIL

Hugh and Linda Mullenbach

Eden Prairie, Minn.

David and Audrey Olsen

Greg Cash

Lake Elmo, Minn.

Sarah and Scott Bjelde

New Orleans, La.

Minnetonka, Minn.

Jon and Sophie Pederson

John Clemedtson

Spicer, Minn.

Moorhead, Minn.

Steven Pollei and Solveig Storvick Pollei

Georg and Reidun Gauger

Tacoma, Wash.

Mound, Minn.

John (Jack) Tunheim

Clinton Gilliland and Mary Turner Gilliland

Minneapolis, Minn.

Menlo Park, Calif.

Alfred Harrison and Ingrid Lenz Harrison

LEADERSHIP GROUP

Wayzata, Minn.

Mark Chen

Keith Johanneson

Group Director

Bemidji, Minn.

Martin Graefe

Ilya Katsnelson

Senior Group Director

Copenhagen, Denmark

David Manning

Ross King

Associate Director of Finance

Vancouver, B.C.

Melissa O. Rademacher

Kent Knutson

Associate Director of Annual Giving and Alumni Relations

Washington, D.C.

Christine Schulze

Margaret Cuomo Maier

Executive Director

Manhasset, N.Y.

Warren Schulze

Vivian Mason

Director of Operations

Minneapolis, Minn.

Jennifer Speir

Dan and Cynthia Mjolsness

Group Director

Barrington Hills, Ill.

Lisa Steffens Associate Director of Marketing and Online Services


greetings from

Concordia Language Villages The fiscal year 2017 annual report is a celebration of our past present and future.

In 1964, Dr. Gerhard Haukebo, the first director

Language Village and is influencing young lives

of Concordia Language Villages, had a vision for

around the world.

building culturally authentic Villages around a lake in

northern Minnesota. It was no small undertaking for Jerry to bring this vision to fruition. He enlisted the assistance of Dr. Charles Mayo to form a development advisory committee to scout out pieces of property across the northern tier of the state. They landed on Turtle River Lake near Bemidji, and it has been our home for the past 50 years.

Because of Jerry’s leadership and the generous

Finally, we look to a future of continued

enrollment growth as well as program enhancements. We are focused on maintaining and improving our Village sites on Turtle River Lake. Building the Language Villages was only the first step in creating an architecturally authentic community of language learners. It is our responsibility, as stewards of Jerry’s vision, to continually maintain and upgrade our buildings and sites as well as consider our needs for

support of our many donors, we have been able to

the future. This is only possible because of our Village

create a global community on the shores of Turtle

families and friends who support our mission through

River Lake that brings together people, languages

their tuition dollars and donations. Thank you for your

and cultures from across the country and around

commitment to Concordia Language Villages.

the world. One of those donors, the Max Kade Foundation, has been a loyal supporter of the German Language Village since 1984. We are pleased to celebrate their contributions and recognize the role that they have played in creating an “übercool experience” at Waldsee.

Sincerely yours,

In 2016, we celebrated an enrollment of over

4,400 villagers in our summer youth immersion programs. This is due in no small part to our outstanding staff from 36 countries. One of our many indispensable staff members, Hyeonjeong Park, is

Christine Schulze

highlighted on our staff profile page. Hyeonjeong

Executive Director

discovered her love of teaching at the Korean

Concordia Language Villages


The 50th anniversary of the acquisition of the Turtle River Lake site was celebrated with a community luncheon.

program highlights

Fourteen staff members celebrated 20 years or more of service to Concordia Language Villages.

Summer youth enrollment was over 4,400 villagers.


Concordia Language Villages was a premier sponsor of the Lead with Languages campaign, a multi-year campaign powered by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages. The campaign is aimed at reversing the nation’s language skills gap and making language learning a national priority.

Lesnoe Ozero, the Russian Language Village, dedicated the new banya or Russian bathhouse.

The 20th anniversary of the Peace Site was recognized during International Day. Concordia Language Villages is one of 980 Peace Sites designated by World Citizen Inc., a Minneapolis-based organization.

.

Concordia Language Villages was designated a Language Training Center for the Department of Defense. The first-year results were exceptionally strong in six different one- and two-week language trainings including Arabic, Chinese, French, Korean, Portuguese and Russian.


enrollment

Top Five Languages

400

853

266

3,409

200

Spanish

Finnish

0 Arabic

Japanese

17 English

1,188

66

33 Danish

286

150

49 Swedish

73

127

116

Russian

125

Portuguese

4,431 Total

Norwegian

399

Korean

Chinese

AND FAMILIES

(Summer Youth and Families)

French 683

4,431

Other Languages

(Summer Youth and Families) German

SUMMER YOUTH

Italian

2016–2017

U.S. Geographic Distribution (50 States Represented)

Top Ten States 1. MINNESOTA

6. NEW YORK

2. ILLINOIS

7. TEX AS

3. WISCONSIN

8. COLOR ADO

4. C ALIFORNIA

9. NORTH DAKOTA

5. VIRGINIA

10. FLORIDA

.

Percentage of Total Distribution 71%

16%

8% 4%

.


ACADEMIC YEAR

10,718

6,287

AND OTHER SUMMER PROGRAMS

Total 2016–2017 Enrollment

Top Five Languages

Other Languages

(Academic Year and Others)

(Academic Year and Others)

German 764

5,963

200

Spanish

107

1,272

39

French

27

29 Italian

Finnish

Arabic

0

5

21

14

*Multi refers specifically to Educator sessions for K–16 teachers who represent a number of languages, including most of the languages offered by Concordia Language Villages and additional critical-need languages of the U.S. government.

24

Academic Year (and other summer programs) Enrollment Totals Concordia Language Villages has become a leader in providing a variety of programming for adults, families, school groups, educators and the youngest of language learners.

2,983

821

342

1,006

1,091

44

Village Weekends

Adults

Families

Pre-K and After School

Twin Cities Day Camps**

Educators

**Twin Cities Day Camps take place during the summer.

58

Swedish

3,529

Russian

6,287 Total

Portuguese

208

*Multi

190

English

Norwegian

400

Korean

Chinese



2016–2017

financials

GIFT INCOME

OPERATING FUND*

Business Support $57,060 Foundation Support $441,247 Organizational Support $5,979 Foreign Entities $223,632 State of Minnesota/Federal $175,999 Individuals $641,993

Tuition and Fees $9,575,248 Charter School $419,453 Retail $269,921 Transportation $507,877 Gifts, Grants, and Endowment $52,906

TOTAL $1,545,910

TOTAL $10,825,405

Source of Gifts

Revenue

Expenses Allocation of Gifts Current Operations/Village Vision (Village Restricted Other) $384,444 Leadership Funds (Village Unrestricted) $46,582 Endowment Funds (Village Endowment) $206,305 Plant Funds (Village Capital) $341,303 Scholarship (Village Restricted Budget Relvg) $567,277 TOTAL $1,545,910

*This schedule is not part of the Audited Financial Statements of Concordia College, and is presented for management purposes only.

Salaries $4,744,041 Fringe $1,061,787 Services $2,652,741 Supplies $537,803 Cost of Sales $893,947 Equipment $66,338 Utilities $373,086 Maintenance $95,662 TOTAL $10,425,405 Balance of Revenue Over Expenses $400,000

DISPOSITION OF NET REVENUE Unallocated Revenue (to College) for Capital Debt/Maintenance Unallocated College Services

N/A $400,000


2016–2017

staff profile

T

he staff who work in Language Villages programs are drawn to the mission of the Villages and the opportunity to share their language and cultural expertise villagers of all ages. Staff typically participate in a week-long orientation where they develop the skills and techniques critical to helping villagers learn in a safe, fun environment.

6

North America

Canada 6 Costa Rica

756

1

Guatemala 1 Honduras 1 Jamaica 1 Mexico 8 United States

756

8

South America

1

1

1

Argentina 15 Brazil 5 Chile

1

Colombia 2 Venezuela 1

1

1 2

Africa

Cameroon 2

Europe

Austria 1 Czech Republic

5

Egypt 2

1

Denmark 1 Finland 6

Nigeria 1 Senegal 7

Asia

China 27

France 4

Japan 7

Germany 7

Russia 9

Ireland 2

Singapore 1

Italy 5

Republic of Korea

Norway 7

Taiwan 1

Spain 12

Tajikistan 1

Sweden 7

Turkmenistan 1

11

1

15


921 Total Staff

165 International Staff 36 Countries

5 Continents

6

7

7

9

1 2

7

1

4

1

5

12

1

1

11

7

27

2

1

7 1 2

1

International Staff Spotlight

Hyeonjeong has been an indispensable part of Sup sogŭi Hosu since 2003! Working at Concordia Language Villages quite literally changed her life: after discovering a love of teaching at Sup sogŭi Hosu, Hyeonjeong changed her college major from marketing to Korean language education. She’s been teaching ever since, most recently at Kyung Hee University in Yongin, Korea. Within the village, Hyeonjeong has done everything: teaching drumming, developing curricula, acting in the daily drama, and running the Village’s immensely popular high school credit program. She continues to make the long trek from Korea to Minnesota every summer, now with her son along for the adventure! Without her enthusiasm, expertise, and unfailing professionalism, Sup sogŭi Hosu just wouldn’t be the same.


celebrating 50 years Celebrating a 50-Year Partnership with Bemidji, 1966–2016 The 800-acre tract of heavily wooded land, which was once owned and logged by George W. Neilson, was at that time owned by Ira and Shirley Batchelder of Bemidji Woolen Mills. The land, which included nearly three miles of shoreline, was purchased in 1966 thanks in large part to the fundraising efforts of the people in the Bemidji community and the support of Concordia College. Today, seven Villages have been built around Turtle River Lake: Norwegian (1970), German (1982), French (1989), Finnish (1992), Spanish (1999), Russian (2006), and Swedish (2008). In 1964, three years after the first Concordia Language Village program was held, founder Dr. Gerhard Haukebo had an idea. Why not find a suitable site for several language camps that would run simultaneously? This would provide greater opportunities for inter-cultural learning and facilities that reflected the culture of the languages that were being taught. In his memoir, “A Brainstorm! The Creation of Concordia Language Villages … from a small but imaginative beginning” (1994), Dr. Haukebo writes, “It was a simple notion, an obvious projection, but it hit me like a thunderbolt.” An advisory group led by Dr. Charles H. Mayo II was put together to evaluate different site options. Dr. Haukebo and Dr. Mayo visited 27 sites in 14 communities and chose five places that they felt were suitable for a permanent site. The advisory group visited each of the five locations and unanimously chose the Turtle River Lake site near Bemidji, Minn.

For over 50 years, Concordia Language Villages has enjoyed a solid partnership with the community of Bemidji. Concordia Language Villages has an estimated annual economic impact on the Bemidji area of $6.34 million. Bemidji Mayor Rita C. Albrecht pointed out the importance of Concordia Language Villages to the Bemidji area economy. “One of the biggest and perhaps little-known drivers of economic development in the Bemidji area is Concordia Language Villages. The Villages attracts campers, families and visitors from across the nation and world who add energy and value to our community in a number of ways.” David Hengel, Executive Director of Greater Bemidji, agrees. “Concordia Language Villages has not only attracted visitors to the region, but also brings with it social and cultural amenities that are unique to our region. It is a driver for our region’s continual growth and development by helping make our community a great place to live, learn, work, and do business.”




foundation spotlight MAX KADE FOUNDATION

Since 1984, Concordia Language Villages’ German programs have enjoyed the generous support of the Max Kade Foundation in New York. The Max Kade Foundation promotes the advancement of knowledge and cultural relations between the United States and the German-speaking countries of central Europe, and have partnered with Waldsee, the German Language Village, in pursuit of that goal. The Foundation was established by Max Kade, a German-born immigrant to the United States who helped to found the pharmaceutical company Seeck and Kade, Inc., manufacturer of the cough medicine Pertussin. The Foundation was created in 1944 to help Germany recover from the effects of World War II and improve its relations with the United States, “to sow the seeds of friendship where there had been enmity.” Thanks to their support, the seeds of friendship continue to sprout and bloom at Waldsee. In 1984, the Max Kade Foundation provided its first grant to Concordia Language Villages. The grant provided money to construct one of Waldsee’s main villager residences which includes four individual cabins under one roof. The building was named the Max Kade Haus in honor of this significant gift. In 2001, the Foundation supported construction of another residential facility, the Erich Markel Haus (named for the Foundation’s second president). In the last 20 years, the Max Kade Foundation has provided nearly 100 need-based scholarships to Waldsee villagers, allowing them to attend a fourweek high school credit session at Waldsee or a credit abroad session in Germany. The Max Kade Foundation is committed to fostering German language proficiency in high school students, with the hope that they will

continue German language studies in college. The Max Kade Foundation has invested in German language programs in 34 colleges and universities in the United States, including Concordia College. The Foundation’s current president is Dr. Lya Friedrich Pfeifer. Dr. Pfeifer commented, “The Max Kade Foundation’s commitment to language immersion and cultural integration are two primary objectives of our mission. This is not so different than the immersion program at Waldsee, the German language program at Concordia Language Villages. How great it is that young people are able to participate in a fun adventure and learn the German language and culture at the same time? Definitely an übercool experience!” Arza Alfred Marsh, a former Max Kade Foundation scholarship recipient from Utah, agrees. “The friendships I made and lessons I learned at Waldsee helped to prepare me for college life incredibly well,” said Alfred, who lived in the Max Kade Haus during his high school credit session in 2016. “Due to being able to attend Waldsee, I was able to pass the International Baccalaureate Higher Level German test and have German credit at my college. I thank Concordia College, the Max Kade Foundation, and everyone involved in my Waldsee experience for helping so much to prepare me for life.”


In 1960, Gerhard Haukebo, a Concordia College faculty member, suggested the College initiate an experimental program using immersion techniques to teach language. The intent of the program was to teach young people about other languages and cultures, while giving Concordia students the opportunity to gain practical teaching experience.

Concordia College sponsored the project in the summer of 1961. The College rented Luther Crest Camp, north of Alexandria, Minn., for the first two-week German session. “Camp Waldsee,” which was limited to 72 campers aged 9–12, was a resounding success. Interest in the program increased steadily and more “Villages” were added. The seven architecturally authentic sites on Turtle River Lake (near Bemidji, Minn.) support year-round programming for thousands of youth, adults and teachers every year.

901 8th St S Moorhead, Minn. 56562 (800) 222–4750; clv@cord.edu

� 2018 Concordia Language Villages, Moorhead, Minnesota, 2865/600/0118