Daily Lobo 12/6/2021

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Monday, D ecember 6, 2021 | Vo l u m e 1 2 6 | I s s u e 1 7 MENTAL HEALTH MATTERS

Custodial union protests against poverty wages, union-busting

Solutions to students’ mental health crises By Megan Gleason @fabflutist2716

Hevyn Heckes / Daily Lobo / @DailyLobo

Members of the custodial union and others in solidarity gather ahead of the annual Hanging of the Greens celebration on Dec. 3 to demand a living wage for UNM’s custodial staff.

By Madeline Pukite @madelinepukite On Friday, Dec. 3, custodial workers at the University of New Mexico protested for the University to pay them a living wage. A coalition of other unions in the state were present in solidarity, including the graduate student workers’ union, who showed up to also protest the University’s recent union-busting attempts. The protest was held hours before the Hanging of the Greens, an annual tradition at UNM in which the community celebrates the holiday season with a variety of festive activities. According to a Dec. 3 press release from the custodians’ union, Communication Workers of America Local 7076, they specifically chose this time to hold their protest to contrast the festivities with the dire treatment of custodial workers. “Despite having, in some cases, decades of service to the University,

most custodial staff still earn just minimum wage,” read the press release. In the past year and half, UNM’s custodial workers have been trying to bargain for higher wages, according to union organizer Milagro Padilla. The custodial union recently confirmed UNM’s compliance with the state minimum wage raise to $11.50 in January. The Union has proposed a $15 per hour minimum wage for custodial workers for the past three years in bargaining sessions, which the University has rejected twice, most recently in November 2021. “I feel like we haven't spoken up enough in the past. We're doing what we're supposed to do now. Now is the time to talk and I think that now is the time for them to listen,” UNM custodial worker Sandra Hernandez said, translated from Spanish by Padilla. The United Graduate Workers of UNM were present in solidarity for the custodial workers, also protesting the recent step the University took to appeal the New Mexico Public Employee Labor Relations Board ruling

that granted graduate workers the right to unionize. The Dec. 3 press release said this not only delays the bargaining process for the Union but continues to cost the University thousands of dollars in lawyer fees. “I'm very interested in making sure that we show that it's not just about graduate workers, ending our poverty wages, but making sure that no one on campus who works or lives here has poverty wages either,” Peter Wood, a steward for the graduate workers union, said. Other union representatives also attended in solidarity, such as from the Committee of Interns and Residents, Academics United and more. “Even if you do not see us standing here right now, I want you to know that we are here in spirit. We add our voices to yours calling for fair wages and safe working conditions at UNMH,” Susan Valentina read from a statement on behalf of the Committee of Interns and Residents. Sentiments of unity and solidarity for individuals throughout the

University were emphasized during the event. “Our unity creates our strength, and we're going to keep fighting,” Hernandez said. “When I got here they told us that there wasn't a union. Look around: there is a union of people. Together, we're capable of everything.“ Madeline Pukite is a beat reporter at the Daily Lobo. They can be contacted at news@dailylobo.com or on Twitter @madelinepukite

The COVID-19 outbreak was declared a pandemic approximately one year and nine months ago — almost half the time it takes to complete a typical bachelor’s degree and nearly the entire average to complete a typical master’s degree. While some students have experienced college knowing nothing but the pandemic and others look back on a time when things weren’t so chaotic, all feel the same weight on their shoulders as they attempt to finish a degree while the national death toll creeps over 5.26 million. “I have found that there really aren’t many young adults in college who don’t struggle at least in some realm with mental health,” Quinlyn McBrayer, a postgraduate student studying nutrition, said. “I think that

see

Mental Health page 2

Hanging of the Greens lights up holiday season (see page 2)

ABQ finds widespread heat discrepancies between communities By Rebecca Hobart @rjhobart The city of Albuquerque released its heat map findings from its heat watch report in late November, compiled by Climate Adaptation Planning Analytics Strategies, a contractor of the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration. The study looked at heat impacts on human health

through temperature and humidity data points collected on July 9, 2021. Kelsey Rader, the city of Albuquerque's sustainability officer, said this report was an opportunity to evaluate how existing infrastructure was supporting active and public transportation users. The study produced results showing a temperature difference of nearly 17 F from the hottest to coolest parts of the city. Rader

said this is a call to action to manage this discrepancy through tree plantings, which has a dedicated budget with the city. The defined study area sought to illustrate current conditions during the hottest month of the year — July — to inform future decisions on tree planting and other urban heat reduction strategies. Rader said this data and

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Heat page 3

Shelby Kleinhans / Daily Lobo / @realShelbyK

Luminarias and trees decked out in lights decorate the lawn to President Garnett Stokes’ house on campus as part of the Hanging of the Greens on Dec. 3.


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PAGE 2 / MONDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2021

Mental Health

from page

there is definitely a pressure put on young people to not only be in college but also to succeed right off the bat in college.” COVID-19 rates in New Mexico have recently been spiking, rising to a rate that the state hasn’t seen since the peak of the pandemic in late 2020. The unknowns of the pandemic have created stressors for many students, but Stephanie McIver, counseling director of Student Health and Counseling, said “part of our stress is the insistence that we go back to normal, and that is likely not going to happen, certainly not anytime soon.” “If we accept what public health officials are telling us that we are, in fact, in a COVID-era and that variations of the COVID virus may continue to emerge, that’s actually not an unknown. We now know what that’s like and we now know what’s required of us to be safe and so rather than think-

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1 ing of this future as the unknown, we could actually accept that we now know,” McIver said. Emma Mincks, a fifth-year Ph.D. student in the English department, said her mental health as a graduate student has suffered heavily because UNM doesn’t prioritize her education. Rather, because she teaches low division courses, she said UNM uses her as an “exploited teacher” rather than allowing her to focus on being a student. “I’m not really able to do the things I’m supposed to be doing as a student. It’s kind of like a running joke in our department that we’re the English department but nobody has the time to read a full book,” Mincks said. Although UNM has resources like the Lobo Food Pantry, Mincks knows many graduate students who can’t buy groceries consistently; she has even experienced

that herself. Last April, over a third of UNM students reported facing food insecurity. In order to make a liveable wage, Mincks has to pick up freelance jobs in addition to her studies and teaching. On top of all of this, Mincks said the pandemic has created a sense of social exhaustion that, combined with dealing with the responsibility of teaching, is difficult to cope with. “You have this social exhaustion from COVID but you also have the stress of feeling responsible for if a student goes to their second year of college or not,” Mincks said. McBrayer said the extreme politicization of the pandemic has hurt her mental health, especially as someone who has a chronic illness and wants others to get vaccinated. The practice of mindfulness, though overlooked by some, makes a substantial difference in individuals’ lives, according to McIver.

The American Psychological Association reported that mindfulness has been shown to decrease stress and rumination. To handle all of her stressors, Mincks goes to counseling, which she said has always been helpful for her. In addition, both Mincks and McBrayer said having their own communities is very helpful. For McBrayer, this is UNM Peers for Advocacy, Wellness and Safety, while Mincks found her community in the United Graduate Workers of UNM. “Really, honestly, what’s gotten me through so far is the Union effort and the people I’ve met through organizing in the Union … I’ve met a lot of really cool people. Also just realizing that I’m not alone (is helpful). I’m not the only person struggling. It’s not just personal; it’s structural,” Mincks said. Having a space for privacy and quiet is extremely important to

maintain good mental health, according to McIver. She also said making time to get enough sleep allows humans to “reset and recharge.” “One of the big issues that’s increasing stress and anxiety is that we are constantly exposed to information and input. And we’re actually kind of resistant to discontinuing attachment to that,” McIver said. McIver encouraged students to use the resources available at UNM, and reach out to someone, whether it’s a teacher, SHAC worker or someone else, if they don’t know where to go.

By Shelby Kleinhans

thousands of luminarias across campus, saw hundreds of students and community members come to campus for the evening’s activities. Food and drink were in abundance as attendees had multiple places to pick up delicious biscochitos and hot chocolate as they strolled around campus. As they wandered, they were treated to the sweet sounds of groups like Something Major A Capella performing holiday tunes. Lobo Louie and Lobo Lucy were also in attendance, dressed in festive attire to help spread holiday cheer to the crowds. The titular activity took place at President Garnett Stokes’ house

on campus. UNM alumnus and 2020 Homecoming King Ansely Emeanuwa presented Stokes with a handmade wreath, which was then hung above the entrance to the house. The festivities concluded with a free screening of Frank Capra’s 1946 classic “It’s a Wonderful Life” at the Southwest Film Center in the Student Union Building theater.

PHOTO STORY

Hanging of the Greens lights up holiday season

@BirdsNotReal99 The University of New Mexico’s oldest annual tradition, the Hanging of the Greens, made a triumphant return to campus on the evening of Friday, Dec. 3 after going virtual last year due to the pandemic. This year, nothing could stand in the way of thousands of luminarias illuminating campus as the sun went down. The event, organized by the Mortar Board Senior Honor Society in association with several campuswide professional and student organizations who helped set up

Megan Gleason is the Editor-inChief of the Daily Lobo. She can be contacted at editorinchief@dailylobo. com or on Twitter @fabflutist2716

Shelby Kleinhans is the multimedia editor at the Daily Lobo. She can be contacted at multimedia@dailylobo.com or on Twitter @BirdsNotReal99

Shelby Kleinhans / Daily Lobo / @realShelbyK

Shelby Kleinhans / Daily Lobo / @realShelbyK

Shelby Kleinhans / Daily Lobo / @realShelbyK

UNM President Garnett Stokes (left) and UNM alumnus Ansely Emeanuwa (right) help Santa Claus hang the wreath at the front of President Garnett Stokes’ house at Hanging of the Greens on Friday, Dec. 3.

UNM alumnus Ansely Emeanuwa holds up the wreath that he made to present to UNM President Garnett Stokes.

Hanging of the Greens attendees walk past luminarias that line a tree planter and the top of the Student Union Building.

Follow us on Twitter! @DailyLobo Megan Gleason Editor-in-Chief @fabflutist2716

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NEW MEXICO DAILY LOBO

Heat

from page

MONDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2021 / PAGE 3

1

knowing possible solutions exist could serve as a call to action and bolster Mayor Tim Keller’s goal of planting 100,000 trees in the next 10 years. “It’s important to understand that we are not experiencing isolated incidents of heat. We’re locked into a trajectory where we are going to be experiencing longer summers, higher heat waves,” Rader said. “This is already a dangerous problem that is going to continue to accelerate over time.” Claudia Isaac, distinguished professor of community and regional planning at the University of New Mexico, said the report illustrates areas as characteristically hot, like the corridors around the Interstate Highways 40 and 25. This is also seen in some low-income neighborhoods near there, such as the International District, which is notably treescarce. She said these areas tend not to be “as well-resourced.” “Poor areas tend to be un-treed, partly because people are working two to three part-time, variable hour jobs and … don't have time to

go to their city council or call the sustainability office and say, ‘We want trees,’” Isaac said. Rader said the defined study area intentionally focused on parts of the city with active transportation routes. “With our public transit users, we know those are predominantly low-income folks,” Rader said. “Active transit users, of course, are also going to be more at risk of suffering from heat stroke or other heat-related, health-related impacts.” Populations dependent on public transit are often in high traffic, urban communities, such as those along Central Avenue, and often lack sufficient green infrastructure, according to Isaac. She said high traffic roads in areas, such as the West side, show greater temperatures in the city’s report. “Finding funding for increased public transit, which is critical in poverty-reduction because that’s how people get to work, also reduces car use,” Isaac said. In the morning from 6-7 a.m., Rader said the temperatures were as high as 79 F in down-

town Albuquerque and the intersection between I-40 and I-25. She said the lowest temperatures in that morning hour were around 62 F around the Sandia foothills. Rader said 90-103 F is the common heat range for Albuquerque during the summer, which is classified by NOAA as an “extreme caution type of heat.” Consequential effects from prolonged exposure to extreme heat conditions could be heat stroke, exhaustion and cramps, according to Rader. The afternoon temperatures, measured from 3-4 p.m., also produced temperature discrepancies between the coolest and hottest parts of the city, according to Rader, with values of 94 F and 105 F. She said these areas may be lacking in adequate tree canopy and shade structures. “This data is really useful in seeing how the (existing) infrastructure affects heat absorption,” Isaac said. “Paved roads, especially paved roads with a lot of traffic on them, absorb and then

radiate heat. It’s not surprising that downtown and parts of the west side, particularly during the afternoon rush hour, are hotter.” Rader said asphalt is the predominant concern with addressing morning temperatures, since shading infrastructure wouldn’t help with the indirect sunlight. Asphalt produces higher temperatures due to absorption of heat and its continued release of that energy through the night. Rader said the city plans to continue implementing solar shade structures in city facilities to offset heat in areas with large amounts of asphalt. “That really highlights to us that there are solutions here,” Rader said. “If there are parts of the city that are experiencing these lower temperatures, of almost a 17 F difference, that means that tree cover, tree canopy, shade structures can make a huge difference in addressing some of the areas of our city that are experiencing some of the highest levels of heat.” Rader said the “Let’s Plant Al-

buquerque” initiative has developed a “climate ready tree list” for Albuquerque. She said the initiative anticipates climate variability from year to year and will inform the city on what types of trees would perform best to address the city's goal to mitigate temperature discrepancies. “They’ve selected trees that are going to be non-water-intensive, prepared for some of the anticipated impacts of climate change in Albuquerque, such as rising temperatures and less available surface water,” Rader said. “It’s a fine balance — finding appropriate trees to plant in this region that are going to survive knowing that we’re going to have variability in our surface water resources for years to come and, of course, overall rising temperatures.” Rebecca Hobart is a senior reporter at the Daily Lobo. She can be contacted at news@dailylobo. com or on Twitter @rjhobart

Twinkle Light Parade returns, brightens Nob Hill By Natalie Jude @natalaroni Friends, families and loved ones clamored to the sidewalks of Nob Hill to watch the over 100 holidayrelated floats light up the streets of Albuquerque for the Twinkle Light Parade on Saturday, Dec. 4. Crowds were delighted to see the parade come back in-person after it was held virtually last year due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The city said that “the parade is comprised of local businesses, organizations, school groups and families, all competing for Best in Show.” This included groups like the University of New Mexico Reserve Officers’ Training Corps, Albuquerque Police Department and more. The Sandia Preparatory School marching band and color guard kicked off the event by marching at the front of the parade line. Cassie Cadwell, band booster president, said she was honored to help organize and get the students ready for the event. "It's just great to be able to get out and do another thing ... The kids weren't in it to win it; they were just so happy to be able to join the com-

Courtesy Photo

A Volkswagen bus adorned in bright holiday lights drives down Central Avenue during the Twinkle Light Parade in 2017. Photo courtesy of the city of Albuquerque.

munity and perform,” Cadwell said. “I'm so proud of them and glad that they had this opportunity." Dean Allen, a cadet of UNM’s ROTC program, marched alongside other classmates, handing out holiday necklaces ahead of a truck

decorated by strings of lights. This was his first time attending the parade as well as being a participant. “There was a lot of good energy there and people were very supportive of us as well as the rest of the parade,” Allen said.

Local cashier Walin Hasan, who was working at a store in close proximity to the parade, said the shop he works at had an increase in business due to the parade activity, as did other businesses in the area. He appreciated the return of live,

in-person performers, especially after last year’s event was held on Zoom. “It’s important, especially during a pandemic, for people to get out,” Hasan said. “(We) can’t stay cooped up forever.” Although the event was held outside and masks weren’t required, many individuals and groups asked others to put on their masks in the heavy crowd of people. This large crowd brought other issues up as well, such as the complicated walking route for participants. Allen said it didn’t fit the spatial needs of the large audience and presentation list, creating “some slowdowns at the beginning” and “a lot of stopping and starting, traffic and blockage.” Other attendees also complained about how crowded it was in the audience on the sidewalks, making it hard to get around. Overall, though, Hasan thought the event was a hit and anticipates more successes to come with the next batch of local holiday events this December. Natalie Jude is a beat reporter at the Daily Lobo. She can be contacted at culture@dailylobo.com or on Twitter @natalaroni

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LOBO OPINION

The Independent Student Voice of UNM since 1895

Monday, December 6, 2021

Opinion Editor / opinion@dailylobo.com

QUESTION:

4

What were your No. 1 Spotify songs this year?

ANSWER:

To the dismay of Apple Music users, the highly anticipated Spotify Wrapped is finally here with a data collection packaged in fun colors and quirky attempts at humor. To commemorate this annual event, the Daily Lobo editors decided to give readers a peek behind the curtain at their top songs. Shelby’s No. 1 Song: “Future Days” by Pearl Jam Pearl Jam’s “Future Days” had an immediate impact on my psyche. Their hit became an earworm last year when I first played my nowfavorite video game, “The Last of Us Part II,” and was touched by how it was integrally woven into the game’s narrative. Fast forward one year later and I still can’t get the song out of my head. The opening lyrics of “If I ever were to lose you / I’d surely lose myself” hold true more than ever nowadays, especially in a time when we’re forced to live face to face with mortality every day. Emma’s No. 1 Song: “Breathless” by Caroline Polachek Caroline Polachek’s “Breathless” is a new take on the eponymous 2000 hit by the Corrs. Polachek first performed the song

on the Late Late Show with James Corden, and from then on I was hooked. The original by the Corrs is a classic, early aughts pop smash, but Polachek’s version adds bass and modulated vocals very much reminiscent of Imogen Heap’s signature sound. Polachek’s style is theatrical and over the top in every sense, and it’s anything but boring. If you’re looking for a new favorite dance tune, I’d highly recommend checking out this absolute banger. Zara’s No. 1 Song: “Rack of His” by Fiona Apple Fiona Apple absolutely does not need my seal of approval. Her critically acclaimed discography, full of infectious tunes and lush lyricism, speaks for itself. Still, I go on record to say Apple is an unparalleled artist who is very near and dear to my heart. Truthfully, “Rack of His” is not my favorite song off this absolute beast of an album (that honor goes to “Ladies”). Still, this confessional masterpiece is clever, honest and raw, and speaks to an unreciprocated yearning ready to boil over. It’s simultaneously brutal and playful, and joyous and tragic. It’s every feeling all at once, wrapped neatly in sparse but effective instrumentals.

John’s No. 1 Song: “Veridis Quo” by Daft Punk To say that Daft Punk’s 2001 album “Discovery” is a masterpiece would be an understatement. Following the news of the duo’s breaking up earlier this year, I found myself revisiting this groundbreaking long play and, more often than not, the song “Verdis Quo.” From the first time you hear that infectiously dreamy synth lead until the song’s eventual fade-out, you are immediately put into a trance. The song is perfect for driving down Central Avenue late at night with your windows down, letting the drum machine and neon lights slowly flow over you. Just don’t be upset when you mistime the entrance of the drums near the beginning. Joseph’s No. 1 Song: “Immaterial” by SOPHIE Pop music has become my guilty pleasure in 2021, noted in my overindulgence of SOPHIE’s “Immaterial” 112 times this year. The power behind artists like the late SOPHIE, who produce genre-bending and boundary pushing music is immense, and is something I’ve come to deeply appreciate during the pandemic. The distorted and twisted intensity of the song is addictive. SOPHIE’s stretched and pitched vocals repeat “I could be anything I want / Any-

how, anywhere, any place, anyone that I want.” SOPHIE’s maximalist and synthesized aesthetic are at their peak in this hyper-pop dance track. It’s a perfect pop-bending anthem that does not disappoint. Dare I call it a religious experience? Liam’s No. 1 Song: “The Bad Party” by WYS It’s 2021, and life is still as stressful as ever. When your go-to hype song no longer suffices in stressful times, adrenaline is depleted and the only thing you want is a cup of calming chamomile tea to relax with, what then? “The Bad Party” by WYS is a perfect laid-back lofi track to melt away the tension built up from finals and school projects. It’s ethereal melody pairs effortlessly with a slow, simple drum track behind it. While some opponents of the lofi genre dismiss it as homogenous and others parallel its worth to that of a white-noise machine, WYS challenges these assumptions with their music. Their music is by far the most emotive of the genre, each track with its own unique flair. Nobody should wrap up the year in silence. Instead, celebrate the end of another semester with our favorite tracks from 2021. Maybe our list will even bring you your top song of 2022.

By Victor Martinez / Daily Lobo / @sirbluescreen

Volume 126 Issue 17 The New Mexico Daily Lobo is an independent student newspaper published on Monday except school holidays during the fall and spring semesters. Subscription rate is $75 per academic year. E-mail accounting@dailylobo.com for more information on subscriptions. The New Mexico Daily Lobo is published by the Board of UNM Student Publications. The editorial opinions expressed in the New Mexico Daily Lobo are those of the respective writers and do not necessarily reflect the views of the students, faculty, staff and regents of the University of New Mexico. Inquiries concerning editorial content should be made to the editor-in-chief. All content appearing in the New Mexico Daily Lobo and the Web site dailylobo.com may not be reproduced without the consent of the editor-in-chief. A single copy of the New Mexico Daily Lobo is free from newsstands. Unauthorized removal of multiple copies is considered theft and may be prosecuted. Letter submission policy: The opinions expressed are those of the authors alone. Letters and guest columns must be concisely written, signed by the author and include address and telephone. No names will be withheld.

Shelby Kleinhans is the multimedia editor at the Daily Lobo. She can be contacted at multimedia@dailylobo.com or on Twitter @BirdsNotReal99 Emma Trevino is the culture editor at the Daily Lobo. She can be contacted at culture@dailylobo.com or on Twitter @itsemmatr Zara Roy is the news editor at the Daily Lobo. She can be contacted at news@dailylobo.com or on Twitter @zarazzledazzle John Scott is the photo editor at the Daily Lobo. He can be contacted at photoeditor@dailylobo.com or on Twitter @JScott050901 Joseph McKee is the design director at the Daily Lobo. They can be contacted at designdirector@dailylobo. com or on Twitter @j_mckee_ Liam DeBonis is the copy chief at the Daily Lobo. He can be contacted at copychief@dailylobo.com or on Twitter @LiamDebonis Have a question? We want to answer it! Questions for the editors can be submitted to the Editor-inChief at editorinchief@dailylobo. com. Title any submissions “ASK THE EDITORS”

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UNM Land Acknowledgement statement Founded in 1889, the University of New Mexico sits on the traditional homelands of the Pueblo of Sandia. The original peoples of New Mexico – Pueblo, Navajo, and Apache – since time immemorial, have deep connections to the land and have made significant contributions to the broader community statewide. We honor the land itself and those who remain stewards of this land throughout the generations and also acknowledge our committed relationship to Indigenous peoples. We gratefully recognize our history. This statement was developed by Pam Agoyo, director of American Indian Student Services and special assistant to the president on American Indian Affairs, in consultation with the Native American Faculty Council.


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MONDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2021 / PAGE 5

Lobos women basketball too good to lose to NMSU By Matthew Salcido @baggeyedguy The University of New Mexico women’s basketball team defeated New Mexico State University 77-58 at The Pit on Friday, Dec. 3, and won again 73-66 against NMSU in Las Cruces on Sunday, Dec. 5. The Dec. 3 win keeps the Lobos’ home streak alive and both wins now make their record 8-3. In the first game, NMSU let a good opportunity for a win slip away against an at times desultory UNM team that was coming off of a twoweek stretch that saw them play five games. The Lobos showed signs of fatigue throughout the game, ultimately ending with 21 turnovers, their most at home this season. UNM’s saving grace was once again

their three-point shooting (54.17%). UNM was carried in the first half by LaTora Duff and LaTascya Duff, who scored 17 and 11 points, respectively. Freshman forward Paula Reus also played well and finished the half by scoring the Lobos’ last seven points. LaTora Duff had a particularly dazzling first half, shooting 6-10 from the field and 5-7 from three, which made it all the more concerning when she went down with 2:47 left in the half and had to be helped off the court. Without LaTora Duff, UNM struggled to find their offense at the start of the second half, failing to score for the first four minutes and 32 seconds. During that period, the Lobos committed five turnovers, some simply by mishandling the ball. It took an aggressive Jaedyn De

La Cerda to right the teetering ship; she scored 15 second-half points. LaTascya Duff added another 11 points in the second half as well. After the game, LaTascya Duff said the main aspects she would be looking at in the film session were defending against penetration and shot selection. In the Dec. 5 match, the gametime decision as to if LaTora Duff would play after her injury in the last game was clear when she did start. Still, UNM struggled in the first half largely due to poor offensive struggles by De La Cerda. The team shot 1-7 from three in the first quarter and recorded 12 turnovers in the first half alone. Antonia Anderson was much more aggressive than usual and ended up scoring the third-most

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Lobo guard LaTora Duff (#5) coming down the court against Northern New Mexico at The Pit on Nov. 12.

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points on the team with 16. Reus played really well, scoring six points and providing much-needed interior defense. LaTora Duff led the team in points at 24 despite her recent injury, with Shaiquel McGruder not too far behind at 17. The team was behind in every quarter but the last, when they managed to turn it around 28-10 against NMSU, snagging the winning score in the end. The team will travel to Arizona for their toughest opponent of the season, the University of Arizona Wildcats, for their next game on Dec. 12.

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(Green Chile, Tomato, Pickle, Onion, Lettuce, Salad Dressing & Cheddar Cheese)

with a regular For only

OPEN 5am - 11 pm Every Day 2400 Central SE

ry Day 1 1 p m E v eE m a 5 N OPE tral S 2400 Cen

$5.90

Frontier Coupon One coupon per customer. Not valid with any other offers. Expires 12/10/2021

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TACO TUESDAY THURSDAY WEDNESDAY FIESTA BURGER Save SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL $1.65 (Red or Green Chile, Cheddar Cheese, Onion, & Lettuce)

2 Crunchy Tacos 2 Carne Adovada withBurritos a regular and a regular soda & Fries or iced tea For only

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HAPS dailylobo.com

PAGE 6 / MONDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2021

NEW MEXICO DAILY LOBO

The Entertainment Guide Monday

Test With Truman Be Empowered. Know Your Status. Walk-in HIV Testing Monday: 8am-noon 801 Encino Pl NE

New Game Plus All you can play video games from 2-10 pm! 505-308-5755 1512-D Wyoming Blvd NE, Albuquerque, NM 87112

Masks Y Mas Find the best holiday gifts this season! Mon-Thurs 11am-6pm facebook.com/masksymas 505-256-4183 3106 Central Ave. SE, 87106

Tuesday

Wednesday

Salt and Board 115 Harvard SE, Suite #9 Open from 11am-10pm Happy Hour 3-6pm, Mon-Fri (505) 219-2001

Home-Gently Used Furniture Moving Out? Donate your furniture and we can pick it up! Moving in? Come See Our stuff Make an appointment to see what we have! (505) 361-7179 208 Dartmouth Dr. NE 87106

Sunshine Theater Jan 31 Doors Open 7pm Hinder: Winter Tour 2022 Ages 21+ (505) 764-0249 120 Central Ave Albuquerque, NM 87102

Sunshine Theater Dec 14 Doors Open 7pm Yngwie Malmsteem: Parabellum Tour All Ages! (505) 764-0249 120 Central Ave, Albuquerque, NM 87102

Salt and Board 115 Harvard SE, Suite #9 Open from 11am-10pm Happy Hour 3-6pm, Mon-Fri (505) 219-2001

: NYE

CA

SEL ROU

AT

LR

RNA

F ETE

SE O HOU

N

OW O

NN ETUR

SALE

Home-Gently Used Furniture Moving Out? Donate your furniture and we can pick it up! Moving in? Come See Our stuff Make an appointment to see what we have! (505) 361-7179 208 Dartmouth Dr. NE 87106

Home-Gently Used Furniture Moving Out? Donate your furniture and we can pick it up! Moving in? Come See Our stuff Make an appointment to see what we have! (505) 361-7179 208 Dartmouth Dr. NE 87106

Visit Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Cir, Santa Fe, NM 87507 Thurs-Mon: 10AM–8PM (505) 395-6369

Guild Cinema Visit guildcinema.com for more showtimes! (505) 255-1848 3405 Central Avenue NE, Albuquerque, NM 87106

Masks Y Mas Find the best holiday gifts this season! Mon-Thurs 11am-6pm facebook.com/masksymas 505-256-4183 3106 Central Ave. SE, 87106 Guild Cinema Visit guildcinema.com for more showtimes! (505) 255-1848 3405 Central Avenue NE, Albuquerque, NM 87106

New Game Plus All you can play video games from 2-10 pm! 505-308-5755 1512-D Wyoming Blvd NE, Albuquerque, NM 87112 Test With Truman Be Empowered. Know Your Status. Walk-in HIV Testing Tuesday: 1pm-5pm 801 Encino Pl NE

Moving Out?

Sunshine Theater Visit sunshinetheaterlive.com for more shows! (505) 764-0249 120 Central Ave, Albuquerque, NM 87102 Luther House Shared Meal in front of Luther House Every Wednesday 5 pm Following the shared meal, at 6 pm, we offer a variety of Liturgical & Spiritual practices Salt and Board 115 Harvard SE, Suite #9 Open from 11am-10pm Happy Hour 3-6pm, Mon-Fri (505) 219-2001 Guild Cinema Visit guildcinema.com for more showtimes! (505) 255-1848 3405 Central Avenue NE, Albuquerque, NM 87106 New Game Plus All you can play video games from 2-10 pm! 505-308-5755 1512-D Wyoming Blvd NE, Albuquerque, NM 87112 Masks Y Mas Find the best holiday gifts this season! Mon-Thurs 11am-6pm facebook.com/masksymas 505-256-4183 3106 Central Ave. SE, 87106

Can’t take it? We’ll pick it up!

Thursday

Welcome Home! Hope. Opportunity. Mindful. Empowerment.

208 Dartmouth Dr. NE 87106 (505)361-7179

@homegentlyusedfurniture

Monday – Thursday: Hours Vary Open Friday & Saturday: 11-5 pm Closed Sundays or by appointment

/homegentlyusedfurniture

Coming Soon DEC 7-9

BRIAN WILSON: LONG PROMISED ROAD

DEC 7-9

DEEP BLUES: THE NEWLY RESTORED 1991 CLASSIC DOC!

4:30 PM 8:30 PM

DEC 18 10 :30 PM

DEC 11

7, 10:30 PM

6:30 PM

DEC 10-12 F-Su 6 PM Sa 4:30 PM

DEC 30 12 PM

DEC 10 10:30 PM

3405 Central Avenue NE Albuquerque, NM

505.255.1848 www.guildcinema.com

Salt and Board 115 Harvard SE, Suite #9 Open from 11am-10pm Happy Hour 3-6pm, Mon-Fri (505) 219-2001 Home-Gently Used Furniture Moving Out? Donate your furniture and we can pick it up! Moving in? Come See Our stuff Make an appointment to see what we have! (505) 361-7179 208 Dartmouth Dr. NE 87106

December 2021 Special Events

Test With Truman Be Empowered. Know Your Status. Walk-in HIV Testing Thursday: 5pm-7pm 801 Encino Pl NE

DEC 10-12 2:45 PM

AGUIRRE, THE WRATH OF GOD - NEWLY RESTORED & PART OF OUR HERZOG WEEKEND! FITZCARRALDO NEWLY RESTORED & PART OF OUR HERZOG WEEKEND!

MORE COMING SOON!

Guild Cinema Visit guildcinema.com for more showtimes! (505) 255-1848 3405 Central Avenue NE, Albuquerque, NM 87106


HAPS @DailyLobo

NEW MEXICO DAILY LOBO

MONDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2021 / PAGE 7

The Entertainment Guide Home-Gently Used Furniture Moving Out? Donate your furniture and we can pick it up! Moving in? Come See Our stuff Make an appointment to see what we have! (505) 361-7179 208 Dartmouth Dr. NE 87106

Thursday (cont) New Game Plus All you can play video games from 2-10pm! 505-308-5755 1512-D Wyoming Blvd NE, Albuquerque, NM 87112 Sunshine Theater Visit sunshinetheaterlive.com for more shows! (505) 764-0249 120 Central Ave, Albuquerque, NM 87102

Masks Y Mas Find the best holiday gifts this season! Mon-Thurs 11am-6pm facebook.com/masksymas 505-256-4183 3106 Central Ave. SE, 87106 Visit Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Cir, Santa Fe, NM 87507 Thurs-Mon: 10AM–8PM (505) 395-6369

Sunshine Theater Dec 17 Doors Open 6:30pm lovelytheband Conversations with Myself About You Tour 2021 All Ages (505) 764-0249 120 Central Ave Albuquerque, NM 87102 Luther House Join us to learn, discuss & take action on theological issues At the SUB ( Lower Level North Entrance) 12:00-1:00pm Guild Cinema Visit guildcinema.com for more showtimes! (505) 255-1848 3405 Central Avenue NE, Albuquerque, NM 87106

Luther House Thursday Centering Prayer 12:00-1:00pm at the Duck Pond

Masks Y Mas Find the best holiday gifts this season! Fri & Sat: 11am-7pm facebook.com/masksymas 505-256-4183 3106 Central Ave. SE, 87106

Friday Visit Meow Wolf See ad for event information! 1352 Rufina Cir, Santa Fe, NM 87507 Thurs-Mon: 10AM–10PM (505) 395-6369

Saturday New Game Plus All you can play video games from 2-10pm! Fighting Game Tournament from 12 - 4 505-308-5755 1512-D Wyoming Blvd, NE, Albuquerque, NM 87112

Salt and Board 115 Harvard SE, Suite #9 Open from 11am-11pm Happy Hour 3-6pm, Mon-Fri (505) 219-2001 New Game Plus All you can play video games from 2-10pm! 505-308-5755 1512-D Wyoming Blvd NE Albuquerque, NM 87112

Salt and Board 115 Harvard SE, Suite #9 Open from 11am-11pm (505) 219-2001

Sunshine Theater Visit sunshinetheaterlive.com for more shows! (505) 764-0249 120 Central Ave, Albuquerque, NM 87102 Visit Meow Wolf See ad for event information! 1352 Rufina Cir, Santa Fe, NM 87507 Thurs-Mon: 10AM–10PM (505) 395-6369

Home-Gently Used Furniture Moving Out? Donate your furniture and we can pick it up! Moving in? Come See Our stuff Weekends open: 12:00pm-6:00 pm (505) 361-7179 208 Dartmouth Dr. NE 87106 Masks Y Mas Find the best holiday gifts this season! Fri & Sat: 11am-7pm facebook.com/masksymas 505-256-4183 3106 Central Ave. SE, 87106 Guild Cinema Visit guildcinema.com for more showtimes! (505)255-1848 3405 Central Avenue NE, Albuquerque, NM 87106

Sunday Sunshine Theater Visit sunshinetheaterlive.com for more shows! (505) 764-0249 120 Central Ave, Albuquerque, NM 87102 Home-Gently Used Furniture Moving Out? Donate your furniture and we can pick it up! Moving in? Come See Our stuff Weekends open: 12:00pm-6:00pm (505) 361-7179 208 Dartmouth Dr. NE 87106

New Game Plus All you can play video games from 2-10pm! Smash Brothers Ultimate Tournament from 10am-2pm! 505-308-5755 1512-D Wyoming Blvd, NE, Albuquerque, NM 87112

Guild Cinema Visit guildcinema.com for more showtimes! (505)255-1848 3405 Central Avenue NE, Albuquerque, NM 87106 Visit Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Cir, Santa Fe, NM 87507 Thurs-Mon: 10AM–8PM (505) 395-6369

Masks Y Mas Find the best holiday gifts this season! Sun 12pm-5pm facebook.com/masksymas 505-256-4183 3106 Central Ave. SE, 87106

Salt and Board 115 Harvard SE, Suite #9 Open from 11am-10pm (505) 219-2001

Luther House

All are welcome! Progressive, Inclusive, Evolving.

wednesday evening shared meal 5pm Enjoy food and fellowship in the front yard of Luther House each Wednesday evening wednesday night liturgy 6pm Following the shared meal on Wednesday evenings, we offer a variety of liturgical and spiritual practices thursday centering prayer We offer a time of respite and centering prayer each Thursday at the Duck Pond. 12:00pm-1:00pm. Learn a variety of ways to pray and ground yourself in your faith friday people’s theology at the SUB Join us on Friday’s 12:00pm-1:00pm, just outside the SUB (lower level, north entrance) to learn, discuss, and take action around contemporary theological issues

North of Dane Smith Hall 1805 Las Lomas Road NE Albuquerque, NM 87106 505.615-2688

Follow Us: @LutherHouseNM Email Us: Lcmunmcnm@gmail.com

GIFT SHOP

505-256-4183

3106 CENTRAL AVE SE ALBUQUERQUE, NM 87106 • • • • •

Canvas Printing Cotton Rag Paper Photo Enlargements Banners Y Mucho Mas

/masksymas MasksYMas.com

BE EMPOWERED.

Know your status. Be #LoboProud

Happy Hour 3-6pm, Mon-Fri

Test with Truman. (505) 272-1312 Charcuterie. Wine and Craft Beer.

Across from UNM! 115 Harvard SE, Albuquerque • 505-219-2001 • saltandboard.com

Walk in HIV testing hours: Mon. 8 a.m. - noon Tues. 1 p.m. - 5 p.m. Thurs. 5 p.m. - 7 p.m.


dailylobo.com

PAGE 8 / MONDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2021

NEW MEXICO DAILY LOBO

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Level 1 2 3 4 November 29th issue puzzle solved

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DailyLobo Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

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ACROSS 1 Branch 5 Advisory group 10 Big name in luxury retailing 14 About 30% of Earth’s land area 15 More fitting 16 Thing with rings 17 Really bad béchamel? 19 Letters facilitating sorting 20 Unpaid stack for scofflaw Aaron? 22 Something to stretch out on 25 Comedian dubbed “Mr. Television” 26 Mitchell protagonist 27 Bone holders 30 With 61-Across, “Yer darn tootin’!” 31 Seaweed for sushi 32 Puts down 35 What happens at the end of a Manilow concert? 38 Most closely related 39 Educational period 42 Letters with Arizona or Maine 45 Made tracks 46 One of composer John Williams’ five 47 Harlem Renaissance writer Zora __ Hurston 49 Does some lawn maintenance 51 Furry creature that isn’t cool? 55 Bee in Mayberry, e.g. 56 Convicted hastily and unfairly ... or, in a way, like the four other longest puzzle answers? 60 It requires some effort 61 See 30-Across 62 Confucius, by reputation 63 See 29-Down 64 Fashionista’s concern 65 __-how

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

9/1/17

By Jeffrey Wechsler

DOWN 1 __ Cruces 2 Prefix with metric 3 Defunct space station 4 Conan, for one 5 Iraqi port 6 Dazzling style 7 Vince Gill’s “Look __” 8 Certain quadrilateral: Abbr. 9 Half of sechs 10 Simple sign holder 11 Major thoroughfare 12 Mother’s whistler? 13 Familiar fivesome 18 City about 150 miles east of San Diego 21 “NCIS” airer 22 It’s other than hither 23 “So that’s your game!” 24 Apparel 27 Accumulated, with “up” 28 Many years 29 With 63-Across, “Is there more?” 32 Decimated sea

November 29thPuzzle issue puzzle solved Thursday’s Solved

©2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

33 Erato’s instrument 34 Assigns work (for), as students 36 Cite, with “to” 37 Religious subgroup 40 “Norma __” 41 Union title? 42 Risky 43 “The Bourne Supremacy,” e.g. 44 Hot spots 46 Dunked snack

9/1/17

48 Barista’s offering 49 “Over the Rainbow” composer 50 Misspoke, say 52 While lead-in 53 Cloudless 54 The Auld Sod 57 “SNL” castmate of Gilda and Chevy 58 Swellhead’s problem 59 Wet blanket

DAILY LOBO CLASSIFIEDS

Services

Jobs Off Campus

PAPER DUE? FORMER UNM instructor, Ph.D., English, published, can help. 505-569-2626 (Text Only); 505254-9615 (Voice Only). www.WritingandEditingABQ.com

THE VILLAGE OF Los Lunas is currently recruiting for an Accountant. December 2021 graduates are welcome to apply. To apply, visit the Village webpage, http://www.loslunasnm.gov/ Jobs.aspx

MATHEMATICS, STATISTICS TUTOR. Billy Brown PhD. College and HS. Telephone and internet tutoring available. 505-401-8139, WELBERT53@AOL.COM

Health & Wellness STRESSED OUT? CALL Agora277-3013.

Apartments WWW.UNMRENTALS.COM Awesome university apartments Unique, hardwood floors, FPs, courtyards, fenced yards. Houses, cottages, efficiencies, studios, 1, 2 and 505-843-9642. 3BDRMs. Garages. Open 6 days/week. QUIET, CLEAN, AFFORDABLE, 1BDRM, $680/mo. Utilities included. 2 blocks to UNM, no pets, NS. 301 Harvard SE 505-262-0433.

For Sale HEY LOBOS! Did you know that you can recieve free advertisements (25 words or less) in this catagory? Email classifieds@dailylobo.com from your UNM email or call 505-277-5656 for more details!

Furniture FREE TO GOOD student(s): One Davenport couch with fold out sleeper, a reclining chair, and a love seat. Good condition. You must pick up. (406) 431-1360 evenings.

WANTED: CAREGIVERS. CARING persons to assist elderly w/ housecleaning/ laundry/ meals/ errands/ personal hygiene. Wkly pay, pd training, 401K, bonuses, more! Must have car ins & pass bkgrnd ck. Apply at 1st Premier Home Care 4411 McLeod Rd NE 271-2120 or send resume to donnab@premierhc.com EOE CAREGIVER POSITION FOR the Top Workplace 8 years in a row! Looking for someone who enjoys working with kids and believes that play is an important part of childhood development. Positions available for part-time and full-time during the summer, and before and after school during the school year. Starting pay is $13/hour with paid holidays and paid time off. Apply online at www.childrens-choice.org LOOKING FOR PSYCHOLOGY student for PT work doing psychoeducational training. $20/ hr.Email resume and letter of interest to dblackwood@theevolutiongroup.com LOOKING FOR A full-time Site Director for the Top Workplace 8 years in a row! Site Directors are responsible for the dayto-day operation of an individual schoolbased program site. Site Directors work directly with children, families, school faculty and staff. Program Directors supervise the Assistants, Caregivers, Enrichment Instructors and Associate Directors. Starting pay is $18.50/hour with benefits, paid holidays and paid time off. Apply online at www.childrens-choice.org

SEEKING HOMECARE AID Overseer in NE Heights. 24 hrs/wk on books. Must have car and clean background. Not be overqualified. Carol 1-8 pm 505-304-4373

NOW HIRING!

Jobs On Campus LANGUAGE LEARNING CENTER (Ortega Hall, 1st floor) is hiring Lab Attendants and IT Lab Attendants for Spring 2022. Work-study required. Must be responsible & friendly, will train. Apply at UNMJobs (req18255, req18254)

www.dailylobo.com www.dailylobo.com www.dailylobo.com

ALL POSITIONS: Cooks, Servers, Dish Washers & Manager Apply in person, by phone 505-821-9300 or www.tomatocafe.com