Daily Lobo 1/10/2022

Page 1

Daily Lobo new mexico

The Independent Student Voice of UNM since 1895

dailylobo.com

Monday, Januar y 10, 2022 | Vo l u m e 1 2 6 | I s s u e 1 9

UNM COVID-19 booster requirement deadline nears No plans for University to start virtually By John Scott @JScott050901

Eligible University of New Mexico students, staff and faculty must receive and upload documentation of having gotten a COVID-19 vaccine booster shot by Jan. 17, the day before the spring 2022 semester is set to start in person. Individuals are currently considered eligible by the University if they have received either the second dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccine on or before June 15, 2021 or the single dose of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine on or before Oct. 15, 2021 because of time requirements between vaccination doses. Those vaccinated after these dates have up to four weeks to upload proof following the Jan. 17 deadline. As of Sunday Jan. 9, 18.4% of students, 45.6% of staff and 48.8% of faculty have confirmed receiving a booster shot. “The key step now, for everyone, is to get a vaccine booster as soon as you can,” UNM spokesperson Cinnamon Blair wrote to the Daily Lobo via email. “Vaccinated people are less likely to get COVID, and when they do

A vaccine lead prepares COVID-19 vaccines at The Pit in January 2021.

they usually don’t get very sick.” According to a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, all three authorized COVID-19 vaccines were effective in reducing symptom severity in breakthrough cases and preventing hospitalization. Blair said there are no cur-

rent plans to return to a virtual learning environment for the spring semester. “We have regular consultations with our internal experts to assess current conditions and adjust as needed,” Blair wrote. “At present we are proceeding with our current instructional plan.”

By Zoe Perls @zoeperls

Official review on the legality of the University of New Mexico Foundation’s indirect investment in fossil fuel companies is ongoing, and the UNM Leaders for Environmental Action and Foresight aren’t giving up. After an initial intake meeting with the office of the attorney general on Dec. 17, 2021, where they reviewed the legal arguments and historical background of their complaint filed last October, the office is still in the process of going over all the information. UNMF, which funds scholarships and campus initiatives at the University, has an estimated $32.5 million of its Consolidated Investment Fund, the investment pool for endowment assets of the University and UNMF, indirectly

see

UNM LEAF page 2

James Holloway, UNM provost and vice president of academic affairs, said the University is potentially looking at ways to improve the quality of masks worn by students, staff and faculty on campus by moving away from cloth masks and toward “medical masks.” “The most important things

John Scott is the managing editor at the Daily Lobo. He can be contacted at managingeditor@dailylobo.com or on Twitter @JScott050901

SAC, ASUNM kickstart spring semester with student events

UNM LEAF meets with attorney general’s office on divestment complaint

invested into fossil fuel stock, according to Gabe Gomez, managing director of UNMF marketing and communication. This is 5.6% of the CIF overall. The UNM LEAF complaint, which was filed with the help of the legal team of the Climate Defense Project, said these financial investments in climate change-causing fossil fuels are a legal violation of the Foundation’s obligation as a nonprofit to provide charitable benefit to its community as per the New Mexico Uniform Prudent Management of Institutional Funds Act. This act states that nonprofit institutions must act toward a purpose that provides some sort of benefit to the community. “The UNMF may not simply seek profit at any cost: the privileges that the Foundation enjoys as a nonprofit institution,

Nick Romero / Daily Lobo / @nicromerophoto

are vaccinations and boosters,” Holloway said. “The second most important tool is good masking.” UNM is following the state mask mandate wherein masks are required for all individuals indoors regardless of vaccination status. The announcement of the booster requirement came shortly after the state of New Mexico issued an emergency public health order requiring a booster shot for a large majority of workers in high-risk environments, including healthcare workers and long-term care facility workers. This came with the surge of the new COVID-19 omicron variant. “The recent emergence of the omicron variant further emphasizes the importance of vaccination, boosters and prevention efforts needed to protect against COVID-19,” CDC Dr. Rochelle Walensky said in the health order. “Early data from South Africa suggest increased transmissibility of the omicron variant, and scientists in the United States and around the world are urgently examining vaccine effectiveness related to this variant.” Holloway said the University is aiming for a fully vaccinated student, staff and faculty population. “My goal is 100%. We really want to get everybody vaccinated … I know we won’t reach 100%, but my real hope is that we can reach that 95% level or better,” Holloway said.

By Zara Roy

@zarazzledazzle With the spring semester beginning Tuesday, Jan. 18, the University of New Mexico’s Student Activities Center and Associated Students of the University of New Mexico have organized several events in the first two weeks to get students back into the groove after break. SAC has organized two Welcome Back Days, scheduled for Jan. 19 and 26 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Student Union Building atrium. There, various departments and organizations around campus will be able to table and showcase their organizations, and prospective students can find groups that fit their interests. The first Welcome Back Day will be focused on showcasing different departments at the University as well as Greek organizations,

Nick Fojud / Daily Lobo / @DailyLobo

Rows of students hold out their hands in an attempt to become hypnotized during Rich Guzzi’s Comedy Hypnotist Performance at UNM in 2016.

and the following week will highlight student organizations. The event was split into two days partly in the interest of social distancing protocols as the COVID-19 pandemic contin-

ues. SAC has been working to ensure the event is in line with COVID-19 protocols, according to Rudy Montoya, SAC student

see

Events

page

2

Inside this Lobo

WALLIN: LETTER: For good of New Mexico schools, congress must act on DOI’s new recommendations (pg. 4)

GLEASON: College students balance school with jobs, pandemic (pg. 3) MCGRAEL: REVIEW: ‘Don’t Look Up’: Reflection of recent years through fun, satirical comedy (pg. 3) MCCULLOUGH & YOUNG: LETTER: Grassy areas of UNM golf course should be reopened for community access (pg. 4)

MCGRAEL: REVIEW: ‘Spider-Man: No Way Home’ gracefully swings MCU out of 2021 (pg. 5) SALCIDO: Women’s basketball snags close win against SDSU (pg. 7) SALCIDO: Men’s basketball loses chaotic game to Utah State (pg. 8)


dailylobo.com

PAGE 2 / MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2022

UNM LEAF

from page

1

and its obligation to support the public purposes of the state’s flagship institution of higher education, come with the responsibility to ensure that its resources are put to socially beneficial ends,” the complaint reads. Cholla Khoury, chief deputy attorney general in civil affairs, Brian McMath, director of the consumer and environmental protection division, as well as several members of UNM LEAF and affiliated supporters attended the meeting, according to UNM LEAF member Stefi Weisburd. Members of UNM LEAF gave a presentation to Khoury and McMath about the complaint and updates to their effort, including additional sign-ons to the complaint and letters of support received followed by an hourlong discussion with Khoury and McMath about the status of their complaint. Weisburd said the office was unable to clarify the exact timeline of the complaint. They told members that investigations into complaints typically take six months to a year, but they were unable to say whether the office had started the investigation or was still deciding whether or not to investigate. When asked for a status update on the UNM LEAF complaint, the office of the attorney general told the Daily Lobo via email that "the status is pending and under review … We have not contacted the UNM Foundation as we are still in the process of reviewing the information received (by UNM LEAF).” Sofia Jenkins-Nieto, director of operations for UNM LEAF, said the office told them at the meeting that they want UNM LEAF to continue getting letters of support from the community because these letters give the office a sense

Events

from page

NEW MEXICO DAILY LOBO

of how much public support there is for divestment. Jenkins-Nieto noted that there is a link on UNM LEAF’s website to sign the petitions and instructions for sending letters of support. “I think (after the meeting) we were feeling, honestly, mostly happy that it had gotten to this point and excited and hopeful that they would follow through and that this would get UNM’s attention,” Jenkins-Nieto said. Weisburd noted that Harvard University also filed a divestment complaint to their attorney general, and the school agreed to divest before the attorney general’s judgement was reached. Connor Chung, a student at Harvard and organizer for the school’s respective divestment complaint, thought that merely submitting the complaint was pivotal in Harvard’s decision to divest. “The strength of the legal argument (for divestment) means that some complaints have pushed schools to divest simply via the legal pressure and threat of an investigation. This was the case at Harvard, for example. And for the schools that fail to respond, the likelihood of an enforcement and compelled divestment grows by the day,” Chung wrote to the Daily Lobo via email. If UNM does not announce divestment before the attorney general makes a decision, UNM will be the first university to divest because of legal requirements, according to Weisburd. Weisburd noted that, unlike Harvard and other prominent schools that have divested, UNM would be unique as being both publicly funded and in a high oil- and gas-producing state. New Mexico is the third-largest oil and gas producer in the nation, and while other public universities

Avery Rogers / Daily Lobo / @DailyLobo

Rallygoers pose with sign on Johnson Field, where UNM LEAF held an Earth Day rally advocating for stronger climate action on behalf of UNM in April 2021.

have divested fossil fuels, divestment efforts have been continually suppressed in Texas and other top oil-producing states. State auditor and candidate for attorney general Brian Colón invited UNM LEAF to submit a complaint to the state auditor’s office in the interest of strengthening the organization’s legal case against the University,

which Jenkins-Nieto said UNM LEAF hopes to do this semester once they finish correcting the original complaint. UNM LEAF is set to have another follow-up meeting with the attorney general’s office on Feb. 25 in order to present additional research to support the complaint and answer questions that may arise, ultimately “to

ensure that the topic remains at the forefront of priorities for the AG,” according to Weisburd. The organization will continue collecting signatures in support of divestment in the meantime.

Events agency also has several activities lined up for students toward the end of the month. On Jan. 27, hypnotist Larry Volz will be visiting for a free event in SUB Ballroom C at 7:30 p.m. The Southwest Film Center will begin showings again on Jan. 29-30, though screening titles have not yet been announced. ASUNM plans to maintain their momentum from last semester in upholding COVID-19 protocols at their events, accord-

ing to ASUNM president Greg Romero. He said the organization is excited for the opportunity to provide more programming for students that is both fun and safe. “To take a second to speak on the safety of these events, it still remains our top priority. With vaccination rates of students being so high along with the booster mandate for UNM, we're confident as of today that we can still have these events masked and safe,” Romero wrote to the

Daily Lobo via email. “Of course, we are taking in new information as it comes. Our goal still is and will always be to create the best experience for students at UNM and to do it safely.” A full calendar of spring student events is available at the SAC office or online.

Zoe Perls is a freelance reporter at the Daily Lobo. She can be contacted at news@dailylobo.com or on Twitter @zoeperls

1

activities specialist. “I think students are always excited to attend an in-person event, and we’ve done our best to keep them safe so that we can actually follow through with them. I do know that attendance sometimes is limited because students still are with one foot in each space: one foot in the virtual world and one foot on campus, and that’s made in-person events a lot different,” Montoya said. Attendance for in-person stu-

dent events has not yet picked up to pre-pandemic numbers, according to Montoya. SAC, however, is welcoming this change for the time being. “(Lower attendance) is not necessarily a bad thing … We’re actually working with that, with some of our events as we return. We don’t know what to expect, and so we try to spread things out and the smaller attendance is a good, slow start,” Montoya said. ASUNM’s Special Students

Zara Roy is the news editor at the Daily Lobo. She can be contacted at news@dailylobo.com or on Twitter @zarazzledazzle

Follow us on Twitter! @DailyLobo

Megan Gleason Editor-in-Chief @fabflutist2716

Gabriel Biadora Beat Reporter @gabrielbiadora

Shelby Kleinhans Multimedia Editor @BirdsNotReal99

Spencer Butler Beat Reporter @SpencerButler48

Annya Loya Freelance Reporter @annyaloyadl

Zara Roy News Editor @zarazzledazzle

Rebecca Hobart Senior Reporter @rjhobart

Matthew Salcido Sports Editor @baggyeyedguy

Sharon Chischilly Staff Photographer @Schischillyy

Zoe Perls Freelance Reporter @zoeperls

Emma Trevino Culture Editor @itsemmatr

Jasmine Casillas Freelance Reporter @jaycasillas

Mackenzie Schwartz Freelance Reporter @mackenzids

Elizabeth Secor Freelance Reporter @esecor2003

Madeline Pukite Beat Reporter @madelinepukite

Joseph McKee Design Director @josephdmckee

Hevyn Heckes Freelance Reporter @H_Squared90

Liam DeBonis Copy Editor @LiamDebonis

Natalie Jude Freelance Reporter @natalaroni

John Scott Photo Editor @JScott050901


@DailyLobo

NEW MEXICO DAILY LOBO

MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2022 / PAGE 3

College students balance school with jobs, pandemic By Megan Gleason @fabflutist2716 Balancing jobs with school is not a new challenge for college students in America. The past two years, however, have added an extra complication as students now have to also balance the stressors of the COVID-19 pandemic with their education. After the University of New Mexico went completely virtual for a period of time last year, many students were anxious to return to an in-person environment. However, senior Indica Simpson said many students set themselves up with unrealistic expectations that made the transition difficult. “All of us thought that once we’d be in person that the world would just be magically fixed again and we’d all understand education to its fullest, and I don’t think that was the case at all. I think that we came back with certain expectations that weren’t met, and I also think it’s been a really hard transition,” Simpson said. Recent graduate Alexandria Wiesel said her schoolwork took a hard hit when the pandemic was at its height and UNM was online. Now, however, she said the feeling of safety that having the vaccine gives her allows her to cope better with the stressors of the pandemic. “I have the luxury to rely on science and get the vaccine and have my mind at ease with it for a little bit … My schoolwork (in fall 2021) in particular was not super affected, but during the pandemic it definitely was.

John Scott / Daily Lobo / @JScott050901

A filled-out planner sits on a desk.

It was hard to do just about anything,” Wiesel said. Simpson said many students used less “brain power” when attending school virtually and that, overall, “it doesn’t feel like college when you’re online.” Looking ahead, Simpson isn’t sure how to plan her time because of how quickly the pandemic changes things. “It’s hard to plan what kinds of classes you want to take, what kind of internships you want to do, what kind of things you want to put your time towards since you don’t know what we’re going to be doing (in the future)”, Simpson said. “You can apply to graduate school but if everything shuts down again, what is the point?” Wiesel said she likes to stay busy and working jobs gives her an outlet to help do that. “I really like to be productive

and I like to have lots of things going on and that makes me feel good, so I guess staying busy is a mental health practice for myself. It’s different than others but everyone has to find their own thing to keep them going,” Wiesel said. As of 2018, the National Center for Education Statistics reported that 43% of full-time undergraduate students had jobs and 81% of part-time undergraduate students had jobs. Simpson said it’s important to find “a job that’s within the same interests” that you’re pursuing in school so that you’re able to do work for both at the same time. The overall dropout rate for undergraduate students is approximately 40% in the U.S., according to the Education Data Initiative, a researchbased site on U.S. education systems. The site said the biggest reason for

REVIEW

‘Don’t Look Up’: Reflection of recent years through fun, satirical comedy pandemic, celebrity conflicts and other current issues. The plot is simple: a comet is hurling itself toward Earth while Leonardo DiCaprio’s character, Dr. Randall Mindy, and Jennifer Lawrence’s character, Ph.D. candidate student Kate Dibiasky, try to warn the world about the impending doom that awaits everyone in the next six months and 14 days. This is a great premise for an action-adventure movie, much like “Armageddon” (1998). This film has many twists and turns. When I watched the film, it subverted my expectations, every

By Maxwell Minty McGrael @ MintyMcGrael Among the sea of Netflix original content, there has been a wide range of movies of varying quality but one of the platform’s last films of 2021, “Don’t Look Up,” was particularly memorable. This fun two-hour cynical comedy asked the question, "What if there was a planet-killing comet on course to destroy Earth?" The film’s response to this question is satirical in its answer with many parallels to politics, the COVID-19

WHY Jujutsu Is Good For � TEACHES HOW TO GENERATE

YOU

SUPERIOR POWER WITH LESS EFFORT by Using Internal Principles

� NEUROGENESIS

Our systematic brain training methods stimulate neural growth/ pathways in the brain and contribute to superior mental efficiency.

� AWESOME SELF DEFENSE SKILLS

WSR Jujutsu derives from the battlefields of feudal Japan and, as a combat/self defense art, it can’t be beat.

� GREAT SHAPE

AND

GOOD HEALTH

WSR training integrates training in distance fighting (like karate), close quarter (like judo), and ground fighting (like BJJ). After four months you’ll get in the best shape of your life and you’ll feel better for it!

Andrew Yiannakis Ph.D. 9th Dan Jujutsu/6th Dan Judo

Sandia Budokan ayiann.jujutsu@gmail.com

turn a new surprise. “Don’t Look Up” had plenty of comments and critiques to make about politics, fame, corporations and society as a whole. For example, early on in the film, Dr. Mindy and Kate try to warn the president of the United States — played by Meryl Streep — about everyone’s imminent doom. The president and her cabinet refuse to listen until they’ve had “their” scientists review the numbers. Even when Dr. Mindy and Kate go to the news after speaking with the president, they are still not taken seriously because the government wants to

dropping out is financial pressure. “Working while attending school can be a challenging balance to maintain for many students. Tuition rates and cost of living in the areas where most major colleges (reside) are high. Many students have to work to meet basic needs while attending college,” the Education Data Initiative reported. “It can be a challenge to schedule classes around jobs.” Simpson said there’s a pressure that college isn’t legitimate if you’re not working on a lot of different things and “a stigma that we have to do all of these things.” She currently works as the Editor-in-Chief of Limina, a student publication at UNM, as well as an intern for Albuquerque Public Schools. “I like to think making time in itself is a skill and a practice that I’ve been working on through my years keep things “light-hearted.” One of the film’s strongest qualities is its all-star cast, and the main cast’s performances were all more than perfect. This is what carries the film at its lowest points. Each character had what felt like a genuine connection to one other, whether that was good or bad. For fans of DiCaprio’s work, he is able to take a break from his more serious roles and play a nerd who doesn’t really know how to speak out for himself. Cate Blanchett as Brie Evantee paired with DiCaprio’s Dr. Mindy was great — their relationship throughout the film was very entertaining to watch develop, to say the least. Other great performances are seen from Lawrence, Streep, Rob Morgan, Jonah Hill, Mark Rylance and many more. Guest appearances from Ariana Grande, Chris Evans

in college,” Wiesel said. “Once you keep yourself organized and once you make time, you can do incredible things, and it is difficult … You have to build it up. It’ll take time.” The New York Times reported that college students were finding jobs or internships more quickly in 2021 than in 2020. In particular, students in STEM-related fields were having the most success. “The appetite for college labor is strong right now, whether it’s student positions or part-time, all the way through entry-level jobs,” Jennifer Neef, director of the Career Center at the University of Illinois UrbanaChampaign, told the Times. However, even though the job market is open for college students and recent graduates, what wages these individuals can make, if any, highly impacts who can take the job. Nearly half of all internships are unpaid and the minimum wage for those that do pay in New Mexico is $11.50 per hour — which doesn’t come close to covering the cost of living. “I’m an unpaid intern so it’s like how do you keep on the lights versus getting this experience in order to do this very niche field? So I would say that I have time (for school and work) but it’s a lot of late nights and crying,” Simpson said. Megan Gleason is the Editor-inChief of the Daily Lobo. She can be contacted at editorinchief@dailylobo. com or on Twitter @fabflutist2716

and a handful of others also make this film stand out. My main problem with the film was its pacing. I thought we had arrived at the end many times before we did. Still, I can easily look past this for the obvious effort that the cast put into the movie. Every time I noticed the film slowing down, the characters would pick it back up and move the film forward. Overall, this is quite an enjoyable movie with an excellent cast and simple premise. It’s cynical with a clear opinion of the last few years but still won’t make you feel bad. I would definitely recommend the watch. Maxwell Minty McGrael is a freelance reporter at the Daily Lobo. He can be reached at culture@dailylobo.com or on Twitter @MintyMcGrael

The Daily Lobo is digital first! The Daily Lobo will publish new content every day on our website, dailylobo.com, on our mobile app, and publish a print issue every Monday and Thursday!

Children's Choice Child Care is Caregivers lead activities, play sports, make crafts, have fun and are good role models for school-age children before and after school. Starting pay is $14.50/hr Associate Directors are in a leadership development position for those who are working toward the position of Site Director. FT or PT. Starting pay is $16.50/hr

HIRING

bo

/DailyLo

obo

@DailyL

@DailyL

obo

Apply at www.childrens-choice.org/jobs

505-296-2880

www.dailylobo.com

o dailylob


LOBO OPINION

4

The Independent Student Voice of UNM since 1895

Monday, January 10, 2022

Opinion Editor / opinion@dailylobo.com

LETTERS

Grassy areas of UNM north golf course should be reopened for community access For more than 40 years, the University of New Mexico’s north golf course has had another life unrelated to golf. When the sun begins to set, dozens to upwards of a hundred students, faculty and surrounding neighbors converge on the green space to walk their dogs offleash in the few minutes prior to sunset. Unsurprisingly, this green space has been a treasured oasis in the center of the city. After the flags come down, Burqueños from all over the city and all walks of life access this space to walk, run, play with their children and dogs, and sometimes to just enjoy themselves on the grass while watching the sunset. Unfortunately, and without community dialogue, UNM and Bernalillo County officials have shut off access to the grassy areas of the course. It is outrageous that UNM President Garnett Stokes supports restricting access to an outdoor space for students and the community during a pandemic. Is this a private golf course? No. Does it impact actual student golfers? No — there’s even a second golf course south of main campus that is dedicated solely to golfers. But do taxpayer dollars support the building and maintenance of the north campus golf course? YES. We both have personal connections to the north golf course. Karla has been visiting this green space nearly every day for 10 years. She frequently walks the perimeter in the morning and visits in the evening with her dog. She travels to this green space from the Old Town area because there isn’t a public grassy area near her home. This is easily the best part of her day. Jenna only recently discovered the golf course during the pandemic, and it is one of the few green areas she

feels safe in walking alone at dusk in Albuquerque as a young woman. For both of us, this space always feels safe and elicits a true sense of community. Our personal testimonials and those of countless others illustrate the special and essential nature of this space. It has been described as a place for exercise, meditation, unplugged family time, a safe sanctuary in the city, the perfect viewing spot for sunsets and balloons, and an intergenerational meeting spot. But now that treasured community gathering space is over because of UNM and community leadership’s ill-advised decision to restrict access. Dissolution of this community gathering space without any public dialogue, especially during a pandemic, is disheartening and shameful. Over 200 UNM students and local citizens have already signed a petition supporting protection of this right to use the golf course at dusk for our shared community, and 100 community members joined a meeting with Commissioner Adriann Barboa on Dec. 15, 2021. The majority of the participants at the meeting supported keeping this green space open and accessible. If you agree that the golf course should remain a positive, open space for students and the community, please email Stokes (presidentstokes@unm.edu) and Barboa (district3@bernco.gov). You can email dogsforngc@gmail.com for more ways to become involved in protecting this treasured local space. Jenna McCullough is a UNM biology Ph.D. student Karla Young is a community member and the mother of a UNM alumnus

For good of New Mexico schools, Congress must act on DOI’s new recommendations Even when we’re grateful for something — for example, the jobs and state revenue we get from oil and gas production — that doesn’t mean we should cut ourselves short and ignore our own needs. We deserve to get the best deal we can. But when it comes to oil and natural gas, we’ve settled for a bad deal for a very long time. While families in New Mexico face rising gasoline prices at the pump, oil and natural gas companies are getting the deal of a century. Not only are they cashing in on higher prices, but they pay pennies on the dollar to lease our public lands for development and evade having to pay New Mexicans what we’re rightfully owed in royalties. All of this undercuts funding for our schools, and our children deserve better. Thankfully, the Department of the Interior (DOI) recently released a new report on the federal oil and gas leasing program with recommendations on how to fix this archaic program, which, for decades, has let oil and gas companies take advantage of outdated rates. For families in New Mexico, which is the second-largest oil-producing state in the country, these recommendations come at a critical time, as this needs fixing, now. The royalty rate for drilling on public lands hasn’t been revised in over a century, according to the DOI’s report. As a result, our state has lost out on billions of dollars over the years that could have been used to give teachers raises, buy new textbooks and broadband for classrooms and support students. The problems with the federal government’s oil and gas program don’t stop there. Oil and gas companies are not currently required to put up enough money

By Victor Martinez / Daily Lobo / @sirbluescreen

Volume 126 Issue 19 The New Mexico Daily Lobo is an independent student newspaper published on Monday except school holidays during the fall and spring semesters. Subscription rate is $75 per academic year. E-mail accounting@dailylobo.com for more information on subscriptions. The New Mexico Daily Lobo is published by the Board of UNM Student Publications. The editorial opinions expressed in the New Mexico Daily Lobo are those of the respective writers and do not necessarily reflect the views of the students, faculty, staff and regents of the University of New Mexico. Inquiries concerning editorial content should be made to the editor-in-chief. All content appearing in the New Mexico Daily Lobo and the Web site dailylobo.com may not be reproduced without the consent of the editor-in-chief. A single copy of the New Mexico Daily Lobo is free from newsstands. Unauthorized removal of multiple copies is considered theft and may be prosecuted. Letter submission policy: The opinions expressed are those of the authors alone. Letters and guest columns must be concisely written, signed by the author and include address and telephone. No names will be withheld.

— called bonds — to cover cleanup costs for the wells they drill on public lands. That’s because current federal bonding rates have not been updated since the 1950s and ’60s. As a consequence, if companies go bankrupt, their wells frequently become “orphaned” and pollute the air, land and water around them. Meanwhile, the responsibility for the increasingly high costs of plugging these wells and restoring surrounding lands falls on the rest of us. At a time when gasoline prices are high and oil and gas companies are raking in record profits, reforms to the federal oil and gas leasing program would be a big win for New Mexico families. Congress has the opportunity to codify these common-sense reforms through the Build Back Better Act and raise significant revenue while protecting the interests of our schools, frontline communities and future generations. The Biden administration’s first lease sale of New Mexico’s public land for oil and gas development is scheduled for early 2022. There is no time to waste — it’s urgent that Congress take up the recommendations the DOI outlined in its report and bring the federal oil and gas leasing program into the 21st century. Doing so will help maximize the value of our public lands and ensure that New Mexicans get a fair return for the natural resources that belong to all of us. Amber Wallin is the deputy director of New Mexico Voices for Children

By Rhianna Roberts / Daily Lobo / @Rhianna_SR

Editor-in-Chief Megan Gleason

Sports Editor Matthew Salcido

Managing Editor John Scott

Culture Editor Natalie Jude

Editorial Staff

Telephone: (505) 277-7527 Fax: (505) 277-7530 news@dailylobo.com www.dailylobo.com

News Editor Zara Roy

Advertising Manager Jordynn Sills Campus Representative Jacob Griego

Advertising Representatives Brenna Henning Natalie Hughes

Advertising Staff

Telephone: (505) 277-5656 advertising@dailylobo.com www.dailylobo.com

Photo Editor Mackenzie Schwartz Designer Joseph McKee

Classifieds Representaive Mariah Rosales

Copy Editor Liam DeBonis Multimedia Editor Shelby Kleinhans

Advertising Design Mariah Rosales

UNM Land Acknowledgement statement

stewards of this land throughout the generations and also acknowledge our committed relationship to Indigenous peoples. We gratefully recognize our history.

Founded in 1889, the University of New Mexico sits on the traditional homelands of the Pueblo of Sandia. The original peoples of New Mexico – Pueblo, Navajo, and Apache – since time immemorial, have deep connections to the land and have made significant contributions to the broader community statewide. We honor the land itself and those who remain

This statement was developed by Pam Agoyo, director of American Indian Student Services and special assistant to the president on American Indian Affairs, in consultation with the Native American Faculty Council.


@DailyLobo

NEW MEXICO DAILY LOBO

MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2022 / PAGE 5

REVIEW

‘Spider-Man: No Way Home’ gracefully swings MCU out of 2021 By Elizabeth Secor @esecor2003

This review contains spoilers for “Spider-Man: No Way Home” and “Spider-Man: Far From Home” After a year of zero Marvel releases in 2020, Marvel ended 2021 with a bang with “Spider-Man: No Way Home.” This film was well worth the wait after being delayed almost half a year from its original release date, taking the audience on a journey that combined both the old and new in a stunning display of cinema. “Spider-Man: No Way Home” was highly anticipated not only due to the rumors swirling of previous Spider-Man actors returning, but also because this film almost didn’t happen. In August 2019, a dispute between Sony and Marvel over contract negotiations almost ended with the two companies splitting completely. Thank goodness we ended up getting the movie after all; I need-

ed answers to the last “Spider-Man” movie desperately. “No Way Home” picks up right where “Spider-Man: Far From Home” dropped off on a cliffhanger with Mysterio not only revealing Peter Parker’s identity as Spider-Man but also labeling him responsible for the London drone attack and Mysterio’s own death. This reveal and Mysterio’s false accusations cause Peter’s life to be turned upside down as well as the lives of his loved ones. To fix this, Doctor Strange and Peter, two of the smartest characters in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, seem to regress to one shared brain cell and use a dangerous spell to erase the memories of all who knew Peter as Spider-Man. Of course, the spell backfires — otherwise, there would be no movie — after Peter continuously interrupts Doctor Strange’s spell with exceptions for who can remember his identity and pure, glorious chaos ensues. Their actions rip open the multiverse, and

the movie kicks into top gear. The long-anticipated wait to see Andrew Garfield and Tobey Maguire in this film, both of whom have played Peter in former “Spider-Man” movies, culminated into an overload of excitement and joy for both myself and the entire theater that erupted into applause on opening night. Their comical entrances set the stage well for quality humor present throughout the film, and many of the scenes with all three Spider-Men were opportunities for good laughs, especially when they all explain how they shoot webs — one of my personal favorite moments. The interactions between all of the Spider-Men are still vivid in my mind weeks after seeing the film. Tom Holland, Garfield and Maguire truly bring the film from great to spectacular, and their on-screen dynamic showcases a unique bond over their experiences maintaining the responsibilities of a superhero. Meanwhile, the entrances of prior “Spider-Man” villains are full of sus-

pense as the audidence starts seeing tell-tale signs from Green Goblin’s bombs to sand bellowing up indicating Sandman. Maguire’s films are a dear memory from my childhood and I still can’t decide which was more exciting: the appearances by Doc Ock or the Green Goblin. “Spider-Man: No Way Home” achieves the grandiosity of mixing beloved characters in a way that other MCU movies wish they had reached (I’m looking at you “Avengers: Endgame”). This movie helps unite fans who’ve argued which Spider-Man actors and movies were better in the past by smashing them all together in this movie, making it a top contender for the best “Spider-Man” film. Even though the film relied partly on nostalgia from the audience, shown through iconic lines like “I’m something of a scientist myself” or the famous “with great power comes great responsibility,” it doesn’t depend on that feeling alone.

Another important aspect of the movie is that it fills us in on what Maguire has been up to as SpiderMan since we left him, and helps wrap up the loose ends of Garfield’s Spider-Man career after his time as Spider-Man came to an end far too early. Still, the film truly seemed to be Holland’s arc into becoming the main Spider-Man we all know and love — one who can stand on his own in his own right while not just being another Avenger. But, even though it’s nice seeing all the actors from other “SpiderMan” movies, this universe is still in chaos as the multiverse is being ripped open. In order to fix all the chaos that he started, Peter has Doctor Strange conduct the memory spell as it should have originally been done — with nobody remembering Peter. Of course, this leaves many questions: Do people offworld remember him? How does he buy an apartment at the end? When will his girlfriend M.J. and his best friend Ned remember him? I need answers. So, Marvel, if you could please put off all other films and release the next segment in the “Spider-Man” series as soon as possible, this fan and many more will appreciate it. Elizabeth Secor is a freelance reporter at the Daily Lobo. She can be contacted at culture@dailylobo.com or on Twitter @esecor2003

daily lobo HOUSING GUIDE LIVE LIKE A

LOBO

1

LIVE ON CAMPUS

NEW RESIDENTS

REGISTRATION OPENS

2.2.22 FOR

ACADEMIC YEAR 2022/2023

H O U S I N G .U N M . E D U IN-PERSON TOURS ARE NOW

AVAILABLE! MAKE YOUR RESERVATION NOW! EMAIL:

RLSHTOURS@UNM.EDU

ALL MAIN CAMPUS UNM HOUSING RESIDENCE HALLS SATISFY THE FRESHMAN RESIDENCY REQUIREMENT


PAGE 6 / MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2022

2

dailylobo.com

NEW MEXICO DAILY LOBO

FIND YOUR NEW HOME AT

THE VIEW ABQ ! s u t i s i v Come

M O C . Q B A THEVIEW SE SPORT ST. N A R T 3 0 0 3 87106 M N , E U Q R ALBUQUE

5 8 1 8 . 2 1 3 . 505

• • • • • • •

ALL INCLUSIVE UTILITIES ($35 electric cap) IN-UNIT WASHER/DRYER FULLY FURNISHED STAINLESS STEEL APPLIANCES SWIMMING POOL WITH GRILLING STATION GATED COMMUNITY PRIVATE SHUTTLE TO AND FROM CAMPUS


@DailyLobo

NEW MEXICO DAILY LOBO

MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2022 / PAGE 7

Women’s basketball snags close win against SDSU UNM ranks No. 1 in Mountain West women’s basketball standings

By Matthew Salcido @baggyeyedguy The University of New Mexico women’s basketball beat San Diego State University 75-72 on Sunday, Jan. 9 at The Pit. With this win, UNM has taken the top spot in the Mountain West conference and remains undefeated in conference play 4-0. SDSU’s Kamaria Gipson punished UNM on the boards early in the game, grabbing four offensive rebounds in the first four minutes and getting to the line twice. UNM didn’t continue their hot shooting from their game against Utah State last Thursday; they shot only 3-13 in the first five minutes of the game. It was their good fortune

that SDSU shot an even worse 1-10 during the same period. SDSU did a very good job covering the roller in UNM’s pick-and-rolls, and star forward Antonia Anderson had to leave the game after picking up two quick fouls in the first three minutes. UNM managed to score off of the fastbreak over the second five minutes of the first quarter, which helped them finish the quarter ahead 17-14. LaTascya Duff was the most efficient player of the quarter for the Lobos, scoring six points. SDSU continued to throw skip passes to far corner shooters who managed to hit threes before the Lobos defense could rotate to them. Jaedyn De La Cerda shot 2-4 from the field and 1-1 from the free throw

line in the second quarter to finish with six points. UNM continued their shooting struggles as a team from the field (3-13). The Lobos were burned in the first half by SDSU guard Asia Avinger who dished out five assists and six rebounds. Sharpshooter Mercedes Staples was on the receiving end of three of those assists and shot 4-5 from the field and 2-2 from three. UNM was able to stay with SDSU by getting to the line more, where they shot 7-11, and scored 11 fastbreak points. However, SDSU star Sophia Ramos was able to put her team up 31-29 with a last-second midrange shot off the dribble, though many Pit fans were convinced she pushed off. UNM’s two bigs, Anderson and

Shaiquel McGruder, came out aggressive in the second half. UNM’s ball handlers did a much better job of finding McGruder — who scored six in the third quarter — on rolls to the basket than in the first half. Anderson scored seven points off of a plethora of drives and dives. After the game, De La Cerda explained what head coach Mike Bradbury had told his players at halftime about getting the ball down low. “The coaches told us to attack the hedge, and the roller (would) always (be) open,” De La Cerda said. “It was open the first half, but sometimes we don’t always see it.” Anderson picked up her third foul on a reach-in with 4:38 left in the quarter, but Bradbury elected to leave

her in the game. Anderson managed to keep from fouling for the rest of the quarter, but UNM fouled seven times as a team in the third. UNM’s five starters all played the whole third quarter and managed to finish the quarter 51-50. Despite the heavy minutes they had played so far, the UNM starters began the fourth quarter with a higher energy level than they had played with in any of the earlier quarters. In the first three minutes of the quarter, the Lobos were a perfect 6-6 from the field, 2-2 from three and 1-1 from the line, and UNM extended their lead to 65-55. SDSU was forced to call a timeout.

see

SDSU page 8

daily lobo HOUSING GUIDE 3

LO B O R A I N F O R E ST ACADEMIC

DOWNTOWN

CULTURE

LIFESTYLE

THE PERFECT BLEND OF

CLASS & COOL

REGISTRATION OPENS 2.2.22 FOR

ACADEMIC YEAR 22/23

H O U S I N G .U N M . E D U SHUTTLE SERVICE PROVIDED

IN-PERSON TOURS ARE

AVAILABLE MAKE YOUR RESERVATION NOW! EMAIL:

RLSHTOURS@UNM.EDU

UNIQUE 2 BED / 2 BATH APARTMENT-STYLE LIVING

Housing Guide Map

3

UNM

1 Residence Life 2 The View Abq 3 Lobo Rainforest

1

Apartments WWW.UNMRENTALS.COM Awesome university apartments Unique, hardwood floors, FPs, courtyards, fenced yards. Houses, cottages, efficiencies, studios, 1, 2 and 3BDRMs. Garages. 505-843-9642. Open 6 days/week. QUIET, CLEAN, AFFORDABLE, 1BDRM, $680/mo. Utilities included. 2 blocks to UNM, no pets, NS. 301 Harvard SE 505-262-0433.

2


dailylobo.com

PAGE 8 / MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2022

SDSU

from page

NEW MEXICO DAILY LOBO

7

Mackenzie Schwartz / Daily Lobo / @mackenzid5

Lobos guard Aniyah Augmon (#12) catches a pass at The Pit in November 2021.

UNM cooled off slightly after the break (1-3 on their next three shots), but their far bigger problem was SDSU’s offensive rebounding. SDSU then began pressuring UNM full court with a 2-1-2 defense. UNM was up 73-63 with one minute left, and SDSU didn’t try to foul. SDSU managed to cut the Lobos’ lead to 73-67 with 14 seconds left, and SDSU gained possession after a UNM fumble out of bounds. SDSU lobbed the ball over UNM’s heads in a good inbounds play following a timeout, making the score 73-69. Bradbury decided to call a timeout to talk things over with 12 seconds left. UNM was unable to get the ball inbounds, prompting another timeout from Bradbury. This time UNM was able to get the ball to Duff, who was fouled and went to shoot bonus free throws. She made both, but SDSU’s Mallory Adams responded with a three.

UNM called their last timeout with 2.7 seconds left, up 75-72. They managed to get the ball inbounds and take a win, remaining undefeated in conference play 4-0. UNM’s biggest problem continues to be rebounding, and they lost this battle on the offensive boards 24-8. SDSU managed to score 16 secondchance points to UNM’s one, and they also managed to play much deeper into their bench, though UNM’s starting five should be expected to play the majority of minutes for the rest of the season. UNM will have a bit of a break before heading out to play at the University of Wyoming on Thursday, Jan. 13. Matthew Salcido is the sports editor at the Daily Lobo. He can be contacted at sports@dailylobo.com or on Twitter @baggyeyedguy

Men’s basketball loses chaotic game to Utah State By Matthew Salcido @baggyeyedguy The University of New Mexico men’s basketball team lost in a frenzied overtime to Utah State University 87-90 Saturday at The Pit. The Lobos were without their head coach Richard Pitino who tested positive for COVID-19 earlier that day. UNM outscored the Aggies 4227 in the first half and shot 51.7% from the field and a scorching 1015 from three-point range. The hot shooting was mainly the result of the Lobos’ willing ball movement, which acting head coach Eric Brown said had been a focus in the week of practices leading up to Saturday’s game. UNM tallied 12 assists in the first half alone. The Lobos played solid defense in the first half, and Utah State struggled to make shots. Javonté Johnson and Jay Allen-Tovar did a solid job defending Aggie star Justin Bean and the Lobos managed to out-rebound their opponent 18-14. The second half was a different story for both teams. UNM struggled to defend in transition and allowed Utah State to score 13

fastbreak points. In the halfcourt, Utah State was able to drive easily into the paint, and too often they were uncontested once they reached the basket. Offensively, UNM leaned heavily on Jamal Mashburn Jr., who scored 14 points and dished out four assists, but Utah State was able to disrupt the fluid ball movement that UNM had shown in the first half by employing multiple defenses. Brown said after the game that these defenses were able to take away the Lobos’ rhythm in the second half. “I think we took some quick shots,” Brown said. “I thought we had a couple of offensive possessions that got away from us in the second half.” Emmanuel Kuac was forced to come out of the game due to an injury with 3:14 left in the second half. Kuac immediately began hopping on his right foot to avoid putting any weight on his left. This injury came in his first start of the season, and this season had already been shortened by a previous injury. An announcement was made Sunday, Jan. 9 that Kuac had surgery on his lower left leg and will miss the remainder of the Lobos’ season.

Liam DeBonis / Daily Lobo / @LiamDebonis

Lobos guard Jamal Mashburn Jr. (#5) shoots a basket during a game against Utah State on Saturday Jan. 8 at The Pit.

It was a tight game from then on until the end of regulation; neither team ever led by more than three. A pair of free throws from Trevin Dorius put Utah State up 73-74 with one minute left. UNM guard Jaelen House missed a three-point attempt and then fouled Utah State’s Steven

Ashworth. UNM called a timeout and substituted in sharpshooter K.J. Jenkins before Ashworth managed to make both of his free throws, putting the Aggies up 73-76 with only 15 seconds left. UNM was able to respond with a House three, assisted by Mashburn, tying the score 76-76. With

only three seconds left, Utah State hastened to get the ball inbounds and managed to bank in what would have been the gamewinning half-court shot; however, they had missed that UNM had managed to call timeout just

see

COUPON BONANZA

Utah State page 9

The Finest and Most Authentic NY Style Pizza in Albuquerque $1.00 Cheese Slice Tuesdays!

3410 Central Ave

2-4pm

(Next to Flying Star)

232-2808

Toppings extra. Dine in only. Not valid with any other offers.

DINE IN | CARRYOUT

Home of the Giant Slice!

Expires 01/16/2022

BOX LUNCH 95 SPECIAL $8

Sandwich/Wrap + Soup & Cookie

Coupon good at Annapurna’s World Vegetarian Cafe. Limit one coupon per person, per visit. Expires 01/16/2022.

2201 Silver Avenue SE (corner of Silver & Yale)

A® CAR-M TO GO e curbside servic

262-2424

5939 4th Street NW Albuquerque 254-2424

5200 Eubank NE Albuquerque 275-2424

Buy 1 get 1 Free

$9.99 18 ” Extra Large Cheese Pizza Dine in and Carry out. Not valid with any other offers. Limit 2 per customer

Dine in and Carry out. Not valid with any other offers. Additional toppings extra.

Expires 01/16/2022

WELCOME NEW STUDENTS! Vegan and Gluten Free Baked Goods Catering Available CHAI HAPPY H Soy-free, wheat-free bakery OUR Tasty made from scratch menu 3-5pm daily

See our Green & Chef’s Plate Specials Online

www.worldvegetariancafe.com

Cheese slice Expires 01/16/2022

®


@DailyLobo

NEW MEXICO DAILY LOBO

Utah State

from page

8

Liam DeBonis / Daily Lobo / @LiamDebonis

Lobos guard Jaelen House (#10) drives the ball down court during a game against Utah State on Saturday, Jan. 8 at The Pit.

y Day 11 p m E v e r m a 5 N OPE tral SE 2400 Cen

K L A W ON ! R E OV OPEN 5am - 11pm 2400 Central SE

MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2022 / PAGE 9

before so it didn’t count. Out of the timeout, Utah State needed to perform their second miracle in a row to win the game. They heaved the ball to Bean, who had to elevate high next to the bench sideline at halfcourt. With no chance to get a shot off, he managed to land on one inbounds foot before stepping out. UNM fans felt certain that a turnover had been committed, but quickly became outraged when the officiating crew determined that Utah State had called a timeout before Bean’s foot went out of bounds. After the timeout, Utah State looked to Bean again, who missed as time ran out. The two teams traded baskets in the overtime period, and again the game came down to its closing seconds. House fouled out with 1:01 left in the period. At 0:59, down 84-86, the Lobos got the rebound and went looking to tie the game. Utah State managed to clamp down defensively and forced a shot-clock vio-

lation on the Lobos. Ashworth was then fouled and made two free throws, putting Utah State up 84-88. Mashburn drove in quickly and scored an and-1, but with only eight seconds left, UNM’s chances to tie the game were bleak. All they could do was foul, and the game ended as a Utah State victory, 87-90. UNM was able to control the game when they moved the ball and didn’t force shots. The epitome of this was Johnson, who played within the offense and finished with 23 points and seven threes. UNM’s offense was a big step up from their struggles and recent loss against the University of Nevada, Reno. The team will get a chance to improve against the University of Nevada, Las Vegas out of state on Tuesday, Jan. 18. Matthew Salcido is the sports editor at the Daily Lobo. He can be contacted at sports@dailylobo.com or on Twitter @baggyeyedguy

WELCOME BACK! GOOD MORNING SPECIAL valid only from 5 am - 11 am

Save $1.75

(Egg, Cheese, Green Chile, and Hashbrowns wrapped in a fresh Flour Tortilla)

Frontier Coupon

Breakfast Burrito

For only

OPEN 5am - 11pm Every Day 2400 Central SE

$3.75

Reg. $5.50

GREEN CHILE CHEESEBURGER

EPT ! K T BES TOWN E H T ET IN SECR

(Green Chile, Tomato, Pickle, Onion, Lettuce, Salad Dressing & Cheddar Cheese)

with a regular For only

OPEN 5am - 11pm Every Day 2400 Central SE

$5.90

One coupon per customer. Not valid with any other offers. Expires 01/14/2022

Save $1.65 Frontier Coupon

Reg. $7.55

One coupon per customer. Not valid with any other offers. Expires 01/14/2022

TACO TUESDAY THURSDAY WEDNESDAY FIESTA BURGER Save SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL $1.65 (Red or Green Chile, Cheddar Cheese, Onion, & Lettuce)

2 Crunchy Tacos 2 Carne Adovada withBurritos a regular and a regular soda & Fries or iced tea For only

$5.50

OPEN 5am - 1am Every Day 2400 Central SE

$4.50 $5.50Reg. $6.15

ForFor only only

No coupon necessary!

Frontier Pile-Up

No coupon necessary!

with red chile or green chileFrontier stew Coupon One coupon per customer.

For only

$5.50

Not valid with any other offers. No coupon Expires 11/11/16

necessary!


HAPS

PAGE 10 / MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2022

NEW MEXICO DAILY LOBO

The Entertainment Guide

Monday

Test With Truman Be Empowered. Know Your Status. Walk-in HIV Testing Monday: 8am-noon 801 Encino Pl NE Sunshine Theater Jan 31 Doors Open 7pm Hinder: Winter Tour 2022 Ages 21+ (505) 764-0249 120 Central Ave Albuquerque, NM 87102

Masks Y Mas Find the best Central and Latin novelties! Mon-Thurs 11am-6pm facebook.com/masksymas 505-256-4183 3106 Central Ave. SE, 87106

Enchanted Circle Brewing $5 half-dozen wings dine-in special Happy Hour 4-6pm Open 12-9 505-433-2642 6001 San Mateo Blvd NE, 87106

Salt and Board 115 Harvard SE, Suite #9 Open from 11am-10pm Happy Hour 3-6pm, Mon-Fri (505) 219-2001

Visit Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Cir, Santa Fe, NM 87507 Thurs-Mon: 10AM–8PM (505) 395-6369 Thirsty Eye Brewing Company Closed Mondays (505)639-5831 206 Broadway Blvd. SE Albuquerque, NM 87102

Guild Cinema Visit guildcinema.com for more showtimes! (505) 255-1848 3405 Central Avenue NE, Albuquerque, NM 87106

We look forward to serving you, 505.639.5831

dailylobo.com

Cheers! Hours:

206 Broadway Blvd SE Albuquerque, NM 87102

Tuesday

Thirsty Eye Brewing Company Come by for craft beers and wine in a fun, artistic atmosphere! Tues-Thurs 3-9pm (505)639-5831 206 Broadway Blvd. SE Albuquerque, NM 87102 Enchanted Circle Brewing $6.95 / 2 Tacos dine-in special Happy Hour 4-6pm Open 12-9 505-433-2642 6001 San Mateo Blvd NE, 87106 Guild Cinema Visit guildcinema.com for more showtimes! (505) 255-1848 3405 Central Avenue NE, Albuquerque, NM 87106 Sunshine Theater Visit sunshinetheaterlive.com for more shows! (505) 764-0249 120 Central Ave, Albuquerque, NM 87102

Tues-Thurs 3-9 pm Fri-Sat 1-10 pm

Beer • Music • Wine • Art

Masks Y Mas Find the best Central and Latin novelties! Mon-Thurs 11am-6pm facebook.com/masksymas 505-256-4183 3106 Central Ave. SE, 87106

BE EMPOWERED.

Know your status. Be #LoboProud

Salt and Board 115 Harvard SE, Suite #9 Open from 11am-10pm Happy Hour 3-6pm, Mon-Fri (505) 219-2001

Guild Cinema Visit guildcinema.com for more showtimes! (505) 255-1848 3405 Central Avenue NE, Albuquerque, NM 87106

Test With Truman Be Empowered. Know Your Status. Walk-in HIV Testing Tuesday: 1pm-5pm 801 Encino Pl NE

Thirsty Eye Brewing Company Come by for craft beers and wine in a fun, artistic atmosphere! Tues-Thurs 3-9pm (505) 639-5831 206 Broadway Blvd. SE Albuquerque, NM 87102

Wednesday Test With Truman Be Empowered. Know Your Status. 801 Encino Pl NE 505-272-1312 Sunshine Theater Visit sunshinetheaterlive.com for more shows! (505) 764-0249 120 Central Ave, Albuquerque, NM 87102 Guild Cinema Visit guildcinema.com for more showtimes! (505) 255-1848 3405 Central Avenue NE, Albuquerque, NM 87106 Masks Y Mas Find the best Central and Latin novelties! Mon-Thurs 11am-6pm facebook.com/masksymas 505-256-4183 3106 Central Ave. SE, 87106 Enchanted Circle Brewing $5 Plain-Jane burger dine-in special Happy Hour 4-6pm Open 12-9 505-433-2642 6001 San Mateo Blvd NE, 87106 Thirsty Eye Brewing Company Come by for craft beers and wine in a fun, artistic atmosphere! Tues-Thurs 3-9pm (505) 639-5831 206 Broadway Blvd. SE Albuquerque, NM 87102 Salt and Board 115 Harvard SE, Suite #9 Open from 11am-10pm Happy Hour 3-6pm, Mon-Fri (505) 219-2001

Thursday Test With Truman Be Empowered. Know Your Status. Walk-in HIV Testing Thursday: 5pm-7pm 801 Encino Pl NE

Test with Truman. (505) 272-1312 Walk in HIV testing hours: Mon. 8 a.m. - noon Tues. 1 p.m. - 5 p.m. Thurs. 5 p.m. - 7 p.m.

Sunshine Theater Visit sunshinetheaterlive.com for more shows! (505) 764-0249 120 Central Ave, Albuquerque, NM 87102 Salt and Board 115 Harvard SE, Suite #9 Open from 11am-10pm Happy Hour 3-6pm, Mon-Fri (505) 219-2001 Masks Y Mas Find the best Central and Latin novelties! Mon-Thurs 11am-6pm facebook.com/masksymas 505-256-4183 3106 Central Ave. SE, 87106 Enchanted Circle Brewing $10 Steak Dinner dine-in special $5 Martinis Happy Hour 4-6pm Open 12-9 505-433-2642 6001 San Mateo Blvd NE, 87106

Friday Test With Truman Be Empowered. Know Your Status. 801 Encino Pl NE 505-272-1312 Visit Meow Wolf See ad for event information! 1352 Rufina Cir, Santa Fe, NM 87507 Thurs-Mon: 10AM–10PM (505) 395-6369 Salt and Board 115 Harvard SE, Suite #9 Open from 11am-11pm Happy Hour 3-6pm, Mon-Fri (505) 219-2001 Thirsty Eye Brewing Company Come by for craft beers and wine in a fun, artistic atmosphere! Friday and Saturday 1-10pm (505) 639-5831 206 Broadway Blvd. SE Albuquerque, NM 87102 Sunshine Theater Jan 28 Doors Open 6pm Bad Suns with Kid Bloom* Little Image BadSuns.com All Ages (505) 764-0249 120 Central Ave, Albuquerque, NM 87102 Guild Cinema Visit guildcinema.com for more showtimes! (505) 255-1848 3405 Central Avenue NE, Albuquerque, NM 87106


HAPS @DailyLobo

NEW MEXICO DAILY LOBO

Friday (cont)

MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2022 / PAGE 11

The Entertainment Guide

Masks Y Mas Find the best Central and Latin novelties! Fri & Sat: 11am-7pm facebook.com/masksymas 505-256-4183 3106 Central Ave. SE, 87106

Enchanted Circle Brewing Open 12-9 505-433-2642 6001 San Mateo Blvd NE, 87106

Enchanted Circle Brewing Stand Up Comedy Show 8pm Happy Hour 4-6pm Open 12-9 505-433-2642 6001 San Mateo Blvd NE, 87106

Sunday

Saturday Test With Truman Be Empowered. Know Your Status. 801 Encino Pl NE 505-272-1312 Sunshine Theater Feb 19 Doors Open 7pm IGORRR* Melt-Banana* VOWWS Spirituality and Distortion North American Tour 2022 All Ages 120 Central Ave, Albuquerque, NM 87102

Sunshine Theater Feb 6 Doors Open 7pm The Halluci Nation (fka A Tribe Called Red) www.TheHalluciNation.com All Ages 120 Central Ave, Albuquerque, NM 87102

Salt and Board 115 Harvard SE, Suite #9 Open from 11am-11pm (505) 219-2001

Masks Y Mas Find the best Central and Latin novelties! Sun 12pm-5pm facebook.com/masksymas 505-256-4183 3106 Central Ave. SE, 87106 Guild Cinema Visit guildcinema.com for more showtimes! (505)255-1848 3405 Central Avenue NE, Albuquerque, NM 87106 Test With Truman Be Empowered. Know Your Status. 801 Encino Pl NE 505-272-1312

Salt and Board 115 Harvard SE, Suite #9 Open from 11am-10pm (505) 219-2001 Thirsty Eye Brewing Company Closed Sundays (505)639-5831 206 Broadway Blvd. SE Albuquerque, NM 87102

Thirsty Eye Brewing Company Come by for craft beers and wine in a fun, artistic atmosphere! Friday and Saturday 1-10pm (505)639-5831 206 Broadway Blvd. SE Albuquerque, NM 87102 Masks Y Mas Find the best Central and Latin novelties! Fri & Sat: 11am-7pm facebook.com/masksymas 505-256-4183 3106 Central Ave. SE, 87106

Enchanted Circle Brewing NFL Sunday Ticket $1 Beer Flights Open 11-9 505-433-2642 6001 San Mateo Blvd NE, 87106

Guild Cinema Visit guildcinema.com for more showtimes! (505) 255-1848 3405 Central Avenue NE, Albuquerque, NM 87106

Happy Hour 3-6pm, Mon-Fri

GIFT SHOP

505-256-4183

3106 CENTRAL AVE SE ALBUQUERQUE, NM 87106 • • • • •

Canvas Printing Cotton Rag Paper Photo Enlargements Banners Y Mucho Mas

/masksymas MasksYMas.com

Did you find anything to do?

Orange you glad you checked

the HAPS!

Charcuterie. Wine and Craft Beer.

Across from UNM! 115 Harvard SE, Albuquerque • 505-219-2001 • saltandboard.com

January 2022 Special Events

Coming Soon JAN 11-13

A SON

JAN 11-13

THE VELVET QUEEN

6 PM

JAN 14

10:30 PM

JAN 14 1 PM

4 PM, 8 PM

JAN 14-17

PASSING

6 PM

JAN 21

10 :30 PM

JAN 22

10 :30 PM

3405 Central Avenue NE Albuquerque, NM

505.255.1848 www.guildcinema.com

JAN 14-17

THE POWER OF THE DOG

3:30 PM 8 PM

MORE COMING SOON!


dailylobo.com

PAGE 12 / MONDAY, JANUARY 10, 2022

NEW MEXICO DAILY LOBO

Your #1 source for UNM News

the many ways to find us...

stay updated on our website dailylobo.com

Look Us Up...

Daily Lobo

Look Us Up...

Follow Us...

Daily Lobo

Friend Us... Add Us... Follow Us...FOR RELEASE NOVEMBER 6, 2017 facebook.com/

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

ACROSS 1 Draw forth 6 Vitello __ parmigiana: ristorante offering 10 Map out 14 Jeans material 15 Porky Pig or Elmer Fudd 16 Hawaiian dance 17 *Degree earner’s celebration 20 “Life of Pi” author __ Martel 21 Cookie containers 22 Fields of study 23 Off base sans permission, in the mil. 25 Italian volcano 27 *Math student’s pad 31 Big galoots 35 Vermouth bottle name 36 Dazed and confused 38 “Lost” network 39 Pop’s pop ... or, divided into three parts, what the answers to starred clues have in common 42 Foe of Chiang 43 ’40s coat-andtrousers outfit 45 Quickly looks over 47 Jazz legend James 48 *Lawn repair piece 51 Dick Tracy’s love __ Trueheart 53 Thin stream of smoke 54 Is __: likely will 57 Many a freshman 59 Triangle ratio 63 *More promising job, say 66 Crowd sound 67 Casting-off place 68 The John B, e.g. 69 Requests 70 Tarzan raisers 71 Coin with Lincoln

Level 1 2 3 4 December 13th issue puzzle solved

dailylobo

@dailylobo

crossword

sudoku

Subscribe to Us...

dailylobo DailyLobo Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

@dailylobo

DOWN 1 Like avant-garde art 2 Aloe __

11/6/17

By Brian Thomas

3 __ empty stomach 4 Snatches for ransom 5 Flightless Aussie bird 6 Number one Hun 7 Pork cut 8 Bit of unfinished business 9 Cape NNW of Cod 10 Exodus tyrant 11 Attract 12 Opposite of baja 13 Those opposed 18 Perched on 19 Searing utensil 24 Taylor and Fillmore, politically 26 Ensnare 27 Enjoy the field, as cattle do 28 Automaton 29 Neckwear for Fred in “Scooby-Doo” 30 Ship of 1492 32 Set one’s sights on 33 Swiss coin 34 Trudge through water 37 Hornets and yellow jackets

December 13thPuzzle issue puzzle solved Saturday’s Solved

©2017 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

40 Persians on the floor 41 Local landing location 44 Ragged clothes 46 Time-release med 49 Takes an oath 50 Reasons to repent 52 Waiting time at the DMV, seemingly

11/6/17

54 Taj Mahal city 55 Golf instructors 56 Shipbuilding wood 58 Sport with swords 60 Cold War curtain material? 61 Bright sign 62 Catch sight of 64 UV index monitor: Abbr. 65 Sugar amt.

DAILY LOBO CLASSIFIEDS 7 days of online advertising and 1 days of print , for 85¢ per word per week. Logos or pictures can be added to print and online publications for $24.99 per week.

classifieds@dailylobo.com www.dailylobo.com 505-277-5656

CLASSIFIED INDEX Announcements Announcements Auditions Fun, Food, Music Garage Sales Health & Wellness Legal Notices Looking for You Lost and Found Services Travel Want to Buy Your Space

Housing Apartments Condos Duplexes Houses for Rent Houses for Sale Housing Wanted Office Space Rooms for Rent Sublets

For Sale Audio & Video Bikes & Cycles Computer Stuff Pets For Sale Furniture Textbooks Vehicles for Sale

Employment Child Care Jobs Jobs off Campus Jobs on Campus Internships Jobs Wanted Volunteers Work Study Jobs

ON THE WEB

STUDENT ADVERTISING

CLASSIFIED RATES

Special effects are charged additionally per line: bold, italics, centering, blank lines, larger font, etc. Color is available for 85¢ per line per day.

Come to Marron Hall, room 107, show your UNM ID and recieve FREE classifieds in Your Space, Rooms for Rent, and For Sale category. Limitations apply.

CLASSIFIED DEADLINE

Rates include both print and online editions of the Daily Lobo.

PAYMENT INFORMATION

Pre-payment by cash, check, money order, Visa, MasterCard, American Express or Discover is required.

1 p.m.. business day before publication.

PLACING YOUR AD

Phone: 505-277-5656 Fax: 505-277-7530 Email: classifieds@dailylobo.com In person: Room 107 in Marron Hall. Web: www.dailylobo.com Mail: UNM Student Publications MSC03 2230 1 University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131

Check out ads with this icon...

DAILY LOBO CLASSIFIEDS new mexico

In the following categories: - Apartments - Duplexes - Houses for Rent

- Houses for Sale - Rooms for Rent

In the Daily Lobo Housing Guide... Services PAPER DUE? FORMER UNM instructor, Ph.D., English, published, can help. 505-569-2626 (Text Only); 505254-9615 (Voice Only). www.WritingandEditingABQ.com

Health & Wellness DEPRESSED? CALL AGORA277-3013.

Apartments WWW.UNMRENTALS.COM Awesome university apartments Unique, hardwood floors, FPs, courtyards, fenced yards. Houses, cottages, efficiencies, studios, 1, 2 and 3BDRMs. Garages. 505-843-9642. Open 6 days/week. QUIET, CLEAN, AFFORDABLE, 1BDRM, $680/mo. Utilities included. 2 blocks to UNM, no pets, NS. 301 Harvard SE 505-262-0433.

Rooms For Rent Hey Lobos! Did you know you can receive free advertisements (25 words or less) in this category? Email classifieds@dailylobo.com from your UNM email account or call 505-277-5656 for more details!

Textbooks Hey Lobos! Did you know you can receive free advertisements (25 words or less) in this category? Email classifieds@dailylobo.com from your UNM email account or call 505-277-5656 for more details!

Page 5-7

Find the Perfect Roommates

Jobs Off Campus THE VILLAGE OF Los Lunas is currently recruiting for an Accountant. December 2021 graduates are welcome to apply. To apply, visit the Village webpage, http://www.loslunasnm.gov/ Jobs.aspx LAW OFFICE LEGAL ASSISTANT: P/T Job Opening (Mon – Fri. 8:00 am – 12:30 pm or 12:30 – 5:00): Medium – sized law firm working in the areas of natural resource law seeking personable, detail – oriented professional to assist with general office duties. Great work environment. Competitive pay scale DOE; start immediately; interested candidates should email resume detailing relevant experience; transcript(s) and letter of interest and references to jb@lrpa-usa.com. GRANTS ADMINISTRATOR $60K to 70K. Full Benefits. Located on VA Campus near airport brinm.org/about/careers/ SEEKING ANTHROPOLOGY GRADUATE student (or similar education/ experience) with strong writing skills for southern NM archaeology website. CV, cover letter to ellen@nmhumanities.org by Jan 24. More: nmhumanities.org/jobs/ LANGUAGE LEARNING CENTER (Ortega Hall, 1st floor) is hiring Lab Attendants and IT Lab Attendants for Spring 2022. Work-study required. Must be responsible & friendly, will train. Apply at UNMJobs (req18255, req18254)

www.dailylobo.com

The Daily Lobo is digital first! The Daily Lobo will publish new content every day on our website, dailylobo.com, on our mobile app, and publish a print issue every Monday and Thursday!

bo

/DailyLo

obo

@DailyL

@DailyL

obo

o dailylob

www.dailylobo.com