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Art of quarantine — and of the times — page 4; Katrina Karkazis and ‘Testosterone: An Unauthorized Biography’ with Labyrinth, 12.

©

10, 20 JUNE

609-452-7000 • PrincetonInfo.com

Summer Arts Go Digital

Concerts, Art Exhibits, and more fill the summer schedule. Page 6

The late Robert Sakson’s watercolor ‘Mancos Boardwalk - Ocean City’ (above) is part of the Trenton City Museum’s online memorial exhibition.

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U.S. 1

JUNE 10, 2020

Police Accountability

A

MANAGING EDITOR Sara Hastings ARTS EDITOR Dan Aubrey DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL INITIATIVES Joe Emanski ADMINISTRATIVE COORDINATOR

Megan Durelli

PRODUCTION MANAGER Stacey Micallef SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Jennifer Steffen

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Mark Nebbia

ADMINISTRATIVE ADVERTISING ASSISTANTS

Gina Carillo, Casey Phillips CO-PUBLISHERS Jamie Griswold, Tom Valeri ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Thomas Fritts FOUNDING EDITOR Richard K. Rein, 1984-2019

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strike define the boundaries of our liberty. But ultimately we are accountable for defining that balance and those boundaries. For Americans are not subjects; our rights are not conferred by royal or statist s the Director of the Eagle- elites. Our freedoms are our birthton Institute of Politics, which right, policed only with our conworks to teach and uphold the val- sent. ues that underlie our democracy, Abuse of the policing power and as Director of the Miller Center calls into question, therefore, the within that Institute, which has very legitimacy of our democracy. worked in cities nationwide and in We can understand the dangers and Europe to build trust between po- difficulties inherent in policing, but lice and vulnerable populations, it we have a right to demand that pois hard to overstate my shock and lice uphold accountable standards outrage at the senseless, of unbiased professionbrutal, and unjust killing al and constitutional of George Floyd and the Between conduct. inability — and seeming Let’s not be naive. The unwillingness — of our There is, and always Lines nation’s media and leadwill be, an irreducible ers to unify the Amerielement of racism and can people in response. I other less overt forms of write to express that outrage, but bigotry in America; that is the buralso to renew my commitment to den of our past. While it can be fight for the equal justice under law eased, it will never be erased. But it that is our Constitution’s elusive simply cannot be tolerated in the ideal. conduct of police without underI have spent much of the past mining the stability of our entire two decades working at the raw in- democratic edifice. tersection of policing and vulneraIt is not asking too much of poble populations. Based on those lice, therefore, to conform to unbiexperiences, I have come to believe ased standards of professional conthat unbiased, professional polic- duct; that is essential, and the vast ing is the most essential mission to majority do. On the other hand, our republic’s well-being, and also, however, it is asking too much to at times, the hardest. expect that unbiased policing alone The police must maintain civic will fix the underlying problem of order while upholding our consti- racism and other forms of discrimitutional freedoms; they necessarily nation in our society. patrol the fault lines that define our As long as our society leaves culture. The balance their actions vulnerable populations isolated and neglected, with minimal opportunities, in conditions unmitiU.S. 1 WELCOMES letgated by other forms of communiters to the editor, corrections, ty-building assistance, the police as and criticisms of our stories well as the affected communities and columns. E-mail your will continue to be the victims of thoughts directly to our edithat neglect. The burden of our past tor: hastings@princetoninfo. and persisting neglect will be mancom. ifest in every fraught encounter.

U.S. 1 Is in Print & Online U.S. 1 has resumed print publication. Distribution is to news boxes located in downtown Princeton and Trenton, at train stations, and in other high-traffic outdoor areas. Additionally, it is now possible to browse full PDFs of recent issues on U.S. 1’s website, www.princetoninfo.com. Click on “Read This Week’s Digital U.S. 1 E-Edition Here.” A full digital edition of U.S. 1 is also distributed by e-mail every Wednesday. Subscribe at tinyurl.com/us1newsletter. The precise remedies may not be clear, and will differ from place to place, but we know now what won’t work. A concentration of police resources in areas of social neglect, unaccompanied by infusions of educational, health, employment and business incentives and resources, and burdened with our history, is a prescription for escalating confrontation and ultimate tragedy. Compassionate, even confessional, rhetoric, unaccompanied by the hard work of bringing people together, will be unavailing. We the governed also know what is essential to our consent: Be active. Be engaged. Care about all communities. Insist that injustice anywhere is not just a threat to justice but undermines it everywhere. Insist that our rights be respected. Insist that our voices be heard. Vote. Real progress awaits the day

when we turn away from our dark history of violence, oppression, and chaos, and bend together toward equal justice under la John J. Farmer, Jr. Director, Eagleton Institute of Politics Director, Miller Center for Community Protection and Resilience The writer is the former attorney general of the state of New Jersey.

Calls for Art & Fiction

U

.S.1 continues to accept submissions for its summer-long summer fiction celebration as well as its weekly Art of Quarantine section. Submissions of original short stories, short plays, and poetry are being accepted now for publication throughout the summer. We ask that writers limit themselves to two short stories or plays and/or five poems. Submit your previously unpublished work as soon as possible. Work will be considered for publication on a rolling basis. Submit work by e-mail to fiction@ princetoninfo.com. If you have any questions, send us an email or call 609-452-7000. Arts Editor Dan Aubrey is also continuing to curate a weekly Art of Quarantine section. This week’s installation, a timely work of commentary and street writing by Trenton artist Leon Rainbow, appears on page 4. To add your work to the Art of Quarantine collection, send a highresolution photograph of your piece and a brief statement explaining the inspiration for or significance of your artwork by email to Dan Aubrey at dan@princetoninfo. com.

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JUNE 10, 2020

SURVIVAL GUIDE

EmbraceRF

Wednesday, June 10

New Norm Marketing: How to Relaunch Your Business

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ith social distancing restrictions being lifted, the question is now how to start over. Businesses that were forced to shut their doors or alter the way the work due to COVID-19 now have to figure out how best to get back to normal. To help businesses relaunch, Daniel Beldowicz, director of business development at West Windsor-based strategic marketing firm CMA, leads a free webinar on how to relaunch your business on Wednesday, June 10, at 12:30 p.m. Register at www.cmasolutions.com/webinar. Beldowicz recently addressed the topic in a post on CMA’s blog.

Daniel Beldowicz of CMA leads a free webinar on how to relaunch your business on Wednesday, June 10.

will be looking for the next big thing, which will lead to a small evolution in the world of marketing. The end of lockdown will not mean a return to the “old normal.” The postCOVID-19 focus will be on removing obstacles for your customers. Digital will continue to grow and the new normal will focus on meeting customers where they are. Companies that were furthest along on the digital transformation journey prior to COVID-19 will be able to rebound and adapt to new customer demands more quickly. If you haven’t moved your brand online, now is the time to do so. Having an online presence will help you sell more by keeping you he COVID-19 pandemic has wreaked connected to your customers. For many businesses, the post-COVID-19 havoc across the world. As stay at home orders are lifted and business resumes, there relaunch is an opportunity to adapt to evolving will be a “new normal.” How will you navi- trends and consumer demands. More busigate the new landscape as restrictions are nesses will accept payments online, setting up loosened? What will that mean for your com- new delivery systems and procedures to make it easier for contactless payment and pickup. pany? How will you reboot your business? Prepare for the new normal now. Start by Restarting will look different for all businesses as companies open at different times communicating your offerings or reposition and in different ways. Companies that have them to meet your customers’ needs. Busistopped or paused marketing during COV- nesses that were able to maintain marketing ID-19, as well as those that were completely efforts to strengthen relationships with clishut down or were operating at limited ca- ents throughout the crisis will likely have an pacity during the pandemic will need to de- easier time rebounding. With a deeper cusvelop a strategy for relaunching. That will tomer connection, they will have a clear unmean rebuilding a digital footprint, as well derstanding of their customers’ challenges, constraints and demands and will be able to as the brand’s online presence. Your marketing strategy may have tailor offerings for a successful rebound. As you reboot your business, be transparworked well pre-COVID-19, but now you ent and communineed to do some finecate how you are retuning. That means starting. That will be taking a holistic apThe post-COVID-19 focus key to making cusproach and reexaminwill be on removing obstatomers feel comforting your SWOT cles for your customers. able in trusting your (strengths, weaknessbusiness and returnes, opportunities and Digital will continue to ing to your physical threats) analysis as grow, and the new normal location. Roll out part of your overall will focus on meeting cusmessaging that admarketing strategy. dresses your audiThen scan the new tomers where they are. ences’ concerns world for opportuniabout safety, as well ties and threats. View as expectations for your business through new goods and services. Continue to comyour customers’ post-COVID-19 eyes. What do they want to know? What is preventing municate with empathy and let your customthem from making a purchase or visiting ers know how you are keeping them and emyour business? Do you need to consider a ployees safe by adhering to new health and digital expansion to accommodate people safety protocols. who are shopping from home? Survey the Landscape: 3 Steps to CreOffering the same services to your former ate Your Relaunch Plan. Start with your clients will likely not cut it. The COVID-19 employees. Have a brainstorming session pandemic has revealed many new threats to with your team, after all they know your businesses — more than were ever imagin- business the best. What ideas do they have able. As you relaunch your business, take for relaunching? What is their comfort level advantage of what you’ve learned from the in returning to the office? How could your global pandemic. Use it as a time to set your services be re-imagined? business up for success. Take stock of your Ask your existing customers and vendors weaknesses and use your restart as an oppor- what their expectations are regarding returntunity to eliminate them. ing to your physical location. Get a feel for A successful relaunch means communi- their safety concerns and address them. Encating with empathy and acknowledging the suring they feel comfortable returning innew norm. Start by recognizing the changes person is crucial to relaunching. that have occurred and then determine how Engage in industry networking groups. your business can adapt. Look for gaps or Find out how your peer companies are reneeds that your business can fulfill to regain launching. Joining a group discussion with and grow your customer base. The post-CO- like-minded individuals and entrepreneurs VID-19 world is a different place, and there is a smart investment of your time. As part of are several steps that businesses need to fol- the relaunch, companies will need to build low to ensure a safe and successful relaunch. trust and communicate with transparency to How to Prepare for the ‘New Norm.’ both customers and employees. Your reWhile this pandemic is forcing many new opening is an opportunity to rebuild and crebehaviors on customers and businesses, in- ate a better future. Once you’ve surveyed the landscape and cluding a shift in mindset, many companies will miss an important step when relaunch- know what your customers’, employees’, and ing. They will continue to market using their vendors’ expectations are, there are some tacsame, familiar marketing practices, failing tical solutions you can start implementing to to pivot to a customer-based mindset. Continued on following page As we navigate the new normal, everyone

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U.S. 1

JUNE 10, 2020

The Art of Quarantine

Trenton street artist Leon Rainbow forwarded this recent work. While written during the pandemic quarantine, the catalyst for the work’s creation was the artist’s response to the disease of racism and the public’s reaction to the cruel death of George Floyd by members of the Minneapolis police. In Trenton, there were two days of energetic yet peaceful protests. That was before a mixed-race faction chose to be destructive and burned a police car and broke the windows of businesses, including those at the Mill Hill Saloon. Rainbow employed his talent with images and lettering — aka street writing — to express something that many in Trenton believe: ‘Spread Love – It’s the Trenton Way.’ It is a sign for our times.

Survival Guide Continued from preceding page

prepare for the relaunch. Think like your customers and mimic their behaviors as you plan your reopening. Four Strategies to Pave a Successful Comeback. Leverage your social media channels to communicate with your customers, clients and prospects. Communicating with transparency is going to be key in reestablishing your business, getting existing clients back, as well as attracting new customers. Use your website to announce your reopening, as well as new operating hours, guidelines or capacity limits. Include updates about how you are keeping your employees safe and how your sanitation efforts have ramped up. Use email marketing to let your customers know that you are open for business. Your email list is an invaluable tool and the most costeffective way to relaunch. Deliver compelling content and continue to serve as a resource. Share video tips or tutorials, offer webinars and free, downloadable resources. COVID-19 changed the psychology of marketing and the rules are being rewritten. With changes in purchasing trends — less luxury splurges and more of a focus on consumables and services — consumers are doing most of their shopping online and through mobile devices. The pandemic has caused a power shift to consumers — consuming better instead of more and patiently delaying purchases and waiting for discounts or price drops. With people spending more time on screens, making online purchases and forging digital connections there are countless opportunities to re-envision your business strategy to deliver on your brand promise.

Marketing is the Engine that Sells. During times of crisis and uncertainty, it may seem that marketing is obsolete, but it is quite the opposite. Time and time again history has proven that companies that continue to advertise and market during economic downturns bounce back and relaunch quicker than those that halt marketing operations. Marketing is the engine that helps to sell your products and services by attracting new customers and moving them through the sales process. Behind every crisis, there is an opportunity for growth. Following the global pandemic, digital marketing will continue to evolve, playing a pivotal role as businesses relaunch. That means your digital footprint, the way you make your first impression with a customer, is more important than ever. Your company needs to show up in search engine results, on social media and in your customers’ inboxes. If your digital presence doesn’t meet your customers’ expectations, they are unlikely to do business with you. Now more than ever, consumers are leveraging mobile devices to do research prior to making a purchase. And a mobile-first user experience is an absolute must. Your digital presence will ensure consumers know you are open and ready for business. That means your website and social media channels need to be maintained, monitored and updated regularly. Post-COVID-19 Roadmap for the Future. As part of your relaunch strategy, consider your company’s roadmap for the future. Are you set up to easily pivot if another crisis arises? Establishing a crisis management strategy should be a part of your strategy as you plan your foundation for growth and recovery. That means updating your SWOT analysis to include a

backup plan, so you are set up to pivot in case of another crisis or even a second wave of COVID-19. In any crisis situation, you need a strategy for how you will adapt as circumstances change. Remember the actions you take, reflect your brand. Taking the right actions and making smart decisions can be difficult in a fast-changing situation. But having a comprehensive crisis communications plan will help your organization mitigate negative fallout, much like stopping a viral outbreak. During a crisis, customers are not just evaluating your business on what you are saying and posting, they are paying careful attention to what you are doing and how you are responding. To read more visit www.cmasolutions.com/blog.

Business Meetings Wednesday, June 10

Lunch & Learn with SheTek’s Extraordinary Women, The Outlet. www.shetek.net. Chaya Pamula, SheTek founder and PamTen President and CEO, interviews Kristin Malek, senior manager of Superior Diversity at CDW. Register for Zoom link. 11 a.m. to noon. The Power of Storytelling, Ellevate Network. www.ellevatenetwork.com. Entrepreneur, presentation coach, and start-up advisor Heather Thomas gives a live webinar about the power of storytelling. Thomas is a managing partner at Ovid, a 25-year-old presentation coaching company, and founder of Winsome Consulting, a growth advisory firm. She graduated from Princeton University in 1994. Register. Free. Noon. New Norm Marketing: How to Relaunch Your Business, CMA. www.cmasolutions.com/webinar. Dan Beldowicz, CMA’s director of business development, leads a

free webinar. Register. 12:30 p.m. How Powerful Is Your Digital Presence?, Princeton SCORE. princeton.score.org. Suzanne Stingo discusses messaging, profiles, and metrics for business and personal social media accounts. Register. Free. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Thursday, June 11

SARS-CoV-2 Precautions, Testing, and Therapeutics, Princeton Innovation Center BioLabs. www.princetonbiolabs.com. Free webinar with Fox Rothschild intellectual property attorneys Gerard P. Norton, Jianming Jimmy Hao, and Nancy Halpern, and patent agent Joe Chen. Register. 2 p.m. Business After Business Virtual Networking, Princeton Mercer Regional Chamber of Commerce. www.princetonmercerchamber.org. Make connections over cocktails at home. Each participant will have the chance to deliver a 30 second commercial and join topical conversations in virtual breakout sessions. Register. 5 to 6:30 p.m. Virtual Meeting, Mercer’s Best Toastmasters. mercersbest. toastmastersclubs.org. Communications and leadership development. Guests welcome. Email contact-3375@toastmastersclubs.org for an invitation. 6:45 to 7:45 p.m.

Friday, June 12

JobSeekers, Professional Service Group of Mercer County. www.psgofmercercounty.org. Keri Zoumas offers daily steps for jobseekers focusing on building productivity, rapport, and communication. 9:45 a.m. to noon. How to Build Deeper, More Meaningful Connections with Donors, Volunteers and Staff, Women in Development. www. widmercer.org. Marge Smith, nonprofit consultant and founder of Princeton Community Works, leads a roundtable discussion to explore how nonprofit organizations are continuing to build con-

Princeton Community Works founder Marge Smith offers tips for nonprofits in a free webinar offered by Women in Development on Friday, June 12. nections in our “new normal.” Register. Free via Zoom. Noon to 1 p.m.

Monday, June 15

Protecting IP & Patents, Princeton SCORE. princeton.score.org. Scientist, entrepreneur, and inventor Roy J. Rosser introduces how to protect intellectual property and how to patent inventions. Register. Free. 6:30 p.m.

Tuesday, June 16

Build or Bide?, Princeton Entrepreneurship Council. entrepreneurs.princeton.edu. View professor John Danner’s TEDx talk about the personality characteristics of the entrepreneurs who build successful businesses, followed by a discussion on Zoom. Register via EventBrite. 5 p.m. JobSeekers. sites.google.com/ site/njjobseekers. For those seeking employment. Visit website for GoTo Meeting link. 7:30 to 8:30 p.m.


JUNE 10, 2020

ART

FILM

LITERATURE

U.S. 1

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DANCE DRAMA MUSIC

PREV I E W

VIRTUAL EVENTS, JUNE 10 TO 17 EVent Listings: E-mail events@princetoninfo.com All of the events listed below are taking place virtually unless noted otherwise. Visit venue websites for information about how to access the events. To include your event in this section email events@princetoninfo.com.

Wednesday June 10 Literati Library Live at Labyrinth, Princeton Public Library & Labyrinth Books. www.labyrinthbooks.com. Donovan Hohn, former editor at GQ and Harper’s, discusses his new book of essays on the borderlands between the natural and the human, “The Inner Coast,” with Jeff Sharlet, contributing editor at Harper’s, Virginia Quarterly Review, and Rolling Stone. Register. 6 p.m.

Kids Stuff

Meet the Animals, The Watershed Institute. www.thewatershed.org. Join Watershed Educator Samantha Bernstein as she feeds some of the resident animals in the Discovery Hall in the Watershed Center. Free on www. facebook.com/theH2Oshed. 11 a.m.

Thursday June 11 In Person Princeton Farmers Market, Franklin Avenue Lot, Princeton. www.princetonfarmersmarket. com. Vendors sell fresh produce, meats, baked goods, and artisanal products. Face coverings and social distancing required. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

rates on the museum’s past preservation effort. Zoom link available online. 5:30 p.m.

Mental Health

Dealing with the Pandemic & Quarantine through Healthy Coping Skills and Stress Reduction Techniques, NAMI NJ. www.naminj.org. Cristina Blasoni offers a webinar on coping skills, mindfulness, focusing exercises, acceptance techniques, and the benefits of meditation to use during the quarantine and beyond. Register. 6:30 p.m.

Film

Schools

Hollywood Streaming Nights, Princeton Garden Theater. www.princetongardentheatre.org. Hollywood Summer Nights are now Hollywood Streaming Nights. Join the YouTube live stream to chat with others during “Heartbeat,” a 1940s comedy that stars Ginger Rogers as a charming runaway. Available for free streaming through June 17. 7:30 p.m.

Virtual Discovery Day, Stuart Country Day School. www.stuartschool.org/openhouse. Learn more about the private school for girls from pre-K through high school. Register. 6 p.m.

Food & Dining

Settle Your Mind and Eat Mindfully, The Suppers Programs. www.thesuppersprograms.org. Dr. Joseph Wieliczko will define what we mean by racing thoughts and share techniques to settle your mind, quiet these thoughts and eat mindfully. Register. Free. Donation requested. 4 to 5 p.m.

Gardens

Socials

Art Making, Arts Council of Princeton & Princeton University Art Museum. artmuseum. princeton.edu. Artist Barbara DiLorenzo teaches “Drawing: Light, Values, and Shading” via Zoom. Free. 8 p.m.

Friday June 12 Classical Music

Thursday Night Nature, BowVirtually Yours: Princeton Festiman’s Hill wildflower Preserve, val Baroque Orchestra, PrinceNew Hope, Pennsylvania. www. ton Festival. www.princetonfestibhwp.org. Series of guest lectures val.org. WWFM 89.1 broadcasts a via Zoom continues with PollinaCO performance from the 2019 Princtors and Pollination Strategies Socials NS NEeton Festival. Visit website for full OnCOby CO Anne Borge. Register. l N T NEW Yours calendar of events. O$12. CONS NE Mary OMercer nyl C12OSTRUVirtually 7 to 8 p.m. Library Drawing Party, W n W N T CEp.m. Oyp 1 UNSRU8N Only CNS R E County Library. www.facebook. TI e2n UniTtRs CTW ly1 2Oa UNli-TRUNC W O com/mclsnj. Follow along O for Lectures e E n U T 1 U S p L d 2 n iF ts CefTIONN IO brarian-led drawing lesson, then en U iTtRs CTW all Let!IO edni ULC ION Preservation Needs Preshare your finished work. For all when 20 ft! N Fats Leserving: T N f ages. 7 p.m. The History of Conser17 ll 2 et!IO ft! N at the Princeton Univer0vation 1 sity 7 Art Museum, Princeton University Art Museum. artmuDaily updates seum.princeton.edu. Bart Deon TWitter volder, conservator at the Prince• PRINCETON ton University Art Museum, elabo255 NASSAU STREET @princetoninfo

The New Jersey Watercolor Society opened its yearlong virtual members exhibition on June 1. Curated by Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts painting department chair Al Gury, the exhibition features work by 73 artists, including show Merit Award recipient Lucy Graves-McVicker of Princeton’s ‘Nighttime NY II’ (above). The exhibition can be viewed at www.njwcs.org/VirtualGallery.htm.

Kids Stuff

For Seniors

Family Frogging, The Watershed Institute. www.thewatershed.org. Join Pat Heaney as she visits the Watershed Institute’s frog pond. Find out what kinds of frogs she catches and learn about their life cycle and adaptations. Register. 4 p.m.

Lessons from COVID-19, New Jersey Foundation for Aging. www.njfoundationforaging.org. “Impact on Age-Friendly Communities and Immigrant Families” presented by Katie York, Lifelong Montclair; and Jonelle Rodriguez, American Friends Service Committee. Register. 10 a.m. to noon.

In Conversation with Nilo Cruz, McCarter Theater. www.mccarter.org. Cuban-American and Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Nilo Cruz joins McCarter’s artistic director and resident playwright Emily Mann for a moderated conversation about playwriting, their friendship, and work as artistic collaborators. Register. 4:30 p.m.

Saturday June 13

Lectures

Outdoor Action

Friday Morning Nature Hike, The watershed Institute. www.thewatershed.org. Take a weekly hike via Facebook Live. Hikes will highlight seasonal wonders and encourage the viewer to find nature. Free at www.facebook.com/ theH2Oshed. 10 a.m.

In Person Farmers Market, Montgomery Friends of Open Space, Village Shopping Center, 1340 Route 206 South, Skillman, 609-915-0817. www.montgomeryfriends.org. Jersey Fresh produce and farm products, baked goods, chicken, eggs, sausage, and more. One person per family. Face covering required. 9 a.m. to noon. Continued on page 11

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JUNE 10, 2020

Summer Arts: Bell Dongs and Digital Doings

T

by Dan Aubrey

his year’s Summer Arts Preview reflects the strange season brought on by the pandemic and its effective containment through social distancing. So a good deal of the regular summer art offerings that bring crowds together have been put on hold until there is a medical allclear. And that is sad. After all, arts programming in the region has blossomed over the past several years. And with the inclusion of classical and jazz music events, professional theater, urban arts festivals, and more, the region has become New Jersey’s epicenter for summer culture. Another reality is that the groups haven’t gone away. And while they are not opening their venue doors this season, they are busy experimenting with new approaches to keep themselves vital and hopefully pay their bills (which also have not gone away). But in one special case, the presenter is just carrying on as usual. That “case” is the live, social distancing-compliant free concert music series featuring the region’s hugest musical instrument, the Princeton University Carillon. Using 67 racked bronze bells high in the Cleveland Tower, the annual “Tuning the Sky!” concerts, now in its 28th season, are scheduled at 1 p.m. on Sundays from July 5 through September 6. With music able to travel up to a mile in all directions, the concerts provide thousands of music lovers plenty of opportunities for safe and healthy listening — and picnic — spots.

Princeton’s official carillonneur and lead carillonneur on North America’s oldest carillon at the Church of the Holy Trinity in Philadelphia, Lisa Lonie usually creates a roster of international artists, but this year focuses she has focused mainly on accomplished artists in states close to New Jersey. The July 5 opener features guest artist Tiffany Lin, a Philadelphia international performer and member of the Guild of Carillonneurs in North America. The rest of the schedule continues as follows: July 12: Jim Brinson, carillonneur at Mercersburg Academy in Pennsylvania. July 19: Tom Gurin, Fort Washington, PA, graduate of the Royal Carillon School of Belgium, a member of the Guild of Carillonneurs in North America. July 26: Andy Zhang, member of the Yale University Guild of Carillonneurs in Connecticut. August 2: Jonathan Lehrer, the New York City-based laureate of four international competitions for carillon. August 9: Lisa Lonie of Bluebell, Pennsylvania. August 16: featuring Lisa Lonie and Janet Tebbel, carillonneur of the First United Methodist Church of Germantown and the Miraculous Medal Shrine, both in Philadelphia. August 23: Doug Gefvert, carillonneur of the Washington Memorial National Carillon in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. August 30: Paul Stelben, Yale

University Guild of Carillonneurs. September 6: Robin Austin, former Princeton University Carillonneur now based in Pennsylvania. A program of Princeton University Chapel Music and made possible by an endowment established by the Class of 1892, the one-hour concerts are held rain or shine. For more information: 609-258-7989 or gradschool.princeton.edu/ about/carillon.

Music

Meanwhile the other music presenters have had to make adjustments due to the pandemic and have gone digital or postponed events. PRINCETON FESTIVAL. The Princeton Festival has already launched its “Virtually Yours” series that continues to the end of June. Reflecting the Princeton Festival’s wide and varied offerings, the virtual presentations include fulllength streaming of past festival opera productions, a live musical theater revue, artist videos, record-

ings, online workshops, and lectures. All content will be available free of charge on the Princeton Festival website and Facebook page, with content published every day. www. princetonfestival.org. PRINCETON UNIVERSITY SUMMER CHAMBER CONCERTS. The concert series organizers replaced what would have been the 53rd season of live concerts with the “2020 53rd Season Virtual Wednesdays.” Following the traditional formula of five free live concerts, the season is as follows: July 1: Diderot String Quartet. The Quartet in Residence at the Washington National Cathedral, Diderot was created by students at Oberlin Conservatory and the Juilliard School in 2012. Its aim is to bring “a fresh approach to works of the 18 and 19 centuries.” In addition to numerous North American concert venues, the quartet has been featured in performance at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Toledo Museum of Art, and the Morgan Library in New York. It

Princeton University carilloneur Lisa Lonie, left, and Princeton Festival’s ‘Le nozze di Figaro,’ to be streamed on June 14. takes its name from the 18th century philosopher. July 8: Pianist Clipper Erickson: The internationally known performer, Westminster Conservatory instructor, and champion of the music by African-American composer Nathaniel Dett will present a performance with commentary. July 15: The Argus Quartet. Based in New York City, Argus Quartet was founded in 2013 and is “dedicated to celebrating the artistic landscape of our time by drawing unexpected connections across styles and centuries in order to foster community amongst performers, audiences, and composers alike.” It served as the Fellowship Quartet in Residence at the Yale

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School of Music and Graduate Resident String Quartet at the Juilliard School and worked with students through residencies and masterclasses at Yale and Princeton. It takes its name from a taco truck. July 22: The Manhattan Chamber Players. A New York-based musicians’ collective comprising artists who have participated the international music festivals and trained at the Curtis Institute, Juilliard School, Colburn School, New England Conservatory, and Yale School of Music. July 29: Poulenc Trio. Using oboe, bassoon, and piano, the trio performs new work or work arranged for their instruments and explores and promotes music reflecting their African, Asian, Eastern European, and Jewish heritage. This concert features a presentation of Princeton University composer Viet Cuong’s “Trains of Thought.” Presentations are at 7:30 p.m. Performance videos will be available for viewing after the presentation. For more information: www. princetonsummerchamberconcerts.org. WESTMINSTER CHOIR COLLEGE. “Westminster’s Virtual Concert Hall” is taking the place of the

annual summer cOPERAtive program. Using a “best of” approach, offerings from one of the best choir colleges in the world include the Westminster Symphonic Choir and the Philadelphia Orchestra performing Verdi’s Requiem under the direction of Yannick Nezet-Sequin; Westminster Choir under the direction of Joe Miller performing at the Abbey of Monserrat in Spain as part of the 11th World Symposium of Choral Music; Westminster Concert Bell Choir performance led by conductor Kathleen Ebling Shaw; Westminster Jubilee Singers conducted by Westminster and Capital Singers of Trenton’s Vinroy D. Brown Jr.; and more videos and audios to be added over the summer. Find the concerts at www.rider.edu/wcc/academics/choral-studies/virtual-concert-hall. For those interested in participating in music classes, the college’s community music school, Westminster Conservatory, has gone remote and is providing instruction for all ages and levels. www.rider.edu/academics/colleges-schools/westminster-college-of-the-arts/westminsterconservatory-music/conservatory-summer-camps

Meanwhile, while all of the above is happening and despite an outcry from the region, Westminster Choir College’s faculty, students, staff are moving from its current home in Princeton to the Rider University campus in Lawrenceville in August. However, the Westminster Conservatory is remaining for the time in Princeton. NEW JERSEY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. The state orchestra is presenting virtual concerts, has commissioned a virtual piece, and will soon announce its Princetoncentered Edward T. Cone Composition Institute dates that comply with the state’s social distancing guidelines (meanwhile listeners can link up to a past Institute concert on the NJSO’s website). The new commission is “Gratias Tibi” (Thank You) by Jose Luis Dominquez, a Chilean-born composer and the conductor of the NJSO’s family concerts and the director of the NJSO Youth Orchestra. Created for a physically distanced orchestra and choir, the work featuring NJSO musicians and the Montclair State University Singers is a message of thanks to the frontline medical service workers responding to the COVID-19 global pandemic. Its world premiere takes place

Monday, June 22, at 7:30 p.m. at njsymphony.org/gratiastibi and on the NJSO’s social media channels. Videos of the performance will be posted after the performance. For more on Gratias Tibi, visit njsymphony.org/gratiastibi. Virtual concerts can be found at www. njsymphony.org/musicians-music/ njso-at-home.

Art Festivals

ARTWORKS TRENTON. The art organization’s highly popular signature project “Art All Night” was forced to change dates and then go virtual at 3 p.m. Saturday, August 15, and running straight through until 3 p.m. Sunday, August 16. “We realized it was prudent to make other plans, and the more we explored the idea of a virtual event, the more we realized how exciting the possibilities were,” says Artworks executive director Lauren

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Otis about the work in progress. And while there is the same spirit of regional inclusion of art, music, film, and more, it will all be done in a digital format. So look for details on participating or attending on the Art All Night Trenton on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. And check their website at www. artallnighttrenton.org. JERSEY FRESH JAM. At press time, New Jersey’s premiere Hip Hop festival was holding August 22 to start up the party at TerraCycle Inc. in Trenton But coordinator and prominent Trenton street artist Leon Rainbow says he plans to make a decision to move forward based on the state’s social distancing guidelines. If so, expect a convergence of some of the liveliest artists in the region. Stay posted at www.jerseyfreshjam.com.

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From left, the Poulenc Trio, whose July 29 virtual concert features work by Princeton University composer Viet Cuong; the Westminster Symphonic Choir; and composer Jose Luis Dominguez, who has composed ‘Gratias Tibi’ for the NJ Symphony Orchestra.

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JUNE 10, 2020

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Theater

MCCARTER THEATER. The theater isn’t presenting its annual jazz series but is marking the summer with a change. Sara Rasmussen assumes the role of the theater’s new artistic director on August 1. The former artistic director of the Jungle Theater in Minneapolis is noted for directing, producing, and commissioning new works by women and people of color. In addition to having directed productions at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, Guthrie Theater, Dallas Theater Center, Actors Theater of Louisville, and La Jolla Playhouse, she also served as a resident director for the Oregon Shakespeare Festival’s Black Swan new work program and as the head of the University of Texas at Austin’s masters in fine arts directing program. Raised in South Dakota, Rasmussen has a B.A. from St. Olaf College and M.F.A. from the University of California. She succeeds playwright and director Emily Mann, who has led McCarter since 1990. www.mccarter.org. CROSSROADS THEATER. Usually quiet over the summer, the Tony Award-winning company in New Brunswick is promoting “Black Women and the Ballot: 3 Short Radio Dramas,” on Friday, June 19, at 7:30 p.m. Presented live as part of the American Slavery Project, the program includes Ensemble Theater member and Slavery Project co-founder Judy K. Tate’s “The Parlour” and “Pulling the Lever”

From left: Keith Spencer and Demetria Joyce Bailey are part of Bristol Riverside’s summer concerts; works by Mario Moore are part of a July 7 conversation hosted by the Arts Council of Princeton; the Zimmerli at Rutgers offers a unique collection of Soviet non-conformist art; and Joy Kreves’ ‘Bee Habitat’ earned first prize in West Windsor Arts Council’s ‘Built Environment’ show. and Romanian-born playwright Saviana Stanescu’s “Don’t/ Dream.” Emmy-nominated actress and director Phylicia Rashad guest stars. www.americanslaveryproject.org. BUCKS COUNTY PLAYHOUSE. The historic theater on the Delaware River had been forced to postpone its scheduled summer productions to 2021. However it still hopes to reopen the production of its gamer and fantasy-themed musical “Other World” as soon as the State of Pennsylvania relaxes social distancing regulations. Meanwhile the theater has also gone online with its “Playhouse Live!” Sunday night series. www.bcptheater.org.

B

RISTOL RIVERSIDE THEATER. The company’s annual summer music series will Zoom into people’s homes this year. The three-part series opens with “From Phantom to Mame,” a tribute to composers Andrew Lloyd Weber and Jerry Herman. Featuring Bristol artists Demetria Joyce Bailey and Keith Spencer, it premieres live on Wednesday, July 1, and is rebroadcast on July 10 and 12. It’s followed by “A Night at The Movies,” featuring music from both musicals and dramas, includ-

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ing “Casablanca” and “Goldfinger.” It premieres Wednesday, August 5, and is rebroadcast on August 7 and 9. The series concludes with “Broadway Summer Spectacular,” featuring works by Broadway composers Stephen Sondheim, Richard Rodgers, and Oscar Hammerstein, Wednesday, September 2, with rebroadcasts on September 4 and 6. Tickets are $35 per viewing, $90 with a subscription. www. brtstage.org. MUSIC MOUNTAIN THEATER IN LAMBERTVILLE. Look for the two part Zoom presentation “Demystifying Oscar,” an overview of legendary Broadway lyricist — and Bucks County resident — Oscar Hammerstein. Presented by grandson William Hammerstein, the talk examines the formative years of the creator of “Show Boat, “The Sound of Music,” “South Pacific,” and more and includes personal insights and family photos. The 60-minute talks on June 20 and 27 include Q&A sessions. $50. www. musicmountaintheatre.org. THE ACTORS’ NET IN MORRISVILLE. The actor-centered theater company using non-union members has used the pandemic closing for an opportunity to release a free full-length series of its productions on YouTube. The Wednesday series that started in May continues with George Bernard Shaw’s comedy “Candida,” June 10; company veterans Maryalice RubinsTopoleski and Charlotte Kirkby’s updated adaptation of Oscar Wilde’s comedy “An Ideal Wife,” June 17; and Anton Chekov’s “Uncle Vanya,” June 24. www.actorsnetbucks.org/tickets.htm. PRINCETON SUMMER THEATER. Coordinators for the semi-professional summer stock theater have postponed their current season and instead offer “Princeton summer theater at home,” an online series that includes dramatic performances, cabaret, and an interactive children’s theater project. www.princetonsummertheater.org.

Museums & Galleries

Since Governor Murphy’s plan to ease some state social distancing restrictions provides guidelines for museums reopening — potentially in June — here is what viewers can expect for regional museums and galleries. But check their websites first to determine if they are open, their hours, and guidelines for entry. PRINCETON UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM. In addition to the poten-

tial that “LIFE Magazine and the Power of Photography,” scheduled until June 23, and “Cezanne: The Rock Paintings,” June 13, can be glimpsed in time, they can still be seen online — along with other PUAM online exhibitions. But do not forget that the museum’s far ranging permanent collection is a treasure and a treat for the eye and mind. artmuseum.princeton.edu. MORVEN MUSEUM & GARDEN. The permanent first floor exhibitions are worth a visit to bring the house alive through the families, workers, and slaves who lived there over two hundred years. And let’s not forget the New Jersey State governors who lived there while it was the governor’s mansion. www.morven.org.

N

EW JERSEY STATE MUSEUM. In addition to the colorful and regionally significant photography exhibition “Preserving the Pinelands: Albert Horner’s Portraits of a National Treasure” on view through August 19, the museum also features exhibitions on Civil War flags, New Jersey fossils, and a permanent collection featuring works by scores of prominent artists who also happened to be New Jersey residents. The museum is making some exhibitions available on line, like its “Fine Feathered Friends: Birds as Mainstay and Muse.” The digital components of this exhibition that mixes science and art includes a visual tour and a series of curatorpresented videos, featuring one focusing on prominent Trenton ceramicist Edward Boehm’s approach to creating porcelain bird replicas. And the education division has posted a series of Maker Projects and craft and story videos to guide youngsters through various projects. www.statemuseumnj.gov. ZIMMERLI ART MUSEUM AT RUTGERS.While it prepares for upcoming exhibitions, the museum’s

permanent collection is always worth a look. The American collection includes work by prominent artists and various approaches, including the groundbreaking Rutgers-connected Fluxus movement and the pioneering work of women artist who were also connected to Rutgers. But take a look at the vast collection of Russian art, which is one-of-a-kind as a Soviet Non-conformist art collection. www.zimmerli.rutgers.edu. TRENTON CITY MUSEUM AT ELLARSLIE MANSION. While museum coordinators re-plan its annual Ellarslie Open, work continues to spotlight the efforts of regional artists through the virtual exhibition “Ellarslie Not Quite Open,” on view through September. Joining it are other are several other digital presentations, including “Robert Sakson Watercolors,” a memorial exhibition featuring 20 works by the masterful Trentonborn artist who died on May 15; “Furniture as Art: Revisited,” an online reprise of a past exhibition that looked at regionally created domestic objects of beauty; and images of the popular and recently closed show “If These Quilts Could Talk” (with a soon to be linked past exhibition tour conducted by COVID-19 masked curators Diane Ciccone and Jane Malloy. For virtual engagement, visit ellarslie.org/category/exhibit/current. For re-opening information, go to www.ellarslie.org. GROUNDS FOR SCULPTURE. A state summer arts destination continues several current exhibitions, including “That’s Worth Celebrating: The Life and Work of the Johnson Family,” with special attention to sculptor and GFS founder J. Seward Johnson who died on March 10. But the real treat is to visit the grounds featuring scores of works by contemporary artists working a variety of approaches — from classical to abstract. That includes works by nationally known New Jersey sculptors George Se-


JUNE 10, 2020

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Opportunities

Call for Art

gal, Isaac Witkin, and, of course, Johnson himself. For re-opening information, go to www.groundsforsculpture.org. WEST WINDSOR ARTS COUNCIL. “The Built Environment” is the 2020 member show that used structural design as the catalyst to explore themes such as identity, ancientness, modernity, interstitial space-built forms, and architectural design. East Orange-based architect Alexandra Schoenberg selected works by Zakia Ahmed, Meta Dunkly Arnold, JBettina, Nancy Collings, Johanna Ericson, Carlo Fiorentini, D.J.Haslett, Carole Jury, Joy Kreves, Eleni Litt, Judith Mazzucco, Lucretia E. McGuffSilverman, Lena Okrainets, William Plank, Maia Reim, Karen Repka, Martin Schwartz, Deirdre Sheean, Jennifer Tungol, Zina Umyn, Barbara Weinfield, and Julian Weitzenfeld. www.westwindsorarts.org.

A

RTS COUNCIL OF PRINCETON. With its normal summer schedule of exhibits and concerts closed by the pandemic, the ACP is presenting a monthly series of virtual conversations between artists and curators or collectors to “celebrate and connect those who make art and those who love art.” The program continues on Tuesday, June 23, with a conversation between Susan DeConcini and Timothy M. Andrews. DeConcini is a Lambertville artist who has exhibited in the region and a scenic artist who paints theatrical sets at McCarter Theater. Andrews is an art collector, past ACP president, and president and CEO of Advertising Specialty Institute. On Tuesday, July 7, the conversation is between Mario Moore and James Steward. Moore is a New York City-based artist who had recently been awarded a Princeton Hodder Fellowship for 2018-’19 and exhibited his portraits of Princeton University employees who are of African ancestry. Steward is the director of the Princeton University Art Museum. Both conversation are scheduled from 7 to 8 p.m. and are free. www.artscouncilofprinceton. org. ARTWORKS TRENTON. Planned to start June 23 is the annual “Counterculture Art” exhibition curated by the Trenton Punk Rock Flea Market. If it is a go, it will be on view through July 25. Following will be “AAM Selects,” works gleaned from Art All Night submissions, on view through August 22 to September 5. www.artworkstrenton.org. BSB GALLERY. The gallery started a few years ago in the former Broad Street Bank building has digital exhibitions and programming. Its current exhibition on view through June 20 is “Here We Are,” an exploration of race, gender, and identity through the mixed media, collage, and portraiture work of several African American women. Then artists, ranging from the regional to the international, take a

Left, ‘Veiled Liberty’ by Stephen Barnwell from the exhibit ‘Free Enterprise’ at BSB Gallery. Above, part of the permanent exhibit at Morven. look at capitalism and the American dream in “Free Enterprise,” July 2 to August 1. Online artist meetups and workshops in drawing and knitting are also available. Speaking of knitters, BSB is a link to World Wide Knit In Public Day on Saturday, June 13. www.bsbgallery.com.

Popular Music

The pandemic has pulled the

plug on this year’s Levitt Concert Series in Trenton, Arts Council of Princeton’s Summer Courtyard Concerts Series, and the Mercer County Park Summer Concert Series at the Festival Grounds in West Windsor. But hopefully they’ll be back next year — loud and clear. In the meantime, continue to support the region’s artists, performers, and presenters that make our region strong in so many ways.

55+ Living.

BSB Gallery in Trenton is accepting artwork in all mediums for its exhibit “Thoughts and Prayers, Another Round of Vacant Stares,” to be held August 13 through September 19. A decision will be made at a later date if the exhibit will be virtual or inperson. The gallery seeks artwork that examines the impact that guns have within our nation, as a symbol of power and freedom, or as an instrument to incite fear and cause harm. Artwork should facilitate a dialog on the divisive iconology of guns, and the power or fear they represent. The deadline for submissions is Tuesday, June 30. Artists may submit up to three works. For full submission guidelines visit w w w. b s b g a l l e r y. c o m / c a l l forart2020. All are invited to take part in the Lawrence Hopewell Trail’s Art on the Trail program launching to create and share art inspired by the walking and bik-

ing trail that runs through Lawrence and Hopewell townships. Take a walk along the trail with your cameras or art supplies and create drawings, paintings, videos and photos of scenes along the Lawrence Hopewell Trail. Submit images to www. lhtrail.org/upload-trail-artwork, and the LHT will share the best of them online, through social media, and in future LHT publications. The program will have monthly themes as follows: June and July, landscapes, submitted by July 31; August and September, flora and fauna, submitted by September 30; October and November, art inspired by waterways, submitted by November 30; December and January, 2021, still life of objects found on the trail, submitted by January 31; February and March, architecture along the trail, submitted by March 31; April and May, selfportrait on the trail, submitted by May 31. Artists can be of any age and participation is free.

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U.S. 1

JUNE 10, 2020

Summer Fiction All Summer Long

The Side of the Road

I

by Marvin Harold Cheiten

’ve lived by the side of this road for … I don’t know how long. It’s always kind of breezy when the cars go whizzing by, and sometimes very noisy with those huge vehicles, but I always stand back and I never get hit. The dirt pouring out of those things will sometimes make my nose hurt and my eyes hurt, but I’m used to it. The days start pretty slowly — just like today. I can usually find something to eat, but it’s not very good. And sometimes one of the neighbors stops by and gives me some food. I’ve known those folks for as long as I can remember, and I think it’s very good of them to help out, but I can never get really close to them. The road is getting crowded now, and I just know that Mommy and Daddy and Mindy will be coming back soon. When they left, I heard them say that they were going to someplace called “California”. Of course they said it very quietly to each other, but my hearing is so good that I heard everything they said about how the cold times were ending and this warmer time was the time to go. Before that, they had spoken for a long time about how they had less and less money, and Daddy had to find a better job. But I thought that their life here was very pleasant, and they were always able to give

me everything I wanted. Before they left, Mindy hugged me very tight and she was crying more than she ever had, but Mindy and I grew up together so I guess she was just being my little sister. Daddy told her “He’ll be all right,” but she didn’t stop crying. When I was younger I would follow her everywhere, and I would always wait by the side of this very road until she came back from school; and sometimes the three of them would go away together, so that’s why I’m sure that Mommy and Daddy and Mindy will come back just as they always did. At first, when the days went by and I waited here, I thought that maybe they didn’t want me anymore, and that thought made me very sad. But then I knew that it couldn’t be right, because we are all part of the same pack, and I knew we would always be together. So it was up to me to be here until they returned, and here I stayed. And then there was that terrible day when a group of men representing what they called the Animal Rescue League came to arrest me and take me away. They kept jabbering about how they were going to “help” me and “save” me, but I wanted to have nothing to do with them. So I ran away and tried to hide in a gully far away from the road, but these evil people followed me, and one of them actually fell into the gully, which I thought was pretty funny. But eventually they caught me in a net, and pushed me into their truck and carried me away. I didn’t know

what they would do with me, and I was really afraid that when Mommy and Daddy and Mindy returned, I wouldn’t be there for them. These people who said they were going to help me and save me put me in a cage — the tiniest space I’ve ever lived in — and then they forgot me and they only came around to serve me some gruel that I wanted no part of. I became thinner and thinner and mainly I just slept. But one day an old gentleman came along and spent some time

I knew that I would have to escape from the old gentleman and run back to the side of the road, because I was certain that Mommy and Daddy and Mindy would now have to return and pick me up and we would all go to this California place together. whispering to them, and finally they let me out of the cage and this man said he was taking me home. That idea wasn’t very appealing, but it was better than the cage, so I went along. He had a home not far from the house where my pack and I lived, and I could even see our home in the distance. The old gentleman treated me pretty well, but all I wanted was to go back home.

The guy also had a dreadful Persian cat, and he seemed to think that the cat and I would be friends, but the cat wouldn’t have anything to do with that and neither would I. So the two of us just sat on opposite sides of the room, glowering at each other. It was all pretty disgusting. The days became hotter and hotter and I kept checking out my home as best I could, and one day I saw a pack entering the house — but they were not my pack, and they eventually came over and introduced themselves to the old gentleman and said that they now “owned” the house. That really shocked me: my pack and I wouldn’t even have a home. So I knew that I would have to escape from the old gentleman and run back to the side of the road, because I was certain that Mommy and Daddy and Mindy would now have to return and pick me up and we would all go to this California place together. As soon as I could, I ran out of the house and almost leapt across the gully, and when I got to the side of the road, I stayed there with my most fervent hopes. At one point the old gentleman came looking for me, but after asking me to “come home,” he shouted something like “You ungrateful cur — go to hell!” and then he left. I’m sure his stupid cat didn’t mind that I was gone. Now I was absolutely determined to stay put until my pack arrived, and the people in the town actually got used to my being there. That was when they started to bring me food, which was very

nice; but though one or two of them tried to take me home, they didn’t try to grab me or hurt me. I guess they knew that I was there for an important reason, and maybe they even remembered my pack and felt that my devotion was all that mattered. As the days went by, the cold times returned. I remembered how unpleasant those times had been when I was young and how Mindy would take me inside and wipe the snow off of me and make me feel warm. Now, all I could do is find a spot under a bush or against a plot of earth on the side of a hillock and try to sleep until I could once again watch for their car. Once a car did pass by me. There was a little girl inside who looked a little like Mindy and when she saw me, she smiled. So I ran after the car as fast as I could and I ran and ran, but the car didn’t stop, and finally I went back to my usual place. If it was Mindy, why didn’t the car stop and why didn’t she take me with her? A policeman who saw me once said : “I wish that everyone had half the loyalty that you have.” But there is nothing unusual about it: we all have it inside ourselves, don’t we? It is getting dark and very, very cold, and my head hurts a lot. So now l guess I’ll just try to sleep — and dream, as I always do, of Mommy and Daddy and Mindy, and everything that once made my life worth living. A longtime Princeton resident, Cheiten is the author of numerous short stories and poems, several plays, and the Princeton-based novella “The Hidden Ally.”

Summer Fiction All Summer Long Short Stories & Poems from the readers of U.S. 1

U .S. 1 Newspaper extends its annual invitation to all writers and poets to present original short fiction, short plays, or poetry.

This is an opportunity to have your work published in hard-copy form and to be recognized in public for your effort. To participate, submit your previously unpublished short story, play, or poem as soon as possible. Please: No more than two stories or five poems per writer. Work will be considered for publication on a rolling basis. Please submit work by e-mail to fiction@princetoninfo.com. Authors retain all rights. Preference will be given to central New Jersey writers whose work addresses a theme or place relevant to the greater Princeton business community. Submissions from children are not encouraged.

Questions?

E-mail fiction@princetoninfo.com or call 609-452-7000.

Important: Be sure to include a brief biographical summary with your submission, along with your name, address, and daytime phone number.


JUNE 10, 2020

U.S. 1

11

June 13 Continued from page 5

Pennington Farmers Market, Rosedale Mills, 101 Route 31, Pennington. www.penningtonfarmersmarket.org. Face masks required for everyone over age 2. Social distancing measures in place. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. West Windsor Community Farmers’ Market, Vaughn Drive Lot, Princeton Junction Train Station. www.westwindsorfarmersmarket. org. Vendors sell fresh produce, meats, baked goods, and more. Yes We Can! food drive ongoing. Face masks required. Bring your own bags. Limit of two shoppers per family. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Film

Saturday Night at the Movies: Amelie, Mercer County Library. www.facebook.com/mclsnj. Borrow the featured title from the Hoopla catalog with a Mercer County Library card and watch it in the virtual company of your community. 8 p.m.

Wolf Dream

Good Causes

Virtual Barn Bash, Waldorf School of Princeton. www.princetonwaldorf.org. Magic show, live music from Gravity Hill Unplugged, and a virtual auction with proceeds to benefit the WSP COVID-19 Fund. Free to join the livestream. 5:45 to 8:30 p.m.

by Wilder Bellamy

M

y name is Talleyrand and I am a (large-size) standard poodle who lives with his master in a walkup on the upper West Side in New York. I am a bit of a coward when I meet a smaller dog. I sit on my hindquarters and shrink into myself. One night I had this dream: I awoke at dawn in a forest, a wolf among wolves. Instinctively I knew that there were wolves around but that humans didn’t exist yet. Also instinctively I knew the barks and growls and body motions that wolves knew to communicate. I had been transplanted into the

Sunday June 14 Flag Day.

In Person Cranbury Candlelight Vigil, Coalition For Peace Action & Bayard Rustin Center for Social Justice, Cranbury Heritage Park, 57 South Main Street, Cranbury. Vigil in memory of George Floyd and victims of police brutality features music by Olive Joseph, speakers including Mayor Matthew Scott of Cranbury, Cranbury police, the Rev. Bob Moore, Robt Seda-Schreiber, and student leaders from area high schools. All proceeds benefit Black Lives Matter. Face coverings required. 7:30 to 8:30 p.m.

There is no such thing as a lone wolf. The wolf pack is a complex hierarchical society; my master would say it’s like a very high-energy (at least during the hunt) human workplace. body of an existing wolf who was known to the tribe. And in this manner I joined the life of the tribe for the next twelve months. This is too brief an account to get into the individual wolves that got to know me and it was after all two years ago. But know this: There is no such thing as a lone wolf. The wolf pack is a complex hierarchical society; my master would say it’s like a very high-energy (at least during the hunt) human workplace. Everybody has a role in the pack. In this role, I did things that wore completely outside my experience: I hunted and killed; I had a mate and we had cubs. In this manner, summer ended, fall passed, the snow of winter

Classical Music

The virtual exhibit ‘Trail of Breadcrumbs: Nature in Fairytales,’ in honor of the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, is on view on the D&R Greenway’s website at www.drgreenway.org. Exhibiting artists include Joe Kazimierczyk; Jada Fabrizio (‘Cry Wolf,’ top); Barbara DiLorenzo (‘Quincy in Math Class’); and Silvere Boureau (‘Fawn,’ above). came and went, and then spring. I woke up on my master’s bed, very early, before he woke up and we were ready to go walking. Would I go back? I am torn and really really miss the wolf family of that dream. And there is something inherited in me that misses that whole life intensely. Bellamy is a member of the

BUYING OR SELLING?

Twin Rivers Library Writers’ Group, led by Nancy Demme. He is also a volunteer with the New Jersey chapter of the Sierra Club.

Virtually Yours: Mozart’s Le Nozze di Figaro, Princeton Festival. www.princetonfestival.org. Live stream of the opera production from the 2015 Princeton Festival. Visit website for full Virtually Yours calendar of events. 1 p.m.

Film

New Jersey ~ the Movie, Ewing Township Historic Preservation Society. www.ethps.org. Zoom screening of a film written and directed by Ewing High School graduate and current Millburn middle school teacher Stephen Chernoski. The film addresses oft-debated questions such as where is the cultural dividing line between North and South Jersey?

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The Ewing Township Historic Preservation Society hosts a Zoom screening of ‘New Jersey ~ the Movie,’ created by Ewing High School graduate Stephen Chernoski, on Sunday, June 14. Is it Pork Roll or Taylor Ham? Wawa or 7-Eleven? Hoagie or sub? and more. Visit website for Zoom link. 2 p.m.

Faith

Conservative Judaism Today and Tomorrow, Beth El Synagogue of East Windsor. www. bethel.net. Zoom-based discussion of a collection of short essays by retiring Chancellor Arnold M. Eisen of the Jewish Theological Seminary exploring essential questions of Jewish belief, practice, community and identify from a Conservative perspective. 9:45 a.m.

For Families

Virtual Lunch and Learn, Historical Society of Princeton. www. princetonhistory.org. Eve Mandel leads a virtual illustrated talk about Albert Einstein for families. Topics include Einstein’s family, pets, love of science and music, and efforts to help end social injustice. Register for Zoom link. Pay what you can, $1 to $10. Noon to 12:30 p.m.

Lectures

Signs, Signals, or Causes Planetary Activity in 2020, Astrological Society of Princeton. www. aspnj.org. Bruce Scofield discusses the major astrological events of the year with a focus on the inferior conjunction of Venus and the Sun. Email aspinfo@ aspnj.org for more information. Register. $10. 2 to 3:30 p.m.

Continued on following page


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ART

JUNE 10, 2020

FILM

LITERATURE

DANCE DRAMA MUSIC

PREV I E W

Hormone Gets Strength Test in Virtual Talk

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abyrinth Books and the Princeton Public Library continue their live stream author talks on Wednesday, June 17, at 6 p.m., with a session featuring the authors of “Testosterone: An Unauthorized Biography”: Rebecca M. JordanYoung, professor of women’s, gender, and sexuality studies at Barnard College, and Katrina Karkazis, anthropologist, bioethicist, professor at Brooklyn College Honors Academy, and Yale Law School Global Health Justice Partnership fellow. In an interview conducted by Yale Law School international human rights lawyer Eszter Kismodi and published online by Sexual and Reproductive Health Matters Journal, Karkasiz explained the creation of the book as follows:

I

have a long history about thinking about controversies over medical interventions for children with intersex variations, basically children who are born with what is commonly thought of as male-typical and female-typical traits. Testosterone figured in those debates, especially in how it was understood to masculinize bodies and behavior. So in some ways I’ve been tracing this hormone for quite some time. That led to a project on testosterone regulations in sport and the desire to limit women’s natural testosterone levels for eligibility to compete in the female category. Basically, testosterone has been used as a biological criterion not only for eligibility, but as a litmus test for whether a woman has what is considered to the appropriate level and hence biology for a woman. Women with high levels, have been banned from sport unless they lower their levels with medically unnecessary interventions. It was during the course of that work that there was a short inter-

Continued from preceding page

Monday June 15 Literati Authors at Home Virtual Program Series, Libraries of Middlesex Automation Consortium. www.explorelmxac.org/authors-at-home. Jeff Cohen, author of “For Whom the Minivan Rolls,” discusses how to create characters people care about. Register. Free. 7:30 p.m.

Faith

Torah & Tea, Beth El Synagogue of East Windsor. www.bethel. net. Discussion led by Rabbi Kornsgold via Zoom. Register. 2 p.m.

view that I had done on the BCC with my co-author Rebecca Jordan-Young. Over the course of about 10 minutes, the interviewer asked three times why testosterone levels were not a good way to divide men from women and why higher levels didn’t make a better athlete or produce a better performance for women with higher levels over their peers with lower levels. The first time she asked it, it seemed a perfectly fine question. By the third time she asked it, I felt like we had hit up against folk wisdom about the hormone, where what we were saying was hard to believe or hard to accept. And so from there, we set out to be understood as rooted in testoswrite a book that tried to deal with a terone, let alone biology. For exlot of sedimented ideas about this ample, men’s generally higher stahormone. The idea that it’s a sex tus in gender hierarchies, their hormone, that it’s a male sex hor- greater presence in fields such as mone specifically, that it only af- STEM, men’s aggression, and the fects sex traits and that higher lev- belief that men take more risks, can els result in particular behaviors, all be traced to the scientific literabehaviors very often coded as mas- ture on this hormone. And that reculine, like risk-taking, aggression, search, does so much work in the world to shape athleticism, ideas about how things like that. men and women What the ‘It’s really this idea are the supposed book does, chapthat so many things natural order of ter by chapter, is or behaviors that we things. We to look at these thought let’s go various domains understand to be natback to the reof research, asuralized should not search and show sessing not only be understood as what it actually what the resays. Without search actually rooted in testostergiving away the says but how one, let alone biolopunchline, let’s folk wisdom gy.’ just say that maabout the horny things that mone, which are people think this deeply tied to ideas about gender, race and class, hormone does, it doesn’t do and it for example, shape not only what certainly doesn’t do in any clear the researchers understand and the and simple way. If we could wipe the “testosterknowledge they produce about testosterone, but also what they ig- one drives all things masculine” framework or the story, then we nore. . . It’s really this idea that so many have a much deeper and longthings or behaviors that we under- standing problem: if biology or tesstand to be naturalized should not tosterone do not explain these sedimented social hierarchies, these

inequalities, the way that women are second status in so many areas, or not understood to take risks (when actually child-bearing is one of the riskiest activities that you can undertake), then we’re left with a much more difficult problem which is the social work, the political work, of undoing inequality because it’s not based in nature, it’s socially created. And that’s our hope: to turn our attention to that more difficult work, which will take significant effort to revamp and undermine. I think one of our main ones or our hopes for this book is to really change the conversation about this hormone, and to start to have people question its connection to masculinity. That not only would the hormone not be thought of as masculine but the things that get attributed to this hormone, like competitive drive, like athleticism, not be understood as masculine but rather as behaviors shared among people and not the domain or the province

For Seniors

Outdoor Action

Beware the Green-Eyed Monster: Elder Abuse and Exploitation 2020, Princeton Senior Resource Center. www.princetonsenior.org. Presentation by Robert J. Shanahan, Esq. of Shanahan and Voight, LLC. 11 a.m.

Tuesday June 16 Classical Music Honoring Trenton, Trenton Music Makers. www.facebook.com/ trentonmusicmakers. Year-end performance by student and teaching artists. 6 p.m.

Good Causes

Virtual Information Session, CASA for Children of Mercer & Burlington Counties. www. casamb.org. Information on the

non-profit organization that recruits, trains, and supervises community volunteers who speak up in Family Court for the best interests of children that have been removed from their families due to abuse and/or neglect and placed in the foster care system. Register by email to jduffy@casamercer.org. 11 a.m.

Lectures

Virtually Yours: Panel Discussion with Princeton Arts Leaders, Princeton Festival. www. princetonfestival.org. Artistic Director Richard Tang Yuk leads a discussion with other leaders of Princeton arts organizations on how to navigate the current situation. Participants include Mary Trigg of Princeton Pro Musica, Hilary Butler of Westrick Music Academy, Patty Thel of Trenton Children’s Chorus, John Cloys of Princeton Singers, Alice Weiss of WWFM, and Jerry Kalstein of Boheme Opera. 1 p.m.

Katrina Karkazis, left, and Rebecca M. JordanYoung, authors of ‘Testosterone: An Unauthorized Biography,’ participate in a Labyrinth Books live stream on June 17.

Living with Urban Coyotes, Mercer County Park Commission. www.mercercountyparks.org. Webinar presentation on wildlife that affects our lives, even in an urbanized environment. Submit questions in advance to krypkema@mercercounty.org. Register. Free. 2 p.m.

Schools

Virtual Open House, Princeton Academy of the Sacred Heart. www.princetonacademy.org. Learn about the private K-8 school for boys. Register. 4 p.m.

Socials

Drink & Draw, BSB Gallery, Trenton. www.bsbgallery.com. Grab a drink, snacks, and drawing materials. BSB curator Christy O’Connor will model poses while curator Aine Mickey answer questions over Zoom. Join via zoom. us/j/91786658842. 8 p.m.

simply of men. Once we sever that, I think we’re able to see all of the ways that women have and use power, the ways that women are risk-takers but in ways that researchers don’t understand to be risk-taking because they’ve understood it through a masculine frame. This could lead us to be more expansive and curious about what this hormone might contribute to — including things we understand as feminine or feminizing — and to expand our knowledge of what it does in all different kinds of bodies, not just male bodies. For example, we have a whole chapter on its relationship to ovulation, which is not understood to be masculine at all and yet testosterone is critical in that function. The event, cosponsored by Princeton University’s Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies, is free. For more information and to register, visit www.labyrinthbooks.com.

Wednesday June 17 Literati Library Live at Labyrinth, Princeton Public Library & Labyrinth Books. www.labyrinthbooks.com. Livestream featuring authors of “Testosterone: An Unauthorized Biography.” 6 p.m.

Kids Stuff

Meet the Animals, The Watershed Institute. www.facebook. com/theH20shed. Watershed Educator Samantha Bernstein feeds resident animals. 11 a.m.

Socials

Library Drawing Party, Mercer County Library. www.facebook. com/mclsnj. Follow along for a librarian-led drawing lesson, then share your finished work. 7 p.m.


JUNE 10, 2020

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khauto.com

Life in the Fast Lane Funding Available

U.S. 1

Edited by Sara Hastings

A

pplications are now being accepted for the New Jersey Economic Development Authority’s expanded Small Business Emergency Assistance Grant Program. The $45 million program will provide grants up to $10,000 to small businesses impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. One-third of the funds will be reserved for businesses in Opportunity Zone-eligible census tracts. Applications are available in English and Spanish. “From the start of the pandemic, the Small Business Emergency Assistance Grant Program has played a central role in supporting New Jersey’s small business community,” NJEDA CEO Tim Sullivan said in a statement. “The expanded program will allow us to serve thousands more businesses in need and our focus on equity will ensure it benefits the communities COVID-19 has hit the hardest.” The new grant funding comes from $50 million the NJEDA received through the federal CARES act. The $5 million not included in the new round of grants will be used to fund businesses that were waitlisted during the first round of grants. Applications will be processed on a first-come, first-served basis. More types of business are eligible for this round of funding, including small business with up to 25 fulltime employees; home-based businesses and sole proprietorships, and some nonprofit organizations. For more information visit cv. business.nj.gov.

Grants Received Princeton Symphony Orchestra, Box 250, Princeton 08542. 609-497-0020. Marc Uys, executive director. www. princetonsymphony.org. Princeton Symphony Orchestra has received a $15,000 grant to strengthen equity, diversity, and inclusion and transform organizational culture. It is one of 28 orchestras nationwide to receive

United Silicon Carbide is expanding to an 11,200-squarefoot space at 650 College Road East. grants from the League of American Orchestras’ Catalyst Fund.

K H & automotive 609-588-0166

23 Industrial Drive • Hamilton, NJ 08619

Continued on following page

Expansion United Silicon Carbide, 7 Deer Park Drive, Princeton Corporate Plaza, Suite E, Monmouth Junction 08852. 732565-9500. Chris Dries, president and CEO. www.unitedsic.com United Silicon Carbide (United SiC) has leased 11,200 square feet of first-floor office space at 650 College Road East in Plainsboro. A team from Cushman & Wakefield’s Iselin office represented the landlord, Nuveen Real Estate, while Jones Lang LaSalle represented the tenant. Nuveen has updated the common areas and amenities at the 168,000-square-foot property to include a 60-foot glass atrium and outdoor courtyard with a seating area and private patio, as well as a new cafe and conference facility in its sister building at 600 College Road East. United Silicon Carbide, a manufacturer of silicon carbide power semiconductors, currently has its corporate headquarters in 6,000 square feet on Deer Park Drive in Monmouth Junction. The company was founded by Rutgers researchers in 1999 and expanded quickly after being acquired by current president Chris Dries and a group of investors in 2009 (U.S. 1, August 18, 2010). In 2018 it expanded around the world with offices in the Philippines, Taiwan, China, California, Belgium, and Denmark. “UnitedSiC was looking for space with a Class A environment and easy access to major highways,” said Todd Elfand of Cushman & Wakefield. “The property’s picturesque setting and upgraded amenities, coupled with Nuveen’s ability to complete the transaction during the COVID-19 pandemic, made 650 College Road East a great option.”

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e e c c a a p S Lab L U.S. 1

JUNE 10, 2020

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Continued from preceding page

The award will enable the orchestra to hire a consultant to facilitate discussions about equity, diversity, and inclusion and conduct training with the staff, board, and musicians. The consultant will also lead an institutional audit to aid in shaping the PSO’s direction and efforts in becoming a more equitable and inclusive organization. “We are thrilled to be a recipient of this important award as it will greatly assist the PSO in understanding and exploring the principles of equity, diversity, and inclusion within our own organization, paving the way towards creating deeper and more impactful connections with the vibrant communities making up the Greater Princeton area,” PSO executive director Marc Uys said in a statement. “Music is for all, and has the ability to unite all people. It is our responsibility as an organization to not stand in the way of that.” HomeFront, 1880 Princeton Avenue, Lawrenceville 08648. 609-989-9417. Connie Mercer, executive director. www.homefrontnj.org. Major League Baseball has selected Lawrenceville-based Homefront as one of 10 nonprofits nationwide to benefit from a new grant program. The funding is for programs that teach children how to develop healthy relationships, support survivors of domestic violence, and build mental health resiliency. “HomeFront will use the $50,000 grant on programming and staff training to help the over 400 local children we serve develop social-emotional resiliency” says Chris Marchetti, director of HomeFront’s Joy, Hopes & Dreams chil-

health +

FITNESS

2020 2013

dren’s program. “This is a basic life skill needed for healthy relationships in general.” HomeFront hosts a variety of programs for local children who are homeless or at risk: Its Children’s Champion Program provides early interventions for those living at the agency’s Family Campus, a temporary shelter for 38 local homeless families. HomeFront’s Atkinson Child Development Center provides local families in need with high quality, trauma-informed care preschool and day care. Its Joy, Hopes, and Dreams children’s program provides school-age children yearround, six days a week with new experiences, life skills, tutoring, and nurturing. HomeFront also runs an educationally enriched summer camp.

Transaction Edison Partners, 281 Witherspoon Street, Suite 300, Princeton 08540. 609-8961900. Chris Sugden, managing partner. www.edisonpartners.com. Princeton-based growth equity firm Edison Partners has sold its interest in the bike-sharing program Zagster to Superpedestrian, a Boston-based mobility engineering and technology company. The firm has also made a $15 million investment in Superpedestrian. “The combination of Superpedestrian with Zagster creates the first fully integrated micromobility company,” Edison partner Daniel Herscovici said in a statement, “One that includes product, manufacturing and supply chain as well as professional fleet operations, government and community relations.” Herscovici will join the board of Superpedestrian, which was found-

ed by experts in urban transport from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Separately, Zagster, which had operated its bike-sharing program in Princeton, on the Princeton University campus, and in Mercer County parks, announced June 1 that the program was terminated, effective immediately. The program had been suspended in March due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Management Moves Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund, 714-716 South Clinton Avenue, Trenton 08611. 609688-0881. Dina PaulsonMcEwen, executive director. www.laldef.org. The Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund has hired Lorraine Goodman as its first director of marketing and advancement. The Trenton-based nonprofit founded in 2004 is dedicated to advancing the rights of immigrants. Goodman, a 1983 alumna of Princeton University, also holds a master’s in nonprofit administration from New York University. She has worked in fundraising for groups including Broadway Cares/ Equity Fights Aids, the Red Hot Organization, and others. She was most recently Princeton AlumniCorps’ development officer.

Deaths Linda M. Hancikovsky, 69, on May 26. She retired after 31 years with the state Department of Civil Service. Rose Robbins, 87, on May 23. She worked for Lenox China in Lawrenceville for 34 years.

Published: Wednesday, June 24 Call NOW to Reserve Space

Attention Health & Fitness Providers:

It Showcase has never been more important your practice, to promote your health services fitness center or other health and safe practices. related service ininthis Take advantage thisrelevant timely and timely special issue. and relevant special issue.

Call TODAY to Reserve Space! (609) 396-1511 *400-500 word advertising feature story.

SHARE YOUR STORY WITH OUR DISCERNING HEALTH READERS

RUN A 1/2 PAGE AD AND GET A FREE STORY*!


JUNE 10, 2020

U.S. 1 Classifieds How to order

Fax or E-Mail: That’s all it takes to order a U.S. 1 Classified. Fax your ad to 609-844-0180 or E-Mail class@princetoninfo.com. We will confirm your insertion and the price. It won’t be much: Our classifieds are just 50 cents a word, with a $7 minimum. Repeats in succeeding issues are just 40 cents per word, and if your ad runs for 16 consecutive issues, it’s only 30 cents per word. Questions? Call us at 609-396-1511 ext. 105.

OFFICE RENTALS 1 day/month/year or longer. Princeton Route 1. Flexible office space to support your business. Private or virtual offices, conference rooms, high speed internet, friendly staffed reception. Easy access 24/7. Ample parking. Call Mayette 609-514-5100. www.princeton-office.com.

RETAIL SPACE DOWNTOWN PRINCETON RETAIL STORE FOR LEASE - 146 NASSAU STREET, 1200 SF, PLUS BASEMENT. WEINBERG MANAGEMENT. TEXT TO: 609-731-1630. WMC@COLLEGETOWN.COM.

HOME MAINTENANCE A friendly handyman seeks small jobs. Let me help you with a variety maintenance and repairs around your home. Please call me at 609-275-6930.

BUSINESS SERVICES

merchandise mart

Computer problem? Or need a used computer in good condition $80? Call 609-275-6930.

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS I Buy Guitars and All Musical Instruments in Any Condition: Call Rob at 609-457-5501.

WANTED TO BUY Antique Military Items: And war relics wanted from all wars and countries. Top prices paid. ‘Armies of the Past LTD’. 2038 Greenwood Ave., Hamilton Twp., 609-890-0142. Our retail outlet is open Saturdays 10 to 4, or by appointment. Buying Baseball & Football cards,1909-1980 - Comic books, 1940-1980. All sports memorabilia, collectibles, and related items. Don 609203-1900; delucadon@yahoo.com. Cash paid for SELMER Saxophones and other vintage models. 609-581-8290, E-mail: lenny3619@ gmail.com Cash paid for World War II military items. 609-581-8290 or e-mail lenny3619@optonline.net. Wanted: Baseball, football, basketball, hockey. Cards, autographs, photos, memorabilia. Highest cash prices paid! Licensed corporation, will travel. 4thelovofcards, 908-596-0976. allstar115@verizon.net.

Thompson Management www.thompsonmanagementllc.com

54 year SHF looking for an intelligent straight man with a sense of humor. I am a conservative woman that likes to hike, take walks, cook, do marathon of series and just spend quality time with someone. Box #240760. If you are lonely, love spring, active, Christian man who is honest, between ages of 68-75, you can contact me. I am DWF, retired professional, somewhat new to the area. I am very active, love music, family life, and more. Conservative values are plus. Please send photo and phone. Box #270779.

STILL ATTRACTIVE WIDOW, sometimes merry, also thoughtful, seeks comparable gentleman, born 1932-37, solvent, reasonably unimpaired, highly educated (but not stuffy about it), to connect and see what develops. Pipe dream? You tell me. Princeton area only. Box #240778.

Singles By Mail: To place your free ad in this section mail it to U.S. 1, 15 Princess Road, Suite K, Lawrenceville 08648, fax it to 609-844-0180, or E-mail it to class­@princetoninfo.com. Be sure to include a physical address to which we can send responses.

Employment Exchange

PERSONAL SERVICES

MEN SEEKING WOMEN

JOBS WANTED

Professional Ghostwriter. Capture family stories or business histories for posterity. Writing your own memoir? Let me bring your memories alive. Memorialize special events with reminiscences of family and friends printed for all to share. Obituaries and eulogies are sensitively created. E. E. Whiting Literary Services. 609-462-5734 eewhiting@ live.com

Elderly gentleman seeks a woman who is more concerned about the suffering occurring around the world than she is about hedonistic pleasures. Box 240346.

Job Hunters: If you are looking for a full-time position, we will run a reasonably worded classified ad for you at no charge. The U.S. 1 Jobs Wanted section has helped people like you find challenging opportunities for years now. We know this because we often hear from the people we have helped. We reserve the right to edit the ads and to limit the number of times they run. If you require confidentiality, send a check for $4 with your ad and request a U.S. 1 Response Box. Replies will be forwarded to you at no extra charge. Mail or Fax your ad to U.S. 1 Jobs Wanted, 15 Princess Road, Suite K, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648. Fax to 609-844-0180. E-mail to class@princetoninfo.com. You must include your name, address, and phone number (for our records only).

A Personal Driver seeking to transport commuters, shopping trips, etc. Modern, attractive car. References provided. Less than commercial taxi services. E-mail to gvprinter@gmail.com or call 609-331-3370.

MUSIC SERVICES Brass Instrument Teacher: Professional musician, University of the Arts graduate. Instruction on Trumpet, Trombone, Tuba, Baritone/Euphonium, Improvisation/Music Theory. 609-2408290. Frank.rein@yahoo.com

Professional seeks a woman from 40-55 years old. I enjoy family, I like to go to movies, go to the beach, festivals, and sometimes dine out and travel. Please send phone, email to set up meeting. Box 240245.

classified by e-mail class@princetoninfo.com

Rexford Carpenter, 90, on May 14. He opened Hamilton Kitchens in Hamilton, and then founded Camelot Kitchens in Princeton. William K. Allegar, 61, on May 26. He worked at Homasote Co. in Ewing as a millwright for 42 years. Edward P. Neuburg on May 23. He worked for the National Security Agency in Washington D.C. as well as for the Institute for Defense Analyses in Princeton, from which he retired in 2013. Helen H. Martinson, 88, on May 18. She was a teacher and later a principal in the West WindsorPlainsboro schools before leading Princeton University’s Teachers as Scholars Program and Program in Teacher Preparation. Glenn Mohrman, 94, on May

1. He started a career in advertising research with Gallup and Robinson Inc. and Opinion Research, both in Princeton. In 1983 he founded Mohrman/Scott Associates, which specialized in pre-testing pharmaceutical company medical journal ads. Jonathan Elliott, 38, on June 5. The playwright and disability rights advocate was involved with Princeton Summer Theater, McCarter Theater, and the ArtPride New Jersey Foundation. He had also been a freelance contributor to U.S. 1. Marion Zarzeczna, 89, on June 1. She was a concert pianist who performed with the Greater Trenton Symphony Orchestra and served on the faculty of Westminster Choir College.

Office/Medical/Professional Princeton

• 195 Nassau Street • Individual Offices • Parking Available

Mercer Corporate Park, Robbinsville

5128 SF Office/Research for Lease Easy access to 130/TPK/195/295

HOW TO ORDER

Singles Exchange

TRANSPORTATION

Lawrence Office Park

Office/Medical/Professional • 168 Franklin Comer Road, Lawrenceville, NJ 4 miles to New Princeton Medical Center and Capital Health Regional Hospital 1,474-2,750 SF • Condos Available for Sale or Lease • Off of Princeton Pike & 295

HOW TO RESPOND How to Respond: Place your note in an envelope, write the box number on the envelope, and mail it with $1 cash to U.S. 1 at the address below.

Home security and home maintenance all in one. Retired police officer available for security and home maintenance. Power washing. Indoor/outdoor house painting. Also do lawn and garden, siding, new construction, replace doors and windows and door locks and house sitting, personal security and driving. Call 609-937-9456 or e-mail dra203@aol.com.

3450 Princeton Pike, Lawrenceville, NJ

2,075 SF Medical / Office Space Available for Lease Next Door to an Adult Day Health Center Easily Accessible from Route 1 and I-95

15

n 609-921-7655

women seeking men

Professional Ghostwriter: Press releases that grab editors’ attention and robust website content that rises above the run of the mill. Have your business history written to preserve the story behind your success. E. E. Whiting Literary Services. 609-462-5734 eewhiting@live.com

I’m an Italian-American widower originally from NY now in PA Newtown/ Yardley area. 73 slim healthy. Seeking a slim healthy woman 65 to 75. I’m active, educated, I like to laugh, have fun and do new things. Are you up for an adventure? We would travel, go to good movies, museums in NYC and Phila. I love jazz, we can stay home have a quiet evening cooking together (I’m an excellent cook). We just may find true love and passion. Please send photo, a note, a phone number so we may talk, and maybe meet for coffee. Box #240718.

U.S. 1

812 State Road, Princeton, NJ

145-1,221 SF for Lease Available Immediately

get a taste of real community For almost 50 years, Whole Earth has been bringing the finest fresh, organic and natural foods to our community. Stop in for taste of real, no-compromise freshness and quality!

100% Organic Produce Section from local farms in season Natural Foods Cafe vegetarian soups, salads, sandwiches Whole-Grain Bakery we make everything from scratch

360 NASSAU ST. (AT HARRISON) • PRINCETON MON–SAT 8AM–6PM • 8AM TO 9AM 65+ ONLY SUN 9AM–6PM • 9AM TO 10AM 65+ ONLY

LOCALLY OWNED • INDEPENDENT • SINCE 1970

EWING INDEPENDENT LIVING 55 PLUS SENIOR APARTMENTS You have many locations to choose from but we’re sure that EWING INDEPENDENT LIVING is your BEST CHOICE! One & Two bedroom units- spacious homes loaded with amenities!

EWING INDEPENDENT LIVING 1015 WHITEHEAD RD. EWING, NJ 08638 Call today for availability (609) 883-8500 EMAIL: office@ewingindependent.com


16

U.S. 1

JUNE 10, 2020

SPACE FOR LEASE RETAIL • OFFICE • MEDICAL

MANORS CORNER SHOPPING CENTER

• Individual roof mounted central A/C units with gas fired hot air heating & separately metered utilities • Tenants include Investors Bank, Udo’s Bagels, MASA 8 Sushi, Farmers Insurance & more • 139 on-site parking spaces available with handicap accessibility • Minutes from Routes 1, 206 & Interstate 295 • Close proximity to hotels, restaurants, banking, shopping & entertainment

SPACE AVAILABLE:

160 Lawrenceville-Pennington Road Lawrenceville, NJ • Mercer County

1,910 sf (+/-)

Retail • Office • Medical

PRINCESS ROAD OFFICE PARK

• Private bathroom, kitchenette & separate utilities for each suite • High-speed internet access available • 336 Parking spaces available with handicap accessibility • Two building complex totaling 47,094 sf (+/-) • On-site Day Care • 9 Acres of professionally landscaped & managed medical/office • Close proximity to hotels & restaurants in the Princeton & Trenton areas

SPACE AVAILABLE:

4 Princess Road Lawrenceville, NJ • Mercer County

Office • Medical

MONTGOMERY PROFESSIONAL CENTER

2,072 & 2,973 sf (+/-)

• Built to suit tenant spaces • Private entrance, bathroom, kitchenette and separate utilities for each suite • High-speed internet access available • 1/2 Mile from Princeton Airport and Route 206 • 210 Parking spaces with handicap accessibility • Close proximity to restaurants, banking, shopping, entertainment, hotels & more • On-site Montessori Day Care

Route 518 and Vreeland Drive Skillman, NJ • Somerset County

SPACE AVAILABLE:

Office • Medical

1,148 & 4,918 sf (+/-)

908.874.8686 • LarkenAssociates.com IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY • BROKERS PROTECTED No warranty or representation, express or implied, is made to the accuracy of the information contained herein & same is submitted subject to errors, omissions, change of price, rental or other conditions, withdrawal without notice & to any special listing conditions, imposed by our principals & clients.

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