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2

| August 2011 | columbusparent.com


ENROLL NOW. SPACES ARE FILLING UP FAST!

You Have a Choice! Serving Grades K-8 State Approved Curriculum

Challenging Curriculum and Daily Sports Instruction!     

No Tuition! All Students Wear Uniforms Strong Academics/State Approved Curriculum Small Class sizes – No more than 18 students per class All Day Kindergarten

 Extended School Day from 8 a.m.-4 p.m.  Daily Fitness Regimen in Martial Arts, Soccer and Tennis  Participation in all State Mandated Academic Testing Programs

Choose from 1 of 5 conveniently located campuses!

1258 Demorest Rd. • Columbus OH 43204 E-mail: jhursey@EdVantages.com Phone: 614-318-0606 K-8

1875 Morse Rd. • Columbus OH 43229 E-mail: hyoung@EdVantages.com Phone: 614-318-0600 K-8

3474 Livingston Ave. • Columbus OH 43227 E-mail: ryoung@EdVantages.com Phone: 614-324-4585 K-8

Information Meetings will be held at each school for interested parents. Please check the websites for dates and times.

274 E. 1st Avenue, Suite 200 • Columbus, Ohio 43201 E-mail: jpammer@performanceacademies.com Phone: 614-318-0720

K-6

2220 Hamilton Ct. E. • Columbus OH 43232 E-mail: mlovinguth@performanceacademies.com Phone: 614-318-1037

K-8

www.edvantages.com # www.performanceacademies.com columbusparent.com | August 2011 |

3


OurMom’s theBest! Congratulations to Columbus Parent editor Jane Hawes, winner of two awards in the Press Club of Cleveland’s 2011 Ohio Excellence in Journalism competition: Food Writing First Place Best in Ohio Division “Cooking with Kids: Gluten-Free Blueberry Muffins” Magazine Column Second Place Magazine Division “Letter from the Editor”

Columbus Parent editor Jane Hawes and her adoring son Colin

4

| August 2011 | columbusparent.com


IT’S SEE IT BEFORE

EXP

extinct!

. e IV v R U S . e P A C s E . e R lO 1 EPTEMBER 5, 201 S H G U O R TH W O N

i atronics, he-artt anim f th h state-of-t f with See dinosaurs come to llife n game, play “Be The Dinosaur” multi-player simulatio and explore a 3000 square-foot maze.

Plus, don’t miss Waking the T.Rex 3D: The Story of SUE on COSI’s new giant digital movie scre en!

Contributing Sponsor:

Media Partners:

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Promotional Partner:

SIZZLING SUMMER SCIENCE!

Farm Days

Little Seeds, Big Tractors August 17–21, 2011 a combine, a Huge farming equipment—including tors and more! four-wheel drive tractor, antique trac

Festival of

Chemistry

Saturday, August 13, 2011 (11am–3

:30pm)

Discover how chemistry connects to our lives every day through fun hands-on experiences. Play Che mistry Bingo, too! PRESE NTED BY

EXHIBI T GROWN BY SUPPO RTED BY

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614.228.2674 | COSI.ORG | columbusparent.com | August 2011 |

5


getting started: TABLE OF CONTENTS

ON THE GO 12 14 16

18

19 20

21 22 23 24

26

NEWS ON THE GO PRODUCT PIX WHAT THE WELLDRESSED KIDS ARE WEARING TO SCHOOL: at Gahanna’s Columbus Academy COLUMBUS PARENT PROFILE: Lewis Center’s Amy “AmyD” Dalrymple ANATOMY OF A PENCIL POUCH HOUSEBROKEN: Dispatch columnist Joe Blundo VITAMIN ME: Capital Style editor Kristy Eckert TAKE IT FROM TRACY: 10TV’s Tracy Townsend PEOPLE YOU SHOULD MEET: The Shazzbots! NEIGHBORHOOD SPOTLIGHT: Historic Dublin SHOP SPOTLIGHT: Create Children’s Boutique

CALENDAR:

209

HOT TOPIC: 28

30

32

THINGS TO D O THIS MONTH

OVERSCHEDULED KIDS: And the overscheduled parents who drive them places SCIENCE FAIR 101: How to get the most out of the experience REPORT-CARD REWARDS: Do you or don’t you give them?

Splash pad at Easton ERIC WAGNER PHOTOS

FAMILY FUN 46

NEED TO KNOW 34

37 38 42 44 45

AGE APPROPRIATE: READINESS AGES 6-12: Using a cell phone AGES 5-12: Packing their own lunch AGES 17-18: Taking a gap year FAMILY FINANCE: gas-price redux, part 2, from Denise Trowbridge THE GO-TO GUIDE: An insider’s guide to the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium PEDIATRIC HEALTHSOURCE: from Nationwide Children’s Hospital HANDY MOM: and the many uses of table salt WHAT’S THE WORST THAT COULD HAPPEN? with a raisin up the nose

48 50 52 53 54 55 News on the Go

56

HANDS ON: Clintonville’s Wholly Craft strings up paper lanterns COOKING WITH KIDS: Candy Sushi EATING OUT WITH KIDS: Worthington’s Rusty Bucket PARTIES: A Back-to-School Party… for parents! WORTH THE PRICE OF A SITTER? Shakespeare in Schiller Park DAY TRIPPIN’: Ohio State Fair PLAYGROUND PATROL: Easton Town Center’s splash pad REVIEWS: Books, apps, games and kids’ music

PAGE 12

ON THE COVER: Claudia bounces back to Columbus Academy’s 100th school year! PHOTO BY JODI MILLER

6

| August 2011 | columbusparent.com


= Better Grades

Call r Ou About ctory Introdu ial! Spec

At our ATA Martial Arts Academy, we work to make sure our students not only receive

BLACK BELTS in MARTIAL ARTS, but they also receive Black Belt Grades in school. Our certified instructors will help stress the importance of studying and getting

grades.

good

Call today and come see why so many teachers and school principals are recommending our Martial Arts School to their students.

Powell

Lewis Center

Pickerington

In the Big Bear Plaza (Corner of Sawmill Pkwy and Powell Rd.)

95 Neverland Drive (N.W. Corner of 23 and Powell Rd.)

773 Windmiller Dr. Suite C

614-760-0000

740-549-1313

614-920-9480 columbusparent.com | August 2011 |

7


getting started: LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Happy New Year!

ColumbusParent.com

34 S. Third St. Columbus, Ohio 43215 614-461-8878 (voice) 614-461-8746 (fax) 614-888-8888 (classifieds) www.ColumbusParent.com PUBLISHER

Katie Wolfe Lloyd

BY JANE HAWES Is it just me or does anyone else’s calendar still begin with the start of school each fall? Even after I was done with my formal education, there has always been something about that moment in late August or early September when I feel as if a new year has begun. Maybe it’s that tiny drop in the daily high temperature, but something about this time of the year always makes me feel like it’s time for a fresh start. And then I married my husband, who is a teacher and coach and has never stopped living on a school-based calendar. And then, soon enough, came our own children and I was well and truly back to living on a school-based calendar — when August becomes an annual scramble to, first, find the school-supplies list, then figure out what we can recycle from the year before (in my books, 19 mostly-whole crayons left over from a 24-pack is close enough), and then buy the rest of the items new (like rulers, which I am convinced are shacking up somewhere in the house with the socks that go missing from the dryer). We haul out clothes and I begin the negotiation process to get my son to try on everything and show me whether it still fits. (Cross-reference to my letter last month when I explained the finer details of the Visual Contact Rule of Parenting: Unless you see it, you cannot believe anything a child tells you about their attire. My son would head back to school with pants that end just below his earlobes, insisting all the while that he looks fine. However, I do need to give the kid props. Last year he insisted he had another couple of months left in his sneakers, so he didn’t need a new pair to start the school year. And, bless his miserly soul, he was right.) But, despite the frenzy of preparation, I still love this time of year. Maybe that’s why we created a special party for this issue, a back-to-school party for

kwolfe@columbusparent.com DIRECTOR OF NICHE PUBLICATIONS

Brian Lindamood blindamood@columbusparent.com EDITOR

Jane Hawes jhawes@columbusparent.com NICHE PUBLICATIONS ADVERTISING MANAGER

Amy Bishop abishop@columbusparent.com DIGITAL ADVERTISING SPECIALIST

Vanessa Micic vmicic@columbusparent.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Will Shilling wshilling@columbusparent.com PRODUCTION EDITOR

Rebecca Zimmer rzimmer@columbusparent.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Michaela Schuett mschuett@columbusparent.com EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Heather Weekley hweekley@columbusparent.com EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Jesse Tigges jtigges@columbusparent.com EDITORIAL INTERN

JODI MILLER PHOTO

parents (with plenty of suggestions for how to stage your own party plus a chance to win a party of your own!). Because, sure, we all joke about how much we celebrate when the kids are back at school, but who doesn’t feel a little tug on the heartstrings that first day as you either walk them into the building or wave to them as they board the school bus? We don’t just celebrate that our children made it to a new grade. We celebrate because we did, too. So let’s salute ourselves and all the exciting new adventures that await our families in the year to come!

Mary Slebodnik mslebodnik@columbusparent.com CONTRIBUTORS

Debbie Angelos, Joe Blundo, Olivera Bratich, Geoff Dutton, Melissa Kossler Dutton, Kristy Eckert, Anietra Hamper, Colin Hawes, Kris Hickey, Kristen Maetzold, Joe Maiorana, Jodi Miller, Phil Pikelny, Elizabeth Seufer, Shawn Sines, Mary Slebodnik, Tracy Townsend, Denise Trowbridge, Eric Wagner DISTRIBUTION If you would like to receive Columbus Parent at your business, or to report delivery concerns:

John Henry 614-410-1797 jhenry@dispatch.com

Columbus Parent is published and distributed by The Dispatch Printing Company every month, available at more than 1,200 locations throughout Central Ohio. One free copy per person. Circulation: 58,000 copies. Copyright © 2011 The Dispatch Printing Company

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| August 2011 | columbusparent.com


MARBURN ACADEMY MYTH: Reading will “click” FACT: Waiting for reading to click in 1st or 2nd grade makes school harder!

FACT: Bright children who struggle with reading, writing, and/or spelling may be exhibiting characteristics of dyslexia or ADHD.

Now accepting new students for

1st and 2nd grade Follow the facts not the myth. Call Barbara Davidson at 614-433-0822 or email bdavidson@marburnacademy.org with any questions.

New School Offers Parents a Choice You have a choice! Whether you are a parent of a child just beginning his or her educational journey or a parent who is not satisfied with your child’s present school, it is time to make a critical choice. The question that befuddles many parents is “How do I know which school is a great choice?” It is a huge decision. Now parents on the east side of Columbus have a choice that is close to home - Imagine Integrity Academy. At Imagine Schools we believe in loving our students and parents enough to provide exactly what each child needs, academically, emotionally and socially. Our schools are not cookie cutter schools. Each Imagine School serves the population that is enrolled in it and the community in which it is located. Parents are valued. We know that you

are the first and best educator of your child. We respect that. When you visit our schools you will know and feel the difference. When making your choice, trust your instincts. You are the parent, and you know what is best for your child. Opening in the fall of 2011, Imagine Integrity Academy is now accepting enrollment applications for Kindergarten through 2nd grade. Tuition is free at all Imagine Schools. Parents love our schools because their children love school.They are happy, excited and learning at high levels. To visit Imagine Integrity Academy call 614-464-1500, or for one of the five other Imagine Schools in the Columbus area go to www.imagineschools.com

Now Registering for 2012 Free Tuition

O P E N H O U S E!

FREE EARLY READING SCREENING September 23, 2011 • 8:30 AM – 12:00 PM For children aged 5 – 7 Find out if your child is likely to struggle with reading. Reservations are required • Space fills up fast Call Barbara Davidson at 614-433-0822 or email bdavidson@marubrnacademy.org

Join us for the first in a series

FREE COMMUNITY PARENT SEMINARS “When Children Struggle With Reading: Is It Dyslexia?” September 13, 2011 • 7:00 – 9:00 PM Reservations required to: bdavidson@marburnacademy.org.

Celebrating 30 years of educational innovation for bright ADHD and dyslexic students.

WWW.MARBURNACADEMY.ORG

IMAGINE INTEGRITY GRADES K-2

TUESDAYS AT IMAGINE INTEGRITY

4 TO 6 P.M.

1585 North Intergrity Drive, off Alum Creek Road Columbus, OH 43209

• All Imagine schools are tuition-free public charter schools of choice • Busing is provided by public school district • All day kindergarten •We offer state licensed pre- school and before and after care program.We accept Title XX.

Choose Imagine and join us on this great journey of Growing Minds and Guiding Hearts.

www.imagineschools.com Imagine Academy of Sullivant 3435 Sullivant Ave. 614-308-5991

Imagine Academy of Columbus 4656 Heaton Rd. 614-443-7510

Imagine Great Western Academy Imagine Groveport Community School Imagine Harrisburg Pike Academy 3109 North Wilson Rd. 4485 South Hamilton Rd. 680 Harrisburg Pike 614-276-1028 614-574-4100 614-223-1510

columbusparent.com | August 2011 |

9


getting started: ON THE WEB

e t a m i t l u Y A D H T R I B y t r a p WINNER IS ... THE

Columbus has Angie Wahlenmaier of m each of

ates fro won $200 in gift certific Mr. Game Room these amazing sponsors: Rooster’s restaufor video-game parties, , transportation rants for wings and food e Chiller ice rinks from Kidz Chauffeur , Th , and inflatables (for a great party venue) from Super Games. and other party games Congratulations!

BACK

TO

SCHOOL

FOR

PARTY parents This month we are giving away a Back to School Lunch Party for up to 8 people that will take place on Tuesday, Aug. 30, at 11 a.m. at Matt the Miller’s Tavern in Dublin (6725 AveryMuirfield Dr.). The prize package is valid for up to $15 per person for a total of $120. Tips and alcoholic beverages are not included. Visit ColumbusParent.com and click on the Contests page to enter. We’ll accept entries from Aug. 1 through Aug. 15, and will randomly draw one winner from the eligible entries. You must be at least 18 years old to enter and you must be able to use the prize offering on Aug. 30.

JULY WAS CRAZY WITH THE GIVEAWAYS! In the meantime, we wore ourselves out in July with all the giveaways. Maybe you were some of the lucky winners of the Ohio State Fair and concert tickets, or the family four-packs of tickets to the Dublin Irish Festival, or the two piñatas we gave away on Facebook, or the Lollacup sippy cup, or “The Kitchen Gardener’s Handbook” by Jennifer Bartley, or the Laurie Berkner Band DVD. What will we be giving away in August? We can’t tell you now, but be sure to check ColumbusParent.com, the Columbus Parent Magazine page on Facebook AND our Twitter feed at @ColumbusParent for more prize giveaways every month!

The Conservatory of Piano... celebrating 40 years of excellence in piano instruction introductory piano classes for: • preschool ages 3 to 6 • beginners ages 7 to 10 • young adults ages 11 to 17 • adults • private lessons for all ages always available • transfer students welcome

autumn sampler september 19 - october 28

adult sampler september 19 - november 11

209 north hamilton road • columbus, ohio 43213 • (614) 755-2424 60 old west wilson bridge road • worthington, ohio 43085 • (614) 436-6076 www.conservatoryofpiano.com

excellence in piano instruction is our only businesssm

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| August 2011 | columbusparent.com

sm


columbusparent.com | August 2011 |

11


on the go: NEWS ON THE GO

NEWS

GO

on the

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

This year, Columbus Academy has a lot to celebrate: 2011 is their milestone centennial year. Rich in academic excellence, the K-12 school has been educating students since 1911. Part of their focus includes honoring tradition, and Academy families have helped uphold that mission. Currently, the school has 11 three-generation families, including the Carlins. Led by patriarch Phil Carlin who graduated in 1958, 12 family members have followed in his footsteps. Carlin’s family has also served as members of the Academy faculty and on the school’s board of trustees. “Columbus Academy has been very good to our family,” said Carlin, “in teaching our children, training athletics, building character and community behavior, and in general preparing us well for college and life.” For more information on Columbus Academy and the centennial celebration, visit their website at columbusacademy.org. —HEATHER WEEKLEY

TAKE DAD OUT TO THE BALLGAME! Don Dunham of Reynoldsburg was the lucky winner of our first “Take Dad Out to the Ballgame” contest. Nominated by his wife, Jennifer, Dunham got to toss out the first pitch at the Columbus Clippers game on July 16 (with a little guidance from 7-year-old daughter Jennifer) and then enjoy the Clippers’ winning effort against the Indianapolis Indians. ERIC WAGNER PHOTOS

FILL ’ER UP

The new school year means backpacks stocked with notebooks, markers, No. 2 pencils and glue sticks. As you fill your child’s backpack, why not help supply those in need? Since 1998, the Tom Fennessy/Mike Harden Back-to-School Project has provided backpacks and school supplies to underprivileged children. Originally started by Columbus Dispatch columnist Mike Harden to honor the late Tom Fennessy, a JAMES D. DECAMP PHOTO former Dispatch columnist and friend, the project now supports more than 8,000 kids each school year. Harden’s name was added to the mission after he died last year. The Back-to-School Project works to ensure that its recipients have an equal opportunity for education. Several Central Ohio groups provide their time and effort each year, and backpacks are given to children in Franklin County and beyond. Many Columbus organizations and children have benefited, including the Homeless Families Foundation, St. Stephen’s Community House and the YWCA Community Center. This year, it will take $65,000 to fill the thousands of backpacks. Want to donate? Visit tomfennessy.org to make an online donation, or send them to Betty Kletrovets, 5277 Infinity Court, Grove City, OH 43123. —HEATHER WEEKLEY

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| August 2011 | columbusparent.com

Don Dunham and his daughter Katherine enjoy a Columbus Clippers game


AT PLAY

FOUR CONVENIENT LOCATIONS:

POST SUMMERTIME

blues

COLUMBUS • GAHANNA WORTHINGTON • REYNOLDSBURG

dance academy Providing a diverse array of classes in a fun, nurturing and professional environment, the BalletMet Dance Academy offers students of all ages a wide variety of dance and technique styles taught by our highly qualified and experienced faculty.

The follies of summer are quickly fading and it’s time to get the family back on schedule for early-morning bus rides, daily homework and other scholarly activities. If your kids are like mine, they’ve probably been glued to their laptops, handhelds or game consoles, and only realized the seasons were changing when you forcibly kicked them out of the house away from their digital entertainment. With the return to school, we always face the same conflict — how do we wean the kids off their fun and back on track for a productive school year? Playing games, especially video games, are a great vacation activity for kids during the summer, but too much of a good thing leads to poor grades, missing homework and a general lack of progress. Get ahead of the problem this year with a few simple tips I’ve used to pull my connected kids back from the brink in years past:

• RATION AND REWARD: Going cold turkey is hard for anyone, so consider creating a schedule for gaming. Also plan some rewards like extra time or a new game if your child manages to keep to the schedule or demonstrates good scholarship and responsibility. • BE PREPARED TO LAY DOWN THE LAW: Electronic games are captivating and kids like to be entertained, even when they go through the motions to earn play time. But be firm and clear that gaming is a privilege to be earned, not a right. • COUNTER-PROGRAM: Now I understand why my parents always got us so involved in fall sports and other activities until I was a parent. While exercise serves to keep your child in shape and active, it also helps break them from the routines established during the summer months. • JOIN THEM: Playing with the kids and setting limits is the best way to control their game usage. Engage and try and share the experience. If you establish that connection, I’ve found it’s even easier to cajole them away from the games toward the textbooks. —SHAWN SINES

FALL CLASSES BEGIN AUGUST 29. BALLET • JAZZ • TAP • MODERN • YOGA • PILATES • MORE! TO REGISTER OR FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CALL 614.224.1672 OR VISIT WWW.BALLETMET.ORG

BACK TO SCHOOL SPECIAL OFFER FOR KIDS OF ALL AGES! Buy one ticket to The Nutcracker and receive the second ticket for half-price! Order tickets at TICKETMASTER.COM or 800.982.2787 Use code BTSCP when ordering. Offer valid September 1–9 only, select performances and seat locations.

columbusparent.com | August 2011 |

13


on the go: PRODUCT PIX BY KRISTEN MAETZOLD

welcome

mat

Mess? What mess? Whether it’s from arts-and-crafts or mac-and-cheese, clean up spills in seconds flat when they fall on the Splat Mat ($32) by SugarBooger. Laminated, 42-inch-by-42-inch cotton canvas in several fun designs is a breeze to clean; a matching zippered pouch makes it equally easy to store. Von Maur, 1530 Polaris Pkwy., Polaris Fashion Place, 614-781-7855, vonmaur.com

1

Wear bug spray with DEET (except infants). Follow the directions on the bottle.

2

Check houses, garages, and landscaping for bee nests.

3

Drain all standing water from toys, kiddie pools, tires, birdbaths, and other containers to keep mosquitoes away.

4

Wear long sleeve shirts, pants, hats, and closed-toe shoes when walking in tall grass and the woods to protect you from ticks and other bugs.

REST EASY The Padalily may not lessen the load, but it sure makes carrying a baby carrier vastly more comfortable. No surprise, Padalily ($30) was invented by a mom. The fabric-covered, plush foam cushion wraps around a car seat handle making it much easier to handle. There are several stylish patterns to choose from and each is reversible. Lilylimes, 7850 Olentangy River Rd., Worthington, 614-448-1222, lilylimes.com

SLAP ON THE WRIST

This is time with a twist. One minute it’s board-straight, but with a slap on your wrist, it winds around in seconds flat. You’ve seen the SLAP and SLAP Jr. Watches ($20) featured in Rolling Stone and on “Ellen” and the “Today Show.” Made of silicone, the watch band comes in nine bright colors with interchangeable faces. Available in the Columbus Museum of Art Store, 480 E. Broad St., Downtown, 614-221-6801, columbusmuseum.org; online at slapwatch.com

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| August 2011 | columbusparent.com


WATER COOLER

Hydration just got personal. These stainless-steel water bottles by Klean Kanteen ($35-$40) and personalized exclusively for Garnett Hill, are free of BPA and other toxins, are dishwasher safe, and insulated to keep drinks hot or cold for hours. They’re sized (12ounce and 18-ounce) to fit easily in book bags and lunch boxes. Plus, they’re just cool. Available online at garnetthill.com

Sometimes the best part of the game is just learning to play. They may be very small players but their smiles are huge. That’s our goal.

Visit soccerfirst.org to register today! Soccer programs for kids:

WHAT A

CROC!

   

KinderTots (2-3 yrs) KinderKickers (3-4 yrs) Kickers (5-6 yrs) Soccer Academy (6-11 yrs)

Soccer First at Character. Family. Community.

614-793-0101

6490 Dublin Park Drive, Dublin, OH 43016

No doubt kids will be rockin’ the Crocs when they head back to class this fall. And just like kids, the versatile slip-on has grown a little over the summer. The new Crocs ($40-$60) still feature the same signature Croslite material, but now come in several new styles including sneakers, boots, and a shaggy creation called “The Thing.” The Crocs Kiosk, 1500 Polaris Pkwy., Polaris Fashion Place, polaris@crocs.com

Keeping the Peace These hippie-chic tees ($42) bearing short messages are long on style and sentiment. With sayings like “Happy Mom,” “Love Lives in a Happy Heart” and “Happiness Rocks,” the shirts are the creation of PeaceLoveMom and all designed to celebrate motherhood. They’ve become a Hollywood-mom must-have, but you’ll find them much closer to home at Fritzy Jacobs in Worthington. Fritzy Jacobs, 635 N. High St., Worthington, 614-885-8283, fritzyjacobs.com

We take competitors’ coupons

FREE hen e rt w t-shi ng befor ri e t t s s i 1 g re st 3 Augu

columbusparent.com | August 2011 |

15


Is your child on the right track?

Dublin & Worthington’s Favorite Child Care Center

FREE REGISTRATION Week - Long Open House Monday – Friday 9:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M. August 8-12 @ 3480 Snouffer Road (614) 792-8700 August 15-19 @ 1123 Bethel Road (614) 461-5200

1123 Bethel Rd. Columbus, 43220 614.451.5200

on the go: WELL-DRESSED

What the WELL-DRESSED kids are wearing

BACK TO SCHOOL ON JULIUS:

ON CLAUDIA:

Gray crew-cut sweatshirt with “Columbus Academy” screen print ($20 from Viking Corner), knee-length khaki shorts ($20 from Gap) and Sperry Top-Sider loafers ($50 from Nordstrom)

Plaid drop-waisted jumper ($33 from Viking Corner), pink polo shirt ($17 from Gap), plaid headband ($7 from Viking Corner), Dansko mahogany clogs ($70 from Von Maur)

3480 Snouffer Rd. Columbus, 43235 614.792.8700

www.jellybeanjunction.com Let us help your children reach their full potential.

The OXFORD SCHOOL of DUBLIN Programs for Early Education and Development • Half & Full Day Programs for Infant, Toddler, Preschool & Kindergarten • Child Care for Children Ages 6 Weeks through Age 12 • Caring, Knowledgeable and Experienced Staff • Small Class Sizes and Low Student/Teacher Ratios • Drop In Child Care • Transportation to Local Elementary Schools • Open house: Aug. 17th Muirfeld/Tartan and Aug. 18th Tuttle 3-6pm

now enrolling for the 2011-2012 school year

$100 off

first month with qualifying Tuttle Muirflield/Tartan enrollment 5700 Blazer Parkway 6055/6065 Glick Road Dublin, OH 43017 Powell, OH 43065

CLAUDIA Age: 7 Heading into: second grade Favorite lunch at school: chicken noodle soup Favorite subject: reading Favorite books: the Junie B. Jones series

JULIUS (his mother calls him J.B.) Age: 5 Heading into: kindergarten Favorite Food: tacos Least Favorite Food: Mommy’s chicken Favorite Sport: ice hockey Favorite Blue Jacket: Rick Nash (so much so that Julius rooted for Canada in the 2010 Winter Olympics!)

614-792-2220 614-761-6400 JODI MILLER PHOTOS

www.theoxfordschool.com 16

| August 2011 | columbusparent.com


ON CAROLINE: ON ABI: Beige pleated Cherokee skirt ($12 from Target), navy Cherokee polo shirt ($10 from Target), zip-up gray sweater with Columbus Academy logo made by Port Authority ($50 at Viking Corner), Sperry Top-Sider loafers ($50 from Nordstrom)

Navy Royal Park kick-pleat skirt ($29 from Viking Corner), maroon Vantage fleece sweater with Columbus Academy logo ($40 from Viking Corner), plaid hair bow ($7 from Viking Corner), Sperry Top-Sider loafers ($50 from Nordstrom)

ABI (her mother calls her Abigail) Age: 10 Heading into: fifth grade Favorite lunch at school: tacos Favorite subject: art Favorite music star: Taylor Swift

CAROLINE Age: 13 Heading into: eighth grade Favorite subject: science Favorite lunch at school: “breakfast for lunch” Least favorite lunch: salmon What you can trade salmon for at lunch: chicken fingers

WHERE TO BUY: Viking Corner is Columbus Academy’s non-profit supply store, 4300 Cherry Bottom Rd., Gahanna

columbusparent.com | August 2011 |

17


on the go: COLUMBUS PARENT PROFILE

Amy Dalrymple

Murphy

AGE: 41 SPOUSE: Bryan Murphy KIDS: Tennessee (16), Indie (8), Ellie (6) NEIGHBORHOOD: Lewis Center JOB: Professional Crafter (I love that that is a legit occupation!) WEBSITE: madebyamyd.com

What is the most played song on your iPod right now? “Stockholm Syndrome” by Muse (judging from the amount of minivans at the Muse concert, they are the most-loved band for moms)

If you had to be on a reality-TV show, which one would it be? “Wipe Out!” I would fail in a spectacular way that would get played repeatedly on YouTube.

Who is your favorite TV/movie parent? Claire from “Modern Family” (when I asked the kids what I should answer, they said “Liz Lemon,” but she’s not a mom.) Which superhero power would you like to have? Control the weather. We talk about this all the time at the dinner table, so I didn’t have to think about that one.

Favorite thing to do for cheap family fun in Central Ohio: The Zoo Favorite restaurant to take the kids: Noodles and Company. I know it’s a chain, but that place keeps the whole crowd happy!

Favorite movie that you went to see with the kids: “Tangled” ERIC WAGNER PHOTO

Best advice you ever received as a parent: As long as the kids know you love them, they will turn out OK. (This advice was given by a professional, so it has way more weight than the “you should spank them” advice given by others!)

What have you learned as a parent that you wish someone had told you before had that first kid? It can be really fun! I was always worried I would suck at it because I thought you had to have a clean house and bake all the time.

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| August 2011 | columbusparent.com

What’s something your mom or dad did that you thought was nuts when you were a kid and now you understand? I’m a fan of the snappy retort, “Start paying the mortgage and you can make the rules.”

What’s the funniest thing your child ever said or did that you really wish he or she hadn’t said or done? Ellie said to her teacher at school, “I collect beer-bottle caps and I have a huge collection because my mom drinks lots of beer.”

If you have more than one child, what’s the biggest difference between them? The two oldest are pretty serious about school and things being done correctly. They eat what’s on their plate and also like to make sure everyone else is following the rules. The youngest is a little different. She adores being the baby of the family and usually tries to find a workaround.

My life’s motto is: No one likes a pussyfooter.


on the go: ANATOMY OF A ...

Pencil pouch

We gave them away as goodie bags at our Back-to-School Party for Parents, but there’s no reason why (most of) these items won’t also work for your back-to-school student. .

THE PENCIL POUCH Everyone say, “Awww!” because is this just not the cutest pencil pouch you’ve ever seen? They’re made by Inkology and retail for $6 each at Staples stores

THE NAME TAG Are “Zippies” destined to be the hot new accessory? Well, that’s what their publicist would have us believe and, frankly, they’re just strange enough looking that we think maybe they will catch on. Right now you can only get them online for $5 each at zippiesfun.com.

WHERE TO GET: Wholly Craft, 3169 N. High St., Clintonville, 614-4473445, whollycraft.net; Staples, multiple locations, staples.com; Target, multiple locations, target.com

THIS JULY: MORE TIME FOR YOUR FAMILY CLOSETS

ALYSIA BURTON PHOTOS

GARAGES

THE NOTEPAD Moleskine adds a touch of class to the most mundane school supplies. Case in point: These tiny “Legendary Ruled Notebooks” ($6 for a set of two). Available at Target in a rainbow of colors.

THE STICKERS Finally, stickers for the editor in us all: These stickers, made by Massachusetts-based Fishcakes and available at Wholly Craft ($5 for a pack of 36), sing the praises of grammar and correct punctuation.

THE BUMPER STICKER Also available at Wholly Craft, graphic artist Sarah Utter (from Portland, Oregon) puts the “rrrrr” back in reading with her “reading is sexy” bumper sticker ($1 each).

HOME OFFICE KIDS ROOMS

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columbusparent.com | August 2011 |

19


on the go: HOUSEBROKEN

still works for

DUMMIES BY JOE BLUNDO

If you go to enough garage sales, you gain an understanding of what people have too much of: everything. But some items in particular seem to show up at every sale. I call them Guaranteed Garage Sale Items. They are the impulse purchases, silly trinkets and itseemed-like-a-good-idea-at-the-time stuff that might as well come from the factory with a 25-cent sticker attached. Here’s my list of things that never fail to end up on a folding table marked “2 for $1”:

Overly specific appliances: Wafflemakers, tortilla presses, cooking gadgets pushed by Ron Popeil: These devices turn up regularly at garage sales, suspiciously clean and sometimes in their original packaging. You just know that someone with insomnia purchased them after watching an infomercial while hungry at 3 a.m. Coffee mugs: I’m guessing that it would take 10 years for the world to absorb the current excess of coffee mugs. There must be at least five for every human on the planet. No wonder they sell for a nickel each at garage sales. Picture frames: Evidently, Americans like to keep an emergency supply of

frames on hand, just in case someone unexpectedly hands them an 8-by-10 of a youth soccer team. An enduring mystery is why we have so many unused frames at the same time we have so many unframed photos in shoeboxes. Books other people thought you should read: Newt Gingrich’s prescription for a better America? An 800-page biography of the Dalai Lama? “The Golden Treasury of Inspirational Sayings”? I see those kinds of books, still pristine in their dust jackets, at lots of garage sales. They just scream “underappreciated Christmas gift.” Sports equipment: If the country is ever invaded, gun-owners will defend themselves with firearms, and the rest of us will seize the tennis racquets, golf clubs and ski poles we haven’t used since 1987. Why do we hang onto these things? Because they remind us of younger days, when we could look at a soccer ball and think “fun.” Now, we think “Advil.” Outdated electronic devices: State law requires that every garage sale offer at least one 12-inch black-and-white TV or a VCR from the Reagan administration. Often, they come with a hand-lettered sign

HARVEST PREPARATORY SCHOOL 4595 Gender Road, Canal Winchester, OH Phone: 614-382-1111

Quality Christian Education for Age 3 - Grade 12. Now Accepting Applications for 2011-12 School Year! For More Information, Please Visit www.harvestprep.org

20

| August 2011 | columbusparent.com

saying “still works.” Well, yes, and so do washboards, hay rakes and typewriters. (Speaking of outdated electronic devices, I could fill a garage with their cables, connectors, adapters and converters alone. I didn’t why I keep them. I didn’t even know what they were for when they were new.) Unfulfilled ambitions: This is a catchall category for the items that speak of goals unrealized and plans postponed. Among the items that fit there are unused sewing patterns, 5,000-piece jigsaw puzzles still sealed in their boxes, clarinets untooted since high school marching band, wine-making kits and any book whose title ends in “…for Dummies.” Don’t ever buy these things new because I guarantee that next weekend they’ll be on sale cheap in a garage near you.

Joe Blundo’s column So to Speak appears in the Life section of The Columbus Dispatch. Visit his blog at Dispatch.com

*Over 50 area churches represented *Bible Classes, Weekly Chapel Svcs. *Championship Athletics *Post-Secondary Enrollment Option Available *A.P./ Honors Courses *Choir, Art, Music P.E. Provided


on the go: VITAMIN ME

Back-toShopping school BY KRISTY ECKERT

I’m sometimes shocked to learn that people hate shopping. My friend Lisa, for example, can’t stand it. Yet she enjoys washing dishes. (“It’s like therapy,” she says. Ironically, I say the same about buying boots.) Nonetheless, even the Lisas of the world venture out this time of year for the traditional back-to-school shopping trek. (Cue the hallelujahs from all parents whose kids wear uniforms.) In the end, for shopaholics and shopaphobes alike, back-toschool shopping boils down to the same thing that most situations do: getting the most bang for your buck. Here are my tips for doing just that:

1. REORGANIZE YOUR CHILDREN’S CLOSETS. Fig-

5. BARGAIN SHOP BEFORE YOU LEAVE THE HOUSE.

ure out what still fits. Give away or hand down what doesn’t. Make sure you’re not buying new jeans if they already have a pair stuffed under the bed that work.

You know what stores you like, so sign up to be on their email lists and don’t shop until they’re having a sale. Also, look for online coupons. One of my favorite general sites is printablecoupons.blogspot.com (just click the retail tab).

2. THREE’S A CHARM. Three basic bottoms will go 6. KNOW YOUR OPTIONS. The malls do offer sever-

a long way: one pair of jeans, one pair of khakis and one pair of khaki shorts or a neutral skirt.

3. IF YOUR CHILDREN ARE OLD ENOUGH TO CRAVE A PARTICULAR BRAND, BUY THEM A TOP OR TWO MADE BY THAT BRAND, AND THEN MAKE IT COUNT. In other words, if they want Abercrombie & Fitch, go to the sale rack, find a couple tees for $15 (yes, you can find them), and make sure they clearly say A&F. The tees can be worn alone while it’s still warm out, and then layered beneath button-up shirts or zip-up hoodies (or both) when it’s cold.

al fun stores. Beyond that, though, options also abound. Old Navy boasts good deals for kids of all ages. Kohl’s is great for bottoms. T.J.Maxx can be a treasure trove. Filene’s Basement is a nice place for teens. Prime Outlets in Jeffersonville can be well worth the drive. And stores’ websites are a wonderful place to clearance shop.

7. SPLURGE ON SOMETHING THEY LOVE. The more they love it, the more they’ll wear it. And isn’t that the point?

4. LAYER UP. Buy one thin layering top and one thick one. (Those that button or zip are best so kids can easily put on and take off as needed.) For the thin layer, a long-sleeved, cotton button-up top works great (try cuffing the sleeves). For the thick layer, a hoodie is perfect — and can also serve as a jacket during fall.

Discover how much fun Your Back-To-School

Kristy Eckert is the editor of Capital Style, a bimonthly women’s magazine published by The Dispatch Printing Company. To sign up for her weekly e-newsletter, visit Capital-Style.com

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6 Convenient Locations

Polaris Parkway 1198 East Powell Road

Westerville

6071 Chandler Dr.

Dublin/Powell 7438 Sawmill Road

Pickerington

1726 Hill Road North

Gahanna/New Albany

(1/3 mile west of Polaris Mall, (On S.R. 3 just 2 traffic lights, (Corner of Sawmill & Hard Rd.) (Rt. 256 next to Barnes& Nobles) behind KFC) North of Maxtown) 792-2899 522-0220

846-5610

898-9855

Open Monday thru Saturday.

4359 Morse Road

(1 mile east of I-270)

428-9999

Hilliard

3233 Hilliard-Rome Rd. (Tinapple Plaza on Hilliard-Rome Rd.)

876-7700

(Open Sunday 12-4 Polaris location only)

Appointments Recommended

www.cookiecutterscolumbus.com columbusparent.com | August 2011 |

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on the go: TAKE IT FROM TRACY

RETHINKING

BY TRACY TOWNSEND

summer VACATION

Those days of long summer vacations that included hours at the pool or playing outside are only a memory — but only for my husband and myself. Summer vacation for my son Ian and his buddies includes a significant amount of school work.

Please don’t get the impression that I’m a so-called Tiger Mom (although I can confess to Tiger Mom tendencies). We’ve made the most of Ian’s break from school with baseball, visits with the grandparents, and family bike rides. As he gets ready for the fourth grade, we’ve also spent a lot of time studying. Yes,

studying — as in reading, writing and arithmetic. As you might imagine, it was all fun, frolic, and family love until it was time to hit the books. Our school, with the assistance of the PTO, sends home a “Brain Games” activity book. Many districts do this now as a way to keep children engaged over the summer.

The books are filled with activities to keep skills they’ve learned during the school year fresh. In addition to “Brain Games,” there’s also the summer reading list. Ian was fine with the activity book and even excited about the reading list because we signed up for the summer reading program at the library. Then the swimming pool opened, baseball season was in full swing, and he and his neighborhood friends remembered how much fun they could squeeze into the long summer days. But children are expected to be ready to learn once the new school year starts. Gone are the days when teachers had time to spend weeks reviewing. My teacher friends tell me it is critical to keep skills sharp because children can drop several reading levels if they don’t read over the summer. If you’ve been reading my column, you know how much I “enjoyed” third grade and all of its homework, tests and projects. The notion that all that hard work (and good grades) could be for nothing was motivation enough for me to introduce Ian to the idea of multi-tasking. The way I see it, he’s learning from the

Master (Mistress?) of Multitasking. We all know life-work balance is a monumental task. I figure since we hear so much today about preparing children for global competition, it may not be too early to learn to multitask. Of course, I am only half joking. We’re making it through the summer by carving out the reading time and making it a “Momand-me” activity where we both tuck into a good book. The morning commute to camp includes math drills after we listen to our favorite summer song and talk about plans for the day. All of this does make me re-think summer vacation — or at least the “vacation” part. My sister, who is a married working mother of two, agrees with me. She says it should be renamed … but we’re too busy to come up with anything because, after all, there’s reading to do, math to review, and book reports to write.

Tracy Townsend is a news reporter and anchor with 10TV News HD.

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| August 2011 | columbusparent.com


on the go: PEOPLE YOU SHOULD MEET

s t o b z z a h The S

WHERE TO FIND THE SHAZZBOTS (FOR FREE!)

BY JANE HAWES

It was one of those experiences that any musician lives for — that magical moment when a song changes from a breeze blowing from performer to audience and explodes into a cyclone that sucks everyone in. The fact that it involved a platypus only made it more magical. The Shazzbots arguably are Central Ohio’s premier kid-music band. Formed in 2008, the rockand blues-influenced quintet now performs regularly at music festivals, libraries, parties and familyfriendly events throughout the area. And earlier this summer, as they performed at the Gahanna branch of the Columbus Metropolitan Library, a 4-year-old boy announced he wanted to hear a song about a platypus. “I told him we didn’t have any, so I asked him if he knew any,” recalled Ian Hummel, the group’s lead singer and acoustic guitar player (under the guise of the “Captain Captain” character). “He said, ‘Yeah, I do,’ ” Hummel went on, “so I invited him up to join us. Now, mind you, this was in front of about 100 people.” Drummer Steve Frey (a.k.a. “Watts Watson”) said the results were amazing … to them all.

9 a.m. Monday, Aug. 8 Lolli-Pops! Summer Children’s Concert Series Village Green Park, 47 Hall St., Powell 10 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 27 HOOT Family Film Series Gateway Film Center, 1550 N. High St., Campus 4 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 1 Bexley Farmer’s Market 2111 E. Main St., Bexley 10 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 24 HOOT Family Film Series Gateway Film Center, 1550 N. High St., Campus

JOE MAIORANA PHOTOS

“He started this tune, just making it up as he went along, and we started to follow along,” Frey said, “and then somehow he resolves it into this little chorus. Mom was sitting over there on the side, sobbing and telling us he’s never done anything like that before.” Frey put the moment in perspective: “There’s too much vicarious living going on in this world, but this was real.” And in that experience came a crystallizing sense of where the Shazzbots’ journey is taking them, said bass player Mike “Scopes” Heslop (who is also the only parent

out of the group of veteran musicians, with sons ages 2 and 4). “It’s about finding those moments of music education,” said Heslop. “We’ve got this idea of getting it out to a mass audience with a TV show and with online content, and working in lessons about the instruments and songs.” The band members — which also include keyboardist Molly “Aurora Borealis” Winters and lead guitarist Josh “Professor Swiss Vanderburton” Tully — have built their lives around music. They may pay the bills with electrical contracting work (in Frey’s case), by

owning Kafe Kerouac in the University District (Heslop), or teaching preschool (Tully) or music lessons (Winters), but such flexibility frees them up to perform for audiences with an early bedtime. Although even there, Hummel said, they find they draw just as many adults, and not even as chaperones. The music is well written and well played, as seen at a recent performance at the Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens. Perhaps one key to their success is that the Shazzbots don’t “play down” to their audiences. The lyrical content may be differ-

ent, Hummel said, but the music isn’t. “If anything, it’s been better,” said Hummel, “because we’re not stuck in one genre. We can play everything and we do.”

columbusparent.com | August 2011 |

23


on the go: NEIGHBORHOOD SPOTLIGHT

HISTORIC

BY MELISSA KOSSLER DUTTON PHOTOS BY JOE MAIORANA

Dublin

Strolling the streets of Dublin’s Historic District, it’s hard not to be struck by how friendly shop owners are to families and children. Even stores with breakables and fancy things eagerly greet young people. The district’s proximity to a Dublin City Schools middle and high school means shop workers are used to kids, said Susie Couger, a longtime employee of Our Cupcakery. “Everybody is welcoming of that,” said Couger, who decorates cakes and cupcakes at the bakery. “We recognize that it’s a huge client base for us.” Rose Lykins, owner of Aboxa Fudge, agreed that kids are an important part of the economy in the district (which is also called “Old Dublin,” or “BriHi” because it sits at the intersection of Bridge and High streets). “They’re some of my best customers,” Lykins said. “A kid will come in and try a free sample and then come back on their bike with their piggybank and buy a box of fudge.” The welcoming atmosphere, unique shops and great dining options m ake the area a fun destination for families. It’s a place to

24

BIDDIE’S COACH HOUSE HA’PENNY BRIDGE IMPORTS park the car and explore on foot. Historic Dublin has been a hub of activity for the town since it was settled in 1810. The town was named after the capital of Ireland by a surveyor who was born there. The area has a much different feel than other parts of the city, which are dominated by new construction designed to look old. Here, many buildings are genuinely old and a number of them are on the National Registry of Historic Places. Many of these shops have interesting nooks and rooms, which make them fun to navigate. (The same could be said of the district’s parking, which is mostly tucked compactly behind shops, but at least it’s free!) The city also celebrates its Gaelic heritage each year by hosting the world’s second largest Dublin Irish

| August 2011 | columbusparent.com

Festival. This weekend-long festival of music, dancing and dining takes place during the first weekend in August, just up the road in

Coffman Park. Ha’penny Bridge Imports of Ireland carries wonderful goods from the town’s namesake. The store has a beautiful selection of Irish china, jewelry and crystal, as well as a room devoted to kid stuff. Items include everything from christening gowns to cute onesies and cozy little sweaters. Blankets and Booties also has a great selection of baby and children items. The store is full of precious clothing for girls up to size 4T and boys up to 9 months. The inventory also

includes some unique gifts including a plate and marker that babyshower guests can personalize for moms-to-be. Clover Boutique offers a beautiful array of clothing, jewelry and vintage items. “It’s a little bit of everything,” said owner Susie Crum. She tries to stock as much environmentally friendly merchandise as she can. Crum sells clothing made from organic cotton and bamboo. She also carries merchandise from Global Girlfriend, a line of fairtrade products made by women in communities in need. Create is a super-luxe boutique for children’s clothing. When you need special clothes for special


DUBLIN IRISH FESTIVAL

COFFMAN PARK DATES: Aug. 5-7 dublinirishfestival.org TICKETS: adults, $10; seniors (60+), students (with ID) and military personnel, $8; children 12 and under are admitted free. Through Aug. 3, you can get a $1 discount on tickets by ordering them online.

occasions (including baptisms and First Communions), this is definitely a shop to visit. They also stock home decor, toys and gifts. When it’s time for a bite to eat, there are numerous options. Tehku Tea Co. has yummy lunch selections. The tea house hosts tea tasting where guests can learn more about the ancient beverage. The shop also has an extensive selection of teas that customers can sniff. Even kids enjoy twisting open the tea containers and taking a whiff of the spicy and fruity tea leaves. For snacks, kids will want to visit Our Cupcakery, which features a DIY cupcake bar. Kids can choose the cupcake and icing flavor they want and then decorate the treat with candy and sprinkles. The bakery also offers kids baking classes and birthday parties. Another fun party and snacking venue is MJ’s Candy Bar. The store has retro candy and all the current favorites. And right at the corner of BriHi sits a Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams (no explanation needed, right?). For a unique treat, visit Biddie’s Coach House. The quaint tea house serves sandwiches, salads and soups and is a lovely spot for a mother-daughter date.

OUR CUPCAKERY

OUR CUPCAKERY

CREATE

16 N. High St. 614-659-1555 ourcupcakery.com

13 S. High St. 614-764-7640 createatdublin.com

ABOXA FUDGE

TEHKU TEA COMPANY

124 S. High St. 614-793-8343 aboxafudge.com

55 S. High St. 614-761-3808 tehku.com

HA’PENNY BRIDGE IMPORTS

MJ’S CANDY BAR

75 S. High St. 614-889-9615 hapennybridgeimports.com

72 N. High St. 614-336-8170 mjscandy.com

BLANKETS AND BOOTIES

JENI’S SPLENDID ICE CREAMS

82 S. High St. 614-889-6303 blanketsandbooties.com

1 W. Bridge St. 614-792-5364 jenisicecreams.com

CLOVER BOUTIQUE

BIDDIE’S COACH HOUSE

48 S. High St. 614-408-8450 cloverboutique.com

76 S. High St. 614-764-9359 biddies.com

columbusparent.com | August 2011 |

25


Back to School For Less

on the go: SHOP SPOTLIGHT

Peggy Sanese BY MELISSA KOSSLER DUTTON

6 Columbus Area Locations Dublin • Columbus • Gahanna • Grove City • Reynoldsburg • Westerville

Hours: M-S 10am to 8 pm • Sunday NOON to 5pm For Store Information and directions, please visit www.onceuponachildcolumbus.com

FOR ALL WOMEN SIZES 0 - 26 & MATERNITY OPEN MON-SAT 10 to 8 • SUN 12 to 5

www.CLOTHES - MENTOR.com

Owner, Create

When Peggy Sanese was raising her children, she owned a beauty salon and loved the flexibility that came with being a business owner. That’s why, eight years ago, she suggested that she and her daughter, Traci Villwock open a children’s boutique together. The mother-anddaughter team share duties at Create and take turns watching Villwock’s two children. “It’s very flexible,” Villwock said. “It allows me to be home after school with the kids. It’s a very nice situation.” Sanese answered a few more questions for us. Where did the name Create come from?

get

My grandmother was an artist and she used the word a lot. I was very close to her. You can create so many things. It just seemed to fit.

for your

You pride yourself on carrying unique merchandise. How do you accomplish that?

More Closet

A lot of people who travel or who have businesses need something that is unique. We will only buy one of each garment in each size. That gives us a way to buy more because we don’t put our money into repeating. It creates interest and variety. Sometimes, I do wish I would have bought two. It just means I’ll sell other choices.

Tell me about your toy selection.

In Arlington

2011 Henderson Rd

614-923-0166

Located In Front of Krogers on Henderson Rd.

In Westerville

399 S. State St. Suite 11

614-899-3000

Located in the Cherry Park Plaza by Once Upon A Child

26

| August 2011 | columbusparent.com

Toys should always be an educational — a process of motor skills, learning, stimulating. Toys are supposed to be active. It’s not like your security blankets where it’s downtime.

CREATE

13 S. High St. 614-764-7640 createatdublin.com JOE MAIORANA PHOTO Peggy Sanese (left) with her daughter and co-owner Traci Villwock

What kind of extras do you offer? We do have people that rely on us to put a gift together. That’s pure trust. They trust us on taste, quality and price. We know what they want to spend and we respect that.

Do you have clothes that can help children display their tastes and personalities? Absolutely. The youngest child we had in the store that picked out her own clothes was 18months-old. I kid you not. This little girl could pick out what she liked. Kids like certain colors and certain feels. They’re interested in what their peers like. These things are important.

Do you have any special items for siblings or twins to wear? We always like to have sister-and-brother and twin outfits because of the photo moments and special occasions. They may use the same patterns in different styles.


COLUMBUS CREATURE FEATURE Tigers

During the tiger training session you will see how our Keepers use the tiger’s favorite food, the of one ’s She a. Iris nd frie meatballs, to reward the tiger for a job well Hi kids! Here’s a picture of my . ium uar Aq and Zoo bus Colum done. The tigers are trained to do some of the three tigers you can visit at the our by p sto same things you would train your own pets to ke sure you While you’re visiting the Zoo ma tion tra ons do such as standing up, sitting down, rolling cial training dem Keeper Talk at 11 a.m. to see a spe over and showing their paws. The tigers are with our tigers. eager to learn and their activities allow the Keeper to see any health problems.

Learn at the Zoo

If you can’t make it to our Keeper Talk don’t worry because seeing the tigers in their habitat is fun too. Tigers love the water and during the summer can be seen playing in their pools and streams. They also like to hangout in their cave which is air conditioned in the summer and heated in the winter.

• Family Overnights

• Birthday Parties

Summer 2011:

• Twilight Tours

• Teacher Workshops

• Summer Day Camps: for ages 3-12 • Family Night Hikes

• Guided Walking Tours (Daily) • Behind the Scene Tours (Daily)

To register visit: www.columbuszoo.org

Zoo Kid Corner Interview: Kassi is a Zoo Aide which is the name of our teen volunteer program at the Zoo. Her favorite job is helping our pre-school program ZooKids. She enjoys watching their faces light up and seeing them get excited when they learn something new. Her favorite animal at the Zoo is the Brown Bears. Brutus and Buckeye are her favorites because when they are up and being active they are enjoyable to watch. Kassi would especially love to travel the world to see tropical birds in the wild. Name: Kassi J. City: Ashville, OH • Age: 16 Education Program: Zoo Aides

For More Creature Feature Fun, Games & Activities Visit:

www.ColumbusCreatureFeature.com

columbusparent.com | August 2011 |

27


hot topic: BACK TO SCHOOL

Overscheduled Kids

And the overscheduled parents who drive them places BY ANIETRA HAMPER

For Delaware dad Cary Hunsaker, managing the schedules of four children as a single father is a daily and daylong challenge. The race begins the minute the morning alarms start ringing. “I’m up at 5:30 a.m.,” Hunsaker said. “I get myself ready, then I make sure they are up in rotation to get them in the shower. I use my lunch hour for dinner planning.” The race continues after work and school when Hunsaker’s 18year-old daughter Courtney heads off to marching band, concert band and pep band practice — if it is not an evening with career-program meetings at school or church activities. While Courtney shuffles around to practices and meetings, 14-yearold Jonathan is rotating two sports with practice some nights and conditioning on others. When he is not on the field, he is busy with his church youth group. And then Kelsey, 17, and Jacob, 9, also have full plates with extracurricular activities that require a virtual juggling act at home. Hunsaker, like many parents with busy kids, has it down to a science. He relies on technology and his oldest daughter for keeping track of the family schedule, which includes drop-offs and pickups at the various Delaware City Schools they all attend. “Courtney is my calendar,” Hunsaker said. “I have a tendency to forget because there are so many activities. And modern technology helps keep me stay on time and on track.” Northwest Columbus residents Shannon Rothwell and her husband Andrew rely on a more traditional calendar to keep track of 14-

28

year-old Ansley’s busy schedule. She just graduated from St. Andrew Catholic School and is headed to Bishop Watterson High School this fall. “I’m old-fashioned,” Rothwell said. “I don’t have an iPhone. I have a calendar. We sit and write things out together.” They have to, otherwise scheduling year-round softball and training, track, Youth to Youth activities, choir, the school play and altar activities would never stay organized. Ansley does all of this and remains on merit honor roll. “A busy kid is a good kid,” Rothwell said. “She’s not on Facebook. She’s not on the computer all the time. She’s not on the iPod all the time and she is not on the phone all the time.” Rothwell said while the activities rotate days durHeather Yardley, a pediatric psychologist with Nationing the week, there is one JOE MAIORANA PHOTO wide Children’s Hospital, says there are warning signs thing on the calendar Delaware resident Cary Hunsaker(center) is a single father when a child is stressed by taking on too much: every day. of four, who juggles a hectic schedule for his children. With • Difficulty sleeping (not sleeping at all or waking up “No matter what, it all four kids having jobs, or extra curricular activities, it can throughout the night) might be 5 o’clock or it be difficult to get the entire family together with their might be 8 o’clock, we • More than typical complaining chaotic schedules. always sit down as a fami• Withdrawal from family and friends ly and have dinner and • Change in eating habits (too much or not enough) discuss the day,” Rothwell that notion of being together and replace a good acasaid. talking about the day is important. demic transcript,” said • Verbally discussing worry or stress “It’s all about balance It encourages families to be Mabel Freeman, assis• Headaches and finding the right cominvolved in each other’s lives and it tant vice president of If parents notice these symptoms, Yardley suggests cutbination for kids,” said really shows kids that their parents undergraduate admisHeather Yardley, a pediting back on activities and working in more time for chilare involved and care,” Yardley sions for Ohio State atric psychologist at dren to just relax. If parents try several strategies and still said. University. “That is Nationwide Children’s see no improvement they should seek professional help Like the Rothwells, that face-towhat every college and Hospital. “A certain for their child. face time is a priority to the Hununiversity looks for amount of structure and sakers who manage to schedule in first.” is a long list of activities does not activity is good for kids, but there a sit-down meal five nights a week. Yardley suggests family rituals are so many options out there, it is necessarily give students an edge. “That one meal we spend like a game night or dinner togeth“We know students who are the er to create much needed downeasy to take on too much.” together is the best,” Hunsaker best are those who are engaged Many students feel pressure to said. “It is quality time with my time for kids to give them a break and involved, but all the extracurbe involved to build an impressive kids. It’s 15 minutes, but it’s a from all the running. college entrance resume. The truth riculars in the world will never quality 15 minutes.” “Even if you get take-out, just

| August 2011 | columbusparent.com

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hot topic: BACK TO SCHOOL

Science Fair 101 How to get the most of the experience BY MELISSA KOSSLER DUTTON

The first time Rachel Yoho went to the State Science Day, she saw something that surprised her. “I saw high-school seniors getting fullride scholarships to different universities around Ohio,” she recalled. “I saw that they were making a difference in their education just by coming here.” The experience at the statewide competition got Yoho, now 20, thinking about science as a job. She continued to enter more

and more involved projects and ended up earning a full scholarship to study biology at Capital University in Bexley. Participating in the science fair helped Rachel discover her life’s passion, said her mother Linda Yoho, who lives outside Galena. “If she hadn’t participated in these science fairs, she would not have the life path she has,” Linda Yoho said. “It certainly can open worlds for you.”

ACCENT ON THE POSITIVE While the science fair will not lead every student to his or career path, it can offer a number of positive experiences. Students who participate in the fair will receive lessons on following directions, public speaking and thinking on their feet, said Lynn Elfner, CEO of the Ohio Academy of Science, which organizes the State Science Day. It’s the culmination of a year-long process of DORAL CHENOWETH III/ Parents help their children assemble displays at the DISPATCH PHOTO school science fairs, followed State Science Day, held in OSU’s French Field House by district qualifiers, which then lead to the state event. “There’s also a sense of accomplishment that projects for seventh-graders. When kids do well in the science fair, it sets comes from competing,” Elfner said. The experience also incorporates a number of them up to enjoy the sciences throughout their school career, he said. It also can help them life lessons, said Dan Keller, a science teacher at overcome any fears that they may have about St. Agatha School in Columbus. taking science classes, he added. “Kids really learn how to be successful, how “A good science-day project can demystify not to quit, how to follow directions, how to science and make it enjoyable,” he said. “These organize and how to overcome a little bit of kids develop a better scientific literacy.” adversity,” said Keller, who oversees the science ERIC WAGNER PHOTO

Rachel Yoho

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| August 2011 | columbusparent.com


Students at the 2011 State Science Day wait to have their projects judged

LESS IS MORE

The key to making the science fair a positive experience is selecting the right project, Keller said. Science-fair projects can really incorporate any interest a student has, Rachel Yoho said. “They don’t have to find a cure for cancer.” In fact, simpler projects are often better because they allow students to gather more data to analyze, Elfner said. Parents don’t need to be scientists to help their kids do well at the science fair, added Linda Yoho, who works as a paralegal. “(Parents) shouldn’t be intimidated if they don’t come from a science background,” she said. “Just be supportive. Just do what you can to facilitate their interests.” Students should work with their parents or advisor to find a topic that lends itself to a good project, Kelly said. “For some kids selecting the topic will take more time than any other step,” he said. “When a kid does a project they want to do that kid will take ownership of it and that is so important.” The most workable topics pose a question that the student develops a way to answer, he added. He encourages every student to participate in the fair. “Science day should not be considered an event for the best and brightest,” he said. “Kids at every academic level can be really successful.”

TESSA BARGAINNIER/DISPATCH PHOTO

SCIENCE FAIR SANITY The Yohos, Kelly and Elfner offered the following tips to help families survive the science-fair experience:

• Choose a topic that means something to the student.

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31


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hot topic: BACK TO SCHOOL

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| August 2011 | columbusparent.com

Report-Card

REWARDS

ERIC WAGNER PHOTO

Alexis Sage, a mom in Pataskala, who does give her 7-year-old daughter Ellie, small rewards.

BY TRUDA SHINKER

DO YOU OR DON’T YOU GIVE THEM? They are the stuff of legends and lunchroom gossip. “I heard Johnny gets $20 for every A on his report card.” “Well, Suzy told me that her parents promised her a car if she got straight A’s.” Those fortunate few whose parents offered high-stakes rewards for good grades seem like the luckiest kids in the whole world. However, recent studies suggest that their parents aren’t doing them any favors.

“Rewards can be harmful if parents are sending the message that all that is important is the grade,” warned Eric Anderman, professor of educational policy and leadership at Ohio State University. Anderman, along with his wife Lynley Hicks Anderman, associate professor of educational policy and leadership at OSU, authored the book “Classroom Motivation.” “Kids can become dependent upon the reward and won’t put in the work once the reward is not given anymore,” he said. Lynley Anderman added, “If you just reward for the grade, you may motivate your child in the short term, but they could lose interest in the long term.”


principle and the fact that kids Keanan and The Andermans found that high-stakes Allyson, both 14, and Collin, 7, are “intrinsirewards can actually be harmful. cally self-motivated.” “The biggest predictor of cheating is the However, she isn’t sure whether the perception that there is some sort of big source of the self motivation is her expectareward in store,” said Eric Anderman. “The tion or her kids’ natural tendencies. It also reward creates stress for the student and helps that her kids’ peers don’t seem to be encourages cheating.” bragging about receiving rewards — “My So how should parents motivate their children have never mentioned their friends kids to get good grades? The Andermans receiving rewards,” said Fomich. advise parents to stay on top of what their The Fomichs anticipate that their policy kids are learning and help them see how it will pay off for their children in the future. relates to real life. “I hope that my children learn to be Additionally, parents should focus on proud of the outcome of their hard work, effort and not just ability — kids should be regardless of the reward or recognition,” praised for taking on a challenge and not said Fomich. only for earning a certain grade. For stuAlexis Sage of dents who are struggling in school, a map of Pataskala does give their progress can her daughter Ellie, 7, be very helpful. nor rewards for good “It can be very Want a free way to ho t ou k ec report cards — and discouraging to Ch s? rd ca rt po good re her method coincides work hard and not offer what these companies perfectly with the see results in Andermans’ advice. grades,” said Lynley their customers! hnut for every She sees it as another Anderman. “For ug do e On E: EM KR Y • KRISP hug do way of saying great these students to six um A on a report card; maxim job on all of the good see graphically that nuts per report card work Ellie has done. they are progressing Free tokens for A “That being statis encouraging.” • CHUCK E. CHEESE’S: with a food purly on id Val s. de ed, it is extra and But don’t jump to gra B and maximum per ens tok 15 always comes after a the conclusion that to Up se. cha conversation about the Andermans are child. the grades and no fun. movie rental for B+ • BLOCKBUSTER: Free classes,” said Sage. “There’s nothing rage. One or higher grade-point ave Mom and daughwrong with celebratd oices are limite rental per grade card. Ch ter discuss areas in ing good grades,” s. to family-friendly movie which Ellie excelled said Lynley Anderfor kie coo e fre A and areas that need man. “You just need : IES • CHERYL’S COOK s, get ld chi r a little more work. to be thoughtful you ee) thr each A (limit of They then set goals about where you place . you for plus a coupon for the next term. the emphasis.” “The reward is She suggests that usually something small like a special when kids bring home dessert or sweet from a bakery or a small their report card, parents should ask questoy,” said Sage. Ellie sees the reward as a celtions about what they learned, how they are ebration. being challenged, how much effort they put “I don’t think (the reward) plays a major into the work and what they liked about the role in her mind throughout the school subject. term,” said Sage. “Ellie does well on her Central Ohio families vary in how they school work and tests because she wants to handle the issue of report-card rewards. learn.” Vickie Fomich of Lewis Center said she and Ellie has mentioned that a number of her her husband Jason do not offer rewards for peers receive rewards for their grades from good grades to their three children. their parents and even their grandparents. “It is the expectation that our children “I hope that rewarding Ellie helps her to will work hard in school simply because feel pleased in an additional way with all the they are supposed to,” said Fomich. “It’s hard work and effort she’s made during that their job as a student.” Fomich attributes the family’s decision to period at school,” said Sage.

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need to know: AGE APPROPRIATE: READINESS

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Can You Call Me Now? Deciding when your child is ready to use a cell phone

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“I need a cell phone. Everyone I know already has one!” Sound familiar? It does to June Grey. Grey and her husband, Keith, decided to get a phone for their oldest son, Xander, just before he turned 10. “He kept telling me that he was the only one of his friends that didn’t have a cell phone,” said Grey. Claiming to be the only one left out seems to be the oldest kid trick in the book but, in this case, Xander may not have been too far off the mark. According to a 2010 Kaiser Foundation media study, 31 percent of 8- to 10year-olds and 69 percent of 11- to 14-year-olds have cell phones. The cell-phone decision can be tricky since most parents can’t look back to see how their own moms and dads handled the issue. So how can you know when your child is ready? The biggest factor for Grey was her son’s increasing independence. Xander, now 11, spends most days playing with neighborhood friends. Joked Grey, “In order to call him in for dinner, I’d literally have to bike around the neighborhood!” Tom Bates, principal at Tremont Elementary School in Upper Arlington, agreed that safety is usually the No. 1 reason parents get cell phones for children. Howev-

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2S 6Y-E1 R A Tom Bates, principal at Upper Arlington’s Tremont Elementary School, suggests that once parents have made a decision to purchase a cell phone for their child, they should set clear expectations for its use.

A child should be able to: • Know where the phone is at all times • Keep the phone charged • Limit text messages and usage minutes to avoid overuse charges • Understand the phone is not a toy • Not use the phone during school, after bedtime or at other inappropriate times er, Bates said, “Families have to make that decision based on what is best for them and not what everyone else is doing.” Parents, Bates added, should consider “whether the child will be responsible with the cell phone.”

Responsibility was another key factor in helping the Greys make their decision for Xander and daughter Alyssa, who recently got a phone after turning 9. But Alyssa, said her mom, “often forgets to bring her phone or charge it so it doesn’t help

The Grey family goes cellular

JOE MAIORANA PHOTO

very much.” Grey now says she thinks Alyssa was just a little too young for the phone. “We’ll see how things go with Alayna,” Grey said about her youngest daughter, now 7. “But I think the best age for us is not before 10.” Age issues aside, Grey has enjoyed the benefits of constant communication with her kids. Xander loves to text his mom funny things throughout the day and let her know he’s made it to a friend’s house safely. “It’s almost like we talk more because it’s opened up a whole new way to communicate,” said Grey.


need to know: AGE APPROPRIATE: READINESS

Let Them Pack Lunch

Summer Youth Performance Company Presents:

Start turning lunch-box duty over to your children

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BY ELIZABETH SEUFER

5-12

Christy Newman lines up lunch boxes while making YEARS breakfast. Ten-year-old Madison and 6-year-old Matthew know the drill: choose a fruit, a vegetable, a grain and a protein. There’s typically a homemade treat to put in as well. Marshall, who turns 5 this month, will also help fill his lunch box when he starts kindergarten this fall. “They make good choices because they’ve been taught to make good choices,” Newman said. “I don’t pack chips or any of that in their lunch, and they don’t ask for it. It’s not even an option. It’s not something they need for lunch.” The Bexley mother said ERIC WAGNER PHOTOS her children have always had Christy Newman and her children in lunch-packing mode. a say in what goes into their lunch boxes. Her daughter was in the Give children a variety of healthy foods first grade when she began to help to choose from. pack her lunch. Little by little, Madison “Empower them to make better took over the task herself. food choices and learn how to take Laura Robertson-Boyd is an execucare of themselves,” she said. “Make tive chef with Local Matters, a Columthem responsible. If they make their bus-based local-food advocacy organiown choices, they’re more likely to eat zation. She said children can begin it and it’s less likely to go in the trash.” packing their lunches with a grownWith adult guidance and age-approup’s help as soon as they start elemen- priate tools, children can begin helping tary school. in the kitchen at very young ages, • Use cookie cutters to make Robertson-Boyd, herself a mother of Robertson-Boyd said. A young child sandwiches in fun shapes. two boys who help pack their lunches can learn how to chop food with a plas• Make spider cookies with pretzel legs. (they’re 8 and 10), is teaching a class tic knife, lettuce knife or even a butter • Fill bento-box compartments or minicalled “Pack a Better School Lunch” at knife. Fourth- and fifth-graders may be muffin cups with tiny bits of food. the Franklin Park Conservatory and able to handle a sharp knife with a par• Mix frozen fruit into plain yogurt. Botanical Gardens on Aug. 28. ent’s supervision. • Create your own trail mix. Let She said parents may be reluctant Newman said she and her daughter, children pick out dried fruits, nuts, to hand over lunch-packing duty who soon will be in the fifth grade, discrackers and cereal, then mix it because it takes longer and involves cuss what foods give her energy together. allowing children to pick what they eat. throughout the day. It does take more time at first, she “It’s important to talk to them For more ideas, visit choosemyplate.gov, or enroll in the Aug. 28 class “Pack a Better School Lunch” at the Franklin said, but the results are worth it. about how their body feels when they Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens. The cost for one Robertson-Boyd suggests picking a eat certain foods,” Newman said. “She child (age 5 or older) and one adult is $20 for FPC members or $25 for non-members. Call 614-645-5923 or visit time that works best for your family, knows that if she has too much sugar, fpconservatory.org to register. like the night before or in the morning. she doesn’t feel good.”

FILLING A LUNCH BOX

August 3–14, 2011 Park Street Theatre

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Special 10 AM Performances Wednesdays, Thursdays & Fridays! 3 Ways to Purchase Tickets: Call CCT at 614-224-6672 Call CAPA at 614-469-0939 Visit TicketMaster.com

Book by John Michael Tebelak, Music by Stephen Schwartz, Lyrics by Stephen Schwartz. Based on The Gospel According to St. Matthew. Recommended for everyone age 6 and older–60 Minutes.

CCT Academy offers theatre classes for ages 3-16. For more information visit our website.

www.ColsChildrensTheatre.org columbusparent.com | August 2011 |

35


need to know: AGE APPROPRIATE: READINESS

Mind the Gap

BY MARY SLEBODNIK

Would you let your child take a gap year after high school?

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| August 2011 | columbusparent.com

When Colleen Campbell decided to take a gap year between high school and college, she faced mixed reactions. Her father, Chris Campbell, is a teacher at Bishop Watterson High School. He met the idea with enthusiasm while her mother, Anne Campbell, expressed concern. She didn’t want her daughter to lose out on the traditional four-year college experience. Her peers, too, were skeptical. “They were like, ‘What are you doing?’ ” Campbell recalled. Though common in the United Kingdom, gap years are not as common with American students. The University of California at Los Angeles Higher Education Research Institute surveyed 300,000 students in 2010 and found 1.2 percent took a year off before college. The practice has gained popularity at Ivy League schools. Requests for oneyear deferments at Harvard University have risen 33 percent in the last 10 years. Princeton University went a step further and created the Bridge Year Program, in which select incoming freshmen do public service abroad for a year before returning to lectures and chalkboards. Campbell, now 21, originally wanted to volunteer abroad, but finances limited her options. So she joined City Year Columbus instead; it’s a non-profit organization that coordinates full-time tutoring and mentoring volunteers who are called “corps members.”

17-18 YEARS

ALYSIA BURTON PHOTO

City Year charges no hefty fees, provides a stipend for living expenses and gives volunteers the $5,550 AmeriCorps Education Award after they accrue 1,700 hours of service. Campbell used her scholarship at Columbus State Community College, where she will be a sophomore studying social work this fall. As a City Year corps member, Campbell logged 50 to 60 hours a week tutoring children at Weinland Park Elementary School in Columbus. She created lesson plans and built playgrounds. Campbell said her students — who called her “Miss Colleen” — improved their reading abilities and started to enjoy the sessions. Campbell said she is glad she stayed in Columbus because she confronted serious problems she’d never known about in her home community.

“Those kids were dealing with a lot more than test scores,” she said. Campbell’s gap year lasted longer than she originally planned — two years total — and she took on greater responsibility the second year. She led a five- to sixperson City Year team — and her team members were all older than she. Campbell made a mantra of her promise to return to college. Many of her highschool classmates will graduate in spring 2012. Campbell’s said her two-year hiatus from school used to make her feel behind, but not anymore. With City Year, she learned about the adult world. For example, evenings with her Ohio State friends ended early for her because she had work in the morning. If she didn’t do her homework, the kids couldn’t do theirs. “I wouldn’t take a moment back,” Campbell said.

TIPS FOR TAKING A GAP YEAR If you’re the student: • Outline goals. These can include saving money for college, exploring possible majors, or increasing self-reliance. • Submit college applications. If admitted, ask for an enrollment deferment. • Consider taking remedial or introductory courses at a community college during time off. • Explore usagapyearfairs.org for popular programs. If you’re the parent: • Evaluate the student’s maturity level and readiness for college. • Help keep track of collegeapplication deadlines and secure financial aid. • Talk with him or her honestly about how much of the gap year (if any) you’ll finance. Sources: Cass Johnson, Otterbein University Director of Admission, and Mark Davis, Upper Arlington High School college counselor


need to know: FAMILY FINANCE

Gas Price Redux,

Part Two

BY DENISE TROWBRIDGE

Last month we started tackling those pesky prices at the gas pump. This month, it’s time to share even more strategies for boosting the discounts available. First, gift cards. If you buy a $50 gift card at Kroger or Giant Eagle, you get 10 cents off a gallon. Strategy: Buy gift cards for other retailers, and use them to pay for items you were planning to purchase anyway. “If you know you are going to go to spend the money anyway, leveraging all of those expenses by buying gift cards for fuel discounts can get you more bang for your buck,” said Brad Huffman, a Worthington-based financial planner. “I have clients who do that and haven’t paid for gas in a long time.”

My lovely neighbor, Tina, bought Lowe’s gift cards at Giant Eagle, and used them to pay for the fixtures in her remodeled bathroom. Thanks to that little bit of planning, she got a lot of free gasoline. Some of it is even sitting in gas cans in her garage. That’s another trick. Gas discounts are only good for one fill-up, and most gas tanks are too small to hold all of the cheap gas you’re entitled to. “It’s within the rules to fill up a gas can at the same time you fill up your car at the discounted price,” said Kroger spokesperson Amy McCormick, “as long as they follow the law.” And the law says a three-quar-

ters-filled container can be stored on the ground, though not inside the vehicle. Another way to stock up on gas discounts is to use a credit card that provides an additional per-gallon discount. For example, if you use the Kroger 1-2-3 Rewards Mastercard, you automatically get 5 cents off a gallon, in addition to the discount you would have already gotten. It would turn your 10 cents off a gallon into 15. The Giant Eagle Fuelperks card will net you an additional 4 cents off a gallon for every $50 you spend at the retailer, so every $50 would get you 25 cents off a gallon instead of 20. If you love Walmart, their Walmart Discover and store credit card

will earn you 5 cents off per gallon at participating stations. If you want discount gas, opening a card for a particular store might not be necessary. Take a closer look at the rewards and perks offered by the cards you already have. Many cards have added or already offer cash-back rebates on gasoline purchases, and if your card doesn’t, it may be possible to call the company and switch to another card that does. The usual caveat — don’t use a credit card for a reward or discount, unless you pay the balance in full every month. “The interest and fees will completely wipe out any discount you may have gotten,” said Huffman.

Denise Trowbridge is a self-professed money geek, who has written about personal finance, banking, and insurance for The Columbus Dispatch and Bankrate.com. She blogs about very personal money issues at middlepathfinance.com. Denise tries not to talk about money at cocktail parties, but sometimes she just can’t help herself.

columbusparent.com | August 2011 |

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need to know: THE GO-TO GUIDE

Goin’ to the BY JANE HAWES & MARY SLEBODNIK PHOTOS BY JOE MAIORANA Living in Central Ohio means we’ve got easy access to one of the best family-fun destinations on the planet — the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium. So we asked the friendly zoo folks to help us help our readers figure out how to make the most out of a visit to the zoo. They supplied us with one of their super docents, Kathy Shank, and a golf cart (don’t hate us), and we learned all kinds of great insider info. Read on to learn more!

THE NITTY-GRITTY

LOCATION: it depends. Some mapping systems recognize 4850 W. Powell Rd., Powell, as the address and some recognize 9990 Riverside Dr., Powell. And, just to complicate matters, one of the staff members advised us that many GPS units will send you to the business office on the now-privatized section of West Powell Road, which has been renamed Jerry Borin Trace. Use the directions published on the Zoo’s website (columbuszoo.org) or take the COTA bus (cota.com/import/ZooBusSchedule.pdf) PHONE: when in doubt, call the main number at 614-6453550. OPEN: every day of the year except Thanksgiving and Christmas, and they close early on Christmas Eve. Daily hours vary by time of the year, but are roughly 9 or 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Check the website to be sure. ADMISSION: There are more variations on admission costs and discounts than we can recount here, but the baseline costs for a single visit are: $14 (ages 10-59), $10 (ages 60+), $9 (ages 2-9) and free under 2. Parking costs $5 (but members park free). And if you plan on visiting twice or more in one year, a family membership will probably save you money.

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| August 2011 | columbusparent.com

WHAT’S A DOCENT?

Pronounced “DOH-sehnt,” a docent is a trained volunteer with an encyclopedic knowledge of zoo animals and operations, and they live to answer your questions. These folks know when animals are most active, what they eat, who’s in trouble (if the brown bears were grade-school boys, they’d be in perpetual detention), when the new baby animals are on display, and all

kinds of other interesting animal gossip. They also know where the bathrooms are, how early you need to arrive if you want to get a seat at any of the animalkeeper talks, and how to get a gorilla to pay attention to you. The docents wear white or red tops (with zoo logos). Other volunteers, who can also answer questions, are teen-aged ZooAides (in green shirts) and the Nationwide Zoo Crew (in dark-blue tops). Staff members wear either blue or black tops.


ON THE MOVE

BYO

It’s a plus that the zoo has room to grow and has grown plenty since opening in 1927 at its Delaware County site. It currently houses more than 5,000 animals on nearly 250 acres, and a new African Savanna is slated to be built by 2014. However, all that room means you’re going to cover a lot of territory when you visit. It can’t be overstated: Either bring a stroller for little ones or rent one at the entrance. The zoo-provided strollers are available on a first-come, first-serve basis. A single-seat stroller costs $8 and a double-seater costs $12. Manual and electric wheelchairs also are available, again on a first-come, first-serve basis (for $12 and $30 respectively). The latter requires a valid driver’s license to rent. Though you don’t need to produce a disabled parking permit to use them, neither is available for recreational use only. For more information, call 614-724-3732.

The zoo lets people bring their own food and drink in, but they ask that you don’t bring anything contained in glass and that you also don’t bring straws. The straws, explained Shank, would be especially dangerous to animals if they fell into or were blown into their enclosures.

IT’S APP-SOLUTELY HELPFUL!

TEACHING MOMENTS

Animals can be such animals — which means that you and your children might encounter some interesting animal behaviors. These can include: • Animals peeing and pooping. • Animals engaged in acts of sexual gratification (beware the bonobos and giant tortoises). • Animals eating other animals that had the misfortune to fly into their enclosures (polar bears dined on Canada geese recently, while the alligators have snacked on ducks). Shank assured us that the docents are armed with enough factual information to aid any parent in explaining these real-life moments to children, but she said the docents always take their cues from parents about how much information is needed. Don’t hesitate to give her an index finger across the throat, Shank said, if little Gertrude or Roderick isn’t ready for a trip around the Circle of Life.

CLOSE ENCOUNTERS

• Want to lure a polar bear over to the “sniff port” located on the far left side of their above-water viewing space? Eat peanut butter beforehand, said Shank. At the sniff port, you’re supposed to breathe out, and the scent that wafts through to the other side often lures the polar bears over. And peanut butter is the smell that seems to be the most alluring. • Want to hang out with a gorilla? Don’t make eye contact, advised Shank. Sit down next to the glass and pretend to be disinterested: “If you don’t look directly at them, they’re more apt to come over, especially with kids.” The gorillas also seem to recognize regular visitors and react with interest to them, even checking out pictures or artwork that the visitors might have sitting out on their laps.

“DID YOUR MOMMY GET LOST?”

That’s what Shank said docents often say when they encounter kids who have that wild-eyed and trembling-bottom-lip look. It’s part of their training to get kids and their lost parents reunited. “This is one of the primary reasons we carry radios, so we can call security who then takes over,” Shank said, adding that the top locations where kids get separated from adults are: • The above-water level of the Polar Frontier exhibit: “They turn around and head right for the Battelle Ice Bear Outpost behind,” Shank explained. • The Nocturnal House (a.k.a. “Bob and Evelyn’s Roadhouse”): “The way the doors are in there, it’s easier to get separated.” • The Reptile House: “It’s constructed as a big loop, but if you get separated, go look for them at the staffed lab. That’s where kids usually go.” • Discovery Reef: “It’s dark in there, and the best thing to tell your children is that, if they get separated from you, they shouldn’t leave the building.”

The zoo introduced its own smartphone app last month, so we asked Phil Pikelny who writes the app reviews for Columbus Parent to give us his app-sessment: Whether planning a trip to the zoo or whether you are already on the grounds, the free Columbus Zoo iPhone and Android apps can serve you well. They’re chock full of planning information — hours of operations, exhibit information, animal photos, a map of the Zoo, descriptions of rides at the Zoombezi Bay water park and videos. You can buy tickets to the facility right from the app and then plan your visit using the 90-Day Planner. A GPS-enabled Zoo map will help you know where you are on the grounds and guides you to the nearest exhibits, concession stands and restrooms. The app will also give you information on The Wilds and The Safari Golf Course. This app may be second only to visiting the Zoo with Jack Hanna at your side. The app is available now for free download on the iTunes App Store and Android Market. Search for “Columbus Zoo” to download.

columbusparent.com | August 2011 |

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For more about this program, go to www.NationwideChildrens.org/KISS,    JQ  "<  2 or call (614) 355-0679. All coloring pages and activity books are also available to freely download and print.



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| August 2011 | columbusparent.com

columbusparent.com | August 2011 |

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need to know: PEDIATRIC HEALTHSOURCE

EXPERTS FROM NATIONWIDE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL ANSWER COMMON QUESTIONS ABOUT HEALTH AND SAFETY It seems that when my child gets vaccinations, he always gets a little feverish afterwards. Is this normal? He has some shots coming up before school starts again. Vaccines, also known as immunizations, contain either a dead or weakened germ that causes a certain illness. When this is injected into the body, the body makes antibodies to fight it. Because the body has created these antibodies, it will know how to combat the disease if ever exposed. Many children experience side effects after they’ve received routine vaccinations. Some of the most common reactions include redness, swelling and/or Dr. Nicole Caldwell soreness at the site, and cold-like symptoms such as fever, runny nose and is a member of the overall fatigue. Section of AmbulaAs long as your child’s symptoms are mild and subside within a few days, tory Pediatrics at there is generally no cause for alarm. In some rare cases, however, vaccinaNationwide Chiltions can trigger allergic reactions or even seizures. Be sure your primary-care dren’s Hospital physician knows of any allergies to food or medication your child has, or if and a Clinical your child has had a bad reaction to a vaccine in the past. Assistant Professor Consult your doctor if your child is running a fever of 104 degrees or highof Pediatrics at the er, is crying inconsolably more than three hours after receiving an injection, or Ohio State Univerexperiences seizures within three days of the immunization. sity College of You and your primary-care physician should keep a record of all the vacciMedicine. nations your child has received, and pay attention to when your child will need a booster.

My son is severely overweight and has been trying to lose weight for more than a year now. We’ve changed his diet and he exercises every day, but nothing seems to work. His doctor mentioned that weight-loss surgery might be an option. What is this and what does it involve?

NATIONWIDE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL, ANTHEM BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD AND THE COLUMBUS ZOO AND AQUARIUM PRESENT:

Teddy Bear Safari at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium

SATURDAY, AUGUST 13, 2011 :: 9 AM TO 5 PM Child’s admission to the Zoo is FREE with a stuffed animal. Come learn about the fascinating world of medicine in a non-scary way. 5706

*Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. Registered marks Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association.

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| August 2011 | columbusparent.com

Weight-loss surgery, also known as bariatric surgery, is not for all overweight people. It offers an option for individuals who are more than 100 pounds above their ideal body weight, have not been able to achieve significant weight loss through dieting alone and suffer from significant obesityrelated illnesses such as hypertension, diabetes, sleep apnea and liver disease. Several surgical options are offered at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, including gastric bypass, gastric sleeve and adjustable gastric band. You and your son should research these procedures to learn which may be an option. Leading up to bariatric surgery, a complete medical evaluation is required. This includes a physical exam and nutritional evaluation. Patients must have regular visits following surgery in order to monitor nutritional status and avoid complications. Bariatric surgery is only one part of the equation for success. In order to achieve optimal weight loss following surgery, it is very important that patients maintain a healthy lifestyle. This includes regular physical activity and appropriate food choices. Nationwide Children’s Hospital offers free monthly sessions that provide an overview of the three types of weight-loss surgery available for teens, as well as the benefits, risks, advantages and disadvantages of each. The next sessions are Aug. 30 and Sept. 6.

Dr. Marc Michalsky is Surgical Director of the Center for Healthy Weight and Nutrition at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and an Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery at the Ohio State University College of Medicine.


To learn more about Nationwide Children’s Hospital, visit www.NationwideChildrens.org

All of the pool swimming this summer leaves the kids’ hair bleached and prone to breaking, and their skin itching. What’s the best way to treat this or prevent it? And is this truly harmful? Bleached hair and itchy skin are common for children and adults who spend a lot of time in pools. After a while, the chlorine in the pool will break down the skin’s natural moisture barriers. This results in dry, itchy or irritated skin. Chlorine dries out hair, leading to breakage. It can also cause discoloration of hair from the metals found in pool water. Try to have your child take a shower or bath with non-chlorinated water as soon as possible after leaving the pool. Avoid the use of harsh or heavily scented soaps, as these will irritate the skin. After showering, apply a bland, fragrance-free moisturizer. A moisturizing shampoo and conditioner will help remove chlorine and coat the cuticle of the hair to make it shinier and less brittle. Specially formulated shampoos and conditioners for swimmers are available, which provide a protective coating to the hair shaft. Some can also remove the green color that sometimes follows chlorine exposure. Applying conditioner to the hair as well as wearing a swimmer’s cap before entering the pool is a preventive measure that can be helpful as well. If you suspect more serious damage, consult your primary-care physician, who will be able to provide more tips for safe, comfortable swimming.

• See a friendly, qualified OhioHealth medical provider – walk in TODAY! • Available days, evenings and weekends. • Most major insurance is accepted, or a discount program is available. • WAHOO!® – (Wait At Home Or Office); we’ll call to let you know when your exam room will be ready! Dr. Patricia Witman is the Chief of the Section of Dermatology at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and an Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics and Clinical Dermatology at the Ohio State University College of Medicine.

ALLERGIES

EARACHE FEVER

INJURED SHOULDER (X-RAY)

INSECT BITES

TIP OF THE MONTH

HYDRATION While summer may be wrapping up, summer temperatures still linger. Follow these tips to keep active children and teens hydrated:

DRINK LOTS OF WATER: It seems common sense, but make sure your kids hydrate before, regularly during, and after sports. AVOID CARBONATED DRINKS: They contain a lot of sugar and empty calories, which lead to weight gain. AVOID ENERGY DRINKS: These are loaded with sugar and caffeine and pose a real health risk to children. The sugar leads to weight gain and the high amount of caffeine will negatively affect concentration. More serious side effects may include fast or irregular heartbeat, high blood pressure and/or seizures.

URGENT CARE FROM A NAME YOU CAN TRUST. DUBLIN: 6955 Hospital Dr., Dublin, OH 43016 Monday-Sunday, 9am-9pm

LEWIS CENTER: 24 Hidden Ravines Dr., Powell, OH 43065 Monday-Sunday, 9am-7pm

GAHANNA/NEW ALBANY: 5610 N. Hamilton Rd., Columbus, OH 43230 Monday-Sunday, 8am-8pm

GROVE CITY: 2030 Stringtown Rd., Grove City, OH 43123 Monday-Sunday, 9am-9pm VICTORIAN VILLAGE: 1132 Hunter Ave., Columbus, OH 43201 Monday-Friday, 9am-7pm • Saturday-Sunday, 9am-5pm

1-888-372-4182 www.OHUCtoday.com columbusparent.com | August 2011 |

43


need to know: HANDY MOM

salt POST-PICTURE PERFECT: To fill in the holes left on walls where the kids’ school pictures have hung, make a paste similar to spackling by mixing two tablespoons salt, two tablespoons cornstarch, and four tablespoons water. Fill in the holes, let it dry, touch it up with paint. Then put all the pictures away for a while so the family can admire your handiwork. LAUNDRY MYTHS: A common household hint advocates adding salt to the laundry. The allure of saving money on detergent may tempt you to dump a cup of salt in the washing machine to make colors “colorfast,” but researchers at the Ohio State University Family and Con-

44

From seasoning food to warding off evil, table salt packs power into each crystal. Superstition says if you throw salt over your shoulder, you’ll hit the devil in the eye — or if you sprinkle it on the chair of a mildly annoying guest, the guest won’t return. And that’s just the kind of multi-tasking that Handy Mom can get behind. Try these tips and see how salt can wield a mighty punch in your home, too. —MARY SLEBODNIK

sumer Sciences department have found that salt has no effect on modern clothing dyes. What does work? Salt mixed with lemon juice will help dissolve rust stains. SWEET ’N’ …SALTY?: That’s right. Add a pinch of salt to cocoa, oatmeal, kettle corn, or even cookie dough to enhance sweetness. PLAY-DOH VS. PLAYSTATION: Make your own salt dough with a mixture of one cup of salt, two cups of flour with 3/4 to 1 cup of lukewarm water. Let the kids choose which shades of food coloring they want to add, and presto, you’ve entertained them and resisted buying the latest video game for another day!

| August 2011 | columbusparent.com

FORSOOTH, IT SOOTHES: Your tween, who finally persuaded you to allow ear piercings, probably received a small bottle of cleaning solution from the piercing shop. When the bottle runs out, 1/2 cup of warm water and 1 teaspoon of sea salt will make a saline solution that can be used to relieve piercing irritation. POTATO BABYSITTER: Use saltwater to babysit your potatoes while you run to the grocery store. When you’ve cubed a five-pound bag of Idaho spuds and realize you’ve run out of milk, keep them in cold water and salt until you return to stop them from turning brown. This also works for apples when you realize you’re out of sugar for the pie.


need to know: WHAT’S THE WORST THAT COULD HAPPEN?

A What Is Stuck Where?! That’s right, a raisin up the nose. In our ongoing salute to the less-than-smart things that kids sometimes do, this month we look at the problem posed by a raisin that has made its way up the nostril of some curious child and can’t find its way out now. In medical-speak, this raisin has become a “nasal foreign body,” according to Dr. Charles Elmaraghy, an ear, nose and throat physician with Nationwide Children’s Hospital. “Children often place in their noses food items, small toys, rocks and whatever they can fit through their nostrils,” explained Elmaraghy. Sometimes parents are lucky enough to realize this has happened as soon as it happens, and can remove the item

themselves. But sometimes it takes a while to find out that something has taken residence in a child’s nasal passages. Elmaraghy assured us that “odor and drainage” will serve as helpful clues in that case. And if the object can’t be removed easily by a parent, said Elmaraghy, the child will “need medical attention immediately and a trip to the pediatrician, urgent care or emergency department should be sufficient.”

Most removals by a medical professional are accomplished easily, Elmaraghy said, but occasionally a child may need to be sedated before an item can be removed. What’s the worst that could happen? Two words — disc battery. Said Elmaraghy, “This is an emergency if a child places a disc battery in the nostril. Batteries can be very destructive and can cause severe problems. Some of the chemicals within the battery and the charge of the battery itself can destroy normal tissue in the nose and cause permanent damage within hours.” And if this scenario happens, get your child to a doctor’s office, urgent-care facility or emergency room right away. —JANE HAWES

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614.929.3526 • www.maefence.com columbusparent.com | August 2011 |

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family fun: HANDS ON

Paper Party

Lanterns BY OLIVERA BRATICH

Celebrate the last days of summer with a fun outdoor gathering! These simple paper lanterns make festive outdoor or indoor decorations, and kids will love stringing them up around the house!

WHAT YOU NEED

• decorative paper (construction paper or scrapbook sheets work great) • scissors • invisible tape or a stapler • glue stick • ribbon

WHO THOUGHT THIS UP

HOW YOU DO IT 1. Cut paper into a 4-inch-by-8-inch rectangle. 2. If one side of your paper is white or plain, use the glue stick to glue the white sides of the paper together, so that both sides are colorful or decorative.

Olivera Bratich owns Wholly Craft, 3169 N. High St. The Clintonville shop features handmade goods from more than 100 crafters and artists, including clothing, jewelry, accessories, paper goods, home decor and more. Hours of operation: 1-8 p.m. weekdays except Tuesdays when they’re closed, 12-7 p.m. Saturdays, 12-5 p.m. Sundays. For more information, go to whollycraft.net or call 614-447-3445.

3. Fold the rectangle in half lengthwise. Starting three-fourths inch from the edge of the paper, draw a line that goes from the fold to about one-half inch from the edge. Draw a parallel line one-half inch below it and continue repeating lines until you reach the end. Your drawing should look like a comb at the end. 4. Cut along the lines you drew. 5. Unfold your paper. Roll the paper around so that the two short edges are slightly overlapping. Use tape or a stapler to attach those edges at the top and bottom. 6. Cut a 3-inch-by-one-half-inch strip of coordinating paper. Tape or staple this to the top of your lantern to form a handle. 7. Repeat steps 1-6 to create as many lanterns as you want for your decorations. 8. Cut a long piece of ribbon. Use tape to attach the lantern handles to paper ribbon, spacing them apart evenly. Tie them up around your patio or porch for colorful summer fun!

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| August 2011 | columbusparent.com

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47


family fun: COOKING WITH KIDS

Such a Sushi Fest!

BY MELISSA KOSSLER DUTTON PHOTOS BY JOE MAIORANA

Kids at the Grandview Heights Public Library had a sweet opportunity to learn about Japan and try a new kind of cuisine. Teen librarian Jen Lawson walked the youngsters through the art of preparing sushi but added a kid-friendly twist. She used candy and rice-cereal treats instead of raw fish, rice and vegetables, the traditional ingredients of the dish that is a staple food in Japan and has become increasingly popular in the United States. Once the kids had their ingredients, Lawson instructed them to “mush up” the rice cereal treats. “Smash into a thin layer. You can just eat the extra if you want,” she told the appreciative kids. Allison Zawisa eyed her work enthusiastically. “It looks like it will be excellent,” the 17-year-old said. After tasting the chewy work of art, Calista Camper offered a word of praise for the delicacy. “Yum,” the 9-year-old said. Lawson, who used to work in a Japanese restaurant, developed the program as part of the library’s summer-reading program, which has an international focus this year. “They think it’s really interesting,” she said, to learn about other countries through food.

CANDY SUSHI INGREDIENTS: • rice-cereal treats (Lawson used storebought treats but suggested that parents may want to make their own and add a few extra marshmallows to the mixture to create softer treats, which would be easier to manipulate) • gummy worms • licorice (string or stick) • fruit roll-ups

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| August 2011 | columbusparent.com

DIRECTIONS: GROWN-UP: Carefully unroll the fruit roll-up without peeling it from the plastic lining.

KID: After a grown-up has started the process, finish rolling the candy up in the fruit roll-up.

KID: Flatten the rice-cereal treats until they are about an inch thick. Place the flattened treats onto the fruit roll-up. Lay two pieces of candy (either licorice, gummy worms or one of each) long ways at the edge of the rice cereal treat.

GROWN-UP: Using a sharp knife (necessary to get through the licorice and gummy worms), cut the candy roll into two- to three-inch sections.

GROWN-UP: Slowly peel the fruit roll-up from the plastic and begin to tightly roll the layers.

KID: Arrange the candy rolls, which resemble California rolls, on their side on a plate and eat!


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family fun: EATING OUT WITH KIDS

Rusty Bucket THE MOM SAYS It’s hard to find a family-friendly patio because we just can’t tolerate eating around second-hand smoke, so we were pleased to arrive at the Rusty Bucket near Worthington Hills (in the same plaza as The Hills Market) and find an outdoor patio with no smokers. We learned that the six tables under the patio roof are always smoke-free, but the three set further away and not under the roof do accommodate smokers. But with all the families we saw that Sunday afternoon, no one was smoking. It was fun to sit outside and watch the cyclists zip by on their way up or down the Olentangy Greenway Trail. In fact we saw a few families ride in and stop for a meal at the Bucket. Jealous! The food was standard American pub fare: lots of munchies, sandwiches, burgers, entrees with pasta and chicken, and not a whole lot of desserts. Plenty of intriguing, malt-based beverage choices for the adults, and the Rogue root beer (from a Portland, Oregon, brewery) was delicious enough to suit kids but zippy enough to satisfy adults. We tried the tamarind BBQ wings (one pound for $8.95) and the deep-fried pickles ($7.50). The wimpy-taste-budded child and I don’t really love deep-fried pickles, but my husband, who is a connoisseur of the stuff, said he was impressed by the lightness of the batter. The wings were fine, though I was

THE RUSTY BUCKET RESTAURANT AND TAVERN 7800 Olentangy River Rd., Worthington 614-436-2626 (and five other locations in Central Ohio) myrustybucket.com

JODI MILLER PHOTOS

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HOURS: 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Monday-Thursday; 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Friday-Saturday; 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Sunday COST: Participating in the Bucketeer Bookworm program (a reading club similar to a library or school program) earns children under 12, one free kids’ menu meal (the usual array of chicken fingers, hot dogs, mac and cheese, PB&J sandwiches priced at $4.95 and under); appetizers $7.50-$16.95, salads $4.25-$11.95, sandwiches and burgers $8.25-$9.95, entrees $8.25-$20.95, desserts $4.95; gluten-free options available

| August 2011 | columbusparent.com

expecting a little more zing from the tamarind. I went for the pesto chicken pasta ($12.95) as an entree. Their pesto had some serious zing. I liked it but it got a bit muted with all the cooked tomatoes, spinach and mushrooms piled in there as well. But the accompanying garlic cheese bread was beyond delish! I could have made a meal out of that stuff. My husband went for the Burger Blues ($9.50), a patty topped with blue cheese, among many other ingredients. Big thumbs up from him, plus his side of fries came with tasty seasoning (unlike the kid’s portion). Our waitress was pleasant, but I wish we had gotten the waiter who is clearly a career server. I love watching and listening to such people work their magic: They really make any meal so much more than just food consumed outside of the home. The bathroom was fine. It has a diaperchanging station. I appreciated the equal-opportunity-ness of a TV in the women’s room, too, but I can’t say as that I would cherish watching TV in there. —JANE HAWES

HOW’D THEY LIKE IT? FOOD:

SERVICE:

BATHROOM:

FAVORITE BITE: MOM: garlic bread side KID: tamarind BBQ wings

GRADING SCALE:

GREAT!

GOOD.

MEH.

BOO.


THE KID SAYS The restaurant looked nicer than I thought it would, because of the theme of a rusty bucket. I thought they were going to try and make it look a little less nice. But it was completely the opposite. On the inside it was cool and sporty; they had a jersey hanging up on the wall and a few TVs by the bar playing sports. We sat on the patio. I was happy that there were no smokers at all, and it was a definitely pleasant experience. Normally we don’t go out on the patio because of the smoking smell. I liked the service. They were really nice to the kids at all the tables. They gave me a sample of the Rogue root beer. They wanted to make sure I’d like it because it’s not as sweet as normal root beer. At first I liked it, but then there was the aftertaste which felt a little dry, like pomegranate juice. So instead I had it as a root beer float ($1.95) which made it taste much better. I liked it so much I had two of them (but they were kind of small to begin with because I got them from the kids’ menu).

For the appetizer, I had the tamarind BBQ wings, and they were awesome. My mom made me have a bite of the deep-fried pickle dipped in ranch dressing, and I didn’t really like it. For the entree ($4.95), I had the hot dog with French fries (they didn’t have the ribs I was hoping for; they only have them on Saturdays). I didn’t like the bread with the hot dog. It tasted like grilled cheese by itself. Same old, same old taste with the French fries. My dad’s fries were spicy (mine were from the kids’ menu and that’s probably why they weren’t spicy). The bathroom was very clean, but they were hard to find. Two urinals, one stall with a diaper-changing station, and they had a small TV in there that had the World’s Strongest Man competition playing on it. Having a TV in the bathroom does feel awkward because you don’t see me carrying my portable DVD player into the bathroom at home. —COLIN HAWES

Out of Africa. Without going out of Ohio.

At the Wilds, rare and endangered animals roam freely on 10,000 rolling acres. Plan your own safari adventure here, and discover just how far something so close can take you. “There is no other place on earth like the Wilds.”

Partners with the Columbus Zoo

740-638-5030

thewilds.org

www.mtmtavern.com

su

Sunday Brunch A MATT’S TRADITION 10AM-2:30PM

FEATURING: Omelet Station | Eggs Benedict | Scrambled Eggs | Home Fries | Bacon

Sausage | French Toast | Flatbreads | Pasta | Fresh Fruit | Salads | Desserts | Pastries Weekly Chef Specials and More.

— $14.95 adults —$6.95 kids 5-10 years old *Kids 4 and under FREE with each paying adult. (Additional 4 and under $4.95 each)

DUBLIN 6725 Avery-Muirfield Drive Dublin, OH | 614.799.9100 GRANDVIEW 1400 Grandview Avenue | Columbus, OH | 614.754.1026

columbusparent.com | August 2011 |

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family fun: PARTIES

Celebrate

BACK TO SCHOOL!

BY JANE HAWES PHOTOS BY ALYSIA BURTON

Who says “back to school” time is only for kids? It’s a big deal for parents, too. And parents often mark the occasion with something special. Maybe it’s getting together for coffee with friends or maybe it’s a full-blown party. Columbus Parent got a jump on the season this year by test-driving some ideas for a party that you could throw — plus, thanks to Matt the Miller’s Tavern, we have a lunch party to give away to one lucky reader (and up to seven of his or her lucky friends).

DIY FOR B2S

You could go nuts with the school theme and use a brown-bag lunch as the basis for your menu: PB&J finger sandwiches (with the crusts cut off, of course), a punch bowl with apple slices cut into number and letter shapes (with a cookie cutter), oven-baked chicken nuggets on skewers, and maybe some of those candy sushi we’ve got in our Cooking with Kids story. Or you could feed your guests like the big kids they are and use your decorations to set the back-to-school mood. That’s what we did with a table at our colleague Katie’s house. She served a cornucopia of her late-summer favorites: chunk chicken and flank steak on skewers with tasty dipping sauces, the “Barefoot Contessa” corn salad, bruschetta, veggies to dip in a green goddess sauce, and canapés made from watermelon and goat cheese with fresh mint. Add an assortment of beverages, and she had a setting suitable for grownups. And the decorations are where we had the most fun. Here’s what we did:

• MENU CARDS: we found dry-erase boards for $1 (per four-pack) at Target. They’re the kind kids use to practice their handwriting, so we used our very best cursive to write out what was being served.

• RED DELICIOUS APPLES: add a festive decorating touch plus they propped up the menu cards.

• MAGIC-MARKER SWIZZLE STICKS: don’t worry, we tested these to see if the ink stayed inside the pen and it did. Pop a cherry tomato or strawberry on top, and you’ve got a school-themed drink stirrer.

• GOODIE BAGS: we had way too much fun putting these together for our parents. Check out our “Anatomy of a Pencil Pouch” feature to see what we put in ours!

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| August 2011 | columbusparent.com

LET MATT THE MILLER HELP YOU CELEBRATE B2S! Or you could just enter our “Back to School Party for Parents” contest this month. We are giving away a luncheon party for up to 8 people that will take place on Tuesday, Aug. 30, at 11 a.m. at Matt the Miller’s Tavern in Dublin (6725 Avery-Muirfield Dr.). We checked: All the area schools should be back in session by then. The prize package is good for lunch, up $15 per person for a total of $120. Tips and alcoholic beverages are not included. You can check out their menu at mtmtavern.com, but just to give you a tempting teaser, you might try their Angus-beef sliders, signature Matt’s salad, Wild Mushroom Flatbread, Tavern Cod Fish platter, or any number of other tasty items. Visit ColumbusParent.com and click on the Contests page to enter. We’ll accept entries from Aug. 1 through Aug. 15, and will randomly draw one winner from the eligible entries. You must be at least 18 years old to enter and you must be able to use the prize offering on Aug. 30.


family fun: WORTH THE PRICE OF A SITTER?

A Play in the Park

THE ACTORS’ THEATRE OF COLUMBUS

Schiller Park, 1000 City Park Ave., German Village 614-444-6888 theactorstheatre.org (check their website under the “Schiller Park” item for excellent tips on parking, seating, weather cancellations and more) UPCOMING: The troupe will perform “Oedipus Rex” (which is definitely more suitable for adults) from Aug. 4-Sept. 4, on Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays at 8 p.m.

BY GEOFF DUTTON AND MELISSA KOSSLER DUTTON

When The Columbus Dispatch printed its annual summer event listing in May, we made a notation on the calendar that The Actors’ Theatre of Columbus would be performing “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” in Schiller Park this season. The Shakespeare comedy is one of our favorite plays and we hoped we would get the opportunity to see it performed. GEOFF: We arrived at Schiller Park about 15 minutes before show time. Even though a large crowd had gathered, we found a great spot for our blanket in the middle of the others. The audience was really varied. There were senior citizens, families with children of all ages, couples and groups of friends. MELISSA: We had eaten an early dinner with the kids before we left the house so we only packed a bottle of champagne. A number of other people in the audience had brought fairly elaborate spreads. People were finishing up delicious-looking salads, sandwiches and fruit. I wished that we had done the same. This is one place where you really can enjoy a gourmet picnic. GEOFF: We are not regular theatergoers. But Shakespeare in the park — now in its 30th season — is one of the truly great Columbus traditions. The charming set-

ting on a grassy hillside in the heart of German Village can’t be beat. The professional actors bring to life plays written nearly 500 years ago — not for stuffy scholars, but for general audiences looking for lively entertainment. The enthusiastic performances and printed programs, with brief plot summaries and historical notes, help tear down the barriers of Elizabethan English. Even novices like us can appreciate the music of the verse, and get pulled into the story.

MELISSA: During the first act, Geoff popped open the champagne and we each had a glass. I know Geoff was wishing we would have brought chairs to sit on; I was fine on the blanket but wished I had thought to bring a pillow. Before long, we both forgot about our seating arrangements and were captivated by the play.

GEOFF: As twilight turned to dark, a half moon shined

THE FINANCIALS: Freewill donation at the play:

$10

Beers and tip at Beck’s Tavern:

$12

Babysitting: Grandma was visiting from Florida so we got a freebie but the outing was definitely worth the price of sitter. TOTAL COST OF THE EVENING: $22 (but probably more like $62 if we had had to pay a babysitter) overhead and summer insects twinkled in the stage lights. An occasional breeze stirred the summer air. The play skipped along, with lots of laughs at the expense of lovelorn characters teased mercilessly by the spells of

ornery forest fairies. Seriously, this is fun stuff (even if I do prefer the tragedies, like Othello). When the troupe passed the hat for donations at intermission, I marveled again that this is free — and really something special.

THE RATING SYSTEM AND VERDICT: Whatever it takes Book a sitter now Only if Grandma is available Candyland, anyone?

VERDICT:

How had we let several years go by without attending Shakespeare in the park?

MELISSA: When the play ended, we weren’t ready to call it a night. We decided we were in the mood for a beer

and headed over to Beck’s Tavern, a low-key bar hidden in the middle of the neighborhood (284 E. Beck St.) and quiet enough for conversation. Why hurry home? If anything is worth the price of a sitter, this was it.

columbusparent.com | August 2011 |

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family fun: DAY TRIPPIN’

the

State FAIR

OHIO BY MELISSA KOSSLER DUTTON

NEAL C. LAURON/DISPATCH

Having grown up going to county fairs in rural parts of Ohio, I had a good idea of what to expect from the Ohio State Fair — yummy food, stinky animals and free entertainment. But until we started taking our boys, I had no idea how many kidfriendly options the 12-day event offered. Of course, there are all the obvious things to do — walk through the barns and view the animals, scope out the award-winning pies and produce, and visit the midway and ride the rides. But I’ve got to tell you there’s way more to the fair — and most of it is free. Last year, the boys (then 4 and 6) and I spent hours at the Ohio Department of Natural Resources’ Natural Resources Park watching live shows. We saw lumberjacks fall off logs while trying to move them through the pond, viewed birds of prey and watched the “Recycling Juggler” do his thing. The boys so thoroughly enjoyed the shows we watched several of them twice. One of the boys even got called on stage to participate at one point. The key to getting the most out of the fair is determining ahead of time what might appeal to your kids. My kids love the outdoors and learning about animals, which was why the ODNR area held so much appeal. Think about what interests your kids. Do you have an aspiring musi-

While creating your own fair itinerary will go a long way to creating memories, it’s also fun to create a list of things your family must do every year. Here is a list of must-dos from Ohio State Fair aficionados: SHARI LEWIS/DISPATCH

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| August 2011 | columbusparent.com

THE BUTTER COW: A staple since the early 1900s, this sculpture is worth an annual look-see.

July 27-Aug. 7, 2011 Ohio Expo Center, 717 E. 17th Ave. 614-644-3247 ohiostatefair.com DAILY HOURS: 9 a.m.–10 p.m., except Aug. 7 until 8 p.m. Gate Admission Prices: Adults (ages 13-59) $10, Youth (ages 5-12) $8, Senior (ages 60+) $8, Children (under 5) free

COURTNEY HERGESHEIMER/DISPATCH

cian, chef, artist or woodworker in your family? You can find displays, demonstrations or performances to suit these interests and many others. The Ohio State Fair has a fabulous website, OhioStateFair.com, that lists the daily schedule to help you plan

your visits. You can even download a map of the grounds to help you decide where to park and what gate to enter. Tailoring your fair visit to your kids and your family is a great way to make this great annual event more memorable.

WAYS TO SAVE MONEY AT THE FAIR: • Buy your tickets and ride wristbands at a Kroger supermarket. Fair tickets cost $6 and ride wristbands are $19 instead of $22 at the grocery store.

• Attend on one of the Fair’s special-discount days. Visit ohiostatefair.com for a list of special dates.

• Bring your own bottles of water and

Building Fair Memories

OHIO STATE FAIR

other snacks.

• Bring reusable water bottles for each member of them family and buy large soft drinks or lemonades and pour the beverages into your own smaller bottles for the kids.

• Share food — since so many fair vendors offer large portions, buy one and divide it among the family. This allows you to sample more and waste less.

SMOKEY BEAR: The U.S. Forest Service’s 67-yearold mascot for wildfire prevention has been chatting up fairgoers in Natural Resources Park for more than 30 years. The larger-than-life bear will strike up a conversation with your child and, once an hour, teaches kids the fire-prevention pledge.

THE GIANT SLIDE: Families have been hoofing up all 105 steps since 1969. It’s a super family activity because even little ones are permitted to whoosh down the slide in a burlap sack.


family fun: PLAYGROUND PATROL

ERIC WAGNER PHOTO

Easton Town Center

FOUNTAINS

BY DEBBIE ANGELOS

Situated in Easton’s Town Square along Townsfair Way, the splash pad fountains at Easton Town Center are a great way to cool down after a day of checking out the hottest trends. Whether fully clothed or swimsuit-clad, kids will love a refreshing romp through the synchronized fountains while parents relax on the shaded concrete benches lining the area. Worried that the siren call of the Lego store and BuildA-Bear will beckon your wee ones? Easton may be known for its shopping, but there are plenty of free activities nearby to keep your mini-consumers at bay. Make the splash pad part of a day on the town by checking out the children’s story times at nearby Barnes & Noble, get active with the “Follow Me! Health Parents, Healthy Kids” exercise series, or monkey around with animals from the Columbus Zoo. On weekends, Easton also offers free towels and a “kid’s snack” option for $1.50 (they used to have the towels every day, but a spokeswoman said they changed it to weekends only this year). As the sun goes down, things heat up as Town Square doubles as a performance stage for both local bands and entertainment groups and for the free-spirited, dripping little ones who just can’t help but shake it to the beat. Town Square’s proximity to popular stores and restaurants make it a high-traffic area, which means parents will definitely need to keep an eye on their kids at all times. But with all there is to do in this mini town center, your kids probably aren’t likely to wander anywhere else.

EASTON TOWN CENTER FOUNTAINS 3900 Easton Station, just south of Brio Tuscan Grille 614-416-7000 eastontowncenter.com HOURS: 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 10 a.m.-10 p.m., Friday and Saturday, 12 noon-6 p.m., Sunday PARKING: Free parking available in surface lots along Townsfair Way ONGOING EVENTS: Children’s storytimes take place in the nearby Barnes & Noble store at 10:30 a.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays and at 11 a.m. on Saturdays; the “Follow Me! Healthy Parents, Healthy Kids” summer exercise series takes place on Town Square from 11 a.m.-12 noon on Tuesdays through August; and Columbus Zoo animals visit Town Square from 12 noon-1 p.m. on Tuesdays through August.

columbusparent.com | August 2011 |

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family fun: MEDIA REVIEWS

booksS FOR

KID

“ABC KIDS” by Simon Basher I never thought I would like an ABCs book as much as Dr. Seuss’, but this is just as great! Basher combines ABCs with funny situations using all words that begin with that particular letter and his adorable manga-like characters give this book an up-to-date feel. A few of my favorite lines: “Henry’s horrible hairy hat has huge holes,” and “Vera vacuums various vegetables.” FOR AGES 2 TO 5.

“THE HOUSE THAT MOUSE BUILT” by Maggie Rudy and Pam Abrams, photographs by Bruce Wolf The authors create a wonderful new version of “The House That Jack Built.” The story has a rhyming, sing-song sound that small children will love and they’ll also enjoy getting lost in the pictures. This book is perfect for dialogic reading: Ask the children what they see and point to different parts of the pictures. For more of Maggie Rudy’s mouse-house worlds, check out her blog at mouseshouses.blogspot.com. FOR AGES 2 TO 8.

“JUST BECAUSE” by Rebecca Elliott Toby loves his big sister and thinks she is the greatest. Why? Just because! His sister Clemmie “can’t walk, talk, move around much, … cook macaroni, pilot a plane, juggle or do algebra.” Toby accepts her for who she is. He thinks her wheelchair is cool and they pretend it takes them to the moon. Elliot’s illustrations are colorful and hopeful. I especially love Clemmie’s big, blue, trusting eyes and her facial expression when she does not like pigeons. FOR AGES 3 TO 8.

“INVISIBLE INKLING” by Emily Jenkins, illustrations by Harry Bliss Hank’s best friend has moved away so he will start fourth grade without him. Hank is contemplating this when he discovers something furry under the sink at his family’s ice-cream shop. His discovery is an invisible critter named Inkling. When Hank saves him from a dog, Inkling must stay and repay the debt. Jenkins keeps us guessing whether Inkling, who tells a lot of humorous lies, is real. I highly recommend this for any child, especially boys who like humor. FOR AGES 7 TO 11.

“ADVENTURES OF A CAT-WHISKERED GIRL” by Daniel Pinkwater This book is loaded with bizarre characters and strange happenings. Big Audrey, as the title suggests, has whiskers like a cat. She takes a job working in a book shop that only has books about UFOs. UFOs are the norm in Poughkeepsie; alien visitors frequent the local fritter house and disappear behind a mansion that may or may not be a mansion at all. Audrey goes on a journey that will involve an insane professor, a leprechaun, a giant who only pretends to be dumb, and a cute puppy that frightens everyone but Audrey. If you enjoy odd twists and turns and intelligent humor, you will love this book as much as I do. FOR AGES 9 TO 12.

“WITHER: BOOK 1 OF THE CHEMICALGARDEN SERIES” by Lauren DeStefano Dystopia is hot right now! The new Chemical Garden series tells the story of a future gone wrong where mankind experiments with designer babies. The first generation did well, but their children started dying in their 20s. Men live to the ripe age of 25 and women don’t live to see 21. Girls are forced into polygamous marriages. Sixteen-year-old Rhine is one of those girls. The story is very creepy and may be too mature for younger readers, but readers who loved Katniss’s fashions in the Hunger Games will love Rhine’s one-of-a-kind wardrobe. DeStefano shows us a world where what we believe is evil may not be at all. FOR AGES 15 TO 17.

MUSIC FOR KIDS “SING ALONG!” by Caspar Babypants KRIS HICKEY, TEAM LEAD I AT THE WHITEHALL BRANCH OF THE COLUMBUS METROPOLITAN LIBRARY.

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Due out Aug. 16, this is the latest offering from the liquid tenor tones of “Caspar Babypants” (aka Chris Ballew), who outdoes himself again with a supporting cast of musician pals like Pete Droge, Stone Gossard, Weird Al Yankovic and Outtasite. But the street cred is not why you should listen to this guy’s music. CB has a genius knack for taking the best of blues, classical music (name that Beethoven tune woven into “Wild Wild Time”) and even African call-and-response music, and turning it into kid music that adults will love. It’s a musical education in an album, and deserving of a Grammy nomination. You can purchase through Amazon, iTunes or CD Baby, but the best price option is the $8 download from babypantsmusic.com. —JANE HAWES


FAMILY APPS

“THE FANTASTIC FLYING BOOKS OF MR. MORRIS LESSMORE” One of the most impressive features of the iPad is how the gadget can bring books to life and make reading an interactive experience. This app ($4.99; $2.99 for the 15-minute animated short) takes the art of iPad reading to a whole new level. The story is about the love for books and the magical power of a good story. The cartoon uses miniatures and computer animation to present an absolute visual delight. The app then takes the highlights of the story and offers them up as interactive puzzles, music, games and other forms of fun. This one is a must-see. —PHIL PIKELNY

VIDEO GAMES

“CRAYOLA’S COLORSTUDIO HD” You might think Crayolas and the iPad don’t mix. You’d be wrong. Griffin Technologies starts with a free app that lets youngsters color pages using their fingers. Add in the iMarker digital stylus (available at Best Buy for $30) and your child can add music, backgrounds and sound effects to their drawings. The iMarker also offers additional art tools — crayons, paintbrushes, markers, colored pencils — for your budding artist to use. As you might expect, the art created in this app can move side to side, can be animated, and allows users to zoom in and out. For the more creative among us, the Crayola’s ColorStudio HD also allows for freestyle doodling. —PHIL PIKELNY

“MADDEN NFL 12” ($60, Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Nintendo Wii; rated E for Everyone) This popular sports franchise returns with updated rosters and a more realistic impact system built to make players feel the crunch of every tackle. “Madden 12” also introduces custom playbooks for dedicated armchair quarterbacks and supports one to four players on the same console or two to six players online.

“CUT THE ROPE” This app ($0.99 for iPad, iPhone and iTouch) is a game of physics that’s just as much fun as “Angry Birds.” Om Nom is a cute little monster that wants to eat candy. The player cuts the ropes to get the candy into Om Nom’s mouth. At the same time you must collect as many stars as you can for a high score. The player must use cause-andeffect smarts while selecting which ropes to cut and when. When Om Nom eats its candy, you move to the other level. If you miss, Om Nom gives you a very sad little monster face and you can try again. —KRIS HICKEY

“HARRY POTTER & THE DEATHLY HALLOWS PART 2” ($60, Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Nintendo Wii; rated E10+ for Everyone 10 and older) The end has arrived. The final confrontation between Harry and Voldemort explodes in this video game based on the film. Players take up the wand to help the heroes of Hogwarts turn back dark tide of the Death Eaters. Play alone or with a friend as you struggle to destroy the dark lord. —SHAWN SINES

MyRustyBucket.com columbusparent.com | August 2011 |

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august 2011

OUT&ABOUT MONDAY 1 FREE! Preschool Story Time, 1:302 p.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave., Grandview. 614-481-3778. ghpl.org FREE! Summer Storytime Classes: Babytime, For ages 0-24 months. 10:15 a.m. Upper Arlington Public Library, 2800 Tremont Rd., Upper Arlington. 614-486-9621. ualibrary.org FREE! Summer Storytime Classes: Family Evening Storytime, 7 p.m. Upper Arlington Public Library, 2800 Tremont Rd., Upper Arlington. 614-486-9621. ualibrary.org FREE! Summer Storytime Classes: Tales for Twos and Threes, 11:15 a.m. Upper Arlington Public Library, 2800 Tremont Rd., Upper Arlington. 614-486-9621. ualibrary.org

TUESDAY 2 FREE! Dog Social, Dogs of all shapes and sizes are invited to try out a small obstacle course, enjoy gourmet treats from Three Dog Bakery and of course, run ‘til their four paws get tired. 7-8:30 p.m. Wheeler Memorial Park, 655 Thurber Dr., Victorian Village. 614-795-4677. grandviewchristianassembly.org Grow with Me Preschool Playgroup, Program for children (through age six) providing opportunities to play and socialize with others, as well as participating in learning circles and crafts. Parents (or caregivers) share this experience with their children often form

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friendships with other adult participants. A light snack will be provided. 10-11:30 a.m. $3 per child. Crooked Alley KidSpace, 630 Wirt Rd., 614-836-3333. groveport.org FREE! Hilliard Farm Market, 4-7 p.m. Downtown Hilliard, Corner of Main and Center, Hilliard. 614-8760000. hilliardfarmmarket.com FREE! Movie Day, Cool off with a summer movie and popcorn. 2-4 p.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave., Grandview. 614-481-3778. ghpl.org FREE! Pottery Barn Kids Story Time, Kids of all ages are invited to join us for story time. 11-11:30 a.m. Pottery Barn Kids, 1500 Polaris Pkwy., Polaris. 614-880-3948. FREE! Summer Stories on the Lawn, For ages 2-5. Bring a blanket. 10:15-10:45 a.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave., Grandview. 614-481-3778. ghpl.org FREE! Totally Terrific Film Night, Bring your pillows and popcorn, and enjoy a family movie on the big screen. 7-9 p.m. Westerville Library, 126 S State St, Westerville. 614-8827277. westervillelibrary.org Creative Minds Art Studio, A drop-in open arts space for children that offers the opportunity to explore various art forms in a safe and lively environment. Although all ages are welcome, there is a special focus on creating a space for children ages 6 and under. 1-3 p.m. $8 reservation; $10 drop-in. Gallery 202, 38 N. State St., Westerville. 614-8908202. creativemindsartstudio.com

| August 2011 | columbusparent.com

GAVIN JACKSON/DISPATCH PHOTO

We’ve customized our daily calendar of events to highlight events that are FREE!

COLUMBUS ZOO AND AQUARIUM Dive-In Movies at Zoombezi Bay Fridays, Aug. 5 and 12, and Saturday, Aug. 13 — Have some floating fun with the whole family, watching films from a pool perch. Pre-show activities start at 8 p.m. in the Wild Tides Wave Pool, and the film showings begin at 9 p.m. Admission comes with a regular Zoombezi Bay entry or membership. See “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” (that’s the original one) on Aug. 5, “Back to the Future” on Aug. 12, and “Rio” on Aug. 13.

JazZoo Concert Friday, Aug. 12 — Settle in at the Water’s Edge Events Park and enjoy great American music. The last one for the Summer 2011 season is an “Elvis, Beatles and Beyond” program. Seating begins at 6:30 p.m. and the concert starts at 8 p.m. Purchase tickets online or by calling the Zoo at 614-724-3485. Student tickets cost $15, adults $27-30.

Teddy Bear Safari Saturday, Aug. 13 — One of the Zoo’s most popular annual events returns! Any child, ages 2 to 9, who brings a teddy bear to the Zoo this day between 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. will receive a free admission as well as an opportunity to take their bear to a Nationwide Children’s Hospital clinic for check-ups and Band-aids. Special bear programs and characters will round out this day’s activities. Visitors also will have the chance to view their favorite Zoo animals in action during the “Block and Roll” when animals throughout the Zoo receive ice blocks filled with their favorite treats!

www.columbuszoo.org


ION LUS INC DS ITS FIN E

C

VOI

MEET DAN HABIB, AWARD WINNING DIRECTOR OF

INCLUDING SAMUEL AT THE 2011 OCALI CONFERENCE

CONFERENCE.OCALI.ORG

NOVEMBER 2011

PHOTO: DAN HABIB/INCLUDINGSAMUEL.COM

A PROJECT OF ESC OF CENTRAL OHIO

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SuperGames is your one stop shop for event planning! From corporate events to children’s birthday parties, we offer a wide variety of activities - climbing walls, group Wii gaming, giant inflatable activities and themed parties. SuperGames can plan, staff, and manage all the details for a truly SUPER event.

• • • •

Birthday Parties Bar & Bat Mitzvah Scouting Events Reunion Picnics (up to 10,000 guests!)

All include: • Location Selection • Event Layout • Staffing •& MORE!

WEXNER CENTER DRIVE-IN MOVIE Thursday, Aug. 18 — The Wex Drive-In features “Howl’s Moving Castle.” This enchanting animated Japanese film from the director of “Spirited Away” is appropriate for all ages and will be shown outdoors on the big screen. Visitors can bring blankets and chairs. Festivities start at 8 p.m. (food, drink, and ice cream available for purchase; popcorn is free). The movie starts at dusk (around 9 p.m.) and runs 119 minutes. Wexner Center Plaza, 1871 N. High St.. (at 15th Ave.). Rain location: Mershon Auditorium. 614-292-3535 or wexarts.org.

Summer Specials Two hour party Mon. - Thurs.

$229 Use Promo code CD89

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aug 2011 FREE! Tuesday Summer Series, A free activity for the family including crafts, activities and exercise. Plus register to win a prize pack every week with a water park pass to Fort Rapids, miniature golf passes to Magic Mountain, admission to the Columbus Museum of Art, free Zumba classes and more. 11 a.m.12 p.m. Easton Town Square, 60 Easton Town Center, Easton. 614216-9900. followmekids.org FREE! Summer Storytime Classes: Babytime, For ages 0-24 months. 10:15 a.m. Upper Arlington

Public Library, 2800 Tremont Rd., Upper Arlington. 614-486-9621. ualibrary.org FREE! Summer Storytime Classes: Tales for Twos and Threes, 11:15 a.m. Upper Arlington Public Library, 2800 Tremont Rd., Upper Arlington. 614-486-9621. ualibrary.org FREE! Skate Zone Free Skating, 6-9 p.m. Skating Zone 71, 4900 Evanswood Dr, North Side. 614-8565626. skatezone71.com

WEDNESDAY 3 Beginner Clogging Lessons, Whether you’re 7 or 70, you can do this uniquely American dance. No dance experience or special shoes required, but using taps is part of the fun. Seven-week session avail-

able in two locations: New Albany Ballet Co. or Dance Connection in Hilliard. 7-8 p.m. $85. Dance Connection, 4121 Main St., Hilliard. 614537-3594. yellowrose.ning.com FREE! Family Story Time on the Lawn, For ages 2-5. Bring a blanket. 7-7:30 p.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave., Grandview. 614-481-3778. ghpl.org FREE! FountainSide, Presented by Sunny 95 on select Wednesday afternoons throughout the summer for a variety of free children’s activities. This Columbus Recreation and Parks Department series offers water play and fountain fun in the new fountain in Bicentennial Park. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Free. Bicentennial Park, 233 Civic Center Dr., Downtown. 614-645-3800. sciotomile.com


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aug 2011 FREE! Graeter’s Dog’s Night Out, Share a cool ice cream treat with your pup, and mix and mingle with dog lovers our event held every first Wednesday of each month. 6-9 p.m. Various locations. graeters.com FREE! Tail Waggin’ Tutors, Register for ten minutes read-aloud time with a certified (and gentle) therapy dog. Youth staff will contact you with your child’s ten-minute reading time. Children only, please. 7-8 p.m. Westerville Library, 126 S State St, Westerville. 614-882-7277. westervillelibrary.org FREE! Uptown Westerville Farmers’ Market, 3-6 p.m. Church of the Messiah, 51 N. State St., Westerville. marketwednesday.com

THURSDAY 4 FREE! Bexley Farmers’ Market, 47 p.m. Bexley Farmers Market, 2111 E. Main St., Bexley. 614-327-0102. bexleyfarmersmarket.com Grow with Me Preschool Rock ‘n Rollers, You and your preschooler will enjoy a movement and musicbased program to engage all of your little one’s creative senses. 1011 a.m. $3 per child. Crooked Alley KidSpace, 630 Wirt Rd., 614-8363333. groveport.org FREE! Music in the Parks 2011: The Spikedrivers, 7-8:30 p.m. Sunny 95 Park, 4395 Carriage Hill

Ln., Upper Arlington. 614-583-5310. uaoh.net FREE! Teen Map Crafts: Marble Magnets, Fun craft event where we turn recycled maps and glass beads into mighty magnets. 12-18 years. 3-4 p.m. Westerville Library, 126 S State St, Westerville. 614-882-7277. westervillelibrary.org FREE! Fryer Flicks on the Hill: “Cars”, A family-friendly movie shown at dusk on the sledding hill. Be sure to bring a blanket or lawn chair. Attendees may bring snacks. Ice cream and popcorn will be sold. 9-11:30 p.m. Fryer Park, 3899 Orders Rd., Grove City. 614-277-3050. grovecityohio.gov FREE! Skate Zone Free Roller Skating, 6-9 p.m. Free. Skating Zone 71, 4900 Evanswood Dr, North Side. 614-856-5626. skatezone71.com

FRIDAY 5 FREE! Columbus Feis, Irish Dance competition with over 1200 dancers. Adults compete Friday night at the Dublin Irish Festival. Children and young adults compete on Saturday morning at Dublin Coffman High School. Dublin Coffman High School, 6780 Coffman Rd., Dublin. 614-657-2858. columbusfeis.com FREE! Concerts on the Creek, Outdoor concerts hosted by Gahanna Parks & Recreation. 7-9 p.m. Free. Creekside Park & Plaza, 123 Mill St., Gahanna. 614-342-4250. Evening Observing Sessions at Perkins Observatory, Content varies based on sky conditions, but

may include a planetarium show, observatory tours, and star gazing with the 32-inch Schottland Telescope. 9-10:30 p.m. $7 adults; $5 children, senior citizens. Perkins Observatory, 3199 Columbus Pike, Delaware. 740-368-6908. perkinsobservatory.org FREE! Fireside Fridays, Circle round the campfire the first Friday of every month after Music in the Park. We’ll be telling campfire stories, going for a night hike, gazing at the stars, and eating campfire snacks. Registration is required. 9-10 p.m. Friendship Park, 150 Oklahoma Ave., Gahanna. 614-342-4250. Grow with Me Preschool Picassos, Create crafts that little hands can easily construct. Children ages two through six are welcome (with adult participation required). 10-11 a.m. $3 per child. Crooked Alley KidSpace, 630 Wirt Rd., 614-836-3333. groveport.org FREE! Movies on the Mile: Inception, An outdoor summer film series along the Scioto Mile. Everything begins with themed activities and concession sales in Bicentennial Park, then the featured movie starts at dusk. 7-11 p.m. Bicentennial Park, 233 Civic Center Dr., Downtown. 614-645-3800. SciotoMile.com FREE! These Guys Live, In addition to music, Family-Fun Friday night concerts offer children’s activities. 78:30 p.m. Grove City Town Center, Downtown Grove City, Grove City. 614-277-3050. grovecityohio.gov The Works Music in the Courtyard Summer Concert Series: Common Thread, Afternoon of

free summer entertainment with live music, food, and fun activities for kids and adults of all ages. Pack a picnic or purchase a fresh meal. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. The Works, 55 S. First St., 740-349-9277. attheworks.org

SATURDAY 6 FREE! 2nd Saturdays, Join Gahanna Parks & Recreation every second Saturday for children’s and adult activities, including crafts, games, trivia, and art displays. 12-9 p.m. Creekside Park & Plaza, 123 Mill St. , Gahanna. 614-342-4250. FREE! Columbus Feis, Irish Dance competition with over 1200 dancers. Adults compete Friday night at the Dublin Irish Festival. Children and young adults compete on Saturday morning at Dublin Coffman High School. Dublin Coffman High School, 6780 Coffman Rd., Dublin. 614-657-2858. columbusfeis.com FREE! The Dennis Walters Show, Dennis Walters, honorary lifetime members of the PGA, fun-filled show features trick shots, skill and inspiration. An accident left him paralyzed from the waist down but didn’t stand in the way of his dream to be a professional golfer. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Champions Golf Course, 3900 Westerville Rd., Westerville. 614471-1404. firstteecolumbus.org Outdoor Classroom Management, Learn to take advantage of teachable moments, along with tricks and tips for keeping students’ attention in an exciting outdoor environment. Appropriate for edu-

DELIVER

WHAT’S A paid exercise routine IN IT FOR

YOU? while others sleep Visit www.dispatch.com/delivery or call 614-461-8585 to see if there’s a delivery area open near you! 62

| August 2011 | columbusparent.com

cators engaging learners of all ages in an outdoor setting. 10:30 a.m.12:30 p.m. $20; $15 members. Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E Broad St., East Side. 614-645-8733. fpconservatory.org Play-A-Palooza 5K Run/Walk, Proceeds go to reducing or eliminating pay-to-participate fees for Pickerington Local School District students. 8 a.m.-9 p.m. $30-$35. Pickerington Central High School, 300 Opportunity Way, Pickerington. 614-837-1958. Photography for Beginners, Teens - Adults. Learn how to use your DSLR camera while using the beautiful surroundings of the Conservatory as your subject matter. Bring your camera, manual and charged batteries. Registration required 2 days in advance of class. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. $45; $40 members. Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E Broad St., East Side. 614-645-8733. fpconservatory.org FREE! Rocky’s Reading Room, Rocky, one of PBJ Connections’ therapy horses, will have books in his Reading Room for kids to take home or read with him and his friends at the farm. Kids earn prizes for reading books throughout the summer. 12-2 p.m. PBJ Connections, 9800 Jug Street Road NW, 614-395-1395. pbjconnections.org FREE! Saturday Tales, Bring the entire family for stories, songs and rhymes. Each session will feature a different letter of the alphabet. 1111:30 a.m. Westerville Library, 126 S State St, Westerville. 614-882-7277 ext. 5006. westervillelibrary.org

FREE! Yoga Storytime, Ages 3-5 and their caregivers will hear stories and tell them through basic yoga poses and stretches. No previous yoga experience is needed. 10:3011:30 a.m. Old Worthington Library, 820 High St., Worthington. 614-8072626. worthingtonlibraries.org FREE! Uptown Westerville Saturday Farmers’ Market, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Messiah Church Parking Lot, corner of Home St and State St., Westerville. 614-890-8202. uptownmerchants.com

SUNDAY 7 The Beacon 3-on-3 Basketball Tournament and Community Festival, Second annual Three vs. Three Basketball Tournament and Back-to-School Drive. Elementary through high school students who attend the event will receive free school supplies. Enjoy face painting, food vendors, and fun. Registration 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., tournament starts at 1 p.m. 12-6 p.m. $30 16+; $15 16 and younger. Whitehall Community Park, 402 N. Hamilton Rd., Whitehall. 614-772-4031. lavauri.com The Depot Rail Museum, Tour the beautifully restored railroad depot featuring reconstructions of the Great Northern Railroad Dining Car, the Central Vermont Caboose, and the Georgia & Florida Railroad Executive car. 1-4 p.m. $6 adults; $5 seniors; $4 kids under 12; children under two free. The Depot Rail Museum, 919 Old Henderson Rd., Northwest Side. 614-324-5930. thedepot.org


In Our Studio 5,000 sq ft studio in Powell All teachers have degrees in music or music education, and are trained and observed Ages 3-adult, Suzuki and traditional methods

In Your Home

Lessons

OPEN HOUSES & REGISTRATION SPECIALS! Details at: www.PrestigeMusicStudios.com

614.764.4000

Piano, Guitar, Voice, Strings, Woodwinds, Brass, Percussion, Audition Coaching and more! Prestige Broadway Academy: singing, acting & dancing workshop for ages 5-18 7 week Exploration Classes for Piano, Violin & Guitar Fun, engaging lessons with recitals, make-up lessons, flexible scheduling, no long-term contracts and more!

46 & 50 Village Pointe Dr, Powell

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aug 2011

Bright Minds Start Here Each Center offers: The foundation to encourage your child’s lifelong love of learning Full-time, year-round programs for infants, toddlers and preschoolers Income-based Fees, Tuition Assistance Available Open communication with parents in a mutually respectful environment

NOW ENROLLING !

FOUR LOCATIONS. ONE PURPOSE!

BIT-C (BROAD STREET INFANT & TODDLER CENTER) 6 weeks - 3 years 760 East Broad Street, Columbus, OH 43205 Phone: 614-221-6102 HOURS: 7AM - 6PM

EASTSIDE

NORTHSIDE

WESTSIDE

18 months - 5 years 94 East Third Avenue, Columbus, OH 43201 Phone: 614-229-1131 HOURS: 6AM - 6PM

6 weeks - 5 years 40 North Grubb St., Columbus, OH 43215 Phone: 614-224-9284 HOURS: 6AM - 6PM

18 months - 5 years 162 North Ohio Avenue, Columbus, OH 43203 Phone: 614-253-5525 HOURS: 6AM - 6PM

FOR MORE INFORMATION: Call the center nearest to you!

www.columbusearlylearning.org

New Albany Ballet Company OPEN HOUSES “A CHILD DANCES ALMOST BEFORE IT WALKS.

DANCE

IS IN OUR

HEARTS FROM THE BEGINNING.”

Saturday, July 30 10 am-Noon Saturday, Aug. 6 10 am-Noon Sunday, Aug. 21 Noon-2 pm Wednesday, Aug. 24 5 pm-8 pm Wednesday, Aug. 31 5 pm-8 pm Wednesday, Sept. 7 5 pm-8 pm

T

he 2011-2012 Season starts Saturday, September 10, 2011. Information on class offerings, days and times are online at www.newballetcompany.com. Whether your child is 2 or 12, seeking dance for fun or serious training, our school offers the most programming for children in Columbus.

5051 Forest Drive New Albany 614-939-9058 Registering now for Fall Classes

www.newalbanyballetcompany.com

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| August 2011 | columbusparent.com

FREE! Goodale Park Music Series 2011: The Spikedrivers, 12:30-2 p.m. Goodale Park, 120 W. Goodale Blvd., Victorian Village. goodaleparkmusicseries.com Kelton House Museum and Garden Audio Tour, Weekly audio tour describing the 19th century home of the Fernando and Sophia Kelton family with actors portraying fugitive slaves and abolitionists. 1-4 p.m. $6 adults; $4 seniors; $2 children. Kelton House, 586 E Town St, Olde Towne East. 614-464-2022. keltonhouse.com

MONDAY 8 FREE! Lolli-Pops! Kids Concert, Enjoy the crowd-pleasing, kidfriendly songs of The Shazzbots. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Village Green Park, 47 Hall St., Powell. 614-396-3322. cityofpowell.us FREE! Mystery Theatre, Have fun, laugh and help solve the mystery during Scottie’s monthly mystery dinner theater hosted by Mouth of the Wolf Productions. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Scottie’s Coffee & Tea House, 660 High St., Worthington. 614-4309055. scottiescoffee.com

TUESDAY 9 Creative Minds Art Studio, A drop-in open arts space for children that offers the opportunity to explore various art forms in a safe and lively environment. Although all ages are welcome, there is a special focus on creating a space for children ages 6 and under. 1-3 p.m. $8 reservation; $10 drop-in. Gallery 202, 38 N. State St., Westerville. 614-8908202. creativemindsartstudio.com Grow with Me Preschool Playgroup, Program for children (through age six) providing opportunities to play and socialize with others, as well as participating in learning circles and crafts. Parents (or caregivers) share this experience with their children often form friendships with other adult participants. A light snack will be provided. 10-11:30 a.m. $3 per child. Crooked Alley KidSpace, 630 Wirt Rd., 614-836-3333. groveport.org

FREE! Hilliard Farm Market, 4-7 p.m. Downtown Hilliard, Corner of Main and Center, Hilliard. 614-8760000. hilliardfarmmarket.com FREE! Pottery Barn Kids Story Time, Kids of all ages are invited to join us for story time. 11-11:30 a.m. Pottery Barn Kids, 1500 Polaris Pkwy., Polaris. 614-880-3948. FREE! Sidewalk Chalk ‘N’ Hop, Bubbles, Jump Rope, 10:30 a.m.11:15 a.m. Westerville Library, 126 S State St, Westerville. 614-882-7277 x5006. westervillelibrary.org FREE! Skate Zone Free Skating, 6-9 p.m. Skating Zone 71, 4900 Evanswood Dr, North Side. 614-8565626. skatezone71.com Team Challenge Informational Meeting, Program where you can run or walk 13.1 miles, or train for a triathlon or cycling event while helping to find a cure two chronic and often debilitating digestive diseases. This race will be held on the Vegas strip at night. 6:30-9 p.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave., Grandview. 614889-6060. ccteamchallenge.org FREE! Tuesday Summer Series, A free activity for the family including crafts, activities and exercise. Plus register to win a prize pack every week with a water park pass to Fort Rapids, miniature golf passes to Magic Mountain, admission to the Columbus Museum of Art, free Zumba classes and more. 11 a.m.12 p.m. Easton Town Square, 60 Easton Town Center, Easton. 614216-9900. followmekids.org

WEDNESDAY 10 Clay Art Camp for Teens, Learn basic skills that will help you make clay masterpieces at Lang-Weil Studio. This camp is for teens ages 1317. Register and prepay by Aug 1. 14 p.m. $65; $60 Residents. Crooked Alley KidSpace, 630 Wirt Rd., 614836-3333. groveport.org FREE! First Day Jitters Kindergarten Storytime, Books and songs will get kids excited about their first day of kindergarten. 7-8 p.m. Northwest Library, 2280 Hard Road, Worthington. 614-807-2626. worthingtonlibraries.org FREE! FountainSide, Presented by Sunny 95 on select Wednesday afternoons throughout the summer for a variety of free children’s activities. This Columbus Recreation and Parks Department series offers

water play and fountain fun in the new fountain in Bicentennial Park. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Free. Bicentennial Park, 233 Civic Center Dr., Downtown. 614-645-3800. sciotomile.com FREE! Open Chess Club, All chess players ages 6 and up. Drop in for an hour of play. 3-4 p.m. Westerville Library, 126 S State St, Westerville. 614-882-7277. westervillelibrary.org FREE! Tail Waggin’ Tutors, Register for ten minutes read-aloud time with a certified (and gentle) therapy dog. Youth staff will contact you with your child’s ten-minute reading time. Children only, please. 7-8 p.m. Westerville Library, 126 S State St, Westerville. 614-882-7277. westervillelibrary.org Tie Dye Fun, Bring a white cotton t-shirt and learn to tie dye a rainbow of colors at this fun, one-night class. Tie Dye Fun is for kids ages 6 and up. Register and prepay by August 5. 7-8 p.m. $6; $5 residents. Crooked Alley KidSpace, 630 Wirt Rd., 614-836-3333. groveport.org FREE! Uptown Westerville Farmers’ Market, 3-6 p.m. Church of the Messiah, 51 N. State St., Westerville. marketwednesday.com

THURSDAY 11 FREE! Bexley Farmers’ Market, 47 p.m. Bexley Farmers Market, 2111 E. Main St., Bexley. 614-327-0102. bexleyfarmersmarket.com Clay Art Camp for Teens, Learn basic skills that will help you make clay masterpieces at Lang-Weil Studio. This camp is for teens ages 1317. Register and prepay by Aug 1. 14 p.m. $65; $60 Residents. Crooked Alley KidSpace, 630 Wirt Rd., 614836-3333. groveport.org Grow with Me Preschool Rock ‘n Rollers, You and your preschooler will enjoy a movement and musicbased program to engage all of your little one’s creative senses. 1011 a.m. $3 per child. Crooked Alley KidSpace, 630 Wirt Rd., 614-8363333. groveport.org Preschool Cooking: Corny Creations, Kids ages 4-5 with an adult explore corn on the cob, cornmeal and popped corn with local Ohio ears. Preschoolers will prepare their own corny snacks, learning knife and measuring skills along the way. Registration required 2 days in advance of class. 11 a.m.-12 p.m. $20; $15 Members. Franklin Park


Congratulations to

ANGIE WAHLENMAIER the winner of our

Ultimate Birthday Party Giveaway ANGIE WAHLENMAIER has won a $1,000 prize package from our fabulous sponsors!

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YES DANCE! YOUTH BALLROOM & HIP HOP DANCE ACADEMY

It’s Art, It’s Exercise, It’s a BLAST! Convenient Location: 1222 Kenny Center Mall Upper Arlington, Ohio 43220

For Boys & Girls Summer & Fall Enrollment Specials Photography: Photo Brilliance by Karina Wetherbee

Come Join Us!

Ages 5-16

youth-dancesport.com Enrollment is 614-204-0196 ongoing...

JAMES D. DECAMP/DISPATCH PHOTO

DUBLIN IRISH FESTIVAL Friday-Sunday, Aug. 5-7 — If it’s the first weekend in August, it must be time for the Dublin Irish Festival. And that means more Gaelic food, music, dance, storytelling and fake Irish brogues than you could shake a shillaleigh at! Festival hours are 4 p.m.-12 midnight on Friday, 11 a.m.-12 midnight on Saturday, and 11 a.m.-9 p.m. on Sunday. Buy discounted admission tickets (for $7-$9) online through Aug. 3, or regular full-price ($8-$10) at the gate or online after Aug. 4. Kids 12 and under are admitted free. The Festival takes place on the grounds of Coffman Park. For more information, call 614-410-4545 or go to dublinirishfestival.org.

aug 2011 On your smartphone, visit

mobile.columbusparent.com

Places to take the kids … from anyplace you happen to be. 66

| August 2011 | columbusparent.com

Conservatory, 1777 E Broad St., East Side. 614-645-8733. fpconservatory.org FREE! Skate Zone Free Skating, 6-9 p.m. Skating Zone 71, 4900 Evanswood Dr, North Side. 614-8565626. skatezone71.com Team Challenge Informational Meeting, Program where you can run or walk 13.1 miles, or train for a triathlon or cycling event while helping to find a cure two chronic and often debilitating digestive diseases. This race will be held on the Vegas strip at night. 6:30-9 p.m. The Jewish Community Center of

Greater Columbus, 1125 College Ave., East Side. 614-889-6060. ccteamchallenge.org FREE! Wicked, Abridged, The young actors of Imaginating Dramatics perform “Wicked.” 7-8 p.m. Grandview Heights Public Library, 1685 W. First Ave., Grandview. 614481-3778. ghpl.org

FRIDAY 12 FREE! Concerts on the Creek, Outdoor concerts hosted by Gahanna Parks & Recreation. 7-9 p.m. Free. Creekside Park & Plaza, 123 Mill St., Gahanna. 614-342-4250. Evening Observing Sessions at Perkins Observatory, Content varies based on sky conditions, but may include a planetarium show, observatory tours, and star gazing with the 32-inch Schottland Telescope. 9-10:30 p.m. $7 adults; $5

children, senior citizens. Perkins Observatory, 3199 Columbus Pike, Delaware. 740-368-6908. perkinsobservatory.org FREE! First Day Jitters Storytime, Books and songs will get kids excited about their first day of preschool or kindergarten. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Worthington Park Library, 1389 Worthington Centre Dr., Worthington. 614-8072626. worthingtonlibraries.org Grow with Me Preschool Picassos, Create crafts that little hands can easily construct. Children ages two through six are welcome (with adult participation required). 10-11 a.m. $3 per child. Crooked Alley KidSpace, 630 Wirt Rd., 614-836-3333. groveport.org FREE! The Paper Project, Old Trail Printing is donating excess and scrap paper for local under-funded arts programs. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Old Trail Print-

ing Co., 100 Fornoff Rd., South Side. 614-443-4852. oldtrailprinting.com FREE! Phantomz, In addition to music, Family-Fun Friday night concerts offer children’s activities. 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Grove City Town Center, Downtown Grove City, Grove City. 614-277-3050. grovecityohio.gov FREE! Uptown Friday Nights, Music performances, local food vendors, and special guest appearances by Charlie Brown. Each event will offer something for the whole family. 6-10 p.m. Historic Uptown Marysville, Court St., between W. 5th & 6th streets, 937-645-1051. marysvilleohio.org

SATURDAY 13 FREE! KidsFest & Back to School Expo, Kids up to age 12 can enjoy the last festival of summer at a party with a bounce house, games, prizes


Part-time Employment Opportunities Available! Are you interested in working on a part-time basis during the day? Then consider the exciting opportunities available at KEMBA Financial Credit Union, the largest credit union in central Ohio with numerous branches in and around Columbus! We are seeking energetic, sales and service-oriented Tellers and Contact Center Member Sales Representatives to join our team on a part-time basis (20 - 25 hours per week). The Teller position requires a high degree of precision and competence and is responsible for providing service support to Member transaction needs in a manner that is professional, courteous and compliant with all policies and procedures. The Tellers will also recommend and refer new and alternative services to Members that best fit their financial needs. The ideal candidates will have a high school diploma or equivalent education and experience; prior Teller or cash handling experience; previous experience in a sales environment; strong organizational skills and attention to detail; professional demeanor; effective communication skills; and basic PC skills (Windows). The ideal candidates will also value a high degree of accuracy. The Contact Center Member Sales Representative will provide sales and service support for our membership by professionally servicing, by phone and email, member activity associated with loan and deposit services. The ideal candidates will be comfortable with Windows-based software; must be able to demonstrate excellent communication, organization and time management skills and have the willingness to work in a fast-paced, changing environment. Prior experience with over-the-phone or platform sales and the ability to meet or exceed all sales, service and productivity goals required. Positive self-starters who are able to flourish in a team environment are needed. KEMBA offers competitive pay and incentives and much more. If you want to put your experience to work for a company that values people and the opportunity to enhance the lives of those we serve, please apply today by completing the online employment application on our Careers page at www.kemba.org. If our current openings are not a fit for you at this time, please apply under General Resumes so that we may consider you for future opportunities. Pre-employment background check required. Equal Opportunity Employer/M/F/D/V

Need help getting your kids to summer camp this year? Get your child’s Passport to Summer Camp with Kidz Chauffeur Affordable Daily & Weekly Rates • Personalized & Dedicated Services • Fully Licensed & Insured

Get your kids their own chauffeur at KidzChauffeur.com Hurry, Limited space available! We get busy kids places when you can’t!

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(614) 385-8711 columbusparent.com | August 2011 |

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The best getting even better The best just got better. dispatch.com — named the state’s top website by the Associated Press Society of Ohio — just relaunched with a fresh, new look that features: better – presentation better – social media tools better – access to features The Associated Press Society of Ohio’s best website in the state

better – organization better – multimedia experience

COLUMBUS PARENT FILE PHOTO

MID-SUMMER MID-OHIO FOODBANK FUNDRAISER! Sunday, Aug. 14 — What a sweet deal to help the Mid-Ohio Foodbank — for $8, you can purchase a handmade, hand-painted ceramic bowl at Outside the Lines Creative Studio, and then they’ll fill it with ice cream for you! To eat! (and you get to keep the bowl, of course) All the proceeds from the “Empty Bowls” event and 20 percent of Outside the Lines sales that day will go to help the Mid-Ohio Foodbank. Outside the Lines Creative Studio is located at 5236 Cemetery Rd. in Hilliard. For more information, call 614-527-7752 or visit their website at outsidethelinescreativestudio.com.

aug 2011 and fun while adults visit a variety of booths to prepare children for school. 1-4 p.m. Free. Crooked Alley KidSpace, 630 Wirt Rd., 614-8363333. groveport.org FREE! PBJ & Jazz Concert Series: Erik Augis and Lisa Clark, 11 a.m.2 p.m. The Topiary Park, 480 E. Town St., Discovery District. 614294-5200. jazzartsgroup.org PurpleStride Columbus, 5K run or 2-mile walk to help support the fight against pancreatic cancer. 9 a.m.-12 p.m. $25-$30. Bicentennial Park, 233 Civic Center Dr., Downtown. 614-664-3183. kintera.org FREE! Rocky’s Reading Room, Rocky, one of PBJ Connections’

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therapy horses, will have books in his Reading Room for kids to take home or read with him and his friends at the farm. Kids earn prizes for reading books throughout the summer. 12-2 p.m. PBJ Connections, 9800 Jug Street Road NW, 614-395-1395. pbjconnections.org FREE! Saturday Tales, Bring the entire family for stories, songs and rhymes. Each session will feature a different letter of the alphabet. 1111:30 a.m. Westerville Library, 126 S State St, Westerville. 614-882-7277. westervillelibrary.org FREE! Touch a Truck, Touch, climb in, get close to and size up many types and sizes of vehicles. There will be fire and medic trucks, police cruisers, semi trucks, tractors and more. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Homestead Park, 4675 Cosgray Rd., Hilliard. 614652-3922. wtwp.com FREE! Uptown Westerville Saturday Farmers’ Market, 10 a.m.-1

p.m. Messiah Church Parking Lot, corner of Home St and State St., Westerville. 614-890-8202. uptownmerchants.com

SUNDAY 14 The American Primate Educational Sanctuary Fundraiser, A.P.E.S. annual fundraiser with food, a raffle, games for the kids, and of course, primates. All proceeds go towards maintaining the sanctuary. 2-4 p.m. $5. American Primate Educational Sanctuary, 8380 Kennedy Rd., New Albany. 614-657-8944. gibbonkeeper.org FREE! Class of 2024 Annual Kindergarten Kick-Off Event, Incoming Kindergartners and their families are invited to visit The Works free of charge for an afternoon that allows children to explore the museum, meet teachers, and enjoy a variety of activities to make the first day of Kindergarten a little


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KIDS’ FRIDAYS AT COLUMBUS COMMONS

Fridays through August, there’s fun for the entire family Downtown at the new Columbus Commons

Commons for Kids, in partnership with Columbus Parent magazine, begins at 10 a.m. each Friday and features: • Free carousel rides and inflatables

• Celebrity story time with Ohio State athletes and coaches, in partnership with the 2nd & 7 Foundation

Sunday, Aug. 14, is Family Fun Day, with support from Columbus Parent, at the Commons. Come down and catch a full day of free family entertainment.

• A chance to kick back with a selection from the Columbus Metropolitan Library’s bookmobile

For a complete schedule of events, visit ColumbusCommons.org.

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less intimidating and a little more exciting. 2-4 p.m. The Works, 55 S. First St., 740-349-9277. attheworks.org The Depot Rail Museum, Tour the beautifully restored railroad depot featuring reconstructions of the Great Northern Railroad Dining Car, the Central Vermont Caboose, and the Georgia & Florida Railroad Executive car. 1-4 p.m. $6 adults; $5 seniors; $4 kids under 12; children under two free. The Depot Rail Museum, 919 Old Henderson Rd., Northwest Side. 614-324-5930. thedepot.org FREE! Goodale Park Music Series 2011: Kique Infante, 12:30-11 p.m. Free. Goodale Park, 120 W. Goodale Blvd., Victorian Village. goodaleparkmusicseries.com Kelton House Museum and Garden Audio Tour, Weekly audio tour describing the 19th century home of the Fernando and Sophia Kelton family with actors portraying fugitive slaves and abolitionists. 1-4 p.m. $6 adults; $4 seniors; $2 children. Kelton House, 586 E Town St, Olde Towne East. 614-464-2022. keltonhouse.com

TUESDAY 16

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Creative Minds Art Studio, Creative Minds Open Art Studio is a drop-in open arts space for children that offers the opportunity to explore various art forms in a safe and lively environment. Although all ages are welcome, there is a special focus on creating a space for children ages 6 and under. 1-3 p.m. $8/reservation rate; $10/drop-in rate. Gallery 202, 38 N. State St., Westerville. 614-890-8202. creativemindsartstudio.com FREE! First Day Jitters Storytime, Books and songs will get kids excited about their first day of preschool or kindergarten. 7-8 p.m. Old Worthington Library, 820 High St., Worthington. 614-807-2626. worthingtonlibraries.org FREE! Going Green with Household Cleaners, Making your own cleaners benefits both the earth and your health. This class will teach you

how to make a variety of natural household cleaners with ingredients from your kitchen. Please register by August 12. 7-8:30 p.m. Groveport Town Hall, 648 Main St., 614836-3333. groveport.org FREE! Hilliard Farm Market, 4-7 p.m. Downtown Hilliard, Corner of Main and Center, Hilliard. 614-8760000. hilliardfarmmarket.com Kids’ Guitar Lessons, This 6 week series will have lessons for ages 5 to 8 from 6:30 p.m.-7 p.m. and ages 9 to 12 from 7:15 p.m.-8 p.m. Students will need to provide their own acoustic guitar. %egister and pre-pay by August 12. 6:30-8 p.m. $47; $45 resident. Crooked Alley KidSpace, 630 Wirt Rd., 614-8363333. groveport.org FREE! Skate Zone Free Skating, 6-9 p.m. Skating Zone 71, 4900 Evanswood Dr, North Side. 614-8565626. skatezone71.com Team Challenge Informational Meeting, Program where you can run or walk 13.1 miles, or train for a triathlon or cycling event while helping to find a cure two chronic and often debilitating digestive diseases. This race will be held on the Vegas strip at night. 7-9 p.m. Liberty Township Powell YMCA, 7798 N. Liberty Rd., Powell. 614-889-6060. ww.ccteamchallenge.org FREE! Tuesday Summer Series, A free activity for the family including crafts, activities and exercise. Plus register to win a prize pack every week with a water park pass to Fort Rapids, miniature golf passes to Magic Mountain, admission to the Columbus Museum of Art, free Zumba classes and more. 11 a.m.12 p.m. Easton Town Square, 60 Easton Town Center, Easton. 614216-9900. followmekids.org

WEDNESDAY 17 FREE! First Day Jitters Preschool Storytime, Books and songs will get kids excited about their first day of preschool. 7-8 p.m. Northwest Library, 2280 Hard Road, Worthington. 614-807-2626. worthingtonlibraries.org FREE! FountainSide, Presented by Sunny 95 on select Wednesday afternoons throughout the summer for a variety of free children’s activities. This Columbus Recreation and Parks Department series offers water play and fountain fun in the new fountain in Bicentennial Park. 11:30

a.m.-1:30 p.m. Free. Bicentennial Park, 233 Civic Center Dr., Downtown. 614-645-3800. sciotomile.com FREE! Tail Waggin’ Tutors, Register for ten minutes read-aloud time with a certified (and gentle) therapy dog. Youth staff will contact you with your child’s ten-minute reading time. Children only, please. 7-8 p.m. Westerville Library, 126 S State St, Westerville. 614-882-7277. westervillelibrary.org FREE! Uptown Westerville Farmers’ Market, 3-6 p.m. Church of the Messiah, 51 N. State St., Westerville. marketwednesday.com

THURSDAY 18 FREE! Art to Change Lives, Local artist Tom Blankenship’s art show to benefit The Salvation Army in Central Ohio. 5-8 p.m. Grange Audubon Nature Center, 505 West Whittier Street, German Village. 614-4372138. FREE! Bexley Farmers’ Market, 47 p.m. Bexley Farmers Market, 2111 E. Main St., Bexley. 614-327-0102. bexleyfarmersmarket.com FREE! Wex Drive-In: Howl’s Moving Castle, 9 p.m. The Wexner Center for the Arts, 1871 N. High St., Campus. 614-292-3535. wexarts.org

FRIDAY 19 FREE! Classic Movie Series: A Bug’s Life, The City of Westerville Parks and Recreation Department is offering quality entertainment for all ages for a movie under the stars. 9-11 p.m. Heritage Park and Everal Barn, 60 N. Cleveland Ave., Westerville. 614-901-6500. westerville.org FREE! Cyndi Black Big Band, In addition to music, Family-Fun Friday night concerts offer children’s activities. 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Grove City Town Center, Downtown Grove City, Grove City. 614-277-3050. grovecityohio.gov Evening Observing Sessions at Perkins Observatory, Content varies based on sky conditions, but may include a planetarium show, observatory tours, and star gazing with the 32-inch Schottland Telescope. 9-10:30 p.m. $7 adults; $5 children, senior citizens. Perkins Observatory, 3199 Columbus Pike, Delaware. 740-368-6908. perkinsobservatory.org FREE! Movies on the Mile: Toy Story 3, A free outdoor summer film series along the Scioto Mile.

Everything begins with themed activities and concession sales in Bicentennial Park then the featured movie starts at dusk. 7-11 p.m. Bicentennial Park, 233 Civic Center Dr., Downtown. 614-645-3800. SciotoMile.com FREE! Tween Scene, Kids 8-13, we have a cure for your boredom on Friday night. Join us for an evening of video gaming on the big screen, Minute to Win It games, crafts and more. 7-9 p.m. Free. Crooked Alley KidSpace, 630 Wirt Rd., 614-8363333. groveport.org

SATURDAY 20 FREE! Annual Dog Jog, This year’s Dog Jog co-exist with the CHA Family Health Fair, and will feature pet and people-related vendors, games, food and music. Genoa Park, 303 W. Broad St., West Side. 614891-5280. chaanimalshelter.org Baby Bargain Boutique and Maternity Sale, 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Bring non-perishable food item. Westerville Community Center, 350 N. Cleveland Ave., Westerville. 614901-6500. westerville.org FREE! Dwight Lenox, 7-8:30 p.m. Grove City Town Center, Downtown Grove City, Grove City. 614-2773050. grovecityohio.gov Family Fun Day, Opening day of Hungry Planet: local food, global view. Columbus carving artists demonstrate the art of fruit and vegetable carving. Free with Conservatory admission. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E Broad St., East Side. 614-645-8733. fpconservatory.org FREE! Flannelboard Making Workshop, Learn how to assemble and use flannelboards for storytelling, rhyming and counting with your child. Supplies will be provided, as will examples of flannel stories and rhymes. Registration is required. 10-11 a.m. Old Worthington Library, 820 High St., Worthington. 614-807-2626. worthingtonlibraries.org FREE! Junior Gardener Summer Program: Bees and Other Insects in the Garden, Summer program sessions for children in grades 1-4. Children will have hands-on learning opportunities, along with games and crafts (snacks will be provided). 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Ohio State University Extension, 771 E. Main St., 740-6705315. licking.osu.edu


FREE! Kelleys Island Homecoming, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Kelleys Island Homecoming, P O Box 22, 419-7462432. kelleysisland.com FREE! Rocky’s Reading Room, Rocky, one of PBJ Connections’ therapy horses, will have books in his Reading Room for kids to take home or read with him and his friends at the farm. Kids earn prizes for reading books throughout the summer. 12-2 p.m. PBJ Connections, 9800 Jug Street Road NW, 614-395-1395. pbjconnections.org FREE! Saturday Tales, Bring the entire family for stories, songs and rhymes. Each session will feature a different letter of the alphabet. 1111:30 a.m. Westerville Library, 126 S State St, Westerville. 614-882-7277. westervillelibrary.org FREE! Stories for Babies, Babies and their caregivers are invited for a special Saturday morning story time. 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Northwest Library, 2280 Hard Road, Worthington. 614-807-2626. worthingtonlibraries.org Team Challenge Informational Meeting, Program where you can run or walk 13.1 miles, or train for a triathlon or cycling event while helping to find a cure two chronic and often debilitating digestive diseases. This race will be held on the Vegas strip at night. 9-11 a.m. Easton Communiy Room, 3981 Gramercy Rd., Easton. 614-889-6060. ccteamchallenge.org FREE! Uptown Westerville Saturday Farmers’ Market, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Messiah Church Parking Lot, corner of Home St and State St., Westerville. 614-890-8202. uptownmerchants.com

SUNDAY 21 The Depot Rail Museum, Tour the beautifully restored railroad depot featuring reconstructions of the Great Northern Railroad Dining Car, the Central Vermont Caboose, and the Georgia & Florida Railroad Executive car. 1-4 p.m. $6 adults; $5 sen-

iors; $4 kids under 12; children under two free. The Depot Rail Museum, 919 Old Henderson Rd., Northwest Side. 614-324-5930. thedepot.org Family Fun Day, Kids enjoy family crafts and activities. Free with Conservatory admission. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E Broad St., East Side. 614-645-8733. fpconservatory.org Glass Tile Mosaics Workshop, Make a round or hexagonal stepping stone or a flower pot. For all skill levels. Materials provided. Registration required 2 days in advance of class. 1-4 p.m. $45; $40 members. Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E Broad St., East Side. 614-645-8733. fpconservatory.org FREE! Goodale Park Music Series 2011: The Randys, 12:30-2 p.m. Goodale Park, 120 W. Goodale Blvd., Victorian Village. goodaleparkmusicseries.com Kelton House Museum and Garden Audio Tour, Weekly audio tour describing the 19th century home of the Fernando and Sophia Kelton family with actors portraying fugitive slaves and abolitionists. 1-4 p.m. $6 adults; $4 seniors; $2 children. Kelton House, 586 E Town St, Olde Towne East. 614-464-2022. keltonhouse.com

o t n i p o P

! h g r u b s d i K Welcome to Pittsburgh, jam-packed with family fun – after all, it’s the place where Mister Rogers built his famous neighborhood!

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MONDAY 22 FREE! Sand Art, Make cool designs with sand in this one night class open for kids ages 3-12. Register by August 17. Space is limited. Children ages 9 and under must be accompanied by an adult. 7-8 p.m. Crooked Alley KidSpace, 630 Wirt Rd., 614-836-3333. groveport.org

TUESDAY 23 Creative Minds Art Studio, Creative Minds Open Art Studio is a drop-in open arts space for children that offers the opportunity to explore various art forms in a safe and lively environment. Although all ages are

SUBMIT YOUR EVENT To add an event to Columbus Parent Magazine’s Out & About calendar, submit information by email to calendar@columbusparent.com or online at ColumbusParent.com. Please submit calendar events by the 7th day of the preceding month.

Pop in for a visit! Book your getaway and get $25 in FREE FUEL from GetGo. VisitPittsburgh.com/kidsburgh

Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh: This summer don’t miss Nickelodeon’s™ “Dora the Explorer LIVE ™! Dora’s Pirate Adventure,” June 11-Sept. 4. Includes live performances (Fri., Sat. & Sun. only, 2:30 pm & 4:30 pm) along with daily Pirate Singalongs and interactive adventures. For more information, show times and tickets, go to doralivepgh.org.

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CLASSES, CAMPS & ONGOING EVENTS 3D Repurpose 101, Join the many contemporary artists who recycle materials into their artworks. Sculptor Susan Li O’Connor repurposes newspapers and other common materials to make her own surprising and whimsical 3D artworks. She’ll share her approaches, where you’ll then invent some of your own as you recycle, reuse, and repurpose materials into fascinating finished 3D pieces you can exhibit at home. For grades nine through twelve. Aug. 1-5, 1:30-4:30 p.m. $95; $75 Members. The Wexner Center for the Arts, 1871 N. High St., Campus. 614-292-6493. wexarts.org ARTcamps, Dublin Arts Council offer creative summer exploration for young artists. Print photos in a darkroom, mold clay on a potter’s wheel, or release an inner actor in a natural riverfront amphitheater. Content, activities, and age levels vary from six to 18 years. Dates vary, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $140-$190. Dublin Arts Council, 7125 Riverside Dr, Dublin. 614-889-7444. dublinarts.org Art Camp for Kids, Explore various mediums for painting, experiment with clay and much more in this one week camp. This camp is open to children ages 6-12. Register and prepay by July 25. Aug. 1-5, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. $95 resident; $100 non-resident. Crooked Alley KidSpace, 630 Wirt Rd., 614-836-3333. groveport.org

through a series of collage/assemblage projects. You’ll build (and deconstruct) surfaces with hammers, sanders, scrapers, and carving tools to reveal all kinds of hidden layers. You will learn how to integrate these techniques with painting and collage to make totally new Camera Obscura, Join Kim Webb for this workshop where you’ll build a cam- works using magazines, maps, newspaera obscura (essentially a pinhole camera pers, wire, metal, and paint on board. minus the film) that’s big enough to walk Power tool usage is optional. For grades nine through twelve. Aug. 1-5, 9:30 inside. Learn about optics and identity a.m.-12:30 p.m. $95; $75 Members. The working with the lens of the camera obscura sculpture and other simple pho- Wexner Center for the Arts, 1871 N. High St., Campus. 614-292-6493. tographic equipment like pinhole camwexarts.org eras. For grades six through eight. Aug. 8-12, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $95; $75 Columbus Web Camp, Kids in ColumMembers. The Wexner Center for the bus Web Camp will learn the basics of Arts, 1871 N. High St., Campus. 614-292- web design, a new and very important 6493. wexarts.org skill. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. $250. The Ohio Union, Camp Otonwe, Day camp for boys and 1739 N. High Street, Campus. 424-4882442. columbuswebcamp.com girls, until Aug. 12. $160 per session. Highbanks Metro Parks, 9466 Columbus Creekside Paddle Boats, Schedule is Pike, 614-481-8227. centralohiocampweather dependent. Special hours possifire.org ble during Creekside events. Tues-Fri, 4-8 p.m.; Sat, 12-8 p.m.; Sun, 12-6 p.m. 4-8 Clay Art Camp for Teens, Learn basic skills that will help you make clay master- p.m. Creekside Park & Plaza, 123 Mill St., Gahanna. 614-342-4250. gahanna.gov pieces at Lang-Weil Studio. This camp, taking place from Aug. 9-11, is for teens Dinosaurs: Explore. Escape. ages 13-17. Register and prepay by Aug Survive., Stomp, crash, and roar your 1. 1-4 p.m. $65; $60 Residents. Crooked way to COSI this summer as dinosaurs Alley KidSpace, 630 Wirt Rd., 614-836take over the country’s No. 1 science 3333. groveport.org center for families. Dinosaurs: Explore, Blooms & Butterflies, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $11 adults; $9 seniors; $6 children aged 3 - 17; Free children under two. Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E Broad St., Olde Towne East. 614-645-8733. fpconservatory.org

Collage Destruction!, Engage in some creative destruction as artist/curator Melissa Vogley Woods guides you

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and advanced computer simulators that let you be a dinosaur, to a huge interactive maze. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $9$25. COSI Columbus, 333 W. Broad St., Downtown. 614-228-2674. cosi.org

Interactive Web Design, Graphic designer Lindsay Beach will teach the basics of interactive design, including HTML, Flash, and the general principles of web design. This class is for beginners, and no experience is necessary, although Graphic Design, Work with graphic more experienced students are also weldesigner Lindsay Beach to see what it’s come. Students will work in an electronic really like to be a designer through a Mac lab on campus, and the class will be series of projects using elements of kept small for one-on-one attention. For graphic composition, typography, brandgrades nine through twelve. Aug. 8-12, ing, logotype theory, and software skills. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $95; $75 Members. You’ll practice using Adobe Photoshop, The Wexner Center for the Arts, 1871 N. InDesign, and Illustrator, and take a visit High St., Campus. 614-292-6493. to a working design studio during a field wexarts.org trip to the Wexner Center’s design Summer Ceramics Classes and Workdepartment. For grades nine through shops, Clayspace is a fully equipped twelve. Aug. 1-5, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. ceramic studio offering summer classes $95; $75 Members. The Wexner Center and workshops instructed by experifor the Arts, 1871 N. High St., Campus. enced ceramic artists in a comfortable 614-292-6493. wexarts.org and supportive environment. Students Hungry Planet: Local Food, Global are encouraged to explore their creative View, Explore global food cultures potential, share thoughts and ideas, and through large-scale photographs that create personal works of art with clay. address local food trends, American eat- Aug. 11-Sept. 2, 6:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m. $125-$230. Clayspace, 833 S. Front St., ing habits, and attitudes towards food. Interactive children’s activities will incor- Brewery District. 614-449-8144. clayspace831.com porate nutritional themes, related lectures, workshops, tastings, and weekly Week Long Preschool Open House, family activities add to the experience. Meet our qualified teachers, tour our 10 a.m. -5 p.m., Aug. 20-Nov. 6. Extended beautiful School and see programs in Wed. hours until 8 p.m. $6-$11. Franklin action. Aug. 1-5, 7 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. Park Conservatory, 1777 E Broad St., Olde Goddard School, 4160 Executive Towne East. 614-645-8733. fpconservaPkwy., Westerville. 614-891-2643. tory.org goddardschool.com


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JOE MAIORANA PHOTO

LOLLI-SHAZZBOT! Monday, Aug. 8 — Enjoy the rockin’ tunes of The Shazzbots, Columbus’ one and only space-age kids’ rock band (and check out our “People You Should Meet” story in this issue about the Shazzbots). They’ll be playing at the city of Powell’s Lolli-Pops! Kids Concert from 10:30-11:30 a.m. at Village Green Park, 47 Hall St. in Powell. (It’s right next to the splash pad with Rita’s Water Ice and Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams shops within shouting distance!) For more information, call 614-396-3322 or go to cityofpowell.us.

aug 2011 welcome, there is a special focus on creating a space for children ages 6 and under. 1-3 p.m. $8/reservation rate; $10/drop-in rate. Gallery 202, 38 N. State St., Westerville. 614-8908202. creativemindsartstudio.com FREE! Hilliard Farm Market, 4-7 p.m. Downtown Hilliard, Corner of Main and Center, Hilliard. 614-8760000. hilliardfarmmarket.com Kids’ Guitar Lessons, This 6 week series will have lessons for ages 5 to 8 from 6:30 p.m.-7 p.m. and ages 9 to 12 from 7:15 p.m.-8 p.m. Students will need to provide their own acoustic guitar. %egister and pre-pay by August 12. 6:30-8 p.m.

$47; $45 resident. Crooked Alley KidSpace, 630 Wirt Rd., 614-8363333. groveport.org FREE! Tuesday Summer Series, A free activity for the family including crafts, activities and exercise. Plus register to win a prize pack every week with a water park pass to Fort Rapids, miniature golf passes to Magic Mountain, admission to the Columbus Museum of Art, free Zumba classes and more. 11 a.m.12 p.m. Easton Town Square, 60 Easton Town Center, Easton. 614216-9900. followmekids.org

WEDNESDAY 24 FREE! FountainSide, Presented by Sunny 95 on select Wednesday afternoons throughout the summer for a variety of free children’s activities. This Columbus Recreation and Parks Department series offers water play and fountain fun in the new

fountain in Bicentennial Park. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Free. Bicentennial Park, 233 Civic Center Dr., Downtown. 614-645-3800. sciotomile.com Slate Painting, Learn how to paint a landscape scene on a slate. Register and pre-pay by August 22. 7-9 p.m. $23; $22 resident. Groveport Town Hall, 648 Main St., 614-8363333. groveport.org FREE! Tail Waggin’ Tutors, Register for ten minutes read-aloud time with a certified (and gentle) therapy dog. Youth staff will contact you with your child’s ten-minute reading time. Children only, please. 7-8 p.m. Westerville Library, 126 S State St, Westerville. 614-882-7277. westervillelibrary.org Team Challenge Informational Meeting, Program where you can run or walk 13.1 miles, or train for a triathlon or cycling event while helping to find a cure two chronic and

often debilitating digestive diseases. This race will be held on the Vegas strip at night. 6-9 p.m. Old Bag of Nails Pub, 24 N. State St., Westerville. 614-889-6060. ccteamchallenge.org FREE! Uptown Westerville Farmers’ Market, 3-6 p.m. Church of the Messiah, 51 N. State St., Westerville. marketwednesday.com

THURSDAY 25 FREE! Bexley Farmers’ Market, 47 p.m. Bexley Farmers Market, 2111 E. Main St., Bexley. 614-327-0102. bexleyfarmersmarket.com FREE! Obetz Zucchinifest, Fourday festival held celebrating the zucchini. Lots of food, fun, and entertainment including Mr. Speed on Friday and Rick Springfield on Saturday. 5 p.m.-10 p.m. Memorial Park, 4175 Alum Creek Dr., South Side. 614-491-1080. obetzzucchinifest.com


Why choose Primrose ? ®

Just ask a mom. My children are learning things I never “imagined they could learn at this point in their lives. My preschooler can write his name and recite his alphabet and numbers. I also have a 15-month old who is learning his shapes and colors. It’s just amazing how much Primrose is teaching

my children.

See this Month’s Movie Reviews at

— Jude & Ethan’s Mom, Primrose Parent

Primrose School of Dublin 614.408.3732 Primrose School of Johnstown Road (Gahanna) 614.775.0899 Primrose School of Lewis Center 740.548.5808 Primrose School of Pickerington 614.575.9930 Primrose School at Polaris 614.899.2588

Now Enrolling!

For more information on WOW! services, call

1-866-826-3889

Each Primrose School is a privately owned and operated franchise. Primrose, Primrose Schools, and The Leader in Educational Child Care are trademarks of Primrose School Franchising Company. ©2011 Primrose School Franchising Company. All rights reserved.

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aug 2011 Scrapbooking, Learn scrapbooking techniques and create a two-page spread in this one night class. Bring 4 or 5 photos to incorporate into your scrapbooking spread. Register and prepay by August 18. 7-9 p.m. $16; $15 residents. Groveport Town Hall, 648 Main St., 614-836-3333. groveport.org

FRIDAY 26

Parents’ Day Out P

R

O

G

R

A

M

Peace

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

Fridays, 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. 235 Diley Road, Pickerington We also have a limited number of openings in our Preschool Program. Call for more details.

614.837.3732 w w w . P e a c e U M C . o r g

On your smartphone, visit

FREE! Friday Flicks: Aladdin, Enjoy outdoor movies on the big screen this summer at Creekside Park. 9-11 p.m. Creekside Park & Plaza, 123 Mill St., Gahanna. 614342-4250. FREE! Obetz Zucchinifest, Fourday festival held celebrating the zucchini. Lots of food, fun, and entertainment including Mr. Speed on Friday. 5 p.m.-11 p.m. Memorial Park, 4175 Alum Creek Dr., South Side. 614-491-1080. obetzzucchinifest.com

SATURDAY 27 FREE! Beanstalk Bonanza, Enjoy the classic tale of Jack & the Beanstalk and then plant and your own beanstalk to take home. For grades K-3. 10-11 a.m. Northwest Library, 2280 Hard Road, Worthington. 614-807-2626. worthingtonlibraries.org Mount Carmel Up and Away 5k, In addition to Grove City’s annual Balloons & Tunes hot air balloon event. All proceeds will benefit LifeCare Alliance’s Meals-on-Wheels program. 8-11 a.m. $25; $30. Beulah

Park, 3811 Southwest Blvd, Grove City. 614-277-3050. grovecityohio.gov FREE! Obetz Zucchinifest, Fourday festival held celebrating the zucchini. Lots of food, fun, and entertainment including Rick Springfield on Saturday. 10 a.m.-11 p.m. Memorial Park, 4175 Alum Creek Dr., South Side. 614-4911080. obetzzucchinifest.com FREE! Outdoor Movie: Tangled, Bring the family to a free outdoor movie, “Tangled.” Concessions will be available for purchase. 9-10:30 p.m. Groveport Heritage Park, 551 Wirt Rd., 614-836-3333. groveport.org FREE! Rocky’s Reading Room, Rocky, one of PBJ Connections’ therapy horses, will have books in his Reading Room for kids to take home or read with him and his friends at the farm. Kids earn prizes for reading books throughout the summer. 12-2 p.m. PBJ Connections, 9800 Jug Street Road NW, 614-395-1395. pbjconnections.org FREE! Ruckus Columbus, A largescale obstacle course created for those looking for an “adult playground” experience. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Ohio Expo Center, 717 E. 17th Ave., North Side. 614-644-3247. runruckus.com FREE! Saturday Tales, Bring the entire family for stories, songs and rhymes. Each session will feature a different letter of the alphabet. 1111:30 a.m. Westerville Library, 126 S State St, Westerville. 614-882-7277. westervillelibrary.org FREE! Uptown Westerville Saturday Farmers’ Market, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Messiah Church Parking Lot, corner of Home St and State St., Westerville. 614-890-8202. uptownmerchants.com

FREE! Wessie Fest, The Wessie Fest at Otterbein Lake will feature Children’s activities, food, live native animals, outdoor education activities and more. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Otterbein Lake, Via 221 W. Maint St., Westerville. 614-901-6500. westerville.org FREE! Yu-Gi-Oh! Tournament, 1-3 p.m. Groveport Town Hall, 648 Main St., 614-836-3333. groveport.org

SUNDAY 28 Kelton House Museum and Garden Audio Tour, Weekly audio tour describing the 19th century home of the Fernando and Sophia Kelton family with actors portraying fugitive slaves and abolitionists. 1-4 p.m. $6 adults; $4 seniors; $2 children. Kelton House, 586 E Town St, Olde Towne East. 614-464-2022. keltonhouse.com FREE! Obetz Zucchinifest, Fourday festival held celebrating the zucchini. Lots of food, fun, and entertainment. 10 a.m.-11 p.m., Memorial Park, 4175 Alum Creek Dr., South Side. 614-491-1080. obetzzucchinifest.com Packing a Better School Lunch, Give your children the tools and confidence to pack their own school lunches. From the food guide pyramid to “zero waste,” you and your child learn everything you need to pack healthy and delicious sack lunches. Ages 5+ with adult. Registration required 2 days in advance of class. 2-4 p.m. $25;$20 members (one child and adult pair). Franklin Park Conservatory, 1777 E Broad St., East Side. 614-645-8733. fpconservatory.org

TUESDAY 30 FREE! Bariatric Surgery Information Session, Nationwide Children’s Hospital will host a discus-

sion about Bariatric Surgery and weight loss options for teens to combat obesity. 5 p.m. Nationwide Children’s Hospital, 555 S. 18th St., Olde Towne East. 614-355-0662. nationwidechildrens.org Creative Minds Art Studio, Creative Minds Open Art Studio is a drop-in open arts space for children that offers the opportunity to explore various art forms in a safe and lively environment. Although all ages are welcome, there is a special focus on creating a space for children ages 6 and under. 1-3 p.m. $8/reservation rate; $10/drop-in rate. Gallery 202, 38 N. State St., Westerville. 614-890-8202. creativemindsartstudio.com FREE! Hilliard Farm Market, 4-7 p.m. Downtown Hilliard, Corner of Main and Center, Hilliard. 614-8760000. hilliardfarmmarket.com Kids’ Guitar Lessons, This 6 week series will have lessons for ages 5 to 8 from 6:30 p.m.-7 p.m. and ages 9 to 12 from 7:15 p.m.-8 p.m. Students will need to provide their own acoustic guitar. %egister and pre-pay by August 12. 6:30-8 p.m. $47; $45 resident. Crooked Alley KidSpace, 630 Wirt Rd., 614-8363333. groveport.org

WEDNESDAY 31 FREE! ! Tail Waggin’ Tutors, Register for ten minutes read-aloud time with a certified (and gentle) therapy dog. Youth staff will contact you with your child’s ten-minute reading time. Children only, please. 7-8 p.m. Westerville Library, 126 S State St, Westerville. 614-882-7277. westervillelibrary.org FREE! Uptown Westerville Farmers’ Market, 3-6 p.m. Church of the Messiah, 51 N. State St., Westerville. marketwednesday.com

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Quality Childcare

PARENTS CLUBS AND SUPPORT GROUPS

Open 7 AM – 6 PM Monday – Friday Year Round

Gahanna Moms Network A support group for stay-at-home moms residing in the 43230 zip code and/or the Gahanna school district. Email gahannamoms@yahoo.com for more information. Mocha Moms of Greater Columbus, Ohio A national support group for mothers of color who have chosen not to work full-time, or who have chosen alternative, less-demanding career paths to allow them to devote more time to their families. Meets the second Wednesday of each month (January - May and September - December) at 9:30 a.m. Group chooses monthly topic on which a professional presents. Childcare for toddlers and infants available, but children are welcome to stay with their mothers. Visit mochamomsofcolumbus.org/ to view current calendar of playgroups, moms’ nights out, and family events. Membership costs $40 per year and must be purchased through the national web site. Visit mochamoms.org/memsub.html and select the Columbus, OH Chapter. Mommies of Miracles A growing international, peer-driven support group of mothers who have children of any age with complex medical issues, rare or undiagnosed conditions and/or developmental disabilities. Facebook page offers numerous links for parents of children with exceptional needs. Search “Mommies of Miracles” on Facebook and choose the first result. MOMS Club of Clintonville A fun social and support group for stay-at-home moms and their children. Playgroups, field trips and monthly moms’ nights out. Meetings are 10 a.m. on the second Wednesday of each month (locations vary). For membership information visit clintonvillemomsclub.yolasite.com. MOMS Club of Delaware A fun, social support group for stay-at-home moms and their children with playgroups, field trips and monthly moms’ nights out. Meets at 10 a.m. the first Monday of every month. For membership information, email momsclubofdelaware@hotmail.com. MOMS Club of Dublin Central Support group for stay-at-home moms. We plan weekly playgroups and activities, and a monthly moms’ night out. Meets at 9:45 a.m. on the second Tuesday of each month at Vineyard Church, 5400 Avery Rd. Contact momsclubdublin_central@yahoo.com. MOMS Club of DublinWest Offers a variety of activities each month. Meetings, mom and tot activities, play groups, parties and a moms’

Infants to Pre-Kindergarten School Age Occasional Care

We’re a TWO STAR Center!

CALL TO SCHEDULE A TOUR 614-885-6656 www.worthingtonsslc.org

860 Griswold Street Worthington, Ohio

Educational Outfitters Your Store For • • • • •

School Uniforms Spirit Wear / Products Athletic Wear Company Apparel Promotional Products

2 Convenient Locations: Westerville (Kroger) Plaza 101 Westerville Plaza Westerville, OH 43081 614-891-7720 Next to Tuesday Mornings

Festival Centre 2759 Martin Road Dublin, OH 43017 614-336-2040 Next to Chuck E. Cheese’s

www.educationaloutfitters.com

CHILDREN THEATRE’S PROGRAM Acting classes for children & teens of all ages. • Original performances based on the classics & class imagination • Each child can find their theatrical interest, including play writing, directing, acting and much more! Join us for our fall silent film class. Students will get to be in their own movie for family film night at the end of fall classes.

Register by August 20th to receive a 15%

Discount!

For locations, class schedule and more info www.mouthofthewolfproductions.com • email: gleason.tina@gmail.com

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| August 2011 | columbusparent.com

night out. For more information email momsclubofdublinwest@gmail.com. MOMS Club of Gahanna Support group for stay-at-home moms. Also serves Blacklick and parts of New Albany. Contact Shannon at 614759-5097 or MOMSClubofGahanna@gmail.com. MOMS Club of Hilliard Northeast A social and support group for stay-at-home and parttime working moms and their children. Playgroups, field trips and moms’ nights out. If interested in joining this group, please contact Teresa at tdterranova@columbus.rr.com. MOMS Club of Hilliard-Northwest A social support group for stay-at-home moms and moms working part time and their children. We offer playgroups, field trips, mom’s nights out and much more. A general business meeting with a speaker on a topic of relevance is held the first Monday of each month. For more information, email momsclubhilliardnorthwest@yahoo.com. MOMS Club of Lewis Center Southeast A non-profit support group for stay-at-home moms. Actively seeking new members who live south of Orange Rd., east of S. Old State Rd., and north of Lazelle Rd. For membership information contact Sherry at Moms_Club_Membership@yahoo.com or go to http://momscluboflewiscenter.com MOMS Club of Pickerington North Support group for stay-at-home moms. Also serves Reynoldsburg and Pataskala. E-mail Dena at denaslamka@yahoo.com MOMS Club of Powell Northeast One of three MOMS clubs serving Powell. Support group for stay at home moms and moms who work part time looking to connect with other moms. Various activities for moms and kids. For more information visit sites.google.com/site/momsclubpowellne. MOMS Club of Sunbury A social and support group for stay-at-home moms and their children. Meets for business the last Thursday of each month at Sunbury United Methodist Church. Monthly activities include play dates, local outings, cooking club, book club and moms’ night out. Contact MOMS Club of Sunbury at sunburymomsclub@yahoo.com, or call 740-936-7810 for more information. MOMS Club of Worthington Support group for stay-at-home moms who want company during the daytime; activities include speakers, parties, playgroups and child-run service projects. Meets third Monday of the month at Worthington Presbyterian Church. Email

join@worthingtonmoms.org for more information. MOPS Pickerington Fellowship and support group open to all moms with young children; 9 to11 a.m. the second Saturday of each month; Peace United Methodist Church, 235 Diley Rd., Pickerington; 614-837-3732. MOPS Upper Arlington Lutheran Church A wonderful opportunity to meet other moms with young children. The group meets every first and third Tuesday at 9 a.m. at the Upper Arlington Lutheran Church, 2300 Lytham Rd. The cost per meeting is $5 and childcare is $2 per child. For more information call 614-4513736 or email mops@UALC.org. Mothers of Multiples East Columbus Support and social group for mothers of multiples. Meetings are at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at Messiah Lutheran Church, 1200 Waggoner Rd., Reynoldsburg. Email ECMom.org for membership information. “My” Food-Allergy Support Group A group for parents of children dealing with life-threatening food allergies. We offer monthly meetings, occasional non-food family activities and a private email group for additional support, sharing of concerns, successes, coping strategies, resources and tools. Email Dena Friedel at dena@foodallergyaids.com. New Moms’ Group An opportunity for new mothers and their babies to meet others and share information. Meets from 1:30-2:30 p.m. on Tuesdays at the Elizabeth Blackwell Center, 3635 Olentangy River Rd., Columbus. Free. 614-566-4446. Perinatal Outreach & Encouragement (POEM, Inc.) We are moms who have survived prenatal or postpartum depression (PPD) so we understand like no one else can. POEM is the Ohio Coordinator of Postpartum Support International (PSI), the leading authority on perinatal mental health. For more information call 614-315-8989 or poemonline.org. Radiant Life Moms—Dublin Fellowship support group for moms with newborns through sixth grade. Meeths 7p.m. the first Thursday of each month at Radiant Life Church. Third Thursday is moms’ night out. For more information call Lindsay at 614-5712995. Westerville Moms Group Support group for stay-at-home moms. We have play groups, craft days and a monthly moms’ night out. Contact westervillemomsgroup@yahoo.com for more information.


AVON Start your own business for only $10, Flexible & works great with summer schedules! Call Anita, ISR 614-837-6883

PIANO LESSONS IN YOUR HOME û (614) 847-1212 û pianolessons inyourhome.com

PIANO or beg. GUITAR LESSONS in-home. OSU Music Grad, 14 yrs. exp. All ages/levels. Ted 352-9619 orletpiano@yahoo.com

ROMAKE Bilingual Preschool

Now Enrolling for Fall 2011 Preschool and PreK Low ratio per teacher

Our curriculum is in line with Ohio’s Board of Education

TUTORING IN YOUR HOME

û (614) 428-8867 û

COLUMBIA HEIGHTS UNITED METHODIST PRESCHOOL 775 Galloway Road Galloway, OH 43119

# 3-5 Years Old # 40+ Years Experience # AM/PM Classes

NOW A 2# “STEP UP TO QUALITY” CENTER

# Degreed Teachers For more info, (614) 878-3788 or visit our website: www.chpreschool.com

Now Accepting Infants 6 weeks to 12 yrs. To schedule a tour or for more information

Call (614) 759-8710 www.romake.com

Reach over 58,000 central Ohio families! Murals • Services • Births • Help Wanted Recreation • Pets • Happy Ads • Information Arts-Crafts-Hobbies • Baby Furniture-Clothes Business Opportunities • Health-Fitness Services Bazaars-Seasonal • Lost and Found Fund Raising • Photography • Misc. for Sale Student Loans • Modeling Info Education-Schools • Tutor Private Lessons Childcare • Entertainment • Parties

(740) 888-5003

Quality Child Care - Over 30 yrs exp. CPR & First Aid trained. Diverse program. Near Easton, off Morse Rd & 270N. Hrs: M-F 8a-5:30p. Call Karen, 614-471-4572 AT HOME DAYCARE Mornings & Some Evening Hrs. Avail. Title 20. South Columbus. Penny: (614) 491-9063.

PUPPIES! PUPPIES! Get one today! Many breeds, sizes, colors and prices. All health guaranteed. Visit our web: blueribbonkennelsofohio .com or call 740-332-4968. Make Calvin Akers your friend on Facebook!

ENTERTAINMENT! Family Magician, Carnival Games, Bounce, Mini Golf, Clowns, Costume Charac ters & Face Painting. Call Bruce at 614-507-6205 www.makingitfun.com

BIRTHDAY PARTY? Awesome Magic, Balloon Sculptures. Call Ken the Magician! Check out: www.b2bfamilyfun.com 740-369-5040

Luke the Juggler

Who Else Wants A Party Full of Laughter, Fun, & Happy Memories that Last a Lifetime?

Birthday’s a Specialty!

JUGGLING, MAGIC, BALLOONS! BEST VALUE FOR YOUR $$$! Call Now To Schedule Your Party!

Call Joe Lyons Columbus’ Funniest Magician

Look for Details & Info. Online

614-764-8010

(614)777-7632

LuketheJuggler.com

www.heyjoelyons.com

“Finally, a magician that can guarantee that his show will be Funny, Fun & Unforgettable...” • Tons of Audience Participation 100% Money Back Guarantee & party packages! • FREE Give-a-ways for every package www.TheColumbusBirthdayPartyMagician.com • Special Pricing for Blue & Gold Banquets

or Call Carroll Baker Today! 1-866-220-7816

INVITE

POOH TO YOUR

PARTY!

Corporate Events • Schools • After-Proms Churches • Festivals • Reunions • Bar/Bat Mitzvahs

(614) 471-3628

Inflatable Games

Variety Acts

Extras

Moon Bounce Gladiator Joust Bungee Run Sumo Wrestling Velcro Wall Big Glove Boxing Inflatable Slides Inflatable Water Slides Obstacle Courses Toddler Inflatables

Clowns • Magicians • Juggler Ventriloquist • Disc Jockeys Caricature Art • Face Painting Pony Rides • Petting Zoo

Snowcones Cottoncandy Popcorn Dunk Tank Putt-Putt Golf Sky Dancers Carnival Games

OR

BUZZ, DORA, SUPER MARIO, MIKEY & MINI MOUSE YOGABBA, ELMO, BARNEY SPONGE BOB, DIEGO, AND SPIDERMAN

30+ entertainers to choose from

614-224-9568

Call for

Magicians, Clowns, Bounces, Sno Cone, Cotton Candy, Popcorn Machines, Carnival Games www.AwesomeFamilyEntertainment.com (all characters are look a likes)

DELIVER

WHAT’S

IN IT FOR

YOU? Supplement your income every week Visit www.dispatch.com/delivery or call 614-461-8585 to see if there’s a delivery area open near you! columbusparent.com | August 2011 |

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Columbus Parent - August 2011