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June 9, 2011

Strayer leaves for state development post City council salaries maintained, mayor earns delayed increase By MICHAEL J. MAURER ThisWeek Community Newspapers

Canal Winchester development director Chris Strayer told city council Monday, June 6, that will resign effective June 10 to join the Ohio Department of Development as special projects manager for the strategic business investment division. “It’s a good opportunity,” Strayer said. “The special projects manager is in charge

of projects where more than $50 million in investment or 200 or more jobs are created. It’s bigger projects, higher-level stuff. “It’s a great opportunity to become involved in larger projects across the state.” Strayer has been at Canal Winchester for four years. His city salary is $65,000 annually. He declined to state his salary with the department of development. Strayer said Canal Winchester had done well, growing during a severe eco-

nomic downturn. “We’ve done a lot of work,” he said. “Look at the industrial park. We’ve done the hospital. And we’ve been through the big downturn. We have increased investment through a very bad downturn in the economy and that says a lot about Canal Winchester’s ability to grow.” Strayer said he did expect the state’s department of development to be priva-

It’s a good opportunity. The special projects manager is in charge of projects where more than $50 million in investment or 200 or more jobs are created. It’s bigger projects, higher-level stuff. It’s a great opportunity to become involved in larger projects across the state.

CHRIS STAYER — leaving as Canal Winchester development director

See STRAYER, page A2

City property tax collections to fall

FLYING HIGH

By MICHAEL J. MAURER ThisWeek Community Newspapers

By Eric George/ThisWeek

Brad Snyder, 10, jumps off the diving board at the Canal Winchester municipal pool, 180 Groveport Road, on June 6. The pool opened for the season on June 4.

Safety committee

Canal Pointe parcel may become preserve By MICHAEL J. MAURER ThisWeek Community Newspapers

The city of Canal Winchester may dedicate about 66 acres of wooded land in the Canal Pointe industrial park as passive use recreation, preserving the wooded, swampy land that is there and saving the city from paying property taxes on it. During city council’s June 1 safe-

ty committee meeting, public works director Matt Peoples said the land was unlikely to be used for development, and making it parkland could save the city from paying property taxes. “This is a big wooded area and there is no way anything is ever going to be built on it,” Peoples said. “Not only is it wooded, it is swampy down there. We pay property taxes on it. We are

talking about making this a preservetype area, not doing anything on it.” Peoples said the city would not likely build trails, although the property could offer an interesting passive recreation opportunity. “It’s a nice nature area,” Peoples said. “We would like to dedicate it as a park.” Development director Chris Strayer said the parcel includes some po-

tentially developable land, but the expected market value is less than the cost of building an access road that would allow it to be developed. “To get there, it just doesn’t make any sense,” Strayer said. “For the cost of building a road, it does not make any sense for two building pads. For the $200,000 or the $300,000 you See CANAL POINTE, page A2

Finance director Nanisa Osborn told Canal Winchester City Council’s finance committee Monday that property valuations in Franklin County are expected to fall by an average of as much as 8 percent in the current three-year valuation cycle conducted by the county auditor. As a result, Osborn said, city revenue from property taxes is likely to fall, also. “Every three years, the value of real estate is reviewed,” Osborn said. “It is all over the state of Ohio, but counties are on different schedules, and 2011 is the year Franklin County reviews the value of all real estate.” Osborn said Franklin County Auditor Clarence Mingo had invited all municipal finance officials to a meeting last week to discuss the valuations. “They are expecting, for the first time in a number of years, that the value of residential real estate in Franklin County will go down,” she said. “Individual properties may have gone down in the past, but it was not the large stroke they are expecting it to be.” Osborn said property taxes collected by Canal Winchester are “inside millage,” a reference to constitutional authority to impose a 1-percent property tax that is allocated to various political subdivisions. Such inside millage is not subject to the provisions of House Bill 920. That state law prevents changes in valuation to properties subject to outside millage (voted property taxes in excess of the 1-percent amount) from changing how much money is collected from the voted levy. Under common circumstances of rising property values, this causes collected property tax millage to decline over time. In times of falling property values, it could cause collected millage to inSee CITY PROPERTY, page A6

Safety expo slated June 25 at Ohio Fire Academy By DAVID S. OWEN ThisWeek Community Newspapers

Firefighters from all over the state will converge on The Ohio Fire Academy, 8895 E. Main St., Reynoldsburg, for the annual Fire Safety Expo & Muster on June 25. The expo is free and open to the public. Hours are 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Event spokesperson Shane Cartmill said kids, families and

firefighting enthusiasts will be able to enjoy a variety of handson fire safety demonstrations. In addition, he said the expo and muster offers a chance for visitors to see the fire trucks used today as well as more than 100 antique fire trucks dating back two centuries. Cartmill said a variety of exhibits will be set up. “There are a large number of historic fire trucks

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dating back to the 19th century all the way up through to today‘s most modern equipment, the bomb squads and their robots, and arson K-9s,” Cartmill said. He said fire agencies from throughout Ohio will be represented and most will stress fire safety. Cartmill said the Fire Safety Expo & Muster, now in it’s ninth year at the academy, has drawn

up to 5,000 people. He said although the event is free, refreshments will be available for purchase, including hot dogs and hamburgers. Families are also welcome to pack a picnic lunch if they want. State Fire Marshal Larry Flowers said the event gives the academy an opportunity to showcase firefighters, fire safety, equipment and the important work Marley is a five-yearold mixed breed dog currently up for adoption at Citizens For Human Action. For information on adopting Marley, visit CHA’s website: chaanimalshelter.org. Watch a video of Marley at ThisWeek NEWS.com.

they perform. “This event is about education,” Flowers said. “It’s about getting information into families’ and young people’s hands. The whole key to it is educating people about fire safety.” He said demonstrations and exhibits will be located inside and outside the Ohio Fire Academy’s See SAFETY EXPO, page A2

A closer look The expo is free and open to the public. Hours are10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Event spokesperson Shane Cartmill said kids, families and firefighting enthusiasts will be able to enjoy a variety of hands-on fire safety demonstrations.

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ThisWeek Community Newspapers Canal Winchester

Page A2

June 9, 2011

Strayer leaves for state development post Continued from page A1 tized, under Gov. John Kasich’s JobsOhio initiative, but did not know how that would affect his position. The city has posted the development director’s job on its website and has set a June 14 deadline for applications. According to the posting, candidates should have experience in economic and community development, business management and/or workforce development issues; strong writing, research, public communication and critical thinking skills; project and team-management experience and a demonstrated ability to

work effectively with diverse constituents. In addition, the web posting says flexibility and adaptability “are key for this position.” The starting salary range is between $61,150 and $70,000. In other business Monday, council heard the first reading of its 2012 revenue budget for submission to the county budget commission in July. A second reading is set for June 20 and a public hearing is scheduled July 5. “This budget sets the revenue for 2012,” finance director Nanisa Osborn said. “The expense side we will look at in the fall, and at that point, we will have a bet-

ter idea what we need to pursue, especially for the capital (expenditure) side of things.” The budget includes general fund revenues and expenditures of approximately $5.8 million, with a balance of $2.7 million. Other funds in excess of $1 million include six funds relating to water, sewer and storm water. Total city revenues are projected at $12.9 million and expenditures at $13.3 million, with a projected balance of $10 million. Osborn said she had proposed an expenditure of $235,000 in capital improvements to expand city office space, but final decisions would have to await

financial developments during the remainder of the year. The city’s largest general fund revenue source is the city income tax, projected to raise $4.17 million in 2012, followed by the property tax, projected to raise $365,000. The city’s largest expenditures include debt service, budgeted at $993,000; fees to the Fairfield County Sheriff’s Office of $870,000; $303,000 to the department of development and $300,000 to street maintenance. Council also discussed proposed changes in compensation for the mayor and council members. By 2009 ordinance previously approved, council members

were paid $5,100 annually and the council president was paid $5,600, until Jan. 1, 2011, when council pay was increased to $6,000 annually and the council president’s pay increased to $6,500. For the next two years, council pay is expected to remain the same. Another 2009 ordinance set the mayor’s annual salary at $76,500 in 2010, increasing to $80,000 Jan. 1, 2011. During discussions Monday, council agreed to keep the mayor’s salary fixed for 2012, but to increase it to $82,500 on Jan. 1, 2013. Employee salaries are budgeted to increase by 3 percent in 2012.

Safety expo slated June 25 at Ohio Fire Academy Continued from page A1 complex. “I kind of like to call it a parade in place,” Flowers said. “They all show up, kind of like a parade. We’ve got the trucks lined up but they really don’t go anywhere, but it’s hands-on, see them up close, and talk … about the history of the trucks. “We’ll have stuff here built prior to 1900 and stuff that was built this year,” he said. Flowers said firefighters are always teaching people about fire safety but this event highlights that effort. “It saves lives, it prevents injuries … if we can train young people on, for example ‘stop, drop

and roll’ if their clothing catches people to hold and use to extin- be on hand at safety trailers to a room full of smoke. expo is available online at www. on fire, or on smoke detectors and guish the flames. Personnel will teach people how to crawl out of More information about the com.ohio.gov/fire the proper response to smoke alarms or safety in the kitchen, this is an opportunity to showcase that,” Flowers said. He said another purpose of this event is to show children there is a real human underneath the fire suit. “There’s a real human under all of this protective equipment, and we’ll have the firefighter basically get dressed in front of the young people, and they’ll know this is not some monster, this is someone that is going to help you,” Flowers said. He said the expo and muster will also feature a mock-up home with flames coming out of it. A water hose will be available for

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Continued from page A1 would get out of it for the buildable acreage, you’re not going to pay for a road.” Strayer said the city owns water supply wells on the property that do have significant development value because water supply is an asset sought by many businesses. “Those wells, there are companies out there that need high capacity of water, but maybe they don’t need treated water,” Strayer said. “Having those wells there, you could plug into a company for cooling, or whatever it is could be very beneficial.” Committee chair Steve Donahue said he was reluctant to set aside the land as parkland without knowing whether the city could decide to develop it later, if the market allowed. “Ten years from now, Diley is going to be completely different from what it is now,” Donahue said. “Look at what Gender Road was 10 years ago.” In other business, the committee discussed whether to allow pool memberships to children who do not live in the Canal Winchester School District, so that they can join swim teams that use the pool. Committee member Bobbie Mershon said such students did not need to use the pool during crowded recreation times, but that they would benefit from being able to join the swim teams they wanted to join.

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ThisWeek Community Newspapers Canal Winchester

June 9, 2011

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ThisWeek Community Newspapers Canal Winchester

Page A4

June 9, 2011

ThisWeek Community Newspapers Canal Winchester

June 9, 2011

Alabama tornado

Commentary & opinion

Church mission marked by heartbreak, help

As it were

Trash: A problem for a growing city

By Chris Bournea/ThisWeek

Scholarship winners

Winners of the Canal Winchester Alumni Scholarship Association’s first annual round of $1,000 college scholarships are (from left) 2011 graduates Navtej Singh, Rachel Miles, Brady Hutchins, Allison Hutchins, Ali Fortney and Megan Emmons.

Coming up To add, remove or update a listing, email month at the Canal Banking Center, 6360 Prentiss School Drive, and from 11:30 a.m.editorial@thisweeknews.com. 12:30 p.m. the fourth Tuesday of the month at the Winchester Tea Room, 25 N. High Government St. Call Karen Stiles at (614) 920-3090. Canal Winchester Village Council, 7 Central Ohio 9-12 Project, 5 p.m. the p.m. the first and third Mondays of the month second Wednesday and 7 p.m. the fourth at Town Hall, 10 N High St. Saturday of the month. Meeting location Planning and zoning commission, 7 varies. For information, call Mike Lyons at p.m. the second Monday of each month at (614) 561-4040 or email info@CentralOTown Hall. hio912.com. Old Town committee meetings, 5:45 Canal Winchester Rotary Club, noonp.m. the second Monday of the month at 1 p.m. Thursdays at Shade on the Canal Town Hall. Restaurant, 19 S. High St. Individuals interFinance committee meetings, 5:45 p.m. ested in learning more about Rotary are the first Monday of the month at Town invited to attend. Visit www.rotarycanalHall. winchester.org. Safety committee meetings, 9 a.m. the Cub Scout Pack 316, 6:45-8 p.m. Thursfirst Wednesday of the month at Town days at Brice United Methodist Church, Hall. 3160 Brice Road. For information or quesService committee meetings, 5:45 p.m. tions, call Tom McInnerney at 863-5221 or the third Monday of the month at Town email tamcinnerney@yahoo.com. Hall. Indians Touchdown Club, 7 p.m. the Landmarks commission, 7 p.m. the first Tuesday of the month in the Canal Winfourth Monday of the month at Town chester High School media center, 300 WashHall. ington St. For information about the club, Madison Township Board of Trustees, visit www.canalwinchesterfootball.com. 6 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month Main Street Canal Winchester coffee in the Community Center, 4575 Madison networking group, 8 a.m. the third Friday Lane, Groveport. of the month at Harvest Moon Coffee House. Visit www.mainstreetcanalwinchester.org/cofMeetings fee.asp. Canal Connections, a networking group, Networking Luncheon, sponsored by 8:30-9:30 a.m. the second Tuesday of the the Canal Winchester Area Chamber of Com-

Church news Church plans drama camp Vineyard Community Church, 15187 Palmer Road S.W., Reynoldsburg, will host a drama camp from June 20-24. The camp will meet from 2 to 4 p.m. each day. Ages kindergarten and older are invited to attend. On June 24, the church will host a lasagna dinner and talent show at 6:30 p.m. The show is not restricted to drama camp participants — anyone is welcome. The cost for the dinner and talent show is $10 for adults, $5 for the first child and $3 for each additional child. The camp fee is $5 for the first child and $3 for each additional family member. To register, call the church at (740) 9277729 or visit www.vineyard05.com.

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merce, 11:30 a.m. the second Wednesday of the month at the Canal Winchester Senior Center, 22 S. Trine St.. RSVP required. Cost is $12 per person. The Right Connection-Canal Winchester Chapter, noon Tuesdays at Donatos Pizza, 6310 Prentiss School Road. Call Rich Wagner at (614) 203-3158. Violet Grange, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Mondays of the month at the Grange Hall, 36 Lockville Road.

Support groups Fairfield County Autism Resource Group, 6:30-8:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month at the Early Childhood Center, 1592 Granville Pike, Lancaster. Call 653-4489 or 862-6171. Grief Support Group meets for lunch at noon the first Wednesday of the month at the Fairfield County District Library, 219 N. Broad St., Lancaster, sponsored by Fairhope Hospice. Call (740) 654-7077. Southeast Moms Club, 10 a.m. the fourth Wednesday of the month at Peace United Methodist Church, 235 Diley Road. For information, visit http://pickeringtonmoms.tripod.com. Reformers Unanimous International Addiction Abstinence, a faith-based program, 7 p.m. Fridays at Heritage Baptist Church, 470 Groveport Road. Visit the church’s Web site at www.hbcministries.com or call (614) 837-6772.

In the wake of a recent threeday holiday weekend, I was reminded of — among other things — the remarkable cleanliness of Ohio’s capital city. Columbus is certainly not unique in the cleanliness of its streets and the remarkable efficiency of its refuse removal. But anybody who has recently been to a “filthy city” — and we will politely not mention any names — probably has thankfully returned to Columbus and assumed that the metropolis of central Ohio has always been this efficiently clean. Of course, that assumption would not be correct. For much of the first 100 years of its history, Columbus was a pretty dirty place. This should not really be all that surprising. Through most of human history, cities have been places where large numbers of people have gathered for one reason or another. And generally, they have been more interested in those reasons — to do business, to worship, to have a good time — than they have been inclined to pick up after themselves. Columbus is a created city. There was not all that much on the “high banks opposite Franklinton at the forks of the Scioto” in 1812 except a lot of forest and a very large Indian mound that gave Mound Street its name. It was at

this pristine location that the Ohio General Assembly decided to make a new home. And even though ED only a few hunLENTZ dred people lived here at first, it did not take them long to make a mess. One of the very first ordinances passed by the Borough of Columbus in 1816 as the legislature was preparing to meet here for the first time dealt with the condition of the streets, such as they were. The ordinance of May 23, 1816, forbade “the obstruction of the thoroughfares by lumber, firewood, stable garbage, earth from cellars or any other means.” The mayor, Jarvis Pike, could impose fines if he saw fit. When one notes that the mayor was making money by removing the stumps from Statehouse Square for the governor in one of the state’s first public works contracts, it probably will not come as a shock to learn that the stumps in High Street were ignored. No one was paying to have them removed. And no one was really complying with the street-cleaning ordinance, either. See AS IT WERE, page A5

ThisWeek Lee Cochran Sports Editor lcochran@thisweeknews.com Sandy Wallace News Editor swallace@thisweeknews.com

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Members of the Reynoldsburg United Methodist Church who recently returned May 29 from a three-day relief mission to tornado-ravaged Alabama said the experience was both an eye-opener and a success. Nearly 80 people, most members of the church’s youth group, drove south in 9 vans and trucks on May 26 to help victims in Harvest, Ala., one of the communities hit hardest by tornadoes in early April. Church member Matt Elliot, one of the mission’s chaperones, said even a month since the area was hit by the raging storms, there was still much work to be done. He said the relief mission’s main task was to help with clean-up efforts. “We wanted to be able to help with cleaning up debris and help families with the opportunity to begin to rebuild. Basically, the neighborhood we were in was pretty much still a disaster area,” Elliot said. “I had never seen anything like that. It was shocking and overwhelming to see that much destruction,” he said. Elliot said church members saw

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bare trees and bare ground and although some clean-up had already been completed, much of what they saw was either half a house still standing or an entire house collapsed into rubble on top of its foundation. He said the group split into smaller groups, with some charged with cleaning up and chopping wood, while others sorted out recyclables, including metals and plastics, and helped salvage any valuables. “I found a digital camera and put it aside for the family,” he said. “We gathered all of those things together, any clothing that was still in good shape — we even moved an entire house to the curb. “It was a one-story house and everything had to be moved to the curb so the Army Corps of Engineers working with FEMA could come and remove everything.” Elliot said the group’s main mission was intended to make sure victims were not forgotten and to assist any way possible. “Personally, I feel like we have escaped a lot of tragedy here in Ohio and I felt this is something I can help do for my fellow Americans,” he said. “I want to be able to get down there and help, as well as just share the love of God with those people.” A return trip may be organized in July to help families rebuild their homes, Elliot said. RUMC member Lisa Cordova, Pickerington Central high school student, said she volunteered for the mission not only for the experience but especially to help the victims. “It was kind of breathtaking,” she said of seeing so much destruction. “It’s hard to describe. It brought me to tears, honestly, to

see all the people — I mean, they have their lives, but that was kind of it, because of their houses and how destroyed they were. “On the other hand, it was good to see how God played a role in their lives,” Cordova said. “We found a lot of Bibles around and Bible verses written down on little papers all around. “We’ll try to go back in July. We formed a good relationship with the Summit Crossing Community Church down there that we stayed at, and they pretty much welcomed us to come back whenever,” she said. Church member Christina Hess, a 10th grade student at Reynoldsburg High School, said she said was absolutely speechless upon arriving in the tornado-ravaged area.“We had seen all the pictures on TV or whatever, but actually getting down there and realizing that there is nothing but huge piles of rubble and then seeing like a little teddy bear or toy laying around … it was speechless,” Hess said. Elliot said when he was a young boy living in Jackson, Ohio, his family’s home burned to the ground and although he could relate to losing a home, he had not seen such devastation like there was in Alabama. He said the group’s mission was a success because the volunteers helped move things along more quickly by salvaging materials that could go back into the community. “The most the mission did, besides give those people hope to say ‘hey, those people were willing to come from Ohio to help us out,’was to encourage our people to focus on life and that it is not about ‘stuff’ or ‘obtaining stuff’ but it’s all about relationships,” he said.

AS IT WERE Continued from page A4

troops at Camp Chase did not help improve city cleanliness much. A local paper complained in 1865 as the Civil War was ending that, “Our Street Commissioner, having wakened up from his Rip Van Winkle slumbers, was out yesterday with an overwhelming force, consisting of a one-legged man and two assistants, actively engaged in cleaning up … Heaven knows there is need of it.” By the early 1870s, Columbus was growing rapidly and the downtown near the Statehouse was being kept reasonably clean. The area north of town near the railyards was another matter: “The weather at present writing warrants a hope that navigation between the National Hotel (Nationwide and High Street) and the North Graveyard (North Market) will be closed today. For several days, it has been impossible to get a respectable footing anywhere in the territory described above. We doubt whether such a sea of mud has ever afflicted any other city.” Actually, many other cities had precisely the same problems. If anything, Columbus — because it was the capital city — was probably cleaner than most cities of comparable size in these years. At last in 1886, a program of relatively regular street cleaning was begun in Columbus. A fourhorse sweeper began to clean High Street six nights a week. By 1892, the service was being performed by two two-horse sweepers. But even this service was not uniform, since it was paid for by local property owners who desired it. It would take another generation for really complete street cleaning and refuse removal to come to Columbus. But by 1911 — 100 years ago — it was here. Superintendent Kautzman described his refuse-collection department for a local paper: “Our present quarters (on Short Street) in addition to the disposal plant, consist of a loading station, a commodious barn, both of brick, and a wagon shed now in the process of completion. We have 104 head of horses, 54 wagons and more than 75 men … “During the last two months, we have collected approximately 10,000 loads of garbage and rubbish. We are making the garbage pay by extracting grease and other byproducts from it … Why should we not make this profit for the municipality?” After all, who can argue with treasure from trash?

Mayor Pike soon decided not to seek re-election and entered into several private-sector businesses. His successors were not better, and may have been worse, at keeping the trash of the city under control. A few examples: On June 26, 1820, the city marshal was ordered to “remove any logs from Broad Street, west of Fourth Street, that may have grown on the ground and is fallen thereon.” There is no record that the marshal did any such thing. In 1832, the residents of lots on High Street from Broad to Main streets were ordered “to collect the dirt into convenient heaps on Saturday of each week.” There is no record that the residents complied with that order, either. “Dirt” was a major problem in the early city. This was due primarily to certain basic facts: Most of the streets were not paved. Most of the streets were being used as sewers as well as thoroughfares. Columbus was a city powered by horses and its streets were filled with what horses left behind. Put all of this together and one can see why the removal of dirt was an important issue. By 1840, Columbus was a town of more than 6,000 people and the streets — at least near Broad and High — were at least moderately clean at least some of the time. An ordinance passed that year was more modest in its intent. The long-suffering marshal was ordered to employ someone to “clean the paved gutters of the city of all dirt and filth.” Presumably, the idea here was that dirt and filth pushed into the street would be washed away after a while. How this would happen in a city without sewers was not explained. Things had not improved much by 1850. A writer informed a local newspaper of the problems of inner city travel: “On Tuesday last, a couple of friends from Cleveland, delegates to the Temperance Convention, wishing to visit the Lunatic Asylum (at Jefferson and Broad), I took them in my carriage and set out on the perilous undertaking of reaching that institution; and by trespassing on the gravel sidewalk of Mr. Kelley (near Fifth and Broad), and some others, we contrived to get within 40 or 50 rods of the Asylum gate, when we were stuck fast in the mud, and after breaking the carriage and harness in endeavoring to proceed, we were compelled to wade on foot through the mire.” Ed Lentz writes a history column The arrival of 26,000 Union for ThisWeek.


ThisWeek Community Newspapers Canal Winchester

Page A4

June 9, 2011

ThisWeek Community Newspapers Canal Winchester

June 9, 2011

Alabama tornado

Commentary & opinion

Church mission marked by heartbreak, help

As it were

Trash: A problem for a growing city

By Chris Bournea/ThisWeek

Scholarship winners

Winners of the Canal Winchester Alumni Scholarship Association’s first annual round of $1,000 college scholarships are (from left) 2011 graduates Navtej Singh, Rachel Miles, Brady Hutchins, Allison Hutchins, Ali Fortney and Megan Emmons.

Coming up To add, remove or update a listing, email month at the Canal Banking Center, 6360 Prentiss School Drive, and from 11:30 a.m.editorial@thisweeknews.com. 12:30 p.m. the fourth Tuesday of the month at the Winchester Tea Room, 25 N. High Government St. Call Karen Stiles at (614) 920-3090. Canal Winchester Village Council, 7 Central Ohio 9-12 Project, 5 p.m. the p.m. the first and third Mondays of the month second Wednesday and 7 p.m. the fourth at Town Hall, 10 N High St. Saturday of the month. Meeting location Planning and zoning commission, 7 varies. For information, call Mike Lyons at p.m. the second Monday of each month at (614) 561-4040 or email info@CentralOTown Hall. hio912.com. Old Town committee meetings, 5:45 Canal Winchester Rotary Club, noonp.m. the second Monday of the month at 1 p.m. Thursdays at Shade on the Canal Town Hall. Restaurant, 19 S. High St. Individuals interFinance committee meetings, 5:45 p.m. ested in learning more about Rotary are the first Monday of the month at Town invited to attend. Visit www.rotarycanalHall. winchester.org. Safety committee meetings, 9 a.m. the Cub Scout Pack 316, 6:45-8 p.m. Thursfirst Wednesday of the month at Town days at Brice United Methodist Church, Hall. 3160 Brice Road. For information or quesService committee meetings, 5:45 p.m. tions, call Tom McInnerney at 863-5221 or the third Monday of the month at Town email tamcinnerney@yahoo.com. Hall. Indians Touchdown Club, 7 p.m. the Landmarks commission, 7 p.m. the first Tuesday of the month in the Canal Winfourth Monday of the month at Town chester High School media center, 300 WashHall. ington St. For information about the club, Madison Township Board of Trustees, visit www.canalwinchesterfootball.com. 6 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month Main Street Canal Winchester coffee in the Community Center, 4575 Madison networking group, 8 a.m. the third Friday Lane, Groveport. of the month at Harvest Moon Coffee House. Visit www.mainstreetcanalwinchester.org/cofMeetings fee.asp. Canal Connections, a networking group, Networking Luncheon, sponsored by 8:30-9:30 a.m. the second Tuesday of the the Canal Winchester Area Chamber of Com-

Church news Church plans drama camp Vineyard Community Church, 15187 Palmer Road S.W., Reynoldsburg, will host a drama camp from June 20-24. The camp will meet from 2 to 4 p.m. each day. Ages kindergarten and older are invited to attend. On June 24, the church will host a lasagna dinner and talent show at 6:30 p.m. The show is not restricted to drama camp participants — anyone is welcome. The cost for the dinner and talent show is $10 for adults, $5 for the first child and $3 for each additional child. The camp fee is $5 for the first child and $3 for each additional family member. To register, call the church at (740) 9277729 or visit www.vineyard05.com.

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But ThisWeekSPORTS.com will keep you in the know with the latest BREAKING NEWS and IN-DEPTH features on central Ohio high school sports.

Weekly newspaper. Daily updates.

merce, 11:30 a.m. the second Wednesday of the month at the Canal Winchester Senior Center, 22 S. Trine St.. RSVP required. Cost is $12 per person. The Right Connection-Canal Winchester Chapter, noon Tuesdays at Donatos Pizza, 6310 Prentiss School Road. Call Rich Wagner at (614) 203-3158. Violet Grange, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Mondays of the month at the Grange Hall, 36 Lockville Road.

Support groups Fairfield County Autism Resource Group, 6:30-8:30 p.m. the second Thursday of the month at the Early Childhood Center, 1592 Granville Pike, Lancaster. Call 653-4489 or 862-6171. Grief Support Group meets for lunch at noon the first Wednesday of the month at the Fairfield County District Library, 219 N. Broad St., Lancaster, sponsored by Fairhope Hospice. Call (740) 654-7077. Southeast Moms Club, 10 a.m. the fourth Wednesday of the month at Peace United Methodist Church, 235 Diley Road. For information, visit http://pickeringtonmoms.tripod.com. Reformers Unanimous International Addiction Abstinence, a faith-based program, 7 p.m. Fridays at Heritage Baptist Church, 470 Groveport Road. Visit the church’s Web site at www.hbcministries.com or call (614) 837-6772.

In the wake of a recent threeday holiday weekend, I was reminded of — among other things — the remarkable cleanliness of Ohio’s capital city. Columbus is certainly not unique in the cleanliness of its streets and the remarkable efficiency of its refuse removal. But anybody who has recently been to a “filthy city” — and we will politely not mention any names — probably has thankfully returned to Columbus and assumed that the metropolis of central Ohio has always been this efficiently clean. Of course, that assumption would not be correct. For much of the first 100 years of its history, Columbus was a pretty dirty place. This should not really be all that surprising. Through most of human history, cities have been places where large numbers of people have gathered for one reason or another. And generally, they have been more interested in those reasons — to do business, to worship, to have a good time — than they have been inclined to pick up after themselves. Columbus is a created city. There was not all that much on the “high banks opposite Franklinton at the forks of the Scioto” in 1812 except a lot of forest and a very large Indian mound that gave Mound Street its name. It was at

this pristine location that the Ohio General Assembly decided to make a new home. And even though ED only a few hunLENTZ dred people lived here at first, it did not take them long to make a mess. One of the very first ordinances passed by the Borough of Columbus in 1816 as the legislature was preparing to meet here for the first time dealt with the condition of the streets, such as they were. The ordinance of May 23, 1816, forbade “the obstruction of the thoroughfares by lumber, firewood, stable garbage, earth from cellars or any other means.” The mayor, Jarvis Pike, could impose fines if he saw fit. When one notes that the mayor was making money by removing the stumps from Statehouse Square for the governor in one of the state’s first public works contracts, it probably will not come as a shock to learn that the stumps in High Street were ignored. No one was paying to have them removed. And no one was really complying with the street-cleaning ordinance, either. See AS IT WERE, page A5

ThisWeek Lee Cochran Sports Editor lcochran@thisweeknews.com Sandy Wallace News Editor swallace@thisweeknews.com

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Members of the Reynoldsburg United Methodist Church who recently returned May 29 from a three-day relief mission to tornado-ravaged Alabama said the experience was both an eye-opener and a success. Nearly 80 people, most members of the church’s youth group, drove south in 9 vans and trucks on May 26 to help victims in Harvest, Ala., one of the communities hit hardest by tornadoes in early April. Church member Matt Elliot, one of the mission’s chaperones, said even a month since the area was hit by the raging storms, there was still much work to be done. He said the relief mission’s main task was to help with clean-up efforts. “We wanted to be able to help with cleaning up debris and help families with the opportunity to begin to rebuild. Basically, the neighborhood we were in was pretty much still a disaster area,” Elliot said. “I had never seen anything like that. It was shocking and overwhelming to see that much destruction,” he said. Elliot said church members saw

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bare trees and bare ground and although some clean-up had already been completed, much of what they saw was either half a house still standing or an entire house collapsed into rubble on top of its foundation. He said the group split into smaller groups, with some charged with cleaning up and chopping wood, while others sorted out recyclables, including metals and plastics, and helped salvage any valuables. “I found a digital camera and put it aside for the family,” he said. “We gathered all of those things together, any clothing that was still in good shape — we even moved an entire house to the curb. “It was a one-story house and everything had to be moved to the curb so the Army Corps of Engineers working with FEMA could come and remove everything.” Elliot said the group’s main mission was intended to make sure victims were not forgotten and to assist any way possible. “Personally, I feel like we have escaped a lot of tragedy here in Ohio and I felt this is something I can help do for my fellow Americans,” he said. “I want to be able to get down there and help, as well as just share the love of God with those people.” A return trip may be organized in July to help families rebuild their homes, Elliot said. RUMC member Lisa Cordova, Pickerington Central high school student, said she volunteered for the mission not only for the experience but especially to help the victims. “It was kind of breathtaking,” she said of seeing so much destruction. “It’s hard to describe. It brought me to tears, honestly, to

see all the people — I mean, they have their lives, but that was kind of it, because of their houses and how destroyed they were. “On the other hand, it was good to see how God played a role in their lives,” Cordova said. “We found a lot of Bibles around and Bible verses written down on little papers all around. “We’ll try to go back in July. We formed a good relationship with the Summit Crossing Community Church down there that we stayed at, and they pretty much welcomed us to come back whenever,” she said. Church member Christina Hess, a 10th grade student at Reynoldsburg High School, said she said was absolutely speechless upon arriving in the tornado-ravaged area.“We had seen all the pictures on TV or whatever, but actually getting down there and realizing that there is nothing but huge piles of rubble and then seeing like a little teddy bear or toy laying around … it was speechless,” Hess said. Elliot said when he was a young boy living in Jackson, Ohio, his family’s home burned to the ground and although he could relate to losing a home, he had not seen such devastation like there was in Alabama. He said the group’s mission was a success because the volunteers helped move things along more quickly by salvaging materials that could go back into the community. “The most the mission did, besides give those people hope to say ‘hey, those people were willing to come from Ohio to help us out,’was to encourage our people to focus on life and that it is not about ‘stuff’ or ‘obtaining stuff’ but it’s all about relationships,” he said.

AS IT WERE Continued from page A4

troops at Camp Chase did not help improve city cleanliness much. A local paper complained in 1865 as the Civil War was ending that, “Our Street Commissioner, having wakened up from his Rip Van Winkle slumbers, was out yesterday with an overwhelming force, consisting of a one-legged man and two assistants, actively engaged in cleaning up … Heaven knows there is need of it.” By the early 1870s, Columbus was growing rapidly and the downtown near the Statehouse was being kept reasonably clean. The area north of town near the railyards was another matter: “The weather at present writing warrants a hope that navigation between the National Hotel (Nationwide and High Street) and the North Graveyard (North Market) will be closed today. For several days, it has been impossible to get a respectable footing anywhere in the territory described above. We doubt whether such a sea of mud has ever afflicted any other city.” Actually, many other cities had precisely the same problems. If anything, Columbus — because it was the capital city — was probably cleaner than most cities of comparable size in these years. At last in 1886, a program of relatively regular street cleaning was begun in Columbus. A fourhorse sweeper began to clean High Street six nights a week. By 1892, the service was being performed by two two-horse sweepers. But even this service was not uniform, since it was paid for by local property owners who desired it. It would take another generation for really complete street cleaning and refuse removal to come to Columbus. But by 1911 — 100 years ago — it was here. Superintendent Kautzman described his refuse-collection department for a local paper: “Our present quarters (on Short Street) in addition to the disposal plant, consist of a loading station, a commodious barn, both of brick, and a wagon shed now in the process of completion. We have 104 head of horses, 54 wagons and more than 75 men … “During the last two months, we have collected approximately 10,000 loads of garbage and rubbish. We are making the garbage pay by extracting grease and other byproducts from it … Why should we not make this profit for the municipality?” After all, who can argue with treasure from trash?

Mayor Pike soon decided not to seek re-election and entered into several private-sector businesses. His successors were not better, and may have been worse, at keeping the trash of the city under control. A few examples: On June 26, 1820, the city marshal was ordered to “remove any logs from Broad Street, west of Fourth Street, that may have grown on the ground and is fallen thereon.” There is no record that the marshal did any such thing. In 1832, the residents of lots on High Street from Broad to Main streets were ordered “to collect the dirt into convenient heaps on Saturday of each week.” There is no record that the residents complied with that order, either. “Dirt” was a major problem in the early city. This was due primarily to certain basic facts: Most of the streets were not paved. Most of the streets were being used as sewers as well as thoroughfares. Columbus was a city powered by horses and its streets were filled with what horses left behind. Put all of this together and one can see why the removal of dirt was an important issue. By 1840, Columbus was a town of more than 6,000 people and the streets — at least near Broad and High — were at least moderately clean at least some of the time. An ordinance passed that year was more modest in its intent. The long-suffering marshal was ordered to employ someone to “clean the paved gutters of the city of all dirt and filth.” Presumably, the idea here was that dirt and filth pushed into the street would be washed away after a while. How this would happen in a city without sewers was not explained. Things had not improved much by 1850. A writer informed a local newspaper of the problems of inner city travel: “On Tuesday last, a couple of friends from Cleveland, delegates to the Temperance Convention, wishing to visit the Lunatic Asylum (at Jefferson and Broad), I took them in my carriage and set out on the perilous undertaking of reaching that institution; and by trespassing on the gravel sidewalk of Mr. Kelley (near Fifth and Broad), and some others, we contrived to get within 40 or 50 rods of the Asylum gate, when we were stuck fast in the mud, and after breaking the carriage and harness in endeavoring to proceed, we were compelled to wade on foot through the mire.” Ed Lentz writes a history column The arrival of 26,000 Union for ThisWeek.


ThisWeek Community Newspapers Canal Winchester

Page A6

Financial finesse

Wedding planning on a budget Your wedding day may be one you have dreamed about your entire life. In those dreams, it’s likely that no expense was spared in making the event memorable for you and your guests. When it comes time to actually plan your wedding, however, you’ll likely be operating on a much tighter budget than you had in those dreams. Fortunately, there are plenty of ways to make the event spectacular without spending a small fortune. In addition to the following tips, research will yield many books and online resources devoted to this topic. • Schedule your wedding out of season. There’s no right or wrong time to plan your wedding, but there are dates that are more popular, and thus more expensive. Avoiding the early summer and early fall months makes it easier to negotiate lower prices with vendors. Additionally, Fridays and Sundays tend to be less expensive than Saturdays. • Choose a nontraditional venue for your ceremony or reception. Holding your event in a backyard, park, on public grounds or in another location that doesn’t specialize in hosting weddings is both unique and can be a big cost-saver. Remember, however, to take into consideration the cost of tables, chairs and other rentals. • Don’t spend a lot on invitations. Couples may think the invitation sets the tone for the wedding, but the reality is, guests rarely remember the invite after opening the envelope. Consider cutting costs by choosing less expensive invitations or even making your own. For the response card, opt for a postcard or even an electronic reply on one of the popular wedding websites to save even more. • Get your friends and family involved. There are likely some very talented people in your circle of friends. Tap them to be part of your special day. You can save hundreds or even thousands of dollars by asking your friends to fill important roles such as photographer, DJ and florist. • Find something borrowed. Friends and fam-

ily may have centerpieces, apparel or other items from their wedding that they would be honored to loan you for yours. Ask around. • Purchase in season. When choosing flowers, look for varieties that will be in season MICHELLE on your wedding day. You’ll save a bundle and likely have JOHNSON more beautiful arrangements. The same principle works with menu planning. Look for local and in-season foods when deciding what you’ll serve at the reception. • Negotiate. Don’t hesitate to ask for a discount from your vendors and suppliers. In a tough economy, they may be willing to offer you great rates to get your business. And there’s no harm in asking. • Rent what you can’t afford to buy. Although most brides opt to purchase and store their wedding dress after the big day, few ever wear or do anything with the gown again. By renting, you can wear a designer dress for a fraction of the cost of purchasing. • Reduce the size of your guest list and wedding party. Scrutinize your guest list and consider limiting the number of your attendants. Scaling back can help you save on the cost of invitations, favors, meals and more. • Make wedding purchases with a rewards card. Rather than writing a check, consider using a credit card that rewards you with frequent-flier miles, hotel points or even cash back. Depending on how much you spend, the rewards could help defray the cost of your honeymoon travel. For additional financial assistance, contact Michelle Johnson, financial center manager with Fifth Third Bank. She welcomes the opportunity to take your comments and questions. Please feel free to contact her at 614-492-8888 or MichelleA.Johnson@53.com.

June 9, 2011

City property tax collections to fall Continued from page A1 crease. “Because our levy is inside millage only, what we will receive from real estate taxes will decrease,” Osborn said. She said the final numbers will not be available from the county auditor for at least three months. “The tax commission of the state has indicated to the county auditor that they are expecting overall Franklin County residential will go down 8 percent,” Osborn said. “Some are going down a lot more, some less.” Fairfield County will not con-

duct a property valuation until 2013, Osborn said. In other business Monday, June 6, the finance committee agreed to waive $2,783 in permit fees for Casto developers for the Waterloo Crossing commercial project, reducing total projected fees from $14,336 to $11,553. “Their request is that $4,149.74 be waived, and I don’t have authority to do that,” Osborn said. Development director Chris Strayer said Casto had made some decisions to speed up work, causing it to pull additional permits when it could have pulled fewer permits and had lower total fees.

food & wine expand your tastes

The finance committee also approved a resolution setting the Canal Winchester Labor Day Festival for Sept. 3 through Sept. 5. Festival boundaries will be High Street from Found Street to the end of South High Street, and Waterloo Street from West Street to Trine Street, and Stradley Place. The committee also approved setting the Canal Winchester Blues and Ribfest for Aug. 5 and 6, with boundaries including High Street from Mound Street to Columbus Street and Waterloo Street from Elm Street to Trine Street, and Stradley Place.

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Commentary

Another strong school year ends The book on the 2010-11 high school sports year is complete. Inside are memories that will stay in the hearts and minds of athletes forever. Here are highlights from another thrilling year in central Ohio. Chris Diaz of Watterson completed his final two years of boys tennis undefeated in singles and capLARRY tured his secLARSON ond consecutive Division II state title. Diaz won the Division I doubles title with his brother, Philip, as a freshman. The Upper Arlington duo of Billy Weldon and Stu Little won their second consecutive Division I doubles title. ... After finishing second the first two years of her high school career, junior Morgan Ransom of Columbus Academy was medalist in the Division II state girls golf tournament. ...Chase Delande of Hilliard Davidson won a state wrestling title at 145 pounds. ...With no seniors, DeSales won the Division II state baseball title. The Stallions beat defending champion Jonathan Alder in a semifinal. Grove City (Division I) and Newark Catholic (Division IV) also reached state. Niki Flower of Upper Arlington overcame an injury-filled season to finish as runner-up in the Division I state girls tennis tournament. It was Flower’s only loss in her final two years of high school. Lauren and Ashley Thai of Hilliard Bradley won the Division II doubles title. ... Harvest Prep won its second consecutive Division IV girls basketball title. Pickerington North reached a state semifinal in Division I. ... The Dublin Jerome boys lacrosse team and the Academy girls team captured state titles in Division II. Watterson (Division III) and Hartley (Division IV) won state football titles, and Davidson (Division I) reached a state semifinal. ... Meghan Parsley of Hilliard Darby closed her prep gymnastics career by qualifying for state in all four events — balance beam, floor exercise, uneven bars and vault. ... State title winners in boys track and field were Tsehaye Hiluf of Reynoldsburg, Drew Windle of New Albany, the Thomas Worthington 800 relay, Nick Frye of Ready, Nigel Preacher of Brookhaven and Jake Blankenship of Gahanna. Blankenship and Olentangy Liberty twins Joey and Chris Uhle completed a recordbreaking year by finishing 1-23 in the pole vault in Division I. The Pickerington North girls and Worthington Christian boys were state runners-up in soccer. ... Liberty reached the state hockey tournament for the first time. ... Thomas and Academy played in a state field hockey semifinal, with Thomas winning. The Cardinals finished as state runners-up. Gahanna was state runner-up

By Lorrie Cecil/ThisWeek

Joscelyn Powell of Canal Winchester placed sixth in the 300-meter hurdles in the Division I state meet June 4 at Ohio State.

Canal Winchester Roundup

Genther, Powell take 6th at state By AARON BLANKENSHIP ThisWeek Community Newspapers

When freshman Joscelyn Powell of the Canal Winchester High School girls track and field team saw opponents trip on each side of her in the Division I state final of the 300meter hurdles on June 4 at Ohio State, she momentarily lost her focus and hit two hurdles. However, Powell was able to regain her balance and composure well enough to finish sixth in 44.9 seconds behind champion Kaila Barber (41.99) of Middleburg Heights. “What caught me off-guard was I saw two girls fall, and one of them was right next to me,” Powell said. “I got distracted and I actually hit a couple of hurdles myself, which made me a little nervous. But I didn’t fall and I was fine until the last straightaway, because I was a little tired. I’m just glad I made it through the race and made the podium (by finishing in the top eight).” Powell has high hopes for the future. She was the only freshman who qualified for state in the event. “I didn’t think I’d make it this far because my times weren’t very good early in the season, but my mom (Teosha) was a hurdler in high school and she’s taught me so much,” said Powell, whose squad scored three points to tie seven teams for 55th behind champion Reynoldsburg (47). “This means so much to me and I feel blessed to be the only freshman competing (in the 300 hurdles) here. One day, I hope to be on See LARSON, page B2 top of the podium, but I’m re-

By Laurie Stevenson/ThisWeek

The Indians’ Jarrod Genther is all smiles on the awards podium after placing sixth in the 1,600 meters at the Division I state meet on June 4.

ally happy with (sixth) for now.” •The boys team scored three points to tie six other squads for 61st in the Division I state meet behind champion Cincinnati LaSalle (36). In his first state meet appearance, junior Jarrod Genther placed sixth in the 1,600

in a program-record 4:16.82 behind champion Brannon Kidder (4:09.32) of Lancaster. “I was never a state-caliber runner before this year, so I never imagined I’d do something like this, this year,” Genther said. “Before this season, 4:35 was my previous best time

By Lorrie Cecil/ThisWeek

Tyler Jenkins of the Indians competes in the preliminaries of the 300 hurdles during the Division I state meet on June 3. Jenkins finished 12th and did not advance to the final.

in the (1,600) and I was able to shave 20 seconds off that, which isn’t common in this race. I knew that finishing top eight was all that mattered, so that was my goal. It was a perfect ending to my season.” The rest of the Indians fell

short of making the podium. Bryn Campbell finished 10th in the discus (153 feet, 8 inches), Tyler Jenkins placed 12th in the 300 hurdles (39.98) and Antonio Whitfield finished 13th See INDIANS, page B2

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ThisWeek Community Newspapers Canal Winchester

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June 9, 2011

State Track & Field Notes

Division I boys pole vault highlighted meet From staff reports The boys pole vault competition in the Division I state track and field meet June 4 at Ohio State featured three athletes who have held the state record. In a battle between Olentangy Liberty High School senior twins Chris Uhle and Joey Uhle and Gahanna junior Jake Blankenship, it was the youngest of the trio who left with the championship. Chris Uhle, the defending champion after vaulting a then-state-record 16 feet, 9 inches last year, ended up third as Blankenship went 17-0 to capture the title. Joey Uhle finished second (16-6), followed by Chris Uhle (16-0). “Having three state record-holders competing at state in the pole vault has definitely never happened in the past and may never happen again,” Joey Uhle said. “This was a fun year to compete in the pole vault because all three of us pushed each other all year.” Blankenship went 16-10 in the OCCOhio Division meet May 14, but Joey Uhle vaulted 17-0 on May 21 in the district 2 meet at Hilliard Bradley. “Whenever the three of us compete, it always goes back and forth between us, and I was fortunate to win on this day,” Blankenship said. “It feels good to win, but we’re all like a family and we’re happy for each other no matter who wins. I really wanted to clear 17 feet for the first time and I couldn’t have done it without Joey and Chris pushing me.” •MORE TITLES COMING? — Both the Reynoldsburg and Hartley girls track teams used mixes of seniors and underclassmen to capture state titles June 4. The Raiders in particular should return a strong unit next year. Junior Destinee Gause won the 100 meters (11.82 seconds) and the 200 (23.84), and classmate Faith Washington placed fourth in the 100 hurdles (14.52) and third in the 300 hurdles (43.58). Of the six competitors who helped Reynoldsburg score 47 points to win a third consecutive team title, only Kacia Grant and Donyelle Brown are seniors. The Hartley girls team also scored

47 points as it won the Division II title. Seniors Aisha Cavin, Maya Pedersen and Chelsea Scott each scored in individual events and ran on relays. Five Hawks who saw action in relays last weekend are eligible to return. •GRADUATION COMPLICATIONS — As if the Uhle brothers did not have enough to worry about on June 4, Liberty’s commencement ceremony was set to begin at 10 a.m. at the Ohio Expo Celeste Center while the pole vault was scheduled for noon. Chris asked anatomy teacher Hap Helfrich to pick up his diploma and Joey had chemistry teacher Brian Lindow stand in for him. “Mr. Helfrich was one of my favorite teachers, so I asked him if he could walk for me and get my diploma,” Chris Uhle said. “He was really honored to do that for me. He texted me afterward and said, ‘I finally graduated.’” Olentangy’s graduation began at 6 p.m. After Braves senior Adaora Anunike finished ninth in the shot put (41-3 1/2), she had less than an hour and a half to drive to the Celeste Center. Alphabetically, Anunike was supposed to be the third senior to receive a diploma, but because she was participating in the state meet, the school moved her to near the end of the order. “I think they’re really looking out for me,” Anunike said. “It’s always a real nice thing to have ‘Tangy’ backing you up.” •SOARING TO A NEW RECORD — Medina senior Taylor Burke set the state record in the girls high jump by clearing 6-1 1/4 to win the Division I state title on June 4. Burke broke the previous record of 6-0 that had been set by Cleveland Collinwood’s Christina Estrict in 2000. •ALSO JUMPING TO A TITLE — After Brookhaven senior Nigel Preacher had the state title in the Division I boys high jump locked up June 4, he set his sights on the state record. Preacher jumped 7-0 to win the title then took three shots at 7-3, but came up short. The state record of 7-2 3/4 was set in 2009 by Toledo Rogers’ Erik Kynard Jr. •STATE-RECORD RUN — New

By Laurie Stevenson/ThisWeek

Liberty’s Joey Uhle (left) and his twin brother, Chris, enjoy the moment on the awards podium with champion Jake Blankenship of Gahanna after the trio waged a battle in the pole vault competition during the Division I state meet June 4 at Ohio State. Blankenship’s winning vault of 17 feet tied the state record set earlier this season by Joey Uhle, who placed second at 16-6. Chris Uhle finished third at 16-0.

Albany’s Taneisha Cordell ran a statemeet record in the girls Division I 800, winning in 2:07.35. Her coach, Otis Winston, is the Division III state meet record holder in the high jump, clearing 7-0 for Toronto in 1992. •TOUGH CALL — Grove City Christian’s Jaymie Barns capped a successful season by advancing to the boys 400 in the Division III state meet. Barns would have finished 14th overall but was disqualified for having improper stitching on his shorts. According to coach Brad Seaburn, Barns competed with the same shorts all season. •SHOELESS — Bay Village Bay’s Michael Brajdic and Westerville North’s Brian Hannaford were among the runners who lost a shoe during their races June 4. Brajdic won the 3,200 in Division II (9:25.07) by more than six seconds despite competing without his left shoe for nearly a mile. He will continue his track career at Ohio State. Things didn’t turn out as well for Hannaford in the Division I 3,200. He

cause we were trying to save her for state. Lynnsey was in pain this season, but she really stepped up and performed well in the meet that matters the most.” Injuries hindered Big Walnut’s Tyler Fifer and Olivia Small last weekend. Fifer, a senior who has two torn ligaments in his left ankle, finished 12th (6-2) in the Division I boys high jump. He had cleared a personal-best 6-10 earlier this year and had qualified for state by going 6-4 at regional May 27 but sustained the injury during a practice before regional. “I had a good season, but obviously I wasn’t healthy and wasn’t able to compete with these guys,” Fifer said. “Everyone here is top class. And if you’re not healthy, you can’t compete with them. It was hard enough for me just to walk. I just tried to suck it up and do what I could do. I don’t like to make excuses, but it was hurting.” Small, a freshman, hurt her left hamstring while competing in the 400 relay at regional but two days later was able to jump a personal-best 17-8 1/2 in the long jump to qualify for state. The pain was worse last weekend, however, and she had to withdraw from the competition after her first jump in the final. She tied for ninth (17-1 1/2). “It hurts really bad,” Small said. “My second jump I just pushed it too hard and it went downhill from there. It bothers me because if I would’ve jumped my (personal best) I would’ve been (eighth). It’s just hard.” •RELAY RECORD FALLS — Bexley senior Elijah Scott, junior D.J. Jones, freshman Rasheed Morgan and junior Jalen Robinette became the first Lions athletes to score in the Division II state boys meet since 2007, placing fifth (1:30.16) in the 800 relay on June 4. In the June 3 preliminaries, the relay broke a 42-year-old school record with a time of 1:29.81. “We were close to the school record early in the season,” Jones said. “We came into the meet (thinking) we’d be happy if we got the school record or made it into the finals. We ended up doing both.”

was hanging with eventual-champion Tsehaye Hiluf of Reynoldsburg for the first five laps before one of his shoes got knocked off by another runner. He stuck with the race for another lap before dropping out. •MEMORABLE SEASON — Gahanna Christian had its first Division III state qualifier in Paris Jenkins, who finished 12th (12.8) in the 100. Jenkins will attend Oral Roberts University, where she is considering competing for the track team. •BATTLING THROUGH INJURY — Gahanna sophomore Lynnsey Brim placed second in the Division I girls long jump (18-8 3/4) behind Middleburg Heights Midpark senior Kaila Barber (19-1 3/4) despite nursing a turf toe injury on her left foot. “Turf toe may not sound that serious, but it’s an injury that can be devastating to a track athlete because it makes every step you take painful,” coach Roger Whittaker said. “Lynnsey didn’t even long jump this season until May 5, and she only took three attempts while winning district and regional be- www.ThisWeekSPORTS.com

Schools announce coaching vacancies The following schools are seeking coaches: Briggs — Boys soccer, girls soccer. Send letter of interest and résumé to Doug Jones, athletics director, Briggs High School, 2555 Briggs Road, Columbus 43223, or email djones9508@columbus.k12.oh.us. Columbus South — Boys golf, girls golf, boys soccer, girls soccer, boys bowling, girls bowling. Send cover letter and résumé to athletics director Jeffrey Sheppard at jsheppard3911@columbus.k12.oh.us, or fax to (614) 365-6650. Delaware — Volleyball. Send letter of interest and résumé to Clint Fetty, athletics director, Delaware Hayes High School, 289 Euclid Ave., Delaware 43015,

Alumni football games planned

By Tim Norman/ThisWeek

Canal Winchester’s Antonio Whitfield finished 13th in the long jump at the Division I state meet, which was held June 3 and 4 at Ohio State.

INDIANS Continued from page B1

ty good race, but I need to get my land speed faster. It’s good to get this one under my belt, so I can come back and do better here next year.”

in the long jump (20-9 1/2). “The atmosphere here is totally different than any other meet and the competition level is way ablankenship@thisweeknews.com higher,” Jenkins said. “Technically, I ran a pret- www.ThisWeekSPORTS.com

LARSON Continued from page B1

vision I 100-yard butterfly and Natalie Ritter of Academy won the Division II diving title. Canal Winchester’s Sam Decker won the boys 100 freestyle in Division II. The girls volleyball teams at Dublin Coffman and Big Walnut both were state runners-up. ... Hartley won the Division II state girls track title with two relays finishing first. Other girls firstplace finishers were Charlotte Myers of Bexley, Taneisha Cordell of New Albany and Emily Morris of Ready. Aaliyah Barnes of Eastmoor won the 100 and 200 meters in Division II and Destinee Gause of Reynoldsburg did the same in Division I, leading the Raiders to their third consecutive Division I state championship. All in all, it was another year of thrills and excitement, and another one is just more than two months away. I’ll see you at a game.

in Division I softball and DeSales reached the Division II state tournament. ... Mary Wells led the Westerville Central girls bowling team to another district title. ... Wil Trapp of Gahanna was named Gatorade Soccer Player of the Year and Trey Burke of Northland was voted Ohio Mr. Basketball. ... St. Charles won its second consecutive Division I boys golf title. ... Brian Hannaford of Westerville North finished third in the Division I state boys cross country meet and Hannah Stefanoff of Grandview finished third in the Division III girls meet. The Northland boys basketball team rewarded retiring coach Satch Sullinger with a Division I runner-up finish. Harvest Prep was runner-up in Division IV. ... The Upper Arlington girls swimming team won its seventh consecutive Division I state title as senior Abby Chin captured four titles. Also in girls swimming, Pickerington Central sophomore Maddie Mar- Larry Larson is a former athletics director at tin won her second consecutive title in the Di- Grandview High School.

Alumni Football USA is organizing teams of former high school players who want “to play in one more full contact football game.” Players can sign up at AlumniFootballUSA.com or call (877) 578-8547. Teams are limited to 40 players. Games will be played around Ohio in August. Alumni Football USA will provide the equipment.

or email fettycl@dcs.k12.oh.us. Dublin Coffman — Hockey. Contact athletics director Tony Pusateri at pusateri_tony@dublinschools.net. Hilliard Davidson — Junior varsity softball. Send letter of interest and résumé to varsity coach Angelo Forte at ange-

lo_forte@hboe.org. Olentangy Liberty — Baseball, boys soccer. Contact athletics director Tom Gerhardt at (740) 657-4210 or tom_gerhardt@olentangy.k12.oh.us. •To add to this list, contact ThisWeek at (740) 888-6069 or sports@thisweeknews.com.

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June 9, 2011

ThisWeek Community Newspapers Canal Winchester

Page B3

New chef brings menu thrills to The Rossi “The thrill is goooone, baaaaby,” yowled B.B. King as I was seated at a rare available table in The Rossi Bar + Kitchen. Usually, a shopworn song like this deflates my mood. But that night (Was it the festive crowd? The stylish restaurant?), the old tune felt almost fresh. And hey, I’ve got nothing against B.B., but as the evening progressed, I realized the blues dude’s words couldn’t have been more off base. Because the thoroughly fabulous food I began slamming back at the Rossi proved the thrill is most certainly not gone here. Actually, I haven’t been more enthusiastic about this place since reviewing it the week it opened, in April 2005. My excitement grew from fantastic nightly specials and spread to just-introduced menu items rolled out by the Rossi’s bright new chef,Andrew Smith. Formerly working in that artsy hotbed of culinary daring called Portland, Ore., Smith’s stuff has been creative without tasting strange, ingredient-conscious without sounding

MENU by G.A. Benton precious. This translates into meals as good as I’ve recently had anywhere in town. Before eating, though, try one of the Rossi’s wild cocktails, like the giggly Beet Down ($10). Not only does this rubycolored, hefty, aromatic oddball go down considerably better than it sounds, but I kinda love it. Refreshingly, it’s a bit citrusy with orange-kissed Watershed Gin flying off pomegranate molasses, both grounded by splashes of earthy beet juice. Crystals of sea salt crust the cocktail glass, realigning the palate between sips. The lovely, light and lemony-dressed arugula salad ($10) is another new favorite. It’s huge — a salad king crowned with toasted hazelnuts and a crunchy crostini smeared with Lucky Penny goat

By Jodi Miller/ThisWeek

Pork and Beans entree at The Rossi.

cheese. Rimming the plate of regal greens are warm prosciutto-wrapped dates that bring smooth and chewy, sweet and meaty contrasts. Like all specials (including a nifty P.L.T.: pancetta, lettuce and tomato salad

with Lucky Penny feta) it’s listed on cards posted above the restaurant “pass.” There, you might also see a (sexily seared) scallop, (bacony) crispy pork rillette and tomatillo-jam appetizer. If you do, order this immediately. Ditto for a terrifically balanced soupof-the-day gazpacho ($6). Rustic yet lush, its fresh and colorful chopped vegetables (tomato, cucumber and red onion) were aromatized by a hint of basil and enriched by drops of an excellent olive oil plus pulverized bread. This brings us to what’s become a much-talked-about dish around town — the Rossi’s incredible new Pork and Beans ($18). Criminally undersold by its mundane name, this breakout entree can easily erase bad memories of underachieving predecessors of the same name. It begins with a huge and beautiful bone-in, center-cut pork chop, expertly char-grilled like the tender and juicy steak it is. On top is a mass of mayonnaisedressed slaw sharpened by sliced green

The Rossi Address: 895 N. High St., Short North Phone: 614-299-2810 Web: rossibarandkitchen.com apple and bits of pickled jalapeno. Surrounding this are gigantic, meaty and creamy corona beans (think extra-large butter beans) that are a riotous pleasure to eat. Combined, it all made for a comfort-food masterpiece dripping with so much arousing flavor that I literally had to pound on the table and declare, “Holy slab of hog, that’s good!” In a similar, dressed-up-casual vein was a glorious Pork Confit sandwich ($9) served with terrific fries. Assembled with carnitas-like strands of intensified pulled pig meat and pickled watermelon rind scented with cinnamon, it’s like the dream of a summertime picnic awakened by a clever chef. And another reason to visit the thrilling Rossi again.

Lac Viet ratchets up cultural-diversity format at Westerville bakery Nanak Bakery and Lac Viet have combined “His good product, my forces in Westerville. good product — that’s a Thang Nguyen has opened his Vietnamese restaugood fit,” he said. rant inside the bakery, which was founded more Plus, he has expanded his than a decade ago by husband-and-wife team bill of fare to include more Hoomin Soltanirad and Fatimah Tajik. appetizers, such as mango Nguyen said his bowls of noodle soups, rice and shrimp salad, crunchy Vietnamese fish tacos dishes and sandwiches match well with the Euro- and fried smelts, and entrees, such as lamb pho pean and Middle Eastern pastries and custom cakes and a lamb rice platter. offered at Nanak, 895 S. State St. The move was strategic, he said. Nguyen has his eyes on the Chase bank crowd in Westerville, where employees number in the 2,000 range. He hopes reasonable prices — no single dish tops $9 — and quick service should get people in the door. “To keep my concept working, I need the volume,” he said, noting that a full liquor license is in place. Banquet space will be used for large parties or spillover seating during restaurant hours. Patio seating also will be added. Nanak, which got its start By Tim Norman/ThisWeek in Bethel Center, has been Hooman Soltanirad (left) is the owner of Nanak Bakery and Thang long known for its quality, Nguyen is the owner of Lac Viet on Bethel Road. Raad holds a choco- natural desserts. When late ganache raspberry cake and Nguyen holds a dish of shrimp manSoltanirad and Tajik relogos salad and beef pho at the Nanak Bakery, 895 S. State St. Nguyen cated to Westerville in late has opened the Vietnamese restaurant inside Nanak Bakery. 2009, Nguyen opened his

second Lac Viet in their Bethel Road storefront. Nanak offered a menu of savory items until recently. Soltanirad said it was too difficult to run the bakery and a separate eatery, so he brought in Nguyen. “I know him. I think his food is very good,” he said. “It’s something Westerville doesn’t have.” Nguyen established his first Lac Viet almost seven years ago in the North Market and later opened Phat Wraps, a healthy-food concept on campus. He said he has sold his interest in both restaurants so he could focus on his two other stores. In related news, Nguyen has attained a license through the Ohio Department of Agriculture that allows him to transport food from Lac Viet on Bethel to other locations, meaning he has turned that store into a commissary kitchen. He recently bought a 60-gallon stockpot and intends to sell his pho broth to other restaurants. “I’m ready for the next level,” he said. Lac Viet is open for lunch and dinner hours six days a week, closed Sunday. For more information, call 614-882-0588.

www.ThisWeekNews.com/foodandwine

Recipe of the week Chestnut agnolotti, courtesy of David MacLennan of Latitude 41.

quently. Incidentally, Oak said he got his start on a food truck at Central and McKinley avenues on the West Side of Columbus.

Great China has opened in the old Fuddruckers location at 3586 W. Dublin-Granville Road, just east of Sawmill Road. The place offers a full Chinese menu (and a traditional menu for those who ask), plus a few Thai and Japanese dishes, said manager Brad Tsai. Great China seats 120 in roughly 5,000 square feet of space. The restaurant has a full liquor license. It is open for lunch and dinner hours daily. For more information, call 614Barbecue veteran Johnny Oak has returned to 336-2465. the mobile food business. In addition to his store After 21 years in business, the Wine Vault on in the University District, he now operates Johnny Oak’s Cajun BBQ at the corner of High and Sawmill Road has closed. The last day was SatGay streets downtown. Oak said he’s there from urday, June 4. Manager John Smither, who had 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. His spe- been there 16 years, chalked it up to fierce comcialties are blackened beef brisket, pulled pork, rib petition, particularly from the chains. “The pie’s not any bigger and it’s getting split tips — offered as sandwiches or part of a platter — and a smattering of sides, which change fre- thinner and thinner,” he said.


ThisWeek Community Newspapers Canal Winchester

Page B4

Home sales Canal Winchester 7679 Laurelwood DrNW, 43110, Michael J. Little and Jan R. Little, $450,000. 6329 Rossmore Ln, 43110,Andrew McLeish and Heather Morgan, $163,000. 6537 Warriner Way, 43110, Lacosta L. Devall, $113,500. 7424 Maple Twig Ave, 43110, Jared S. Hunter and Tasha M. Hunter, $97,000. 3234 Canyon Bluff Dr, 43110, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., $88,000. 3431 Trentshire Dr, 43110, The Bank of New York Mellon, $88,000. 6064 Northbend Dr, 43110, Brian D. Days, $79,000. 4224 Bowman Meadow Dr, 43110, Fifth Third Mortgage Co.; Condo, $68,000. 6738 Axtel Dr, 43110, Ben A. Lyttle, Jr. and Jeanette C. Lyttle; Condo, $50,000.

Metro Park district

Snoddy and Rayonia S. Snoddy, $243,475. 585 Preston Trails Dr, 43147, John Loc Nguyen and Crysty Yee Nguyen, $241,300. 820 Dunvegan Circle, 43147, Todd A. Embrey, $185,000. 1063 Milford Dr, 43147, Kenneth L. Dickinson and Kimberly S. Dickinson, $179,900. 13152 Ault Rd NW, 43147, Dennis S. Thompson and Adelina M. Thompsen, $170,900. 8848 Chevington Ct, 43147, Ronald Stacy, $165,000. 1161 Overlook Court, 43147, Janet Orr, $144,000.

The following is a list of Metro • Aquatic Adventure, 2 p.m. Parks programs for this week. Sunday at the Glacier Knoll picnic area. Take a 1-mile round-trip Blacklick Woods Metro Park walk to search for aquatic crea6975 E. Livingston Ave., tures in a wetland. Reynoldsburg • Preschoolers: Swamp • Tram Tour, 1-3:30 p.m. Sat- Things, 10 a.m. Tuesday at the urday at the Ash Grove picnic area. Glacier Knoll picnic area. Learn The tram will run continuously about the small creatures that make for leisurely rides through the park. their homes in the wetlands. • Nature Kids: Feed Your Slate Run Metro Park Beak, 10 a.m. or 1 p.m. Monday 1375 state Route 674 N., at the nature center. Learn how Canal Winchester and why birds eat certain foods, • Love Those Lightning Bugs, and build a bird feeder for your own backyard. Bring a clean twoliter plastic bottle. For ages 6-12.

Baltimore

Pickerington Ponds 3313 Bickel Church Rd, 43105, Metro Park Blake E. Sousa and Kelly L. 7680 Wright Road, Gillies, $330,000. Canal Winchester 357 Carroll Eastern Rd NW, •All About Predators, 10 a.m.43105, Joseph D. Woodburn and Amanda Woodburn, $177,900. 12:30 p.m. Saturday at the Glacier Knoll picnic area. Discover Check out recent home sales in the fascinating lives of predators Lithopolis other central Ohio neighborhoods through activities, displays and 526 Market St, 43136, Melanie at www.ThisWeekNews.com. live animals. L. Provehzuno, $102,900.

Pickerington

June 9, 2011

9 p.m. Saturday at the Slate Run wetlands. Take a 0.5-mile walk through the wetland to look for lightning bugs and learn how to bring them close to you. • Lunchtime Tram Rides, 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Thursday, June 16, at the Shady Grove picnic area. Bring the kids for a tram ride through the park. Coloring pages and crayons provided to an extra activity as you wait for your ride. Slate Run Living Historical Farm

1375 state Route 674 N., Canal Winchester • Riddle Me These, Please!, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Thursday-Saturday and 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday. Pick up a list of riddles at the farmhouse and think your way around the farm. Interpreters and assistive listening devices for persons with hearing impairments are available for any program. Call 891-0700 (TDD 895-6240) to schedule these services.

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Your Your free free online online classifieds classifieds

(740) 888-5003 Automotive

Employment

HELP WANTED SKILLED TRADES **In need of a good HVAC/R technician to join our growing company in Columbus**

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ESTIMATOR Established Mechanical Contractor seeks highly motivated individual to service customers and estimate projects. This individual should be familiar with sales, estimating, project management, and scheduling. Compensation and benefits reflect the responsibility and effort required to perform in this position. Only individuals with a long term, relationship building perspective will be considered. To apply for this position, e-mail resume, salary history, and references to info@kirkwilliamsco.com. EOE

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Steady work and excellent customer base. Right can didate must be professio nal, have attention to detail and ability to fix problems on a timely manner. Mini mum 3 years experience servicing commercial HVAC/Refrigeration equip ment. Must have good ref erences and proven experience. We offer excellent salary, company car, full health benefits, vacation,holiday and 401K. Please send your resume at valleymechanical@ yahoo.com

HELP WANTED SKILLED TRADES MECHANIC / TRUCK

FLEETMASTER LEASING CORP. IN COLUMBUS IS SEEKING AN EXPERIENCED DIESEL MECHANIC.TO BE CONSIDERED YOU MUST OWN YOUR TOOLS, WITH AT LEAST 5 YEARS EXPERIENCE & A CLEAN DRIVING RECORD. (CDL) HELPFUL. BENEFITS INCLUDE: ∂ EXCELLENT PAY PACKAGE ∂ PAID VACATIONS & HOLIDAYS ∂ FULLY PD HEALTH/DENTAL/LIFE ∂ 401K WITH MATCHING FUNDS ∂ ANNUAL PROFIT SHARING ∂ NEW FACILTY OPENED IN 1999 ∂ LATE MODEL EQUIPMENT ∂ FURNISHED UNIFORMS ∂ RELOCATION ASSISTANCE ∂ TRAINING PROGRAMS FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 1-800-477-7201, E-MAIL doug@fleetmaster.us OR FAX RESUME TO 614-224-8002.

Superintendent experienced, light commercial project, excellent salaries and benefits, 614-863-8832

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HELP WANTED SALES/MARKETING

HELP WANTED SALES/MARKETING

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HELP WANTED TRANSPORTATION/ DRIVERS

HELP WANTED TRANSPORTATION/ DRIVERS

Class A CDL Driver Class A CDL Flatbed Driv ers Needed! Must have a clean driving record & be able to pass an ODOT physical & drug test. Home evenings & weekends. Weekly pay & benefits available. Apply via e-mail (lisa@evanslogistics.net), fax 614-443-7058 or in per son at 1700 Haul Road, Columbus, OH 43207.

Builders Trash Service is looking for Drivers. Roll off experience prefered but not necessary. NO CDL REQ. 40 + hrs week, year round work. Good pay, 401(k), medical ins, holiday & vacation pay. Must have good driving record. Call 614-444-7060.

DRIVER Be Your Own Boss! $.50 to $1.22 per mile No Truck to Own or Lease. Deliver decked trucks Class A CDL w/1 yr OTR exp, Double/Triple Endorse- ment, & Tow Car req’d. Unimark Truck Transport 866-254-2884 www.unimarkinc.com

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DRIVERS

DRIVERS Class A CDL. Home weekends. 60 year old com pany. Benefits. 866-469-3999 DRIVERS ECM TRANSPORT, LLC Now Hiring Company Drivers Enjoy our new 2011 PAY INCREASE! .47/cpm plus Home Time, Excellent Benefits, 401K, and MORE! Requirements: CDL A, Hazmat & 2 years verifiable experience Must apply online @ https://www.ecm. apply2jobs.com For questions please call 888-RUN-4ECM (786-4326)

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HELP WANTED TRANSPORTATION/ DRIVERS DRIVERS - OTR REGIONAL Trans Form Trucking associated with EFCO Corp in Columbus, OH is seeking a qualified driver for it’s regional flatbed operation. Loads would mostly origi nate in Cols & deliver in a 300 mile radius. Minimum require ments include: ± Class A CDL & good MVR ± 2 yr OTR driving ex perience ± Flatbed experience preferred ± Ability to lift 75 to 100 pounds We offer excellent pay with flexible work sched ule. Benefits include: ± Paid Vacation & Hol idays ± Health, life, dental ins, 401(k) ± Assigned equip ment Fax qualifications to: 515-313-4434 or email to: don.peterson@efcofo rms.com Call Don at 800-7474835.

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HELP WANTED TRANSPORTATION/ DRIVERS Regional OTR Drivers Want to earn $45 - $55,000 a year. With no touch freight and be home multiple times weekly? We are family owned, offer benefits, and are looking for you if you have relevant CDL experience. Please call 866-425-0666 or apply online at FleetmasterExpress.com Start living better today! Higher Earnings and Consistent Home-Time! OWNER OPERATORS NEEDED **$2,000 Sign-On Bonus!**

Get Home Daily! - Roundtrip Dedicated Freight - All Miles Paid the Same Loaded or Empty - Leading Fuel Surcharge Paid 100% Company Drivers Needed Too! Call Today! 866-733-2902 www.drivefor greatwide.com

HELP WANTED SALES/MARKETING Aflac 2 Managers Needed We are growing our Co lumbus sales force and are in need of leadership. We offer: Management trainee program; Tiered compen sation packages; Stock Options; Trips, Bonuses, and Incentives. Must be willing to obtain an Ohio In surance License. Experi ence preferred but is not necessary. Please email resumes to gary_spanraft@ us.aflac.com to schedule an interview. SALES - PT Columbus & surrounding areas. Selling and resets in grocery andC-Store. Hour ly & mileage paid. Fax re sume to: 937-981-4926.

ThisWeekNews.com Community news Sports Videos Contests ThisWeekNews.com


ThisWeek Community Newspapers Canal Winchester

June 9, 2011

HELP WANTED COMPUTERS/ INFORMATION SERVICES

Business Intelligence Consultant For cent OH systems consulting/development co. Duties: contribute to Business Intelligence Practice including gather requirements, estimate hrs, SQL programming, testing, data analysis, user training; manage & develop design efforts across platforms inclu. Oracle & SQL Server; design & develop Business Objects Universe to support cross business platform reporting; administer Business Objects environment; design & develop Web Intelligence reports & Crystal reports; develop reports using Business Objects Universe & ODBC Connections; perform data modeling as part of data warehousing & ETL efforts; design migration strategies; support various environments escalated on defect tracking tools Quality Center & Remedy. Requirements include bachelor’s or equivalent degree in computer science, MIS, engineering or related field; 5 years progressive experience in the following: full project lifecycle responsibilities, including gathering BI requirements, developing new reports, writing functional requirements & estimating project work hours; Business Objects; data warehousing, ETL, Crystal Reports & data modeling; SQL Server; defect tracking tools, such as Remedy & Quality Center. Qualified applicants send résumés to ICC, attn: K. Clementz 2500 Corporate Exchange Dr. 320 Columbus, OH 43231. HELP DESK LEAD Leading help desk role to support shippers and carri ers using Transportation Management Software.

HELP WANTED ENGINEERING/ TECHNICAL

HELP WANTED ENGINEERING/ TECHNICAL

HELP WANTED MEDICAL/DENTAL

HELP WANTED FINANCIAL/BANKING

HELP WANTED GENERAL

MDS Nurse

ELECTRICAL DESIGNER

MECHANICAL DESIGNER

AWESOME CARE PROVIDERS NEEDED!!!

The Grote Company is a manufacturer of custom food processing equipment, located on the east side of Columbus. We are looking for an Electrical Designer to join our engineering team.

The Grote Company is a manufacturer of custom food processing equipment, located on the east side of Columbus. We are looking for a Mechanical Designer to join our engineering team.

We are seeking a motivated and experienced MDS Nurse to support our Mill Run Gardens Care Center. This full-time position offers a flexible schedule and a stable, competent interdisciplinary team.

The ideal candidate will have a minimum three years’ experience designing electrical motion control systems for industrial equipment. A minimum 2,000 hours creating electrical schematics using AutoCAD Electrical of an equivalent CAD package is required. The ability to alter existing designs and create production schematics, BOM’s and panel alayouts, as well as develop new designs from concept through to commissioning, is required. A minimum 1,000 hours of PLC programming using either Allen Bradley or Mitsubishi controls is a requirement, as is servo control experience. Troubleshooting control systems both in the factory and in the field is a requirement. Good communication skills and the ability to interact effectively with on-site manufacturing personnel are a must. All candidates will have either a two year degree, or equivalent education and experience. Up to five percent domestic travel can be expected.

The ideal candidate will have a minimum of three to five years’ experience designing industrial equipment using SolidWorks. A minimum 1,000 hours ’hands-on’ experience with SolidWorks or an equivalent CAD system is required. In addition, all candidates must have the ability to create production drawings, layout and modify existing designs, and develop new designs from concept under the supervision of an engineer. An understanding of manufacturing techniques such as welding, machining, and sheet metal forming is required, along with the ability to enter and maintain BOM’s in an ERP system. Good communication skills and the ability to interact effectively with on-site manufacturing personnel are a must. All candidates will have either a two year degree, or equivalent education and experience. Experience in material handling, conveyor systems, or food grade design is a plus.

COMPLIANCE OFFICER Must ensure bank-wide compliance expected by the FDIC, communicate findings to senior manage ment and the board of di rectors, and assist in train ing bank employees. Must have knowledge of BSA as well as deposit and loan regulatory requirements as well and thorough under standing of bank opera tions and familiarity with bank processes. Bache lor’s degree or equivalent work experience required. Send resume and salary requirements to: Fahey Bank, Attn: HR, 127 N. Main St., Marion, OH 43302, job code CO01. EOE, M/F/D/V

The Grote Company offers an outstanding compensation and benefits package, which includes health, dental, and 401(k) with company match, after 30 days. You can learn more about us at www.grotecompany.com . Interested candidates should send a resume and cover letter to: hr@grotecompany.com.

The Grote Company offers an outstanding compensation and benefits package, which includes health, dental, and 401(k) with company match, after 30 days. You can learn more about us at www.grotecompany.com . Interested candidates should send a resume and cover letter to: hr@grotecompany.com.

Visit http://www.besttrans port.com/careers.html for full job description.

HELP WANTED MEDICAL/DENTAL

SOFTWARE ENGINEERS in Columbus, OH area. Create multifaceted stored procedures, triggers &functions using T-SQL and SQL. Write Business Objects using Visual Basic.Net/C#. (Object Lay er). Send res. to Optimum Technology Inc. 100 E. Campus View Blvd., Suite 380, Columbus, OH 43235.

Cardiovascular Sonographer

HELP WANTED ENGINEERING/ TECHNICAL

Assistant Stationary Engineer Under direct supervision of higher level Stationary Engineer, monitors and operates all Power Plant equipment in a safe and efficient manner including boilers, steam turbines, generators, chillers, air compres sors, pumps, water treatment and associated equipment; troubleshoots, maintains and cleans plant equipment; completes logs and record keeping; follows operating, safety and environmental standards; works rotating shifts. Subject to 24 hour emergency call. Required: HS diploma; work experience in mechanical systems; computer literacy; Driver’s License; successful Stationary Engineer Licensing required within 16 months. Desired: State of Ohio High Pressure Boiler Operator license: successful completion of a 125 hour steam boiler and steam turbine operation course approved by the superintend ent. For a complete position description and application instructions please visit ww w.jobsatosu.com and search by requisition number 357309. Application deadline: 6/12/2011.

Facilities Engineer The Facilities Engineer provides engineering and technical support on mechanical systems equipment with a solid understanding of utility applications. Engineers robust and reliable repairs and system upgrades to steam, chilled water and utility generation and distribution equipment. Develops and applies preventive and predictive maintenance techniques and software systems to improve mechanical systems operation efficiency and reliability for rotating equipment, boilers, chillers, pumping systems and utility pipelines; performs root cause failure analysis to support safe, reliable and efficient operation, develops and prepares maintenance reports; reviews and inspects utility equipment to assess condition and maintains asset inventories. Provides technical support to Utilities maintenance effort working with supervisors and planners to develop effective repair and capital replacement plans and schedules. Conducts design document reviews, applies superior team building and communication skills to work with all levels of the organization. Subject to 24 hour emergency call. Required: Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical/ Electrical/Chemical Engineering or equivalent; min. of 5 years engineering experience in Utility Plant maintenance and repairs: experience with Computer ized Maintenance Management Software and Systems. Position requires ability to climb ladders and platforms, work in confined spaces and areas of heat stress and noise, ability to lift 50 pounds; strong technical competencies in mechanical engineering discipline with solid understand ing of practical utility systems applications; skills to work with all levels of the organization; experience analyzing mechanical failures and equipment conditions; valid driver’s license.

To build a diverse workforce Ohio State encourages applications from individuals with disabilities, Desired: Training and exminorities, veterans and perience with ASME preswomen. EEO/AA employer. sure codes and welding standards, rotating equipment repair and failure analysis. For a complete position description and application instructions please visit ww w.jobsatosu.com and search by requisition number 357308. Application deadline: 6/26/2011.

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Read the 1812 Nut on ThisWeekNews.com and get all the central Ohio sports your pretty little head can handle.

BLOGS

To build a diverse workforce Ohio State encourages applications from individuals with disabilities, minorities, veterans and women. EEO/AA employer.

Advertise your service! $26 gets you any 5 papers weekly. (5 line minimum) (740) 888-5003

Full-time cardiac and vascular sonographer needed for medical imaging facilities in central Ohio. Qualified applicant should possess valid licensure registration and/or certification in accordance with ODOH. Please send a detailed resume by FAX 614857-2670 or EMAIL resumes423@gmail.com

Duties include: ∂ Direct and coordinate comprehensive assessments for each resident as required by law. ∂ Work in an independent and interdependent role with other members of the medical profession. Job Requirements: ∂ Registered Nurse with recent MDS experience. ∂ Experience in long-term care. ∂ Ability to record information and perform technical procedures. ∂ Strong communication skills ∂ PC Literate We offer competitive compensation and our benefits package includes; medical, dental STD, 401(k), paid time off and more. Apply via email to ragena.mcguire@mmclp.com or fax to 614.358.6276.

Medical Office The Columbus Arthritis Center is a fast-paced 8 physician office providing high quality comprehensive care seeking: ---------------------------------------

To build a diverse workforce Ohio State encourages applications from individuals with disabilities, minorities, veterans, and women. EEO/AA employer

HELP WANTED FINANCIAL/BANKING

HELP WANTED MEDICAL/DENTAL

Registered Nurse Accreditation Clinical Man ager for an international non-profit society based in Columbus, Ohio.

Who’s got the beat? We do! Read the

BeatBlog on ThisWeekNews.com and join ThisWeek arts, dining and entertainment reporters for their take on central Ohio.

BLOGS HELP WANTED FINANCIAL/BANKING

The Bank Delaware County Bank & Trust Company

A dynamic community bank is looking for the following positions: Commercial Lender Customer Service Representative – Marysville Part Time Teller – Sunbury & Westerville Response Teller – Location varies

To join our team send your resume to HR@dcb-t.com or: The Bank Attn: Human Resources PO Box 1001 Lewis Center, Ohio 43035-1001 EOE M/F

HELP WANTED FINANCIAL/BANKING

HELP WANTED FINANCIAL/BANKING

Page B5

HELP WANTED MEDICAL/DENTAL

National Healing manages clinically and financially successful outpatient wound departments in hospitals nationwide. If you are a dedicated healthcare professional looking to move forward in your healthcare career, then take a closer look at National Healing at Berger Hospital.

It’s Where You Belong! Clinical Manager Clinic Hours: M-F, 8am-5pm Must be RN with current state license and 3+ years’ management experience. Prior experience in an ambulatory setting preferred. National Healing offers comprehensive training from nationally recognized wound care experts, a supportive environment and a competitive salary and benefits package. Interested candidates may apply online at: www.nationalhealing.com

CARPET CLEANERS Compile & analyze asset, Accepting applications for experienced Carpet liability, revenue & expenses for US & headquarters Cleaners. Must have clean Infusion RN/LPN in China with FAS 47 & police report , transporta Who is an energetic and tion & clean driving China Accounting Standcompassionate teamrecord. Apply in person ard 36; prepare balance player, an individual M-F, 10am-2pm, 941- A sheet, profit & loss & financommitted to providing cial statements with Great Robinwood Ave. Whitehall quality patient care in our 43213. Plains & Great Plains FRx; friendly and professional analyze general ledger acTo place an ad for your environment. Infusion/IV count in external audits usbazaar or seasonal event exp/skills are required. ing Excel PivotTable, --------------------------------------- Vlookup & Array; Forecast call (740) 888-5003 (local call) Medical Assistant financial requirements, preHELP WANTED A team player to join our pare annual budget, MEDICAL/DENTAL exceptionally caring and schedule expenditures, friendly staff. Physicians and analyze variances usOffice experience required, ing break-even analysis, raEMR experience preferred. tio analysis & efficiency --------------------------------------- analysis; research internaNo evenings, weekends or tional tariff regulations & holidays! standards for company’s import & export products; Submit resume to review company’s federal hr@columbusarthritis.com & state tax position in transfer pricing for internaPatient Care tional tax planning projects Registered Nurse Coordinator/SX Scheduler in US & China. RequireICU Urology practice in need of ment: Master’s Degree in Long Term Care (Gables) a Patient Care Accounting and one (1) Med/Surg (Morey Center) Coordinator/SX Scheduler. year work experience as ICU Qualified applicants must Accountant in Public Achave prior medical experi - counting Firm. Mail resume Patient Care Technician ence working with patients to: Sanhua International, Imaging and physicians both in per - Inc. Attn: HR, ICU son and on the telephone, Reference: SHI201101, scheduling surgeries, ap Home Healthe Aide (Homemaker Aide) 8400 Industrial Parkway, pointment scheduling, Plain City, OH 43064 Sleep Lab Technician medical billing, insurance verification, etc. Must be ThisWeekNews.com Registered Respiratory Therapist dependable, able to multitask and have excellent or ganizational, communica Community news tion, and follow-up skills. Athena Practice Manage Sports ment system exp. prefer red. Urology exp. a plus. Videos Travel required to satellite offices. Email resume Contests w/salary history/requirements to: hrmedoffice@aol.com ThisWeekNews.com

This is a unique opportuni ty for an RN with expertise in cardiac services with an emphasis on chest pain, Clinical Instructor - heart failure and atrial fibril lation. Responsibilities in Technology clude management of daily Learning Complex operations of an accredita tion service line and staff The Ohio State University competency. Some travel College of Nursing is curis involved. rently accepting applications for a Clinical InstrucMust have the ability to tor in the college’s Tech- manage remote professio nology Learning Complex. nals and multiple projects Individual will facilitate with tight deadlines; also learning and skills check- must have exceptional criti off for various undergradu cal thinking, writing, and ate nursing skills; assist communication skills. Must students with nursing skills have a master’s degree remediation; facilitate simu- and at least 5 years man lation education experien - agement experience. Ex ces; plan, research and cellent salary and benefits. document scenario and ex ercise simulations for nurs- Resumes will be accepted ing courses; operate hu- via email only with cover man simulations for nursletter and salary require ing courses; organize and ments to inventory disposable sup- hearthealth66@gmail.com plies and equipment; ini- with “RN Manager” in sub tiate and document new ject line. policies and procedures. This is a nine month posi- DAYCARE PROVIDERS tion beginning Autumn & PRESCHOOLS 2011. Take advantage of our The successful candidate great childcare rates! will have a master’s de(740) 888-5003 gree in Nursing and must be a licensed RN within the state of Ohio. Two years of medical/surgical nursing experience desired; knowledge of current nursing trends required. Please send resume to: The Ohio State University College of Nursing Human Resources 1585 Neil Avenue Columbus, Ohio 43210 or email Melissa McConnell at mcconnell.91@osu.edu

Senior Accountant

AWESOME care providers needed to assist male teen with disabilities and behavioral challenges in his family’s home in southern Delaware county. Behaviors vary from moderate to severe so EXPERIENCE with behaviors is a must! Individual specific training provided! Competitive wages and benefits! Fulltime & part-time positions are available for the right person! Become part of a team committed to providing our families with the best possible supports for success! If you are the right person and ready to give 100%, then go to our website at: www.life-inc.net and submit an application today! EOE

EOE

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HELP WANTED FINANCIAL/BANKING

HELP WANTED FINANCIAL/BANKING

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CHASE MORTGAGE SPECIALISTS INTERVIEW DAY (By invitation only)

Friday, June 10, 2011 Please apply online to the job number of interest at

www.jpmorganchase.com/careers All qualified candidates will be contacted by a recruiter and scheduled for an interview. Interviews will occur on Friday, June 10, 2011.

Operations Specialist Job #110044270 (Westerville) Monitors the foreclosure process of defaulted mortgages to ensure compliance with the various governmental and investor guidelines. Requires a high school diploma/equivalent. Mortgage banking and previous foreclosure or legal experience are preferred, as well as familiarity with LPS and MSP.

Foreclosure Operations Supervisor Job #110045412 (Westerville) Supervises Foreclosure Specialists to improve productivity, cost reductions, revenue generation and quality assurance while ensuring compliance with all Chase policies. Requires a high school diploma/equivalent and 2-3 years of supervisory or lead experience. 5 years of mortgage banking and previous foreclosure or legal experience are preferred, as well as familiarity with LPS and MSP.

Operations Manager II Job #110046108 (Westerville) Responsible for the management of Foreclosure functions including compliance with state/federal requirements and the overall integrity of foreclosure processes. Participates in short and longrange goals and strategic planning for the business unit. Requires 6-8 years of both operational and supervisory experience. Must have expertise in production, client relations, people/team dynamics, risk, project management and budget management. A bachelor’s degree is preferred. Chase offers an exceptional benefits program and a highly competitive compensation package including: Medical, 401(k), Pension Plan, Paid Vacation, and Employee Stock Purchase Plan. Chase is an equal opportunity and affirmative action employer M/F/D/V. © 2011 J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. All Rights Reserved. www.jpmorganchase.com/careers


Page B6

ThisWeek Community Newspapers Canal Winchester

HELP WANTED GENERAL

HELP WANTED GENERAL

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT OPENINGS

1) Office Assistant (clerical) - 25-30 hours/ wk (Westerville) 2) Janitor (full service cleaning) – FT (Northeast Columbus) 3) Leasing Representative (apartment rentals) - 30 hours/wk (Westerville) 4) Maintenance Tech (general maintenance) – FT (Westerville) 5) Occupancy Specialist (eligibility processing for project based section 8 apartments) FT (Northeast Columbus) 6) Occupancy Specialist (eligibility processing for project based section 8 apartments) FT (Downtown Columbus)

For all positions we offer a competitive hourly wage, full benefit package including medical/dental insurance, 401k w/match, and good working environments. For consideration, please e-mail your resume, wage history/expectation and indicate which position/location you are interested in to: jims@sterlingllc.com AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

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CASE MANAGER

RESIDENT MANAGER/ MAINTENANCE

Full-time entry level posi tion in community mental health center. Willing to train. Degree required. Knowledge of community resources and experience with SMD clients. Must have Ohio driver’s license/auto. Work primari ly in the community. Mile age reimbursement. Sal ary: $11hr., Monday thru Friday, 8am-4:30 pm. Optin of four 10-hour work days after 6 months available. Applications/resumes ac cepted at NCMHS, 1301 N. High St., Columbus, Ohio 43201, fax to 614-298-2227, e-mail to hr@ncmhs.org EOE

Due to its continued growth in the Columbus area The Barcus Company, Inc. a local property management firm, has immediate openings for the following positions in the Columbus Metropolitan Area:

Applicants must be able to work independently, have excellent communication and organizational skills, be detail oriented and have a minimum of 1 year of experience in the above position applied for. Non-smokers, experience with Microsoft Office and OneSite software are preferred, but not required. Maintenance applicants must have own tools.

HELP WANTED GENERAL

Crazy crew, crazy cash. Love the outdoors? Love to drive? FT, M-F. Company car provided. Make up to $600 weekly, no joking, no kidding. Serious callers, Ron 614-483-7091 FENCE INSTALLERS National Construction Rentals has immediate openings at our Cols facili ty for Fence Installers. Top pay in the industry, out door work, extreme physi cal labor. Eligible candi dates must be 21 or over, pass a drug screen and background check. Also, must have a clean driving record. Please apply in per son at: 2177 McKinley Ave. Cols, OH 43204 or email resume to: Jalford@ rentnational.com EOE - Drug Free WP.

INSURANCE Property & Casualty Insurance Agency seeks individuals to market its niche products in the Cincinnati and Columbus areas. Fast-paced and fun work environment. Two to three years experience preferred, but will consider recent college graduate. Competitive salary, benefits.

• Medical/Dental/Prescription • Paid Vacations • Discount on Kroger Brand Products • & SO MUCH MORE! Must be able to work NIGHTS and WEEKENDS! Apply online today at:

Kroger.com Or, Visit our facility 24 hours a day/7 days a week, just 1 mile east of Delaware off Rt. 36: Kroger Distribution Center 2000 Nutter Farms Lane • Delaware, OH 43015

Please send resume to mfulkerson@guains.com or fax to 440.356.8734

RECEPTIONIST Part-time Front office in fast paced social service agency. Duties include answering phones, assisting guests, filing, general clerical. Must be personable, wellspoken and have excellent customer service skills. Entry level position with flexible hours. CORI Care, Inc. 1060 Kingsmill Parkway, Cols, OH 43229 Ph: (614) 848-4357 Fax: (614) 848-5192 marlacoricare@copper.net

BIG TYPE Makes you look twice!

The Columbus Foundation, the ninth largest community foundation in the country, seeks two individuals to support the work of the Foundation’s accounting/finance and communications/marketing departments.

Staff Accountant Major responsibilities include: processing gift/grant transactions; reconciling investment accounts; posting monthly investment activity; preparing reports utilizing the Foundation’s custom software, Access, Excel, Crystal Reports, etc.: assisting the Foundation’s Controller preparing for and during the annual audit process, including the preparation of IRS Form 990 and assisting in the maintenance of the Foundation’s database. Candidate must possess an accounting degree, familiarity with Microsoft Office and report generating applications, and experience in database management. Not-for-profit accounting experience is preferred but will consider recent accounting degree graduates.

Person or couple for north end apartment building. Duties include leasing, custodial & maintenance. Salary in addition to benefits package which includes a 2 bdrm apartment, medical & 401K. E-mail resume to: Resident Manager, beverlee.west@ spgroup.com or fax to 445-4994. RESURFACING TECH FT, HIRING IMMED. Autobody exp. helpful ⁄Will train. (614)801-0432

THINK BIG! International Company has Immediate Openings REGISTRATION AGENTS Average $25/hr. No Experience -No Problem! Mr. Crosby, 614-388-9264

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS!

Multiple Openings!

Must love sports. A lot. Read the 1812 Nut on ThisWeekNews.com and get all the central Ohio sports your pretty little head can handle.

BLOGS

HELP WANTED PROFESSIONAL/ MANAGEMENT DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET Under policy direc tion of the Board of Commissioners, per forms and assigns all tasks related to the fis cal planning and man agement of a multimillion dollar annual County Budget. Re sponsible for overseeing and coor dinating financial man agement of the Board of Commissioners an nual appropriations; directs the Office of Managment and Budget comprised of budget, financial con trol, purchasing and perform other related duties as required. Qualifications: Must be a Certified Public Accountant or pos sess a Master’s De gree in Business Ad ministration and pos sesses 4-8 years of re sponsible financial management in a me dium to large organi zation. An essential requirement is the knowledge and ability to use financial soft ware in a technologi cal environment. Applications on line, or Commissioners Of fice, 21 West Boardman Street, 44503. Deadline for all appli cations is June 17, 2011 @ 4:30 p.m.

Apartment rental package Starting at $70/month for any 4 papers! (740) 888-5003

SOUTHGATE POTTER LODGE 782 DATES

June 11, July 9 and Aug 13. Open from 8am to 1 pm.

VENDORS arrive at 6:30am. Spaces are 16ft by 16ft for $15 each day or rent for all 3 dates for $10 each and save $15. Indoor bathrooms and hot dogs, snacks and drinks in our air conditioned dining hall. Parking for visitors is just $1 no matter how many people you get in the vehicle.

Our Local Community Freemasonry has been in Canal Winchester for 125 years! We are your friends, neighbors and work in the community with you. We support the local Food Bank and Special Olympics.

June 9, 2011

HELP WANTED PROFESSIONAL/ MANAGEMENT

HELP WANTED PROFESSIONAL/ MANAGEMENT

HR/Benefits

The University of Toledo invites applications for a

Franklin County Board of Commissioners seeks to fill two vacant positions in the HR/Benefits Office resulting from promotion and retirement.

Lecturer in Health Information Administration

Benefits Analyst Assist with employee benefit plan admin. with focus on oper. proc. and comm.. research, special projects, print and electronic media.

Benefits and Finance Administrator Challenging position responsible for oper. and fiscal integrity of large, self-insured, multiemployer employee benefits plan; compet. selection of vendors, health fund and budget mgmt., data analysis and reporting. For detailed job descriptions and to apply on-line go to: http://www.franklincounty ohio.gov/commissioners/ hr -EOEMARRIAGE & FAMILY THERAPIST A financially stable, pro gressive, behavioral healthcare provider is seeking applicants with a Master or Doctorate in Mar riage and Family Therapy, a passion for excellence, and an interest in providing cost effective, quality care within a performancebased culture. MFTs serve as primary team members of a recognized familycentered, school-based mental health program. Du ties include intake assess ment, individual therapy, group therapy, and consul tation with school person nel as well as home-based and clinic-based family therapy. Candidates must have expertise in researchbased, theory guided inter vention and be license eli gible. AAMFT Approved Supervision is provided. EOE. Send resume with salary history in confidence to: Northwood Health Sys tems, Attn: Clinical Director PO Box 6400, Wheeling, WV 26003 304-234-3500 Ext. 2248 Fax: 304-234-3511 Email: recruit@ corp.northwoodhealth.com Must love sports. A lot. Read the 1812 Nut on ThisWeekNews.com and get all the central Ohio sports your pretty little head can handle.

COME OUT FOR THE COMMUNITY FLEA MARKET AND STAY FOR THE OPEN HOUSE!

SOUTHGATE POTTER LODGE 782

beginning August 2011. This position involves teaching baccalaureate de gree online courses related to healthcare documenta tion requirements, acute and ambulatory coding and reimbursement. The candidate must pos sess a Master’s Degree and hold the Registered Health Information Admin istrator’s credential. Applicants should visit http ://www.utoledo.edu/depts/ hr/employment/index.html, select “employment oppor tunities” then “faculty” and search for posting # 994085 regarding applica tion procedures and dead lines. The University of Toledo is an Equal Opportunity Em ployer committed to excel lence through diversity. An EEO/AA/Title IX employer.

Announcements

ADOPTION- A loving alternative to unplanned pregnancy. You choose the family for your child. Receive pictures/info of waiting/ approved couples. Living expense assistance. 1-866-236-7638 I Want To Make Your House Payment For You! Can’t make your house payment? I’ll make it for you. Heading towards fore closure? Call: 614-3728964.

Instruction

AIRLINES ARE HIRINGTrain for high paying Avia tion Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualifiedHousing available. CALL Aviation Institute of Mainte nance (877)818-0783 Attend College Online from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Computers, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 800-488-0386 www.CenturaOnline.com Medical Management Careers start hereGet Connected Online. Attend college on your own time. Job Placement Assiscance. Computer Available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 800-482-3316 www.CenturaOnline.com

Merchandise

Digital Media Coordinator Major responsibilities include: executing digital media strategies and creating compelling, engaging content that inspires and connects donors, prospects, nonprofits, and the greater community with the Foundation. Accountable for day-to-day creation of digital content focused on social media; product launches and promotions; and production of web videos, audio podcasts, blogs, and other multimedia. This position requires a strong passion for communications/marketing and experience with using technology, digital media, and the web. Candidate must have a minimum of four years experience in implementing digital strategies and creating digital content; strong written and verbal skills along with a propensity for visual aesthetic; be highly organized, flexible, and detail-oriented; enjoy working as part of a team; and have the ability to see solutions in a dynamic environment. Experience with Adobe Creative Suite, a wide range of social media networking sites, publishing platforms, and Google Analytics is required. Respond by regular mail or electronically, including salary requirements, to:

Pam Straker Director of Human Resources The Columbus Foundation 1234 East Broad Street, Columbus, OH 43205 pstraker@columbusfoundation.org • www.columbusfoundation.org The mission of The Columbus Foundation is to assist donors and others in strengthening and improving our community for the benefit of all its residents. The Columbus Foundation is an equal opportunity employer.

E RE UR TU UT FU AF Y EA VE AV HA UH OU YO

WITH KROGER! Opening Soon…

NEW KROGER STORE 1288 Nor th High Street

Open House! Hours for the open house are 9am to 2pm Located at: 651 Groveport Pike We’re serving breakfast, and later hot dogs, chips and drinks. See the inside of a Masonic Lodge room and ask all the questions you’ve wondered about.

See all the regalia we wear

Please apply now at:

www.kroger.com/careers

Select store at the following location: 1288 North High Street, Columbus, OH 43204

Place your ad online Visit ThisWeekNews.com click on classifieds

ith the the alter w HT OF IG “GREAT LNRY” MASO played. proudly dis

Franklin Hills Memory Garden, Canal Winchester, OH. 2 lots, 2 vaults & 1 marker. Make offer, 740-983-3903 Two Cemetery Plots in Garden of Devotion Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens. $1500 ea. 631-537-3394

BUYING GOLD/ SILVER JEWELRY Broken ok. State cert. scale. Safe Grove City location.

614-946-3846. We’ll beat anyone’s price!

Craftsman/Honda 5.5 hp 21 inch self-propelled mulching mower w/bag. 4 yrs old. Starts on first pull! Only $175. 759-8993 Ryobi 31cc gas powered weed trimmer. Comes with edger, trimmer, & snow blower attachments. Only $95. 614-759-8993

Bergamonte- The Natural Way To Improve Your Glucose, Cholesterol & Cardiovascular Health! Call today to find out how to get a free bottle with your order.! 888-470-5390

STRAWBERRIES

Circle S Farms

In order to staff this new facility, we will need people to fill the following positions:

Cashiers • Baggers • Night Stock Clerks Meat/Seafood Clerks • Deli/Bakery Clerk Pastry Chef • Floral Clerks • Produce Clerks Grocery Clerks

2-Family Sale Honda go kart, collectibles, albums, elec tronics, die cast cars, girls clothes & toys. 6/10 & 11, 9a-5p. 860 Premier Dr 43207. Annual Winchester High lands Community Garage Sale, June 10 & 11, 8am-2pm. N. of Rt. 33, off Gender Rd. Lots of great items!! Don’t Miss This One!! COMMUNITY SALE! 6/10 & 11, 9-5. 152 unit complex. Variety of stuff! 3683 Chartridge Dr, Chartwell Apts. located off Gender & Refugee on Long across from YMCA Cul-de-sac Sale June 10 & 11, 9am-2pm Knarwood Ct.. Haaf Farms HH items, furn., clothes toys, & lots more!!!

FAMILY SALE June 10, 11 & 12, 9-4 8421 Morningdew Dr. E. Main St to Taylor Rd. Collectibles, antiques, HH items, ladies clothes & shoes, toys, dolls & more! GARAGE SALE June 10 & 11, 9am-5pm 6640 Forrester Way, off Rosehill Rd., Brookfarm Subdivision. Dishes, pics, x-mas items, decor & lots of misc. GARAGE SALE June 9, 5pm-8pm June 10 & 11, 8am-5pm 6281 Barberry Hollow, Col Shop tools, baby furn., Harley items, odd & ends Gararge Sale. Home Decor and Much More! Redeco rating! Great home decor. Items for college students and home. Smooth-top Kenmore oven, sofa (like new), chair, table/chairs, TV’s, dryer, lamps, pic tures, lawn mower, micro waves, plus many more items. Fri. June 4 9-4PM, Sat. June 5 9-1PMm 445 Stonebridge Blvd. Pickerington, OH 43147 Huge 5 Family Sale 13815 Sudbury Dr, Pickerington HH goods, childrens items, books, clothes, misc. items, many new. Friday & Saturday, June 10th & 11th, 9a-4p. HUGE CANAL WINCHES TER MOVING SALE Thurs 6/9, Fri 6/10; 9a-3p. 4514 Gender Rd. across frm World Harvest Church. Many coll-ectibles, some thing for everyone. Huge Indoor Sale! Fri-Sun, 8-5. 85 E. Innis Ave 43207., off S. High St. Collectibles, beer, signs, NASCAR memorabilia, pia no, vintage jewelry, build ing full of goodies! Pickerington Community Garage Sales in Melrose & Mingo off of Refugee & SR. 256. Friday June 10th and Saturday June 11th; 8a-? Reynoldsburg Garage Sale. 1185 Starlight Drive, June 10 & 11, 9-4, Moving Sale - Patio furniture, TV’s, household goods and fur niture, clothing. Everything must go! Reynoldsburg Multi-Family Yard Sale. Trinity Circle, 6/10 & 6/11, 9-4. Womens, mens & boys clothes, furni ture, toys, household items and much more. SMITH FARMS CONDOMINUMS COMMUNITY GARAGE SALE. Located at the intersection of McNaughten and Baskerville Dr., between Broad and Main. Saturday, June 18th ONLY. 9:00 a.m.- 4:00 p.m. Plenty of treasures! Villages at Westchester Community Garage Sale Fri - Sat, June 10 - 11 In Canal Winchester off of Gender Rd. Walnut Hill UMC Garage Sale/Bake Sale 975 Rathmell Rd. Fri. 6/17 & Sat. 6/18 8a-4p Lunch is available 11a-2p.

For More Information Call: Mark 614-296-3908 Ask about membership, we welcome the opportunity to discuss being a Mason with you. Free Masonry has been in Canal Winchester for 125 years. We are your friends, neighbors, and work in the same community with you. We support the Local Food Bank and special olympics!

For Already Picked Call 614-878-7980 For Picking Information Call 614-878-9462 9015 London-Groveport Rd Grove City, OH 43123

Strawberry Shortcakes Served Daily. Gourmet Food Sampling - Strawberry Salsa

Bakery • Lunch Available


ThisWeek Community Newspapers Canal Winchester

June 9, 2011

Real Estate

Recreation

CASTLETON GARDENS

DIRECTV DEALS! FREE Movie Channels for 3 mos - starting at $29.99 for 24 mos -210+ Channels+FREE DIRECTV CINEMA plus, Free Installa tion! Limited time only. New Cust only. 1-866-528-5002 promo code 34933

OFFERING 1 BEDROOM APARTMENTS

J.D. 2009 2520 4 w/d trailer with loader & 62" mower, under warranty 46 hours, $15,500. Call 740-259-4185 evenings.

To qualify you must be at least 62 or are disabled/handicapped Call Mon.-Fri. 9-1 614-863-6478 TTY 800-750-0750

Pets & Livestock

10 month NKC American Bulldog For Sale. House trained, understands basic commands, good with kids. Comes with a 10x10 kennel and dog house. $500 neg...740-380-0220 Border Collie puppies (1/4 Australian Shepherd, 3/4 Border Collie) 8 wks, color blue merles, 2M, 1 w/blue eyes. $100. 740-474-6161 To place an ad for your bazaar or seasonal event call (740) 888-5003 (local call)

Rents are based on 30% of adjusted income & includes all basic utilities

Pickerington HUNTINGTON HILLS, 6653 Kennington Sq N. Red brick white trim, 4BR, 3.5BA, 1st flr Mother-in-law suite, whl chr access w/BA & Sun rm. 12x25 family room w/gas log FP, LR, DR, lrg mstr BR w/shower & built in vanity, 2c gar, wa ter proof bsmt w/lifetime wrty. 2 tenths mi to Toll gate Elementry & Middle School, 1.4 mi to Pick. North Jr & Sr HS. $209,700 ∑ 864-640-3412

71 W. North St. LITHIOPOLIS

2 Bedroom Apt available. Totally remod eled. No pets. $525 per mo. plus security deposit. Call 837-4434 Focus Real Estate

Sports Shorts Sign-ups • Leagues • Clinics • Camps

ThisWeek’s Sports Shorts is your COMMUNITY MVP! Guarantee placement of your event in the sports section by calling Paul Krupa (740) 888-5000 (local call)

CLASSIFIEDS

e-mail maggiesprague@att.net Visit us at www.lanecoapartments.com

ATTN SALES REPS: Inc.500 Co CPAY (www.cpay.com) is now hiring Sales Partners in your area. Commissions paid daily, plus bonuses and residual income. Sell Visa and MasterCard services to businesses. Proven and accomplished company with career opportunities. Call 1-800-213-3350

AVON Flexible, Easy and Fun! $10 Business Start-Up! Call, Anita, Sr. Exec.,ISR

614-837-6883 12 years Exp. Leading Others to Success! ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS Needed Immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300 per day depending on job requirements. No experi ence, All looks needed. 1-800-951-3584 A-105. For casting times /locations Help Wanted!!! Make $1000 a Week processing our mail! FREE Supplies! Helping HomeWorkers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerpro.com DAYCARE PROVIDERS & PRESCHOOLS

Take advantage of our great childcare rates! (740) 888-5003

Page B7

BUILD NEW BUSINESS!

Revolutionary Credit Fix! JUNE Special * ONLY $99 Make Up To $2,000.00+ Fix Your Credit QUICKLY. Per Week! New Credit Remove Collections, Card Ready Drink-Snack Advertise in Call the Experts Foreclosures, Vending Machines. Mini Bankruptcies, Charge Offs, mum $3K to $30K+ Invest Judgments, etc. ment Required. Locations Fix your credit in no time! Available. BBB Accredited www.NewCreditForYou.co Business. (800) 962-9189 m 1-800-506-0790 1 Day CCW Classes Could YOU use a few in Pickerington, Ohio. hundred dollars a day? NRA Certified Instructor If you can read and speak, Wipe Out Credit Card Weekend Classes $99 ea. YOU’RE HIRED! No sell - Debt! STOP Garnishments, Call Today! 614-561-4040 ing! 1-800-446-3268 www. Repossessions, babystepstoyourmoneytre Foreclosures & e.com Harassment! Take advantage of these great rates! Attorney Driven Investors - Outstanding 5 LINE ADS Nationwide Offices and immediate returns in $$ CASH $$ FREE Consultation! equipment leasing for frac Readers reached Cost For Your Junk Drive Camp Se Habla Espanol industry. Immediate lease ers, School Buses, Autos 70,854 $26 Call Now - 888-476-3043 out. Tax benefits and high Free Towing 614-596-9844 returns. We need more 115,945 $44 equipment! 888-567-4972 Earn $1000 a week Mailing 326,067 $7314 Brochures from Home. PAID IN ADVANCE! To place an ad for your Free Supplies! Guaranteed Make $1000 Weekly Call Income! No experience bazaar or seasonal Mailing Brochures from ing required. Start Today! Home. Income is guaran u o event call ab t sav www.thehomemailer.com ! teed! No experience o even m re (740) 888-5003 required. Enroll Today! Award-winning www.thehomemailer.com (local call) editorial coverage Call (740) 888-5003 today! **2011 POSTAL JOBS!** (866) 790-4502 $14 to $59 hour + Full (toll free) Federal Benefits. No Expe rience Required. NOW HIRING! Green Card OK. 1-866-477-4953 ext. 95 EARN $1000’s WEEKLY! Receive $12 for every envelope Stuffed with our sales materials. Free 240hr. information. 1-888-234-2259 code 15 Earn up to $150 per day Undercover Shoppers Needed to Judge Retail & Dining Establishments Experience Not Required Call Now 1-877-737-7565 I MADE $180,000 IN 6 Place ad online: Call your ad in: Months In A Down Economy! Let Me Show You How I Did It! www.make180K.com

Book your GARAGE SALE today!

25 19 $

$

Advertise your product or service nationwide or by region in over 10 million households in North Ameri ca’s best suburbs! Place your classified ad in over 750 suburban newspapers just like this one. Call Classified Avenue at 888-486-2466 or go to ww w.classifiedavenue.net

Did you know: you can place your ad online?

IN 4 COMMUNITIES OF YOUR CHOICE 5-line ad to grab shoppers’ attention

Flat rate. Non-commercial advertisers only. Add lines or communities for a nominal charge.

(740) 888-5003 local call TOLL FREE (866) 790-4502

Go to: ThisWeekNews.com and click on CLASSIFIEDS!

CALL THE EXPERTS

Advertise Your Business Here Landscapers, Handyman, Remodeling, Auto Repair, Lawn Maintenance, Contractors Choose your neighborhood or many… become the Call the Experts Sponsor!

www.ThisWeekNews.com/experts

To advertise your expertise, call (740) 888-5003 or toll-free (866) 790-4502.

SENIOR HOMECARE BY ANGELS We send you the best home caregivers for hygiene, meals, light housework. Up to 24hr care. Caregivers are experienced in elder care. Very reasonable rates. We do things your way! (614) 561-0075 www.v-angels.com

CALL ME FIRST! 7 days a week. CASH for your CARS $250-1000!!! Running or Not. Pay top $DOLLAR$ 614-778-5660 Not sure what to put in an ad? Ask one of our experts!

(740) 888-5003

"LET THE EXPERT DO IT" STEVE’S BASEMENT AND DRAIN TILE REPAIR Downspout Drain Lines Sump Pumps French Drains Basement Repair Waterproofing 34 Years Journeyman Pipe Filter FREE ESTIMATES! (614)352-1075

Advantage Paving New or recap blacktop, Driveways, parking lots, 10% off with ad, free esti mate. Call 614-832-6700

A JOB WELL DONE AGAIN Custom Carpentry/Repairs

614-235-1819

The Wife’s HANDYMAN REMODELING CARPENTRY PAINTING FLOORING ELECTRICAL PLUMBING ADDITIONS DECKS HEATING & COOLING SPECIALIST DOORS & WINDOWS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND MORE

614-396-7202 OVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE ----FREE ESTIMATE----

• Home or Office • Free Estimates Locally owned and operated for 18 years ACCREDITED BUSINESS

614-764-6900 www.maidtomop.net

AFFORDABLE HAULING Trash, Brush, Junk Dumpsters Available Call today! Haul 2 -Day! 614-471-6444 John’s Dumpster Hauling Best Rates in Town Trash Outs & Dumpster Rental Avail. Cash Special È 614-774-0302

BOB TEAGUE Ceiling fans, Electrical, Phone & Cable Jacks, 30+Yrs., 614-478-2100

Carpentry ∂ Home Repair Renovations & Trim Detail 30+yrs. exp. Mike Gregory

û (614) 237-1795 û VRC Basement finishing, Bathroom remolding, All Drywall needs & Painting Call Shane: (614)735-3173 To place an ad for your bazaar or seasonal event call (740) 888-5003 (local call)

DAN FEW CONCRETE 38 Years in Central Ohio. Drives, Walks, Pole Bldg, BB courts. Lic/Bond/Ins. Call 614-575-8561

Drywall & Plaster Repair Textured Ceilings. Affordable Prices. Call 614-551-6963. ûûûûûûûûûûûûû

ûRepairs Unlimited û Plumbing, Electric, Paint, Kitchens, Baths, Flooring, Basements and More Call Greg (614) 296-4232

CARPET CLEANING RK’S CARPET CARE

Bobcat & Backhoe Service Free Estimates µ Footers Trenching µ Post holes Final grades µ Reseeding Good concr ete finish work! Call Gil: (740)467-3939

MOWING SERVICE Comm. & Residential Starting at $23.00. Mention this ad for a FREE CUT!!! 614-302-7008, More Svs Weedbustersonline.com "CLASSIC LANDSCAPES " Spring Clean Up, Pruning, Mulch, Paver Brick Patios /Walkways, Design/Install, FREE EST,614-332-1498 ÙÙ Quality Mulch ÙÙ ÙBlackÙ BrownÙ ÙRed Playground Bag or Bulk 614-274-2640

Auto Accident, No Insurance, File Bankruptcy, get license back, Atty. John H. Bates (614)221-3630 BANKRUPTCY Chapter 7 or 13. Flat fees, Free consult, pymt plan, eve/wkend appts. 614-834-7110

CUSTOM COLORS 4-YEAR WARRANTY FREE Gutter Cleaning & Powerwash with an Exterior Contract. Angie’s List , BBB,

614-394-4499 A Budget Priced Company with Professional Quality. BUDGET PRO SIGN-UP today & get a FREE POWERWASH w/whole house paint job. Ins/Free Est, 614-237-4187 budgetproservice.com A Job Well Done Again Painting, Powerwashing, Stucco & Drywall Repair, Gutter Cleaning, Carpentry. Need some thing done? Just ask! (614) 235-1819 Call Today! PRECISION 1 Serving Central Ohio Since 1986! Exterior trim, stucco, siding, paint, power wash ing & deck restoration. 614-833-6000

Madison Plumbing

ARE YOU READY FOR SUMMER'S

(740) 964-3629 (614) 769-4128

Accurate Garage Doors

THINK GREEN SAVE ENERGY SAVE MONEY

Celebrating 33 Years Serving Columbus & Surrounding Areas!

MINUTEMEN HEATING & COOLING

837-5062 5% OFF NEW INSTALLS EXPIRES July 31, 2011

Free Estimates For Installation Of High Efficiency Heating & Air Conditioning Systems OH Lic. #19984

Visit Us on Our Website www.minutemenheatingcooling.com

$10 off with ad 5% Senior Discount Seamless Gutters:

Alexander Hauling Topsoil, Mulch, Limestone Gravel, Sand, Comtil Spreading Available Bobcat Services & Patio Excavations-(614)491-5460

Take advantage of our great childcare rates! (740) 888-5003

Roofing, Siding, Gutters FREE INSPECTIONS Licensed, Insured, Bonded

www.justcleanmycarpet.com

BENCHMARK ROOFING

614-236-2000

EMERY’ S MAINTENANCE BUILDING & REMODELING,INC.

Roofing • Room Addition

Snaked, Repaired, Replaced

KITCHEN AND BATH REMODELING •GARAGES SIDING • WINDOWS • ELECTRICAL • PLUMBING

5542019 DAYCARE PROVIDERS & PRESCHOOLS Take advantage of our great childcare rates! (740) 888-5003

A Job Well Done Again

BUDGET PRO Budget Priced, Prof Quality $139-1 sty, $239-2 sty, 614-237-4187

Installed, screened, Cleaned

Underground Drains:

Clean, Oil, Adjust $29.95 Repair/Service, Guarant’d 614-890-7362

Repair Specialists/Chimneys

Aaron Allen Moving Owned by Military Veteran Bonded & Insured PUCO #158-044-HG (614) 299-6683 & 263-0649 DAYCARE PROVIDERS & PRESCHOOLS

Paige Gutters/ Drains

ALL REPAIRS DONE IN YOUR HOME

Licensed & Insured ûFree Ests. û Call Today! Karl (614) 313-7806

benchmarkroofing.com

MINUTEMEN HEATING & COOLING, INC.

ûû C.C. S. Roofing ûû STORM/WIND DAMAGE? Call us for a Free Estimate! Licensed, Bonded, Insured 614-352-6227 EliteRoofingOfOhio.com PRECISION 1 Roofing, Siding, Gutters, Windows, Insulation. www.precision1home improvement.com 614-578-3026 HUGHES Roofing/Siding/Gutters Lic.-bonded-insured. BBB. Serving Central Oh for 30 yrs. 614-882-0811

614-235-1819

Office: Cell:

Service call only $25 Broken spring? Problem with Openers? 24/7 Svc µ 614-888-8008 $10 Off Svc call w/ ad

Kitchens, Baths, Carpentry, Plumbing, Minor Electric, Drywall, Ceramic Tile, 17 yrs Exp. Ins. Free Est. Jerry, 614-563-5488

RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL

$

250 OFF

ANY JOB OVER $5000

EXPERIENCED DEPENDABLE

LICENSED • BONDED • INSURED

614-837-3046

OH LIC 24238

Roofing • Room Addition

Rich’s Tree 65’ Bucket Srv. Stump removal, Lic. & Ins. Free Estimates Call: 614-394-2367

WE ARE YOUR

MISSING PIECE

A Division of Benchmark Contractors

Not sure if you have damage... We offer a FREE, NO OBLIGATION inspection • Award winning Co. w/a large referral base • 15 Yr Workmanship Warranty • GAF Master Elite Installer • Licensed, BBB member, Insured, & Bonded • Insurance Repair Experts

www.benchmarkroofing.com

614-236-2000

ACCREDITED BUSINESS


ThisWeek Community Newspapers Canal Winchester

Page B8

June 9, 2011

Coughlin Automotive is the ONLY GM & Ford/Lincoln/Mercury factory certified repair facility in Pickaway County Cadillac 48 month/50,000 mile maintenance included!

#C1799

LEASE FOR $429/ MONTH*

Truck Headquarters

2011 CADILLAC CTS SEDAN

2011 CADILLAC SRX

#C1811

AWD

FWD, LUXURY, TOW, PLATINUM ICE

MSRP ........................ $39,240 COUGHLIN DISC...........-$3,752

MSRP ..........................$40,575 COUGHLIN DISC...........-$2,087

$

35,488

$

LEASE FOR $519/ MONTH*

2011 GMC SIERRA 1500 CREW CAB 4WD

#T2551

MSRP ........................... $33,520 COUGHLIN DISC.............-$1,532 TMS REBATE..................-$4,505

38,488

2011 CADILLAC CTS COUPE

#C1808

$

LEASE FOR $349/ MONTH

2011 GMC TERRAIN 15 TO CHOOSE FROM, FULL POWER, AIR, AUTO

LEASE FOR $379/ MONTH**

UP TO 38

MSRP ............................$40,035 COUGHLIN DISC............. -$3,047

$

36,988

2011 BUICK LUCERNE

#B1703

6 PASS LEASE FOR $339/ MONTH**

2011 BUICK LACROSSE CX

2011 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 2011 CHEVROLET TRAVERSE LS AWD 1500 CREW CAB #A2762 LEASE FOR $389/ MONTH**

MSRP ....................................$27,745 COUGHLIN DISC..................... -$1,257

$

#B1707

23,488

#A2690

MSRP ................................................ $31,335 COUGHLIN DISC..................................-$1,347 TMS REBATE.......................................-$4,000

$

MPG’S

Starting at

$

#B1714

27,483

IF YOU FINANCE THROUGH ALLY OR GM FINANCIAL

$

25,988

26,488 OR

24,988 WITH GM LOYALTY

MSRP ........................$32,374 COUGHLIN DISC......... -$1,886 TMS REBATE.............. -$2,000 $

MSRP ........................ $30,370 COUGHLIN DISC..........-$1,882 TMS REBATE...............-$4,505 $

LEASE FOR $329/ MONTH**

28,488

23,983

2011 BUICK REGAL CXL

2011 CHEVROLET CRUZE

LEATHER, AUTO

FULL, POWER, AIR, 6 TO CHOOSE FROM

LEASE FOR $269/ MONTH* MSRP ..............................$26,995 COUGHLIN DISC............... -$2,507 BUICK BONUS CASH ........... -$500

44 MPG’S Starting at

$

23,988

$

**39 MONTHS, PLUS TAX, TITLE, LICENSE FEES AND 1ST PAYMENT. *FINANCING AVAILABLE WITH APPROVED CREDIT THROUGH ALLY. ALL REBATES TO DEALER. VEHICLE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. **MUST PROVE OWNERSHIP WITH REGISTRATION. *FREE MAINTENANCE, 4 YEARS @ 50,000 MILES. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. OFFER EXPIRES 6/13/11.

18,788

PLUS TAX, TITLE, LICENSE FEES AND 1ST PAYMENT. **39 MONTHS, PLUS TAX, WITH GM LOYALTY

COUGHLIN CIRCLEVILLE CADILLAC/BUICK COUGHLIN CIRCLEVILLE CHEVROLET/GMC

800-704-8455 MONDAY-THURSDAY 9AM-8PM, FRIDAY 9AM-6PM, SATURDAY 9AM-5PM, SUNDAY CLOSED

800-704-8455 MONDAY-THURSDAY 9AM-8PM, FRIDAY 9AM-6PM, SATURDAY 9AM-5PM, SUNDAY CLOSED

COUGHLIN FORD OF CIRCLEVILLE 24001 U.S. ROUTE 23 S. • CIRCLEVILLE, OH 43113 • 800-319-3170 JUST ACROSS FROM SUPER WALMART

NEW 2011 FORD F-150

40/20/40 CLOTH SEAT, AUTOMATIC, AIR CONDITIONING, FLEX FUEL

MSRP ..........................................................$23,765 MAN. REBATE .............................................. -$2,500 COUGHLIN DISC........................................... -$1,280 BUY FOR

$

19,985*

$

19,485

OR

WITH FMCC FINANCING TO QUALIFIED BUYERS WITH APPROVED CREDIT

NEW 2011 FORD RANGER XLT SUPERCAB 4X4

4X4, POWER EQUIPMENT GROUP, SKID PLATES, TOW PACKAGE, XLT PACKAGE, ALLOY WHEELS AND MORE!

MSRP ..........................................................$27,560 MAN. REBATE .............................................. -$3,500 COUGHLIN DISC .......................................... -$2,075 BUY FOR

POWER EQUIPMENT GROUP, ALL TERRAIN TIRES, LIMITED SLIP AXLE, CRUISE CONTROL, CD PLAYER, POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS, CHROME BUMPERS $

$

21,985

NEW 2011 FORD F-150 REG CAB 4X4 MSRP ..........................................................$30,200 XL WORK DISCOUNT ....................................... -$500 MAN. REBATE .............................................. -$2,500 COUGHLIN DISC........................................... -$2,215

24,985

OR

$

24,485*

WITH FMCC FINANCING TO QUALIFIED BUYERS WITH APPROVED CREDIT.

#H2572

NEW 2011 FORD EDGE SE 3.5L V6, MY FORD, FWD

MSRP ..........................................................$28,265 MAN. REBATE .............................................. -$1,000 COUGHLIN DISC........................................... -$1,280

$

25,985

OR

$

24,985*

WITH FMCC FINANCING TO QUALIFIED BUYERS WITH APPROVED CREDIT

MONDAY-THURSDAY 9AM-8PM, FRIDAY 9AM-6PM, SATURDAY 9AM-5PM SUNDAY CLOSED *$1,699 DUE AT SIGNING, PLUS TAX, TITLE, FEES, WITH APPROVED CREDIT THROUGH FMCC, 21,000 TOTAL MILES ALLOWED 20¢ ADDITIONAL. NO SECURITY DEPOSIT REQUIRED. RESIDENCY RESTRICTIONS APPLY. ALL MANUFACTURER REBATES AND DISCOUNTS TO DEALER. PLUS TAX AND TITLE. **RESIDENCY RESTRICTIONS MAY APPLY. VEHICLE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSES ONLY. OFFER EXPIRES 6/30/11.

ThisWeek Canal Winchester 6/9  

June 9 edition of ThisWeek Canal Winchester

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