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FEBRUARY 16, 2017

Word spreading about tiny libraries P16

DOUGLAS COUNTY, COLORADO

A publication of

DOUGLAS COUNTY SCHOOLS

WHAT A RUSH

District talks budget concerns at town hall Change means more money for elementary schools, less for secondary schools BY MIKE DIFERDINANDO MDIFERDINANDO@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Facing rising costs and stagnant funding, the Douglas County School District community is searching for solutions. To some, this means a mill levy or bond measure will need to be placed on the ballot — something that has not been popular in the county in the past. More than 100 community members packed the auditorium at Southridge Recreation Center in Highlands Ranch Feb. 12 to discuss concerns about budget changes and funding shortages. “We’re here to solve a problem and find a solution,” said parent Meg Masten, one of the event’s organizers. The biggest point of contention was a change made by the school district that will see more money available for elementary schools, but less for middle and high schools.

Highlands Ranch students and players storm the court to celebrate the Falcons’ boys basketball victory over Rock Canyon on Feb. 10. A near-capacity crowd filled both upper and lower gym bleachers to see the host Falcons win 59-56 in overtime. Holten Sparling led Highlands Ranch in scoring with 20 points, while Sam Masten led Rock Canyon with 27. PAUL DISALVO

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LoneTreeVoice.net

VOLUME 16 | ISSUE 5


2 Lone Tree Voice

February 16, 2017F

MY NAME IS

NEWS IN A HURRY

KENNETH BURSON

Dentist, traveler, community outreach enthusiast Finding a way to Denver I am from Omaha, Nebraska. My dad was a pilot in the Air Force. I went to Creighton University for my undergrad for dentist school. At Creighton, I met some Denver friends and that really drew me out here. I joined on with the management group Pacific Dental Services and they gave me the opportunity to own my first practice in Highlands Ranch. But I moved and now have my second practice in Lone Tree. Now I own Lone Tree Dentists and Orthodontics. I am a general dentist, so I do cosmetics, implants, dentures and anything an adult needs that is not a specialty. I got into dentistry because I liked to work with my hands and I like to work with people. I also wanted to run a business. Community outreach I like getting involved in the community. I donate once a quarter to the homeless shelter to do dentistry there. I run coat

Kenneth Burson travels around the world volunteering his dental skills and services to those who would not otherwise be able to afford dental work. COURTESY PHOTO

drives, sock drives, pet toys for the Dumb Friends League and toy drives for the children’s hospital. My mom and dad, since we were kids, have always made us volunteer our time. My grandmother gave me a quote that I live by. She said, “If you can count your blessings, you can be a blessing for others.” Once or twice a year, I will go overseas. I have been to Guatamala, Ethiopia and Fiji. In Ethiopia, the rich are poor and the poor are extremely poor. People walk miles every day just to get water. We go over there to do not only dentistry, but to work with CHARITY WATERS to help build wells.

My favorite shirt When we were in Fiji, we had seen a thousand patients in three days. People would travel for three days to get to us. The people were singing us this farewell song and there was so much positivity in this culture. I had taken out a little girl’s tooth. She had been crying for a year-and-a-half because she couldn’t afford to go to the dentist. When we were leaving, this guy just came zipping up on a bike. He gets in line and starts singing while he was crying. After the song, he and the translator came over and he gave me a shirt. He said through the translator that he bought it for me because I helped his daughter who cried herself to sleep for so long because of the pain in her tooth. He told me that last night was the first night she had slept without crying. He got me the shirt to say thank you. The translator started crying. She said that she had seen the shirt for sale and it cost $25. He makes only $7 a month. If you have suggestions for My Name Is..., contact Stephanie Mason at smason@coloradocommunitymedia.com.

Movie series with discussions A Love Is in the Air Film Series ends Feb. 24 with “Moonrise Kingdom” at the Douglas County Library in Lone Tree, 10055 Library Way. The screening starts at 1 p.m. and is followed by a discussion with a local film expert. Visit DCL.org for rating information and to register. South Metro Fire citizen academy If you are interested in the lives of your city’s firefighters, want to know how to use Jaws of Life to save someone from a car crash, learn how to investigate the cause of a fire or learn how to better protect your family from a fire, enroll in the South Metro Fire Rescue citizen academy. This eight-week academy offers an opportunity to learn about modern firefighting and learn life-saving skills. Classes are held on Wednesday evenings from 6-10 p.m. starting April 5. Locations vary depending on the topic. Participants are expected to attend every class. The program is open to adults over the age of 18 who live in or work in South Metro Fire Rescue’s jurisdiction. To apply, submit an application by March 6. The application is available at www.southmetro.org.

Join citizen police academy If you’ve ever wondered what it would be like to be a Lone Tree police officer, participating in Lone Tree’s Citizen’s Police Academy can give you a glimpse. The Citizen’s Police Academy was created to foster a better understanding between police and citizens, provide a medium for citizens to gain insight into police work, and create, preserve and improve partnerships between the police and the community. Hihglights include driving a Patrol Car, mock crime scene investigation, observing a K-9 demonstration and participating in shoot-house training operations. The Lone Tree Police Department is accepting applications for the next academy which will take place March 16 through May 18. The classes are Thursday evenings and on a few Saturdays. Classes are held at the Lone Tree Police Department, 9220 Kimmer Drive. All participants must be over 18 years of age, complete an application of intent, and pass a criminal background check. Go to www.cityoflonetree. com and search “Citizens Police Academy” to find the application and release.


Lone Tree Voice 3

7February 16, 2017

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4 Lone Tree Voice

February 16, 2017F

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School board supports concealed carry on campus One of the two bills would provide training for teachers BY MIKE DIFERDINANDO MDIFERDINANDO@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

The Douglas County Board of Education voted to support a pair of bills that would allow people, including teachers, with a concealed carry permit to carry a handgun on school campuses. One of the measures was killed in the state House the day after the school board’s Feb. 7 meeting and the other recently passed the Senate and was sent to the House. Both bills were introduced and supported by Republicans, who control the Senate, but opposed by Democrats, who hold a majority in the House. The board’s motion of support does not have any official standing, but serves to signify its backing of the legislation. House Bill 17-1036, a measure that would have changed the law to allow anyone with a concealed carry permit to carry a handgun on public

school grounds, garnered a 4-3 vote of support from the school board. It was voted down on a 6-3 party-line vote in a House committee on Feb. 8. Its sponsors were state Reps. Patrick Neville, R-Castle Rock, and Kim Ransom, R-Acres Green, and state Sen. Tim Neville, R-Jefferson County. The board also voted 4-3 to support Senate Bill 17-005, which would allow teachers and other public school employees who have concealed carry permits to carry a handgun on campus after completing safety training. The legislation — which passed the Senate on Feb. 6 — is sponsored by Senate Majority Leader Chris Holbert, R-Parker, and Patrick Neville. It would allow a county sheriff to provide a safety-training course to employees of any public elementary, middle, junior high or high school who has a permit to carry a concealed handgun. Once that training is completed, the employee would be permitted to carry the handgun on campus. On both bills, Meghann Silverthorn, Judith Reynolds, James Geddes and Steven Peck voted in favor of support, while David Ray, SEE GUNS, P8

Bill on gun training for school employees passes state Senate A separate bill on concealed carry in schools is killed in the House BY ALEX DEWIND ADEWIND@COLORADOCOMMUNITY

A bill that would allow teachers and other public school employees who have the proper permit to carry a handgun on campus after completing safety training has passed the state Senate. Meanwhile, a measure that would have allowed anyone with a concealed carry permit to carry a handgun on public school grounds was defeated in the House. Both bills were introduced and supported by Republicans, who control the Senate, but opposed by Democrats, who hold a majority in the House. Senate Bill 17-005 is sponsored by Senate Majority Leader Chris Holbert, R-Parker, and House Minority Leader Patrick Neville, RCastle Rock. It would allow a county sheriff to provide a safety-training course to any employee of any public elementary, middle, junior high or high school who has a permit

to carry a concealed handgun, a summary of the bill says. Once that training is completed, the employee would be permitted to carry the handgun on campus. It was approved 18-17, a party-line vote, on Feb. 6. It will now face an uphill battle in the House. Holbert said his bill encourages a greater Holbert level of training for all people who are armed in public schools, including law enforcement and staff who are hired as private security guards. As part of the bill, a county sheriff would consult with the school district in the sheriff ’s Neville county to establish a curriculum for the safety-training course. Individual school districts would need to approve the program set up by the sheriff and would be able to cap the number of employees who are permitted to carry a gun at each school. House Bill 17-1036, which would have changed the law to allow anyone with a concealed carry permit SEE SENATE, P8


Lone Tree Voice 5

7February 16, 2017

Highlands Ranch teen sentenced for role in murder plot Brooke Higgins takes the stand, apologizes to community BY ALEX DEWIND ADEWIND@COLORADOCOMMUNITY

At her sentencing hearing, Brooke Higgins, a teenager convicted of a plot to kill staff and students at Mountain Vista High School, took the stand and wept as she apologized to the community. “Finally and most importantly, I want to say I’m sorry,” said Higgins, who was joined at the stand by her two lawyers. “I reflect on that time and it doesn’t seem like me, it doesn’t seem like anything I could have thought, written or done.” Higgins, now 17, was formally sentenced Feb. 8 at a hearing at the Douglas County Courthouse in Castle Rock. Higgins pleaded guilty to two charges, one as a juvenile and one as an adult, on Dec. 20. She will spend three years in the Department of Youth Corrections — including the past year that she has been in custody — for solicitation to commit murder, for which she was prosecuted as a juvenile. That will be followed by four years of adult supervised probation with mental health treatment in the adult case, conspiracy to commit muder. If she successfully completes the probation sentence, she can have the adult conviction sealed. Higgins and Sienna Johnson were arrested in December 2015 after TextA-Tip reported their alleged murder plot against the high school in Highlands Ranch. They were sophomores and 16 at the time. Both were charged as adults in January 2016 with conspiracy to commit first-degree murder with extreme indifference and conspiracy to commit first-degree murder after deliberation. Johnson’s next court appearance is scheduled for Feb. 27. Unlike past hearings, the Douglas County courtroom where Higgins’ sentencing hearing was held was filled with family members and friends. Several witnesses, including a teacher, a child psychiatrist, a juvenile correc-

Brooke Higgins, 17, prepares to address the courtroom during her sentencing hearing Feb. 8 in Castle Rock. At left is one of her attorneys, Kathleen McGuire. Higgins, a former Mountain Vista high school student, was sentenced to three years in a juvenile corrections facility, followed by four years of adult probation, for conspiracy to commit murder and solicitation to commit murder in connection with a plot to attack her school. POOL PHOTO BY MIKE GRADY/KUSA tions officer, a public safety psychologist and Higgins’ father, Thomas Higgins, took the stand. “High school was and is not the best year in our lives. It is a time poor choices are made and friends are made and lost,” said J.J. Babbs, a Mountain Vista High School teacher who taught Higgins for a year. “Just like high school didn’t define any of us, I know it doesn’t define her.” Thomas Higgins’ expressed his disappointment in the court system, arguing that his daughter’s case should have been kept in juvenile court. “I’m outraged that (District Attorney George) Brauchler would file a girl in adult court who didn’t have any weapons and has never hurt anyone before in her life,” he said. “The silver lining is that we have a daughter who is safe and healthy.” Court testimonies and Higgins’ arrest affidavit, which was released in early January, paint the picture of a teenager who struggled with depression, post traumatic stress disorder and drug abuse. According to the affidavit, Higgins brought the idea of a school shooting

to Johnson in December 2015 and the two took steps toward carrying out their plan. They planned to kill themselves after carrying out the attack, according to the document. Higgins tried to obtain guns through other individuals, pawn shops and online stores. Johnson, whose name appears redacted in the affidavit, created an intricate map of the school that included all exits, the busiest locations and times and information on the school’s security, the document says. In her journal, Higgins had written about cocaine use, suicidal thoughts and feelings of sadness. She wrote about being in counseling, hoping it would create a new chapter in her life. She also wrote about how she wished she had been part of the 1999 Columbine High School mass shooting that left 12 students and a teacher dead. One of Higgins’ lawyers, Iris Eytan, argued at the sentencing hearing that Higgins never planned to shoot up the school. “Brooke was 16 and Googling and writing things that she thought no one would see,” Eytan said. “She was

clouded by depression and drugs.” At the sentencing hearing, Brauchler referenced a slideshow that outlined key evidence in the case, including journal entries, text messages and photos taken by Higgins. He said that Higgins went to a friend’s house to try to obtain a gun. “At the end of the day, judge, this is no victim. She made the decision that she made, she knew what she was doing and she took steps. This wasn’t just words,” Brauchler said. Judge Paul King acknowledged certain factors of Higgins’ life that played a role in the case, including her home life and her parents’ divorce. He also recognized the problems Higgins had created in her life, including her choice of friends and her drug use. “Some of the problems you have are vested on you by adults,” King said to Higgins. “Some of these problems lay squarely on your feet. “Now every parent has to say, ‘Is my child going to be protected from being murdered by their fellow classmates?’ That’s not a joke, we in Colorado know that all too well.”

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6 Lone Tree Voice

February 16, 2017F

Class boosts health, outlook of people with cancer Presidents Day Douglas County offices will be closed Monday, February 20 for Presidents Day. Many county services are available online at www.douglas.co.us

Neighbors helping Neighbors If your new year’s resolution involves finding ways to serve others, Neighbor Network has some recommendations that may be just what you’re looking for – and close to home. To volunteer please fill out an application at www.dcneighbornetwork.org or call 303-814-4300.

Need help with heating costs? Eligible low income households in Douglas County may apply for energy assistance through the Low Income Energy Assistance Program (LEAP). For more information or to download the application please visit www.douglas. co.us and search for LEAP or email LEAPHELP@discovermygoodwill.org

Business Personal Property Tax Declarations due by April 15 2017 Business Personal Property Tax Declarations may be filed online at www.DouglasFilesOnline.org Business owners who own, lease, or borrow business personal property with a total market value greater than $7,400, must report the property to the County Assessor. For more information visit www.douglas.co.us/assessor

Driver’s License Services unavailable Feb. 17-20 On-site and online Driver’s License services will not be available beginning at 3 p.m. Feb 17 through Feb. 20 due to a state-mandated technology upgrade. Services will become available again during normal business hours on Tuesday, Feb. 21. For more information visit douglas.co.us and search Driver’s License.

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BY STEPHANIE MASON SMASON@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Sometimes, just one chair stand without assistance is the greatest victory, Sandy Dickman said. Dickman, a certified cancer exercise specialist and personal trainer for South Suburban Parks and Recreation, leads a group fitness class designed specifically for people with cancer. Living Well with Cancer is a 75-minute class that adult cancer patients can attend twice a week. It has been part of the Goodson Recreation Center in Centennial for 13 years. Cancer patients from all over the south metro area attend the class. “Exercise is medicine,” Dickman Dickman said. New participants go through a oneon-one assessment with Dickman. The assessment covers agility, strength, cardiovascular and overall physical ability. It is used to create a personalized exercise program for the participant’s differing goals and needs. “Everyone is different,” Dickman said. “It is based on what kind of cancer they have. Some are in treatment, others are out of treatment.” Cardiovascular, strength, flexibility and core fitness are the focuses of the classes, which are $5 per session. The class registration is renewed monthly. Dickman recommends committing at least six months to the program to see signs of improvement. There are approximately 12 people in the program each month. Anyone who currently has or once had cancer can join the class. The goal, Dickman said, is to work with people going through treatment. She said some people cannot take the class

ABOUT THE CLASSES When: 1:15 to 2:30 p.m. every Tuesday and Thursday Where: Goodson Recreation Center, 6315 S. University Blvd., Centennial Who: People with cancer ages 18 and up How: To register, go to www.ssprd.org/Catalog.aspx and click on “fitness.” The Living Well with Cancer class is in the “Group Training” section. because of the physical strain that treatments can have. The reason exercise is so good for cancer patients, Dickman said, is that it stimulates the lymphatic system, which helps filter out impurities in the body. Dickman said the class is not for mourning or feeling down about having cancer. “We call it a support group on the move, but it’s not depressing,” Dickman said. “If you have ever been to a support group, you know it is depressing. Everyone goes in and tells their sad story, and it is a sad story. But if you want to get better, you need something more positive than that.” Some people have participated in the program for years. Dickman said it becomes part of their lives. “I have been involved with this group of cancer survivors and (Dickman) for nearly six years,” said Mary, a class participant, who did not give her last name. “I was able to think I could beat this as I came to realize I was not alone; I am a survivor. We maintain a positive and upbeat attitude due to (Dickman’s) guidance as she keeps us moving. I always leave class glad that I attended that day.”

Texting and driving bill advances in Legislature Penalties amended as measure moves to Senate Finance Committee STAFF REPORT

A bill to increase penalties for drivers convicted of distracted driving related to cellphone use passed the state Senate’s State, Veterans & Military Affairs Committee on Feb. 8 by a 4-1 vote. The committee amended some of the bill’s language and changed penalties assessed to drivers in an effort to gain more bipartisan support. The bill, sponsored by Sen. Lois

Court, D-Denver, originally included a fine of $500 and five points on the driver’s license for a first offense and a $750 fine and six points for a second or subsequent offense. Current law requires a $50 fine and one point for a first offense and a $100 fine and one point for subsequent offenses. After it was rewritten, the bill calls for a penalty of a $300 fine and four points on the driver’s license per occurrence. State Rep. Jovan Melton, D- Aurora, is sponsoring the bill in the House. The next step for the bill is a vote by the Senate Finance Committee, scheduled for Feb. 16. Court is confident the bill will advance to the full Senate thereafter and move to the House by the end of the month.


Lone Tree Voice 7

7February 16, 2017

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8 Lone Tree Voice

February 16, 2017F

GUNS FROM PAGE 4

Anne-Marie Lemieux and Wendy Vogel were opposed. While all of the board members agreed that 17-1036 was likely to die in the House, each thought it was import to advocate for their point of view in the school safety debate. “This piece of legislation is not outside the realm of what is acceptable by the people of Douglas County,” Peck said. “The only thing that will stop a bad person with a gun is a good person with a gun.” Ray rejected this line of thinking. “I philosophically do not believe that when you put more guns in a place it makes it safer,” Ray said. Vogel argued that the district already employs armed security personnel and that “there is no need to go beyond that.” Lemieux raised questions about the potential liability and risks associated with allowing teachers to be armed on school grounds.

“Our teachers are not equipped to do this,” she said. “This is not what they went to school for.” Geddes, while supporting the bill, said he preferred a more comprehensive solution that would see armed and trained security personnel in every school in the district. “I think there are other ways to protect our schools,” Geddes said. “We could be the world’s leader in safe schools.” Reynolds, who said she grew up around firearms, said she supported the bill on principle and that “people should be able to protect themselves.” DCSD has employed armed security officers since 2003. In addition, in 2013, the district began its School Marshal Program, in partnership with the Douglas County Sheriff ’s Office and Castle Rock, Lone Tree and Parker police departments. Officers and deputies provide security at elementary and middle schools by making multiple daily unannounced visits. The Douglas County School District comprises 87 schools and about 67,000 students.

SENATE FROM PAGE 4

to bring a handgun on campus, was voted down on a 6-3 partyline vote in a House committee on Feb. 8. Its sponsors were Patrick Neville and state Rep. Kim Ransom, R-Acres Green, and state Sen. Tim Neville, RJefferson County. “I believe teachers should focus on teaching and nurturing our children, not act as armed security,” state Rep. Susan Lontine, D-Denver, told the committee, according to a news release. Chris Gdowski, superintendent for Adams 12 Five Star Schools, said arming his employees is not something he’s interested in doing. His district has plenty of safety protocols in place. “Due to our existing safety policies, the presence of our

school resource officers in school buildings, and other safety and security staff throughout our district, state legislation on weapon use in schools is not an avenue we are interested in pursuing at this time,” Gdowski said. Also on Feb. 8, two additional gun-related bills were killed in a House committee on partyline votes. HB 17-1037 would have added businesses to the locations that may be lawfully defended with lethal force if an owner or employee felt sufficiently threatened. HB 17-1097 would have repealed the prohibition on the sale of large-capacity ammunition magazines. “Once again, Democrats showed their opposition to the Second Amendment and dismissed calls from millions of Coloradans to help improve school, workplace and individual safety,” Patrick Neville said in a news release.

It’s not good for our water... either. Whenever you are outside and you notice a piece of trash, please stop and dispose of it properly. What isn’t collected today is picked up in the next rainstorm and sent directly to the nearest creek. From the moment this small piece of trash enters our waterways, it is responsible for a tremendous amount of damage. Local stormwater agencies are teaming together to bring you this message. We take this so seriously that we posted this ad rather than send you more garbage in the mail. One thing is clear: our creeks, rivers and lakes depend on you.

T H IS ST ORMWATER MESSAGE B R OUGHT TO YOU B Y

Visit onethingisclear.org to: • Report accidental and illegal dumping to your local agency • Search local volunteer events • Find more helpful tips Creek and highway cleanup efforts help offset pollution from our major transportation corridors. Contact your local agency to find out how you can get involved. Colorado Community Media agrees: Please recycle this newspaper responsibly and partner with our communities for a better tomorrow. Ad campaign creative donated by the Castle Rock Water, Stormwater Division.


Lone Tree Voice 9

7February 16, 2017 STEM School and Academy social studies students use artificial intelligence to create a talking Kaiser Wilhem, the last German emperor, that responds to questions. The project demonstrated a problemsolving lesson on WWI. ALEX DEWIND

History students utilize virtual reality STEM students gain lessons through high-tech gadgetry BY ALEX DEWIND ADEWIND@COLORADOCOMMUNITY

STEM School and Academy 10thgraders are incorporating technology into what used to be book-driven subjects. On a recent day in Owen Cegielski’s history class, students took turns wearing a black virtual reality headset. With the headset on, one student navigated through a virtual museum of ancient civilizations. Another went to Mars on a rocket ship. “We can see the result of what we work on in our other classes here,” William Joslin said as he pulled up a computer program in which he

designed the museum. Another group of students huddled around a small, clay head with gray hair, light-up eyes and a moving mouth. Art experts in Ceigielski’s class crafted the head to look like Wilhelm II, the last German emperor and a public figure of World War I. Engineering experts programmed the head to have similar mannerisms as Wilhelm and to respond to questions from individuals in the classroom — similar to the Google Home or Amazon Echo. Depending on the nature of the question, Wilhelm would declare war or not declare war The goal of the project, Ceigielski said, was to combine STEM — science, technology, engineering and math — principles into a history class. “It resembles a real-world problem,” Ceigielski said. “It takes a solving team to solve a problem.”

Two Douglas County schools recognized in app contest $15,000 prizes will go to winners chosen by fans, experts STAFF REPORT

Two Douglas County schools were recognized out of more than 1,800 teams across the country as finalists in the Verizon Innovative Learning app challenge, a nationwide contest challenging students to design a mobile app concept that will improve societal issues, according to a media release from Verizon. Cimarron Middle School in Parker and STEM School and Academy in Highlands Ranch were awarded best in state for the middle and high school categories. Teams received $5,000 from the Verizon Foundation along with tablets for each team member. A group of seventh-grade students from Cimarron Middle School developed an app concept called “Care Packager” that allows users to ship requested items directly to a recipient. The app is

directed at men and women serving in the armed forces who need items from home. A group of seven freshmen from STEM School and Academy crafted an app concept called “We the People” following last year’s election to help citizens access unbiased news on politics. “Time constraints for citizens is what helped us come up with the idea to create a nonpartisan app that will efficiently inform citizens of the issues/candidates on the ballot,” team member Chase Babair wrote in a news release. “When there is not an election, our app will provide unbiased news.” The two teams are up for one of eight best in nation awards, determined by a panel of experts, and one fan favorite award, determined by public voting. The eight teams named best in nation and the one team named fan favorite will win $15,000 for their schools and the chance to build their app concept into reality alongside experts from MIT. Winners will also receive an expenses-paid trip to the Technology Student Association (TSA) Conference in Orlando, Florida this June.

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Highlands Ranch woman elected chair of Doulgas County Democrats STAFF REPORT

Maritza Carrera, a longtime Democrat from Highlands Ranch, was elected chair of the Douglas County Democrats at a reorganization meeting on Feb. 4 at ThunderRidge High School. Carrera and her husband Christian founded HR Dems, a grassroots organization that connects Democrats of Highlands Ranch, Lone Tree and Roxborough, in 2004. Over the past 13 years, more than 1,000 new Democrats have participated in Highlands Ranch Democratic meetings, according to a media release from the Douglas County Democrats. “In Douglas County, I see the grassroots movement filled with passion and enthusiasm,” Carrera said in the media release. “These next two years we will harness this energy and create a vibrant grassroots movement. “ Carrera became a precinct captain in 2003. She was also nominated as

chair of House District 43 — which encompasses parts of Highlands Ranch — and became part of the Douglas County Democrats Executive Committee. Carrera was elected as the Highlands Ranch District captain from 2004 to 2008. Most recently, she served as the first vice Carrera chair of Douglas Country Democrats and remains on the Colorado State Party Executive Committee. In addition to her work in Douglas County, Carrera has been involved with the Arapahoe County Latina Initiative, a means to increase Latino participation in the political process. She is also working on creating a progressive women’s group. “One of her overall goals is to connect with neighboring counties and create a strong progressive community,” the media release says.

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10 Lone Tree Voice

February 16, 2017F

Some find park conditions are for the birds Canada geese and their droppings pose a dilemma for groundskeepers BY KYLE HARDING KHARDING@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

The south metro area’s parks and golf courses have become popular spots for Canada geese, frustrating many walkers, golfers and dog owners. “Redstone Park is disgusting right now,” Highlands Ranch resident Carrie Comeford wrote on the Facebook page Word of Mouth Highlands Ranch. “There are so many droppings around the playground there... unsavory.” Other than the geese themselves, the most visible sign of the birds is their waste blanketing the ground of parks, golf courses and sometimes, sidewalks. However, the geese, which are a protected species by both federal and state law, can also damage golf course greens by pecking through the surface to get to sand, which aids their digestion. So why do the geese like it here so much? “There are two things that attract them,” said Dave Brueggeman, parks manager for South Suburban Parks and Recreation District. “Bodies of water and open grass to graze on.” South Suburban manages more than 2,000 acres of open space across the south metro area — primarily in the

A GAGGLE OF FACTS • Canada geese call Colorado home yearround, according to Colorado Parks and Wildlife, but fall and winter see increased numbers as migratory birds come through. • The geese are protected by both federal and state laws, but non-lethal control activities in which there is no direct contact can be done without permits. This includes hazing, or scaring the geese away. • Egg and nest control activities, including coating the eggs with oil to keep them from hatching, require permits. • Other methods to control geese on property, Parks and Wildlife says, can include landscape modification, such as planting trees, bushes or hedges between grassy areas and water, building barriers like fences or rock walls, not feeding them or using commercially available repellents. Littleton, Lone Tree and west Centennial areas — with 74 parks and four golf courses. South Suburban controls geese by “hazing” them when they become a nuisance — using air horns or The Goosinator, a remote-controlled “predator,” to scare them away. But hazing must be done constantly in order to keep the geese at bay. “Resource-wise, it’s taxing,” Brueggeman said. The Highlands Ranch Metro District uses a variety of tactics to attempt to scare geese away from Redstone Park, its largest complex, including coyote cutouts, balloons, streamers and

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Redstone Park in Highlands Ranch has a pond and open space making it a suitable place for geese to dwell. PHOTOS BY ALEX DEWIND remote-controlled devices, according parks and parkways manager Dirk Ambrose. “Nothing seems to reliably work for very long, nor can we afford to have staff constantly move them along,” he said in an email. Jamie Noebel, community relations manager of the Highlands Ranch Community Association, said residents have complained about bird droppings in parks and on sidewalks. Ambrose said that goose complaints typically rise when the spring sports season comes around. “Although it sure seems that the goose activity is on the rise this year, we have no hard data to confirm that,” he said. Colorado Parks and Wildlife spokeswoman Jennifer Churchill said it is hard to tell if the goose population has risen in recent years, but, anecdotally, there does seem to be more lately. The fact that the metro area’s largest bodies of waters don’t freeze over during the winter is an attraction for the geese. “We have open water all winter long so we have a heck of a lot of geese,” she said. Tim Davis, superintendent at Englewood’s Broken Tee golf complex, said in an email that the problem seems bigger this year. “It seems like every other golf course superintendent I talk to is dealing with a bigger mess than usual,” he said. Davis said that Broken Tee currently uses pyrotechnic devices to scare the geese away, but that doesn’t prevent them from landing on the course in the first place. Flashing strobe lights help deter them from nesting on the course’s ponds. Brueggeman said another thing that South Suburban can do is to control nests, with permitting from Parks and Wildlife. This is done by coating the eggs with corn oil, preventing them from hatching. The district is legally permitted to oil 200 eggs per year. An alternative method to controlling geese that has emerged is to scare them away with trained dogs. Tim Eubank, owner Littleton’s of Up & Away Goose Control, said that border collies are particularly effective because their behavior mimics that of the Arctic fox, a natural predator. Eubank said he currently contracts

g s o o t p s

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Dozens of Canada geese take a swim at a pond at Redstone Park in Highlands Ranch.

WHAT’S THE HARM? Goose waste can pose potential health hazards to people and pets. According to the Internet Center for Wildlife Damage Management — a nonprofit organization run by professors from several universities — parasites and bacteria can be carried in goose feces. E. coli, salmonella and listeria are among them. They can also carry viruses, including avian influenza. However, the center cautions that the presence of a disease does not necessarily translate into a public health threat. Find out more at icwdm.org with 12 apartment complexes, including one where an elderly woman was knocked down by an attacking goose, three golf courses, four churches and a business park. He has also developed and marketed The Predator, a remote-controlled device similar to The Goosinator. Davis said that Broken Tee is working on a program to allow owners of herding breed dogs to train them on the course. He said dogs are typically the most effective form of goose hazing. He is also considering purchasing a remote-controlled device, which he says he has used effectively at another course he worked at. Churchill said trained dogs have proven successful and are allowed as long as they don’t harm the geese. Eubank’s dogs are trained not to touch the geese, but the geese don’t know that. “We’re just politely asking the geese to go hang out somewhere else,” Eubank said. — Staff writer Alex DeWind contributed to this report.

r s a a s

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7February 16, 2017

Giving heartbreak a beatdown

Lone Tree Voice 11

Kick-boxing studio gives women a chance to shred angry memories BY TOM SKELLEY TSKELLEY@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

It was the night before Valentine’s Day at iLoveKickboxing in Parker, and though there was plenty of heavy breathing, the only roses in sight were reduced to petals strewn about the floor. Nearly 30 women gathered for the gym’s annual Shred Your Ex workout session. Participants brought photos of ex-spouses, ex-lovers or printouts of negative words and ideas and taped them to punching bags before punching and kicking the images to shreds. “It’s a night for them to focus on one thing that’s troubled them in their life,” instructor Haley McDonald said. “It’s also just a night to have fun, take it out on the bag and leave with a smile.” Hearts were pumping and ears were ringing throughout the hourlong session, as the drumming of gloved fists and bare feet hitting the bags beat an erratic rhythm under McDonald’s shouting and a DJ’s blaring music. Marie Hopper drove from Green Valley Ranch to get in on the work-

Ali Daily works out her frustrations during a workout session at iLoveKickboxing in Parker. On the eve of Valentine’s Day, the gym hosted its Shred Your Ex event in which attendees beat up on photos of their exes. PHOTOS BY TOM SKELLEY out. She brought two printouts, one of the word “tax,” and one of President Trump. “It’s just the perfect picture,” Hopper said. “He looks like he wants to fight, so we’re going to do this.” The session ended with a combination of hoots and gasps for breath as the boxers dropped their gloves and reached for their water bottles.

Mouths that had been twisted in determination opened into smiles, hands that were clenched into fists relaxed for a round of high-fives. “It’s just such an adrenaline rush,” said Amy Buoniconti of Parker, who brought a printout of the word “negativity,” and punched it to bits. “The first 15 minutes is pure hell,” she said “Then it’s fun.”

Karen Olsen kicks a punching bag labeled with a sign encouraging her to “kick cancer’s butt” during the Shred Your Ex event at iLoveKickboxing in Parker. Some participants, like Olsen, brought printouts of negative words and concepts, while others brought photos of their ex-boyfriends or exlovers as they took out their aggression with gloved fists and bare feet.

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12 Lone Tree Voice

LOCAL

February 16, 2017F

VOICES Let others into your heart to put your problems in perspective

WINNING WORDS

Michael Norton

T

his week I would like to share a quick story with you about a boy and his journey and understanding of the bigger picture while finding purpose along the way to becoming a man. His story starts out very sadly as his father dies in a car accident when the boy was only 5 years old. He had a brother and two sisters, so his father’s death left his mom alone to raise four children on her own. Friends and neighbors helped out as much as they could and were around often enough in the beginning, but as time went on, they had to tend to their own lives and families. Extended family played a huge part of helping to raise the young boy and his siblings; in particular, his

grandparents were extremely loving and supportive. A few years went by and the young boy’s mother did remarry. However, it was an unhealthy marriage and there was plenty of trouble and hardships for the family. After enduring the marriage for 10 years his mother and stepfather divorced. Although difficult to get by and divorce is never easy, it was healthier for everyone. And within another two years, his mother remarried once again. This was also unfortunately a short-lived marriage as the boy, who by now was a teenager, watched as his mother’s newest husband and the family’s newest stepfather passed away unexpectedly one day while hanging the Christmas

lights on the outside of the house. Throughout this young man’s life, his grandparents had raised him in the church. However, as his life seemed to be filled with more struggles and misery than he felt he could handle, he was often conflicted with how he felt about the church and God. It seemed as though his friends and neighbors and cousins and other families had “normal” lives compared to his own life and he wondered for years why this was happening to him and his family. His patience eventually gave in to anger and resentment and he found himself shaking his fist at the sky and cursing and SEE NORTON, P13

Hey, speeders: There’s nothing pedestrian about this concern

QUIET DESPERATION

Craig Marshall Smith

I

live on a street named after a sobbing tree. The street is a shortcut to a nearby high school. The posted speed limit is 25 mph. But you wouldn’t know it, mornings, when the teenagers are on their way. Maybe they’re just late for school. I wonder if they would rather be late for school, or headed to court, to appear in front of a judge on reckless driving and manslaughter charges? My street is lined with children — little children. Now and then, they get away from a parent. My street is lined with dog owners, who like to walk their dogs without the fear of turning into a couple of asphalt scabs. There’s one old guy who walks his incontinent dachshund off and on all day long. He’s the neighborhood Grinch, but he loves his dog.

The two of them are a familiar sight on my street. They don’t walk very far on each trip. The dog is old and has very short legs. In the morning this is what they hear: Whoosh. Whoosh. Whoosh. Whoosh. Teenagers, your first driver’s license, loud music, and obliviousness to the law all go together. And that’s fine. Take it out somewhere else. Just not up and down subdivision streets that are lined with children and dogs. John Kay is 72. He was born Joachim Fritz Krauledat in East Prussia, Germany (now a part of Russia). He and his family made their way to Canada, and then to the United States. He wears sunglasses, indoors and outdoors, all day long. Kay is legally blind. The punch line is that Kay and his band

Steppenwolf recorded a song that you could be listening to right now, as background for this column. “Born to Be Wild” is everywhere. Maybe you first heard it when you watched “Easy Rider” in 1969. Maybe you heard it again during the Coen brothers’ 2017 Super Bowl commercial. It was a teenager’s anthem when I was a teenager, and it still is. I was not, however, born to be wild. At the age of 15, I turned 35. I didn’t want it, it just happened. There was something about a murder. I was a witness. I had to sit up straight and talk like an adult for the first time. In 2001, I was shown a transcript of my testimony in 1963. It surprised me. I sounded good: complete sentences, with no fillers. Like “like.” SEE SMITH, P35

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Guns in schools a bad idea On Feb. 6, Senate Bill 17-005, a bill that would allow a county sheriff to provide training to educators seeking to carry a concealed weapon in school, led by state Sen. Chris Holbert, of Parker, and state Rep. Patrick Neville, of Castle Rock, was approved in the Senate. As a school psychologist in a Douglas County school, and more importantly, the parent of Douglas County students, I have grave concerns as this bill moves forward.

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Having worked over 20 years in public schools in both suburban schools and inner-city schools, including Richmond, Virginia, and Cincinnati, Ohio, I have never felt the need or desire to carry a firearm on school property, and I might add that I have handled over a dozen types of firearms. First, it is foolish to think that one can have easy access to a firearm to defend, and at the same time, guard against students also having access to the firearm. Studies show that

children are drawn to weapons and many will quickly figure out where firearms are located. Secondly, I have great doubts that all adults who carry handguns have the executive functioning skills required to discern level of threat and counter impulsive response when faced with a spectrum of stressful situations. Our role as educators, principals, psychologists, social workers, etc. is not to be public defenders. Our role is, among other things, to create a climate of calm and thoughtful prob-

lem-solving. We try to teach students to work through problems through verbal exchange, not physical acts of violence. By carrying weapons on school grounds, not only do we create a stifling climate of hostility and a greater potential for accidental and purposeful gun shootings, we send a clear message that schools are no longer a safe place to thrive and learn. Suzi Hackett Castle Rock

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Lone Tree Voice 13

7February 16, 2017

Washington affects economic growth, with changes coming thick and fast

T

he new administration is well underway and there are changes in policy almost daily. Congress is facing a packed legislative calendar during the first 100 days. It may be hard for the average person to keep up. Let’s review what we know so far and how it might affect the economy and investments. The first pledge was to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. Republicans have promised swift action on this priority although they have not formulated a specific plan as of this writing. They are working on the details of a replacement plan that would allow individuals to keep coverage during the implementation of the new reforms. Once a strategy is approved, it could still take several years to eliminate the current version of the ACA. The next top priority is regulatory reform. There have already been announcements about regulations ranging from FDA approval, corporate acquisitions, building codes, banking and even the Department of Labor client services rule that have been targeted. The theory is that less regulation will allow for higher growth. The question is, will there be a negative outcome for the consumer? Most of these regulations were designed for consumer protection, whether it be keeping corporations from becoming

NORTON FROM PAGE 12

yelling at God. As time went on, he eventually found his way back to church again, and he actually volunteered as one of the youth directors of the church. Every Friday night he would help the youth pastor lead the group. The youth group was open to everyone, not just members of that particular church. One Friday night a young girl showed up to attend youth group. She kept to herself most nights and was very quiet. And then one night, an opportunity came up that allowed the young man and the new girl attending the youth group meetings to talk. And as she shared her story, in that instant, the young man knew immediately that everything that had happened to him as he was growing up did not happen to punish him, but rather to prepare him for something bigger in his life. He was being prepared for this very moment with the young girl, and as he would find out later in life, he was also being prepared for many other opportunities just like it. You see, the young girl shared with him that she was feeling bad, she was feeling hurt, and she was feeling sad and angry all at the same time. She had lost her mom, her father remarried, he later divorced, and then remarried again, and then unfortunately divorced again. She felt it was somehow her fault. She shared that her friends all seemed to live “normal” lives and seemed so much more stable. She was tired of the way people looked at her and her family. She felt like she

FINANCIAL STRATEGIES

Patricia Kummer

so large there is no price competition or protecting investors’ wealth through rules created out of the 2008 financial crisis. Many financial analysts agree that while deregulation can spur growth in the short term, it could add inflation and reduce consumer protection in the long

run. Tax reform was a major campaign promise that now has settled on the back burner. This is upsetting many major corporate CEOs who were welcomed to the White House in the first weeks only to find that tax cuts have been pushed into late 2017 at the earliest. At first glance, the Republican outline shows the current seven tax brackets being consolidated into three and some deductions going away. There is also talk of repealing the current estate tax but adding some capital gains for assets over a certain size. Again, this could spur some shortterm growth but the question remains if this is sustainable given our deficit. Stricter immigration policy could slow growth and increase inflation as we have fewer workers willing to work

didn’t belong. As the young man listened, with his own heart breaking as he was hearing his own life story played back to him, he was able to look her in the eye and not say, “I think I know how you feel.” Instead he was able to say, “I know exactly how you feel.” He shared his own story and there was immediate trust amongst them. The young girl continued attending youth group, made many friends, and her own family life stabilized as she grew and matured as a person and in her faith. And again, in that one instant, in that very moment, a boy, turned teenager, turned young man, realized that there really is a bigger picture, there really is a purpose, he was not here by accident, and that his own life story, even as tragic as it may have seemed, was leading him and preparing him for something far greater in life. And sometimes it takes years, maybe even many years for us to get past the anger, frustration, and pain before we can see and understand it all. We just have to be open to seeing it, or we may end up missing the opportunity to see the bigger picture and finding our own purpose. How about you? Is something happening right now that is confusing, frustrating, and making it hard for you to see the bigger picture? I really would love to hear all about it at gotonorton@gmail.com. And when we can look through and even past the tragedies and triumphs of life so that we can see the bigger picture, it really will be a better than good week. Michael Norton is a resident of Castle Rock, the former president of the Zig Ziglar Corporation, a strategic consultant and a business and personal coach.

menial jobs for low pay. This along with a push for more infrastructure spending could stretch the employment picture, forcing wages and benefits higher to attract more American workers to these jobs. This in turn could fuel higher costs of goods and services as businesses ranging from retail to construction have higher overhead. Trade agreements among a myriad of other agenda items remain uncertain. Historically both fiscal stimulus (tax cuts) and protectionist policies have tended to boost inflation. Stimulus in the form of infrastructure spending typically provided the greatest benefit at the beginning of an economic cycle when unemployment is high and the economy has significant upside potential. The fact this is coming late in the cycle, when unemployment is low and we have been in recovery for eight years, is adding uncertainty that the outcome will be positive for America.

In summary, some of the new policies should spur economic growth but likely at the price of inflation, including taxing imports. Corporate earnings appear positive for the time being, but higher labor costs can put a damper on the length of the upward trend. Fewer regulations could lighten the cost structure of some industries, but not without additional risks to the consumer. Stay tuned … we are only a month into the new administration. (Excerpts from Fidelity Viewpoint, Jan. 20) Patricia Kummer has been an independent Certified Financial Planner for 30 years and is president of Kummer Financial Strategies Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor in Highlands Ranch. Kummer Financial is a six-year 5280 Top Advisor. Please visit www.kummerfinancial.com for more information. Any material discussed is meant for informational purposes only and not a substitute for individual advice.

In Loving Memory Place an Obituary for Your Loved One. Private 303-566-4100 Obituaries@ColoradoCommunityMedia.com

Funeral Homes Visit: www.memoriams.com


14 Lone Tree Voice

February 16, 2017F

BUDGET

‘I think we learned a lot. Lesson one is that when we have this kind of an impact on student learning, we need to slow the process down.’

FROM PAGE 1

In the past, all schools paid the same average amount for a teacher, calculated using his or her salary, plus benefits and retirement contributions. Now, rather than using the districtwide average, that amount will be differentiated among the elementary, middle schools and high schools. Because elementary teachers cost the district less, those schools would be able to hire more people with the same amount of money, district officials said. Middle school and high school teachers, however, would be more expensive to hire. The town hall event was attended by several school district officials — interim Superintendent Erin Kane, Chief Financial Officer Bonnie Betz and assistant superintendents Steve Cook and Ted Knight. Two board of education members, Anne-Marie Lemieux and David Ray, attended. All seven school board members were invited. The guests each had a chance to speak and then answer questions from the crowd. The majority of questions centered on why more money needed to be directed to elementary schools, the lack of community input in the decision and ideas for solving the problem. The district said it does not have plans for cuts to staff or programing at the secondary level at this time. “I have seen these cuts come down the line in the past and they have been

David Ray, board member

A BUDGET CHANGE A change was made to school-based budgeting that will impact the cost of teachers on each school. Instead of all schools paying the same average amount for a teacher during the budgeting process, now elementary, middle and high schools will be differentiated. All averages include salary, benefits and PERA. Projected 2017-18 average teacher cost:

Overall: $74,574

Middle school: $76,092

Elementary: $71,801

High school: $76,971

tough,” said Laura Mutton, a parent who also helped organize the town hall event. Mutton has had children in the district since 2003 and said she has seen firsthand the impact of budgets, most notably during the recession in 2008 and 2009 when the district eliminated jobs in school services, transportation and high school education in an effort to save money. Now, the district faces financial challenges, including rising costs to areas such as employee retirement (PERA), medical coverage, nursing and needed improvements for special

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The Subdudes Friday, March 3 at 8pm This New Orleans-formed group is a living encapsulation of American music, a vibrant cauldron of sounds that stirs together meaty grooves and jazzy dynamics, soulful R&B swagger, asy vocal harmonies, cheeky rock ‘n’ roll attitude, and folky social consciousness.

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needs and mental health care. Other increased costs include building repairs, salary increases and bonuses for teachers and staff, and technology and device refresh for schools. State funding through per-pupil revenue is expected to stay flat or increase only slightly. The per-pupil funding for the 2016-17 school year is $7,163. “Many of our schools have much lower enrollment then they used to have,” Kane said, adding that lower enrollment means less money at each building to combat rising costs. For 2016-17, DCSD’s enrollment is 67,470, up from 66,896 in 2015-16, according to the Colorado Department of Education. However, some elementary schools are experiencing declining enrollments, district officials say. The district has projected the following schools in the Parker, Highlands Ranch and Castle Rock will be under utilized in the 2017-18 school year: Pine Lane Elementary, Mountain View Primary Arrowwood Elementary, Larkspur Elementary, Mesa Middle School Ponderosa High School. Other schools have been projected to be under unitized by the 2021-2022 school year: Northeast Intermediate, Trailblazer Elementary, Sierra MiddleSchool and Castle Rock Middle School Administrative cuts planned The deficit has been felt especially hard at the elementary level, where schools have struggled to afford specialists like art and music teachers on a full-time basis, Kane said. Before any money is directed away from schools, Kane said the district will make cuts to central administration. The proposed 2017-18 budget will be presented at the Feb. 21 school board meeting along with a review of proposed cuts. Cindy Barnard, of the group Taxpayers for Public Education, has been involved in the district as a volunteer for 18 years. “The funds that I continue to see at the administrative level — funds that are not reaching students in our schools — is shocking,” she said. While she did not attend the meeting, school board President Meghann

Silverthorn spoke to Colorado Community Media before the event and voiced her confidence in the district’s ability to limit the impact on students. “The superintendent and her staff are working hard to make next year’s budget as minimally impactful as possible,” Silverthorn said. “This means keeping programming and keeping funding cuts related to enrollment changes only. When I was first elected to the board, the district was nearly insolvent. Now, our expenditures are funded in cash and we have a healthy reserve and funds that can help schools keep programming available for students.” Ray said it was unfortunate the community did not have a chance to give its input on the proposed changes until after they were made. “I think we learned a lot. Lesson one is that when we have this kind of an impact on student learning, we need to slow the process down,” Ray said. “That means we need to be thinking thoroughly before making a decision.” Take it to the ballot? Douglas County residents said no the past two times school-funding issues made the ballot. The community voted down a $200 million bond issue in 2011 that would have gone toward building three new schools in Castle Rock and Parker and a $29 million mill levy override that would have provided funding for instructional expenses and pay-for-performance for teachers. In 2008, Douglas County voters rejected a $395 million bond issue and a $17 million mill levy override to support building new schools, improving student achievement, recruiting and retaining the workforce and improving the district’s technological advances in the face of expanded enrollment. Kane said district staff is gathering data and will present options for a ballot measure to the public before the next school year. “If we want to put a tax incentive on the ballot, we need to make sure that we convince you that we are going to be the best stewards possible of the money we have,” Ray said. Cook said that the more the community and district can work together, the easier it will be to garner support for a possible tax measure from the public. “If we are going to win over those voters, we need to show that we’re on the same page,” he said. “It’s a different day. Let us demonstrate the trust that we can show you. And if our actions aren’t showing it, call us on it. We’ll answer.”


Lone Tree Voice 15

7February 16, 2017

Democrats want permanent funding for transportation Caveat that education spending must not be hurt is difficult part BY JAMES ANDERSON ASSOCIATED PRESS

Colorado’s Democratic House leadership said any effort to create a permanent funding source to improve the state’s congested road network must not sacrifice education spending. On Feb. 8, a month into Colorado’s four-month legislative session, House Speaker Crisanta Duran told reporters she’s “optimistically cautious” that talks with leaders in the Republican-led Senate will produce a possible ballot measure on paying for roads to be referred to voters. Transportation funding was

declared a top priority in 2017 by lawmakers of both parties. But a detailed proposal has yet to be introduced by anyone, and Senate Republican President Kevin Grantham suggested this week that talks have been difficult. Colorado roads projects face a $9 billion Duran backlog — plus a $1 billion maintenance bill each year. Other government priorities, including making up for chronically underfunded K-12 spending, must not be further harmed by any roads deal, Duran said. Wist Republicans have insisted that roads funding — especially issuing bonds — be paid for

from the general fund. Democrats say there’s no money to back bonds. Complicating the task: General fund revenues will drop by at least $135 million in the fiscal year that begins July 1 because of a constitutional amendment that requires a reduction in residential property tax collections. Already, per-pupil spending is set to decline by $122 under Gov. John Hickenlooper’s proposed 2017-18 fiscal year budget. Public education has been shortchanged for years under a budgeting gimmick that’s allowed the state to rack up an $876 million debt in that sector. “We want to invest in transportation, but not at the expense of our kids,” Duran said. “It is imperative that we don’t continue to put a Band-Aid on our fiscal situation.” State Rep. Cole Wist, R-Centennial, was not impressed with what he heard from Duran.

“Speaker Duran’s call for more taxpayer revenue without any offsetting tax reductions is a complete departure from constructive conversations with Republicans and shows she and the Democrats have given up on a fiscally responsible solution to transportation funding,” Wist said in a news release. Duran revived an idea rejected this year and last by Republican leaders: Using income from a state hospital fund to create breathing room for more spending. That proposal, which could have added $750 million to the state budget last year, went nowhere in the 2016 legislative session. The GOP considers the fund, paid by hospitals to get matching funds from the federal government, a tax that counts toward annual state revenue limits under the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights.

Serving the southeast Denver area

Castle Rock/Franktown

First United Methodist Church 1200 South Street Castle Rock, CO 80104 303.688.3047 www.fumccr.org

  Services:

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Sunday 8:00am, 9:30am, and 11:00am  Children’s Sunday School 9:30am

Little Blessings Day Care 

www.littleblessingspdo.com

Centennial

Greenwood Village

 

Sunday Worship 8:00 & 10:45 a.m. Sunday School Bible Study 9:30am Trinity Lutheran School & ELC (Ages 3-5, Grades K-8)

Catholic Parish & School

Seven Sunday Masses Two Daily Masses Confessions Six Days a Week STM Catholic School Preschool – Grade 8

8035 South Quebec Street Centennial, CO 80112 303.770.1150

www.stthomasmore.org

Congregation Beth Shalom Serving the Southeast Denver area

Call or check our website for information on services and social events! www.cbsdenver.org

303-794-6643

Lone Tree Chabad Jewish Center South Metro Denver Synagogue, Preschool, Hebrew School & Much More! www.DenverJewishCenter.com

 

tapestry umc JOIN US FOR WORSHIP AT CU SOUTH DENVER

10035 Peoria Street Meeting every Sunday at 9:30

All are welcome! Tapestry United Methodist Church on Facebook

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Parker evangelical Presbyterian church Connect – Grow – Serve

Sunday Worship

8:45 am & 10:30 am 9030 MILLER ROAD PARKER, CO 80138 3038412125 www.pepc.org

303-792-7222

 303-841-4660  www.tlcas.org 

 

Parker

St. Thomas More

Trinity Lutheran Church & School

Parker

To advertise your place of worship in this section, call Karen at 303-566-4091 or email kearhart@ColoradoCommunityMedia.com

Sunday Services - 10 a.m. Cimarron Middle School 12130 Canterberry Parkway Parker, CO 80138 www.CSLParker.org

Joy Lutheran Church Sharing God’s Love

SAturdAy 5:30pm

SundAy 8am & 10:30am

9:15am Education hour

Pastor Rod Hank

Joyful Mission Preschool 303-841-3770 7051 East Parker Hills Ct. • Parker, CO 303-841-3739 • ELCA • www.joylc.org

Pine Lane Elementary South 6475 E Ponderosa Dr. Parker, CO 80138 303-941-0668


16 Lone Tree Voice

LOCAL

February 16, 2017F

LIFE

O

h

p d

c

i C a

Little library,

l s l b o a s

w g

p g m t i

lots of

community Todd Walsh, his wife, Kristi, and their two daughters, Maya and Nora, created two Little Free Libraries for their Lakewood community. Todd gets requests to build Little Free Libraries from neighbors and the school he works at frequently. COURTESY PHOTO

Trend helps create connections while boosting love of reading BY STEPHANIE MASON SMASON@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

A

fter the bus drops her off from school, London Branch, 5, runs to her Little Free Library box to look for a new

book. “It is almost like a treasure box, you never know what you are going to discover,” said Fernando Branch, London’s father. Rewind to spring break 2016. Fernando, a principal at Noel Community Art School, decided to spend his weeklong break to complete a project with his daughters that would benefit the community. Despite the cold weather and 1-yearold daughter Lauren’s persistence in stealing the wood glue, Fernando and his family built their Little Free Library and put it up in front of their home on South Madison Circle in Centennial in mid-January. Building the box is a memory he will always have with his daughters, Fernando said. London adores keeping track of what is new. For both of his daughters, their favorite book found in their library, so far, has been “The Very Hungry Caterpillar” by Eric Carle. “She runs over there to see if some-

NOT JUST FOR YOUNG FAMILIES Young families are not the only Little Free Library lovers. Josh Beers, 17, from Golden employed his Boy Scout troup to build some for the community. Each year, Boy Scouts plan, fund and complete service projects to earn their Eagle Scout badges. Josh’s mom told him about a Little Free Library she came across on her walk and, after some research, Josh decided to make a few for his service project.

MAKE YOUR OWN ganized members from Troop 130 in Golden to construct three little libraries. “I organized everything and taught everyone what to do,” Josh said. “It was really easy.”

On littlefreelibrary.org, a variety of alreadybuilt library hutches are available for purchase. For those interested in building a Little Free Library, the website offers resources, support and inspiration.

After planting the libraries in front of a church, an apartment complex and within a community, Josh found that each library is sustaining itself.

In addition, you can find the Little Free Library nearest to you by going to the same website and clicking on “map.”

ACTION BOOK CLUB

With blueprint help from his father, Josh or-

“Now I can say that I found that they are being taken care of,” Josh said. “Sometimes they get a little empty, but there is always that person who will come and put a ton of books in.”

one has put something in there that she wants,” Fernando said. “I love to see that it started an enthusiasm for reading in her.” Fernando also is excited about the response from his neighbors. “While I was out there with the girls measuring, people would stop and ask what we were doing,” Fernando said. “It started so many conversations.” Conversations at the box go beyond a friendly “hello.” He finds the Little Free Library to be a way for people to learn about the diversities found in his own neighborhood. He believes it brings people together with similarities. “When we engage in these projects with our families, it encourages the American values that we share,” Fernando said. “The core of reading is

education. As a society, we are really quick to point out the differences of us all. But if we focus on the love of the things we share in common, like the love to read and educate ourselves — that is a unifier.” The Little Free Library is, at its core, a small-scale neighborhood book exchange. A structure sheltering between 20 to 60 books is built or purchased by a community member and planted in the community. Whoever comes across a Little Free Library is welcome to either take a book or leave a book. Margret Aldrich, media and programming director at the Little Free Library nonprofit organization, based in Hudson, Wisconsin, said the library becomes self-sustaining. All family-friendly reading materials

“I liked the idea of a self-sufficient library,” Josh said. “It was like an experiment.”

In late January, the Little Free Library started the Action Book Club. This club encourages participants to engage with their community by reading books on timely topics, engaging in lively conversations and committing to community service projects. Different book clubs can communicate online. To sign up an Action Book Club of your own, visit littlefreelibrary.org/actionbookclub.

are welcome in the exchange. Self-help, Westerns, science fiction, picture books and many more genres are encouraged to circulate through the libraries. The first Little Free Library was built in Hudson, Wisconsin, in 2009 by Tod Bol in tribute to his book-loving mother. The Little Free Library became a nonprofit in 2012. The little library trend has grown to 50,000 set-ups in 50 states and in 70 SEE LIBRARY, P17


Lone Tree Voice 17

7February 16, 2017

O

Swallow Hill gives new songwriters a chance to shine ne of the trickiest things about being a musician is getting your music out there where people can actually

hear it. And while there’s a slew of online platforms to host music for free, that doesn’t mean people will hear it. That’s where Swallow Hill Music comes in. For the ninth year, the organization is hosting its annual Young Writers Competition for performers in middle and high school. “Submissions have to be original lyrics that can be performed live,” said Cheri Gonzales, director of Swallow Hill’s school operations. “The biggest prize for our winners is the opportunity to perform at our venues, and to have some time in a professional recording studio.” But for Thomas Koenigs, who won the contest in 2015, there was a greater prize. “Winning wasn’t the most important thing, although it was very gratifying,” he remembered. “For me, the best part was meeting all these people, and making some crazy important connections.” Swallow Hill is accepting submis-

LIBRARY FROM PAGE 16

countries. Colorado is home to more than 600 Little Free Libraries. According to Aldrich, the libraries become community hubs. There is no style guide dictating the appearance of a Little Free Library. Though the usual structure resembles a birdhouse or a dollhouse, people are encouraged to be creative. There are Little Free Libraries y that are brightly painted or shaped like robots, police-call boxes, whales, log cabins and rowboats. A $40 registration fee puts the library on the website’s official community map and database. The company sends an

.

LINER NOTES

sions until 5 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 24. Gonzales said the nonprofit usually receives about 20 to 30 submissions, and from there 10 contestants are selected to perform live on April 1, at the Museum of Contemporary Art in downtown Denver. Clarke Reader There are no genre limitations for entry, and over the years participants have included a cappella, solo singer-songwriters, duos and groups. “It’s really whatever the performer feels is the best way to express themselves,” she said. “We’ve had people who take the Bob Dylan, solo acoustic guitar route, to multi-instrumentalists who are able to pull off really dynamic performances.” For Koenigs, music was a way to channel his interest in writing and appreciation for artists like Dylan and Creedence Clearwater Revival. “I’d taken some rock classes, but had only written some basic chord progressions,” he said. “It was nerve-

official “Little Free Library” sign and an information and resource packet. The trend also helps the homeless, who may not have access to books at conventional libraries because they have no address, Aldrich said. Love at first sight Five years ago, Todd Walsh, his wife and their two daughters spent a vacation visiting friends. During a walk, they discovered a Little Free Library. The family instantly fell in love with the idea. Three summers later, Walsh was hammering the nails into his own Little Free Library for his home on West Applewood Knolls Drive in Lakewood. “Where we live in Lakewood, our house is right on the corner and it is a popular route to a park,” Walsh said.

CLARKE’S ALBUM OF THE WEEK Selection: Ryan Adams’ “Prisoner” released on Pax Am/Blue Note records. Review: Adams’ first album of new material since 2014, “Prisoner” is a moving and heartfelt exploration of loves ending and beginning, at least partly inspired by his divorce from Mandy Moore in 2015. The album showcases some of Adams’ best and most devastating songwriting, and anyone wracking to get up and perform something I had written, but everyone was so friendly, and helped me get better.” The professional performance and recording opportunities are a great boon to its winners, Gonzales said, but any occasion to play music live is a plus. “For a lot of contestants, they’re just getting started in the professional music process,” she said. “Giving them a chance to put their work out there is very important, and we make sure everyone is very encouraging throughout the process.” Currently, Koenigs is studying English literature, but the people he met in the competition are still a part of his life.

“We have a lot of foot traffic.” The Slater Elementary School teacher only had time to work on the project while his daughters Maya, 6, and Nora, 4, were napping. While working on the project, Walsh’s neighbor walked across the street to see what was going on. The two discussed the Little Free Library and decided that their neighborhood needed not one, but two of the book hubs. Walsh completed both projects after a month of work. One is dedicated solely to housing children’s books while the other, directly across the street, holds books for teen and adult readers. “It has been amazing and we have loved it,” Walsh said. “It has been a great way for us to meet people. It is a great conversation starter. We watch

who has suffered a broken heart while find a line or two that hits like a punch to the gut. But for both Adams and the listener, there’s also beauty and release to be found in music. Favorite song: “Shiver and Shake” Best homage to Bruce Springsteen’s “Tunnel of Love”: “Tightrope” “The whole environment for this was so supportive,” he said. “There’s no downside to taking a chance and trying this.” For more information, and submission guidelines, visit www.swallowhillmusic.org/community/young-songwriters-competition. Clarke Reader’s column on how music connects to our lives appears every other week. A community editor with Colorado Community Media, he admires anyone who performs their material live. Check out his music blog at calmacil20.blogspot.com. And share your performance stores at creader@ coloradocommunitymedia.com.

from the windows and love seeing families on bike rides stop and take books.” Walsh did not stop building at two little libraries. The Slater Elementary sixthgraders, as a tradition, leave a contribution to their school before advancing to middle school. They commissioned Walsh in 2016 to make a Little Free Library for the school. To this day, passersby knock on Walsh’s door and ask him about the little library outside his home. Many people ask him to make a little library for their neighborhoods miles away. “It really is a conversation starter,” Walsh said. “Normally someone might say ‘hello,’ but now we have gotten to know so many of our neighbors because we have something to talk about.”

London and Lauren Branch helped their father, Fernando, build a Little Free Library for the Centennial neighborhood they live in. COURTESY PHOTO


18 Lone Tree Voice

February 16, 2017F

New Orleans sound will be coming around SONYA’S SAMPLER

The Subdudes, who originally formed in 1987 in New Orleans, and did a farewell tour and then regrouped, will perform at Lone Tree Arts Center, 10075 Commons St., Lone Tree, at 8 p.m. March 3. The five musicians promise jazzy dynamics, cheeky rock ‘n’ roll Sonya Ellingboe attitude and folky social consciousness. Tickets start at $33, lonetreeartscenter. org, 720-509-1000. `Eye of the Camera’ The Littleton Fine Arts Board presents its 51st photography exhibition, “Eye of the Camera,” from Feb. 17 to March 26 at the Littleton Museum, 6028 S. Gallup St., Littleton. The juror is Randy Brown of Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design. Open during museum hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays; 1 to 5 p.m. Sundays. Admission is free. 303-795-3950. Books! Books! Books! The Friends of the Littleton Library/ Museum offers autographed copies, first editions and other unusual books through Feb. 26 in the third annual silent auction at Bemis Library, 6014 S. Datura St., Littleton. Volunteer Sue McNamee says to look in the large

The Subdudes will perform at Lone Tree Arts Center on March 3 with their New Orleansflavored rock and harmonic styling, honed with 10 albums and 25 years of music. COURTESY PHOTO

glass cases just inside the entrance to see what’s available, then look at the notebook (with the FOL/M volunteer or at the Main Desk) to see description, photos and existing bids to date. The first set will be displayed through Feb. 26, when a second set goes on display until March 12. Some more valuable items will be shown all four weeks. Ask if you want to see the book more closely. Included: “No Future Without Forgiveness,” Desmond Tutu’s memoir, autographed; “Seven Godivas” written for adults in 1937 by Dr. Seuss; and more. Revisit to see if your bid is still top! Dorothy Tanner “Lumonics” artist Dorothy Tanner will appear at Museum of Outdoor Arts Indoor Gallery and Hampden Hall, in the Englewood Civic Center, 1000 Englewood Parkway, Englewood, for the screening of a short film about Mel and Dorothy Tanner and a brief discussion with MOA Executive Director Cynthia

Madden Leitner about the couple’s artistic journey. Refreshments in the gallery will follow. The event is on Feb. 25 starting at 1 p.m. 303-806-0444; moaonline.org. (The exhibit runs through March 24.) Like to make music? The Castle Rock Band, patterned after the CR Band that existed in the early 1900s, begins rehearsals for the 2017 season on March 6 at Faith Lutheran Church. 303 N. Ridge Road in Castle Rock. No audition and no cost. Rehearsals are every other Monday and the band seeks new members in all sections. Music is at about high school level. For more information, see castlerockband. com or email CastleRockBand@aol. com. Hear soaring voices The Preliminary Competition for the Denver Lyric Opera Guild’s awards for Colorado operatic singers offers a free

LETTERS FROM PAGE 12

Time for better health care fix The guest column by Joe Sammen demands a response. I find it very ironic he cites studies that the repeal of the ACA without replacement would lead to millions uninsured and replacement must contain certain protections. Where was this concern when millions lost coverage at the implementation of the ACA in the first place? The implementation of the ACA had to rely on deception (Pelosi: “We have to pass the law to find out what’s in the law”), and lies (Obama: “If you like your plan you can keep you plan; if you like your doctor you can keep your doctor”) to become law in the first place. Yes, pre-existing coverage and adult children staying on parents’ plans until 26 are the good parts of the ACA. And they should be part of any new replacement plan. But the answer was to not upend coverage for 100 percent of the population to solve a problem for 10-15 percent of the population. There were much better alternative fixes for the 10-15 percent that lacked coverage than what the ACA did to everyone else.

day Feb. 25 (9 a.m. to 5 p.m.) of arias by young singers who are on a professional track. Professional judges will choose winners who will compete again in the finals on March 25. (Top prize is $6,000.) It takes place at Bethany Lutheran Church, 4500 E. Hampden Ave., Cherry Hills. Admission is free and you can enter and leave at any time. Contact DLOG to order a boxed lunch: Barbara at 720-934-2867 or denverlyricoperaguild.org. Art workshop “Adding Surface Treatments” is Jo Ann Nelson’s topic for a March 4 workshop from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., presented by Heritage Fine Arts Guild of Arapahoe County at First Presbyterian Church, 1609 W. Littleton Blvd., Littleton. Registrants should bring acrylic paints, three 16X20 canvases or boards, glue, wet plaster and texture media (see HFAG website for complete list, heritage-guild. com). Cost is $30/members; $50 nonmembers. Memberships cost $35 and sign up forms are at heritage-guild. com/membership. Hail to the chiefs Highlands Ranch Historical Society presents “U.S. Presidents That Made the Greatest Impact on Colorado — and Colorado Governors,” on Feb. 20 from 7 to 8:30 p.m., at Highlands Ranch Southridge Recreation Center, 4800 McArthur Ranch Road, upstairs auditorium. Open to guests — $2 donation requested. Info or to register: 641-715-3900 ext. 147406# or email programs@thehrhs.org.

But Obama put his ideology ahead of what was good for the country and we ended up with what we have today — a failed ACA that has to be repealed and replaced. Greg Nierling Centennial

Bad move by senator I wrote our Senator, Cory Gardner, and implored him to not vote for Betsy DeVos as education secretary. I based myJ argument on the confirmation hearings Q where she displayed an almost complete i l ignorance of public school issues. 2 At the time of my writing the letT ter, I was unaware of the Center for American Progress report listing Cory a m Gardner as a recipient of $49,800 in campaign contributions from the DeVos D family. Had I known that, I would have L asked him to recuse himself from the L vote because of ethics violations. To the credit of Sen. Gardner’s staff, f i shortly after his vote to confirm, I received a reply where he praises her as t being a “long-time advocate for educa- t tion reform.” He apparently is unaware that in Douglas County our school board p has made “education reform” a dirty word that means to destroy our public schools. Bob Hogan Castle Rock

Caring for our Community by

Using Sustainable Printing Practices. ColoradoCommunityMedia.com


Lone Tree Voice 19

7February 16, 2017

‘The Zeus Problem’ came to stage via winding path Buntport started with one plan before switching to another BY SONYA ELLINGBOE SELLINGBOE@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

The Buntport company explains in the beginning of the program that members had started writing a different play, collaboratively, as they always do. “But a few months ago, we made an abrupt shift, choosing to make something that felt more tied to the times. Besides the current climate, we took inspiration from ‘Prometheus Bound,’ a story of what happens when someone defies the king of the gods.” They were joined by “the incomparable Jim Hunt” as the creative process moved forward, becoming “The Zeus Problem,” which will play through Feb. 25 at Denver’s Buntport Theater. Looking spiffy in a purple suit, Zeus (Jim Hunt) struts in front of the audience, backed by a black curtain — asking if they like his suit! He then gets fussy — “You need me, but I most definitely don’t need you … You’re like a bunch of disgusting artichokes!” He goes on to explain that he “needs new suits all the time … worship causes bloating … The rise (front seam where zipper is located) is not easily altered … I start there and build

“THE ZEUS PROBLEM: A DARK COMEDY ABOUT A GOD AND THE MESS HE MADE” plays through Feb. 25 at Buntport Theater, 717 Lipan St., Denver. Performances: 8 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays; 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 19. Tickets: $18, advance, $20 at the door. ($3 discount for students and seniors.) buntport.com. the whole suit around it …” He soon changes into baggy sweatpants. We hear dramatic, loud, stormy music and Zeus (who is given to throwing lightning bolts around) opens the curtain, revealing the scene. The stage is dominated by a huge wooden table, where Io (Erin Rollman), Prometheus (Erik Edborg) and a noisy, fussy eagle, in an outstanding costume (Hannah Duggan), are gathered at one end. American writer Thoreau is at the far end, translating from Aeschylus’ account of “Prometheus Bound.” Thoreau is annoyed that their words don’t rhyme! What is this, he wonders. “A dinner buffet? Liver buffet?” Zeus responds, “You didn’t receive a formal invitation? Did anybody? … Let’s play a game …” Prometheus is a god who crossed Zeus’ wishes and stole fire from the home of the gods to give to the humans he was charged with creating out of clay. He is punished by being chained to a rock and the eagle keeps eating his liver, which keeps rejuve-

BY SONYA ELLINGBOE SELLINGBOE@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Jim Hunt storms and squabbles as Zeus, King of the Gods in “The Zeus Problem: A Dark Comedy About a God and the Mess He Made,” which plays through Feb. 25 at Buntport Theater. COURTESY PHOTO nating. “No onions!” the eagle complains. “Ever done a liver detox?” Zeus gave Prometheus’ brother the trouble-making Pandora, with her box of troubles. “That was not nice,” Io observes. Prometheus periodically quotes from Aeschylus’ poetic account of the story. “I’m so hungry,” Io keeps complaining — “I think I’ll just place an order!” (Io was an Argive princess whom Zeus lusted after. To hide her from the jealous goddess Hera, Zeus turned Io into a white heifer.) “People don’t deal with me — I deal with them!” Zeus declares. “I want

this story to get told without casting a negative light on yours truly.” “Aeschylus’ account doesn’t include Zeus — or an eagle,” Thoreau states. More lightning here! “When you fill your bellies, you forget about the gods,” Zeus complains — and with that, he closes the curtain on the others, telling the audience, “I don’t think you’re artichokes …” This most clever crew offers their view inspired by the daily headlines, enhanced by lightning bolts and artichokes. A quick mythology refresher would add to enjoyment perhaps, but it’s not necessary.

CIRQUE MONTAGE

‘All That Jazz’ concert set for Lone Tree Arts Center Denver Concert Band conductor Jacinda Bouton has announced that Queen City Jazz Band will be the invited guests at the bands’ Feb. 26 collaborative concert, “All That Jazz,” at 2:30 p.m. at the Lone Tree Arts Center. The two bands will play separately and together for an afternoon of joyful music, beginning with “Symphonic Dances from ‘West Side Story’” by Leonard Bernstein, arranged by Paul Lavender. Queen City Jazz Band, QCJB, will follow with a group of selections from its sizable repertoire, followed by the two bands playing “Buddy’s Habits” together. Following intermission, the DCB will perform Gary Zeik’s “Burnin,’” fol-

n k

IF YOU GO

IF YOU GO THE DENVER CONCERT BAND AND QUEEN CITY JAZZ BAND will perform “All That Jazz” at 2:30 p.m. on Feb. 26 at Lone Tree Arts Center, 10025 Commons St., Lone Tree. Tickets: $13-$20, 720-509-1000, lonetreeartscenter.org. lowed by 10 minutes of QCJB selection. Then the two band will combine sounds for “Platte River Ramble,” “Struttin’ with Some Barbecue,” “Nobody Knows Me,” including QCJB’s vocalist Wendy Harston, and finally, “Oxford Stomp.” Tuba player and retired Metropolitan State University professor Bill Clark directs the QCJB. (He is also the spark behind the annual “Tuba Christmas” in downtown Denver, which draws 100 or more festively dressed and decorated musicians to play together.) The Queen City Jazz Band, with vocalist Wende Harston, will perform with the Denver Concert Band on Feb. 26 at Lone Tree Arts Center. COURTESY PHOTO

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20 Lone Tree Voice

February 16, 2017F

LE DISTRICT – POSITION AVAILAB CASTLE PINES METROPOLITAN Maintenance Tech 1 District surroundings? Castle Pines Metro Enjoy working outside in beautiful oriented person to fill a Maintenance Tech 1 team ated, motiv drainage is looking for a positive, maintenance; signage repair; storm position. Duties include landscape tenance; snow removal; some OT. Maintenmain r sewe and r wate ce; ol diploma or maintenan to 1 year of experience, high scho ance Tech 1 must have 6 months clean MVR. Full time (Monday-Friday), starting and GED, valid CO driver’s license + retirement plan. and/or certifications. Full benefits salary dependent on experience e to C. Frainier, 303-688-8339, or Fax current resum ro.com email to cfrainier@castlepinesmet

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Lone Tree Voice 21

7February 16, 2017

Mother-daughter duo explore issues surrounding end of life Libby and Patty Bortz give presentation at Mizel Center

Libby Bortz and her daughter, Patty Bortz, have developed a program they call “The Last Chapter” about the value of discussing latelife decisions while one can talk about one’s wishes clearly.

BY SONYA ELLINGBOE SELLINGBOE@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

“Sooner or later, I’m going to lose my parents,” said Patty Bortz by way of introduction in a discussion of end-of-life issues. “Let me introduce my mother, Libby Bortz, mentor and best friend, who serves on many boards, including hospital ethics and admissions committee for the medical school … (she is well-known in Littleton, her longtime hometown for work on housing, including the Libby Bortz Assisted Living Center, political involvement, service to Arapahoe Community College and much more). Libby spoke of her daughter: “mother, lawyer, serves on many boards, school activist … She suggested this presentation,” which they have named “The Last Chapter.” They spoke at the Mizel Arts and Culture Center in Denver, a Jewish Family Service program, on Jan. 10 and plan to make further presentations in the metro area “Friends say they and their parents are not willing to talk (about end-oflife issues),” the octogenarian Libby said. “Why is it important? Are there resources? The most challenging parts

COURTESY PHOTO

of this stage include pain, loss of energy, feeling invisible, divesting things, finding clothes that fit. I will need to move out of my home, funerals, losing the ability to participate. When I was younger, I created organizations. Now, I’m more of a passenger.” Libby continued: “I’m not afraid of dying, makeup is optional, investment in health insurance is paying off — How lucky I am that saying goodbye will be so hard.” Patty picked up the train of thought: “At 58, I’m caring for my father, who is confused and struggling. I’ve watched my parents give up skiing. (Libby only last year.) My parents have lost a lot of friends … spend a lot of emotional and physical energy fighting (aging).”

“I thought I could direct my life by having that conversation now, help avoid possible conflict. I have seen families fight about `what mother would have wanted’ and fall apart — about life support, for example. Then depression can be somewhat diminished and we can focus on the living we’ve done,” Libby responded. Patty acknowledged “a real sense of relief in sharing a plan for the future. We will be better able to handle it. I will be a better support.” Libby drew laughs when she said, “Put me in a lovely piece of pottery and keep me where the action is …” “How will I divide with my brother?” Patty bounced back, then asked, “What matters most now? As different from 20 years ago?”

Reply: “What matters most is that I have your help, have my friends, not suffer much …” “The role I play — I can’t give as much time as you’d like,” Patty observed. “With my own mother, I was part of the `sandwich generation. Patty, I know you have your own needs, family, I can’t promise `no guilt,” but it’s OK.” They recommended a book called “The Other Talk,” from AARP, a serious talk with one’s doctor, which Medicare pays for, a look at alternatives to driving (Uber, Lyft). Writing may be easier than talking, as in “What matters the most to me is … What do you want the most from my home — i.e, a piece of art?” “It’s never too soon — Boomers should talk to their teens,” Patty said. “Life is like a roll of toilet paper — the closer you get to the end, the faster it goes!” Final words of advice from both: “Get things accessible, including DNR (do not resuscitate) forms if you have them. There are bracelets. Some have it tattooed on their chests … They recommended “Life Alert” as a resource in case you fall and the kids are out of town, and a magnet on the fridge with a plastic bag containing DNR form, list of medications … Learn about palliative care and other medical resources. Use a mediator if the kids disagree. (We will hope to announce future presentations.)

Careers Help Wanted 10 Temp FT Landscape Laborer Positions. 4/1/17-11/15/17. Applicants must be willing, qualified, to perform wrk described in ad & avail for entire period specified. Transport provided, designated locale to jobsite. Worksites in the counties of Denver, Douglas & Arapahoe, CO. Poss duties: Loading & unloading of maintenance trailers. Operate powered equipment, such as mowers, trimmers, electric clippers, sod cutters, or pruning saws. Mow or edge lawns, using power mowers or edgers, use hand tools, such as shovels, rakes, pruning saws, saws, hedge or brush trimmers, plant seeds, bulbs, foliage, flowering plants, grass, ground covers, trees, or shrubs and apply mulch for protection, using gardening tools. Maintain & install irrigation systems, install rock gardens & other related Landscape Laborer activities per SOC/OES 37-3011 (onetonline.org). No min. edu. reqmt. OJT Poss daily/wkly hrs: 6:30A - 4P; 35-40+. To include breaks. OT avail, not reqd. M-F. Poss wkend/holiday wrk. Variable weather conditions; hrs may fluctuate (+/-), poss downtime/OT. Emplyr will comply w/applicable Fed, State, local laws pertaining to OT. Must be 18 due to insurance. Performing physical activities: such as lift, balance, walk, stoop, handle, position, move, manipulate materials use static strength to exert maximum muscle force to lift, push, pull, or carry objects up to 50lbs. $13.95/hr up to poss $20.00/hr OT $20.93/hr up to poss $30.00/hr. Wage may vary. DOE. Use/maintenance of emplyr provided tools/equip./supplies at no cost/deposit. Attn to detail, complete tasks. Drug/Alcohol/Tobacco free work zone. Based on Emplyr's discretion/cost: Wrkr may have random drug/alcohol testing during emplymnt: positive test/ refusal to abide = dismissal. Guaranteed offered work hrs @ least 3/4s of wrkdays ea 12/wk period of total emplymnt period. Transport: Will provide/pay cost of wrkr return transport, subsistence from worksite to place from which wrker departed to wrk for emplyr if wrkr completes period of emplymnt or dismissed from emplymnt before end of wrk period above. Transport & subsistence will be reimbursed by check in 1st work week for cost from the place from which the wrkr has come to wrk for the emplyr, whether in the U.S. or abroad, to the place of employment. Must show proof of legal authority to wrk in US. Contact: Century Maintenance, Email: susandeshon@yahoo.com or Fax: 720-282-3077 How to apply: Inquiries, applications, indications of availability and/or resumes may be sent to the nearest CO SWA: 1200 Federal Blvd, Denver, CO 80204. Job Order #: 6792967

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Help Wanted CUSTOMER SERVICEMAN Assists Meter Readers, Tap Inspector as well as the Backflow Technician in performing a variety of jobs incident to the reading of meters, repair of water service facilities, inspection of backflow devices, operation of mainline valves for new installation and the performance of special services to the customer; responsible for maintaining and utilizing current working knowledge and technical skills applicable to the specific requirements of this position. Requires: Valid Colorado Driver’s License (Driving record can have no more then 4 points in a three year period) The Consolidated Mutual Water Company offers a competitive benefits package. Application forms can be found on our web page under Employment – Current Job Openings To be considered applicants please either e-mail or mail your resume and application to: Hr@cmwc.net or The Consolidated Mutual Water Company 12700 W. 27th Avenue Lakewood CO 80215

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FULL-TIME, BENEFITED Criminalist/Senior Criminalist Salary: $51,085 - $81,237/year Closes: 2/27/17 Utilities Systems Specialist Salary: $54,916 - $70,297/year Closes: 2/21/17 Utilities Technician – FOGG Salary: $47,520 - $60,830/year Closes: 2/21/17 HOURLY, NON-BENEFITED Assistant Golf Professional (Hourly) Salary: $10.73 - $13.62/hour Closes: 3/20/17 Golf Course Attendant Salary: $9:30 - $11.79/hour Closes: 3/20/17 Golf Course Retail Shop Clerk Salary: $9.57 - $12.13/hour Closes: 3/20/17 Massage Therapist Salary: $27.17 - $34.59/hour Closes: 4/10/17 Scorekeeper Salary: $9.30 - $11.79/hour Closes: 3/6/17 Submit City of Westminster online applications thru 8:30 a.m. on close date http://www.cityofwestminster.us/jobs EOE


22 Lone Tree Voice

February 16, 2017F

2017

Jillian Miller performed her original song, “My Love Begins in Winter” at the Music with a Mission concert series on Jan. 13 at Good Shepherd Episcopal Church in Centennial. Miller is a middle school science teacher in Commerce City who sings about science theories and laws to her students.

BEST OF THE BEST

STEPHANIE MASON

Community concert series gives back Church offers free performances to feature local artists and support local charities BY STEPHANIE MASON SMASON@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

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Members of the audience leaned forward as Jillian Miller continued to lightly strum her guitar and tell her story in front of a the packed sanctuary of Good Shepherd Episcopal Church in Centennial. “Winter Solstice, ironically, is probably my favorite day of the year,” Miller said to the audience before performing her original song, “My Love Begins In Winter.” “I know the days will only get brighter from then on.” The singer-songwriter was one of five local artists who performed at the Jan. 13 concert, “Winter Solstice: A Night of Story & Song.” The concert, celebrating the time of year when the sunlight stretches further into the day, made a metaphorical addition of light into the lives of youths facing homelessness by raising more than $1,000 for Urban Peak. Urban Peak is a nonprofit that provides services for people 15 to 24 years old who are experiencing homelessness. Services offered include an overnight shelter, a drop-in center, a street outreach, education and employment programming and supportive housing. According to its website, Urban Peak Denver served 2,035 youths in 2015. The concert is part of Music with a Mission, a concert series that Good Shephard, located at 8545 E. Dry Creek do do Road, hosts from September through y it y C n t o mmu C o m m u ni April. Each month, a concert is provided free to the community. Donations received are donated to a charity. Musicians who decorate the room with jazz, gospel, tango, a cappella and acoustic sounds have played through the concert series’ first and second seasons. “The concert series was developed for the Centennial community to feature as many local artists and local To provide the most accurate results by geographical area, Colorado mission organizations as possible,” Community Media does not require, but does encourage readers to said DeeDee Atwood, Good Shepherd’s vote for businesses in their immediate local community. All nominated contemporary music director and conbusinesses have an equal opportunity of winning, no purchase required. cert chairwoman. “It is a very eclectic Please see voting website for complete contest rules and regulations. mix of performers, so people in the Centennial community feel like they

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NEXT CONCERTS

17TH AVENUE ALLSTARS When/where: 7 p.m., Feb. 17 at Good Shepherd Episcopal Church, 8545 E. Dry Creek Road, Centennial Partnering Mission: Covenant Cupboard Food Bank About the performers: The 17th Avenue Allstars are celebrating their 27th year as one of Denver’s top a cappella acts. The Allstars performed across the United States and opened for National Acts such as: BB King, The Temptations, Dave Mason, Mel Torme, Robert Cray and were named the official anthem singers of the Denver Broncos. Peter and Will Anderson Jazz Trio When/where: 7 p.m., April 4 at Good Shepherd Episcopal Church Partnering Mission: St. Francis Center / St. Clare’s Ministries About the performers: Peter and Will Anderson are known for their exciting arrangements of jazz classics and fresh original music. Hailing from Washington, D.C., the brothers were recognized internationally as teenagers by Betty Carter’s Jazz Ahead, the Next Generation Jazz Orchestra, and NFAA Young Arts. Peter and will perform with a jazz guitarist as a trio. have a great concert series to go to.” Last year’s largest gathering was at the Voices West Select performance of the Broadway Spectacular. More than 350 people in the auditorium exceeded capacity and $2,500 was raised for Covenant Cupboard Food Pantry. Between the five concerts in the 2015-16 series, $10,000 was raised and donated to local homeless and hungry projects, medical missions and crisis centers. Atwood said she has seen a correlation between the cause and the amount donated. “The thing that is really interesting is that the cause that we choose really does determine the amount of money that we get,” Atwood said. “Homeless and hungry causes raise the most money.” Kaia Kena, a performer in the Winter Solstice event, is a CU Denver graduate. She hopes the money raised will provide the youths with “wonderful opportunities.” “Good Shepherd has always been a warm and supportive community for me, and I’m so happy to see their vibrant passion for the community express itself through the Music with a Mission series,” Kena said in an email. “I’m so touched by the generosity of those who attended the concert, and so happy that the proceeds will be going to Urban Peak, somewhere I’ve highly respected for many years.”


Lone Tree Voice 23

7February 16, 2017

HOW TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE Send volunteer opportunities to hharden@ coloradocommunitymedia.com. 18th Judicial District Attorney’s Office Domestic Violence Program Provides information and support to crime victims Need: Victim Adocates interact with and support victims of domestic violence. They also provide resource referrals and explain processes to victims. Requirements: 20 hours of training required; volunteers must commit to one morning a week at the Justice Center in Castle Rock. Contact: Mel Secrease, 720-733-4552 or msecrease@da.18.state.co.us. AARP Foundation TaxAide Helps Colorado taxpayers who need assistance prepare and file their tax returns Need: Volunteers for the upcoming tax season. Requirements: Free training provided; volunteers do not have to be AARP members or retirees. Contact: www.aarp.org/money/taxes/aarp_ taxaide/ or 888-OUR-AARP.

Deadline: Apply by Dec. 15 Alzheimer’s Association, Colorado Chapter Provides care and support to 67,000-plus families dealing with all kinds of dementing e illnesses. Need: Walk to End Alzheimer’s committee members. Requirements: Individuals who love to help plan and execute. Our Walk to End Alzheimer’s attracts more than 10,000 people, so planning committee members are essential. Contact: Deb Wells, 303-813-1669 or dwells@ alz.org. Angel Heart Project Delivers meals to men, women and children with life-threatening illnesses Need: Volunteers willing to deliver meals to clients in the South Denver area. Requirements: Attend an orientation and submit to a background check before volunteering. Training provided to all new drivers. Deliveries start at 1 p.m. and last until 3 p.m. Contact: 303-830-0202 or volunteer@projectangelheart.org. Animal Rescue of the Rockies Provides foster care for death-row shelter dogs and cats throughout Colorado Need: Foster families for animals on lists to be euthanized Contact: www.animalrescueoftherockies.org. ASSE International Student Exchange Program Organizes student exchange programs Need: Local host families to provide homes for boys and girls age 15-18 from a variety of coutries. Contact: Cathy Hintz, 406-488-8325 or 800733-2773 Audubon Society of Greater Denver Provides engaging and educational birding and wildlife programs at the Audubon Nature Center at Chatfield State Park and throughout the Denver metro area. Need: Volunteers lead birding field trips and assist with nature programs, office projects, fundraising and community events. Location: Chatfield State Park and offsite locations around Denver. Age requirement: 18 years or older for yearround volunteers; 13-17 for summer camp programs. Contact: Kate Hogan at communityoutreach@denveraudubon.org or 303-973-9530.

AYUSA: International Youth Exchange Program Promotes quality exchange programs for high school students from around the world. Need: Host families for international high school students studying in the Denver area. Requirements: To provide students with a safe home, meals and transportation for 5-10 months. All family types are considered. Must fill out onlilne application and pass background check. Contact: Adrienne Bivens, 720-467-6430 or abivens@ayusa.org. Go to www.ayusa.org.

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Castle Rock Senior Activity Center Provides services to local seniors Need: Volunteer drivers to take seniors to appointments, the grocery store, pharmacies and more. Contact: Steph Schroeder, 303-688-9498 Children’s Hospital Colorado South Campus, Highlands Ranch Contact: 720-777-6887 Colorado Humane Society Handles animal abuse and neglect cases Need: Volunteers to care for pregnant cats, dogs and their litters, as well as homes for cats and dogs that require socializing or that are recovering from surgery or injuries. Contact: Teresa Broaddus, 303-961-3925 Colorado Refugee English as a Second Language Program Teaches English to recently arrived refugees, who have fled war or persecution in their home country. In Colorado, refugees are from Afghanistan, Burma, Bhutan, Somalia, Iraq, Eritrea and D.R. Congo, among others. Need: Volunteers to teach English. Tutoring takes place in the student’s home. Refugees live throughout Denver, but the largest concentrations are in Thornton, near 88th Avenue and Washington Street, and in east Denver/ Aurora, near Colfax Avenue and Yosemite Street. Other details: Tutors do not need to speak the student’s language. Most participants are homebound women and small children, adults who are disabled, and senior citizens. Many are not literate in their first language, and remain isolated from American culture. Requirements: Volunteers must attend training at Emily Griffith Technical College in downtown Denver. Sessions take place every 6-8 weeks. Go to www.refugee-esl.org for information and volunteer application. Next training session is Saturday, July 30. Contact: Sharon McCreary, 720-423-4843 or sharon.mccreary@emilygriffith.edu. Court Appointed Special Advocates Works with abused and neglected children in Arapahoe, Douglas, Elbert and Lincoln counties Need: Advocates for children, to get to know, speak up for and ensure their best interests in court Contact: 303-695-1882 or www.adv4children. org. Denver Asset Building Coalition Provides low-income families with free tax preparation Need: Volunteers to join the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program Requirements: Volunteers are needed from Jan. 28 to April 17. No accounting background necessary; DABC trains all volunteers through an IRS-approved certification. Volunteers can choose their schedule and time commitment. Contact: Marissa Stanger, volunteer coordinator, at 303-388-7030 or marissa@denverabc. org; go to www.denverabc.org.

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24 Lone Tree Voice

February 16, 2017F

Braille Challenge offers competition, camaraderie Contest focuses on spelling, speed, reading comprehension, accuracy BY TOM SKELLEY TSKELLEY@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

The proctor reads the word to be spelled, uses it in a sentence for context, then repeats the word. “‘Advice,’” she reads. “‘Parents are known for giving good advice.’” She and the timekeeper chuckle softy at the example sentence as the spelling test begins. Three children, Lexi Mink, 8, Matthew Falco, 8, and Asher Koren-Zoloto, 9, sit at a long table, softly sounding out the word as their fingers spread across the keys of their Braille writers, searching for the correct combination of keys. “You can tell they’re enjoying it,” said Diane Covington, school and community liaison for the Colorado Center for the Blind in Littleton. “When you see a child get all excited with the clacking and dinging of the Braille writers all going, it’s so rewarding.” The center, in conjunction with the National Braille Institute and the Colorado School for the Deaf and Blind, hosted the 2017 Braille Challenge on Jan. 26. Participants from first to 12th grade all competed in spelling, reading comprehension, speed and accuracy in a competitive setting designed to hone their skills and foster a sense of community. “It’s a tough test and it’s tough on purpose,” said Jim Olson, material supervisor for the CSDB in Colorado Springs. Olson, the only sighted person in the room, kept the Braille writers from running out of paper and the children from running out of patience. “It’s a time to celebrate Braille, not for them to be stressed out,” he said. “It’s for them to show what they know and have a great time doing it.” Koren-Zoloto and Falco were doing just that as they tussled with each other during a break. “I want to win, and I’m going to beat Matthew,” said Koren-Zoloto, a student at Westminster’s Cotton Creek Elementary. He has Leber’s congenital

FOR SPECIALS:

Students use Braille writers, devices similar to typewriters but designed to imprint paper with the Braille code, during the 2017 Braille challenge at the Colorado Center for the blind in Littleton. Pictured from left to right are Matthew Falco, 8, Asher KorenZoloto, 9, timekeeper Julie McGinnity and proctor Hindley Williams. PHOTOS BY TOM SKELLEY Lexi Mink, 8, takes a reading competition test at the 2017 Braille Challenge in Littleton on Jan. 26. Mink says her favorite intramural activity is cheerleading and her favorite part of school is recess. amaurosis, a degenerative eye disease affecting about one in every 80,000 people. Like many children his age, he enjoys reading Harry Potter books and fighting monsters, but his mother, Hila Koren, said he’s increasingly aware that his loss of vision makes him dif-

LITTLETONALLEY

LittletonAlley.com • 720.399.0463

ferent from his peers. “It’s really great to be in an environment where he sees he’s not alone,” she said. “This is invaluable.” Koren-Zoloto’s fast friend, 8-year-old Matthew Falco, reveled in the opportunity to grab some pizza and blow off steam after the first half of the competition. “It was so hard,” said Falco, who attends Crown Pointe Academy in Westminster. “You have to do everything so fast.” A fall from a slide ruptured a cyst on Falco’s brain at age 4, taking most of his vision. A shunt keeps enough pressure off his optic nerve to preserve some of his sight, though that could change if the shunt fails. Nevertheless, Falco’s mother, Amber, said he’s more independent than most 8-year-olds she’s known. “He’s always saying ‘Mom, I want to cook you breakfast,’” she said. “He looks out for (his younger sisters), he’s their mediator when they fight and he wants to teach them Braille.” Like Koren-Zoloto, 8-year-old Lexi Mink, a student at Vista Peak Elementary in Aurora, has LCA. She uses a walking stick to get around but enjoys

Matthew Falco, 8, on the left, and Asher Koren-Zoloto, 9, enjoy a private joke during a break in the competition at the 2017 Braille Challenge. A goal of the competition, held at the Colorado Center for the Blind in Littleton, is fostering a sense of community among the participants, many of whom are the only vision-impaired students at their schools. her favorite activities — swinging at recess and cheerleading after school — without it. Mink said the tests were “challenging” and she knows she’ll be able to use what she practiced there in her schoolwork. “Let’s just say that you have a little fun when you do it because you can get better and use what you learn at the Braille Challenge at school,” she said. It will take several days to tally the scores, and only 12 students from across the United States and Canada will be selected in May to advance to the national competition in California. And Mink wants to be one of them. “You have to work super hard if you’re going to win,” she said. “I want to win first place … then I would be able to go to California. And maybe Disney World.”


7February 16, 2017

AURORA

Lone Tree Voice 25

LONE TREE


26 Lone Tree Voice

THINGS to DO

THEATER

‘Bonnie & Clyde’: 7:30 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, and 2 p.m. Sundays from Friday, Feb. 17 to Sunday, March 19, at 2450 W. Main St., Littleton. Additional show time at 2 p.m. March 4. Tickets available at the box office, by calling 303-794-2787, ext. 5, or online at townhallartscenter.org/ bonnie-clyde. A Little Cinderella and Tea Party: 3 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25, and Sunday, Feb. 26, at Cleo Parker Robinson Theater, 119 Park Avenue West, Denver. Presented by Ballet Ariel. Call 303-945-4388 or go to www.balletariel.org.

MUSIC

17th Avenue Allstars Concert: 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17, at Good Shepherd Episcopal Church, 8545 E. Dry Creek Road, Centennial. Go to http://gshep.org/ministry/musicmission-concert-series Groove N’ Motion Performance: 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25, at the Forney Museum of Transportation, 4303 Brighton Blvd., Denver. Full access to the museum, light hors d’oeuvres, cash bar, and a performance of classics from Earth, Wind & Fire, Chicago, and Tower of Power, as well as current well-known hits. Tickets are available at: https://events. r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07edi 7d91yd7780534&oseq=&c=& ch=. Contact Scott at 303-5218206 or scott@ groovenmotion. com for information. Inside the Orchestra’s Tiny Tots Shows: 9:30-10:15 a.m. and 10:45-11:30 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 28, at CU Denver South, 10035 S. Peoria St., Parker. For ages 6 and younger, and their families. Children surround the 30-plus piece orchestra and interact with the conductor and musicians. Register at insidetheorchestra.org/ tiny-tots-events or by calling 303-355-7855.

FILM

Now Playing Film Series: 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 19, at the Castle Pines Library, 360 Village Square Lane. Drop in for a free showing of the Disney classic “Beauty and the Beast.” No registration required; call 303-791-7323 or go to DCL.org.

February 16, 2017F

this week’s TOP FIVE Arapahoe Philharmonic Presents ‘Eastern Powers’: 7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17, at South Suburban Christian Church, 7275 S. Broadway, Littleton. Concert preceded by a talk with Maestro Devin Patrick Hughes and guest soloist Phoenix Avalon at 6:45 p.m. A musical glimpse at two prolific Russian classical composers Dmitri Shostakovich and Modest Mussorgsky. Go to www.arapahoe-phil.org. Knights of Columbus Gala 2017: 5-11:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 18, at Denver Marriott South, 10345 Park Meadows Drive, Lone Tree. Black tie optional. Dinner, dance and auction presented by Knights of Columbus Council 1498. Register and pay online at http:// tinyurl.com/jhzhce6. Call 303-925-0004. Looking for Love Online After 50: 1 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 18 at the Philip S. Miller Library, 100 S. Wilcox St., Castle Rock. First part of two-part series explores the highlights and pitfalls of online dating for those 50plus. Second part of series is at 1 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25, at the Philip S.

EVENTS

Caturday Morning and Dog Day Afternoon: 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Feb. 18 at the Parker Library, 20105 E. Mainstreet. Pet extravaganza includes activities, crafts, pet adoptions, homemade pet treats and more. No registration required; call 303-791-7323 or go to DCL.org. More than a March: 4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 19 at Castle Rock Unitarian Universalist Community, meeting at New Hope Presbyterian Church, 3737 New Hope Way, Castle Rock. The Rev. Julia McKay is the guest speaker. Contact Cath Wyngarden at cath@cruuc. org to RSVP. Potluck and social hour follows the exploration. Bring food or drink to share. Casual attire welcome. Presidents, Governors Impact on Colorado: 7-8:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 20 at the Highlands Ranch Recreation Center at Southridge, 4800 McArthur Ranch Road, Highlands Ranch. Learn about the U.S. presidents who did the most for Colorado. Also, learn about the good, some bad and some very bad Colorado governors. Program of the Highlands Ranch Historical Society. Go to http://thehrhs.org/ Obituaries from The Denver Post: 1-3 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 21, at Lutheran Church of the Holy

Miller Library, 100 S. Wilcox St., Castle Rock. Features writing workshop for creating an online dating profile. Ages 50-plus. Registration required; call 303-7917323 or go to DCL.org.

Yoga with Laurie: 10:30 a.m. Monday, Feb. 20 at Valley House, 255 S. Valley Drive, Castle Rock. Laurie will guide participants through yoga poses with a focus on the breath while teaching them to concentration on the present. Event is free and open to the public. Space is limited. Call 303-4825552 for information or to RSVP.

Family Tree Maker Software, Part 1: 9:30-11:30 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 21 at Lutheran Church of the Holy Spirit, 6400 S. University Blvd., Centennial. A good user-friendly genealogy software program is essential to organizing your research. Program led by Deena Coutant. Go to www.ColumbineGenealogy.com. Live Show and Stuffed Animal Sleepover: 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 23. Bring a stuffed animal to see “The Berenstain Bears LIVE!” at the Parker Arts, Culture & Events Center. After the show, drop your animal off at the Parker Library, 20105 E. Mainstreet, for a sleepover. Pick up animals at 10 a.m. or 5 p.m. Friday, Feb. 24, and see photos of their overnight adventures, enjoy storytime, and create a craft. Sleepover activity is free, but registration is required. Call 303-791-7323 or go to DCL.org. Must have ticket for 6:30 p.m. show to participate.

Spirit, 6400 S. University Blvd., Centennial. Obituaries can be a goldmine of personal data as well as a trap of misinformation. Former Denver Post journalist Claire Martin describes writing obituaries as extraordinary because of the opportunity it gave her to tell the life stories of many different people and to look at their place in history. Go to www.ColumbineGenealogy.com. Love Is In the Air Film Series: 1 p.m. Friday, Feb. 24, at the Lone Tree Library, 10055 Library Way. Stop by for a screening of “Moonrise Kingdom,” followed by a discussion with local film expert Matt Wigdahl. Registration required; call 303-791-7323 or go to DCL.org. Special Needs Sweetheart Dance: 7-9 p.m. Friday, Feb. 24, at the Recreation Center at Southridge, Wildcat Auditorium. Ages 16 and older. Highlands Ranch Community Association program includes games, fun and food. Call 303-471-7043, email summer. aden@hrcaonline.org or go to www.hrcaonline.org/tr. Video Chat Pitchfest for Authors, Agents: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25 at 1101 W. Mineral Ave., Littleton. 24 agents representing all genres of fiction and categories of nonfiction will be available for 240 10-minute video pitch sessions. Go to www.ultimatepitchfest.com or call 310-210-9221. Stephen Ministry Introductory Workshop: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25, at Mountainview Christian Church, 40 Highlands Ranch Parkway, Highlands Ranch. Ministering to Those Experiencing

Grief, An Intro to Stephen Ministry and How to Care in a Distinctively Christian Way. Register at www. stephenministry.org/workshop or call 314-428-2600. Root Beer Float Social: 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 26, at Victorian House, 19600 Victorian Drive, Parker. Root Beer Social is free and open to the public. Space is limited. Call 303-482-5552 for information or to RSVP. Free Healthy Community Dinner: 6-7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 28 at First Presbyterian Church, 1609 W. Littleton Blvd., Littleton. No reservations are required. Call 303798-1389 or go to fpcl.org/dinner. Dinner is served the last Tuesday of each month; 2017 dates are March 28, April 25, May 30, June 27, July 25, Aug. 29, Sept. 26, Oct. 31 and Dec. 26. Thanksgiving Day meal is served from noon to 2 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 23. Visiting Cuba, Land of Mystery and Beauty: 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 28, at Bemis Public Library, 6014 S. Datura St., Littleton. Author and international tour director Frank Slater has completed 26 tours in Cuba during the last three years through the peopleto-people program. He will talk about the history of Cuba, the embargo and blockade, as well as the current Cuban culture. Call 303-795-3961.

HEALTH

St. Louis Parish Blood Drive: 8 a.m. to noon Sunday, Feb. 19 at 3310 S. Sherman St., Englewood. Contact 303-363-2300 or visit bonfils.org.

Health of the Human Spirit: 6:308 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 21, at the St. Luke’s United Methodist Church, 8817 S. Broadway, Highlands Ranch. Brian Luke Seaward, author of “Stand Like Mountain, Flow Like Water: Reflections on Stress and Human Spirituality,” weaves theory and story, personal experience and humor, wit and love in a way that both educates and inspires. Go to www.stlukescse.org. Castle Rock Adventist Health Campus Blood Drive: 9-10:40 a.m. and noon to 2:30 p.m. Feb. 22 at 2350 Meadows Blvd., Castle Rock. Contact 303-363-2300 or visit bonfils.org. Littleton United Methodist Church Blood Drive: 1:30-6 p.m. Feb. 23 at 5894 S. Datura St., Littleton. Contact Christine Trickey at 303-730-3835 or visit bonfils.org Travelers Blood Drive: 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Feb. 23 at 6060 S. Willow Drive, Greenwood Village. Contact 303-363-2300 or visit bonfils.org. Truven Health Analytics Blood Drive: 9-10:40 a.m. and noon to 2 p.m. Feb. 23 at 6200 S. Syracuse Way, Englewood. Contact 303363-2300 or visit bonfils.org. EDUCATION Ponderosa Montessori Academy Parent Information Meetings: 6 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 21, at the Philip S. Miller Library, 100 S. Wilcox St., Castle Rock; and 6:30 p.m. Monday, March 6 at the Parker Library, 20105 E. Mainstreet. Learn about Montessori education and the public Montessori Farm School. Contact 303-928-9534 or go to ponderosamontessoriacademy.weebly.com to RSVP. Editor’s note: Calendar submissions must be received by noon Wednesday for publication the following week. Send listings to calendar@coloradocommunitymedia.com. No attachments, please. Listings are free and run on a space-available basis.


5

Lone Tree Voice 27

7February 16, 2017

-

know about Colorado’s fastest-growing jobs things to

BY TOM SKELLEY TSKELLEY@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Zippia, a career services website that predicts workplace trends, recently released a list of the five fastest-growing

jobs in the Centennial State. Included below are a synopsis of each job, how many positions are predicted for 2024 and their average pay. Information for the study was compiled from the Department of Labor and the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and covers a 10-year span between 2014 and 2024.

1 2 3 4 5

Interpreter/translator: 2,410 jobs — $56,300 • Compiling information and technical terms into glossaries and terminology databases. • Speaking, reading, and writing fluently in English and at least one other language. • Rendering spoken messages accurately, quickly and clearly while relaying the style and tone of the original language.

Brick and block masons: 2,700 jobs — $45,880 • Measuring and cutting brick and cement block to fit blueprints and planned designs. • Fastening or fusing brick and block to structures with cement and other materials. • Estimating costs of materials, labor and time to complete various projects.

Personal care aides: 32,110 jobs — $22,110 • Helping clients perform a variety of tasks they are unable to perform themselves, such as shopping or housework. • Maintaining compassionate relationships with clients who may be challenged cognitively or socially. • Assisting clients with physical tasks they cannot perform themselves, such as bathing or moving from one place to another.

Grain Finished Buffalo

Ranchway Feeds Building At The Larimer County Fairgrounds

We offer high quality care at cost effective prices. Please call 303.237.0914 to schedule an appointment. The Cat Clinic - 5787 W. 6th Avenue (Lower Level), Lakewood, CO

NO RESERVE#'s: $150 & 5% Commission RESERVE#'s: $250 & 8% Commission BUYERS FEE: 5% Fee To consign or buy visit us online at: www.specialtyautoauction.com

or call 970-266-9561

(303) 237-0914 • www.catcaresociety.org/ services/veterinary-care Littleton Ladies Golf League 9 Hole Accepting new members for Wednesday morning play for the 2017 season Contact Mary Uppinghouse uppies@aol.com Want To Purchase minerals and other oil/gas interests. Send details to: P.O. Box 13557 Denver, CO 80201

SEEKING ACCIDENT WITNESS On May 13, 2016, at approximately 12:02 pm, there was a traffic accident in the intersection of 88th Ave and Harlan St. The accident involved two vehicles- a Mercedes Sprinter van and a Toyota Tacoma pick-up. At least one driver was injured. The Westminster Police Department investigated the accident; however, they were unable to identify/locate any independent witnesses to the accident. Your assistance is needed. If you witnessed this accident, please contact:

Please Recycle this Publication when Finished

Investigator Hal Shucard HDS & Associates, LLC 303 797-3736

719-775-8742

Firewood

Moto 4G lite unlocked phone 32 gigs, can expand to 128 gigs on an SD micro card, cables and case included Quicken Deluxe 2016, Corel Paint Shop, Landstrom 10k gold belt buckle, Sterling and Turquoise belt buckle, Never used Sony record player, 2 new plain metal headboards (photos can be provided) 2 queen bed frames, never used 720-645-5066

Classic Cars Street Rods Muscle Cars Memorabilia Doors Open: 8am - Memorabilia: 9am - Vehicles: 10am March 4th, 2017 - Larimer County Fairgrounds

Miscellaneous Animal Trap and trapping supplies $1 per item 303-975-6145

quartered, halves and whole

Specialty Auto Auction March 4th, 2017

February is Dental Health Month! We are offering discounted dental procedures for a flat rate of $395 (for cats under 7) and $475 (for cats over 8). The cost includes exam, bloodwork, scale/ polish, unlimited extractions, anesthesia and medication(s).

Home health aides: 24,890 jobs — $26,190 • Provide basic health-related services such as checking vital signs or administering prescribed medication and preparing meals to meet a client’s dietary specifications. • Help to organize a client’s schedule, plan appointments and arrange transportation. • Help to keep clients engaged in their social networks and communities.

Farm Products & Produce

The Cat Clinic at Cat Care Society is a full-service feline only veterinary clinic that provides routine medical examinations, diagnostics, dentistry, vaccinations, spay/ neuter services, and general surgery.

We have expanded our veterinary services to include extended hours, in-house diagnostics, additional surgery options and Royal Canin prescription food.

Medical sonographers: 1,300 jobs — $80,300 • Administer diagnostic ultrasound tests to clients for conditions including pelvic (obstetric and non-obstetric), prostate, breast, thyroid, extremity and carotid issues. • Having a sound understanding of anatomy and physiology to provide optimal procedure results. • Maintaining licensure and continuing education in the field.

Split & Delivered $275 a cord Stacking available extra $25 Call 303-647-2475 or 720-323-2173

Furniture

Autos for Sale Woodley’s entertainment center. Cherry wood. TV cabinet: W 47”, H 86”; holding up to 40” TV; 2 lower cabinets with shelves, sliding racks. Accessory cabinet (to left): W.23”, H. 84”, 4 wooden shelves; glass door. 1 lower cabinet with shelves. Display shelves above both cabinets with recessed can lights. $1,500 or best offer. Also, Sony 34’’ HDTV, Model XBR. $200 OBO. 303-523-3175

2008 Toyota Camry XLE V6 New Tires at 90,000, alignment, complete professional detail, new oil/oil filter, new front & rear brakes at 90,000, heated leather power seats, alloy wheels, power sun roof, NADA Book Value $9,500 we need $8,900 303-482-5156

Cash for all Vehicles! Cars, Trucks, Vans, SUV’s

Health and Beauty I

Any condition • Running or not Under $700

(303)741-0762

Cell: (303)918-2185 for texting Electric Bicycle Sale Buy 1 ebike & get 1 ebike FREE All 2016 New & Used electric Bikes on sale LIMETED SUPPLY HURRY FAST – BRAND NEW 2016 ELECTRIC BIKES 303-257-0164

Bestcashforcars.com

BUY DIABETIC Test Strips! OneTouch, Freestyle, AccuChek, more! Must not be expired or opened. Call Chris Today: 800-506-4964

DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK, BOAT, RV; Running or not, to www.developmentaldisabled.org Tax deductible! 303-659-1744. 19 years of service (go onto website to see 57 Chevy)


28 Lone Tree Voice

LOCAL

February 16, 2017F

SPORTS

Some games leave a lasting impression

I

Valor Christian sophomore Lindsay Stenstrom celebrates after winning the 50-yard freestyle at the Class 4A State Championships Feb. 11 at the Eldora Pool Ice Center in Fort Collins. Stenstrom also swam of the Eagles winning 400 yard freestyle relay team as defending state champion Valor finished second in the team standings to Cheyenne Mountain.

JIM BENTON

Valor takes second at 4A state meet Rock Canyon finished sixth in Class 5A BY JIM BENTON JBENTON@COLORDOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Valor Christian’s girls swimming team walked out of the Eldora Pool Ice Center in Fort Collins with another trophy. However, this one was a runnerup plaque — not the state championship hardware the school won last year. Cheyenne Mountain, loaded with depth, won the Class 4A State Swimming Championships that concluded Feb. 11 after amassing 308 points. Valor was second with 276 and Jefferson County League 4A rival Evergreen finished third with 230 points.

“Second isn’t bad. I am really so proud,” Valor Christian coach Lori Stenstrom said. “The girls really had to swim and dive to the best of their ability to come away with that beautiful trophy and they did it.” The Eagles had two individual champions in sophomore Lindsay Stenstrom in the 50-yard freestyle and junior diver Izzy Mroz. Stenstrom also swam on Valor’s state champion 400 freestyle relay team along with Ella Kirschke, Madison Hoehn and Abbey Owenby. “The 50-free champion is my daughter and she watched her big sister do this before and she did an amazing job,” said coach Stenstrom. “Izzy is just so talented. We obviously had high hopes for her and were absolutely celebrating all she was able to do.” Lindsay Stenstrom was excited and expressed her feelings after

winning the 50 free and she joined her sister Brooke, now a freshman at Stanford, who won three individual state championships and swam on two title-winning relay teams. “It’s the most amazing feeling in the world to be a state champion, and I just want to give God all the glory and I’m so happy I got to experience it with my team,” Lindsay said. “I did pretty well. There were a few things I could have done better but I couldn’t ask for anything more than the opportunity I had to achieve.” Mroz led all three rounds of the diving and finished with 484.65 points. “I’m so excited to do it for the team, which is like a family,” she said. “All I thought about was dive by dive, get through it and do my best. SEE STATE, P30

STANDOUT PERFORMERS Kassie Rembisz, basketball, sophomore, Legend: She dominated the boards in the Titans’ 73-22 win over Northglenn on Feb. 6. She had 17 rebounds, 10 coming off the defensive glass, dished out five assists and scored five points. Issac Essien, basketball, senior, Mountain Vista: He figured in on all aspects of the Golden Eagles’ 69-54 Continental League

win over Regis Jesuit on Feb. 7. He scored 17 points, pulled down 10 rebounds, had six assists and made four steals. Kylie Andrews, swimming, junior, Heritage: She won the individual titles in the 100yard freestyle and 100 backstroke at the Class 4A State Swimming Championships. Delaney Bernard, basketball, senior, Cher-

ry Creek: She connected on five 3-points baskets and finished with 20 points in the Bruins’ 67-47 Centennial League win over Arapahoe on Feb. 8. Lexie Barker, swimming, senior, Douglas County: She was crowned the Class 5A state diving champion on Feb. 10 when she compiled 493.25 points at the State Swimming Championships.

STANDOUT PERFORMERS are five athletes named from south metro area high schools. Preference is given to those making their debut on the list. To nominate an athlete, contact Jim Benton at jbenton@coloradocommunitymedia.com

remember years ago, 29 to be exact, being in the Denver North gym for a memorable night of high school basketball. Manual’s Chucky Sproling set a singleOVERTIME game state record by scoring 74 points against the Vikings. Alameda’s boys basketball coach Henry Aguilar probably won’t forget the evening he spent in the North gym Feb. 6, when the Pirates Jim Benton outlasted North, 95-93, in a four-overtime, non-league game. “It was like playing two games, it was a long night,” said Aguilar, who assumed the Alameda head coaching reins less than three weeks before the start of the season. “The win kind of helps bring us together. We’ve had a rough season. Four starters fouled out of the game against North and everybody was completely exhausted. We had to play the fourth overtime with four sophomores and one senior starter. That was tough.” The win helped boost Alameda’s overall record to 9-10. “The first overtime, they were up by two and our senior guard Anthony Lawson drove to the basket and hit two clutch free throws to send it to the second overtime,” Aguilar explained. “In the second overtime, we had a two-point lead with like 20 seconds left and a younger guy took a shot when he wasn’t supposed to. The North point guard took it all the way and got a layup and sent it to the third overtime. “We hit two free throws and sent it to the last overtime. In the fourth overtime, four starters fouled out so we had four reserves. A couple of our younger players stepped up. A sophomore, Domonic Creazzi, hit a clutch three, we got fouled a couple times and made some free throws and ended up winning.” Heritage hires Eberle Heritage has hired Hannah Eberle as its new volleyball coach. Eberle is a Ralston Valley graduate and a former Mustangs junior varsity coach. She replaces Jana Barrett, who stepped away after compiling a 11-330 record over the past two seasons. Jim Benton is a sports writer for Colorado Community Media. He has been covering sports in the Denver area since 1968. He can be reached at jbenton@coloradocommunitymedia. com or at 303-566-4083.


Lone Tree Voice 29

7February 16, 2017

Local wrestlers advance to state tournament Ponderosa third, Mountain Vista fourth at regional meet BY TOM MUNDS TMUNDS@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

The announcer frequently called the names of Ponderosa and Mountain Vista wrestlers as the Mustangs and Golden Eagles earned points and claimed honors at the Feb. 10 and 11 Class 5A Region 2 Wrestling Tournament at Legacy High School. Wrestlers earned team points for wins and the top four wrestlers in each weight division earned the right to compete in the state tournament Feb 16-18 at the Pepsi Center in Denver. Brighton won the team title with 271 points and Legacy was second with 207.5 points, with Ponderosa finishing third with 161 points and Mountain Vista fourth with 123 points. Ponderosa coach Corey McNellis said the season got off to an interesting start. “We had a state placer then we got hit by the injury bug that includes a serious injury that sidelined a state finalist for the season,” he said. “But gradually we started getting healthy, started getting every back and that is when we started hitting on all cylinders. Today, we came in thinking we could have seven or eight qualifiers, but we lost some matches we probably should have won. But we’ll be taking some quality wrestlers downtown to the state meet next week.” Three Mustangs won regional championships: Parker Benekas at 145 pounds, Jayden Woodruff at 182 pounds and defending state champion Cohl Schultz at 220 pounds. A trio of Ponderosa wrestlers — Thomas Dixon at 120 pounds, Daniel Turco at 152 pounds and Korry Tunnicliff at 160 pounds — all earned fourth place in their weight divisions and also advanced to the state tournament. Schultz, a sophomore, said his

Support your local paper!

Trent Schultz, Mountain Vista’s 195-pounder, applies pressure to turn Kaelin Chin of Overland onto his back during the 195-pound championship match at the Feb. 10-11 Class 5A Region 2 Wrestling Tournament at Legacy High School. Schultz scored a technical fall with a score of 16-1 to win the weight division championship. TOM MUNDS

‘I took up wrestling because it is the only sport mentioned in the Bible.’ Trent Schultz, Mountain Vista senior dad wrestled in high school and his older brother wrestled, so he wrestled too. “My brother and I have been wrestling since we were about 3 years old,” he said. “Wrestling is my only sport and I think I am a lot better wrestler now than I was at this time last year. I move a lot better than I

did last year and I have opened up my offense.” He said he said he knows his strengths and knows what he wants to do as he goes into each match. Mountain Vista had five wrestlers qualify for state, including senior Trent Schultz, Cohl Schultz’s older brother.

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P RO G R A M

“I took up wrestling because it is the only sport mentioned in the Bible,” he said. “My younger brother and I grew up wrestling together. We wrestled each other for about 14 years but now he is wrestling for Ponderosa.” He said he won the state title last year and now he is focused on defending that title. “Last year, I doubted myself even though I was ranked No. 1,” he said. “I won the title and now I am focused on defending that title this year because I feel I have something to prove.” Schultz will be joined at state by four teammates. Preston Weaver won the 126-pound title, Nolan Stritchko was second at 145 and two Golden Eagles finished fourth, Roger Meyer at 132 pounds and Nico Gonzalez at 285 pounds.

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30 Lone Tree Voice

STATE

February 16, 2017F

STATE SWIMMING: HOW THEY FINISHED

FROM PAGE 28

Highlands Ranch, led by sophomore Aimee Burton’s fourthplace finish in the 50 freestyle, was eighth in the 4A title chase with 111 points. In the Class 5A state championships, Rock Canyon was the top school from Highlands Ranch finishing sixth with 125 points. Mountain Vista was eighth with 99 points and ThunderRidge was 11th with 76 points. Rock Canyon sophomore Jessica Beckwith was fourth in the 100 butterfly and the Jaguars scored points in the championship final of three relay events. Mountain Vista junior Natalie Arky was second in the 100 butterfly and fourth in the 100 backstroke to lead the way for the Golden Eagles. “I knew it was going to be a challenge,” she said. “I had a lot of energy and was pumped.”

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Lone Tree Voice 31

7February 16, 2017

Parker girl moves to mountains to chase downhill dream BY TOM SKELLEY TSKELLEY@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Casey Adams first strapped on a pair of skis at the age of one and a half. About five years later, she decided she wanted to wear them to work when she grew up. “What really inspired me was watching the Olympics,” she said of the 2006 Winter Games. “After watching the Alpine skiers I decided — ‘I want to do that one day.’” Adams, 17, attended Challenge to Excellence Charter School from kindergarten to eighth grade, but her schedule grew hectic as she spent more time training in the mountains. To cut down on travel time, the family came up with an unconventional living arrangement, and at 14 the slopes became her second home Casey and her mother Karen now live in Breckenridge, commuting about an hour each way to Casey’s Minturn high school, Vail Ski and Snowboard Academy. Casey’s father is still in Parker, as was her older brother until he left for flight school in January. “We knew we would be spending more time in Breckenridge than in Parker,” Karen said. “People in the Front Range don’t understand her schedule sometimes, but we make it work … In the summer when everyone else is going to the mountains, we go home to Parker.” Casey said the change in schools was

Casey Adams carves a turn in a time trial at the International Ski Federation Speed Series in Vail in January. Adams, 17, recently qualified to compete with members of the United States Ski Team in February. COURTESY PHOTOS intimidating at first, and it took some time to ingratiate herself with her new friends. But being in school with a group of like-minded competitors has created a tight bond between her and her classmates. “I’m training with all the same people every day, we go to class together, and we travel together,” she said. Skiing competitions and trainings have taken Casey and her teammates around the country, and the world, including two three-week trips to Argentina and Chile over the last two years. And the training is paying off. Casey recently competed in the International Ski Federation Speed

series in Aspen, earning her first top 10 finish, eighth place, in a downhill event. She also earned a spot to compete in the NORAM Alpine Speed events in Copper Mountain, competing with many members of the United States Ski Team. Casey said she’s keeping her career options open, researching colleges that have strong mathematics programs as well as ski teams. But her dream of making the U.S. Ski Team is still alive, and carving a sharp turn at full speed still gives her the same adrenaline boost she remembers from her first downhill run. “I just love adventure, I love speed,” she said. “It’s just such a rush.”

Casey Adams takes a break from training to show off her smile in November. Adams first hit the slopes as a 1-year-old and decided she wanted to become a professional skier after watching the 2006 Olympic Games in Turin, Italy.

The Lone Tree Voice, your hometown newspaper and part of the largest local media company in the state is looking to fill a full and part-time sales positions. If you strive to be a larger part of your community by meeting with business owners big and small, helping them grow their business by marketing with digital media, community newspapers, and everything in between – then we would like to meet you.

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32 Lone Tree Voice

February 16, 2017F

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Lone Tree Voice 33

7February 16, 2017

Services Handyman

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34 Lone Tree Voice

February 16, 2017F

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Please Recycle this Publication when Finished


Lone Tree Voice 35

7February 16, 2017

SMITH FROM PAGE 12

I was unwild in college. The song has never suited me, and Steppenwolf was never one of my favorite bands. However, I took to “Steppenwolf ” the novel, because it was about me, it seemed, and it became the theme of my master’s thesis. The middle-aged man, Harry Haller, in “Steppenwolf ” was not born to be wild either.

SEND US YOUR NEWS Colorado Community Media welcomes event listings and other submissions. Please note our submissions emails. Events and club listings calendar@coloradocommunitymedia.com School notes schoolnotes@ coloradocommunitymedia.com Military briefs militarynotes@ coloradocommunitymedia.com

He would never have driven my street like a bat out of hell, or a teenager late for school. Some people seek out preachers, and even hand over their Visa cards. Not me. I’m not preaching. Just asking. Slow down? You don’t want a 4-year-old stuck to your windshield. Or my incontinent dachshund. Craig Marshall Smith is an artist, educator and Highlands Ranch resident. He can be reached at craigmarshallsmith@comcast.net.

General press releases Submit through our website Obituaries obituaries@coloradocommunitymedia.com Letters to the editor letters@coloradocommunitymedia.com Fax 303-566-4098 Mail to 9137 Ridgeline Blvd., Ste. 210 Highlands Ranch, CO 80129

A collaboration concert with the Denver Concert Band and the Queen City Jazz Band

Sunday, February 26 • 2:30pm at the Lone Tree Arts Center

For tickets call (720) 509-1000 or visit lonetreeartscenter.org

Answers

© 2016 King Features Synd., Inc.

Solution

THANKS for

PLAYING!


36 Lone Tree Voice

Notices

February 16, 2017F

Public Notices

To advertise your public notices call 303-566-4100

Douglas County Public Notice DOUGLAS COUNTY GOVERNMENT Salary Publication Year End December 31, 2016 Position Title Wages 4-H Admin Support Specialist 41,165.23 911 Data Specialist 54,041.67 911 Data Specialist 39,634.92 911 Finance Coordinator 72,252.27 ACA Coordinator 41,005.31 Accountant I 47,129.77 Accountant II 55,982.88 Accounting Clerk 46,598.87 Accounting Clerk 35,308.79 Accounting Clerk II 9,988.14 Accounting Clerk II 46,957.91 Accred/Policy Unit Program Manager 57,901.68 Administrative Coroner Investigator 61,426.30 Administrative Assistant 56,133.83 Administrative Assistant 60,038.88 Administrative Assistant 46,999.87 Administrative Assistant 45,505.35 Administrative Assistant 32,268.22 Administrative Assistant 56,001.23 Administrative Assistant 59,867.70 Administrative Assistant 16,712.80 Administrative Assistant 44,257.16 Administrative Secretary 50,670.52 Administrative Secretary 47,612.55 Administrative Secretary 43,871.11 Administrative Secretary 26,719.68 Administrative Secretary 51,550.91 Administrative Secretary 56,980.87 Administrative Secretary 56,793.88 Administrative Specialist 42,436.26 Administrative Specialist 50,018.89 Administrative Specialist 34,493.99 Administrative Specialist 40,647.30 Administrative Support Technician 11,074.31 Administrative Services Manager 67,261.91 Administrator, Child Welfare 103,047.83 All Hazard Mitigation Specialist 13,644.04 All Hazard Mitigation Team Specialist 43,072.74 All Hazard Mitigation Team Specialist 7,008.41 All Hazard Mitigation Team Specialist 38,849.93 All Hazard Mitigation Team Supervisor 55,855.68 Applications Specialist 82,838.87 Applications Specialist 94,778.87 Applications Specialist 82,838.87 Applications Specialist 110,660.87 Applications Support Specialist 67,973.88 Applications Support Specialist 71,898.84 Applications Support Specialist 74,782.91 Appraisal Solutions Administrator 71,678.39 Appraiser I 48,081.50 Appraiser I 48,471.26 Appraiser I 50,627.28 Appraiser I 46,619.27 Appraiser I 46,619.28 Appraiser I 48,438.61 Appraiser I 48,283.82 Appraiser I 27,065.41 Appraiser II 54,168.68 Appraiser II 56,448.06 Appraiser II 55,424.15 Appraiser II 58,236.84 Appraiser III 67,540.73 Appraiser III 63,125.78 Appraiser III 62,664.41 Appraiser III 66,120.47 Appraiser III 62,324.17 Appraiser III 67,846.95 Appraiser IV 72,608.87 Apprentice Appraiser 4,466.47 Apprentice Appraiser 38,315.38 Apprentice Appraiser 24,658.40 Assessment Administrator 88,605.20 Assessment Technician I 18,113.87 Assessment Technician I 42,019.67 Assessment Technician II 49,620.47 Assessment Technician II 47,681.29 Assessment Technician II 49,521.11 Assessment Technician II 45,767.37 Assessment Technician II 48,111.59 Assessment Technician II 46,698.62 Asset Management Technician 56,498.88 Assistant County Attorney 79,226.87 Assistant County Attorney 77,040.35 Assistant Supervisor, Concrete 67,112.52 Assistant Supervisor, District 85,114.38 Assistant Supervisor, District 72,747.84 Assistant Supervisor, District 69,470.05 Assistant Supervisor, District 77,771.00 Assistant Supervisor, District 67,851.52 Assistant Supervisor, District 69,988.75 Assistant Supervisor, District 83,723.11 Assistant Supervisor, District 70,806.62 Assistant Supervisor, Drainage 78,454.26 Assistant Supervisor, Mechanic 75,639.62 Assistant Supervisor, Mechanic 84,316.60 Assistant Supervisor, Signal 74,756.66 Assistant Supervisor, Traffic 71,304.06 Assistant Training Coordinator 35,340.81 Associate Analyst 59,713.70 Assistant Director, Community & Resource Services 100,508.57 Assistant Director, Planning Services 109,489.92 Assistant Director, PW & Engineering 148,126.48 Assistant Director, Finance 123,474.84 Assistant Manager, Motor Vehicle 68,405.87 Assistant Supervisor, Residential Appraisal 69,175.57

Assistant Supervisor, Facilities 65,896.92 Assistant Supervisor, Recording 58,095.00 Assistant Director, Pks, Trails, Building Grounds 116,984.84 Auto CAD Operator 46,434.83 Auto CAD Operator 46,467.40 Bankruptcy & Tax Technician 42,590.87 Benefits Assistant 47,593.87 Building Contractor Licensing Specialist 48,204.84 Building Maintenance Technician 41,252.27 Building Maintenance Technician 9,981.35 Building Maintenance Technician 33,126.63 Building Maintenance Technician 50,980.91 Building Maintenance Technician 54,374.86 Building Maintenance Technician 38,411.24 Building Maintenance Technician 39,056.95 Building Maintenance Technician 44,758.46 Building Maintenance Technician 53,638.89 Building Maintenance Technician 35,820.36 Building Maintenance Technician 19,917.80 Building Maintenance Technician 38,499.55 Building Maintenance Technician 40,980.83 Building Maintenance Technician 37,451.13 Budget Analyst 78,878.88 Budget Analyst I 33,646.40 Budget Manager 97,290.90 Building Elevator Specialist 45,518.83 Building Inspector I 56,007.44 Building Inspector I 60,091.61 Building Inspector I 43,159.28 Building Inspector III 54,661.60 Building Inspector III 75,250.91 Building Inspector III 66,052.92 Building Inspector III 78,307.91 Building Inspector III 80,935.91 Building Inspector III 82,541.46 Building Inspector III 28,794.60 Building Maintenance Worker 30,104.17 Building Maintenance Worker 38,678.87 Building Maintenance Worker 42,923.87 Building Maintenance Worker 31,587.84 Building Support Technician 38,298.61 Busines Resource & Engineering Fin Svcs Mgr. 84,938.88 Business Resource Technician 30,403.18 Business Resource Technician 44,425.92 Business Resource Technician 5,412.98 Capital Projects Engineer IV 115,538.87 Capital Projects Engineer IV 28,128.24 Captain 120,878.87 Captain 132,265.48 Captain 118,598.87 Captain 131,845.48 Captain 129,505.48 Case Services Technician 42,150.84 Caseworker 57,285.84 Caseworker 44,166.74 Caseworker 19,637.00 Caseworker 49,689.41 Caseworker 60,069.38 Caseworker 45,929.38 Caseworker 10,954.11 Caseworker 18,541.16 Caseworker 62,740.84 Caseworker 50,534.33 Caseworker 63,350.72 Caseworker 18,723.58 Caseworker 50,312.37 Caseworker 22,852.37 Caseworker 55,380.89 Caseworker 63,324.89 Caseworker 49,886.39 Caseworker 11,842.04 Caseworker 49,886.40 Caseworker 17,810.59 Caseworker 48,476.39 Caseworker 18,723.80 Caseworker 26,146.38 Caseworker 20,061.96 Caseworker 9,453.00 Caseworker 51,534.90 Caseworker 32,513.54 Caseworker 23,978.12 Caseworker A - Screener 25,998.45 Caseworker A - Screener 39,928.53 Caseworker A - Screener 26,748.41 Caseworker A-Program Specialist 43,158.85 Caseworker Supervisor 66,988.85 Caseworker Supervisor 58,864.32 Caseworker Supervisor 29,799.82 Caseworker Supervisor 74,016.42 Caseworker Supervisor 65,788.86 Caseworker Supervisor 67,188.85 Cashier 4,281.97 Cashier 7,379.59 Central Receiving / Mail Clerk 37,138.50 Central Receiving / Mail Clerk 41,388.17 Chief Building Official 102,753.84 Chief Deputy 142,645.48 Chief Deputy 142,645.48 Chief Deputy Clerk & Recorder 89,346.34 Chief Deputy Coroner 91,795.89 Chief Information Officer 160,053.52 Chief Planner 77,614.87 Chief Planner 88,019.88 Chief Planner 79,516.90 Child Support Specialist 43,288.92 Child Support Specialist 60,426.84 Child Support Specialist 17,725.76 Civil/Warrant Specialist 52,667.32 Civil/Warrant Specialist 57,967.05 Civil/Warrant Specialist 45,658.78

CJRA Support Specialist 65,808.58 CJS Officer I 20,453.91 CJS Officer I 12,111.24 CJS Officer I 41,721.86 CJS Officer II 50,700.08 CJS Officer II 56,884.19 CJS Officer II 50,971.67 CJS Officer II 11,576.20 CJS Officer II 57,982.79 CJS Officer II 46,668.39 CJS Officer II 58,950.97 CJS Specialist 10,964.83 CJS Specialist 38,899.05 CJS Specialist 35,928.87 CJS Specialist 32,127.35 CJS Specialist 8,405.58 CJS Specialist 1,578.87 CJS Supervisor 68,371.65 Clerk III 24,950.58 Clerk III 9,183.69 Clerk III 23,734.66 Clerk III 50,035.41 Clerk III 3,416.40 Clerk III 41,033.87 Clerk III 41,869.94 Clerk III 43,612.59 Clerk III 47,271.83 Clerk III 33,044.96 Clerk III 30,850.34 Clerk III 41,179.95 Clerk III 40,251.83 Clerk III 36,918.38 CO Works Assessment Specialist 27,784.05 CO Works Assessment Specialist 22,038.25 Collaboration Services Specialist 96,360.84 Communication & Digital Content Specialist 51,241.85 Communications Manager 78,938.87 Communications Specialist 25,720.34 Communications/Web Admin 74,187.07 Community & Resources Services Manager 74,046.17 Community of Care Navigator 59,748.83 Community Resource Coordinator 64,226.45 Community Services Program Specialist 50,753.87 Concrete Finisher 48,382.82 Concrete Finisher 44,413.79 Concrete Finisher 48,363.68 Contract Coordinator 68,410.86 Coroner Investigator I 35,934.33 Coroner Investigator I 5,683.88 Coroner Investigator II 54,445.62 Coroner Investigator III 63,885.47 Coroner Investigator III 61,607.38 Coroner Investigator III 65,355.14 Corporal 83,253.58 Corporal 86,117.38 Corporal 76,765.13 Corporal 82,946.00 Corporal 85,511.13 Corporal 74,531.89 Corporal 85,605.39 Corporal 67,266.47 Corporal 77,839.20 Corporal 83,134.29 Corporal 79,088.15 Corporal 85,535.08 Corporal 79,863.67 Corporal 86,028.99 Corporal 84,478.69 Corporal 83,181.16 County Attorney 171,211.48 County Commissioner 87,300.00 County Commissioner 87,300.00 County Commissioner 87,300.00 County Manager 179,083.73 Crime Analyst 80,660.87 Crime Scene Technician 85,809.20 Crime Scene Technician 88,801.27 Crime Scene Technician 70,648.12 Crime Tech/Forensic Chemist 70,062.58 CSU Extension Coordinator 60,713.60 Customer Support Specialist 33,499.92 Cyber Security Officer 134,154.96 Data Imaging Clerk 21,929.52 Data Imaging Clerk 44,941.27 Data Imaging Clerk 15,798.98 Database Developer II 98,311.92 Demographic Program Analyst 67,135.93 Deputy 78,214.71 Deputy 69,785.99 Deputy 51,286.02 Deputy 81,673.39 Deputy 73,194.04 Deputy 73,570.62 Deputy 75,673.15 Deputy 60,266.33 Deputy 26,930.31 Deputy 85,595.13 Deputy 62,184.81 Deputy 65,700.87 Deputy 73,941.84 Deputy 40,604.35 Deputy 72,752.63 Deputy 4,696.17 Deputy 82,660.80 Deputy 83,603.33 Deputy 72,385.30 Deputy 76,296.00 Deputy 62,121.53 Deputy 60,984.45 Deputy 55,007.44 Deputy 85,737.19 Deputy 77,767.84

Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy

82,585.77 78,528.53 56,909.27 75,625.68 74,295.12 68,537.37 81,413.63 40,331.89 78,274.54 57,626.85 11,463.76 70,734.68 68,257.40 76,858.63 44,621.99 82,702.13 17,359.37 74,973.48 24,544.73 12,129.81 79,623.11 40,779.00 55,066.33 65,328.85 57,248.10 64,615.67 55,436.92 87,142.69 78,151.16 79,260.07 22,062.16 80,458.42 78,047.14 79,722.95 59,113.31 56,780.86 43,541.97 54,798.93 79,257.43 37,700.18 81,845.62 78,317.15 50,020.23 59,624.57 67,632.08 24,346.57 74,797.52 78,931.58 70,602.76 21,339.10 78,324.08 62,133.20 17,821.26 61,785.63 76,294.83 101,042.83 62,579.81 77,636.37 74,036.86 50,757.79 80,687.46 55,452.37 60,988.87 83,716.92 80,157.47 86,714.74 82,730.06 81,244.62 61,670.05 92,063.34 83,912.43 65,393.27 61,946.61 71,348.08 77,525.39 83,307.16 78,009.90 61,556.23 80,267.57 56,225.94 83,613.64 42,516.71 33,638.72 54,724.91 53,364.97 56,815.78 85,088.61 74,162.91 95,186.85 75,010.54 57,158.39 66,372.81 83,008.16 98,529.14 68,047.86 74,120.89 68,343.63 78,194.23 79,611.22 78,176.07 79,127.09 70,558.22 6,143.95 78,456.78 15,712.53 75,835.13 79,760.17 61,245.45 1,007.64 85,964.10 67,661.71 83,223.50

Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy

54,413.95 77,868.87 65,076.57 84,616.74 10,080.37 62,325.89 85,341.54 49,709.21 71,745.07 83,326.39 66,243.75 72,992.24 13,827.56 78,771.04 82,152.84 55,087.61 42,884.71 70,078.31 77,098.01 81,887.52 77,299.15 83,432.98 40,895.45 73,594.33 55,287.15 55,083.80 72,684.07 40,243.10 63,558.87 17,956.41 65,047.19 35,621.62 56,725.04 79,688.31 79,871.91 81,380.11 63,622.52 81,187.93 81,595.29 69,094.18 53,510.89 71,923.22 12,385.57 57,137.92 81,021.51 51,162.34 78,425.12 59,184.93 77,462.95 48,957.86 78,698.84 79,406.40 54,473.92 41,162.41 85,048.26 18,587.06 77,935.41 70,846.88 54,030.32 69,549.31 50,999.35 78,345.05 79,663.35 49,398.51 83,316.59 55,798.25 78,789.23 78,475.39 54,459.89 79,534.83 67,476.91 68,711.38 66,370.03 80,371.29 57,213.33 80,067.40 94,032.42 54,648.74 82,245.95 83,000.06 80,902.89 77,991.27 85,225.90 82,823.52 80,414.79 7,028.35 7,765.82 80,274.37 27,272.77 70,571.60 84,117.54 43,493.90 80,933.23 56,177.97 84,798.87 49,753.84 73,009.53 80,723.76 85,931.19 43,492.34 73,100.78 81,957.33 82,229.21 78,438.16 80,389.99 75,687.52 26,819.96 40,583.40 83,348.67 81,976.99

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7February 16, 2017 Page 2 of 3 930551, 552, 553 Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Deputy Chief Building Official Deputy County Attorney Deputy County Manager Deputy Director HR Deputy, Appraisal Deputy, Elections Deputy, Motor Vehicle Deputy, Recording Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Detention Specialist Director, Community Justice Services Director, Community Development Director, Emergency Management Director, Facilities Director, Finance Director, Human Resources Director, Human Services Director, OS & Natural Resources Director, Public Affairs Director, Public Works Engineer Director, Public Works Operation Discovery Support Specialist Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Dispatcher Driver’s License Supervisor Economic Development Coordinator Elected Official - Assessor Elected Official - County Survey Elected Official - Coroner Elected Official - Sheriff Elected Official - Treasurer

76,184.82 60,887.79 104,496.85 80,216.36 84,483.13 48,542.06 80,404.74 30,671.11 82,864.54 80,504.97 63,513.62 64,446.40 61,815.92 100,499.87 170,991.52 140,865.48 126,233.87 96,248.71 91,646.87 79,407.84 79,991.74 6,729.23 41,922.97 32,771.92 45,492.05 14,365.66 25,954.96 33,785.53 43,943.00 49,298.87 108.12 17,521.81 40,391.17 42,903.90 58,930.85 38,416.74 31,849.77 41,590.85 40,635.17 51,713.86 64,624.87 43,247.36 12,771.47 11,422.24 50,247.02 4,285.46 51,304.02 18,186.30 4,164.85 59,297.24 9,366.92 42,518.87 49,995.98 18,373.26 42,635.56 40,018.06 5,149.22 15,825.88 31,692.97 14,470.89 53,609.46 11,487.55 51,243.51 49,502.69 59,608.29 38,494.29 46,846.34 108.12 32,887.35 45,017.16 40,255.58 34,623.02 76,154.77 57,593.57 57,904.24 40,022.71 45,732.40 57,643.87 43,259.35 120,715.91 146,370.48 96,638.87 140,608.48 139,877.44 140,077.52 132,145.48 123,198.83 133,940.44 158,500.48 109,910.87 56,958.90 21,489.41 30,415.50 51,836.15 49,866.25 66,033.27 68,516.87 10,415.87 48,678.36 53,914.22 43,453.50 66,094.13 49,052.10 9,328.00 56,447.73 71,973.60 32,563.50 50,298.14 45,268.83 62,379.56 45,608.08 45,783.12 4,041.68 10,546.17 55,913.26 50,303.35 57,363.17 36,658.30 33,092.75 44,335.98 18,449.03 10,061.32 55,948.86 44,016.08 38,131.88 1,833.30 14,008.08 47,361.04 87,912.91 87,300.00 5,499.96 87,300.00 111,099.96 87,300.00

Elected Official-Clerk & Recorder 87,300.00 Election Coordinator 52,714.47 Election Technician 11,932.94 Election Technician 5,952.44 Elections Specialist I 43,304.48 Elections Specialist I 31,316.30 Elections Specialist I 39,797.54 Elections Specialist I 38,726.59 Elections Specialist III 57,509.66 Elections Specialist III 54,651.07 Elections Technology Coordinator 52,719.18 Electrical Inspector II 76,874.85 Electrical Inspector II 65,132.92 Electrical Inspector II 1,442.50 Electrical Inspector III 91,854.36 Electrical Inspector III 68,880.78 Electrical Inspector III 68,487.74 Electronic Equipment Technician 59,285.31 Eligibility Specialist 18,115.80 Eligibility Specialist 27,255.96 Eligibility Specialist 3,429.65 Eligibility Specialist 39,128.75 Eligibility Specialist 42,689.56 Eligibility Specialist 1,365.99 Eligibility Specialist 37,247.06 Eligibility Specialist 38,551.69 Eligibility Technician 6,711.02 Eligibility Technician 12,594.59 Eligibility Technician 2,206.65 Eligibility Technician 23,988.68 Eligibility Technician 30,685.78 Eligibility Technician 4,840.74 Eligibility Technician 2,317.20 Eligibility Technician 25,271.34 Eligibility Technician 11,320.13 Emergency Management Coordinator 61,478.87 Emergency Management Supervisor 65,858.87 Engineer Inspector IV Contract Maintenance 86,434.60 Engineer Inspector IV Contract Maintenance101,654.52 Engineer II 63,162.32 Engineer II 62,160.83 Engineer II 70,489.90 Engineer II 67,397.87 Engineer III 96,178.91 Engineer III 89,379.84 Engineer III 103,089.85 Engineer III 91,358.87 Engineer III 100,068.85 Engineer III 100,575.83 Engineer IV 107,744.83 Engineer IV 56,762.09 Engineer IV 100,147.14 Engineer IV 25,536.29 Engineer IV 121,521.66 Engineer IV 105,391.92 Engineer IV 105,187.91 Engineer IV 114,004.91 Engineer IV 118,309.92 Engineer, Special Projects 88,064.38 Engineering Inspector II 58,413.32 Engineering Inspector II 77,552.12 Engineering Inspector II 79,656.58 Engineering Contracts Spec. 62,090.88 Engineering Inspector I 73,327.49 Engineering Inspector III 60,105.86 51,775.91 Engineering Technician Engineering Technician 50,386.03 Engineering Technician 58,161.83 Environmental Resources Specialist 81,757.87 Equipment Operator 62,415.30 Equipment Operator 6,243.57 Equipment Operator 45,367.13 Equipment Operator 60,539.88 Equipment Operator 56,750.73 Equipment Operator 58,037.18 Equipment Operator 47,070.26 Equipment Operator 18,604.55 Equipment Operator 53,357.55 Equipment Operator 46,993.38 Equipment Operator 50,415.55 Equipment Operator 44,641.34 Equipment Operator 53,010.26 Equipment Operator 7,595.75 Equipment Operator 24,409.15 Equipment Operator 53,103.15 Equipment Operator 52,413.36 Equipment Operator 19,914.60 Equipment Operator 55,736.70 Equipment Operator 6,409.32 Equipment Operator 20,740.35 Equipment Operator 46,235.11 Equipment Operator 50,592.49 Equipment Operator 48,108.46 Equipment Operator 43,519.95 Equipment Operator 328.32 Equipment Operator 53,056.85 Equipment Operator 44,958.78 Equipment Operator 49,448.10 Equipment Operator 44,057.71 Equipment Operator 57,392.74 Equipment Operator 59,099.01 Equipment Operator II 54,769.37 Equipment Operator II 62,299.93 Equipment Operator II 62,270.65 Equipment Operator II 54,889.32 Equipment Operator II 54,247.28 Equipment Operator II 48,760.27 Equipment Operator II 65,053.17 Equipment Operator II 58,096.31 Equipment Operator II 65,288.58 Equipment Operator II 60,626.32 Equipment Operator II 53,205.99 Equipment Operator II 53,057.19 Equipment Operator II 64,239.78 Equipment Operator II 63,044.16 Equipment Operator II 63,898.47 Equipment Operator II 66,566.13 Equipment Operator II 72,958.42 Equipment Operator II 59,895.72 Erosion Control Inspector II 76,137.44 Erosion Control Inspector II 52,514.63 Erosion Control Inspector II 57,892.59 ERP Manager 58,167.91 ERP System Analyst 56,914.06 ERP System Analyst 92,062.91 Event Coordinator 1,903.44 Evidence Technician 58,430.13 Evidence Technician 65,378.51 Facilities Projects & Maintenance Manager 99,074.87 Facilities Safety & Security Coordinator 35,735.48 Facilities Security Technician 63,301.64 Facilities Security Technician 51,277.59 Fair Coordinator 92,037.95 Fairgrounds Admin Support Specialist 68,218.28 Fairgrounds Facilities Manager 44,241.43 Family Egmt Meeting Facilitator 53,369.88

Family Get Meeting Facilitator 7,811.65 Family Supp Program Division Manager 36,286.56 Field Investigator 52,175.88 Finance Specialist 68,597.16 Fleet Admin Support Specialist 55,547.87 Foreclosure Technician II 5,643.15 Foreclosure Technician II 45,097.43 Forensic Crime Lab Manager 85,934.89 Geospatial Database Admin 88,117.19 GIS Analyst 62,219.59 GIS Analyst 74,239.38 GIS Services Manager 90,766.91 GIS Specialist 61,087.07 GIS Specialist II 70,724.16 Grant Support Specialist 48,438.89 Grants/Contracts Administrator 75,051.87 Historical Restoration Specialist 73,232.77 HRIS Specialist 63,572.88 HRLETF Range Specialist 50,816.01 HRLETF Range Specialist/ Equipment Operator 45,135.32 Human Services Manager & IV-D Administrator 74,708.15 Human Services Program Manager 83,336.33 Human Services Program Manager 82,494.84 Human Resources Generalist 29,027.53 Human Resources Generalist 57,686.29 Integrated Services HB1451 41,646.29 Investigations& Recovery Specialist 53,203.91 Investment Administrator/Accountant 92,522.87 Justice Center Assistant Facilities Supervisor 53,714.78 Justice Center Assistant Facilities Supervisor 73,657.33 Justice Center Facilities Supervisor 61,852.91 Journeyman Electrician 72,071.98 Journeyman Electrician 74,539.26 Land Management Specialist/Park Ranger 57,835.80 Land Management Specialist/Park Ranger 71,038.25 Land Management Specialist/Park Ranger 62,356.05 Land Record & License Tech I 12,691.68 Land Record & License Tech I 23,642.73 Land Record & License Tech I 32,907.91 Land Record & License Tech I 32,761.31 Land Record & License Tech I 11,243.42 Land Record, PP & License Tech II 50,235.06 Land Record, PP & License Tech II 14,418.31 Land Record, PP & License Tech II 41,063.02 Land Record, PP & License Tech II 36,405.52 Lead Building Specialist 49,560.91 Lead Caseworker 56,322.86 Lead Caseworker 54,544.11 Lead Caseworker 50,140.87 Lead Caseworker 63,430.86 Lead Child Support Specialist 62,508.18 Lead CJS Officer 51,929.46 Lead Eligibility Specialist 43,048.37 Lead Eligibility Specialist 54,807.36 Lead Janitorial Worker 36,779.99 Lead Motor Vehicle Specialist 45,827.26 Lead Motor Vehicle Specialist 41,602.36 Lead Motor Vehicle Specialist 51,532.68 Lead Motor Vehicle Specialist 50,715.98 Lead Parks Worker 7,611.60 Lead Parks Worker 44,904.70 Lead Parks Worker 41,486.72 Lead Parks Worker 2,514.55 Lead Parks Worker 48,582.81 Lead Parks Worker 43,410.62 Lead Parks Worker 52,466.03 Lead Parks Worker 16,320.09 Lead Parks Worker 51,679.11 Lead Parks Worker 42,451.74 Lead Parks Worker 48,420.36 Lead Parks Worker 61,664.48 Lead Parks Worker 43,984.92 Lead Records Clerk 48,450.75 Lead Screening Caseworker 47,887.53 Legal Analyst 75,368.83 Legal Analyst 60,651.36 Legal Assistant 49,594.92 Lieutenant 111,758.88 Lieutenant 111,758.88 Lieutenant 109,826.88 Lieutenant 97,679.50 Lieutenant 111,758.87 Lieutenant 114,098.87 Lieutenant 112,478.88 Lieutenant 111,758.87 Lieutenant 102,746.88 Lieutenant 111,758.87 Lieutenant 112,238.88 Lieutenant 111,758.88 Lieutenant 111,758.87 Lieutenant 109,826.87 Lieutenant 109,826.88 Lobby Control Specialist 69,744.61 Mail Courier 37,190.87 Manager, Accounting 101,178.10 Manager, Adult Services Program 92,625.83 Manager, Budget & Logistics 127,215.88 Manager, Business Resources 79,428.83 Manager, CJS Division 80,498.87 Manager, CJS Division 84,544.91 Manager Development Review 117,425.88 Manager, Elections Operations 67,858.91 Manager, Fleet Services 82,604.88 Manager, Fleet Transportation 60,148.73 Manager, Public Safety Technician 118,898.87 Manager, Zoning Compliance 88,652.87 Mechanic 52,661.33 Mechanic 66,404.23 Mechanic 53,262.78 Mechanic 42,075.66 Mechanic 44,864.34 Mechanic 71,117.62 Mechanic 54,778.90 Mechanic 55,569.64 Mechanic 52,883.51 Mechanic 67,803.18 Mechanic 58,826.83 Mechanic’s Assistant 19,290.33 Medicaid & PREA Coordinator 54,100.63 Mental Health Initiative Coordinator 14,117.21 Manager Capital Improvement Project 141,997.48 Manager Permits, Inspect & Utilities 146,152.48 Manager Software Development 136,594.47 Manager Youth Services Program 74,144.87 Manager Business Office Program Integrity 105,394.92 Manager Parks, Trails, Building Grounds 123,125.88 Mobility Manager 48,068.99 Mobility Manager 21,291.32 Motor Vehicle Specialist 1,293.36 Motor Vehicle Specialist 37,572.45 Motor Vehicle Specialist 36,747.81 Motor Vehicle Specialist 253.60

Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist Motor Vehicle Specialist MV Technical Support Specialist Natural Resource Specialist Night Custodian Night Custodian Night Custodian Night Custodian Night Custodian Night Custodian Night Custodian Night Custodian Night Custodian Night Custodian Noxious Weed Field Supervisor Noxious Weed Support Specialist Office Manager Public Trustee Foreclosure Specialist Park District Supervisor Park District Supervisor Park District Supervisor Park District Supervisor Parks Worker Parks Worker Parks Worker Parks Worker Parks Worker Parks Worker Parks Worker Parks Worker Parks Worker Parks Worker Parks Worker Parks Worker Parks Worker Parks Worker Parks Worker Parks Worker Parks Worker Parks Worker Parks Worker Parks Worker Parts Inventory Specialist Payroll/Accounts Payable Specialist Personnel Coordinator Plan Review Technician Planner Planning Manager Planning Manager Planning Resources Supervisor Planning Technician Planning Technician Planning Technician Planning/Addressing Specialist Plans Examiner I Plans Examiner I Plans Examiner II Plans Examiner II Plans Examiner Specialist Principal Planner Principal Planner Principal System Administrator Principal Traffic Engineer Problem Manager Producer / Editor Producer / Editor Program Development Manager Program Development Manager Program Development Manager Program Manager II Project & Systems Coordinator Project Analyst Project Coordinator Project Coordinator-Youth Education Project Manager Property Tax Adjustment Specialist Public Trustee Purchasing Specialist Quality Assurance Engineer II Quality Assurance Engineer II Radio Systems Administrator Radio Systems Specialist Radio Systems Specialist Real Prop Acquisition Specialist II Receptionist Receptionist Records Clerk Records Clerk Records Clerk Records Clerk Records Clerk Records Clerk Records Clerk Records Clerk Records Clerk Records Clerk

36,434.20 41,582.60 43,935.12 38,075.01 8,507.50 34,395.57 44,992.04 41,829.11 36,798.30 10,854.76 267.84 126.80 36,973.27 50,783.88 32,246.44 34,035.50 41,524.64 14,991.79 26,343.12 253.60 2,361.63 25,730.15 36,261.70 39,747.23 38,988.16 5,813.06 48,507.23 18,050.90 40,974.88 11,659.81 50,671.96 39,986.65 34,801.23 35,338.82 43,007.73 38,481.48 17,396.94 52,074.52 29,965.02 39,635.93 11,635.45 9,702.68 50,892.66 71,588.00 25,687.91 28,166.87 4,605.96 29,962.91 25,687.92 12,917.05 6,758.87 11,345.28 29,849.88 25,927.18 76,959.24 50,524.86 78,934.91 59,122.91 83,384.87 79,692.84 65,693.88 75,467.87 5,550.00 19,100.63 6,721.00 4,528.50 5,679.39 11,587.50 5,986.50 6,342.38 4,821.00 19,767.62 5,264.00 6,165.00 8,211.00 6,645.00 2,550.00 4,791.00 10,074.62 6,373.25 6,048.00 7,635.00 60,103.25 43,006.92 69,359.77 27,975.69 12,625.54 97,408.92 92,544.92 78,060.92 51,330.83 41,446.29 24,249.40 74,612.87 33,299.79 6,914.07 77,231.88 79,476.65 55,390.91 67,638.83 78,643.93 125,927.87 105,161.10 87,354.56 54,608.16 28,706.63 92,687.88 39,782.72 25,277.51 64,261.80 88,133.88 60,457.87 66,845.87 76,251.97 67,397.16 53,030.87 72,500.04 47,582.87 60,681.43 95,566.91 95,378.87 83,975.66 83,670.11 95,926.87 38,738.87 34,430.87 50,690.27 37,823.87 44,611.68 3,379.39 25,047.99 32,117.23 21,458.07 12,894.48 14,379.38 40,172.55

Records Clerk 8,309.53 Records Clerk 37,552.36 Records Clerk 24,924.85 Recruitment And Training Specialist 13,711.01 Resource Services Supervisor 66,224.47 Revenue Collection Specialist 53,907.39 Risk Manager 66,083.88 Risk Manager 34,992.04 Sales Tax Investigator 33,110.39 Self-Sufficiency & Family Support Manager 78,576.89 Sergeant 102,536.53 Sergeant 100,751.73 Sergeant 103,766.75 Sergeant 98,200.01 Sergeant 85,738.97 Sergeant 100,321.98 Sergeant 108,293.72 Sergeant 98,570.61 Sergeant 86,971.01 Sergeant 101,517.86 Sergeant 111,179.29 Sergeant 101,845.89 Sergeant 104,064.32 Sergeant 101,844.96 Sergeant 97,662.61 Sergeant 101,923.45 Sergeant 83,800.07 Sergeant 101,447.79 Sergeant 102,195.43 Sergeant 89,148.50 Sergeant 104,333.33 Sergeant 94,127.01 Sergeant 104,656.21 Sergeant 101,567.51 Sergeant 35,915.17 Sergeant 80,969.70 Sergeant 97,954.68 Sergeant 50,156.94 Sergeant 82,368.13 Sergeant 103,676.80 Sergeant 99,870.63 Sergeant 82,999.26 Sergeant 104,850.02 Sergeant 102,943.13 Sergeant 106,821.71 Sergeant 66,424.45 Sergeant 109,158.21 Sergeant 99,713.12 Sergeant 108,831.09 Sergeant 106,523.82 Sergeant 46,251.42 Sergeant 38,630.40 Service & Parts Coordinator 52,234.49 Service Desk Manager 82,757.84 Shop Utility Worker 42,035.58 Signal Electronics Specialist 67,259.19 Signal Technician 48,524.54 Site Development Administrator 75,964.83 Social Media Coordinator/PIO 64,958.87 Special Project Manager 72,392.89 Special Projects Administrator 85,569.46 Sr. Land Record, PP & License Technician 57,377.41 Sr. Land Record, PP & License Technician 51,687.96 Sr. Accounting Clerk 49,761.81 Sr. Accounting Clerk 53,994.29 Sr. Accounting Clerk 55,675.92 Sr. Accounting Clerk 50,189.88 Sr. Accounting Clerk 57,086.88 Sr. Accounting Clerk 50,172.84 Sr. Assessor Analyst 77,431.75 Sr. Assistant County Attorney 69,453.78 Sr. Assistant County Attorney 66,471.85 Sr. Asst Cnty Atty Land Use Specialist 46,266.11 Sr. Asst Cnty Atty Specialist Human Services 101,318.72 Sr. Asst Cnty Atty Specialist Human 135,203.44 Services Sr. Building Maintenance Technician 43,240.20 Sr. Building Maintenance Technician 28,840.83 Sr. Building Maintenance Technician 47,344.37 Sr. Building Maintenance Technician 40,643.56 Sr. Building Maintenance Technician 40,390.18 Sr. Budget Analyst 81,923.87 Sr. Database Administrator 94,888.61 Sr. Database Developer 108,223.93 Sr. Database Developer 131,302.91 Sr. ERP Analyst 9,075.54 Sr. Facilities Security Technician 71,111.92 Sr. Fairgrounds Maintenance Technician 53,568.11 Sr. GIS Analyst 73,935.43 Sr. Human Resources Generalist 82,133.83 Sr. Human Resources Generalist 86,341.91 Sr. HVAC Technician 68,496.34 Sr. HVAC Technician 47,406.61 Sr. HVAC Technician 71,169.41 Sr. Land Management Specialist/ Park Ranger 83,694.83 Sr. Legal Analyst 93,163.92 Sr. Manager, Collaboration Services 138,848.43 Sr. Manager, Infrastructure Services 29,873.92 Sr. Manager, Infrastructure Services 132,819.53 Sr. Network Engineer 98,427.12 Sr. Network Engineer 109,898.87 Sr. Planner 54,062.84 Sr. Planner 54,873.91 Sr. Planner 75,858.04 Sr. Planning Technician 48,499.91 Sr. Program Manager 44,736.98 Sr. Program Manager 110,517.82 Sr. Program Manager 116,143.92 Sr. Program Manager 120,859.91 Sr. Program Manager 47,248.56 Sr. Program Manager 83,626.93 Sr. Program Manager 9,492.20 Sr. Program Manager 124,497.84 Sr. Quality Assurance Engineer 90,945.72 Sr. Signal Technician 66,273.24 Sr. Signal Technician 55,780.18 Sr. Software Engineer 109,893.83 Sr. Software Engineer 113,861.87 Sr. Software Engineer 116,855.92 Sr. Software Engineer 115,449.83 Sr. Software Engineer 107,585.87 Sr. Software Engineer 113,039.88 Sr. Software Engineer 94,879.92 Sr. Software Engineer 111,063.83 Sr. Support Specialist 68,210.31 Sr. Support Specialist 71,222.48 Sr. Support Specialist 71,379.98 Sr. Support Specialist 55,722.95 Sr. Support Specialist 42,493.54 Sr. Support Specialist 65,257.79 Sr. Systems Administrator 87,941.56 Sr. Systems Administrator 115,513.92 Continued to Next Page 930551, 552, 553

Lone Tree * 2


38 Lone Tree Voice Misc. Private Legals Public Notice NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED

To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the Same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom It May Concern, and more especially to:

OCCUPANT - Anita M Schaefer - Castleville, Inc., a Minnesota Corporation - Clifford E Katalin, President, Katalin Companies Inc - Clifford E. Katalin, as its agent, and attorney-in-fact C/O Lockhart Company, Colorado Springs - Douglas County Public Trustee - Eldon Miller C/O Davis & Ceriani, P.C. - Gerald J Dent, Executive Vice President C/O Zions Bancorporation, successor in interest to The Lockhart Company - James Abbott, Director Zions Bancorporation - Joseph G Poehler, Chief Executive Officer C/O Castleville Inc, a Minnesota Corporation - Karen L Sanders, Deputy Public Trustee of Douglas County - Katalin Companies - Katalin Companies Inc - K-C Investments, Inc. a Colorado Corporation - Lawrence E Livingston - Lockhart Company - Lockhart Company, Colorado Springs - Lockhart Company, Colorado Springs, a Colorado Corporation - Marilyn C Green Public Trustee - Ronald J Wolf - Ronald J Wolf Living Trust - Spencer A Katalin, Registered Agent for Katalin Companies Inc - Spencer A Katalin, Treasurer, Katalin Companies Inc - Spencer A Katalin, Vice President, Katalin Companies Inc Thomas C Katalin, Secretary, Katalin Companies Inc - Thomas E. Schaefer - Thomas E. Schaefer and Anita M Schaefer - Zions Bancorporation - Zions Bancorporation C/O Katalin Companies Inc - Zions Bancorporation, successor in interest to The Lockhart Company You and each of you are hereby notified that on the 13th day of November 2008 the then County Treasurer of the County of Douglas, in the State of Colorado, sold at public tax lien sale to Ronald J Wolf the following described real estate situate in the County of Douglas, State of Colorado, to wit: LOT 17 BLK 20 PERRY PARK 5 0.906 AM/L

and said County Treasurer issued a certificate of purchase therefore to Ronald J Wolf. That said tax lien sale was made to satisfy the delinquent taxes assessed against said real estate for the year 2007. That said real estate was taxed or specially assessed in the name(s) of Katalin Companies Inc for said year 2007

That on the 14th day of November 2016 said Ronald J Wolf assigned said certificate of purchase to Ronald J Wolf Living Trust. That said Ronald J Wolf Living Trust on the 15th day of November 2016 the present holder of said certificate, has made request upon the Treasurer of said County for a deed to said real estate; That a Treasurer’s Deed will be issued for said real estate to the said at 1:00 o’clock P.M., on the 8th day of June 2017 unless the same has been redeemed. Said property may be redeemed from said sale at any time prior to the actual execution of said Treasurer’s Deed. Witness my hand this 16th day of February 2017 /s/ Diane A. Holbert Page 3Treasurer of 3 930551, 552, 553 County County of Douglas

Sr. Systems Administrator 90,795.83 Legal Notice No.: 930626 Sr. Systems Administrator First Publication: February 16, 2017 113,536.91 Sr. Systems Administrator 92,263.83 Last Publication: March 2, 2017 Sr. Telecommunications Engineer Publisher: Douglas County News-Press100,812.75 Sr. Traffic Technician 58,621.05 Sr. Traffic Technician 64,588.42 Sr. Wildfire Mitigation Specialist 82,827.84 Sr. Manager, Application Services 137,992.48 Staff Development/Training Coordinator 48,008.83 Statutory Programs Clerk 13,238.87 Statutory Programs Clerk 6,270.03 Statutory Programs Clerk 7,718.87 Statutory Programs Clerk 1,870.00 Statutory Programs Clerk 8,540.00 Statutory Programs Clerk 2,940.00 Statutory Programs Clerk 2,470.00 Statutory Programs Clerk 230.00 Statutory Programs Specialist 48,756.45 Storm water Specialist 55,473.42 Supervisor, Public Outreach & Assistant 79,839.91 Supervisor, Accounting 77,507.87 Supervisor, Accounting 75,121.92 Supervisor, Appeals 92,987.99 Supervisor, Branch 53,869.01 Supervisor, Branch 54,343.92 Supervisor, Branch 54,599.89 Supervisor, Branch 57,908.87 Supervisor, Building Inspection 93,503.87 Supervisor, Child Support 63,477.83 Supervisor, Dispatch 70,342.85 Supervisor, Dispatch 67,612.91 Supervisor, Dispatch 91,447.50 Supervisor, Dispatch 94,352.90 Supervisor, Dispatch 61,199.56 Supervisor, Dispatch 91,524.52 Supervisor, District 88,888.91 Supervisor, District 90,145.91 Supervisor, District 89,032.91 Supervisor, District 83,314.91 Supervisor, Eligibility 44,340.49 Supervisor, Eligibility 39,998.00 Supervisor, Eligibility 21,926.92

specially assessed in the name(s) of Katalin Companies Inc for said year 2 007 That on the 14th day of November 2016 said Ronald J Wolf assigned said certificate of purchase to Ronald J Wolf Living Trust. That said Ronald J Wolf Living Trust on the 15th day of November 2016 the present holder of said certificate, has made request upon the Treasurer of said County for a deed to said real estate; That a Treasurer’s Deed will be issued for said real estate to the said at 1:00 o’clock P.M., on the 8th day of June 2017 unless the same has been redeemed. Said property may be redeemed from said sale at any time prior to the actual execution of said Treasurer’s Deed. Witness my hand this 16th day of February 2017

Misc. Private Legals

/s/ Diane A. Holbert County Treasurer of Douglas County Legal Notice No.: 930626 First Publication: February 16, 2017 Last Publication: March 2, 2017 Publisher: Douglas County News-Press

City and County Public Notice NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the Same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom It May Concern, and more especially to: OCCUPANT - AscentPointe Development, LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company c/o Stroh Ranch Development LLC - Audrey Miklavcic c/o MW Housing Partners III LP - Bel Shower Door Corporation, a Colorado Corporation aka Bel Shower aka Bell Shower, a Colorado Corporation - Carol Baumgartner, Town Clerk David Casiano Mayor, Town of Parker Attn: Carol Baumgartner - Diane Bailey as Public Trustee of the County of Douglas, State of Colorado c/o Public Trustee - Donald L Lambert, Professional Land Surveyor c/o Frontier Surveying, Inc - Douglas County Public Trustee aka Public Trustee - Ed Garneau, Manager aka Edouard A Garneau c/o SR Condominiums LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company - Ed Garneau, LLC Manager aka Edouard A Garneau c/o SR Condominiums LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company - Edouard A Garneau as registered agent for SR Condominiums LLC -Edwin J Stephens, Vice President, MW Housing Partners III L.P., by MW Housing Management III LLC, its General Partner, by WRI CP Investments III LLC, its Co-Manager, by Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Inc, it Manager - First American Heritage Title Co - Frontier Surveying, Inc - Garner Stoll, Planning Director, Town of Parker Attn: Carol Baumgartner - Gary L Hunter, Manager, AscentPointe Development LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company c/o Stroh Ranch Development LLC -Gary Laster, Mayor, Town of Parker Attn: Carol Baumgartner George G Smith, Jr., a registered Professional Land Surveyor c/o Kirkham Michael Consulting Engineers - Hunters Chase Condominiums c/o Cap Management - John M. Beng, Vice President, Washington Mutual Bank c/o JP Morgan Chase Bank - JP Morgan Chase Bank, national association, as successor to Washington Mutual Bank F.A. - Lola Duncan, Assistant Vice President MW Housing Partners III L.P., by MW Housing Management III LLC, its General Partner, by WRI CP Investments III LLC, its CoSupervisor,by Eligibility 46,862.64 Manager, Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Supervisor, Environmental Insp c/o WRI 83,398.91 Inc, it Manager - Lola Duncan InvestSupervisor, Facilities Maintenance ments III LLC - Michael J. Guyerson,89,902.91 Attorney Supervisor, Financial Services 69,620.88 for SR Condominiums LLC c/o Onsager, GuyerSupervisor, Human Resources 94,170.83 son, Fletcher & Johnson - Michael Monge, Vice Supervisor, MW Investigations-HS President, Housing Management32,456.08 III, LP, a Supervisor,Limited Land Appraisal 88,909.11 California Partnership -Michael Monge, Supervisor, Payroll Vice President, MW Housing Partners78,545.87 III, LP, a Supervisor,Limited Plans Examiner 77,607.53 California Partnership - Michael Monge, Supervisor, Purchasing 84,337.92 Vice President, WRI CP Investments III, LLC, a Supervisor, Records 51,641.14 Washington Limited Liability Company - MiSupervisor, Signal 79,180.92 chael Monge, Vice President, Weyerhaeuser Supervisor, Traffic Services Realty Investors, Inc., a Washington 89,343.84 CorporaSupervisor. BusinessaServices tion -MW Housing California limited49,351.24 partnerSupervisor. Business Services 9,687.55 ship aka MW Housing - MW Housing Partners Support II III, LP - Specialist MW Housing Partners III, LP14,390.64 aka MW Support Specialist II 62,125.12 Housing - MW Housing Partners III, LP, a California Limited Partnership - MW Housing ManSupport Specialist II 52,494.84 agement III, LP, IIa California Limited65,884.80 PartnerSupport Specialist ship, its Specialist General IIPartner - Nicole Sayer, Chief Support 56,973.41 Title Officer c/o Western Title Funding LLC Support Specialist II 46,771.80 Paul Mosovero c/oII First American Heritage Title Support Specialist 59,404.01 Company Public Trustee for the County of Support Specialist II 27,989.59 Douglas Randal A Craven, Manager c/o SR Supervisor- Engineering Inspections 107,871.85 Condominiums LLC, a Colorado Limited LiabilSupervisor Personal Property Appraisal 80,254.45 ity Company - Robert Jacob Grzywa89,322.83 - Robert Supervisor Special Projects District Shaiman, agentFacilities for Stroh Ranch DeSupervisorregistered Special Projects 89,850.83 velopment LLC - Robert Shaiman, registered Supervisor Commercial Appraisal 92,008.91 agent for Stroh Ranch LLC aka Supervisor Facilities Tech Development Systems 88,491.84 Robert Shaiman, registered for Stroh Supervisor Residential Appraisal agent 86,269.79 Ranch - Robin Administrator L Cupka, Asst. Vice President, Surveyor/CADD 79,331.88 Washington Mutual Bank, FA c/o JP Morgan System Administrator II 86,300.87 Chase - SR Condominiums LLC aka SR SystemBank Administrator II 63,908.85 Condominiums SR Condominiums LLC et al System Administrator II 60,675.50 SR Condominiums LiSystems CoordinatorLLC, a Colorado Limited 38,447.51 ability Company Stroh Ranch aka Stroh Ranch Systems Coordinator 97,751.47 Development LLC -Town of Parker WashingSystems Support Specialist 74,713.92 ton FA (WAMU) aka Washington Tax Mutual Workoff Bank Specialist 756.63 Mutual Bank - Western Title Funding,644.03 LLC Tax Workoff Specialist Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Inc., a 792.95 WashTax Workoff Specialist ington Corporation, its Manager WRI CP InTax Workoff Specialist 515.22 vestments LLC, a Washington Limited600.98 LiabilTax WorkoffIII, Specialist ity Company, its Co Manager –Kirkham Michael Tax Workoff Specialist 583.11 Consulting Engineers - Edouard A Garneau Tax Workoff Specialist 536.08

haeuser Realty Investors, Inc, it Manager - First American Heritage Title Co - Frontier Surveying, Inc - Garner Stoll, Planning Director, Town of Parker Attn: Carol Baumgartner - Gary L Hunter, Manager, AscentPointe Development LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company c/o Stroh Ranch Development LLC -Gary Laster, Mayor, Town of Parker Attn: Carol Baumgartner George G Smith, Jr., a registered Professional Land Surveyor c/o Kirkham Michael Consulting Engineers - Hunters Chase Condominiums c/o Cap Management - John M. Beng, Vice President, Washington Mutual Bank c/o JP Morgan Chase Bank - JP Morgan Chase Bank, national association, as successor to Washington Mutual Bank F.A. - Lola Duncan, Assistant Vice President MW Housing Partners III L.P., by MW Housing Management III LLC, its General Partner, by WRI CP Investments III LLC, its CoManager, by Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Inc, it Manager - Lola Duncan c/o WRI Investments III LLC - Michael J. Guyerson, Attorney for SR Condominiums LLC c/o Onsager, Guyerson, Fletcher & Johnson - Michael Monge, Vice President, MW Housing Management III, LP, a California Limited Partnership -Michael Monge, Vice President, MW Housing Partners III, LP, a California Limited Partnership - Michael Monge, Vice President, WRI CP Investments III, LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company - Michael Monge, Vice President, Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Inc., a Washington Corporation -MW Housing a California limited partnership aka MW Housing - MW Housing Partners III, LP - MW Housing Partners III, LP aka MW Housing - MW Housing Partners III, LP, a California Limited Partnership - MW Housing Management III, LP, a California Limited Partnership, its General Partner - Nicole Sayer, Chief Title Officer c/o Western Title Funding LLC Paul Mosovero c/o First American Heritage Title Company - Public Trustee for the County of Douglas - Randal A Craven, Manager c/o SR Condominiums LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company - Robert Jacob Grzywa - Robert Shaiman, registered agent for Stroh Ranch Development LLC - Robert Shaiman, registered agent for Stroh Ranch Development LLC aka Robert Shaiman, registered agent for Stroh Ranch - Robin L Cupka, Asst. Vice President, Washington Mutual Bank, FA c/o JP Morgan Chase Bank - SR Condominiums LLC aka SR Condominiums - SR Condominiums LLC et al SR Condominiums LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company - Stroh Ranch aka Stroh Ranch Development LLC -Town of Parker - Washington Mutual Bank FA (WAMU) aka Washington Mutual Bank - Western Title Funding, LLC Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Inc., a Washington Corporation, its Manager - WRI CP Investments III, LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company, its Co Manager –Kirkham Michael Consulting Engineers - Edouard A Garneau

City and County

You and each of you are hereby notified that on the 12th day of November 2013 the then County Treasurer of the County of Douglas, in the State of Colorado, sold at public tax lien sale to Robert Jacob Grzywa the following described real estate situate in the County of Douglas, State of Colorado, to wit: GARAGE UNIT G4A-6 BUILDING G4A HUNTERS CHASE CONDOS PHASE 2 (PLEASE NOTE: Legal description numbering does not match physical number assigned; this garage is physically numbered 3) and said County Treasurer issued a certificate of purchase therefore to Robert Jacob Grzywa. That said tax lien sale was made to satisfy the delinquent taxes assessed against said real estate for the year 2012; That said real estate was taxed or specially assessed in the name(s) of SR Condominiums LLC for said year 2012.That a Treasurer’s Deed will be issued for said real estate to the said Robert Jacob Grzywa at 1:00 o’clock P.M., on the 18th day of May 2017, unless the same has been redeemed. Said propTax Specialist ertyWorkoff may be redeemed from said sale831.00 at any Tax Specialist timeWorkoff prior to the actual execution of said619.10 TreasTax Workoff Specialist urer’s Deed. Witness my hand this 2nd682.34 day of Tax Workoff2017. Specialist 265.93 February Tax Workoff Specialist 831.00 Tax WorkoffA.Specialist 750.23 /s/ Diane Holbert Tax Workoff Specialistof Douglas County 831.01 County Treasurer Tax Workoff Specialist 617.35 Tax Workoff Specialist 831.01 Legal Notice No.: 930563 Tax Specialist 831.00 FirstWorkoff Publication: February 2, 2017 Tax Specialist 728.45 LastWorkoff Publication: February 16, 2017 Tax Workoff Douglas SpecialistCounty News-Press 448.25 Publisher: Tax Workoff Specialist 831.00 Tax Workoff Specialist 692.06 Tax Workoff Specialist 629.81 Tax Workoff Specialist 510.58 Tax Workoff Specialist 831.00 Tax Workoff Specialist 810.23 Tax Workoff Specialist 432.12 Tax Workoff Specialist 831.00 Tax Workoff Specialist 486.47 Tax Workoff Specialist 678.02 Tax Workoff Specialist 518.22 Tax Workoff Specialist 830.42 Tax Workoff Specialist 586.93 Tax Workoff Specialist 831.00 Tax Workoff Specialist 831.01 Tax Workoff Specialist 831.00 Tax Workoff Specialist 180.41 Tax Workoff Specialist 565.74 Tax Workoff Specialist 690.17 Tax Workoff Specialist 831.00 Tax Workoff Specialist 831.00 Telecommunications/Fiber Technician 58,401.68 Temporary Professional Support 16,614.72 Temporary Professional Support 11,908.87 Temporary Professional Support 621.92 Temporary Professional Support 26,201.64 Temporary Professional Support 11,312.62 Temporary Professional Support 4,367.25 Temporary Professional Support 20,467.88 Temporary Professional Support 20,988.23 Temporary Professional Support 2,016.00 Temporary Professional Support 4,910.88

Douglas County

Colorado, to wit: GARAGE UNIT G4A-6 BUILDING G4A HUNTERS CHASE CONDOS PHASE 2 (PLEASE NOTE: Legal description numbering does not match physical number assigned; this garage is physically numbered 3)

City and County

and said County Treasurer issued a certificate of purchase therefore to Robert Jacob Grzywa. That said tax lien sale was made to satisfy the delinquent taxes assessed against said real estate for the year 2012; That said real estate was taxed or specially assessed in the name(s) of SR Condominiums LLC for said year 2012.That a Treasurer’s Deed will be issued for said real estate to the said Robert Jacob Grzywa at 1:00 o’clock P.M., on the 18th day of May 2017, unless the same has been redeemed. Said property may be redeemed from said sale at any time prior to the actual execution of said Treasurer’s Deed. Witness my hand this 2nd day of February 2017. /s/ Diane A. Holbert County Treasurer of Douglas County Legal Notice No.: 930563 First Publication: February 2, 2017 Last Publication: February 16, 2017 Publisher: Douglas County News-Press Public Notice NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the Same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom It May Concern, and more especially to: OCCUPANT - AscentPointe Development, LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company c/o Stroh Ranch Development LLC - Audrey Miklavcic c/o MW Housing Partners III LP - Bel Shower Door Corporation, a Colorado Corporation aka Bel Shower aka Bell Shower, a Colorado Corporation - Carol Baumgartner, Town Clerk David Casiano Mayor, Town of Parker Attn: Carol Baumgartner - Diane Bailey as Public Trustee of the County of Douglas, State of Colorado c/o Public Trustee - Donald L Lambert, Professional Land Surveyor c/o Frontier Surveying, Inc - Douglas County Public Trustee aka Public Trustee - Ed Garneau, Manager aka Edouard A Garneau c/o SR Condominiums LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company - Ed Garneau, LLC Manager aka Edouard A Garneau c/o SR Condominiums LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company - Edouard A Garneau as registered agent for SR Condominiums LLC -Edwin J Stephens, Vice President, MW Housing Partners III L.P., by MW Housing Management III LLC, its General Partner, by WRI CP Investments III LLC, its Co-Manager, by Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Inc, it Manager - First American Heritage Title Co - Frontier Surveying, Inc - Garner Stoll, Planning Director, Town of Parker Attn: Carol Baumgartner - Gary L Hunter, Manager, AscentPointe Development LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company c/o Stroh Ranch Development LLC -Gary Laster, Mayor, Town of Parker Attn: Carol Baumgartner George G Smith, Jr., a registered Professional Land Surveyor c/o Kirkham Michael Consulting Engineers - Hunters Chase Condominiums c/o Cap Management - John M. Beng, Vice President, Washington Mutual Bank c/o JP Morgan Chase Bank - JP Morgan Chase Bank, national association, as successor to Washington Mutual Bank F.A. - Lola Duncan, Assistant Vice President MW Housing Partners III L.P., by MW Housing Management III LLC, its General Partner, by WRI CP Investments III LLC, its CoTemporary Support Realty 1,718.88 Manager,Professional by Weyerhaeuser Investors, Temporary Professional Support 4,056.00 Inc, it Manager - Lola Duncan c/o WRI InvestTemporary Support 21,557.65 ments IIIProfessional LLC - Michael J. Guyerson, Attorney Temporary Professional Support 17,101.90 for SR Condominiums LLC c/o Onsager, GuyerTemporary Professional Support 7,296.75 son, Fletcher & Johnson - Michael Monge, Vice Temporary Professional Support 8,630.12 President, MW Housing Management III, LP, a Temporary Support CaliforniaClerical Limited Partnership -Michael222.75 Monge, Temporary Clerical MW Support 6,492.38 Vice President, Housing Partners III, LP, a Temporary Support 15,252.25 CaliforniaClerical Limited Partnership - Michael Monge, Temporary Clerical WRI Support Vice President, CP Investments9,405.00 III, LLC, a Temporary Clerical SupportLiability Company 1,027.00 Washington Limited - MiTemporary ClericalVice Support 14,067.62 chael Monge, President, Weyerhaeuser Temporary Clerical Support 14,556.92 Realty Investors, Inc., a Washington CorporaTemporary Support 2,379.00 tion -MWClerical Housing a California limited partnerTemporary Support- MW Housing 754.00 ship aka Clerical MW Housing Partners Temporary Clerical SupportPartners III, LP 6,242.87 III, LP - MW Housing aka MW Temporary Support Partners III, LP, 2,324.00 Housing Clerical - MW Housing a California Limited Partnership - MW Housing ManTemporary Clerical Support 550.00 agementClerical III, LP,Support a California Limited PartnerTemporary 1,026.00 ship, its General Partner - Nicole Sayer, Chief Temporary Clerical Support 7,409.50 Title Officer c/oSupport Western Title Funding LLC Temporary Clerical 16,540.96 Paul Mosovero First American Heritage Title Temporary Clericalc/o Support 6,358.00 Company Public Trustee for the County Temporary Clerical Support 13,142.13 of Douglas Clerical - Randal A Craven, Manager c/o SR Temporary Support 6,780.57 Condominiums a Colorado Limited LiabilTemporary Clerical LLC, Support 5,439.00 ity Company - Robert - Robert Temporary Clerical SupportJacob Grzywa 5,053.25 Shaiman,Clerical registered agent for Stroh Ranch Temporary Support 812.00Development LLC Support - Robert Shaiman,10,470.19 registered Temporary Clerical agent forClerical Stroh Support Ranch Development LLC aka Temporary 19,454.88 Robert Shaiman, registered agent for Stroh Temporary Clerical Support 16,346.38 Ranch - Clerical Robin LSupport Cupka, Asst. Vice 5,778.25 President, Temporary Washington Mutual Bank, FA c/o JP Morgan Temporary Clerical Support 7,295.32 Chase Bank - SR Condominiums LLC aka SR Temporary Clerical Support 6,193.31 Condominiums SR Condominiums LLC et al Temporary Clerical Support 1,596.38 SR Condominiums LLC, a Colorado 6,262.50 Limited LiTemporary Clerical Support ability Company Stroh Ranch aka Stroh Ranch Temporary Clerical Support 9,969.00 Development LLC -Town of Parker 13,925.39 - WashingTemporary Clerical Support ton Mutual BankSupport FA (WAMU) aka Washington Temporary Clerical 12,828.87 Mutual Bank - Western LLC Temporary Clerical Support Title Funding, 7,900.69 Weyerhaeuser a WashTemporary ClericalRealty SupportInvestors, Inc., 11,398.26 ington Corporation, its Manager WRI CP Temporary Clerical Support 4,268.00 Investments III, LLC, aSupport Washington Limited LiabilTemporary Engineering 4,704.00 ity Company, its Co Manager – Kirkham MiTemporary Labor 9,743.88 chael Consulting Engineers - Edouard A Temporary Labor 22,102.50 Garneau

haeuser Realty Investors, Inc, it Manager - First American Heritage Title Co - Frontier Surveying, Inc - Garner Stoll, Planning Director, Town of Parker Attn: Carol Baumgartner - Gary L Hunter, Manager, AscentPointe Development LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company c/o Stroh Ranch Development LLC -Gary Laster, Mayor, Town of Parker Attn: Carol Baumgartner George G Smith, Jr., a registered Professional Land Surveyor c/o Kirkham Michael Consulting Engineers - Hunters Chase Condominiums c/o Cap Management - John M. Beng, Vice President, Washington Mutual Bank c/o JP Morgan Chase Bank - JP Morgan Chase Bank, national association, as successor to Washington Mutual Bank F.A. - Lola Duncan, Assistant Vice President MW Housing Partners III L.P., by MW Housing Management III LLC, its General Partner, by WRI CP Investments III LLC, its CoManager, by Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Inc, it Manager - Lola Duncan c/o WRI Investments III LLC - Michael J. Guyerson, Attorney for SR Condominiums LLC c/o Onsager, Guyerson, Fletcher & Johnson - Michael Monge, Vice President, MW Housing Management III, LP, a California Limited Partnership -Michael Monge, Vice President, MW Housing Partners III, LP, a California Limited Partnership - Michael Monge, Vice President, WRI CP Investments III, LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company - Michael Monge, Vice President, Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Inc., a Washington Corporation -MW Housing a California limited partnership aka MW Housing - MW Housing Partners III, LP - MW Housing Partners III, LP aka MW Housing - MW Housing Partners III, LP, a California Limited Partnership - MW Housing Management III, LP, a California Limited Partnership, its General Partner - Nicole Sayer, Chief Title Officer c/o Western Title Funding LLC Paul Mosovero c/o First American Heritage Title Company - Public Trustee for the County of Douglas - Randal A Craven, Manager c/o SR Condominiums LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company - Robert Jacob Grzywa - Robert Shaiman, registered agent for Stroh Ranch Development LLC - Robert Shaiman, registered agent for Stroh Ranch Development LLC aka Robert Shaiman, registered agent for Stroh Ranch - Robin L Cupka, Asst. Vice President, Washington Mutual Bank, FA c/o JP Morgan Chase Bank - SR Condominiums LLC aka SR Condominiums - SR Condominiums LLC et al SR Condominiums LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company - Stroh Ranch aka Stroh Ranch Development LLC -Town of Parker - Washington Mutual Bank FA (WAMU) aka Washington Mutual Bank - Western Title Funding, LLC Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Inc., a Washington Corporation, its Manager - WRI CP Investments III, LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company, its Co Manager – Kirkham Michael Consulting Engineers - Edouard A Garneau

February 16, 2017F

City and County

You and each of you are hereby notified that on the 12th day of November 2013 the then County Treasurer of the County of Douglas, in the State of Colorado, sold at public tax lien sale to Robert Jacob Grzywa the following described real estate situate in the County of Douglas, State of Colorado, to wit: GARAGE UNIT G4A-8 BUILDING G4A HUNTERS CHASE CONDOS PHASE 2 (PLEASE NOTE: Legal description numbering does not match physical number assigned; this garage is physically numbered 1)

and said County Treasurer issued a certificate of purchase therefore to Robert Jacob Grzywa. That said tax lien sale was made to satisfy the delinquent taxes assessed against said real estate for the year 2012; That said real estate was taxed or specially assessed in the name(s) of SR Condominiums LLC for said year 2012.That a Treasurer’s Deed will be issued for said real estate to the said Robert Jacob Grzywa at 1:00 o’clock P.M., on the 18th day of May 2017, unTraffic Operations Manager 26,195.63 lessEngineer/Traffic the same has been redeemed. Said propTraffic Operationsfrom Manager 122,439.42 ertyEngineer/Traffic may be redeemed said sale at any Traffic Support Specialist 45,677.89 time prior to the actual execution of said TreasTraffic Technician urer’s Deed. Witness my hand this15,365.61 2nd day of Traffic Technician 49,473.56 February 2017. Traffic Technician 47,590.43 Traffic Technician 44,045.80 /s/ Diane A. Holbert Traffic Technician 28,333.70 County Treasurer of Douglas County Traffic Technician 43,452.24 Traffic Technician 40,206.75 Legal Notice No.: 930564 Traffic FirstTechnician Publication: February 2, 2017 8,108.64 Traffic LastTechnician Publication: February 16, 201745,606.77 Training Supervisor 58,592.59 Publisher: Douglas County News-Press Training Supervisor 650.88 Training Support Specialist 49,298.87 Transcriber 25,272.82 Undersheriff 145,945.47 Utility Locator 53,750.89 Veterans Services Officer 24,199.09 Victim Assistance Advocate 59,312.28 Victim Assistance Advocate 64,599.76 Victim Assistance Advocate 64,503.25 Victim Assistance Advocate 49,257.35 Victims Assistance Coordinator 88,030.87 Video Production Administrator 69,884.21 Volunteer Coordinator 47,318.88 Warehouse & Logistics Technician 59,055.24 Water Resource Planner 103,658.87 Weed & Mosquito Control Coordinator 77,068.68 Weed Technician 48,106.36 Weed Technician 722.57 Wrap Around Facilitator 43,214.88 Wrap Around Facilitator 39,132.83 Wrap Around Facilitator 37,832.87 Zoning Compliance Official 17,937.47 Zoning Compliance Official 19,119.66 Zoning Compliance Official 30,934.90 Zoning Compliance Official 26,293.15 Year End December 31, 2016 Total 79,569,133.96 Legal Notice No.: 930551, 930552, 930553 First Publication: February 16, 2017 Last Publication: February 16, 2017 Publisher: Douglas County News-Press

You and each of you are hereby notified that on theCounty 12th day of November 2013 the then County You and may each of Legal you are hereby notified that on The above is a statement of gross salaries for Douglas Government employees. istration fees (if applicable); and an employee assistance program. Some employees Notice No.: 930554 Treasurer the County oftoDouglas, in the theas12th day of November 2013 theFebruary then County This includes regular pay, overtime, sick and vacation pay, (whereofapplicable) paid emalso beState offered auto benefit, uniform, phone, and / or tool allowances, as well recogniFirst Publication: 16, 2017 at paid, public tax lien sale Robert The County wide average percentage of salaries paid for the aforementioned Treasurer of the County of Douglas, in the State ployees during the year ending December 31, 2016. of In Colorado, addition to sold wages Douglas tiontoawards. Last Publication: February 16, 2017 Jacob the following described real is esof Colorado, at public tax lien sale to Robert County Government offers the following fringe benefits to allGrzywa benefit eligible employees: benefits 35.01%. This notice is published under the direction of the Board of County sold Publisher: Douglas County News-Press situatepremiums; in the County of reDouglas, State of in accordance with C.R.S. 30-25-111. Jacob Grzywa the following described real esEmployee-paid health, dental, vision, and supplementaltate insurance matching Commissioners Colorado, to wit: tate situate in the County of Douglas, State of tirement; the required employer’s match for Social Security and Medicare; unemployment Colorado, to wit: insurance; short-term and long-term disability insurance; life insurance; accidental ANDREW COPLAND, DIRECTOR OF FINANCE GARAGE UNIT G4A-6death BUILDING G4A and dismemberment insurance; workers’ compensation; flexible spending program adminHUNTERS CHASE CONDOS PHASE 2 GARAGE UNIT G4A-8 BUILDING G4A (PLEASE NOTE: Legal description numbering HUNTERS CHASE CONDOS PHASE 2 does not match physical number assigned; this (PLEASE NOTE: Legal description numbering garage is physically numbered 3) does not match physical number assigned; this

Lone Tree * 3


tate situate in the County of Douglas, State of 7Colorado, February 16, 2017 to wit:

GARAGE UNIT G4A-8 BUILDING G4A HUNTERS CHASE CONDOS PHASE 2 (PLEASE NOTE: Legal description numbering does not match physical number assigned; this garage is physically numbered 1)

City and County

and said County Treasurer issued a certificate of purchase therefore to Robert Jacob Grzywa. That said tax lien sale was made to satisfy the delinquent taxes assessed against said real estate for the year 2012; That said real estate was taxed or specially assessed in the name(s) of SR Condominiums LLC for said year 2012.That a Treasurer’s Deed will be issued for said real estate to the said Robert Jacob Grzywa at 1:00 o’clock P.M., on the 18th day of May 2017, unless the same has been redeemed. Said property may be redeemed from said sale at any time prior to the actual execution of said Treasurer’s Deed. Witness my hand this 2nd day of February 2017. /s/ Diane A. Holbert County Treasurer of Douglas County Legal Notice No.: 930564 First Publication: February 2, 2017 Last Publication: February 16, 2017 Publisher: Douglas County News-Press Public Notice NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED

To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the Same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom It May Concern, and more especially to:

OCCUPANT - AscentPointe Development, LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company c/o Stroh Ranch Development LLC - Audrey Miklavcic c/o MW Housing Partners III LP - Bel Shower Door Corporation, a Colorado Corporation aka Bel Shower aka Bell Shower, a Colorado Corporation - Carol Baumgartner, Town Clerk David Casiano Mayor, Town of Parker Attn: Carol Baumgartner - Diane Bailey as Public Trustee of the County of Douglas, State of Colorado c/o Public Trustee - Donald L Lambert, Professional Land Surveyor c/o Frontier Surveying, Inc - Douglas County Public Trustee aka Public Trustee - Ed Garneau, Manager aka Edouard A Garneau c/o SR Condominiums LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company - Ed Garneau, LLC Manager aka Edouard A Garneau c/o SR Condominiums LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company - Edouard A Garneau as registered agent for SR Condominiums LLC -Edwin J Stephens, Vice President, MW Housing Partners III L.P., by MW Housing Management III LLC, its General Partner, by WRI CP Investments III LLC, its Co-Manager, by Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Inc, it Manager - First American Heritage Title Co - Frontier Surveying, Inc - Garner Stoll, Planning Director, Town of Parker Attn: Carol Baumgartner - Gary L Hunter, Manager, AscentPointe Development LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company c/o Stroh Ranch Development LLC -Gary Laster, Mayor, Town of Parker Attn: Carol Baumgartner George G Smith, Jr., a registered Professional Land Surveyor c/o Kirkham Michael Consulting Engineers - Hunters Chase Condominiums c/o Cap Management - John M. Beng, Vice President, Washington Mutual Bank c/o JP Morgan Chase Bank - JP Morgan Chase Bank, national association, as successor to Washington Mutual Bank F.A. - Lola Duncan, Assistant Vice President MW Housing Partners III L.P., by MW Housing Management III LLC, its General Partner, by WRI CP Investments III LLC, its CoManager, by Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Inc, it Manager - Lola Duncan c/o WRI Investments III LLC - Michael J. Guyerson, Attorney for SR Condominiums LLC c/o Onsager, Guyerson, Fletcher & Johnson - Michael Monge, Vice President, MW Housing Management III, LP, a California Limited Partnership -Michael Monge, Vice President, MW Housing Partners III, LP, a California Limited Partnership - Michael Monge, Vice President, WRI CP Investments III, LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company - Michael Monge, Vice President, Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Inc., a Washington Corporation -MW Housing a California limited partnership aka MW Housing - MW Housing Partners III, LP - MW Housing Partners III, LP aka MW Housing - MW Housing Partners III, LP, a California Limited Partnership - MW Housing Management III, LP, a California Limited Partnership, its General Partner - Nicole Sayer, Chief Title Officer c/o Western Title Funding LLC Paul Mosovero c/o First American Heritage Title Company - Public Trustee for the County of Douglas - Randal A Craven, Manager c/o SR Condominiums LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company - Robert Jacob Grzywa - Robert Shaiman, registered agent for Stroh Ranch Development LLC - Robert Shaiman, registered agent for Stroh Ranch Development LLC aka Robert Shaiman, registered agent for Stroh Ranch - Robin L Cupka, Asst. Vice President, Washington Mutual Bank, FA c/o JP Morgan Chase Bank - SR Condominiums LLC aka SR Condominiums - SR Condominiums LLC et al SR Condominiums LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company - Stroh Ranch aka Stroh Ranch Development LLC -Town of Parker - Washington Mutual Bank FA (WAMU) aka Washington Mutual Bank - Western Title Funding, LLC Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Inc., a Washington Corporation, its Manager - WRI CP Investments III, LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company, its Co Manager – Kirkham Michael Consulting Engineers - Edouard A Garneau

You and each of you are hereby notified that on the 12th day of November 2013 the then County Treasurer of the County of Douglas, in the State of Colorado, sold at public tax lien sale to Robert Jacob Grzywa the following described real estate situate in the County of Douglas, State of Colorado, to wit: GARAGE UNIT G4A-4 BUILDING G4A HUNTERS CHASE CONDOS PHASE 2

Garneau You and each of you are hereby notified that on the 12th day of November 2013 the then County Treasurer of the County of Douglas, in the State of Colorado, sold at public tax lien sale to Robert Jacob Grzywa the following described real estate situate in the County of Douglas, State of Colorado, to wit:

City and County

GARAGE UNIT G4A-4 BUILDING G4A HUNTERS CHASE CONDOS PHASE 2 (PLEASE NOTE: Legal description numbering does not match physical number assigned; this garage is physically numbered 5) and said County Treasurer issued a certificate of purchase therefore to Robert Jacob Grzywa. That said tax lien sale was made to satisfy the delinquent taxes assessed against said real estate for the year 2012; That said real estate was taxed or specially assessed in the name(s) of SR Condominiums LLC for said year 2012.That a Treasurer’s Deed will be issued for said real estate to the said Robert Jacob Grzywa at 1:00 o’clock P.M., on the 18th day of May 2017, unless the same has been redeemed. Said property may be redeemed from said sale at any time prior to the actual execution of said Treasurer’s Deed. Witness my hand this 2nd day of February 2017. /s/ Diane A. Holbert County Treasurer of Douglas County Legal Notice No.: 930566 First Publication: February 2, 2017 Last Publication: February 16, 2017 Publisher: Douglas County News-Press Public Notice NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the Same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom It May Concern, and more especially to: OCCUPANT - AscentPointe Development, LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company c/o Stroh Ranch Development LLC - Audrey Miklavcic c/o MW Housing Partners III LP - Bel Shower Door Corporation, a Colorado Corporation aka Bel Shower aka Bell Shower, a Colorado Corporation - Carol Baumgartner, Town Clerk David Casiano Mayor, Town of Parker Attn: Carol Baumgartner - Diane Bailey as Public Trustee of the County of Douglas, State of Colorado c/o Public Trustee - Donald L Lambert, Professional Land Surveyor c/o Frontier Surveying, Inc - Douglas County Public Trustee aka Public Trustee - Ed Garneau, Manager aka Edouard A Garneau c/o SR Condominiums LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company - Ed Garneau, LLC Manager aka Edouard A Garneau c/o SR Condominiums LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company - Edouard A Garneau as registered agent for SR Condominiums LLC -Edwin J Stephens, Vice President, MW Housing Partners III L.P., by MW Housing Management III LLC, its General Partner, by WRI CP Investments III LLC, its Co-Manager, by Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Inc, it Manager - First American Heritage Title Co - Frontier Surveying, Inc - Garner Stoll, Planning Director, Town of Parker Attn: Carol Baumgartner - Gary L Hunter, Manager, AscentPointe Development LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company c/o Stroh Ranch Development LLC -Gary Laster, Mayor, Town of Parker Attn: Carol Baumgartner George G Smith, Jr., a registered Professional Land Surveyor c/o Kirkham Michael Consulting Engineers –Hunters Chase Condo Assn. Inc. c/o Cap Management - Hunters Chase Condominiums c/o Cap Management - John M. Beng, Vice President, Washington Mutual Bank c/o JP Morgan Chase Bank - JP Morgan Chase Bank, national association, as successor to Washington Mutual Bank F.A. – Leonard Rudolph - Lola Duncan, Assistant Vice President MW Housing Partners III L.P., by MW Housing Management III LLC, its General Partner, by WRI CP Investments III LLC, its Co-Manager, by Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Inc, it Manager - Lola Duncan c/o WRI Investments III LLC - Michael J. Guyerson, Attorney for SR Condominiums LLC c/o Onsager, Guyerson, Fletcher & Johnson - Michael Monge, Vice President, MW Housing Management III, LP, a California Limited Partnership -Michael Monge, Vice President, MW Housing Partners III, LP, a California Limited Partnership - Michael Monge, Vice President, WRI CP Investments III, LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company - Michael Monge, Vice President, Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Inc., a Washington Corporation -MW Housing a California limited partnership aka MW Housing MW Housing Partners III, LP - MW Housing Partners III, LP aka MW Housing - MW Housing Partners III, LP, a California Limited Partnership - MW Housing Management III, LP, a California Limited Partnership, its General Partner - Nicole Sayer, Chief Title Officer c/o Western Title Funding LLC - Paul Mosovero c/o First American Heritage Title Company - Public Trustee for the County of Douglas - Randal A Craven, Manager c/o SR Condominiums LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company - Robert Shaiman, registered agent for Stroh Ranch Development LLC - Robert Shaiman, registered agent for Stroh Ranch Development LLC aka Robert Shaiman, registered agent for Stroh Ranch Robin L Cupka, Asst. Vice President, Washington Mutual Bank, FA c/o JP Morgan Chase Bank - SR Condominiums LLC aka SR Condominiums - SR Condominiums LLC et al - SR Condominiums LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company - Stroh Ranch aka Stroh Ranch Development LLC -Town of Parker - Washington Mutual Bank FA (WAMU) aka Washington Mutual Bank - Western Title Funding, LLC - Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Inc., a Washington Corporation, its Manager - WRI CP Investments III, LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company, its Co Manager –Kirkham Michael Consulting Engineers – Eduard A Garneau You and each of you are hereby notified that on the 12th day of November 2013 the then County Treasurer of the County of Douglas, in the State

velopment LLC -Town of Parker - Washington Mutual Bank FA (WAMU) aka Washington Mutual Bank - Western Title Funding, LLC - Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Inc., a Washington Corporation, its Manager - WRI CP Investments III, LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company, its Co Manager –Kirkham Michael Consulting Engineers – Eduard A Garneau

City and County

You and each of you are hereby notified that on the 12th day of November 2013 the then County Treasurer of the County of Douglas, in the State of Colorado, sold at public tax lien sale to Hunters Chase Condo Assn Inc. the following described real estate situate in the County of Douglas, State of Colorado, to wit: GARAGE UNIT G4B-1 BUILDING G4B HUNTERS CHASE CONDOS PHASE 2 (PLEASE NOTE: Legal description numbering does not match physical number assigned; this garage is physically numbered 4) and said County Treasurer issued a certificate of purchase therefore to Hunters Chase Condo Assn Inc. That said tax lien sale was made to satisfy the delinquent taxes assessed against said real estate for the year 2012; That said real estate was taxed or specially assessed in the name(s) of SR Condominiums LLC for said year 2012.That a Treasurer’s Deed will be issued for said real estate to the said Hunters Chase Condo Assn Inc. at 1:00 o’clock P.M., on the 18th day of May 2017, unless the same has been redeemed. Said property may be redeemed from said sale at any time prior to the actual execution of said Treasurer’s Deed. Witness my hand this 2nd day of February 2017. /s/ Diane A. Holbert County Treasurer of Douglas County Legal Notice No.: 930567 First Publication: February 2, 2017 Last Publication: February 16, 2017 Publisher: Douglas County News-Press Public Notice NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the Same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom It May Concern, and more especially to: OCCUPANT - AscentPointe Development, LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company c/o Stroh Ranch Development LLC - Audrey Miklavcic c/o MW Housing Partners III LP - Bel Shower Door Corporation, a Colorado Corporation aka Bel Shower aka Bell Shower, a Colorado Corporation - Carol Baumgartner, Town Clerk David Casiano Mayor, Town of Parker Attn: Carol Baumgartner - Diane Bailey as Public Trustee of the County of Douglas, State of Colorado c/o Public Trustee - Donald L Lambert, Professional Land Surveyor c/o Frontier Surveying, Inc - Douglas County Public Trustee aka Public Trustee - Ed Garneau, Manager aka Edouard A Garneau c/o SR Condominiums LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company - Ed Garneau, LLC Manager aka Edouard A Garneau c/o SR Condominiums LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company - Edouard A Garneau as registered agent for SR Condominiums LLC -Edwin J Stephens, Vice President, MW Housing Partners III L.P., by MW Housing Management III LLC, its General Partner, by WRI CP Investments III LLC, its Co-Manager, by Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Inc, it Manager - First American Heritage Title Co - Frontier Surveying, Inc - Garner Stoll, Planning Director, Town of Parker Attn: Carol Baumgartner - Gary L Hunter, Manager, AscentPointe Development LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company c/o Stroh Ranch Development LLC -Gary Laster, Mayor, Town of Parker Attn: Carol Baumgartner George G Smith, Jr., a registered Professional Land Surveyor c/o Kirkham Michael Consulting Engineers - Hunters Chase Condominiums c/o Cap Management - John M. Beng, Vice President, Washington Mutual Bank c/o JP Morgan Chase Bank - JP Morgan Chase Bank, national association, as successor to Washington Mutual Bank F.A. - Lola Duncan, Assistant Vice President MW Housing Partners III L.P., by MW Housing Management III LLC, its General Partner, by WRI CP Investments III LLC, its CoManager, by Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Inc, it Manager - Lola Duncan c/o WRI Investments III LLC - Michael J. Guyerson, Attorney for SR Condominiums LLC c/o Onsager, Guyerson, Fletcher & Johnson - Michael Monge, Vice President, MW Housing Management III, LP, a California Limited Partnership -Michael Monge, Vice President, MW Housing Partners III, LP, a California Limited Partnership - Michael Monge, Vice President, WRI CP Investments III, LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company - Michael Monge, Vice President, Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Inc., a Washington Corporation -MW Housing a California limited partnership aka MW Housing - MW Housing Partners III, LP - MW Housing Partners III, LP aka MW Housing - MW Housing Partners III, LP, a California Limited Partnership - MW Housing Management III, LP, a California Limited Partnership, its General Partner - Nicole Sayer, Chief Title Officer c/o Western Title Funding LLC Paul Mosovero c/o First American Heritage Title Company - Public Trustee for the County of Douglas - Randal A Craven, Manager c/o SR Condominiums LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company - Robert Jacob Grzywa - Robert Shaiman, registered agent for Stroh Ranch Development LLC - Robert Shaiman, registered agent for Stroh Ranch Development LLC aka Robert Shaiman, registered agent for Stroh Ranch - Robin L Cupka, Asst. Vice President, Washington Mutual Bank, FA c/o JP Morgan Chase Bank - SR Condominiums LLC aka SR Condominiums - SR Condominiums LLC et al SR Condominiums LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company - Stroh Ranch aka Stroh Ranch Development LLC -Town of Parker - Washington Mutual Bank FA (WAMU) aka Washington Mutual Bank - Western Title Funding, LLC Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Inc., a Washington Corporation, its Manager - WRI CP Investments III, LLC, a Washington Limited Liabil-

Ranch - Robin L Cupka, Asst. Vice President, Washington Mutual Bank, FA c/o JP Morgan Chase Bank - SR Condominiums LLC aka SR Condominiums - SR Condominiums LLC et al SR Condominiums LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company - Stroh Ranch aka Stroh Ranch Development LLC -Town of Parker - Washington Mutual Bank FA (WAMU) aka Washington Mutual Bank - Western Title Funding, LLC Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Inc., a Washington Corporation, its Manager - WRI CP Investments III, LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company, its Co Manager – Kirkham Michael Consulting Engineers - Edouard A Garneau

City and County

You and each of you are hereby notified that on the 12th day of November 2013 the then County Treasurer of the County of Douglas, in the State of Colorado, sold at public tax lien sale to Robert Jacob Grzywa the following described real estate situate in the County of Douglas, State of Colorado, to wit: GARAGE UNIT G4B-3 BUILDING G4B HUNTERS CHASE CONDOS PHASE 2 (PLEASE NOTE: Legal description numbering does not match physical number assigned; this garage is physically numbered 2) and said County Treasurer issued a certificate of purchase therefore to Robert Jacob Grzywa. That said tax lien sale was made to satisfy the delinquent taxes assessed against said real estate for the year 2012; That said real estate was taxed or specially assessed in the name(s) of SR Condominiums LLC for said year 2012.That a Treasurer’s Deed will be issued for said real estate to the said Robert Jacob Grzywa at 1:00 o’clock P.M., on the 18th day of May 2017, unless the same has been redeemed. Said property may be redeemed from said sale at any time prior to the actual execution of said Treasurer’s Deed. Witness my hand this 2nd day of February 2017. /s/ Diane A. Holbert County Treasurer of Douglas County Legal Notice No.: 930568 First Publication: February 2, 2017 Last Publication: February 16, 2017 Publisher: Douglas County News-Press Public Notice NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS A public hearing will be held on March 6, 2017 at 7:00 p.m. before the Douglas County Planning Commission and on April 11, 2017 at 2:30 p.m. before the Douglas County Board of County Commissioners in the Commissioners’ Hearing Room, 100 Third Street, Castle Rock, CO. The hearing is for proposed amendments to the Douglas County Zoning Resolution (DCZR) regarding Section 18A, the Water Supply Overlay District. For more specific information, call Jamie Hartig, Douglas County Planning, at 303-660-7460 regarding file #DR2016-011. Legal Notice No.: 930609 First Publication: February 16, 2017 Last Publication: February 16, 2017 Publisher: Douglas County News-Press Public Notice REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL (RFP) #007-17 DOUGLAS COUNTY CORONER’S OFFICE CASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM The Office of the Coroner of Douglas County, Colorado, hereinafter referred to as the County, respectfully requests proposals from responsible and qualified companies for the implementation and support of a Coroner/Medical Examiner case management system. The RFP documents may be reviewed and/or printed from the Rocky Mountain E-Purchasing System website at www.rockymountainbidsystem.com. RFP documents are not available for purchase from Douglas County Government and can only be accessed from the above-mentioned website. While the RFP documents are available electronically, Douglas County cannot accept electronic proposal responses. Please submit one (1) paper copy and one (1) electronic copy (saved to a USB flash drive) of your RFP response in a sealed envelope plainly marked “RFP No. 007-17, Coroner’s Office Case Management System”. Responses will be received until 4:00 p.m., on Tuesday, March 21, 2017 by the Douglas County Finance Department, Purchasing Division, 100 Third Street, Suite 130, Castle Rock, Colorado 80104. Proposal responses will not be considered which are received after the time stated, and any responses so received will be returned unopened. Douglas County Government reserves the right to reject any and all proposals, to waive formalities, informalities, or irregularities contained in a said proposal and furthermore, to award a contract for items herein, either in whole or in part, if it is deemed to be in the best interest of the County to do so. Additionally, we reserve the right to negotiate optional items/services with the successful vendor. Please direct any questions concerning this RFP to Carolyn Riggs, Purchasing Supervisor, 303660-7434, criggs@douglas.co.us, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. Legal Notice No.: 930627 First Publication: February 16, 2017 Last Publication: February 16, 2017 Publisher: Douglas County News-Press Public Notice NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the Same was Taxed or Specially As-

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Public Notice

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED

City and County

To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the Same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom It May Concern, and more especially to:

OCCUPANT - AscentPointe Development, LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company c/o Stroh Ranch Development LLC - Audrey Miklavcic c/o MW Housing Partners III LP - Bel Shower Door Corporation, a Colorado Corporation aka Bel Shower aka Bell Shower, a Colorado Corporation - Carol Baumgartner, Town Clerk David Casiano Mayor, Town of Parker Attn: Carol Baumgartner - Diane Bailey as Public Trustee of the County of Douglas, State of Colorado c/o Public Trustee - Donald L Lambert, Professional Land Surveyor c/o Frontier Surveying, Inc - Douglas County Public Trustee aka Public Trustee - Ed Garneau, Manager aka Edouard A Garneau c/o SR Condominiums LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company - Ed Garneau, LLC Manager aka Edouard A Garneau c/o SR Condominiums LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company - Edouard A Garneau as registered agent for SR Condominiums LLC -Edwin J Stephens, Vice President, MW Housing Partners III L.P., by MW Housing Management III LLC, its General Partner, by WRI CP Investments III LLC, its Co-Manager, by Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Inc, it Manager - First American Heritage Title Co - Frontier Surveying, Inc - Garner Stoll, Planning Director, Town of Parker Attn: Carol Baumgartner - Gary L Hunter, Manager, AscentPointe Development LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company c/o Stroh Ranch Development LLC -Gary Laster, Mayor, Town of Parker Attn: Carol Baumgartner George G Smith, Jr., a registered Professional Land Surveyor c/o Kirkham Michael Consulting Engineers –Hunters Chase Condo Assn. Inc. c/o Cap Management - Hunters Chase Condominiums c/o Cap Management - John M. Beng, Vice President, Washington Mutual Bank c/o JP Morgan Chase Bank - JP Morgan Chase Bank, national association, as successor to Washington Mutual Bank F.A. – Leonard Rudolph - Lola Duncan, Assistant Vice President MW Housing Partners III L.P., by MW Housing Management III LLC, its General Partner, by WRI CP Investments III LLC, its Co-Manager, by Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Inc, it Manager - Lola Duncan c/o WRI Investments III LLC - Michael J. Guyerson, Attorney for SR Condominiums LLC c/o Onsager, Guyerson, Fletcher & Johnson - Michael Monge, Vice President, MW Housing Management III, LP, a California Limited Partnership -Michael Monge, Vice President, MW Housing Partners III, LP, a California Limited Partnership - Michael Monge, Vice President, WRI CP Investments III, LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company - Michael Monge, Vice President, Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Inc., a Washington Corporation -MW Housing a California limited partnership aka MW Housing MW Housing Partners III, LP - MW Housing Partners III, LP aka MW Housing - MW Housing Partners III, LP, a California Limited Partnership - MW Housing Management III, LP, a California Limited Partnership, its General Partner - Nicole Sayer, Chief Title Officer c/o Western Title Funding LLC - Paul Mosovero c/o First American Heritage Title Company - Public Trustee for the County of Douglas - Randal A Craven, Manager c/o SR Condominiums LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company - Robert Shaiman, registered agent for Stroh Ranch Development LLC - Robert Shaiman, registered agent for Stroh Ranch Development LLC aka Robert Shaiman, registered agent for Stroh Ranch Robin L Cupka, Asst. Vice President, Washington Mutual Bank, FA c/o JP Morgan Chase Bank - SR Condominiums LLC aka SR Condominiums - SR Condominiums LLC et al - SR Condominiums LLC, a Colorado Limited Liability Company - Stroh Ranch aka Stroh Ranch Development LLC -Town of Parker - Washington Mutual Bank FA (WAMU) aka Washington Mutual Bank - Western Title Funding, LLC - Weyerhaeuser Realty Investors, Inc., a Washington Corporation, its Manager - WRI CP Investments III, LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company, its Co Manager –Kirkham Michael Consulting Engineers – Edouard A Garneau

You and each of you are hereby notified that on the 12th day of November 2013 the then County Treasurer of the County of Douglas, in the State of Colorado, sold at public tax lien sale to Hunters Chase Condo Assn Inc. the following described real estate situate in the County of Douglas, State of Colorado, to wit:

GARAGE UNIT G4A-5 BUILDING G4A HUNTERS CHASE CONDOS PHASE 2 (PLEASE NOTE: Legal description numbering does not match physical number assigned; this garage is physically numbered 4)

and said County Treasurer issued a certificate of purchase therefore to Hunters Chase Condo Assn Inc. That said tax lien sale was made to satisfy the delinquent taxes assessed against said real estate for the year 2012; That said real estate was taxed or specially assessed in the name(s) of SR Condominiums LLC for said year 2012.That a Treasurer’s Deed will be issued for said real estate to the said Hunters Chase Condo Assn Inc. at 1:00 o’clock P.M., on the 18th day of May 2017, unless the same has been redeemed. Said property may be redeemed from said sale at any time prior to the actual execution of said Treasurer’s Deed. Witness my hand this 2nd day of February 2017. /s/ Diane A. Holbert County Treasurer of Douglas County Legal Notice No.: 930569 First Publication: February 2, 2017 Last Publication: February 16, 2017 Publisher: Douglas County News-Press

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February 16, 2017F

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