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February 15, 2018

DENVER Since 1926

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Slot homes could see ban proposal moved up

Casey Gunning, 34, feels the burn as she works out at Pure Barre Greenwood Village.

Two on council aren’t content to wait for May timetable BY ANDREW KENNEY AKENNEY@DENVERITE.COM

TABATHA STEWART

of the few places in the Denver metro area that offers workout classes for people with disabilities. Owners Briget and Scott Russomanno launched Barre Stars in early 2018 to help combat adult obesity. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 36 percent of adults with disabilities are obese, versus 23 percent of adults without disabilities. Obesity can lead to various other health issues, including diabetes and heart disease.

Slot ‘em if you got ‘em. Denver officials may try to kill the notorious slot home sooner than expected. City staff and a committee have been working for more than a year on a proposal that would keep developers from building slot homes, the widely criticized architectural style that fits more units on less land. A slot home is a multi-unit residential project that is designed around a narrow driveway or open space, aka “the slot.” While most residences face toward the street, slot homes turn inward, often presenting bare walls to their neighbors. To make it really simple: Houses aren’t “supposed” to be sideways.

SEE FITNESS, P4

SEE SLOT, P15

Building confidence and fitness Facilities aim to improve health of people with disabilities BY TABATHA STEWART TSTEWART@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

The energy at Pure Barre fitness was running high. Thumping music, grunts of exertion and the smell of sweat filled the air as fitness specialist Briget Russomanno led the workout class. “You can do it,” she said to the

class. “Just one more set, let’s keep going!” Groans of protest were mixed with smiles of joy, as she eventually wrapped up the class with a cooldown session. “Wow. This is my new place. I’m coming here again,” said Casey Gunning, 34, who has Down syndrome and attended the exercise class at 5375 Landmark Place in Greenwood Village for the first time. Every client in the class had a disability of some sort, some mental and some physical. Pure Barre is one

THE BOTTOM LINE PERIODICAL

“People do unthinkable things to people. Now and then, someone appears, like Zackari Parrish, and reminds me that life is worth living.” Craig Marshall Smith | columnist, Page 8 INSIDE

VOICES: PAGE 8 | LIFE: PAGE 10 | CALENDAR: PAGE 11 VOLUME 91 | ISSUE 15


2 Denver Herald

February 15, 2018

‘Innovation zone’ requests go out to more Denver schools More autonomy goes to facilities taking part in innovative program BY MELANIE ASMAR CHALKBEAT.ORG

The Denver school district is soliciting more schools to join its first “innovation zone,” a bold experiment that grants broad autonomy to public schools, even as the district is once again negotiating with the zone over how its schools should be funded. A key element of the zone is that its schools can opt out of certain district services and use that money to buy things that meet their students’ specific needs. But less than two years after the zone was created, its leaders are asking for even more financial freedom. Figuring out how the zone should work has been as messy and tensionfilled as it has been inspiring, said school board President Anne Rowe, who spoke recently at a panel discussion following the release of a case study about the zone. “It has been a journey,” Rowe said. “Where we are now is we have a model that is incredibly intriguing within a ‘portfolio’ district. It truly is an innovation driver.” Denver Public Schools is known nationwide for nurturing a “portfolio”

‘It has been a journey. Where we are now is we have a model that is incredibly intriguing within a ‘portfolio’ district. It truly is an innovation driver.’ Anne Rowe, Denver School Board president

of different school types, and educators around the country are watching its innovation zone. The zone is a hybrid of sorts, often described as a “third way” of governing public schools. The four schools in the zone don’t have as much autonomy as charter schools, which are publicly funded but independently run. But they have much more freedom than traditional district-run schools. Concept touts freedom The idea is that giving principals more control over their budgets and time allows them to better serve their students, or, in their words, to take their schools “from good to great.” The zone is overseen by a nonprofit organization called the Luminary Learning Network. The teachers in the zone schools are still Denver

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Public Schools employees, but the nonprofit’s board of directors has the authority to hire and fire the principals. Those principals can opt out of district meetings, trainings, and other requirements, which allows them to spend more time in their schools. Principals said it has been invaluable. “When I’m there, I know what’s happening,” said Jennifer Jackson, the principal of Cole Arts and Science Academy, an elementary school in northeast Denver that is part of the zone. “I know if my fourth-grade teacher planned today. I know if she’s following through on the feedback we had about pausing.” The zone schools can also opt out of paying for some district services. That puts money back into their budgets to pay for programs and staff tailored to their school’s needs, such as a fulltime psychologist or another special education teacher. But zone principals want to flip the financial model to one in which they get nearly all of their per-pupil state dollars up front and then opt into paying for just the district services they want. That’s how charter schools are funded, and it’s what the principals originally suggested to the district. District officials have several concerns with that model. Zone schools are not fully independent from the district, and officials said they want to make sure they’re funded in accordance with district values. That includes pooling resources to pay for programs like high school athletics and full-day kindergarten, and spending more money on traditionally underserved students, such as students from low-income families. Jessica Roberts, the executive director of the nonprofit that oversees the zone, said zone leaders agree with those priorities. But she said they would like more predictability in their budgets. Current figures fluctuate Under the current model, the amount of money the schools get back when they opt out of paying for some services can change each year if the department that provides those services grows or shrinks. For example, say a school opted out this year of the services provided by Department X and got back $50 per student, which it used to hire a nurse. But Department X is making cuts next year, which means its services will only be worth $30 per student.

The school can still opt out, but it’ll get less money in return, which means it may no longer be able to afford its nurse. Roberts said she’s hopeful the district and zone can negotiate a flat fee its schools would pay to cover essential and important services, and then the schools could keep the rest. “It’s not about getting more dollars per student,” she said. “It’s about having control of those dollars.” Before joining together in a zone, all four schools were “innovation schools,” which meant they could do things like set their own calendars and choose their own curriculum by waiving state and district rules. But the principals still had to attend district meetings and report to district supervisors, and they did not have the financial flexibility the zone provides. Both innovation schools and innovation zones were created by a 2008 state law that Denver Public Schools helped write. The district has 58 innovation schools, which is far more than anywhere else in Colorado. Other districts, such as neighboring Aurora Public Schools, have innovation zones, but Denver’s is the only one overseen by a nonprofit board. Change of plans Denver officials had said they were planning to extend the same financial model this fall to all district innovation schools, regardless of whether they were in a zone or not, which advocates took as a sign the zone was having a greater impact. But officials recently announced they’d abandoned that plan in part because it was too complex. They did, however, extend the same flexibility to what the district calls “innovation management organizations,” which are networks of innovation schools. This year, there are two networks with two schools each. The district will add a third network this fall when leaders of an innovation school in Montbello take over a neighboring district-run school being shuttered for low performance. The leaders of the innovation networks will also be involved in the negotiations over what the financial structure will look like going forward, said Jennifer Holladay, associate chief of the district department that oversees charter and innovation schools. The district also plans to include in the discussions the leaders of any innovation schools interested in joining the Luminary Learning Network and the leaders of any innovation schools that want to form their own zone, Holladay said. The district recently posted applications for schools interested in doing either. Schools had until Feb. 9 (after press time) to submit letters of intent. Applications are due in April. The sevenmember Denver school board, which has the final say, is set to vote in May. The applications are the first of their kind. SEE INNOVATION, P9


Denver Herald 3

February 15, 2018

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4 Denver Herald

February 15, 2018

FITNESS

‘People with a disability certainly can exercise safely’

FROM PAGE 1

The National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability says that the 50 million-plus Americans with disabilities, who are at greater risk for developing health problems associated with a sedentary lifestyle, are getting even less physical activity because of the numerous barriers they face in becoming physically active. “For many, they don’t know how or where to exercise,” said Kelly Bonner, an inclusion specialist with NCHPD. “Marketing material is not focused on this minority group, and to be honest, many fitness centers aren’t equipped to work with these individuals so they don’t know where to go that can create a plan that is appropriate for them.” The CDC also recommends that people with disabilities get regular physical activity. But historically, there have been few facilities to meet their needs, as well as various other factors that prevent healthy activity. “So few programs exist that offer safe and effective fitness programming in a way that educates and adapts to the specific needs of these individuals,” said Scott Russomanno. “Parents and caretakers are left to face this challenge alone without a community equipped to serve the health and fitness needs of their children.” Russomanno said attitude plays a big part in a successful fitness plan, and that people with special needs are often told they can’t do certain things. “They’re either told they can’t, or assume they can’t be active,” he said. “The truth is, everyone can do a little something that’s good for them, and we are here to help them achieve what they can.” Trevor Wicken and his wife Misty, owners of RISE Movement Solutions in Englewood, have spent more than 10 years helping people stay physically active after becoming disabled or being diagnosed with a life-long condition, such as multiple sclerosis. According to Wicken, many people who are diagnosed with a disorder or receive an injury are prescribed a period of physical therapy that is helpful, but doesn’t foster an attitude of staying healthy after receiving a diagnosis. A regular fitness plan that fits into the new “normal” of their lives is seldom

Luke Stehno, 17, enjoys a good workout with a buddy as part of the non-profit All-Stars Club at Pure Barre Greenwood Village. TABATHA STEWART

HOW EXERCISE HELPS Benefits of physical activity for people with disabilities include: • Improved cardiovascular fitness • Improved muscle fitness • Improved mental health • A better ability to do tasks of daily life Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention addressed by physicians. “A lot of times when they come to us, they’ve been told that nothing else can be done,” said Trevor Wicken, who began the medical fitness training practice in 2004, and started the MS gym, an online Facebook page that has gained 11,000 followers in less than a year. Wicken said his goal is to bridge the gap between medical and fitness needs, and figure out the next steps after physical therapy. He works with clients with multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, strokes, osteoarthritis and brain injuries, and said attitude and accessibility are two barriers to fitness for those who have a disability or an injury. “General fitness plans don’t work for people with disabilities. They try to work out and get hurt, or never feel better or get better,” said Wicken. “Or they’re told they’re broken and just fall into a pattern of unhealthy habits. We’re intensely passionate about helping them feel better, because they are more than their disease.” Training sessions, such as those Wicken offers, are not always

OBESITY AND DISABILITIES • Obesity rates for adults with disabilities are approximately 57 percent higher than among adults without disabilities, which means about 36 percent of adults with disabilities are obese, compared with 23 percent of adults without disabilities. • In children with disabilities, obesity rates are approximately 38 percent higher than for children without disabilities, or 22 percent of children with disabilities are obese, compared to 16 percent of children without disabilities. Source: Centers for Disease Control National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities covered by insurance and are seldom promoted by health-care professionals. While Wicken does not accept insurance, clients can submit claims to their insurance providers for possible reimbursement. For those who attended the class at Pure Barre, getting physical was not only good for them, but they had a good time doing it. Dana Stehno, of Englewood, brought her 17-year-old son Luke to the workout class, and said it was a great experience and she hopes he will continue to attend. “He never really wants to do anything like this. He’s apprehensive and not sure he can do what everybody else does,” Stehno said. “This is a non-intimidating environment and we’ll be back. He’s definitely going to walk out of here with a smile on his face.”

WHERE TO GO Here are some of the facilities in the Denver area that provide physical fitness classes and activities for people with disabilities. • Metropolitan State University of Denver offers a variety of adaptive fitness programs that provide a safe, fun workout for people with disabilities. Classes are held at the Auraria Campus, 1198 11th St., Denver; more information: msudenver.

edu/campusrec/adaptivefitness/ • Denver Parks and Recreation has several programs and classes for people of all ages with disabilities of all ages. Programs are held throughout the Denver area; more information: www.denvergov.org/content/denvergov/ en/denver-parks-and-recreation/activities-programs/ adaptive-recreation.html • The Thrive Center is a com-

munity resource center that provides parents with information on adaptive fitness programs at several locations along the Front Range for parents of children with disabilities; more information: www.thrivectr. org/disability-recreationresources/ • RISE Movement Solutions, 750 West Hampden, Suite 200, Englewood, offers medical fitness classes to

help people with disabilities, injuries or recently diagnosed conditions; more information: www.facebook.com/TheMSGym/ • Pure Barre Fitness, 5375 Landmark Place, Suite 109, Greenwood Village, hosts workout classes for adults with disabilities through the Barre Stars program; more information: http:// purebarre.com/co-denvergreenwoodvillage/

Kelly Bonner, inclusion specialist with the National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability who has spent 17 years working with people with disabilities, weighed in on challenges facing people with disabilities and physical exercise, via an email interview with Colorado Community Media. The center was founded in 1999, as a resource center on health promotion for people with disabilities. The organization seeks to “help people with disability and other chronic health conditions achieve health benefits through increased participation in all types of physical and social activities…” The NCHPAD has numerous free resources and free online workout programs at www. nchpad.org/14weeks. Do disabilities cause obesity? Certainly disability and health can coexist. There are plenty of people with a disability who are in great shape. But a disability can predispose someone to secondary health conditions such as obesity for a number of reasons. Can people with disabilities exercise safely? In general, it is always wise to get medical clearance before beginning an exercise program, especially if you have any concerns. That being said, YES. People with a disability certainly can exercise safely and they will probably find that exercise helps them in many facts of their life, from performing their activities of daily living, to transferring, to better sleep. Is exercise/activity usually factored into their care plans? Care plans for people with a disability vary greatly across the U.S., as well as with different disability types. Many people with a disability do not have a specific care plan and are not told how they can be active after acquiring their disability. Often I think doctors are so rushed in their patient interactions that they are focused on treatment or current issues ... (and) rarely have time to address preventive measures like physical activity. What are the biggest barriers to exercise in people with disabilities? There are a number of barriers to physical activity for people with a disability. For many, they don’t know how or where to exercise. Many fitness centers aren’t equipped or knowledgeable enough to work with these individuals. Access is also a problem. People with a disability need access to the facility by not only providing an accessible building and parking area, but once they get inside they need access to the fitness equipment by providing more space between equipment, cardio machines geared toward upper body movement and a list of other things. But surprisingly, research shows that one of the biggest barriers to physical activity for people with a disability is attitude. Staff members questioning why they are there or not knowing how to effectively communicate with them or meet their needs is a quick turn-off.


Denver Herald 5

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February 15, 2018

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Matt Stege, co-pilot of a Boeing 737 for a major airline, gets his picture taken in the cockpit of the plane. Stege, 33, of Denver knew he wanted to be a professional pilot since he was 14. COURTESY PHOTO

Before careers can soar, pilots must pay their dues Those who fly face intense training, uncertain market

2018 BEST OF THE BEST

VOTING BEGINS MARCH 1st Check back next week for voting information. Vote once per day March 1, 2018 – April 10, 2018 To provide the most accurate results by geographical area, Colorado Community Media does not require, but does encourage readers to vote for businesses in their immediate local community. All nominated businesses have an equal opportunity of winning, no purchase required. Please see voting website for complete contest rules and regulations.

BY CHRISTY STEADMAN CSTEADMAN@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

When Matt Stege was 6 years old, three T6 World War II trainer planes flew over his house en route to an air show. There was just something about it, he said, recalling that day when he stood on the front porch of his Aspen home and watched the planes fly overhead. It was “seeing them in formation and the sound they made,” Stege said. “I just got hooked.” But it was at age 14, when he took off in a plane for the first time during an introductory training flight, that he knew someday he would become a professional pilot. And that he did. Now, Stege, 33, a resident of Denver, is a first officer of a Boeing 737 for a major airline. The topic of a shortage of airline pilots is popular in the headlines. Yet a straightforward answer to whether or not it exists is hard to come by. The airlines are volatile industry, said Dan Callender of Arvada, a captain with a major airline. Any little change in the economy can hit the airlines up front, causing an effect — good or bad — in the airlines more quickly than in any other industry, he said. For example, a change of only a couple cents for a gallon of fuel can make a significant impact on the airlines. Airlines are constantly evaluating what their forecasted needs may be, Callender said. That’s why there are times when there’s a lot of hiring of pilots happening, and other times when there’s a lull, Callender said. An airline pilot shortage would be based on forecasted need, and the number of pilots available, he said. “If projection goes up, need goes up,” Callender said. “It’s all supply and demand.”

However, a few major contributors can be associated with or attributed to a shortage of airline pilots, said Kevin Kuhlmann, a professor and the associate chair in the Aviation and Aerospace Science Department at Metropolitan State University of Denver. These are legislation that stems from the 2009 plane crash of Colgan Air Flight 3407, a massive retirement rate of pilots and the cost of education and training. Colgan Air Flight 3407 At about 10:15 p.m. on Feb. 12, 2009, in wintry weather conditions that consisted of light snow, fog and wind, Colgan Air Flight 3407 crashed into a house just outside of its destination city of Buffalo, New York. A total of 50 people died in the crash — 49 crew members, including the two pilots, and passengers, and one person in the house. The incident triggered legislation. New standards for first officers, also refered to as co-pilots, raised their minimum of flight experience level from 250 hours to 1,500 hours — the same amount that captains must accumulate. It took effect in August 2013. How the new legislation plays into the potential shortage of airline pilots, Kuhlmann said, is it creates a vacuum of hireable pilots. The larger, major airlines, such as Delta and United, for example, want to hire the pilots who have a surplus of 3,000 to 4,000 in-flight hours. Often, pilots earn these hours from working at a smaller, regional airline, such as Frontier and Spirit, for example, or through corporate aviation or as charter pilots. The regional airlines try to attract and retain the qualified candidates — those who have earned 1,500 in-flight hours and their Air Transport Pilot certificate — from other sources, such as instructors at flight schools or perhaps the military. As it is, the number of pilots earning their ATP is barely keeping up with the number of job openings for airline pilots, Stege said. SEE PILOTS, P7


Denver Herald 7

February 15, 2018

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Retirement, employment cutbacks For about a decade prior to Sept. 11, 2001, airlines went through a rough patch of time, Stege said. “Then 9/11,” he added, “and that hit them hard.” In those years, Stege said, the industry was not hiring, employees suffered from pay cuts and furloughs, and pilot pensions were taken away. Airlines were merging, and others went bankrupt. Now that the economy is recovering, the airline industry is as well, Stege said. But in his opinion, it’s still only been within the past few years that it’s beginning to bounce back. Kuhlmann agrees. After the 9/11 attacks in 2001, airlines cut the pay scale significantly, so there fewer people wanting to enter the industry, Kuhlmann said. “We’re slowly seeing a rebound to that,” he said, “but there’s still not enough to fill the need.” Another thing that airlines will need to keep up with so as not to experience a shortage of airline pilots is the number of pilots retiring, Stege said. On July 15, 2009, the FAA issued a ruling that raised the mandatory retirement age of airline pilots from 60 to 65. It helped pilots approaching retirement age in that period of time, Callender said. However, within the next decade or so, there will be a massive retirement rate of pilots from the Vietnam era, Kuhlmann said. The time period for the Vietnam era, as defined by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, is Aug. 5, 1964 through May 7, 1975, but begins in February 1961 for veterans who served in the Republic of Vietnam during that period. It should be noted that not all pilots from that time period flew in the war, Callender added. No matter which stance a person takes on whether there is or not a pilot shortage, one thing for certain is that pilots enter the career for the love of flying. And to become a pilot, specifically a professional pilot, it takes true passion, Price said. “If, when you’re not flying you wish you were, then a pilot career is what you need,” Price said. “It’s a feeling that you must do this. Your life will have a hole in it that can never be filled if you don’t pursue it. Oh, and the view is pretty cool, too.”

CALM AFTER THE STORM

C ol

Cost of education, flight training Being a pilot is “one of the best jobs you could ever have,” Stege said. But there’s no denying that it takes a lot of dedication and the initial flight training is expensive. To earn a degree in aviation in addition to all the certifications needed, Stege said, it can cost a person upward of $80,000 to $100,000 or more. Sarah Denton knew she wanted to pursue a career in aviation since she was a teenager. “My grandpa is my role model and inspiration to become a pilot,” Denton said. “I remember walking up to my best friend one morning before school, and telling her that I wanted to fly like my grandpa did.” Her grandfather is a fantastic storyteller, she said, so she grew up hearing his stories about the Vietnam War — he was a weapon systems operator and flew an F-4 Phantom II. Now, Denton, 25, is a private pilot and is working as a line service technician for Signature Flight Support at Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport. However, she was recently offered a position with Jeppesen where she will work as a navigation information analyst. Denton received a couple scholarships that helped pay for her training, but she also had to take out loans. But for her, it was worth it, she said. “Pilots are in high demand,” Denton said. But “it’s also just a fun industry with a variety of jobs both on the ground and in the air.” She suggests taking jobs in the industry that will provide a variety of different perspectives. “Enjoy the journey,” Denton said. “Don’t let finances stop you, because there is always a way.” Once a person has earned a commercial pilot certificate and a certified flight instructor certificate, he or she may teach at a flight school. Stege’s guess is that flight instructors can earn about $15 to $20 an hour, but it is difficult to do it as a full-time job. Scott Frank, 27, of Broomfield graduated from Metro on Dec. 15 with a bachelor’s degree in aviation technology with a professional pilot concentration. This spring, he will be starting an internship with a major airline where he will work in the chief pilot’s office at Denver International Airport. His long-term goal is to work for an international major airline. “It’s a step-by-step process,” Frank said, but added that so far, it’s been the most rewarding thing he’s done. Frank currently works as a flight instructor for Western Air Flight Academy out of Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport, and he enjoys it because he likes seeing the smiles on people’s faces. From the first day of students’ flight training when they know nothing about aviation to the “perma-grin”

ia

One thing that may be helping to ease the crunch, Kuhlmann said, is some airlines are starting to look at colleges and interview aviation students, keeping in mind that they still have a ways to go before all the credentials are met.

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FROM PAGE 6

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PILOTS

they get after their first solo, Frank said. “I love my job.” Pay for pilots depends on what they are flying and for whom, said Jeff Price, an author and professor in the Department of Aviation and Aerospace at Metro. Some companies pay better than others, and the regional airlines typically pay less than the major airlines, Price said. In general, during “the first few years, they don’t make a lot at all,” Price said. But “then it really starts jumping.” Some pilots can make as little as $18,000 to $23,000 in their early years, he said. Others, during their first few years at the charter and regional levels, can make somewhere between $25,000 to $45,000. A pilot of 10 or 20 years can easily be making an excess of six figures, with some into the $200,000 and up range with a major airline, Price said.

C o m m u nit

y


8 Denver Herald

I

LOCAL

February 15, 2018

VOICES

When death took a stranger, it claimed a much-needed friend

people. Now and then, in the didn’t know Zackari QUIET of it, someone appears, Parrish. Not at all. DESPERATION middle like Parrish, and reminds me I know I have needed that life is worth living. men and women like him There are times when I have my entire life. Not because thought otherwise. The morning of the fact that he was a I watched the Murrah Federal good deputy, but because he Building fall, and heard there was someone with a good was a daycare full of kids in it. heart, and a bright light in a What happened in Los Angeworld that often goes deeply les, my Los Angeles, after the cruel on me. Rodney King verdict. (I’m writing this in first The Turpin kids. person for a reason.) Craig Marshall I have had my own moments I read about the 5K run/ with the Douglas County Sherwalk at the Douglas County Smith Fairgrounds, and saw a picture of Par- iff ’s Office. Back in my own darker days. Every single man and woman I rish’s wife and read what she said and met was kind to me. “Jack,” wherever sat there on the couch and cried. you are, thanks for being compassionBy some design that I cannot ate to a drunk. explain, there have been just enough In some countries, all I see is hate good examples in my life against the and evil and genocide, and there are other kind, of which there are many no Parrishes, or if there are, they are (too many). swiftly punished or executed. People do unthinkable things to

Syria now. Cambodia once. Uganda. I wish there were more good people in America than there are. Our freedoms come with a gift card for the bad guys. I’ll take it over repression. I read that Parrish “used humor to de-escalate tense situations.” I do the same thing, only I am the tense situation. I don’t mean I am over here on pins and needles. I mean that life’s curve balls and sliders get to me, and that’s when I contact Mark, or watch W. C. Fields or read Steve Martin. Mark can turn almost any word into something else, just like Groucho, or take a couple of words and turn them into a brilliant, surreal, non-sequitur, like Steven Wright. I have a number of saved movies, and before I turn off the lights at night, I watch 10 minutes of one that I may have seen a hundred times. I don’t want to go to sleep — or try to

go to sleep —with the news of the day on my mind. I watch the same scene in “Sullivan’s Travels” over and over. Joel McCrea meets Veronica Lake in an “owl wagon” in Los Angeles at sunrise. I love that scene. (Even though I know what later happened to Lake. She was only 50 when she died. I have the same disease.) It sounds like Parrish had some of my father in him. Dad had a sense of humor, and he was my buffer, between my mother and me. When I began to look at it objectively, I realized that Dad could have left our messy little family. His life would have improved. He didn’t. Thanks, Zackari Parrish. I didn’t know you, but I needed you. Craig Marshall Smith is an artist, educator and Highlands Ranch resident. He can be reached at craigmarshallsmith@comcast.net.

Working on fulfilling dreams with hope and encouragement

I

’m working on a dream, though it can feel so far away, I’m working on a dream, our love will make it real someday, I’m working on a dream though it can feel so far away, I’m working on a dream, and our love will make it real WINNING someday.” — Bruce Springsteen, “WorkWORDS ing on a Dream” Sometimes our dreams can feel so far away, can’t they? Sometimes they feel so far away we almost feel like giving up. Almost. But we don’t quit, we don’t walk away, and we don’t Michael Norton give up. And one of the reasons we persist and pursue our dreams with vigor and conviction is because we are surrounded by the hope and encouragement of others whose love will help us make them come true someday. “The doors of hope swing widest on the hinges of encouragement.” — Zig Ziglar It is so true, isn’t it? And whether or not we have others in our life who lift us up, and fuel our hope with encouragement, we can still pick ourselves

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up, look ourselves in the mirror, review our plan, course-correct if necessary, and get back in the dream game. The hope and encouragement of others is awesome, it is fantastic, it is enormous … and when it is coupled with the hope and encouragement we find within our own hearts, there really is no stopping us. We have all probably heard at some point in our lives that “Hope is not a strategy.” I always love to debate that statement, as I think hope is a major strategic element of any successful endeavor. I get the fact that we cannot “hope” our way out of challenging situations or trouble spots. But that doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t remain hopeful in those situations and keep “hope” alive so that we can come up with an alternate plan or solution. When I am building business plans and models, I absolutely include “hope” in my strategic thinking, because as Dr. Alfred Adler shared, “Hope is the foundational quality of all successful change; no hope; no change.” And when building a business or a strategic plan, “encouragement” is a key element of my anticipated success. I look for family, friends, business partners, clients, co-workers, and associates at all levels to live and work

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in such a way that we are constantly encouraging one another. It is just too easy to go negative on someone or something. It is too easy to find the faults in a project or program. It’s only easy to go negative if we don’t live with and work with the full armor of hope and encouragement. How’s this for a question to ask your family, your company, or your organization: “Are we living and working with the spirit of hope and encouragement?” Now be truthful in your own response here as well, “Is my family, my business, or my organization living with the spirit of hope and encouragement?” How would you answer this question? How would others answer the question about you, your family, or your company? Would they see people who are life-lifters and encouragers, or would they see and feel a vibe of negativity? As Bruce Springsteen wrote in his song above, “Working on a Dream,” the way we achieve our goals and realize our dreams is when our love makes it real someday. We all have dreams, our family members have dreams, our friends have dreams, our associates and co-workers have dreams. Our job, our responsibility to one another is to lift each other up, and open those doors of hope with positive

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encouragement and love. Anyone can go negative, that’s easy. But it is the difference-makers in life who fill their families, their communities, and this world with hope and encouragement. We all know someone very close to us who is working on a dream, don’t we? A dream to be cancer-free, a dream to beat addiction or have a loved one find sobriety, a dream to find a new job, a dream to start a new business, a dream for happy and healthy children, a dream of a loving and flourishing relationship, a dream of peace, and so many other dreams and goals. Let’s help them, let’s lift them up, let’s let our hope, encouragement, and love make it all real someday. So how about you? Are you working on a dream? Do you know someone who is? Are you filling them with hope, encouragement, and love? I would really love to hear your sources of motivation and inspiration at gotonorton@ gmail.com. And when we let the doors of hope swing open wide on the hinges of encouragement and love, it really will be a better than good week. Michael Norton is a resident of Castle Rock, the president of the Zig Ziglar Corporate Training Solutions Team, a strategic consultant and a business and personal coach.

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Denver Herald 9

February 15, 2018

Colfax-Federal interchange in spotlight for walkability Various options are being considered at crossing that’s busy but risky BY ADRIAN D. GARCIA AGARCIA@DENVERITE.COM

West Colfax residents want to drive a pedestrian-friendly design change to one of Denver’s most heavily trafficked intersections. Options for the area where Federal Boulevard runs above West Colfax Avenue include bringing the streets down to one level and making the north-south corridor a split one-way with generous room set aside for cyclists and bikers. The West Colfax Denver Business Improvement District and Walk Denver are leading the Over the Colfax Clover project. The organizations plan to demonstrate temporary solutions for the cloverleaf intersection this summer ahead of seeking out money and partners for a larger, long-term transformation of the nearly 29-acre area. Walk Denver recently counted that more than 200 people per day walk across Federal Boulevard and West Colfax Avenue. The mobility-minded organization found that the number goes up during events and games at the nearby Mile High Stadium. Some of those pedestrians might be accessing the Decatur-Federal transit station to the south. “If you look at it you’re like, ‘This is so hostile to pedestrians. Why would anybody actually walk here?’” said Jill Locantore, newly named executive director of Walk Denver. “The Colfax-Federal cloverleaf is just a perfect example of a street that is just incredibly dangerous for people who are walking, biking or trying to access transit,” Locantore said. Residents started the Over the Colfax Clover project in 2017 and found the community wants a quicker public transit route, clear and safe pedestrian and bike routes and nearby businesses for people to visit. Win King owns a property on the 3600 block of West Colfax Avenue and serves on the board of the business improvement district for the neighborhood. He said changing the intersection could better connect West Colfax to Sun Valley and the surrounding neighborhoods.

INNOVATION

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Even though the process of creating

.the zone has been tense and difficult

at times, district officials said outsidethe-box ideas are essential if Denver is going to accelerate students’ academic achievement — what Rowe, the school board president, called “the very good but incremental improvement we’re seeing.”

‘The Colfax-Federal cloverleaf is just a perfect example of a street that is just incredibly dangerous for people who are walking, biking or trying access transit.’ Jill Locantore, Walk Denver executive director “We’re not as connected as a series of those neighborhoods that go east,” King said. “To engage this community and respectively connect West Colfax as a neighborhood to the all of Denver would be wonderful.” West Colfax residents plan to put some of the improvements they’re planning on display June 3 during a design demonstration. A portion of the cloverleaf will be blocked off from cars. Music, food and activities are planned as well as dog park, open space and marketplace areas. A planning meeting for the demonstration is set for 6 pm. Feb. 15 at 3275 W. 14th Ave. Colorado artist Pat Milbery is anticipated to add pedestrian-friendly street art to West Colfax Avenue as part of the Vizion Zero traffic safety initiative. Long-term, the community would need to secure millions of dollars and work with the city of Denver and Colorado Department of Transporation, whose headquarters is going in nearby at Howard Place and Federal Boulevard, in order to make substantial changes to the cloverleaf. “Going into next year, we’re hoping to have interim designs actually funded and then move onward toward implementation and actual funding of the longterm designs,” said Dan Shah, director of the West Colfax Business Improvement District. Denverite is an online local news source for everything you need to know about Denver in 5 minutes. Visit denverite.com/subscribe for more. “I believe very strongly in a ‘both/ and’ world where we can embrace really strong district-run schools, where we can embrace terrific innovative models like the Luminary Learning Network, where we can embrace terrific charter schools,” said Denver Public Schools Superintendent Tom Boasberg, who was on the panel about the zone recently with Rowe. “Often, the dialogue in the public is an ‘either/or,’” he said. “I think, frankly, that’s very harmful.”

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February 15, 2018

Film gathering aims to inform, inspire in 12th year Colorado Environmental Film Festival brings together creators from all over world BY CLARKE READER CREADER@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

There’s no accounting for the twists and turns that bring creative people together, but the first meeting of filmmakers Haley Thompson and Tomas Zuccareno was all too fitting, in light of the work they would end up doing together — they meet at The Local Food Convergence in Aspen back in early 2016. “We both wanted to make a movie about the next generation of farming, and sustainable and healthy food,” Zuccareno remembers. “We both recognized there was a problem in the farming communities we came from — that young people weren’t getting the support they needed to do this important work.” Now, after two years of filming and editing, the pair are ready for the world premiere of their first film, “How We Grow,” which will take place at the 12th annual Colorado Environmental Film Festival. The festival runs from Feb. 22 through 24 at Golden’s American Mountaineering Center, 710 10th St. About 56 films will be shown, some shorts and others closer to feature length, all of which are aimed at raising awareness of interconnected ecological, social and economic themes. International and local filmmakers will be represented. “Colorado is such a great place to host a festival like this, not only because of how active residents are, but because so many people are invested in protecting the environment,” said Nicole Bickford, festival director. “We want to show films that bring light to environmental issues, but also offer solutions and hope for the future.” The free opening night event, beginning at 5:30 p.m. on Feb. 22, will include a reception featuring light appetizers, drinks, opportunities to interact with local businesses and a special silent auction benefiting CEFF programs. Afterward, there will be a screening of the film “Chasing Coral” and awards ceremony, hosted by local activist and filmmaker (and former mayor of Golden) Jacob Smith. Over the following days, films on a variety of subjects — ranging from deforestation and ocean health to wolves and, in the case of Jane Zelikova’s film, “End of Snow,” the effects of climate change on snowpack in the Western United States — will be shown. It premieres during the 7 to 9 p.m. session on Feb. 24. “The film follows me, a climate change scientist, as I go on a journey to learn how snowpack is changing in the West and what changes we can expect in the future,” Zelikova explained. “The idea came from my own research on the impacts of dust

Danny Ledonne’s “Growing VEGI” takes a look at the San Luis Valley’s Valley Educational Gardens Initiative. VEGI works with schools and community programs to address the root causes of hunger and food insecurity by cultivating a relationship with nourishing foods from the soil up. The film will be shown at the Colorado Environmental Film Festival during the 4 to 6 p.m. session on Feb. 23. COURTESY PHOTOS

IF YOU GO WHAT: Colorado Environmental Film Festival WHERE: American Mountaineering Center 710 10th St., Golden WHEN: Feb. 22 through 24 COST: Tickets range in price from $8 per person for a single film screening session to $50 per person for access to all film screening sessions all three days of the festival. TICKETS: www.ceff.net on snowpack in the Snowy Range mountains in Wyoming.” Many filmmakers, like Thompson and Zuccareno, will be on hand for their screenings, and available for discussions and meetings afterwards. In “How We Grow,” which premieres at 7:30 p.m. on Feb. 23, Thompson and Zuccareno take a look at ambitious young farmers building community around locally grown food in the Roaring Fork Valley of Western Colorado. It examines the characters and systems of farming through the themes of education, legislation, community, food access and micro-finance — in order to tell the story of how these farmers are able to create resilient food systems. “There’s a lot stacked against these farmers and their communities,” Thompson said. “We hope the response to the film is that people are inspired to get their hands in the dirt and start working.” For Zelikova, film is a way to bring the global challenge of climate change to people in a realistic, moving way. Stories help people connect to ideas and inspire them to tackle

Jane Zelikova’s film, “End of Snow,” explores the effects of climate change on snowpack in the western U.S., and will be shown at the Colorado Environmental Film Festival during the 7 to 9 p.m. session on Feb. 24. challenges, she added. “As much as it feels overwhelming, there are solutions we can implement today, solutions that don’t require a breakthrough invention or new technology,” she said. “These solutions come from people who want to be good stewards of their land and manage in a sustainable way, in the process helping fight climate change.” It would be easy for the films shown in the festival to be all doom and gloom, but Bickford said that’s why CEFF focuses on films that inspire, as well as inform. “We’ve found that a festival atmosphere like this is great, because people really love to gather and talk about solutions after they see these kinds of movies,” she said. “We want people to walk away empowered and know that they want to get involved.”

The Colorado Environmental Film Festival is returning to Golden for its 12th year. This year, there will be 56 movies screened, all of which tackle important environmental issues.


February 15, 2018

Denver Herald 11

THINGS to DO THEATER

Evil Dead: The Musical: through Feb. 17 at The Bug Theatre, 3654 Navajo St., Denver. Presented by Equinox Theatre Company. Performances at 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Parking is free. Go to www. EquinoxTheatreDenver.com. Recommended for mature audiences. Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde: 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays from Feb. 17 to March 17 at the John Hand Theatre, 7653 E. 1st Place, Denver. True stories of the three trials of England’s most celebrated playwright. Call 303-5623232 or go to www.FirehouseTheaterCompany.com. Guys and Dolls: 7:30 p.m. Feb. 22-24, March 1-3; 2:30 p.m. March 4 at Eugenia Rawls Courtyard Theatre, King Center Auraria Campus. No children under 5. Reservations recommended. Call 303-566-2296. Respect: A Musical Journey of Women: 7 p.m. Thursdays, 7:30 p.m. Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays through Feb. 25 at Mizel Arts and Culture Center, 350 S. Dahlia St., Denver. Additional shows at 7 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 18 and Feb. 25. Call 303-800-6578 or go to www.cherrycreektheatre.org. Jotunheim: A Legend of Thor and His Hammer: 8 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays, and 2 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays, from Feb. 22 to April 8 at the BiTSY Stage, 1137 S. Huron St., Denver. No show March 29 to April 1. Thor’s hammer has gone missing and clever Loki devises a plot to get it back. Admission is free. Donations accepted. Reservations are required at www.bitsystage. com or call 720-328-5294. No late seating. Sorcerer’s Apprentice and Sleeping Beauty Suite: 3 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 24 and Sunday, Feb. 25 at Cleo Parker Robinson Theatre, 119 Park Avenue West, Denver. Tickets available at www.balletariel.org or call 303-945-4388. A Little Tea Party with Princess Aurora and other costumed cast members follows the performance. Storybooks on Stage: 10:30 a.m. Saturday, March 3 at McNichos Civic Center Building, 144 W. Colfax Ave., Denver. Call 303-4940523 or go to www.storiesonstage.org for tickets.

ART

Basic Sewing for Adults: 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 17 at Anythink Perl Mack, 7611 Hilltop Circle, Denver. Learn how to sew with our team of sewists. The first hour will be spent on mending, so bring something that is in need of repair. Then, we will complete a new project. Appropriate for adults. Space is limited; registration encouraged. Call 303-405-3576 or go to anythinklibraries.org.

Tweens & Straws: 5-6 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 27 at Anythink Perl Mack, 7611 Hilltop Circle, Denver. Gather with friends and learn to make clever contraptions. For tweens and teens. No registration required. Call 303405-3576 or go to anythinklibraries.org.

FOOD

Perl Mack Snacks, Marshmallow Pops: 5-6 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 22 at Anythink Perl Mack, 7611 Hilltop Circle, Denver. Dip in and top off some marshmallows for a sweet treat. For tweens and teens. No registration required. Call 303-405-3576 or go to anythinklibraries.org.

EVENTS

Library for All: Creative Club: 10-11 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 15 at Eloise May Library, 1471 Parker Road, Denver. Let’s celebrate creativity and individuality at this program designed especially for our community with developmental or intellectual disabilities and their caregivers, but all patrons are welcome to participate. Enjoy crafts, art creation, story times, games, musical play, library exploration and more. Go to arapahoelibraries.org. Denver Veterans Writing Workshop: 2:30 p.m. Sundays, Feb. 18, March 11, April 15 and May 20 at the Denver Public Library Central Branch, 10 W. 14th Avenue Parkway. To sign up, or for more information, go to https:// coloradohumanities.submittable.com/ submit/89122/denver-veterans-war-stories. Contact Jason Arment at Jason@coloradohumanities.org or call/text 619-663-5247. Go to www.coloradohumanities.org. Sissy Bear at The Fort: 6-7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 22 at the Denver Women’s Press Clubhouse, 1325 Logan St., Denver. How did a real bear come to live at the famous Colorado restaurant? Enjoy a reading from the children’s book by Holly Arnold Kinney. Contact 303-839-1519 or dwpconline.org. JeffCo International Women’s Day: 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Thursday, March 8 at Baldoria on the Water, 146 S. Van Gordon St., Lakewood. Keynote speaker is Brynn Watson, vice president of navigation systems operations at Lockheed Martin Space Systems Co. Find out winners of Girls in STEM, Innovator Woman of the Year and Volunteer Woman of the Year contests. Go to https://www. ixpowerfoundation.org/women-s-day/.

EDUCATION

Argentina: 2-3 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 15 at Windsor Gardens, 597 S. Clinton St., Denver. Join Active Minds as we review Argentina’s history, culture, current status, and future prospects. No RSVP required. Spain: 3-4 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 15 at RossUniversity Hills Library, 4310 E. Amherst Ave., Denver. Join Active Minds as we explore the roots and legacy of the Spanish Empire and how this important country fits into the regional and global puzzle today. No RSVP required. South Korea: 1:30-2:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 21 at Washington Street Community Center, 809 S. Washington St., Denver. Join Active Minds as we explore the country of South Korea, past, present, and future. Call 303-733-4643 ext. 100.

North Korea: 6:45-7:45 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 22 at Sam Gary Library, 2961 Roslyn St, Denver. Join Active Minds for a discussion of recent developments as well as a review of North Korean history. STEM Conference for Girls: 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 24 at the University of Colorado, Boulder Engineering Center. For girls in 6th, 7th and 8th grades. Expanding Your Horizons attendees will learn about careers involving engineering, math, science and technology through a day of hands-on workshops. An adult program running at the same time focuses on strategies for supporting girls’ academic success and paying for college. Register at www.expandingyourhorizons.org/conferences/Boulder. Iceland: 2:30-3:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 26 at Springbrooke, 6800 Leetsdale Drive, Denver. Active Minds program. Seating is limited; RSVP required. Call 303-331-9963.

Muhammad Ali: 5-6 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 27 at Tattered Cover, 2526 E. Colfax Ave., Denver. Join Active Minds as we review the life and legacy of the man often referred to simply as “The Greatest.” Call 303-322-7727 to RSVP.

HEALTH

Senior Living Lunch and Learn: 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 21 at Porter Place, 1001 E. Yale Ave., Denver. An overview of senior living - what does it cost, how is it paid for, what is covered by insurance, and more. For the retired Littleton Nurses Group and their friends. RSVP at 303-765-6805. Editor’s note: Calendar submissions must be received by noon Thursday for publication the following week. Send listings to calendar@coloradocommunitymedia.com. No attachments, please. Listings are free and run on a space-available basis.


12 Denver Herald

February 15, 2018

With early start this season, flu hammers much of nation Experts unsure why strain similar to last year’s is hitting so many people BY MIKE STOBBE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sick with the flu? You’ve got a lot of company. The flu has continued to blanket the U.S., with only Hawaii being spared. In late January, one in 15 doctor visits were for symptoms of the flu. That’s the highest level since the swine flu pandemic in 2009. The government doesn’t track every flu case but comes up with estimates; one measure is how many people seek medical care for fever, cough, aches and other flu symptoms. Flu is widespread, with 39 states reporting high traffic to doctors in late January, up from 32. At this rate, by the end of the season somewhere around 34 million Americans will have gotten sick from the flu, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Jan. 26. Some good news: Hospital stays and deaths from the flu among the elderly so far haven’t been as high as in some other recent flu seasons. However, hospitalization rates for people 50 to 64 — baby boomers, mostly — has been unusually high, CDC officials said in the report, which covers the week ending Jan. 20. A New York pediatrician said her office has been busy but the kids with the flu haven’t been quite as sick as in the past. “For most of them, their symptoms are milder,” said Dr. Tiffany Knipe. This year’s flu shot targets the strains that are making Americans sick, mostly the H3N2 flu virus. But exactly how well it is working won’t be known until next

month. It’s the same main bug from last winter, when the flu season wasn’t so bad. It’s not clear why this season — with the same bug — is worse, some experts said. “That’s the kicker. This virus really doesn’t look that different from what we saw last year,” said Richard Webby, a flu researcher at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis. It may be that many of the people getting sick this year managed to avoid infection last year. Or there may be some change in the virus that hasn’t been detected yet, said the CDC’s Dr. Dan Jernigan, in a call with reporters. Based on patterns from past seasons, it’s likely the flu season will start to wane soon, experts say. There are some places, like California, where the season already seems to be easing, CDC officials said. “If I was a betting man, I’d put money on it going down,” Webby said. “But I’ve lost money on bets before.” The season usually peaks in February, but this season started early and took off in December. Flu is a contagious respiratory illness. It can cause a miserable but relatively mild illness in many people, but more a more severe illness in others. Young children and the elderly are at greatest risk from flu and its complications. In a bad season, there are as many as 56,000 deaths connected to the flu. In the U.S., annual flu shots are recommended for everyone age 6 months or older. Last season, about 47 percent of Americans got vaccinated, according to CDC figures. Jennifer Manton didn’t get a flu shot and got sick about three weeks ago, hit by high fever and body aches. She missed two days of work at a New York law firm, and felt bad for about 10 days. “I had not had the flu since 1996,” said the 48-year-old Manton. “It’s been 22 years since I felt that badly.”

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Denver Herald 13

February 15, 2018

Dancers, musicians convey modern mythology `Aphrodite’s Switchboard’ shows varying outcomes of magical bid to foster love

IF YOU GO Performances of “Aphrodite’s Switchboard” began at the Pinnacle Charter School Performing Arts Complex in Federal Heights and will continue in upcoming performances: Feb. 17 (7:30 p.m.) and Feb. 18 (2 p.m.) at the PACE Center, Parker, 20000 Pikes Peak Ave, Parker. Tickets: 303-805-6800, parkerarts.org. The final performance will be Feb. 24 (7 p.m.) at the Newman Center, 2344 E. Iliff Ave., Denver. Parking garage entry from Wesley Avenue, just west of South University Boulevard. 303-8716200, newmancenterpresents.com.

BY SONYA ELLINGBOE SELLINGBOE@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Garrett Ammon, choreographer/director of Wonderbound contemporary dance company, has again collaborated with the Denver psychedelic folk band Chimney Choir (the two companies previously produced the popular “Boomtown”), to produce a new artistic creation: “Aphrodite’s Switchboard,” which appears in three area theaters to herald spring, Valentine messages and looks at assorted human relationships. Described as “a full length evening of theatrical dance,” it will feature the company’s remarkable dancers and music compiled in a new album that features folk harmonies and instrumental melodies to create a landscape for masterful storytelling through Feb. 2, in conjunction with the versatile band. That earthly landscape, set in the 1930s era, looks dreary to the gods on Mount Olympus, so they send Aphrodite, goddess of love, desire and beauty — accompanied by Hermes (messenger of the gods and sometime trickster, with winged feet and helmet) — to bring love back to the world. The goddess soon finds a job as a switchboard operator and begins to

Members of Wonderbound contemporary dance company perform in its latest story in dance: ‘Aphrodite’s Switchboard’ in Parker and Denver, with music by the psychedelic folk band, Chimney Choir. AMANDA TIPTON connect people — with varying results. Ammon said the new project “pushed all of us into new territory while exploring themes that have captivated humanity through the ages. This production is a great example of the magical possibilities that arise through the collaborative process.” The band’s Kevin Larkin speaks of “new composition techniques and orchestration.” A cabin in Fairplay offered the musicians an opportunity to create new music, away from city distractions. An exploration of conveying ancient mythological tales with contemporary music offered new experiences — and the first band produc-

tion with Greek mythology as source. Formerly known as Ballet Nouveau, Wonderbound’s company began to change with Ammon’s arrival in 2007 — and his penchant for using live music. In 2012, the name Wonderbound and a symbol of a jumping red hare were adopted and the company moved its headquarters to Denver from Broomfield. (Check the website for announcements of performances and open rehearsals in this urban studio.) Chimney Choir began in 2011 with guitar, banjo, mandolin and suitcase drum and have toured nationally, while developing “layers of electronics, live looping and percussion. They remain fascinated with folk music and traditions while they constantly evolve and experiment …” Watch for the next Wonderbound production — with members of the Colorado Symphony — in April/May: “Madness, Rack and Honey.”

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NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Frances Moreno, Deceased Case No.: 18PR30023

Notice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of William Ivey, aka William S. Ivey, aka William Shawn Ivey, Deceased Case Number: 2017 PR 031453

All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before June 15, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred. Heather Hudson-Kimball Personal Representative c/o 3i Law 3900 E. Mexico Avenue, Suite 530 Denver, Colorado 80210 Legal Notice No: 8338 First Publication: February 15, 2018 Last Publication: March 1, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch Public Notice NOTICE OF HEARING BY PUBLICATION PURSUANT TO § 15-10-401, C.R.S. ESTATE OF TANJA DEL CARMEN RAMSEY Case No. 2017PR31325 To All Interested Persons: A hearing on Petition for Formal Probate of Will and Formal Appointment of Personal Representative is set at the following date, time and location or at a later date to which the hearing may be continued: Date: March 1, 2018 Time: 8:00 a.m. Address: Denver Probate Court, 1437 Bannock Street, Room 230, Denver, CO 80202 George M. Eck III (#48001) Feldmann Nagel, LLC P.O. Box 775628 Steamboat Springs, CO 80477 Legal Notice No.: 8225 First Publication: February 1, 2018 Last Publication: February 15, 2018 Publisher: Denver Herald Dispatch Public Notice NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Barbra Austin Telfair, a/k/a Barbra A. Telfair, a/k/a Barbra Telfair , Deceased Case Number: 2018PR30008 All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before June 1, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred. Samuel F. Telfair, Personal Representative 841 Elati Street Denver, CO 80204 Legal Notice No.: 8226 First Publication: February 1, 2018 Last Publication: February 15, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch Public Notice NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of MARY BONIFACE MEDINA-MARTINEZ, Deceased Case Number: 2017PR0543 All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before June 1, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred. /s/ Mary Nathan Mary Nathan Attorney to the Personal Representative 8441 W. Bowles Ave., #240 Littleton, CO 80123 Legal Notice No.: 8318 First Publication: February 1, 2018 Last Publication: February 15, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch Public Notice NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Frances Moreno, Deceased Case No.: 18PR30023 All persons having claims against the above named estate are required to present them to the personal representative or to the Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before June 1, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred. /s/ original signature on file in office of Palmer, Goertzel & Associates, P.C. Virginia Del Castillo, Applicant 4740 Saulsbury Street

All persons having claims against the above named estate are required to present them to the personal representative or to the Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before June 1, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred.

Notice To Creditors

/s/ original signature on file in office of Palmer, Goertzel & Associates, P.C. Virginia Del Castillo, Applicant 4740 Saulsbury Street Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 Christopher Moreno, Applicant 3241 West Alaska Denver, CO 80219

Legal Notice No.: 8319 First Publication: February 1, 2018 Last Publication: February 15, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch Public Notice NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of ELEENE MARY SCOTT also known as ELEENE M. SCOTT, and ELEENE SCOTT, Deceased Case Number: 2018PR30103 All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the Denver Probate Court, Colorado on or before June 8, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred. Dale J. Scott Personal Representative 9009 East Nassau Avenue Denver, Colorado 80237 Legal Notice No.: 8327 First Publication: February 8, 2018 Last Publication: February 22, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch Public Notice NOTICE TO CREDITORS Michael Manual Hazelwood, aka Michael M. Hazelwood, aka Michael Hazelwood, Deceased Case Number: 2018PR30045 All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before June 8, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred. Tasha L. Hazelwood Personal Representative c/o Pearman Law Firm 4195 Wadsworth Blvd. Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 Legal Notice No.: 8329 First Publication: February 8, 2018 Last Publication: February 22, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch Public Notice NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Doris E. Dwinell, Deceased. Case Number: 18 PR 30001 All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before June 30, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred. Robert M. Waldo Attorney for Personal Representative 2314 W. 17th Street Greeley, CO 80634 Kathryn D. Panteloglow Personal Representative 1480 S. Decantur Denver, CO 80219 Legal Notice No.: 8330 First Publication: February 8, 2018 Last Publication: February 22, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch Public Notice NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Patricia Jeannine Bohm, aka Patricia J. Bohm, aka Patty J. Bohm aka Pat Bohm, Deceased Case Number: 2017 PR 031461 All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or the Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado or before June 15, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred. Sharon Bohm, Personal Representative 1535 Jasmine Street Denver, Colorado 80220 Legal Notice No.: 8332 First Publication: February 15, 2018 Last Publication: March 1, 2018 Publisher: Denver Herald Dispatch Public Notice NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Corabelle Chadbourne Jensen, Deceased. Case Number: 2018PR30099

NoticePublic To Notice Creditors NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Corabelle Chadbourne Jensen, Deceased. Case Number: 2018PR30099 All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the Denver Probate Court on or before June 15, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred. ss/original signature on file in attorney’s office Erin E. Hickey, Attorney for Personal Representative The Hickey Law Firm, LLC 12600 West Colfax Avenue Suite C-400 Lakewood, Colorado 80215 (303)935-2701 Legal Notice No.: 8333 First Publication: February 15, 2018 Last Publication: March 1, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch Public Notice NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of ELLEN KARSH, Deceased Case Number: 2018PR30143

February 15, 2018

Denver Probate Court Denver County, Colorado 1437 Bannock Street, Room 230 Denver, Colorado 80202 In the Matter of the Estate of: GERALDINE SPEAR

Attorney or Party Without Attorney: Peter D. Van Soest, Attorney for Petitioner 2121 South 0neida Street, Suite 600 Public Notice Denver, Colorado 80224 Phone Number: 303-756-2277To advertise your public notices call 303-566-4100 District Court, Denver County, Colorado FAX Number: 303-756-4308 1437 Bannock Street, Room 256 Atty. Reg. #: 4220 Case Number: 2017PR031044 Filed in Denver District Court, Denver, Colorado, September 5, 2017 NOTICE OF HEARING BY PUBLICATION PURSUANT TO §15-10-401, C.R.S. In re the Marriage of: Yesenia Gutierrez, Petitioner To: Ross Spear, William Spear, and Jose A. Perez Contrerar, Respondent: Ronald Spear, and, Susan Spear Last Known Address, if any: Unknown,: Party Without Attorney: Yesenia Gutierrez -- 720-461-0132 Ross Spear, heir, nephew of son of Decedent’s, Case Number:2017DR2371 Courtroom: 311 sister, Catherine William Doman William Spear, Son, nephew of Decedent’s SUMMONS FOR: DISSOLUTION brother, William Spear OF MARRIAGE Ronald Spear, Son, nephew of Decedent’s To the Respondent named above, this brother, William Spear Summons serves as a notice to appear in Susan Spear, niece of Decedent’s brother, this case. William Spear

Notice To Creditors

Misc. Private Legals

Efforts have been made to locate these heirs by searching the Internet, phone directories, and other sources with negative results,.

If you were served in the State of Colorado, you must file your Response with the clerk of this Court within 21 days after this Summons is served on you to participate in this action.

A hearing on Petitioner’s Petition for Formal Probate and Former Appointment of Personal Representative. Petitioner, Victor Kritz, has filed a Petition with the Court requesting that be appointed as Personal Representative of the Estate of Geraldine Spear in order that he can administer her estate. (Hearing) will be held at the following time and location or at a later date to which the hearing may be continued: Date: Time: Courtroom or Division: Address:

If you were served outside of the State of Colorado or you were served by publication, you must file your Response with the clerk of this Court within 35 days after this Summons is served on you to participate in this action. You may be required to pay a filing fee with your Response. The Response form (JDF 1103) can be found at www.courts.state.co.us by clicking on the “Self Help/Forms” tab.

PUBLIC NOTICE

After 91 days from the date of service or publication, the Court may enter a Decree affecting your marital status, distribution of property and debts, issues involving children such as child support, allocation of parental responsibilities (decision-making and parenting time), maintenance (spousal support), attorney fees, and costs to the extent the Court has jurisdiction.

Lawrence I. Karsh Personal Representative 7 Mountain View Road Greenwood Village, Colorado 80111

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Lucille S. Rosenfeld, aka Lucille Rosenfeld, Deceased Case Number: 2018 PR 30033

If you fail to file a Response in this case, any or all of the matters above, or any related matters which come before this Court, may be decided without further notice to you.

Legal Notice No.: 8334 First Publication: February 15, 2018 Last Publication: March 1, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch

All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before June 1, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred.

This is an action to obtain a Decree of: Dissolution of Marriage or Legal Separation as more fully described in the attached Petition, and if you have children, for orders regarding the children of the marriage.

All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before June 15, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred.

Public Notice NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of CHARLOTTE ANN ITO, aka CHARLOTTE A. ITO, Deceased Case Number: 2018PR000062 All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before June 15, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred. Rodney Conover, Sr., Personal Representative 38 Road 3142, Aztec, NM 87410 Legal Notice No.: 8335 First Publication: February 15, 2018 Last Publication: March 1, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch Public Notice NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of GENE MILTON TUCKER, a/k/a GENE M. TUCKER, a/k/a GENE TUCKER, Deceased Case Number: 2018PR030127 All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to Denver Probate Court of the City & County of Denver, State of Colorado on or before June 15, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred. Shelley Thompson, Esq. on behalf of the Personal Representative for the Estate of Gene Milton Tucker Burns, Figa & Will, P.C. 6400 S. Fiddlers Green Circle, #1000 Greenwood Village, CO 80111 (303) 796-2626 Legal Notice No.: 8339 First Publication: February 15, 2018 Last Publication: March 1, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch Public Notice Denver Probate Court Denver County, Colorado 1437 Bannock Street, Room 230 Denver, Colorado 80202 In the Matter of the Estate of: GERALDINE SPEAR Attorney or Party Without Attorney: Peter D. Van Soest, Attorney for Petitioner 2121 South 0neida Street, Suite 600 Denver, Colorado 80224 Phone Number: 303-756-2277 FAX Number: 303-756-4308 Atty. Reg. #: 4220 Case Number: 2017PR031044 NOTICE OF HEARING BY PUBLICATION PURSUANT TO §15-10-401, C.R.S. To: Ross Spear, William Spear, Ronald Spear, and, Susan Spear Last Known Address, if any: Unknown,:

Legal Notice No.: 8336 First Publication: February 15, 2018 Last Publication: March 1, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch

Sigmund J. Rosenfeld Personal Representative Katz, Look & Onorato, P.C. 1120 Lincoln Street, Suite 1100 Denver, Colorado 80203 Legal Notice No: 8317 First Publication: February 1, 2018 Last Publication: February 15, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of June V. Dominguez, Deceased Case Number: 2018 PR 30061 All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before June 1, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred. Derick D. Dominguez Personal Representative 6 Larkdale Drive Littleton, Colorado 80123 Legal Notice No: 8323 First Publication: February 1, 2018 Last Publication: February 15, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Patricia B. Paull, Deceased Case Number: 2017 PR 31581 All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before June 1, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred. James F. Paull Personal Representative 363 S. Pontiac Way Denver, Colorado 80237 Legal Notice No: 8324 First Publication: February 1, 2018 Last Publication: February 15, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch

Misc. Private Legals Public Notice District Court, Denver County, Colorado 1437 Bannock Street, Room 256 Filed in Denver District Court, Denver, Colorado, September 5, 2017 In re the Marriage of: Yesenia Gutierrez, Petitioner and Jose A. Perez Contrerar, Respondent:

Notice: §14-10-107, C.R.S. provides that upon the filing of a Petition for Dissolution of Marriage or Legal Separation by the Petitioner and CoPetitioner, or upon personal service of the Petition and Summons on the Respondent, or upon waiver and acceptance of service by the Respondent, an automatic temporary injunction shall be in effect against both parties until the Final Decree is entered, or the Petition is dismissed, or until further Order of the Court. Either party may apply to the Court for further temporary orders, an expanded temporary injunction, or modification or revocation under §14-10-108, C.R.S.

A request for genetic tests shall not prejudice the requesting party in matters concerning allocation of parental responsibilities pursuant to §14-10-124(1.5), C.R.S. If genetic tests are not obtained prior to a legal establishment of paternity and submitted into evidence prior to the entry of the final decree of dissolution or legal separation, the genetic tests may not be allowed into evidence at a later date.

Automatic Temporary Injunction – By Order of Colorado Law, You and Your Spouse are:

1. Restrained from transferring, encumbering, concealing or in any way disposing of, without the consent of the other party or an Order of the Court, any marital property, except in the usual course of business or for the necessities of life. Each party is required to notify the other party of any proposed extraordinary expenditures and to account to the Court for all extraordinary expenditures made after the injunction is in effect; 2. Enjoined from molesting or disturbing the peace of the other party; 3. Restrained from removing the minor children of the parties, if any, from the State without the consent of the other party or an Order of the Court; and

4. Restrained without at least 14 days advance notification and the written consent of the other party or an Order of the Court, from canceling, modifying, terminating, or allowing to lapse for nonpayment of premiums, any policy of health insurance, homeowner’s or renter’s insurance, or automobile insurance that provides coverage to either of the parties or the minor children or any policy of life insurance that names either of the parties or the minor children as a beneficiary. Date: September 5, 2017 /s/ Signature of the Clerk of Court/Deputy Legal Notice No.: 8310 First Publication: January 18, 2018 Last Publication: February 15, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch Public Notice NOTICE OF DEFAULT AND FORECLOSURE SALE

WHEREAS, on February 20, 2003, a certain Deed of Trust was executed by Frankie Dee Hosea, as Grantor, in favor of Financial Freedom Senior Funding Corporation, a Subsidiary

Denver Herald * 1


Hosea, as Grantor, in favor of Financial Freedom Senior Funding Corporation, a Subsidiary of Lehman Brothers Bank, FSB as Beneficiary, and the Public Trustee of Denver County, Colorado as Trustee, and was recorded on March 5, 2003, at Reception Number 2003035313 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of the County of Denver, Colorado; and

February 15, 2018

SLOT FROM PAGE 1

ADDITION, CITY AND OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO.

Denver Herald 15

Commonly known as: 2260 Poplar St., Denver, CO 80207 The sale will be held at 2260 Poplar St., Denver, CO 80207

WHEREAS, the Deed of Trust was insured by the United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (the Secretary) pursuant to the National Housing Act for the purpose of providing single family housing; and

The Secretary of Housing and Urban Development will bid the lesser amount of the loan balance or the appraised value obtained by the Secretary prior to sale.

veying fees, all real estate and other taxes that are due on or after the delivery date of the remainder of the payment and all other costs associated with the transfer of title. At the conclusion of the sale, the deposits of the unsuccessful bidders will be returned to them.

service of this notice of default and foreclosure sale, or all amounts due under the mortgage agreement are tendered to the Foreclosure Commissioner, in the form of a certified cashier’s check payable to the Secretary of HUD, before the public auction of the property is completed.

4915 W 17th Ave., Denver, Denver County, CO 80204. Public comments regarding potential effects from this site on historic properties may be submitted within 30 days from the date of this publication to: Trileaf Corp, Alex Grigsby, a.grigsby@trileaf.com, 10845 Olive Blvd, Suite 260, St. Louis, MO 63141, 314-997-6111.

The amount that must be paid if the mortgage is to be reinstated prior to the scheduled sale is $275,196.44 as of January 9, 2018, plus all other amounts that would be due under the mortgage agreement if payments under the deed of trust had not been accelerated, advertising costs and postage expenses incurred in giving notice, mileage by the most reasonable road distance for posting notices and for the Foreclosure Commissioner’s attendance at the sale, reasonable and customary costs incurred for title and lien record searches, the necessary out of pocket costs incurred by the Foreclosure Commissioner, and all other costs incurred in connection with the foreclosure prior to reinstatement.

Legal Notice No.: 8337 First Publication: February 15, 2018 Last Publication: February 15, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch

But it’s happening in Denver There will be no proration of taxes, rents or other income or liabilities, except that the purWHEREAS, the beneficial interest of the Deed because it’s a way to increase chaser will pay, at or before closing, his proof Trust is now owned by the Secretary, pursuthe marketable space you can build rated share of any real estate taxes that have ant to an assignment recorded on May 18, 2010 been paid by the Secretary to the date of the at Reception Number 2010053937 in the office on a property while still selling units foreclosure sale. of the Clerk and Recorder of the County of Denver, Colorado. separately and avoiding potential When making their bids, all bidders except the WHEREAS, a default has been made in the covconstruction-defect litigation. Secretary must submit a deposit totaling 10% of enants and conditions of the Deed of Trust in the Secretary’s bid in the form of a certified that Paragraph 9 (a) (i) has been violated; and Now, the city has developed a set check or cashier’s check made out to the Secof rules to prevent the construction retary of HUD. A deposit need not be accomWHEREAS, the entire amount delinquent is pany each oral bid. If the successful bid is oral, $275,196.44 as of January 9, 2018; and of new slot homes. They’re on track a deposit of 10% of the Secretary’s bid must be presented before the bidding is closed. The deWHEREAS, by virtue of this default, the Secretto implement that new law in May — posit is nonrefundable. The remainder of the ary has declared th e entire amount of the inbut that’s not fast enough for some. purchase price must be delivered within 30 days debtedness secured by the Deed of Trust to be of the sale or at such other time as the Secretimmediately due and payable; Council members Wayne New and ary may determine for good cause shown, time Rafael Espinoza want the city to shut being of the essence. This amount, like the bid NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to the powers deposits, must be delivered in the form of a cervested in me by the Single Family Mortgage the door on slot homes nearly two tified or cashier’s check. If the Secretary is the Foreclosure Act of 1994, 12 U.S.C. 3751 et highest bidder, he need not pay the bid amount seq., by 24 CFR part 27, subpart B, and by the months earlier. Under a new proin cash. The successful bidder will pay all conSecretary’s designation of me as Foreclosure posal, Denver would stop accepting veying fees, all real estate and other taxes that Commissioner, recorded on July 19, 2017 at Reare due on or after the delivery date of the reception No. 2017094067, notice is hereby given developers’ design applications for mainder of the payment and all other costs asthat on February 26, 2018 at 11:00 a.m. local sociated with the transfer of title. At the conclutime, all real and personal property at or used in Public Notice slot homes at 4:30 p.m. on March 14. sion of the sale, the deposits of the unsuccessconnection with the following described “It effectively ends the use of the ful bidders will be returned to them. premises (“Property”) will be sold at public aucNOTICE OF DEFAULT tion to the highest bidder: slot home form in its most egregious AND FORECLOSURE SALE The Secretary may grant an extension of time way sooner rather than later, which within which to deliver the remainder of the payLOT 3 AND 4, BLOCK 32, EXCEPT THE REAR WHEREAS, on February 20, 2003, a certain ment. All extension will be for 15-day incre8 FEET THEREOF, CHAMBERLIN’S COLFAX of Trust was executed by Frankie Dee in the public’s view can’t happenDeed ments for a fee of $500.00, paid in advance. The ADDITION, CITY AND OF DENVER, STATE Hosea, as Grantor, in favor of Financial Freeextension fee shall be in the form of certified or OF COLORADO. dom Senior Funding Corporation, a Subsidiary soon enough and should have hapcashier’s check made payable to the Secretary of Lehman Brothers Bank, FSB as Beneficiary, pened years ago, to be quite honest,” of HUD. If the high bidder closes the sale prior Commonly known as: 2260 Poplar St., and the Public Trustee of Denver County, Colorto the expiration of any extension period, the unDenver, CO 80207 ado as Trustee, and was recorded on March 5, Espinoza said. used portion of the extension fee shall be ap2003, at Reception Number 2003035313 in the plied toward the amount due. The city’s Slot Home Task Force office of the Clerk and Recorder of the County of The sale will be held at 2260 Poplar St., Denver, Colorado; and Denver, CO 80207 voted unanimously in support of the If the high bidder is unable to close the sale within the required period, or within any extenWHEREAS, the Deed of Trust was insured by The Secretary of Housing and Urban Developchange. Even the developers on the sions of time granted by the Secretary, the high the United States Secretary of Housing and Urbment will bid the lesser amount of the loan balcommittee agreed, likely becausean Development (the Secretary) pursuant to the ance or the appraised value obtained by the bidder may be required to forfeit the cash deposit, or at the election of the foreclosure comNational Housing Act for the purpose of providSecretary prior to sale. they feared that the city council could missioner after consultation with the HUD reping single family housing; and resentative, will be liable to HUD for any costs There will be no proration of taxes, rents or othtake a harsher action instead. incurred as a result of such failure. The ComWHEREAS, the beneficial interest of the Deed er income or liabilities, except that the purThe Denver City Council still has to is now owned by the Secretary, pursu- chaser will pay, at or before closing, his pro- missioner may, at the direction of the HUD repof Trust resentative, offer the property to the second to an assignment recorded on May 18, 2010 ratedAvenue share of any real estate taxes KEVIN that have approve the new moratorium. ant A “slot” development on 18th in West Colfax. J. BEATY highest bidder for an amount equal to the at Reception Number 2010053937 in the office been paid by the Secretary to the date of the Slot homes became popular because highest price offered by that bidder. of the Clerk and Recorder of the County of Denforeclosure sale. ver, Colorado. they’re a way to fit the maximumWHEREAS, There is no right of redemption, or right of posWhen making their bids, all bidders except the a default has been made in the covbased uponresidenca right of redemption, in the must submit a deposit totaling 10% of tssession of the Deed this,” of Trust in However, Denver could see new slot maximize profi for certain unhappy with saidSecretary Ty Mumamount of building space onto a enants and conditions mortgagor or others subsequent to a foreclosthe Secretary’s bid in the form of a certified that Paragraph 9 (a) (i) has been violated; and homes for years to come — develop—outtownhomes and row-homes, ford, a developer who also is or oncashier’s the check es given piece of land. If developers ure completed pursuant to he the Act. Therefore, check made to the SecForeclosure a Deed retary of HUD. A deposit said. need not be accomWHEREAS, slot the entire amount delinquent have the option to hold on to The zoningthe code will Commissioner still allowwill issueers home task force,isin an earlier can’t build sideways “slot” units,$275,196.44 to the purchaser(s) upon receipt of the entire pany each oral bid. If the successful bid is oral, as of January 9, 2018; and purchase price in accordance with the already terms of a deposit of 10% of the Secretary’s bid mustto be build approved plans and build developers larger, denser interview. they might have to shrink a typical sale as provided herein, HUD does not guarpresented before the bidding is closed. The deWHEREAS, by virtue of this default, the Secretbuildings inthethe the form Some also have questioned complex from 12 residences to 11ary antee thatof thecondos property willand be vacant. them later. posit iswhether nonrefundable. The remainder of has declared th e entire amount of the inprice must be delivered within 30 days debtedness secured by the Deedwill of Trust to be thepurchase apartments. the changes hurt housing residences. The scheduled foreclosure sale shall be canof the sale or at such other time as the Secretimmediately due and payable; is an online local news An earlier kill celled dateormay prevent supply by reducing the number of for good cause “It will create a better product, adjourned if it is established, by Denverite docuPublic Notice ary may determine shown, time mented written application of the mortgagor to being of the essence. This amount, like the bid NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to the powers some slot homes from being built, units that are built. but I do think that real-estate wise, source for everything you need to know the Foreclosure Commissioner no less than Cellco Partnership and its controlled affiliates deposits, must be delivered in the form of a cervested in me by the Single Family Mortgage three (3) days before theand date of sale, or other- Denver doing business as Verizon Wireless (Verizon tified is or cashier’s the Secretary the Foreclosure ActEspinoza of 1994, 12 U.S.C. 3751 et this it alsoismay cost developers argues that not check. Ifand there’s going to be a couple hundred about in 5 minutes. Visit denwise, that the default or defaults upon which the Wireless) proposes to build a 31-foot CityPole highest bidder, he need not pay the bid amount seq., by 24 CFR part 27, subpart B, and by the landwillsellers someforeclosure potential revenue. the case.of Slot are just aThe way to bidder land sellers that are going to be very foratmore. is based did not exist at theverite.com/subscribe time of Communications Tower the approx. vicinity of Secretary’s designation me as homes Foreclosure in cash. successful pay all conPublic Notice

Misc. Private Legals NOTICE OF DEFAULT AND FORECLOSURE SALE

Commissioner, recorded on July 19, 2017 at Reception No. 2017094067, notice is hereby given that on February 26, 2018 at 11:00 a.m. local time, all real and personal property at or used in connection with the following described premises (“Property”) will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder:

Misc. Private Legals

WHEREAS, on February 20, 2003, a certain Deed of Trust was executed by Frankie Dee Hosea, as Grantor, in favor of Financial Freedom Senior Funding Corporation, a Subsidiary of Lehman Brothers Bank, FSB as Beneficiary, and the Public Trustee of Denver County, Colorado as Trustee, and was recorded on March 5, 2003, at Reception Number 2003035313 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of the County of Denver, Colorado; and

LOT 3 AND 4, BLOCK 32, EXCEPT THE REAR 8 FEET THEREOF, CHAMBERLIN’S COLFAX ADDITION, CITY AND OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO.

WHEREAS, the Deed of Trust was insured by the United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (the Secretary) pursuant to the National Housing Act for the purpose of providing single family housing; and

The Secretary of Housing and Urban Development will bid the lesser amount of the loan balance or the appraised value obtained by the Secretary prior to sale.

WHEREAS, the beneficial interest of the Deed of Trust is now owned by the Secretary, pursuant to an assignment recorded on May 18, 2010 at Reception Number 2010053937 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of the County of Denver, Colorado. WHEREAS, a default has been made in the covenants and conditions of the Deed of Trust in that Paragraph 9 (a) (i) has been violated; and WHEREAS, the entire amount delinquent is $275,196.44 as of January 9, 2018; and WHEREAS, by virtue of this default, the Secretary has declared the entire amount of the indebtedness secured by the Deed of Trust to be immediately due and payable;

NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to the powers vested in me by the Single Family Mortgage Foreclosure Act of 1994, 12 U.S.C. 3751 et seq., by 24 CFR part 27, subpart B, and by the Secretary’s designation of me as Foreclosure Commissioner, recorded on July 19, 2017 at Reception No. 2017094067, notice is hereby given that on February 26, 2018 at 11:00 a.m. local time, all real and personal property at or used in connection with the following described premises (“Property”) will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder:

LOT 3 AND 4, BLOCK 32, EXCEPT THE REAR 8 FEET THEREOF, CHAMBERLIN’S COLFAX ADDITION, CITY AND OF DENVER, STATE OF COLORADO.

Commonly known as: 2260 Poplar St., Denver, CO 80207 The sale will be held at 2260 Poplar St., Denver, CO 80207

There will be no proration of taxes, rents or other income or liabilities, except that the purchaser will pay, at or before closing, his prorated share of any real estate taxes that have been paid by the Secretary to the date of the foreclosure sale. When making their bids, all bidders except the Secretary must submit a deposit totaling 10% of the Secretary’s bid in the form of a certified check or cashier’s check made out to the Secretary of HUD. A deposit need not be accompany each oral bid. If the successful bid is oral, a deposit of 10% of the Secretary’s bid must be presented before the bidding is closed. The deposit is nonrefundable. The remainder of the purchase price must be delivered within 30 days of the sale or at such other time as the Secretary may determine for good cause shown, time being of the essence. This amount, like the bid deposits, must be delivered in the form of a certified or cashier’s check. If the Secretary is the highest bidder, he need not pay the bid amount in cash. The successful bidder will pay all conveying fees, all real estate and other taxes that are due on or after the delivery date of the remainder of the payment and all other costs associated with the transfer of title. At the conclusion of the sale, the deposits of the unsuccessful bidders will be returned to them. The Secretary may grant an extension of time within which to deliver the remainder of the payment. All extension will be for 15-day increments for a fee of $500.00, paid in advance. The extension fee shall be in the form of certified or cashier’s check made payable to the Secretary

Misc. Private Legals

The Secretary may grant an extension of time within which to deliver the remainder of the payment. All extension will be for 15-day increments for a fee of $500.00, paid in advance. The extension fee shall be in the form of certified or cashier’s check made payable to the Secretary of HUD. If the high bidder closes the sale prior to the expiration of any extension period, the unused portion of the extension fee shall be applied toward the amount due. If the high bidder is unable to close the sale within the required period, or within any extensions of time granted by the Secretary, the high bidder may be required to forfeit the cash deposit, or at the election of the foreclosure commissioner after consultation with the HUD representative, will be liable to HUD for any costs incurred as a result of such failure. The Commissioner may, at the direction of the HUD representative, offer the property to the second highest bidder for an amount equal to the highest price offered by that bidder. There is no right of redemption, or right of possession based upon a right of redemption, in the mortgagor or others subsequent to a foreclosure completed pursuant to the Act. Therefore, the Foreclosure Commissioner will issue a Deed to the purchaser(s) upon receipt of the entire purchase price in accordance with the terms of the sale as provided herein, HUD does not guarantee that the property will be vacant. The scheduled foreclosure sale shall be cancelled or adjourned if it is established, by documented written application of the mortgagor to the Foreclosure Commissioner no less than three (3) days before the date of sale, or otherwise, that the default or defaults upon which the foreclosure is based did not exist at the time of service of this notice of default and foreclosure sale, or all amounts due under the mortgage agreement are tendered to the Foreclosure Commissioner, in the form of a certified cashier’s check payable to the Secretary of HUD, before the public auction of the property is completed. The amount that must be paid if the mortgage is to be reinstated prior to the scheduled sale is $275,196.44 as of January 9, 2018, plus all other amounts that would be due under the mortgage agreement if payments under the deed of

Misc. Private Legals

Tender of payment by certified or cashier’s check or application for cancellation of the foreclosure sale shall be submitted to the address of the Foreclosure Commissioner provided below. Dated: January 24, 2018 Foreclosure Commissioner Deanne R. Stodden 1430 Wynkoop Street, Suite 300 Denver, CO 80202 Telephone: (303) 623-1800 Email: dstodden@messner.com Legal Notice No.: 8322 First Publication: February 1, 2018 Last Publication: February 15, 2018 Publisher: Denver Herald Dispatch Public Notice Cellco Partnership and its controlled affiliates doing business as Verizon Wireless (Verizon Wireless) proposes to build a 31-foot CityPole Communications Tower at the approx. vicinity of 4915 W 17th Ave., Denver, Denver County, CO 80204. Public comments regarding potential effects from this site on historic properties may be submitted within 30 days from the date of this publication to: Trileaf Corp, Alex Grigsby, a.grigsby@trileaf.com, 10845 Olive Blvd, Suite 260, St. Louis, MO 63141, 314-997-6111. Legal Notice No.: 8337 First Publication: February 15, 2018 Last Publication: February 15, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch

Misc. Private Legals

City and County Public Notice IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF RUTHERFORD COUNTY, TENNESSEE TIFFANI WARFORD (COOPER), PETITIONER, VS. LACEDRIC WARFORD, RESPONDENT. CASE NO: 13CV-1780 TO: LACEDRIC WARFORD Order of Publication

It appearing from the bill in this cause, which is sworn to that the residence and current address of the above listed defendant, LACEDRIC WARFORD, is unknown and cannot be served with process, It is therefore ordered that publication be made for four consecutive weeks in COLORADO COMMUNITY MEDIA, a newspaper published in DENVER COUNTY, DENVER, COLORADO, requiring the above listed defendant, LACEDRIC WARFORD, appear before the clerk of said Court on or before thirty days after the last publication hereof and make defense to the bill filed in the above cause, which seeks MODIFICATION OF RESIDENTIAL SCHEDULE or otherwise said bill be taken for confessed and cause proceeded with exparte. This the 8th day of February, 2018. John A. W. Bratcher, Clerk of said Court. By: Lori Finch, Deputy Clerk. Solicitors for Plantiff: Joshua Crain Legal Notice No.: 8340 First Publication: February 15, 2018 Last Publication: March 8, 2018 Publisher: Denver Herald Dispatch

Denver Herald * 2


16 Denver Herald

February 15, 2018

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Denver Herald Dispatch 0215  
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