The Coast News, October 28, 2022

Page 1

DEL MAR — The for mer proposed site of the Marisol resort is now being eyed for a massive residen tial project that would bring 259 rental housing units to the city’s north bluff.

City officials received an application earlier this month for the proposed

Seaside Ridge development on the 7-acre property at 929 Border Ave, which San Diego philanthropist Carol Lazier purchased in 2001.

The application propos es a nine-building develop ment just north of Del Mar Dog Beach, with 85 units designated as affordable, including 42 for low- to ex tremely low-income house holds.

The development would be the largest apart ment project in San Diego County’s smallest city if ap proved.

The site along the frag ile bluff has been a battle ground regarding devel opments, with most of the community showing resis tance to past project pro posals.

In 2020, voters rejected the Marisol development proposed at the site. This luxury resort would have brought 65 hotel rooms, 31 villas, 22 affordable hous ing units, a spa and dining options to the bluff.

“After 20-plus years of

Council backing Prop 1

Encinitas adopts mayor’s resolution despite resistance

ENCINITAS — Three weeks before the November general election, city lead ers unanimously endorsed Proposition 1, which seeks to codify a woman’s right to reproductive freedom — in cluding abortion — into the California Constitution.

The Encinitas City Council voted 5-0 last Wednesday in favor of a res olution sponsored by May or Catherine Blakespear to voice the city’s support for Proposition 1, despite a majority of public speakers and written comments op posed to the resolution.

“Whereas, the City of Encinitas will continue to uphold the right to privacy, self-determination and lib erty by protecting reproduc tive freedoms and access to health services, welcoming anyone to Encinitas to exer cise their full reproductive rights; and now, therefore, be it resolved that the City Council of the City of En cinitas hereby pledges sup port for Proposition 1 and urges Encinitas voters to vote Yes on Proposition 1 in the November 8, 2022 elec tion,” the resolution reads in part.

Elected officials hailed their decision as sending a strong message to the com munity regarding the city’s

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Page 17. Photo by Jordan P. Ingram
 North County celebrates Día de los Muertos. 3  Unbeaten Cathedral Cath olic volleyball wants title. 12 Food & Wine  Lick the Plate: Steak is the star at Ranch 45. 23  23 face charges in Escon dido gang probe. 8  Carlsbad opens new fire station in La Costa area 8 PATCH PERFECT
 Sports Talk: Padres look ahead to next year. 11
Kihana Ogawa of Japan performs a backside air in the vert competition on Sunday at the 11th annual Exposure Skate at Encinitas Skate Plaza. Story on Page 5 Photo by Laura Place
SKATERS PUT ON SHOW Developers eye Marisol site  Seaside Ridge to build 295 units on north bluff TURN TO PROP 1 ON 13  Oceanside council OKs Ocean Kamp project. 9

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North County cities celebrate Día de los Muertos

throughout North San Di ego County are celebrating Día de los Muertos through out the end of October and early November with com munity events offering tra ditional food, dance and chances to honor loved ones who have passed on.

Originating in Mexico, Día de los Muertos is tra ditionally celebrated Nov. 1-2 and allows families the chance to celebrate and honor their deceased loved ones.

In the city of Solana Beach, an annual Día de los Muertos celebration at La Colonia Park on Oct. 23 drew residents from the historic La Colonia de Eden Gardens community as well as neighboring cities of En cinitas, Oceanside and be yond.

This year’s event was focused specifically on the ancestors who worked in the agricultural fields of Rancho Santa Fe, Del Mar, Encinitas and other sur rounding areas when La Co lonia was founded.

“It means a lot because this community originated in the 1920s, and a lot of the families came togeth er during that time,” said event emcee Brittney Rojos Canales. “We want to keep our history and community going.”

Along with enjoying live music and kids’ activi ties, families erected elab orate ofrendas, or altars, many honoring former La Colonia residents, along the steps of the park as well as in the trunks of classic cars.

Every year for the past several years, Donna Orte ga and her brother Benny Barajas have set up an of renda in the back of Ortega’s 1957 Chevy Bel Air in honor of their mother, Margarita Barajas.

“There’s nothing I wouldn’t do for her,” Ortega said. “Our roots go back to La Colonia — our abuelo and abuelas, tíos and tías used to live here. I spent many child hood summers here. That’s why I feel like we belong here.”

Further north, Friends of Oceanside Día de los Muertos had its 21st annu al celebration in downtown Oceanside. There, dozens of individuals also set up ofren das in the trunks of classic cars during the Por Siempre Car Show.

Families were also able to create a tribute to a loved one in the chalk graveyard, and enjoy music. Entertain ment included traditional carnival parades and dances such as Comparsa, Danza de los Diablos and Danza de los

Rubios.

Additional cities have planned Día de los Muertos events for the coming week.

ENCINITAS

The Encinitas Día de los Muertos celebration will take place Oct. 29 from noon to 4 p.m. at the Encinitas Community Center, located at 1140 Oakcrest Park Dr. The family-friendly event will include performances by Ballet Folklórico de San

Dieguito, Ballet Folklórico Rancho Buena Vista High School, Mariachi Nuevo San Diego, Mariachi Estado de Oro, among others, a lowrid er car show by Callejeros de Encinitas Car Club.

There will also be a com munity ofrenda, face paint ing contest, and activities including sugar skull mak ing, face painting and tissue flower making.

Find more information at encinitasarts.org.

Entry to the museum will be free for the event, which will include a com munity altar, dance per formances by Aztec dance group Xinachtli and Tierra Caliente Academy of Arts, an artisan craft market, face painting and arts and crafts, and a variety of food trucks.

Visit artcenter.org for more information.

VISTA

Vista’s historic Rancho Guajome Adobe will host a Día de los Muertos celebra tion on Oct. 29 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. that includes food, altars, entertainment and arts and crafts.

Cash-only entry to the event is $4 for adults, $3 for ages 4 to 12 and free for ages 3 and under.

Rancho Guajome Ado be is located at 2210 N San ta Fe Ave.

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JOSE
VEGA of Oceanside created an ofrenda in the trunk of his 1950 Chevy for the Día de los Muertos celebration at La
Colonia Community
Park in
Solana Beach
on
Oct.
23.
Photo by Laura Place
FACE PAINT, treats and en tertainment await community members at Día de los Muer tos celebrations throughout North County, like this Oct. 23 celebration at La Colonia Community Park in Solana Beach. Photo
by
Laura Place
SIBLINGS Donna Ortega and Benny Barajas of Encinitas show off an ofrenda to their mother, Margarita Barajas, in the trunk of Donna’s 1957 Chevy Bel Air. Courtesy photo OCEANSIDE held its 21st annual Día de los Muertos celebra tion in the city’s downtown on Oct. 23. Photo courtesy of Friends of Oceanside Día de los Muertos.

OpiniOn &

dit Orial

More reasons to leave Texas off your wish list

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INTERNS

SDUHSD vs. free speech rights

Amidst

ongoing con troversy in the San Dieguito Union

High School Dis trict, at a board meeting on Oct. 13, Board Trustee Katrina Young proposed a hate speech resolution that sought to dampen First Amendment rights.

The proposed resolu tion explicitly encouraged Board Trustees to denounce “hate speech” during public board meetings in an effort to shame parents and citi zens who express viewpoints that she finds offensive.

The school district re ceived letters from lawyers outlining the reasons why the resolution is unconsti tutional, and anyone who understands the US Consti tution can see that the reso lution undermines the First Amendment.

Constitutional scholars agree that rigorous public discourse depends on the free exchange of ideas, re gardless of how disagree able one may find them.

Yet even after both le

gal analysis and illumina tion by members of the pub lic about the grave dangers of attempting to regulate speech, Young and Trust ee Julie Bronstein chose to vote in favor of the resolu tion. The resolution failed to pass with a 2-2 vote when Mo Muir and Michael All man voted against it.

The sweeping and sub jective definition of “hate speech” is one of the resolu tion’s many problems.

It defines hate speech as “any kind of communi cation in speech, writing or behavior that attacks... a person... on the basis of who they are,” a definition so broad that it would serve to silence dissenting remarks and criticisms, as well as putting an end to dialogue that is in any way seen as politically incorrect, argu mentative, or conflicted.

Trustee Young goes so far as to say that “conten tious rhetoric by non-ex tremist individuals” is also something to be wary of. That can easily be inter preted to mean that normal

people with normal dis agreements are no longer welcome to express them selves.

She further threat ens to issue district-wide communications to shame people by labeling such re marks as “hate speech.”

This hate speech res olution is nothing short of authoritarian, and if passed would diminish the free exchange of ideas. The Supreme Court has ruled time and again that “hate speech” is protected speech, with only narrow excep tions such as incitement of violence. No school district can or should be engaged in challenging settled law.

SDUHSD Board Trust ees are morally, ethically, and legally bound to defend our constitutional rights, which apply in the public boardroom as earnestly as they do in every sector of public life.

Leila Currah is a Carmel Valley resident and parent in the San Dieguito Union High School District.

Facts about the Boo Bash controversy

To the Editor:

As the election ap proaches, EUSD parents urgently need to hear the truth behind controversial and misleading headlines that made national news last week.

The real story is simple.

EUSD is not hosting, planning, promoting or in any way affiliated with Boo Bash.

Important facts:

any Boo Bash advertising.

• The school board does not exercise approval over flyers emailed by PeachJar.

Activists (including non-EUSD parents) staged a hostile takeover at a re cent school board meeting. They used the public forum to make outrageous and false allegations against school board members.

But for those who pre fer to incorrectly equate drag with porn, who re fuse to learn the actual definition of drag perfor mance, who choose to live in fear and ignorance of our LGBTQ+ neighbors, I hope that we can still agree that the truth matters.

MostCalifornians have long been restless and mobile; many of us or our parents came from someplace else. So it’s no surprise when sur veys show almost half the folks living here have at least thought about moving somewhere else.

The most popular des tination for those who do leave is Texas, where about 35,000 former Californians have gone in each of the last five years.

This has not seriously dented California’s 39.5 million population, as most emigrants were quickly replaced by new arrivals from around the world and nation.

But there is now am ple reason to believe the transplanted Californians did not land in the nirvana many expected to find, a place of much lower taxes, cheap real estate and little government regulation.

For many, one of their first Texas experiences came in mid-February 2021, when a blizzard and deep-freeze struck the Lone Star state, dropping outdoor temperatures near zero and indoor levels into the 30s or lower as electric ity failed.

Icy temperatures froze water pipes, many laid near the land’s surface be cause Texas building codes are lax. Several hospitals saw their water polluted, forcing mass patient trans fers in extreme weather.

All this barely three years after Hurricane Harvey reduced much of Houston, the nation’s fourth-largest city, to a bunch of rivulets and ponds.

For sure, there is little zoning and building reg ulation in much of Texas, where the state’s ideal of light government control often lets junk yards, strip joints and body shops ex ist beside single-family homes.

But it’s something else to see Houston reduced to non-functionality twice in 40 months.

california focus tom elias

Proposition 13, which bas es property taxes on 1% of the latest sales price for the vast majority of properties. The comparison is based on federal income taxes, plus state and local sales taxes, property tax and in formation from the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics and the U.S. Census.

These figures debunk the notion of Texas as a low-tax state. It turns out Texans in the lowest 20% of income earners (less than $20,900 per year) pay about 13% of their income in state and local taxes.

Californians in the bottom 20% (under $23,200 year ly) pay 10.5% of their in come in such taxes.

Similar proportions apply to middle and up per-middle class taxpayers in both states, with Texans paying more than Cali fornians unless they are in the top 1% of earners ($714,000 or more in Cali fornia).

In Texas, the one-per centers pay 3.1% of their income in state and lo cal taxes, compared with 12.4% in California.

All of which destroys yet another popular con cept about Texas, as Cali fornia imports to that state discover soon after arriv ing.

Sure, some companies and billionaires get big tax breaks from Texas state and local governments as incentives to move there. But that still leaves newly arrived women subject to the cruelties and potential criminal charges imposed on some of the pregnant by the blanket abortion ban.

letters to letters@coastnewsgroup.com

• A Boo Bash ad came to EUSD parents via email from a third-party market ing company called Peach Jar.

• PeachJar emails about a dozen ads a week to EUSD parents. The ads are all marked “Distribution of this flyer does not imply en dorsement by EUSD.”

• Parents have a choice to opt in to receive Peach Jar emails, and the choice to opt out any time.

• Children do not re ceive PeachJar emails and were not the recipients of

Videos of their liefilled speeches went viral on social media, local news, and even went national on Tucker Carlson and the New York Post, to name a few.

They also altered the Boo Bash flyer to make it falsely appear that the event was hosted by school officials on school grounds.

Many of us parents are not offended by the notion of a Halloween party in Hill crest with a family-friendly Disney villain themed drag show. We are alarmed and saddened by the harm this false story has afflicted on our LGBTQ+ community.

Spreading lies during election season is against democracy, against our community, and ultimately against our children.

There is definitely no such thing as family-friend ly fascism. Be careful where you get your news.

EUSD/SDUHSD Parents: Joanie Mendenhall-Lefkow its, Brad Lefkowits, Talitha Matlin, Farhad Mahmoudi, Brittney Chase, Anna Trave sa, Susan Grant Legacki, Lei lani Johnson, Eric Johnson, Kristen Medina, Todd Gill, Emily Gill, Liza Suh M.D., Jody White, James White, Tiffany Rogers, Chris Rogers and many more

It also turns out “light government control” is a mere legend. It may apply to zoning and guns, which anyone can carry con cealed, but no longer to some vital personal choic es.

All abortions, even for pregnancies involving rape and incest, are now criminal. If a fetus has fa tal disorders, it cannot be aborted. And never mind the mother’s health or sur vival.

Now comes a new re port from the Washington, D.C.-based Institute of Tax ation and Economic Policy, which concluded that only the wealthiest Texans ac tually pay lower taxes than Californians.

That is at least in part because of this state’s

It’s much the same in other states that have been popular with California emigres. For example, Ida ho, Arizona and Tennessee all have abortion bans sim ilar to the Texas law.

Tweeted Robert Gar cia, Long Beach mayor and current Democratic candidate for a California congressional seat, upon learning the Texas tax numbers: “Hey, Texans, come over to California to pay lower taxes. And we have great weather.”

As those numbers ap peared, so did billboards in San Francisco and Los An geles bearing the message “Don’t Move to Texas” and “The Texas Miracle Died in Uvalde,” referring to the mass shooting there.

No one knows who put up those billboards, but they just may be offering sound advice.

4 T he C oas T N ews OCT. 28, 2022 Subscriptions: 1 year/$75; 6 mos./$50; 3 mos./$30 Send check or money order to: The Coast News, P.O. Box 232550, Encinitas, CA 92023-2550. The CoasT News P.O. Box 232550 Encinitas, CA 92023-2550 315 S. Coast Hwy. 101 Encinitas, Ste. W 760.436.9737 www. coast news group .com The Coast News is a legally adjudicated newspaper published weekly on Fridays by The Coast News Group. It is qualified to publish notices required by law to be pub lished in a newspaper of general circulation (Case No. 677114). Op-Ed submissions: To submit letters and commentaries, please send all materials to editor@coastnewsgroup. com. Letters should be 250 to 300 words and oommentaries lim ited to no more than 550 words. Please use “Letters,” or “Commentary” in the subject line. All submissions should be relevant and respectful. To submit items for calendars, press releases and community news, please send all materials to community@ coastnewsgroup. com or calendar@coastuewsgroup.com. Copy is needed at least 10 days prior to date of publication. Stories should be no more than 300 words. To submit story ideas, please send request and information to stories@coastnewsgroup.com. Submit
Zoe Morris • Ava DeAngelis
E
Views expressed in Opinion & Editorial do not reflect the views of The Coast News

Top skate talent returns to Encinitas for Exposure 2022

many, the annual Expo sure skateboarding event is about more than just skating— it’s a celebration of community, growth and belonging.

The community ties were stronger than ever last weekend as the 11th annual Exposure returned in person to the Encinitas Skate Plaza from its twoyear virtual hiatus due to COVID-19. Over 150 com petitors of all ages repre senting 18 different coun tries showed off their skills in the street, bowl and vert divisions.

The three-day compe tition is the flagship event for the nonprofit, which seeks to empower female, transgender and nonbinary youth through skateboard ing opportunities as well as raise funds for survivors of domestic violence.

“We love being back in Encinitas; this is just the best venue,” said Exposure co-founder Amelia Brodka, who also emceed the event.

“We’ve tried to move this event to other places, but there’s no other place like Encinitas that brings the community together. The best thing is seeing the event grow.”

While Exposure of fers a cash prize purse of $60,000 and features some of the world’s best youth skaters — some of whom, like Encinitas skateboard ing icon Bryce Wettstein, represented Team USA in the 2020 Olympics — the main point of the event is to have fun and try new

skills in an encouraging environment.

“That’s what skate

boarding is about, trying to do something that you couldn’t do yesterday. I

think overall the communi ty just wants to see one an other succeed. Yes, there is a competition, but the real competition is within your self,” Brodka said.

Encinitas hometown hero Wettstein has been involved with Exposure for around a decade, and said it’s hard to find the words to describe what the event and the organization mean to her. She called that spe cial mix of feelings “Expo etry.”

“Being out here at Ex posure, I feel kind of like everybody is family,” she said. “Exposure is that example of Expoetry, a re distribution of feelings for me. It’s like a peanut but ter and jelly sandwich of feelings.”

This year’s Exposure drew tons of other interna tional top talent — Japan’s Junto Matsuoka, 11, got the highest air in the vert fron tside air competition; Yu juan Li, 19, of China placed third in the open-pro vert finals; and Kihana Ogawa, 21, of Japan brought the

highest backside air and took first place in the bowl open-pro finals.

For many, like Aaliyah Wilson of Victoria, Austra lia, it was their first time participating in an Expo sure event. Despite suffer

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NORTH COUNTY NATIVE and skateboarding legend Tony Hawk signs a skate deck at the 11th annual Exposure Skate competition at Encinitas Skate Plaza on Sunday. Photo by Laura Place ENCINITAS’ OWN Olympic skateboarder Bryce Wettstein, 18, competes in the vert on Sunday. Photo by Laura Place
TURN TO SKATE ON 14
6 T he C oas T N ews OCT. 28, 2022 A different kind of car Even Democrats say State Senate candidate Matt Gunderson is a different kind of Republican. He’s running for the right reasons! Election Day is right around the corner. Vote Matt Gunderson for State Senate by Nov. 8th. Paid for by Matt Gunderson for State Senate 2022 | FPPC ID #1441367 A different kind of music A different kind of lizard A different kind of Republican “Matt is a Moderate with solid values and will bring balance to our State Legislature.” – Sheila Cameron, Former Democratic Mayor of Encinitas “Matt has been pro-choice all his life and will protect reproductive choice in California. (Of course he will—he has four daughters!) He is an environmentalist. He opposes assault weapons. He has long supported LGBTQ rights.” – Sarah Lifton, Encinitas Resident and Lifelong Democrat “I’m a lifelong Democrat, and I’m supporting Matt Gunderson for State Senate. Matt’s prochoice and pro-environment. He has a real plan to deal with homelessness and will fight to make our state more affordable.”
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Correction

Due to a formatting error, The Coast News mistakenly published a chart that mixed up candidates and their associated school districts in the Oct. 7 print edition.

The candidates’ responses to the ques tions were not impacted by the mistake.

The chart on this page is the correct data visualization based on information from the candidate questionnaire.

We sincerely regret the error.

OCT. 28, 2022 T he C oas T N ews 7

Carlsbad unveils new La Costa fire station

CARLSBAD – Nearly six years to the day after voters approved a ballot measure for a new fire house, the city unveiled its latest gem — a new Fire Station No. 2 on El Camino Real and Arenal Road in La Costa.

Carlsbad Fire Chief Mike Calderwood and the City Council held a press conference and tours on Oct. 20 at the $14 million station house.

Dreams of a new fire station were solidified af ter voters overwhelming ly (71%) passed a ballot measure in 2016. After 16 months of construction, the city’s fire crews, who were temporarily stationed at the Dove Library, moved in Oct. 13 to the newly-built station.

“We had a lot of dis cussions about what would it take for this to occur,” Calderwood said. “The conversation started very early with the neighbors. This was the spot we need ed it to be, and I was not a believer. What was sitting here today, I did not think we would fit it on this lot. I have to hand it to the ar chitect and design team. It’s amazing they made this fit.”

The project also includ ed reconfiguring the inter section at El Camino Real and Arenal Road for ingress and egress for fire trucks, along with still-to-be-com pleted art installations in corporating the Carlsbad landscape.

Former Fire Chief Mike Davis, who also attended he event, said the department had been discussing a new Fire Station No. 2 since the early 1990s. By 2014, the old building had fallen out of code and into disrepair, but calls for service at the station were on the rise, to taling more than 4,500 calls each year.

So, Davis and Calder wood teamed with Jason Haber, then assistant to the city manager, to craft a bal

lot measure to fund a new firehouse.

Before writing the bal lot measure, Davis, Calder wood, and others in the de partment spoke to residents in the adjacent neighbor hood to gauge local support.

In 1972, the city of Carlsbad took over the sta tion, first built three years earlier, after the La Costa neighborhood voted to be come part of the city.

Mayor Matt Hall said the city was able to avoid us ing bonds or debt financing through strategic and longterm planning. By doing so, the project saved the tax payers millions of dollars.

“We get paid to run into burning buildings and being part of a communi ty proposition is not in our wheelhouse,” Davis said laughing. “There’s a lot of people who work here that spend a lot of time here. It’s also a neighbor and this is a great example of a neigh borhood firehouse.”

The new facility is state-of-the-art with a hose system that ties into the truck’s exhaust pipes to pump out emissions. Also, a new turnout room to house and clean gear, an oxy gen tank refilling station, dorms, office spaces, a mas sive kitchen, a balcony with

views of Batiquitos Lagoon, a lounge, and a dining room table made from the shin gles of old station’s roof.

Firefighter Mike Miles said the front door of the new station, located on Arenal Road, is open to the public who want to stop by and take a look if the fire crews aren’t responding to a service request. The pub lic access can also be used for residents to walk up and report an incident.

The new 10,000-squarefoot, two-story fire station can house a ladder truck — the longest of the fire department’s apparatus — and the department’s larg er vehicles, which initially came as a shock to Davis and Calderwood.

The five-person crew now has access to any vehi cles stationed onsite, using El Camino Real to avoid navigating tight spaces along Arenal Road. The sta tion is also equipped with two pushbuttons to change the traffic signal so the crews can safely access the road.

23 charged, guns seized in Escondido gang probe

ESCONDIDO — An 18-month joint operation between local and federal law enforcement agencies resulted in the arrest of 23 individuals on various weapons and drug charges and the seizure of more than 100 firearms, a major ity of them being private ly-made or “ghost guns,” according to an Oct. 25 re lease.

The Escondido Police Department and the San Diego field office of the Bu reau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives announced the seizure of 113 firearms during the in vestigation.

Most of the weapons — including 71 pistols, six rifles, 33 machine guns (in cluding 19 fully-automatic conversion kits), two shot guns, and a silencer — were privately-made firearms known as “ghost guns.”

The joint operation, “Operation Devil’s Den,” targeted some of the most violent street gangs in Es condido, including the Dia blos, Westside and Floren cia 13.

Of the 23 arrests, the majority were from Escon dido (18), with two from Coachella Valley, one from San Diego and two un named suspects.

“The Escondido Police Department places a high priority on combating vi olent crime and keeping our community safe,” said Escondido Police Interim Chief David Cramer.

“An integral part of that endeavor is the part nerships we maintain with other law enforcement agencies. We are proud of the collaboration with our federal partners to keep dangerous and illegal weap ons out of the hands of pro hibited persons.”

Operation Devil’s Den specifically targeted con victed felons for illegal fire arm production and sales without a federal firearms license. Law enforcement also seized 19 machine gun conversion kits (commonly referred to as “switches” and “drop-in auto sears)” to convert semi-automatic pis tols and rifles into fully-au tomatic weapons.

In addition to nearly two dozen arrests and more than 100 firearms, the in vestigation also seized 15.5

pounds of methamphet amine, 115 grams of fentan yl, 20 grams of ecstasy and five grams of cocaine.

The San Diego County District Attorney’s Office is prosecuting approximately one-third of the criminal cases resulting from Opera tion Devil’s Den.

The DA’s Office has reported an uptick in gang-related cases, which have increased since 2020. Prosecutors reported 368 gang-related cases in 2020, which ballooned to 465 cas es the following year.

The joint investigation also involved 38 controlled purchases of firearms and narcotics using undercover agents, police officers and confidential informants. Investigative techniques utilized in Operation Dev il’s Den included extensive surveillance, which yielded key evidence in the capture of an individual suspected of attempted murder.

“This joint investiga tion is another exemplary illustration of ATF’s com mitment to creating safer communities,” said Mo nique Villages, ATF Los Angeles Field Division’s special agent in charge.

“ATF is working non stop with our local law enforcement partners to disrupt the private manu facturing of firearms and machine gun conversion devices. What ATF saw 10 years ago with the emer gence of the ghost gun phe nomena, is now what ATF is seeing with the emergence of machine gun conversion kits. The same criminals making and trafficking their own firearms are some of the same criminals trafficking the conversion devices.”

In 2021, the ATF seized 1,576 machine gun conver sion devices through the course of its own investi gations — a 438% increase from 2020.

From Jan. 1, 2016, through Dec. 31, 2021, law enforcement agencies re ported confiscating 45,240 suspected ghost guns at crime scenes nationwide, including firearms associat ed with 629 homicides or at tempted homicides, accord ing to numbers reported to the ATF.

During the five-year timeframe, the number of recovered ghost guns has increased from 1,758 in 2016 to 19,344 in 2021.

“This operation demon strates that we continue to grapple with an increase in gang- motivated shoot ings and the ongoing pro liferation of ‘ghost guns’–firearms that are usually untraceable,” said District Attorney Summer Stephan.

Volunteers must be at least age 50, be in good health, pass a background check, have auto insurance & a valid California driver’s license. Training includes a two week academy plus training patrols. The minimum commitment is 24 hours per month, & attendance at a monthly meeting. Interested parties should call (760) 966-3579 to arrange an information meeting.

“The increase in our prosecutions paint a dis turbing picture of gang violence on the rise in the county. We will continue to collaborate and cooperate with our law enforcement partners in the North Coun ty — and across San Diego County — to address gang violence through prosecu tion and prevention.”

8 T he C oas T N ews OCT. 28, 2022
JOIN THE NORTH COASTAL SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT SENIOR VOLUNTEER PATROL VOLUNTEER The Senior Volunteer Patrol of the North Coastal Sheriff’s Station performs home vacation security checks, assists with traffic control, enforces disabled parking regulations, patrols neighborhoods, schools, parks and shopping centers and visits homebound seniors who live alone for the communities of Encinitas, Solana Beach, Del Mar.& portions of the county’s unincorporated areas.
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CARLSBAD’S new Fire Station No. 2 was unveiled Oct. 20 at El Camino Real and Arenal Road in the La Costa neighborhood. Photo by Steve Puterski
THE NEW 10,000-square-foot, two-story station can house the Carlsbad Fire Department’s larger vehicles, including a ladder truck. Photo by
Steve Puterski

Council gives final OK to Ocean Kamp

Kamp, the giant mixed-use development with up to 700 homes and a wave pool, will replace the site of a former swap meet and drive-in movie theater after receiv ing City Council’s final ap proval last week to move forward.

Ocean Kamp was first approved by the Planning Commission in July. The project will include apart ments, condos, townhomes and senior housing, as well as 134,000 square feet of commercial retail and of fice space on a 92-acre site at the northeast corner of Foussat Road and state Route 76.

The project will also have a 300-key hotel resort with 232 hotel rooms, eight villas with 18 rooms, 16 casitas with 20 rooms and Airstream trailers with 30 rooms as well as a 3.5-acre wave lagoon for year-round surfing, swimming and pad dleboarding.

Two local groups filed appeals to the project shortly after the Planning Commission vote: one by Diane Nygaard on behalf of Preserve Calavera, a lo cal group that advocates for open spaces and the protec tion of natural resources, and another by San Diegans for Sustainable, Economic, and Equitable Development (SD SEED).

When a development project is appealed, the fi nal decision falls to the City Council. SD SEED with drew its appeal of the proj ect before Council’s Oct. 19 public hearing.

O’side Partnership, LLC, the developer of Ocean Kamp, reached a set tlement agreement with SD SEED that included the de veloper accepting several environmental concessions related to construction air quality, biological resourc es and water supply.

“We agree this project could bring some benefits to Oceanside, but the proj ect before you tonight also includes huge risks and huge impacts,” Nygaard said. “Those impacts in clude traffic congestion, air pollution, greenhouse gases, compromising the regional wildlife corridor, among many others.”

According to staff, the project will produce a $3.4 million net surplus to the city’s general fund at build-out, $295 million in one-time economic impacts from construction, the gen eration of nearly 1,800 jobs over the construction peri od and $8.9 million annual economic activity in the county.

As for airport safety, the San Diego Airport Land Use Commission reviewed the project and found it to be consistent with the Oceanside Municipal Air port’s adopted Airport Land Use Compatibility Plan.

Additionally, the Fed eral Aviation Administra tion completed an aeronau tical study of the project and determined it would not create a hazard to air navigation.

An air quality report concluded that the project would result in 3.0 met ric tons of carbon dioxide equivalents annually, in cluding construction. This is below the city threshold of significance established by the Climate Action Plan of 3.5 metric tons, making the project’s impact less than significant in terms of greenhouse gas emissions.

Nygaard and others also see the wave pool as wasteful given the state’s water supply issues in the midst of a drought and the pool’s proximity to the near by ocean where people al ready surf.

Jon Corn, CEO of O’side Partnership, argued that the wave pool will be a huge economic driver and tourist attraction for Oceanside.

“When I started on this project four years ago, I was kind of a wave pool doubt er… but then I went to a couple and they’re amazing, they’re super fun and have an energy about them that is very thrilling and makes people happy to be around them,” Corn said.

Corn noted that the wave pool will use about 5 million gallons a year, the same amount used on a sin gle hole of an 18-hole golf course per year.

A majority of more than 40 members of the public spoke in favor of the project, several of whom were local workers who are excited to be able to work closer to home instead of traveling far distances away from their families. A handful of surfers also be lieved the wave pool would be a valuable asset to the surf community, and others noted that the addition of homes will help the city’s low housing numbers.

Still, several people were concerned about the project’s impacts on the en vironment and traffic.

Prior to Ocean Kamp, the Oceanside Pavilions shopping center was ap proved for the site 14 years ago. The shopping center was never constructed, and O’side Partnership bought the property in 2018.

According to city staff and developers, the Ocean Kamp project will gener ate far less traffic than the shopping center would have.

The City Council unanimously approved the project. Councilmember Christopher Rodriguez was absent from the meeting.

COUNCIL WEIGHS IN ON FAIR FIELDS ACCESS

OCEANSIDE — The city is working on updating its recreational facilities us age policy to make reserv ing fields and gyms more equitable and transparent.

Over the last several months, community mem bers involved in recreation al sports have met with both city staff and members of the Parks and Recreation Commission and City Coun cil to address their strug gles with accessing fields and gyms.

For many, it appears that some sports groups are unfairly prioritized over others.

“I believe there is a perception of inequity in the scheduling of field time and I think that it needs to be resolved,” said Coun cilmember Kori Jensen.

An ad hoc committee was formed from Parks and Recreation Commission members to find a solution to the issue, however that work has stalled for now due to some disagreements with the committee’s struc ture.

Earlier this year, the ad hoc committee became aware that Coastal Acade my, a public charter school, had been grouped in with Oceanside Unified School District’s joint use agree ment with the city.

The agreement places school sports teams under a priority tier that eliminates the rental fee for field or gym time and only charges staff support time.

Parks and Recreation Division Manager Mark Ol son previously told the ad hoc committee that he made that call to include Coastal Academy because of their status as a public school;

however the Oceanside Uni fied School District clari fied that the charter school is not part of its agreement with the city.

“We put an immedi ate end to that so that is no longer in place,” said City Manager Jonathan Bor rego. “They are no longer receiving scheduling priori ty based on the assumption that they fall under the ex isting joint use agreement —that was put to an end several months ago.”

Borrego has also been looking into the issue, hav ing met with community members to discuss their concerns as well.

“In no way, shape or form do I think that the city was denied revenue by the fact that Coastal Academy was given access to those fields, because at the end of the day they are a public charter school so they don’t fall under any sort of cate gory that would require us to charge them for usage of those facilities,” Borrego said. “Now whether or not they received priority that they shouldn’t have is a completely different situa tion.”

Borrego also said while the city has improved its field reservation process in some ways, such as making

it easier to use via the inter net rather than in its previ ous paper form, there is still plenty of room for more im provements.

More than 20 members of the public spoke on the subject of field and gym access during the Oct. 19 council meeting.

Several pickleball play ers and others shared that they felt they were treated well by city staff through the process, and several shared how they were con stantly struggling to get their teams on the field and felt pushed aside by staff.

Wayne Godinet, a longtime member of the com munity, called for an inves tigation into the Coastal Academy situation. He also feels there is a potential conflict of interest with CJ Palmer, a city sports pro gram specialist, whose chil dren attend Coastal Acade my and play basketball for the school.

“If that’s not a conflict of interest I don’t know what is,” Godinet said.

Olson previously ad dressed that perceived con flict of interest by explain ing that he would be the one to handle any scheduling conflicts with Coastal Acad emy and not Palmer.

Borrego did not feel that the city needed to hire an outside entity to conduct an investigation into the matter since Coastal Acad emy was no longer being prioritized.

Instead, Borrego and staff will work to further improve the field schedul ing process based on the input he has received from community members.

One issue pointed out by community members re garding access to fields is the lack of fields in Oceans ide in general. Demand for field use has also increased with more year-round sports seasons.

Councilmember Pe ter Weiss pointed out that the city is installing lights at Mance Buchanon Park, which will help to expand field access throughout the evenings.

Borrego is expected to come back to City Council in 30 days with an update on improvements to the scheduling process.

Vista city manager resigns

By Laura Place VISTA — Patrick Johnson has announced his resignation as Vista’s city manager after nearly 11 years in the position, in opposition to a new pol icy that removed his sole authority over the depart ment head hiring process.

Johnson informed the city of his involuntary resignation in an Oct. 13 letter, stat ing that he made the decision following the City Council’s adoption of a code change in September that required him to ap point department heads in consultation and agree ment with a majority of the council for the coming six months.

Johnson, who recent ly clocked in his 24th year serving as a city employ ee, said the new policy had resulted in a materi al change to his contract without his consent, thus triggering his ability to tender his involuntary resignation and be placed on paid administrative leave through March 2023.

“This was a funda mental change in the City Manager position and authority by remov ing my ability to create and manage an effec tive management team. I advised you in advance that this action would be taken against my wishes and result in involuntary resignation as City Man ager,” Johnson stated in his letter.

A city staff report confirms that Johnson is currently on paid ad ministrative leave. The City Council appointed Assistant City Manager Amanda Lee as acting city manager at its Tues day meeting while the

OCT. 28, 2022 T he C oas T N ews 9
OCEAN KAMP is a mixed-use development in Oceanside that will have up to 700 homes, commercial space, a hotel resort and a wave pool. The project will occupy a 92-acre site at Foussat Road and Route 76. Courtesy rendering
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JOHNSON TURN TO CITY MANAGER ON 14

Halloween prep is part inspiration, part perspiration

Asalways, I am rel ishing the Hallow een season. My fake black cat’s on the porch and my witch’s broom stands ready for flight.

I even have genuine spi der webs pretty much every where, if I just stop vacuum ing for 12 hours.

I also get to decorate the school library, which has a particularly receptive au dience.

And I remain shame less. I will spray my hair green and wear glittery spider deely bobbers on my head just to get a laugh out

of the kids.

I think I’m ready. I’m stocking up on hot dogs that I serve in the driveway, which has become a fun neighbor hood tradition. I have far too much candy stashed where filchers can’t find it.

Well, it always seems like far too much, but when

I see those bright eyes and adorable little faces, my in tention to give one piece to each child just crumbles. I have to throw in handfuls.

And I always have to save some for the junior high kids who never come by until after 8 p.m.

I love to shout, “Trick or Treat forever!” I am one of the few who encourage them to keep being goofy, even when the pressure is on to be too cool to toss on a cos tume and schlep from house to house.

Besides, it keeps them from toilet-papering my house later.

Rolling on wheels of future past

water spot

OnWednesday, Oct. 19, 18-year-old wonder woman, surfer/skater, phi losopher queen, singer/ songwriter Bryce Wettstein became California Surf Museum’s latest “Making Waves” inductee.

Bryce, as many of you realize, skated for the Unit ed States in the 2020 Tokyo Olympics (held in 2021). While she is a brilliant surfer and the top-ranked woman skateboarder in the country, she is far more than that.

She is a mentor who without saying a word makes us want to be better versions of ourselves. This, she does by simply being joyful and open, and pull ing off difficult surf and skate moves, effortless ly, with a great smile and equally great style.

Her message is more direct in her music. Once you get beyond her up lifting melodies, Bryce’s songs, somehow soft and powerful, simple and com plex all at the same time turn out to be a matrix of meaning.

Consider the lyrics to her song “Extraordinary”: “When you have something you think is nothing/Noth ing never comes from some thing/You are everything in your story, and that’s what makes you extraordi nary.”

Talent and kindness gift wrapped in a humble, appreciative, attractive package. What were you doing at 18? (I’ll spare you my wasted youth stories and move on.)

Bryce credits family: father, Max; mother, Don na; younger sister, Sum mer, and those who first laid down the tracks she follows in her chosen sports for her success.

While her music re veals traces of islanders Jack Johnson and Israel Kamakawiwo'ole, her skat ing is apparently influ enced by freestyle genius

Rodney Mullen and local skaters like Steve Caballe ro and her neighbor, Tony Hawk.

A small crowd has gathered to hear Bryce tell her story and sing her songs. Later that evening she pauses to speak with Bruce Logan before real izing that he is someone whose skateboarding can be traced to the sport’s steel-wheeled, two-by-four origins.

Logan, who is a twotime world skateboarding champion and the first in ductee to the Skateboard ing Hall of Fame, invented many of the basic tricks, the nose wheelie, and the space walk among them, that Bryce and her peers still use today when skat ing freestyle.

When I mentioned to Bryce that Bruce had changed the world with his skating, he turned to her and said, “Now, it’s your turn.” Contemplating that possibility, Bryce thanked Bruce and said, “Okay, I’m gonna try hard, for you.”

Over five decades sep arate a legend and a future legend of the sport of skate boarding. A blink of an eye really when you consider how fast these two have rolled.

I would never presume to give advice to an orga nization so well run as the

California Surf Museum. But please pardon my mak ing this one suggestion: a Big Wednesday event fea turing the Logan family.

Known collectively as “The First Family of Skateboarding,” composed of mother, Barbara (RIP), Skateboarding Hall of Famers Brian, Bruce and Robin Logan, along with Brad, who was sure to be the next superstar in the family before skateboard ing crashed in the late ’70s.

This family once ruled the skate world while op erating Logan Earth Ski, a skateboard company that was among the top skate board manufacturers in the world.

Most every great skat er from the past, including legends Tony Alva and Jay Adams, were part of the Logan team at one time. The Logans have many stories that are well worth hearing.

I’ll bet that with a lit tle coaxing we could even convince Bryce to play some of her magical songs.

Check out the Bryce Wettstein exhibit at the California Surf Museum. 312 Pier View Way, Oceanside,

CA 92054.To learn more about the museum, please visit: visitoceanside.org/trav el-tips/california-surf-mu seum

No, I won’t eat my can dy stash before Monday, be cause I carefully purchase candy that I don’t like. It is the only insurance against eating as much as I hand out.

The downside is that you won’t find much choc olate being offered at my door.

Now all that’s left to do is perfect a costume that won’t terrify my little pals when they come to my house.

I also have more fun if they recognize me, as they are always amazed to see their school librarian in the driveway.

Who’s NEWS?

Business news and special achievements for North San Diego County. Send information via email to community@ coastnewsgroup.com.

CUT YOUR OWN TREE

The USDA Forest Ser vice is selling Christmas Tree permits through Rec reation.gov, which makes it more convenient for vis itors to find and purchase permits to cut holiday trees from their favorite national forest. Visit Recreation.gov to purchase a permit. The permit system helps to thin densely populated stands of small-diameter trees. Local forest health experts iden tify areas that benefit from thinning trees and tend to be the perfect size for Christmas trees.

GRAUER SCHOLARSHIP

The Grauer Diversi ty, Equity and Inclusion program announces that students who embody the Grauer School's core values of compassion, resourceful ness and leadership - and have a demonstrated finan cial need - are invited to apply for a full, four-year scholarship. In order to be considered, students must live in North County San Diego and be entering high school in the fall of 2023. Applicants must complete the admissions and finan cial aid applications, both online on the school’s web site. Applicants will be no tified if they are selected to participate in a brief inter view. Applications must be submitted by Feb. 1, 2023, and the scholarship will be awarded in mid-March.

ADHD AID

Bridget Smith of Carlsbad, who experienc es ADHD herself, is now teaching virtual live-in teractive classes on Out school's online learning platform to help children learn skills like impulse control, organization skills, emotion regulation guides, the science behind a brain with ADHD and more. Fir more information, visit out school.com.

RIBBON CUTTING

The Rhoades School, 520 Balour Drive, Encini tas, hosted a ribbon-cutting ceremony Oct. 19 to cele brate the grand opening of

A good portion of them figure I just sleep under my desk at school.

Another factor that goes into costume planning is the chance of warm weather. It can be tough to be anything that requires long sleeves, a hood, a wig, boots or worst of all, a rubber mask.

Somehow, prize-win ning Halloween horror at tire doesn’t often start with short sleeves and flip-flops.

Thus, it requires some extra creativity on our part, or the willingness to just be sweltering for the sake of shock value.

But if you are a serious

its new preschool. For more information, visit rhoadess chool.com.

TOP GOLFER

Cal State San Marcos student-athlete Caroline Wales has been named the CCAA Women's Golfer of the Week for the week of Oct. 18. Wales finished tied for first at the Nick Turner Invitational in Albuquer que, New Mexico Oct. 18.

SCREEN TIME

Sofia King of Solana Beach majoring in Inte grated Marketing Commu nications, was featured in a University of Mississip pi's television commercial Sept. 17 during the football game between Ole Miss and Georgia Tech on ABC. The 30-second commercial, titled “Where are You Go ing,” features Ole Miss stu dents describing their per sonal aspirations.

TOP STUDENTS

Oregon State Univer sity honor roll students for fall 2022 include James Adelhelm, Zareena A. Bokhari, Adeline R. Hull and Qwen A. Landis of Carlsbad; Miranda L. Lar roque, Makana M. Phillips and Sydney C. Templin of Encinitas; Shilah Beamish of Escondido; Melissa L. Vogt of Oceanside and Se fath S. Khan of Vista.

TRACK REPAIRS

The Orange County Transportation Authority

Halloween fan, you just have to decide to be com fortable or memorable.

If you get into a seri ous costume, you might spend the night dripping with sweat but you will be applauded and admired for your efforts. It’s a tough call.

This year, I believe I will just go as an aging, sub urban mom. Oh, that can be plenty frightening. Just ask my children.

Jean Gillette is a free lance writer who is plenty scary without her makeup. Contact her at jean@coast newsgroup.com.

began emergency work this month to stabilize the rail road track through south ern San Clemente – work that is expected to take approximately 90 days. Project engineers and geo technical experts will con tinually monitor the slope next to the track during construction. That track work will involve drilling large steel anchors approx imately 100 feet long into the bedrock of the slope ad jacent to the railroad track to prevent it from pushing the track further toward the ocean. The track has moved as much as 28 inches during the last 13 months, due to storm surge and sand erosion on the coastal side and the gradually sliding hillside on the other.

NEW HEADQUARTERS SITA Couture cele brated its new headquar ters at the historic Derby House Oct. 15 at 649 S. Vul can Ave., Encinitas. SITA’s sustainable line of clothing is manufactured in L.A. with private shopping by appointment and e-com merce sales and offices in Encinitas and LA. For more information, e-mail sita@ sitathompson.com

CLUB RENAMED

Boys & Girls of Greater San Diego has renamed its 4S branch the Mollenkopf Family branch after a gen erous donation from Steve Mollenkopf, CEO of Qual comm.

Pet of the Week

Jax is pet of the week at Rancho Coastal Humane Society. He’s a 3½-year-old, 12-pound, male, domestic short hair cat with a blue-and-white coat.

Jax was surrendered to Rancho Coastal Hu mane Society three years ago. He was adopted right away. Now his family says they can’t afford to keep him, so they brought Jax back to find a new home.

The $100 adoption fee includes medical exam, spay, up-to-date vaccinations, registered microchip, and a one-year license if the new home is in the jurisdiction of San Diego Humane Society’s Department of Animal Services.

For information about adoption or to become a virtual foster, stop by Rancho Coastal Humane Society at 389 Requeza St., Encinitas, call (760) 753-6413 or visit SDpets. org.

10 T he C oas T N ews OCT. 28, 2022
small talk jean gillette
OLYMPIC skateboarder Bryce Wettstein, right, with a leg end of the sport, Bruce Logan, at the California Surf Muse um in Oceanside last week. Photo by Chris Ahrens chris ahrens

From A to Z: Best, worst of weekend

Houston will meet the Phil lies in the World Series.

Sport S

Again, it’s wait until next year for the Padres

AGrade

for the radio play-by-play from Jesse Agler and Tony Gwynn Jr. calling the Padres-Phillies NL Championship Series. They did not miss a beat all weekend. Tony’s commen tary added insight into in dividual players’ mindsets and Agler has been solid all season long.

Burrow, as in Joe Bur row, who had a marvel ous day as the defending AFC champs (Cincinnati Bengals) are finding their groove. Burrow was on-tar get all afternoon, com pleting 34 of 42 passing attempts for 481 passing yards and three TDs in the Bengals’ 35-17 romp over the Atlanta Falcons.

C olts: Indianapolis is falling apart like a cheap suit. QB Matt Ryan is not the answer. Do they still have Phillip Rivers’ phone number? Or maybe Colts head coach Frank Reich can lace up and play the po sition again.

D etroit Lions after scoring at least three touch downs in the first four games of the season, the Li ons’ offense has struggled, scoring just six points in the last two games. The hot seat getting hotter for Lions head coach Dan Campbell. But, Detroit is used to this. No touchdowns Sunday and a 1-5 record to begin the season.

E is for everyone who supported our Padres this year. Add enthusiasm like we never have seen before. E is for energy and electric ity that surged throughout Petco Park all season.

F is for Tom Brady, Aaron Rodgers, Matt Ryan and Trevor Lawrence all soaked like wet noodles. Brady might want to recon sider retirement — again. No touchdowns and losing to the under-inflated Caro lina Panthers make things worse for the reigning Su per Bowl champs.

G reen Bay is on a threegame losing streak, drop ping games they should win. Another loss and they will be Green BY. This team has major problems. Losing to the Washing ton Commanders with no sense of urgency will make for a long season for the Cheeseheads. Green Bay travels to Buffalo for Sun day Night Football. Ouch!

H ouston Astros: They won’t need garbage cans or buzzers this year. Dusty Baker is a managerial ge nius. This team has it all: speed, hitting and pitch ing. The Astros swept the Yankees 4-0 to become the American League champs.

Philadelphia will try for its third title, while the Astros seek their second champi onship ring. H is also for Bryce Harper…Phillies gave him a 13-year con tract to do what he does, which is plays the game hard every day…A big-time player who stepped up big during the playoffs.

I is for I swear, these NFL coaches are totally in complete with their clock management and analyt ics. Incompetent decisions seem to be a weekly pat tern. Has the LA Chargers Head Coach Brandon Staley got the memo? Also, “I” is for Padres manager Bob Melvin not intentionally walking Bryce Harper.

J acksonville Jaguars: No matter who coaches them, they are still bad. The Jags are now 2-5 with no help in sight after los ing Sunday to the NY Gi ants, 23-17. This franchise accepts complacency and subpar performances with out accountability. And we thought former Jack sonville head coach Urban Meyer was the problem?

K ansas City Chiefs blasting the 49ers, 44-23. It’s not how you start but how you finish. When you have a QB like Patrick Ma homes, it makes winning easy. The 49ers have a mash unit on the field, and their stellar defense was exposed Sunday after Mahomes threw for over 400 yards.

L as Vegas Raiders get ting a much-needed confi dence boost in a 38-20 win over the Houston Texans. Don’t count this squad out yet. Halloween is coming soon and the Raiders are digging themselves out from the grave.

M ajor League Baseball for having an afternoon playoff game on Sunday just hours after a night game. If the series went a full seven games, both teams would’ve played five straight games without any days of rest between. Who made this schedule? Merci less!

N ew York Jets and Gi ants both winning again. New York-New York: No one saw this coming. The Jets are 5-2 for second place in the AFC East and the Gi ants are 6-1 for second place in the NFC East.

O regon blasting UCLA 45-30 and giving Bruins head coach Chip Kelly, the former Ducks HC, a reason to drink. UCLA drops from among college football’s few remaining undefeated teams.

Phillies, a No. 6-seed, ousted the Padres with three straight wins at home to become the National League champs and head to the World Series. The Phil lies’ last World Series title was in 2008.

Q uarter by quarter:

talk

paris

The Padres were hop ing to play Game 7 on Tuesday rather than putting the fi nal touches on their Cloud 9 ride.

Instead of wrestling with the Philadelphia Phil lies for the final World Series invitation, general manager A.J. Preller and manager Bob Melvin held court with the media. Not yet 48 hours after the Pa dres were eliminated by the Phillies in Game 5 of the National League Cham pionship Series, Preller and Melvin tried to make sense of what happened and what lies ahead.

The sting of the Padres’ deepest run in the playoffs since 1998 was evident. The pain that accompanies a late loss in the postseason hung in the room. The long ing for nine more innings in front of those rabid Padres fans was obvious.

“We have the motiva tion to do it again,” Preller said.

Preller, an Encinitas resident, gave long-suffer ing Padres boosters a thrill by constructing a team that shocked the New York Mets and slew the Los Angeles Dodgers in the playoffs. That the Padres were but three wins from only their third World Series, with a chance to win their first World Series title, wasn’t lost on Preller or Melvin.

“The season was hard, but I think it served us well

as we got to the postsea son,” Preller said.

There were a few ques tions on Melvin’s usage of Game 5 pitchers, after right-hander Robert Suarez left a cookie over the plate in the eighth inning for Bryce Harper, the Phillies’ left-handed hitting super star. He deposited it into the left-field bleachers for a go-ahead, two-run homer.

But Melvin never wa vered on his decision to leave lefty Josh Hader in the bullpen. Just because the calculation failed doesn’t mean it was the wrong move, Melvin said.

Much of the briefing was spent on what went right with the Padres during their roller-coaster season, which often fos tered a love-hate relation ship between the Padres and their faithful followers. The Padres supplied many opportunities to send fans in the other direction, but they were just too good, and too entertaining, to be shut out completely.

Instead the patrons

stuck and they delivered what was needed in the sea son’s final months. So much that before power was cut from the microphones, Mel vin made another point.

“They were immense in our success,” Melvin said of the crowds. “They were a big part of it. They were almost like another roster player.”

A peek at the Padres’ squad reveals more smiles than frowns, as if there were any remaining. With offensive weapons such as third baseman Manny Machado, right fielder Juan Soto and infielder/outfield er Fernando Tatis Jr., the Padres could be in the same position next year.

With the only caveat being they anticipate gath ering the media after the World Series, and just may be, a World Series title.

“I think a lot of the guys here are prepared to take that next step,” Melvin said. “Look at the players that we have coming back and we are going to be as good as anybody.”

That’s high praise and it was once sprinkled with regularity on Tatis. But if there was a smidgen of news from Tuesday’s wake, it was where Tatis will play.

Tatis, who is rebound ing from shoulder and wrist surgery as he serves his 80-game suspension for ingesting performance-en hancing drugs, is no longer a lock to play shortstop. Not after Ha-Seong Kim was steady in the middle of the infield. The Padres are in no hurry to move Kim, where reliability eclipses being on ESPN’s top 10 plays.

Preller was vague on where Tatis, who’s eligible to play again on April 20, will play next season.

“I just want to see him on the field for 145 games next season,” Preller said. “He can play all over the field.”

Throughout San Diego County, the locals enjoyed a season that won’t soon fade from their memories. It had drama, lows, highs and a late-season run that shook Petco Park to its bedrock.

Sure, it ended with a gut punch and Melvin said the players felt the same thing. Although their ab dominal pain came with a nod toward 2023.

“They are going to be really hungry to go fur ther,” he said.

With Preller working the roster’s edges. Unlike previous offseasons, Prel ler’s moves will be minimal.

“We feel like we have a really good foundation in place,” Preller said. “We just need a couple other pieces to take the final step.”

at https://maps.certify. sba.gov/hubzone/map)

OCT. 28, 2022 T he C oas T N ews 11 SUPERINTENDENT SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATE REQUIREMENTS: • 10 years verifiable similar superintendent experience • Must have and maintain a current valid driver’s license and clean DMV record • Must be able to obtain DBIDS clearance • Pre-employment drug/ alcohol testing will be administered • Obtain minimum vehicle insurance of 100/300/100 • CQM cert is plus and EM 385-40 is required • HUBZone resident – a plus (verify address at https://maps.certify. sba.gov/hubzone/map) QUALITY CONTROL MANAGER SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATE REQUIREMENTS: • Should be familiar with the NAVFAC QCM program • Current QCM cert • College degree • 5 years+ relative construction experience: ground up construction $10-$30M • Army Corps of Engineers so RMS/QCS experience a plus • Must have and maintain a current valid driver’s license and clean DMV record • Pre-employment drug/ alcohol testing will be administered • Must be able to obtain DBIDS clearance • Obtain minimum vehicle insurance of 100/300/100 • CQM cert is plus • EM 385-40 is required • HUBZone resident — a plus (verify address at  https://maps.certify. sba.gov/hubzone/map) SITE SAFETY & HEALTH OFFICER (SSHO) JOB TASKS: Site Safety and Health Officer (SSHO) shall perform safety and occupational health management, surveillance, inspections, and safety enforcement for the Contractor. • Promotes job site safety, encourages safe work practices and recti fies job site hazards immediately. • Ensures all company employees and contractors are adhering to stipulated company and project safety policies. • Additional duties as assigned SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATE REQUIREMENTS: • Should be familiar with EM 385-40 • Must have and maintain a current valid driver’s license and clean DMV record • College degree not required but a plus • Relative construction experience $2M-$5M+ • Pre-employment drug/ alcohol testing will be administered • Must be able to obtain DBIDS clearance • Obtain minimum vehicle insurance of 100/300/100 • EM 385-40 is required • HUBZone resident — a plus (verify address at https://maps.certify. sba.gov/hubzone/map) GENERAL CONSTRUCTION LABORER JOB TASKS: We are looking for a skilled construction laborer who is reliable, mo tivated and who understands safe work practices on a construction site. General site cleanup, loading/unloading material, able to carry up to 90-pounds, able to operate a variety of hand and power tools. Other skills desired include minor framing, drywall, and concrete.  SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATE REQUIREMENTS: • Must have own transportation • Must have valid driver’s license. • HUBZone resident — a plus (verify address
We are a small General Contractor working primarily with the Federal Government on military projects. We presently are looking to hire for design-build and design-bid-build projects, who are willing to travel within California and Arizona. The candidate should be familiar with the NAVFAC QCM program. Projects have a fast paced project schedule. Successful candidates should respond with a resume to joinourteam125@gmail.com HELP WANTED
Contact Jay Paris at jparis8@aol.com and follow him @jparis_sports
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TWO DAYS after the Padres’ NLCS loss, GM A.J. Preller, left, and manager Bob Melvin met the media and expressed op timism for another run in 2023. Photo via Twitter
felix taverna inside information TURN TO INSIDE INFO ON 12

Sport S

— North County residents could mistake the salvo of bumps, cut shots, spikes and kills from the Cathedral Catholic girls' volleyball team as an artillery exer cise at Camp Pendleton.

But it’s just the Dons (35-0) demolishing their op ponents in unprecedented fashion — they haven't lost a set all season.

The Dons wrapped up the regular season on Oct.

20 with a 25-8, 25-14, 25-8 sweep of Patrick Henry in the City Western confer ence finale.

The Dons are currently ranked No. 1 in the nation by Maxpreps and USA Today, led by a roster loaded with Division I collegiate com mits making national head lines. Earlier this month, Cathedral won the Geico Girls Volleyball Invitational in Omaha, Nebraska, broad cast live on ESPN+.

Despite the national

attention, Dons head coach Juliana Conn said the team is focused on one challenge at a time.

“Now, it’s our turn,” Conn said after Cathe dral’s impressive 25-9, 2514, 25-9 sweep of Torrey Pines on Oct. 18. “We have this dream team, but we don’t want to get ahead of ourselves. We don’t talk about anything other than the next match. Let’s make sure we’re getting better. As soon as you blink an eye, a

team that you’re not expect ing can take a game from you, (you) get out of sorts, and you lose a match.”

The Dons' rise to new heights began last year from the ruins of a devastat ing 3-1 loss in the CIF Open Division state semifinals to Marymount of Los Angeles.

Conn said they learned from the defeat, working on the team's ball control in the offseason, leading to better passing and a more consistent offense.

Cathedral took advan tage of a rematch with Ma rymount last month, drop ping the Sailors 2-0.

“We know if we can take care of the back of the game, the front of the game is a given for us,” Conn said of the team's improved ball control.

While the girls dream of a state title, staying pres ent in the moment is more important, Conn said, pre paring for every opponent to avoid last year’s postsea son heartbreak.

“We just keep our goals in check,” senior middle blocker Mia Compas said. “Our one focus is to win, and we don’t let anything else get in our way.”

Besides the team’s

work ethic and focus, the Dons veteran squad has an embarrassment of riches regarding talented players.

Senior outside hitter Julia Blyashov, a Stanford com mit, leads the team with 32 kills, averaging four per set.

Blyashov, who was named player of the match against the Falcons, has plenty of help from senior opposite hitter Noemie Glover, committed to Ore gon, Compas (Davidson), senior outside hitter Cate

Schnell (Tennessee), ju nior middle blocker Jen na Hanes (Michigan), and many more.

The hitters are equipped with arms like howitzers, smashing each ball from setters Amanda Saeger (DePaul) and Te hya Maeva (Nevada) before quickly pivoting to play de fense when opponents at tempt a kill.

Height is another ad vantage: the Dons have 11 players standing at least 6 feet tall. Blyashov and Hanes are both 6 feet, 3 inches, Glover (6-2), Schnell (6-1) and Compas (6-0) — all of whom make for a formi dable front line difficult for opposing hitters to pene trate.

And yet, the roster of talented players amidst a flawless season remain humble and focused.

“I think we realized any team can beat us, and we need to work hard at practice and get 1% better,” Blyashov said of last year’s loss. “The way we work in practice shows in how we play.”

The Dons’ were sched uled to host Del Norte (286) in a noncoference match last night.

The Denver Broncos look horrible and are in big trouble. The Broncs will be parading for a touchdown soon. This is not what John Elway envisioned. The “Orange Crush” offense couldn’t crack an egg, los ing to the NY Jets, 16-9.

R is for Roll Tide: The Alabama Crimson Tide bounced back from last week’s dramatic loss to Tennessee, dominating the Mississippi State Bulldogs, 30-0. Bama is now 7-1.

S is for Smith, as in Sea hawks QB Geno Smith mak ing the Seattle fans forget about Russell Wilson. Se attle improves to 4-3 after whipping the LA Chargers 37-23 to take first place in the NFC West.

Tennessee Titans flying

underneath the radar with their fourth-straight win. Add Tampa Bay for their fourth-consecutive loss and beginning to crumble as defending Super Bowl champs. Remember the Ti tans, who still aren’t getting any respect after their 0-2 start.

U as in United: The Pa dres uniting our city like never before. And having a top-five league home at tendance count. You, San Diego, made it happen.

V : The number of games (4-1) it took the Phillies to oust the San Diego Padres and claim the NLCS crown. The Astros only needed four games to sweep the Yan kees and send them fishing.

W is for Westwood One: Hall of Fame QB Kurt War ner and Kevin Harlan being such a great broadcasting team for Monday Night

Football on the radio. Add Seattle RB Kenneth Walker III rushing 23 times for 168 yards. Also, the World Se ries begins this week: Phil adelphia vs. Houston.

X is for the Los Ange les Lakers and the lack of making baskets and finding someone who can shoot. The Lakers are 0-3 to begin the NBA season. This team is hard to watch.

Y is for Yu Darvish, a stud and a great pitcher to inspire young and old base ball players alike. Darvish is a true professional, on and off the field, and gave fans a season filled with phenomenal pitching.

Z end.

Join us on the radio for Race and Sports Radio at 9 a.m. on Saturday mornings at The Mightier 1090 AM

12 T he C oas T N ews OCT. 28, 2022
ESPN Radio! INSIDE INFO CONTINUED FROM 11
Readers Like You! Make the difference! $75/year When you become a subscriber, you support what matters. Your readership helps keep our staff reporting on the local and regional developments affecting you. Your readership encourages independent businesses to keep advertising and growing. Most importantly, your readership helps keep our community connected, informed and engaged in democracy. SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY for as little as The CoasT News Group The CoasT News Group The Coast News • Inland Edition Receive The Coast News mailed to you every week plus full access to all online content Serving Oceanside to Del Mar PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY CLIP AND MAIL PAYMENT TO THE COAST NEWS GROUP 315 S. Coast Hwy. 101, Ste. W, Encinitas, CA 92024 or email: subscriptions@coastnewsgroup.com o New Subscriber o Renewal Name: Address: City: _____________________________ State: ________ Zip: Phone: ________________________ Email: Credit Card No.: Exp Date: ____________ CVV: ________ Billing Zip Code: Signature ‘It’s our turn’: Unbeaten Dons motivated by ’21 CIF loss CATHEDRAL CATHOLIC junior middle blocker Jenna Hanes, left, stands ready at the net during the Oct. 18 match against Torrey Pines. The 6-foot-3 Hanes is one of 11 players on the Dons’ roster at least 6 feet tall. Above right, the Dons (35-0) celebrate during their straight-sets victory over Torrey Pines. Through Oct. 20, they haven’t lost a set all season.
Photos by Steve Puterski THE DONS, coached by Juli ana Conn, haven’t lost since last year’s CIF state semifi nals. Photo by Steve Puterski

Wave inaugural season ends in NWSL semis

REGION — San Diego

Wave FC’s hopes of a berth in the NWSL Championship in its inaugural season end ed with a 2-1 loss to Portland Thorns FC in a semifinal last Sunday in Portland, Oregon, with substitute Crystal Dunn scoring the winner three minutes into second-half stoppage time.

The sequence began with Meghan Klingenberg's corner kick that two Wave defenders tried to head out of the penalty area. Dunn

beat Wave defender Chris ten Westphal to the loose ball, then put a right-footed shot from just inside the pen alty area into the net for her first goal in five games this season after giving birth to her first child May 20.

“I was able to react and able to get there first,” said Dunn, a member of the 2019 FIFA Women’s World Cup champion U.S. team who en tered the game in the 62nd minute, replacing midfield er Rocky Rodriguez, who scored Portland’s first goal.

Wave midfielder Taylor Kornieck opened the scoring in the eighth minute, head ing in a cross from Alex Mor gan six yards from the goal for her fourth goal in Wave FC’s five games against Port land in all competitions.

Thorns FC tied the score in the 20th minute.

The victory advanc es Portland into Satur day’s NWSL Championship against the Kansas City Cur rent, a 2-0 winner over OL Reign in the other semi.

Wave FC finishes with a

10-6-6 record.

“Obviously, absolutely disappointed right now but immensely proud so mixed emotions,” Wave FC coach Casey Stoney said. “I said to the players I'm so proud of them. We were so close tonight. They scored two ab solute worldly goals at the edge of the box.”

On Oct. 16, Morgan’s goal gave the Wave a 2-1 win over the Chicago Red Stars in overtime at Snapdrag on Stadium in a first-round playoff game.

College breaks ground on stadiums

SAN MARCOS — Palomar College broke ground on a sports facility that will include new foot ball and softball stadiums, in a ceremony on campus Oct. 18.

Envisioned as a oneyear project, the new sta diums are expected to be unveiled in time for the Comets’ 2023 football sea son, allowing the team to host home games on cam pus for the first time.

The softball stadium, for its part, will hold four

their votes accordingly.”

times the number of fans than current accommoda tions, with a press box four stories above field level.

“In building these stadiums, we are honoring a legacy of excellence by two of our cornerstone pro grams — football and soft ball,” said Palomar Athlet ic Director Daniel Lynds.

The project now un der way is Phase 1 of two planned phases of improve ments, the second of which will include a state-of-theart athletics field house and other amenities.

commitment to the prochoice position.

“The support for abor tion, to me, is saying that women have the ability to determine the fundamental direction of their life and that the government will not interfere with that,” Blakespear said. “Being forced into childbirth when someone does not want it, I see that as anathema to the freedoms we hold as Amer icans and also to women’s ability to try to achieve equality with men.”

Councilman Joe Mos ca seconded the mayor’s thoughts by reasserting his personal beliefs in a wom an’s right to choose.

“I deeply believe in the fundamental right of women to decide what to do with their bodies and to have control over their future,” Mosca said. “This is a personal decision for the woman. With almost 50 years of federal protections gone overnight, we must pass Proposition 1 on the ballot so that we preserve this fundamental right in California.”

Proposition 1, spon sored earlier this year by Gov. Gavin Newsom, Senate Pro Tempore Toni Atkins (D-San Diego) and state As sembly Speaker Anthony Rendon, would amend the state constitution to grant a woman’s right to abortion and contraceptives explicit ly.

Blakespear asserted there was precedent for the city to make such an en dorsement of the resolution, pointing to other surround ing cities such as San Mar cos, Vista, and Escondido, where elected officials had brought up synonymous pro posals.

“We are the fourth city regionally to consider a reso lution in support of Prop 1,” Blakespear said in defense of her rationale for bringing forth the resolution. “The reason for Prop 1 is that it moves the issue of abortion out of the hands of a judge and codifies that protection of privacy.”

Councilman Tony Kranz agreed.

“As a council member and a Catholic, I take an approach to governance from a secular perspective,” Kranz said. “The reality is that we’re in a post-Roe era where there is a need to

take action. And you don’t agree — I get it. But frank ly, it’s one of those things where it’s time to stand up, and women’s fundamental choice about whether to bring a child into the world is at threat.”

The majority of public speakers at Wednesday’s meeting expressed strong opposition to the resolution, including numerous written letters opposing the propos al. Some called the resolu tion a political stunt, while others questioned the coun cil’s authority to endorse a ballot proposition on behalf of all their constituents.

“Mayor Blakespear in dependently initiated item 12A, a citywide resolution which clearly is intended to support her well-published platform for her campaign for Senate,” said longtime resident Dennis Kaden. “To a growing number of citi zens, this appears to be an abuse of power. With the election just weeks away, this should be questioned not only from the voter’s perspective but also from a legal one.

“Does the council now assume they have the power to make political and moral decisions for their constit uents? By what legal right could this be considered within their purview to de clare that all citizens sup port Prop 1 – and influence Encinitas voters prior to the upcoming elections on November 8th by adopting this proposed resolution on

behalf of our city?”

Resident Ann McGinn is criticized the council for improperly using city re sources to influence voters to support Proposition 1 on the November ballot.

“It is not the place of the mayor, nor the City Council, to arrogantly urge the citizens of Encinitas to vote for or against any issue on the ballot,” McGinnis said. “And, it is certainly not your place to spend city time or funds to promote the passage of a particular proposition. If you vote for this resolution, it opens the door for you to influence citizens to vote a particular way on myriad issues.

“While (Blakespear) is entitled to her personal opinion, it does not belong in a proposed city resolu tion. As a public servant, she is expected to represent all the citizens of Encinitas and show respect for the court and our system of government. Whether she agrees with the decision or not does not take away the legitimacy of the decision.”

Other residents who op pose the ballot measure ac cused the mayor of attempt ing to push her personal opinions on the abortion issue onto Encinitas resi dents.

“Our family is offend ed on more than one level,” said Julie Madden. “First and foremost, we are offend ed that the City Council would encourage Encinitas residents to vote for a mea

sure that would literally kill more unborn babies’ lives than are already taken each year. This is not a ‘right to reproductive healthcare.’ This is the killing of ba bies, and this Proposition 1 would allow the killing of babies up until the moment of birth.

“Think about that, for even just a moment. Let it also be known that the cit izens of California would pay for these abortions via our tax dollars. City coun cil, your views are not our views. The citizens of Encin itas will vote on Proposition 1 on Nov. 8. We do not need the City Council to repre sent the moral views of the city of Encinitas.”

And still others felt Blakespear’s resolution was inappropriate based on her political aspirations, at tempting to bolster her cur rent campaign platform.

“Your resolution does not represent the feelings of all people in Encinitas,” residents William and Rose mary Wolanin wrote in a let ter. “I feel strongly that it is a conflict of interest for May or Blakespear to present a resolution that is part of her political platform. Further more, it is not the place for a city council to support or deny by resolution a propo sition that is deeply felt by people both for and against an issue. Please do not make the issue of abortion an En cinitas political statement. Let each of the voters make up their own minds and cast

Other residents sup ported the resolution, call ing it an essential step in affirming the city’s support for the pro-choice move ment.

“The City of Encinitas is home to a large health care community,” said res ident Theresa Beauchamp, a healthcare practitioner. “This resolution is an im portant declaration that our City will support our com munity members’ access to and our medical profession als’ provision of high quality and safe reproductive care.”

Councilwoman Kellie Hinze defended the coun cil’s decision while acknowl edging the move was deeply unpopular with some resi dents.

“In today’s climate, voters want to know where their elected officials stand on protecting women’s right to reproductive freedoms, so I was glad Mayor Blake spear brought forward the resolution to support Prop 1,” Hinze said. “During Wednesday night’s public comment, anti-choice speak ers ardently described their

opposition to abortion with some of the most impas sioned language I’ve heard during my four years as a council member.

“I firmly respect the right of anyone who doesn’t support abortion never to get one, just as I believe that women who choose abortion and contraceptives have the right to do so. Abortion is healthcare which is why Prop 1 has the support of medical professionals. A woman’s right to bodily au tonomy belongs enshrined in our state’s constitution.”

OCT. 28, 2022 T he C oas T N ews 13
20% OFF Hair Services w/Britt w/mention of Coast News Call Britt Rose 760 521.3054 @hairbybrittrose 828 N Coast Hwy 101 • Leucadia Hair & Nails Deluxe add the following small at the bottom: Joy Morgan - nails • Marianne Hawkins - hair Johanna Watson - Hair • Patricia Elliot - Sa lon Owner Joy Morgan - Nails • Marianne Hawkins - Hair Johanna Watson - Hair • Patricia Elliot - Salon Owner CALIFORNIA VOTERS will determine the fate of Proposition 1, which seeks to codify women’s reproductive rights, including the right to choose abortion and contraceptives, into the state constitution. The Coast News graphic PROP 1 CONTINUED FROM FRONT Sport S

FROM 5

incredible.

event

“It’s more amazing than I could have ever thought it would be,” said Wilson, who pushed through her injury to com pete in the vert competi tion on Sunday. “I really love Amelia and I think what she is doing for fe male skateboarding is awe some, and I wanted to be a part of it.”

North County is a known skating mecca, with Encinitas being its vibrant epicenter, and connec tions in the community are

strong. The vert ramp used at Exposure’s competition was loaned by none oth er than legendary skate boarder and North Coun ty native Tony Hawk, who stuck around to watch the competition.

“It’s important for the diversity and inclusivity of skating,” Hawk said of Exposure. “I love seeing what’s possible.”

Encinitas 12-year-old Katelyn West, who enjoyed an ice pop after competing in the vert division on Sun day, called her first year at Exposure “awesome” and encouraged other young aspiring skaters to give it a try.

“Do it, it’s an amazing event. Just do it for fun,” West said.

Brooks Street pool renovations set for ’23

By Samantha Nelson OCEANIDE — The Brooks Street pool is get ting a million-dollar make over.

The City Council ap proved a $1.1 million con tract with California Wa ters Development, Inc. of Yorba Linda to design and construct several renova tions at the Brooks Street Swim Center.

The pool first opened in 1976 and has undergone several renovations over the years.

The last major reno vation project at Brooks

County gas prices continue to drop

REGION — The av erage price of a gallon of self-serve regular gaso line in San Diego County dropped Wednesday for the 21st consecutive day since rising to a record, decreasing 3.6 cents to $5.692.

The average price has dropped 74.3 cents over the past 21 days, accord ing to figures from the AAA and the Oil Price Information Service. The decreases follow a run of 32 increases in 33 days to taling $1.213.

The average price is at its lowest amount since Sept. 24 and 23.8 cents less than one week ago and 9.2 cents lower than one month ago but $1.179 more than one year ago.

The national average price dropped for the 14th time in 15 days, decreas ing 1.1 cents to $3.764, its lowest amount since Sept. 27. It has dropped 15.9 cents over the past 15 days.

Street was the plastering of the main and wading pools in 2011.

A needs assessment was conducted in 2014 to determine what else the pool could use.

Then in 2022, the city received both state and county grant funding to support the continued oper ation of the pool.

The city will use $600,000 from a state grant, $289,000 from a county grant and $211,000 from the city’s American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds to pay for the renova

tions.

The scope of the ren ovation work will include replacement of the pool’s deck, re-plastering the main and wading pools, replacing pool mechanical equipment and other im provements mandated per California building code and the Department of En vironmental Health.

An additional $124,340 was pulled from the city’s park fees fund as well as an other $75,659 from ARPA to pay for additional staff time and contingency costs that make the overall proj

ect cost about $1.3 million.

Construction is expect ed to be completed by next summer, which means the pool will be closed between January and June 2023.

“Operations will be temporarily moved over to the Marshall Street Swim Center,” said Senior Civil Engineer Darra Woods.

California Waters De velopment, the company hired to the project, was also responsible for the re cent re-plastering of the main and wade pools at the Marshall Street Swim Cen ter.

will all

WINS ENVIRONMENTAL

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city searches for Johnson’s replacement.

The controversial policy altering the terms of John son’s contract was adopted by the City Council in a 4-1 vote in September, with Mayor Judy Ritter dissent ing, taking effect on Oct. 14.

to discuss what the hiring panel will look like and how to develop this policy mov ing forward at a workshop scheduled for Thursday.

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The policy includes a sunset clause that will revert the policy back to its original language six months after its adoption, removing council involve ment in the hiring process. During those six months, staff planned to develop a policy that would include a hiring panel to advise the city manager on qualified applicants.

City leaders, stakehold ers and community mem bers will have a chance

Councilmember John Franklin, who initially vot ed against the policy when it was introduced in Au gust but voted in favor of it in September, said while he was aware that Johnson may choose to resign, it still came as a surprise.

“He certainly made clear that it was a possible outcome. I think we were still surprised when he ten dered his voluntary resigna tion,” Franklin said.

“It was a great loss to lose Patrick Johnson. He was very highly thought of by the employees. I am sad dened that he has decided to move along, and we’ve got big shoes to fill to replace him.”

14 T he C oas T N ews OCT. 28, 2022 Rates: Text: $15 per inch Approx. 21 words per column inch Photo: $25 Art: $15 (Dove, Heart, Flag, Rose) Tin Aung Solana Beach October 10, 2022 Ruth Frances Fox Carlsbad October 4, 2022 Ellen Marie Martin-Huff Carlsbad October 8, 2022 Anne B. Tragesser Encinitas October 15, 2022 Joseph Francis Ferrari Oceanside October 18, 2022 Sheri Lee Kearney Oceanside October 1, 2022 VISTA CHAPEL FD 1120 1315 S. Santa Fe Ave Vista, CA 92083 760 726 2555 SAN MARCOS CHAPEL FD 1378 435 N. Twin Oaks Valley Rd San Marcos, CA 92069 760 744 4522 www.allenbrothersmortuary.com ALLEN BROTHERS MORTUARY, INC. CROP .93 .93 4.17 4.28 There’s an old saying, “From the day that you’re born, till you ride in a hearse…” We may not take that final ride “in a hearse” but we
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C T  Y N O A  O P C Are You Wondering … Will it be ok? Will they be ok? Share the story of your loved ones life... because every life has a story. Submission Process Please email obits @ coastnewsgroup.com or call (760) 436-9737 x100. All photo attachments should be sent in jpeg format, no larger than 3MB. the photo will print 1.625” wide by 1.5” tall inh black and white. Timeline Obituaries should be received by Monday at 12 p.m. for publi catio in Friday’s newspaper. One proof will be e-mailed to the customer for approval by Tuesday at 10 a.m. For more information call 760.436.9737 or email us at: obits@coastnewsgroup.com ing an injury to her knee during the bowl on Satur day, where she placed 5th, Wilson said the
was
SKATE CONTINUED
GRACE MARHOEFER shows off her invert in the vert skate boarding competition Sunday at the 11th annual Exposure skateboarding benefit event at the Encinitas Skate Plaza. Photo by Laura Place CITY MANAGER
CONTINUED
MARKETPLACE NEWS ADVERTORIAL - This advertising feature is a way to purchase a story about your business that looks like real news.Your article can be published in The Coast News, Inland Edition or both! TWO SIZES AVAILABLE 28” and 14” All articles are archived online at: www.CoastNewsGroup.com on the home page under the News tab and are WEB SEARCHABLE! Call today! 760.436.9737 advertising@coastnewsgroup.com
U.S.
Marine
Brig. Gen. Jason Woodworth,
commanding general of Marine Corps Installations West, Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, accepts the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Military Conservation Partner Award on behalf of Camp Pendleton on Oct. 17. The award recognizes significant natural-resources management achievements by military installations, particularly the conservation of important wildlife and their habitats through cooperation with the USFWS and others. The base’s Environmental Security Department has worked to restore and protect habitat for 19 federally endangered and threatened species. U.S. Marine Corps
photo by Lance Cpl. Nataly Espitia
PENDLETON
AWARD

SEASIDE

ownership of the land, and multiple attempts to devel op the property as a hotel resort, it has become clear that a mixed-income com munity is the most benefi cial use of the land for the city and the region,” Sea side Ridge representative Darrel Pudgil said.

This time around, de velopers eyeing the land are doing whatever they can to ensure that their project can move forward.

Southern California law firm Sheppard Mullin, which is representing the project, argues that Assem bly Bill 1398 and Senate bills 330 and 8 — which limit jurisdictions’ abili ties to restrict new afford able housing developments — would allow the project to move forward under the state’s by-right process and remove any of the city’s discretionary or subjective requirements.

AB 1398 states that jurisdictions that submit their Housing Element to the state more than a year after the statutory deadline cannot be in com pliance unless they first rezone all properties iden tified as potential housing sites.

With Del Mar’s 6th Cy cle Housing Element still under review by the state,

lawyers argue that the city fits these terms and must rezone the property now.

“The actions of the State to create an expe dited path for this land to become part of the solution to our worsening housing crisis is a welcome opportu nity to make a meaningful impact for people who can not otherwise afford to live in this special area of our region,” Pudgil said.

In an initial response to the application, City Manager Ashley Jones stated the city “is not in agreement with the pro posed legal basis by which the project has been de signed” and said that the application — which did not include rezone, design review permit or coastal development applications — would not be able to pro ceed as is.

“The City of Del Mar is not in agreement with the proposed legal basis by which the project has been designed. It is the City’s position that the submit ted application request is not consistent with the cur rent zoning and density al lowances for the property located at 929 Border Ave nue,” Jones said.

The 929 Border Ave property is already includ ed in the city’s Housing Element as a potential site to be rezoned to fulfill state affordable housing re

quirements, but purely as a backup option if they can not secure an agreement to develop affordable housing units on the Fairgrounds by 2024.

“The City’s adopted Housing Element identi fies a sufficient inventory of sites with correct zoning and capacity to meet the City’s [Regional Housing Needs Assessment] without the need to rezone proper ties,” Jones added.

The city of Del Mar recently approved its first by-right housing project, the 50-unit Watermark de velopment on the corner of Jimmy Durante Boulevard and San Dieguito Drive, in April.

However, progress on the contentious project has been stalled after it was appealed to the Califor nia Coastal Commission, where the matter remains to be decided.

Lazier’s project ap plication also includes a request that the project is allowed to exceed the city’s 14-foot maximum building height to permit building up to 55 feet tall.

Due to the “high lev el of public interest” in the Seaside Ridge proj ect, the city of Del Mar has made all application documents available on their delmar.ca.us/861/ Seaside-Ridge-Prelimi nary-Development-Ap.

Healthier days ahead

OCT. 28, 2022 T he C oas T N ews 15 We also offer: Preventive Care • Bridges • Dentures Implant Supported Dentures • Dental Extractions • Root Canals Gum Treatment • Cancer Care • Emergency Dental Care GET YOUR Back Comfortable, long lasting treatment Dental Implant Package $1,850 ($3,800 Value) Implant abutment and crown. Complicated cases may require additional work, extractions, bone graft, CT scan or stent which could result in additional costs. Offer not valid with insurance and only applies to patients not eligible for any other benefits. New patients only. 760-280-2270 · www. SeniorDentalNC.com · 1706 Descanso Ave. Ste. A, San Marcos Minimally Invasive Dentistry
The healthcare network that gives you more Regal Medical Group and Lakeside Community Healthcare bring you comprehensive care close to home. We have been serving the community for 30 years providing a vast network of quality doctors, specialists, hospitals, and urgent care centers throughout Southern California. With resources that go beyond the doctor’s office, we help you live a well-balanced life through every stage of your healthcare journey. Learn about our doctors in your community by calling (844) 912-3880, or visit RegalMedicare.com Our Vista Community Clinic locations RegalMed.com 818 Pier View Way Oceanside, CA 92054 134 Grapevine Rd. Vista, CA 92083 1000 Vale Terrace Dr. Vista, CA 92084
CONTINUED FROM FRONT SEASIDE RIDGE Site Plan: A conceptual illustration for the proposed Seaside Ridge devel opment, which would bring 259 rental housing units to Del Mar’s north bluff at 929 Border Ave. Graphic courtesy of Frank Wolden
16 T he C oas T N ews OCT. 28, 2022 Assembly candidate Chris Duncan will make gas more expensive SOURCES: (1) San Clemente City Council Minutes, 7/20/21 (2) CalMatters, 2020 (3) ABC 7, 11/7/18 (4) San Clemente Times, 2/23/22 Supported a bill that would raise gas prices1 Backed by politicians that want to gut Prop. 132 and hike the gas tax3 Supported a measure that could have doubled his own taxpayer-funded salary4 Cutting unfair taxes. Lowering costs for families. DaviesForCA.com /DaviesForCA @DaviesForCA “This is shown in [Davies’s] rare success in her freshman term in introducing 13 bills that were signed into law, on issues from fentanyl to food insecurity.” San Diego Union Tribune, 10/14/2022 In the State Assembly, I’ll continue to fight to bring down prices by suspending the gas tax, lowering healthcare costs, and pushing for equal pay for women. Laurie Davies Re-elect Assemblywoman LAURIE Davies PAID FOR BY LAURIE DAVIES FOR ASSEMBLY 2022 Gas shouldn’t be THIS expensive Say NO to Chris Duncan PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT

EVENTS CALENDAR

OCT. 29

FILM DEBUT

“Memories of a For gotten Childhood” by Lars Smekel, will be screened for the first time as part of the San Diego Internation al Kids' Film Festival at 1:30 p.m. Oct. 29 at Schul man Auditorium, 1775 Dove Lane, Carlsbad. A Q&A with director is planned after the screening. For more infor mation, visit larssmekal.de

ONE BOOK - ONE SAN DIEGO

The Oceanside Pub lic Library will host a book club at 3 p.m. Oct. 29 in the Civic Center Library, 330 N. Coast Highway, Oceanside, to discuss this year’s adult selection for One Book - One San Diego. Sign up required at kpbs.org/one-book-onesan-diego.

SYMPHONY & CHORUS

La Jolla Symphony & Chorus begins its 2022-23 Rising season with “Pow erful Nature” at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 29 and 2 p.m. Oct. 30 at Mandeville Auditorium, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jol la. Tickets at https://man deville.ucsd.edu/directions/ index.html.

OCT. 30

FOLK MUSIC

San Diego Folk Her itage presents Tannahill Weavers in concert at 4 p.m. Oct. 30 at Pilgrim Unit ed Church of Christ, 2020 Chestnut Ave., Carlsbad. General Admission $25. Ad vance tickets at ticketweb. com or at the door.

OZUTOCHI TOUR

Ozuna and the OzuTo chi Tour is in town from 7 to 10 p.m. Oct. 30 at the Pechanga Arena, 3500 Sports Arena Blvd., San Di ego. Tickets at showclix.com or allevents.in.

OCT. 31

CIVIC ART SHOW

The Encinitas Civic Art Show opens Oct. 31 and runs through Dec. 5 at City Hall, 505 S. Vulcan Ave., Encini tas with Misti Washington Gourd & Basket Guild.

NOV. 1

COMEDY NIGHT

North Coast Repertory Theatre presents Tuesday Night Comics at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 1 at 987 Lomas San ta Fe Drive, Solana Beach, hosted by Lisa Gilbert. Tick ets $39 at (858) 481-1055 or northcoastrep.org.

NOV. 2

O’SIDE LIBRARY CLOSED

All Oceanside Public Library locations will be closed on Wednesday, Nov. 2, for staff training. The Li brary will reopen at 9 a.m. Nov. 3 for normal business hours.

PARKINSON’S SUPPORT

The La Costa chapter

Halloween happenings

of the North County Par kinson's Support Group will meet from 1 to 3 p.m. Nov. 2 at Christ Presbyteri an Church, 7807 Centella, Carlsbad. Information at ncpsg.org.

CATHOLIC FRIENDS

TIME TO HAUNT

Agua Hedionda La goon Foundation hosts its Haunted Corn Maze, from 6:30 to 10 p.m. Oct. 28 and Oct. 29 at 1050 Cannon Road, Carlsbad.

GHOST TOWN

The San Dieguito Heritage Museum and the Ovation Theatre are col laborating on a Haunted Ghost Town at Heritage Ranch, 450 Quail Gardens Drive Oct. 28 to Oct. 30 Visit SDHeritage.org for tickets and more informa tion. Ticket prices are $20 for adults and $10 for chil dren 10 and under.

CARRILLO DAY OF DEAD

In honor of the tra ditional Day of the Dead holiday, the historic Leo Carrillo Ranch hacienda, at 6200 Flying Leo Car rillo Lane, Carlsbad, is dressed up with colorful decorations and a custom ary ofrenda table dedicat ed to the Carrillo family. The main building of the hacienda is open for vis itors from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fridays through Sun days until Nov. 2 , with a special open house 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Oct. 28 and Oct. 29. No tickets are required.

FREE GASLAMP FLICKS

The Gaslamp Quarter presents free Friday Gas lamp Flicks: Halloween Edition, outdoor movie night for the family Oct. 28 , with “The Nightmare Before Christmas” at 6:30 p.m. and “Beetlejuice” at 8:30 p.m. On Island Street between 4th and 5th Ave nues, San Diego. Get free tickets at Eventbrite.com.

LEGO HALLOWEEN

Legoland California Resort holds its Brick-orTreat Monster Party Oct. 29. More information at LEGOLAND.com/Califor nia.

DIA DE LOS MUERTOS

Join the Dia de los Muertos event organized by Encinitas Friends of the Arts from noon to 4 p.m. Oct. 29 at the Encin itas Community & Senior Center, 1140 Oakcrest Park Drive, Encinitas. Ballet folklorico dancers,

Mariachi bands, ofrendas, Callejeros de Encinitas Car Club and more.

HALLOWEEN FUN

80s HEAT presents “Halloween Heat” with The Last Dance at the Bel ly Up Tavern at 8 p.m. Oct. 29 at 143 S. Cedros Ave., Solana Beach. For tickets and information, visit bel lyup.com/.

HALLOWEEN IN VILLAGE

Calling all kids in costume, looking for trickor-treating. Stop by the Village Faire Shopping Center from noon to 3 p.m. Oct. 30 at 300 Carlsbad Vil lage Drive, Carlsbad. The Carlsbad Village Faire businesses will be handing out candy. Even well-man nered Fido in costume is welcome.

TRUNK OR TREAT

There will be a fam ily-friendly Halloween Trunk or Treat event fol lowing Sunday worship services at 10 a.m. and again at 11:30 a.m. Oct. 30 at the Village Church, 6225 Paseo Delicias, Ran cho Santa Fe. Cars will have trunks filled with candy for trick or treaters. Church-friendly costumes are welcome. More infor mation at alycenn@vil lagechurch.org.

COUNTRY SCARE

Cowboy Jack plays Country-Western music from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Oct. 30 at the Mel lano Farm Stand Spooky Festival, 5750 North River Road, Oceanside.

HIGHWAY 101 HALLOWEEN

The Encinitas 101 MainStreet Association will present its “Safe Trickor-Treat” event from 5 to 8 p.m. Oct. 31, along with Pumpkin Lane, on High way 101. Trick-or-treating at local businesses.

PUMPKIN TIME

Pumpkin Station is open from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. through Oct. 31 at the Del Mar Fairgrounds, East Lot 15555, Jimmy Du rante Blvd., Del Mar. Vis it pumpkinstation.com/ pumpkin-stations/del-marpumpkin-station/ for a cou pon for a free train ride.

The Catholic Widows and Widowers of North County, a group for those who desire to foster friend ships through various so cial activities, will attend All Souls Mass, Prince of Peace Abby, Oceanside Nov. 2; Walk Oak Riparian Park, 4625 Lake Blvd., Oceanside Nov. 4 and hold a general meeting and Thanksgiving potluck, San Rafael Church, Oceanside Nov. 13. Reserva tions are required at (760) 696-3502.

NOV. 3

TWOFER AT BELLY UP

Hear Guster and Rat boys at 7 p.m. Nov. 3 at the Belly Up Tavern, 143 S. Ce dros Ave., Solana Beach. For tickets and information, vis it bellyup.com.

NOV. 4

BELLY UP

Hear Mustache Harbor at 9 p.m. Nov. 4 at the Bel ly Up Tavern, 143 S. Cedros Ave., Solana Beach. For tick ets and information, visit bellyup.com.

BOOGIE WOOGIE

Join Wounded Warrior Homes at the Boogie Woo gie Ball from 6 to 10 p.m. Nov. 4 for live 1940s music from the jazz quartet 'Gin & Tonix', plus dancing, din ner, silent and live auctions. Raise funds to provide transitional housing and services for post-9/11 veter ans challenged with PTSD and traumatic brain injury. Register at woundedwar riorhomes.ejoinme.org/Boo gieWoogieBall_Register.

SHARE ART SUPPLIES

The Escondido Arts Partnership will take dona tions from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Nov. 4 and Nov. 5 at the gal lery, 262 E. Grand Ave., Es condido for its Nov. 12 Yart Sale. Bring clean usable/re usable art related stuff - art supplies, canvasses, frames (without glass), books, art works, craft supplies, music instruments and more.

NOV. 5

TAINTED LOVE

Tainted Love and DJ CG 8.0 come to the Belly Up Tavern, at 8 p.m. Nov. 5 at 143 S. Cedros Ave., Solana Beach. For tickets and infor mation, visit http://bellyup. com/.

NORTH COAST SYMPHONY

The North Coast Sym phony Orchestra celebrates its 75th anniversary with a concert featuring American composers at 2:30 p.m. Nov. 5 at the San Dieguito Unit

The need for local journalism has never been more important than it is today. Misinformation, biased reporting and fake news impact your ability to make informed decisions. The Coast News needs your help to continue honest communitybased reporting you can trust. Just like many of you, our team at Coast News Group has also been impacted by the coronavirus. In order to continue our mission to provide quality local journalism, we are now accepting reader donations. We appreciate all your support during this time of need.

make a contribution, go to thecoastnews.com/support-coast-news/ or scan this QRCODE:

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RAIN, WIND, AND FIRE...

“The three menaces to any chimney, fireplace, or stove.”

Every year there are over twenty thousand chimney / fireplace related house fires in the US alone. Losses to homes as a result of chimney fires, leaks, and wind damage exceeds one hundred million dollars annually in the US.

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For a limited time, readers of this paper will receive a special discount on our full chimney cleaning and safety inspection package with special attention to chimney water intrusion points in preparation for the rainy season.

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OCT. 28, 2022 T he C oas T N ews 19 Authentic. Genuine. Hand-knotted Afghan rugs. “As an Afghan woman bred on Afghan rugs, I am passionate about how lives can play out on them. Whether it’s toddlers learning to crawl or families coming together for board game nights, my quality, durable rugs serve as canvases for your memories. Best of all, my rugs are meant to make you feel good in your space. Each new rug is made by seasoned artisans who, like me, are dedicated to empowering women and crafting fair trade, sustainable rugs. I look forward to helping you find a quality rug.” TheRugMine.com SCAN HERE KEEP IT LOCAL owner SAVE using the code COAST Expires 12.31.22 (hello) Proud to be a fair trade, sustainable, and woman-owned based small business Market sells fruits, nuts & jams and local goods. Market is open 9-4 & pumpkin patch is open 9-6 daily Open daily from 9am to 4pm daily • info@carlsbadstrawberrycompany.com 760-603-9608 See Our Fall Season Festivities! Pumpkin Patch, Corn Maze and Tractor Rides Daily 1050 Cannon Rd Carlsbad 92008 Carlsbad Strawberry CO. is a family owned business dedicated to serving the community with delicious produce & family fun. Also featuring: • Hay Pyramids • Photo Opportunities • Marigold Field Haunted Corn Maze (Open Fri & Sat ONLY in Oct.) For the 17th year, the Super Dentists are offering the Halloween Candy Buy-Back program, helping children turn candy into cash. From Nov. 1 to Nov. 5, bring in candy to any of the Super Dentists’ six offices (thesuperdentists.com/locations) and ex change it for cash. Youngsters receive $1 for each pound of candy they bring in. The Super Dentists will donate the thousands of pounds of candy they collect to active-duty service members to enjoy. Stock photo A SWEET DEAL AFTER HALLOWEEN

This holiday season, we have the same buyers as last year and despite supply chain shortages, Tip Top Meats is proudly fully stocked up for the holidays! John Haedrich has secured a large inventory of supplies at great prices guaranteed to help fight inflation. As he has always promised he will offer you great pricing while not sacrificing the quality, service or the availability. John went on to say, “We are so fortunate to secure all of your holiday supplies including German Specialty Items in our European Deli. He wants to thank his dedicated staff for their hard work and to the experience of Eva, who is the buyer for the European market.

As you might suspect, the team at Tip Top is asking their customers to get their turkey orders in as early as possible as they will only be receiving 80% of their order for this year’s Thanksgiving holiday. They want to be able to fulfill your order efficiently. If you are looking for hassle-free convenience this holiday, Tip Top Meats can cook your turkey for you and provide a cooking pan and bag for later preparation. Haedrich explained, “For days over the Thanksgiving Holiday

we have our convection ovens going non-stop and will cook over 200 turkeys just for starters.” These pre-cooked turkeys can be reheated and they include instructions that will result in a perfect turkey every time.

So, as you would expect from Big John and his team, they are also already preparing their specialty handcrafted Turduckens, which are a special boneless cut of turkey, duck and chicken, all stuffed with fresh herbs and celery. This delicacy is in high demand and moves fast and comes with cooking instructions as well.

Make sure you don’t leave Tip Top Meats without your holiday sides! Homemade and delicious, you can add stuffing, mashed and sweet potatoes, gravy, all natural of course, and Diane Haedrich’s famous cranberry sauce, which is back by popular demand this year. She makes over 80 gallons of this delicious sauce and it goes fast, so make sure to pick up a tub or two! They also have plenty of fresh, hand cut turkey parts to make your thanksgiving stock extra delicious!

Also back this season, is Tip Top Meats’ Famous

Thanksgiving Day Meals which feature turkey dinners with white and dark meat along with mashed and sweet potatoes, stuffing, cranberry sauce, a roll and butter, all for only $14.98 + tax. If poultry isn’t for you, indulge in their Prime Rib meal, also available on Thanksgiving Day for $14.98 + tax. John is proud to confirm that his prices for these large portion homemade holiday meals are the same price as last year and he is proud to be able to offer his customers these value meals once again while keeping prices in check. Tip Top also has family meals available, please check with the team there for more details.

Big John wants to give thanks for all his blessings this holiday season especially his wonderful customers that have visited his meat market, restaurant and European delicatessen for over 5 decades. John says, “We are grateful and thankful to serve you as our loyal customers over the many decades. The supply, quantities and prices at Tip Top can’t be beat.” He went on to say, “From the entire team at Tip Top Meats, we wish you a happy and blessed holiday season.”

20 T he C oas T N ews OCT. 28, 2022
THANKSGIVING PRIME RIB OR TURKEY DINNERS TURKEY DINNER White and dark meat, mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes, stuffing, cranberry sauce and roll and butter. PRIME RIB DINNER Prime Rib, baked potato & mixed vegetables and roll and butter. $1498 ea +tax $1498 ea +tax Celebrating 55 Years since 1967 Grateful & Thankful This Thanksgiving AVAILABLE YEAR ‘ROUND! +tax$8.98 $9.98+ tax Get your Diestel Turkey order in early! North County's Last Great Butcher Shop EUROPEAN DELICATESSEN & GOURMET FOODS 760.438.2620 6118 Paseo Del Norte • Carlsbad • TipTopMeats.com $5.98 LB Free-range, all natural smoked Turkeys, whole or half Turkey Let Big John and his staff make your holidays JOYFUL and STRESS FREE! HAPPY GIVINGThanks for only FEATURING... John says, “When you come to Tip Top Meats, you always get what you want! We cater to you to make your holiday extra special at the most competitive prices. HURRY! Limited Quantity! Pick up your Turducken early before we run out! To all our wonderful customers, suppliers & associates — we wish you a very happy & peaceful holiday season.”

The search continues for the perfect cocktail glass

cheers! north county

ryan woldt

Ihada cocktail glass… err, let me rephrase that. I’ve had many cocktail glasses. Let me rephrase again. I have a cocktail glass now that looks fantastic and vintage despite being recently pur chased.

It’s fine. It reflects light through the pattern on the glass in a cool way. Previously, it was on the shelf as a tea-light candle holder.* I have a cocktail glass, and it is fine.

Honestly, it’s a little bit too small in my hand, the weight isn’t right, and the glass doesn’t have the same precision as my other favorite cocktail glasses. So, when it comes to glass ware, I’m a bit particular, but only because I care.

I’m loyal to a fault when I commit to a cock tail glass. It becomes part of my hand at happy hour. If it is dirty, I wash it. The weight of it in my hand eas es any anxieties I may have accumulated throughout the day.

Ice thumps comfort ably against the side walls, which will echo the crack ing across the cube when pouring my preferred alco hol over the top.

There are rules about glasses. Professional bar tenders make sure to serve martinis in martini glasses; whiskey in a rocks glass; wine in a wine glass; a mule in a copper mug, and a Collins in a highball. But since I’ve retired from slangin’ drinks (as the kids say), everything I drink gets poured into the same glass.

My favorite cocktail glass of all time had a horse on it. It was a thrift store find, and the base

was thick glass. It had a heft that tempted me to throw it against the wall like I was a black-hatted cowboy in an old western film, but I would never.

Sadly, it slipped from my grasp during a wash ing session. The American Saddle Horse (glass) would ride no more.

Then for a time, I was obsessed with Mason jars. Besides being available in various sizes and shapes, the screwtop lids came in handy when traveling to the beach for sunset.

Not to mention many had convenient marks on the side, making mixing a cocktail easier.

I’m a believer that the right cocktail glass finds me. A type of magic occurs when I pick up the right glass for the first time — I just know.

So, for now, I’ll make do with the tea-light glass or, in a pinch, a leftover jar of Bonne Maman fruit preserves with a red-white checkered lid. The search continues.

Post a photo of your fa vorite cocktail glass, mug, or jar and tag @CoastNews and @CheersNorthCounty on Instagram. Then, fol low and share all of your drinking adventures with

Food &Wine

Camping

Where: Joshua Tree Coffee Company, 61738 29 Palms Hwy, Joshua Tree CA 92252

Open: Tuesday-Thursday 7 a.m.-3 p.m., Friday-Mon day 7 a.m.-5 p.m.

What: Batch Brew black drip Bali Kintamani (Single Origin)

Roast: Light Price: $3.25

What I’m listening to: DOPE LEMON, “Coyote”

Last week, I so journed to the des ert — Ryan Camp ground in Joshua Tree, to be precise. It’s an adventure common among San Diegans looking to es cape. Escape what, besides the wi-fi signal, I’m not sure. That’s why I was go ing. No internet. I packed the car with the essentials — books, camera, sleeping bag, peanut butter and jel ly sandwiches, whiskey, and really good coffee.

I rarely sleep well the first night at any camp, especially in the desert. I crawled into my sleeping bag. For once, I remem bered my pillow, and the fall temperatures dropped down into the high 40s making for the perfect cozy temps in the back of the Ruka (Ruka is the name of my Wife’s Subaru).

I shifted around, trying to twist and contort so that none of the various back seat apparatus ended up jamming into the square of my back.

I lay there looking at the stars through the car’s moonroof. The desert sky is big and wide. Even when camping alone, I point out the constellations I know as if I’m teaching a child. Then I explore the sky for shapes that look familiar and drag the dregs of my brain for long-lost astrono my class knowledge.*

Then as the darkness settled, the desert ampli fied every noise. Carabin ers tink-tink-tinked as my neighbor campers returned from a night climb, their laughter amplified off the boulder walls. Gravel crunched as campers head ed for the bathroom. Wind surfed the ridges before dropping in and whistling

through the Joshua Trees in the valley.

Rodents skittered be low, and long after dark ness fell completely, a pack of coyotes howled at the rising moon—or more like ly a poor rabbit they were chasing — with such feroc ity I couldn’t help sitting up against the back of the pas senger seat to listen.

All of this is a long-winded way of saying there are many reasons I don’t sleep well in the des ert, and when I awake to the purple and red sky not long after dawn, I really want coffee. This week I had two options, both of which I pur sued. They are as follows.

Morning one, I crawled out of my warm and com

fortable bag, popped the hatch, and dropped to the ground. I heated up water on our propane camp stove, hand-ground roasted coffee beans from Steady State Roasting — tasting notes include chocolate, caramel, and plum — and brewed a

single cup on an Aeropress coffee brewer.

The Aeropress is a plas tic contraption containing a tube with a paper filter and a grate at one end that holds the coffee and then anoth er slightly narrower tube with a rubber stopper that is pressed down in the first tube. The pressure forces the water through the fil ter into the coffee cup. Fun fact, the inventor of the Aeropress also invented the flying disc with the hole in the middle that we toss around at the beach.

The coffee I brewed in the Aeropress was rich and creamy. The chocolate and caramel flavors enhanced the joy I felt as I settled back into a lounge chair to watch the morning light grow white and the sky turn blue until the warmth of the sun’s rays started peaking over Ryan Mountain onto the campground.

Morning two, I got out of the back of the car through the hatch only to get right back into the driver seat. I fired up the engine, ad justed the radio to an indie rock station, and pulled out of the campground, off the gravel, and back onto the blacktop headed for town. I passed the Hall of Horrors and Hemingway and Quail

OCT. 28, 2022 T he C oas T N ews 21
MY FAVORITE cocktail glass of all time I bought at a thrift shop. Photo by Ryan Woldt
Now Available at Total Wine & More in Encinitas Now vailable in Southern40 year old cognac When only the best will do TURN TO CHEERS! ON 24
+ coffee in Joshua Tree Bean Journal Serving dinner Thursday thru Sunday Dine-in or carry-out delicious quality meals Dine in or buy from our butcher shop & grill yourself! Visit us for your holiday BBQ! Locally Sourced Ingredients Available for Micro Catering • In-house Butcher 512 Via de la Valle St. 102, Solana Beach 858-461-0092 • www.ranch45.com BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER RELAX ON OUR PATIO Enjoy a great drink at the end of a long day! BREW WITH A VIEW on a camping trip to Joshua Tree Nation al Park, which included a stop at Joshua Tree Coffee Com pany on Twentynine Palms Highway. Photo
by Ryan
Woldt TURN TO BEAN JOURNAL ON 24
22 T he C oas T N ews OCT. 28, 2022 Where Every Day Matters INDEPENDENT LIVING | ASSISTED LIVING | MEMORY CARE | RESPITE STAYS MEMORY CARE Unlike Any Other Cherish Your Time Together Silvergate’s newly remodeled Memory Care Suites offers families the ability to let go of full-time caregiving and return to being a full-time loved one. With decades of experience caring for seniors with Alzheimer’s, dementia and memory loss, you can trust the experts at Silvergate. You’ve done it because you love them, but there’s a better way. FREE Downloadable Resource “ What To Look For In A Great Memory Care Community ” Learn what questions to ask as you evaluate Memory Care options for your loved one. Scan QR Code to Download 1560 Security Place San Marcos, 92078 Lic.#374600026 (760) 744-4484 SilvergateRR.com/SM

Food &Wine

Revisiting Ranch 45, where steak is the star

in Oceanside.

Aron and Pam definite ly have put their combined experience to good use at the fabulous Ranch 45. Lis ten to a deeper dive into both of their back stories on Lick the Plate on The Mightier 1090 at www.lickthe-plate.com.

Before I get into their newish dinner service, I have to make note of one of the best breakfasts I’ve had in a while. After we re corded the radio portion of our interview, I ordered up their Dutch Steak & Eggs with a Brandt Beef Dutch Steak, two Eben-Haezer eggs, hash browns and a roasted tomato salsa.

I’ll go out on a limb here and say it was the best steak, eggs and hash brown combo I’ve had. EbenHaezer is a free-range egg ranch founded in 1955 in Ramona and it produces some mighty fine eggs.

lick the plate

david boylan

is the first time I’ve had it grilled and it blew me away. The grilled flavor combined with their Harissa-Horse radish sauce and charred lemon is one of a kind and I highly recommend it.

We split the sizable Wedge Salad with Brandt Beef Bacon and I should mention there is a nice-look ing Smoked Ahi Tostada among the starters.

star, but a Kagoshima A5 Wagyu is offered for those seeking meat perfection. I went with my favorite cut: the 12-ounce Brandt Ribeye and my seafaring compan ion Captain Mark Mihelich chose the Brandt Filet Mi gnon. Both were cooked to medium rare perfection.

It’s not all about steak, though. Ranch 45 offers a Beef Stew, Chicken Pail lard, Pan Seared Ocean Trout and a Veal Milanese along with its take on the Drugstore Burger.

SinceI first visited Ranch 45 in 2019 there have been some recent changes that piqued my interest enough to revisit this gourmet out post on Via De La Valle in Solana Beach.

The first is its new din ner service and the second is owner Pam Schwartz bringing on her husband and accomplished chef Aron Schwartz to run the kitchen. I featured Aron several years ago when he was the chef at the Marina Kitchen at the San Diego

Marriot Marquis. Aron is a San Diego native, a Torrey Pines grad uate who attended the Cu linary Institute of America and met Pam, who was also a student there at the time.

His culinary road to Ranch 45 is impressive. Post-graduation, Aron land ed a position as the sous chef for Charlotte Restau rant, a small food and wine-focused restaurant in Lakeville, Connecticut.

After that it was on to Las Vegas where he worked as sous chef for the French

restaurant Lutèce at The Venetian, a great training ground for any chef. Follow ing his time in Las Vegas, Aron returned to San Di ego to work for Bernard’O Restaurant, then Marina Kitchen.

Pam’s culinary resume is equally impressive. Af ter graduating from CIA, she worked primarily front of the house and manage ment positions in Atlanta, Las Vegas and New York. In San Diego, she managed Ar terra, Pamplemousse Grille and Hello Betty Fish House

Brandt Beef is also fea tured prominently on the menu and in the meat case. It’s located in Brawley and has been in business since the early 1900s. Brandt Beef feeds its animals a vegetarian corn-based diet without hormones and is an tibiotic free.

The breakfast and lunch menu has a variety of tempting delights. The Ranch 45 Salad, Brandt Burger, House Smoked Pas trami Sandwich and the Smoked Tri Tip Sandwich are all standouts.

Besides my dally into that fabulous breakfast, this visit was about dinner and that was a standout as well. First up was the Grilled Shrimp Cocktail. Being somewhat of a shrimp cock tail freak, I’ll admit this

When I see risotto on a menu it’s almost a given I’m going to try one of my favor ite dishes ever. We decided to give that a split also as we had beef on our minds for entrees. It was cooked to perfection with an interest ing twist of chunks of Vella Dry Jack cheese. It was a perfect complement to the meat fest that was on the way.

The Butcher Shop Se lection, as they call it, is the star of the show at Ranch 45. Again, Brandt is the

We sat on the very com fortable outdoor dog-friend ly patio, and it should be noted that a major expan sion is underway with a full retail store and expanded butcher’s counter.

Ranch 45 is open sev en days a week for break fast and lunch and Thurs day-Saturday for dinner and is offering a new Wednesday Bistro menu with discounted wine and an everything under $20 menu. Their full service ca tering is also very popular. Kids’ menu is available.

Ranch 45 is located at 512 Via de la Valle, suite 102 in Solana Beach. For more information, visit ranch45.com.

Concerned about Mental Health or Chemical Dependency Issues?

Aurora Behavioral Healthcare San Diego is a 101 bed mental health and chemical dependency treatment hospital located in Rancho Bernardo, providing inpatient and outpatient services for children, adolescents and adults. Aurora San Diego Hospital is a proven leader in behavioral healthcare treatment in San Diego County and is fully licensed and accredited by the Joint Commission on Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO).

For more information on hospital programs and services please visit our website at: aurorasandiego.com or call 858-675-4228 to speak to one of our mental health professionals and to schedule your NO COST confidential assessment.

Help is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Most health insurance plans accepted, including Kaiser and TriCare.

OCT. 28, 2022 T he C oas T N ews 23
Ride E-bikes Free For A Day! Download: BCycle App Select: Day Pass PromoCode: COASTNEWS22 ENCINITAS LEARN TO CODE • JAVA • PYTHON • UNITY Prepare for a career in tech! Students in grade 5-12 In-Person classes Online Classes Prep for AP Comp. Sci. A Work towards Oracle Certificate Small Class sizes (858) 248-0481 info@jointheleague.org Register Now! www.jointheleague.org
THE CULINARY
DREAM TEAM of Aron and
Pam Schwartz
at
Ranch
45 in
Solana Beach.
The couple met as students at the Culinary Institute of America. Photo
by David Boylan

M arketplace News

County Supervisor Desmond talks with residents at Silvergate San Marcos on key concerns for seniors

SAN MARCOS, CA –

October 27, 2022 – More than 30 inquisitive residents and team members from Sil vergate San Marcos -- the area’s premier senior living community -- turned out for an informative presentation by County Supervisor Jim Desmond on Tuesday, Oc tober 18 to hear an update on key issues relevant to seniors in the community. The 45-minute discussion focused on several topics, including mental health, homelessness, and the cur rent state of the Covid pan demic in California.

“We know seniors can have a hard time getting out, which is why we be lieve it’s important to bring intriguing programs like this directly to them right where they live,” said Joan Rink-Carroll, Executive Director for Silvergate San Marcos. “Having access to relevant speakers is a true benefit to living here, and it’s exactly these types of events that make Silvergate so unique among senior liv ing communities. There are so many more unique expe riences like this coming to the community in the com ing weeks.”

Desmond, who is a U.S. Navy Veteran and north San Diego County resident, currently serves as a board member for the San Diego County Water Authority, the Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCO), the San Onofre Nuclear Gen erating Station Removal Board and the North Coun ty Transit District (NCTC).

While not a career politi cian, Desmond spent more than a decade as Mayor of San Marcos while simulta neously working as a pilot for Delta Airlines before re tiring in 2020.

During his speech, the Supervisor gave residents a

robust overview of what he -- as one of five district Su pervisors -- has responsibili ty for on a day-to-day basis.

He described the primary uses of the $7 billion budget they oversee, along with the improvements he’s seeking in county health services, roads and traffic, homeless services, tax collection and many other areas affecting seniors. His talk also ad dressed issues such as men tal health and what’s being done to assist those in need; the growing population of San Marcos and what im provements to the commu nity he believes will help support that growth; safety upgrades through highly trafficked areas; and, how law enforcement’s numbers can be bolstered to keep the citizens of San Diego safe.

“I was pleased to attend this event today to learn more about the Supervisor’s plans,” said Joan Slavinski, a resident of Silvergate who previously owned a floral business in town, served on the local planning board and has resided in San Marcos for more than two decades.

“I went into this discussion a little apprehensive. Poli tics are very personal, but when my husband and I left

mentarily until a barista pops out from a doorway shouting your name.

the event, we felt very sat isfied with the Supervisor’s answers. It left us with an impressed feeling.”

“We appreciate the Su pervisor taking the time to come out and share his views with our residents directly during what we know is a busy political season,” said David Petree, Chief Exec utive Officer of AmeriCare Health & Retirement, the parent company to the Sil vergate retirement commu nities in San Diego County.

Bill Feeney, a former Boston police officer and resident of San Marcos since 2001 said, “I have voted for Desmond a couple of times before. He has deep ties with the community. I want ed to get some time with him during this discussion to see how his views and opinions have shifted with time. I’m glad Silvergate brought him in to speak to us so that I could ask him questions per sonally.”

Bringing local politi cians like Desmond into Sil vergate to engage with res idents is part of the senior living community’s ongoing program of onsite activities and events. The year-round roster of events at Silver gate offers a wide range of

educational opportunities peppered with regular ap pearances from local politi cians, well-known authors, historians, astronomers, ed ucators, health professionals and subject matter experts. These programs are one of the many ways Silvergate is making every day matter for its residents.

ABOUT SILVERGATE SAN MARCOS

For more than 25 years, Silvergate San Marcos has been the region’s premier retirement community, of fering award-winning In dependent Living, Assisted Living and Memory Care services. The community builds intriguing events and fun-filled activities right into the lifestyle, keeping residents active and social ly engaged throughout the year. Families often discov er that loved ones are more ready for senior living than they think. To learn more about Silvergate San Marcos or other upcoming events at the community, call David Nelson, Marketing Direc tor at 760-744-4484 or visit www.SilvergateRR.com. Sil vergate San Marcos is locat ed at 1550 Security Place, San Marcos, CA 92078.

MiraCosta gets grant for stem cell careers

By Staff

OCEANSIDE — MiraCosta College has received a state grant of almost $2.9 million that will be used to offer in ternships, mentoring, and financial support to en courage students to pursue careers in stem cell re search and manufacturing.

The college was one of 16 California public col leges and universities that received grants totaling $46 million from the Cal ifornia Institute for Re generative Medicine, the state’s stem cell agency that was created in 2004 following passage of a $3 billion bond measure to en courage stem cell research.

Mike Fino, dean of mathematics and sciences at MiraCosta College, said students will be placed in internships, partner with a mentor working in the stem cell industry, and re ceive financial support.

“This will broaden participation,” he said.

“We will bring more stu dents who are underrep resented into the fields of regenerative medicine and cell-based manufacturing

CHEERS!

CONTINUED FROM 21

Cheers! North County on Facebook and Instagram.

• The 14th Annual Thanksgiving Punk Rock Food Drive is being held on Saturday, Nov. 12, at Belching Beaver Brewing in Oceanside.

Eight punk bands will be playing the benefit to support the North County Food Bank. Live music goes from 2 p.m. to close, and tickets are only $10.

So have a beer, listen to live music, partake in the raffle, and feel good knowing you’re supporting those in need right here in North County San Diego.

and help them be success ful.”

Students who are working toward a bach elor’s degree in bioman ufacturing at MiraCosta College will be eligible to participate in the program. Two-thirds of the grant money will go directly to students, with each stu dent in the program re ceiving about $68,000 in support over two years.

MiraCosta College and Solano Community Col lege in Fairfield were the only community colleges to receive the state grants. Each college received $2,894,500 to fund similar internship and mentoring programs known as COM PASS — Creating Opportu nities through Mentorship and Partnership Across Stem cell Science.

According to Fino, the college will immediately begin developing an appli cation process so students can join the program for the spring 2023 semester.

The program will accept a total of 25 COMPASS scholars, through three co horts, until the grant con cludes in 2027.

Last year’s event gen erated 26,000 meals for those in need. Hopefully, this year’s concert will be the biggest yet. Get tickets at eventbrite.com or sup port the effort from afar by donating at donate.punk rockfood.com.

• I ran into some of the Punk Rock Food Drive team at Burgeon Beer at The Oasis’s 2nd Anniver sary event this weekend in Escondido.

Congrats to Burgeon Beer for continuing to thrive, grow and represent great beer in North County.

*Shout out to my wife for thinking outside the box.

Springs on my way to the West Entrance.**

Out of the park, I passed desert homes remod eled and painted for AirB nB, and my phone began to ping with unseen texts and e-mails and notifications.

At the intersection with the Old West-themed bar, I turned right.

The building that hous es Joshua Tree Coffee Com pany isn’t open to the pub lic. To get to the coffee, you pass down an outdoor hall way into an open courtyard painted teal. A tree splits the walkway, forcing you to choose left or right. You’ll likely see other guests wait ing even if you get there early.

Around the back of the building is a pop-up tent where a cashier takes your order — mine was a sin gle-origin black drip from Bali — and punches it into a handheld terminal.

You’ll pay and wait mo

I brought my own mug, but they didn’t use it, which was a bummer. I assume it was a policy instituted during the pandemic, and I won’t fault anyone for their efforts at Covid-safety. My coffee came in a pink cup with the blue silhouette of a Joshua Tree adorning the side.

There is a large seat ing patio with picnic tables down a set of stairs behind the building. Sporadic bench seating is closer to the order station, but sitting here in the courtyard is not why I’m here in the desert.

I got back in the car and returned the way I came, to wards the wide-open Josh ua Tree sky free of social media and wi-fi and e-mails.

I waved my National Parks annual pass at a smiling Park Ranger and reen tered the park. I followed the curves past oversized boulders and fields of Josh ua Trees. I turned onto the

satellite road at Cap Rock. A few miles on, the road be gan to climb, and I followed a long sweeping curve to the end of the blacktop.

I dumped my Joshua Tree coffee into my own mug, wandered up a short

path, and looked out over the valley below. The sun was fully up now, the air crisp and clear, and the scale of the view tremen dous. Far to my left, I could see the glint off the surface of the Salton Sea. To the

right, mountain peaks punc ture the sky at more than 10,000 feet of elevation.

The coffee keeps my hand warm, and I can’t help but sigh into the Coachella Valley after taking my first sip. Down below, the San

Andreas crack in the Earth runs east to west. It is a pow erful visual reminder that I should not take the calm of the morning for granted.

I take another sip of my coffee. I lean my knees against the rock wall and let my body rest. I close my eyes. The wind begins to pick up speed, whistling past me, headed for the Joshua Trees in the valley far behind me.

*Last week, I bought a deck of Night Sky playing cards from the Joshua Tree Park HQ. They show the constellations and the sea son they are best viewed. I was thrilled to know the shape I thought was some thing was, in fact, Perseus, the slayer of Medusa.

**Those are rock for mations off the main road through the park.

Get more Bean Journal on roastwestcoast.com or lis ten to the Roast! West Coast coffee podcast on Spotify. Follow @RoastWestCoast on Instagram.

24 T he C oas T N ews OCT. 28, 2022
Marketplace News is paid sponsored content
SAN DIEGO COUNTY Supervisor Jim Desmond speaks with residents at Silvergate San Marcos, a senior living community that hosted the politician to hear about updates to his plans for the region. Courtesy photo
BEAN JOURNAL CONTINUED FROM 21
JOSHUA TREE COFFEE CO. is a java oasis in the California desert. Photo by Ryan Woldt

where I stood, I could see three, tiny white splotches on the sheer rock face on the far side of the Crook ed River.

“Are those climbers,” I asked a woman next to me who probably had better distance vision than myself.

“Yes,” she said, “and there are some there, there, and over there.”

The index finger at the end of her outstretched arm pointed out, counterclock wise, what is not an unusu al sight here at Smith Rock State Park in Central Ore gon.

Smith Rock, a dra matic, jagged feature that rises abruptly out of the High Desert, is considered the birthplace of sport climbing and a rock climb er’s mecca. Just minutes away from Terrebonne, the park claims to offer the third-most-difficult climb ing route in the world.

Things called volcanic welded tuff and basalt col umns with jam cracks and stemming corners draw thousands who love all types of rock climbing.

For years, Central Ore gon has been a magnet for outdoor enthusiasts of all kinds - campers, skiers, bik ers and hikers. But a solid indoor scene that encom passes art, music, theater, museums, bars and restau rants is emerging.

First, a geography les son.

Central Oregon or the High Desert as locals of ten call it, includes Bend (population 98,000); Red mond (32,000); Sisters (2,700); Terrebonne (1,700); and the Confederated Tribes of The Warm Springs Reservation (5,200).

The altitude of the four cities is roughly 3,200 feet and the reservation sits at about 1,500 feet. About 4.5 million visit the area annu ally, and while summer is high season, it’s also toasty. Spring and fall are ideal

for both outdoor and indoor pursuits.

During my three-plus day stay in the area, I head quartered at the Waypoint Hotel in Bend on Highway 97, the lifeblood artery of Oregon’s High Desert. The spacious, tastefully and practically renovated rooms start at $135.

The hotel is a 10- to 15-minute walk to the leafy, historic district of down town and its shops, galler ies, excellent restaurants and the iconic 1940s Tower Theatre, a renovated Art Deco gem on Wall Street. It’s the perfect venue for the annual Bend Film Fes tival.

I began the day with a walk through the ver dant Drake Park and dis covered the appropriately named Mirror Pond, then it’s breakfast at the near by Blissful Spoon, where everything is gluten-free, including pastries.

Next, a screening of the film “Being Michelle." The powerful documentary fol lows the challenging life of a 30-something deaf, autis tic woman who finds solace and healing in her art and the couple who takes up her cause.

Director Atin Mehta spoke at length with the au dience after the screening.

“We had no idea how the story would turn out,” Mehta said of his film, but the gamble paid off. The story grabs filmgoers im mediately and holds them until the end.

Happening the same weekend was one of six concerts presented by the annual Jazz at the Oxford, staged at the well-appoint ed Oxford Hotel in down town Bend. The first concert of the 11th season featured five-time, Grammy-nom inated jazz singer Karrin Allyson and I learned that I was lucky to be there, as tickets were hard to come by.

The woman next to me said she was thrilled to be there because “you have to wait until someone dies to

get season tickets.”

For more photos and discussion, visit www.

facebook.com/elouise.on dash or instagram @elouis eondash.

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Photos by E’Louise
Ondash e’louise ondash hit the road
SMITH ROCK State Park in Central Oregon is volcanic in or igin. The park, 26 miles north of Bend, is a mecca for rock climbers. Photo by E’Louise Ondash
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ARIES (March 21 to April 19)

Although you love being the focus of everyone’s attention, it’s a good idea to take a few steps back right now to just watch the action. What you see can help with an upcoming decision.

TAURUS (April 20 to May 20)

“Caution” continues to be your watch word this week, as a former colleague tries to reconnect old links. There are still some dark places that need to be illuminated.

GEMINI (May 21 to June 20)

Making a good first impression is important. Revealing your often hid den sense of humor can help you get through some of the more awkward situations.

CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Are you taking that Cancer Crab image too seriously? Lighten up. Instead of complaining about your problems, start resolving them. A friend would be happy to help.

LEO (July 23 to August 22) A wid ening distance between you and that special person needs to be handled with honesty and sensitivity. Don’t let jealousy create an even greater gap between you two.

VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Congratulations. Your handling of a delicate family matter rates kudos. But, no resting on your laurels just yet. You still have to resolve that on-the-job problem.

LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) You might surprise everyone by being unusually impulsive this week. But even level-headed Libras need to do the unexpected now and then.

SCORPIO (October 23 to Novem ber 21) A period of turmoil gives way to a calmer, more settled environ ment. Use this quieter time to patch up neglected personal and/or profession al relationships.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) A new relationship could create resentment among fami ly and friends who feel left out of your life. Show them you care by making more time for them.

CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Concentrate on complet ing all your unfinished tasks before deadline. You’ll then be able to use this freed-up time to research new career opportunities.

AQUARIUS (January 20 to Feb ruary 18) You’re right to try to help colleagues resolve their heated dif ferences. But keep your objectivity, and avoid showing any favoritism between the two sides.

PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Your personal life continues to show positive changes. Enjoy this happy turn of events, by all means. But be careful not to neglect your workplace obligations.

BORN THIS WEEK: People of all ages look to you for advice and encouragement. You would make an excellent counselor.

OCT. 28, 2022 T he C oas T N ews 27 1. MYTHOLOGY: What are the Nereids in Greek mythology? 2. LITERATURE: Which 19th-century English novel has the subtitle, “The Parish Boy’s Progress”? 3. ACRONYMS: In printing, what does the acronym DPI stand for? 4. GEOGRAPHY: Which city lies near the largest natural harbor in the world? 5. ANIMAL KINGDOM: How does a bat find its prey? 6. HISTORY: Who is the youngest person to win a Nobel Peace Prize? 7. LANGUAGE: What does the Latin prefix “super-” mean in English? 8. LAW: What is double jeopardy? 9. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: Who founded the American Red Cross? 10. MEDICAL: What vitamin deficiency causes night blindness?
© 2022 King Features Synd., Inc. FROM KING FEATURES WEEKLY SERVICE, 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, FL 32803 CUSTOMER SERVICE: 800-708-7311 EXT. 257 SALOME’S STARS #12345_20221024 FOR RELEASE OCT. 24, 2022 EDITORS: These horoscopes are for use the week of Oct. 31, 2022. TRIVIA TEST ANSWERS 1.Seanymphs.2.“OliverTwist”(CharlesDickens).3.Dotsperinch.4.Sydney,Australia.5. Echolocation(sendinghigh-frequencysoundwaves).6.MalalaYousafzaiofPakistan,who ghtsfiforchildren’srightstoeducation,was17whenshewontheaward.7.Above,over(supervise,etc.).8.Prosecutingapersontwiceforthesameoffense.9.ClaraBarton.10.VitaminA.

LEGALS LEGALS LEGALS LEGALS LEGALS LEGALS LEGALS

CITY OF CARLSBAD

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to you, because your interest may be affected, that the City Council of the City of Carlsbad will hold a public hearing at the Council Chamber, 1200 Carlsbad Village Drive, Carlsbad, California, at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2022, to consider approving a General Plan Amendment and Zone Change to modify of the land use designation of one parcel totaling 0.16 acres (APN: 203-201-01-00) from a R-15 Residential (8 – 15 du/ac) General Plan land use designation to R-15/O Residential/ Office (8 – 15 du/ac), and to change the zoning from Residential Density-Multiple Zone (RD – M) to Residential Professional - Qualified Development Overlay (R-P-Q); and 2) approval of a Tentative Tract Map, Planned Development Permit, Non-Residential Planned Development Permit, and a Site Development Plan to construct four residential air-space condominium units and a detached, approximately 897-square-foot office building located at 2770 and 2754 Jefferson Street within Local Facilities Management Zone 1. The potential environmental effects of the project were adequately analyzed by a previously certified Environmental Impact Report (EIR) and Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program (MMRP) for the Comprehensive General Plan Update (EIR 13-02) and an Addendum to the Final EIR was prepared pursuant to CEQA Guidelines section 15164 because only minor changes and additions to the Final EIR are necessary to address the project changes and no circumstances exist calling for the preparation of a subsequent or supplemental EIR pursuant to CEQA Guidelines sections 15162 and 15163 and more particularly described as:

LOT 1 OF SCHELL AND SITES ADDITION TO CARLSBAD, IN THE CITY OF CARLSBAD, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, ACCORDING TO MAP THEREOF NO. 2145, FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY, FEBRUARY 20, 1929.

Those persons wishing to speak on this proposal are cordially invited to attend the public hearing. Copies of the staff report will be made available on Nov. 4, 2022. The meeting can be viewed online at https://www.carlsbadca.gov/city-hall/meetings-agendas or on the city’s cable channel. In addition, written comments may be submitted to the City Council at or prior to the hearing via U.S. Mail to the attention of Office of the City Clerk, 1200 Carlsbad Village Drive, Carlsbad, CA 92008, or via email to clerk@ carlsbadca.gov. The hearing will commence at 5 p.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard. If you have any questions, please contact Lauren Yzaguirre in the Planning Division at (442) 339-2634 or lauren.yzaguirre@carlsbadca.gov

If you challenge the General Plan Amendment, Zone Change, Tentative Tract Map, Planned Development Permit, Site Development Permit in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City of Carlsbad, Attn: City Clerk’s Office, 1200 Carlsbad Village Drive, Carlsbad, CA 92008, at or prior to the public hearing.

CASE FILE: GPA 2021-0004/ZC 2021-0003/CT 2021-0001/PUD 2021-0004 /PUD 2022-0002/SDP 2021-0014 (DEV2020-0116)

CASE NAME: JEFFERSON MIXED-USE

PUBLISH: FRIDAY, OCT. 28, 2022

CITY OF CARLSBAD CITY COUNCIL

T.S. No. 18-52265 APN: 124-39627-00 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 3/25/2011. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale.

Trustor: ANGELA COOPER AND HENRY COOPER HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS

Duly Appointed Trustee: ZBS Law, LLP fka Zieve, Brodnax & Steele, LLP Deed of Trust

recorded 4/6/2011, as Instrument No. 2011-0178052, The subject Deed of Trust was modified by Loan Modification Agreement recorded as Instrument 20150483068 and recorded on 9/14/2015, of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of San Diego County, California, Date of Sale:11/18/2022 at 9:00

AM Place of Sale: Entrance of the East County Regional Center, East County Regional Center, 250 E. Main Street, El Cajon, CA 92020 Estimated amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $637,713.17

Note: Because the Beneficiary reserves the right to bid less than the total debt owed, it is possible that at the time of the sale the opening bid may be less than the total debt owed. Street Address or other common designation of real property: 3607 LANCEWOOD WAY FALLBROOK, California 92028 Described as follows: As more fully described on said Deed of Trust. A.P.N #.: 124-396-27-00 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale.

NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the

10/28/2022 CN 27075

highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information.

If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property.

NOTICE TO PROPERTY

OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (855) 9763916 or visit this Internet Web site www.auction.com, using the file number assigned to this case 18-52265. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale.

NOTICE TO TENANT: You may have a right to purchase this property after the trustee auction pursuant to Section 2924m of the California Civil Code. If you are an “eligible tenant buyer,” you can purchase the property if you

CITY OF ENCINITAS DEVELOPMENT SERVICES DEPARTMENT LEGAL NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BY THE CITY COUNCIL

PLACE OF MEETING: Council Chambers, Civic Center 505 S. Vulcan Avenue Encinitas, CA 92024 IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT/ SECTION 504 REHABILITATION ACT OF 1973 AND TITLE VI, THIS AGENCY IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY PUBLIC ENTITY AND DOES NOT DISCRIMINATE ON THE BASIS OF RACE, COLOR, ETHNIC ORIGIN, NATIONAL ORIGIN, SEX, RELIGION, VETERANS STATUS OR PHYSICAL OR MENTAL DISABILITY IN EMPLOYMENT OR THE PROVISION OF SERVICE. IF YOU REQUIRE SPECIAL ASSISTANCE TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS MEETING, PLEASE CONTACT THE CITY CLERK AT (760) 633-2601 AT LEAST 72 HOURS PRIOR TO THE MEETING. It is hereby given that the City Council will conduct a Public Hearing on Wednesday, the 9th day of November 2022, at 6:00 p.m., or as soon as possible thereafter, to discuss the following item of the City of Encinitas: CASE NUMBER: PLCY-005101-2022 (SB 9 Interim Ordinance); APPLICANT: City of Encinitas; LOCATION: City-wide; PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Public hearing to consider the adoption of City Council Ordinance No. 2022-19 to consider approval of a one-year extension of Urgency Ordinance No. 2021-25 pertaining to development regulations for urban lot splits and two-unit residential development in single family zones as allowed under Senate Bill 9 (“SB9”).

ENVIRONMENTAL STATUS: This Ordinance is exempt from the provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) pursuant to Government Code Sections 65852.21(j) and 66411.7(n), because the adoption of an ordinance to implement SB9 shall not be considered a project under Division 13 (commencing with Section 21000) of the Public Resources Code. Further, CEQA Guidelines Section 15301 exempts from environmental review the addition of up to 10,000 square feet if the project is in an area where all public services and facilities are available to allow for maximum development permissible in the City’s General Plan.

STAFF CONTACT: Melinda Dacey, Senior Planner-Housing, 760-633-2711 or mdacey@ encinitasca.gov. The draft ordinance is available for review at the City of Encinitas Development Services Department: Encinitas Civic Center, 505 South Vulcan Avenue, Encinitas, CA 92024 during normal business hours, once open to the public and online at https://encinitasca.gov/I-Want-To/Public-Notices/Development-Services-Public-Notices. Under California Government Code Section 65009, if you challenge the nature of the proposed action in court, you may be limited to raising only the issues you or someone else raised regarding the matter described in this notice or written correspondence delivered to the City at or before the time and date of the determination. For further information, or to review the application prior to the hearing, please contact staff or contact the Development Services Department, 505 South Vulcan Avenue, Encinitas, CA 92024 at (760) 633-2710 or by email at planning@encinitasca.gov 10/28/2022 CN 27076

match the last and highest bid placed at the trustee auction. If you are an “eligible bidder,” you may be able to purchase the property if you exceed the last and highest bid placed at the trustee auction. There are three steps to exercising this right of purchase. First, 48 hours after the date of the trustee sale, you can call (855) 976-3916, or visit this internet website tracker. auction.com/sb1079, using the file number assigned to this case 18-52265 to find the date on which the trustee’s sale was held, the amount of the last and highest bid, and the address of the trustee. Second, you must send a written notice of intent to place a bid so that the trustee receives it no more than 15 days after the trustee’s sale. Third, you must submit a bid so that the trustee receives it no more than 45 days after the trustee’s sale. If you think you may qualify as an “eligible tenant buyer” or “eligible bidder,” you should consider contacting an attorney or appropriate real estate professional immediately for advice regarding this potential right to purchase. Dated: 10/21/2022 ZBS Law, LLP fka Zieve, Brodnax & Steele, LLP, as Trustee 30 Corporate Park, Suite 450 Irvine, CA 92606 For Non-Automated Sale Information, call: (714) 848-7920 For Sale Information: (855) 976-3916 www.auction. com Michael Busby, Trustee Sale Officer This office is enforcing a security interest of your creditor. To the extent that your obligation has been discharged by a bankruptcy court or is subject to an automatic stay of bankruptcy, this notice is for informational purposes only and does not constitute a demand for payment or any attempt to collect such obligation. EPP 35682 Pub Dates 10/28, 11/04, 11/11/2022 CN 27073

T.S. No. 089180-CA APN: 162-260-54-00

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 7/15/2013. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU,

YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER On 12/16/2022 at 9:00 AM, CLEAR RECON CORP, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 7/24/2013 as Instrument No. 2013-0461421 and later modified by a Loan Modification Agreement recorded on 06/30/2017, as Instrument NO. 2017-0297007, and later modified by a Loan Modification Agreement recorded on 09/15/2017, as Instrument NO. 2017-0423678, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of San Diego County, State of CALIFORNIA executed by: JASON PARKER, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, SAVINGS ASSOCIATION, OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE; ENTRANCE OF THE EAST COUNTY REGIONAL CENTER, 250 E. MAIN STREET, EL CAJON, CA 92020 all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: MORE FULLY DESCRIBED ON SAID DEED OF TRUST The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 3980 SHENANDOAH DRIVE, OCEANSIDE, CA 92056

The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition, or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation

postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (800) 280-2832 or visit this Internet Web site WWW. AUCTION.COM, using the file number assigned to this case 089180-CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale.

NOTICE TO TENANT: Effective January 1, 2021, you may have a right to purchase this property after the trustee auction pursuant to Section 2924m of the California Civil Code. If you are an “eligible tenant buyer,” you can purchase the property if you match the last and highest bid placed at the trustee auction. If you are an “eligible bidder,” you may be able to purchase the property if you exceed the last and highest bid placed at the trustee auction. There are three steps to exercising this right of purchase. First, 48 hours after the date of the trustee sale, you can call (855) 313-3319, or visit this internet website www. clearreconcorp.com, using the file number assigned to this case 089180-CA to find the date on which the trustee’s sale was held, the amount of the last and highest bid, and the address of the trustee. Second, you must send a written notice of intent to place a bid so that the trustee receives it no more than 15 days after the trustee’s sale. Third, you must submit a bid so that the trustee receives it no more than 45 days after the trustee’s sale. If you think you may qualify as an “eligible tenant buyer” or “eligible bidder,” you should consider contacting an attorney or appropriate real estate professional immediately for advice regarding this potential right to purchase.

FOR SALES INFORMATION: (800) 280-2832 CLEAR RECON CORP 4375 Jutland Drive San Diego, California 92117 STOX 934606_089180-CA 10/21/2022, 10/28/2022, 11/04/2022 CN 27035

NOTICE OF PUBLIC LIEN SALE

NOTICE

secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $214,565.64 If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned or its predecessor caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located.

TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property.

NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the contents of the following storage units will be offered for sale at public auction for enforcement of storage lien. The Online Auction will be held Friday, November 4th, 2022, times as shown below.

Location of Online Auction: www.storagetreasures.co m. Storage address: 1566 E. Valley Parkway, Escondido, CA 92027.

Terms are CASH ONLY! Valley Rose Self Storage reserves the right to refuse any bid or cancel the auction. The following units may include, but not limited to electronic items, furniture, & household items, unless otherwise stated.

At 1:00 pm: Sharolynn Fisher - G20 At 1:15 pm: Nadia Bedolla - F216 10/21, 10/28/2022 CN 27062

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE# 37-202200041200-CU-PT-NC

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner(s): Christopher Brent Carey & Heather Margaret Carey filed a petition with this court for a decree changing name as follows: a. Present name: Christopher Brent Carey change to proposed name: Nanak Love; b. Present name: Heather Margaret Carey change to proposed name: Tiaga Love; c. Present name: Bodhi Suniai Carey change to proposed name Bodhi Suniai Love

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this

28 T he C oas T N ews OCT. 28, 2022

LEGALS LEGALS LEGALS LEGALS LEGALS LEGALS LEGALS

matter appear before this Court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing.

NOTICE OF HEARING: On November 29, 2022 at 8:30 a.m., in Dept. 25 of the Superior Court of California, 325 S Melrose Dr., Vista CA 92081, North County Division.

NO HEARING WILL OCCUR ON THE ABOVE DATE; ATTACHMENT TO ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME (JC FORM #NC-120) NO HEARING WILL OCCUR ON THE DATE SPECIFIED IN THE ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE.

The court will review the documents filed as of the date specified on the Order to Show Cause for Change of Name (JC Form #NC-120).

If all requirements for a name change have been met as of the date specified, and no timely written objection has been received (required at least two court days before the date specified), the Petition for Change of Name (JC Form #NC100) will be granted without a hearing. One copy of the Order Granting the Petition will be mailed to the petitioner.

To change a name on a legal document, including a birth certificate, social security card, driver license, passport, and other identification, a certified copy of Decree Changing Name (JC Form #NC-130) or Decree Changing Name and Order Recognizing Change of Gender and for Issuance of New Birth Certificate (JC Form #NC-230) may be required. Contact the agency(ies) who issues the legal document that needs to be changed, to determine if a certified copy is required.

A certified copy of Decree Changing Name (JC Form #NC130) or Decree Changing Name and Order Recognizing Change of Gender and for Issuance of New Birth’ Certificate (JC Form #NC-230) may be obtained from the Civil Business Office for a fee. Petitioners who are seeking a change of name under the Safe at Home program may contact the assigned department for information on obtaining certified copies.

If all the requirements have not been met as of the date specified, the court will mail the petitioner a written order with further directions.

If a timely objection is filed, the court will set a hearing date and contact the parties by mail with further directions.

A RESPONDENT OBJECTING TO THE NAME CHANGE MUST FILE A WRITTEN OBJECTION AT LEAST TWO COURT DAYS (excluding weekends and holidays) BEFORE THE DATE SPECIFIED. Do not come to court on the specified date. The court will notify the parties by mail of a future hearing date. Any Petition for the name change of a minor that is signed by only one parent must have this Attachment served along with the Petition and Order to Show Cause, on the other nonsigning parent, and proof of service must be filed with the court. IT IS SO ORDERED.

Filed Date: 10/13/2022

James E. Simmons Jr.

Judge of the Superior Court. 10/21, 10/28, 11/04, 11/11/2022

CN 27057

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME

37-2022-

CITY OF CARLSBAD

ORDINANCE NO. CS-435

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF CARLSBAD, CALIFORNIA, AMENDING CARLSBAD MUNICIPAL CODE CHAPTER 2.04, SECTION 2.04.020 – COMPENSATION – CITY CLERK AND CITY TREASURER

WHEREAS, the voters of the City of Carlsbad at the June 3, 2008 election voted to change the powers and duties of the City of Carlsbad by adopting a City Charter; and

WHEREAS, under the California Constitution, the City Council has plenary authority to legislate matters of local concern notwithstanding general laws to the contrary; and

WHEREAS, the compensation of the City Clerk and City Treasurer is a matter of local concern; and

WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Carlsbad wishes to adopt a standing methodology that will govern future salary adjustments for the City Clerk and City Treasurer.

NOW, THEREFORE, the City Council of the City of Carlsbad, California, ordains as follows that:

1. The above recitations are true and correct.

2. That Carlsbad Municipal Code Chapter 2.04, Section 2.04.020 is amended to read as follows:

2.04.020 Compensation—City clerk and city treasurer.

A. The compensation of the city clerk and city treasurer shall be set at $1,070 per month, payable biweekly. In January of each year, when the city council considers compensation adjustments under section 2.04.010(A), the city council shall consider whether to adjust the compensation for the city clerk and city treasurer.

Adjustments to the compensation for the city clerk and city treasurer shall not exceed the amount established by the San Diego Regional Consumer Price Index.

The city council may not enact retroactive increases for years in which a salary increase was not approved.

B. In addition to the compensation the city clerk and city treasurer receive under subsection (A) of this section, the city clerk and city treasurer shall receive an automobile allowance as established by resolution of the city council.

EFFECTIVE DATE: This ordinance shall be effective thirty days after its adoption; and the City Clerk shall certify the adoption of this ordinance and cause the full text of the ordinance or a summary of the ordinance prepared by the City Attorney to be published at least once in a newspaper of general circulation in the City of Carlsbad within fifteen days after its adoption.

INTRODUCED AND FIRST READ at a Regular Meeting of the Carlsbad City Council on the 11th day of October, 2022, and thereafter

PASSED, APPROVED AND ADOPTED at a Regular Meeting of the City Council of the City of Carlsbad on the 18th day of October, 2022, by the following vote, to wit:

AYES: Hall, Blackburn, Bhat-Patel, Acosta, Norby.

NAYS: None.

ABSENT: None.

PUBLISH DATE: Oct. 28, 2022 City of Carlsbad | City Council 10/28/2022 CN 27067

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:

Petitioner(s): Emily Ruth Nybo filed a petition with this court for a decree changing name as follows: a. Present name: Emily Ruth Nybo change to proposed name: Emily Ruth Nybo Petersen

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this Court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing.

NOTICE OF HEARING: On November 29, 2022 at 8:30 a.m., in Dept. 25 of the Superior Court of California, 325 S Melrose Dr., Vista CA 92081, North County Division.

NO HEARING WILL OCCUR ON THE ABOVE DATE; ATTACHMENT TO ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME (JC FORM #NC-120)

NO HEARING WILL OCCUR ON THE DATE SPECIFIED IN THE ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE.

The court will review the documents filed as of the date specified on the Order to Show Cause for Change of Name (JC Form #NC-120).

If all requirements for a name change have been met as of the date specified, and no timely written objection has been received (required at least two court days before the date specified), the Petition for Change of Name (JC Form #NC100) will be granted without a

hearing. One copy of the Order Granting the Petition will be mailed to the petitioner.

To change a name on a legal document, including a birth certificate, social security card, driver license, passport, and other identification, a certified copy of Decree Changing Name (JC Form #NC-130) or Decree Changing Name and Order Recognizing Change of Gender and for Issuance of New Birth Certificate (JC Form #NC-230) may be required. Contact the agency(ies) who issues the legal document that needs to be changed, to determine if a certified copy is required.

A certified copy of Decree Changing Name (JC Form #NC130) or Decree Changing Name and Order Recognizing Change of Gender and for Issuance of New Birth’ Certificate (JC Form #NC-230) may be obtained from the Civil Business Office for a fee. Petitioners who are seeking a change of name under the Safe at Home program may contact the assigned department for information on obtaining certified copies.

If all the requirements have not been met as of the date specified, the court will mail the petitioner a written order with further directions.

If a timely objection is filed, the court will set a hearing date and contact the parties by mail with further directions.

A RESPONDENT OBJECTING TO THE NAME CHANGE MUST FILE A WRITTEN OBJECTION AT LEAST TWO COURT DAYS (excluding weekends and holidays) BEFORE THE DATE SPECIFIED. Do not come to court on the specified date. The court will notify the parties by mail of a future hearing date.

Any Petition for the name change of a minor that is signed by only one parent must have this Attachment served along with the Petition and Order to

Show Cause, on the other nonsigning parent, and proof of service must be filed with the court. IT IS SO ORDERED.

Filed Date: 10/13/2022 James E. Simmons Jr. Judge of the Superior Court. 10/21, 10/28, 11/04, 11/11/2022 CN 27054

SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) CASE #: 37-2021-00024078CU-PO-CTL NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): CITY OF SAN DIEGO; and DOES 1 through 50, inclusive. YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: (LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE):

CARLOS CARDOZA LUGO, an individual, NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below.

You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online SelfHelp Center (www.courtinfo. ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court.

CITY OF CARLSBAD Summary of Ordinance CS-438 per Government Code §36933(c)

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF CARLSBAD, CALIFORNIA, AMENDING CARLSBAD MUNICIPAL CODE TITLE 2, CHAPTER 2.42 HISTORIC PRESERVATION COMMISSION AND TITLE 22 HISTORIC PRESERVATION

The ordinance contains a comprehensive update to the city’s Historic Preservation Ordinance, including adopting a local Mills Act program.

The ordinance revises the criteria for designating historic resources, historic landmarks and historic districts to be consistent with state law. The ordinance specifies that only the property owner can initiate the process for designating a property as a historic resource. If the Historic Preservation Commission recommends, and the City Council determines that a property qualifies for the local register, then the property is designated as a historic resource. Removing the property from the local register follows the same process.

The ordinance eliminates references to the 1991 Cultural Resource Survey because the survey was deleted by the City Council in 1993.

Under the ordinance, work on a historic resource will require a permit and property owners cannot remove their property from the list of historic resources upon request. If the application for work is on a historic resource subject to a historical property contract – that is, a Mills Act contract -- then the City Planner would review the scope of work to make sure it is consistent with the terms of the contract, the Secretary of Interior’s Standards and any applicable local guidelines or standards adopted, and issue a permit administratively. If the application is for a property not subject to a historical property contract or cannot be issued administratively, then the Historic Preservation Commission must hold a public hearing to consider the request.

Proposed Mills Act program:

Important features of the Mills Act program, established by the state legislation and incorporated into the ordinance include:

• The Mills Act program is a voluntary program.

• The contract is between the city and the owner of a designated historic resource.

• The initial contract is for 10 years. At the end of each year, the term is automatically extended one year, unless the owner or the city gives notice not to renew.

• The agreement provides for periodic inspections to determine compliance with the contract.

• The penalty for breach of contract is 12.5% of the current property value, payable to the San Diego County assessor.

• The basic requirement is that the owner preserve, rehabilitate and maintain the historical and architectural character of the property.

• The contract runs with the property, so its benefits and obligations automatically transfer to each new owner and the property is not reassessed to full market value upon sale.

• The amount of tax reduction depends on a number of variables. The largest tax reductions usually occur for properties purchased or reassessed in recent years and at high market values. For properties with existing low assessments, taxes cannot increase due to a Mills Act contract, but it is possible that they would not decrease.

The ordinance also makes changes to Chapter 2.42 to clarify the purpose and authorization of the Historic Preservation Commission to assist the commission, the city staff who work with the commission and the public better understand all matters with which the commission is concerned.

A certified copy of the full text of the proposed ordinance is posted in the Office of the City Clerk, 1200 Carlsbad Village Drive, Carlsbad, CA 92008.

PUBLISH DATE: Oct. 28, 2022 City of Carlsbad | City Council

There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia. org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www. courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil. case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case.

AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO despues de que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefonica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta.Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas informacion en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov),

en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exencion de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podra quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www. lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniendose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesion de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y direccion de la corte es): San Diego Superior Court Civil Division 330 W. Broadway

10/28/2022 CN 27066

San Diego CA 92101

The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la direccion y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es):

Daniel J. Rafii, Esq.

SBN 244174

RAFII & ASSOCIATES, P.C. 9100 Wilshire Blvd., Ste 465E Beverly Hills CA 90212 Telephone: 310-777-7877 Fax: 310-777-7855

Date: 06/02/2021

Clerk (Secretario), by M. Guyot, Deputy (Adjunto)

NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served as an individual defendant. 10/21, 10/28, 11/04, 11/11/2022 CN 27053

NOTICE OF PUBLIC LIEN SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the contents of the following storage units will be offered for sale at public auction for enforcement of storage lien. The Online Auction will be held Friday, November 4th, 2022 at 1:00 pm. Location of Online Auction: www.storagetreasures. com. Storage address: 2405 Cougar Drive Carlsbad, CA 92010. Terms are CASH ONLY! West Coast Self-Storage reserves the right to refuse any

OCT. 28, 2022 T he C oas T N ews 29
CASE#
00041174-CU-PT-NC
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CITY OF CARLSBAD Summary of Ordinance CS-437 per Government Code §36933(c)

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF CARLSBAD, CALIFORNIA, REPEALING AND REPLACING CARLSBAD MUNICIPAL CODE CHAPTERS 18.04 (BUILDING CODE), 18.06 (UNIFORM HOUSING CODE), 18.08 (MECHANICAL CODE, TO BE RETITLED HISTORICAL BUILDING CODE), 18.12 (ELECTRICAL CODE), 18.16 (PLUMBING CODE), 18.18 (SOLAR ENERGY CODE), 18.19 (DANGEROUS BUILDING CODE), 18.20 (RESIDENTIAL CODE), 18.21 (GREEN BUILDING STANDARDS CODE), AND 18.30 (ENERGY CONSERVATION REGULATIONS), AND ADDING CHAPTERS 18.03 (GENERAL PROVISIONS), 18.09 (EXISTING BUILDING CODE), AND 18.10 (MECHANICAL CODE), BASED ON THE 2022 CALIFORNIA BUILDING STANDARDS CODE AS AMENDED

The ordinance proposes to adopt by reference the 2022 Building Standards Code, Code of Regulations Title 24, into the Carlsbad Municipal Code. The 2022 Building Standards Code was adopted by the State Building Standards Commission and will be enforced statewide effective Jan. 1, 2023. Local jurisdictions are required to enforce these regulations as the minimum standards for construction throughout the State.

The 2022 Building Standards Code includes the International Building Code, National Electrical Code, International Residential Code, Uniform Mechanical Code, Uniform Plumbing Code, and Green Building Code.

The City Council is proposing to adopt the state model codes with amendments to some of the building standards to address locally unique topographical, geological, climatic, and environmental conditions. The local amendments being considered can be categorized into two types: 1) changes to building standards, and 2) changes that are administrative in nature. The proposed amendments to the state model code building standards are few and minor in scope and intended to address unique conditions and situations. The proposed changes to the building standards relate to:

• Noise standards near the airport or freeway

• Screening of roof-mounted equipment and rooftop hazards

• Roof rainfall drainage systems

• Fire classification rating for solar photovoltaic systems

• Green Building Code, Energy Code, and Climate Action Plan:

o Single-family home service water heating systems – requires solar or recovered energy of at least 60%.

o Non-residential service water heating systems – requires solar or recovered energy of at least 40%.

o Service water heating in restaurants of a certain size or valuation (at least 1,000 square feet or $200,000).

o Energy efficiency upgrades such as duct sealing, attic insulation, cool roofs, lighting packages, etc. in existing residential buildings of a certain valuation ($60,000 or more).

o Non-residential on-site renewable energy – 1% of electricity in projects of a certain size or valuation (greater than 1,000 square feet or $200,000).

o Non-residential solar photovoltaic required in projects of a certain size or valuation (greater than 2,000 square feet of roof area, or 75% of existing floor area, and $1 million).

Additional administrative amendments are intended to streamline, clarify, and improve the plan check review and permitting and inspection process. The proposed changes that are administrative in nature include:

• Make residential building permits valid for 12 months.

• Establish an appeal process in which appeals are heard and decided by trained professionals.

• Allowing the issuance of partial permits to allow applicants to initiate limited work (i.e., underground plumbing or electrical work, trenching for footings) while permit reviews are being completed.

• Provide more specificity in the applicable fees that might apply when obtaining a building permit or related cost-recovery service, including but not limited to investigation fees, preliminary review fees, and reinspection fees.

• Clarify when a remodel or addition qualifies as new construction, which would require the entire existing structure to meet current code standards.

• Clarify the role and duties of the building official to carry out procedures relating to violations associated with unpermitted or illegal construction projects.

A certified copy of the full text of the proposed ordinance is posted in the Office of the City Clerk, 1200 Carlsbad Village Drive, Carlsbad, CA 92008.

PUBLISH DATE: Oct. 28, 2022

City of Carlsbad | City Council

Batter Garrett

10/28/2022 CN 27065

CITY OF CARLSBAD Summary of Ordinance CS-436 per Government Code §36933(c)

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF CARLSBAD, CALIFORNIA, REPEALING EXISTING CHAPTER 17.04 OF THE CARLSBAD MUNICIPAL CODE, AND ADOPTING A NEW CHAPTER 17.04, FIRE PREVENTION CODE BASED ON THE 2022 CALIFORNIA FIRE CODE

The ordinance repeals Chapter 17.04 Fire Prevention Code of the Carlsbad Municipal Code and replaces it with a new Chapter 17.04 Fire Prevention Code. The new Chapter 17.04 adopts the 2022 California Fire Code, by reference, with certain changes and amendments.

The ordinance includes specific fire codes that are more stringent than those adopted by the state, including amendments that were approved in prior years and additional technical amendments that reflect the City of Carlsbad’s unique conditions and risks.

These amendments are necessary due to local climatic, geological, and/or topographical conditions in the City of Carlsbad.

No new fees will be established, and no fees will be increased as a result of this proposed ordinance.

A certified copy of the full text of the proposed ordinance is posted in the Office of the City Clerk, 1200 Carlsbad Village Drive, Carlsbad, CA 92008.

PUBLISH DATE: Oct. 28, 2022

City of Carlsbad | City Council

of Gender and for Issuance of New Birth’ Certificate (JC Form #NC-230) may be obtained from the Civil Business Office for a fee. Petitioners who are seeking a change of name under the Safe at Home program may contact the assigned department for information on obtaining certified copies.

If all the requirements have not been met as of the date specified, the court will mail the petitioner a written order with further directions.

If a timely objection is filed, the court will set a hearing date and contact the parties by mail with further directions.

A RESPONDENT OBJECTING TO THE NAME CHANGE MUST FILE A WRITTEN OBJECTION AT LEAST TWO COURT DAYS (excluding weekends and holidays) BEFORE THE DATE SPECIFIED. Do not come to court on the specified date. The court will notify the parties by mail of a future hearing date. Any Petition for the name change of a minor must have this Attachment served along with the Petition and Order to Show Cause, on the other nonsigning parent, and proof of service must be filed with the court. IT IS SO ORDERED.

Filed Date: 10/12/2022

Michael T Smyth Judge of the Superior Court 10/21, 10/28, 11/04, 11/11/2022 CN 27037

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE# 37-202200040239-CU-PT-NC

ATTACHMENT TO ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME (JC FORM #NC-120) NO HEARING WILL OCCUR ON THE DATE SPECIFIED IN THE ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE.

The court will review the documents filed as of the date specified on the Order to Show Cause for Change of Name (JC Form #NC-120).

If all requirements for a name change have been met as of the date specified, and no timely written objection has been received (required at least two court days before the date specified), the Petition for Change of Name (JC Form #NC100) will be granted without a hearing. One copy of the Order Granting the Petition will be mailed to the petitioner.

To change a name on a legal document, including a birth certificate, social security card, driver license, passport, and other identification, a certified copy of Decree Changing Name (JC Form #NC-130) or Decree Changing Name and Order Recognizing Change of Gender and for Issuance of New Birth Certificate (JC Form #NC-230) may be required. Contact the agency(ies) who issues the legal document that needs to be changed, to determine if a certified copy is required.

10/28/2022 CN 27064

10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04/2022

27024

NOTICE OF ENTRY OF JUDGMENT ON SISTERSTATE JUDGMENT CASE# 37-2022-00001923CL-EN-NC Superior Court of California, County of San Diego 325 S. Melrose Dr. Vista, CA 92081

PLAINTIFF: Whatcom Educational Credit Union DEFENDANT: Brandon Cotes, et al.

TO JUDGMENT DEBTOR: Brandon Cotes

YOU ARE NOTIFIED

Upon application of the judgment creditor, a judgment against you has been entered in this court as follows:

(1) Judgment Creditors: Whatcom Educational Credit Union

(2) Amount of judgment entered in this court: $17,661.34.

This judgment was entered based upon a sister-state judgment previously entered against you as follows:

is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Salomon Dominguez, 10/28, 11/04, 11/11, 11/18/2022 CN 27074

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9022607 Filed: Oct 12, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Blush Skin Bar; B. Blush Events; C. Blush Spa Suites. Located at: 3077 State St., Carlsbad CA 92008 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Cherilyn Marie Cowell, 6691 Encelia Pl., Carlsbad CA 92011. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 10/01/2022 S/ Cherilyn Marie Cowell, 10/28, 11/04, 11/11, 11/18/2022 CN 27072

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9022846 Filed: Oct 14, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Datura Consulting. Located at: 3600 Bayview Pl., Carlsbad CA 92010 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Datura EHS and Compliance LLC, 3600 Bayview Pl., Carlsbad CA 92010. This business is conducted by: Limited Liability Company. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 04/01/2022 S/Samantha Chua, 10/28, 11/04, 11/11, 11/18/2022 CN 27071

bid or cancel the auction. The following units may include, but not limited to electronic items, furniture, & household items, unless otherwise stated.

Size Name

10x10 Heskett, George

10x30 Cayne, Jaeson

10x15 Durant, Barbie

10x7.5 Hayes St.Clair, Edith

10x7.5 Medina, Roberto

5x5 Horn Baker, Joleen

5x5 Quigley, Tesha 10/21, 10/28/2022 CN 27038

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE# 37-202200040903-CU-PT-CTL

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner(s): Lee Deborah Batter Garrett filed a petition with this court for a decree changing name as follows: a.

Present name: Lee Deborah Batter Garrett change to proposed name: Deborah

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this Court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing.

NOTICE OF HEARING: On November 28, 2022 at 8:30 a.m., in Dept. 61 of the Superior Court of California, County of San Diego, 330 W. Broadway, San Diego CA 92101 Central Division, Hall of Justice.

NO HEARING WILL OCCUR ON THE ABOVE DATE; ATTACHMENT TO ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME (JC FORM #NC-120) NO HEARING WILL OCCUR ON THE DATE SPECIFIED IN THE ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE.

The court will review the documents filed as of the date specified on the Order to Show Cause for Change of Name (JC Form #NC-120).

If all requirements for a name change have been met as of the date specified, and no timely written objection has been received (required at least two court days before the date specified), the Petition for Change of Name (JC Form #NC100) will be granted without a hearing. One copy of the Order Granting the Petition will be mailed to the petitioner.

To change a name on a legal document, including a birth certificate, social security card, driver license, passport, and other identification, a certified copy of Decree Changing Name (JC Form #NC-130) or Decree Changing Name and Order Recognizing Change of Gender and for Issuance of New Birth Certificate (JC Form #NC-230) may be required. Contact the agency(ies) who issues the legal document that needs to be changed, to determine if a certified copy is required.

A certified copy of Decree Changing Name (JC Form #NC130) or Decree Changing Name and Order Recognizing Change

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:

Petitioner(s): Nadine Linda Vaughan filed a petition with this court for a decree changing name as follows: a. Present name: Nadine Linda Vaughan change to proposed name: Nadine Linda Boulware

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this Court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing.

NOTICE OF HEARING: On November 22, 2022 at 8:30 a.m., in Dept. 25 of the Superior Court of California, 325 S Melrose Dr., Vista CA 92081, North County Division.

NO HEARING WILL OCCUR

ON THE ABOVE DATE;

A certified copy of Decree Changing Name (JC Form #NC130) or Decree Changing Name and Order Recognizing Change of Gender and for Issuance of New Birth’ Certificate (JC Form #NC-230) may be obtained from the Civil Business Office for a fee. Petitioners who are seeking a change of name under the Safe at Home program may contact the assigned department for information on obtaining certified copies.

If all the requirements have not been met as of the date specified, the court will mail the petitioner a written order with further directions.

If a timely objection is filed, the court will set a hearing date and contact the parties by mail with further directions.

A RESPONDENT OBJECTING TO THE NAME CHANGE MUST FILE A WRITTEN OBJECTION AT LEAST TWO COURT DAYS (excluding weekends and holidays) BEFORE THE DATE SPECIFIED. Do not come to court on the specified date. The court will notify the parties by mail of a future hearing date.

Any Petition for the name change of a minor that is signed by only one parent must have this Attachment served along with the Petition and Order to Show Cause, on the other nonsigning parent, and proof of service must be filed with the court. IT IS SO ORDERED. Filed Date: 10/07/2022 James E. Simmons Jr. Judge of the Superior Court.

(1) Sister-state: Washington (2) Sister-state court: Skagit County Superior Court, 205 W. Kincaid, Room 102, Mount Vernon, WA 98273 (3) Judgment entered in sisterstate on: September 24, 2021 (4) Title of case and case number: Whatcom Educational Credit Union v Brandon Cotes, et al. Case No. 21-2-00171-29

A sister-state judgment has been entered against you in a California court. Un-less you file a motion to vacate the judgment in this court within 30 DAYS after service of this notice, this judgment will be final.

This court may order that a writ of execution or other enforcement may issue. Your wages, money, and property could be taken without further warning from the court.

If enforcement procedures have already been issued, the property levied on will not be distributed until 30 days after you are served with this notice.

Date: 01/19/2022

Clerk, by D. Hansen, Deputy NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served as an individual judgment debtor. 10/07, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28/2022 CN 26996

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9023452

Filed: Oct 24, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. San Marcos Wood Working. Located at: 141 Pacific St., San Marcos CA 92069 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Salomon Dominguez, 141 Pacific St., San Marcos CA 92069. This business

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9023031 Filed: Oct 17, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Champagne Lakes RV Resort LLC. Located at: 8310 Nelson Way, Escondido CA 92026 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Champagne Lakes RV Resort LLC, 8310 Nelson Way, Escondido CA 92026. This business is conducted by: Limited Liability Company. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 10/23/2020 S/Charles J Williams, 10/28, 11/04, 11/11, 11/18/2022 CN 27070

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9022659 Filed: Oct 12, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Pacific View OB-GYN Medical Group; B. Pacific View OB-GYN. Located at: 6260 El Camino Real #105, Carlsbad CA 92009 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Pacific View OB-GYN Medical Group Inc., 6260 El Camino Real #105, Carlsbad CA 92009. This business is conducted by: Corporation. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 09/02/2022 S/ Jeremy Raimo, 10/28, 11/04, 11/11, 11/18/2022 CN 27069

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9022240 Filed: Oct 07, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Kindle & Stone. Located at: 1785 Savannah Way, San Marcos CA 92069 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Reform Fitness LLC, 3225 Business Park Dr. #4, Vista CA 92081. This business is conducted by: Limited Liability Company. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 08/31/2022 S/ Sarah Holder, 10/28, 11/04, 11/11, 11/18/2022 CN 27068

30 T he C oas T N ews OCT. 28, 2022
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CITY OF CARLSBAD

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to you, because your interest may be affected, that the City Council of the City of Carlsbad will hold public hearings at the Council Chamber, 1200 Carlsbad Village Drive, Carlsbad, California, at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2022, or as soon thereafter as the matter may be called, at the City Hall Council Chamber, pursuant to California Government Code Sec. 6066, to consider the following items:

California Building Standards Code Adoption

Every three years, the California Building Standards Commission (Commission) updates the state’s model building codes, which local jurisdictions adopt and enforce as the minimum standards for new construction. The state allows local amendments to the state model codes when findings can be made that such code changes are necessary to address locally unique topographical, geological, climatic, and environmental conditions.

This is a public notice for two related items: MCA2022-0005 and MCA2022-0006.

1. MCA2022-0005 (Amending Title 18, Building Codes and Regulations). Introduction of an ordinance that adopts and amends the 2022 triennial edition of the Building Code, Residential Code, Fire Code, Existing Building Code, Historical Building Code, Electrical Code, Plumbing Code, Mechanical Code, Green Building Standards Code and the Energy Code.

2. MCA2022-0006 (Amending Title 17, Fire Protection). Introduction of an ordinance that adopts and amends the 2022 triennial edition of the Fire Code.

In accordance with California Government Code Sec. 6066, publication of notice pursuant to this section shall be once a week for two successive weeks. This is the second notice.

Those persons wishing to speak on this proposal are cordially invited to attend the public hearing. Copies of the staff reports presenting the projects were made available on Nov. 4, 2022. If you have any questions about the portions of the California Building Standards Codes that includes building codes and regulations (MCA2022-0005), please contact Mike Strong, Assistant Community Development Director, in the Planning Division at (442) 339 -2721 or mike.strong@carlsbadca.gov. If you have any questions about the portion that includes the fire code (MCA2022-0006), please contact Randy Metz, Fire Division Chief, in the Fire Department at (442) 339-2661 or randy.metz@ carlsbadca.gov.

If you challenge the project in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City of Carlsbad, Attn: City Clerk’s Office, 1200 Carlsbad Village Drive, Carlsbad, CA 92008, at or prior to the public hearing.

CASE FILE: MCA2022-0005 and MCA2022-0006

CASE NAME: Adopt and Amend the 2022 California Building Standards Code PUBLISH: Oct. 28, 2022

CITY OF CARLSBAD CITY COUNCIL

Statement of Abandonment of Use of Fictitious Business Name #2022-9022610 Filed: Oct 12, 2022 with San Diego County Recorder/County Clerk.

Fictitious Business Name(s) To Be Abandoned: A. San Diego Analytics. Located at: 1104 Las Flores Dr., Carlsbad CA CA 92008. Mailing Address: Same. The Fictitious Business Name Referred to Above was Filed in San Diego County on: 10/29/2018 and assigned File # 20189027075. Fictitious Business Name is being Abandoned By: 1. Sheffler and Martin, 1104 Las Flores Dr., Carlsbad CA 92008. The Business is Conducted by: Corporation. S/William J Sheffler, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04, 11/11/2022 CN 27061

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9022649 Filed: Oct 12, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. McGuire Glassworks. Located at: 2948 Clay Ave., San Diego CA 92113 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Nicolaus Edward McGuire, 2948 Clay Ave., San Diego CA 92113; B. Hollie Ann Hoppes McGuire,

2948 Clay Ave., San Diego CA 92113. This business is conducted by: Married Couple. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 01/02/2017 S/Nicolaus Edward McGuire, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04, 11/11/2022 CN 27060

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9021256

Filed: Sep 23, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. MegaDeath Machine. Located at: 1672 Acacia Ln., Fallbrook CA 92028 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Megan Elaine Vilardi, 1672 Acacia Ln., Fallbrook CA 92028. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 12/14/2020 S/ Megan Elaine Vilardi, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04, 11/11/2022 CN 27056

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9022948

Filed: Oct 17, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County

10/28/2022 CN 27063

Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Goldenstate Sushi; B. Goldenstate Sushi Inc. Located at: 3365 Mission Ave. #I, Oceanside CA 92058 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Goldenstate Sushi Inc., 1632 Grandview St., Oceanside CA 92054. This business is conducted by: Corporation. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 05/05/2021 S/Monique Johnston, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04, 11/11/2022 CN 27052

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9022439

Filed: Oct 10, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Lost at Sea Oyster Sauce. Located at: 135 Roper Ct., Encinitas CA 92024 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Adiv Elysium, 135 Roper Ct., Encinitas CA 92024. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Adiv Elysium, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04, 11/11/2022 CN 27051

Statement of Withdrawal From Partnership Operating Under Fictitious Business Name #20229022810 Filed: Oct 14, 2022 with San Diego County Clerk.

Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Swami’s Point. The Original Statement of this Fictitious Business Name was Filed in San Diego County on: 10/23/2017 and assigned File #20179026063. Located at: 1105 S. Coast Hwy 101, Encinitas CA San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: Same. The Following Partner Has Withdrawn: 1. Donald M. Hansen, 1105 S. Coast Hwy 101, Encinitas CA 92024. S/Donald M. Hansen, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04, 11/11/2022 CN 27050

NOTICE INVITING BIDS

CITY OF ENCINITAS CITYWIDE LED REPLACEMENT PROJECT

Notice is hereby given that the City of Encinitas will receive ELECTRONIC BIDS ONLY, via the on-line bidding service PlanetBids, up to 2:00 PM, on November 3, 2022. At which time said ELECTRONIC BIDS will be publicly opened and read. The results will be posted on PlanetBids immediately at the close of the bid opening. Bidders need not be present at bid opening. The results of the bids for the CITYWIDE LED REPLACEMENT PROJECT will only be available in PlanetBids starting at 2:00 p.m. on November 3, 2022.

WORK TO BE DONE: The work to be done generally includes: Work to be done consists of purchasing the LED luminaire and replacement of existing pedestrian, safety, and street lighting fixtures with new LED fixtures and other related work not mentioned above.

The Contractor shall complete the proposed work in its entirety. Should any detail or details be omitted from the Contract Documents which are essential to its functional completeness, then it shall be the responsibility of the Contractor to furnish and install such detail or request such details from the City Engineer so that upon completion of the proposed work, the work will be acceptable and ready for use.

Engineer’s Estimate - $442,000

LOWEST RESPONSIVE AND RESPONSIBLE BIDDER: All bids are to be compared on the basis of the City Engineer’s estimate of the quantities of work to be done and the unit prices bid by the bidder. The award of the contract, if it is awarded, will be to the lowest responsive and responsible bidder. Pursuant to Public Contract Code Section 1103, a “Responsible Bidder”, means a bidder who has demonstrated the attributes of trustworthiness, as well as quality, fitness, capacity, and experience to satisfactorily perform this public works contract.

OBTAINING CONTRACT DOCUMENTS: The website for this advertisement and related documents is: PlanetBids (http://www.encinitasca.gov/bids). All bid documents and project correspondence will be posted on the PlanetBids website. It is the responsibility of Proposed Bidders to check the website regularly for information updates and Bid Clarifications, as well as any addenda. To submit a bid, a bidder must be registered with the City of Encinitas as a vendor. To register as a vendor, go to the following link (http://www.encinitasca.gov/bids) and then proceed to the “Register As A Vendor” link. In compliance with California Contract Code Section 20103.7 electronic copies will be made available to contractor plan series bid boards and contractors upon their request. The City makes no representation regarding the accuracy of Contract Documents received from third party plan rooms and Contractor accepts bid documents from third parties at its own risk.

Contractors shall be responsible for obtaining all addendums for the project and signing and submitting all addendums with their bid. Any contractor that does not acknowledge receipt of all addendums by signing and submitting all addendums with their bid shall be deemed a non-responsive bidder and their bid will be rejected.

PREVAILING WAGE AND ENFORCEMENT COMPLIANCE: This is a prevailing wage project and prevailing wage rates for this locality and project as determined by the director of industrial relations apply, pursuant to labor code section 1770, et. Seq. The Prevailing Wage Determination for this project is 2022-2. A copy of the prevailing wage rates shall be posted on the job site by the contractor. A schedule of prevailing wage rates is available for review at the City’s offices or may be found on the internet at http://www.dir.ca.gov/Public-Works/Prevailing-Wage.html. The successful bidder shall be required to pay at least the wage rates set forth in that schedule. Certified Payroll records shall be maintained by the contractor and copies of the certified payroll shall be electronically sent to the Department of Industrial Relations and be delivered to the City at the end of each month during the entire duration of the project

The project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the Department of Industrial Relations. Subject to exceptions as set forth in Labor Code section 1771.1, contractor or subcontractor shall not be qualified to bid on, be listed in a bid proposal, subject to the requirements of Section 4104 of the Public Contract Code or engage in the performance of any contract for public work, as defined by statute, unless it is currently registered and qualified to perform public work pursuant to Labor Code Section 1725.5. The City may not accept a bid, nor any contract or subcontract entered into without proof of the contractor or subcontractor’s current registration to perform public work pursuant to Section 1725.5. For more information, go to http://www.dir.ca.gov/Public-Works/Certified-Payroll-Reporting.html

COMPLIANCE WITH LABOR LAWS: The prime contractor shall be responsible for insuring compliance with all applicable provisions of the Labor Code, including, but not limited to, section 1777.5.

Please also see INFORMATION AND INSTRUCTIONS FOR BIDDERS in bid documents for additional bid information and requirements.

City of Encinitas

BY: Jill T. Bankston, P.E.

DATE: October 13, 2022 Director of Engineering/City Engineer

END OF NOTICE INVITING BIDS

10/21/2022, 10/28/2022 CN 27047

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9022811 Filed: Oct 14, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Swami’s Point. Located at: 1105 S. Coast Hwy 101, Encinitas CA 92024 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Hansen Family South 101 LLC, 1105 S. Coast Hwy 101, Encinitas CA 92024; 2. Brooks Gifford Jr., 1105 S. Coast Hwy 101, Encinitas CA 92024. This business is conducted by: Joint Venture. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 01/01/2021 S/ Joshua Hansen, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04, 11/11/2022 CN 27049

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9022740 Filed: Oct 13, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Pacific Pressure Washing. Located at: 3401 Yosemite St., San Diego CA 92109 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Pacific Pressure Washing LLC, 3401 Yosemite St., San Diego CA 92109. This business is conducted by: Limited Liability Company. Registrant First Commenced to Transact

Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 10/03/2022 S/ Fernando Greve, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04, 11/11/2022 CN 27046

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9022168 Filed: Oct 06, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Rustic 102; B. Rustic 103. Located at: 6105 Paseo Delicias #10, Rancho Santa Fe CA 92067 San Diego. Mailing Address: 821 Ocean Crest Rd, Cardiff CA 92007. Registrant Information: 1. Jaime Adame Gattas, 821 Ocean Crest Rd., Cardiff CA 92007. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 09/16/2022 S/Jaime Adame Gattas, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04, 11/11/2022 CN 27045

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9022167 Filed: Oct 06, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Rustic 101. Located at: 1786 1,2 N. Coast Hwy 101, Encinitas CA 92024 San Diego. Mailing Address: 821 Ocean Crest Rd, Cardiff CA 92007. Registrant Information: 1. Carmen B. Barnard, 821 Ocean Crest Rd.,

Cardiff CA 92007. This business is conducted by: Individual.

Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 04/01/1999 S/Carmen B. Barnard, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04, 11/11/2022 CN 27044

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9022598 Filed: Oct 12, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Amalfi Enoteca Italiana. Located at: 1556 Camino Del Arroyo Dr., San Marcos CA 92078 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Made in Italy LLC, 1265 High Bluff Ave., San Marcos CA 92078. This business is conducted by: Limited Liability Company. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 10/07/2022 S/ Emiljano Muslija, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04, 11/11/2022 CN 27043

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9022602 Filed: Oct 12, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Amalfi Marina Bar. Located at: 1035 La Bonita Dr. #B, San Marcos CA 92078 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same.

Registrant Information: 1. Made in Italy LLC, 1265 High Bluff Ave., San Marcos CA 92078. This business is conducted by: Limited Liability Company. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 08/24/2020 S/Emiljano Muslija, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04, 11/11/2022 CN 27042

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9022051

Filed: Oct 05, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Some Pig Insights. Located at: 1281 Hymettus Ave., Encinitas CA 92024 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Kathryn Spitzberg Johnson, 1281 Hymettus Ave., Encinitas CA 92024. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Kathryn Spitzberg Johnson, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04, 11/11/2022 CN 27036

OCT. 28, 2022 T he C oas T N ews 31
Coast News legals continued on page 32

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9022464

Filed: Oct 10, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Yuwei Designs; B. Yuwei. Located at: 2118 Twain Ave., Carlsbad CA 92008 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Yuwei Designs Inc., 2118 Twain Ave., Carlsbad CA 92008. This business is conducted by: Corporation. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 11/16/2012 S/ Yuwei Lee, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04/2022 CN 27031

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9022524 Filed: Oct 11, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk.

Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Kishko Management Group. Located at: 4785 Tarantella Ln., San Diego CA 92130 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Anna Kishko, 4785 Tarantella Ln., San Diego CA 92130. This business is conducted by: Individual.

Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 10/11/2022 S/Anna Kishko, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04/2022 CN 27030

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9021396 Filed: Sep 27, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk.

Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Coastal Luxury Home Living; B. Coastal Beauty and Brows; C. Coastal Photography. Located at: 4820 Del Monte Ave., San Diego CA 92107

San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Coastal Co. & Luxury, 4820 Del Monte Ave., San Diego CA 92107. This business is conducted by: Corporation.

Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Krystal Ihm, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04/2022 CN 27026

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9022273 Filed: Oct 07, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk.

Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Lilac Recovery Center. Located at: 1507 E. Valley Pkwy Ste 3 #360, Escondido CA 92027

San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. NDLLJ Inc., 1507 E. Valley Pkwy Ste 3 #360, Escondido CA 92027. This business is conducted by: Corporation. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 04/19/2022 S/Richard R. Rice, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04/2022 CN 27025

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9022354 Filed: Oct 07, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Career Ecology. Located at: 7717 Calle Madero, Carlsbad CA 92009 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Irvington Group Inc., 7717 Calle Madero, Carlsbad CA 92009. This business is conducted by: Corporation. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 10/01/2022 S/ John Wallace, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04/2022 CN 27023

Statement of Abandonment of Use of Fictitious Business Name #2022-9022196 Filed: Oct 06, 2022 with San Diego County Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s) To Be Abandoned: A. Med Care Pharmacy. Located at: 161 Thunder Dr. #100, Vista CA San Diego 92083. Mailing Address: Same. The Fictitious Business Name Referred to Above was Filed in San Diego County on: 04/06/2022 and assigned File # 2022-9008059. Fictitious Business Name is being Abandoned By: 1. Asbac Pharmacy Inc, 161 Thunder Dr. #100, Vista CA 92083. The Business is Conducted by:

Corporation. S/Joseph Devins 10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04/2022 CN 27022

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9022173 Filed: Oct 06, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk.

Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Anthony Vitale; B. Joseph Colubus Knight. Located at: 948 Greenfield Dr., El Cajon CA 92021 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Trevor Neil Scumidt, 948 Greenfield Dr., El Cajon CA 92021. This business is conducted by: Individual.

Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 04/01/2015 S/Trevor Neil Scumidt, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04/2022 CN 27021

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9021198 Filed: Sep 23, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk.

Fictitious Business Name(s): A. The Agni Life. Located at: 4655 Norma Dr., San Diego CA 92115 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Agnieszka Messina, 4655 Norma Dr., San Diego CA 92115. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 09/29/2021 S/ Agnieszka Messina, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04/2022 CN 27020

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9022097 Filed: Oct 05, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Encinitas Periodontics and Dental Implants. Located at: 477 N. El Camino Real, Encinitas CA 92024 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Dr. Kanika Bembey DDS Corporation, 6671 Agave Cir., Carlsbad CA 92011. This business is conducted by: Corporation. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 06/01/2021 S/

Kanika Bembey, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04/2022 CN 27019

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9021887 Filed: Oct 03, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Re3 Gifts; B. Re3. Located at: 514 Via De La Valle #303, Solana Beach CA 92075 San Diego. Mailing Address: 1850 Bel Air Ter., Encinitas CA 92024. Registrant Information: 1. Bydand Group LLC, 1850 Bel Air Ter., Encinitas CA 92024. This business is conducted by: Limited Liability Company. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 09/23/2022 S/Christopher Gordon, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04/2022 CN 27018

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9021989 Filed: Oct 04, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Catch Real Estate; B. Catch Realty Solutions. Located at: 13277 Kingsfield Ct., San Diego CA 92130 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Blue Corner Inc., 13277 Kingsfield Ct., San Diego CA 92130. This business is conducted by: Corporation.

Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Sandra Alatriste, 10/07, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28/2022 CN 27016

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9021562 Filed: Sep 28, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Fountain Car Wash. Located at: 1352 N. Santa Fe, Vista CA 92083 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Farhedge Properties LLC, 6640 Curlew Terr., Carlsbad CA 92011. This business is conducted by: Limited Liability Company.

Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under

the Above Names(s) as of: 09/28/2022 S/Nicholas Hedges, 10/07, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28/2022 CN 27010

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9021471 Filed: Sep 27, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Spellbinder Coffee. Located at: 4806 Glenhollow Cir., Oceanside CA 92057 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. R & R Foods, 4806 Glenhollow Cir., Oceanside CA 92057. This business is conducted by: Corporation. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Taylor Omori, 10/07, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28/2022 CN 27009

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9021320 Filed: Sep 26, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Sauc.d. Located at: 123 W. Jason St. #B, Encinitas CA 92024 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Adam Conklin, General Partner, 123 W. Jason St. #B, Encinitas CA 92024; 2. Raven LoGiurato, 123 W. Jason St. #B, Encinitas CA 92024. This business is conducted by: General Partnership. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 08/01/2022 S/Adam Conklin; Raven LoGiurato, 10/07, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28/2022 CN 27008

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9021777 Filed: Sep 30, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Salty Sister Consulting; B. Salty Sister Co. Located at: 1220 Morse St., Oceanside CA 92054 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Salty Sister Consulting LLC, 1220 Morse St., Oceanside CA 92054. This business is conducted by: Limited

Liability Company. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 01/01/2022 S/ Alisa Prestie, 10/07, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28/2022 CN 27007

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9021574 Filed: Sep 28, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Geier Goodman Design. Located at: 1209 Meadow Wood Pl., Encinitas CA 92024 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Susan Geier, 1209 Meadow Wood Pl., Encinitas CA 92024. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 03/11/2019 S/ Susan Geier, 10/07, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28/2022 CN 27006

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9020068 Filed: Sep 08, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk.

Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Toasted Gastrobrunch & Sammy’s Dinner. Located at: 339 N. Cleveland St., Oceanside CA 92054 San Diego. Mailing Address: 875 Prospect St. #203, La Jolla CA 92037. Registrant Information: 1. Sammy’s Woodfired Pizza, 875 Prospect St. #203, La Jolla CA 92037. This business is conducted by: Corporation. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Amy Bulgatz, 10/07, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28/2022 CN 27004

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9021390 Filed: Sep 27, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk.

Fictitious Business Name(s): A. SD Pool Technician. Located at: 1833 S. Ditmar St., Oceanside CA 92054 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Ethan Wyatt Cox, 1833 S. Ditmar St., Oceanside CA 92054. This business is conducted by:

Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 09/27/2022 S/ Ethan Wyatt Cox, 10/07, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28/2022 CN 27003

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9021003 Filed: Sep 20, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Great Western Mortgage. Located at: 2029 Shadytree Ln., Encinitas CA 92024 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. William Edward Taylor, 2029 Shadytree Ln., Encinitas CA 92024. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 04/01/2000 S/William Edward Taylor, 10/07, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28/2022 CN 27002

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9021582 Filed: Sep 28, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Arrai Media. Located at: 1244 San Elijo Rd. N., San Marcos CA 92078 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Arrai Media, 1244 San Elijo Rd. N., San Marcos CA 92078. This business is conducted by: Limited Liability Company. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: Not Yet Started S/Charles Edward Harris Jr, 10/07, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28/2022 CN 27001

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9021591 Filed: Sep 29, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. Left Coast Food Co. Located at: 220 Bingham Dr. #104, San Marcos CA 92069 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. GCP Distribution LLC, 220 Bingham Dr. #104, San Marcos CA 92069. This business is conducted by: Limited Liability Company. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 06/07/2017 S/Guy Roney, 10/07, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28/2022 CN 27000

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9021044 Filed: Sep 21, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. LPD Carwash & Detail Center. Located at: 1580 Leucadia Blvd., Encinitas CA 92024 San Diego. Mailing Address: 310 Smilax Rd. #1, San Marcos CA 92069. Registrant Information: 1. Paola Lara Olvera, 310 Smilax Rd. #1, San Marcos CA 92069. This business is conducted by: Individual. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 09/21/2022 S/ Paola Lara Olvera, 10/07, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28/2022 CN 26995

Fictitious Business Name Statement #2022-9021509 Filed: Sep 28, 2022 with County of San Diego Recorder/County Clerk. Fictitious Business Name(s): A. La Jolla Press; B. Roam Federal. Located at: 1902 Wright Pl. #200, Carlsbad CA 92008 San Diego. Mailing Address: Same. Registrant Information: 1. Roam Advisors LLC, 1902 Wright Pl. #200, Carlsbad CA 92008. This business is conducted by: Limited Liability Company. Registrant First Commenced to Transact Business Under the Above Names(s) as of: 09/01/2022 S/ Heath A. Anderson, 10/07, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28/2022 CN 26991

32 T he C oas T N ews OCT. 28, 2022
LEGALS LEGALS LEGALS LEGALS LEGALS LEGALS LEGALS This Free Paper Strengthens Our Community 78% of The Coast News’ readers are age appropriate 25 to 64 years which accounts for the “highest levels of consumer spending.”* Proudly serving North San Diego County for over 32 years! advertising@coastnewsgroup.com | www.coastnewsgroup.com | 760.436.9737 The CoasT News Group The Coast News • Inland Edition*Source: CVC annual readership study

What Burn Ban?

Things got a little heat ed — which is to say 73 vehicles were utterly con sumed by raging flames — at the annual fall festival at the Robinson Family Farm in Temple, Texas on Oct. 15, an event that features a pumpkin patch, hayrides, live music, kids’ games and more. The Bell County Fire Marshall’s Office is seek ing information about an attendee who, according to witnesses reporting on social media, flicked a cig arette butt in the grassy parking lot, which, com bined with the gusty winds and dry conditions that had already prompted the coun ty to issue a burn ban, most likely started the blaze. “I have to say that is the most exciting and expensive pumpkin patch we’ve been to,” one attendee posted on Facebook after the disaster claimed their family van. [Autoblog.com, 10/18/2022]

Unsportsmanlike

David Alan Taylor, 41, of Pensacola, Florida, did not follow the guidelines for safe tackling recom mended by the various youth, college and profes sional football organiza tions when he charged onto the practice field on Sept. 20, donned a helmet, got into a football stance and charged his target, burying his helmet in said target’s chest before grabbing him by the arms and pushing him to the ground. But it wasn’t Taylor’s form that got him in trouble; it was the fact that his victim was 9 years old. The Pensaco la News Journal reported that shortly before demon strating his rusty football skills, Taylor had become

enraged upon seeing his son being overpowered by the victim during a oneon-one tackling drill. The tackled youth was not seri ously hurt, and Taylor was booked to the Escambia County jail on a first-de gree felony count of aggra vated child abuse and a misdemeanor count of dis orderly conduct. [Pensacola News Journal, 9/29/2022]

Awesome!

When your horse runs off with a herd of wild mus tangs, let him go, because man, he’s gone. That was the reality Shane Adams of Fielding, Utah, had to accept when his 10-yearold horse, Mongo, joined a passing herd in the middle of the night during a camp ing trip eight years ago.

Adams reported his horse missing and searched the area regularly for years, to no avail. But Yahoo Insider reported that the Bureau of Land Management recent ly contacted Adams with incredible news: Mongo had been found. The horse is seriously underweight due to the scarcity of food in the region where he and the herd were roaming, but Adams said Mongo is in good health and has not forgotten his training.

Adams said his life had taken a downward turn in the years since Mongo disappeared; he and his wife divorced, and an auto accident in 2021 left him disabled. However, he now feels things are looking up: “My life is like down in the dumps, like the car acci dent. I lost my house, I lost everything. I got my horse back though.” [Yahoo! Life, 10/12/2022]

Rare Vintage

A pair of Levi’s jeans found in an abandoned mine in the American

West sold for a staggering $87,400 at a New Mexico auction on Oct. 1, reported CNN.com. What was so spe cial about the jeans? They dated back to the 1880s, and while it’s not uncom mon for “denim archaeol ogists” to find jeans from that period of history, it’s incredibly rare to find them so well-preserved. “There’s a couple of soft spots on the jeans that could use a bit of reinforcement, but oth erwise they’re super-duper solid jeans,” said Zip Ste venson, who runs a denim repair shop in Los Angeles and placed the winning bid with a partner. Though Stevenson would prefer the jeans were purchased and put on display in a museum, he said he would consider selling them to a private buyer. “I could easily imag ine Johnny Depp or Jason Momoa wearing them,” Stevenson said. [CNN, 10/20/2022]

Smelly Situations

— An overturned semi on I-95 in Cumberland County, North Carolina, on Oct. 18 gave commuters more than the usual traf fic accident inconvenience. That’s because when 22,000 pounds of catfish and 150 gallons of diesel fuel hits the road ... it stinks. State troopers told WBTW-13 that the semi driver was unhurt in the crash, which was caused by another driv er pulling in front of him. [WBTV-13, 10/18/2022]

— The Fairfield Sun Times reported that Ollie the black Labrador was safe and sound, but very stinky, after spending a few hours in the sewer behind his owners’ home in Holbury, Hampshire, England on Oct. 18. The dog was miss ing when his owners re turned to the house earlier

in the day after a brief out ing, and it was discovered that he had fallen through a manhole in the backyard into the sewer about three meters below. Neighbors were asked not to flush their toilets during the res cue operation. [Fairfield Sun Times, 10/18/2022]

People With Issues

Rorie Susan Woods, 55, of Hadley, Massachusetts, is facing multiple assault and battery charges after she took extreme measures in an attempt to prevent what she and other protes tors believed was a wrong ful eviction being carried out by sheriff’s deputies in Longmeadow on Oct. 12. WWLP-22 reported that Woods drove an SUV haul ing a trailer loaded with beehives to the residence of Alton King, the homeowner being served an eviction notice. While wearing a protective beekeeping suit, Woods shook the beehives, unleashing a swarm of an gry bees on the officers, three of whom were allergic to bee stings. Sheriff Nick Cocchi said Ross’ actions could have gotten someone killed: “We had one staff member go to the hospi tal and luckily, he was all right or she would be fac ing manslaughter charges.” [WWLP-22, 10/20/2022]

But Is It Art?

The city of Cheadle, Al berta, Canada, is the tem porary home of a newly re vealed shrine to snacking. A 17-foot-tall statue com missioned by Frito-Lay was unveiled in early October. The work memorializes the signature Cheetos experi ence: three fingers hold ing up one of the crunchy snacks, their tips covered in the powdery orange residue the brand has christened “Cheetle.” “We’re excited

Enlarged pelvic veins not cause for concern

By Dr. Keith Roach DEAR DR. ROACH: I'm a 71-year-old female with no children, but I did have an ectopic pregnancy at age 43. Other than that, I have had no "female" issues. I was getting a CT scan for my spleen area, when it was discovered that I had enlarged pelvic veins in my groin. I don't have pel vic pain, nor do I have pain with sex. So, the only symp toms I do have, which may or may not be related, are bloating and some constipa tion.

I have seen a vascular surgeon and a urogynocol

ogist to ask about this con dition and if I need "treat ment" for it. Both were rather vague, saying if I'm not experiencing pain, I should just get it imaged every year. Is that sound advice? Can the veins twist and cause blockage? Can they cause a blood clot? I can't really get any info on it. -- J.F.

ANSWER: Although advanced imaging like CT and MRI scans have led physicians to be able to make more precise diag noses than before, there is an issue of what to do with "incidental" findings. Many people have written to me about small tumors (which are far more common than we thought), but enlarged pelvic veins are another example of an incidental finding.

Some women do have a condition called "pel vic congestion syndrome," which is a cause of pelvic pain that is worsened by prolonged standing or sex ual activity. This condition is found in women in the reproductive age group, especially those who have had multiple children, but

is not found in menopaus al women. Since you aren't in the age group and don't have symptoms, you clearly don't have pelvic congestion syndrome.

Dilated veins in the legs are simply called var icose veins, and they are often due to loss in function of the valves in our legs as we age. Pelvic vein enlarge ment is the same thing: Veins get bigger as we age.

There are cases of blood clots in the pelvic veins, but it is not clear whether a per son like you is at increased risk. I don't see the need to repeat the imaging studies.

DEAR DR. ROACH: Why do multivitamins in variably provide some in gredients with more than 100% -- and some with less than 100% -- of the daily re quirement? Why aren't all ingredients 100%? -- D.H.

ANSWER: 100% of the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) is intend ed to provide the nutrient requirements for about 98% of the population. Most people will get what they need from food. Many North Americans feel that

more vitamins are better or decide to take a vitamin pill as an insurance policy against an inadequate diet. Both of these have been reasonable hypotheses, but many studies have been done and have not shown any convincing benefit of taking vitamins in absence of a clear medical reason for deficiency.

Vitamin manufacturers put in large amounts mostly for marketing: People are more likely to buy the pill that has 1,000% of B12, for example, since it must be better than the one with 500%. In fact, your body will simply excrete more B12 if you take more, so the supplement with 1,000% of a water-soluble vitamin like B12 is not any better for you.

However, a few nutri ents in multivitamins are dangerous at high levels: Vitamin A has a high risk of causing birth defects at high doses, and beta caro tene promotes lung cancer growth in smokers, as two examples. Responsible vi tamin manufacturers don't put in doses of vitamins that will be toxic if taken as directed.

to be celebrating Cheetle and Canadians’ cheesy, Cheetle-dusted fingertips on such a grand scale and in such a uniquely mischie vous way,” said Lisa Allie, senior marketing director at PepsiCo Foods Canada. CNN reports that the Chee tle Hand Statue will be on display in Cheadle until Nov. 4, when it embarks on a tour of Canada. [CNN, 10/12/2022]

Court Jester

A municipal judge in Cleveland, Ohio, was or dered to be removed from the bench on indefinite sus pension on Oct. 18 and will undergo evaluations for her physical and mental health after a long series of bizarre incidents and behavior, the Columbus Dispatch re ported. The Ohio Supreme Court took action after Judge Pinkey S. Carr wore sneakers, spandex shorts, T-shirts and even tank tops while sitting the bench — a bench that had become lit tered with so many cups, dolls and novelty items that Carr’s own attorney described it as “resembling a flea market.” The 58-page complaint filed by the Ohio Supreme Court states that, among many other inci dents, Carr repeatedly dis cussed the television show “P-Valley” and joked about giving lenient sentences and accepting kickbacks with attorneys and defen dants while court was in session. When a prosecut ing attorney had not yet arrived for a hearing, Carr is quoted as having stated, “The prosecutor’s not here. Let’s see how much we can get away with.” A tempo rary replacement for Carr will be appointed by Gov ernor Mike DeWine and will sit the bench until vot ers elect a new judge in a future election. [Columbus

Dispatch, 10/18/2022]

Ewwwww WRGB in Albany re ported the arrests of Chrys tal Thomas, 33, on Oct. 4, and Austin Smith, 20, on Oct. 15, for the duo’s part in the illegal tattooing of a 10-year-old boy. Thomas, the boy’s mother, claimed she was not in the room when Smith permanently inked the child’s name on his arm “in full-size block letters.” Authorities were made aware of the situation when the boy asked a school nurse for Vaseline to apply to the tattoo. Both Thomas and Smith were charged with endangering the wel fare of a child, and Smith was additionally charged with second-degree unlaw fully dealing with a child.

[WGRB, 10/19/2022]

The Passing Parade

On Oct. 5, the Shizuo ka (Japan) prefectural police were alerted to the presence of an unattended attache case, partially hid den among some roadside bushes in the Shimomata neighborhood of Kakega wa. Sora News 24 reported that the bomb squad was dispatched, traffic in the area was shut down, and an onsite command post was set up to assess the case and safeguard against an explosion, but when inves tigators finally opened the case, they were greeted not with a bomb, but with a collection of sex toys. No one was injured, and the site was cleared after about three and a half hours, but online commentors seized the opportunity to get off some zingers, including “Not a bomb, but still dis charge-related,” and “I’m sure whoever forgot their attache case there is really hard up right now.” [Sora News 24, 10/6/2022]

Moments in Time

The hisTory Channel

• On Nov. 12, 1892, William "Pudge" Hef felfinger becomes the first professional football player when Pittsburgh's Allegheny Athletic As sociation pays him $500 to play as a ringer in a game against the rival Pittsburgh Athletic Club. Before then, players had traded their services on the field for expense mon ey or trinkets, not cash.

• On Nov. 11, 1918, at 11 o'clock of the 11th day of the 11th month, the First World War comes to an end. The Great War claimed the lives of 9 mil lion soldiers; 21 million more were wounded. Ci vilian casualties caused indirectly by the war num bered close to 10 million.

• On Nov. 10, 1969, "Sesame Street," a TV show that would teach gen erations of young children the alphabet and counting, makes its broadcast de but. Over the years, critics have blamed the show and its use of brief segments for shrinking children's at tention spans.

• On Nov. 13, 1974, Karen Silkwood is killed in a car accident in Okla homa on her way to a meet with a reporter. She reportedly carried documents proving that Kerr-McGee Corp. was negligent when it came to worker safety at its plutonium plant. The theory was that someone forced her off the road to prevent the meeting.

• On Nov. 8, 1974, Salt Lake City resident Carol DaRonch narrowly escapes being abducted by serial killer Ted Bun dy. When Bundy was fi nally captured in 1978 in Florida, he confessed to the murders of 28 wom en, and was executed in 1989.

• On Nov. 12, 1799, Andrew Ellicott Doug lass, an early American astronomer born in Ver mont, witnesses the Leo nids meteor shower from a ship off the Florida Keys. Douglass' journal entry is the first known record of a meteor show er in North America.

OCT. 28, 2022 T he C oas T N ews 33
odd Files

Copy

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Becoming

better writer

Meaning if you’ve read this far without your eyes glazing over, you’re signifi cantly different from the overwhelming majority of the population.

know I’m a stick ler for good com munications, of tentimes cringing at what passes today for quality composition.

Too often I’ve encoun tered emails with dead links, websites missing pages and sales letters with typographical errors.

At great personal ex pense I’ve learned the fol lowing lessons. Convinced we’re all selling to someone in some way, I’m providing these thoughts for improv ing your writing after com pleting your “brain dump.”

1) BE CLEAR . If you don’t know your objective, the reader won’t be able to figure it out either.

2) INFORM . Answer audience questions before they’re asked.

3) BE CONSISTENT Write like you speak. And yes, I REALLY speak this way.

4) BE QUICK . Most people have a short atten tion span; get to the point ASAP.

5) ANTICIPATE . Ask yourself, “What’s in it for the reader?”

6) BE A SOLUTION Address readers’ concerns.

7) BE ACCURATE . Al ways check your facts BE FORE you publish.

8) BE BOLD. Don’t be afraid to make bold FAC TUAL statements.

9) KNOW YOUR READER . Keep messages suited to your audience’s demographics.

10) BE BRIEF. Don’t overdo the details.

11) SPEAK APPRO PRIATELY. Despite the headlines, a positive tone will engage more readers than a harsh one.

12) GET INPUT. Ask others to read your draft for a different perspective. Take their criticisms seri ously.

13) INCLUDE A CTA . Marketing materials with out a Call to Action are wasted opportunities.

14) PROOFREAD Proof and edit your work. Then have someone else do it too.

15) BE SUCCINCT Keep it organized … and short.

The thing is lots of folks who can speak figure they can also write persua sively. Actually, crafting solid, effective messag ing is an art. Making one word do the job of eight is a time-consuming, frustrat ing challenge.

And the kicker? Writ ing short, effective copy is harder than writing long winded prose. Attention spans are getting shorter, and it’s not uncommon to have just a few seconds to grab attention with your letter, text, email, head line, or website.

Regardless of what you’re selling, good com munications is critical to reaching your objectives. Next time you’re fashion ing your message, edit first drafts using these ideas as a filter.

You might be surprised by the results.

With that said, I wish you a week of profitable marketing.

Get more free marketing advice at www.askmrmarketing.com.

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E ducational opportuniti E s

Learn to play ‘Best Day of My Life’ - today!

What if you could learn to play a song today? Learn ing to play a piece of music may seem complicated, but in the following five easy steps, you will be able to play today!

In this interactive mu sic lesson article, we will focus on these five steps.

STEP 1. Download and print the Sheet Music from our website: www.leading notestudios.com/sheet-mu sic

STEP 2. Listen to the Song "Best Day Of My Life” by American Authors.

STEP 3. Count the Beats and the Rhythm.

STEP 4. Learn the two

chords, D & G.

STEP 5. Sing and Play with our interactive in structional video: www. leadingnotestudios.com/ bestdayofmylifeinstruc tionalvideo

STEPS 1- 3

Once you have down loaded the sheet music from our website, listen to the song and count the rhythm. You will notice each line of the song is four counts. (4/4) Count one, two, three, four, and start over again, one, two, three, four.

STEP 4. Learn the two chords, D & G.

For the D chord, you will play three notes, D, F

sharp, and A. For the G chord, you will play three notes, G, B, and D.

Those two chords are played throughout the song, back and forth. Look at the sheet music. It's that sim ple.

STEP 5. Sing and Play with our Interactive Video!

We have the entire song on video on our web site which you can watch for free:

The Grauer School to host Discover Grauer Day open house

Encinitas, CA – The Grauer School welcomes the community to learn about renowned indepen dent education at its Dis cover Grauer Day Open House on Saturday, No vember 5, 2022, between 11:00 am and 2:00 pm.

Families can stop by anytime for a student-led campus tour and a chance to talk with Grauer faculty members, current parents and students about the school’s unique programs. Stuart Grauer, Founder and Head of School, will give a brief overview of the school’s philosophy approx imately every 20 minutes. RSVPs are recommended at grauerschool.com.

For 31 years, The Grau er School has balanced humanitarian, relation ship-based education with college preparatory rigor.

As a small school by design, with approximate ly 160 students in grades 7-12 and a 7:1 student to teacher ratio, The Grauer School emphasizes Socrat ic teaching, expeditionary learning, and meaningful mentoring relationships.

Dr. Grauer notes, “Our goal is to provide a struc ture that promotes learn ing both inside and outside of the classroom, lifelong relationships, clear stu dent voices, self-reflection, and creativity among our

students. Our students graduate with clear voices. They will make a differ ence, and they know it.”

Through The Grauer School’s Expeditionary Learning program, stu dents travel locally and abroad.

These expeditions provide opportunities for students to think on their feet, make lasting friend ships, and offer humanitar ian and ecological service.

The goal of the school’s expeditionary learning program is for students to connect with each oth er and faculty mentors outside of the traditional classroom setting.

The Grauer School pro vides an inspiring range of STEM (Science, Tech nology, Engineering, and Mathematics) options for students. Morgan Brown, STEM Center Coordina tor notes, “We maintain a very successful robotics program, led by our Shock wave Robotics team which has competed at the FIRST Tech Challenge (FTC) World Competitions an im pressive six times.

We also offer engi neering design,computer science, and graphic de sign electives. Our STEM classes provide hands-on opportunities that direct ly correlate to and expand upon what students have

learned in the classroom.”

The Grauer School’s extensive extra-curricular programs include music and performing arts, visu al arts, photography, film studies, leadership, and community service.

Students also have a wide variety of no-cut sports to choose from, in cluding archery, basket ball, cross-country, flag football, golf, soccer, surf ing, tennis, track and field, and volleyball.

Dana Abpla nalp-Diggs, Grauer’s Prin cipal, says “Our small size affords students greater opportunities for lead ership and inclusion in a variety of activities they might not have access to at a larger, more impersonal school.”

Shelley Joslin, Di rector of Counseling, re marks, “We believe that our emphasis on relation ship-driven education is the reason for the school’s superior college accep tance rates.

Last year, 96% of our graduates were accepted to one of their two top choice schools.

The connection with mentors is vital to the de velopment of engagement and self-advocacy and makes our students highly attractive to colleges and universities.”

ed Methodist Church, 170 Calle Magdelena, Encini tas, with reception to fol low. Admission: $12 gen eral, $10 seniors/students/ military, $30/family max. For more information, visit northcoastsymphony.com.

MUSIC AND MORE

Carlsbad Music Festi val returns 1 to 9 p.m. Nov. 5 at St. Michael’s by-theSea, 2775 Carlsbad Blvd., Carlsbad, with headliner Monophonics, 60 free per

formances plus ticketed events. For schedules and tickets, visit carlsbadmu sicfestival.org/#festivalan nounce.

SUPPORT THE SURFER The California Surf Museum invites all to its 14th annual gala fundrais er from 4 to 10 p.m. Nov. 5 at Cape Rey Hilton, 1 Point Drive, Carlsbad. Tickets at surfmuseum.org, at the California Surf Museum, or call (760) 721-6876.

BEETHOVEN AND MORE The MiraCosta Sym

phony Orchestra presents “Romantic Masterworks — Beethoven and Dvorák” at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 5 and Nov. 6 in the Concert Hall (OC2406) on campus, 1 Bar nard Drive, Oceanside. $10 General Admission. More information at miracosta. edu.

NOV. 6

FALL BACK FEST

Fall Back to the Past with a free family-friendly Sunday at the 22nd annu al Fall Back Festival from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 6

in downtown San Diego’s Gaslamp Quarter. For more information, contact (619) 233-5008 or visit gas lampquarter.org.

JOKES4SPOKES

Thanks4Giving hosts the Jokes4Spokes fundrais er from 5 to 7:30 p.m. Nov. 6 at the Mic Drop, 8878 Clairemont Mesa Blvd., San Diego. Cost $25 at https:// do-something-now.org/.

NOV. 7

HONORING MILITARY

Republican Women of

California-San Marcos host a dinner to honor veterans and active-duty military at 5:30 p.m. Nov. 7 the St. Mark Golf Club, 1750 San Pablo Drive, Lake San Mar cos. Registration ($31 to RWC-SM), and names of those veterans/active duty you would like to have rec ognized, to Elizabeth Lais ter, 1053 San Pablo Drive, Lake San Marcos 92078 by Oct. 31. Information at e.laister@hotmail.com or (760) 744-1569

INLAND PARKINSON’S HELP

The Inland North

County Parkinson’s Sup port Group meets from 10 a.m. to noon Nov. 7 at San Rafael Church, 17252 Ber nardo Center Drive. For more information, call (760) 749-8234 or (760) 5181963.

NOV. 8

INTERNATIONAL FILMS

The free International Film Series at MiraCos ta College presents “The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness,” at 7 p.m. Nov. 8,

36 T he C oas T N ews OCT. 28, 2022 Encinitas 760 753 7002 San Marcos 760-815-0307 Offering the JOY of Music to Everyone! Free workshops, free recitals, rock bands, orchestra, vocal groups for kids and adults and a full recording studio!
Educational Opportunities is a paid advertorial. If you would like an article on this page, please call (760) 436-9737
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17

Oceanside Campus, Little Theater (OC3601), 1 Bar nard Drive, Oceanside.

QUILT GUILD

El Camino Quilt Guild meets at 9:30 a.m. Nov. 8 at The Fields Church, 2265 Camino Vida Roble, Carls bad. Guest fee $10. Visit elcaminoquilters.com or email info@elcaminoquil ters.com for more informa tion.

NOV. 9

‘GRINCH’ AT GLOBE

Tickets are now on sale for The Old Globe’s “Dr. Se uss’s How the Grinch Stole Christmas,” opening Nov. 9, at tinyurl.com/34y2nzb4.

HIRING FAIR

The Vista Chamber of Commerce is holding a hiring fair from 4 to 7 p.m. Nov. 9 at the Vista Civic Center, 200 Civic Center Drive. More information at vistachamber.org

WINE & FOOD FESTIVAL

Be part of the 18th San Diego Bay Wine & Food Festival to be held Nov. 9 to Nov. 13. Times and loca tions at sandiegowineclas sic.com/all-days/. Tickets at sandiegowineclassic.com/ tickets/.

AMBROSIA

Spend an Evening with Ambrosia at 8 p.m. Nov. 9 at The Belly Up Tavern, 143 S. Cedros Ave., Solana Beach. For tickets and informa tion, visit bellyup.com.

BAJA’S BEST

Take a day trip to the Valle de Guadalupe for a cross-border exploration of wineries, restaurants and culinary experiences in Baja California. Tickets at sandiegowineclassic.com/ event/expeditions/baja-cu linary-expedition/.

NOV. 10

ALL THINGS GREEN

Join the Farm & Nurs ery Expo with a tradeshow 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and a social hour 3 to 4 p.m. Nov. 10 at the California Center for the Arts, 340 N. Escondido Blvd., Escondido. Pre-regis ter to attend at sdfarmbu reau.org/expo/attend/.

CHARITY CONCERT

There will be a char ity concert headlined by Steve Poltz at the Belly Up

Tavern at 7 p.m. Nov. 10. Proceeds go to the Adapt Scholarship Fund for those affected by MS, ALS, SCI and other conditions. For tickets and information, visit bellyup.com.

FALSTAFF FOILED

The MiraCosta College Theatre presents “The Mer ry Wives of Windsor” Nov. 10 through Nov. 20, Oceans ide Campus, Theatre (OC2001), 1 Barnard Drive, Oceanside. For perfor mance schedule and tick ets, visit miracostatheatre. universitytickets.com/w/ event.aspx?SeriesID=8.

NOV. 11

AND THEY’RE OFF!

The Del Mar Racetrack opens its winter racing sea son on Nov. 11 through Dec. 4 at the Del Mar Racetrack, 2260 Jimmy Durante Blvd., Del Mar. Tickets at dmtc. com/tickets.

CHILDREN’S CHOIR

San Diego Children's Choir Fall Concert, honor ing veterans, is at 5 p.m. Nov. 11 at the The Conrad Prebys Performing Arts Center, 7600 Fay Ave., La Jolla. Tickets at https:// theconrad.org/events/sdchildrens-choir-2/?mc_ci d=34b5983061&mc_eid=c 4fa3c2859.

SHIMSHAI IN TOWN

Joining Shimshai at 8 p.m. Nov. 11 at Soul of Yoga, 627 Encinitas Blvd., Encin itas, will be musician, sing er, songwriter Joss Jaffe. Tickets at ShimshaiCon cert.eventbrite.com.

NOV. 12

BALLET SEASON

City Ballet of San Diego presents a special family ballet, “Carnival of the Animals” Nov. 12 with special activities in the lobby for children at 1:30 p.m. and perfor mance at 2 p.m. at Balboa Theatre, 868 Fourth Ave., San Diego. Tickets $25 at ticketmaster.com/ event/ 0A005D19AA432175.

BIG HEAD TODD

Spend an evening with Big Head Todd & the Mon sters at 8 p.m. Nov. 12 and Nov. 13 at The Belly Up Tavern, 143 S. Cedros Ave., Solana Beach. Tickets $47 to $83 at bellyup.com.

TRIBE CELEBRATES

“Spirit Of The Valley,”

M arketplace News

Celebrating menopause – the end is just the beginning!

I don’t feel beautiful anymore. I feel old and wrinkled and my hair is thinning. I’m depressed and can’t sleep. “These are some of the ‘glass half emp ty’ comments that I often hear from my mature pa tients going through meno pause,” said Kari Lynn Purcott, MD, a board-cer tified obstetrician/gyne cologist at Pacific View OB/GYN, Tri-City Medical Center’s newest OB/GYN clinic. “But I try to encour age them to see the ‘glass half full’ and celebrate this time in their lives. Meno pause is the beginning of freedom from monthly pe riods, cramps and worrying about getting pregnant.”

“I also reinforce that menopause is a normal part of the aging process and that it is OK to talk about it,” added Dr. Purcott. “Women readily share issues related to pregnancy but are often afraid to open up about their experiences during menopause. I've seen the relief on my patients’ faces when they finally get over that fear and self-imposed shame. Once they ask ques tions and learn what is hap pening to their bodies, they realize that they are not ‘broken’ and feel empow ered. It makes me so happy to see them embrace this change.”

Menopause occurs when a woman’s ovaries no longer produce eggs and the level of estrogen and proges terone, female hormones, declines. A woman official ly reaches menopause only after it has been 12 months since her last period. From this point on, a woman can no longer have children and will be in “postmenopause.”

Women may begin to experience menopause symptoms during their mid to late forties, and most will reach this milestone by age 52, according to the Office on Women’s Health at the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. This transition period, which may last about four years, is referred to as “perimeno

pause” and is often when women begin to see irregu larities in their periods and experience symptoms, such as hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness and low li bido due to changes in hor mone levels.

“It’s important for women to understand that just like they are uniquely different, so too will be the ways in which they experi ence these symptoms and the treatments that work most effectively for them,” said Dr. Purcott. “Some women will only have few hot flashes throughout the day, while others will have many and these hot flashes can last for one to five min utes or more. Fortunately, there are several treatment options and lifestyle chang es to improve these various symptoms that may contin ue for years.”

Hormone therapy en tails either estrogen thera py or combination therapy (estrogen and progesterone) if a woman still has her uter us. It is sometimes called hormone replacement ther apy, or HRT, and the drug is synthetic (man-made). According to the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ACOG), there are different forms of hor mone therapy: pills, skin

patches, gels and sprays are used to release the hormone into the bloodstream so that it travels to the appropriate part of the body, whereas vaginal rings, tablets and creams release the hormone directly into the vaginal tis sue. As with any prescrip tion medication, there may be some risks such as heart disease, stroke or breast cancer. Women should dis cuss dose, duration, regi men and route of admin istration with their doctor based on their individual needs.

“The standard of care for treating menopause symptoms is hormone ther apy,” said Dr. Purcott. “Lo cal vaginal treatments for dryness are very safe as they are at a lower dose and only affect that area of the body. Although some of my patients use supplements, I do not recommend them as they are only weakly supported by scientific ev idence, if at all. Similarly, hormone pellet therapy is a new option that may prove beneficial but is currently not regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administra tion (FDA).”

Hormone pellet ther apy is an in-office, mini mally invasive procedure during which a doctor plac

es implants, smaller than a grain of rice, under the skin near the hip that slow ly and continuously release hormones over three to six months. These “compound ed bioidentical” hormone pellets contain a mixture of hormones that are derived from plants that mimic human hormones. These drugs are prescribed off-la bel by a physician, custom ized for each woman and mixed by a licensed phar macist.

Exercising, eating a healthy diet, losing weight, quitting smoking, meditating and getting enough sleep are all life style changes that may help to improve symptoms.

“Changes in a woman’s body from childbirth, age, menopause or genetics can weaken her pelvic floor and may cause urinary inconti nence,” added Dr. Purcott.

“Strengthening the muscles in the pelvic floor through Kegel exercises, can help. I often recommend a woman physical therapist who spe cializes in the female pelvic floor to work with my pa tients to get these muscles back in shape.”

Most symptoms will eventually subside over time and become more re lated to aging than meno pause. Since women are at greater risk for conditions such as heart disease, stroke and osteoporosis when they reach postmenopause, it is essential that they continue to see a doctor.

“As women, I think we're fabulous because we are,” said Dr. Purcott. “It may take a little bit more effort for a woman to un derstand her body and really get to know what's normal, which is why I am passionate about teaching my female patients about menopause, so that we can celebrate this time in their lives. The end is just the be ginning!”

To schedule an appoint ment with Dr. Purcott to discuss menopause, please call 760-476-2929, or visit Pacific View OB/GYN.

OCT. 28, 2022 T he C oas T N ews 37
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KARI LYNN PURCOTT, MD is a board-certified obstetrician/gynecolo gist at Pacific View OB/GYN, Tri-City Medical Center’s newest OB/GYN clinic. Courtesy photo
Then you need to check out The Coast News EVENT CALENDAR for things to do in North County SD I’m Looking for something FUN to do... To view or post events, SCAN THE QR CODE or visit us online at calendar.thecoastnews.com TURN TO CALENDAR ON 38 NOV. 9: Tickets are on sale now for a holiday tradition at The Old Globe, “Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christ mas,” running through Dec. 31. Photo by
Rich Soublet
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City Council Representative Kori Jensen’s Deep Roots in Oceanside

An Oceanside native, Kori Jensen is running for District 1 Oceanside City Council to tackle the issues of homelessness, en vironmental preservation, and economic revitaliza tion.

Jensen’s grandparents were successful employers and owned iconic busi nesses in Oceanside. Her father’s parents were the founders and operators of Scandia Bakery & Foun tain on Mission Avenue in downtown. Her moth er’s parents, both immi grants from Sonora, Mex ico, founded and built the successful Palomar Lin en Supply, a commercial laundry that served North County.

“Prior to the pandem ic, I worked in the alcohol, drug, and mental health field, and I saw the home less population growing exponentially,” she said. “What was strange to me about the lockdown re strictions was that the homeless population had no restrictions, no social distancing…and then you have a city council saying that there’s nothing we can do. I personally think that everyone on the street has a substance or mental health issue. They’re ba sically in survival mode… we have to build trust and show them the way and deal with the problems that got them onto the street…there’s a lot of dif ferent things that create the problem.”

Jensen said she was also motivated to run for office after growing con cerns surrounding sand loss and erosion in Oceans ide.

“The second most important thing to me in Oceanside is the sand is sue. A lot of people who don’t frequent the beach don’t realize what’s going on down here. I have seen erosion going on down there for decades…now

there’s hardly any san dy beach. It’s critical to tourism…somebody has to make sand the priority, and we should look at ev ery possible solution,” she said. “There are so many sand studies that the other communities have done, so we need to look and see what’s feasible for us. At this point, sand replace ment and retention require every measure possible.”

“Last, my goal is to bring back dog parks to Oceanside and establish limited access for the dogs at the Harbor Beach.”

Jensen also vehement ly denied accusations lev eled by one of her oppo nents, Darin Selneck, who claims that she doesn’t ac tually live in Oceanside.

“The only thing he [Selneck] has is to make people believe I’m not from here…that’s what they’re attacking…but the truth is that I was the only person who applied that has deep roots in this com munity, and those kind of roots were a threat to people like [Selneck] who just came to California,” Jensen said. “I do own property in Carlsbad, yes, but that was brought up as a distraction to take away from the issues at hand…unfortunately a lot of people believed this tac tic, and it caused people to become confused. To set the record straight, I live in Oceanside, I have deep roots in Oceanside period…he [Selneck] is a bureaucrat, a professional politician, calling people names. He’s a distraction, and some people will like that, but I think that the majority won’t.”

To learn more about Kori Jensen’s plans to im prove Oceanside and/or to get involved in her cam paign, please visit her web site at https://www.kori jensenforcouncil.com/.

Paid for by Kori Jensen for City Council #1437855

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Edwards-Tate is the choice for Palomar Health Board

A wealth of knowledge, leadership, professional ex perience and four years on the Palomar Health Board of Directors make Laurie Ed wards-Tate the easy choice to re-elect for Division 3.

During her tenure on the board, Edwards-Tate has been a steward of patient advocacy, financial manage ment and long-term vision to read industry trends to position the board, and the hospital and its staff, in the best position.

As a CEO of her own healthcare business for 30 years, who also founded a nonprofit coupled with a master’s degree in human resources and organizational management, Edwards-Tate understands the nuances of how a large-scale business functions and where chal lenges lay ahead.

“I am a positive force during changing times,” Edwards-Tate said. “I am running because when I vote, my vote carries for and on behalf of the entire dis trict. I am running because I care.”

Edwards-Tate’s profes sional experience is undeni able. With her State of CA licensed Home Care Organi zation, she focuses on home and community-based ser vices. She serves disabled seniors, individuals with developmental disabilities, and veterans.

Her district covers ar eas in Carlsbad (La Costa, Rancho Carillo), San Mar cos, parts of Escondido and Rancho Santa Fe. Palomar Health, meanwhile, is the largest hospital district in the state with 600,000 resi

CALENDAR

a free celebration of the Lu iseño Tribe, The San Luis Rey Band of Mission Indian is being held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 12 at Heri tage Park, 220 Peyri Drive, Oceanside. For more infor mation, visit studioace.org/ valley-arts-festival or call (760)-730-5203.

‘YART’ SALE

Escondido Arts Part nership is having a “YART” sale fundraiser with surplus art supplies 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Nov. 12 at the Escondido Arts Partnership, 262 E. Grand Ave., Escondido.

UPCOMING

2022 TURKEY TROT

All new at the 2022 Encinitas Turkey Trot, kids under 10 are free. Kids run the age-banded short course and receive free, bright ly-colored “K” T-shirts and finishers medal, plus room to take photos/video of all the action. Register for Nov. 24 race at encinitasturkey trot.org/.

COMPETITION CONCERT

An Elite Music com petition will be held at 10 a.m. Dec. 3 at Ruby Schul man Auditorium, 1775 Dove

dents.

With so many residents, and their health at stake, Edwards-Tate is prioritizing patients, fiscal responsibil ity and addressing future headwinds now, rather than take a reactive approach, she said. She also wants to ensure the hospital’s staff can meet its demand, while being compensated appro priately.

adapting to an ever-chang ing landscape.

“Throughout that time, my main concern was the patient,” Edwards-Tate said. “I never lost my focus. The patient we serve is our whole reason for being.”

how it is rapidly changing. Edwards-Tate said her sec ond term will also focus on long-term strategic plan ning to proactively position the hospital and the board to meet the labor force de mands and the realities of tomorrow.

She said a lack of bal ance in Sacramento from a legislative perspective is a hurdle for the hospital, but also the industry trends in healthcare. The labor force, Edwards-Tate said, the coun try will lose 90,000 physi cians due to retirement or burn out.

For years she has known this wave, whether the Sil ver Wave or burn out, has been on the horizon. Ed wards-Tate said these re alities, plus the imbalance in the legislature, requires an experienced voice who knows how to address and proactively move the hospi tal in the right direction.

She’s also chaired sev eral committees giving her a more thorough foundation and understanding of oper ations, staff and the hospi tal’s finances. Additionally, she put in countless hours of work during the COVID-19 pandemic, where she would spend days planning and

Lane, Carlsbad for students ages 6 through 22. Piano, violin, guitar, cello, voice, duets, and ensembles up to 4 players are welcome. Application due Nov. 15 at elitemusiccompetition.org/ forms/application.

ONGOING

KIDS FREE MONTH October’s Kids Free Month runs through Oct. 31 at both the San Diego Zoo and San Diego Zoo Safari Park. For more information about Kids Free, HalGLOW een and Autumn Festival, visit sdzwa.org.

‘INTO THE BREECHES’

North Coast Reperto ry Theatre presents “Into The Breeches!” running through Nov. 13 at 987 Lo mas Santa Fe Drive, Suite D, Solana Beach. Tickets at northcoastrep.org.

NIGHT SKIES

Palomar College Plan etarium host two shows ev ery Friday at 7 p.m. “The Sky Tonight,” and 8:15 p.m. “Fulldome Presentation.” When the weather cooper ates, college staff sets up telescopes on the patio for free viewing.

ART AT MIRACOSTA MiraCosta College

She said if the board and staff are not doing their best by prioritizing and tak ing care of their residents, then the hospital will fail. With that leadership and mission, Edwards-Tate said her excellent leadership and ability to manage large-scale budgets ensures the hospital can move forward in a posi tive direction.

One of the biggest chal lenges that lays ahead, she said, is the labor force and

“I realized that it is im perative upon those of us who have the capacity or background to be a positive source or positive force of help,” she said. “During the changing time of healthcare, I felt it incumbent upon me to get re-elected.”

Paid for by Laurie Edwards-Tate for Palomar Health Board 2022.

Kruglak Art Gallery hosts artist Sage Serrano’s “Pa perworks” through Nov. 4 at the Oceanside Campus, 1 Barnard Drive, in the Stu dent Center (OC3419).

HIKE OLIVENHAIN

A Recreational Trail Master Plan links out door-related hikes within Olivenhain. The trails range in difficulty, terrain and environment. Olivenhain Trails Maps available for sale at Carter’s Hay & Grain. For more information, visit trails4encinitas.org/.

NEW OLD GLOBE

The Old Globe’s 2023 Season has been announced, kicking off in January with “The Notebooks of Leonar do da Vinci.” Tickets and schedule at theoldglobe.org.

TEXTILE ART

Regional artists con tribute fiber works to the Visions Museum of Textile Art San Diego art exhibi tion through Nov. 4 at 2825 Dewey Road, Suite 100, San Diego, with textiles and nat ural materials are used in sculptures, garments, bas ketry, installations, book art, and more.

FAST CARS

The San Diego Automo tive Museum launched “Elu

sive Luxuries- Supercars and the Thrill of the Chase” running through Jan. 8 at 2080 Pan American Plaza, San Diego. See a 1966 Fer rari 275, 2012 Lamborghi ni Aventaor, 1953 Bentley Mark VI and Graber Drop head Coupé

LOCAL HIKING

Join the docent-guid ed, moderately strenuous, long-distance educational hike at Elfin Forest Recre ational Reserve from 8 to 11 a.m. from in front of the Elf in Forest Interpretive Cen ter, 8833 Harmony Grove Road, Escondido.

COASTAL BIRDING

Join Coastal 101 Bird ing along the Buena Vista Lagoon from 9 a.m. to noon every fourth Saturday. Meet at the Buena Vista Nature Center, 2202 S. Coast High way, Oceanside. No registra tion required.

EXPLORE BY BIKE

North County Cycle Club rides every Saturday morning starting at 8 a.m. and also 8:30 a.m., from the car park of Old California Restaurant Row, 1020-1080 W. San Marcos Blvd., San Marcos. See ridewithgps. com/organizations/381-nc cc/home?lang=endetails for more information.

38 T he C oas T N ews OCT. 28, 2022 M arketplace News
Political
A VOTE for Laurie Edwards-Tate is a vote for a health care advocate you can trust. Laurie promises to be an independent voice for ALL peo ple in the district. Courtesy photo
I am running because I care.”
Laurie Edwards-Tate Palomar Health Board of Directors
MEET LAURIE
CONTINUED FROM 37
HOMELESSNESS, ENVIRONMENTAL preservation, and eco nomic revitalization are issues in Oceanside that Kori Jen sen is ready to tackle. Courtesy photo
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