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CBCForum October 2011

Coastal Bend College

FREE DENTAL HYGIENE SERVICES THIS MONTH ... SEE INSIDE FOR DETAILS

Volume 6, Number 3


CBC Forum 3800 Charco Road, Beeville, TX 78102 361.354.2399 Saftety instructor sought

Apply to CBC at ApplyTexas.org

Coastal Bend College is looking for a safety trainer. Send your resume to Glynis Strause, Continuing Education, 3800 Charco Road, Beeville, TX 78102 or email to ghstraus@coastalbend.edu.

Future CBC students can now apply online at www.ApplyTexas.org. A single application can be submitted to most public Texas colleges and universities.

Join the community band in Beeville

CBC seeks instructors for Continuing Ed courses

Did you play an instrument in high school? Do you want to join a band? The Beeville Community Band is recruiting for the 2011-2012 performance season. Anyone with musical experience and a love of playing can join. The band meets

Coastal Bend College is expanding the course offerings in continuing education to include a wide variety of classes to meet the needs of the community. There is a need for more qualified instructors. If you can teach courses such a cake

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information, contact Roberta Kreis at (361) 354-2244 or kreisr@coastalbend.edu.

360 Training: Alcohol Server Training This course provides all the necessary knowledge and techniques needed to be a responsible server of alcohol on the premises of a restaurant, bar, club, or hotel. Specifically, students will learn: how to protect themselves and the establishment they work in from liability; how alcohol affects their customers; how to recognize the effects of alcohol on customers; how to prevent customers from becoming intoxicated; how to intervene when they need to cut someone off; how to prevent and deal with disturbances, and; how to accurately check IDs and recognize minors. Please call (361)362-2366 or go to www.coastalbend.edu/ce for more information.

360 Training: Alcohol Seller Training

on Thursdays, 7-8:30 p.m. in the Gertrude R. Jones Fine Arts Building at Coastal Bend College. For more information, contact Gene Stephenson at (361) 3542305 or estephenson@coastalbend.edu.

decorating, cooking, dancing, music, art, health-related topics, send your resume to Glynis Strause, Continuing Education, 3800 Charco Road, Beeville, TX 78102 or email to ghstraus@coastalbend.edu.

Ultimate Money Skills seminar

CBC Testing Information website

Ultimate Money Skills teaches students how to develop smart money management skills in college that will lead to a lifetime of financial independence. An UMS presentation will be held at Coastal Bend College in Beeville on Oct. 6, 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. For more information, contact Lindsey Hagen at (361) 354-2728 or lhagen@coastalbend.edu.

Students in the LAC will have quick access to testing information by clicking on the desktop icon which is on all computers in the Learning Assistance Center. Students not using the computers in the LAC can reach the testing site by going to the following URL address: http://www.coastalbend.edu/testing/. The website contains information about each exam offered in the testing department and practice exams. For additional

CBC Forum

This course provides all the necessary knowledge and techniques needed to be a responsible seller of alcohol at a grocery store, convenience store, liquor store, or package store where alcohol is consumed off the premises. Specifically, students will learn: how to protect themselves and the establishment they work in from liability; how alcohol affects their customers; how to recognize the effects of alcohol on their customers; how to prevent customers from becoming intoxicated; how to intervene when they need to refuse a sale to someone; how to prevent and deal with disturbances; how to accurately check IDs and recognize minors; how to prevent second party sales and loitering, and; how to refuse a sale. Please call (361)362-2366 or go to www.coastalbend.edu/ce for more information.

is a publication of Coastal Bend College, Office of Institutional Advancement, 3800 Charco Road, Beeville, Texas. View this and previous issues online at www.coastalbend.edu. Coastal Bend College does not discriminate on the basis of race, creed, color, national origin, gender, age or disability. For more information about Coastal Bend College, Coastal Bend visit the website at www.coastalbend.edu or call toll free (866) 722-2838.

College


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CBC Forum

GRANT AWARD

Coastal Bend Community Foundation awards dental hygiene program Coastal Bend College recently received two grants totaling $5,000 from Coastal Bend Community Foundation for the college’s dental hygiene program. CBC students and faculty in the dental hygiene program provide services to at-risk youth and elderly residents in Bee County. Support for this program was provided by grants from the Coastal Bend Community Foundation. Students and faculty take portable units to area schools and nursing homes to provide dental care and awareness. They are currently working with third-graders at FMC Elementary School in Beeville. They will move to Thomas Jefferson Elementary School next. Throughout the year, teams will visit are nursing homes and schools to provide services including oral cleanings, sealant applications, x-rays and dental referrals. “The grant received from the Coastal Bend Community Foundation will be used to purchase the toothbrushes, educational materials, and other preventive aids given to patients,” said CBC Dental Hygiene Director Andrea Westmoreland. Last year, dental hygiene students visited Pettus Independent School District and placed sealants on teeth at risk for decay as well as performed cleanings on the participating third graders. In the spring they treated residents of Hacienda Oaks Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Beeville. They continue to build relationships in the county that foster good dental health and increase the students’ connections with at-risk patients. Field work for students provides them opportunities to practice and improve the skills they learn in the classroom and to have a positive impact on community health. Clinical work is a large component of the dental hygiene program. For more information about dental hygiene or to schedule an on-campus clinic appointment, call (361) 354-2555. Clinic hours and fees are available on the web at www.coastalbend. edu. The Coastal Bend Community Foundation was incorporated in 1981 with the mission of enhancing and improving the quality of life in the seven counties of the Coastal Bend. The Foundation serves donors by providing a vehicle for the establishment of various types of charitable funds designed to fulfill their wishes. Since its inception, the Foundation has distributed more than $65 million from donor contributions and revenues to scholarships to students and grants to nonprofit organizations.

Coastal Bend College Dental Hygiene student Lindsay Cathy checks the periodontal health of an FMC Elementary School third-grader. The students use a portable lab to perform community outreach work at area schools and nursing homes.

Coastal Bend College student Grace Avila-Perez, a dental hygiene students, provides preventative oral care to one of dozens of elementary school students seen recently by dental hygiene students.


CBC Forum 3800 Charco Road, Beeville, TX 78102 361.354.2399

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Andrew Linsalata Roswell, New Mexico

Monzelle White Houston, Texas

Mario Rodriguez Jr. El Campo, Texas

Johstan Padron Refugio, Texas

Todd Drennan Montgomery, Texas

Alex Pineda Houston, Texas

Ruben Ramirez Refugio, Texas

Eduardo Ramos Houston, Texas

Carlos Cordero Refugio, Texas

Cristian Padron Refugio, Texas

Kris Mireles El Campo, Texas

Daniel Lopez Mexico City, Mexico


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Gabriel Cerda Runge, Texas

CBC Forum

Inaki Flores

CBC Men’s Soccer Schedule DATE

OPPONENT

October Oct. 1 San Jacinto College Oct. 15 Tyler Junior College Oct. 16 San Jacinto College Oct. 21 Lon Morris College Oct. 28-29 TBA

Victor Carbajal Beasley, Texas

Jaime Eide

Carissa Elizalde Beeville, Texas

TIME

Beeville 1 p.m. Beeville 1 p.m. Houston 1 p.m. Jacksonville3 p.m. TBA TBA

Head Coach: Bill Cleavelin Athletic Coordinator: Estevan Vasquez President: Dean of Student Services: Mascot: College Website:

Arnoldo Pruneda

PLACE

Dr. Thomas Baynum Velma Elizalde Cougars www.coastalbend.edu


CBC Forum 3800 Charco Road, Beeville, TX 78102 361.354.2399

Each month, students in the Adult Basic Education program at Coastal Bend College come together for activity day, a shared learning experience outside of the traditional classroom setting. Typical activities include presentations from guest speakers, and participatory events such as science stations and multi-level spelling bees. When Program Director Roxann Gleason learned about ProLiteracy’s Keys to Safety Campaign, she decided to host an activity day dedicated to fire prevention and safety. Gleason’s interest in fire ABE, GED and Pre-GED classes are held safety runs in Beeville at CBC Lott-Canada Facility. in her family. Classes are also available in George West, Her daughter, Ingleside, Sinton and Taft. Students Heather Greenmust attend an orientation session bewell, is a physifore the course begins and those under cal therapist in 18 years old have special restrictions. the burn unit at Brooke Army English as a Second Language classes are Medical Center, held in Beeville for those interested in a division of the learning or strengthening basic English United States skills. ESL classes are free and are open to Army Institute everyone. Students in the current classes of Surgical Rehail from Mexico, Nigeria, China, Hondusearch located ras and Columbia. at Fort Sam Houston. When For more information, contact Roxann Gleason’s local Gleason at (361) 362-6095 or rgleason@ fire department coastalbend.edu. was not able to participate in the activity day, she contacted Greenwell for assistance. Preparing for Activity Day In preparation for the fire safety activity day, instructors used materials provided by ProLiteracy to teach basic fire prevention and safety. Students learned about escape plans and fire drills, smoke alarm installation and maintenance, and fire extinguisher use. Gleason also brought in a smoke alarm to demonstrate testing. Students had a chance to learn practical fire safety tips and ask questions in the comfort of their regular classroom, building interest in the topic and setting the

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stage for an informative guest speaker presentation. As instructors shared critical safety information with students, they began to pay more attention to safety precautions and processes in their own organization. This resulted in several improvements to the program’s overall safety plan. Staff tested the smoke alarms in the building to ensure that each was in proper working condition. For the first time ever, they developed an escape plan, complete with a safe outdoor meeting place. The plan was shared with students, and everyone participated in a program-wide fire drill. Program staff also noticed that there were no illuminated fire exit signs over the doors in the building. The problem was reported to the building administrators and the signs will be installed soon. A Powerful Presentation With support from her colleagues at the Brooke Army Medical Center, Greenwell put together a presentation for the students and staff of the Coastal Bend College Adult Basic Education Program. She shared personal stories and images that provided approximately 40 attendees with a realistic understanding of the aftermath of a burn injury. She spoke of the challenges faced by her patients who are currently undergoing extensive therapy to regain skills and mobility lost to fire-related injuries, and of the impact access to physical therapy can have on the healing process. Next Steps The Coastal Bend College Adult Basic Education Program plans to offer additional fire prevention and safety programming in the future. While Gleason’s daughter will soon be transferred out of state, it is likely that another representative from Brooke Army Medical Center will be able to participate in the event. Gleason plans to involve the local fire department in the next program. “This collaboration added a unique dimension to the fire prevention and safety activity day, and rounded out the basic fire prevention and safety tips the students learned in the classroom with a realistic look at the devastation a fire can leave behind,” Gleason said. For more information about Adult Basic Education at CBC Lott-Canada Facility, contact Roxann Gleason at (361) 362-2633.


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Adult Basic Education students attended orientation at CBC LottCanada Facility in Beeville at the start of the academic year. Students can attend English as a Second Language, GED and pre-GED prep or adult basic education classes toward completing a high school equivalency diploma. Included in this year’s program are, from left, Sabrina Robledo, Brittany Moses, Kassandra Lemus, instructor Rosie Maldonado, Jennifer Zepeda, Rachel Caballero, Mercedes Hernandez, Ester Garcia, Misty DeLeon and Jennifer Gomez.

CBC Forum

Incoming students include, from left, Janette Gonzales, Misty Arismendez, Johnny Rangel, David Cantu, Crystal Cantu, Heather Smith (standing), Gold Okpalo, Vianey Granado, Anna Manzano, Jessica Funez, Noel Hale, Dominic Bonham (standing), Christian Okpalo, Maria Villareal, Shan Liu, Belinda Martinez and Virginia Vasquez.

Adult Basic Education students meet College President Dr. Thomas Baynum during a recent tour of the Coastal Bend College campus.

Visual arts gallery, workshop schedule Coastal Bend College’s Simon Michael Art Gallery, located in the Frank Jostes Visual Arts Building on the main campus in Beeville, will exhibit the work of a variety of artists and media. The 2011-2012 gallery schedule follows. Oct. 19 -- Gallery Opening: “CBC Art Alumni Invitational,” Reception and Gallery Talk, 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Simon Michael Art Gallery, Frank Jostes Visual Arts Building. Closes Nov. 17. Nov. 30 -- Gallery Opening: “Student & Faculty Art Exhibition,” Reception and Gallery Talk, 10:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m., Simon Michael Art Gallery, Frank

Jostes Visual Arts Building. Closes Dec. 7 Nov. 30 -- Student Art Sale, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Frank Jostes Visual Arts Building.

Barnhart Workshop Series, 2011-2012 Oct. 25-28, 2011, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. “China Painting: Roses,” Artist in Residence: Brenda Morgan Moore


CBC Forum 3800 Charco Road, Beeville, TX 78102 361.354.2399

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Marine Sargeant Ceasar Araujo talks about service options with From left, Kenedy High School counselor Kelan Grimes and seniors Taylor a Coastal Bend College student. Atkinson, Lauren Smart and Candice Ornelas were among 400 hundred local high school and college students making contacts with more than 30 Texas universities at a single event.

Junior Jill Davis, left and senior Alex Diaz of Three Rivers High School

Coastal Bend College students, from left, Patricia Segura (registered nursing), Sabrina Gonzales (social work), Crystal Rangel (medical assistant) and Bethany Amador (liberal arts)


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McMullen County High School seniors, from left, Nathan Jackson, Jandy Spence, Hillary Gillin; Brandon Patterson and Andrea Leal

www.coastalbend.edu

CBC Forum

Goerge West High School seniors, from left, Ariana Chapa, Sydney Williamson and Alexa Wheeler

Taft High School seniors, from left, Gabriel Martinez, Brandon Mendez, Mireyna Gonzales, Jordan Downie and Julie Cancino were among 400 Karnes City High School seniors, from left, Chelsea Gonzales, Daniel hundred local high school and college students making contacts with Rosales, Lawrence Carrasco and Wally Gonzales visited Coastal Bend College for its annual Transfer and Recruitment Day. more than 30 Texas universities at a single event.

A.C. Jones High School seniors, from left, Valerie Garcia, Laneisha Nathaniel, Margarita Aguilar and Ora Bruns

A.C. Jones High School seniors, from left, Kimberley Wolfe, Deidre Acosta and Leslie Alaniz


CBC Forum 3800 Charco Road, Beeville, TX 78102 361.354.2399 High school, college students visit university reps from around the state Coastal Bend College’s annual Transfer and Recruitment Day attracted more than 400 area high school students and 75 college students. Students and counselors from Beeville, George West, Karnes City, Kenedy, McMullen County, Nordheim, Pettus, Taft, Tilden and Three Rivers schools attended. In conjunction with Texas Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (TACRAO), the college pulled in more than 30 representatives from Del Mar College, Baylor University, Texas A&M University, the University of Texas, Texas Tech and other Texas colleges and universities. Representatives from the U.S. Army and Marines were also on hand, as well. CBC counselors and program representatives from Cosmetology, Drafting and Design, Airframe and Power Technology, Law Enforcement, Automotive and Welding were available to recruit for Coastal Bend College. In many cases, CBC students like Jose Molina and Daniel Pittman, both in the automotive program, manned tables and talked about their programs to potential students. “The recruiting event is a community effort to get high school students to think about their futures and to provide face-to-face connections with the recruiters that can get them where they want to go,” said Adrian Jackson, public relations officer for the college. “If you think of it in terms of the amount of money, time and gas it would take to visit 31 universities, you can quickly see the impact this event had on its participants.” CBC students took part in a luncheon with university representatives to talk about transfers. Students planning to transfer before Fall 2012 were able to talk to university reps in more details about programs and course offerings. CBC has partnerships with most public institutions in Texas to make the transition from the college to universities easier for students.

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Upcoming National Spill Control School course to be held in Pleasanton The National Spill Control School at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi and Coastal Bend College are teaming up to offer the OSHA mandated 40-hour HAZWOPER for Oil Spill Response course. The next class will be held in at CBC Pleasanton, located at 1411 Bensdale Road in Pleasanton on Oct. 10-14, 2011 at a reduced cost of $650. The National Spill Control School at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi has been providing worldclass oil and hazmat spill response and planning and waste management instruction since 1977. National and international oil and gas industry organizations depend on the NSCS for educational programs, environmental program development, research and consultation. The new Oil Spill Response course at Coastal Bend College will allow area students and oilfield employees opportunities to obtain the required spill response training close to home. Participants will learn how to safely and efficiently plan and prepare for any oil spills that could threaten area waterways or groundwater resources. Spill response exercises will be conducted on local rivers and reservoirs. “The NSCS is looking forward to an exciting new period of growth for the exploration and production industry of South Texas,” said Tony Wood, director of the

National Spill Control School. “We are thrilled to have been able to team with Coastal Bend College to offer this safety course to the companies and in the communities which will benefit the most from oil spill prevention, preparedness and response training.” According to Wood, oil and gas discoveries in the Gulf of Mexico and directional drilling opportunities in the Eagle Ford formation are currently reinvigorating the economy of central south Texas. These opportunities also present potential safety and environmental issues related to corporate liabilities in the exploration and production industry that have been redefined by the Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf last summer. The National Spill Control School and CBC offer courses that will help oil and gas companies to improve safety, reduce risks and maximize preparedness. Glynis Holm Strause, dean of institutional advancement at the Coastal Bend College, said, “CBC’s Continuing Education Petroleum Industry Training Program is proud to be partnering with the National Spill Control School at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi and others to provide a wide variety of courses to train current and future oil field employees.” For additional information, contact Glynis Holm Strause at (361) 354-2447 or ghstraus@coastalbend.edu.


Brushing your teeth for two minutes at least twice a day remains a critical component to maintaining a healthy smile. Studies have shown that brushing for two minutes is perhaps the single most important step an individual can take to reduce plaque buildup and the risk of plaque-associated diseases, such as cavities and gingivitis. Proper brushing is essential for cleaning teeth and gums effectively. Flossing or interdental cleaning removes plaque and food particles in places where a toothbrush cannot easily reach — under the gumline and between your teeth. Because plaque build-up can lead to tooth decay and gum disease, daily flossing is highly recommended. Let’s face it, getting into a routine of regular flossing is probably the greatest home care challenge. Studies have revealed that only 16% of 961 periodontal patients followed over an eight-year period, complied with the recommended maintenance schedules. The results of these studies are an excellent example of how different perceived ideal can be from clinical reality. There are many different types of floss (besides waxed or unwaxed) with different thicknesses, filaments and coatings. Flossing is an essential part of the tooth-cleaning process because it removes plaque from between teeth and at the gumline, where periodontal disease often begins. Rinsing your mouth each day with an anti-microbial mouth rinse is another important step in preventing the gum disease known as gingivitis. Speak with your dental hygienist for more information on which mouth rinse is right for you. Brushing and flossing disrupt plaque on the teeth and gums, but teeth make up less than half of your mouth. To kill plaque and gingivitis germs that brushing leaves behind, be sure to finish your oral care routine with an antiseptic mouthwash with the American Dental Association Seal of Acceptance. Chewing sugar-free gum after eating is clinically proven to be an important part of good oral health. It stimulates the most important natural defense against tooth decay - saliva - which, in turn helps fight cavities, neutralize plaque acids, remineralize enamel to strengthen teeth and wash away food particles. Research from around the world has now shown conclusively that chewing sugar-free gum has many oral health benefits. When chewing is incorporated into the daily oral healthcare routine, especially after eating and drinking, it positively affects oral health. Child Oral Health Dental decay (cavities) is the most common chronic disease of childhood, affecting 50 percent of children by middle childhood and nearly 70 percent by late adolescence.1 Chronic gingivitis is also common among children. The mildest form of periodontal disease, gingivitis is often caused by inadequate oral hygiene which leads to plaque buildup. Fortunately, most oral diseases can be prevented. The best way to ensure that your child does not get cavities or periodontal disease is to instill proper oral habits early. Good oral hygiene routines should be established as early as infancy and continued through-


out life. Dental hygienists are valuable resources in promoting, establishing, and maintaining oral health in infants and children. Adolescent Oral Health Good nutrition and oral hygiene care practiced at home are particularly important during the teen years. Proper diet, brushing, and flossing all play an important role in maintaining a healthy smile and preserving teeth during these challenging years. Cavities and periodontal (gum) disease can be a threat to teens as well as adults. Recent survey results show that bleeding gums were most prevalent among adolescents and that three-fourths of 13-17 year-olds had gums that bled. Adolescents also have particular issues not shared by younger age groups. These concerns include: oral piercings, mouthguards, eating disorders and orthodontic care, as well as significant rates of tooth decay. Adult Oral Health The hectic pace of today’s adult lifestyle often leaves little time for the daily oral health care routine needed to prevent cavities and periodontal disease. This is unfortunate since periodontal disease is the most common cause of tooth loss in adults. An estimated 75% of Americans reportedly have some form of periodontal disease. Early detection of periodontal disease reduces the risk of permanent damage to teeth and gums and can prevent more extensive and costly treatment in later years. Regular professional visits, every six months or as scheduled by your dental hygienist, will help you learn more about proper care for your teeth and gums. Regular professional visits are important because gingivitis, the early stage of periodontal disease, is usually painless; you may not be able to detect it on your own. Senior Oral Health Almost 250 million people or about 40 percent of the adult population in Europe, USA and Japan are estimated to suffer from some form of edentulousness, or loss of natural teeth.2 Incidence of tooth loss generally increases with age. While the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) reports the prevalence of both partial and total tooth loss in seniors has decreased from the early 1970s, seniors over age 65 lose an average of 13 teeth (including wisdom teeth) and 26% of seniors over age 65 have no remaining teeth.3 Whether caring for natural teeth or dentures, seniors face a range of special oral concerns, including root decay and periodontal disease. You can keep your smile healthy by following a routine of proper oral care and making regular visits to your registered dental hygienist and dentist. If you have arthritis or limited use of your hands, try adapting the toothbrush for easy use. Insert the handle into a rubber ball or sponge hair curler; or glue the toothbrush handle into a bicycle grip. Toothbrush handles can be lengthened with a piece of wood or plastic such as a ruler, ice cream bar stick or tongue depressor. For people who have dexterity problems and cannot use a manual toothbrush, an electric toothbrush may be easier to use and increase effectiveness. Numerous studies confirm that electric brushes are excellent plaque removing devices and are extremely effective in stimulating gums. Dental floss holders are also available.


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October is National Dental Hygiene Month COASTAL BEND COLLEGE DENTAL HYGIENE HOURS: Mondays: 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m., 2:30 p.m. and 5 p.m. Wednesdays: 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.

FREE DENTAL HYGIENE SERVICES THIS MONTH SERVICES AVAILABLE: Teeth Cleaning, Fluoride Treatments, Dental X-rays, Site-specific Antimicrobial Placement and Pit/Fissure Sealants Placement

(361) 354-2555

It’s simple. Healthy habits for a healthy smile. Ask your dental hygienist to find out more.

Among other benefits, daily brushing and flossing protect older smiles from two common problems of getting older: Root decay--a condition that affects older adults if a great amount of root surfaces are exposed--and tooth decay caused by the weakening or chipping of older fillings.

tion, smokers who smoked less than a half a pack a day were more than three times likely than non-smokers to develop periodontal disease. The same study found that those who smoked more than half a pack a day were six times as likely.

Denture care and cleaning Dentures—full or partial—should be brushed daily with a soft toothbrush or denture cleaning brush, using a commercially prepared denture powder or paste, hand soap or baking soda. Toxic or abrasive household cleaners should never be used. Dentures should be brushed inside and outside, and rinsed with cool water.

Chewing tobacco also has severe oral health implications. In addition to possibly causing cavities, studies have shown that about up to 27% of regular smokeless tobacco users have gum recession and may lose the bone around the teeth and experience tooth loss.4 Chewing tobacco also causes leukoplakia, white patches that form on the site where the user holds the tobacco.5 Leukoplakia, in 5-25% of cases, is a precursor to oral cancer.6

When not in use, dentures should be covered with water or a denture cleaning solution to prevent drying. Smoking and chewing tobacco The damages to the mouth that are caused by smoking have long been recognized. Smoking’s oral effects include bad breath, stained teeth, loss of taste and smell, canker sores, failure of dental implants, oral cancer, and the gum recession, bone loss and tooth loss associated with gum disease. According to the Centers of Disease Control and Preven-

[1] Centers for Disease Control and Preven1. tion. Fact Sheet: Key Findings from NHANES 1999-2002. Updated Nov. 18, 2005. [2] http://www.astratechdental.com/Library/396636.pdf, retrieved 6/2008, Astra Zeneca, 2005 [3] http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/DataStatistics/FindDataByTopic/ToothLoss/ToothLossSeniors65andOlder, retrieved 6/2008 NIDCR, 2008 [4] American Cancer Society: Smokeless tobacco. http://www.cancer.org/docroot/ PED/content?PED_10_2x_Smokeless_Tobacco_and_Cancer.asp?sitearea=PED [5] Shulman JD, Beach MM, Rivera-Hidalgo F: The prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in U.S. adults: Data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988-1994. Journal of the American Dental Association 2004:135:1279-1286. [6] Oral Pathology for the Dental Hygienist. Fourth Edition, Ibsen, Phelan, p. 260. Elsevier, 2004.

(Source: ADHA.org)


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CBC Forum

HIGHER ED

Texas launches adult degree completion program ‘Grad TX’ people for their career choices, a college degree leads to greater financial independence. According to a recent study by the Center on Education and the Workforce, the United States can reverse the growth of income inequality by increasing the number of college graduates. In 2010, the average weekly wage for workers without a college degree was $712. Workers with a bachelor’s degree earned an average of $1,038. THECB selected eight Texas universities to be part of the launch of this new program that offers specialized programs with online, compressed, and regular course offerings for returning students.

Eight Texas public universities provide program designed for adults to finish their bachelor’s degrees The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) recently announced the launch of Grad TX (pronounced “Grad Texas”), a program designed to help adults return to college and finish their bachelor’s degrees. Offered by eight Texas universities, Grad TX targets the over 40,000 adults in Texas who “stopped out” of college with 90 or more credit hours, but have not finished the 120 credit hour requirement to receive a bachelor’s degree. The program’s website, GradTX.org, features an online transfer tool that allows returning students to enter completed coursework and preview how their credits would count toward a bachelor’s degree at a participating university. The website also connects returning students to counselors at each university who specialize in meeting the unique needs of returning students, such as determining how work experience could count toward a bachelor’s degree and helping returning students graduate faster. Grad TX includes information about paying for college and financial aid, as well as a section addressing the needs of veterans.

In 2010, the average weekly wage for workers without a college degree was $712. Workers with a bachelor’s degree earned an average of $1,038. “The THECB, working closely with our state colleges and universities, is focused on significantly increasing the number of college graduates,” said Commissioner of Higher Education Raymund Paredes. “Encouraging and assisting our adult population to get back on track for a college degree is critical for Texas to become a national leader and global competitor.” In addition to better preparing

The eight universities are Lamar University, Midwestern State University, Texas A&M University Commerce, Texas Tech University, University of Houston-Downtown, University of Houston-Clear Lake, University of North Texas System and University of Texas at Brownsville. The Grad TX website features stories of adult students at the universities featured in the programs. Teneka Duke, who received her BAAS in Business Administration from Texas A&M Commerce explains in her story, “When I had 21 hours left, I went to see an advisor who told me about the BAAS program. It was a perfect fit for me. I was able to apply my work experience and it enabled me to


CBC Forum 3800 Charco Road, Beeville, TX 78102 361.354.2399

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finish my degree in two semesters instead of two more years at the pace I was going.” Hilda Flores, a graduate of UT Brownsville with a BAAS in Applied Business Technology, applauds her program in her story, “I didn’t have to start way frsom the beginning. I was able to build on what I already had [the associate’s degree] so that I was able to go back to get my BAAS… and now I’m a program coordinator. I couldn’t have gotten that position without my bachelor’s degree.” “There are more than three million Texas residents like Duke and Flores who have partial college credit, but not a college degree,” explains Dr. Van Davis, Director of Special Projects. “Grad TX puts a bachelor’s degree within reach for many Texans.” Grad TX is part of the Generation TX movement to get all Texas students on the path to success in college and Coastal Bend College Staff Association recently ratified its bylaws and elected board members, from left, Dee Dee C. Arismendez, president; Tina Casarez, president elect; Maria Trevino, vice their careers. Grad TX specifically focuses on returning adult students president; Valerie Trevino, secretary; and Rachel Ramoz (not pictured), parliamentarian. who want to advance their career by earning a bachelor’s degree.

2011-2012 Women’s Volleyball Schedule

Grad TX is a project of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) with initial funding provided through a federal College Access Challenge Grant. For more information, please visit www.gradtx.edu.

DATE Oct. 1 Oct. 8 Oct. 8 Oct. 12 Oct. 19 Oct. 22 Oct. 22 Oct. 22 Oct. 27

OPPONENT Lee College San Jacinto College Hill College Laredo Junior College Wharton County Junior College University of Texas at San Antonio Trinity University University of the Incarnate Word Lee College

PLACE Beeville Pasadena Pasadena Beeville Beeville San Antonio San Antonio San Antonio Baytown

TIME Noon 1 p.m. 3 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. TBA TBA TBA 6 p.m.

Nov. 4-5

Region XIV District M Tournament

TBA

TBA


f r The t h : The t h : men ily his re in a en who story. I mothe am five . u o a y r w a r T le i 5 m d M g i a fa cancer st wom mily h r gran mmog t age 3 n r h i e u v d W a a o a o a f t , Fin in yo s ho h f breas roup, m ave no r, sister ave a m tarting n ’s w a p else lum t me ast ry o risk g ancer h aughte hould h sis, or s e o n t o n r s o c re d as ome our ow ighe breast other, er, you r diagn s bre ave b h o t h ei m e nc r it th in y sk fac. e hav have a ast ca e of th s f you r. s u i n re e ag gio u tra ell grow f the r e b a s o c t i r d y n n o d h a t o o c r ca ho h before nce rolled aware you ump r is c a w e f c c I t t n l : rs reas f uncon y being st ca yea ruth sistent any b a T e h r c ene o elf b t B g t : a l The a per st or e, it c h 2 u t s A r ot es . My r su ea BRC ann is the r ect you n plan r c o The cove ur br ast tis ou see u 1 t o o re RCA yo h: Y cancer can pro detecti ty B t u e r in es in b nt tha ly. How e T th y st s in The . Brea er, you an earl ng porta diate ps ar e and a g h v y n n c e d g e a e m h bo .How lowin me ry im imm st lu ve c cer. in m d risk y a l d s o h is ve sician 0 brea us. So edif o e n b and en crease lly o you ast ca 1 g r y m g f e h s e c n r o es an in actua to wi nt bre a p out t can y from t they h o t n . 8 K e o a a r, s in dual to atients lation n yth: ou prev eve n, or n stay aw ear wh health o M i p at rre ivi t s, ur ig n The help y yf lter an ind 0% of lute co breas a ben wome se the e of yo lf-exam th n e 1 f l o a o s c i u o se hi u g es se : W edispo y 5% t t an ab istory But yo tim re beca e char reast ation w oh t r l. pr nl no Tru yh ic eb mm ca Tak he en can ncer, o This is famil contro regula cal find. routin mmun lar ma T a a ’t r n. co g ht gu wom reast c utatio aving st can erform ct you mig rformin ngoing ling re p h u a j b f m r r , u e o of this age o tor you know n the greate by p ishing d sched e v o e ha your a fac ician cus bl an e ar s o s er. e f y s c ’ a esta octor, k h t d n i e d i e p L s rd st ca cer, your ms, an this di mat th a i n t e a s r you . c i e t b g xa get it is osed w till n le self-e t havin ms t r a dor a o a r c o e n s g e n t o y s s o d g i n a e ia ch en d bre ces of and . Ea ll be d centag st selfM y s : r t n h a n i r a tr cha 90%. Myt pira con men w this pe lar bre s r n e e The a h th tip ancer. e t 1,700 While s regu n t i aA u h: east c eN : Q tely ll die. selve cians. t h h y t t r M at ) are Tru wi ma em ysi ad. s he ause b e r T r e The pproxi nd 450 give th eir ph p rch te (NCI ive h ts c a er a to s a t t n o r e t s s o a e s l a e t c Re stitu onclus th canc uld a nges e b se : can h h t t n f t t o s a s h Tru ncer I any c use o rea e of OT cau b brea men s e any ch n e e o h a s T al C of aus ll, ot the nts or st, i It CANN he mam m e n a r g o an c sma and n e a i c r n t aw linki rspira ubs e b ancer. from t ou fro s am r h m t t g a o ’ n ence ex tipe the s f mo y of reast c breast keep y sician n m a a r d a i y s s b X m ev erarm and ent o , or tion of on the erience your ph estion h: A t m y a u r M und orants velopm q ec e put s exp n on g t e y o e h n d T amm early d ressur eople’ decisio iscuss a deo ent de er. m p e p A equ t canc h: for th n the other e your re to d r. st s i u h r a T s f o u le reas mily ncer b The vailab d, nor c tales o am. Ba nd be s ur doct a f a a a gr sa ea yo let ing east c will v tool to spr o not ammo dation s with a u br :H m .D en rn cer yth y of ans yo it. M can ogram aving a ecomm r conce get me tor The o r h m

For more information, go to: http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/AP-Deo


CBC Forum 3800 Charco Road, Beeville, TX 78102 361.354.2399

The College Board recently announced that 43 percent of 2011 college-bound seniors met the SAT® College and Career Readiness Benchmark. The SAT College and Career Readiness Benchmark represents the level of academic preparedness associated with a high likelihood of college success and completion. The SAT Benchmark is a very reliable tool for measuring the college and career readiness of groups of students. It was developed to help secondary school administrators, educators and policy makers evaluate the effectiveness of academic programs in order to better prepare students for success in college and beyond.

The College Board also announced that more college-bound students in the class of 2011 took the SAT than in any other high school graduating class in history. Nearly 1.65 million students from the 2011 graduating class participated in the college-going process by taking the SAT. The class of 2011 SAT takers represented the most diverse class in history, underscoring the College Board’s continued commitment to access, equity and minority participation. “The SAT is the national leader in assessing college readiness and students who meet the College Board’s College Readiness benchmark are more likely to enroll in,

Page 18

succeed and graduate from college,” said College Board President Gaston Caperton. “Ensuring that students are ready to attend and complete college provides them with the competitive advantage they need to successfully compete in the global economy, which is critical to the future of our nation.” The College Board has long been committed to expanding access and equity and increasing minority participation. More than ever, the population of students taking the SAT reflects the diverse makeup of America’s classrooms. • 44 percent were minority students: Among SAT takers in the


Page 19

class of 2011, 44 percent were minority students, making this the most diverse class of SAT takers ever. 36 percent were first-generation college goers: 545,010 of

www.coastalbend.edu

SAT takers in the class of 2011 report being the first in their family to attend college 27 percent do not speak exclusively English: 431,319 of SAT takers in the class of 2011 report

Performing Arts Calendar Oct. 9 -- The Flying Balalaiken Brothers, presented by the Beeville Concert Association, admission, Gertrude R. Jones Fine Arts Auditorium, 3 p.m.

CBC Forum

that English was not the only language first learned at home.

(Souce: The College Board)

CBC Men’s Basketball Schedule OPPONENT

PLACE

TIME

Mullens/Mitchell Jamboree

Dallas

TBA

Nov. 5

Fort Sam Houston

Beeville

2 p.m.

Nov. 9

San Jacinto College

Houston

7:30 p.m.

Nov. 11

Southwest Texas Junior College-Uvalde Beeville

TBA

Oct. 23 -- Mariachi Campanas de America, presented by the Beeville Concert Association, admission, Gertrude R. Jones Fine Arts Auditorium, 3 p.m.

Nov. 17

San Jacinto College

Beeville

7:30 p.m.

Nov. 19

Western Texas College

Beeville

2 p.m.

Nov. 21

Lee College

Beeville

7 p.m.

Nov. 12 -- Fiesta Bee County, Fiesta Ballet Folklorico Recital, free admission, Gertrude R. Jones Fine Arts Auditorium, 7 p.m.

Nov. 25-26

(Richland College)

Dallas

TBA

Nov. 17 -- Beeville Community Band/CBC Concert Band, Fall Concert, free admission, Gertrude R. Jones Fine Arts Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

December Dec. 1

Odessa College

Odessa

TBA

Dec. 2

South Plains College

Levelland

TBA

Dec. 3

New Mexico Military Institute

Levelland

TBA

Dec. 10

Northwest Vista College

Beeville

2 p.m.

Nov. 20 -- CBC Music Department Recital, free admission, Gertrude R. Jones Fine Arts Auditorium, 3 p.m.

Dec. 14

Northwest Vista College

Beeville

7 p.m.

Dec. 1 -- CBC Drama Department presents a Children’s Show, admission, Gertrude R. Jones Fine Arts Auditorium, 6 p.m.

January Jan. 6

Louisiana State University-Shreveport

Beeville

7 p.m.

Dec. 2 -- CBC Drama Department presents a Children’s Show to area elementary schools, free admission, Gertrude R. Jones Fine Arts Auditorium, performances at 9 a.m., 11 a.m., 1 p.m.

Jan. 7

Lee College

Baytown

7 p.m.

Jan. 12

Western Texas College

Snyder

6 p.m.

Jan. 14

Lone Star College-Tomball

Beeville

3 p.m.

Dec. 2 -- CBC Drama Department presents a Children’s Show, admission, Gertrude R. Jones Fine Arts Auditorium, 6 p.m.

Jan. 19

Fort Sam Houston

San Antonio 7 p.m.

Jan. 21

Lackland Air Force Base

San Antonio 2 p.m.

Dec. 3 -- CBC Drama Department presents a Children’s Show, admission, Gertrude R. Jones Fine Arts Auditorium, 1 p.m.

Jan. 28

Lackland Air Force Base

San Antonio 2 p.m.

Dec. 3 -- Beeville Community Chorus, Fall Concert, Mission at Goliad State Park, 8 p.m.

February

Oct. 15 – United States Air Force Southwest Winds, free admission, Gertrude R. Jones Fine Arts Auditorium, 7 p.m. Oct. 21 -- Tom McDermott, a native Texan telling stories with music, presented by the CBC Cultural Arts Committee, partially funded by the Texas Commission on the Arts, free admission, Gertrude R. Jones Fine Arts Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

Nov. 19 -- Beeville Community Chorus and local church choir members present the “Messiah,” free admission, Gertrude R. Jones Fine Arts Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

Dec. 4 -- Beeville Community Chorus, Community Advent Service, Faith Lutheran Church, Beeville, 3 p.m. Dec. 5 -- CBC Continuing Education and Music Department presents Guitar Extravaganza, free admission, Gertrude R. Jones Fine Arts Auditorium, 7 p.m. Dec. 6 -- Beeville Community Chorus, Fall Concert, admission, Gertrude R. Jones Fine Arts Auditorium, 7:30 p.m.

DATE October Oct. 8 November

Joe Huey Thanksgiving Classic

Feb. 3

Southwest Texas Junior College-Uvalde Uvalde

7 p.m.

Feb. 6

Victoria College

Victoria

7 p.m.

Feb. 15

Temple College

Temple

7:30 p.m.

Feb. 18

Lone Star College-Tomball

Tomball

3 p.m.

Feb. 27

Victoria College

Beeville

7 p.m.

Region 14 Play-In Series

TBA

TBA

March Mar. 5


CBC Forum 3800 Charco Road, Beeville, TX 78102 361.354.2399

Page 20

HIGHER ED NEWS

Texas receives $1M to transform developmental education The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) announced recently that Complete College America (CCA) has awarded Texas a $1 million dollar Completion Innovation Challenge Grant. CCA funding gives Texas the opportunity to enhance developmental education efforts for students who are not college ready by significantly transforming remediation in math to close attainment gaps, boost college completion, and reach labor market goals. “Complete College America’s generous investment in Texas speaks volumes about our collective efforts to fundamentally transform developmental education and improve student outcomes,” said THECB Chairman Fred W. Heldenfels IV. “Texas is quickly becoming a national model for innovation in this area. This is a direct result of the collaboration between the THECB and our universities and community colleges.” “Complete College America recognizes the need for developing innovative, cost-effective strategies to help students graduate college in a timely manner, and recognizes Texas as a national leader in these efforts,” Gov. Perry said. “We’re ready to put this grant to good use, building on reforms to developmental education that we initiated during the 82nd Legislative Session.” Through the CCA grant, THECB aims to reduce time-to-degree by allowing students to fulfill remediation requirements while also receiv-

ing college credit for math within a single semester. This innovative instructional model has been developed and tested at Texas State University-San Marcos. For three years, Texas State’s Department of Mathematics – through the efforts of Dr. Selina Vasquez Mireles – has piloted a state-funded developmental math bridge program. Initial data has

will participate in this initiative. The selected institutions are largely composed of students from low-income and underrepresented ethnic groups. “Enhancing developmental education in mathematics not only helps ensure student success, but also aids in meeting the goals of Texas’ Closing the Gaps initiative,” said Senator

“Texas is quickly becoming a national model for innovation in this area. This is a direct result of the collaboration between the THECB and our universities and community colleges.” Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board Chairman Fred W. Heldenfels IV

shown promising results. The grant funding will help the THECB extend the new model to 15 community colleges throughout the state. “Governor Perry gets it: doing more of the same will not boost student success or get Texas the additional college graduates it must have to be competitive,” said Complete College America President Stan Jones. “It’s long past time for bold innovation in higher education to remove unnecessary obstacles to success, fix broken policies that hold students back, speed achievement and redesign pathways to college graduation for the new majority of students who must balance work and school.” Fifteen community colleges representing every region of the state

Judith Zaffirini, Chair of the Senate Higher Education Committee. “I am delighted that two colleges serving the South Texas region will benefit from this grant.” “Too often, the current model for developmental education becomes more of a stumbling block for students than a step ladder,” said Representative Dan Branch, Chairman of the House Higher Education Committee. “I’m optimistic that innovative programs such as the one developed by Texas State and implemented by the Complete College America grant will give students the support they need while keeping them on a path to completion.” In addition to programmatic initiatives in developmental education, Texas is aggressively pursuing


Page 21

www.coastalbend.edu

research and instructional improvements designed to increase success rates. Texas State is the first university in the country to launch a Ph.D. in Developmental Education with the goal of improving teaching and research in this area. The strategies implemented by Dr. Mireles and the university demonstrate the critical role institutional innovation will play in meeting the remediation challenge. “When we admit a student to one of our institutions, we must do more than just hold the door open for them. We must do all that we can to help them earn the degree. To do otherwise simply wastes the state’s money, the student’s money and time, and causes us to be complicit in destroying their dreams,” said Texas State University System Chancellor Brian McCall. “I’m proud that Dr. Vasquez Mireles and Texas State have played a critical role in developing a successful program that can now be replicated throughout Texas.” In Texas, math presents a significant barrier for college readiness and completion. In FY 10, 38 percent of students enrolling in a public community or technical college direct from high school failed to meet the state college readiness thresholds in math. The CCA grant will augment innovative strategies and programs already in place at community colleges throughout the state. “I am excited to be here

CBC Forum today on behalf of TACC as we take another important step in helping all Texans achieve their educational dreams,” said Dr. Rey Garcia, President of the Texas Association of Community Colleges. “The Complete College America Texas project will be a valuable resource for institutions and policymakers as we work towards the common goal of more degree and certificate completions.” The Center on Education and the Workforce projects that the United States must add 20 million more postsecondary educated workers to the nation’s workforce by 2025 to be globally competitive. In Texas, 56% of jobs (7.7 million) will require postsecondary education by 2018. The initiative funded by the CCA award is the latest in a series of efforts underway to improve college completion rates in Texas with the goal of making the state a national leader and global competitor. Established in 2009, Complete College America is a national nonprofit working to significantly increase the number of Americans with a college degree or credential of value. CCA grants were awarded to ten states that produced the best plans to deploy innovative, statewide strategies designed to substantially increase college completion for traditionally underrepresented populations. For more information, go to Complete College America at www.completecollege.org.


CBC Forum 3800 Charco Road, Beeville, TX 78102 361.354.2399

Page 22

Tips to help you keep yourself stay safe on campus

by Emily Rowe MakingItCount.com College is a time for having fun, making friends and stretching your boundaries. But being on your own can also call for responsibility, and that includes making sure you stay safe on campus. According to the United States Department of Education, there are more than 77,000 crimes committed on college campuses every year.

Even with these shocking statistics, many students think they could never be a victim. Campus safety has become a major issue for colleges and universities around the nation, but protecting yourself and avoiding these situations is the responsibility of one person: you. Being safe on campus doesn’t mean being paranoid or feeling like a victim. It means taking the correct precautions and making smart deci-

sions. The following tips will provide you with ideas and help you learn new ways to keep yourself safe on campus: Personal Information • When coming to college, decline to have your picture or personal information published for distribution to the campus community. • Share your class and activities schedule with parents and close friends to create a buddy system.


Page 23

This way, people know where you are. • Program all local emergency numbers into your mobile phone’s speed dial. • Most campus crimes are committed by someone the victim knows. Make sure to take notice of any acquaintances that make you feel uncomfortable. Be aware of red flags, such as unwanted attention or overly physical actions. • Trust your instincts. Most crime victims had a sense that something was wrong beforehand, but failed to act. Follow your gut. • Have a plan of action. Find the exits in your dorm building and class buildings and know who to contact on campus for assistance. Walking Around Campus • Always travel in groups. Walk with at least one other person whenever possible. • Avoid walking alone at night. • Don’t take shortcuts around campus. Stick to busy and well-lit areas. • When running or jogging around campus, recruit a friend to run with you. If you listen to music, make sure that you keep your earphones turned down low enough that you can still hear what is going on around you. • When walking, stay on the part of the path that is farthest away from bushes, dark doorways, or alleys. • If you observe any suspicious activity or a crime taking place, report it to campus authorities or call 911.

www.coastalbend.edu

In Your Dorm Room • Make sure that all doors and windows in your room are equipped with updated and fully operational locks. • Always lock your door when you leave your room, even when hanging out with a friend down the hall. • Do not loan out your key to anyone or make copies for friends. • Ask for your residence hall to put a new lock on your door when your key is lost or stolen. • If you live on the first floor, make sure to lock your windows at night. • Make sure you know who is at your door. If you can’t see your visitor, ask him or her to identify him or herself before you open it. • Do not leave your identification or other valuables in open view. • Get to know your neighbors and

CBC Forum

ask them to let you know of anything suspicious. • If you leave campus, let a roommate or friend know where you are going, when you plan to return and how to reach you. • Report obscene, harassing or threatening phone calls, instant messages, or emails to campus authorities immediately. Campus crime is not always preventable, but thinking smart and taking the necessary precautions is the best way to stay safe on your college’s campus. By being well-prepared and aware of your surroundings, you will be able to avoid many scary situations and enjoy your experience at college.

(Source: www.makingitcount.com)

Fall 2011 Automotive Shop Fees CBC Current Students (with ID) ................$20 CBC Employees (with ID) ...........................$20 CBC Board Members ..................................FREE All Others....................................................$40 Oil Changes ................................................$10 Tire Rotation/Balance (4) ..........................$10 Flat Tire Fixes (cars and pickup trucks) ....$5 (CBC students and employees only) A/C Freon ....................................................75¢ per ounce

By Appointment Only Must Purchase Own Parts Automotive Instructor Will Arrange Parts Order at the Parts Store


CBC Forum October 2011  

Meet Coastal Bend College's 2011 Men's Soccer Team. Read about a Coastal Bend Community Foundation grant that helps improve dental health. C...

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