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Undergraduate Prospectus 2011


One of the College-wide objectives is to develop social responsibility in our graduates and equip them to contribute to the future wellbeing of society. As citizens in the community and as members of the future workforce, our graduates will become influential in matters of environmental protection and sustainability. Therefore, the College seeks to promote environmental responsibility through our learning and research programmes. This is achieved through an integration of environmental issues across the curriculum and by demonstrating good practice in all campus activities. Writtle College Environmental Statement

Admissions Tel: +44 (0) 1245 424200 Email: admissions@writtle.ac.uk


Contents Welcome............................................................................4 Open Days.........................................................................6

School of Horticulture................................................ 79

Being an undergraduate student at Writtle College..................................................8

Horticulture . ...................................................................84

Writtle and the surrounding area.....................................10 Welcome from the President of the Students’ Union....................................................12 University of Essex..........................................................14 Learner Services..............................................................16 The Careers Centre.........................................................19 Information for international students.............................21 Higher education qualifications.......................................24 Course directory............................................................29 Research activity.............................................................30 Centre of Academic Standards, Teaching and Learning (CASTLe)....................................32

Green Space Management.............................................86 Social and Therapeutic Horticulture................................87 Floristry............................................................................94 School of Sustainable Environments......................... 99 Agriculture.....................................................................102 Business Management..................................................111 Conservation and Environment.....................................116 Further information.....................................................123 Finance and fees...........................................................124 How to apply.................................................................126 Entry requirements........................................................130 Accommodation............................................................132

School of Design........................................................ 35 Art and Design.................................................................38 Interior Architecture and Design......................................40 Landscape and Garden Design.......................................43 School of Sport, Equine and Animal Sciences........... 51 Equine Studies and Science...........................................58 Animal Management and Science...................................67 Sports and Exercise Performance...................................75

Facilities on campus......................................................134 Students’ Union.............................................................135 Sports clubs..................................................................136 Information and library services....................................137 Short Course Training....................................................138 Alumni of Writtle............................................................139 Campus map.................................................................140 Index..............................................................................142 How to find us...............................................................143 Disclaimer......................................................................143

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Welcome to the 2011 Writtle College Undergraduate Prospectus, designed to give you an overview of our inspirationally environmental study programmes.


Welcome to Writtle College Founded in 1893, Writtle is one of the longest established specialist colleges in the UK. A distinctive character and an international reputation for the quality of our graduates and acclaimed academic experts together ensure that the College is highly regarded throughout the professions that it serves. Students who immerse themselves in their degree programmes at Writtle become highly skilled and knowledgeable, learning from a team of approachable and hands-on academic staff who strive to be at the forefront of world quality research and consultancy. With all our degrees accredited and awarded by the University of Essex – one of the UK’s top ten universities for research – graduates move on into their chosen careers with confidence. An overview of all our undergraduate courses follows and there’s plenty of additional information available on our website. If you have any questions, just give us a call on +44 (0)1245 424200 and we will be happy to help. If you’d like to come and see us, why not register for one of our Open Days? Alternatively, if our Open Day dates are not suitable for you, we will do our best to arrange a campus visit at a convenient time. We very much look forward to welcoming you on campus at Writtle and telling you more about our unique, friendly and highly specialist College – a learning environment that is geared to making a very real difference to the world around us.

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Open Days Open Days are held throughout the year and provide the perfect opportunity for students to find out all they need to know about the application process, finances, student life and what Writtle College is really about.

At open days Students will have the opportunity to: • Meet the course Admission Tutors • Tour the campus with current students • Discover student life at Writtle College • Learn about the support available to students including finance, accommodation and admissions.

Pre-event registration is required To register please contact: Admissions Tel: +44 (0)1245 424200 Email: openday@writtle.ac.uk or apply online at: www.writtle.ac.uk


Open Days for 2010 – 2011 take place on the following dates: 2010

2011

Wednesday 14 April

Wednesday 19 January

Wednesday 5 May

Wednesday 16 February

Wednesday 2 June

Wednesday 16 March

Saturday 10 July

Wednesday 13 April

Wednesday 20 October

Wednesday 4 May

Saturday 13 November

Wednesday 8 June

Wednesday 1 December

Saturday 9 July

There are several communicators at the College who can assist students with a hearing impairment who require communication support and would like to attend an Open Day. Please advise when booking a place.

Alternative arrangements For those who are unable to attend on one of the dates shown and would like to make alternative arrangements, please contact Admissions on: +44 (0)1245 424200.

Higher education fairs Writtle College participates in higher education fairs across the UK. Details of dates and venues can be found at: www.writtle.ac.uk under forthcoming events.

Equine & animal Open Days 2010 – 2011 For those equine and animal course students who are unable to attend on one of the dates shown and would like to make alternative arrangements to visit the College, please contact: Jane Hart, Equine and Animal Course Admissions Tutor Tel: +44 (0)1245 424200 Email: equine@writtle.ac.uk

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The Schools work closely together in academic areas, ensuring that students gain maximum benefit from the facilities and knowledge-related subjects.


Being an undergraduate student at Writtle College By studying at Writtle College, students benefit from the College’s international reputation as one of the UK’s leading specialist institutions of higher education. The College provides training in specialist areas relating to the environment and rural affairs, horticulture, equine and animal science, agriculture, business, sport, design, floristry and related management disciplines. All Writtle College degrees are validated by the University of Essex, one of the UK’s leading universities for research ranked among the top ten in the UK.

Schools Each programme is set in one of the four Schools: • School of Design • School of Sport, Equine and Animal Sciences • School of Horticulture • School of Sustainable Environments The Schools work closely together in academic areas, ensuring that students gain maximum benefit from the facilities and knowledge from related subjects.

This allows each student the flexibility to specialise in areas of study relating to their own interests and career aspirations. Courses are developed through industrial consultation to ensure that, on leaving the College, graduates are equipped with the skills and knowledge demanded by employers. This is achieved by giving students the opportunity to carry out visits, attend lectures with guest speakers and undertake industrial placement years. The excellent on-site facilities enable students to gain practical, hands-on experience. This valuable insight into the world of work is backed up by individual guidance from the College’s Careers Centre. As a result, students benefit from excellent job prospects. Employers continue to turn to Writtle College first for graduates with a strong academic background and the professionalism needed to make a success of business operations.

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Writtle and the surrounding area

Writtle College campus is a unique place. It is set in its own 220-hectare estate with conservation areas; landscaped gardens; design studios; animal, equine and stud units; a working farm; a science centre; and sport and leisure facilities. With halls of residence for up to 400 students, the campus has a lively, community atmosphere.


Writtle village Writtle is one of the most attractive villages to be found anywhere in England and is just a few minutes’ walk from the College campus. There is a supermarket and a post office, as well as banking facilities and a variety of restaurants and traditional-style pubs. On the outskirts of Writtle is Hylands Park which is nationally famous for hosting the V Festival, which has brought the likes of The Kings of Leon, Kasabian and Faithless to the area.

Chelmsford The cosmopolitan, self-contained and lively campus at Writtle College is just two miles from Chelmsford – the county town of Essex and a major commuter town for London, which is just 40 minutes away by train. Getting there is easy, as buses to Chelmsford run regularly from Writtle village. The town has an impressive 15th century cathedral, a bustling shopping centre, attractive parks and gardens, theatres and a variety of restaurants and bars. Nightclubs hold special student nights during the week offering discounts to NUS members on drinks and entry charges.

The county of Essex Essex offers excellent facilities for a wide range of outdoor activities including walking, cycling, horse riding, fishing and sailing. The county has an extensive coastline stretching from the Thames Estuary to the port of Harwich. This attractive coastline takes in seaside attractions and popular marinas. The county’s underdeveloped coastline and large, low-lying islands are of particular value as wildlife habitats. There are also significant areas of surviving ancient forests in Epping and Hatfield.

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Welcome from the Writtle College Students’ Union As the Students’ Union (SU) President and on behalf of the entire SU team, I would like to extend this warm welcome to Writtle College. Writtle College is located in idyllic surroundings in the heart of Essex. The campus itself has a warm and close community, with friendly staff and students, allowing great bonds to be formed and enabling students to reach their full potential. The College offers brilliant courses and fantastic facilities including welcoming halls of residence, computer rooms and the recreational centre. There are a number of sports teams at the College, ranging from men’s and women’s rugby, hockey and football to equine and shooting teams. If you can’t find an activity that interests you, then the SU will support you when starting your own team. The College also has an active Christian Union and an interdenominational chapel. The SU is here to make sure that your time at College is full of memorable and fun activities. We hold events throughout the year such as Freshers’ Week, a Christmas Ball, a Summer Ball and a beer and music festival. We also hold an annual RAG (Raise And Give)

week, which hosts events such as a slave auction and a BBQ. This is all to raise money for the SU’s chosen charities of the year. I was once told that the friends you make at university are the ones that stay with you for life – how true this statement is. The Writtle College experience will stand you in good stead for your future, providing you with fond memories and friends that will never be forgotten. I hope this has given you a brief insight into College life. The SU team is here to engage, entertain and support you during your time at College. I look forward to meeting you and do hope that if you have any questions or queries regarding anything to do with College life, you will not hesitate to contact the SU team. Regards, Emily Stevens Students’ Union President


The SU is here to make sure that your time at College is full of memorable and fun activities.

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University of Essex Essex has one of the most active and well-developed Students’ Unions in the country. As well as employment and development opportunities, the Students’ Union provides an excellent array of commercial and social facilities including a student-run radio and TV station.

All Writtle College degrees are validated by the University of Essex, which was established in 1965 and is now one of the UK’s leading academic institutions. Essex is ranked in the UK top ten for its research excellence, with many of the academic schools and departments at the forefront of international research in their fields. The university is also ranked eighth nationally for the quality of its teaching. The University has eighteen academic schools and departments which are arranged into four faculties and located at three campuses across Essex: Humanities and Comparative Studies; Law and Management; Social Sciences; and Science and Engineering. It has a strong Graduate School, offering both taught courses and research programmes. Essex is the UK’s most internationally diverse campus university, with students from 130 countries.

The Colchester Campus is set in a beautiful 200-acre parkland, just two miles outside of Colchester. The Southend Campus is based in the heart of Southend-on-Sea and is home to students studying within Essex Business School, the School of Health and Human Sciences, and East 15 Acting School. The Loughton Campus is the base for students on many of the East 15 Acting School’s courses. The Campus is just five minutes from the nearest London Underground station, Debden, on the Central Line.


Subject areas on offer at the University of Essex: • Accounting, Finance and Banking

• History

• Acting

• Humanities

• American Studies

• Human Rights

• Biochemistry

• Italian

• Biology

• Latin American Studies

• Biomedical Sciences

• Law

• Business Management

• Marine Biology

• Computer Science

• Marketing

• Creative Writing

• Mathematics

• Criminology

• Modern Languages

• Drama

• Nursing

• Economics

• Occupational Therapy

• Electronic Engineering

• Philosophy

• English, European and US Literature

• Physiotherapy

• Entrepreneurship and Business

• Psychology

• European Studies • Film Studies • French • German

• History of Art

• Politics • Social Sciences • Sociology • Spanish • Sports Science

• Health and Human Sciences

The University will be holding undergraduate Open Days on: Colchester Campus • Saturday 19 June 2010 • Saturday 25 September 2010 • Saturday 30 October 2010

Southend Campus For further information, please contact: Tel: +44 (0)1206 873666, Email: admit@essex.ac.uk www.essex.ac.uk

• Saturday 18 September 2010

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Learner Services The Learner Services department has a full range of services to help students get the most out of their time at Writtle. This includes financial advice and support, counselling services and study support. Professionally trained staff deliver each aspect of the Learner Services work, enabling them to offer a friendly and helpful service.

The College welcomes applications from students who have a disability, learning difficulty or medical condition and actively encourages early disclosure of support needs and requirements.


Financial assistance and the Disabled Students’ Allowance Higher education students may be eligible for the non-means-tested Disabled Students’ Allowance (DSA). Students will be asked to provide assessment/evidence of their disability, learning difficulty or medical condition in order to ensure support is available for the beginning of their studies. Students should apply for a DSA as soon as possible. Detailed information is available from: www.direct.gov.uk/studentfinance

Students with disabilities There are several communicators at the College who can assist students with a hearing impairment who require communication support. Most buildings around the College are accessible to those with mobility difficulties. In halls of residence, there are rooms which have been specifically designed to suit those with mobility difficulties or hearing impairments. There are also dedicated car parking bays and toilet facilities available. The Learner Services department encourages students to get in contact to discuss accommodation and access requirements.

There is also an informative guide entitled ‘Bridging the Gap’. To order a copy, please contact:

Access to Learning Fund

Student Finance England

Students who find themselves experiencing serious financial difficulties during their studies may apply to the Access to Learning Fund.

Tel: 0845 300 5090 Minicom: 0845 604 44 34 We can assist with form filling and guide students through the process of applying for financial assistance and the DSA. Learner support, equipment and travel support is usually dependent on securing a DSA. Once funding is secured, we are able to assist with oneto-one study skills and support sessions, including a non-medical helper for support with note taking, reading and library visits. Support may also be available for time management, organisation, proofreading and planning. A student’s support needs will be detailed in their Needs Assessment which forms the basis of the DSA assessment.

Counselling and welfare Pastoral care at Writtle is of the utmost importance. Students will be assigned a course or personal tutor who is available for regular contact sessions to ensure things are going well and to address any worries students may have. Learner Services can provide help and advice on any personal, emotional or practical problems and students are given access to a confidential counselling service. The College also has good links with the local GP surgery and other charities and organisations.

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Examinations and assessments Students with special requirements should discuss examination and assessment arrangements with Learner Services at the start of their course. Arrangements vary depending on the requirements of the individual, but could include additional time and use of a computer, a reader, writer or separate room. The intention is that special arrangements should compensate for the restriction imposed by the disability without affecting the validity of the examination. Students are asked to provide up-todate assessment or medical reports as evidence of their disability. Often, a Needs Assessment will be sufficient evidence.

Confidentiality of information Any information relating to an individual student’s disability, specific learning difficulties or medical condition will be regarded as confidential. However, College policy is to allow for disclosure to those who need to know for teaching, assessment and accessibility arrangements and for health and safety purposes. Students who are concerned about confidentiality are welcome to contact the Head of Learner Services. A copy of the College’s disability information leaflet and details of the Disability Equality Scheme can be viewed online at: www.writtle.ac.uk. Course information contained in this prospectus is also available to view online. Writtle College is committed to equality of access. Should you require any information in an alternative format – such as large print, audio or Braille – please contact: Learner Services Tel: +44 (0)1245 424200 Minicom: +44 (0)1245 424254 Email: student.support@writtle.ac.uk

Children’s day nursery Writtle College students can benefit from subsidised childcare facilities on campus in the Kiddi Caru Day Nursery, which caters for children aged 0-5 years. The nursery, which is located opposite the main College campus, is purpose-built with its own specially designed children’s garden and interior design feature. The nursery has a team of qualified and highly experienced staff who provide a safe, friendly and caring environment in which to learn, develop and have fun. For further information, please contact: Kiddi Caru Day Nursery Tel: +44 (0)1245 421341 Emails: kiddiwrittlecollege@childcare.uk.com www.kiddicaru.com


The Careers Centre Career development at Writtle College is an integral part of the student experience.

The College has a dedicated Careers Centre which offers specialist advice and information. In addition, students will benefit from expert help via Admissions Tutors, Course Managers and other staff.

Career development in the academic curriculum

Service availability

Career development is built into the curriculum for all students, enabling them to develop the skills and knowledge needed to find a rewarding career. Foundation degree students engage with career development in greater depth as part of the work-based learning element of their programmes. The inclusion of career development in the curriculum has resulted in excellent employment statistics for the College.

All Writtle students are entitled to the help of the qualified Careers Guidance Adviser. The service is available throughout their course and for at least three years after leaving the College, in order to provide additional support. Service features include: • A friendly, student-focused service • In-depth careers interviews and quick queries • Opportunities for guided self-exploration • Flexible interview times • A well-stocked Careers Information Centre • The latest graduate vacancy information

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High quality career and guidance information Students receive independent and impartial career guidance. Every course area is individually researched and continuously updated, resulting in a superb range of bespoke Jobhunters’ Guides.

Writtle graduate careers Each year the College carries out a survey of former students to find out how they are getting on in the employment market. This is becoming an increasingly important resource for employers both regionally and nationally.

Business

Horticulture

• European Component Manager

• Tree and Landscape Officer

• Human Resources Assistant

• Plant Buyer/Quality Controller

• Property Manager

• Head Greenkeeper

• Graduate Management Trainee

• Landscape Contract Manager

• Operations Manager

• Nursery Management Trainee

Design

Rural and Agricultural

• Visual Designer

• Postharvest Researcher

• CAD Designer

• Agricultural Assistant

• Drawing Office Assistant

• Farm Manager

• Self-employed Landscape Designer

• Rural Business Consultant

• Landscape Designer

• Conservation Officer

Equine and Animal

• Bat Consultant

• Animal Breeder

For further information, please contact:

• Equine Research Assistant • Veterinary Nurse • Teacher • Trainee Biomedical Scientist • Yard Manager • Equine Claims Assessor

Careers Centre Tel: +44 (0)1245 424200 Email: careers@writtle.ac.uk


Information for international students Writtle College is an international institution with over 100 students from outside the UK. With its friendly, cosmopolitan and safe environment, Writtle College has an excellent reputation for student support and takes extra care in ensuring that all students enjoy their time at Writtle College and benefit from the full range of academic and cultural programmes on offer.

Student support The College has a dedicated International Student Adviser to offer support and guidance on all matters relating to international students. Students can receive help on a range of matters from immigration advice on visa extensions and regulations on working to general guidance on living in the UK, academic programmes or any other matters. There is also a range of social events and orientation activities, so there is plenty to make each student’s stay at Writtle College a successful one.

English language requirements For all courses, students whose first language is not English must prove that they are sufficiently able to understand and express themselves. Two tests that Writtle College uses to confirm a student’s level of English are IELTS and TOEFL. Undergraduate requirements are IELTS (Academic) 5.5, or TOEFL (paper-based) 527, TOEFL (computer-based) 197 and TOEFL (Internet-based) 71. Please quote the College’s TOEFL code number of 1436 as a score recipient when requested during the testing process.

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Writtle College is an international institution with over 100 students from outside the UK.


English language support Once students have started an academic programme, the College offers English language classes – in both General English and Academic English – to international students whose first language is not English and who wish to improve their level of English. These classes are provided to help students build confidence in their language and skills ability, making it easier for them to integrate in lectures and in social situations. Together with an introduction to British culture, these can be combined to result in the achievement of the 15-credit module, ‘English Language and Culture’, which is offered during semester A. Individual English language tutorial support is also available.

Writtle International Social Club (WISC) WISC is available to all students at Writtle College, whether international or domestic. WISC organises day trips to places of interest and visits to local leisure amenities. The club is an excellent way to meet people and become part of a supportive network of friends.

Academic requirements In order to be accepted onto a programme of study at Writtle College, students from outside the UK will have to: • Meet the academic requirements of their chosen programme

International student visa information Students who wish to study in the UK need to obtain the following documents before they arrive. It is advisable to start collecting the documentation as soon as possible: • A valid passport is essential and a visa will be required under the new Points-Based-System (PBS) for immigration to the UK. Full-time international students from outside the EU need to satisfy new regulations to obtain a General Student visa. One of the key benefits of the new system is that a student will be able to work out whether they have sufficient points before they make a visa application. • To obtain a General Student visa, each student will need to obtain 40 points. • A Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) will give the student 30 points and Writtle College, as a UK licensed sponsor, will supply the CAS when a student has satisfied the entry requirements. A Maintenance and Funds Test will provide the final 10 points needed for a visa to be granted. Detailed student visa information and advice can be found at: www.ukcisa.org.uk For students already living in the UK please visit: www.ind/homeoffice.gov.uk For those living outside the UK visit: www.ukvisas.gov.uk/en For further information about life in the UK as a student, visit: www.ukstudentlife.com

• Show evidence of their qualifications

For further details, please contact:

• Supply a personal statement outlining their reasons for applying

International Office Tel: +44 (0) 1245 424200 Email: international@writtle.ac.uk www.writtle.ac.uk

• Provide a reference from their school, college, university or employer • Provide evidence of a suitable level of proficiency in English For details of how to apply, see page 135.

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Higher education qualifications All higher education courses at Writtle College are available on a full- and part-time basis and are open to students with a wide range of qualifications – for example, A levels, BTEC National Diplomas or the International Baccalaureate. Applications are also welcome from those who may not have studied for some time.

Modules Higher education programmes are made up of study units or ‘modules’. These can be seen as building blocks of credits covering specific subjects within the curriculum that are accumulated towards a chosen qualification.

Qualifications framework The College’s higher education qualifications are cleverly designed to enable students to fit studying around their lifestyle. Programmes can be studied on a full- or part-time basis. Students can choose a programme which allows them to vary their pace of study and progress from one award to the next.


Honours degree (BSc or BA) These usually take three years to complete if studied on a full-time basis. Each completed year gives the student 120 credits. The final year of study leads to an Honours degree.

Foundation degree (FdSc or FdA) These usually take two years to complete if studied on a full-time basis. However, they are ideal for part-time study as some Foundation degree credits can be gained in the workplace. Foundation degrees have a higher practical content than Honours degrees, as they are designed in liaison with employers and aimed at equipping students with the essential skills to meet the needs of the employment market. On completing a Foundation degree, students can progress onto the final year of an Honours degree.

The College’s higher education qualifications are cleverly designed to enable students to fit studying around their lifestyle.

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Taster qualifications For those who are unable to commit to full-time study, the College provides awards which are seen as higher education tasters. A Certificate of Continuing Education allows students to mix and match four modules (60 credits) from any degree scheme to suit their own interests and timescale. A Higher Certificate (120 credits) is equivalent to one year of full-time study. Another way of getting a taste of study at Writtle is to enrol on one or two modules as an Associate Student. Many students find this is an ideal way to start their studies if they are unable to commit to a full degree course. Associate Students usually attend College for one day a week over one semester of 15 weeks for each module they study.

‘Topping-up’ This is a process for students who wish to use an existing qualification to progress to a higher level. Writtle awards are designed to make ‘topping-up’ easy, particularly from Foundation degree to Honours degree level. Applications for ‘top-ups’ are welcome from students who have gained qualifications from other institutions. Students should contact the College for individual advice on the most appropriate level and course for them.

Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL) The College recognises the achievements of students even if they have previously studied elsewhere. This occurs through a process known as Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL), for previous qualifications gained, or Accreditation of Prior Experimental Learning (APEL), for learning gained in the workplace.


Part-time study

Postgraduate study

To qualify as part-time, students would need to study at least 50% of a full-time programme per year. This enables students to fit their studies around work and family commitments, by studying for as little as two days a week.

Many degree students choose to go on to postgraduate level study. Writtle College offers a wide range of postgraduate certificates, diplomas and degrees.

Part-time study programmes can be extended to fulltime, depending on the student’s own circumstances and aspirations. The credits accumulated in part-time mode can contribute to various awards which may be the final goal or a step-off point along the way to higher qualifications.

To request a copy of the College’s Postgraduate prospectus, visit: www.writtle.ac.uk For further information, please contact: Admissions Tel: +44 (0)1245 424200 Email: admissions@writtle.ac.uk

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Course Directory Research Activity............................................................. 30 Centre of Academic Standards, Teaching and Learning (CASTLe).................................... 32

School of Design.........................................................35 Art and Design..................................................................38 Interior Architecture and Design.......................................40 Landscape and Garden Design........................................43 School of Sport, Equine and Animal Sciences............51 Equine Studies and Science............................................58 Animal Management and Science....................................67 Sports and Exercise Performance....................................75 School of Horticulture.................................................79 Horticulture.......................................................................84 Green Space Management..............................................86 Social and Therapeutic Horticulture.................................87 Floristry.............................................................................94 School of Sustainable Environments......................... 99 Agriculture......................................................................102 Business Management...................................................111 Conservation and Environment......................................116

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Research Activity Research is a significant part of the work at Writtle College. Active research programmes provide up-to-date information for associated industries as well as informing the College’s teaching and training of students.

The College aims to expose all undergraduate students to research in order to demonstrate the importance of research and development in today’s world and to begin preparing students for careers in research-led industries. The College places great importance on collaborative research with external organisations, where sharing of resources and expertise can increase the value of the work. Consequently, there is an active liaison between the College and a number of universities and commercial companies, both in the UK and overseas. Writtle staff regularly contribute to peer-reviewed journals in relevant disciplines and publish with respected university presses. In recent years the College has been successful in obtaining funding for research from a range of commercial and independent sources.

Postgraduate Research Writtle offers the opportunity to study for postgraduate research degrees within the four academic schools at the College. Degrees are available at both Masters and Doctorate level. To find out more please contact Admissions: Tel: +44 (0)1245 424200  Email: admissions@writtle.ac.uk


Research projects currently being undertaken at the College include: School of Design • Place constructs in protected landscapes • Interface of coastal landscapes and river systems • Recovering landscapes and brownfield sites • Position and relationship on the projected links between interiors and gardens • Japanese-style gardens in the British Isles • Mobile technologies in landscape character assessment • Cinematic influence on spatial design

• Photographic databases of plants for use in horticultural education • Landscape character assessment • Surrogate surveys for planting design • Gardens and plants in changing climate

School of Sustainable Environments • Forest dynamics and ecosystem resilience in the context of climate change

• Semiotics and phenomenology in retail design

• Woodland structure, dynamics and resilience in the context of environmental change

School of Sport, Equine and Animal Sciences

• Strategies for promoting sustainable use of small woodlands in East of England

• Early detection of lameness in dairy cows through locomotion and activity analysis

• Protected area management and climate change, from policy to practice

• Effects of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids on ram semen quality

• Use of eco-tourism models to evaluate public use of reserve sites in East Anglia

• Early nutritional effects on lifetime performance in dairy cows

• Measures of conservation success for priority species on RSPB nature reserves

• Composition and presentation of feeds to growing pigs • The impact of rearing systems on calf health and welfare • Feeder systems for weaner pigs • The effects of hoof lesions on cow locomotion • Conformational analysis of event horses • Thoroughbred racetrack performance • Gender and sports performance

School of Horticulture • Packaging of fresh produce • Postharvest extension of the life of cut flowers

• Assessment of butterfly introduction schemes using landscape-scale measures • Long-term monitoring of functional indicators of environmental change • Assessment of the distribution and spread of Himalayan Balsam on the River Can • Biological inventory for key sites within the local biodiversity action plan • Ecological study of the biodiversity of Hylands Park including forest fires, moths and butterflies and reptile translocation project

• Reduction and use of postharvest chemicals • Research into control of pernicious weeds such as Japanese knotweed • Archive research and data assimilation for historic gardens

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CASTLe

(Centre of Academic Standards, Teaching and Learning)

CASTLe brings together teams of Writtle staff who are working with one shared aim – to provide the best possible student learning experience while developing people and building their careers. This involves several strands of work:

Academic Standards We ensure that programmes at Writtle meet the expectations of the university sector as a whole by meeting or exceeding the standards of student achievement established by external bodies such as the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA). This means working closely with our Validating Partner, the University of Essex, to develop and deliver a high quality, innovative curriculum.


Learning and teaching

Careers

Making sure the College designs and delivers programmes that meet the changing needs of students – using, for example, work-based learning, problem solving and group assignments – is another part of our work. This means working closely with employers and professional bodies in the land-based sector. The College is keen to support all students, including those with disabilities, part-time students, international students and those returning to education or making a career change. The College has been particularly praised by the University of Essex for its work in widening participation.

The College provides tailored careers support for students in developing the skills they need to gain initial employment and to manage their career development during their professional life.

Learning resources The library, other learning spaces and learning technologies are managed within CASTLe to ensure that high quality facilities are available to support learning. The College’s online system has made learning much more flexible, allowing students to access study materials from wherever and whenever they choose.

Educational and professional development We provide opportunities for both students and staff to develop their academic, professional and managerial skills on a continuing basis. Skills development is an integral feature of all Writtle programmes and individuals within CASTLe support modules that focus on Academic Study Skills, Personal Development Planning, Research Methods and English Language. Staff are also supported in their Continuous Professional Development through the University of Essex Certificate of Higher Education Practice (CHEP) and other ongoing staff development opportunities.

Scholarship of learning and teaching CASTLe staff ensure that teaching is influenced by current research in academic practice. CASTLe supports projects to develop learning and teaching, providing funding for staff to develop new and innovative approaches. Recent examples include the use of voice recognition software as an assessment tool, an investigation into the cultural understanding and academic performance of overseas students and the use of digital technology to record emotional responses to landscape and environment.

Hearing the student voice We need to make sure that the work of CASTLe is relevant to learners’ needs. Students act as academic representatives, making important contributions to the work of College committees and communicating the views of their peers to College Senior Management and the University of Essex. Students are asked for their views on individual modules and on whole courses, with their feedback being used to enhance the learning experience for future students. All these strands have contributed to the university’s reapproval of Writtle College as a partner institution, based on its high academic standards and the quality of learning opportunities provided. CASTLe will ensure that quality is maintained and improved in all areas of its work.

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School of Design


Art and Design • BA (Hons) Art and Design Practice • FdA Digital Art and Design

Interior Architecture and Design • BA (Hons) Interior Architecture • BA (Hons) Interior Design • FdA Interior Design – Commercial and Residential

Landscape and Garden Design • BSc (Hons) Landscape and Garden Design • BSc (Hons) Landscape Architecture • BSc (Hons) Garden Design, Restoration and Management • FdSc Garden Design • Diploma in Garden Design/Higher Certificate Garden Design • Certificate of Continuing Education in Garden Design

Writtle School of Design (WSD) provides students with the opportunity to become immersed in an art and design culture where they can develop a means to see, understand and interact with a complex, multifaceted world.

“Writtle School of Design sits within the top ten Art and Design institutions nationally.” – Guardian University Guide, 2010 35


Students become part of an innovative art and design culture that is challenging at many levels of theory, design, technology and presentation.

The desire to shape our surroundings and create usable and beautiful forms has always existed. Throughout the art and design courses there is a continual emphasis on the understanding and applications of these issues via creative and spatial aspects of interior, exterior and product design. Courses are designed to provide students with an in-depth, applied understanding of professional practice and commercial awareness to complement their creative abilities and education. Students become part of an innovative art and design culture that is challenging at many levels of theory, design concept, technology and presentation. This learning can be applied to diverse fields including illustration; interactive digital art and design; design within commercial, public and domestic contexts; retail and exhibition; theatre, film or set design; and virtual design exhibitions. The growing public interest in areas of interior, garden and landscape design has created employment possibilities for those with appropriate design skills, abilities and qualifications.


There is a demand for highly creative graduates with managerial, technical and administrative skills to coordinate projects from conception to completion. Writtle art and design graduates have a proven track record in securing challenging and demanding positions within private companies and public organisations, and in successfully establishing their own businesses. The Writtle School of Design (WSD) aims to enhance the student experience through both the curriculum and the provision of additional learning opportunities including personal development planning, educational visits, international study tours, work-related learning, industrial placements, careers advice and postgraduate progression. For further information, visit: www.writtle.ac.uk/design

Resources There are four specialist, multidisciplinary studios that provide outstanding resources for all students undertaking art and design-based studies on a range of courses at the College. These studios provide individual workspaces for all year groups. The studios are supported by integrated computer suites with specialist design and graphic software and a 3D workshop, along with more traditional lecture and seminar rooms where discussions, seminars, and tutorials take place. In addition, a Computer-Aided Design (CAD) Centre is equipped with specialist programmes required by those entering the design professions. These resources make it possible for students to explore their designs thoroughly by producing photo-realistic imagery and animated ‘walk-throughs’. All design facilities are available to students in the evenings, at weekends and during the day when formal teaching is not taking place. There is a diverse, green campus that provides a place for learning, inspiration and relaxation.

Centre for the Arts and Design in the Environment (CADE) The work of WSD is supported by the Centre for the Arts and Design in the Environment (CADE), which was formed to enrich the academic experience at Writtle College through the establishment of creative collaborations with arts and design communities. These partnership activities seek to fulfil the centre’s objective of enhancing the environment both within the College campus and in the wider context of urban and rural regeneration. CADE activities include artistic and design residencies at the College, and outreach to communities and organisations in the Eastern region – including those involved in local government, health and education – along with consultancy and research opportunities which are used as a means to enhance the curriculum. CADE has recently established a starter studio provision on the Writtle College campus, enabling recent design graduates to develop their careers and businesses, so adding to the creative sector developments taking place in Essex. For further information, visit: www.cade.writtle.ac.uk For further information about courses within Writtle School of Design, please contact: Design Admissions Tutor Tel: +44 (0)1245 424200 Email: design@writtle.ac.uk

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Art and Design FdA Digital Art and Design The Foundation degree in Digital Art and Design is suitable for students who have a vocational or non-vocational interest in the subjects of Fine Art or 2D Design. The subjects of Art and Design are initially taught through an interdisciplinary approach, promoted through an open studio culture, to provide the opportunity to explore a range of themes and subject disciplines and to develop both traditional communication and digital media skills. A particular focus is on the use of virtual and online environments for creating and presenting critical image, spatial interaction and time-based ideas.

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

In year two, students have a greater opportunity to shape and devise their own individual study programmes in accordance with their professional goals, gaining a strong grounding in the application of social media for creation and promotion of their work, as well as organising and devising public platforms for their work such as exhibitions and online portfolios.

Career prospects

STAGE TWO Semester 4

Design Sector Studies – Design Thinking & Communication

Foundation Degree Academic & Professional Development – Design Practice & Content

Creative Digital Applications – Specialist Workshops

Professional Focus – FdA Version

Art and Design Culture – History & Theory Studio 1a – Principles of Art & Design

UCAS Code: W280

Studio 1b – Meaning & Context

Entry requirements UCAS Tariff points BTEC National Diploma/Certificate OCR National Extended

Students in the Fine Art pathway will gain a broad, multidisciplinary experience of contemporary practice. Students in the 2D Design pathway are located in the broad discipline of information and graphic design, offering the opportunity to apply skills

Semester 3

to the areas of advertising, illustration and web-based design. On completion of the FdA course, students have the opportunity to progress to the BA (Hons) Art and Design Practice.

Studio 2a – Studio 2b – Nominated Discipline Foundation Major Study Project – Self-Initiated

Irish Leaving Certificate Scottish Highers

120 PPP/MP P3 2 X C1 2 X C Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion


BA (Hons) Art and Design Practice (Top-up) The BA (Hons) Art and Design Practice course offers students the opportunity to extend their FdA studies by undertaking studio-based and theoretical investigation of a chosen research project. The course aims to provide specific and interdisciplinary skills by combining aspects of art and design practice and theory, contextual and cultural studies, multimedia communications, digital technologies and professional practice. Central to the learning experience is an understanding that innovation and creativity comes from challenging traditional discipline boundaries. Interdisciplinary learning is promoted through an open studio culture which accommodates a range of approaches and activities. Studio practice is not defined by the traditional discipline titles but by areas of common interests such as image and text, space and object, and interactivity and time. This approach reflects the broad, multidisciplinary experience of contemporary professional practice, and allows students the flexibility to develop individual responses to concepts, themes and issues.

Career prospects Typically students can apply their knowledge and skills to the areas of illustration, photography, video, interactive art and design, installation, information design, printmaking, spatial and 3D design, and sculpture. Professional opportunities lie in the areas of advertising, art commission, graphic design for print and web, game design, animation, visualisation, illustration and web-based design.

Entry requirements Successful completion of level 4 and 5 Fda or BA (Hons) in an appropriate subject, achieving 240 credits. Submission of Level 5 Portfolio, proposal for study and attendance at informal interview.

STAGE THREE: LEVEL 6 Semester 5

Semester 6

Studio Practice I

Studio Practice II Dissertation

Critical & Cultural Study

Technology – Process & Production

Professional Context & Practice

Exhibition & Portfolio

UCAS Code: WW12

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Interior Architecture and Design BA (Hons) Interior Architecture The study of Interior Architecture is concerned with the spatial and structural reworking of the existing built environment. It is seen as an extension of the design fields of architecture, landscape, graphic and small-scale urban design. It requires the student to learn about social theory, construction techniques, artistic influences and design ideas and methods. Through a consideration of such factors, students propose new uses for buildings and spaces that respond to current social needs, expectations and hopes. The course is concerned with the strategic planning and structure of the built environment in response to a wide range of contextual influences. Project work typically covers the areas of leisure, entertainment, education, health,

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

Sector Studies – Design Thinking & Communication Introduction to the Built Environment

3D Form & Fabrication

History & Context of Design

Contemporary Design Practice

Studio 1a – Principles of Art & Design

Studio 1b – Spatial & 3D Design

UCAS Code: W251

workplace, retail and exhibition design. Students will work with a large scale building and show an understanding of the immediate urban surroundings. There is focus on constructional questions involved in proposing structural interventions to both the interior and exterior of the building.

Career prospects Interior Architecture opens up various career paths to students. It is, in part, creative and, in part, technical. As a result, students learn artistic and practical skills that allow them to work in two quite diverse sectors if they wish. Typically, design students can work in design studios as designers, CAD technicians, construction specialists or visualisers.

STAGE TWO Semester 3

Semester 4

Academic & Professional Development – Design Practice & Context Construction & Design

Art & Design Theory

Studio 2a – Commercial & Social Contexts

Studio 2b – Confirmatory Degree Study

They can also enter fields such as set design and construction, animation and graphic design.

Entry requirements: UCAS Tariff points

200

BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

MMP/DM

OCR National Extended

P1

Irish Leaving Certificate

4 X C1

Scottish Highers

4 X C Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion

STAGE THREE Semester 5 Conceptual Applications in Design (Dissertation Prep) Studio 3

Semester 6 Dissertation: Comprehensive Design Project

Elements of the Built Environment Interior Architecture Professional Focus – Interiors Programme


BA (Hons) Interior Design As with Interior Architecture, the Interior Design course is concerned with the spatial and structural reworking of the existing built environment. What distinguishes this course is a concern with working within the existing building shell. There is a primary focus on materials, textures, colour and light on the internal environment and a secondary focus on structural interventions and, as a result, less of a concentration on construction and structure. The projects dealt with in Interior Design tend to be small – medium scale and see the resolution of detailed spatial planning as a necessity. There remains a need to understand design and social theory but also a greater awareness of the psychology of design: how the environment of the spaces we inhabit influences how we think and feel. Again, projects typically involve retail, commercial, educational

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

Sector Studies – Design Thinking & Communication Introduction to the Built Environment

3D Form & Fabrication

History & Context of Design

Contemporary Design Practice

Studio 1a – Principles of Art & Design

Studio 1b – Spatial & 3D Design

and cultural centres. However, there is also scope for domestic and officetype projects. Whatever the project chosen by the student, the aim is to understand and create exciting, intimate and thought-provoking interior spaces.

Career prospects

Entry requirements UCAS Tariff points

200

BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

MMP/DM

OCR National Extended

P1

Irish Leaving Certificate

4 X C1

Scottish Highers

4 X C Higher

Interior Design tends to lead people into design and design-related industries. Students may choose to work in interior design offices as designers, project managers or visualisers. Some go into shopfitting and window design, whilst others may choose to enter the field of set design. The design and building industries are two of the biggest sectors of the world economy and jobs are normally available in the UK, Europe and further afield.

International Baccalaureate 24 points

STAGE TWO

STAGE THREE

Semester 3

Semester 4

Academic & Professional Development Construction & Design

Art & Design Theory

Studio 2a – Commercial & Social Contexts

Studio 2b – Confirmatory Degree Study

14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion

Semester 5 Conceptual Applications in Design (Dissertation Prep) Studio 3

Semester 6 Dissertation: Comprehensive Design Project

Elements of the Built Environment – Interior Design Professional Focus – BA (Hons) Version

UCAS Code: W250

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FdA Interior Design – Commercial and Residential This course provides an approach to the conversion and renovation of buildings that is orientated to small scale projects. Typical skills and knowledge required includes space planning, an understanding of colour combinations / effects, an awareness of material properties and an ability to deign small scale construction details. These skills may be applied to the design of entire buildings, rooms or objects such as reception desks, shelving units and other fixtures and fittings. Emphasis is placed on a need to understand and respond to human needs and activity in settings such as residential conversions, retail and exhibition designs, office lobbies and art gallery reception areas.

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

Sector Studies – Design Thinking & Communication Introduction to the Built Environment

3D Form & Fabrication

History & Context of Design

Contemporary Design Practice

Studio 1a – Principles of Art & Design

Studio 1b – Spatial & 3D Design

UCAS Code: W290

This course offers students the opportunity to fine tune interior design skills in a two year programme of study aimed at producing interior designers capable of working on their own or as part of a design studio. Students are able to top up to the full BA (Hons) degree in a additional third year of study if they wish.

Entry requirements

Career prospects

International Baccalaureate 24 points

Students from the FdA course often go on to work on their own with private residential and commercial clients. They also find employment with small scale Interior Design companies as designers, product selectors or visualisers. Some students choose to continue for one more year of study to complete a BA degree in Interior Design or Architecture whilst others have gone on to other fields such as exhibition design.

14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion

STAGE TWO Semester 3

Semester 4

Foundation Degree Academic & Professional Development Professional Focus – FdA Version

Studio 2a – Studio 2b – Nominated Discipline Foundation Major Study Project – Self-Initiated

UCAS Tariff points BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

120 PPP/MP

OCR National Extended

P3

Irish Leaving Certificate

2 X C1

Scottish Highers

2 X C Higher


Landscape and Garden Design Garden Design and Landscape Architecture are rich and diverse interdisciplinary subjects drawing on the traditions of art, architecture, landscape, history, ecology and the rural and urban environment. The courses within the Landscape and Garden Design programme develop theoretical and practical applications of garden and landscape planning and design, allowing students to progress towards innovative design

solutions. The courses apply current and sustainable technologies through the perspective of buildings, gardens and landscapes as part of a social and ecological approach in a constantly changing world.

Our design studios and dedicated workspaces provide students with the opportunity to work in a studio culture reflecting design practices and preparing students for industry.

BSc (Hons) Landscape and Garden Design The BSc (Hons) Landscape and Garden Design course uses a theoretical and ecologically based approach to design. This Landscape Institute accredited course develops a core knowledge of horticulture, artistic practice, designed landscape history, earth science and sustainable landscape technologies to enable landscape and garden design solutions. The course views the exterior space of the garden as an interaction with architecture and neighbourhood contexts ranging from intimate spaces to larger public gardens. This course benefits from a range of minor lines which provide students with the option to specialise in a particular area of interest within Landscape and Garden Design. These include Art in the Environment, Digital Design, Historic Garden Management or Plantsmanship.

Career prospects

Entry requirements

Students graduating from this course find employment in a diverse range of landscape and garden professions. Past graduates have developed their own garden design, or garden design and build businesses while others have chosen to work for private landscape practices or public bodies including local authorities. The specialities explored through the minor lines enable graduates to work in the horticultural industry as planting designers, while others specialise in niche markets such as playground and school landscape design and as artists working with landscape as their preferred medium.

UCAS Tariff points

200

BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

MMP/DM

OCR National Extended

P1

Irish Leaving Certificate

4 X C1

Scottish Highers

4 X C Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion

continued >>

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STAGE ONE Semester 1

STAGE TWO

Semester 2

Sector Studies – Design Thinking & Communication Landscape Interpretation

Site Appraisal & Design Technology

Spatial Design Studies

Context, Meaning & Form

Semester 3

Semester 4

Academic & Professional Development Construction & Horticultural Technology for Design Site Planning

Gardens & Plants Through Time

Landscape & Garden Design Projects

STAGE THREE Semester 5

Semester 6

Dissertation: Comprehensive Design Project Landscape Planning & Law

Professional Practice

Landscape Design

Detailed Design Applications

Choose additional module line below

UCAS Code: K310

Digital Design Digital Media Communications

CAD & GIS

Professional Focus – Design Profile

Self-Directed Learning

Designing within a Historical Context

Art in the Environment Landscapes, Gardens & the Arts

World Gardens

Historic Garden Management Traditional & Contemporary Planting

World Gardens

Conservation of Historic Gardens

Plantsmanship Horticultural Plantsmanship

Ethnobotany

Systematic Botany

Horticultural & Landscape Ecology

Graduate Profile John Dennis, BSc (Hons) Landscape Architecture “I have always been a creative person and my background as a goldsmith is where I developed my interest in design. I came to Writtle and this course to further my interest in landscape design and combine my previous knowledge and experience. The course has been very challenging yet enjoyable, which balances professionalism and theory with conceptual-based design. I have gained a valuable understanding of the industry that is not offered at other colleges. As a result, I will be pursuing a career in this exciting industry as a landscape architect.”


BSc (Hons) Landscape Architecture This course runs parallel with the BSc (Hons) Landscape and Garden Design but differs in the secondand third-year studios, where students concentrate on larger-scale applications with an urban-rural focus encompassing broader environmental contexts. A dedicated minor line of study explores visual representation and landscape architecture theory, ensuring that students are able to communicate their ideas and put landscape theory into design practice. This Landscape Institute accredited course equips students with the theoretical knowledge and design skills to enter a postgraduate qualification in landscape architecture, providing the opportunity to work within the professional landscape architect arena.

Upon achieving a postgraduate award in Landscape Architecture, graduates can progress to the professional status of Chartered Landscape Architect through the Pathway to Chartership scheme. Professional landscape architects can work in both UK and international practices and experience a broad spectrum of work including planting design and management, local and regional planning and regeneration projects in both rural and urban contexts.

OCR National Extended

P1

Career prospects

Irish Leaving Certificate

4 X C1

Graduates of this course may choose to gain experience in landscape architecture offices while others continue on to the Diploma in Landscape Architecture or Masters programme.

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

Sector Studies – Design Thinking & Communication Landscape Interpretation

Site Appraisal & Design Technology

Spatial Design Studies

Context, Meaning & Form

Gardens & Plants Through Time

Entry requirements UCAS Tariff points

200

BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

Scottish Highers

MMP/DM

4 X C Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion

STAGE TWO Semester 3

Semester 4

Academic & Professional Development Construction & Horticultural Technology for Design Site Planning

Landscape & Garden Design Projects

Digital Media Communications

STAGE THREE Semester 5

Semester 6

Dissertation: Comprehensive Design Project Landscape Planning & Law

Professional Practice

Landscape Design

Detailed Design Applications

Landscape Urbanism (Theory & Practice)

Professional Focus – Design Profile

UCAS Code: WK23

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BSc (Hons) Garden Design, Restoration and Management This course combines the history, theory and practical application of garden design with the conservation, restoration and management of designed landscapes. Initially students study on the Landscape and Garden Design course and in the second and third year special design modules aim to develop their specialist expertise. These years include sensitivities to a range of philosophical and practical approaches needed to design successfully for the future, while respectfully acknowledging the past. This course develops skills that enable graduates to research, design and manage those landscapes that have historic relevance and interest to the heritage industry in both public and private arenas.

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

Sector Studies – Design Thinking & Communication Landscape Interpretation

Site Appraisal & Design Technology

Spatial Design Studies

Context, Meaning & Form

Gardens & Plants Through Time

UCAS Code: KN32

Career prospects

Entry requirements

Students of the BSc (Hons) Garden Design, Restoration and Management course have several career options upon graduating. Employment can be found within governmental and charitable organisations that take on a stewardship role for the UK’s historical properties and associated landscapes. There are also opportunities within landscape architecture practices to develop design proposals, working alongside planners to ensure that historic landscapes continue to develop strategically while meeting the needs of historic listed buildings and registered landscapes. Some graduates choose to focus their skills and talents on larger-scale private gardens and landscape designs, specialising in sites with architectural, archaeological or cultural significance.

UCAS Tariff points

STAGE TWO Semester 3

Semester 4

Academic & Professional Development Construction & Horticultural Technology for Design Site Planning

Landscape & Garden Design Projects

Traditional & Contemporary Planting

World Gardens

200

BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

MMP/DM

OCR National Extended

P1

Irish Leaving Certificate

4 X C1

Scottish Highers

4 X C Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion

STAGE THREE Semester 5

Semester 6

Dissertation: Comprehensive Design Project Landscape Planning & Law

Urban Environment

Self-Directed Learning

Designing within a Historical Context

Conservation of Historic Gardens


FdSc Garden Design The Foundation Degree in Garden Design is a two-year course which shares core modules with the first two years of the BSc Landscape and Garden Design course. In the second year of study, there is a strong vocational focus and a dedicated strand of study ensures students are exposed to, and aware of, the range and scope of garden design practices in which they might work. Skills gained on this course ensure that graduates understand good garden design practice, the use of both hard and soft landscaping materials and the expectations of clients and other professionals. Students are provided with the opportunity to integrate design skills with horticultural knowledge using creative, self-exploratory and practical techniques throughout the course. with the potential to develop their own garden design business or work for already established garden design Career prospects companies. There are opportunities The knowledge, skills and insights into for graduates to specialise in the the profession of garden design gained design of planting schemes and on this course find students graduating maintenance operations. Very often

graduates take the opportunity to gain work experience upon completion of the course and then return to undertake a third year of study to complete an undergraduate degree in the Landscape and Garden Design programme at Writtle College.

Entry requirements STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

Sector Studies – Design Thinking & Communication Landscape Interpretation

Site Appraisal & Design Technology

Spatial Design Studies

Context, Meaning & Form

Gardens & Plants Through Time

UCAS Code: DK44

STAGE TWO Semester 3

Semester 4

Foundation Degree Academic & Professional Development Construction & Horticultural Technology for Design Site Planning

Landscape & Garden Design Projects

Vocational Focus Study

Vocational Design Study

UCAS Tariff points BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

120 PPP/MP

OCR National Extended

P3

Irish Leaving Certificate

2 X C1

Scottish Highers

2 X C Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 advanced Diploma Completion

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Higher Certificate in Garden Design (Writtle College Diploma in Garden Design) This course has a long and successful history at Writtle College. Formerly known as the Writtle College Diploma in Garden Design, this well-respected course has recently been revalidated as the Higher Certificate in Garden Design. This one-year, part-time course challenges students to develop the range of skills and expertise needed for garden design including design theory and process, presentation methods, horticulture theory and survey and analysis. Attracting career changers and those who may have already been practising in garden design, this course

is tailored to provide students with an intensive educational experience including the study of garden design principles and spatial design, with a range of other areas of study including planting design.

Career prospects Most students embark on this course of study with the intention of developing their own garden design practice or working as part of an existing garden design company upon graduation. Graduates now have the opportunity to progress further to the BSc Honours

degrees in the Landscape and Garden Design programme.

MODULES Context, Theory & Process in Garden Design

Selecting & Using Plants in Design Landscape Materials & Contract Administration

UCAS Code: K302

Certificate of Continuing Education in Garden Design This two-year, part-time evening course sets a high standard of learning, providing the essential tools to begin designing gardens. The course has been developed from the BSc (Hons) Landscape and Garden Design and equips students with the knowledge and skills to understand and apply the fundamental principles of garden design in small-scale domestic gardens in a range of contexts. The course provides a foundation of spatial design and visual communication skills, which students combine with conceptual thinking and practical knowledge to produce a portfolio of garden designs. A whole semester is spent on planting design, in which students learn basic plant science, develop a knowledge of planting material and learn how to create planting schemes. This course is particularly suited to those already working in the garden industry, considering a change of career or those who are developing a passion for garden design or the use of plants.

Career prospects The course provides an insight into garden design and some graduates may go on to develop their own garden design business. As their interest and knowledge in garden design deepens upon the completion of this course of study, many graduates elect to progress to the Foundation degree in Garden Design or one of the BSc courses in the Landscape and Garden Design programme.

MODULES Spatial Design Techniques

Designing a Garden Part 1

Designing a Garden Part 2

Planting Design

Garden Design Projects


Further education access courses Writtle College offers further education courses in Art and Design, which can prepare students for undergraduate study and enable applicants to produce an advanced portfolio of creative work. Further education courses include: • Edexcel (BTEC) Level 3 Diploma in Foundation Studies (Art and Design) – can be studied both full and part-time • Edexcel (BTEC) Level 3 National Award in Art and Design (Access to higher education) • City and Guilds Certificate in Design & Craft – Planning a Room Level 1 & 2 • City and Guilds Certificate in Design & Craft – Planning a Room Level 3 • City and Guilds Certificate in Design and Craft – Garden Design Level 2 For further information, visit: www.writtle.ac.uk/artanddesign

Writtle School of Design Postgraduate courses Writtle School of Design (WSD) is distinguished by its innovative collaboration of learning methods and design projects. The following courses are available within WSD at postgraduate level: • MA Landscape Architecture (MALA) • DipLA Landscape Architecture • MA Garden Design • MA Fine Art and the Environment* • MA Environmental Design and Management* For further information, visit: www.writtle.ac.uk/design *Subject to validation

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School of Sport, Equine and Animal Sciences


Equine Studies and Science • BSc (Hons) Equine Studies (with Award) • BSc (Hons) Equine Studies and Business Management • BSc (Hons) Equine Science (with Award) • BSc (Hons) Equine Breeding and Stud Management • BSc (Hons) Equine Sports Therapy • BSc (Hons) Human and Equine Sports Performance • Certificate of Continuing Education in Equine

Animal Science and Management • BSc (Hons) Animal Management • BSc (Hons) Animal Management (with Award) • BSc (Hons) Animal Science • BSc (Hons) Animal Science (with Award) • FdSc Animal Management • FdSc Animal Science • Diploma of Higher Education in Animal Management • Higher Certificate Animal Studies

Sports and Exercise Performance • BSc (Hons) Sports and Exercise Performance • BSc (Hons) Sports and Exercise Performance (with Award)

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The equine and animal industries are very diverse and offer a wide range of careers in a large number of ancillary organisations including government agencies and nutrition and pharmaceutical companies, as well as in marketing, retailing and journalism.

Equine and Animal Science Employers today are seeking well-trained, professionally qualified staff who are able to relate scientific theory to practical situations. Writtle’s graduates have a proven track record in securing exciting and challenging positions in all sectors of the equine and animal industry, both at home and abroad, in vocational and commercial situations. Employers clearly recognise the benefits of courses which combine the development of practical competence with commercial awareness and academic ability.


College teaching staff are highly regarded within the industry, with several members of the team involved with research and consultancy activities for key organisations such as the British Equestrian Federation and all associated disciplines, British Breeding, the British Horse Society, the Animal Health Trust, the Royal Veterinary College, Natural England, Dairy Co, the Animal Medicines Training Regulatory Authority (AMTRA) and the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra). This results in students obtaining excellent contacts within the industry, with key figures regularly contributing to lecture programmes.

Industrial placements

The College is also a member of the British Equine Trade Association. International exchanges are currently available with universities in the USA, Canada and Finland as part of the Honours and Foundation degree programmes. Writtle College works with a number of organisations to give students the best possible opportunities for employment and research, including Dengie Feeds, Ingatestone Saddlery Centre, Natural England, British Eventing, British Breeding, the British Equestrian Federation, the British Society of Animal Science, the British and Irish Association of Zoos and Aquariums, and the British Pig Executive. The College’s proximity to Newmarket, and Colchester Zoo, as well as other notable international horse venues and animal collections, is maximised for the students’ benefit.

Equine & Animal course Open Days 2010 – 2011

It is likely that the 2012 Olympics being held in London will increase demand for graduates in the equine area. The College is an official training camp for equestrian teams for the London 2012 Olympics.

Jane Hart, Equine and Animal course Admissions Tutor Tel: +44 (0)1245 424200 Email: equine@writtle.ac.uk

All students are offered the opportunity to complete an industrial placement. For Foundation degree courses, this is compulsory. Students may either complete a one-year placement in paid employment or a summer placement of at least 10 weeks between years 1 and 2 of a Foundation degree or at any stage of an Honours degree. Individual arrangements may be made as appropriate for those with existing employment experience.

For those students interested in the equine and animal courses who are not able to attend on one of the dates shown on page 6 and would like to make alternative arrangements to visit the College, please contact the Equine and Animal course Admissions Tutor. Taster days for sixth form or college students can be arranged on request. For further details, please contact the Equine and Animal course Admissions Tutor.

College Open Days are also held once a month from October to July on Wednesdays. See page 6 for details.

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Writtle College Equine Training & Development Centre provides an excellent teaching resource for practical stable management, equitation teaching, training and equine sports therapy.


Equine resources

The Lordships Stud

Writtle College Equine Training & Development Centre provides stabling for seventy horses and incorporates a range of stable design features. From April 2010, in addition to its existing 24 x 55 m indoor arena, the centre will have a second Olympic-size indoor school and a therapy barn to include solarium, equine hydrotherapy spa and various therapeutic modalities. The centre also has an outdoor all-weather arena, jumping paddock and cross-country course. These facilities provide an excellent teaching resource for practical stable management, equitation teaching, training and equine sports therapy. The centre is also equipped with a weighbridge, horsewalker and a mechanical horse, all used within the teaching of applied Equine Science modules.

The well-established Lordships Stud is set on a picturesque 20-hectare site. The stud currently stands a Fell pony stallion on a permanent basis. During the course of the breeding season, the stud has a variety of competition stallions visiting on a regular basis. The yard houses approximately 40 animals at any one time. This includes a range of mares from native pony breeds to German- and Dutch-bred competition horses and eventers, with an equally diverse population of youngstock which are produced by students before being sold.

The Equine Training and Development Centre also provides a 20-box student DIY livery yard. Students taking advantage of Writtle’s DIY livery have use of all College facilities and the opportunity to compete in Riding Club and College-run events. The College runs BHS training courses, while Writtle Riding and Equestrian Club provides extra-curricular riding tuition, lectures, demonstrations, trips to major events and the chance to compete in BUSA equestrian team competitions. Please note – due to the nature of horses at the College, students should weigh no more than 13 stone (82.5 kilos); non-riding stud options are available.

Its modern facilities provide an excellent backdrop for student training and the production of quality competition horses. Students are involved in all aspects of stud management and young horse production, from conception to sale. Specialist facilities at the stud include modern veterinary examination and semen collection areas, a semen analysis laboratory, ménage, an indoor school and foaling boxes with CCTV which can be accessed by students via a website. The stud’s latest addition to its facilities is a brand-new ComputerAided Sperm Analysis system, which is the first of its type in the country. Both enterprises are used as an integral part of the teaching at Writtle. They provide valuable practical training for students on all Equine courses and facilities for grassland management teaching, youngstock training and production. The sites also record a wide range of realistic enterprise management data used by students studying Business Management modules via Stablemate database systems. The equine units are well resourced and are regularly used for the purpose of research into a wide range of areas, both by undergraduate/postgraduate students and outside commercial organisations such as pharmaceutical and feed companies, bedding manufacturers and stable equipment suppliers. The College also has its own resident Equine Veterinary Surgeon who is actively involved in the management of horses, teaching of student practical classes and various research projects.

55


Animal resources Lordship Science Centre All the Animal Science and Animal Management courses involve significant study of anatomy, physiology, nutrition, health and breeding, which means that many classes take place in one of the specialised laboratories at the Lordship Science Centre. Studies are carried out using a variety of different examination and investigative methods, ranging from the use of fresh or preserved slide material to more specialised analysis techniques, especially in the case of degree students carrying out research for their dissertations.

Animal Care Unit The Animal Care Unit houses traditional companion species such as rabbits, guinea pigs and rodents, as well as more exotic animals including snakes, water dragons and geckos. The unit also accommodates yard animals such as goats, sheep, geese and ducks, making it an ideal facility for learning how to handle important husbandry management approaches and handle the challenges of different animal species. Once students are confident in their animal husbandry abilities, study at the unit becomes more specialised, focusing on the applied aspects of animal management – for example, housing and nutrition.

All the Animal Science and Animal Management courses involve significant study of anatomy, physiology, nutrition, health and breeding.


The College farm Farm livestock constitute a major sector within the animal industry. Practical classes at the College farm give students first-hand experience of cattle, sheep and pigs, while those interested in poultry will have access to a commercial unit off site. The farm animals are also used extensively for undergraduate research projects on topics such as health and welfare and animal behaviour.

Conservation areas The interaction of the animal (both wild and domestic) with its environment and species conservation are important components of all the Animal Science/Animal Management courses at Writtle College. Specific modules make good practical use of the many conservation areas found across the College estate, where students can observe examples of good practice and have the opportunity to study wild animals in their natural habitat. To find out more about the undergraduate Animal courses at Writtle College, please contact: Jane Hart, Animal & Equine Admissions Tutor Tel: +44 (0)1245 424200 Email: animal@writtle.ac.uk

Centre for Equine and Animal Science (CEQAS) One of the Centres of Innovation at Writtle College, CEQAS is developing a research and consultancy portfolio to capitalise on the expertise of academic staff and enrich the learning environment of students. The activities of CEQAS feed directly

into the curriculum and have provided numerous opportunities for students to complete assignments, case studies and dissertations based on ongoing work. The work of CEQAS focuses around six themes: Fertility and Reproductive Performance, Animal Health and Nutrition, Behaviour and Welfare, Industry and Enterprise Development, Complementary Therapies and Ethnoveterinary Medicine, and Equestrian Sports Performance. Current research and consultancy work includes the causes, detection and prevention of lameness in dairy cows, evaluation of semen quality, biomechanical dysfunction and treatment in horses and evaluation of equine sports performance. CEQAS staff have presented papers and keynote addresses at numerous national and international conferences.

Postgraduate This School offers a number of postgraduate taught and research opportunities. The following courses are available at postgraduate level: • MSc Equine Science • MSc Animal Biology and Welfare • MSc Animal Production and Nutrition • MSc by Dissertation For further information, visit: www.writtle.ac.uk

57


Equine Studies and Science BSc (Hons) Equine Studies (with Award*) *Please choose your specialist minor award from the next page

The course is one of few equine degree courses which fully integrate practical work and students are encouraged to undertake additional external qualifications, such as BHS exams.

Career prospects

This course is designed to equip students with the knowledge, understanding and practical skills required to succeed in equine enterprises. It focuses on producing practical employees who can handle a variety of horses and understand the application of scientific theory relating to their safe, efficient and cost-effective production and use.

Inclusion of current computer-based record management, data handling and design applications ensures that graduates are ready to enter a variety of roles in the equine industry, both in ‘primary’ situations and the ancillary trades, while three minor choices allow a specialist focus in Breeding and Reproduction, Behaviour and Nutrition, or Sports Horse Performance.

This programme covers all aspects of equine management. In year 1, students study husbandry skills at both the equitation and stud sites, to receive a good grounding in the essentials. In years 2 and 3, they must select either an equitation or a stud specialist strand.

The minors follow a common first-year content of Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology and Equine Nutrition, with four subsequent modules specific to the selected specialism. Some modules are based on animals (rather than specifically horses) to enable wider comparison and debate.

Opportunities for those who complete the courses include groom, instructor or management roles in any equine practical situation including livery, competition and stud yards, and veterinary and rehab yards, as well as numerous ‘secondary sector’ jobs such as event, racecourse and competition venue managers; feed, tack and pharmaceutics reps; equine goods manufacturing and distribution roles and positions in equine and animal welfare and charitable organisations.

Entry requirements: UCAS Tariff points BTEC National Diploma/Certificate OCR National Extended

200 MMP/DM P1

Irish Leaving Certificate 4 X C1 Higher Scottish Highers

4 X C Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion


STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

Sector Studies for the Equine Industry

STAGE TWO Semester 3

Applied Equine Management Mammalian Anatomy & Physiology

Semester 4

Semester 5

Academic & Professional Development

Semester 6 Dissertation

Training & Equestrian Enterprise Management*

Rider Fitness & Performance

or

or

Youngstock Production*

Applied Stud Management*

Complementary Therapies

Applied Equine Technology

Grassland Science & Production

Equitation & Coaching* Husbandry Skills

STAGE THREE

or

Equine Nutrition

Advanced Equitation or

Equine Structural Development

Current Issues in the Equine Industry

Choose award line below

*Any students taking husbandry skills will be expected to do yard duties.

BSc (Hons) Equine Studies (Breeding and Reproduction) Reproduction & Genetics

Equine Health Management

Equine Breeding Systems

Issues Facing the Stud Industry

UCAS Code: D334 BRE

BSc (Hons) Equine Studies (Behaviour and Nutrition) Behaviour

Equine Performance Nutrition

Equine Feed Technology

Applied Behaviour & Animal Welfare

UCAS Code: D334 BEH

BSc (Hons) Equine Studies (Sports Horse Performance) Exercise Physiology

Equine Health Management

Biomechanics

Equine Sports Medicine

UCAS Code: D334 SPO

59


BSc (Hons) Equine Studies and Business Management This course aims to prepare students for a wide range of management careers within equine-based business and service organisations and the ancillary industry. On successful completion of the course, graduates will have a sound grasp of management issues, an understanding of the constraints within which decision making occurs and the problem-solving skills to identify solutions, contextualised to situations and enterprises related to horses. Additionally, they will be able to apply theoretical knowledge of anatomy, physiology, nutrition and response to training to a variety of practical husbandry situations. Inclusion of current issues and computer-based record management, data handling applications ensures that graduates are ready to enter a variety of roles in the equine industry. Students will gain the fundamental theoretical knowledge required to build a successful career in equine business. The course includes essential and applied business modules (covering

human resource management, finance, marketing, operations management, ethics and strategic management), which take up one quarter of the degree, alongside equine specialist subjects including grassland and applied equine technology; and anatomy, physiology and nutrition. This programme covers all aspects of business and equine management. In year 1, students study husbandry skills at both the equitation and stud sites, to receive a good grounding in the essentials. In years 2 and 3, they must select either an equitation or a stud specialist strand.

Semester 2

Sector Studies for the Equine Industry

Mammalian Anatomy & Physiology

Husbandry Skills Essential Business

UCAS Tariff points

200

BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

MMP/DM

OCR National Extended

Equine Studies and Business Management students go on to work in a variety of primary equine businesses, such as riding schools, competition yards, breeding enterprises and livery yards. Event and facility management is also popular, with ex-students managing racecourses, international competition venues and corporate

Irish Leaving Certificate 4 X C1 Higher

STAGE TWO

STAGE THREE

Semester 3

Semester 4

Academic & Professional Development Equitation & Coaching

Equine Nutrition

Entry requirements:

Career prospects

STAGE ONE Semester 1

entertainment businesses. The business orientation also prepares graduates for non-equine business careers in commercial organisations, as well as accounting, banking and finance (subject to further specialist accredited training). Job prospects are excellent for Equine Studies and Business Management graduates and many of our students progress quickly to senior positions both in the UK and abroad.

Scottish Highers

P1 4 X C Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion

Semester 5

Semester 6 Dissertation

Training & Equestrian Enterprise Management

or

or

Young Stock Production

Applied Stud Management

Applied Equine Technology

Grassland Science & Production

Management Concepts & Practice

Any students taking husbandry skills will be expected to do yard duties.

Current Issues in the Equine Industry

Equine Computer Applications Applied Business

UCAS Code: D323


BSc (Hons) Equine Science (with Award*) *Please choose your specialist minor award from the next page

The Health and Exercise minor includes human performance and manipulation of the factors which influence it, recognising the importance of the rider as part of the equine athletic performance team. Equitation and Coaching focuses on the rider, and includes practical modules involving the training of horses and riders at the Equine Training and Development This programme covers all aspects of Centre. Behaviour and Welfare equine science, from equine development, students are exposed to other animal anatomy, physiology and nutrition, to species to broaden and develop the health management, exercise physiology application of theory. This science and use of biomechanics technology course includes a large proportion of to enhance performance. Inclusion of laboratory-based work and practical physical therapy, equine sports medicine applications of technology to the and structural development of horses production, maintenance and use of enhances the ability of students to equine athletes. understand how to get the most from a horse whilst minimising risk of injury. Career prospects The three minor choices, with each Opportunities for those who complete representing one quarter of the selected the Equine Science courses include course, allow a specialist focus on Behaviour and Welfare, Equitation and Coaching or Health and Exercise. This course is designed to equip students with the knowledge, understanding and skills required to succeed in equine scientific organisations and businesses. It focuses on producing employees who understand the application of scientific theory to the production and management of horses as athletes.

STAGE ONE Semester 1

work in a variety of primary equine businesses – such as riding schools, competition yards, breeding enterprises and livery yards – and technical positions involving equine reproductive technologies, nutrition, pharmaceutics, sports technologies and equine research. Job prospects are excellent for Equine Science graduates and many of our students progress quickly to senior positions both in the UK and abroad.

Entry requirements: UCAS Tariff points BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

Sector Studies for the Equine Industry

Semester 3

Semester 4

MMP/DM

OCR National Extended

P1

Irish Leaving Certificate 4 X C1 Higher Scottish Highers

4 X C Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion

STAGE TWO

Semester 2

200

STAGE THREE Semester 5

Academic & Professional Development

Semester 6 Dissertation

Mammalian Anatomy & Physiology

Introduction to Biomechanics

Exercise Physiology

Equine Health Management

Biomechanics

Equine Structural Development

Biological Processes

Equine Nutrition

Physical Therapy

Equine Performance Nutrition

Equine Feed Technology

Equine Sports Medicine

Choose from award options listed on next page

continued >>

61


BSc (Hons) Equine Science (Behaviour and Welfare) Equine Practical Skills

Behaviour

Animal Health & Welfare

Complementary Therapies

Applied Behaviour & Animal Welfare

Rider Fitness & Performance

Advanced Equitation

Disability in Sport & Recreation

Exercise Prescription

UCAS Code: D322 BEH

BSc (Hons) Equine Science (Equitation and Coaching) Equine Practical Skills

Equitation & Equestrian Coaching*

Reflective Coaching

UCAS Code: D322 EQUC *Equitation & Equestrian Coaching involves yard duties

BSc (Hons) Equine Science (Health and Exercise) Contemporary Issues in Sport and Exercise

Special Populations

Fitness & Performance Testing

Principles of Training

UCAS Code: D322 HEA

Graduate Profile Carly Tyler, BSc (Hons) Equine Studies “I chose to study at Writtle for the impressive stud facilities and the opportunity to be so practically involved at the stud. With the combination of the supportive teaching staff and good facilities, Writtle enabled me to learn to my full potential, whilst enjoying a fantastic social life and meeting the best friends I’ve ever had. I am currently a trainee equine veterinary nurse at the Royal Veterinary College. In this job, I will complete my Veterinary Nursing qualifications. The course at Writtle has provided me with an excellent understanding of anatomy and physiology, diagnostic techniques and veterinary procedures. Without this prior knowledge, I feel it would have taken me longer to get to grips with the job.”


BSc (Hons) Equine Breeding and Stud Management

This course is designed to equip students with the knowledge, understanding and skills required to succeed in the breeding and production of horses and the management of breeding enterprises. It focuses on producing practical employees who can handle breeding horses and understand the application of scientific theory to their safe, efficient and cost-effective production. This programme covers all aspects of equine management. Throughout

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

Sector Studies for the Equine Industry Biological Processes

Functional Anatomy

Mammalian Anatomy & Physiology

Equine Nutrition

Stud Husbandry Skills

years 1 and 2, students must undertake stud practical modules, to ensure that they have vocational competence upon which to build their theoretical knowledge and compete more effectively in the job market. Anatomy, physiology and nutrition, health management, reproduction and genetics, and the strategies used by the industry to enhance genetic progress and performance are included. Study of current issues in the stud industry, computer-based record management and applications ensure that graduates are ready to enter a variety of roles in equine breeding, both in ‘primary’ stud situations and their ancillary trades.

with teasing, covering, foaling and youngstock training at Lordships Stud, and have the opportunity to prepare and show the College horses.

This ‘stud degree’ includes the scientific approach to how horses function and move, alongside compulsory practical skills with mares, foals, stallions and youngstock. Reproductive technologies and strategies, health and exercise, management of stud facilities (including the grazing) and sports medicine are some of the specialist features. Students are involved

BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

STAGE TWO Semester 3

Semester 4

Academic & Professional Development Exercise Physiology Reproduction & Genetics Youngstock Production*

Equine Health Management Applied Stud Management* Grassland Science & Production

Career prospects Opportunities for those who complete the course include management and practical roles in TB, sports horse and other studs, as well as technical positions involving reproductive technologies, breeding programme management and data recording, and work in sales and auction venues.

Entry requirements: UCAS Tariff points

200 MMP/DM

OCR National Extended

P1

Irish Leaving Certificate 4 X C1 Higher Scottish Highers

4 X C Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion

STAGE THREE Semester 5

Semester 6 Dissertation

Complementary Therapies Equine Breeding Systems Biomechanics

Equine Sports Medicine Issues Facing the Stud Industry Equine Structural Development

UCAS Code: D426 *Any students taking practical skills will be expected to do yard duties.

63


BSc (Hons) Human and Equine Sports Performance This course is designed to equip students with the knowledge, understanding and skills required to succeed in equine or human sportrelated organisations and businesses. It focuses on the application of scientific theory relating to the athletic combination of horse and rider. The modules studied will give the student a good understanding of how to optimise performance and minimise the risk of injury across a wide range of equestrian sports. This programme integrates aspects of equine and human sports science. The physiological and psychological principles and adaptations to training in both horse and rider feature strongly in the course. All modules have a theoretical and practical component including fitness and performance testing, anatomical dissection and performance and biomechanical analysis.

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

Sector Studies for the Equine Industry

Coaching science in both human sports and equestrian sports is studied alongside psychology reflecting the UK Coaching Certificate knowledge required by the industry. The knowledge required for Fitness professional qualifications is integrated into the course and students are encouraged to gain additional industry qualifications.

Career Prospects

Entry requirements: UCAS Tariff points

200

BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

MMP/DM

OCR National Extended

P1

Irish Leaving Certificate 4 X C1 Higher Scottish Highers

4 X C Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion

Opportunities for those who complete the course include employment in both human and equine athlete development. Areas could include rider performance, performance analysis, sports development, nutrition, exercise physiology and biomechanics some of which may require further specialist accreditation. Postgraduate education is a popular progression route for Writtle sports students.

STAGE TWO Semester 3

Semester 4

Academic & Professional Development

Mammalian Anatomy & Physiology

Equine Nutrition

Sports Nutrition

Saddle Fitting & Farriery

Introduction to Biomechanics

Equitation & Equestrian Coaching*

Introduction to Psychology

Coaching in Practice

Exercise Physiology

Equine Performance Nutrition Training & Equestrian Enterprise Management* Reflective Coaching

STAGE THREE Semester 5

Semester 6 Dissertation

Rider Fitness & Performance

Equine Sports Medicine

Biomechanics

Exercise Prescription

Applied Sports & Exercise Psychology

Complementary Therapies

UCAS Code: CD64 *Equitation and Equestrian Coaching, and Training and Equestrain Enterprise Management involve yard duties.


BSc (Hons) Equine Sports Therapy This unique course is designed to equip students with the knowledge, understanding and skills required to specialise their career in the relationship between structure and function and the optimisation of equine performance. It focuses on the application of scientific theory to the management of horses as athletes and students who elect to undertake the embedded external qualification Equine Bodyworker will be able to practise as equine sports massage therapists. This programme covers all aspects of equine science including anatomy, physiology and nutrition, with therapyfocused modules such as Saddle Fitting and Farriery, Physical Therapy, Rehabilitation and Performance, and Equine Sports Medicine. It also covers exercise physiology, health management and biomechanics. The Equine Bodyworker course (delivered and assessed by Equine Energy) is optional, and incurs a

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

Sector Studies for the Equine Industry

small fee (which the College partly subsidises). It requires two weeks’ attendance in the summer holiday after year 2, with the externship module in year 3 enabling students to complete their portfolio of treated horses under expert supervision.

UCAS Tariff points

200

BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

MMP/DM

OCR National Extended

P1

Irish Leaving Certificate 4 X C1 Higher

Career prospects

Scottish Highers

Opportunities for those who complete the courses include working within the performance horse industry with, for example, sports horses or racing and endurance horses, or in the rehabilitation of horses (working alongside veterinary professionals) and in (self-) employment as massage therapists. Graduates will also have the necessary skills to undertake postgraduate courses such as MSc McTimoney Animal Manipulation or further specialist study in specific equine therapies including myofascial release, trigger point therapy, acupressure and craniosacral therapy.

STAGE TWO Semester 3

Entry requirements:

Semester 4

Academic & Professional Development

4 X C Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion

STAGE THREE Semester 5

Semester 6 Dissertation

Mammalian Anatomy & Physiology

Functional Anatomy

Physical Therapy

Equine Health Management

Equine Massage Externship*

Complementary Therapies

Saddle Fitting & Farriery

Equine Nutrition

Exercise Physiology

Rehabilitation & Performance

Biomechanics

Equine Sports Medicine

Behaviour

Equine Performance Nutrition

Equine Feed Technology

Applied Behaviour and Animal Welfare

Equine Practical Skills

UCAS Code: DD4H

65


Certificate of Continuing Education in Equine* * Subject to validation

The Certificate in Continuing Education in Equine is a brandnew, two-year part-time programme designed for those wishing to study equine management at higher education level but who may not be in a position to commit themselves to full-time study. A total of 60 credits will be studied, giving an essential introduction to higher-level study via delivery of the key elements of horse anatomy, physiology and nutrition, along with two further optional modules.

All students study Equine Nutrition and Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology. The four named awards are CCE Equine Studies and Business Management (which has a double module covering marketing, personnel, finance and business operations), Equine Science (including Biological Processes and an Introduction to Biomechanics), Equine Breeding and Stud Management (involving Stud Husbandry* Skills based at Lordships Stud) and Equine Studies (including Husbandry Skills* or learning through work).

ESSENTIAL MODULES Mammalian Anatomy & Physiology

Equine Nutrition

Career prospects CCE will provide students with the confidence to commit to extending their education, or it would equally suit those already working in the equine industry or keeping horses for leisure who wish to update their knowledge or extend their specialist knowledge. The course content is the same as half of the first year of the parent degree programme, so progression to a more advanced qualification (such as Foundation degree or Honours degree) is therefore straightforward. *Husbandry skills and Stud Husbandry Skills involve yard duties.

OPTIONAL MODULES

Certificate of Continuing Education in Equine Studies Husbandry Skills OR Learning through Work

Certificate of Continuing Education in Equine Studies and Business Management Essential Business

Certificate of Continuing Education in Equine Science Biological Processes

Introduction to Biomechanics

Certificate of Continuing Education in Equine Breeding and Stud Management Stud Husbandry Skills


Animal Management and Science BSc (Hons) Animal Management These husbandry-based degree programmes are designed to equip students with the knowledge, understanding and skills required to meet the diverse needs of the animal industry. They allow students to develop a sound understanding and in-depth knowledge of the essential principles of animal management, combining theoretical knowledge with practical application. Animal Management students take a more holistic view of the animal. They have the opportunity to study animals with less emphasis on ‘pure’ science and more on the application of science in the day-to-day management of animals. Writtle College Animal Management degrees have developed to be more applied in focus, enabling students to study equine, zoo, companion or farm animals, wildlife management and conservation, as well as business management. Students also have the opportunity to combine theoretical and scientific aspects with practical husbandry skills. Specialist laboratories enable demonstration of, and practical involvement in, a range of procedures

including analytical chemistry, feed analysis, microbiology and dissection of fresh anatomical specimens. Honours students are also encouraged to undertake industrial placements as these can enhance their knowledge, as well as their practical and employment skills and competencies. The flexibility of the course comes from the combination of the core subjects with a variety of award options.

Career prospects The animal industry is very diverse and offers a wide range of careers for those who complete the Animal Management courses. Graduates are successful in finding employment within the animal sector and related ancillary organisations, including government agencies and nutrition and pharmaceutical companies, as well as in marketing, retailing and journalism.

and industry liaison officer. A number of students also decide to progress to further studies, such as MSc and PhD.

Entry requirements: UCAS Tariff points BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

200 MMP/DM

OCR National Extended

P1

Irish Leaving Certificate 4 X C1 Higher Scottish Highers

4 X C Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion

Examples of employment according to First Destination Surveys include the following roles: animal welfare officer, farm manager, pet superstore manager, animal collections manager, veterinary nurse, breeding technician, environment officer, technician, insurance adviser, lecturer, teacher

continued >>

67


STAGE ONE Semester 1

STAGE TWO

Semester 2

Semester 3

Sector Studies for the Animal Industry

Semester 5

Academic & Professional Development

Mammalian Anatomy Comparative Anatomy & Physiology & Physiology Biological Processes

STAGE THREE

Semester 4

Animals in Society

Animal Management

Semester 6 Dissertation

Animal Management Case Study

Reproduction & Breeding

Principles of Nutrition

Behaviour

Animal Health & Welfare

Applied Health Management

Applied Behaviour & Animal Welfare

Bioethics

Animal Trade

Applied Nutrition & Feeding

Animal Breeding Strategies

Consultancy Project

UCAS Code: D301

BSc (Hons) Animal Management (Companion and Zoo Animals) Applied Animal Management

Animal Management

Animal Trade

Companion & Zoo Animal Nutrition and Feeding

Current Issues in Companion & Zoo Animals

Equine Feed Technology

Equine Structural Development

UCAS Code: D301 COM

BSc (Hons) Animal Management (Equine Studies) Animal Management

Exercise Physiology

Equine Health Management

UCAS Code: D301 EQUS

BSc (Hons) Animal Management with Business Management Essential Business

Management Concepts & Practice

Applied Business

UCAS Code: D301 BUS

BSc (Hons) Animal Management with Wildlife Conservation Principles & Practice of Ecology

Principles of Habitat Management

Biodiversity & Conservation

UCAS Code: D301 WIL

BSc (Hons) Animal Management with Farm Livestock Production Introduction to Livestock Production

UCAS Code: D301 FAR

Farm Livestock Production

Integrated Livestock Production


BSc (Hons) Animal Science These science-based degree programmes allow students to develop a sound understanding and in-depth knowledge of the essential principles of Animal Science relevant to the animal sector. In comparison with the longestablished Animal Science courses offered by the university sector, where the emphasis has been very much on the acquisition of scientific knowledge in the traditional areas of Animal Science, Writtle College Animal Science degrees have developed to be more applied in focus, enabling students to study equine, zoo, companion or farm animals, as well as conservation and ecology. By concentrating on subject areas such as nutrition, health, behaviour and reproduction, and by incorporating the study of particular species (or groups of species) of their choice, students learn the application of scientific principles and theoretical concepts in a vocational context. As a result, the courses have appealed to a wider group of students than

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

Sector Studies for the Animal Industry Mammalian Anatomy Comparative Anatomy & Physiology & Physiology Biological Processes

Introduction to Biochemistry

Animal Management

those attracted to traditional university science degrees.

pursue further studies such as MSc, PhD and Veterinary Science courses.

Students also have the opportunity to combine theoretical and scientific aspects with practical husbandry skills. Specialist laboratories enable demonstration of, and practical involvement in, a range of procedures including analytical chemistry, feed analysis, microbiology molecular biology, genetic engineering and dissection of fresh anatomical specimens.

Examples of employment according to First Destination Surveys include the following roles: animal welfare officer, senior breeding technician, environment officer, research technician, lecturer and teacher.

Students are also encouraged to undertake industrial placements, as these can enhance their knowledge, as well as their practical and employment skills and competencies.

Entry requirements:

Career prospects

OCR National Extended

The animal industry is very diverse and offers a wide range of careers in a large number of ancillary organisations, including government agencies and nutrition and pharmaceutical companies. A number of students

STAGE TWO Semester 3

Semester 4

Academic & Professional Development Reproduction & Genetics

Principles of Nutrition

Behaviour

Animal Health Science

Bioethics

Animal Trade

Job prospects are excellent for Animal Science graduates and many of our students progress quickly to more senior positions.

UCAS Tariff points

200

BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

MMP/DM P1

Irish Leaving Certificate 4 X C1 Higher Scottish Highers

4 X C Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion

STAGE THREE Semester 5

Semester 6 Dissertation

Animal Growth & Development

Biotechnology & Genetic Engineering

Recent Advances in Animal Science Applied Nutrition & Feeding

Applied Behaviour & Animal Welfare

UCAS Code: D321 continued >>

69


Alternatively students can study the BSc (Hons) Animal Science course with one of the award options below:

BSc (Hons) Animal Science (Companion and Zoo Animals) Applied Animal Management

Animal Management

Animal Trade

Companion & Zoo Animal Nutrition & Feeding

Current Issues in Companion & Zoo Animals

Equine Health Management

Equine Feed Technology

Equine Structural Development

UCAS Code: D321 COM

BSc (Hons) Animal Science (Equine Studies) Animal Management

Exercise Physiology

UCAS Code: D321 EQUS

BSc (Hons) Animal Science with Wildlife Conservation Principles & Practice of Ecology

Principles of Habitat Management

Biodiversity & Conservation

UCAS Code: D321 WIL

BSc (Hons) Animal Management with Farm Livestock Production Introduction to Livestock Production

Farm Livestock Production

Integrated Livestock Production

UCAS Code: D321 FAR

Graduate Profile Yvonne Owen, BSc (Hons) Animal Science “I wanted to study Animal Science and Writtle College was desirable due to its long history of land- and animal-centric studies. Within beautiful surroundings, Writtle is a community of students, staff and lecturers. The people are helpful, supporting a productive atmosphere in which to study and work. I found the course modules to be fascinating and informative and truly enjoyed studying for my degree at Writtle. The structure and content of the lessons were such that we naturally accrued the academic skills required to succeed. I would recommend Writtle to any potential student looking to achieve and be the best that they can be. I am now a PhD student at Writtle. This role includes research and supporting lecture staff.�


FdSc Animal Management

This programme aims to produce graduates who have developed an interest in and knowledge of aspects such as nutrition, breeding, behaviour, health and the animal’s environment. They will also have the legal knowledge and applied management skills necessary to manage animal collections effectively. The College has an extensive employer network to ensure the vocational relevance of its courses. The College’s comprehensive resources allow Writtle students the opportunity to undertake practical husbandry modules as part of the course.

Career prospects

Entry requirements:

Opportunities for those who complete the course include working in industry with organisations such as Defra and other enforcement agencies, or in animal sanctuaries and rescue centres, or even in animal units. The opportunity also exists for students to progress to the BSc (Hons) Animal Management course.

UCAS Tariff points

120

BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

PPP/MP

OCR National Extended

P3

Irish Leaving Certificate 2 X C1 Higher Scottish Highers

2 X C Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

Sector Studies for the Animal Industry Mammalian Anatomy Comparative Anatomy & Physiology & Physiology Biological Processes

Animals in Society

Learning Through Work

STAGE TWO Semester 3

Semester 4

Foundation Degree Academic & Professional Development Reproduction & Genetics

Principles of Nutrition

Behaviour

Animal Health & Welfare

Learning From Work

UCAS Code: D391

71


Diploma of Higher Education in Animal Management For those students who already have a wealth of practical experience, it is now possible to study a two-year, full-time programme that results in the award of a Diploma of Higher Education. This award is effectively the first two full years of the Honours degree programme, so it is possible to progress directly to the third year of the Honours programme following successful completion of this award. As with the Honours programmes, this award prepares students for a wide range of careers within animal management and its ancillary industries. For more details, please email: admissions@writtle.ac.uk

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

Sector Studies for the Animal Industry Mammalian Anatomy Comparative Anatomy and Physiology and Physiology Biological Processes

Animals in Society

Animal Management

STAGE TWO Semester 3

Semester 4

Academic and Professional Development Reproduction and Genetics

Principles of Nutrition

Behaviour

Animal Health and Welfare

Bioethics

Animal Trade


FdSc Animal Science This programme aims to produce graduates who have a developed interest in and knowledge of aspects of Animal Science including biochemistry, genetics, behaviour and disease. They will also have an ability to apply scientific principles and concepts in the context of animal management and production. The College has an extensive employer network to ensure the vocational relevance of its courses. The College’s comprehensive resources allow Writtle students the opportunity to undertake practical husbandry modules as part of the course.

Career prospects Opportunities for those who complete the course include working in industry with organisations that prepare research into areas relevant to human and animal behaviour, or research into nutrition. Options are also available for students to go into teaching or journalism. There is also the opportunity for students to progress to the BSc (Hons) Animal Science or the BSc (Hons) Animal Management programmes.

Entry requirements: UCAS Tariff points BTEC National Diploma/Certificate OCR National Extended

120

STAGE ONE Semester 1

PPP/MP P3

Semester 2

Sector Studies for the Animal Industry

Irish Leaving Certificate 2 X C1 Higher

Mammalian Anatomy Comparative Anatomy & Physiology & Physiology

Scottish Highers

Biological Processes

2 X C Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion

Introduction to Biochemistry

Learning Through Work

STAGE TWO Semester 3

Semester 4

Foundation Degree Academic & Professional Development Reproduction & Genetics

Principles of Nutrition

Behaviour

Animal Health & Disease

Learning From Work

UCAS Code: D300

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Higher Certificate Animal Studies This course offers a vocational approach to the study of animals at higher education level. By incorporating practical animal husbandry skills into a broad programme of academic study, students will develop a sound understanding of scientific principles whilst also developing practical competence with a wide range of species. The Higher Certificate year encourages development of practical husbandry skills within each of the three major animal groups (companion animals, farm animals and horses). Coupled with this practical

competence is a basic grounding in biological science, anatomy and physiology and an appreciation of the animal’s environment and simple business techniques. The Higher Certificate is a one-year programme. The course content is exactly the same as the first year of the BSc (Hons) Animal Science and Animal Management programmes, as well as the corresponding Foundation degrees. Progression to a further qualification is therefore very straightforward. This allows students enhanced flexibility in their choice of career direction. The course is supported by excellent practical facilities in the form of science laboratories and animal units. It aims to develop an awareness of the principles of the science of animals and their application. The College is currently involved in a number of research projects to support teaching, and has an extensive employer network to ensure the vocational relevance of its courses.

Career prospects The Higher Certificate has been designed as a ‘taster’ course for those wishing to study animals at higher education level who may not be in a position to commit themselves to more than one year of study. It is intended as a feeder course to the Honours or Foundation degree programmes, although it does give students sufficient knowledge to be able to enter the job market confidently within the animal sector. Students will be equipped with the technical understanding and skills required for a huge range of

career opportunities. Posts such as laboratory officers, research support technicians, nutritional advisers, conservation officers, pet trade advisers, behaviourists, veterinary sales representatives, journalists and a whole host of other opportunities will be available to those achieving a Higher Certificate qualification.

MODULES Semester 1

Semester 2

Sector Studies for the Animal Industry Mammalian Anatomy Comparative Anatomy & Physiology & Physiology Biological Processes

Animals in Society

Animal Management

UCAS Code: D303


Sports and Exercise Performance Resources The sports facilities at the College include a recreation centre and gym, tennis courts, outdoor pitches for a range of sports including 5-a-side and netball, horse riding trails and a climbing wall. Sports Science facilities at the Lordships Science Centre and Centre for Exercise & Health (CEH) include video analysis equipment and

software, a range of physiological and biomechanical performance testing equipment, health screening tools, heart rate monitors and gas analysis equipment. The campus is a short bus ride from the centre of Chelmsford, which has an active leisure programme and first-rate facilities including Melbourne Athletics Centre, Riverside Ice and Leisure Centre and Essex County Cricket Club.

Centre for Exercise & Health (CEH) One of the Centres of Innovation at Writtle College, CEH is developing a research and consultancy portfolio to capitalise on the expertise of the academic staff and enrich the learning environment of the students. The activities of the CEH lead directly into the curriculum and provide numerous opportunities for students to complete assignments, case studies and dissertations based on active research. The work of the CEH focuses around the themes of physiology of the athlete, notational analysis, biomechanical analysis and psychological preparation for sport. Current research concerns the pacing strategy of elite cyclists, the central governor theory of performance and coaching behaviours in elite field hockey. CEH staff have presented papers at numerous national and international conferences. Students of the course have presented their research at the British Association of Sport and Exercise Science student conference.

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BSc (Hons) Sports and Exercise Performance The Sports and Exercise Performance degrees at Writtle College combine essential sports science theory with practical experience in coaching and participation. Sports and Exercise Performance programmes are aimed at those who wish to pursue a more directed approach to the study of sport and exercise and the science involved in participation at all levels – from recreational through to elite performers and from those in good health through to those with specific medical conditions. It combines academic theory with a strong practical approach to the science of coaching and performing. The field of Sports and Exercise Performance is a rapidly growing area, with organisations looking for candidates with a high level of academic qualification, as well as valid practical experience. The course

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

Sector Studies for the Sports Industry

provides students with the opportunity to complete National Governing Body coaching qualifications and Sports Coach UK awards. Students are also encouraged to gain experience in the workplace, with many undertaking voluntary work in schools, sports clubs and teams. The course develops knowledge of the principles of Sports and Exercise Performance and the science underpinning coaching. Students gain the associated practical experience and skills required for work within the sports and exercise industry. The flexibility of this course comes from the combination of the core subjects with a variety of award options.

education and sports development. These include the sport and leisure industry, such as in health and fitness clubs and local authority sports development. Many of our graduates go on to train as physical education teachers or physiotherapists. With the 2012 Olympics being held in London, it is expected that there will be an increase in demand for graduates in this area.

Entry requirements: UCAS Tariff points

200

BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

MMP/DM

OCR National Extended

P1

Irish Leaving Certificate 4 X C1 Higher

Career prospects

Scottish Highers

Graduates of the Sports and Exercise Performance course go on to work in several varied areas of sports science,

14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion

STAGE TWO Semester 3

Semester 4

Academic & Professional Development

4 X C Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points

STAGE THREE Semester 5

Semester 6 Dissertation

Mammalian Anatomy & Physiology

Introduction to Biomechanics

Sports Nutrition

Sports Injury

Applied Exercise Physiology

Sports Medicine & Rehabilitation

Introduction to Psychology

Coaching in Practice

Introduction to Exercise Physiology

Reflective Coaching

Applied Sports & Exercise Psychology

Analysis of the Performer

Contemporary Issues in Sport & Exercise

Special Populations

Fitness & Performance Testing

Principles of Training

Disability in Sport & Recreation

Exercise Prescription

UCAS Code: C600

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BSc (Hons) Sports and Exercise Performance with Business Management Essential Business

Management Concepts & Practice

Applied Business

UCAS Code: C600 BUS

BSc (Hons) Sports and Exercise Performance with Event Management History, Development & Principles of Event Management

Planning & Running an Event

Types of Events & Contemporary Issues within the Events Industry

UCAS Code: C600 EVE

Graduate Profile Josh Congdon, BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Performance “I always felt comfortable and welcome at Writtle; everybody is friendly and Writtle seemed to promote a learning environment where everybody was there to help each other – I felt part of a team on my course. I am now a postgraduate student at the University of Essex, studying on their accelerated MSc Physiotherapy course. Studying at Writtle gave me the personal and academic skills to progress further, opened up many more opportunities to me, and helped me to get onto a highly regarded Masters programme. Writtle installed a good attitude to learning, which has been invaluable to me on this course so far. In under two years’ time I will have finished my Masters and be qualified as a chartered physiotherapist.”

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School of Horticulture


Horticulture • BSc (Hons) Horticulture • BSc (Hons) Horticulture (with Award) • BSc (Hons) Green Space Management • BSc (Hons) Social and Therapeutic Horticulture • FdSc Horticulture • FdSc Horticulture (with Award) • FdSc Green Space Management • FdSc Social and Therapeutic Horticulture • Certificate of Continuing Education in Professional Gardening • Certificate of Continuing Education in Horticulture • Higher Certificate in Horticulture

Floristry • FdA Professional Floristry • Professional Floristry Top-up Year BA (Hons) • Higher Certificate in Professional Floristry • Certificate of Continuing Education in Professional Floristry

Writtle College currently offers one of the largest horticulture degree programmes in the UK. Undergraduates are able to undertake specialisms in a wide range of horticultural disciplines.

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Horticulture courses allow students to combine the theoretical principles underlying plant cultivation with the practical and vocational skills associated with the horticultural industry.

Horticulture is a major employment sector which plays a significant role in maintaining and improving the quality of life in town and country. Students are attracted to this industry by the diversity and wealth of career opportunities and the satisfaction of working in a green environment. The UK’s world-class heritage of parks and gardens is visited by millions of tourists each year.


Gardens and landscapes are created by innovative designers and constructed and maintained by skilled craftsmen. Theme parks, shopping malls, residential complexes and business parks are all planned with landscapes. Landscaping is not just about working outdoors; interior landscaping is also a rapidly expanding industry. It is also likely that the 2012 Olympics being held in London will increase demand for graduates in horticulture. The commercial horticulture industry is a multi-billion pound business, vital to the health and wellbeing of the nation. Apart from the major sectors of fruit, vegetables and protected crops, the industry embraces nursery production, cut flowers and bedding plants, vineyards and an increasing range of organically produced crops. Employment opportunities exist in areas such as plant production, supply chain management and advisory services. To cater for the growing interest in these areas, there has been a corresponding growth of opportunities in teaching, journalism and horticultural therapy. Business management skills are increasingly important for those working in this industry, as there are vast opportunities for managers and the self-employed. IT skills are crucial too, particularly in computer-aided design.

Resources Increasingly society is looking to the role that horticulture plays in the quality of life and its restorative benefits. Writtle has a wealth of outdoor and indoor resources used extensively in the teaching of horticulture.

practical sites for surveying, landscape appraisal and construction of new gardens and features. There are also tropical and temperate glasshouses on campus. The College estate offers a wide range of resources for teaching crop production, with facilities devoted entirely to education and research and used for practical training purposes, case studies and dissertations. The fruit and vegetable production areas provide examples of different growing techniques both in outdoor and protected cropping. The glasshouses are an excellent resource for some of the crops grown at the College, including ornamentals, tomatoes and strawberries. Hardy nursery stock resources are used by both commercial and amenity horticulture students. Production techniques are covered, with particular emphasis on plant propagation and a wide range of propagation techniques are demonstrated within the facility. The Amenity Landscape Building enables experimental designs to be built indoors. It is used to plan the College’s entries to shows such as the RHS Chelsea and Hampton Court flower shows. The College has won numerous medals at both shows, including prestigious gold medals for its gardens and exhibits. The grounds provide an important resource for research and trials work. A suite of modern drawing offices and design studios – with drawing boards, computer applications and associated teaching rooms – caters for the artistic expression of landscape and garden design students. The Computer-Aided Design Centre provides modern technology, enabling students to produce 2D and 3D designs.

The extensive College gardens are home to an abundance of trees and plants. Students design and work on specific areas of the gardens each year, which means the look of the campus is constantly changing. There is a plant collection of over 10,000 specimens and a tree collection of over 1,200 specimens. Students are actively involved in the planting and maintenance of this valuable resource. The grounds provide students with

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Graduate Profile Peter Jones, BSc (Hons) Horticulture “I came for an Open Day and was impressed with the range of facilities available; I also discovered that Writtle has an impressive reputation in the horticulture industry. Having had a very demanding career for nearly thirty years as a civil servant, the College offered me a chance to take a breath and look at what to do with the rest of my life. I had three very enjoyable years at Writtle, making many life-long friends and crucially providing me with a basis for a whole new career. I greatly enjoyed the intellectual challenge and the facilities, especially the library and the new experimental glasshouse. The opportunity to be part of the 2007 Chelsea Flower Show team – where we won a silver medal – was also a particular highlight.” Worshipful Company of Gardeners award for ‘Outstanding Achievement 2009’


Many of the academic staff at Writtle have ongoing research work which provides interesting teaching material and project topics for undergraduate students.

Floristry Floristry students are involved with floral exhibits and designs on and off campus and opportunities exist to gain work experience with floristry enterprises.

Centre of Horticulture The horticulture industry is very broadly based and this is reflected in the project areas currently being undertaken in the Centre of Horticulture, one of the Centres of Innovation at Writtle College. The Postharvest Unit has a wellequipped laboratory and a long record of undertaking applied research on an international basis in many aspects of crop handling, transport and storage. The unit also provides specialist training courses for companies in this sector. With an industrial partner, the Centre of Horticulture has recently been awarded a research grant to investigate the control of non-native invasive weeds in amenity landscape areas.

Many of the academic staff at Writtle have ongoing research work which provides interesting teaching material and project topics for undergraduate students. Current topics include breeding of ornamental plants, issues concerning historic gardens and contemporary planting schemes. For further information about Horticulture courses, please contact: Horticulture Admissions Tutor Tel: +44 (0)1245 424200 Email: horticulture@writtle.ac.uk

Postgraduate This School offers a number of postgraduate opportunities. The following courses are available: • International Horticulture • Horticulture (Crop Production) • Postharvest Technology • Landscape Management • Historic Designed Landscapes

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BSc (Hons) Horticulture The Horticulture degree offers a general overview across a range of subjects and often proves the best option for those people that wish to find out more about the industry as a whole whilst keeping their options for specialist studies open. It has a flexible package of options that enable students to tailor their studies to reflect their own mixture of interests, although at its core is a firm basis of scientific study. Other core modules are specifically aimed at developing and honing research skills, in readiness for the final-year dissertation project. In the first year, most modules are shared with other awards, and offer students a broad introduction to the study of horticulture. Following on from this broad overview, however, specialist options – available from the second year onward – allow students to gain deeper insight, and in some cases specialise in a particular area of interest.

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

Sector Studies for the Horticulture Industry Biological Processes

Horticultural Science

The option modules available are devised in conjunction with Industrial Advisory Panels and include subject matter that is of current relevance to the sector, giving the course a strong vocational emphasis and allowing students to develop vocational competences in certain key areas within the horticultural industry. The Writtle BSc is compatible with other nationally and internationally devised qualifications, enabling progression to or transfer from other institutions.

landscape management, commercial crop production, plant breeding, arboriculture, education and media. Employment prospects are good, with a shortage of specially trained graduates in this area on a national and international basis. Graduates may also elect to undertake further studies at postgraduate level, either at Writtle or elsewhere.

Entry requirements: UCAS Tariff points

180

Career prospects

BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

On completion of the course, students will have acquired a good range of practical horticultural and business skills to equip them for a career in a wide choice of fields. Graduates of this programme go on to work in an immensely diverse range of employment including

OCR National Extended

STAGE TWO Semester 3

Semester 4

Academic & Professional Development Plant Production Science

Plant Propagation & Production

Traditional & Contemporary Planting*

World Gardens*

Gardens & Plants Through Time

Tropical Horticulture*

International Horticulture*

MMP/DM P1

Irish Leaving Certificate 4 X C2 Higher Scottish Highers

4 X C Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion

STAGE THREE Semester 5

Semester 6 Dissertation

Crop Growth & Pathology

Plant Breeding or Horticultural & Landscape Ecology

Conservation of Historic Gardens* Post Harvest Physiology & Technology*

Trade and International Supply Chain Management*

UCAS Code: D410 *It is possible for students to select alternative study modules from stage two and three

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BSc (Hons) Horticulture (Global Crop Production) Introduction to Supply Chain Management

Consumer Behaviour & Markets

Tropical Horticulture

International Horticulture

Postharvest Physiology & Technology

Trade & International Supply Chain Management

Planting & Detail Design

Self-Directed Learning

Design in a Historical Context

UCAS Code: D450

BSc (Hons) Horticulture with Garden Design Spatial Design Techniques

Designing a Garden Part 1

Garden Design Applications

UCAS Code: D410 GAR

BSc (Hons) Horticulture with Business Management Essential Business

Management Concepts & Practice

Applied Business

UCAS Code: DN42

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BSc (Hons) Green Space Management The Green Space Management degree provides the practical and professional training necessary for those seeking positions of responsibility in the management of landscapes, large parks, estates, prestige gardens or associated leisure facilities and amenities.

The specialist modules are devised in conjunction with Industrial Advisory Panels and include subject matter that is of current relevance to the sector, giving the course a strong vocational emphasis and allowing students to develop vocational competences in key areas of Green Space Management.

As on other BSc programmes, a firm basis of scientific study forms its foundation, whilst other core modules are specifically aimed at developing and honing research skills, in readiness for the final-year dissertation project.

As with other Writtle BSc programmes, this course is compatible with other nationally and internationally devised qualifications, enabling progression to or transfer from other institutions.

In the first year, most modules are shared with other awards, and offer students a broad introduction to the study of horticulture. Following on from this broad overview, however, the specialist modules from the second year onward allow students to gain deeper insight into the area of managing green spaces in the public and private sectors.

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

Sector Studies for the Horticulture Industry Biological Processes

Horticultural Science

Career prospects

Entry requirements: UCAS Tariff points

180

BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

MMP/DM

OCR National Extended

P1

Irish Leaving Certificate 4 X C2 Higher

On completion of the course, students Scottish Highers 4 X C Higher will have acquired a good range of International Baccalaureate 24 points practical horticultural and business 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion skills to equip them for supervisory or management positions in a wide choice of fields including local authority parks, public/historic gardens, country parks, botanic gardens, national parks, nurseries and garden centres.

STAGE TWO Semester 3

Semester 4

Academic & Professional Development Plant Production Science

Gardens & Plants Through Time

Traditional & Contemporary Planting

Parks & Green Spaces

Plant Propagation & Production

Garden & Landscape Contracts

Landscape Construction Project

UCAS Code: DK43

Employment prospects are good, with a shortage of specially trained graduates in this area on a national and international basis. Graduates may also elect to undertake further studies at postgraduate level, either at Writtle or elsewhere.

STAGE THREE Semester 5

Semester 6 Dissertation

Crop Growth & Pathology

Plant Breeding or Horticultural & Landscape Ecology

Conservation of Historic Gardens Landscape Planning & Law

Urban Environment


BSc (Hons) Social and Therapeutic Horticulture Career prospects On completion of the course, students will have acquired a good range of practical horticultural and business skills to equip them for supervisory or management positions in a diverse range of settings. Employment prospects are good, with a shortage of specially trained graduates in this area on a national and international basis. Graduates may also elect to undertake further studies at postgraduate level, either at Writtle or elsewhere.

Entry requirements: UCAS Tariff points This course combines the art and science of professional horticulture with its application through education and research in the particular social and scientific context of horticultural therapy. This programme would suit those students who enjoy working with plants and people and wish to develop both horticultural and therapy-related skills. As on other BSc programmes, a firm basis of scientific study forms its foundation, whilst other core modules are specifically aimed at developing and honing research skills, in readiness for the final-year dissertation project. In the first year, most modules are shared with other awards, and offer students a broad introduction to the study of horticulture. A specific core of therapy is introduced at this stage, however, giving the course a

unique direction and emphasis from the outset. The specialist modules from the second year onward allow students to gain deeper insight into the area of therapeutic horticulture in both the public and private sectors.

BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

180 MMP/DM

OCR National Extended

P1

Irish Leaving Certificate 4 X C2 Higher Scottish Highers

4 X C Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points The specialist modules are devised in conjunction with Industrial Advisory 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion Panels and include subject matter that is of current relevance to the sector, giving the course a strong vocational emphasis and allowing students to develop vocational competences in key areas of therapeutic horticulture. As with other Writtle BSc programmes, this course is compatible with other nationally and internationally devised qualifications, meaning that progression to or transfer from other institutions may be possible.

continued >>

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STAGE ONE Semester 1

STAGE TWO

Semester 2

Semester 3

Sector Studies for the Horticulture Industry

Biological Processes

Horticultural Science

Foundations in Social & Therapeutic Horticulture

STAGE THREE

Semester 4

Semester 5

Academic & Professional Development

Dissertation Ecohealth & Ecotherapy

Plant Production Science Social & Therapeutic Horticulture Therapy Theory & Practice

Semester 6

Holistic Health & Wellbeing or Horticultural & Landscape Ecology

Professional Practice Application in Social & Therapeutic Horticulture

UCAS Code: D495

Choose from module options listed below

Horticulture Strand 1 Plant Propagation & Production

Tropical Horticulture

International Horticulture

Garden & Landscape Contracts

Garden & Landscape Management

Floriculture & Ornamental Plant Production

Horticulture Strand 2 Gardens & Plants Through Time

Landscape Planning & Law

Urban Environment

Graduate Profile Alastair Arnold, BSc (Hons) Horticulture “I chose to study at Writtle primarily for the range of option modules available on the Horticulture degree scheme. This enabled me to combine elements of study that I was particularly interested in and those which I considered as useful tools for the future. Studying at Writtle has been such a positive experience, through which I have gained important knowledge and had the privilege of being taught by some brilliant and inspirational academics whilst meeting with like-minded students, many of whom have become friends for life. I took an industrial placement year at a horticultural production nursery in Christchurch, New Zealand, which was also a very worthwhile experience from an educational, personal and cultural viewpoint.” Worshipful Company of Gardeners award for ‘Outstanding Achievement 2009’


FdSc Horticulture This two-year course has been designed to prepare students for positions of responsibility within a vastly expanding industry. Whilst the FdSc in Horticulture shares many features with the Honours degree – especially during the first year, with a number of the first-year core modules being shared with the same subject provision at BSc level – it has been designed to align closely with national benchmarks. As a consequence, it has a considerably more practical element to the content, with a specialist workbased element that comprises 25% of the total study, firmly distinguishing the two courses from each other. As with the related Horticulture degree, the FdSc offers a general overview across a range of subjects and often proves the best option for those people who wish to find out more about the industry as a whole, whilst keeping their

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

Sector Studies for the Horticulture Industry Biological Processes

Horticultural Science

Learning Through Work

options for specialist studies open. It retains an element of option choice that enables students to tailor their studies to reflect their own mixture of interests. There is also a firm basis of scientific study, as well as core modules that are specifically aimed at developing and honing research skills.

supervisory personnel in this area on a national and international basis. As a direct consequence of the subject links throughout the programme, students studying on an FdSc programme may also progress to an Honours degree following the completion of their course.

Entry requirements:

Career prospects On completion of the course, students will have acquired a good range of practical horticultural and business skills to equip them for a career in a wide choice of fields. Graduates of this programme go on to work in a diverse range of employment including landscape management, commercial crop production, plant breeding, arboriculture, education and media. Employment prospects are good, with a shortage of specially trained

UCAS Tariff points BTEC National Diploma/Certificate OCR National Extended

100 PPP/PP P3

Irish Leaving Certificate 2 X C2 Higher Scottish Highers

2 X C2 Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion

STAGE TWO Semester 3

Semester 4

Foundation Degree Academic & Professional Development Plant Production Science Learning From Work

UCAS Code: D419

FdSc Horticulture (Landscape Construction) Gardens & Plants Through Time

Garden & Landscape Contracts

Landscape Construction Projects

UCAS Code: K301 N.B It is possible for students to select alternative study modules for the foundation degree: Ethnobotany Plantsmanship

Traditional & Contemporary Planting World Gardens

Plant Production Science Tropical Horticulture

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FdSc Green Space Management As with the related degree programme, the specialist modules from the second year onward allow students to gain deeper insight into the area of managing green spaces in the public and private sectors. There is also a firm basis of scientific study, as well as core modules that are specifically aimed at developing and honing research skills.

Career prospects

This course prepares students for positions of responsibility within the management of landscapes, large parks, estates, prestige gardens or associated leisure facilities and amenities. The course is practical in its application and develops a broad range of horticultural and managerial skills as they relate to green spaces. Whilst the FdSc in Green Space Management shares many features with the Honours degree – especially

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

Sector Studies for the Horticulture Industry Biological Processes

Horticultural Science

Learning Through Work Gardens & Plants Through Time

UCAS Code: D4KH

during the first year, with a number of the first-year core modules being shared with the same subject provision at BSc level – it has been designed to offer a more discrete provision which is aligned more closely with national benchmarks. As a consequence, it has a considerably more practical element to the content, with a specialist workbased element that comprises 25% of the total study, firmly distinguishing the two courses from each other.

STAGE TWO Semester 3

Semester 4

Foundation Degree Academic & Professional Development Traditional & Contemporary Planting

Entry requirements: UCAS Tariff points BTEC National Diploma/Certificate OCR National Extended

100 PPP/PP P3

Irish Leaving Certificate 2 X C2 Higher Parks & Green Spaces

Learning From Work Garden & Landscape Contracts

On completion of the course, students will have acquired a good range of practical skills to equip them for a career in management positions in local authority parks, public/historic gardens, country parks, botanic gardens, national parks, nurseries and garden centres. Employment prospects are good, with a shortage of specially trained supervisory personnel in this area on a national and international basis. As a direct consequence of the subject links throughout the programme, students studying on an FdSc programme may also progress to an Honours degree following the completion of their course.

Landscape Construction Project

Scottish Highers

2 X C2 Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion


FdSc Social and Therapeutic Horticulture The two-year Foundation degree combines a vocational and practical application of horticulture to the applied work environment of horticultural therapy and, whilst it shares many features with the Honours degree – especially during the first year, with a number of the first-year core modules being shared with the BSc in Social and Therapeutic Horticulture – it has been designed to offer a more discrete provision which is aligned more closely with national benchmarks. As a consequence, it has a considerably more practical element to the content, with a specialist workbased element that comprises 25% of the total study, firmly distinguishing the two courses from each other. As with the related degree programme, first-year modules are largely shared

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

with other awards, although a specific core of therapy is introduced at this stage, giving the course a unique direction and emphasis from the outset. Specialist modules from the second year onward allow students to gain deeper insight into the area of horticulture as a therapeutic medium in public and private sectors. There is a firm basis of scientific study, as well as core modules that are specifically aimed at developing and honing research skills.

Career prospects On completion of the course, students will have acquired a good range of practical skills to equip them for a career in supervisory or management positions in a diverse range of settings. Employment prospects are good,

with a shortage of specially trained supervisory personnel in the area of therapeutic horticulture on a national and international basis. As a direct consequence of the subject links throughout the programme, students studying on an FdSc programme may also progress to an Honours degree following the completion of their course.

Entry requirements: UCAS Tariff points BTEC National Diploma/Certificate OCR National Extended

100 PPP/PP P3

Irish Leaving Certificate 2 X C2 Higher Scottish Highers

2 X C2 Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion

STAGE TWO Semester 3

Semester 4

Sector Studies for the Horticulture Industry

Foundation Degree Academic & Professional Development

Learning Through Work

Learning From Work

Foundations in Social & Therapeutic Horticulture

Social & Therapeutic Horticulture Therapy Theory & Practice

UCAS Code: D496

Choose from module options listed below

Horticulture Strand 1 Plant Propagation & Production

Glass & Nursery Production

Fruit & Vegetable Crop Production

Garden & Landscape Contracts

Landscape Construction Project

Horticulture Strand 2 Gardens & Plants Through Time

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Higher Certificate in Horticulture 1 day per week for one year, or part time over two years

Alternatively the student may wish to complete this qualification part-time * over two 30 week academic years. Successful completion of this qualification will allow students’ the opportunity to enter on to the second year of a degree. The course starts in September

Entry requirements: UCAS Tariff points

100

BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

PPP/PP

OCR National Extended

P3

Irish Leaving Certificate 2 X C2 Higher Scottish Highers

2 X C2 Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion This Level 4 qualification would be attractive to people returning to education; combining work with part time study; looking at a career change or for those wishing to study Horticulture and Professional Gardening at Higher Education level. The course which leads to the Higher Certificate in Horticulture provides a good introduction to the Art and Science of professional gardening. Students learn not only the principles and practices of Horticulture, but also how plant function is supported by Biology and Horticultural Science. The course explores the life of the plant from propagation and production, through to establishment

and maintenance. In parallel students consider the way plants grow, use water and absorb nutrients. This course is validated by the University of Essex and is equivalent to the first year of an undergraduate degree programme. Following successful examination students will be awarded a total of 120 academic credits which can be used to progress to further qualifications. The award is offered as both a full and part-time study package. The entire subject matter can be studied as a ‘1-day-a-week’ option. This study path is delivered over a 35 week academic year.

MODULES Gardens & Plants Through Time Plant Propagation & Production Sector Studies Biological Processes Horticultural Science

UCAS Code: D406


Certificate in Continuing Education Professional Gardening (CCEPG) Certificate of Continuing Education (CCE) in Horticulture These level 4 modules can be completed on an individual basis or a mixture of the modules can result with either the Certificate in Continuing Education in Professional Gardening or the Certificate of Continuing Education in Horticulture. Both are worth 60 credits. To achieve the Certificate in Continuing Education in Professional Gardening the evening modules Plant Diseases and Plant Pests are core modules. These can

be combined with either the other two evening modules or with the day time delivery of Gardens and Plants Through Time OR Plant Propagation and Production To achieve the Certificate of Continuing Education in Horticulture, Biological Processes and Horticultural Science are core modules. To complete the 60 credit criteria for this qualification, a choice of one other module (this does not include *modules) would be required.

These study routes have proved to be highly popular with individuals returning to education, or for those undertaking a career change as well as those juggling full time work commitments with studying. All modules commence in September apart from * modules, which commence in September and in January.

MODULES Gardens & Plants Through Time Plant Propagation & Production Sector Studies Biological Processes

Horticultural Science

Learning Through Work

Any other Module at Level 4 Maintaining Plants*

Establishing Plants*

Plant Diseases in Horticulture*

Plant Pests in Horticulture*

*Modules are evening delivery only

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Floristry Floristry students are involved with creative events both on and off campus, including floral exhibitions and national industry shows. These excellent opportunities enrich the programme of study and enhance career prospects. Through excellent industry contacts, the course team assists and encourages students to participate within exciting work placement opportunities both locally and throughout the UK. FdA Professional Floristry This course is ideal for students aspiring to become professional, skilled florists with the focus on up-to-date commercial practices, product knowledge and the industry requirements which are essential within a commercial floral design business today. Study areas are focused on both practical and

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

theoretical traditional UK floral design and contemporary European trends and designs. Students will demonstrate their own creativity and explore unique ideas to enhance their portfolio of designs, in preparation for working in the industry either in the UK or internationally.

STAGE TWO Semester 3

Semester 4

Sector Studies for the Floristry Industry

Foundation Degree Academic and Professional Development

Transferable Floristry Techniques

Current Trends in Floral Design

Contemporary Floristry 1

Contemporary Floristry 2

Learning Through Work

Learning From Work

UCAS Code: DW47

Career prospects Learning the craft and industry requirements will equip students to gain opportunities in creative floral design businesses, and in related careers in freelance design, demonstrating and corporate/event decoration.


BA (Hons) Professional Floristry (Top-up Year) After successfully completing the Foundation degree, students can choose to progress to a top-up year. This year of further craft development will focus the student on creating bespoke floral items, setting new trends whilst exploring international design styles and investigating other craft subjects to influence their ideas. Students will organise and showcase their inspirational floral designs as part of an exhibition. A dissertation will enable students to focus on academic research related

to the craft, with modules linked to Postharvest and Trade and International Supply Chain Management.

Career prospects Students who successfully complete this year will look to obtain positions as creative directors, senior floral designers and managers within the industry. A floral designer career will enable students to focus or specialise as wedding or corporate event designers, or lecturers and demonstrators of the craft.

STAGE THREE Semester 5

Semester 6

Dissertation: Comprehensive Design Project Commercial Floral Practices Contemporary Floral Design Postharvest Physiology & Technology

Trade & International Supply Chain Management

UCAS Code: D418

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Higher Certificate in Professional Floristry This is a one-year, full-time or twoyear, part-time course designed to enable students to study four modules (120 credits at Level 4). Students will focus on the industry of professional floristry, with an opportunity to embark on work experience whilst studying the craft and obtain valuable study support skills. These subjects are complemented by two practical skills modules which will enable the student to explore and learn both traditional and contemporary methods applied to gift, funeral and wedding design. Students who select this certificate will be able to access the Foundation degree in Professional Floristry. Learning the craft and industry requirements will equip students to seek employment opportunities within commercial floral design businesses and related careers as freelance designers.

Entry requirements: UCAS Tariff points

100

BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

PPP/PP

OCR National Extended

P3

Irish Leaving Certificate 2 X C2 Higher Scottish Highers

2 X C2 Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

Sector Studies for Floristry Industry Transferable Floristry Techniques Contemporary Floristry 1 Learning Through Work

UCAS Code: WD24

Certificate of Continuing Education in Professional Floristry This certificate is a flexible, part-time learning programme, focusing on the practical and theoretical skills required within a professional commercial floristry business. Students are able to study two modules (60 credits at level 4). The two practical skills modules will enable the student to learn both traditional and contemporary theoretical and practical methods applied to gift,

funeral and wedding design. Students who select this certificate will be able to access the Higher Certificate or Foundation degree in Professional Floristry. This programme is an excellent introduction to higher education professional floristry. Students have the opportunity to progress their skills studying floristry at a higher level and

to seek employment within commercial floral design businesses.

MODULES Transferable Floristry Techniques Contemporary Floristry 1


Student Profile Robyn Rayner, BA (Hons) Professional Floristry Firstly I had studied and achieved the Foundation Degree in Professional Floristry and then after a summer working for a florist in Chelmsford I knew floristry was the career I wanted to pursue and so decided to top up my qualification to a BA (Hons). The BA (Hons) is an opportunity to learn, research and create floral art to a high standard. The Commercial Floral Practices module is one of my favourites. We are taught about branding, marketing and how to advertise events. When I graduate my ambition is to run my own business and concentrate on wedding floral designs.�

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School of Sustainable Environments


Agriculture • BSc (Hons) Agriculture • BSc (Hons) Agricultural Business Management • BSc (Hons) Agricultural Crop Production • BSc (Hons) Farm Livestock Production • Higher Certificate Agriculture • FdSc Agriculture (Award Options) • Diploma of Higher Education in Agriculture • Diploma of Higher Education in Agricultural Business Management (Crop Production) • Diploma of Higher Education in Agricultural Business Management (Livestock Production)

Business • BA (Hons) Business Management (Award Option) • FdA Business Management (Award Option) • Higher Certificate Business Management

Conservation and Environment • BSc (Hons) Conservation and Environment (Biological Surveying) • BSc (Hons) Conservation and Environment (Award Option) • FdSc Conservation and Environment (Award Option) • Higher Certificates • Certificates of Continuing Education

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Students have access to 1800 hectares of farmed estate


The agricultural industry makes a huge contribution to the rural economy of the United Kingdom. Around three-quarters of our land area is managed by the farming community and the industry employs around half a million people. Increasingly efficient and sustainable production, coupled with excellent land management standards and high levels of animal welfare are becoming priorities for new entrants. Professionals within the industry will have an increasingly important role to play in responding to rural development priorities and legislative changes to ensure secure and sustainable food production in the future.

Agriculture Worldwide populations are increasing, producing an increasing demand for top quality food produced by sustainable methods. Dedicated and skilled professionals are needed to grow crops, look after animals and to manage production, processing and distribution to the point of sale. The individuals who will be responsible for future changes and developments in British agricultural practice will be graduates with a sound understanding of the industry as well as technical and practical expertise. The agricultural industry is currently relying on a workforce that is getting older; this will result in many good opportunities for new entrants. These individuals will bring a fresh, new impetus to the agricultural and ancillary industries; they are likely to play an important role as future custodians of the British countryside.

Resources A recent restructure of our farming operations has given students access to nearly 1900 hectares of arable land in addition to improved livestock enterprises. The presence of these commercial enterprises makes a vital contribution to the teaching of realistic farming practices and gives students valuable hands-on experience. On the College farm, there are examples of commercial arable, pig, sheep and beef units, all of which contribute to the delivery of the Agriculture courses. The College works with a partner to undertake the arable operations, giving the students access to nearly 1900 hectares of cropped land that demonstrates a range of crops grown using modern farming practice. The College also runs an 85-strong breeding sow unit (plus followers), a small flock of commercial ewes and a 50-head beef unit. In addition, the College has an established link with a local, modern dairy farm. The College farm has also entered the Higher Level Stewardship (HLS) scheme and Writtle College is proud of the initiatives that have been undertaken to encourage and preserve biodiversity on its farmed estate. Writtle College offers a whole range of Agriculture courses at further education, undergraduate and postgraduate level. From September 2010, these courses will be further supplemented by the provision of a new MSc Arable Crop Management course*. (*subject to validation) For further information about Agriculture courses, please contact: Agriculture Admissions Tutor Tel: +44 (0)1245 424200 Email: agriculture@writtle.ac.uk

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Agriculture BSc (Hons) Agriculture This award prepares students for a wide range of careers in the agriculture industry and service organisations. The course is designed to give students an opportunity to undertake a range of modules that will result in knowledge of farm business management, livestock and crop production. On successful completion of the course, students will have an understanding of the broad principles underpinning general farm production whilst monitoring environmental and commercial viability. Students will gain the fundamental knowledge required to run a successful business. Additional modules will cover the production of combinable and root crops, alternative cropping, farm livestock production (including dairy, beef, sheep, pigs and alternative animals), food chain supply, land and resource management, sustainability and conservation issues.

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

Sector Studies for the Agricultural Industry

The graduate will be an educated agricultural practitioner who will be flexible, innovative and creative in the commercial management of business, land, environmental and related resources. This programme will instil considerations of business principles, environmental impact and sustainability into all facets of agricultural practice. It aims to produce students capable of critical thinking, who can analyse complex agricultural operations and suggest improvements and changes leading to commercial success. The course will also provide an awareness of research methodologies and a capacity to design and complete an individual investigative project.

Career prospects

Entry requirements: UCAS Tariff points

200

BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

MMP/DM

OCR National Extended

STAGE TWO Semester 4

P1

Irish Leaving Certificate 4 X C1 Higher Scottish Highers

There is a high demand for wellqualified Agriculture graduates and this provision will support a varied

Semester 3

industry in roles such as agronomist and commodity trader, and in work within grain & seed merchants; nutrition & breeding companies; sales companies; food, fertiliser & chemical companies; food chain suppliers; machinery dealers; plant breeders; and commercial farming production companies. Such organisations seek graduates from Writtle every year.

4 X C Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion

STAGE THREE Semester 5

Semester 6

Academic & Professional Development

Dissertation

Managing Farm Resources

Farm Enterprises

Introduction to Crop Production

Combinable, Root Crops & Alternative Crop Production

Integrated Crop Production

Introduction to Livestock Production

Farm Livestock Production

Integrated Livestock Production

Biological Processes

UCAS Code: D401

Agricultural Science


BSc (Hons) Agricultural Business Management This award prepares students for a wide range of careers in the agricultural production industry and service organisations. The course is designed to give students an opportunity to specialise in farm business management and supplement this core delivery with a choice of option modules that may include crop production, animal production or marketing and supply chain option modules. Students will gain the fundamental knowledge required to run a successful business; issues such as personnel, economics, business planning and development, finance and marketing

will be examined. Additional modules will cover the production systems, together with food chain supply, land and resource management, sustainability and conservation issues. The graduate will be an educated agricultural practitioner who will be flexible, innovative and creative in the commercial management of business, land, environmental and related resources. This programme will instil considerations of business principles, environmental impact and sustainability into all facets of agricultural practice. It aims to produce students capable of critical thinking, who can analyse complex agricultural operations and

suggest improvements and changes leading to commercial success. The course will also provide an awareness of research methodologies and a capacity to design and complete an individual investigative project.

Career prospects There is a high demand for wellqualified Agriculture graduates and this provision will support a varied industry in roles such as agronomist and commodity trader, and in work within grain & seed merchants, sales companies, fertiliser & chemical companies, food chain suppliers, machinery dealers, plant breeders and commercial farming production companies. Such organisations seek graduates from Writtle every year.

Entry requirements: UCAS Tariff points

200

BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

MMP/DM

OCR National Extended

P1

Irish Leaving Certificate 4 X C1 Higher Scottish Highers

4 X C Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion

continued >>

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STAGE ONE Semester 1

STAGE TWO

Semester 2

Semester 3

Sector Studies for the Agricultural Industry Biological Processes

Agricultural Science

Essential Business

STAGE THREE

Semester 4

Semester 5

Semester 6

Academic & Professional Development

Dissertation

Managing Farm Resources

Farm Enterprises

Managing Concepts & Practice

Essential Business

Choose from award options listed below

BSc (Hons) Agricultural Business Management (Crop Production) Introduction to Crop Production

Combinable, Root Crops & Alternative Crop Production

Integrated Crop Production

UCAS Code: ND24

BSc (Hons) Agricultural Business Management (Farm Livestock Production) Introduction to Livestock Production

Farm Livestock Production

Integrated Livestock Production

UCAS Code: ND2K

BSc (Hons) Agricultural Business Management with Marketing and Supply Chain Management Introduction to Supply Consumer Behaviour Chain Management & Markets

Advertising, Sales & Promotion

Product Development & Packaging

Postharvest Physiology & Technology

Trade & International Supply Chain Management

UCAS Code: D441 MAR

BSc (Hons) Agricultural Business Management with Event Management History, Development & Principles of Event Management

Planning & Running an Event

Types of Events & Contemporary Issues within the Events Industry

UCAS Code: D441 EVE

BSc (Hons) Agricultural Business Management with Equine Studies Animal Management

UCAS Code: D441 EQUS

Exercise Physiology

Equine Health Management

Equine Feed Technology

Equine Structural Development


BSc (Hons) Agricultural Crop Production This award prepares students for a wide range of careers in the arable crop production industry and service organisations. The course is designed to give students an opportunity to specialise in crop production whilst undertaking study that enables a greater appreciation of the requirements for conservation or marketing and supply chain management*. On successful completion of the course, students will have an understanding of the broad principles underpinning general arable production whilst monitoring environmental and commercial viability. Students will gain the fundamental knowledge required to run a successful crop production enterprise. Modules will cover the production of combinable and root crops, alternative cropping, food chain supply, land and resource management, sustainability and conservation issues. The programme aims to produce students capable

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

of critical thinking, who can analyse complex agricultural operations and suggest improvements and changes leading to commercial success. The course will also provide an awareness of research methodologies and a capacity to design and complete an individual investigative project. *Please note that if you would like to combine Crop Production with Business Management, the course is titled ‘Agricultural Business Management (Crop Production)’.

and commercial farming production companies. Such organisations seek graduates from Writtle every year. In addition to the more traditional agricultural industry jobs, if conservation modules are chosen there are opportunities for Agriculture graduates to work for organisations such as Natural England or local county and borough councils as advisers.

Entry requirements: UCAS Tariff points

200

Career prospects

BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

There is a high demand for wellqualified Agriculture graduates and this provision will support a varied industry in roles such as agronomist and commodity trader, and in work within grain & seed merchants, sales companies, fertiliser & chemical companies, food chain suppliers, machinery dealers, plant breeders

OCR National Extended

Semester 4

P1

Irish Leaving Certificate 4 X C1 Higher Scottish Highers

4 X C Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion

STAGE TWO Semester 3

MMP/DM

STAGE THREE Semester 5

Semester 6

Sector Studies for the Agricultural Industry

Academic & Professional Development

Dissertation

Biological Processes Agricultural Science

Managing Farm Resources

Farm Enterprises

Introduction to Crop Production

Combinable, Root Crops & Alternative Crop Production

Integrated Crop Production

Choose from award options listed below

BSc (Hons) Agricultural Crop Production with Conservation Management Landscapes & Ecosystems

Principles of Habitat Management

Climate Change & Biodiversity

Protected Area Management

UCAS Code: D402 CON continued >>

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BSc (Hons) Agricultural Crop Production with Marketing and Supply Chain Management Introduction to Supply Chain Management

Consumer Behaviour & Markets

Advertising, Sales & Promotion

Product Development & Packaging

Postharvest Physiology & Technology

Trade & International Supply Chain Management

UCAS Code: D4202 MAR

BSc (Hons) Agricultural Crop Production with Wildlife Conservation Principles & Practice of Ecology

Principles of Habitat Management

Biodiversity & Conservation

UCAS Code: D402 WIL

BSc (Hons) Agricultural Crop Production with Global Crop Production Plant Propagation & Production

Glass & Nursery Production

Fruit & Vegetable Crop Production

Floriculture & Ornamental Plant Production

UCAS Code: D402 GLO

BSc (Hons) Farm Livestock Production This award prepares students for a career within agriculture and associated ancillary industries, whilst allowing the individual to tailor the programme to their own requirements by undertaking a suitable award option. On successful completion of the course, students will have an understanding of the broad principles underpinning farm livestock production whilst developing an appreciation of the core skills and knowledge required to link the primary producer, processors, retailers and consumers. Students will gain the fundamental knowledge required to manage the production of traditional farm livestock species such as dairy, beef, sheep and pigs, as well as examine possible viable alternatives. The graduate will be an educated agricultural practitioner who will be

flexible, innovative and creative in the commercial management of the business and related resources. This programme will instil considerations of business principles, environmental impact and sustainability into all facets of agricultural practice. It aims to produce students capable of critical thinking, who can analyse complex agricultural operations and suggest improvements and changes leading to commercial success. The course will also provide an awareness of research methodologies and a capacity to design and complete an individual investigative project.

Career prospects There is a high demand for wellqualified Agriculture graduates and this provision will support a varied industry; in particular, those who

choose to specialise in Marketing and Supply Chain Management will be capable of employment within a range of companies along the food supply chain including primary producers, processors, food development & retail companies and those concerned with providing the consumer directly.

Entry requirements: UCAS Tariff points

200

BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

MMP/DM

OCR National Extended

P1

Irish Leaving Certificate 4 X C1 Higher Scottish Highers

4 X C Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion continued >>


STAGE ONE Semester 1

STAGE TWO

Semester 2

Semester 3

Sector Studies for the Agricultural Industry Biological Processes

Agricultural Science

Introduction to Livestock Production

Semester 4

STAGE THREE Semester 5

Semester 6

Academic & Professional Development

Dissertation

Managing Farm Resources

Farm Enterprises

Farm Livestock Production

Integrated Livestock Production

Choose from award options listed below

BSc (Hons) Farm Livestock Production with Wildlife Conservation Principles & Practice of Ecology

Principles of Habitat Management

Biodiversity & Conservation

UCAS Code: D420 WIL

BSc (Hons) Farm Livestock Production with Marketing and Supply Chain Management Introduction to Supply Consumer Behaviour Chain Management & Markets

Advertising, Sales & Promotion

Product Development & Packaging

Postharvest Physiology & Technology

Trade & International Supply Chain Management

UCAS Code: D420 MAR

BSc (Hons) Farm Livestock Production with Conservation Management Landscapes & Ecosystems

Principles of Habitat Management

Habitat Evaluation & Management Planning

UCAS Code: D420 CON

BSc (Hons) Farm Livestock Production with Equine Studies Animal Management

Exercise Physiology

Equine Health Management

Equine Feed Technology

Equine Structural Development

UCAS Code: D420 EQUS

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FdSc Agriculture Foundation degree awards encourage the integration of work-based learning with traditional delivery. This award prepares students for a wide range of careers in the agriculture industry and service organisations. The course is designed to give students an opportunity to undertake a range of modules that will result in knowledge of farm resource management and crop or livestock production. On successful completion of the course, students will have an understanding of the broad principles underpinning general farm production whilst monitoring environmental and commercial viability. This will be complemented by the skills and selfawareness developed whilst working within the industry.

Students will study modules such as Managing Farm Resources. Additional modules will cover the production of combinable and root crops and alternative cropping or farm livestock production, combined with land and resource management, sustainability and conservation issues. The graduate will be an educated agricultural practitioner who will be flexible, innovative and creative in the commercial management of business, land, environmental and related resources. This programme will instil considerations of business principles, environmental impact and sustainability into all facets of agricultural practice. It aims to produce students capable of decision making based on the knowledge accrued and applied to the workplace.

Career prospects There is a high demand for wellqualified Agriculture graduates and this provision will support a varied industry, working in organisations such as grain & seed merchants, commodity traders; sales companies, fertiliser & chemical companies, machinery dealers and commercial farming production companies, which all seek graduates from Writtle every year. Students who successfully complete the Foundation degree will be able to progress into the final year of the BSc (Hons) award.

Entry requirements: UCAS Tariff points BTEC National Diploma/Certificate OCR National Extended

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

STAGE TWO Semester 3

Semester 4

Sector Studies for the Agricultural Industry

Foundation Degree Academic & Professional Development

Learning Through Work

Learning From Work

Biological Processes

Agricultural Science

Managing Farm Resources

Choose from award options listed below

FdSc Agriculture (Crop Production) Introduction to Crop Production

Combinable, Root Crops & Alternative Crop Production

UCAS Code: D490

FdSc Agriculture (Farm Livestock Production) Introduction to Livestock Production

UCAS Code: D491

Farm Livestock Production

100 PPP/MP P3

Irish Leaving Certificate 2 X C1 Higher Scottish Highers

2 X C Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion


For those students who already have a wealth of practical experience it is now possible to study a two-year, full-time programme that results in the award of a Diploma in Higher Education.

Diploma of Higher Education in Agriculture

These awards are effectively the first two full years of the Honours degree programme, so it is possible to progress directly to the third year of the Honours programme following successful completion of this award. As with the Honours programmes, these awards prepare students for a wide range of careers within agriculture and its ancillary industries. For more details, please email: agriculture@writtle.ac.uk

Diploma of Higher Education in Agricultural Business Management (Crops)

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

Sector Studies for the Agricultural Industry Biological Processes

Agricultural Science

STAGE TWO Semester 3

Semester 4

Academic & Professional Development Managing Farm Resources

Introduction to Crop Production

Combinable, Root Crops & Alternative Crop Production

Introduction to Livestock Production

Farm Livestock Production

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

Sector Studies for the Agricultural Industry Biological Processes

Agricultural Science

STAGE TWO Semester 3

Semester 4

Academic & Professional Development Managing Farm Resources

Introduction to Crop Production

Combinable, Root Crops & Alternative Crop Production

Essential Business

Management Concepts & Practice

Diploma of Higher Education in Agricultural Business Management (Livestock) STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

Sector Studies for the Agricultural Industry Biological Processes

Agricultural Science

STAGE TWO Semester 3

Semester 4

Academic & Professional Development Managing Farm Resources

Introduction to Livestock Production

Farm Livestock Production

Essential Business

Management Concepts & Practice

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Higher Certificate Agriculture The Higher Certificate course is intended to provide a taster of studying Agriculture at higher education level. It covers aspects of agricultural science, crop production and livestock production, as well as allowing students to gain an appreciation of the industry. Students will also acquire the study skills necessary to enable them to progress to a higher award if desired. A Higher Certificate is a one-year, full-time or two-year, part-time course, designed to enable students to progress to Foundation or Honours degree programmes following completion.

MODULES Sector Studies for the Agricultural Industry Biological Processes

Agricultural Science

Introduction to Crop Production Introduction to Livestock Production

UCAS Code: D405

Graduate Profile Matt Solley, BSc Agriculture “I have come a long way since my time at Writtle College, but I certainly made sure I made the most of my time spent there, both academically and socially. After leaving my family farm in Kent, the College became my second home and I enjoyed every minute. I am now the Farm Manager of a 1600-acre estate and I thrive from my work and am always looking for new solutions to the day-to-day challenges.� Farmers Weekly Farm Manager of the Year in 2008


Business Management Writtle College’s comprehensive Business Management provision offers a range of courses at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Today’s managers need to keep one step ahead of the rapid changes in the business environment. The wide-ranging skills possessed by well-trained managers are in high demand across all commercial, service and not-for-profit organisations. Successful managers are equipped with people management and communication skills, a good grasp of financial planning techniques, the ability to manage change and a sound understanding of marketing and product development. The College offers a wide range of business services, which attract employers from far and wide for conferences, courses and seminars. These close links with businesses allow students access to a wide range of materials for visits, case studies and applied project work. Students use a range of dedicated business and accounting software for lectures and projects. Writtle College works with a number of professional bodies such as the Institute of Management, the Chartered Institute of Purchasing and Supply and the Chartered Institute of Marketing. These links enrich the learning environment and study opportunities for all our management students.

Research activity Business Management research projects have been working closely with local businesses to investigate consumer behaviour and develop markets, to improve business strategies and to enhance performance management. Work has been conducted nationally to develop and implement the balanced scorecard as a focus for strategy and performance measurement. Research and consultancy is also ongoing in the areas of rural business development and entrepreneurial activity, market research, supply chain relationships, international trade, business strategy and performance management.

Postgraduate Business A dynamic and fast-growing sector within the postgraduate School is Business Management. The following courses are available at postgraduate level: • Postgraduate Certificate in Management Studies (PCMS) • Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma in Management Studies • Postgraduate Diploma in Management Studies • MBA Masters in Business Management • MA Business Management For further information, visit: www.writtle.ac.uk

For further information about Business courses, please contact: Business Admissions Tutor Tel: +44 (0)1245 424200 Email: business@writtle.ac.uk

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BA (Hons) Business Management This course aims to prepare students for a wide range of management careers within business and service organisations, as well as the ancillary sectors. On successful completion of the course, graduates will have a sound grasp of management issues, an understanding of the constraints within which decision making occurs and the problem-solving skills to identify solutions. Students will gain the fundamental theoretical knowledge required to build a successful business career. The course includes a comprehensive range of business modules including human resource management, finance, marketing, operations management, ethics and strategic management. Students can take Event Management as a minor; they will be able to plan and run an event, or contribute to one or more events, using planning techniques. Companies increasingly look to special events as a very important source of revenue and publicity, with some organisations entirely based on

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

Sector Studies for Business Economics

Global Business

Essential Business E-Commerce

Consumer Behaviour & Markets

organising and managing events. There is also an opportunity for those students interested in supply chain management to take this as a minor. Minors represent 25% of the degree. This programme covers all aspects of general management. The emphasis throughout is on case study material, which integrates theoretical modules within an applied learning environment.

Students taking the Marketing and Supply Chain Management minor can expect to gain employment as marketing co-ordinators, purchasing officers, sales and marketing assistants, import/export assistants, contract managers, promotions officers and managers on graduate training programmes.

Entry requirements:

Career prospects

UCAS Tariff points

Business Management students go on to work in a variety of commercial organisations in general management positions, as well as in accounting, banking and finance. Job prospects are excellent for Business Management graduates and many of our students progress quickly to senior positions both in the UK and abroad.

BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

200 MMP/DM

OCR National Extended

P1

Irish Leaving Certificate 4 X C1 Higher Scottish Highers

4 X C Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion

Those taking Event Management may pursue exciting careers in sporting, equine, cultural, arts and entertainment, business and trade events.

STAGE TWO Semester 3

Semester 4

Academic & Professional Development Managing Operations

Information Systems

Management Concepts & Practice Advertising, Sales & Promotion

Procurement Policy

STAGE THREE Semester 5

Semester 6 Dissertation

Finance & Management Control

Human Resources Management

Applied Business Strategic Management

Business Ethics

UCAS Code: N200 continued >>


Alternatively students can study the BA (Hons) Business Management course with one of the award options below:

BA (Hons) Business Management (Event Management) History, Development & Principles of Event Management

Planning & Running an Event

Types of Events & Contemporary Issues Within the Events Industry

UCAS Code: NN28

BA (Hons) Business Management (Marketing and Supply Chain Management) Introduction to Supply Consumer Behaviour Chain Management & Markets

Advertising, Sales & Promotion

Product Development & Packaging

Postharvest Physiology & Technology

Trade & International Supply Chain Management

UCAS Code: NN25

113


FdA Business Management This course is designed to equip students with the knowledge, understanding and skills required to succeed in a commercial organisation. It focuses on producing practical employees who can make an immediate impact within their company and/or career. Students will take two general business modules – Essential Business and Management Concepts and Practice – together with more specialist modules such as Introduction to Economics, Operations Management, Managing People and Information Systems. Students can take Events

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

Management or Marketing and Supply Chain Management as a minor. All of our Foundation degree schemes include a two-year, work-based learning strand. There is also the opportunity, on successful completion, to progress to the BA (Hons) award.

STAGE TWO Semester 3

Semester 4

Essential Business

Management Concepts & Practice Managing Operations

Information Systems

UCAS Code: N202

FdA Business Management (Event Management) Planning & Running an Event

UCAS Code: NN2V

FdA Business Management (Marketing and Supply Chain Management) UCAS Code: NN2M

PPP/MP P3

Irish Leaving Certificate 2 X C1 Higher International Baccalaureate 24 points

Learning From Work

Introduction to Supply Consumer Behaviour Chain Management and Markets

OCR National Extended

Opportunities for those who complete the courses include roles as accounting technicians, assistant managers, supervisors and marketing and purchasing technicians.

Learning Through Work

History, Development & Principles of Event Management

BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

100

Scottish Highers

Foundation Degree Academic & Professional Development

Global Business

UCAS Tariff points

Career prospects

Sector Studies in Business

Economics

Entry requirements:

Advertising, Sales and Promotion

Product Development and Packaging

2 X C Higher

14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion


Higher Certificate in Business Management The Higher Certificate is a one-year programme designed for those wishing to study Business Management at higher education level who may not be in a position to commit themselves to more than one year of study. The course content is exactly the same as the first year of the BA (Hons) Business Management programme. Progression to a more advanced qualification is therefore very straightforward. This allows students enhanced flexibility in their choice of career direction.

Career prospects This career-enhancing course provides a firm basis for future employment or for progression to a higher award. Students will be introduced to essential aspects of business management such as human resource management, marketing, finance and economics.

MODULES Sector Studies in Business Essential Business Introductory Economics

Managing Operations

E-Commerce

Consumer Behaviour and Markets

UCAS Code: N203

Student Profile Tara Sharp (International Student from Zimbabwe), FdA Business Management with Events Management “I originally heard about Writtle College when close school friends applied to study the International Horticulture course. Writtle was also recommended to me by a Zimbabwean UK college recruiter. At the time, I thought it was just an agricultural college, but was delighted to find that I could study for a Business qualification. Writtle has friendly staff and a very fresh, welcoming atmosphere. It has been my home away from home for the last two years and I have thoroughly enjoyed it so far. It is not as big as some other colleges, so the smaller classes make the lectures more personal and productive.�

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Conservation and Environment The Conservation and Environment Scheme has been developed in close association with countryside bodies and employers and therefore has a focus on sector relevance, resulting in a highly contextualised programme of study. Students will develop a broad understanding of the ecological principles required for effective management of our wild flora and fauna. Combined with a sound scientific underpinning, students will gain hands-on experience in the techniques of biological surveying, habitat management and collecting, analysing and interpreting data for the conservation and sustainable management of our natural environment. Historically, food production has been the main focus of land use. However, with the advent of food surpluses and a greater understanding of the environmental effects of modern agricultural and industrial practices, the countryside needs managers who are able to make decisions which balance commercial acumen and environmental discernment.

Resources The College’s 220-hectare estate has been the focus of continuing environmental work which reflects the growing interest in areas of countryside management. This work is carried out in association with students, both as part of practical

coursework and as voluntary members of the College conservation group – the ‘Green Machine’. Wildflower meadows have been created, orchids have been preserved and there is an ongoing strategy to increase and improve woodland habitats, including a plantation of rare Black Poplar (Populus nigra). There is a wide variety of habitats ranging from wetland to chalk grassland. The conservation effort continues around the commercial farmland, which is included in the Higher Level Stewardship scheme.

the real world at all levels. For further information, visit: www.cera.org.uk

Postgraduate Conservation management is a rapidly expanding provision within the College. Graduates can study the following course at postgraduate level: • MSc Conservation Management

Centre for Environment and Rural Affairs (CERA)

For further information about Conservation courses, please contact:

One of the Centres of Innovation at Writtle College, CERA delivers sustainable rural development through project management, research, consultancy and training. CERA supports research linked to the College’s environmental courses, as well as serving as a conduit for obtaining and facilitating work on a regional, national and international level. CERA’s work feeds directly into the rural agenda, giving students and staff opportunities to interact with

Conservation Admissions Tutor Tel: +44 (0)1245 424200 Email: conservation@writtle.ac.uk


BSc (Hons) Conservation and Environment (Biological Surveying) This course will enable students to develop knowledge and skills in the practices required to play a full and rewarding part in the management and conservation of our natural heritage. The degree runs over three years and deals with both theoretical and practical aspects of ecology and conservation management. It provides a solid background in ecological principles and concepts through logical strands of study, coupled with a strand geared towards practical conservation management, personal development and ultimately research and dissertation. The other three strands deal with management of landscapes and ecosystems, scientific principles of the natural world and the practical application of ecological knowledge in conservation management through surveying and monitoring.

and practical management, such as hedgelaying. These aspects can also be pursued with the College conservation volunteer group for additional experience, which is so important for future employability.

Career prospects Biological surveying and GIS are fundamental to modern ecological management and support legislation designed to minimise habitat disturbance and degradation. The course furnishes the student with the tools to enter a number of industries which need to comply with the law and best practice in today’s countryside. Graduates from Biological Surveying will

be equipped for careers with, amongst others, the Environment Agency, Natural England, Defra, country parks, conservation organisations and private consultancy companies.

Entry requirements: UCAS Tariff points

200

BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

MMP/DM

OCR National Extended

P1

Irish Leaving Certificate 4 X C1 Higher Scottish Highers

4 X C Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion

Graduates will develop a knowledge of the history of land use and conservation practice, as well as technical understanding and skills for monitoring, surveying and recording wildlife and habitats. Students are introduced to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) software at an early stage so that it can be used throughout their studies. In all areas of the course, the opportunity to demonstrate theory in a real-life setting is taken both by utilising the many resources of the College estate and by making visits to local reserves. The estate is used for a variety of activities including species identification, habitat studies continued >>

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BSc (Hons) Conservation and Environment (Biological Surveying) STAGE ONE Semester 1

STAGE TWO

Semester 2

Semester 3

Semester 4

STAGE THREE Semester 5

Semester 6

Sector Studies in the Conservation Industry

Academic & Professional Development

Dissertation

Landscapes & Ecosystems

Principles of Habitat Management

Biodiversity & Conservation

Biological Processes

Wildlife Identification & Classification

Principles & Practice of Ecology

Landscape Ecology & Assessment Biological Surveying

Climate Change & Biodiversity

Protected Area Management

Habitat Evaluation & Management Planning

UCAS Code: CF97 Alternatively students can study the BSc (Hons) Conservation and Environment course with one of the award options below:

BSc (Hons) Conservation and Environment with Business Management Essential Business

Management Concepts & Practice

Applied Business

UCAS Code: D4NG

BSc (Hons) Conservation and Environment with Event Management History, Development & Principles of Event Management

Planning & Running an Event

Types of Events & Contemporary Issues within the Events Industry

UCAS Code: D4N8

Student Profile Lauren French, BSc (Hons) Conservation and Environment “I have been interested in the environment since a very young age, and attended wildlife discovery days run by the Essex Wildlife Trust for many years, before volunteering my spare time to help out the Education Officer in assisting with similar events. The vast Writtle estate allows learning to become practical rather than entirely classroom-based, which assists in my learning as well as adding an extra element of fun. The lecturers are always on hand to answer any questions and make studying more personal in comparison to other big universities. I am currently working part-time as an Education Officer for the Essex Wildlife Trust, and my degree was an integral part of being offered the job. I hope that in the future I can use my knowledge to inspire other young people to take an interest in the world around us and I have Writtle to thank for that.�


FdSc Conservation and Environment (with Award*) *please choose your specialist minor award below

These are both two-year vocational degrees (see award options below) focusing on the sustainable use of our countryside and deal with the theoretical and practical aspects of ecology and conservation management. They both provide a solid background in ecological principles and concepts through logical strands of study, coupled with a strand geared towards practical conservation management and personal development. The student will also engage with the workplace through a suite of modules which run through both years, thus gaining the much-needed experience sought by employers. Another aspect of this sector is the volunteering ethos

and this is encouraged and facilitated through extra-curricular activity on the College estate and elsewhere. Visits to local sites are also a feature of these courses. The degrees are differentiated by the fact that the FdSc Conservation and Environment (Ecology and Habitat Management) concentrates on habitat assessment and management and the FdSc Conservation and Environment (Biological Surveying and Habitat Management) concentrates on identification skills and wildlife and habitat surveying methods.

Career prospects Both these courses equip the student with the knowledge and experience necessary to enter the

STAGE ONE Semester 1

Semester 2

STAGE TWO Semester 3

Semester 4

Sector Studies in the Conservation Industry

Foundation Degree Academic & Professional Development

Learning Through Work

Learning From Work

Landscapes & Ecosystems

Principles of Habitat Management

Choose from award options listed below

Landscape Ecology & Assessment

OCR National Extended

100 PPP/MP P3

Irish Leaving Certificate 2 X C1 Higher

FdSc Conservation and Environment (Biological Surveying and Habitat Management) UCAS Code: CF8R

Entry requirements: BTEC National Diploma/Certificate

UCAS Code: D449

Biological Processes

Foundation degrees are designed to enable progression to stage 3 BSc (Hons) Conservation and Environment (Biological Surveying) after completion, making a total of three years of study to achieve Honours.

UCAS Tariff points

FdSc Conservation and Environment (Ecology and Habitat Management) Principles & Practice of Ecology

conservation sector. Graduates from both Foundation degrees will be contenders for careers with, amongst others, the Environment Agency, Natural England, Defra, country parks, conservation organisations and private consultancy companies. Ecological knowledge is fundamental to the sustainable management of the natural world, its species and habitats and therefore Ecology and Habitat Management is particularly relevant for ranger or warden roles. Biological Surveying and Habitat Management, with its emphasis on use of GIS and supporting, as it does, legislation designed to minimise habitat disturbance and degradation, gives the graduate potential to operate in planning and development roles with conservation organisations, local government and private consultancy firms.

Wildlife Identification and Classification

Scottish Highers

2 X C Higher

International Baccalaureate 24 points 14–19 Advanced Diploma Completion

Biological Surveying

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Higher Certificate Conservation and Environment This is a one year full-time or two year part-time vocational course which deals with both theoretical and practical aspects of ecology and conservation management. It provides a solid background in ecological principles and concepts and an insight into the skills required to undertake practical habitat and species management. As with the BSc Honours course the estate and visits are used in teaching appropriate elements and the College volunteer group offers additional experience.

Career Prospects This course is a starting point in Higher Education for the student who wishes to further their career in or to enter the conservation sector. The Higher Certificate can give academic support for a voluntary warden post or similar or be a stepping stone on the route to a full degree when no qualifications other than experience and interest can be offered by the candidate. Organisations such as the Wildlife Trusts, National Trust, RSPB etc. rely upon some voluntary roles and people who fill these positions can often, with formal academic training, go on to full time paid employment with these bodies.

MODULES Sector Studies in the Conservation Industry Landscapes & Ecosystems Wildlife Identification & Classification

Biological Processes

Principles & Practice of Ecology

UCAS Code: DF47

Higher Certificate Biological Surveying This is a one year full-time or two year part-time vocational course which deals with both theoretical and practical aspects of ecology. It provides a solid background in ecological principles and concepts and the skills required to undertake practical biological surveying, including monitoring methodologies and habitat classification. As with the BSc Honours Conservation and Environment, in its various forms, the estate and visits are used in teaching appropriate elements and the College volunteer group offers additional experience. Candidates who wish ultimately to progress to BSc Honours

will normally be interested in our other one year course the Higher Certificate Conservation and Environment.

Career Prospects Candidates for this certificate will probably have a role within the conservation sector and have identified specific training in biological surveying as being necessary to their development. Organisations such as the Wildlife Trusts, National Trust, RSPB etc. are increasingly encouraging formal academic training for both their voluntary and full time paid employees.

MODULES Principles & Practice of Ecology Landscapes & Ecosystems Biological Processes

Wildlife Identification and Classification

Biological Surveying

UCAS Code: CD94


Certificate of Certificate of Continuing Education Continuing Education Biological Surveying Conservation Management This is a one year part-time vocational course which deals with both theoretical and practical aspects of ecology. It provides a solid background in ecological principles and concepts and the skills required to undertake practical biological surveying, including monitoring methodologies and habitat classification.

This is a one year part-time vocational course which deals with the fundamentals of habitat and species management. It provides a background into why the British Landscape is as it is and explores both traditional and modern conservation techniques.

MODULES

MODULES

Biological Surveying

Landscapes & Ecosystems

Principles and Practice of Ecology

Principles of Habitat Management

Both of these Certificates of Continuing Education are suitable for mature students returning to Higher Education who are unable to commit to a full time course. Contact time is about six hours a week and on successful completion 60 credits will be held towards the full time Honours degree in Biological Surveying and so progression to that award is possible for successful candidates. The estate is used within teaching the courses in much the same way as our other provision and access to other resources such as the volunteer group is also available.

Career Prospects These courses are starting points in Higher Education for students wishing to further their career in or to enter the conservation sector but who may not offer the standard entry requirements for academic study. The Certificate of Continuing Education Conservation Management can give academic support for a voluntary warden post or similar or be a stepping stone on the route to a full degree. The Certificate of Continuing Education Biological Surveying is more likely to be appropriate for someone with a role within the conservation sector who has identified specific training in biological surveying as being necessary to their development. Organisations such as the Wildlife Trusts, National Trust, RSPB etc. are increasingly encouraging formal academic training for both their voluntary and full time paid employees.

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Further information Finance and fees........................................................... 124 How to apply................................................................. 126 Entry requirements........................................................ 130 Accommodation............................................................ 132 Facilities on campus...................................................... 134 Students’ Union............................................................. 135 Sports clubs.................................................................. 136 Information and library services.................................... 137 Short Course Training.................................................... 138 Alumni of Writtle ........................................................... 139 Campus map................................................................. 140 Index.............................................................................. 142 How to find us............................................................... 143 Disclaimer...................................................................... 143

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Finance and fees Tuition fees for full-time UK and EU students

Student loans for maintenance for UK students

Full-time Foundation and Honour degree programme students pay £3,290 per annum. These fees apply to students registering with the College for the first time and those continuing studies on new programmes. Fees shown relate to the year 2010/11 and are subject to change for the year 2011/12.

The student loan for maintenance helps to pay for living expenses such as accommodation, food and course materials. This is in addition to the student loan to cover the cost of tuition fees. Both types of loan are provided by the government and the interest rate charged is linked to inflation, so that the money students repay is the same in real terms as the money they originally borrowed. It is likely to be the cheapest form of borrowing students will ever get.

Non-repayable grants for full-time UK students (2010 rates) There is extra help to meet the costs of going onto higher education for students from lower income households. This could be worth up to £2,906 and it does not have to be paid back.

Student loans for tuition fees for UK students The College advises students to apply to: www.direct.gov.uk/studentfinance even if, at this stage, they do not intend to apply for a student loan. If students do not apply, they will be expected to pay the full fees charged by the College and they will not be able to receive student loans and grants towards living costs. The application process may change from 2011. Refer to: www.direct.gov.uk/studentfinance for further information.

Further information can be found at: www.direct.gov.uk/studentfinance

Bursaries for UK students* (*details are subject to change) For full-time UK students paying the full tuition fee, the College will provide bursaries of up to £529 for those in receipt of the maximum maintenance grant award from the Student Loan Company. Students on household incomes between £25,000 and £30,000 will receive £200. Students on household incomes between £30,000 and £40,000 will receive £150. For further information, email: bursaries@writtle.ac.uk


Tuition fees for part-time UK and EU students

Student loans for tuition fees for full-time, non-UK EU students

Part-time students from England can apply for assistance with tuition fees. Those from Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are subject to different arrangements. The EU Team at the Student Loan Company will process applications for part-time support from EU nationals and their family members (conditions apply).

Non-UK EU students can apply for a student loan for tuition fees but not living costs.

If a student studies at least 50% of a full-time course, they may qualify for a non-repayable grant towards their fees. These grants are available to students from lower income households who intend to complete their course in no more than twice the length of time it would ordinarily take to complete the full-time course. Students should apply to their Local Authority for support.

Bursaries for part-time UK students (details are subject to change) Part-time students paying tuition fees linked to the new variable fees system and attending at least 50% of a full-time course may be eligible for a bursary of £50 per module if they are in receipt of one of the following meanstested benefits, or if they are an unwaged dependant of persons in receipt of the benefits marked with an asterisk, or if they are an asylum seeker in receipt of the equivalent of income-based state benefit: • Income Support* • Job Seeker’s Allowance (income-based)* • Working Tax Credit (WTC) with a household income of less than £15,276* • Housing/Council Tax Benefit* • Pensions Credit-Guarantee Credit (only over 60s) • Employment and Support Allowance (ESA)

For further information, please contact: European Customer Service Team (Non-UK) Student Loan Company Tel: +44 (0) 141 243 3570 Email: eu_team@slc.co.uk www.slc.co.uk

Tuition fees for non-EU students The tuition fees for non-EU students are £7,930. This fee is payable in full at the start of the student’s studies. Fees relate to the year 2010/11 and are subject to change for 2011/12.

Access to Learning Fund for UK students Students who find themselves experiencing serious financial difficulties during their studies may apply to the Access to Learning Fund. For further information, please contact: Learner Services Tel: +44 (0)1245 424200 Email: student.support@writtle.ac.uk

Equivalent Level Qualifications (ELQ) The government no longer provides funding to teach students who study for a second degree at the same time or at a lower level than a qualification already held. Students studying Foundation degrees are not affected. ELQ students pay the normal fee + 50%.

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How to Apply

All applications are dealt with centrally by Admissions, who work closely with the relevant academic staff to ensure that: • Applicants are given information about their course and the College. • Previous qualifications, levels of experience and enthusiasm are taken into account when a decision is taken on whether to offer applicants a place. • Applicants are kept informed about the progress of their application and are given a decision as quickly as possible.

Visits to the College All applicants are invited to visit the College to attend an Open Day. Pre-event registration is required; please see page 6 for details or email: openday@writtle.ac.uk

Full-time applications Applications for full-time Foundation or Honours degrees at universities and colleges in the UK are made through the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) using Apply, an online application system available at: www.ucas.com The application fee for this service is £19* for more than one choice or £9* for a single choice. *Fees are correct at time of going to press.

Applications for part-time study Applications for part-time higher education courses, and Certificates of Continuing Education or Higher Certificates part-time, are made directly to the College. An application form can be requested from Admissions on: Tel: +44 (0)1245 424200. Application forms can also be downloaded from the website: www.writtle.ac.uk


Applying through UCAS 1. Students at a school or college registered with UCAS All UK schools and colleges are registered with UCAS to manage their students’ applications. Applicants obtain a ‘buzzword’ from their tutor or careers adviser in order to register with UCAS. This establishes the institution from which each applicant is applying, allowing the referee to attach their reference. Once the application is completed, the applicant submits it to their referee, who then submits the completed application to UCAS on the applicant’s behalf. Applicants pay for their application either by credit or debit card online, or by paying their school or other registered centre, which will then pay UCAS. 2. Independent applicants in the UK

When to apply for 2011 entry The UCAS application process begins on: 1 September 2010. The closing date for application to UCAS is: 15 January 2011. UCAS will continue to forward application forms to institutions even if received after 15 January 2011. Writtle College is willing to consider late applications, subject to course availability.

Other UK applicants who are not at school or college apply online independently at: www.ucas.com and are responsible for paying the correct application fee, obtaining and attaching the academic reference and submitting the completed application online to UCAS.

Please note that the UCAS application information for Writtle College is:

3. International applicants outside the UK (EU and worldwide)

Institution code number: W85

Institution code name: WRITL

Applicants from the EU (excluding the UK) and worldwide apply independently online, except for those whose school or college is registered with UCAS. Advice is available from British Council offices and other centres overseas, or the applicant’s school or college. The applicant is responsible for paying the correct application fee, obtaining and attaching the academic reference and submitting the completed application online to UCAS. For further information, please contact: UCAS Customer Service Unit Tel: +44 (0)871 468 0468 (Monday to Friday, 08:30 – 18:00 GMT) www.ucas.com

UCAS Track Once applicants have submitted their application, UCAS will provide them with a personal ID number, together with a user name for Track, the online application tracking system which enables applicants to monitor the progress of their application.

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How is the application dealt with?

College Admissions Policy and Code of Practice

Once the application is received, the College will automatically send an acknowledgement card to the applicant. The applicant will then be contacted again with additional information, which may include an offer and an invitation to visit the College. The College encourages all applicants to visit the College, although the College appreciates that this is not always possible due to the length and cost of the journey involved.

Writtle College operates an open Admissions Policy that ensures fair and equitable treatment for all applicants. This policy can be viewed at: www.writtle.ac.uk

Full-time Applicants Upon the College offering a place, UCAS will send an official statement to inform the applicant of the College’s decision. The applicant then needs to contact UCAS online with their decision. If the offer is conditional on examination results and the applicant successfully meets the conditions, the College will confirm the applicant’s place and notify UCAS direct. UCAS then informs the applicant of the College’s decision. If the examination results do not meet the conditions of the offer, applicants should contact Admissions, who will review the results with the subject Admissions Tutor.

Part-time Applicants Upon offering a place, the College will send an official statement informing the applicant of its decision. The applicant then needs to inform the College with their decision whether or not to accept the offer. If the offer is conditional on examination results and the applicant successfully meets the conditions, the College will confirm the applicant’s place. If the examination results do not meet the conditions of the offer, applicants should contact Admissions, who will review the results with an Admissions Tutor.

Availability of courses Writtle College is obliged to provide courses that are cost-effective. This means that each programme must recruit a minimum number of students. Occasionally this does not occur and, as a last resort, it may be necessary to cancel a course. Please be assured that this is a situation we will do our utmost to avoid. In the event that we cannot offer students a place on their preferred course for this reason, we will, wherever possible, offer a place on an alternative course. Note: new courses are continually being introduced and current courses may be updated, so applicants are advised to contact the College or view the website for full details. The College will contact applicants to offer an alternative course if the applied for has significantly changed. For further information, please contact: Admissions Tel: +44 (0)1245 424200 Email: admissions@writtle.ac.uk


Writtle College operates an open Admissions Policy that ensures fair and equitable treatment for all applicants.

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Entry requirements

Applicants from schools and colleges Applications for all full-time programmes must be made through the UCAS system. For advice or support during the application process please contact the Admissions Office at the College: admissions@writtle.ac.uk or +44 (0) 1245 424200 The qualifications needed to join our undergraduate programme vary. Further details and required tariff points can be viewed on both the College and UCAS website: www.writtle.ac.uk or www.ucas.com

Other comparable qualifications The College welcomes applicants holding other qualifications, including the following for example: Irish Highers Certificate, Scottish Highers, International and European Baccalaureate, BTEC National Diploma, OCR National Extended Diploma, and the 14–19 Diploma (Advanced). Further information on requirements for these qualifications can be found on the course pages of this prospectus.

Key Skills A maximum of 20 Tariff points from Level 3 Key Skills will be taken into consideration when making offers of places for higher education courses.

GCSEs Four GCSEs grade A–C including Maths, English and Science.


Applications from those returning to education

Writtle is an Equal Opportunities provider

Writtle College recognises that the needs of students who may not have studied for some time differ to those who have recently completed education. The College takes into account academic background and practical work experience since leaving full-time education to reach a decision on the application.

The College’s Equality and Diversity Policy endeavours to ensure that no one suffers discrimination. The College is fully committed to and supportive of equal access and inclusion and aims to avoid unfair discrimination on any grounds.

Applications from overseas students A number of overseas qualifications which are equivalent to UK A levels will be acceptable, together with evidence of proficiency in English. Please see page 21 for details.

We believe that a student body which is diverse in terms of background and experience contributes to a stimulating learning environment. The Admissions Policy and Admissions Code of Practice are available to download on the College website at: www.writtle.ac.uk For further information, please contact: Admissions Tel: +44 (0)1245 424200 Email: admissions@writtle.ac.uk

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Accommodation Writtle College has on-site accommodation for around 400 students, which allows for a campus with a lively, community atmosphere. Many students are keen to live on campus, particularly for the first year of their course. It is easier to settle in and all the facilities – such as the launderette, Writz restaurant and bar, fitness centre, library and computer services – are close at hand. Leaving home is a big step, so where students choose to live is an extremely important decision. Whether in a hall of residence or a shared house off campus, contracts are likely to be for a full academic year or longer and it may not be easy to change accommodation once a contract has been signed, so students should take time to weigh up all the options before signing any agreement.


The College’s Accommodation Office will endeavour to ensure that students are placed in the most suitable accommodation for them by taking into account factors such as their course, age, gender and any special requirements. The Accommodation Office maintains a waiting list for places in halls and for those who prefer to live off campus, the office has lists of privately owned lodgings, flats and shared houses in the area.

Key facts

Hall fees*

• All rooms have free Internet access.

Contracts are for a full academic year, including the Christmas and Easter vacations. Fees include a meal allowance of 10 meals per week (term time only). Hall fees are payable in three instalments – on arrival, after Christmas and around Easter.

• Other rooms have showers and toilets nearby and some have their own washbasin.

• The majority of places in halls are allocated to first-year students. • All hall contracts include a meal provision equivalent to 10 meals per week (term time). • There are rooms specifically designed for students with disabilities. • Around half the rooms have private en suite facilities.

• All halls are non-smoking. • All halls are mixed sex residences. • Each hall is equipped with a common room/lounge area together with small kitchens.

Large single with en-suite:

£4,621

Single room with en suite:

£4,251

Single room with basin or large single:

• There is a launderette on campus equipped with washing machines, tumble dryers and ironing facilities.

£3,844

• There are on-site sport and recreational facilities including a bar, sports hall and gym.

Twin room with en suite or standard single:

£3,437

• Free parking.

* fees relate to the year 2010/11.

Security

Where students choose to live is an extremely important decision.

The halls are fitted with security locks on entrances and all bedrooms have a fitted safe. In addition, CCTV operates on campus. For further details of the accommodation policy and procedure for applying, please contact: Accommodation Office Tel: +44 (0) 1245 424200 Email: student.services@writtle.ac.uk A full copy of the accommodation guide can be found on the College website.

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Facilities on campus Campus shop

The Recreation Centre

The campus shop stocks items for everyday needs including snacks, stationery and groceries.

The Recreation Centre is the social and sporting focus for the student community at Writtle College. All students are automatically enrolled as members of the Recreation Centre Club. Members are also able to join the College gym for a small subscription fee.

The Writz Meals, snacks and drinks are available all day from the Writz self-service restaurant on campus. The Writz spills out onto an outside terrace seating area and affords excellent views of the gardens.

Chapel The College chapel is an interdenominational space used for prayer, chaplaincy services, religious study and meetings. Music and singing practice are also enjoyed there throughout the year.

College Bar and Chef The College Bar and Chef provides an attractive centrepiece for the student social scene. The bar is spacious and equipped with state-of-the-art audiovisual equipment, which allows all events held to be of a high quality. A wide range of hot and cold snacks is also available from the Chef.

All students, whether resident or not, can make use of the facilities on campus.


Students’ Union The Students’ Union (SU) helps students to make the most of their time at Writtle College. The SU is an enthusiastic group of volunteers who get involved with everything around the College and, above all, look after students’ interests. There are 10 SU committee members. Elections are held in February/ March, with the new members taking up their posts in September. The SU organises a range of social events including discos, barbecues, themed nights and comedy nights throughout the year. There are several balls including the Freshers’ Ball and Christmas Ball, but the Summer Ball is the main formal event of the year with huge marquees, big name bands and fairground rides.

The Writtle RAG The Writtle RAG (Raise And Give) is a long-held tradition at the College. Students pick good causes to support and then raise as much money as possible in very imaginative ways. These include the RAG Raid in Chelmsford town centre, Moulsham 11, Slave Auction and themed party nights.

Find a Friend Night This is an opportunity to meet up with like-minded individuals and sample the range of beverages from the College bar.

Freshers’ Ball This event is the culmination of Freshers’ Week, with live bands and a disco.

Local nightlife On the occasions when students fancy a change of scenery, the town centre of Chelmsford and the surrounding areas offer an exciting and varied scene every night of the week. There is a huge variety of places for eating, drinking and dancing. Nightclubs hold special student nights during the week, offering discounts to NUS members on drinks and entry charges. Writtle village also has traditional-style pubs and restaurants. For further information, visit: www.writtlesu.com

Freshers’ Week For many students, Freshers’ Week will be their first taste of College social life, which is why the SU organises a week full of fun events. A full programme of exactly what is going on is available to students when they arrive.

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Sports clubs Writtle College is well represented in team sports, with 10 teams regularly fulfilling fixtures. The teams play in both British University and College Sport (BUCS) leagues and the Southern England Student Sports Association (SESSA) leagues and cups.

Every year many of the teams represent the College on tour, either in the UK or Europe, enabling the culture of Writtle College to spread far and wide. Sports clubs that are currently very active at Writtle College include:

Rugby

Netball

Equestrian

The College runs both men’s and women’s rugby teams. They compete in the BUCS and SESSA leagues, playing approximately 10 – 15 fixtures each per season. Teams also compete in several sevens tournaments. Both the men’s and women’s teams travel abroad or in the UK on a tour at the end of the season.

The College’s netball team plays under the name Chelmsford Student Sport, linking up with other institutions in Chelmsford to compete in the SESSA Premier League, as well as in several sevens tournaments throughout the season. The team also travels on a tour at the end of the season to compete in netball tournaments.

Two teams compete in the BUCS competition, with a high demand for additional teams.

Football The College runs both men’s and women’s football teams, which compete in the SESSA league as well as cup competitions the teams qualify for. Teams also travel on a tour at the end of the season to compete in football tournaments.

Cricket The College’s cricket team plays in the BUCS league, as well as in social games in the evenings.

Hockey The College runs mixed hockey teams, which also play in several sevens tournaments throughout the season.

Other smaller clubs that take place include badminton, basketball, squash, tennis, indoor football and fitness classes. Any sport not available at the College can be arranged locally.


Information and library services

Information services Students have access to fifteen computer suites throughout the College, each equipped with high specification computers running a wide range of up-todate software. High quality colour printing, copying and scanning facilities are also provided. The College uses technology as part of the blended learning environment and all students will benefit from high quality and innovative material through regular use of the College Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). Internet access is provided via the College network either from the computer suites or from the halls of residence. Advice and support on IT-related matters is available from the support desk which is located near to the main building computer suites. Help is also available connecting the students’ own computers to the student network, which extends to the halls of residence and a number of buildings campus-wide. All students automatically receive their own network account for file storage, email, Internet access and the College student Intranet, including access to the Electronic Support Desk system.

In order to assist students with their learning, a number of items are available on loan, free of charge, including digital cameras, digital video (DV) cameras, multimedia projectors, dictaphones and slide projectors. The College has also introduced a video editing facility, where equipment is provided and software guidance given to students who are working with video as part of their studies.

Library services The College library provides one of the leading specialist book and information collections in the country. A variety of study facilities are available and the range of computer facilities allows students access to international databases and journals via the Internet. Books and reference material are easily accessible and can be reserved using the online computer catalogue. The library is open seven days a week during semester time. Qualified and experienced staff are available to help students with any information requests.

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Short Course Training Based at Writtle College, Short Course Training is involved in the management and delivery of training and business support for employers and individuals throughout the Eastern Counties. We understand that well-trained and motivated employees are the key to success in an ever-changing marketplace and we are therefore committed to meeting the needs of our clients by delivering cost-effective, pragmatic training on a flexible basis. Our scheduled courses and bespoke training packages can take place at Writtle College, in the workplace or at the client’s chosen venue.

• Agriculture, Engineering and Machinery

The courses are also suitable for individuals who want to learn a new skill, either to satisfy a personal interest or to enhance career prospects.

Some short courses are seasonal while others run throughout the year; for up-to-date information on dates and prices, please refer to our website: www.writtle.ac.uk

With subjects suitable for both work and leisure, together with our specialist trainers, we are able to offer courses in the following subject areas:

• Animal Care and Management • Arboriculture • First Aid / Health & Safety • Floristry and Flower Arranging • Horticulture and Landscaping

To make a booking, please call our booking line on: 01245 424286


Alumni of Writtle Students who have completed worked-based learning schemes, part-time study, Foundation degree, undergraduate school and postgraduate school courses are welcome to become a member of Alumni of Writtle. This body has been established to create a continuing link between past students and the College. As a member, you will receive updates on future developments at Writtle and will be able to take advantage of certain College services and facilities:

Career information The careers service provides impartial advice and guidance to alumni up to 3 years after graduation.

Sports fee savings As a member of Alumni of Writtle, you are entitled to a 64% discount on the cost of the annual Recreation Centre membership. The £79 fee includes access to a fully equipped, air-conditioned gym and use of the squash & tennis courts, sports hall and changing facilities for 361 days of the year!

Finding an old friend If you need help tracing an old friend or classmate from Writtle College, we should be able to help you to get in touch.

Reunion If you would like to organise a reunion, we are here to help. We can negotiate competitive rates for alumni when you book catering and accommodation on our campus.

Library Borrow books for a reduced fee of £15 per year or use the library for FREE for reference and research!

Supporting Writtle Members will have the opportunity to ‘give something back’ to the College. This can be done by offering time and experience in mentoring opportunities or by making a financial contribution. Your contact details will be carried over from your student file and held on our database*, so please make sure they are kept up-to-date for when you leave. Alternatively, you may update your contact details online by visiting the College website and clicking on the alumni pages. We hope many of you will remain in touch beyond the duration of your course and continue to benefit from an ongoing relationship with Writtle College. * If you do not wish for your details to be held by the Alumni of Writtle office, please contact us at any time after completion of your course. For further information or any enquires, please contact: alumni@writtle.ac.uk or call on: +44 (0) 1245 424 254.

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Campus Map

Writtle Village Lordships Stud (half mile)

24

25 1

Main Entrance and Reception

2

Main Teaching Building and College Shop

3

Library

4

Writz Refectory, including The Essex Suite

14 Design Studio 26

15 Chapel 16 Fitness Centre 27

17 Recreation Centre, Chef and Bar 18 Design Centre

28

19 Stoneyshotts

5

Maddison Building

20 Student Plots

6

Maddison Halls

21 Amenity Landscape Building

7

Tabor Halls

8

Hamilton Halls

9

Harvey Halls

P

29

30

31

10 Strutt Halls 11 Gill Halls

32

12 Dent Halls

33

13 Landscape Gardens

35

36 34

Sports Pavillion


22 Willmott Building

28 Lordship Science Centre

23 Moat

29 Northumberland Building Lecture Theatre

24 Baroness Platt Workshop 25 Tithe Barn 26 Mechanisation

23

27 Motor Vehicles

Cycle Track to Cow Watering Campus

P 8 22

19

18

31 Garden Centre and Garden Tea Rooms 32 Turner Building 33 Innovation Centre 34 Commercial Horticulture and Innovation Business Centre

20

21

30 Rural Business Centre

7

35 Floristry Training Shop 36 Children’s Day Nursery P

Parking

T

Tennis Courts

9 10

17

6

15 16

5

12

14

13

2

11

4 T

Countryside Skills Sturgeons Farm Cow Watering Campus: Animal Care Unit Equine Centre

1 3

141


Index 2012 Olympics

53, 76, 87

Academic Standards

32

Accommodation Access to Learning Fund

132 17, 125

Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL) Admissions Policy Agriculture Airports

26

24

RAG

135

Freshers’ Week

135

Chartered Institute of Purchasing and Supply 111

Recreation Centre

134

Garden Design

43

Research Activity

30

Chartered Management Institute

Glasshouse Crops

81

Science Centre

56

111

Graduate Careers

19

Schools

9

Chef

134

Grants

124

Security

133

Chelmsford

11

Green Space

Sheep Unit

101

102

Children’s Day Nursery

18

Hall Fees

133

Shop

134

143

College Bar (Baa)

Halls of Residence

133

Higher Certificate

24

Social and Therapeutic Horticulture

87

24

Sport, Equine and Animal Science, School of

51

24

Sports Facilities

79

Sports Clubs

56

Alumni of Writtle

139

Application Procedures

Foundation Degree 111

128

Animal Care Unit Animal Science and Management

Chartered Institute of Marketing

67 126

Associate Students

26

Availability of Courses

26

134

Computer-Aided Design Centre

37

Conservation and Environment

116

Counselling and Welfare Conservation Areas

17 116

CV Boosting Crops

86

Higher Education Qualifications Honours Degree Horticulture, School of How to Find Us

143

19

Information Services

137

101

40

Student Loans

124

21

Students’ Union

135

Design, School of

35

Interior Architecture /Design

Digital Art and Design

38

International Students

Disabled Students’ Allowance

17

Landscape Architecture

45

Disclaimer

143

Language Requirements

21

Enlarged Print Formats

143

Centre for the Arts and Design in the Environment (CADE) 37

Learner Services

16

Entry Requirements

130

Learning Resources

Centre for Equine and Animal Science (CEQAS) 57

Equal Opportunities

Beef Unit

101

Business Management

111

Bursaries

125

Campus Map

140

Careers Centre CASTLe

10 32

Centre for Environment and Rural Affairs (CERA) 116 Centre of Horticulture

83

Certificate of Continuing Education

24

Chapel

134

Key Skills

Environmental Statement

2 131

Equine Training and Development Centre

55

Essex

11

Farm

57, 101

Farm Livestock

101

Facilities on Campus

134

Finances and Fees

124

Floristry

Sports and Exercise Performance

75 136

94

Library Services London

130

32 137 11, 143

Modules

24

Nightlife

135

Open Days

6

Open Days, Equine

53

Part-time study

27

Pig Unit Postgraduate Study

101 27

Qualifications Framework 24

Stud

75 55

Sustainable Environments, School of 99 Taster Qualifications

26

‘Topping-Up’

26

Tuition Fees

124

UCAS

127

University of Essex

14

Visas

23

WISC (Writtle International Social Club) 23 Writtle Village Writz, The

10 134


How to find us Location

By air

By bus

Writtle College is 50 km/30 miles north-east of central London. We are situated 3 km/2 miles west of Chelmsford, the county town of Essex, in an attractive 220-hectare estate in the historic village of Writtle.

London Stansted is a 35-minute drive from Writtle. Heathrow and Gatwick airports are easily accessible via the M25.

A regular bus service runs between Chelmsford and Writtle Village Green.

By rail Chelmsford Station is approximately 15 minutes’ drive from Writtle College. The journey from London Liverpool Street station to Chelmsford takes around 40 minutes, with trains running on a regular basis.

By car The College is about 15 minutes’ drive from the M25, with ample parking on site for students and visitors. The College is clearly signposted from the A414 Writtle bypass. If approaching from the east, take the A1060 Sawbridgeworth Road from Chelmsford, as far as Lordship Road and follow the signposts to the College.

By coach A regular coach service is available to Chelmsford bus station from London and all major London airports (Stansted, Heathrow and Gatwick).

Writtle College is committed to equality of access. Should you require any information in an alternative format – for example large print, audio or Braille – please contact: student.support@writtle.ac.uk

DISCLAIMER Please note: every attempt has been made to ensure that the information contained within this prospectus is correct at the time of going to press; however the College accepts no responsibility for any errors or omissions. New courses are continually being introduced and optional modules revised, so readers are advised to contact the College for up-todate course details. The College reserves the right to withdraw courses or parts of courses where there is insufficient demand, to charge a registration fee to cover aspects such as study visits and learning materials and to vary modes of delivery. Our offer to you and your acceptance of a place at Writtle College will be subject to this express condition. The General College Regulations and the Academic Regulations are contained in the appropriate Student Handbooks, which are available on request. Writtle College is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites that are included in this prospectus.

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Chelmsford Essex CM1 3RR Tel: +44 (0) 1245 424200 Fax: +44 (0) 1245 420456 Minicom: 01245 424254 Typetalk/TextDirect: 18001 01245 424200 Email: info@writtle.ac.uk www.writtle.ac.uk Writtle College is committed to equality of access. Should you require any information in an alternative format – for example large print, audio or Braille – please contact: student.support@writtle.ac.uk

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Writtle College

Writtle College Undergraduate Prospectus  

Writtle College Undergraduate Prospectus

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