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S U M M A R Y

a s s e t s at d e c e m b e r 3 1, 1993 n e w gi f t s r e c e i v e d

1993

$ 7 3 9 ,9 0 6 ,7 2 3

$ 1 3 ,0 4 5 ,9 1 0

g r a n t s and p r o g r a m - r e l a t e d i n v e s t m e n t s a u t h o r i z e d

1993 grants and program-related investments by program area

$ 3 7 ,7 1 3 ,9 5 0 *

Ctotals include undesignated, designated, and donor-advisor grants)

civ ic affairs

$5.3 million - 1 4 %

cu ltu ra l affairs

$3.8 million - 1 0 %

e c o n o m ic d e v e lo p m e n t

$3.8 million - 1 0 %

p re c o lle g ia te e d u c a tio n

$4.0 million - 1 1 %

h ig h e r e d u c a tio n

$3.9 million - 1 0 %

*Grants listed in this report represent the total authorizations made in 1993. Within these authorizations, in certain instances, the grant is contingent upon action by the grantee and thus is not recognized in the fina ncial statements until the condition is met.


I

i

contents ------------------ sch o la rsh ip s

A Message to O u r Readers

2

A Tribute to Hom er Wadsworth

4

The Distribution Committee

6

The Operations Committee

8

The Grantmaking Process

9

$0.5 million - 1 %

Grantmaking Staff ------------------------h e alth

$6.1 million - 1 6 %

1993 Grantmaking Civic Affairs

--------------- so cial s e r v ic e s

------------- g e o g ra p h ic funds

sp e cial p h ila n th ro p ic s e rv ic e s

$5.1 million - 1 4 %

10

12

Cultural Affairs

I6

Economic Development

22

Precollegiate Education

26

Higher Education

30

Health

36

$0.5 million - 1 %

Social Services

40

Geographic Funds

46

Special Philanthropic Services

50

$4.7 million - 1 3 %

Funds of The Cleveland Foundation

52

Giving to The Cleveland Foundation

54

New Gifts, 1993

g ran ts b y su p p o rtin g o rg a n iz a tio n s

$1 .8 m illion

56

Donor-Advisor Funds

64

Supporting Organizations

69

Financial Report

73

Investment Report

78


A message to our readers The Cleveland Foundation, the nation's oldest community foundation, is now 80 years old. O ur history of commit­ ment to the long view and focus on key issues a ffectin g th e G r e a t e r Cleveland community was reflected in our I 993 activities. Our work is carried out through grantmaking, which supports pro­ grams that enhance the community's quality of life; through careful atten­ tion to key local, regional and nation­ al issues; in our activities as a philan­ thropic leader; and by reaching out to donors, whose gifts make possible the scope of our grantmaking. The Cleveland Foundation is com­ mitted to supporting a wide range of endeavors in education, economic development, Cleveland's neighbor­ hoods, health issues, social services, arts and cultural organizations, and urban revitalization. In 1993, the Foundation awarded more than $37 million in grants, including $2.2 million in program-related investments. Much of our work built upon pre­ viously established initiatives, advancing them to a higher level. A major grant to

The Neighborhood Institute will enable South Shore Bank of Chicago and the Southwestern Pennsylvania Econom ic D evelo p m ent District (SPED D ) to help establish in Cleveland new mechanisms for community eco­ nomic development, including a com­ mercial bank, a real estate develop­ ment company and a nonprofit organi­ zation focusing on enterprise and labor force development. The Foundation-sponsored Study Commission on Medical Research and Education, which issued its final report in 1992, urged new strategies to stimu­ late the development of biotechnology in Northern Ohio. As a result, the first grant in response to the Commission's recommendations was made in 1993 to Case Western Reserve University for the purpose of establishing a pro­ gram in molecular cardiology. Another major grant supported The Cleveland Initiative for Education (CIE), an umbrella organization sup­ ported by the business and philan­ thropic communities. CIE works with school administrators, students, teach­ ers and parents to improve education in the Cleveland Public Schools. A number of grants supported ongoing efforts to address the prob­ lems of persistent urban poverty and carry out the recommendations of The

Cleveland Foundation Commission on Poverty, whose I 993 final report has attracted national attention. The Cleveland Foundation remains the nation's second largest community foundation, with assets at year end of $740 million. N ew gifts of more than $13 million were received in 1993. In early I 994 we welcomed a new sup­ porting organization, the Higley Fund of The Cleveland Foundation. During the past year, we added two new investment managers, Merrill Lynch and Gries Financial Services. They join our trustee banks, Society National Bank, National City Bank, Huntington National Bank, Bank One, Cleveland, NA, and First National Bank of Ohio, who, along with American Asset Management and McDonald & Company, manage the Foundation's portfolio. W e continue to expand investment options to provide a variety of mechanisms through which donors may work. A major step was taken in Findlay, Ohio in 1993 with the establishment of the Findlay-Hancock Coun ty Community Fund of The Cleveland Foundation (FHCCF). Established with a challenge grant from the L. Dale D o rn ey Fund of The Cleveland Foundation, the FH CCF is working toward what w e anticipate will be


who in 1993 was appointed the Foundation's first senior fellow. W e were deeply saddened by the loss of two friends of the Foundation, Homer C. Wadsworth and Frances Wick Sherwin. Hom er Wadsworth, a major figure in American philan­ thropy, served as director of The Cleveland Foundation from 1974 to 1984. His influence is reflected today throughout the city, most especially in community development, the lakefront and the arts. Frances Sherwin, with her late husband John, was responsible for the establishment of the Sherwick Fund, the first family foundation in the United States to affiliate with a community foundation. W e are fortunate to have the involvement and dedication of an out­ standing Distribution Comm ittee whose members contribute countless hours of wise counsel. They are sup­ ported by the Foundation's talented staff, who bring nationally recognized expertise to their work. The staff is led by Steven Minter, who early in I 994 completed ten years as execu­ tive director.

an independent community founda­ tion. Our second geographic affiliate, the Lake-Geauga Fund, also reached a milestone in 1993 when its cumula­ tive grantmaking reached more than $1 million. The Foundation inaugurated a series of print advertisements designed around the theme “A History of Looking Ahead." The purpose of the ads is to increase public awareness of the Foundation and its work, as well as to attract new donors. The Foundation’s endeavors are the result of thoughtful work and ded­ ication on the part of many individu­ als, several of whom we wish espe­ cially to recognize here. W e extend our thanks to Lindsay J. Morgenthaler, who has concluded ten years of ser­ vice on the Distribution Committee, the maximum permissible. W e are grateful for her diligent work on each of its subcommittees, in particular for her wise and experienced leadership of the Cultural Affairs subcommittee. W e welcome to the Foundation James E. Bennett, a director in the Cleveland office of McKinsey & Com ­ pany, who succeeds Lindsay on the Distribution Committee; and Dr. Arthur J. Naparstek, a professor of urban studies at the Mandel School of Case Western Reserve University,

W e hope this overview provides you with a better understanding of the Foundation and its work. The body of the report which follows describes the full scope of our efforts.

\^\

Alfred M. Rankin, Jr. Chairperson of the Distribution Committee


HOMER C. WADSWORTH

Homer Wadsworth was a towering fig­ ure in philanthropy and one of its most widely respected and loved persons. W e mourn his death, and at the same time celebrate his remarkable life. He enriched countless individuals through his bold and visionary leader­ ship in philanthropy and community service, most especially as director and president of the Kansas City Association of Trusts and Foundations from I 949 to 1974 and as director of The Cleveland Foundation from 1974 to 1984. Under H om er’s direction, the Foundation was instrumental in fur­ thering the revival of Playhouse Square, which is now the nation’s largest restored theater complex, and in supporting the creation of Cleveland Ballet and Cleveland Opera. He guided the Foundation in helping to launch the renewal of Cleveland's neglected lakefront by supporting the Ohio Department of Natural Resources in managing the

lakefront as a state park. During Homer's tenure in Cleveland, the assets of the Foundation nearly dou­ bled, including new gifts of almost $50 million. A founder of the Council on Foundations and Independent Sector, Hom er brought to Cleveland more than 30 years of experience as a community builder. He had served as executive director of the Pittsburgh Planning Commission, director of Pittsburgh's Parks and Recreation Department, and as vice-president and dean of the N ew School of Social Research in N ew York. President of the Kansas City Public Schools Board of Education during the period of that district's desegre­ gation, he also led the development of Hospital Hill, the establishment of Truman Medical Center and a school of medicine at the University of Missouri at Kansas City. After his retirement from The Cleveland Foundation, Homer worked

as a consultant to the Ford Founda­ tion; through that consultancy, he help­ ed to establish community foundations in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. A recipient of the Distinguished Grant Maker award from the Council on Foundations in 1986, he served on a number of national and local boards, including the Council on Foundations, the National Endowments for the Arts and Humanities, the National Institutes of Health and the Harvard University/Robert W ood Johnson Study Group. In Cleveland, he served on the boards of North Coast Harbor, the Great Waters Aquarium, MetroHealth Foundation and Friends of the Cleveland School of the Arts, and was the first chairperson of the board of Cleveland Works. Homer Wadsworth was a man of vision whose style was once describ­ ed as "a rare blend of idealism, prag­ matism, good humor, toughness and sensitivity to the human condition.” W e are privileged to have known him.


the distribution committee The Cleveland Foundation is govern­ ed by the Distribution Committee. Its I I members, who are chosen for their knowledge of the community, establish policy and programmatic pri­ orities, allocate fund income and prin­ cipal, and make final decisions on grant authorizations. All serve without pay for five-year terms, and for a .maximum often years. Members are chosen by a process designed to ensure that a broad range of viewpoints is represented on the Distribution Committee. Five mem­ bers are appointed by the Trustees Committee, composed of the chief executive officers of the Foundation's trustee banks. Five additional mem­ bers are appointed by public officials: one each by the chief judge of the United States District Court, North­ ern District of Ohio, Eastern Division; the presiding judge of the Probate Court of Cuyahoga County; the mayor of Cleveland; the president of the Federation for Community Plan­ ning; and the chief justice of the C o u rt of Appeals for the Eighth Judicial District of Ohio. These five “public" appointees in turn appoint an eleventh member with a background in private philanthropy.

alfred m. rankin jr.

rev. elmo a. bean

Chairperson Appointed 1988 by the Trustees Committee; reappointed 1990

Appointed 1987 by the Chief Justice, Court of Appeals, Eighth Judicial District of Ohio; reap­ pointed 1991

Al Rankin, president and chief executive officer of NACCO Industries, Inc., is a director of NACCO Industries, Inc., BF Goodrich Company, the Standard Products Company, Reliance Electric, and The Vanguard Group. He serves on the boards of trustees of the Holden Arboretum, University Hospitals of Cleveland, The Musical Arts Association, University Circle Incorporated, World Resources Institute, the John Huntington Polytechnic Trust, Cleveland Tomorrow, The Cleveland Museum of Art, and the Greater Cleveland Growth Association. He has chair­ ed the Cultural Affairs subcommittee and, as chairperson of the Foundation's long-range planning committee, guid­ ed the development of the 1990 strategic plan. A Cleveland native, he holds a bachelor of arts degree in economics and a juris doctor degree, both from Yale University.

annie lewis j. garda Vice Chairperson Appointed 1989 by the Trustees Committee; reappointed 1992 Annie Lewis Garda has a distinguished record of service in both the public and nonprofit sectors. In the early 1980s she coordinated the Mayor's Operation Volunteer Effort in which 1,000 loaned executives and volunteers helped revamp municipal finances and city services in the wake of default. She also devel­ oped the Children's Key Concerts Endowment during her presidency of the Junior Committee of The Cleveland Orchestra. She sits on the boards of the MetroHealth System, Leadership Cleveland, The Benjamin Rose Institute, the Business Volunteerism Council, The Musical Arts Association and the Ohio East Area United Methodist Foundation. She is also a member of the board of visitors for Trinity College of Duke University.

Pastor of St. James African Methodist Episcopal Church, Rev. Elmo Bean is secretary of the board of directors of Neighbor­ hood Progress, Inc., an organization designed to aid in community eco­ nomic development, and serves on the boards of Working for Empower­ ment Through Community Organization (W EC O ) and Payne Theological Seminary. He is a mem­ ber of the advisory com­ mittee of the Senior Companion Program of The Benjamin Rose Institute, and the Inter­ denominational Ministerial Alliance, a coalition of local ministers. He is also a member of the external oversight committee for a study of the Cleveland Police Department.

jam es e. bennett III Appointed 1994 by the Trustees Committee In his 26-year tenure at McKinsey & Company, Jim Bennett has served as managing director for Canada, managing direc­ tor of the Cleveland/ Pittsburgh Office Complex, member of the world­ wide Executive Committee and member of the worldwide Shareholders Committee. He is cur­ rently a director in McKinsey's Cleveland office. He chairs the visit­ ing committee of Case Western Reserve University's Weatherhead School, and serves as vice chairman for market­ ing and communications at the Greater Cleveland Growth Association, trustee of Hathaway Brown School, trustee of United Way Services, trustee and past chairman of Cleveland Ballet and member of the Cleveland Museum of Art's corporate council. He holds a juris doctor degree from Harvard University Law School.


jam es m. delaney

russell r. gifford

adrienne lash jones

Charles a. ratner

Appointed 1986 by the Mayor, City of Cleveland; reappointed 1991

Appointed 1989 by the Trustees Committee; reappointed 1993

Jim Delaney, office man­ aging partner of Deloitte & Touche, served as financial supervisor to the commission overseeing the City's fiscal recovery. He currently chairs the Mayor's Operation Volunteer Effort and was selected in 1989 as chairperson of the BuildUp Greater Cleveland Policy Committee of the Greater Cleveland Growth Association. He serves on the boards of the Greater Cleveland Growth Association, John Carroll University, The Salvation Army, and the Diocesan Inner-City School Fund. He is vice president of Youth Opportunities Unlimited and past board chair of Beaumont School. He is past chairperson of Case Western Reserve University's Advisory Council for its five-year accountancy program and serves on the visiting com­ mittee of the Weatherhead School at CWRU.

Russ Gifford is president and chief executive officer of The East Ohio Gas Company. A director of National City Bank, Bearings, Inc. and trustee of First Union Real Estate Investments, he is also active in community affairs, serving as chair­ person of the Greater Cleveland Growth Association, as well as chairperson of North Coast Harbor, Inc. He is a member of the Board of Governors of the American Red Cross and is a trustee of Cleveland Tomorrow, the Greater Cleveland Roundtable and University Hospitals of Cleveland, and serves on the boards of Baldwin-Wallace College, the Urban League of Greater Cleveland, the Convention and Visitors Bureau of Greater Cleveland and Playhouse Square Foundation, and the Cleveland advisory board of The Salvation Army.

Appointed 1988 by the Chief Judge, U.S. District Court, Northern District of Ohio; reappointed 1994

Appointed 1992 by the Committee of Five Distribution Committee Members

Adrienne Jones is an associate professor and department chair in the Department of AfricanAmerican Studies at Oberlin College and holds a Ph.D. in American Studies from Case Western Reserve University. She serves on the board of The Cleveland Museum of Art and has been active with the Young Women’s Christian Association as vice presi­ dent of its national board of directors ( 1976-82) and currently as a mem­ ber of the National YWCA Board of Trustees. She is also a trustee of Karamu House, a member of the Alumni Advisory Com­ mittee of the Women's Community Foundation, and a former board member of the Federation for Community Planning.

Chuck Ratner is president and chief operating officer of Forest City Enterprises. He is a trustee of the Mandel Associated Foundations, David and Inez Myers Foundation, Forest City Charitable Foundation, National Foundation for Jewish Culture and the Council for Initiatives in Jewish Education. He has also served as a trustee of United Way Services, Mt. Sinai Medical Center, and Hawken School. Currently, he is on the boards of The Musical Arts Asso­ ciation and Cleveland State University Develop­ ment Foundation and is general chairman of the Jewish Welfare Fund Appeal. In addition, he serves as president of the Jewish Education Center of Cleveland.

doris a. evans, m.d. Appointed 1992 by the Trustees Committee Dr. Doris Evans, a pedia­ trician whose private practice emphasizes pre­ ventive health, is an asso­ ciate clinical professor of Pediatrics at Case Western Reserve University. She is a staff physician at University Hospitals of Cleveland, Mt. Sinai Medical Center, and Meridia Hillcrest. The former executive director of the Glenville Health Association, Dr. Evans is a past director of Ameritrust Corporation, Ameritrust Company National Association and Ameritrust Development Bank. Currently, she is a director of Society National Bank and a trustee of Cuyahoga Community College. A member of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Northern Ohio Pediatric Society and Cleveland Medical Association, she is also a lifetime member of the NAACP and an active member of Fairmount Presbyterian Church.

jerry v. jarrett Appointed 1988 by the President of the Federation for Community Planning; reappointed 1993 Jerry Jarrett is retired chairman and chief exec­ utive officer of Ameritrust Company and its holding company, Ameritrust Corporation. He is a director of Forest City Enterprises, Inc., and Developers Diversified Realty Corporation and chairs the board of Baldwin-Wallace College. He is also treasurer of The Musical Arts Associ­ ation, and a trustee of the Cleveland Clinic Founda­ tion, the Holden Arbo­ retum, and the Center for Families and Children. He chaired the 1986 United Way campaign, which raised more than $47 million, and has served as chairperson of United Way Services, United Way Assembly and The Salvation Army. He serves on the National Advisory Board of The Salvation Army.

jam es v. patton Appointed 1991 by the Presiding Judge, Probate Court of Cuyahoga County Jim Patton is a retired vice president of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Ohio, and now serves as a con­ sultant in government relations, health policies, and business affairs. He has served on the execu­ tive committee of the National Foundation of the March of Dimes, Cuyahoga County Division; the Cleveland Academy of Medicine's Cost Con­ tainment Committee on Health Education; as vice chairman of New Business Development for United Way Services; and chair­ man of the City of Westlake's Assessment Equalization Board. He is a member of the Greater Cleveland Growth Asso­ ciation. He has also served on the board of directors of the Cleveland Advertis­ ing Club, the advisory board of Catholic Social Services of Cuyahoga County, and as trustee of the American Cancer Society, Cuyahoga County Division.

7*


ope rat ions committee The Cleveland Foundation exists to enhance the quality of life for all resi­ dents of Greater Cleveland. Using funds entrusted to its stewardship by thousands of people of various means, the Foundation makes grants to non­ profit organizations and governmental agencies working to address the com­ munity’s needs and opportunities. The Foundation has been one of Cleveland’s great resources since its creation in 19 14 as the nation’s pioneer community trust. Although known chiefly for its grantmaking, the Foundation plays other significant roles: convener of funders and community leaders around specific issues; catalyst for new programs and new organiza­ tions; project manager; and local and national philanthropic leader. Management responsibility resides in the Operations Committee, which consists of the four executive officers of the Foundation.

steven a. m inter

j. t. mullen

Executive Director

Chief Financial Officer/Treasurer

Steve Minter, who became The Cleveland Foundation’s seventh chief executive officer in 1984, is a former director of the Cuyahoga County Welfare Department and Massachusetts Com­ missioner of Public Welfare, and served as the first Under Secretary of the United States Depart­ ment of Education. He is a member of the Governor's Education Management Council and a trustee of The Cleveland Initiative for Education, Leadership Cleveland, North Coast Harbor, Inc., The Foun­ dation Center, and The College of Wooster, as well as a director of sev­ eral corporations. A native of northeast Ohio, Minter is a gradu­ ate of Baldwin-Wallace College and holds a master’s degree in social administration from Case Western Reserve University.

susan n. lajoie Associate Director Susan Lajoie, as associate director, oversees all grantmaking and other programmatic activities of The Cleveland Foundation. She also serves as princi­ pal staff to the McDonald Fund, a supporting orga­ nization of the Foundation. Since joining the staff in 1978, she has served as program analyst, program officer for education and economic development, and project manager for the Foundation’s strategic planning. She is president of Donors Forum of Ohio and vice president of the Leadership Cleveland Alumni Association, as well as a member of the Council on Foundations Research Committee. She holds a Ph.D. in public policy from the John F. Kennedy School of Govern­ ment at Harvard University and has taught at the Uni­ versity of Massachusetts.

J.T. Mullen brought expe­ rience in both public and private-sector accounting when he joined the Foun­ dation staff in 1987. A former manager with Arthur Young & Company, he had also worked for the Board of Cuyahoga County Commissioners. He is a member of the National Nonprofit Quality Reporting Project and the finance committee of Donors Forum of Ohio. He serves on a commit­ tee of the Fiscal and Administrative Officers Group of Community Foundations, analyzing the impact of new account­ ing standards on the field. He holds a bachelor’s degree in business admin­ istration from Cleveland State University.

roberta w. allport Special Assistant to the Executive Director and Corporate Secretary In addition to serving as special assistant and cor­ porate secretary, Roberta Allport is the Foundation's program officer for spe­ cial philanthropic services. She is project director for the Teaching Leadership Consortium-Ohio, and an advisory board member of the Volunteer Trustees Institute. She represents the Foundation on the community foundation committees of both the Council on Foundations and Donors Forum of Ohio. Before joining the Foundation she was a research analyst with the National Security Agency in Fort Meade, Maryland. She hold a bachelor's degree in literature and political science from Gettysburg College.


el

grantmaking

As a primary source of this community's social risk capital, The Cleveland Foundation is dedicated to supporting good ideas with the potential to improve the quality of life for residents of Greater Cleveland. In carrying out this mission, the Foundation makes grants for programs and pro­ jects that creatively address the community's changing needs. g r a n t e l i g i b i l i t y Most of our grants are made to tax-exempt private agencies classified as 501(c)(3) organizations, public charities under the law. W e also make grants to governmental agencies, but grants are not made to individuals. Grants are awarded in six program areas: health, social services, civic affairs, education, cultural affairs and economic development. In general, only programs in the G reater Cleveland area are considered for support. Some agencies or fields of interest in other communities may be eligible for grants if a donor has directed that they be supported with income from his or her gift. W e ordinarily do not support endowments, membership drives or annual appeals, travel for individuals or groups, or publications unless they are an integral part of programs already being sup­ ported. Because The Cleveland Foundation is nonsectarian, w e do not support religious organi­ zations for religious purposes.

g r a n t p e r i o d s Most grants are one-year awards. Any multiple-year grant undergoes a performance review at the end of each year before funds for the subsequent year are released. f i r s t -t i m e g r a n t s e e k e r s Write, telephone or stop by the Foundation for a free copy of “Guidelines For Grantseekers,” a booklet providing details of our policies and procedures as well as information on how to prepare a good proposal. W e recommend that you send a brief letter of inquiry, including information on the specific nature of the project and a basic proposal outline, to the associate director's attention. The Foundation staff is eager to help grantseekers prepare the best pos­ sible proposal, and may arrange to talk informally before the grant application process begins. The full proposal should be written clearly and concisely and include information on the agency's background; the project being proposed for fund­ ing; detailed plans for implementation; plans for continuing the work after the funding period; plans for measuring results; and the agency’s financial information, including a detailed project budget,

Each proposal undergoes a thorough review, after which the program officer and associ­ ate director prepare a written evaluation of the proposal for consideration by a subcommittee of the Distribution Committee. The subcommittee makes a recommendation to fund, decline or defer the proposal, and the full Distribution Committee takes final action. t h e pro c ess

d e a d l i n e s In order to give each proposal the time and attention it deserves, deadlines for full propos­ als are set approximately three months prior to the Distribution Committee meetings.

FULL PROPO SAL

D ISTRIBU TIO N

D EAD LIN E

C O M M ITTEE M EETING

December 3 I March 3 I June 30 September I 5

March June September December

Proposals cannot be accepted by facsimile.

A

final report on the project is required, together with an evaluation of the project’s effectiveness and an audited financial statement. a f t e r t h e g r a n t p e r io d e x p ire s

FOR MORE IN FO RM ATIO N PLEASE W RITE TO:

Susan N. Lajoie Associate Director The Cleveland Foundation 1422 Euclid Avenue, Suite 1400 Cleveland, OH 44115-2001


grantmaking staff The Foundation's staff plays an impor­ tant role in the grantmaking process. Each proposal is assigned to the pro­ gram officer into whose area of exper­ tise it falls. The program officer may meet with the grantseeker to discuss the project and perhaps strengthen the proposal o r sharpen its focus. A promising proposal will undergo a thorough review, drawing on the experience of the staff and Distribution Committee, and occasionally on out­ side experts in the field. Program associates assist the pro­ gram officers with the review and eval­ uation of grants, grant monitoring and other related activities.

goldie k. alvis

joyce r. daniels

Senior Program Officer, Social Services

Program Officer, Precollegiate Education

Prior to joining the Foun­ dation in 1985, Goldie Alvis was coordinator of community affairs with the Cuyahoga County De­ partment of Human Services. In addition to managing the Foundation’s grantmaking in social ser­ vices, Alvis is co-chairper­ son of Grantmakers Forum's Ad Hoc Funders Committee on Hunger and Homelessness and is a member of the Governor's Advisory Council for Ohio Families and Children First. She is a member of the pro­ gram committees for Donors Forum of Ohio and Grantmakers Forum. She holds a doctorate in jurisprudence from Cleveland-Marshall Law School and a master of science degree in social administration from the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences at Case Western Reserve University.

Prior to joining the Foundation in 1990, Joyce Daniels spent ten years as education and government relations coordinator for the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce and served as director of a retention program for minority undergraduates at the University of Maryland at Baltimore. In 1991 she was a member of the Donors Forum of Ohio’s annual conference program committee and has been a member of the precollegiate educa­ tion advisory committee of the Council on Foun­ dations for two years. A native of Washington, D.C., Daniels holds a bachelor's degree from Boston University and a M.A. and M.Ed. in applied human development and guidance from Teachers College, Columbia University.

kathleen a. cerveny Program Officer, Cultural Affairs Kathleen Cerveny joined the Foundation in 1991 after a varied career as a working artist, educator, development officer, and, most recently, awardwinning producer of arts programming for public radio station W CPN . A graduate of The Cleveland Institute of Art, she is a past president of the board of trustees of Ohio Designer Craftsmen. Her teaching experience includes arts and humani­ ties in an alternative school, and she taught art at the undergraduate and graduate levels at Case Western Reserve University and Lake Erie College.


barbara m. deerhake Program Officer, The L. Dale Dorney Fund As the Foundation’s rep­ resentative in Findlay and Hancock County, Barbara Deerhake has primary responsibility for grantmaking from the L. Dale Dorney Fund and pro­ vides staff support to the newly established Findlay-Hancock County Community Fund of The Cleveland Foundation. Deerhake came to the Foundation in 1987, hav­ ing served in leadership positions with numerous volunteer organizations in the Findlay area. She is a past president of the United Way of Hancock County and the Findlay Service League, which in 1984 named her its Outstanding Volunteer. She holds a master’s degree in home econom­ ics education from The Ohio State University.

robert e. eckardt

terri coleman-kovach

carol kleiner willen

Senior Program Officer, Health

Program Associate, Health and Social Services

Senior Program Officer. Higher Education

Bob Eckardt manages the Foundation's grantmaking in health, aging, and environmental affairs. Before joining the Foun­ dation staff in 1982, he was a planning associate at the Federation for Community Planning and a consultant to The Benjamin Rose Institute. Eckardt serves on the executive committees of Funders Concerned About AIDS and Grantmakers in Health, where he serves as vice presi­ dent of the board. He holds a certificate in gerontology and a doc­ torate in public health with a specialty in health policy from the University of Michigan.

Terri Coleman-Kovach has served as the Foun­ dation's first program associate for health and social services since 1992. Prior to that time, she held a number of positions in health and human services, including health policy analyst for the Ohio Department of Health, health program specialist for the Ohio Department of Human Services, and research intern for United Way of Franklin County. A gradu­ ate of the University of Cincinnati with a bachelor of science degree in health planning and administra­ tion, she also holds a master of public adminis­ tration from The Ohio State University.

Carol Willen's portfolio includes the Foundation's grantmaking in higher education; the Fenn Educational Fund, a spe­ cial-purpose fund that supports cooperative education programs; and the Statewide Program for Business and Manage­ ment Education, which makes grants to strength­ en business education at Ohio colleges and univer­ sities. She holds a Ph.D. in Romance languages and literatures from Harvard University and is a past president of the Cleveland Association of Phi Beta Kappa. Before joining the Foundation's staff in 1987, she was a program officer for the Premier Industrial Foundation and executive director of the William Bingham Foundation.

pam ela 1. george Program Associate, Civic Affairs and Economic Development Pam George held a Foundation summer internship to conduct research in housing and neighborhood develop­ ment in 1987; she again joined the Foundation staff in 1993 as program associate. She previously served as assistant to the director of the InterUniversity Council of Ohio where she moni­ tored pending legislation affecting Ohio's public universities. She has also been a legislative aide to the majority floor leader of the Ohio House of Representatives. She holds a bachelor of arts degree in sociology from Chatham College in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and a master's degree in public administration from Cleveland State University.

jay talbot Senior Program Officer, Civic Affairs and Economic Development Before joining The Cleve­ land Foundation’s staff in 1984, Jay Talbot was the founding executive direc­ tor of the Cincinnati Institute of Justice and president of the South­ western Ohio Council on Alcoholism. In addition to managing the Founda­ tion's portfolio in civic affairs and economic development, he over­ sees grantmaking in Findlay and Hancock County. In 1993 he was reappointed to the Governor's Human Resources Investment Council and is a member of its Executive Committee. He is also active in national professional organizations concerned with housing and com­ munity development, as well as with criminal jus­ tice. He holds a master's degree in business admin­ istration from Xavier University.


Storefront renovations in the B u ck ey e area are pa rt o f the C ity o f C l e v e l a n d ’s c o m m u n ity wide effort to r e v i t a l i z e n e ig h b o rh oods.

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The vitality of Cleveland's neighbor­ hoods directly affects the community's well-being and is an essential element for the overall regeneration of the city. Grantmaking in Civic Affairs in 1993 maintained its focus on housing but also incorporated support for a broader approach to neighborhood development that included employ­ ment and training, as well as public safety issues and programs. The Foundation allocated more than $600,000 to a wide variety of local organizations involved in employ­ ment and training. Tw o grants focused on creating “employment linkages” between neighborhood residents and businesses. A grant was made to Vocational Guidance Services for a program linking residents in two of Cleveland's poverty-stricken areas, Central and Fairfax, with employers located in the nearby Midtown Corridor, This program has a unique “demand-driven” approach whereby the actual jobs available shape recruit­ ment and referral. The Urban League also is helping disadvantaged persons gain access to

g r a n t s

un d e sig n a ted gran ts

the labor market. With a grant from the Foundation, the League will pro­ vide basic skills training for more than 270 individuals who are having diffi­ culty gaining employment. On the policy level, a grant to the Cuyahoga County Department of Employment Services will enable it to explore how to better coordinate the array of public employment and training programs the County admin­ isters. Grant monies will be used to help the agency define its role in the community and develop stronger plans for guiding and monitoring departmental activities. In the area of neighborhood de­ velopment, the Foundation awarded $3 million to Neighborhood Progress, Inc. (NPI), a citywide agency esta­ blished in 1988 as part of the Foun­ dation's Special Initiative for Housing and Neighborhood Development. In the past two years, N P I’s capacitybuilding and financing activities have helped local community development corporations (CD Cs) produce approx­ imately 380 houses, 460 rental units and more than 334,000 square feet

$3,042,985

p ro g ra m - re la te d in ve stm e n t

d es ig n a te d gran ts

$2,000,000

$691

to ta l grants

$3,043,676

of commercial space. O f the total I 993 award, $ I million was a grant to enhance N P I’s work with CDCs; $2 million represented a program-relat­ ed investment to support residential and commercial real estate projects in Cleveland's neighborhoods. As a complement to continued efforts in neighborhood development, attention was also focused on public safety. Specifically, the Foundation is interested in community-based pro­ grams in which citizens work with law enforcement agencies to address neighborhood safety problems. Grants made to two organizations, St. ClairSuperior Coalition and Crossroads Development Corporation, featured alliances between residents and the Cleveland police. St. Clair-Superior targets specific areas for intensive law enforcement, while Crossroads addresses aspects of the physical envi­ ronment, such as poorly lit streets, which may increase the opportunity for crime. In order to meet its objective of strengthening local government's leadership, the Foundation made a grant of $ 120,000 to Cleveland State University's College of Urban Affairs to implement a Leadership Academy. The Academy will conduct training and development sessions for local government officials and administrators in order to enhance their knowledge base and management capabilities.

7.9


B y

t r a c k in g

p o lic e

civic affairs grants

s t a t is t ic s ,

the st. ciair-

C o m m itt e e fo r P u b lic A r t

Neighborhood and downtown projects

Superior

A m e r ic a n R e d C ro s s , G r e a t e r C le v e la n d C h a p t e r

Fire prevention and public education campaign

$50,000

28,250

C o u n c il fo r A d u lt an d E x p e r ie n tia l L e a rn in g , C h ica g o , Illin o is

C o a l i t i o n h e lp s 26,200

T h e C e n t e r fo r C le a n A i r P o lic y , W a s h in g t o n , D .C .

Training of local community groups in energy efficiency

th e C le v e la n d 5,000

C le v e la n d D e v e lo p m e n t F o u n d a tio n

City of Cleveland’s 1993 Unity Day Celebration Holiday lighting at Public Square

5,000

police investigate

Annual dues for Council for Community-Based Development and the Neighborhood Funders Group Assessment of Neighborhood Progress, Inc. and review of the Special Initiative for Housing and Neighborhood Development (over two years) Capacity-building initiative in the environment Public Square Preservation and Maintenance Committee (over three years) Technical assistance and assessment for Vocational Guidance Services

11,222

146,1 17

C o v e n t r y P .E .A .C . E ., In c.

Plan for improvement of area’s public space

5.000

C ro s s ro a d s D e v e lo p m e n t C o rp o r a tio n

Safe Neighborhoods Program by Brooklyn Centre Development Corporation

T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n ( In c . )

Advisory Committee on Police Procedures

Outreach program to local businesses to improve educational skills of workers (over two years)

22,000

c r -m ■n Q j a c n v j _ C u y a h o g a C o u n ty D e p a r tm e n t of

5,000

100,000 7,500 269,000

t i e s i n th e n e %g h b o r h o o d .

E m p lo y m e n t S e rv ic e s

Study on coordination of publicly supported employment and training programs

15.000

C u y a h o g a C o u n ty P la n n in g C o m m iss io n

Policy development sessions for the Brownfields Working Group

1.000

C u y a h o g a C o u n ty P u b lic L ib ra r y

The Dial-Law project

15.000

10,000 T h e C u y a h o g a P la n o f O h io , In c.

C le v e la n d R e s t o r a t io n S o c ie t y

Operating support

50.000

Neighborhood-focused historic preservation program (third year)

Review of area government housing strategies by the Metropolitan Strategy Group (second year)

15.000

40,000

C le v e la n d S t a t e U n iv e r s ity

Local Government Leadership Week Local Leadership Academy at the College of Urban Affairs (over two years)

T h e C u y a h o g a R iv e r C o m m u n ity P la n n in g

3,000 120,000

Staff support for the Cuyahoga River Remedial Action Plan (over two years)

70.000

D u n h a m T a v e r n M u seu m

C le v e la n d W o r k s , In c .

Stipends for law student interns with the Cleveland Works Legal Department

O rg a n iz a tio n

Exterior renovations

5.000

5-000 T h e E a r t h D a y C o a litio n

Director of volunteer services (over two years) Earthfest '94

14

60.000 7.000


T h e C it y o f E a s t C le v e la n d

N a t u r a l R e s o u rc e s D e fe n s e C o u n c il, N e w Y o r k ,

Consultant assistance on strategic plan for the city (over three years)

N e w Y o rk 46,700

Water runoff project in Cleveland (second grant)

E n v ir o n m e n t a l H e a lt h W a t c h

N e ig h b o rh o o d P r o g re s s , In c.

Public education on household hazardous wastes

Capacity-building and financing for neighborhood revitalization projects (over two years)

20,000

V o c a tio n a l G u id a n c e S e rv ic e s

20,000

Projects with Industry program

1,000,000

E n v ir o n m e n t a l C a r e e r s O r g a n iz a tio n , B o s to n , 9 to 5 , W o r k in g W o m e n E d u c a tio n Fu n d

M a s s a c h u s e tts

Environmental careers presentations in Cleveland-area schools (over 15 months)

Public policy analysis related to women in the workplace

Literacy tutoring program at the Cuyahoga County Jail (second grant) R o x b o ro C o m m u n ity D e v e lo p m e n t C o rp o r a tio n

Human relations program in the Hillcrest suburbs (second year)

Community park and public space 10,000

5,000

S t . C la ir - S u p e r io r C o a litio n

Public safety program

24,000

H is p a n ic C o m m u n ity F o ru m

Latino Federation for Social Equity plan

28,919

T h e C it y o f S h a k e r H eig h ts

Community Preservation Partnership program (over two years)

In te r n a t io n a l C e n t e r fo r th e P r e s e r v a t io n of

75,000

Je w is h C o m m u n ity F e d e r a tio n o f C le v e la n d

T a s k F o rc e on V io le n t C r im e C h a r ita b le Fund

Comprehensive training program for Soviet emigrants to Cleveland area by Jewish Vocational Services (third year)

Public education and prevention programs by the Substance Abuse Initiative of Greater Cleveland (third year)

133,922

5,000

29,500

L a w E n fo r c e m e n t F o u n d a tio n , In c o r p o r a t e d , U n ite d L a b o r A g e n c y , Inc.

D u b lin , O h io

Human diversity and law enforcement training project (second year)

Organization assessment

50,000

7,500 T h e U r b a n Le a g u e o f G r e a t e r C le v e la n d

Employment and training programs (over 18 months)

L iv in g in C le v e la n d C e n t e r

Preferred Real Estate Agents Program (over two years)

18,690

L u t h e ra n M e tr o p o lit a n M in is t r y A s s o c ia tio n

Corrections programs operated by the Community Re-Entry Program (over 18 months) Tomorrow’s Leaders program (over two years)

66,900 6,436

M a in g a te / B u s in e s s D e v e lo p m e n t C o rp o r a tio n

Business development and marketing plan

20,000

C le v e la n d Z o o lo g ic a l S o c ie t y

$3,042,985

101,513

$137

T h e W o m e n ’s C it y C lu b o f C le v e la n d

Educational lectures

554 $691

T o t a l C iv ic A ffa irs G r a n t s — D e sig n a te d and U n d e s ig n a te d

S h a k e r L a k e s R e g io n a l N a t u r e C e n t e r

Strategic plan

7,000

(The following recipients and programs were designated by donors. Grants are for general support unless otherwise noted.)

T o t a l D e s ig n a te d G r a n t s 30,750

W ild A n im a ls , In c., C o lu m b u s , O h io

Wildlife conservation education program with the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo (over 18 months)

Strategic plan

designated gravy,/.s 10,000

20,000

H illc r e s t N e ig h b o rs C o rp o r a tio n

9 5,751

W o m e n ’s C it y C lu b F o u n d a tio n

T o t a l U n d e s ig n a te d G r a n t s

P r o je c t : L E A R N , In c.

Improvement of access for women seeking employment in nontraditional jobs (third year)

50,000

30,000

3 4,115

H a r d H a t te d W o m e n of C le v e la n d , Inc.

Employment program in Midtown Corridor for residents in the Central and Fairfax neighborhoods

$3,043,676

program-related investment N e ig h b o rh o o d P ro g r e s s , In c.

Development financing for community development corporation projects to revitalize selected neighborhoods

$2,000,000

T o t a l P r o g r a m - R e la te d In v e s tm e n t

$2 ,000,000


P erform ances by H is p a n o D a n za o f the C entro C ultural H ispano de C leveland help p re s e r v e and prom ote

c u l t u r a l affairs


Because the arts are critical to a city's vitality, fostering a thriving arts com­ munity has long been the goal of Cultural Affairs grantmaking. The downturn in funding for the arts, first seen in the late 1980s, has taken its toll on local cultural institu­ tions. W hile the local arts climate remains harsh, Cleveland has fared better than other cities, some of which have lost long-standing arts institutions. As in the past, the Foundation was challenged with balancing its interest in sustaining high-quality pro­ gramming in the more traditional dis­ ciplines and its desire to support innovative projects and newer, emer­ ging arts activities. In particular, grantmaking in I 993 focused on helping arts organizations face up to the financial realities of diminishing support. Building organiza­ tional capacities and creating a broader audience base are part of this effort. Strategic planning and board development projects were funded

G R A N T S

un d e sig n a ted grants to ta l grants

$2,850,778

$3,5 I 9,74 I

for a number of organizations, includ­ ing the Great Lakes Theater Festival and Beck Center for the Cultural Arts, to assist them in making effective use of scarce resources. Mergers and col­ laborative efforts, strategies often employed for survival in corporate America, were also encouraged. A $100,000 grant to Playhouse Square Foundation will foster cooperative efforts among its resident organiza­ tions, including Cleveland Ballet, Cleveland Opera, DANCECLEVELAND, Great Lakes Theater Festival and Ohio Ballet, to meet shared objec­ tives. A grant to Cuyahoga Community College brought two smaller organiza­ tions, JazzFest and the Cleveland International Film Festival, together for a regional marketing effort. Outreach efforts designed to increase access to the arts were fund­ ed for a number of organizations. One such grant will bring concerts this summer by the Cleveland Jazz Orchestra to Cuyahoga Metropolitan

d es ig n a te d g ran ts

$668,963

Housing Authority estate residents. Another grant brought the Ohio Ballet to downtown's To w er City for a showcase of free performances. And a $9,146 grant to the Lake Erie Girl Scout Council is helping young girls “ Discover the Arts” by arranging for Scouts to work with female artists in their studios. To support broader access to the arts in education, The Cleveland Foundation, along with the George Gund, Martha Holden Jennings, Kulas, John P. Murphy, and Thomas H. White foundations, commissioned a study to discover how local arts organizations can produce program­ ming for use in the Cleveland Public Schools and how best to encourage such activity. Results from the study demonstrate a need for the arts to develop programs with education, rather than audience development, as their central goal. The Foundation’s grantmaking will be influenced by the study’s recommendations. A grant of $57,680 in arts educa­ tion to the Friends of the Cleveland School of the Arts will give talented but disadvantaged students in the Cleveland Public Schools the oppor­ tunity to compete for careers in music. The project is a collaborative effort with Oberlin Conservatory and Cuyahoga Community College.

/ 7-


cultural affairs grants A cce s s to th e A rts

Start-up support for fine arts programming for the elderly (second year)

$15,000

A p o llo ’s F ir e : T h e C le v e la n d B a r o q u e O r c h e s tr a

Concerts in the 1992-93 and 1993-94 seasons (over 16 months)

27.000

B e c k C e n t e r fo r th e C u lt u r a l A r t s

Strategic plan and board development

10.000

C a s e W e s t e r n R e s e r v e U n iv e r s ity

Field-based studies by Arts Management Program at the Weatherhead School (third year) C e n t r o C u lt u r a l H is p a n o d e C le v e la n d , In c.

Start-up support for Hispanic Cultural Center (third year)

75.000

20.000

C h o r a l A r t s S o c ie t y o f C le v e la n d

Ohio premiere of Paul McCartney's “Liverpool Oratorio"

5,000

C le v e la n d A r t is t s F o u n d a tio n

“Cleveland as a Center of Regional American Art" symposium project (second year)

4,700

C le v e la n d B a ll e t

Repertory programs for the 1993-94 season and audience development (second year)

155.000

C le v e la n d C e n t e r fo r C o n t e m p o r a r y A r t

Marketing specialist and exhibitions for 25th anniversary

100.000

C le v e la n d C h ild r e n ’s M u seu m

Outreach and marketing activities

IS

50,000


The Girl Scout Council pairs S c o u ts w i t h local

T h e C le v e la n d M u s ic S c h o o l S e t t le m e n t C it y o f C le v e la n d

a r t i s t s to

Showagon program by Department of Parks, Recreation and Properties

6,200

creativity and artistic abilities.

Establishment of public awareness mission for the Cleveland Arts Consortium

50,000

Staff support for the Cleveland Arts Consortium

16,850

Start-up support for A Cultural Exchange

30,000

Study of school-based arts education programming by area arts organizations

15,000

85, 120

15,000

Retrospective exhibition and scholarly catalogue documentation of past visual arts winners of Cleveland Arts Prize (over two years)

1994 Festival and retrospective exhibit of performance art with Cleveland Center for Contemporary Art

15.000

T h e C le v e la n d P la y H o u s e 150.000

C le v e la n d P u b lic R a d io 100.000

C le v e la n d P u b lic T h e a t r e , In c.

Capital campaign for purchase of building which houses the theater

T h e C le v e la n d In s tit u t e of A r t

250.000

C le v e la n d P e r fo r m a n c e A r t F e s tiv a l In c.

Community service project (second year)

C it y o f C le v e la n d H e ig h ts

Strategic marketing plan for Cain Park

Special project support and productions in 1993-94 season (second year)

Production of new works in 1993-94 season

C le v e la n d H e a lth E d u c a tio n M useu m

Marketing, management and planning initiative

33,333

C le v e la n d O p e r a

T h e C le v e la n d Fo u n d a tio n (In c .)

discover their

Scholarship support for performing arts students and Lila Wallace-Readers Digest challenge grant match (second year)

5.000

MA

35.000

Publication of scholarly materials on four exhibitions in the Art Gallery

9,650

Festival of New Plays and the Ohio premiere of 40,000 C le v e la n d S t a t e U n iv e r s ity

T h e C le v e la n d In s tit u t e o f M usic

Community outreach project of the Robert Casadesus International Piano Competition

10,000 T h e C le v e la n d W o m e n ’s O r c h e s tr a

“Salute to Women in the Arts" concert

C le v e la n d Ja z z O r c h e s tr a

Summer outreach concerts

1.000

12,000 C u lt u ra l and E d u c a tio n a l In s tit u t e fo r B o r ic u a

T h e C le v e la n d M useu m o f N a t u r a l H is to r y

Charrette on feasibility of expansion and renovation of planetarium (over 15 months)

A dvan cem en t 30,000

Start-up support for the Julia de Burgos Educational Arts Center

10.000

J9


N e w O r g a n iz a tio n fo r th e V is u a l A r t s ( N O V A )

Community art projects

12,000

Outreach project to the minority community for Open Studio Day

4,000

N o r th e a s t O h io Ja z z S o c ie t y

“Thunder from the Heartland," “Jazz on Wheels” and the "Cleveland-New York Connection” programs

17 ,134

O h io C h a m b e r B a lle t, A k r o n , O h io

Acquisition of Kurt Jooss’ The Big City and summer concerts in Cleveland (second year)

65,000

Free Summer Festival performance in Cleveland

5,000

T h e R o b e r t P a g e S in g e rs and O r c h e s tr a C u y a h o g a C o m m u n ity C o lle g e

JazzFest community outreach events in 1994

25,000

Regional marketing for JazzFest and Cleveland International Film Festival

10,000

Showtime at High Noon program for the Hispanic Art and Culture Festival

10,000

G r e a t e r C le v e la n d V e t e r a n s M e m o ria l, In c.

Concert of choral compositions by African-Americans

Artists and jury honoraria for design competition for proposed new memorial sculptures

P la y h o u s e S q u a r e Fo u n d a tio n

Je w is h C o m m u n ity C e n t e r

“Bernstein - The Man and His Music" summer concert at Cain Park

5,000

13,500

Fine arts activities and programs

100,000

Rent subsidy for five constituent performing arts groups at Playhouse Square Center (second year)

100,000

P o e t s ’ L e a g u e o f G r e a t e r C le v e la n d D A N CECLEVELA N D

Artistic programs for 1993-94 season

K a r a m u H o u s e , In c.

35,000

Earwitness Public Poetry Reading Series (over 18 months)

Theater operations and strategic plan

6,990

T h e R e p e r to r y P r o je c t K e n t S t a t e U n iv e r s ity F o u n d a tio n , In c., K e n t, O h io

D o b a m a T h e a tre

Professional artists' costs for production of Sight Unseen

5,000

E d u c a tio n a l T e le v is io n A s s o c ia tio n o f M e tr o p o lit a n

L a k e E r ie G ir l S c o u t C o u n cil

Fine arts events for the Art Through the Park Festival

15,000

The Tom E v e rt D ance C om pany 25,000

57,680

40,000

34,000

W e s t S id e E c u m e n ic a l M in is tr y

Professional training activities of Near West Theatre’s Youth Theatre program

M e tr o p o lita n O p e r a N a tio n a l C o u n c il A u d itio n s

M u sic & P e r fo r m in g A r t s a t T r in it y C a t h e d r a l, In c.

Engagement of professional artists in 1993-94 season

Artistic fees for world premiere of Paul Turok’s "Concerto for Two Violins"

T o t a l U n d e s ig n a te d G r a n t s

"Get Close to the Music" project (second year) 5,000

Implementation of the strategic plan

100,000

Production of Death of a Salesman and community educational activities for Arthur Miller Festival

205,000

SO

Program support for the 1993-94 exhibition season

15,000

th e W o r k in g T h e a tr e

G r e a t L a k e s T h e a t e r F e s tiv a l

Educational outreach activities of “Othello From a Moorish Perspective”

Transition to repertory structure for 1994 performance season

District and regional auditions in Cleveland

F r ie n d s o f th e C le v e la n d S c h o o l o f th e A r t s

Plan and implementation of Excellence in Music project in collaboration with Oberlin Conservatory and Cuyahoga Community College (over two years)

SPA C ES

Management training for managing director

E n s e m b le T h e a t r e

Planning and organizational development project

3,000

20,000 L y r ic O p e r a C le v e la n d

Professional artists’ costs in the 1993-94 season

15,000

R o c k e fe lle r P a r k C u ltu ra l A r t s A s s o c ia tio n

“Discovering the Arts Through Girl Scouting1 ' project

C le v e la n d , W V I Z - T V

Production of community service outreach programs

Acquisition of new modem dance work and dancers' rehearsal time

25th anniversary concert for Kent/Blossom Music Center

T h e M u s ica l A r t s A s s o c ia tio n

75th Anniversary Campaign including performance of new and unusual music, community outreach, free concert on Public Square and special projects “Star Spangled Spectacular" concert

350,000 5,000

12,500 $2,850,778


designated grants Theater F estival

(The following recipients and programs were designated by donors. Grants are for general support unless otherwise noted.) C le v e la n d B a lle t

touring pro d u c­

3,700

T h e C le v e la n d In s tit u t e o f M u s ic

5,423

tion brought

T h e C le v e la n d M u seu m o f A r t

S p le n d id M u m m e r,

T h e C le v e la n d M u seu m o f N a t u r a l H is t o r y

Purchase of objects of art exhibited at the May Show in memory of Oscar Michael, Jr.

C le v e la n d O p e r a

t h e s t o r y o f th e

102,663

500 191,786 89

T h e C le v e la n d P la y H o u s e

8,853

Experimental dramatic work or scholarship

1,567

In te rm u s e u m C o n s e r v a tio n A s s o c ia tio n

f i r s t black actor

$88

C le v e la n d H e a lt h E d u c a tio n M u s e u m

K ara m u H ouse

13,561 125,090

L a M e s a E s p a n o la

to p l a y O t h e l l o ,

Jessie C. Tucker Memorial Program L a k e w o o d L it t le T h e a t r e , In c.

477 6,229

T h e M u s ica l A r t s A s s o c ia tio n

The Cleveland Orchestra

8 1,243

O g le b a y In s tit u t e , W h e e lin g , W e s t V ir g in ia

Cultural and educational activities at Oglebay Park

114,874

T o le d o M u seu m o f A r t , T o le d o , O h io

1,000

T h e W e s t e r n R e s e r v e H is t o r ic a l S o c ie t y

5,513

Care of memorabilia of the First Cleveland Cavalry Association

6,307

T o t a l D e s ig n a te d G r a n t s

$668,963

T o t a l C u lt u ra l A ffa ir s G r a n t s — D e s ig n a te d and U n d e s ig n a te d

$3,519,741


D ow ntow n redevelopm en t a nd efforts to r e b u i l d C l e v e l a n d ’s neighborhoods w ork together to b o o s t t h e local e c o n o m y .

economic d e v e l o p m e n t


The Foundation's 1993 grantmaking in Economic Development focused on two themes to improve the local econ­ omy: rebuilding neighborhoods and fostering regional economic growth. T h e N eighborhood Institute received a significant grant for the Neighborhood Economy Initiative (NEI), a comprehensive approach to neighborhood revitalization repre­ senting a major, long-term venture for Cleveland. The Foundation's $2 mil­ lion grant for this effort will be part of a total investment of more than $ 17 million from public, private and philan­ thropic sources. The NEI involves the creation of a community development bank, real estate developer and ven­ ture capital operation, all seeking ulti­ mately to raise residential real estate values, increase business formation and improve access to employment for neighborhood residents. Modeled after Chicago's South Shore Bank, the NEI will target funds in eight neigh­ borhoods of Cleveland's east side.

G R A N T S

un d e sig n a ted grants

$3,435,888

Additional grants were made to support neighborhood development projects which expand economic opportunities for entrepreneurs, especially minorities. The Foundation made a $250,000 program-related investment in the Northcoast Fund as part of an $8 million loan pool for substantial minority-owned ventures, primarily in the manufacturing sector. Enterprise Development, Inc., which helped create the Northcoast Fund, received a grant of $ I 10,000 to con­ tinue its public education programs designed to encourage entrepreneur­ ship. By increasing awareness about opportunities, it expects to stimulate new minority business development. Case Western Reserve University's Center for Regional Economic Issues is investigating ways to improve the economy. The Foundation awarded the Center a $ 120,000 grant to assess three key aspects of the local economy: manufacturing and trade, workforce skills, and science and technology.

p ro g ra m -re late d

investm ent

$250,000

Information garnered from these analyses should provide valuable back­ ground for a Foundation-sponsored endeavor by Cleveland Tomorrow. Its Technology Leadership Council received a grant to initiate a survey of existing local efforts in science and technology, as well as to explore new ideas in this arena. The result is expect­ ed to be a new vision for utilizing re­ search and development to stimulate growth of Cleveland and the region. Internationalization is a new Foun­ dation strategy to foster regional economic growth. A grant to the Cleveland Development Foundation helped the Greater Cleveland Inter­ national Trade Alliance secure a World Trade Center designation for the city. This designation gives north­ east Ohio companies access to a valu­ able network of information and services designed to increase interna­ tional trade. The Foundation awarded a grant to the Cleveland Development Founda­ tion for the Cleveland Bicentennial Commission to help it plan the city's 200th birthday in 1996. This multi­ year celebration is designed to involve all residents of Cleveland.

m.'ii


economic development grants

C onstruction

C a s e W e s t e r n R e s e r v e U n iv e r s ity

p r o j e c t s t i e d to

Analyses of employment and industrial issues by The Center for Regional Economic Issues at the Weatherhead School of Management

$120,000

C l e v e l a n d ’s

C le v e la n d A d v a n c e d M a n u fa c tu r in g P r o g r a m

Manufacturing Learning Center (second year)

250.000

lakefront renewal

C le v e la n d D e v e lo p m e n t F o u n d a tio n

Establishment of a World Trade Center by the Greater Cleveland International Trade Alliance

34,375

Marketing campaign by the New Cleveland Campaign (over two years)

150.000

Operating support for the Cleveland Bicentennial Commission

100.000

Outreach program to attract large-scale athletic events by the Greater Cleveland Sports Commission (second year)

in tim e fo r 15.000

the c it y 's 1996

C le v e la n d N e ig h b o rh o o d D e v e lo p m e n t C o rp o r a tio n

Industrial retention and expansion program (over 30 months, second and third grants)

136,563

bicentennial

T h e C le v e la n d T o m o r r o w P r o je c t , In c.

Analysis of science and technology related to region’s economic growth

10.000

E d is o n P o ly m e r In n o v a tio n C o rp o r a tio n

Consortium on uses of polymer matrix composites and infrastructure applications (over two years)

w i l l be c o m p l e t e d

40,000


The C ollinw ood

E n te r p r is e D e v e lo p m e n t, In c.

Projects for public education and minority entre足 preneurial development (fourth year)

Enterprise

I 10,000

G r e a t L a k e s M u s e u m o f S c ie n c e , E n v ir o n m e n t and T e c h n o lo g y

Pre-opening expenses and operating support (third year)

Center provides

278,450

T h e H is t o r ic W a r e h o u s e D is t r ic t D e v e lo p m e n t C o rp o r a tio n o f C le v e la n d

Physical revitalization (fourth year)

entrepreneurs and start-up

40,000

T h e N e ig h b o rh o o d In s tit u t e , C h ic a g o , Illin o is

Entrepreneurial development and financing program for Neighborhood Economy Initiative in Cleveland (over three years)

2,000,000

T h e N o r th C u y a h o g a V a lle y C o r r id o r , In c.

Creation of National Heritage Corridor (second year)

coyripames the sp a c e a n d services new businesses require.

30,000

O h io A e r o s p a c e In s tit u t e

Collaborative research among university, private sector and government laboratory scientists (over 18 months)

112,500

O h io C D C A s s o c ia tio n , C o lu m b u s , O h io

Ohio Microenterprise Development program for community development corporations (second year) T o t a l U n d e s ig n a te d G r a n t s

9,000 $3,435,888

_p rogram-related investment N o r th c o a s t Fu n d L .P .

Investment in minority business venture capital fund

$250,000

T o t a l P r o g r a m - R e la te d In v e s tm e n t

$250,000


The M a y fa ir E lem entary S c h o o l “l a t c h k e y � program provides children w ith a s a f e p l a c e to learn and play a fte r school.

pr ecollegiate education


The Foundation's grantmaking in Precollegiate Education focuses on building the capacity of schools to provide quality education. Because urban education is important to the city and region, the Foundation takes a special interest in the Cleveland Public Schools. Grantmaking built on a number of recent positive develop­ ments including the adoption of Vision 2 1 and the proposed settlement of a 20-year-old desegregation case, allowing the schools to become free of federal court supervision in 1997. Vision 2 1, a new districtwide edu­ cation reform plan, was adopted in mid-1993 by the Cleveland Board of Education. The plan has three major components: improving basic educa­ tion; designing programs to enhance the core curriculum with a special emphasis on improving the achieve­ ment of African-American students; and providing parents more choice in the school their child attends. An earli­ er Foundation grant provided assis­ tance to the district in the planning phase of Vision 2 1. Future grantmaking in Precollegiate Education will be con­ sidered within Vision 2 1's framework.

g r a n

t s

u n d e sig n a te d g ra n ts t o ta l g ra n ts

$ 3 ,7 7 9 ,1 3 0

$ 3 ,7 9 8 ,4 2 9

Three I 993 grants were made to ensure Vision 2 1's successful imple­ mentation. A grant to the Community Training and Assistance Center, a national school reform team working in a number of other urban districts, will provide technical assistance to the superintendent of the Cleveland Pub­ lic Schools to carry out Vision 2 1. The Cleveland Board of Educ­ ation, challenged with financing Vision 21 while operating under tight bud­ getary constraints, was awarded a grant of $101,000 for professional accounting, auditing and management consulting services. The Foundation continued to support The Cleveland Initiative for Education (CIE), an umbrella organi­ zation concerned with educational improvement, A three-year, $2.5 mil­ lion grant, the largest single 1993 award in Precollegiate Education, launched C IE ’s $ 10 million fundraising campaign. C IE and its program part­ ners work collaboratively with the Cleveland Public Schools in teacher training, student services, parental involvement, and school-to-work transition initiatives. The partners

d e s ig n a te d g ra n ts

$ 1 9 ,2 9 9

include The Cleveland Education Fund, Cleveland Education Partners, Youth O pp ortu n ities Unlim ited, Project W E CARE, Career Beginnings, INROAD S/Precollege Component Male Initiative, and the Cleveland Scholarship Programs. Early childhood education and school readiness continued to be areas of interest. A grant to the Cuyahoga Metropolitan Housing Authority will bring H IP PY (H om e Instructional Program for Preschool Youngsters) to families in the Outhwaite Estates. H IPPY is a nationally recognized early childhood education model designed for and taught by parents. Broadening its reach to at-risk children outside the Cleveland Public Schools, the Foundation made a grant of $225,000 to The Urban Community School. This indepen­ dent, racially diverse school serves a near west side student population pri­ marily from families living below the poverty level. The Cleveland Heights-University Heights City School District received a grant of $ I 6,522 for its Accelerated Math Support Project, designed to help minority students gain interest, self-confidence and ultimately the math skills required to enter career/ college track mathematics courses, such as Algebra I. Enrollment of African-American students in eighth grade Algebra I has doubled since the project began.

2 7


precollegiate education grants B la c k E c o n o m ic U n io n

Summer education program

$3,800

Jo h n C a r r o ll U n iv e r s ity

Evaluation of the Institute for Educational Renewal Strategic planner/executive director at Granville Academy

15,350 5.000

H eights High

C le v e la n d B o a r d o f E d u c a tio n

Center for School Improvement and Professional Development in the Cleveland Public Schools

25.000

Professional accounting, auditing and management advisory services to the Cleveland Public Schools

101,000

School students gain confidence

C le v e la n d D e v e lo p m e n t F o u n d a tio n

Inner-City School Fund

84,800

in their

T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n (In c . )

Audit and strategic business plan for Marotta Montessori Schools of Cleveland Consultant and technical assistance for Esperanza, Inc. Evaluation of scholarship tracking for The Cleveland Initiative for Education Major Work program at Gracemount Elementary School

85.000 5.000

m a. t h e m a t i c aI

25.000 1.000

s k ills by

C le v e la n d H e ig h ts - U n iv e r s ity H e ig h ts C it y S c h o o l D is t r ic t

Summer accelerated math program for students

16,522

•participating

T h e C le v e la n d In it ia t iv e fo r E d u c a tio n

Operating, program and scholarship assistance (over three years)

2,500,000

in the

T h e C le v e la n d M u s e u m o f N a t u r a l H is t o r y

Clerical assistant at Science Resource Center

6,519

Accelerated M ath Program.

&8


C le v e la n d S t a t e U n iv e r s ity

In te rc h u r c h C o u n cil o f G r e a t e r C le v e la n d

American Association of University Women Equity Roundtable

School Adoption Center (fourth year)

30,000

T h e O h io H u m a n itie s C o u n cil, C o lu m b u s , O h io

Summer humanities institute for teachers

C lo se - U p F o u n d a tio n , A le x a n d ria , V ir g in ia

Washington, D.C. Fellowship Program for high school students (over three years)

5,000 T h e C le v e la n d E d u c a tio n Fu n d

75,000

B o s t o n , M as s a c h u s e tts 195,000

$1,000

O h io P u b lic E x p e n d itu r e C o u n cil, C o lu m b u s , O h io

Summary of the Education Progress Report by the State Department of Education and Governor's Education Management Council

C o m m u n ity T r a in in g a n d A s s is ta n c e C e n t e r , In c.,

Leadership of School Reform initiative in the Cleveland Public Schools (over three years)

designated, grants (The following recipients and programs were designated by donors. Grants are for general support unless otherwise noted.)

4,998

T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n (In c .)

Major Work award at Oliver Hazard Perry School

1,000

C le v e la n d L u t h e ra n H ig h S c h o o l A s s o c ia tio n

1,935

H a th a w a y B ro w n Scho ol

6,000

10,000

O ra n g e S c h o o l D is t r ic t

Instructional material to address racial diversity and prejudice

2,580

C u y a h o g a M e tr o p o lit a n H o u s in g A u t h o r ity

Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) in Outhwaite Estates and Miracle Village Substance Abuse Program

H aw ken School

O rp h e u s C h o ra l S o c ie t y o f C le v e la n d , In c.

Cleveland Boychoir Program

806

27,630 T h e H ill S c h o o l, P o t ts t o w n , P e n n s y lv a n ia

65,530

88

P .M . Fo u n d a tio n , In c. E a s t C le v e la n d C it y Sc h o o ls

Latchkey program at Mayfair Elementary School

25,000

Instructional and school expenses at Urban Community School (over three years) "Our Wildest Dreams" summer camp by Urban Community School (second year)

E d u c a tio n C o m m iss io n o f th e S t a te s ,

D a n ie l E. M o rg a n S c h o o l 225,000

S h a k e r H e ig h ts B o a r d of E d u c a tio n

10,345

“Transforming Mathematics Instruction" in collaboration with East Cleveland Board of Education (third year)

62,800

E s p e r a n z a , In c .

Program support, student matching grants and accountant services

S o c ie t y F o r P r e v e n t io n O f V io le n c e 7 1,800

Social skills training for elementary school guidance counselors in the Cleveland Public Schools

232

T h e P in e y W o o d s C o u n t r y L ife S c h o o l, 9,667

D e n v e r , C o lo r a d o

Analysis of public school financing issues by Ohio State Education Policy Seminars

Book awards to children

P in e y W o o d s , M ississip pi

7,149

U n iv e r s ity S c h o o l

1,089

T o t a l D e s ig n a te d G r a n ts

$19,299

T o t a l P r e c o lle g ia t e E d u c a tio n G r a n t s — D e s ig n a te d and U n d e s ig n a te d

$3,798,429

2,805

G u n S a fe t y In s tit u t e

"Solutions Without Guns" pilot program in the Cleveland Public Schools

T h e S O S T e s t P r e p a r a tio n P r o g r a m o f E m m a n u e l

5,000

B a p t is t C h u rc h

Saturday Enrichment Program

10,000

In itia t iv e s in U r b a n E d u c a tio n F o u n d a tio n

Writing project at Tremont Elementary School (second year)

U n iv e r s ity Sc h o o l 5,000

REACH Program for gifted African-American middle school males

17,500

W a r r e n s v ille H I P P Y C o rp o r a tio n

Consultant assistance for HIPPY Program at Cuyahoga Metropolitan Housing Authority and staff support T o t a l U n d e s ig n a te d G r a n ts

44,484 $3,779,130

3

f)


The M ulti cultural A c t i o n P r o j e c t at B a l d w i n -Wall ace College helps students, faculty and staff address issues of diversity.

higher education


The Foundation has long realized that a thriving community requires an edu­ cated population. But while Cleveland is home to many colleges and univer­ sities, its educational levels are low rel­ ative to other cities. As is the case nationwide, minority students here are less likely than whites to pursue a col­ lege education, and, although female students outnumber males on many local campuses, they remain under­ represented in certain key fields. The Foundation thus strives to promote greater participation in post-secondary study by all citizens, especially minori­ ties and women. Today's student populations are widely diverse in age, race and gender, as well as preparedness and prior expe­ rience. Colleges and universities are becoming increasingly attuned to differ­ ences in learning styles and are explor­ ing new approaches to teaching, including the use of innovative electron­ ic technologies. Responding to these developments, the Foundation encour­ ages programs that seek to strengthen the teaching and learning process.

u n d e sig n a te d g ra n ts t o ta l g ra n ts

The Foundation made a number of grants to local schools addressing the needs of women in the classroom. Ursuline College, one of the few insti­ tutions in the country to modify its cur­ riculum to reflect the latest research on the cognitive abilities of women, received Foundation support for the implementation of a “collaborative learning” model. Faculty are mastering new techniques emphasizing learning that is student-centered, interactive and cooperative. A grant made to Case Western Reserve University from the Fenn Educational Fund marked another pioneer effort: a cooperative education program designed especially for female students at a coeducational institution. The year I 993 marked the 70th anniversary of cooperative education in Cleveland, a movement that effec­ tively bridges academic experience and real-world performance, LINK, a Cleveland State University coopera­ tive education program originally designed for minority business and engineering students, had a 93 per­ cent retention rate for full-time fresh­

$ 1 ,3 9 0 ,9 6 8

d e s ig n a te d g ra n ts

$ 6 8 4 ,7 6 7

$ 2 ,0 7 5 ,7 3 5

s c h o la rs h ip g ra n ts

$ 4 5 1 ,3 2 0

s p e c ia l p u rp o s e funds

$ 5 8 3 ,0 0 0

men who entered Fall 1991 and returned Fall 1992, as compared to the University’s overall retention rate of 50 percent for the same period. In 1993 the Foundation awarded more than $100,000, including $48,000 from the Fenn Educational Fund, to expand the LIN K program to students in the College of Arts and Sciences. Fostering positive intergroup rela­ tions on college campuses also played a part in 1993 grantmaking. BaldwinWallace College received a grant for its Multicultural Action Project, a model program in which faculty, staff and students are trained by consul­ tants to conduct educational sessions on diversity issues and ways to reduce prejudice. A number of grants were awarded to help institutions prepare for the future. In connection with a major strategic planning project, Cleveland State University received a grant to conduct focus groups with students, faculty and representatives of the com­ munity to help define the University's mission as an urban academic institu­ tion. The Foundation awarded a $100,000 grant to support Case Western Reserve University's National Institute on the Profession of Law in the 2 1st Century to examine issues of legal professionalism and access to legal services.


higher education grants

U n it e d N e g r o C o lle g e F u n d , In c ., N e w Y o r k , N e w Y o rk

Campaign 2000 scholarship fund (over three years)

148,500

B a ld w in - W a lla c e C o lle g e

Multicultural Action Project and faculty and curriculum development (over two years)

U r s u lin e C o lle g e

$ 135,250

C a s e W e s t e r n R e s e r v e U n iv e r s ity

George S. Dively Executive Education Building at the Weatherhead School of Management

150,000

Enhancement of Judaic Studies Program (over two years)

8 3 ,126

Staff support and applied field research at Mandel Center for Nonprofit Organizations

109,868

Start-up support for the School of Law's National Institute on the Profession of Law in the 2 1st Century

100,000

Sumner Canary Lectureship

Strategic plan

54,000

Women as Leaders Mentoring Network

25,000

T h e W e s t e r n R e s e r v e H is to r ic a l S o c ie t y

Preservation of historical manuscripts (over 18 months) T o t a l U n d e s ig n a te d G r a n t s

58,750 $1,390,968

designated grants

5,000

(The following recipients and programs were designated by donors. Grants are for general support unless otherwise noted.)

C le v e la n d S c h o la r s h ip P r o g ra m s

Nontraditional student program (second year)

Faculty development for the Ursuline Studies Program (over two years)

50,000

A s h la n d L ib r a r y A s s o c ia tio n , A s h la n d , O h io

$2,603

4,755 A s h la n d U n iv e r s ity , A s h la n d , O h io

5,206

C le v e la n d S t a t e U n iv e r s ity

Expansion of LINK Program to include students in the College of Arts and Sciences (over two years) Forgivable loan component of Ohio Scholars ProjectTeaching Leadership Consortium (over two years) Strategic plan

B a ld w in - W a lla c e C o lle g e

99,235 150,320

K e n t S t a t e U n iv e r s ity F o u n d a tio n , In c ., K e n t, O h io

Forgivable loan component of Ohio Scholars ProjectTeaching Leadership Consortium (over two years)

60,699

L a k e E d u c a tio n a l A s s is ta n c e F o u n d a tio n

Operating support (over two years)

40,000

M a r ie t t a C o lle g e , M a r ie t t a , O h io

Start-up support for the Ohio Campus Compact (over three years)

The L I N K cooper足 ative education p r o g r a m at Cleveland State U niversity

45,000

targets m in o r ity

N o t r e D a m e C o lle g e o f O h io

Staff support in the Minority Affairs Office

59,419

5 1,825

19,640

students in business, engineering, science a n d the arts.

U n iv e r s ity of C a lifo r n ia , B e r k e le y , C a lifo r n ia

183

Jo h n C a r r o ll U n iv e r s ity

137

C a s e W e s t e r n R e s e r v e U n iv e r s ity

10,291

Adelbert College

5,663

Franklin Thomas Backus Law School

4,857

Biological Field Station at Squire Valleevue Farm operated by the Department of Biology Case Institute of Technology Graduate School Reference books for the Library of Western Reserve College Social research at the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences

22,977 3,735 155,765

169

1,372


designated grants

scholarship grants

(The following recipients and programs were designated by donors.) B a ld w in - W a lla c e C o lle g e

Scholarship support

$19,000

A s h la n d U n iv e r s ity , A s h la n d , O h io

The Hazel Myers Spreng Scholarship

$ 4 ,165

B e r e a A r e a M o n te s s o ri A s s o c ia tio n

Scholarship support

1.500

A v o n L a k e U n it e d C h u rc h o f C h r is t , A v o n L a k e , O h io

B e r e a C o lle g e , B e r e a , K e n tu c k y

Scholarships for students from the Cleveland area

20,000

Scholarships for Christian work

2,616

B a ld w in - W a lla c e C o lle g e Jo h n C a r r o ll U n iv e r s ity

Scholarship support

C le v e la n d P u b lic L ib ra r y

Services to shut-ins C le v e la n d S t a t e U n iv e r s ity

137

Scholarship support

C o n n e c tic u t C o lle g e , N e w Lo n d o n , C o n n e c tic u t

183

T h e C le v e la n d Fo u n d a tio n (In c . )

Scholarships for students from the Cleveland area attending Huron Road Hospital School of Nursing

C o rn e ll U n iv e r s ity , Ith a c a , N e w Y o r k

Deanship at Johnson Graduate School of Management

38,000

C u y a h o g a C o u n t y P u b lic L ib ra r y

435

D e n is o n U n iv e r s ity , G r a n v ille , O h io

2,500

F e n n E d u c a tio n a l Fu n d

88 229

H ills d a le C o lle g e , H ills d a le , M ic h ig a n

16,388

K e n y o n C o lle g e , G a m b ie r, O h io

10,291

L a k e E r ie C o lle g e

Scholarships to graduates of Aurora High School

22,000

Scholarship support

James J. Doyle Scholarship 7.500

1.500

36.000

H a r r y C o u lb y M e m o ria l Sc h o la rs h ip s

For Dyke College students and Cleveland Scholarship Programs

1,119

For a female student in foreign study

2,408

Harriet Fairfield Coit and William Henry Coit Scholarships

1,296

William Curtis Morton, Maud Morton, Kathleen Morton Fund Scholarships

13,931

Oglebay Fellow Program in the School of Medicine

68,936 79

Scholarships in Franklin Thomas Backus Law School

9,554

The Hazel Myers Spreng Scholarship

4,165

In e z and H a r r y C le m e n t A w a r d

146,703 7,877

C a s e W e s t e r n R e s e r v e U n iv e r s ity

9,000

Cleveland Public Schools annual superintendent’s award

E a s t S u b u rb a n M o n te s s o ri S c h o o l, In c. O h io W e s le y a n U n iv e r s ity , D e la w a r e , O h io

1,744

The Aloy Memorial Scholarship Fund for women

Scholarships in aerospace or computers 40.000

D y k e C o lle g e

Scholarship support

4,279

2 0 ,0 0 0

C le v e la n d M o n te s s o ri A s s o c ia tio n

Scholarship support for Ruffing Montessori (West)

The Frederick R. and Bertha Sprecht Mautz Scholarship Fund Jo h n C a r r o ll U n iv e r s ity

C le v e la n d S t a t e U n iv e r s ity

E d u c a tio n a l T e le v is io n A s s o c ia tio n o f M e tr o p o lita n

4 ,165

C a p ita l U n iv e r s ity , C o lu m b u s , O h io

82,442 C a s e W e s t e r n R e s e r v e U n iv e r s ity

C le v e la n d , W V I Z - T V

20,000

The Hazel Myers Spreng Scholarship

Scholarship support

1,000

1.500 T h e C le v e la n d In s tit u t e o f A r t

U n iv e r s it y o f th e P a c ific , S t o c k t o n , C a lifo r n ia

183

F a ir m o u n t M o n te s s o ri A s s o cia tio n

Scholarship support at Ruffing Montessori School (East) P r in c e to n U n iv e r s ity , P r in c e to n , N e w Je r s e y

Isaac C. Goff Fund Scholarships T h e C le v e la n d M u sic S c h o o l S e t t le m e n t

89 H u d so n M o n te s s o ri A s s o c ia tio n

S a in t M a r y S e m in a r y S m i th C o lle g e , N o r th a m p t o n , M a s s a c h u s e tts

1,615 98,081

Scholarship support

$684,767

T o t a l H ig h e r E d u c a tio n G r a n t s — D e s ig n a te d and U n d e s ig n a te d

Scholarships at the Harvard East Branch 1.500

7,149 T o t a l U n d e s ig n a te d S c h o la r s h ip G r a n ts

T o t a l D e s ig n a te d G r a n t s

The Nellie E. Hinds Memorial Scholarships

$2,075,735

4,000

1.500

739

W e s t s h o r e M o n te s s o ri A s s o cia tio n

Scholarship support U n it e d N e g r o C o lle g e F u n d , In c.

1,800

1.500

$202,500

C le v e la n d S c h o la r s h ip P r o g r a m s , In c .

1,000


special purpos efunds The Cleveland Foundation administers two special purpose funds in the area of higher education. The Fenn Educational Fund, established in 1971, is designed to promote and assist in the development of cooperative education and work-study pro­ grams at institutions of higher learning in the Greater Cleveland area. The Foundation's other special purpose fund in education, the Statewide Program for Business and Management Education (PBME), was established in 1982 with the support of the L. Dale Dorney Fund to strengthen business and management education at colleges and uni­ versities statewide. N o r th C e n t r a l C o lle g e , N a p e r v ille , Illin o is

C le v e la n d S t a t e U n iv e r s ity

Scholarships in Cleveland-Marshall College of Law

739

fen n educational fu n d grants

The Hazel Myers Spreng Scholarship in memory of Bishop Samuel P. Spreng

D a r t m o u th C o lle g e , H a n o v e r , N e w H a m p s h ir e

The John Marshall Raible and David Gardner Raible Scholarship Fund

O h io W e s le y a n U n iv e r s ity , D e la w a r e , O h io 19,755

V in c e F e d e r ic o M e m o r ia l S c h o la rs h ip s

For Wickliffe High School graduates

The Hazel Myers Spreng Scholarship

4,165

P u rd u e U n iv e r s ity , W e s t L a fa y e tt e , In d ia n a 6,000

The John C. McLean Scholarships in engineering

H aw k en School

T h e M iria m K e r r u is h S ta g e S c h o la rs h ip

The John Marshall Raible and David Gardner Raible Scholarship Fund

For Shaker Heights High School graduates

40,963

4,239

For graduates of the public high school of Elyria, Ohio

H ills d a le C o lle g e , H ills d a le , M ich ig a n

3,250

16,388

For furthering the college education of a female graduate of Shaw High School

$4,800

“Work Study Plus" program to prepare students for participation in cooperative education (second year)

25,520

Employer development in the cooperative education program

6,900

Special honorary scholarships

5,000

C a s e A lu m n i A s s o c ia tio n

U n iv e r s ity S c h o o l

The John Marshall Raible and David Gardner Raible Scholarship Fund

V ir g in ia Jo n e s M e m o r ia l S c h o la r s h ip

Special honorary scholarships

Jo h n C a r r o ll U n iv e r s ity

10,000

A d a G a te s S t e v e n s S c h o la rs h ip

The John C. McLean Scholarships to deserving students

B a ld w in - W a lla c e C o lle g e

Special honorary scholarships 800

2,000

Charles J. Stilwell Scholarship at Case Institute of Technology

15,000

5,000

U r s u lin e C o lle g e T h e Jo n L e w is M e m o r ia l A w a r d

Lillian Herron Doyle Scholarship

For a Cleveland Heights High School graduate to pursue further studies

T o t a l D e s ig n a te d S c h o la r s h ip G r a n ts

5,000

T o t a l S c h o la r s h ip G r a n t s —

M a c M u r r a y C o lle g e , Ja c k s o n v ille , Illin o is

The George D. and Edith W. Featherstone Memorial Fund Scholarships

1,744 $248,820

D e s ig n a te d an d U n d e s ig n a te d 2,616

C a s e W e s t e r n R e s e r v e U n iv e r s ity

Women’s Initiatives for Leadership and Learning (WILL) program

32,250

T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n (In c .) $451,320

Fenn Educational Fund operating budget

23,000


statewide program for business and management education grants (PBME) Jo h n C a r r o ll U n iv e r s ity

Program on teaching ethics in functional business areas

U r s u l i n e C o l le g e

Continuation of the Statewide Program for Business and Management Education

ho.s u:on n a t i o n a l recognition fo r

c u r r t c u l, u m b. a s e d . on w o m e n 's lea r n in g styles.

69,438

L a k e E r ie C o lle g e

Enhancement of undergraduate and graduate business programs (over two years)

C le v e la n d S t a t e U n iv e r s ity

in n o v a tiv e

36,160

F r a n k lin U n iv e r s ity , C o lu m b u s , O h io

Curriculum enhancement in the Master of Business Administration Program (over two years)

it s

$26,960

T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n (In c .)

R. Earl Burrows Memorial Scholarships

2,000

Conference on current issues in the field of cooperative education

4,400

Expansion of the LINK Program to include students in the College of Arts and Sciences

48,812

Special honorary scholarships

18.400

D y k e C o lle g e

Job readiness skills program to prepare students for participation in cooperative education program (second year)

13.400

L a k e E r ie C o lle g e

Cooperative education program for nontraditional-age students

12,181

N o t r e D a m e C o lle g e o f O h io

Employer development in the cooperative education program Henry Ford II Memorial Scholarship T o t a l Fe n n E d u c a tio n a l Fu n d G r a n ts

I 1,090

1,000 $228,753

39,500

M a r ie t t a C o lle g e , M a r ie t t a , O h io

Integration of leadership education into management curriculum (over two years)

71,889

X a v ie r U n iv e r s ity , C in c in n a ti, O h io

Center for International Business and internationalization of curriculum in the College of Business Administration (over two years)

I 10,300

T o t a l P B M E G r a n ts

$354,247

T o t a l S p e c ia l P u rp o s e Fu n d s G r a n ts

$583,000


The B e n ja m in Rose In stitu te is stu d y in g interactions between n u rs in g home residents, their fa m ilies and nursing

health


W h ile many national health care reform issues did not emerge until late in 1993, the Foundation's grantmaking in health reflected similar themes of access, affordability and quality. Grant recipients traditionally have been organizations working to provide affordable, quality health care for the indigent and underserved. Grants totaling $300,000 were made to Case W estern Reserve University's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing to support the Nursing Health Center located in the Shaker-Buckeye neighborhood. The Center will use advance practice nurses to provide birthing services and primary care for neighborhood residents. A 1993 grant made to the Alz­ heimer's Disease and Related Dis­ orders Association will expand a

u n d e sig n a te d g ra n ts to ta l grants

$3,689,467

$6,032,158

computer support group for care­ givers of Alzheimer’s patients. The support group helps users share infor­ mation and find solutions to their common problems. With the number of persons over the age of 65 growing dramatically, the Foundation continually seeks ways to better the quality of geriatric care. The Benjamin Rose Institute received a grant to study interactions between nursing assistants and the families of nursing home residents. Improvements in these interactions should lead to improvements in the quality of nursing home care. The relationship of health care quality to cost is another national agenda item being addressed locally with the help of Foundation grant monies. The Cleveland Health Quality Choice Program, a project of Cleveland

d e s ig n a te d g ra n ts

$2,342,691

Tomorrow, received a grant of more than $100,000 to produce informa­ tion on health care outcomes to assist purchasers of health care in their decisionmaking. Quality of care also was addressed in a grant to the W ork in Northeast Ohio Council. W IN O C has arranged for three area hospitals, St. Alexis, Geauga and Marymount, to work collaboratively to further their total quality management efforts. The Foundation has long recog­ nized that developing the city's teach­ ing and research centers will ultimately lead to better health care for Cleve­ landers. A significant grant went to Case Western Reserve University for the purpose of establishing a program in molecular cardiology. This grant will further efforts to bring Cleveland into the top ranks of U.S. medical research and educational centers, pri­ marily through increased collabora­ tion among major local hospitals and universities. A number of 1993 planning grants were made in anticipation of health care financing reforms. The Free Medical Clinic of Greater Cleveland, Neighbor­ hood Health Care, Inc. and the Cleve­ land Hearing and Speech Center are among the organizations receiving support designed to create stronger agencies better positioned to face the challenges of health care reform.


health grants A lz h e im e r ’s D is e a s e a n d R e la te d D is o rd e rs A s s o c ia tio n , In c.

T h e C le v e la n d C lin ic Fo u n d a tio n

Expansion of Alzheimer's disease computerized support network program (over three years)

Collaborative research on multiple sclerosis with Case Western Reserve University

$ 139,650

Strategic plan

2 1,500

Educational program for children with chronic renal disease (over two years)

T h e F r e e M e d ic a l C lin ic o f G r e a t e r C le v e la n d

Nurse manager for the evening clinic (over three years) 100,000

59,850

35,000

Consolidation of administrative and laboratory facilities

26,000

5,000

B la c k D e a f A d v o c a t e s C le v e la n d C h a p t e r 2

3,000

Evaluation of American Society on Aging’s New Ventures in Leadership program (over two years) Implementation of recommendations of the Commission on Medical Research and Education (over five years)

H e a lth S y s te m s A g e n c y o f N o r th C e n t r a l O h io

3,000

C a s e W e s t e r n R e s e r v e U n iv e r s ity

Molecular cardiology program in the School of Medicine (over two years) Report on ethical issues associated with dementia by the Center for Biomedical Ethics Start-up support and facility renovation for the Nursing Health Center of the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing (over three years) Western Reserve Geriatric Education Center in the School of Medicine

Phase II of strategic plan 1,000 33,750

221,000

"Health on Wheels" education program

Interim program support

1.000

General support

36,750

M e n o ra h P a r k C e n t e r fo r t h e A g in g

Music therapist at the Eliza Bryant Center

Study of resident competence for medical decisionmaking

25,000

30,000 M e rid ia E u c lid H o s p ita l

T h e C le v e la n d S o c ie t y fo r th e B lin d

General support Improved services for visually impaired elderly (over 18 months)

36,750

Program to upgrade educational level of hospital staff (over four years)

300,000

T h e U n iv e r s ity of M ic h ig a n , A n n A r b o r , M ich ig a n 130,500

Evaluation of the SMILE program of Golden Age Centers

4,750

5 3 ,100 T h e C le v e la n d T o m o r r o w P r o je c t , Inc.

C e n t r a l S c h o o l o f P r a c t ic a l N u rs in g , In c.

Staff support for the home nursing program

3,025

7,500

T h e C le v e la n d M u s ic S c h o o l S e tt le m e n t

300,000

Design consultant assistance for expansion and renovation

A . M . M c G re g o r H o m e 60,000

750,000

3,000

36,000

Lin ks W e s t A llia n c e F o r M e n ta l Illn es s E n lig h te n m e n t 23,950

C le v e la n d H e a lt h E d u c a tio n M useu m

Childhood Life Stage exhibit (over three years)

Teen Health Corps Je n n in g s H a ll, Inc.

C le v e la n d H e a r in g an d S p e e c h C e n t e r

Medical curriculum archival project

5,000

T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n (In c .)

W a s h in g t o n , D .C .

Breast Health Awareness Day of the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing

25,000

G r a n t m a k e rs in H e a lt h , W a s h in g to n , D .C .

Program support (fifth and sixth years)

Symposium on education for the deaf

5> 000

T h e C le v e la n d E y e B a n k , Inc.

A s s o c ia t io n o f G e r o n t o lo g y in H ig h e r E d u c a tio n ,

Annual meeting in Cleveland

120,000

T h e G o ld e n A g e C e n t e r s o f G r e a t e r C le v e la n d , In c.

Implementation of strategic plan

A m e r ic a n S o c ie t y on A g in g , S a n F ra n c is c o , C a lifo r n ia

Cleveland participants in New Ventures in Leadership program (second and third years)

Strategic plan

25,000

Patient outcome measurement system by the Quality Information Management Corporation

N e ig h b o rh o o d H e a lt h C a r e , Inc.

Strategic plan for Neighborhood Family Practice

2 1,000

103,000 T h e N e w Y o r k C o m m u n ity T r u s t , N e w Y o r k ,

C h r is t L u t h e ra n C h u r c h o f th e D e a f

C u ya h o g a C o u n ty Ju v e n ile C o u r t D iv isio n

Independent living skills training program for the deaf (over two years)

Health care service information and delivery system model

N e w Y o rk 4,800

42,425 D ia b e te s A s s o c ia tio n o f G r e a t e r C le v e la n d

C le v e la n d C h in e s e S e n io r C itiz e n s A s s o c ia tio n

Senior housing plan in the Chinatown district

5,000

Comprehensive diabetes education program in the City of Cleveland health centers (over two years)

C it y o f C le v e la n d

F a ir v ie w Fo u n d a tio n

Lead abatement project by Department of Public Health (third year)

Expansion of Parish Nurse Pilot Program by Health Cleveland (over two years)

50,000

Operating support for Funders Concerned About AIDS (sixth and seventh years)

5,000

N o r th C o a s t H e a lth M in is tr y 58,300

Community health education program

2,500

N o r th e a s t O h io A r e a w id e C o o r d in a tin g A g e n c y

14 1,202

Design of responsive transportation system for the elderly

55,000

O h io P r e s b y t e r ia n R e t ir e m e n t S e rv ic e s , F e d e r a tio n fo r C o m m u n ity P la n n in g

AIDS/HIV Coordinating Unit

5,000

Attendance at Intergenerational Training Institute

1, 155

Cleveland Health Care for the Homeless program

46,260

C o lu m b u s , O h io

Staff training program for assisted living and adult day care programs at Breckenridge Village (over 18 months)

40,000


T h e B e n ja m in R o s e In s tit u t e

Expansion of adult day care program (over two years) General support

A .M . M c G r e g o r H o m e

C a th o lic C h a r itie s C o rp o r a tio n 50,000

Benefit of aged persons

36,750

Study of relationships between nurse assistants and families of nursing home residents (over two years) 120,000

T h e C le v e la n d C lin ic F o u n d a tio n

21,501

Research in diseases of the eye

13,931

T h e C le v e la n d Fo u n d a tio n (In c .) U n it e d W a y S e rv ic e s

World AIDS Day activities in Cleveland by Citizens Committee on AIDS/HIV

Perrysburg Hospice Program 2,000

W e s t S id e E c u m e n ic a l M in is t r y

Adolescent dual diagnosis day treatment program by The Covenant (over three years)

T h e C le v e la n d P s y c h o a n a ly tic S o c ie t y F o u n d a tio n 195,000

W o r k in N o r t h e a s t O h io C o u n cil

Total quality management program in local hospitals T o t a l U n d e s ig n a te d G r a n t s

Research and application of psychoanalysis and support projects T h e C le v e la n d S o c ie t y fo r th e B lin d

75,000 $3,689,467

3,091

MetroHealth Medical Center’s Burn Unit

2,030

MetroHealth Medical Center's Nurse Award T h e M o n te fio r e H o m e

Research or any other purpose Volunteer Braille Transcribers

Deaconess Hospital of Cleveland

831 6,706

2,500 51,673 38 72,502 259,303

Equipment or supplies T h e B e n ja m in R o s e In s tit u t e S a in t A n n F o u n d a tio n S a in t Jo h n W e s t S h o r e H o s p ita l

91,437 1,296 15,739 3,091 13,629

13,992 3,091

S a in t L u k e ’s H o s p ita l S t . V in c e n t C h a r ity H o s p ita l

6,706

6,080

Aid for alcoholics and indigent sick

1, 160

T h e D e a co n e s s F o u n d a tio n

designated grants

M e t r o H e a lt h F o u n d a tio n , In c.

R a in b o w B a b ie s a n d C h ild r e n s H o s p ita l C le v e la n d H e a rin g and S p e e c h C e n t e r

6,706

3,000

Elizabeth Boersig Soyer bed

457

879

E ly r ia M e m o ria l H o s p ita l, E ly r ia , O h io

(The following recipients and programs were designated by donors. Grants are for general support unless otherwise noted.)

Wiliam H. Gates bed F a ir v ie w G e n e r a l H o s p ita l

16,003

Equipment

39,435

$ 1,765

Christiana Perren Soyer bed A m e r ic a n C a n c e r S o c ie t y , C u y a h o g a C o u n t y U n it

Research or any other purpose

879

13,992

28,594

145,021

H e a lt h H ill H o s p ita l fo r C h ild r e n

3,091

1,954

A m e r ic a n V e t e r in a r y M e d ic a l A s s o c ia tio n F o u n d a tio n , S c h a u m b u rg , Illin o is A r t h r i t i s F o u n d a tio n , N o r th e a s t e r n O h io C h a p t e r B e lle v u e H o s p ita l, B e lle v u e , O h io E liz a B r y a n t C e n t e r

Medical research and general support

Henry L. Sanford Memorial bed

H u ro n R o a d H o s p ita l

9,768

Spine research in the Department of Surgery

12,000

Urological or vascular research

63,797

Maternity Hospital

E liz a Je n n in g s H o m e

22,748

Equipment

28,594

L a k e w o o d H o s p ita l

5,823 103,121

T h e L u th e ra n H o m e fo r th e A g e d

9,715

L u th e ra n M e d ic a l C e n t e r

2,674

Outpatient clinic for dispensary

50,268

Conference travel

Research in diseases of the eye

27,861

L u th e ra n M e d ic a l C e n t e r F o u n d a tio n

Scholarships or research

2,430 622,024

1,615

T h e V is itin g N u r s e A s s o c ia tio n o f C le v e la n d T o t a l D e s ig n a te d G r a n t s

385 32,761

5,294 M a n s fie ld M e m o r ia l H o m e , M a n s fie ld , O h io

355

5 ,9 6 1 1,296

3,591 $2,342,691

T o t a l H e a lt h G r a n t s — D e s ig n a te d and U n d e s ig n a te d

100,024

9,208 14 3 ,156

1,423

o f M e d ic in e 16,524

13,413

H o ly F a m ily C a n c e r H o m e

L a k e w o o d H o s p ita l F o u n d a tio n , In c.

C a s e W e s t e r n R e s e r v e U n iv e r s ity S c h o o l

Cancer research

7,149

Employees' Christmas fund

806

18,107

Cancer research

Lakeside Hospital

18,648

4,240

Benefit aged people

Conference travel

13,992 H ig h la n d V ie w H o s p ita l

A m e r ic a n L u n g A s s o c ia tio n o f N o r t h e r n O h io

T a m p a , F lo rid a U n iv e r s ity H o s p ita ls o f C le v e la n d

G r a c e H o s p ita l

A m e r ic a n H e a r t A s s o c ia tio n , N o r th e a s t O h io

Research or any other purpose

10,412

S h r in e r s H o s p ita ls fo r C r ip p le d C h ild r e n ,

I 19,405

Equipment A ffilia t e , In c .

S a m a r ita n H o s p ita l, A s h la n d , O h io

Mr. and Mrs. A. N. Myers memorial room

A k r o n C it y H o s p ita l, A k r o n , O h io

Obstetrical division

2,000

$6,032,158


Students from C l e v e l a n d 's S t. I g n a t i u s H i g h School tutor neighborhood children in a hom ew ork clinic t h r o u g h the Youth Connection Project.

social services


The Found ation’s grantm aking in Social Services is designed to help the com m unity address problem s faced by disadvantaged youth, the homeless and chronically p o o r and to support creative approaches to em erging c o m m u n ity needs. The Foundation's efforts to address persistent poverty have cen­ tered on the re p o rt o f The Cleveland Foundation Comm ission on Poverty and th e C leveland C o m m u n ity Building Initiative Council, created to facilitate implementation o f the re port’s recommendations. Activities w ill be built on a com prehensive approach to social services designed to strengthen fam ilies and ne ig hbo rho ods. Three grants totaling m ore than $4 50,000 w ere made in 1993 to Case W estern Reserve University, fis­ cal agent fo r the Council, to support testing o f this approach in fo u r pilot neighborhoods. A related grant was made to th e C e n te r fo r U rban Poverty and Social Change to help evaluate th e results. Funding cutbacks and increased needs in the com m unity prom pted many local agencies to seek new approaches to social services. A number

u n d e s ig n a te d g r a n ts to ta l

g ran ts

$4,726,391

$3,662,356

o f grants w ere made to help agencies re-exam ine th e ir focus and strength­ en th e ir capacity. The Federation fo r C om m unity Planning received a grant fo r technical assistance to help com m unity agen­ cies plan and im plem ent a fam ily developm ent model. This model has also been embraced by the C o m ­ munity-Building Initiative Council and providers nationwide as an effective, comprehensive approach to deliver­ ing social services. The Cleveland Housing N e tw o rk received a grant o f $45,000 fo r its Family D evelopm ent program, de­ signed to provide supportive services to families attem pting to become m o re self-sufficient. A $200,000 grant awarded to the N eighborhood C enters Association (N C A ) w ill support a redesign o f its centers into family-focused centers, positioning N C A to play a new role in strengthening the social fabric o f in n e r-c ity neighborhoods. The largest child-serving agency in the com m unity, the Cuyahoga C ounty D epartm ent o f Children and Family Services, is placing a greater emphasis on enabling children to re­

d e s ig n a te d g r a n ts

$1,064,035

main with the ir birth families. The Foun­ dation awarded the D epartment a grant o f $36,480 to refurbish the Bessie Benner Metzenbaum Children's Center, fo rm e rly an emergency residential fa­ cility, to become a child visitation site. The Foundation made grants to several oth er agencies, including The Cleveland Christian H om e, Inc. and Parmadale-St. Anthony Youth Services Village, as they also explore various approaches to family reunification. The O h io D epartm ent o f Human Services, The National C ouncil o f Jewish W om en, Providence House, and th e Hispanic U rban M in o rity Alcoholism and D rug Abuse O utreach Program also received grants fo r planning and capacity-building efforts. In keeping w ith its tradition o f serving disadvantaged you th, the Foundation aw arded a grant o f $1 14,000 to the Cuyahoga C ounty Juvenile C o u rt to establish an alterna­ tive school w hich helps youth released from Camp Roulston Boot Camp make a b e tte r adjustm ent as th e y re tu rn to th e c o m m u n ity and re e n te r th e public school system . Grants to address the grow ing issue o f youth and domestic violence w ere made to Bellflower C enter fo r the Prevention o f Child Abuse, Garfield Heights C om m unity Services Center, and W o m e n T o g e th e r, Inc.


social services g ra n ts

C le v e la n d H o u s in g N e t w o r k , In c .

A c h ie v e m e n t C e n t e r f o r C h ild r e n

C le v e la n d M e d ia tio n C e n te r

Replication of Technical Assistance Program

Family Development Program (fourth year)

$ 2 5 ,2 15

Domestic relations pilot program

B e llf lo w e r C e n t e r f o r P r e v e n tio n o f C h ild

C le v e la n d R a p e C r is is C e n te r

A b u s e , In c .

Hospital advocacy liaison coordinator

Strategic plan Teen Moms Project (third year)

F e d e r a tio n f o r C o m m u n ity P la n n in g

45,000

Collaborative services model for black males in the 26,000

5,000

Office on Homeless Services

5,000

Operating support for Center for Urban Poverty and Social Change at Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences (third year)

Summer youth program by the Youth Services Coordinating Council (fourth year)

Working capital for Cleveland Commission on Poverty's Community-Building Initiative at Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences (recoverable grant)

25,000

261,104

Pilot project to help teens establish paternity of children born out of wedlock (over two years)

46,230

Bessie Benner Metzenbaum Family Reunification Center

36,480

C u y a h o g a C o u n ty D e p a r t m e n t o f H e a lth a n d

18 7 , 154

H u m a n S e rv ic e s

Strategic plan for Department of Senior and Adult Services (over 18 months)

-4-J&

2 6,742

Conflict resolution education, training and intervention services for elementary school youth

36,7 18

Capital campaign

30 6,525

Cleveland Family/Neighborhood Leadership Strategy initiative

200,000

Adoption specialist (over tw o years)

60,7 39

35,750

Camp Roulston Boot Camp transitional school at City Center operated by Phoenix Alternative School

H a r v a r d C o m m u n ity S e r v ic e C e n te r

Board/staff strategic planning retreat

30,000

H is p a n ic U r b a n M i n o r i t y A lc o h o lis m a n d D r u g

Estate-based social service survey and data analysis 29,400

Graduate student stipends at Riverview and Valleyview estates HUD Urban Revitalization Demonstration grant application

5,000

28,820 5,000

A b u s e O u tr e a c h P r o g ra m

Staff support (over two years)

12 5,000 70,000

T h e d e P a u l S c h o o l o f N o r t h e a s t O h io , In c .

Phase II of curriculum development project

6 1,594

F a m ily T r a n s it io n a l H o u s in g , In c .

Case manager II and child advocate staff positions

44,800

109,047

T h e I n s t it u t e f o r C r e a tiv e L iv in g

Emergency support Staff support and targeted brochures

7,000

3.000

114,000

T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a t io n ( I n c . )

Senior fellow for The Cleveland Foundation

Baby-sitting cooperative for teen parents in GED/ABE classes (second year)

H A R A M B E E : S e rv ic e s t o B la c k F a m ilie s 93,655

C u y a h o g a M e t r o p o lit a n H o u s in g A u t h o r it y

Program support for Lutheran Metropolitan Ministry Association (recoverable grant, over 14 months)

F r ie n d ly In n S e tt le m e n t , In c .

A s s o c ia tio n

F a m ily S e rv ic e s

C le v e la n d C h r is t ia n H o m e , In c .

Consultant assistance on long-term funding for Center for Urban Poverty and Social Change at Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences

4.00 0

G r e a t e r C le v e la n d N e ig h b o r h o o d C e n te r s

C u y a h o g a C o u n ty D e p a r t m e n t o f C h ild r e n a n d 5,000

C h ild r e n ’ s S e r v ic e s , In c .

Specialized foster care recruiter

Transition of Project HEAT from the Federation for Community Planning

G a r fie ld H e ig h ts C o m m u n ity C e n t e r , In c .

C u y a h o g a C o u n ty C h ild S u p p o r t E n fo r c e m e n t A g e n c y

C u y a h o g a C o u n ty ju v e n ile C o u r t D iv is io n

Therapeutic recreation program at Jones Home for Children

4 3,0 0 0

287,000

C e n t e r f o r H u m a n S e rv ic e s

Service integration model

120,000

F ir s t U n it e d M e th o d is t C h u rc h C u y a h o g a C o u n ty B o a rd o f C o m m is s io n e r s

Consultant assistance to maximize revenues

Focus groups in Mt. Pleasant area for the Cleveland Community-Building Initiative at Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences

1,062

16,800

C a s e W e s te r n R e s e rv e U n iv e r s it y

Operating support for Cleveland Commission on Poverty's Community-Building Initiative at Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences

Glenville area Technical and consultant assistance for family centers

15,000 30,000

Attendance by community youth at the 1993 Health and Human Services Institute

5.00 0

20,000


N o r t h R o y a l t o n ’s

N o r t h R o y a lto n C o m m u n ity P la y g r o u n d F u n d

Construction of handicap-integrated playground

new play ground

15.000

O h io D e p a r t m e n t o f H u m a n S e rv ic e s , C o lu m b u s , O h io

Evaluation of the Learning, Earning, and Parenting (LEAP) program for teens conducted by Manpower Demonstration Research

is designed

5 0.00 0

S ta te o f O h io , O ffic e o f th e G o v e r n o r , C o lu m b u s , O h io

to be a c c e s s i b l e

Policy Academy for Ohio Family and Children First Initiative

2 5 .00 0

P a r m a d a le - S t. A n t h o n y Y o u t h S e rv ic e s V illa g e

to a n y c h i l d ,

Family Development Institute short-term intensive treatment service for children and their families

7 5 .00 0

P la n n e d P a r e n th o o d o f G r e a t e r C le v e la n d , In c .

including

Teen market research plan

9,515

J e w is h C o m m u n ity F e d e r a tio n o f C le v e la n d

those w ith

Volunteer recruitment and placement program, and child care scholarships (third year)

P o s itiv e E d u c a tio n P r o g r a m 73,380

Public television documentary on "Crisis of Care" by American Re-education Association

20.000

T h e J u n io r L e a g u e o f C le v e la n d , In c .

Consultant assistance for strategic plan

special needs.

5,000

L u th e r a n M e t r o p o lit a n M in is t r y A s s o c ia tio n

Linkage of the Gang Hotline with the Community Re-Entry Crisis Intervention Team Program

P ro v id e n c e H o u s e , In c .

Communications and marketing consultant (over three years) 38,000

6 0,000

P u b lic C h ild r e n S e rv ic e s A s s o c ia tio n o f O h io , C o lu m b u s , O h io

N .A .A .C .P . - C le v e la n d

African-American Family Day Picnic

5,000

Staff support to maximize reimbursements for the Department of Children and Family Services and Juvenile Court

3 5.20 0

N a tio n a l C e n t e r f o r C h ild r e n in P o v e r ty , N e w Y o rk , N e w Y o rk

United Way Services fellow from Columbia University

S a in t Ig n a tiu s H ig h S c h o o l 24,926

Youth Connection Project

2 5.20 0

N a t io n a l C o u n c il o f J e w is h W o m e n - C le v e la n d S e c tio n

Strategic plan (over three years)

82,000

T h e N a t io n a lit ie s S e rv ic e s C e n te r

Expansion of Language Bank services

40,000

N o r t h e a s t O h io C o a litio n f o r th e H o m e le s s

Operating support (second year)

30,000

43


S h o e s F o r K id s , In c .

Silver anniversary campaign

35,000

d e sig n a te d

grants

(The following recipients and programs were designated by donors. S t a r t i n g P o in t f o r C h ild C a r e a n d E a rly E d u c a tio n

Grants are for general support unless otherwise noted.)

Operating support (fourth year)

80,000 A c h ie v e m e n t C e n t e r f o r C h ild r e n

Equipment

T r a n s i t i o n a l H o u s in g , In c .

Project Second Chance (third year)

$16,245 28,594

46,700 A lc o h o lis m S e rv ic e s o f C le v e la n d , In c .

56

U n it e d W a y S e r v ic e s

Diversity training program for staff and agency executives

19,000

Marketing campaign for The Black Professionals Association

4,000

Operating support for Donated Goods Clearinghouse

5,000

A m e r ic a n B ib le S o c ie ty , N e w Y o r k , N e w Y o r k A m e r ic a n R ed C ro s s , G r e a t e r C le v e la n d C h a p te r B eech B ro o k

Staff support for The Greater Cleveland Committee on Hunger (over three years)

75,000

U n iv e r s it y S e t t le m e n t , In c .

B e lle fa ir e

518 6,371 45,126 6,954

B o y S c o u ts o f A m e r ic a , G r e a t e r C le v e la n d C o u n c il

Time Dollars pilot volunteer program (over two years)

47,900

V ie t n a m e s e C o m m u n it y in G r e a t e r C le v e la n d

Community education program for Vietnamese-American youth

N o. 440

137

B o ys a n d G ir ls C lu b s o f G r e a t e r C le v e la n d , In c . 1.300

C a th o lic C h a r itie s C o r p o r a t io n

Benefit of Parmadale-St. Anthony Youth Services Village W e s t S id e E c u m e n ic a l M i n is t r y

Family development program (second year)

30,000

C e n t e r f o r H u m a n S e rv ic e s

Counseling Division

248 37,490

W o m e n T o g e t h e r , In c .

Subsidized services for low-income women by The Center for Prevention of Domestic Violence

28,400

W om enS pace

Day Nursery Association of Cleveland

4,091

Family Preservation Program

2,000

C h ild G u id a n c e C e n te r

180

C h ild r e n F o r e v e r H a v e n

886

West S id e Ecum enical

Operating support for the Helpline Y o u n g M e n ’ s C h r is t ia n A s s o c ia t io n o f C le v e la n d

Emergency repair of swimming pools

7 0,000

T h e C h ild r e n ’ s A id S o c ie ty

Industrial Home T o t a l U n d e s ig n a t e d G r a n ts

372

M in is tr y teaches

67,033

$3,662,356

f a m i l i e s to

44


C h ild r e n ’ s S e rv ic e s

860

H e ig h ts B la u g r u n d L o d g e N o . I 152 B ’ n a i B ’ r i t h

1,615

T h e H ir a m H o u s e

1,981

S is te r s o f N o t r e D a m e

Physical education program for the Julie Billiart School C h r is t E p is c o p a l C h u r c h

1,103

12,203

S o c ie ty o f S t. V in c e n t d e P a u l T h e C h u rc h H o m e

6,706

T h e C h u r c h o f t h e S a v io u r , U n it e d M e t h o d is t

4,165

C le v e la n d C h r is t ia n H o m e , In c .

2,616

664

Je w is h C o m m u n ity F e d e r a tio n o f C le v e la n d

13,152

Research or any other purpose

13,992

S t a r r C o m m o n w e a lth f o r B o y s , A lb io n , M ic h ig a n

1,343

19,491

S u n s h in e C h ild r e n ’s H o m e , M a u m e e , O h io

1,000

Jo n e s H o m e o f C h ild r e n ’ s S e rv ic e s

Capital improvement

28,594 T h e T h r e e - C o r n e r - R o u n d P a c k O u t f i t , In c .

C it y o f C le v e la n d , D i r e c t o r o f P u b lic S a fe ty

Prevention of delinquency among boys

L a k e w o o d C h r is tia n C h u r c h

2,076

Camping program

L a k e w o o d U n ite d M e th o d is t C h u r c h

2,834

T r i n i t y C a th e d r a l

11,4 18

757 1,571

C o m m u n ity I n f o r m a t io n V o l u n t e e r A c t io n C e n t e r ( C lV A C )

2,741

T h e H a t t i e L a r lh a m F o u n d a tio n , In c ., M a n tu a , O h io

12,746

U n it e d A p p e a l o f A s h la n d C o u n ty , O h io , In c ., A s h la n d , O h io

C u y a h o g a C o u n t y D e p a r t m e n t o f H u m a n S e rv ic e s

Special client needs E a s t E n d N e ig h b o r h o o d H o u s e

L i t t l e S is te r s o f t h e P o o r

2,681

L u th e r a n A g e n c ie s O rg a n iz e d in S e rv ic e

1,935

372

U n it e d W a y o f G r e a t e r T o le d o , O h io

3,091

Needy and deserving families and children

569

S ilv e r S p r in g , M a r y la n d

4,037

O u r L a d y o f t h e W a y s id e , I n c o r p o r a t e d , A v o n , O h io

6,229

P a r m a d a le - S t. A n t h o n y Y o u th S e rv ic e s V illa g e

14,076

P la n n e d P a re n th o o d o f G r e a t e r C le v e la n d , In c .

103,451

1,673

T h e F ir s t C o n g r e g a t io n a l C h u r c h o f S o n o m a , C a lif o r n ia T h e F ir s t U n it e d M e th o d is t C h u r c h , A s h la n d , O h io G o o d w ill I n d u s t r ie s o f G r e a t e r C le v e la n d

137 5,206 939

S t. A n d r e w s U n it e d M e th o d is t C h u r c h , F in d la y , O h io

G r e a t e r C le v e la n d N e ig h b o r h o o d C e n te r s A s s o c ia t io n T h e H e b r e w F re e L o a n A s s o c ia tio n

R o s e -M a ry C e n t e r

3 8 2,0 1 3

6,706

11,160 M is s io n a ry S e rv a n ts o f t h e M o s t H o ly T r in it y ,

F e d e r a t io n f o r C o m m u n it y P la n n in g

1,000

U n it e d W a y S e rv ic e s M a ry c re s t S chool

F a ir m o u n t P r e s b y t e r ia n C h u r c h

2,6 03

2,633 115

10,076

V o c a tio n a l G u id a n c e S e rv ic e s

4 ,0 7 9

Assistance to needy clients of Sunbeam School

l ,000

Assistance to needy of Sunbeam School graduating class

1,000

W e s t S h o r e U n it a r ia n U n iv e r s a lis t C h u r c h

995

W e s t S id e D e u ts c h e r F ra u e n V e r e in , T h e A lt e n h e im

2 0 ,35 9

T h e Y o u n g M e n ’ s C h r is t ia n A s s o c ia tio n , A s h la n d , O h io

2,603

T h e Y o u n g M e n ’ s C h r is t ia n A s s o c ia tio n o f C le v e la n d

12,905

Lakewood Branch

7,14 9 14,297

S t. D o m in ic ’ s P a ris h

4,037

West Side Branch

S t. J o h n L u th e r a n C h u r c h

1,935

T h e Y o u n g W o m e n ’ s C h r is tia n A s s o c ia tio n

1,000

S t. M a r t in ’ s E p is c o p a l C h u r c h S t. T im o t h y E p is c o p a l C h u r c h , P e r r y s b u r g , O h io T h e S a lv a tio n A r m y T h e S a lv a tio n A r m y , A s h la n d , O h io

137 2,000

o f C le v e la n d

8,4 86

Lakewood Branch

7,14 9

Y o u th V is io n s , In c .

Big Brothers/Big Sisters Program

10,49 6

Big Buddy/Little Buddy Program

10,2 9 2

16,307 2,603 T o t a l D e s ig n a te d G r a n ts

$ 1,06 4,03 5

T h e S c o ttis h R ite B e n e v o le n t F o u n d a tio n , L e x in g to n , M a s s a c h u s e tts

137

T o t a l S o c ia l S e rv ic e s G r a n ts — D e s ig n a te d a n d U n d e s ig n a te d

S h a k e r H e ig h ts L o d g e N o . 4 5 F O P A s s o c ia te s

2,332

T h e S h a k e r O n e H u n d r e d , In c .

2,332

$ 4,726,391


Students visiting the L a k e la n d Area. C e n t e r f o r Science and M a them .a t i c s conduct im aginative e xp e rim e n ts that enhance their classroom education.

geographic f u n d s


I. d a le d o rn e y

fund

The D orn ey Fund was established as a tru s t fund o f The C leveland Foundation in 1977 to serve as a pe r­ manent charitable resource in Findlay and H ancock C oun ty. Established through a $5 million bequest from longtim e Findlay resident L. Dale D o rn e y , th e Fund to date has financed m ore than $3.4 million in grantmaking fo r programs in educa­ tio n , the arts, econom ic de velop­ ment, health and social services. D orney stipulated that 45 percent o f the Fund’s incom e be earmarked

the

I. d a l e

d o r n e y fu nd

$171,210

fo r tax-exem pt private (and in some cases governm ental) agencies in Findlay and Hancock County. The remaining 55 percent was designated to strengthen business education p ro ­ grams at colleges and universities across the state. Findlay-area grantmaking is overseen by a five-m em ber advisory body, the Findlay D istribu­ tion C om m ittee, which reviews grant applications on a quarterly basis and presents funding recommendations to The Cleveland Foundation's D istribu­ tio n C om m ittee fo r approval.

the

la k e - g e a u g a fu n d

$374,

In response to grow ing needs in Findlay and H ancock C oun ty, the Findlay-Hancock C ounty C om m unity Fund (FH C C F) o f The C leveland Foundation was established in I 992. This newly form ed supporting organi­ zation builds on current activities o f the D orney Fund and is governed by a nine-m em ber advisory board w hich w ill oversee all grantm aking and administration o f gifts. Grantmaking has been deferred until assets reach $ 1.5 m illion. Grants in 1993 supported a num ­ ber o f efforts including the Findlay Board o f Education’s Peer Coaching Program, a staff developm ent p ro ­ gram fo r interm ediate school teach­ ers. In cultural affairs, the Findlay Area Arts C ouncil received a grant to bring a variety o f visual and perform ing arts programs to the area. A $16,00 0 grant in civic affairs brought tog ethe r state, county and local resources to revitalize the Broadway area in d o w n ­ to w n Findlay.

4 7-


la k e-g ea u g a

fund

The Lake-Geauga Fund was established in 1987 in recognition o f G reater C leveland’s expanding geo­ graphic base and to help m eet the grow ing needs in Lake and Geauga counties. The fund made I 993

I. d a le d o rn e y f u n d

grants

F in d la y A r e a A r t s C o u n c il

The Findlay Distribution Committee The Hon. Allan H. Davis,

7,000

Artistic fees for programs F in d la y L ig h t O p e r a C o m p a n y

Chairperson

Production of Peter Pan in 1993-94 season

Rev. G. Terry Bard Lee R. Luff

9,800

H a n c o c k H is t o r ic a l M u s e u m A s s o c ia tio n

The Hon. Keith Romick

Research coordinator to compile information about women of Hancock County between 1815 and 1950

James W. Speck

4,290 $24,690

T o t a l C u lt u r a l A ffa ir s G ra n ts C I V I C A F F A IR S C i t y o f F in d la y

Landscape design plans for Broadway development

P R E C O L L EG I A T E E D U C A T I O N

$ 16,000 F in d la y B o a r d o f E d u c a tio n - F in d la y C it y S c h o o ls

H a n c o c k C o u n t y / C it y o f F in d la y J o in t R e c r e a tio n

Attendance by middle school educators at inter­ disciplinary curriculum workshop

D is tr ic t

Community recreational needs assessment and feasibility study

17,000

H a n c o c k P a r k s F o u n d a tio n

Professional design services for "Wild Encounters" display at Oakwood Nature Preserves

Consultant assistance and workshop expenses for Peer Coaching Program at Washington Intermediate School (over two years) Consultant assistance for strategic plan

7,600

20,000

20,000 T o t a l P r e c o lle g ia te E d u c a tio n G r a n ts

T o t a l C iv ic A f f a ir s G r a n t s

$16,000

$43,600

$53,000 S P E C IA L P H I L A N T H R O P I C

S E R V IC E S

C U L T U R A L A F F A IR S T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n ( In c .) B o w lin g G r e e n S t a te U n iv e r s it y , B o w lin g

Operating budget of the L. Dale Dorney Fund

$49,920

T o t a l S p e c ia l P h ila n t h r o p ic S e rv ic e s G r a n t

$49,920

G r e e n , O h io

Teaching artist residencies in Hancock County by Arts Unlimited

$3,600 T o t a l L. D a le D o r n e y F u n d G ra n ts

4-S

$171,210

grants totaling $374,121. The fund is managed by a seven-m em ber advi­ sory com m ittee o f area residents w h o review grant proposals fro m nonprofit organizations in the tw o counties and make funding recommendations to The Cleveland Foundation’s Distribution Com m ittee. Education and the protection o f greenspace are consistent themes in the fund’s grantmaking, but sup­ port is also provided fo r health, social services, cul­ tural affairs, civic affairs and economic development. A num ber o f innovative educational projects w ere supported in 1993. A grant to the Lake C ounty Board o f Education funded a collaborative e ffort w ith Lake M etroparks and H olden A rb o r­ etum to expand a model science program to fifth graders in the Lake and Geauga public schools. The program, which in previous years brought third and fou rth grade students and th e ir teachers to a Science and Math Center, w ill n o w add an “o u td o o r laboratory” fo r environm ental education. A nother Lake-Geauga Fund grant supported a pilot Teacher-to-Teacher mentorship program in the Madison Local Schools, enabling younger teach­ ers to receive informal guidance from a retired teacher serving as a consultant to the district. O ne o f the m ore unusual projects funded in I 993 involved the com m unity’s efforts to acquire the 415-acre M e ntor Lagoons property fo r public purposes. Funds w ere allocated by the C om m ittee to support a task force charged w ith sorting o u t the legal, environm ental and econom ic com plexities involved in purchasing this section o f the Lake Erie shoreline abutting the M e ntor Marsh State N ature Preserve. Critical assistance was provided to the Geauga C om m unity Mental Health Board to establish a therapeutic foster care program in w hich children w ith serious em otional and behavioral problem s are counseled locally w ithin foster homes, rather than in costly, ou t-of-coun ty institutions.


L a k e E d u c a tio n a l A s s is ta n c e F o u n d a tio n

L a k e C o u n ty M e n ta l H e a lth C e n te r

Operating support (fourth year)

Construction of a children’s wing

L e a r n in g A b o u t B u s in e s s

Interactional education/support program for preschool-age children with behavior problems and their families

5 ,00 0

Public awareness on mental health issues and services

3,90 0

General support

20,000

M a d is o n L o c a l S c h o o ls

Pilot Teacher-to-Teacher mentor program

5,000

L a k e C o u n ty S o c ie ty f o r R e h a b ilit a t io n o f C h ild r e n a n d A d u lt s

T o t a l P r e c o lle g ia te E d u c a tio n G r a n ts

la k e -g e a u g a fu n d The Lake-Geauga Committee John Sherwin Jr.

grants

$50,500

Chairperson (completed, term March 1994)

Local match to purchase facility

L a k e E rie C o lle g e $8,370

Bereavement training program for volunteers in Geauga County

15,000

T o t a l H e a lth G ra n ts

1,000

S O C I A L S E R V IC E S

Options for Women program (second year)

Philip L. Krug

(appointed April 1994 )

$73,751

M o r le y L ib r a r y

Molly Offutt

General support

James F. Patterson

T o t a l H ig h e r E d u c a tio n G r a n ts

$24,370

B o y S c o u ts o f A m e r ic a , N o r t h e a s t O h io C o u n c il, N o . 463

C IV IC A F F A IR S

General support

$ 50 0

S C H O L A R S H IP S

T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n ( In c .) $5,000

H a b i t a t o f P a in e s v ille

T o t a l C iv ic A f f a ir s G r a n ts

2,68 0

L a k e la n d C o m m u n ity C o lle g e

Arlene M . Holden

General support

7,00 0

V i s it in g N u r s e S e r v ic e , A k r o n , O h io

Implementation of strategic plan

James K. Collins Jr.

Task force activities toward Mentor Lagoons acquisition

1,000

S e m i- In d e p e n d e n t L iv in g P r o g r a m o f L a k e C o u n t y H IG H E R E D U C A T I O N

Charles P. Raker Jr.

John J. Monroe

General support

1,000

$ 6,000

C a m p S ue O s b o rn T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n ( In c .)

General support

General scholarships for residents of Painesville area not attending Lake Erie College

$45,000

1,000

100,000 L a k e E rie G ir l S c o u t C o u n c il

General support

L a k e E rie C o lle g e

Scholarship support for Painesville area students

C U L T U R A L A F F A IR S

L a k e C o u n ty Y M C A

General support

Scholarships for third- and fourth-year medical students from Lake and Geauga counties attending Ohio schools

500

500

10,000 O h io 4 - H F o u n d a tio n

T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n ( In c . )

Lake Erie Fine Arts Series

$ 6,000

5,000

Institute for Leadership Action at Case Western Reserve University

1,000

General support

L a k e la n d C o m m u n ity C o lle g e

Scholarship support for Painesville area students

C le v e la n d P u b lic R a d io

T h e P h illip s - O s b o r n e S c h o o l

Capital enhancement project to improve reception in Lake County

Scholarship support for needy students

U n it e d W a y o f L a k e C o u n ty , In c .

Volunteer Action Center T o t a l S c h o la r s h ip G r a n ts

Y o u n g M e n ’ s C h r is tia n A s s o c ia tio n o f C le v e la n d 5,000

Start-up support for the Outback Teen Center at Centerville

HEALTH T o t a l C u lt u r a l A f fa ir s G r a n ts

1,000

20,000

$161,000

L a k e C o u n t y H is t o r ic a l S o c ie ty

General support

10,000

9,000

$16,000 A lz h e im e r ’ s D is e a s e a n d R e la te d D is o r d e r s

T o t a l S o c ia l S e rv ic e s G r a n ts

$4 2 ,5 0 0

A s s o c ia tio n , In c . P R E C O L L E G IA T E E D U C A T IO N

Programming in Lake and Geauga counties (third year)

L a k e C o u n t y B o a r d o f E d u c a tio n

G e a u g a C o m m u n ity M e n ta l H e a lth B o a r d , A lc o h o l &

Expansion of programming at Lakeland Area Center for Science and Mathematics to all fifth grade students in Lake and Geauga counties (over tw o years)

Therapeutic foster care program by Geauga County Children's Cluster

$9, 17 1

T o t a l L a k e -G e a u g a F u n d G r a n ts

$374,121

D r u g A d d ic t io n S e rv ic e s $30,000

2 5,000

4.0


The F o u n d a tio n C enter Libra ry's C leveland office serves as a valuable resource to n o n p r o f i t organizations seeking grants.

specmiphilanthropic services


5 R A

The Cleveland Foundation is the nation's second largest com m unity foundation, a leader in philanthropy, and the largest funder in O hio. In each of those roles, the Foundation seeks to prom ote effective grantmaking by supporting services to grantseekers and to oth er charitable funders. Grantmakers Forum, w hich has been supported by the Foundation since 1985, is an association o f staff and trustees o f foundations and c o r­ porate giving programs. A 1993 high­ light was publication o f the Survey of Foundation and Corporate Giving in Cuyahoga, Geauga, Lake, Lorain and Summit Counties, a jo in t project o f the Forum and the G reater Cleveland G ro w th Association. The re p o rt offered first-ever data on grantmaking by field o f interest. The Forum also provided educational and netw orking opportunities fo r funders through 26 meetings, programs and workshops. The Foundation provides addi­ tional service to regional grantmakers and grantseeking nonprofit organiza­

tions throug h its sup port o f the Foundation C enter's Cleveland office, the Kent H. Smith Library. The library served m ore than 12,600 persons in 1993. All libra ry materials w e re reclassified to link w ith oth er Foun­ dation C enter libraries nationwide in an on-line catalog. There was sub­ stantial grow th in the Friends o f the Library, and Take it for Granted!, an occasional publication fo r Friends, was launched. The A n isfie ld -W o lf M em orial Aw ard fo r Outstanding C om m unity Service was presented to Cleveland W orks, a program established in 1986 to help individuals move from welfare to full-tim e em ploym ent. The program offers jo b training, jo b place­ m ent and comprehensive family ser­ vices, all under one ro o f and free of charge. In 1993, 293 C leveland W orks graduates w ere placed in full­ tim e jobs. The $10,000 prize is sup­ ported by the Foundation and admin­ istered by the Federation fo r C o m ­ m unity Planning.

s p e c ia l p h ila n t h r o p ic s e rv ic e s

grants

B u s in e s s V o lu n t e e r is m C o u n c il

Start-up support (over tw o years)

$ 1 5 5 ,0 0 0

C a se W e s te r n R e s e rv e U n iv e r s it y

Conference of Corporate Executives/Corporate Philanthropy Officers and Scholars

5.00 0

Start-up support for the Ohio Database of Nonprofit Organizations

3 0.00 0

C le v e la n d D e v e lo p m e n t F o u n d a tio n

Volunteer Trustee Institute feasibility study for the Business Volunteerism Council

5.0 0 0

T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n ( In c .)

Grantmakers Forum

7 1.000

Operating budget of The Cleveland Foundation for the year 1994

1,134,000

C o u n c il o n F o u n d a tio n s , W a s h in g to n , D .C .

Consultant assistance for the Committee on Community Foundations

2,80 0

Critical Needs Project, a special initiative for community foundations (over tw o years)

20.000

Preservation of papers of philanthropic visionary Dr. Paul Ylvisaker

3.00 0

D o n o r s F o r u m o f O h io , C o lu m b u s , O h io

Operating support (over three years)

30.0 00

T h e F o u n d a tio n C e n t e r , N e w Y o r k , N e w Y o r k N

T

S

u n d e s ig n a te d g r a n ts

$4,696,300

to ta l

grants

$4,696,300

Operating support of The Foundation Center - Cleveland

9 2 .00 0

T h e L im a C o m m u n ity F o u n d a tio n , L im a , O h io

Transfer of funds to The Dayton Foundation

143,500

W o m e n & F o u n d a tio n s /C o r p o r a te P h ila n t h r o p y , N e w Y o rk , N e w Y o rk

Operating support T o t a l U n d e s ig n a te d G r a n ts

5.00 0 $ 4 ,6 9 6 ,3 0 0


The com m unity foundation concept is both simple and ingenious: a perm a­ nent e n d o w m e n t b u ilt o v e r tim e through gifts o f all sizes, designed to carry out the charitable interests of donors and respond to needs in the com m unity. The grants listed in this annual re p o rt w ere made possible through the generosity o f countless donors w h o wished to provide fo r the future o f G reater Cleveland, Because many donors have made unrestricted gifts, The Cleveland Foundation enjoys an unusual degree o f fle x ib ility in responding to com m unity needs. In oth er cases, donors have elected to specify a concern - such as the elder­ ly, disadvantaged children, o r educa­ tion - to w hich the income fro m the ir gifts is targeted. Still o th e r donors have designated specific organizations as beneficiaries o f th e ir funds. D onors may create a fund at the Foundation w ith a num ber o f different

m arjorie m. carlson

m ich aelj. hoffm ann

Director of Donor Relations

Director o f Philanthropic Services

Marge Carlson is the pri­ mary liaison to current and prospective donors to the Foundation. Prior to joining the staff in 1986, she served in several vol­ unteer leadership posts, including the presidency of The Junior League of Cleveland. She is a trustee of the Northern Ohio Planned Giving Council, Musical Arts Association, Judson Retirement Community, Playhouse Square Foundation, and The College of Wooster, her undergraduate alma mater. She is a member of the steering committee of ADNET, a national network of development officers at community foundations. She holds a master's degree in speech pathology from Case Western Reserve University.

Michael Hoffmann serves as principal staff to the Foundation's LakeGeauga Fund, to five of the seven supporting organizations, or affiliated funds, and to three donoradvisor funds. Prior to joining the Foundation's staff as administrative offi­ cer in 19 8 1, he was trea­ surer of the Cleveland City School District. He has helped plan and develop operations of the Puerto Rico Community Foundation since its inception in 1985. A life­ long Cleveland resident, he holds a master's degree in business administration from Case Western Reserve University.

d a re corrigan woidke Donor Relations Associate Clare Corrigan Woidke, the Foundation's first donor relations associate, most recently served as alumni fund director at John Carroll University. She also is a former director of development at Cleveland’s Magnificat High School. She is a past board member of the American College of Nurse-Midwives and a current board member of the Northern Ohio Planned Giving Council. She holds a bachelor of arts in English from Georgetown University and is pursuing a master of nonprofit organizations at the Mandel Center of Case Western Reserve University.

gift vehicles.

5.3


T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a t io n

gift guidelines

Gifts to The Cleveland Foundation may be made with a variety of assets, including cash, securities, real estate and other personal property. Gifts of any size are welcome.

Types of funds that can be established' may be established w ith a m inim um gift o f $10,000. These funds may carry any name the d o n o r desires.

perm a n en t n am ed fun d s

may be established w ith a $50,00 0 m inim um contribution. Additional gifts of any size may be added to increase the fund’s value and grantmaking potential. The donor-advisor may make grant recom m en­ dations annually on up to 6 percent o f the fund's m arket value. Up to 20 percent o f the grant rec­ om m end ation s may be dire cted outside the G reater Cleveland area. The do nor-advisor fund exists fo r the lifetime o f the d o n o r and spouse, o r 25 years, w hichever is longer. The named fund then continues in perpe­ tu ity as unrestricted endow m ent o f The Cleveland Foundation fo r charitable purposes. If the fund is established at $250,000 o r more, the donor-advisor's children may continue making grant recom m endations fo r th e ir lifetimes. d o n o r *a d v i s o r

54-

fun d s

s u p p o r t i n g o r g a n i z a t i o n s allow a family o r private foundation to create a special fund w ithin The Cleveland Foundation and stiil maintain the ir dis­ tinctive grantmaking identity. The fund may be cre­ ated w ith assets o f $2 million o r more. The supporting organization has its ow n board of trustees appointed by the d o n o r and the D istribution C om m ittee o f the Foundation; the assets are managed by a trustee bank o r invest­ m ent manager o f the donor's choice.

Planned gift vehicles The Cleveland Foundation offers donors a variety o f planned gift vehicles they may choose in the ir estate planning and charitable giving arrangements. Some o f these w ill provide life income. in a w ill are the simplest and most often used planned gifts. They direct a fixed num ber of dollars o r percentage o f assets to The Cleveland Foundation fo r grantmaking. beq uests

r e m a i n d e r t r u s t s , normally established w ith assets o f $100,000 o r m ore, are an arrange­ m ent between the d o nor and a trustee o f his o r her choosing, usually a bank. Property is trans­ ferred to the trust but the d o nor retains the right to receive its income. c h a r it a b l e

There are tw o types o f these trusts: the charita­ ble rem ainder annuity trust, w hich provides a fixed payout o f trust assets, and the charitable rem ainder unitrust, which provides a variable payout. A fter the d o n o r’s lifetime, the principal is distrib­ uted to The Cleveland Foundation and used to establish a perm anent fund in the donor's name. The d o n o r may indicate ho w the fund's income should be directed, p o o l e d i n c o m e f u n d is a fund estab­ lished by The Cleveland Foundation in w hich gifts are “ pooled" fo r investment and administrative purposes, w ith incom e shared p roportiona tely among the donors. A minimum gift o f $10,000 is required to partici­ pate in this fund, which, like the gift annuity, provides life income. The amount o f income is based on the number o f shares held and fund performance. Upon the death o f the d o n o r o r donors, these shares are used to establish a perm anent fund at the Foundation. Income from this fund is then dis­ trib uted to nonprofits o f the donor's choice. c o m m u n it y

g i f t a n n u i t i e s , w hich are simple legal agreements between a d o n o r and the Foundation, may be established w ith a m inim um gift o f $ 10,000. In exchange fo r a gift o f assets, the Foundation promises to pay the d o nor a lifetime incom e. A fter death, the Foundation receives any unused portion o f the gift fo r unrestricted grantmaking. c h a r it a b l e

is another vehicle used to make charitable gifts. The d o nor secures a policy in the usual m anner and names The C leveland Foundation as the o w n e r and beneficiary. Upon redem ption, a perm anent named fund is estabished in the d o n o r’s name. A minim um face value o f $25,000 is required to use life insurance as a gift vehicle. D onors may use an existing policy by transferring the ow nership and beneficiary status to The Cleveland Foundation. c h a r i t a b l e l if e i n s u r a n c e


Goff S o cie ty The G off Society recognizes the generosity o f living donors w ho have established permanent named funds o f over $10,000, donor-advisor funds, o r supporting organizations.

Legacy S o cie ty The Legacy Society recognizes those individuals w h o plan to leave a mark on th e ir com m unity through a planned gift in the form o f bequests, trusts, pooled income funds, life insurance o r charitable gift annuities.

Ruth E. Adom eit Mrs. William Harry Alexander Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Broadbent Lenore V. Buford, Ph.D. David and Ginger Campopiano Corning Chisholm James M. and Ann M. Delaney

Philip R. Uhlin

Ruth E. Adom eit

Charlotte S. Levy

Jim and Isabelle Dunlap

Paul and Sonja Unger

Lewis and Ruth Affelder

Eleanor M. and Wayne H. Lewis

Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas J. Federico

Hon. and Mrs. George V. Voinovich

Robert E. Bingham

Mr. and Mrs. G. Russell Lincoln

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Garda

Mrs. Peter W ellman

Jeannette W . Brewer

Charles R. McDonald

Sally K. Griswold

Mrs. Michael A. W ipper

Lenore V. Buford, Ph. D.

Steven and D olly Minter

Holsey Gates Handyside

Mrs. Samuel W olp ert

Marge and Harry Carlson

A rthur P. Moebius

Dr. and Mrs. S. W . Hartwell Jr.

Robert J. and Janet G. Yaroma

Mary C. Carter

Mary B. Moon

Beverly G. and Albert M. Higley Jr.

Anonymous (12)

Richard H. and Cathy L. Crabtree

J. Howard Morris Jr.

Arlene and A rthur S. Holden

Philip Dawson

James A. (Dolph) and Fay-Tyler N orton

Eleanor M. Lewis and Wayne H. Lewis

Patricia Jansen Doyle

John F. O ’Brien

Robert R. Lucas

Doris Anita Evans, M .D.

Barbara H, Patterson

Mrs. Leonard G. Martien

Helen V. Fitzhugh

Catherine and James Pender

Charles R. McDonald

Virginia Q. Foley

William Hughes Roberts

Thornton D. and Penny P. McDonough

Mary Louise and Richard Hahn

James L. Ryhal Jr.

Mrs. John P. McWilliams and

Holsey Gates Handyside

Henry W. Sciulli

Mary Jane D. Hartwell

Mr. and Mrs. Edward W . Sloan Jr.

William A. and Margaret N. Mitchell

Beverly G. and Albert M. Higley Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H. Thomas

Lindsay J. and David T. M orgenthaler

Flora D. Hirsohn

Anonymous (3)

James A. (Dolph) N o rton and

Michael J. Hoffmann

As o f A pril 25, 1994

W . J. Barlow McWilliams

Fay-Tyler N orton

The Foundation also w elcom es into The G off Society th e follow ing organizations and co rp o ra tio n s that have established funds at The Cleveland Foundation: American Cancer Society, O hio Division Incorporated City o f Cleveland Cuyahoga County Public Library The Forest City Hospital Foundation The G oodrich Social Settlement

Ronald D. Holman

George J. Picha

Elizabeth W . and William M. Jones

Victoire and Alfred M. Rankin Jr.

Intermuseum Conservation Association

Virginia L. Jones

W illiam Hughes Roberts

The Junior League o f Cleveland, Inc.

Norm an F. and Sandra L. Klopp

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Roulston

Elizabeth D. Kondorossy

Henry W . Sciulli

The Lincoln Electric Foundation

Mrs. Ellery Sedgwick Jr.

N o rthern O hio Opera

Mr. and Mrs. John Sherwin Jr.

N orthw est Emergency Team

Mr. and Mrs. Edward W . Sloan Jr.

O hio Bell/Ameritech

Mrs. Kent H. Smith

St. James A.M.E. Church

Russell H. and Gretchen H. Smith

Scholarship-ln-Escrow

(Children's Theatre)

Mr. james P. Storer

United Way Services

Dudley J. Taw

W om en's General Hospital

Mrs. William C. Treuhaft

As o f A pril 25, 1994


S U M M A R Y

OF

F U N D S

$9,747,841

n e w p e r m a n e n t fu n d s

764,035

a d d it io n s t o p e r m a n e n t fu n d s

new

gifts

T he $37 m illion in grants reflected in this re p o rt w e re made possible by the generous continuing support o f pub­ lic-spirited Cleveland individuals, fami­ lies and corporations. W e are pleased to re p o rt tha t in 1993 m ore than $ 13 million was received in new dona­ tions. The largest single gift, $6.8 m il­ lion, came fro m the transfer to The Cleveland Foundation o f Scholarshipin-Escrow funds.

I I 1,750

a g e n c y e n d o w m e n t fu n d s

20,986

a d d it io n a l g ifts

26,000

n e w p r o je c t a c c o u n ts a d d it io n s t o

I 3 I ,568

p r o j e c t a c c o u n ts

1.357,500

n e w d o n o r - a d v i s o r fu n d s a d d it io n s t o d o n o r - a d v i s o r fu n d s

473,665

n e w s u p p o r t in g o r g a n i z a t io n

309,500

a d d it io n s t o s u p p o r t in g o r g a n i z a t io

103,065 $1 3,045,9 10

t o t a l o f n e w g ifts

new permanent funds R uth E. A d o m e it P ooled Incom e Fund, $ 2 5 ,0 0 0 t

D onor: Ruth E. Adomeit U se o f R em ain der: To be added to The

C a th y L. C ra b tre e Insu ran ce F und, $ 7 ,5 0 0 *

D onors: Cathy L. and Richard H. Crabtree Use o f in com e: Designated to Baldwin-Wallace College, Bay United Methodist Church, Youngstown State University Foundation, and the remainder for unrestricted charitable

Adomeit Fund

purposes

M a ry K. and R o b e rt R. B ro a d b e n t Salvation

A lzada S ingleton D avis F und, $ 1 0 ,0 0 0

A rm y E n d o w m e n t Fund, $1 0 ,2 7 6

D onors: Robert R. and Mary K. Broadbent Use o f incom e: Designated for The Salvation Army of Greater Cleveland

D onor: Lenore V. Buford Use o f incom e: An award for academic excel­ lence to be given to an African-American woman at the Cuyahoga Community College Metropolitan Campus matriculating at an upper-division college or university


John F. O ’B rie n C h a rita b le R em ainder U n itru s t, $ I 3 ,4 3 5 *

D onor: John F. O ’Brien Use o f R em ain der: Designated

I /4 Outright to Georgetown University, I /4 to St. Edward High School, and the remainder is restricted to agencies in the Greater Cleveland area that provide alcoholism and drug addiction services R einh old W . E ric k s o n F und, $ 3 7 0 ,0 04

D onor: Estate of Reinhold W. Erickson U se o f in com e: To assist churches along Interstate 7 1 in lighting their steeples, and the remainder for health education B e tty H . and Jean E. F a irfax F und, $1 0 ,0 0 0

D onors: Betty H. and Jean E. Fairfax U se o f incom e: To support collaborative pro­

T h e V irg in ia L. Jones C h a rita b le R em ainder U n itru s t, $ 7 8 ,4 3 1 *

D onor: Virginia L. Jones Use o f R em ain der: Designated

1/2 each for 10 years to The Garden Center of Cleveland and Beck Center for the Cultural Arts and at the end of 10 years the assets remaining will be used for unrestricted charitable purposes

grams between public community colleges and universities that demonstrate success in enabling African-American students in Greater Cleveland to obtain baccalaureate degrees

D onor: Norman F. Klopp Family Fund U se o f Incom e: Unrestricted charitable

H elen V. F itz h u g h G ift A n n u ity , $ 5 ,0 3 4 *

Leslie and E liza b e th D . K o n d o ro ssy

D onor: Helen V. Fitzhugh Use o f R em ain der: Unrestricted charitable

Sandra L. K lo p p Insurance Fund, $ 19,592+

purposes

C h a rita b le R e m ainder U n itru s t, $ 7 1 ,8 2 7 *

purposes

D onor: Elizabeth D. Kondorossy U se o f R em ain der: Designated 1/3 each for

D ouglas P. H a n dyside M e m o ria l

The Musical Arts Association, Oberlin College and Judson Retirement Community

F und, $ 1 0 ,0 9 9

D onors: Barbara G. Handyside and Ambassador Holsey Gates Handyside Use o f incom e: Designated for the Southeast Family YMCA

Frances D o o little Lesser C o m m u n ity P ooled In co m e Fund, $1 0 ,0 0 0

D onor: Frances Doolittle Lesser U se o f R em ain der: Designated for The Hathaway Brown School Endowment Fund

H e ig h ts Y o u th C e n te r F und, $ 2 5 ,6 8 7

D onors: Helen and Gordon Anderson, A.W. and Joanne Benkendorf, Robert V, and Roberta F. Bergstrom, Armine G. Cuber, Nancy J. and Richard C. Dietrich, Gaetana Friedman, Suzanne Halbe, Virginia A. and Alan B. Kuper, Mafalda McNamara, Nancy H. and Patrick J. O'Connor, Susan R. and Lawrence j. Rakow, Thomas M. and Geraldine H. Rask, Mary W. Rautenberg, Paul and Alice R. Rolnick, Celia Ryder, Alice and Albert Stratton, Gordon B. Wean, Frederick B. and Diana M. Woodbridge, and June C. Wortman U se o f in com e: Designated for The Heights Youth Center

Leo n a rd G. M a rtie n Fund, $32 ,5 1 9

D onor: Phyllis M. Martien U se o f incom e: Designated

1/3 to Planned Parenthood of Greater Cleveland and the remainder to support programs in daycare and early childhood development

J. H o w a rd and Josephine L. M o rris G ift A n n u ity , $ 7 4 ,2 6 1*

D onor: J. Howard Morris Use o f R em ain der: Unrestricted charitable

V ic to ire and A lfre d M . Rankin Jr. Fund $ 3 ,0 9 7 to w a rd a pledge o f $10 ,0 0 0

D onors: Victoire and Alfred M. Rankin Jr. Use o f incom e: Unrestricted charitable purposes R oulston Fam ily Fund N o . 3, $ 14 ,3 4 1f

additions to permanent funds C ha rle s R ieley A rm in g to n F u nd, $ 3 6 ,0 0 0

D onor:

Elizabeth Rieley Armington

H elen and Ira J. B irc h e r F und, $ 6 0 ,0 0 0

D onor: Roulston Family Fund No. 2 Use o f incom e: Unrestricted charitable

D onors:

purposes

Judge L illia n W . B u rk e S ch o la rs h ip F u nd, $75

D onor:

Helen and Ira J. Bircher

The Honorable Lillian W . Burke

S ch o la rs h ip -in -E s c ro w Fund, $ 6 ,8 3 8 ,7 6 8

D onor: Scholarship-ln-Escrow Use o f incom e: To pay scholarship funds to post-secondary institutions of learning on behalf of students from the Cleveland Public Schools with credits earned under the Scholarship-ln-Escrow program

T h e C h ild re n 's T h e a tre E n d o w m e n t F und in m e m o ry o f W illia m J. B ra ttin , $50

D onors:

Norman J. and Renee L. Snow

A r th u r F. and G ladys D . C o n n a rd Fund, $2 3 ,8 7 5

D onor:

Gladys D. Connard

M ild re d S. T a y lo r Fund, $ 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0

D onor: Mildred S. Taylor Use o f incom e: Unrestricted charitable purposes

*These amounts are not included in The Cleveland Foundation financial statements. *The value of certain planned gifts is list­ ed at their charitable tax deduction level, as determined by the Internal Revenue Service.

H a r ry C o u lb y F und N o . 2, $ 5 ,0 0 0

D onor:

The Interlake Steamship Company

C uyahoga C o u n ty P u b lic L ib ra ry E n d o w m e n t F und, $495

D onor:

Cuyahoga County Public Library

James M . and A n n M . D ela n e y F und, $ 2 ,5 0 0 to w a rd a pledge o f $ 5 ,0 0 0

D onors: James M. and Ann

M. Delaney

T h e V in ce F e d e ric o M e m o ria l F u nd, $2 8,651

D onors: Vincent Federico Memorial Golf Tournament and The Arnold L. and Gerrie R. King Philanthropic Fund of The Jewish Community Federation of Cleveland

purposes T h e N o r th w e s t E m ergency Team Fund, $ 1 7 0 ,0 0 0

D onor:

Northwest Emergency Team, Incorporated Scholarships for children of police officers, firefighters and emergency services personnel in six west side suburbs

U se o f incom e:

.‘57'


agency endowment funds

T h e Fenn E d u c a tio n a l F und, $3 00

D onor:

Northeast Ohio Ford Dealers Advertising Fund, Incorporated

D e m e tra A. S ciulli Fund, $ 21,03 I

D onor:

Henry W. Sciulli

T h e H o ls e y G ates R esidence P re s e rv a tio n Fund, $15,01 I

D onor: Ambassador Holsey Gates Handyside

Josephine R. and E d w a rd W . Sloan Jr. Fund, $ 6,269

D onor:

Edward W. Sloan Jr.

A gnes E. M e y e r H e rz o g F und, $ 2 5 0

D onor:

Barbara H. Patterson

T a w Fam ily Salvation A rm y E n d o w m e n t Fund, $22,483

T h e La ke-G eauga F und, $ 3 0 ,1 0 0

D onors:

D onor:

Dudley J. and Louise Taw

Arthur S. and Arlene M. Holden, and Virginia Lois Kennedy

A m os B u rt and Jeanne L. T h o m p so n

D o n a ld W . M c In ty re F und, $ 4 2 ,5 9 4

D onor:

Fund, $ 1 ,0 0 0

D onor:

Neil L. Thompson

Estate of Donald W. McIntyre M o lly A gnes V o in o v ic h M e m o ria l

T h e N o r th e r n O h io O p e ra F und, $500

Fund. $ 1,055

D onor:

D onors:

Perkins Charitable Foundation

F a y -T y le r M u rra y N o r to n F und, $75

D onor:

Eleanor R. Gerson

Jane E. Conroy, Arthur and Sara J. Kobacker, Nick and Patricia A. Tomino, Donald and Nancy Vickers, and Josephine B. Voinovich

P rin c e to n U rb a n S tu die s F e llo w s h ip

T h e H o m e r C. W a d s w o rth A w a rd , $289

F und, $ 9 ,3 16 to w a r d ple dg es o f $ 10 , 0 16

D onors:

D on o rs:

Bruce H. Akers, John E. Becker, James R. Bright, Ann and George B. Chapman Jr., Helen T. Clements, S. Sterling McMillan, Thomas A. Quintrell, Robert H. Rawson Jr., Elizabeth H. Rose, Dorothy R. and Henry E. Seibert IV, Wilbur J. Shenkjr., and Margaret N. and David W. Sloan

Robert E. Eckardt and Richard F. Tompkins

The Cleveland Foundation holds and manages the endowm ents fo r a num ber o f nonprofit agencies in the C leveland area, annually directing the income o f the funds to the organizations fo r th e ir unre­ stricted use. The follow ing no n­ p ro fit organizations established agency endow m ent funds at the Foundation in o rd e r to. receive gifts fro m individuals interested in the long-term financial stability o f these agencies. These funds may also receive th e principal o f C o m ­ m unity Pooled Income Fund gifts after a d o n o r’s lifetime. In 1993, n e w agency e n d o w m e n t funds totaled $1 I 1,750.

new agency endowment funds

Fund, $ 4 5 3 ,9 1 6

D onors:

Estate of Dorothy L. Hofrichter and The Women’s Hospital Association of Cleveland

American Red Cross, The G reater Cleveland Chapter Fund The Children's Theatre Endowment Fund The Cleveland Hearing and Speech Center Fund The Cleveland Institute o f A rt Fund Cuyahoga County Public Library Endowment Fund Hathaway Brown School Endowment Fund The Catherine Horstmann Home Endowment Fund The Intermuseum Conservation Association Endowment Fund The Benjamin Rose Institute Fund Friends and Members Endowment Fund o f St. James A.M.E. Church The Salvation Arm y o f G reater Cleveland Endowment Fund The Endowment Fund fo r United

American Red Cross, The Greater

Way Services

Cleveland Chapter Fund Hathaway Brown School Endowment Fund The Catherine Horstmann Home

T h e W o m e n ’s G e n e ra l H o s p ita l

established agency endowment funds

Endowment Fund The Benjamin Rose Institute Fund Friends and Members Endowment Fund

additional gifts T h e C leveland F o u n d a tio n A d m in is tra tiv e Fund. $ 5,000

D onor: Bank One Ohio Trust Company, NA Use o f G ift: To underwrite Frederick Harris Goff Philanthropic Leadership Dinner

of St. James A.M.E. Church Field o f In te re s t Fund, $263

Donor:

Mark Bresler Enterprises, Incorporated in the name of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, Forest City Management Company and Statler Office Tower Use o f G ift: To benefit local social service agencies 58


permanent funds of the Cleveland foundation L ife Insurance F o u n d a tio n E n d o w m e n t (L IF E ). $ 1 ,1 68

D onors:

Mark W. Hicks, Ronald D. Holman, Gerhard M. Kuechle, James H. Parkhurst, James R. Pender, Kenneth E. Pike, and John R. Telich Sr.

Use o f G ifts:

Additional contributions toward establishment of a donor-advisor fund Y o u th C ha lle ng e E n d o w m e n t, $ 2,50 0

D onor: Youth Challenge Use o f G ift: Initial contribution toward estab­ lishment of an agency endowment fund

Thousands o f donors have con­ tributed to The Cleveland Foun­ dation since its creation in 1914, often through bequests, but also through gifts o f life insurance poli­ cies, stocks, bonds and real estate. Following is a listing o f the perm a­ nent named funds of the Foundation.

perm anent funds Morris Abrams Fund The Adom eit Fund

U n re s tric te d G ifts , $ 12 ,0 0 5 to w a rd s

Ruth E. Adom eit Fund

pledges o f $1 2,05 5

Lewis and Ruth Affelder Fund

D onors:

American Asset Management Company, Marjorie M. Carlson, Clyde A. Case III, Theodora P. Dakin, Gregory T. Holtz, Society Management Company, Madge Umlauf, Joel Wachs, Mary F. (Ky) Wilson, James P. and Clare C. Woidke In m e m o ry o f R aym ond Q . A rm in g to n

D onors:

Marge and Harry Carlson, and Robert D. Gries

Rhoda L. Affelder Fund Wickham H. Aldrich Fund Rob Roy Alexander Fund The William Harry Alexander Fund The Aloy Memorial Scholarship Fund The Dr. David Alsbacher Fund for Medical Research Raleigh F. Andrie Memorial Fund The George and May Margaret

In m e m o ry o f M ich ae l Ryan G ud in

D onors:

Ben Alexander, Eileen Behr, BMG Music, Chris Carsillo, Tony Catalano, Renee DeMarco, Steve Fritsky, Eric Kenney, Lillian M. Kozan, Annmarie Milhard, Michael K. Sheehan, Sami Valkonen, and David M. WolthofF In h o n o r o f th e m a rria g e o f Lind a J. O ’B rie n and M a rtin A . C o y le

D onors:

William H. and Betsy A, Steinbrink

In m e m o ry o f S a n fo rd S. and M a rc e lle K. S c h nu rm ac h er

D onor:

Estate o f Marcelle K. Schnurmacher

Angel I Trust Anisfield-W olf Fund Charles Rieley Armington Fund Katherine B. Arundel Fund W alter C. and Lucy I. Astrup Funds (2) Sophie Auerbach Fund Margaret M ontgom ery Austin and Charles Taylor Austin Memorial Fund Ruth and Elmer Babin Fund The Frederic M. and N ettie E. Backus Memorial Fund The Magdalena Baehr Fund Fannie W hite Baker Fund

W alter C. Baker Fund W alter C. and Fannie W hite Baker Fund

The Harry F. and EdnaJ. Burmester Charitable Remainder Unitrust No. I

Lilian Hanna Baldwin Fund

The Thomas Burnham Memorial

Mabel R. Bateman Memorial Fund

The Thomas Burnham M emorial Trust

W arner M. Bateman Memorial Fund

Katherine W ard Burrell Fund

Cornelia W . Beardslee Fund

Edmund S. Busch Fund

James C. Beardslee Fund

Janet G. and Mary H. Cameron

Louis D. Beaumont Fund

M emorial Fund

Robert K. Beck Memorial Fund

Marian M. Cameron Fund

The Beckenbach Scholarship

The Martha B. Carlisle M emorial Fund

Memorial Fund Mary Berryman Fund

Edna L. and Gustav W . Carlson Foundation M emorial Fund

N estor B. Betzold Trust

Alfred J. C arpenter M emorial Fund

Ida Beznoska Fund

Leyton E. C arter M emorial Fund

Big Brothers o f Greater Cleveland Fund

Robert and Annie Cartman Fund

The Dr. Hamilton Fisk Biggar Fund

The Central High School

Hattie E. Bingham Fund

Endowment Fund

Helen and Ira J. Bircher Fund

The Fred H. Chapin Memorial Fund

George Davis Bivin Fund

The George Lord and Elizabeth

The Martin E. and Evelyn K. Blum Fund Tom L.E. Blum and Martin E. Blum Fund

Chapman Fund* The Frank J. and N ellie L. Chappie Fund*

Katherine Bohm Fund

The Children Forever Endowm ent Fund

Ernest J. Bohn Memorial Fund

The Adele Corning Chisholm

Roberta Holden Bole Fund

Memorial Fund

N ewell C. Bolton Fund

George W . Chisholm Fund

Helen R. Bowler Fund

Garnetta B. Christenson and LeRoy W .

The George H. Boyd Fund*

Christenson Fund

Alva Bradley II Fund

Mr. and Mrs. Harold T. Clark Fund

Jeanette W . Brewer Fund

J.E.G. Clark Trust

G ertrude H. Britton, Katharine H. Perkins Fund Mary K. and Robert R. Broadbent Salvation Arm y Endowment Fund Fannie Brown Memorial Fund

Marie O denkirk Clark Fund Clark-O wen M emorial Fund The Elsa Claus M emorial Fund N o . 2 Inez and Harry Clem ent Award Fund Cleveland: N O W Fund

Marie H. Brown Fund Ada G. Bruce Fund George F. Buehler Memorial Fund Marie I. Buelow Fund Judge Lillian W . Burke Scholarship Fund .5T.9


Cleveland Recreational Arts Fund

Mary McGraw Everett Fund

Frank S. Gibson Memorial Fund

George Halle Hays Fund

Cleveland W ar M emorial

The Irene Ewing Trust

Rose B. and Myron E. Glass

N ora Hays Fund

Clevite W elfare Fund

Betty H. and Jean E. Fairfax Fund

Caroline E. C o it Fund

Charles Dudley Farnsworth Fund

Frederick Harris G off Fund

A rthur F. and Gladys D. Connard Fund

Charles Farran Fund

Frederick H. and Frances Southworth

A.E. Convers Fund*

The George D. and Edith W .

H arry Coulby Funds (2)

Featherstone M emorial Fund

Jacob D. Cox Fund

The Vince Federico Memorial Fund

S. Houghton Cox Fund

Dr. Frank Carl Felix and

Cathy L. Crabtree Fund The Eileen H. Cram er and Marvin H. C ram er Fund The W illiam R. and F. Cassie Daley Trust Fund Henry G. Dalton Fund Alzada Singleton Davis Fund Edward H. deConingh Fund

Flora W ebster Felix Fund William S. and Freda M. Fell Memorial Fund

Memorial Fund

Goff Fund*

Heights Youth Center Fund The Henry E. Heiner and Marie Hays Heiner M emorial Fund The Louise W . and Irving K. Heller Fund

Isaac C. G off Fund*

Mildred Shelby H eller Memorial Fund

Edwin R. Goldfield Fund

The William M yron Heller

Lillian F. Goldfield Fund Marie Louise Gollan Fund Dr. Isadore J. Goodman and Ruth Goodman Memorial Fund

Memorial Fund W arren J. Henderson Fund Iva L. Herl Fund The Clifford B. Hershik Memorial Fund

The Fenn Educational Funds (4)

Julius E. Goodman Fund

Agnes E. Meyer Herzog Fund

First Cleveland Cavalry-Norton

The George C. and Marion S.

The Siegmund and Bertha B. Herzog

Memorial Fund W illiam C. Fischer and Lillye T. Fischer

Gordon Fund Robert B. Grandin Fund

Endowment Fund James R. Hibshman Family Trust

Harold R. Greene Fund

Highland View Hospital Employees’ Fund

Mary E. Dee M emorial Fund

Fisher Fund

Maxine Y. Haberman Fund

Albert M. Higley Memorial

James M. and Ann M. Delaney Fund

Erwin L. Fisher and Fanny M. Fisher

The Hortense B. Halle and Jay M.

Albert M. and Beverly G. Higley Fund

The Howard and Edith Dingle Fund

M emorial Fund*

M emorial Fund

The Hinds M emorial Fund*

Edward C. Flanigon Fund

Edwin T. and Mary E. Hamilton Fund

The Hiram House Fund

Percy R. and Beatrice Round Forbes

The Lynn J. and Eva D. Hammond

The Jacob Hirtenstein Fund

Helen V. Fitzhugh Gift Annuity

Edwin A. and Julia Greene AnnaJ. Dorm an and Pliny O . Dorman M emorial Fund L. Dale D orney Fund James J. Doyle and Lillian Herron Doyle Scholarship Fund

Mary G. Higley Fund

Dorothea W right Hamilton Fund

The Carl and Marion D ittm ar Fund Dodd Funds (2)

Halle Fund

Memorial Fund Frances B. and George W. Ford Memorial Fund The Forest City Hospital Foundation Fund

Memorial Fund* Douglas P. Handyside Memorial Fund

H. M orley and Elizabeth N ew berry Hitchcock Fund~

Leonard C. Hanna Jr. Funds (9)

Reuben W. Hitchcock Fund

The Leonard C. Hanna Jr. Special Fund

Suzanne and Michael J. Hoffmann Fund

W illiam Stitt Hannon Fund

Mr. and Mrs. A rthur S. Holden Fund

Charles A. D riffield Memorial Fund

Gladys J. and H om er D. Foster Fund

Janet Harley Memorial Fund

Helen M. Holland Memorial

The Mary and Wallace Duncan Fund

Constance C, Frackelton Funds (4)

Mr. and Mrs. Roy G. Harley Fund

Dr. John W . Holloway M emorial Fund

The W illiam C. and Agnes M.

The Fannie Pitcairn Frackelton and David

H. Stuart Harrison Memorial Fund

Mildred E. Hom m el and A rthur G.

Dunn Fund

W . Frackelton Fund

Perry G. Harrison and Virginia C. Harrison Memorial Fund

Homm el M emorial Fund

Bruce S. Dwynn M emorial Fund

Robert J. Frackelton Fund

Alice M cHardy Dye Fund

The George Freeman Charity Fund

Lyda G. and H oratio B. Ebert Fund

W inifred Fryer Memorial Fund

Kristian Eilertsen Fund

Frederic C. Fulton Fund

F.H. Haserot Fund

Virginia M. Huey Fund

The Emerald Necklace Fund

Charles H. Gale Fund

Melville H. Haskell, Mary H. Hunter,

Martin Huge, Martha M. Huge, Theodore

Ada C. Emerson Fund*

Frederic H. Gates Fund

Gertrude H. Britton, Katharine H.

Irene C. and Karl Emmerling

The Holsey Gates Residence

Perkins Funds (2)

Scholarship Fund Reinhold W . Erickson Fund H enry A. Everett Trust H om er Everett Fund

Preservation Fund The William F. and Anna Lawrence Gibbons Fund* Emil and Genevieve Gibian Fund

The Kate Hanna Harvey Memorial Funds (2)

Centureena S. Hotchkiss Fund Howard W . Hottenstein Fund

L. Huge and Reinhardt E. Huge Memorial Fund

Henry R. Hatch Memorial Fund

The John Huntington Benevolent Fund

H om er H. Hatch Fund

The A.W . H urlbut Fund

John and Helen A. Hay Memorial Fund

The N orm a W itt Jackson Fund

Lewis Howard Hayden and Lulu May

Rhea Hanna Jerpbak M emorial Trust

Hayden Fund 60

A.R. H o rr Trust*


Earle L. Johnson and W alter Sawtelle

Dr. Jane Power McCollough Fund

Doan and Ella P. Doan

The Lewis A. and Ellen E. McCreary

Memorial Fund

Memorial Fund

The J. Kimball Johnson M emorial Fund

Heber McFarland Fund

Sherman Johnson M emorial Fund

The John A. and Mildred T.

The Thomas Hoyt Jones Family Fund

McGean Fund

Jessie Roe N o rth and George Mahan N o rth M emorial Fund The N o rthern O hio Opera Fund The N o rthw e st Emergency Team Fund Fay-Tyler Murray N o rto n Fund Blanche E. N orvell Fund*

The Virginia Jones Memorial Fund

Hilda J. McGee Fund

Harry N orvell Fund

The Virginia L. Jones Charitable

The George W . and Sarah McGuire Fund

John F. O berlin and John C.

Remainder Unitrust James S. Jordan Fund Adrian D. Joyce Fund The Frederick W . and Henryett Slocum Judd Fund

Donald W . McIntyre Fund Harley C. Lee and Elizabeth Keedick Lee Fund

Gladys M. McIntyre Memorial Fund W . Brewster McKenna Fund

O berlin Fund John F. O 'Brien Charitable Remainder Unitrust

Frances D o olittle Lesser Fund

The Katherine B. McKitterick Fund

The Crispin and Kate Oglebay Trust O hio N ut and Bolt Company Fund

The Jon Lewis Fund

The John C. McLean Memorial Fund

Henryett S. Judd Fund

The Lima Comm unity Fund

Ruth Neville McLean Memorial Fund

Beulah N. O linger Fund

Tillie A. Kaley and W arren R. Kaley

Martha M. Linden Fund

The Howard T. McMyler Fund

John G. and May Lockwood O liver

Robert M. Linney Fund

The Thomas and Mary McMyler

M emorial Fund Karamu House Trust

Sue L. Little Fund

A lbert B. and Sara P. Kern

Vida C. Logan Fund

M emorial Fund

Elizabeth T. Lohmiller Fund

Memorial Fund The Albert Younglove Meriam and Kathryn A. Meriam Fund

Joseph E. Kewley Memorial Fund

Meta M. Long Fund

Alice Butts Metcalf Fund

O rrin F. Kilmer Fund

Gustave Lorber and Frieda Bruml Lorber

The Grace E. Meyette Fund

Lillian E. Kirchner Fund

Memorial Fund

Clarence A. Kirkham Memorial Fund

Henry M. Lucas Fund

John R. Kistner Fund

Clemens W . Lundoff and Hilda T.

D r. Emmanuel Klaus Memorial Fund

Lundoff Fund

M emorial Fund Clarence A. Olsen Trust Mary King O sborn Fund W illiam P. Palmer Fund The Dr. Charles B. Parker M emorial Fund*

Sarah Stern Michael Fund

Erla Schlather Parker Fund

Herman R. and Esther S. Miller

The Joseph K. and Amy Shepard

Memorial Fund

Patterson M emorial Fund

William P. M iller Fund

Blanche B. Payer Fund Linda J. Peirce M emorial Fund

Sandra L. Klopp Fund

Frank J, Lynch Fund

Helen Gibbs Mills Memorial Fund

Samuel B. Knight Fund

Nellie Lynch Fund

Victor Mills Fund

Douglas Perkins Fund

The Philip E. and Bertha Hawley

The William Fred Mackay and Cora

Anna B. Minzer Fund

The August G. and Lee F. Peterka Fund

John A. Mitchell and Blanche G.

Grace M. Pew Fund

Knowlton Fund Estelle C. Koch Memorial

Carlisle Mackay Memorial Fund Theresa Mae MacNab Fund

M itchell Fund

Caroline Brown Prescott M emorial Fund

Anna Mary Magee Memorial Fund

Cornelia S. M oore Fund*

W alter D. Price Fund

Richard H. Kohn Fund

The Maude F. Majerick Fund

The Mr. and Mrs. Jay P. Moore

W illiam H. Price Fund

Leslie and Elizabeth D. Kondorossy

Leone R. Bowe Marco Fund

Scholarship Fund

Charitable Remainder Unitrust The O tto and Lena Konigslow Memorial Fund* Samuel E. Kramer Law Scholarship Fund

Leonard G. Martien Fund

John H. and Beatrice C. M oore Fund

Alice Keith Mather Fund

J. Howard and Josephine L. M orris

The Samuel Mather and Flora Stone Mather Memorial Fund

Mary Kopec Kreicher Fund

Ruth A. Matson Fund

Leonard Krieger Fund

The Frederick R. and Bertha Specht

Elroy J. and Fynette H. Kulas Fund*

Memorial Fund

Mautz Scholarship Fund

Gift Annuity William Curtis M orton, Maud M orton, Kathleen M orton Fund Mary MacBain Motch Fund E. Freeman Mould Fund

Princeton Urban Studies Fellowship Fund Florence Mackey Pritchard and P.J. Pritchard Scholarship Fund The Public Square Preservation and Maintenance Fund The J. Ambrose and Jessie W heeler Purcell M emorial Fund* The George John Putz and Margaret Putz

The Lake-Geauga Funds (5)

Erma L. M awer Fund

Jane C. Mould Fund

Kathryn V. Lantz Fund

Harriet E. McBride Fund

Frank A. Myers Fund

The Fred O. and Lucille M. Quick Fund

The A rthur A. Lederer and

Malcolm L. McBride and John Harris

Tom Neal Fund

The Charles G reif Raible and Catherine

Ruth Lawrence Lederer Fund

McBride II Memorial Fund

Harold M. Nichols Fund

M emorial Fund

Rogers Raible Fund 61


The John R. Raible Fund

Marion R. Spellman Fund

Henrietta Teufel M errprial Fund

V ictoire and Alfred M. Rankin Jr. Fund

Josephine L. Sperry Fund

The Katharine Holden Thayer Funds (3)

M arion E. Rannells Fund

The George B. Spreng and Hazel Myers

Frances Lincoln Rathbone M emorial Fund

Spreng Memorial Fund

Barbara Haas Rawson M emorial Fund

The Hazel Myers Spreng Fund in

Grace P. Rawson Fund

m emory o f her parents,

Clay L. and Florence Rannells Reely Fund

Mr. and Mrs. A .N. Myers

Hilda Reich Fund

The John H. Thomas Fund Allison John Thompson M emorial Fund Amos Burt and Jeanne L. Thompson Fund Chester A. Thompson Fund

Virginia Spriggs Fund

H om er F. Tielke Fund

Leonard R. Rench Fund

William C. Scofield Memorial Fund

The Miriam Kerruish Stage Fund

Maude S. Tom lin M emorial Fund

The Retreat M emorial Fund

Alice Duty Seagrave Foreign Study Fund

The D o rothy and Oscar H. Steiner

Marie Richardson M emorial Fund

W arner Seely Fund

Charles L. Richman Fund

Charles W . and Lucille Sellers

Nathan G. Richman Fund

Memorial Fund

Helen D. Robinson Fund

William K. Selman Memorial Fund

Alice M. Rockefeller Fund

The A rthur and Agnes Severson

Elizabeth Becker Rorabeck Fund Rebecca and Etta Rosenberg M emorial Fund Edward L. Rosenfeld and Bertha M.

Memorial Fund Glenn M. and Elsa V. Shaw Fund Frank S. Sheets and Alberta G. Sheets Memorial Fund

Fund for the Conservation of Abused Children Frederick C. Sterling Second Testamentary Trust

Mabelle G. and Finton L. Torrence Fund Stephen E. Tracey and Helen O ster Tracey Fund Jessie C. Tucker M emorial Fund Isabelle Tumpach Fund

Avery L. Sterner Fund

James H. T urner Fund

Ada Gates Stevens Memorial Fund

The Edward A. and Esther T. Tuttle

Catherine E. Stewart, Martha A. Stewart, Judith H. Stewart and Jeannette Stewart Memorial Fund

M emorial Fund Rufus M. Ullman Fund Leo W . Ulm er Fund

Frank E. Shepardson Fund

Jessie R. Stewart Fund

Christian and Sophia Vick M emorial Fund

Roulston Family Fund # 3

Nina Sherrer Fund

The Charles J. Stilwell Scholarship Fund

M olly Agnes Voinovich M emorial Fund

Charles F. Ruby Fund

The Henry A. Sherwin and Frances M.

Ralph P. Stoddard Memorial Fund

Corinne T. Voss Fund

Charles L. and Marion H. Stone Fund

The H om er C. W adsworth Award John F. and Mary G. Wahl

Rosenfeld Fund

W illiam A. Ruehl and Mary Ruehl

Sherwin Funds* (3) James Nelson Sherwin Fund

Esther H. and B.F. Stoner Memorial Fund

D o rothy and Helen Ruth Fund

The John and Frances W . Sherwin Fund

Harriet B. Storrs Fund

St. Barnabas Guild fo r Nursing Fund

Cornelia Adams Shiras Memorial

Vernon Stouffer Memorial Fund

Jessie MacDonald W alker M emorial Fund

Virginia Salay M emorial Fund

The John and LaVerne Short

Leonard F. Stowe Fund

The John Mason W alter and Jeanne M.

M emorial Fund

Janet Coe Sanborn Fund Mary C o it Sanford Fund

Memorial Fund The A.H. and Julia W . Shunk Fund

M ortim er I. Strauss and Helen E. Strauss and Blanche N ew Memorial Fund

The Mary C o it Sanford M emorial Fund

The Thomas and Anna Sidlo Fund

The Ignatz and Berta Sunshine Fund

O live r H. Schaaf Fund

Josephine R. and Edward W .

C.F. Taplin Fund

D r. Henry A. and M aryJ. Schlink M emorial Fund

Sloan Jr. Fund Kent H. Smith Fund

Scholarship-in-Escrow Fund

The Nellie B. Snavely Fund

O tto F. Schramm and Edna H. Schramm

Society fo r Crippled Children - Tris

Memorial Fund The Robert N. Schwartz Fund for Retarded Children Demetra A. Sciulli Fund

Speaker Memorial Fund A.L. Somers Fund William J. Southworth Fund William P. Southworth and Louisa Southworth Fund Dr. George P. Soyer Fund The John C. and Elizabeth F. Sparrow Memorial Fund

OS

Charles Farrand Taplin and Elsie H. Taplin Fund Taw Family Salvation Arm y Endowment Fund

Memorial Fund

W alter Memorial Funds (2) Philip R. and Mary S. Ward M emorial Fund Cornelia Blakemore W arner Memorial Fund Helen B. W arner Fund Mabel Breckenridge Wason Fund A Mabel Breckenridge Wason Fund B*

Mildred S. Taylor Fund

Stanley H. Watson Memorial

The Alma M. and Harry R. Tem pleton

Frank W alter W eide Fund

Memorial Fund

Harriett and A rthur W eiland Fund The Harry H. and Stella B. Weiss Memorial Fund Burt W enger Fund Leroy A. Westman Fund George B. and Edith S. W heeler Trust


Earle L. Johnson and W alter Sawtelle

Dr. Jane Power McCollough Fund

Doan and Ella P. Doan

The Lewis A. and Ellen E. McCreary

Memorial Fund

Memorial Fund

Jessie Roe N o rth and George Mahan N o rth M emorial Fund The N o rthern O hio Opera Fund

The J. Kimball Johnson M emorial Fund

Heber McFarland Fund

The N orthw est Emergency Team Fund

Sherman Johnson M emorial Fund

The John A. and Mildred T.

Fay-Tyler Murray N o rto n Fund

The Thomas Hoyt Jones Family Fund

McGean Fund

Blanche E. N orvell Fund*

The Virginia Jones M emorial Fund

Hilda J. McGee Fund

Harry N orvell Fund

The Virginia L. Jones Charitable

The George W . and Sarah McGuire Fund

John F. O berlin and John C.

Remainder Unitrust James S. Jordan Fund Adrian D. Joyce Fund The Frederick W . and Henryett Slocum

Donald W . McIntyre Fund Harley C. Lee and Elizabeth Keedick Lee Fund

Gladys M. McIntyre M emorial Fund W . Brewster McKenna Fund

O berlin Fund John F. O ’Brien Charitable Remainder Unitrust

Frances D oolittle Lesser Fund

The Katherine B. McKitterick Fund

The Crispin and Kate Oglebay Trust O hio N u t and Bolt Company Fund

The Jon Lewis Fund

The John C. McLean Memorial Fund

Henryett S. Judd Fund

The Lima Comm unity Fund

Ruth Neville McLean Memorial Fund

Beulah N. O linger Fund

Tillie A. Kaley and W arren R. Kaley

Martha M. Linden Fund

The Howard T. McMyler Fund

John G. and May Lockwood O liver

Robert M. Linney Fund

The Thomas and Mary McMyler

Judd Fund

Memorial Fund Karamu House Trust

Sue L. Little Fund

Albert B. and Sara P. Kern

Vida C. Logan Fund

Memorial Fund

Elizabeth T. Lohmiller Fund

Memorial Fund The Albert Younglove Meriam and Kathryn A. Meriam Fund

Joseph E. Kewley M emorial Fund

Meta M. Long Fund

Alice Butts Metcalf Fund

O rrin F. Kilmer Fund

Gustave Lorber and Frieda Bruml Lorber

The Grace E. Meyette Fund

Lillian E. Kirchner Fund

Memorial Fund

Clarence A. Kirkham M emorial Fund

Henry M. Lucas Fund

John R. Kistner Fund

Clemens W. Lundoff and Hilda T.

D r. Emmanuel Klaus Memorial Fund

Lundoff Fund

M emorial Fund Clarence A. Olsen Trust Mary King O sborn Fund William P. Palmer Fund The Dr. Charles B. Parker Memorial Fund*

Sarah Stern Michael Fund

Erla Schlather Parker Fund

Herman R. and Esther S. Miller

The Joseph K. and Amy Shepard

Memorial Fund

Patterson M emorial Fund

William P. M iller Fund

Blanche B. Payer Fund Linda J. Peirce M emorial Fund

Sandra L. Klopp Fund

Frank J. Lynch Fund

Helen Gibbs Mills Memorial Fund

Samuel B. Knight Fund

N ellie Lynch Fund

Victor Mills Fund

Douglas Perkins Fund

The Philip E. and Bertha Hawley

The William Fred Mackay and Cora

Anna B. Minzer Fund

The August G. and Lee F. Peterka Fund

John A. Mitchell and Blanche G.

Grace M. Pew Fund

Knowlton Fund Estelle C. Koch Memorial

Carlisle Mackay Memorial Fund Theresa Mae MacNab Fund

Mitchell Fund

Caroline Brown Prescott Memorial Fund

Anna Mary Magee Memorial Fund

Cornelia S. M oore Fund*

W alter D. Price Fund

Richard H. Kohn Fund

The Maude F. Majerick Fund

The Mr. and Mrs. Jay P. M oore

W illiam H. Price Fund

Leslie and Elizabeth D. Kondorossy

Leone R. Bowe Marco Fund

Scholarship Fund

Charitable Remainder Unitrust The O tto and Lena Konigslow M emorial Fund* Samuel E. Kramer Law Scholarship Fund

Leonard G. Martien Fund

John H. and Beatrice C. M oore Fund

Alice Keith Mather Fund

J. Howard and Josephine L. Morris

The Samuel Mather and Flora Stone Mather Memorial Fund

Mary Kopec Kreicher Fund

Ruth A. Matson Fund

Leonard Krieger Fund

The Frederick R. and Bertha Specht

Elroy J. and Fynette H. Kulas Fund*

Memorial Fund

Mautz Scholarship Fund

Gift Annuity William Curtis M orton, Maud M orton, Kathleen M orton Fund Mary MacBain Motch Fund E. Freeman Mould Fund

Princeton Urban Studies Fellowship Fund Florence Mackey Pritchard and P.J. Pritchard Scholarship Fund The Public Square Preservation and Maintenance Fund The J. Ambrose and Jessie W heeler Purcell M emorial Fund* The George John Putz and Margaret Putz

The Lake-Geauga Funds (5)

Erma L. M awer Fund

Jane C. Mould Fund

Kathryn V. Lantz Fund

H arriet E. McBride Fund

Frank A. Myers Fund

The Fred O. and Lucille M. Q uick Fund

The A rthur A. Lederer and

Malcolm L. McBride and John Harris

Tom Neal Fund

The Charles G reif Raible and Catherine

Ruth Lawrence Lederer Fund

McBride II Memorial Fund

Harold M. Nichols Fund

M emorial Fund

Rogers Raible Fund 61


The John R. Raible Fund

Marion R. Spellman Fund

Henrietta Teufel Memorial Fund

Victoire and Alfred M. Rankin Jr. Fund

Josephine L. Sperry Fund

The Katharine Holden Thayer Funds (3)

Marion E. Rannells Fund

The George B. Spreng and Hazel Myers

The John H. Thomas Fund

Spreng M emorial Fund

Frances Lincoln Rathbone M emorial Fund

The Hazel Myers Spreng Fund in

Barbara Haas Rawson M emorial Fund Grace P. Rawson Fund

m emory o f her parents,

Clay L. and Florence Rannells Reely Fund

Mr. and Mrs. A .N . Myers

Allison John Thompson M emorial Fund Amos Burt and Jeanne L. Thompson Fund Chester A. Thompson Fund

Virginia Spriggs Fund

H om er F. Tielke Fund

Leonard R. Rench Fund

W illiam C. Scofield Memorial Fund

The Miriam Kerruish Stage Fund

Maude S. Tom lin M emorial Fund

The Retreat M emorial Fund

Alice Duty Seagrave Foreign Study Fund

The D orothy and Oscar H. Steiner

Marie Richardson M emorial Fund

W arner Seely Fund

Charles L. Richman Fund

Charles W . and Lucille Sellers

Hilda Reich Fund

Nathan G. Richman Fund

Memorial Fund

Helen D. Robinson Fund

W illiam K. Selman Memorial Fund

Alice M. Rockefeller Fund

The A rthur and Agnes Severson

Elizabeth Becker Rorabeck Fund Rebecca and Etta Rosenberg M emorial Fund Edward L. Rosenfeld and Bertha M.

M emorial Fund Glenn M. and Elsa V. Shaw Fund Frank S. Sheets and Alberta G. Sheets Memorial Fund

Fund fo r the Conservation of Abused Children Frederick C. Sterling Second Testamentary Trust

Mabelle G. and Finton L. Torrence Fund Stephen E. Tracey and Helen O ster Tracey Fund Jessie C. Tucker M emorial Fund Isabelle Tumpach Fund

Avery L. Sterner Fund

James H. T urner Fund

Ada Gates Stevens Memorial Fund

The Edward A. and Esther T. Tuttle

Catherine E. Stewart, Martha A. Stewart, Judith H. Stewart and Jeannette Stewart Memorial Fund

M emorial Fund Rufus M. Ullman Fund Leo W . Ulm er Fund

Frank E. Shepardson Fund

Jessie R. Stewart Fund

Roulston Family Fund # 3

Nina Sherrer Fund

The Charles J. Stilwell Scholarship Fund

M olly Agnes Voinovich M emorial Fund

Charles F. Ruby Fund

The Henry A. Sherwin and Frances M.

Ralph P. Stoddard M emorial Fund

Corinne T. Voss Fund

Rosenfeld Fund

W illiam A. Ruehl and Mary Ruehl M emorial Fund

Sherwin Funds* (3) James Nelson Sherwin Fund

Christian and Sophia Vick Memorial Fund

Charles L. and Marion H. Stone Fund

The H om er C. W adsw orth Award

Esther H. and B.F. Stoner Memorial Fund

John F. and Mary G. Wahl

D o rothy and Helen Ruth Fund

The John and Frances W. Sherwin Fund

Harriet B. Storrs Fund

St. Barnabas Guild fo r Nursing Fund

Cornelia Adams Shiras Memorial

Vernon Stouffer Memorial Fund

Jessie MacDonald W alker M emorial Fund

Virginia Salay M emorial Fund

The John and LaVerne Short

Leonard F. Stowe Fund

The John Mason W alter and Jeanne M.

Janet Coe Sanborn Fund

Memorial Fund

M ortim er h Strauss and Helen E. Strauss

Mary C o it Sanford Fund

The A .H. and Julia W . Shunk Fund

and Blanche N e w Memorial Fund

The Mary C o it Sanford M emorial Fund

The Thomas and Anna Sidlo Fund

The Ignatz and Berta Sunshine Fund

O live r H. Schaaf Fund

Josephine R. and Edward W.

C.F. Taplin Fund

D r. H enry A. and Mary J. Schlink M emorial Fund

Sloan Jr. Fund Kent H. Smith Fund

Scholarship-in-Escrow Fund

The N ellie B. Snavely Fund

O tto F. Schramm and Edna H, Schramm

Society fo r Crippled Children - Tris

M emorial Fund The Robert N. Schwartz Fund fo r Retarded Children Demetra A. Sciulli Fund

Speaker Memorial Fund A.L. Somers Fund William J. Southworth Fund William P. Southworth and Louisa Southworth Fund

Taplin Fund Taw Family Salvation Army Endowment Fund

W alter Memorial Funds (2) Philip R. and Mary S. Ward Memorial Fund Cornelia Blakemore W arner Memorial Fund Helen B. W arner Fund Mabel Breckenridge Wason Fund A Mabel Breckenridge Wason Fund B*

M ildred S. Taylor Fund

Stanley H. Watson Memorial

The Alma M. and Harry R. Tem pleton

Frank W alter W eide Fund

Memorial Fund

Harriett and A rthur W eiland Fund The Harry H. and Stella B. Weiss Memorial Fund

Dr. George P. Soyer Fund

Burt W enger Fund

The John C. and Elizabeth F. Sparrow

Leroy A. Westman Fund

M emorial Fund

63

Charles Farrand Taplin and Elsie H.

Memorial Fund

George B. and Edith S. W heeler Trust


Lucius J. and Jennie C. W heeler Memorial Fund Jane D. W hite Funds (2) Mary C. W hitney Fund The Marian L. and Edna A. W hitsey Fund Edward Loder W hittem ore Fund Henry E. and Ethel L. W iddell Fund R.N. and H.R. W iesenberger Fund The John Edmund Williams Fund Teresa Jane W illiams Memorial Fund W hiting Williams Fund A rthur P. and Elizabeth M. Williamson Funds (2) James D. W illiamson Fund Ruth Ely W illiamson Fund The George H., Charles E., and Samuel Denny W ilson M emorial Fund Marjorie A. W inbigler Memorial Edith Anisfield W o lf Funds (2) The Benjamin and Rosemary W olpaw Memorial Fund The W om en's General Hospital Fund Nelle P. W oodw orth Fund David C. W right M emorial Fund Edith W right M emorial Fund The W u lf Sisters Memorial Fund H erbert E. and Eleanor M. Zdara Memorial Fund Roy J. Zoo k and Amelia T. Zoo k Fund

*Partial Benefits Funds provide pay­ ments of annuities to certain individuals prior to payment of income to the Foundation. With three exceptions, The Cleveland Foundation will ultimately receive the entire net income from these funds. The principal amounts of these funds are carried as assets of The Cleveland Foundation.

project accounts In keeping w ith its philanthropic leadership role, T h e C leveland Foundation is occasionally called upon to manage projects. Often these projects are supported by oth er funders as w ell as by The Cleveland Foundation,

new project accounts A rts E d ucation C o n su lta n cy, $ 2 6 ,0 0 0

D onors:

The George Gund Foundation, Martha Holden Jennings Foundation, The Kulas Foundation, The John P. Murphy Foundation, and Thomas White Foundation U se o f in com e: A study of arts education in the schools

additions to project accounts

C o m m u n ity AID S P a rtn e rsh ip , $24,563

D onors:

Case Western Reserve University, CWRU Charity Choice Program, Delta Sigma Pi-Beta Pi Chapter, David Henry Jacobs, David H. and Barbara M. Jacobs Foundation, David and Inez Meyers Foundation, Steven A. Minter, Prentiss Foundation, United Way Services, and Donn T. and Anne M. Westervelt In m e m o ry o f C ha rle s A n d re w B arb e r

D onors:

Frank E. and Martha J. Joseph, Mr. and Mrs. G. Robert Klein, Deborah McColloch, Mr. and Mrs. David L. Simon, The USF and G Foundation, and Mary B. Waldo

T h e C le ve la n d A rts C o n s o rtiu m , $9 5 ,6 7 9

D onors:

BP America, Cleveland Ballet, Cleveland Center for Contemporary Art, Cleveland Children’s Museum, Cleveland Electric Illumination Co., The Cleveland Museum of Art, The Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Cleveland Opera, The Cleveland Play House, The George W. Codrington Foundation, Garden Center of Greater Cleveland, Robert D. Gries, The George Gund Foundation, The Health Museum, Karamu House, The Kulas Foundation, Lyric Opera Cleveland, Thomas W. and Jane A. Morris, The John P. Murphy Foundation, The Musical Arts Association, New Organization for the Visual Arts (NOVA), Ohio Ballet, Ohio Chamber Orchestra, Playhouse Square Foundation, Society Management Company, SPACES, The Stocker Foundation, The Stouffer Corporation Fund, University Circle Incorporated, and Western Reserve Historical Society

established project accounts Arts Education Consultancy The Cleveland Arts Consortium Cleveland Heights High School Model School Program C om m unity AIDS Partnership East Cleveland Mathematics and Science Program Evaluation Energy Conservation Program Fiscal O fficers’ Group Project Grantmakers Forum Grantmakers in Aging

In m e m o ry o f R o b e rt Spencer Luce

Karamu Mission

D onors:

M inority Teacher Education Program

Hilary W. and Linda G. Gedman, and John J. and Lisa M. Pucci In h o n o r o f Steven A. M in te r’s te n years

Neighbors Against Racial Violence Fund N o rthern O hio GIVES

o f se rvice as e x e c u tiv e d ir e c to r o f

Police Com m unity Public Safety Program

T h e C leveland F oundation

Starting Point fo r Child Care and Early

D onor:

Robert E. Eckardt

G ra n tm a k e rs F o ru m , $ 7 ,000

Education Teaching Leadership C onsortium o f O hio

D onors:

Bank One Ohio Trust Company, NA, East Ohio Gas Company, Nordson Corporation, Ohio Bell, and The Sihler Mental Health Foundation N o rth e rn O h io GIVES, $ 3 ,3 2 6

D onors: Jewish Community Federation of Cleveland and Society Management Company T each in g Leadership C o n s o rtiu m o f O h io , $ 1,000

D onor:

BP America

63


new donor-advisor funds T h e GAR Fund, $ 1 ,1 3 2 ,5 0 0

Donor: The GAR Foundation U se o f incom e: To further the development of and provide benefit primarily to organiza­ tions in northeastern Ohio T h e T R W Fund, $ 2 2 5,000

d

so: funds

An increasing num ber o f donors are choosing to participate actively in th e ir charitable giving by establishing do nor-adviso r funds. A $50,000 m in­ im um c o n trib u tio n is re q u ire d to establish the fund; additional gifts may be added at any tim e to increase the fund's value and grantmaking po ten­ tial. Although the Foundation main­ tains sole responsibility fo r managing the fun d’s assets and final authority ove r grantmaking, donors may make grant recom m endations on up to 6 percent o f the fu n d ’s asset value in a given year. U p to 20 pe rcent o f the grant recom m endations may be made outside the Cleveland area. In addition, the fund provides maxim um tax benefits to the donor. A do nor-adviso r fund remains in place fo r the lifetime o f the d o n o r o r 25 years, w hiche ver is longer. Then the named fund continues in perpetuity as unrestricted en dow m ent o f The Cleveland Foundation. If the fund is established at $2 50,000 o r m ore, the donor-advisor's children may continue making grant recom m endations fo r th e ir lifetim es. In 1993, new funds and additions to existing donor-advisor funds totaled $1,83 1,165. Grants totaling $2,555,981 w e re made fro m these funds to a broad array o f community organizations.

Donor: The TRW Foundation U se o f incom e: To further the development of and provide benefit to The Great Lakes Museum of Science, Environment and Technology, The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, Inc., The Cleveland Initiative for Education and other organizations

additions to donor-advisor funds

established donor-advisor funds

(Additions are gifts o f the donor-advisor unless otherwise noted.)

American Cancer Society, O hio Division Incorporated, Cancer Research and

T h e Fund fo r th e C ity o f C le ve la n d / C leveland T re e S ubfunds, $1 14,966

D onors:

The City of Cleveland and Cleveland Energy Resources

T h e Fund fo r th e C ity o f C le ve la n d / R ecre a tio n S ubfund. $12,985

D onor:

Hahn Loeser & Parks and proceeds from "Set the Pace Race" T h e C leveland F ou n d a tio n Special Fund N o . 2, $5 0 ,0 0 0

Education Fund The Edward C. and Jane D. Bloomberg Fund The Campopiano Family Fund Alvah Stone and Adele Coming Chisholm Memorial Fund The Funds for the City o f Cleveland (3) The Cleveland Foundation Special Fund No. 2 The Cleveland Foundation Special Fund No. 3

G ris w o ld Fam ily Fund, $100

Donor:

Patricia Jansen Doyle

The Cleveland Foundation Special Fund No. 5

T h e L in co ln E le c tric Fund fo r E xcellence in

The James E. and Isabelle E. Dunlap Fund

E ducation, $ 1 0 5 ,0 0 0

The GAR Fund

Donors.-

The Lincoln Electric Foundation and Emma S. Lincoln

The Garda Family Fund

R o b e rt R. and A n n B. Lucas Fund, $75

Norman F. Klopp Family Fund

Griswold Family Fund

Leaderson Fund T h e M a ry B. M o o n Fund, $15,000 T h e Lindsay J. and D avid T . M o rg e n th a le r Fund, $75

Eleanor M. Lewis Fund The Lincoln Electric Fund for Excellence in Education Robert R. and Ann B. Lucas Fund

R oulston Fam ily Fund N o . 2, $175 ,4 6 4

D onors:

Lois M. Roulston and Thomas H. Roulston Sr.

The Thornton D. and Penny P. McDonough Family Fund


d o n o r-a d v is o r

grants

C U L T U R A L A F F A IR S

(The following recipients and programs were recommended by the donor-advisors. Grants are for general support unless otherwise noted.)

A ccess to th e A r ts

Arts in Education program C I V I C A F F A IR S C le v e la n d C o u n c il o n W o r ld A ffa ir s

C le v e la n d W o r k s , In c .

7,000 500

E n g lis h -S p e a k in g U n io n

John P. McWilliams and Brooks Barlow

Patron Fund for English-ln-Action

1,000

H e ig h ts C o m m u n ity C o n g re s s

300

McWilliams Fund Andrea and Elmer Meszaros Fund William A. and Margaret N. Mitchell Fund

1,000

The Mary B. Moon Fund The George L. and Genevieve D. Moore Family Fund No. I

L a w E n fo r c e m e n t F o u n d a tio n , In c ., D u b lin , O h io

Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.) program and D.A.RE. training at Police Executive Leadership College

5,000

The Lindsay J. and David T. Morgenthaler Fund Ohio Bell/Ameritech Fund George J. Picha Fund

O h io

500

T h e N u c le a r A g e R e s o u rc e C e n t e r

300

O h io E n v ir o n m e n ta l C o u n c il, C o lu m b u s , O h io

300

Roulston Family Funds Rukosky Family Fund

R a p id R e c o v e ry , In c ., d b a C L E A N - L A N D , O H IO

Fall planting plan

250 4 5,000

250

C le v e la n d B a lle t

5,00 0

C le v e la n d C h ild r e n ’ s M u s e u m

2 ,0 0 0

T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n ( I n c . )

Mailtix program by Cleveland Arts Consortium

1,000

T h e C le v e la n d I n s t it u t e o f A r t

5,5 0 0

T h e C le v e la n d M u s e u m o f A r t

4,5 0 0 16,449

Department of Musical Arts

5,00 0

T h e C le v e la n d M u s e u m o f N a t u r a l H is t o r y

2,0 0 0

T h e C le v e la n d M u s ic S c h o o l S e t t le m e n t

Capital campaign

N a t u r e C o n s e r v a n c y -O h io F ie ld O ffic e , C o lu m b u s ,

F. James and Rita Rechin Fund Stewart L. and Judith P, Rice Fund

Friends of Eldred Theatre

T h e C le v e la n d I n s t it u t e o f M u s ic

T h e H o ld e n A r b o r e t u m

20,000

C a se W e s te r n R e s e rv e U n iv e r s it y $250

T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n ( In c .)

"Arnie the Arborist" urban forestry mascot for the City of Cleveland

$ 1,00 0

A R T S B R ID G E , IN C ., P a r k e r s b u r g , W e s t V i r g in ia

C le v e la n d O p e r a T h e C le v e la n d P la y H o u s e

Guest artist fund (over two years)

5,3 58 4 0 ,00 0 1,000 850

100,000

C le v e la n d P u b lic R a d io

Community affairs programming and equipment

35,0 00

R.H. Smith Family Fund The Elizabeth M. and William C. Treuhaft

Purchase and planting of trees in the crty of Cleveland

D a y to n A r t I n s t it u t e , D a y to n , O h io

110,000

"I Dream a World" exhibition

20,000

Fund The TRW Fund

S h a k e r L a k e s R e g io n a l N a t u r e C e n t e r

250

Paul A. and Sonja F. Unger Fund

D a y to n O p e r a A s s o c ia tio n , D a y to n , O h io

American Sign Language interpreted performances

Philip R. Uhlin Fund T o w a r d s E m p lo y m e n t, In c .

D o b a m a T h e a tre

Wellman Philanthropic Fund

U n iv e r s it y C ir c le I n c o r p o r a t e d

Harold L. and Patricia D. Williams Fund

Capital campaign

10,000

5,500 300

500

1,000

F in e A r t s A s s o c ia tio n

1,000

F rie n d s o f t h e C le v e la n d S c h o o l o f t h e A r t s

1,000

W ipper Family Fund The W olpert Fund

W o m e n ’ s C o m m u n ity F o u n d a tio n

Women Managing Money program

25,000

The Robert J. and Janet G. Yaroma Family Fund

T h e G a rd e n C e n t e r o f G r e a t e r C le v e la n d T o t a l C iv ic A ff a ir s G r a n ts

2 50

$ 2 0 3,650

65


H IG H E R E D U C A T I O N A n t io c h U n iv e r s it y , Y e llo w S p rin g s , O h io

$ 1,000

B a ld w in - W a lla c e C o lle g e

Campaign for the 2 1st Century (over three years) G r e a t L a k e s T h e a t e r F e s tiv a l T h e L a k e V ie w C e m e t e r y F o u n d a tio n M u s ic & P e r f o r m in g A r t s a t T r i n i t y C a th e d r a l, In c .

2,500

P R E C O L L E G IA T E E D U C A T I O N

500

A u r o r a O n e F u n d , A u r o r a , O h io

500

Education and recreation programs for young people of Aurora and neighboring communities

T h e M u s ic a l A r t s A s s o c ia t io n

5,000

Cleveland Orchestra chair endowment

3,000

Education Fund

7,327

C le v e la n d C e n t e r f o r E c o n o m ic E d u c a tio n

P e n n s y lv a n ia

Morgenthaler Chair in Entrepreneurship $6,0°0 5,000

J o h n C a r r o ll U n iv e r s it y

Roulston Series on Leadership and Achievement

100,00 0

,nn

iUU 2 5 ,00 0

C ase W e s te r n R e s e rv e U n iv e r s it y

T h e C le v e la n d E d u c a tio n F u n d

Small Grants Program

1,000,000

C a r n e g ie - M e llo n U n iv e r s it y , P it t s b u r g h ,

25,000

Franklin Thomas Backus School of Law

1.000

Capital campaign for Mandel School of Applied N e w O r g a n iz a t io n f o r t h e V is u a l A r t s ( N O V A )

Artists of Color Program in Cleveland Heights P la y h o u s e S q u a r e F o u n d a t io n T o t a l C u l t u r a l A f f a ir s G r a n t s

500 12,000 $308,784

Weatherhead School of Management

3 0,00 0

Weatherhead School of Management Building Fund

15,000

C le v e la n d C o lle g e o f J e w is h S tu d ie s

1,000

Letter machine and supplies for student publication center at Fairfax Elementary School T h e C le v e la n d I n it i a t iv e f o r E d u c a tio n

H a th a w a y B r o w n S c h o o l

T h e G r e a t L a k e s M u s e u m o f S c ie n c e ,

R o c k a n d R o ll H a ll o f F a m e a n d M u s e u m , In c .

Social Sciences

S c h o o l D i s t r ic t

Richard W . Pogue Institute for School Leadership and Management

E C O N O M IC D E V E L O P M E N T

E n v ir o n m e n t a n d T e c h n o lo g y

C le v e la n d H e ig h ts - U n iv e r s ity H e ig h ts C ity

$75,000 50,000

100,000

10.000 250

C le v e la n d P u b lic L ib r a r y H ir a m C o lle g e , H ir a m , O h io

K e n t S ta te U n iv e r s it y F o u n d a tio n , In c .,

L a m b u th U n iv e r s it y , J a c k s o n , T e n n e s s e e

K e n t, O h io

The Johnston Education Fund in memory of Dr. Leland M. Johnston

Network for Deaf Education T o t a l E c o n o m ic D e v e lo p m e n t G r a n ts

1.000

20.000

$125,000 1.000

P .M . F o u n d a tio n , In c .

Urban Community School Urban Community School Endowment Fund

500 10,000

647

M a s s a c h u s e tts I n s t it u t e o f T e c h n o lo g y , C a m b r id g e ,

O r p h e u s C h o r a l S o c ie ty o f C le v e la n d , In c .

The Cleveland Boychoir

1’00°

M a s s a c h u s e tts

Faculty Research Award at Sloan School of Management

18,0 0 0

I OK Competition Award at Sloan School of Management

10 ,0 0 0

500

J. Herbert Hollomon Memorial Fund

5,000

5,000 O h io S ta te U n iv e r s it y , C o lu m b u s , O h io

S t. D o m in ic S c h o o l

Max M. Fisher College of Business

1.0 00

Spanish language program S in c la ir C o m m u n ity C o lle g e F o u n d a t io n , D a y t o n , O h io T r i n i t y C a th e d r a l

U n iv e r s ity S c h o o l

2,500

Annual Fund in memory of Peter H. Wellman T o t a l P r e c o lle g ia te E d u c a tio n G ra n ts

66

Project READ program

Preschool program

1,500

250 $178,500

1.000


C a se W e s te r n R e s e rv e U n iv e r s it y S c h o o l o f M e d ic in e

S m ith C o lle g e , N o r t h h a m p t o n , M a s s a c h u s e tts

Class of 1954 Gift

S a in t J o h n a n d W e s t S h o re H o s p ita l

Serenity Hall C e n tr a l S c h o o l o f P r a c tic a l N u r s in g , In c .

500

C h ild r e n ’ s H o s p ita l M e d ic a l C e n te r o f A k r o n , O h io

500

S y c a m o re , Illin o is

T h e C le v e la n d C lin ic F o u n d a tio n

500

U n iv e r s it y H o s p ita ls o f C le v e la n d

300

U n it e d L e u k o d y s tr o p h y F o u n d a tio n ,

10,000

T o le d o - L u c a s C o u n t y P u b lic L ib r a r y , T o le d o , O h io

5 00

1,500

U n it e d N e g r o C o lle g e F u n d , In c . o f C le v e la n d U n it e d N e g r o C o lle g e F u n d , In c . o f C o lu m b u s , O h io

6,000

U r s u lin e C o lle g e

5,250

In memory of Mother Marie Sands

5,000

Room in Research Building C le v e la n d H e a r in g a n d S p e e c h C e n te r T h e C le v e la n d S o c ie ty f o r t h e B lin d

T o t a l H ig h e r E d u c a tio n G r a n ts

1.500

10,000

$ 1,258,397

Eye Bank F a ir v ie w G e n e r a l H o s p ita l

35.000 500

Ireland Cancer Center

300

John P. McWilliams Fund for respiratory health

5,495

Rainbow Babies and Childrens Hospital

1,000

4,850 500

T h e V is it in g N u r s e A s s o c ia tio n o f C le v e la n d

300

T o t a l H e a lth G r a n ts

1,500 $ 95 ,9 26

S C H O L A R S H IP S T h e F re e M e d ic a l C lin ic o f G r e a t e r C le v e la n d

Safe Space program

C a s e W e s t e r n R e s e rv e U n iv e r s it y

Scholarship in humanities

3.500

10.000 2.500

H e a lth H ill H o s p ita l f o r C h ild r e n

2.500 A m e r ic a n R e d C ro s s

7 50

H e a lth Issu e s T a s k fo r c e o f C le v e la n d , In c .

1,000

South East Office

5 00

H o m e H e a lth C a re , In c .

2 ,0 0 0

B eech B ro o k

Scout Home

Financial aid awards

1,500

Scholarship support

1,500 $5,750

N e w Y o rk , N e w Y o rk

A m e r ic a n C a n c e r S o c ie ty , O h io D iv is io n In c . $3,931

J u d s o n R e t ir e m e n t C o m m u n ity

Judson Manor

1.500

A f f i l i a t e , In c .

3,000

2,000

3 00

B ib lio te c a s B e ts y M c W illia m s In c .

500

C a lif o r n ia

5,000

1,144

ju v e n ile D ia b e te s F o u n d a tio n , C le v e la n d C h a p te r

"Clevelanders Who Care" Fund for medical research

1.500

C a th o lic C h a r it ie s C o r p o r a t io n

Catholic Charities Services B a r lo w R e s p ir a to r y H o s p it a l, L o s A n g e le s ,

2,000

Friends Campaign

B o ys & G ir ls C lu b s o f G r e a t e r C le v e la n d A m e r ic a n H e a r t A s s o c ia t io n , N .E . O h io

$ 39 4

B e lle fa ire /J e w is h C h ild r e n ’ s B u r e a u

H u n t in g t o n ’ s D is e a s e S o c ie ty o f A m e r ic a , In c .,

HEALTH

“Restricted to Ohio 1993" pilot research program

A m e r ic a n H u n g a r ia n F rie n d s o f S c o u tin g

T h e G o ld e n A g e C e n te r s o f G r e a t e r C le v e la n d , In c . C le v e la n d S t a t e U n iv e r s it y

T o t a l S c h o la r s h ip G r a n ts

S O C I A L S E R V IC E S

$2,750

600

L a k e w o o d H o s p ita l F o u n d a tio n , In c .

Heart research

300

M a la c h i H o u s e o f H o p e

550

C e n t e r f o r H u m a n S e rv ic e s

Rap Art Center

500

M e t r o H e a lt h F o u n d a tio n , In c .

Burn/Trauma Center

300

O h io P r e s b y te r ia n R e t ir e m e n t S e rv ic e s , C o lu m b u s , O h io

Breckenridge Village

2,000

T h e B e n ja m in R ose I n s t it u t e

1,100 67-


U n it e d W a y S e rv ic e s

3 1,384

Annual Campaign (over two years)

8 0,000

V o c a tio n a l G u id a n c e S e r v ic e s

1,250

Permanent reserve fund

15 0,000

Y M C A o f C le v e la n d , G e a u g a C o u n ty B r a n c h

250

Y o u th V is io n s , In c .

Big Brothers/Big Sisters Program C h ild G u id a n c e C e n t e r

1,000

M a n tu a , O h io

C le v e la n d H il l e l F o u n d a tio n , In c .

T o t a l S o c ia l S e rv ic e s G r a n ts 1,000 300

M a k e - A - W is h F o u n d a tio n

$357,931

500 S P E C IA L P H I L A N T H R O P I C

T h e N a t io n a lit ie s S e rv ic e s C e n te r

English as a Second Language program C le v e la n d H u n g a r ia n H e r it a g e S o c ie ty

500

2,000

C h i l d r e n ’ s D e fe n s e F u n d , W a s h in g to n , D .C .

Operating support for the Ohio office

2,000

Project Friendship

T h e H a t t ie L a r lh a m F o u n d a tio n , In c .,

S E R V IC E S

1,000 B r a te n a h l C o m m u n ity F o u n d a tio n

250

$ 1,500

N o r t h e a s t O h io C o a lit io n f o r t h e H o m e le s s

Kidsacks program

C le v e la n d I n t e r n a t i o n a l P r o g r a m F o r Y o u t h L e a d e rs a n d S o c ia l W o r k e r s , In c .

250

T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n ( In c .)

Unrestricted purposes

3,000 P la n n e d P a re n th o o d o f G r e a t e r C le v e la n d , In c .

3,000

17,043

The Homer C. Wadsworth Award

2,50 0

W o m e n ’ s C o m m u n ity F o u n d a tio n

1,000

D io c e s e o f O h io E p is c o p a l C o m m u n it y S e rv ic e s F o u n d a t io n

1,000

E a s t S id e C a t h o lic S h e lt e r

250

F a m ily T r a n s it io n a l H o u s in g , In c .

500

F e d e r a te d C h u r c h o f C h a g r in F a lls

644

P ly m o u th C h u r c h o f S h a k e r H e ig h ts F o u n d a tio n

390

P r o je c t I m p a c t, In c ., B o s to n , M a s s a c h u s e tts

Adoption program P ro v id e n c e H o u s e , In c .

T o t a l S p e c ia l P h ila n t h r o p ic G r a n ts 10,000 500

R e tir e d S e n io r V o lu n t e e r P r o g r a m o f C le v e la n d F i r s t C h u r c h o f C h r is t , S c ie n t is t

600

(over three years)

F r ie n d ly I n n S e t t le m e n t , In c .

250

S t. B e r n a d e tte C h u r c h

G e s t a lt I n s t i t u t e o f C le v e la n d

500

G o o d r ic h - G a n n e t t N e ig h b o r h o o d C e n t e r

250

Charitable requests and center for the needy

3,000

789

S t. P a u l C r o a tia n C h u rc h

G o o d w ill In d u s t r ie s o f G r e a t e r C le v e la n d , In c .

1,000

G r e a t e r C le v e la n d N e ig h b o r h o o d C e n te r s A s s o c ia t io n

Heights Youth Center

Humanitarian Fund

9,159

T h e S a lv a tio n A r m y

5,097

31,240 300

S is te rs o f N o t r e D a m e

Julie Billiart School H e ig h t s E m e r g e n c y F o o d C e n t e r

900

S t. P a u l's E p is c o p a l C h u r c h , C le v e la n d H e ig h ts

250

300 S t a r o f t h e S e a , In c .

H e ig h t s P a r e n t C e n t e r H it c h c o c k C e n t e r f o r W o m e n , In c .

500 1,000

Stella Maris center

300

S t a r t in g P o in t f o r C h ild C a re a n d E a r ly E d u c a tio n

Scholarships to families in need

2,590

J e w is h C o m m u n it y F e d e r a t io n o f C le v e la n d

Welfare Fund

6S

2,000

T r a n s it io n a l H o u s in g , In c .

250

$ 22,043


organizations The supporting organization enables a private foundation, family o r individual to affiliate w ith The Cleveland Foundation to take advantage o f its p ro ­ fessional program assistance, administrative ser­ vices and tax status. A t the same tim e, the fund maintains its ow n grantmaking identity. Seven supporting organizations w ere affiliated w ith The Cleveland Foundation in 1993, including tw o pioneers in the field: The Sherwick Fund, the first family foundation in the United States to affili­ ate w ith a com m unity foundation, and The TreuM art Fund, the nation’s first supporting organization affiliated w ith both a com m unity foundation and a Jewish com m unity federation. Each supporting organization has com m itted its assets to the benefit and charitable purposes o f The Cleveland Foundation, yet retains its own iden­ tity and charitable priorities. Each also has its own board o f trustees. W ith support from the L. Dale D orney Fund, The Findlay-Hancock C ounty C om m unity Fund of The Cleveland Foundation was established in 1993 as a supporting organization. Grantmaking has been deferred until assets reach $1.5 m illion. In 1993, supporting organizations awarded $ 1,849,495 to programs w hich benefit the Greater Cleveland com m unity. The grants listed are fo r general support unless otherw ise noted.

T H E S H E R W IC K F U N D A ffilia te d in 1973 John and Frances W ic k S h e rw in , fo u n d in g d o n o rs

T ru stees:

John Sherwin Jr., Homer C. Wadsworth

(deceased April 1994), James M. Delaney, Russell R. Gifford,

Sally K. Griswold

1993 G R A N T S A lz h e im e r ’ s D is e a s e a n d R e la te d D is o r d e r s A s s o c ia tio n , In c .

Programming in Lake and Geauga counties (third year) B o y S c o u ts o f A m e r ic a , G r e a t e r C le v e la n d

$ 9 ,17 2

C o u n c il N o . 4 4 0

1,200

B o y S c o u ts o f A m e r ic a , N o r t h e a s t O h io C o u n c il

1,200

C a se W e s te r n R e s e rv e U n iv e r s ity

Research on artificial feeding at the end of life by the Center for Biomedical Ethics at the School of Medicine

20,000

C h ild r e n ’ s O n c o lo g y S e rv ic e s o f N o r t h e a s t e r n O h io , In c .

Capital campaign for new Ronald McDonald House

15.000

T h e C it y C lu b F o r u m F o u n d a tio n , In c .

Marketing/communications director

10.000

C le v e la n d D e v e lo p m e n t F o u n d a tio n

Marketing communications programs for the City of Cleveland by New Cleveland Campaign

10,000

T h e C le v e la n d E ye B a n k , In c .

Consolidation of administrative and laboratory facilities

10,000

T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n ( In c .)

For allocation by The Cleveland Foundation Distribution Committee

6 0,50 0


U n it e d N e g r o C o lle g e Fu n d , In c. o f C le v e la n d

2,400

U n it e d W a y o f L a k e C o u n ty , In c .

10,300

U n it e d W a y S e rv ic e s

25,0 00

U n iv e r s it y C ir c le I n c o r p o r a t e d

Property fund C le v e la n d H e a lt h E d u c a t io n M u s e u m

2,400

V o c a tio n a l G u id a n c e S e rv ic e s

G r e a t e r C le v e la n d N e ig h b o r h o o d C e n te r s

Permanent reserve fund

A s s o c ia tio n

Capital campaign

T h e C le v e la n d I n i t i a t i v e f o r E d u c a tio n

Operating support (over three years)

25,0 00

2 5 ,00 0

30,000 T h e W e s te r n R e s e rv e H is t o r ic a l S o c ie ty

4 0,000

2,4 0 0

H a w ke n School T h e C le v e la n d M u s e u m o f A r t

2,400

The David S. Ingalls, Jr. Gymnasium (over two years)

T h e C le v e la n d M u s e u m o f N a t u r a l H i s t o r y

2,400

T h e H o ld e n A r b o r e t u m

150,000

Y o u n g M e n ’ s C h r is tia n A s s o c ia tio n o f C le v e la n d

Emergency repair of swimming pools T o t a l S h e r w ic k F u n d G r a n ts

Capital enhancement project

10,000

Residential hospice facility

C le v e la n d S c h o la r s h ip P r o g r a m s

2,400

L a k e C o u n ty M e n ta l H e a lth C e n te r

T H E G O O D R IC H

Construction of a children’s wing 10,000

2 5,000

2 5,000

L a k e C o u n ty S o c ie ty f o r R e h a b ilita tio n o f C h ild r e n a n d A d u lts

C le v e la n d Z o o lo g ic a l S o c ie t y

2,400

Summer program for school-aged children with disabilities for enhancement of social and functional skills

10,000

C u y a h o g a V a lle y L in e R a ilr o a d , P e n in s u la , O h io

Educational programs

12,500

T h e d e P a u l S c h o o l o f N o r t h e a s t O h io , In c .

Phases III and IV of curriculum development project

$6 72 ,8 72

H o s p ic e o f t h e W e s te r n R e s e rv e

C le v e la n d P u b lic R a d io

Development of alternative to Scholarship-in-Escrow program in cooperation with The Cleveland Initiative for Education

35,0 00

2,400

L a k e C o u n ty Y M C A

2,400

T h e M u s ic a l A r t s A s s o c ia tio n

2,400

S O C IA L S E T T L E M E N T

A ffilia te d in 1979

G ran tm akin g in te re sts:

Goodrich-Gannett and Lexington-Bell

neighborhood centers A d d itio n s in 1993: $33,497 D onors: Robert R. Rhodes Testamentary Trust and Ellen Garretson Wade Memorial Fund T ru stees: S. Sterling McMillan, III, Richard W. Pogue, David G. Hill, Ann L. Marotta, Steven A. Minter

1993 G R A N T S

15,000 N a t io n a l C o n fe r e n c e o f C h r is tia n s a n d Jew s, In c .

E c o n o m ic s A m e r ic a

(over five years)

25,000

G o o d r ic h - G a n n e tt N e ig h b o r h o o d C e n t e r

Human relations leadership program for Greater Cleveland area high schools

5,000

Summer camp

$5 2,00 0 1.000

E d u c a t io n a l T e le v is io n A s s o c ia tio n o f M e t r o p o lit a n C le v e la n d , W V I Z - T V

2.400

P la n n e d P a r e n th o o d o f G r e a t e r C le v e la n d , In c .

2,400

L e x in g to n - B e ll C o m m u n ity C e n t e r

F in e A r t s A s s o c ia tio n

2.400

P la y h o u s e S q u a re F o u n d a tio n

3,600

T o t a l G o o d r ic h S o c ia l S e t t le m e n t G r a n t s

T h e B e n ja m in R ose I n s t it u t e

T h e F o u n d a t io n C e n t e r , N e w Y o r k , N e w Y o r k

Operating support for The Foundation Center - Cleveland

2.400

Printing of 85th anniversary history booklet

T h e F r e e M e d ic a l C lin ic o f G r e a t e r C le v e la n d

2.400

T h e S a lv a tio n A r m y o f L a k e C o u n ty

T h e G a r d e n C e n t e r o f G r e a t e r C le v e la n d

2.400

Second Century of Caring Campaign for expansion of facilities in Painesville

7-0

6,000

10,000

60,50 0 $ 1 1 3,50 0


THE EL IZ A B ET H A N D ELLERY SE D G W IC K FUND

T a ll T im b e r s R e s e a rc h , In c., T a lla h a s s e e , F lo rid a

10,000

THE TREU-MART FUND E stablished in 1980 by W illia m C. and E liza b e th M. T re u h a ft

E s tablished in 1978 by E liz a b e th and E lle ry Sedgw ick

T o w a r d s E m p lo y m e n t, In c .

A d d itio n s in 1993: $69,568 D onors: Elizabeth and Ellery Sedgwick T ru stees: Elizabeth Sedgwick, Walter G. Sedgwick,

Job placement program

Frances M. King, Annie Lewis J, Garda, Steven A. Minter

"Acting Out” program for children by the New West Theatre

4,000

1993 G R A N T S

Y .E .S . In c .

1,000

C le v e la n d C h ild r e n ’ s M u s e u m

T o t a l S e d g w ic k F u n d G r a n ts

5,000

as a s u p p o rtin g o rg a n iz a tio n o f b o th T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n and T h e Jewish C o m m u n ity F e d e ra tio n o f C leve la nd

W e s t S id e E c u m e n ic a l M in is tr y

T ru stees: Arthur W. Treuhaft, Mary Louise Hahn, Henry L. Zucker, Jerry V. Jarrett, Frances M. King, Henry J. Goodman, Albert B. Ratner

1993 G R A N T S

Elizabeth Flory Kelly Fund C le v e la n d C o u n c il o n W o r ld A f f a ir s

$ 7 7 ,0 0 0 B e lle fa ire /J e w is h C h ild r e n ’ s B u r e a u

$ l ,000 3,000

THE A LTO N

Expansion of Expressive Arts Therapy Program (over tw o years)

F. A N D C A R R IE S . D A V I S F U N D

T h e F re e M e d ic a l C lin ic o f G r e a t e r C le v e la n d

E stablished in 1979 by A lto n F. and C a rrie S. Davis

OB/GYN Nurse Practitioner for care of pregnant adolescents

Mary Jane Davis Hartwell, Shattuck W. Hartwell Jr., M.D., John J. Dwyer, Sally K. Griswold, Harvey G. Oppmann

15,000

B u s in e s s V o lu n t e e r is m C o u n c il

T ru stees:

Volunteer Trustee Institute

1993 G R A N T

Assessment of school-age health care project by the Center for Adolescent Health at the School of Medicine

10,000

Nursing Health Center of the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing

15,000

2 5,00 0

C a se W e s te r n R e s e rv e U n iv e r s it y G r e a t e r C le v e la n d C o m m u n it y S h a re s

2 ,0 0 0

G r e a t e r C le v e la n d N e ig h b o r h o o d C e n te r s N e ig h b o r h o o d H e a lth C a r e , In c .

A s s o c ia tio n

Capital campaign (over tw o years) H e ig h ts P a r e n t C e n t e r

10,000

M a la c h i H o u s e o f H o p e

Research on inner-city youth and violence

T o t a l D a v is F u n d G r a n t

$ 1 5 ,0 0 0

C h ild r e n ’ s D e fe n s e F u n d , W a s h in g to n , D .C .

3,000

Operating support for the Cleveland office (over three years)

2 ,0 0 0

T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n ( In c .)

Mailtix program by Cleveland Arts Consortium (over tw o years)

N e ig h b o r h o o d H e a lt h C a r e , In c .

Family planning program by Neighborhood Family Practice (over tw o years)

$15,000

10,000

10,000

3 00 ,0 00

10,000

T h e C le v e la n d I n it ia t i v e f o r E d u c a tio n

Operating support (over three years) P r e t e r m C le v e la n d , In c .

Site acquisition or renovation of new office space

7 ,96 9

1,000

L u t h e r a n M e t r o p o lit a n M i n is t r y A s s o c ia tio n

Friend-to-Friend prison visitation program

Family planning program by Neighborhood Family Practice (over tw o years)

3 0,00 0


C le v e la n d P u b lic T h e a t r e , In c .

Production of The Dybbuk in the 1993-94 season

THE M C D O N A LD

J e w is h V o c a tio n a l S e rv ic e 5,000

Volunteer initiative program

FUND

25,200 E stablished in 1984 b y C ha rle s M c D o n a ld

T h e F o u n d a tio n C e n t e r , N e w Y o r k , N e w Y o r k

N e w O r g a n iz a tio n f o r t h e V is u a l A r t s ( N O V A )

Operating support for The Foundation Center - Cleveland (over tw o years)

"Art in Special Places" program

4,000

3,500 O h io C o u n c il o n H o lo c a u s t E d u c a tio n , K e n t, O h io

Reprinting of curriculum guide, Prejudice Unleashed

G r e a t L a k e s T h e a t e r F e s tiv a l

Subscription campaign for 1993-94 season

30,000

25,000 1993 G R A N T

H a n n a P e rk in s S c h o o l

Outreach programs at three inner-city daycare centers

G r e a t W a t e r s A q u a r iu m

12,000 C le v e la n d S m a ll B u s in e s s In c u b a t o r , In c .

Design and physical plan for a new aquarium R a in b o w B a b ie s a n d C h ild r e n s H o s p ita l

Assessment of Early Learning Progress project

G r e a t e r C le v e la n d N e ig h b o r h o o d C e n te r s

50,000

Operating support (fourth year)

T o t a l M c D o n a ld F u n d G r a n t

$7 3 ,85 4

40,000 T H E F IN D L A Y -H A N C O C K C O U N T Y C O M M U N IT Y F U N D O F T H E C L E V E L A N D F O U N D A T IO N

Y o u n g M e n ’ s C h r is tia n A s s o c ia tio n o f C le v e la n d 129,600

Emergency repair of swimming pools

100,000

25,000 E stablished in 1993

T o t a l T r e u - M a r t F u n d G ra n ts

J e w is h F a m ily S e r v ic e A s s o c ia t io n o f C le v e la n d

Capital campaign (over three years)

$7 3 ,85 4

S t a r t in g P o in t f o r C h ild C a re a n d E a r ly E d u c a tio n

J e w is h C o m m u n it y F e d e r a t io n o f C le v e la n d

Integration and acculturation services for Soviet Jewish youth (third year)

Operating support for Collinwood Enterprise Center 10,000

A s s o c ia t io n

Capital campaign

G ran tm akin g fo cu s: Small business development in the city of Cleveland T ru stees: Charles R. McDonald, John J. Dwyer, Gary L. Bleiweiss, David G. Hill, Steven A. Minter

$ 8 9 7 ,2 6 9

G ran tm akin g fo c u s: The City of Findlay and Hancock County A d d itio n s in 1993: $ 156,750 toward pledges of $309,500 D onors: Cooper Tire and Rubber Company, Dr. and Mrs. Richard H. Deerhake, Thomas B. Donnell, Findlay Industries, Incorporated, Findlay Machine and Tool, Incorporated, The Findlay Publishing Company, H. Fort Flowers Foundation, Incorporated, Mr. and Mrs. J. Louis Frank, Philip D. Gardner, Mr. and Mrs. Ivan W. Gorr, G.S.W. Manufacturing, Incorporated, Hancor, Incorporated, James L. and Rebecca E. Kirk, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph R. Kirk, Mr. and Mrs. Dennis W. Krueger, Marathon Oil Company, National Lime and Stone Company, Mr. and Mrs. G. Norman Nicholson, The Ohio Bank, OHM Corporation, Whirlpool Foundation

S teerin g C om m ittee Co-chairmen: Thomas B. Donnell and G. Norman Nicholson

Executive Committee: Ivan W. Gorr, J. Louis Frank, Philip D. Gardner, James L. Kirk, Dennis W. Krueger Asset development phase in 1993; no grants were made.


re p o rt o f independent

auditors

The Cleveland Foundation Distribution Committee and Trustee Banks of The Cleveland Foundation We have audited the accompanying statement of financial position of The Cleveland Foundation as of December 31,1993, and the related statements of activities and cash flows for the year then ended. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Foundation's management. O ur responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with generally accepted auditing stan足 dards. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain rea足 sonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by man足 agement, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion. In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of The Cleveland Foundation as of December 31, 1993, and the results of its activities and its cash flows fo r the year then ended, in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles.

statem en t o f financial position December 3 1 ,1 9 9 3

A ssets Cash and cash equivalents

basis o f accounting.

2,454,453 37,288,694

Securities - N ote D: U.S. Government obligations

2 9 ,12 5 ,6 14

Bonds

22,267,137

Comm on and preferred stocks

270,080,036

Common trust funds

131,657,014

Comm on investment funds

235,036,787 688,166,588

O ther investments - Note D

8,586,510

Property and other assets

3,410,478 $ 739,906,723

Liabilities and net assets Accounts payable and accrued expenses

As further discussed in Note C to the financial statements, in 1993 The Cleveland Foundation adopted Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. I 17 and changed its basis of accounting from primarily cash basis to the accrual

$

Short-term investments

Grants payable

$

768,087 12,2 0 0 ,13 1

Net assets: Unrestricted: For grantmaking purposes

1,397,482

Board designated: For administrative purposes Property

Cleveland, Ohio

8 32 ,513 1,242,816

Temporarily restricted

33,392,198

Permanently restricted

690,073,496 726,938,505

April 13, 1994

$ 739,906,723

See notes to financial statements.

7-.S


sta te m e n t o f activities Year Ended December 31, 1993

C hanges in unrestricted net assets

Changes in tem porarily restricted net assets

Revenues: Received from donors Interest income O ther

Total unrestricted revenues

$

334,061

Received from donors

8,335,632

141,243

Dividend income

4,780,422

Interest income

3,467,268

624,836 1,100,140

N et assets released resulting from satisfaction of donor and program restrictions

Total unrestricted revenues and other support

37,495,121

38,595,261

Comm on trust fund income

5,107,654

Comm on investment fund income

7,509,857

Partial benefit fund income - Note E

6,223,875

O ther income

129,485

N e t unrealized and realized gains

358,655

N e t assets released resulting from satisfaction Expenses:

o f donor and program restrictions

Authorized by trustee banks: Trustees' fees O ther expenses Grants authorized

3,061,355 252,314 33,183,780

Administrative expenses: Grantmaking

1,9 4 1,428

Increase in tem porarily restricted net assets

Received from donors

416,398

O ther income

Special projects

587,269

Net unrealized and realized gains

Development

777,722

N e t assets released resulting from satisfaction

Fund management

108,513

Total expenses D ecrease in unrestricted net assets

3,831,330 40,328,779 (1,733,518)

1,804,404

Changes in perm anently restricted net assets

Philanthropic services

Total administrative expenses

(34,108,444)

o f donor and program restrictions

Increase in perm anently restricted net assets Increase in net assets N et assets a t beginning o f year restated - Note C N et assets a t end o f year

See notes to financial statements.

4,376,217 2,998 21,804,826

(3,386,677)

22,797,364 22,868,250

704,070,255 $ 726,938,505


notes to financial statements

statem ent o f cash flows

A. O rganization Year Ended December 31, 1993

Cash flo w s fro m operating activities Increase in net assets

$

22,868,250

Adjustments to reconcile increase in net assets to net cash and cash equivalents provided by (used for) operating activities: 239,039

Depreciation and amortization

(22,163,481)

Net unrealized and realized gains

(898,800)

(Increase) in other investments

1,596,203

Decrease in other assets (Decrease) in accounts payable

(5,407,433)

and accrued expenses Increase in grants payable

3,035,629

Contributions o f securities

(8,570,985)

N et cash and cash equivalents ( used fo r) operating activities

(9,301,578)

Cash flo w s fro m investing activities (99,436)

Purchase o f property Proceeds from maturities and sales o f short-term

379,381,233

investments and securities

(371,718,355)

Purchase o f short-term investments and securities

N et cash and cash equivalents provided by investing activities N et (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

7,563,442

(1,738,136)

B. Significant Accounting Policies

The Cleveland Foundation reports gifts of cash and other assets as restricted support when they are received with donor stipulations that limit the use o f the donated assets. When the intent of the donor is that the assets are to remain in perpetuity, the assets are reported as perma­ nently restricted. The investment income generated by these assets (excluding net unrealized and realized gains and losses) is reported as temporarily restrict­ ed until the program restriction of the donor is fulfilled. When a donor restric­ tion expires, that is, when a stipulated time restriction ends o r program restric­ tion is accomplished, temporarily restricted net assets are released to unrestrict­ ed net assets and reported in the statement of activities as net assets released from restrictions. Temporarily restricted net assets are available for program purposes in accordance with published standards established by The Cleveland Foundation. In accordance with the Resolutions of Trust, permanently restricted net assets may be released to unrestricted net assets in certain limited circum­ stances. N et assets are released from donor restrictions by incurring expenses including grant authorizations that satisfy the restricted purposes o r by occur­ rence o f other events specified by donors. The Cleveland Foundation considers all highly liquid instruments purchased with a maturity of three months or less to be cash equivalents. Cash and cash equiv­ alents consist of demand deposits and repurchase agreements.

4,192,589

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year

Cash a nd cash equivalents a t end o f year

The financial statements include the accounts o f The Cleveland Foundation (“charitable corporation"), The Greater Cleveland Foundation, The Cleveland Foundation (“community trust,” approved by Resolutions o f Trust) and affiliated supporting organizations: The Davis Fund, The Goodrich Social Settlement Fund, The McDonald Fund, The Sedgwick Fund, The Sherwick Fund, and The Findlay-Hancock County Community Fund. The supporting organiza­ tions were established under the provisions of Section 509(a)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. The Cleveland Foundation is responsible fo r expenditures of these supporting organizations for specific charitable purposes. Interorganizational transactions and accounts have been eliminated.

$

2,454,453

See notes to financial statements.

75


C. B asis o f P resentation a nd Accounting Effective January I, 1993, The Cleveland Foundation adopted Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. I 17, Financial Statements of N ot-for-Profit Organizations. The statement estab足 lishes uniform standards for external financial statement presentation for not-forprofit organizations and accordingly, the 1993 financial statement presentation differs substantially from the financial statement presentation previously used by The Cleveland Foundation. The adoption o f this statement did not have an effect on net assets o f The Cleveland Foundation as of December 31,1993. Effective January I, 1993, The Cleveland Foundation changed its basis of accounting from primarily cash basis to the accrual basis of accounting. Such changes include the recognition o f securities as o f trade date versus settlement date, the recognition o f receivables and related income, and grants payable and related expenses. N et assets as of January 1, 1993 have been restated for these changes to conform to generally accepted accounting principles and resulted in a decrease in net assets of $5,969,237 as o f January 1, 1993. This change had the effect of decreasing net assets by $ 10,825,047 at December 31,1993 and decreasing the change in net assets for the year ended December 31,1993 by $4,855,810. D. Securities and Other Investm ents Securities and other investments are reported at their market value. Securities traded on a national securities exchange are valued at the last reported sales price on the last business day of the year; investments traded in the over-the-counter market and listed securities fo r which no sale was reported on that date are valued at fair value based upon the most recently reported bid prices. Short-term investments are valued at cost which approximates market. Certain other investments are valued at fair value as determined by The Cleveland Foundation or its trustee banks. Realized and unrealized gains or losses are determined by comparison of asset cost to net proceeds received at the time of disposal o r changes in the difference between market values and cost, respectively. These amounts are reflected in the financial statements as net unrealized and realized gains o r losses.

Cost of securities and other investments at December 31,199 3 are: U.S. Government obligations

$

Bonds

27,602,599 20,780,063

Comm on and preferred stocks

2 0 1,374,122

Comm on trust funds

12 1,383,642

Comm on investment funds

222,379,230 593,519,656

O ther investments

8 ,5 2 1,595 $ 602,041,251

The Cleveland Foundation has established three common investment funds which allow for the commingling of various trust assets into common investment funds. The common investment funds are maintained at separate trustee banks and invest足 ment in the funds is limited only to the trust funds o f The Cleveland Foundation. Market value of investments held by the common investment funds consists of the following at December 31,1993: Short-term investments U.S. Government obligations Bonds Common and preferred stocks Common trust funds O ther investments

$

3,242,394 29,579,453 39,270,672 12 5 ,16 1,256 37,065,699 7 17 ,3 13

$ 235,036,787


E. P artial B enefit Funds

Partial benefit funds generally provide, each in varying amounts, for payment of annuities to certain individuals, trustees’ fees and other expenses of the trusts, prior to payment of the balance o f the income to The Cleveland Foundation (“community trust"). The total market values of partial benefit funds are included in the accompanying statements since The Cleveland Foundation ("community trust”) ultimately will receive the entire income o f such funds. In 1993, The Cleveland Foundation ("community trust") received approx­ imately 82% o f the aggregate income o f the various partial benefit funds. The market value of partial benefit funds was $ 185,836,444 at December 31.1993.

F. A dm inistrative E xpenses

Administrative expenses, as reported on the state­ ment of activities consist o f the following: 1993 Salaries

$ 1,8 2 1,462

Employee benefits

3 0 5 ,15 1

Occupancy and office expense

652,802

Professional and consulting fees and staff expenses

568,484

O ther

483,431 $ 3,831,330

G. Supporting O rganizations Total assets of the

supporting organizations which are included in the statement of financial position are comprised of the following:

The Davis Fund The Goodrich Social Settlement Fund

$

December 31,1993 totals $ 10,753,113.

H. O perating Leases

The Cleveland Foundation leases office space under an operating lease agreement which expires May 16, 2003 with a renewal option for tw o consecutive five year terms. Rental expense was $295,245 in 1993. Future minimum rental payments at December 31,1993, under the non-cancel­ able operating lease are as follows: I 994—$2.86,892; I 995—$292,6 14; 1996—$298,540; 1997-$304,465; 1998-$3 10,444; thereafter-$ 1,575,665.

I. R etirem ent Plan

The Cleveland Foundation has a defined contribution retire­ ment plan, based upon specified percentages of salary, for all employees. Retirement plan expense fo r 1993 was $149,030. All contributions under the plan are funded and vest with employees as made.

J. Income Taxes

The Internal Revenue Service has ruled that the community trust, The Greater Cleveland Foundation, the charitable corporation and each of the supporting organizations qualify under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code as tax exempt organizations.

1,080,194 1, 15 2 ,9 14

The McDonald Fund

1,280,043

The Sedgwick Fund

1,272,192

The Sherwick Fund

13 ,8 19 ,6 9 1

The Findlay-Hancock County Community Fund

The Treu-Mart Fund is a supporting organization of both The Cleveland Foundation and the Jewish Community Federation o f Cleveland. Financial trans­ actions and account balances of the Treu-Mart Fund are not included in these financial statements. Market value of investments held by The Treu-Mart Fund at

329,788 $ 18,934,822

7”?'


Investm ent Managers

in v e s tm e n t

report

Consistent w ith its original design in 19 14 as this cou ntry’s first com m unity foundation, The Cleveland Founda­ tio n shares a jo in t stewardship role w ith its trustee banks and provides guidance to its investm ent managers. The Foundation sets investm ent p o li­ cies and m onitors perform ance w hile th e tru stee banks and investm ent managers generate the dividend and interest incom e used fo r grantmaking. N e w gifts and market appreciation are added to o u r perm anent endowment. Thus, superior investment performance and new gifts are the Foundation’s chief sources o f growth. Th e F o und ation’s investm ent policies aim fo r real g ro w th in p rin ­ cipal w h ile assuring a predictable incom e stream tha t maintains and even enhances income available fo r grantmaking. This approach, in con ju nction w ith the generosity o f donors, has enabled the Foundation to double in size ove r the past ten years, w hile still authorizing m ore than $261 m illion in grants to the com m unity.

73

Bank O ne O h io T rust Com pany, N A 600 Superior Avenue Cleveland, O H 441 14-0183 First National Bank o f O h io 123 W est Prospect Avenue Cleveland, O H 441 15-1070 The Huntington Trust Com pany, N A 917 Euclid Avenue Cleveland, O H 44115 National C ity Bank I 900 East N inth Street Cleveland, O H 441 14-3484

FINDLAY AREA INVESTMENT MANAGERS

Bank O ne O h io T rust Com pany, N A 500 South Main Street Findlay, O h io 45840 Fifth T h ird Bank o f N o rth w e s te rn O hio, N A 246 I South Main Street Findlay, O h io 458 40 Mid Am erican National Bank & T rust Co. I 27 East Main Cross Findlay, O h io 45840

Society National Bank 127 Public Square, 17th Floor Cleveland, O H 441 14-1306

T h e O h io Bank 236 South Main Street P.O. Box 300 Findlay, O h io 45839

Am erican Asset Management Com pany 200 Public Square 26th Floor, Suite 3500 Cleveland, O H 44114-2301

The Peoples Banking Com pany 301 South Main Street Findlay, O h io 45840

Gries Financial C o rpo ratio n 1801 East N inth Street Suite 1600 Cleveland, O H 441 14-3100 M cDonald & Com pany Securities, Inc. 800 Superior Avenue Suite 2 100 Cleveland, O H 44114 M errill Lynch T rust Com pany O ne Cleveland C enter 1375 East N inth Street Cleveland, O H 441 14-1798

Society National Bank 4 18 South Main Street Findlay, O h io 45840 M cDonald & Com pany Securities, Inc. 400 South Main Street Findlay, O h io 45840


G R O W T H

OF

T H E

C L E V E L A N D

F O U N D A T I O N

(in Millions)

.......

84

85

86

87

88

89

90

91

92

93

84

85

86

87

88

89

90

91

92

93

84

A S S E T

85

M A R K E T

86

87

88

V A L U E

G R A N T M A K I N G G I F T S

R E C E I V E D

89

90

91

92

93


C U L T U R A L A F F A IR S

Steven A. M in te r

Kathleen A. C erveny

Executive Director

Program Officer,

Barbara M. D eerhake

Cultural Affairs

Program Officer,

Susan N . Lajoie Associate Director Roberta W . A llp o rt Foundation Secretary and Special Assistant to the Executive Director A rth u r J. N aparstek Senior Fellow

T H E D I S T R IB U T I O N C O M M IT T E E A lfre d M . Rankin Jr.

Vice Chairperson Rev. E lm o A. Bean James E. B en ne tt

Joan M. C erne Administrative Secretary/

DEVELO PM EN T Jay T albot Senior Program Officer, Civic Affairs and Economic Development

M arvelous Ray Baker

Pamela L. G eorge

Executive Secretary

Program Associate

P ierretta H. W ingfield

D iane C . Kaszei

Records Management Administrator

Administrative Secretary

C arl C urtis

SyM one R. M cClain

Staff Assistant/Records Clerk

Grants Administrator

H E A L T H A N D S O C IA L S E R V IC E S

D O N O R R E L A T IO N S

G oldie K. Alvis

M a rjo rie M. Carlson

Senior Program Officer,

Director of Donor Relations

R obert E. Eckardt Senior Program Officer, Health

(appointed March 1994)

C lare C orrigan W o id ke Donor Relations Associate C elene E. Petkash Administrative Assistant

James M. D elaney

T e rri C olem an-Kovach

D o ris A. Evans, M .D .

Program Associate

Russell R. G ifford

C in d y Tausch

Administrative Secretary/

J e rry V. Ja rrett

Administrative Secretary,

Grants Administrator

A d rie n n e Lash Jones

James V. Patton C harles A. Ratner T R U S T E E S C O M M IT T E E

P H I L A N T H R O P IC S E R V IC E S

Karen N . H o rn Bank One, Cleveland, NA Richard L. H ard gro ve First National Bank of Ohio G e org e B rookes Huntington National Bank W illia m E. M acD on ald III National City Bank

M ichael J. Hoffm ann Director of

E D U C A T IO N Joyce R. Daniels Program Officer, Precollegiate Education Juanita L. W o rth y Administrative Secretary/ Grants Administrator C arol K. W ille n

D eanne M. M achen Adminstrative Secretary/ Grants Administrator Janet M. C a rp e n te r Office Services Administrator Janice M. C u trig h t Information Systems Specialist D avid L. M ueckenheim Programmer/Analyst Lynn M. Sargi Human Resources Administrator M artha A. Burchaski Receptionist G lo ria J. Kish Senior Accountant Karen H o o i Jean A. Lang Kathy S. Parker

C arolyn M. G ro th

Joyce E. Schneider Administrative Secretary, Health

Chief Financial Officer/Treasurer

Accountants

Social Services

Lindsay Jordan M org en th ale r (completed term March 1994)

The L. Dale Dorney Fund A D M IN I S T R A T I O N A N D F IN A N C E J. T . M ullen

C I V I C A F F A IR S A N D E C O N O M IC

Leslie A. D unford

Social Services

COUNTY

Grants Administrator

Senior Administrative Assistant

Chairperson A nnie Lew is J. Garda

F IN D L A Y A N D H A N C O C K

E X E C U T I V E O F F IC E

Edna M. Deal Account Clerk C O M M U N IC A T IO N S Lynne E. W o o d m a n Director of Communications

Philanthropic Services and

M ary Frances Knuth

Principal Staff. The Lake-Geauga Fund

Communications Associate

and Supporting Organizations Ellen M. Ivory

Alicia M, C ilib e rto Administrative Assistant

Administrative Secretary/ Grants Administrator

G ENERAL CO U N SEL M alvin E. Bank Thompson, Hine & Flory

Senior Program Officer,

The staff list reflects the organization of

Higher Education

the Foundation as of April 15, 1994.

Viena R. M elton

S tephen E. W a ll

Administrative Secretary/

Society National Bank

Grants Administrator


f o r m o re

inform ation

E D ITO R Lynne E. W oodm an A S S O C IA T E ED ITO R S

...about applying fo r a grant from The Cleveland Foundation

Alicia M. C iliberto M ary Frances Knuth

Write, call, or stop in for a free copy of

E D IT O R IA L A S S IS T A N T S

GUID ELINES FOR GRANT SEEKERS

Janice M. C utright

Contact Susan N. Lajoie, Associate Director,

G loria J. Kish

or the program officer for the appropriate area

Jean A. Lang Celene E. Petkash

...about giving to your com munity through The Cleveland Foundation

D ES IG N

Write, call, or stop in for a free copy of

P R IN C IP A L P H O T O G R A P H Y

Epstein, G utzw iller, Schultz and Partners, Inc.

GIFT OF A LIFETIME:

Daniel M ilner

G UID E T O SHAPING YO UR LEGACY

A D D IT IO N A L P H O T O G R A P H Y

Contact Marjorie M. Carlson,

Rodney L. Brown

Director of Donor Relations

Great Lakes Theater Festival Ron Linek

...about the Lake-Geauga Fund of The Cleveland Foundation W rite, call, or stop in for a free brochure Contact Michael J. Hoffmann, Director of Philanthropic Services

Baldwin-Wallace College Jerry Mann North Royalton Community Playground Fund New Organization for Visual Arts (NOVA) Bill Reiter

o th er

publications

Cleveland State University Saint Ignatius High School

Available without charge from the

M o rt Tucker

Office of Communications

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum

A N N U A L REPO RTS

Ursuline College Jonathan Wayne

Q U A RTER LY N EW SLETTERS K EEPING THE TRUST

News and features about the Foundation

Enterprise Development, Inc. Bobbi Perkins-W hite W est Side Ecumenical Ministry

and its grantees Steve Z o rc VENTURES IN PHILANTHROPY

A resource for current and prospective donors

The Benjamin Rose Institute

lynne e. w oodm an Director of Communications Lynne Woodman joined the Foundation staff in 1993 as director of communications. She most recently served for six years in corporate communications at Ameritech. She also is a form er supervisor of communications at The Cleveland Museum of Natural History and member of the piano faculty at The Cleveland Institute of Music. She is a past board member of the Broadway School of Music and the Arts, the Press Club of Cleveland and the Cleveland Advertising Club, and a current board member of the Public Relations Society of America, Greater Cleveland chap足 ter. A graduate of Ohio Wesleyan University with a bachelor of music in piano, she also holds a master of business administration from the Weatherhead School of Case Western Reserve University.

m ary fian ces knuth Communications Associate Mary Frances Knuth joined the Foundation in 1992 as a grants adminis足 trator in health and social services, and was named communications associate in 1994. Prior to joining the Foundation staff, she held a variety o f advertis足 ing positions with Adverama Directory and Marketing Services, Inc, She is a member of The Junior League of Cleveland and is editor of The League magazine. She holds a bachelor's degree in journalism from Ohio University and is pursuing a master of busi足 ness administration from Cleveland State University.


<F THE

CLEVELAND

FOUNDATION

1422 Euclid Avenue, Suite 1400 Cleveland, Ohio 44115-2001 Phone: 216.861.3810 TTY: 216.861.3806 FAX: 216.861.1729


Cleveland Foundation – 1993 Annual Report