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TA BL E O F C O N T E N T S

A ssets a t D e c e m b e r 31, 1992

T h e C l e v e la n d F o u n d a t i o n exists to

Investment Report

78

$710 m illio n

N ew g ifts re c e iv e d , 1992

$11 m illio n

G ra n ts a n d p ro g ra m -re la te d in v e s tm e n ts a u th o riz e d

$30 m illio n

g r e a t r e s o u r c e s sin c e its c r e a t i o n in

e n h a n c e the quality of life tor all resi­

1914 as the n a t i o n ’s p io n eer c o m m u ­

d en ts o f G re a te r C lev e la n d . U sin g

nity trust. A l tho u gh k n o w n chiefly for

fu nd s e n tr u ste d to its ste w ard s h ip by

its g r a n t m a k i n g , T h e C l e v e l a n d

th ou sa nd s o f people o f various m eans,

F o u n d a t i o n plays o ther roles: co n ven­

the F o u n d a t i o n makes gr ants to n o n ­

er o f fun d ers a n d c o m m u n i t y leaders

profit organizations a n d go vernm ental

a r o u n d specific issues; catalyst for new

agencies to address the c o m m u n i t y ’s

p r o g r a m s a n d o r g a n i z a t i o n s ; project

n eeds a n d o p p o r tu n itie s . T h e F o u n ­

m an ag er; a n d local a nd national p h il­

d a t i o n h a s b e e n o n e o f C l e v e l a n d ’s

a nth rop ic leader.


1992 G ra n ts and pro gram -related investm ents by program area (to ta ls in c lu d e u n d e s ig n a te d , d e s ig n a te d , a n d d o n o r -a d v is o r g r a n ts ) GRANTS BY SUPPORTING ORGANIZATIONS

$1.5 m illion

CULTURAL AFFAIRS

PRECOLLEGIATE EDUCATION

SCHOLARSHIPS

SOCIAL SERVICES

GEOGRAPHIC FU

$3.5 m illion - 11%

$1.7 m illion - 5%

$0.4 m illion - 1%

$4.5 m illion - 15%

$0.9 m illion - 3%

$3.0 m illion - 10%

$4.6 m illion - 15%

$3.5 m illion - 11%

Thefollowing grant was omitted from the Civic Affairs section. Youth Opportunities Unlimited

Summer youth employment program (third year) $150,000

The section totals on page 15 should be adjusted accordingly.

$4.4 m illion - 15%

p h il a n t h

$4.3 m illion


T h i s A n n u a l R e p o r t s e r v e s as T h e

help from T h e Cleveland Fou ndation,

Clev e la nd F o u n d a t i o n ’s official record

d e v e l o p m e n t o f C l e v e l a n d ’s greatest

ping complex in the M id to w n Corridor

o f 1992. It is designed to fu rther your

natural resource — its location on Lake

on Cleveland ’s east side. Anch ored by a

u n d e r s t a n d i n g o f the F o u n d a t i o n a n d

Erie - progressed in 1992. At the I n ner

superm arket an d featuring a variety o f

its w o r k by d o c u m e n t i n g gifts received,

H a r b o r, c o n s tru c tio n b eg an on the

o t h e r c o m m e r c i a l s e rv ic e s , C h u r c h

grants authorized, a n d significant activ­

Rock and Roll H all o f Fam e an d M u se­

Square serves an area formerly w ithout

ities o f the year.

H

N i n e t e e n n in e­

completion o f C h u r c h Square, a shop­

u m a n d p la n s for th e G r e a t L akes

m ajor sh op pin g facilities. Over the next

ty-two b r o u g h t Cleveland a wide range

M u s e u m m o v e d f o rw a r d .

P lanning

few y e a r s, it w i l l be j o i n e d b y n e w

o f ch a lle n g e s . W o r k b e g a n o r m o v ed

also continued durin g 1992 for a state-

housing, expanded social services, and

fo rw ard on a n u m b e r o f endeavors

of-the-art aq u a r i u m , “G r e a t Waters of

other civic a n d economic development

w h i c h will sha pe the f u tu re look a nd

the World,” on Lake Erie at the m o u th

e f fo r t s .

feel o f the city. E a c h o f these gave cause

o f th e C u y a h o g a River.

At the

co m m u n ity life expan ded , others c on ­

for r enewed energy a n d enthus iasm . At

o p p o site e n d o f th e d o w n t o w n area,

tracted sharply. Wren ch ing downsizings

sam e

c o nstruction began on the G atew ay

affected the Cleveland corporate c o m ­

time, m ajor

com plex, w h ic h will ho use a baseball

munity, r ed u cin g n o t only the size o f

O OUR

c h a n g e s in

sta diu m a nd sports arena. T h e facility

w o rk fo rces b u t in m a n y cases th e

E AID E R S

the c o rp o ­

is su p p orted by a n u m b e r o f business

a m o u n t o f corporate com m u n ity f u n d ­

rate com -

a n d civic p a r t n e r s , i n c l u d i n g T h e

ing. State bu dg et cuts sharply reduced

m u n i t y

Cleveland Foundation. W h e n Gateway

aid for G e n e r a l Assistance recipients

the

MESSAGE

11

H

W h ile th ese areas o f

a n d t h e h u m a n services a r e n a h a d a

is com pleted, Cleveland will have not

a n d f u n d i n g for e d u c a t i o n a n d t h e

p ainful im p act on m a n y area individu­

only world-class facilities b u t the first

arts.

als a n d families.

11

I n c re a s i n g l y , p u b l i c a n d

Several strate­

sports com plex in the nation designed

private agencies are turn ing to fo un da­

gic goals for the city o f Clevela nd are

a n d built in full com p lian ce w ith the

tions a n d o t h e r f u n d e rs as r eso urces

r e la te d to n e w m o d e s o f ec o n o m ic

Am ericans W ith Disabilities Act. G ate­

have diminished. However, co ntinuing

11

develop m ent in the 1990s a n d are su p­

w ay a n d t h e l a k e f r o n t d e v e l o p m e n t

weakness in the national econom y a n d

po rted by T h e Clevela nd F o u nd ation .

p rojects will d r a w m illio n s of people

g row ing need in the co m m un ity mean

A c h i e v i n g t h e s e g o a l s w i l l h e l p to

into

each

th at foundation s a nd corporate funders

assure that Cleveland becomes a highly

year.

T h e F o un dation also su p ­

cannot always fill the gaps. T h e F o u n ­

d e s i r a b l e v isitor d e s t i n a t i o n , d r i v in g

ported developm ent beyond the d o w n ­

dation in 1992 stretched to the limits its

fu rther ec onom ic expansion a n d creat­

tow n

various roles as p h i l a n t h ro p i c leader,

ing th ou sa n d s o f n ew jobs.

neig hborhoods was highlighted by the

11

W ith

d o w n to w n 11

area.

C lev e la n d

C o n stru c tio n

in

the

co nvener and educator.

11

The

Alfred M . Rankin , Jr.

Chairperson o f the Distribution Committee


final report o f the Stu dy C om m issio n

Steven A. M in ter

Executive Director

F oundation remains the second largest

1992, t h e F o u n d a t i o n e x p a n d e d t h e

o n M e d ical R esearch a n d E d u c a t i o n

co m m u n i t y fo u n d atio n in the nation,

options op en to donors by establishing

was a key event o f 1992. Com po sed o f

with an e n d o w m e n t in excess o f $700

the C o m m u n i t y Pooled Incom e F u n d,

nationally em in en t experts, an d m oder­

million. In 1992, grants an d pr ogram -

w h ic h allows nonprofits to h ave th eir

ated an d fu nded by the Foundation, the

related investments were m a d e totaling

d o n o r s m a k e gifts to th e F o u n d a t i o n

C o m m i s s i o n r e c o m m e n d e d t h a t th e

n e a r ly $30 m i l l io n a n d n e w gifts o f

w h ich ultimately will streng then th eir

c o m m u n ity ’s leadership w ork to recruit

m ore t h a n $11 millio n were received.

o w n en d o w m en ts . We also c on clu ded

distinguished researchers to Cleveland

T h e F o u n d a t i o n ’s portfolio, m an ag ed

a n agreem en t with M c D o n a ld & C o m ­

an d establish two strengthened acade­

by Society N a t i o n a l B a n k , N a t i o n a l

pany designed to enco urag e M c D o n a ld

mic medical centers whi ch would coor­

City Bank, H u n t i n g t o n N ational Bank,

clients a n d o th e r interested d o n o r s to

d i n a t e t h e i r c o m m o n a c t i v i t i e s . It

B a n k O n e , C le v e la n d , N A , F irst

e s t a b l i s h f u n d s at t h e F o u n d a t i o n

further recom m ended th at the F o u n d a­

National B ank o f Ohio, a n d American

w h i c h M c D o n a l d w o u l d in v e s t a n d

tion continue to w ork with two major

Asset M anagem ent, has performed well

m an ag e.

partners, Cleveland To m orrow ’s Tech­

above the m edian o f similar investment

the recent death o f Raym o n d Q. Arm -

n o lo g y L e a d e r s h i p C o u n c i l a n d the

f u n d s o v er t h e p a s t five years. T h e

in g ton , f o u n d e r a n d c h a i r m a n o f the

Edison Biotechnology Center, to attract

e n d o w m e n t is m a n a g e d acco rdin g to

Webb-Triax Company, w h o chaired the

11

We w ere sa d d e n e d by

scientists an d provide opportunities for

objectives established by the D istribu ­

F o u n d a t i o n ’s D istribu tio n C o m m i t t e e

c o m m e r c i a l i z i n g tech n o lo g y . T h e

tion C o m m i t t e e .

T h e T ru stees

in t h e 1970s a n d r e m a i n e d inv o lved

Fou nd ation has com m itted $5 million

Committee, made u p o f the ch ief exec­

as an advisor to a fund created in m e m ­

over the next five years to help further

utives o f th e t ru stee b an k s , a p p o in ts

ory o f his son, Charles Rieley A rm ing-

the Study C o m m issio n’s reco m m en da­

five m em bers o f the Distribution C o m ­

ton.

tions.

11

11

As always, w e are fortunate

T h e C leve la n d F o u n d a ­

mittee an d approves all am en d m en ts to

to have the su pp ort a n d dedication o f

tion Co m m ission on Poverty, created in

o u r ch arter. T h i s g r o u p is c u r r e n tl y

an o u t s t a n d i n g 11- m e m b e r D i s t r i b u ­

1990 to exam ine the problems of pover­

chaired by Kar en H o r n , C h a ir m a n and

tion C om m ittee. T h e y are supported by

11

ty in o u r c o m m u n i t y , c o n c l u d e d its

C E O of Ba n k O n e, Cleveland, NA. We

the F o u n d a t i o n ’s ta l e n t e d staff, w h o

w o r k this year. Its report, w h i c h has

greatly app reciate th eir wor k.

bring an e no rm ou s range o f expertise to

U

alr e a d y a t t r a c t e d n a t i o n a l a t t e n t i o n ,

T h e F o u n d a tio n investe d n o t only

their work. We consider it an h o n o r to

provides a power fu l n ew ap p roach to

funds but considerable time and energy

work with each o f these individuals.

persistent u rban poverty. T h a t report is

in expan ding the philanthropic capital

discussed at length in the essay o n the

base o f the co m m un ity a n d helping to

following pages.

s t r e n g t h e n t h e n o n p r o f i t se ctor. In

11

T h e Cleveland


We h a v e

beautiful

neighbors.

We

look out

for ea c h

other and

we try

to h e l p

each other

out. �


effo rts. T h i s v i e w s p r i n g s f r o m t h e C o m m i s s i o n ’s belief t h a t an y effort to c h a n g e c o n d i t i o n s i n C l e v e l a n d ’s n e ig h b o r h o o d s m u s t focus o n b u i l d ­ T h e Cleveland F o u n d a tio n was barely

in g th e social h e a l t h o f fam ilies a n d

six w e e k s o l d in F e b r u a r y o f 1914

co m m u n i t i e s . Accordingly, t h e C o m ­

w h e n its f o u n d e r, C l e v e la n d b a n k e r

m iss io n d e s i g n e d C C B I a r o u n d five

a n d a t t o r n e y F re d e ri c k H a r r i s Goff,

key p r in c ip le s.

a n n o u n c e d t h a t th e fledg lin g t r u s t ’s

m u s t be both co m p reh en siv e a n d in te­

11

F irst, t h e p l a n

first wo rk w ou ld be “a great social an d

age th a t t h r e a t e n e d nearly to d o u b le

grated. N o single p ro blem causes p e r ­

e c o n o m i c s u r v e y o f C l e v e l a n d , to

by the tu r n o f the century.

The

sistent poverty, a n d n o single solution

u n c o v e r t h e c a u s e s o f p ov erty ...an d

3 0 -m em b er C o m m ission , m ad e u p o f

can effectively address it. Since p over­

p o i n t o u t t h e c u r e .”

As events

b u s i n e s s , civ ic a n d n e i g h b o r h o o d

ty results from in terlo c kin g p r o b lem s

w o u l d have it, t h a t p ro p o se d sur vey

leaders, operated from its inception on

th at reinforce a n d co m p licate one

was su p p la n te d by o th e r c o m p r e h e n ­

th e c o n v i c t i o n t h a t t h e c o n c e r n s o f

a n o th e r over time, solutions to poverty

sive e f fo r t s . B u t G o f f h a d q u i c k l y

those it was in ten d ed to serve sh o u ld

m u st actually bu ild on an d u tilize

t u r n e d th e n e w F o u n d a t i o n ’s a t t e n ­

drive its actions. T h e C o m m i s s i o n ’s

the

tion to the problem s o f u r b a n poverty,

final report, w h ic h w as iss ued at the

problem s.

a concern in w h ich it rem ains deeply

close o f 1992, has already d raw n atten­

sh ou ld be specifically tailored to i n d i ­

e n g ag ed today.

tion at the n a t i o n a l level.

those

S eco n d , strategies

The

vidual neighb o rho od s, w h ic h have d i f ­ fe re n t c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s , r e s o u r c e s a n d

was

1 99 0 in

m u n i t y - B u i l d i n g I n i ti a t i v e ( C C B I ) ,

needs. B r o a d - b a s e d a p p r o a c h e s d o

resp o n s e to g r o w i n g c o n c e r n s a b o u t

an innovative new app ro ach to issues

n o t a c c o u n t for n e ig h b o r h o o d

t h e c i t y ’s p o v e r ty levels. M o r e t h a n

o f persistent poverty. C C B I is built on

ch a r a c te r .

forty p e r c e n t o f C l e v e la n d re sid e n ts

an integrated view w h ich distinguish­

b o r h o o d ’s strategy s h o u ld be b uilt on

were th en living in poverty, a percen t­

es the Cleveland ap p roach from ot her

its strengths. T h e s e c o m m u n i t y assets

early

U

H

am ong

re p o r t o u t l i n e s t h e C l e v e la n d C o m ­

in

T h e C leve la n d

linkages

F o u n d a t i o n C o m m i s s i o n o n Poverty convened

11

11

11

H

T h ird , each n e ig h ­


“I get

a good

sim ultaneously to strengthen c o m m u ­ nities.

In v e s tm e n t —

in h o u s in g ,

n e ig h b o rh o o d -b a se d co m m ercial d e v e lo p m e n t, a n d jobs — in c lu d e s

tions affecting inner-city residents an d

s u p p o r t for ind iv id u al e n t r e p re n e u rs

the m inority p o o r at disp roportio nate

an d organizations in the com m un ity to

rates.

ca rry o u t village ren ew al.

developm ent

e d u c a tio n ,

II

The

If

Fin ally,

hum an resource

at t h e v illage level will

m ay include cultural organizations,

second,

in clu d es v il­

include identifying a n d tr a i n in g p e o ­

sc h o o ls, c h u r c h e s , e m p l o y e r s , social

l a g e - b a s e d action to ensu re that p re­

ple in the principles a nd tech n iq u es o f

service p rog ram s, health services o rg a­

sc h o o le rs are read y for school; h i g h

c o m m u n i t y b u ild in g in o rd er to help

n izatio ns, child care centers, libraries,

acad e m ic p erfo rm an ce in ele m e n ta r y

im p le m e n t these pr ogra m s. T h r o u g h ­

p ublic retail areas or an y th in g else the

school is en co urag ed ; an d educational

o u t t h is ef fort, t h e fo cu s w ill be on

residents them se lves reg ar d as n e i g h ­

o p p o rtu n itie s

p e o p l e , w i t h a h o l i s t i c a p p r o a c h to

b o rh o o d stren g th s.

adults.

H

F ourth,

IT

are

expanded

fo r

T h e third p rog ram area

lives

and

the

life

o f th e

b ecause the trad itio n al a p p ro a c h o f

is fam ily

a t t a c k i n g pover ty from t h e to p d o w n

i n g c o m m u n i t y . I f f a m i l i e s are n o t

by th e C leve la n d C o m m u n i t y - B u i l d ­

a n d o n l y t h r o u g h t h e p u b l i c s e c to r

fu n ctio n in g , th eir n eig h b o rh o o d

in g I n itiative C o u n c il , a 1 5 - m e m b e r

fails to s u p p o r t a n d e n c o u r a g e local

q u i c k l y b e c o m e s d y s f u n c t i o n a l as

g ro u p m ad e u p o f co m m u n i t y leaders,

initiative, r e fo r m s m u s t g r o w o u t o f

well. Villag e- based s u p p o r t for fa m i­

people already w o r k i n g in social ser­

d e c is io n s m a d e at th e c o m m u n ity

lies w ill i n c r e a s e t h e c o m m i t m e n t

vices in th e n eigh b o rh o o d s, a n d fo ur

level.

of

11

Finally, this ap pro ach will

developme?it, the key to b u ild ­

th eir

those

fam ilies

to

H e a lth

the

family.

11

C C B I will be over seen

com ­

n e ig h b o rh o o d representatives. T h e

be t e s te d o v er t h e n e x t few years in

m unity.

affects b o th

greatest challenge will be to link these

f o u r pilot u r b a n “villages” defined as

individual a nd family life. C o m m u n i ­

p r o g r a m areas at t h e village level in

n e i g h b o r h o o d s by the people w h o live

ty a n d p r i m a r y h e a l t h ca re serv ices

o rder to use resources m ore efficiently

there, a n d evaluated before b eing car­

s h o u l d b e in c r e a se d b o t h in q u a l i t y

a n d to develop the synergies re quire d

ried to o th e r co m m u n ities.

The

a n d q u a n t i t y a n d s h o u l d be readily

to m o v e t h e p r o c e s s f o r w a r d . T h i s

C o m m i s s i o n id e n tifie d five p r o g r a m

ac c e ss ib le to village r e s i d e n t s . T h e

ef fo r t w ill r e q u i r e i n n o v a t i v e s o l u ­

areas in w h i c h activity m u s t take place

e m p h a s i s s h o u l d be o n th o se c o n d i ­

tions, n o t only in t h e villages b u t at

11

H

feeling

about

the

neighborhood.


m

co u n ty , sta te , a n d n a t i o n a l levels as

P | well.

|

H

T h e C o m m i s s i o n ’s find-

i n g s h a v e a l r e a d y f o r m e d t h e basis for a m a jo r n e w fed eral initiativ e, H O P E VI, w h ic h takes a dramatically

m differen t a p p ro ach to public ho using. C C B I has been awarded $1.5 million in

® federal funds to begin the task o f imple-

jjg m en ting the C o m m ission ’s reco m m en ­ dations.

H

It is crucial to recognize

t h a t t h is in i t i a t i v e w ill c o n t i n u e for m a n y years to come. C o m m u n i t i e s in distress ar e h u n g r y for solutions a n d e ag er for t h e m to arrive quickly. B ut the conditions a nd problem s o f u rban

T h e r e are

poverty have n o t developed overnight, a n d m a n y years will pass be fore the re sults o f thes e efforts will be a p p a r ­ en t.

H

H i sp a n ic s,

T h e F o u n d a t i o n has corn­

e l m i t t e d its e n e r g i e s a n d re s o u r c e s to

s u p p o r t i n g C C B I as this vital effort

Whites,

m oves f o rw a r d . All C l e v e la n d e rs are

£H ur ged to consider h o w they, too, m ight co ntribute . To q u o t e H e n r y }. G o o d -

I tal ians, Blacks,

® m a n , c h a i r o f th e C o m m i s s i o n : “To M | accept su c h a situation d im in ishes us

|

as a p e o p l e . T o d e c i d e t h a t w e are

and I

g oin g to change the situation is to say ‘yes’ to all th at is best in ourselves and

H to th e f u tu re o f o u r city.”

enjoy t h a t . ”


T h e C lev e la n d F o u n d a t i o n is go v ern ­ e d by a n 1 1 - m e m b e r D i s t r i b u t i o n C o m m i t t e e . I t s m e m b e r s , w h o are c h o s e n fo r t h e i r k n o w l e d g e o f t h e c o m m u n ity , e sta b lish policy and p ro g ra m m a t i c priorities, allocate fu nd in co m e a n d principal, a n d m a k e final decisions on g r a n t a u tho rization s. All serve w i t h o u t pay, n orm ally for a fiveyear term , a n d for a m a x i m u m o f ten years.

11

T h e selectio n process

d a t e s to t h e F o u n d a t i o n ’s e a r l i e s t years a n d was designed to en su re th at a b road range o f view points w ould be r e p re s e n te d on the D is tr ib u ­

ALFRED

M.

RANKIN

JR.

Chairperson Appointed 1988 by the Trustees Committee Alfred Rankin, president and chief executive officer of NACCO Industries, Inc., is a director of NACCO Industries, Inc., BF Goodrich Company, the Standard Products Company, Reliance Electric, and The Vanguard Group. H e serves on the boards of trustees of the Holden Arboretum, University Hospitals of Cleveland, T he Musical Arts Association, University Circle Incorporated, World Resources Institute, the John H untington Polytechnic Trust, Cleveland Tomorrow, T he Cleveland M useum of Art, and the Greater Cleveland Growth Association. He has chaired the Cultural Affairs subcom­ mittee and, as chairperson of the Foundation’s long-range planning committee, guided the development of the 1990 strategic plan. A Cleveland native, he holds a bachelor of arts degree in Economics and a juris doctor degree, both from Yale University.

ANNIE

L E W IS

J . G AR DA

Vice Chairperson Appointed 1989 by the Trustees Committee; reappointed 1992 Annie Lewis Garda has a distinguished record of service in both the public and nonprofit sectors. In the early 1980s she coordinated the Mayor’s Operation Volunteer Effort in which 1,000 loaned executives and volunteers helped revamp municipal finances and city services in the wake of default. She also developed the Children’s Key Concerts Endow m ent during her presidency of the Junior Committee of The Cleveland Orchestra. She currently sits on the boards of the M etroHealth System, Leadership Cleveland, T he Benjamin Rose Institute, the Business Volunteerism Council, The Musical Arts Association and the Ohio East Area United Methodist Foundation. She is also a member of the board of visitors for Trinity College of Duke University.

t i o n C o m m i t t e e . Five m e m b e r s ar e a p p o i n t e d b y the Trustees Committee,

HE

m ad e u p o f the chief

[STRIBUTION

executive o ffic e rs

3 MMITTEE

o f the F o u n d a t i o n ’s t r u s t e e b a n k s . Five a r e a p p o i n t e d by

p ublic officials: one each by th e chief j u d g e o f t h e U n i t e d S ta te s D i s t r i c t C o u rt, N o r th e rn D istrict o f O h io , E astern Division; the presiding judge o f the P ro b a te C o u r t o f C u y a h o g a C o u n ty ; the m ay o r o f Clev eland; the p re sid e n t o f th e

F e d e r a tio n for

C o m m u n i t y P l a n n i n g ; a n d the ch ie f justice o f the C o u r t o f Appeals for the E ig h th A p p ellate D istrict o f O hio. T h e s e five “p u b lic ” appointees in tu r n a p p o i n t a n e le v e n th m e m b e r w i t h a b a c k g r o u n d in priv ate p h i l a n t h ro p y .

REV.

ELMO

A.

BEAN

Appointed 1987 by the C hief Justice, Court o f Appeals, Eighth Judicial District o f Ohio; reappointed 1991 Pastor of St. James African Methodist Episcopal Church, Rev. Elmo Bean is secretary of the board of directors of Neighborhood Progress, Inc., an organization designed to aid in community economic development, and serves on the boards ot W orking for Empowerment Through Comm unity Organization (W ECO) and Payne Theological Seminary. H e is a member of the advisor)' committee of the Senior Companion Program ot T he Benjamin Rose Institute, and the Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance, a coalition of local ministers. He is also a member ot the external oversight committee for a study ot the Cleveland Police Department.


JA M E S

M.

DELANEY

RUSSELL.

R.

GIFFO RD

ADRIENNE

LASH

JO N ES

JAMES

V.

PATTO N

Appointed 1986 by the Mayor, City o f Cleveland; reappointed 1991

Appointed 1989 by the Trustees Committee; reappointed 1993

Appointed 1988 by the C hief Judge, U.S. District Court, Northern District o f Ohio

Appointed 1991 by the Presiding Judge, Probate Court o f Cuyahoga County

Jim Delaney, office managing partner of Deloitte & Touche, served as financial supervisor to the commission overseeing the City’s fiscal recovery. H e currently chairs the Mayor’s Operation Volunteer Effort and was selected in 1989 as the new chairperson of the Build-Up Greater Cleveland Policy Committee of the Greater Cleveland Growth Association. H e serves on the boards o f the Greater Cleveland Growth Association, John Carroll University, The Salvation Army, and the Diocesan Inner-City School Fund. H e is vice president of Youth Opportunities Unlimited and board chair of Beaumont School. H e is past chairperson of Case W estern Reserve University’s Advisory Council for its five-year accountancy program and serves on the visiting committee of the W eatherhead School at CWRU.

Russell Gifford is president and chief executive officer of T he East Ohio Gas Company. A director of National City Bank, Bearings, Inc. and trustee of First Union Real Estate Investments, he is also active in community affairs, serving currently as chairperson of the Greater Cleveland Growth Association, as well as chairperson of N orth Coast Harbor, Inc. H e is a trustee of Cleveland Tomorrow, the Greater Cleveland Roundtable and University Hospitals of Cleveland, and serves on the boards of the Greater Cleveland Chapter of the American Red Cross, Baldwin-Wallace College, the Urban League of Greater Cleveland, the Convention and Visitors Bureau of Greater Cleveland and Playhouse Square Foundation, and the advisory board of T he Salvation Army.

Adrienne Jones is an associate professor and departm ent chair in the Departm ent of AfricanAmerican Studies at Oberlin College and holds a Ph.D. in American Studies from Case Western Reserve University. She serves on the advisory council of T he Cleveland M useum of Art and has been active with the Young W om en’s Christian Association as vice president of its national board of directors (1976-82) and currendy as a member of the National YWCA Board of Trustees. She is also a trustee of Karamu House, a member of the Alumni Advisory Committee of the W omen’s Community Foundation, and a former board member of the Federation for Community Planning.

Jim Patton is a retired vice president o f Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Ohio, and now serve: as a consultant in government relations, health policies, and business affairs. H e has served on the executive committee of the N ational Foundation of the March of Dimes, Cuyahoga County Division; the Cleveland Academy of M edicine’s Cost Containm ent Comm ittee on H ealth Education; as vice chairm an o f New Business Development for United Way Service and chairman of the City of W estlake’s Assess­ m ent Equalization Board. H e is a member of the Greater Cleveland Growth Association. He has also served on the board of directors of the Cleveland Advertising Club, the advisory boarc of Catholic Social Services of Cuyahoga Count and as trustee of the American Cancer Society, Cuyahoga County Division.

D oris A . Evans, M .D .

DORIS

A.

EVANS,

Jerry V. Jarrett

Russell R . G ifford

M .D.

Appointed 1992 by the Trustees Committee Dr. Doris Evans is a pediatrician whose private practice emphasizes preventive health, and is an associate clinical professor of Pediatrics at Case W estern Reserve University. She is a staff physician at University Hospitals of Cleveland, Mt. Sinai Medical Center, and Meridia Hillcrest. T he former executive director of the Glenville H ealth Association, Dr. Evans is a past director of Ameritrust Corporation, Ameritrust Company National Association and Ameritrust Development Bank. Currently, she is a director of Society National Bank and a trustee of Cuyahoga Comm unity College, W VIZ Public Television, and The Salvation Army. A member of the American Academy of Pediatrics, N orthern Ohio Pediatric Society and Cleveland Medical Association, she is also a lifetime member o f the NAACP and an active member of Fairm ount Presbyterian Church.

JE R R Y

V.

Adrienne Lash Jones

JARRETT

Appointed 1988 by the President o f the Federation fo r Community Planning; reappointed 1993 Jerry Jarrett is retired chairman and chief executive officer of Ameritrust Company and its holding company, Ameritrust Corporation. H e is a director of Forest City Enterprises, Inc., and Developers Diversified Realty Corporation and chairs the board of Baldwin-Wallace College. H e is also treasurer of The Musical Arts Association, which operates The Cleveland Orchestra, and a trustee of the Cleveland Clinic Foundadon, the Holden Arboretum, and the Center for H um an Services. He chaired the 1986 United Way campaign which raised more than $47 million, and has served as chairperson of United Way Services, United Way Assembly, and T he Salvadon Army- H e serves on the National Advisory Board of The Salvation Army.

Lindsay Jordan M orgenthaler

LIN DSA Y J O R D A N M O R G E N T H A L E R

Janies V. Patton

CHARLES

Charles A. Ratn

A.

RATNER

Appointed 1984 by the Trustees Committee; reappointed 1989

Appointed 1992 by the Committee o f Five D istribution Committee Members

Lindsay M orgenthaler is a well-known civic leader who has organized several of Cleveland’s most successful benefits. She is currendy a trustee of Playhouse Square Foundation, Cleveland Ballet, and Lakewood Hospital, and honorary trustee of Case W estern Reserve University, as well as chairman of the School of Medicine’s capital campaign. She is also a longtime trustee of Pittsburgh’s Carnegie-Mellon University, where she currently vice-chairs the capital campaign. She serves on the Cleveland Bicentennial Commission and is a past president of the W om en’s City Club and the Great Lakes Theater Festival. She is also a graduate of Leadership Cleveland.

Charles Ratner is executive vice president of Forest City Enterprises. H e is a trustee of the Mandel Associated Foundations, Forest City Charitable Foundadon, N ational Foundation for Jewish Culture and the Jewish Education Service of N orth America. H e has also served as a trustee of United Way Services, Mt. Sinai Medical Center, and Haw ken School. Current he is active with the Jewish Comm unity Federation, of which he is former vice presiden and general chairman of the Jewish Welfare Fund Appeal. In addition, he serves as co-chaii of the Commission on Jewish Continuity.


STEVEN

A.

M INT ER

Executive Director a p r o g r a m officer, a c c o r d i n g to th e g e n e r a l s u b j e c t a r e a i n t o w h i c h it falls. A p r o m i s i n g p r o p o s a l w ill As a p r im a r y so urce o f th is c o m ­

u n d e r g o a t h o r o u g h review, d r aw in g

m u n i t y ’s s o c i a l r i s k c a p i t a l , T h e

on th e exp erien ce o f th e sta ff and

Clev e la n d F o u n d a t i o n is dedicated to

D istribution

s u p p o r t i n g go o d ideas t h a t have the

occasionally, on outside experts in the

p otential to im pro ve the q uality o f life

f ie ld .

for residents o f G r e a te r Cleveland. In

representatives o f the g ran tseek in g

c a rry in g

11

C om m ittee

and,

A fter disc ussions w ith

the

o r g a n i z a t i o n , t h e p r o g r a m o f fi c e r

F o u n d a t i o n m a k e s g r a n t s to t a x -

a n d associate d ire c to r p re p a re a

ex e m p t private o rg a n iz a tio n s, and

s t a f f e v a l u a t i o n fo r c o n s i d e r a t i o n

s o m e t i m e s to g o v e r n m e n t agencies,

by t h e a p p r o p r i a t e s u b c o m m i t t e e .

for p ro g ra m s

T h e su b c o m m itte e th e n m akes

out

this

and

m issio n ,

projects

that

creatively address

a reco m m en d atio n

IE j E V E L a ]\r d

e v e r-c h a n g in g

d e c lin e th e p ro p o sa l, on w h ic h

co m m u n ity needs.

t h e full D i s t r i b u t i o n C o m m i t t e e , in

3 UNDATI ON’S RANTMAKI NG

The

t u r n , takes final action.

F oundation

to f u n d or

11

Write,

do es n o t o r d in a rily

call, or stop by the F o u n d a t i o n offices

aw ard

f o r a fre e c o p y o f “ G u i d e l i n e s for

su p p o rt,

o p eratin g except

G rant

S eek ers,” a b ooklet that

w h e r e t h e d o n o r h a s so p r o v i d e d ,

p ro v id es d etails o f o u r po licies a n d

n o r does it m a k e grants to individuals.

p r o ced u r es as well as use fu l tips for

the process

T h e Clevela nd F o u n d a ­

p reparin g a good proposal.

11

The

ti o n ’s g r a n t m a k i n g is governed by an

F o u n d a t i o n ’s asso ciate d ir e c to r a nd

11- m e m b e r D i s t r i b u t i o n C o m m i t t e e

p r o g r a m officers a r e c l o s e s t to t h e

w h ose v o lu n teer m em b er s are chosen

g r a n t m a k i n g process a n d will gladly

for

a n s w e r a n y sp e c i fi c q u e s t i o n s n o t

their

k now ledge

of

the

D istrib u tio n

covered in the booklet. F or first-time

C o m m i t t e e m eets quar terly - bo th in

grantseekers, it is a good idea to des­

s u b c o m m i t t e e s a n d as a w h o l e -

cribe the project concept to one o f these

to e s ta b lis h p o licy a n d c o n s id e r

sta ff m e m b e r s , in a letter o r by tele­

co m m u n ity .

The

The

phone, before submitting a full proposal.

F o u n d a t i o n ’s staff plays an i m p o rta n t

W i t h th eir guidance, you can develop

role in this process. E a c h proposal is

a stro n g er p roposal and, if ap p ro ­

a s sig n e d by t h e asso ciate d irecto r to

priate, find o th er fu n d i n g sources.

g ran t recom m endations.

H

Steve M inter, who became T he Cleveland Foundation’s seventh chief executive officer in 1984, is a former director of the Cuyahoga County W elfare Departm ent and Massachusetts Commissioner of Public W elfare, and served as the first U nder Secretary of the United States Departm ent of Education. H e is currendy a member o f the Governor’s Education M anagement Council and a trustee of the Cleveland Initiative for Education, Leadership Cleveland, North Coast Harbor, Inc., The Foundation Center, and T he College of Wooster, as well as a director of several corporations. A native of northeast Ohio, M inter is a graduate of Baldwin-Wallace College and holds a master’s degree in social administration from Case W estern Reserve University.

Steven .4 . M inter

SUSAN

N.

L A JO IE

Associate Director

Susan Lajoie, as associate director, oversees all grantmaking and other programmatic acdvides of T he Cleveland Foundadon. She also serves as principal staff to the McDonald Fund, a supporting organizadon of the Foundation. Since joining the staff in 1978, she has served as program analyst, program officer for education and economic development, and project manager for the Foundation’s strategic planning. Currendy, Lajoie is president o f Donors Forum of Ohio and secretary of the Leadership Cleveland Alumni Association, as well as chairperson of the M anagement Subcommittee for the 1993 Council on Foundations Annual Conference. She holds a Ph.D. in public policy from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at H arvard University and has taught at the University of Massachusetts.


G O L D IE

K.

A L V IS

Senior Program Officer, Social Services

. JOYCE R .

Prior to joining the Foundation in 1985, Goldie Alvis was coordinator of community affairs with the Cuyahoga County Departm ent of H um an Services. In addition to managing the Foundation’s grantmaking in social services, Alvis is principal staff to T he Cleveland Foundation Commission on Poverty and co-chairperson of the Ad Hoc Comm ittee of Funders Concerned W ith Homelessness and Hunger. She currently is a member o f the program committees for Donors Forum of O hio and Grantmakers Forum. She holds a doctorate in jurisprudence from ClevelandM arshall Law School and a master of science degree in social administration from the Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences at Case W estern Reserve University.

Prior to joining the Foundation in 1990, Joyce Daniels spent ten years as education and government relations coordinator for the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce and served as director of a retention program for minority undergraduates at the University of Maryland at Baltimore. In 1991 she was a member of the Donors Forum of O hio’s annual conference program committee and has been a member of the precollegiate education advisory committee of the Council on Foundations for two years. A native of Washington, D.C., Daniels holds a bachelor’s degree from Boston University and a M A . and M.Ed. in applied hum an development and guidance from Teachers College, Columbia University.

ii G oldie K. A lvis

K A T I- I L E E N A.

K athleen A. Cerveny

CER V EN Y

DANIELS

Program Officer, Precollegiate Education

Joyce R. D aniels

B A R B A R A M.

ROBERT

E.

ECKARDT

DEERHAKE

Program Officer, The L. Dale Dorney Fund

Kathleen Cerveny joined the Foundation in 1991 after a varied career as a working artist, educator, development officer, and, most recently, awardwinning producer of arts programming for public radio station W CPN. A graduate of The Cleveland Institute of Art, she is a past president of the board of trustees of Ohio Designer Craftsmen. Cerveny also served as assistant principal responsible for arts curriculum at The School on Magnolia and has taught art at the undergraduate and graduate levels at Case Western Reserve University and Lake Erie College.

As the Foundation’s representative in Findlay and Hancock County, Barbara Deerhake has primary responsibility for grantmaking from the L. Dale Dorney Fund and provides staff support to the newly established Findlay-Hancock County Community Foundation. She also administers The Lima Comm unity Fund of T he Cleveland Foundation in Allen County. Deerhake came to the Foundation in 1987, having served in leadership positions with numerous volunteer organizations in the Findlay area. She is a past president of the United Way of H ancock County and the Findlay Service League, which in 1984 named her its O utstanding Volunteer. She holds a master’s degree in home economics education from The Ohio State University.

K L E IN E R

W IL LEN

Program Officer, Higher Education

Robert Eckardt manages the Foundation’s grantmaking in health, aging, and environmental affairs. Before joining the Foundation staff in 1982, he was a planning associate at the Federation for Comm unity Planning and a consultant to T he Benjamin Rose Institute. Eckardt serves on the executive committees of Funders Concerned About AIDS and Grantmakers in Health, where he serves as vice president of the board. H e holds a doctorate in public health and certificate in gerontology from the University of Michigan and in 1991 was elected a fellow of the Gerontological Society of America.

Carol W illen’s portfolio includes the Foundation’s grantm aking in higher education; the Fenn Educational Fund, a special-purpose fund that supports cooperative education programs; and the Statewide Program for Business and M anagem ent Education, which makes grants to strengthen business education at Ohio colleges and universities. She holds a Ph.D. in Romance languages and literatures from Harvard University and studied at the Bryn M awr Institut d’Etudes Frangaises in Avignon. Before joining the Foundation’s staff in 1987, she was a program officer for the Prem ier Industrial Foundation and executive director of the W illiam Bingham Foundation.

Barbara M. Deerhake

Program Officer, Cultural Affairs

CAROL

Senior Program Officer, Health

Robert E. Eckardt

JAY TA LBO T

Senior Program Officer, Civic Affairs and Economic Development Before joining The Cleveland Foundation’s staff in 1984, Jay Talbot was the founding executive director of the Cincinnati Institute of Justice and president of the Southwestern Ohio Council on Alcoholism. In addition to managing the Foundation’s portfolio in Civic Affairs and Economic Development, he oversees grantmaking in Findlay and Hancock County. In 1991 he was appointed to the Governor’s State H um an Resources Advisory Council and is a member of its Executive Committee. Talbot is also active in national professional organizations concerned with housing and community development, as well as with criminal justice. H e holds a master’s degree in business administration from Xavier University.

Jay Talbot

C arol K leiner W illen


on t h e retail a n d c o m m e r c i a l h u b at the intersection o f St. Clair Avenue, E ast 152nd

c

i

v

i

c

a

f

Revitalizing n e ig hb o rho od s at risk requires

Street, a n d Iv an h o e R oad k n o w n as “Five

m o r e t h a n h o u s i n g rehabilita tion a n d new

P o i n t s . ” A $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 g r a n t to St. V i n c e n t

co n stru ctio n .

em ploym ent

Q u ad ran g le, Inc., supported its m aste r plan

o p p o r t u n it i e s ar e a m a j o r e l e m e n t in any

to i m p r o v e t h e “q u a d ” w h e r e C l e v e la n d

l o n g - t e r m r e v i t a l iz a t i o n p lan .

Two

S tate U niv ersity , C u y a h o g a C o m m u n i t y

F o u n d a tio n g ra n ts h e lp ed C lev e la n d ers

College, a nd St. V in c e n t C harity H o s p ita l

u p g r a d e t h e i r s k i l l s a n d g a i n a c c e ss to

are located. T h e Clevela nd N e i g h b o r h o o d

new occupations.

D e v e lo p m e n t C orpo ratio n received a gr ant

T ow ards

to assist its 32 d e v e l o p m e n t c o r p o r a t i o n

f

a

i

r

Increased

s

Em­

pl oyment, w h ich

m em bers

to s t r e n g t h e n

and

expand

seeks to h elp the 1,800 i n div idu als it sees

n e ig h b o rh o o d -b a s e d ind u stry .

A

a n n u a l l y secure m e a n i n g f u l jobs, received

concern

f u n d i n g to e x p lo re n e w lin k a g e s w ith

conditions an d declining n eig hborhoods in

pr ivate-sector employers. Since 1979, H a r d

the

H a t t e d W o m e n h as b een h e l p i n g w o m e n

$1 10,000 g r a n t a n d a $100 ,000 p r o g r a m -

g ain e n t r a n c e to o ccu p atio n s traditionally

related

for

in n e r-rin g

deteriorating

suburbs

i n v e s tm e n t to

z

U n d e s ig n a te d G ra n ts D e sig n a te d G ra n ts T o ta l G ra n ts

-

P ro g ra m -R e la te d In v e s tm e n ts

$ 2 ,200 ,9 68 $587 $2 ,201 ,5 55 $550,000

physical

p ro m p te d

the

1

a

L u th e ra n

held by m en . Its “B u ild ing Blocks” project,

H o u s i n g C orp o ration for a m ajor p rogra m

a n o u t r e a c h e f fo r t to b r o a d e n e m p l o y e r

in E a st C lev e la n d . T h e o r g a n iz a tio n ,

lin k a g e s, receiv ed a f o u n d a tio n g ra n t.

w h i c h h e l p s low - a n d m o d e r a t e - i n c o m e

A n o th er aspect o f n eig hborhood

families secure decent, affordable ho using,

r e n e w a l in v o lv es u p g r a d i n g c o m m e r c i a l

is workin g to create a ho usin g plan for the

areas a n d r e ta in in g a n d e x p a n d in g the

city. C o m p o n e n t s i n c l u d e h o m e r e p a ir,

c i t y ’s i n d u s t r i a l b a s e . A g r a n t t o t h e

rehabilitation, new construction, an d h o m e ­

C o l l i n w o o d Services C e n t e r f u n d e d w o r k

o w n e r co u nseling to avoid foreclosure.

I l l


v e l a n d W o r k s ’ “B e a t T h e e e t s �p r o g r a m te a c h e s tn g , u n e m p l o y e d m e n t h e s ic s k i l l s t h e y n e e d to f i n d l- tim e jo b s .


■ CIVIC AFFAIRS GRANTS

B a ld w in -W a lla c e C o lleg e D evelopm ent of environmental education program (over two years) T h e C E IP F u n d , In c ., B o sto n , M a s s a c h u s e tts Participation by Cleveland-area nonprofits and smaller governmental organizations in Minority Environm ental Sum m er Associate Program C itiz e n s L e a g u e R e s e a r c h I n s titu te Citizen involvement in public policy making (over two years) C ity o f C le v e la n d Civic Vision 2000 Downtown Plan Book G un Buy-Back Program M anagem ent retreat for the executive staff and cabinet members

$37,875

21,000 160,000 2,556 5,000

125,000

C ity o f C le v e la n d H e ig h ts H illcrest H ousing Services (over two years)

40,000

C le v e la n d N e ig h b o r h o o d D e v e lo p m e n t C o r p o r a tio n Industrial retention and expansion program C le v e la n d S ta te U n iv e r s ity Com m unity planning project by C enter for N eighbor­ hood Development at the College of Urban Affairs Cuyahoga River water quality education project at the College o f Urban Affairs (over 15 months) Staff support for the Ohio Commission on the Public Service at the College of Urban Affairs

C le v e la n d W o rk s, Inc. “Beat the Streets” youth employment program

65,000

C o llin w o o d C o m m u n ity S e r v ic e s C e n te r Five Points commercial development program (fourth year)

20,843

C u y a h o g a C o u n ty P la n n in g C o m m is sio n Greenfields Symposium and related activities on regional growth dynamics

23,402

C u y a h o g a M e tr o p o lita n H o u s in g A u th o r ity Police management study

20,000

T h e C u y a h o g a P la n o f O hio, Inc. Fair housing programs 54,000 Review of area government strategies to improve housing affordability by the Metropolitan Strategy Group 20,000

T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n (I n c .) Special sum m er youth programs in Cleveland

C le v e la n d M e tr o p a r k s S y s te m O pen space inventory for Cuyahoga County

10,000

C le v e la n d Z o o lo g ic a l S o c ie ty W ater conservation plan for Cleveland Metroparks Zoo 52,000

C le v e la n d D e v e lo p m e n t F o u n d a tio n Holiday lighting at Public Square

C le v e la n d H o u s in g N e tw o r k , Inc. Citywide hom e weatherization program (third grant)

C le v e la n d W a te r fr o n t C o a litio n , Inc. Public education on local waterfront issues and development

10,000 100,000

C u y a h o g a V a lley A s s o c ia tio n , P e n in su la , O h io Cuyahoga Valley Environm ental Education Center curriculum 30,000 C u y a h o g a V alley P r e s e r v a tio n a n d S c e n ic R a ilw a y A s s o c ia tio n , P e n in su la , O h io M aster plan for the Cuyahoga Valley Line Railroad

25,000

T h e E a r th D a y C o a litio n C hildren’s section of guidebook for Earthfest ‘93 Volunteer services director

7,000 20,000

32,000

F e d e r a tio n f o r C o m m u n ity P la n n in g Research and technical assistance on options for delinquent youth by the Juvenile Court

12,000

G r e a te r C le v e la n d H a b ita t f o r H u m a n ity , In c. Homeownership program in the Central neighborhood of Cleveland (second year) 55,000

20,000 15,704

G r e a te r C le v e la n d P e a c e O ffic e r s M e m o r ia l S o c ie ty Construction of Greater Cleveland Peace Officers Memorial

24,138

2,500

G un S a fe ty In s titu te Curriculum development for “Solutions W ithout G uns" project H a r d H a tte d W o m en Im provement o f access for women seeking employment in nontraditional jobs (second year) H e ig h ts C o m m u n ity C o n g r e ss Fair housing enforcement program (over two years) H illc r e s t N e ig h b o r s C o r p o r a tio n H um an relations program in the Hillcrest suburbs

25,000


H is p a n ic C o m m u n ity F o ru m “C ruzando Horizontes: Creando Nuevas Fronteras” convention Leadership development, research and organizational development program (over 18 months) I n d u s t r y w id e N e tw o r k f o r S o c ia l, U rban a n d R u r a l E ffo r ts , W a sh in g to n , D.C. Final report o f the Low- and Moderate-Income H ousing T ask Force I n s titu te f o r E n v ir o n m e n ta l E d u c a tio n W orkshops in Cleveland school sites

T a sk F o rc e o n V io le n t C rim e C h a r ita b le F u n d Public education and prevention programs by Substance Abuse Initiative of G reater Cleveland (second year) 32,158 5,000 70,000

5,000 10,376

T o w a r d s E m p lo y m e n t Program development office (over two years) L u th e r a n H o u s in g C o r p o ra tio n H ousing development program for City of East Cleveland (second and third years) L u th e r a n M e tr o p o lita n M in is tr y A s s o c ia tio n “Tomorrow’s Leaders” Program M id -T o w n C o r rid o r Business district development program (over two years) N a tio n a l A s s o c ia tio n o f S e c r e ta r ie s o f S ta te, L e x in g to n , K e n tu c k y Comm unity meetings on voter participation in Greater Cleveland

T h e L u t h e r a n H o u s i n g C o r p o r a tio n a c q u i r e s d i l a p i d a t e d h o u s e s in E a s t C le v e la n d a n d r e h a b s th e m f o r s a le to lo w - i n c o m e f a m i l i e s .

N a tu r a l R e s o u r c e s D e fe n s e C o un cil, N e w Y o rk, N e w Y o rk W ater runoff project in Cleveland N e ig h b o r h o o d H o u s in g S e r v ic e s o f C levela n d , Inc. Strategic plan

J e w i s h C o m m u n ity F e d e r a tio n o f C le v ela n d Comprehensive training program for Soviet emigrants to Cleveland area by Jewish Vocational Service (second year) L a k e E rie N a tu r e a n d S c ie n c e C e n te r Strategic plan L a r c h tn e r e D e v e lo p m e n t A s s o c ia tio n Commercial revitalization activities (third year) L e a g u e o f W o m en V o te rs o f C le v e la n d E d u c a tio n a l F u n d , Inc. Expansion of Voter Information Center (over two years) Revision of “H ere’s Cuyahoga County” brochure

U n io n -M iles D e v e lo p m e n t C o r p o r a tio n Union-M iles Public Safety Pilot Project (over two years) 50,059

110,000

U n iv e r sity C ircle I n c o r p o r a te d Comm unity development and master plan (over three years)

2,918

W est P a r k U n ite d C h u r c h o f C h r is t Com m unity hum an relations project by C om m unities Acting Together for C hange and H ope

120,384

T o ta l U n d e s ig n a te d G ra n ts 5,000

20,000 7,000

m

C le v e la n d Z o o lo g ic a l S o c ie ty T h e W o m en 's C ity C lub o f C leve a n d Educational lectures

37,500

3,700

O h io C ity R e d e v e lo p m e n t A s s o c ia tio n , Inc. Citizen-based safety program (second and third years)

27,350

15,000

O p en D o o r W est, Inc. Fair housing program in western suburbs of Cuyahoga County (third year)

20,000

P ro je c t: LE AR N , Inc. Workplace literacy program

33,725

L u th e r a n H o u s in g C o r p o r a tio n Loan pool for purchase and rehabilitation of homes for moderate-income families in East Cleveland

50,000

T o ta l C ivic A ffa ir s P ro g r a m R e la te d I n v e s tm e n ts

50,000 5,000

S a in t V in c en t Q u a d r a n g le , Inc. Master plan for the area (over two years)

5,000 $2,200,968

DESIGNATED GRANTS

N e ig h b o r h o o d P r o g r e s s , Inc. Evaluation of the organization and its impact on the community Neighborhood Commercial H ub Revitalization Program (third year)

119,430

252,000

(The following recipients and programs were designated by donors.)

T o ta l D e s ig n a te d G ra n ts 20,000

46,340

T o ta l C ivic A ffa ir s G r a n ts — D e s ig n a te d a n d U n d e s ig n a te d

$139 448 $587 $2,201,555

■ PROGRAM-RELATED INVESTMENTS

C ity o f C le v e la n d Church Square Project and Mill Creek Development residential developments

$450,000 100,000 $550,000


w h ile e n c o u ra g in g in n o v ativ e, sm a ller p r o g r a m s in o t h e r v e n u e s . T h o u s a n d s o f l u n c h t i m e p a t r o n s t h r i l l e d to t h e C levela nd arts o rganizations felt the im pact

“S ho w tim e at H i g h N o o n ” series sp onsor­

o f f u n d i n g cuts from a variety o f sources in

e d by C u y a h o g a C o m m u n i t y C o l l e g e .

1992. T h e r eces sio n a n d o t h e r e c o n o m i c

F e a t u r i n g local a n d n atio n ally reco gn ized

factors in f lu e n c e d co r p o ra te g iving in the

a r tists, t h e s e free p u b l i c p r o g r a m s b o t h

arts a n d the e a r n e d in c o m e capacity o f

ed ucate a n d p r o m o te artistic a n d cu ltural

m a n y arts groups. A 33 percent reduction in

diversity.

A n o t h e r g r a n t su pp orted a

O h i o Arts C o u n c il (OAC) f u n d i n g forced

p ro je c t at C le v e la n d S tate U niversity.

c u tb a c k s in o p e r a tin g d o lla rs, a n d th e

“S a t u r d a y in t h e S t u d i o ” m a k e s d a n c e

e l i m i n a t i o n o f i m p o r t a n t O A C p ro g ram s ,

a c c e s s i b l e to C l e v e l a n d P u b l i c S c h o o l

m o s t serious ly th o se for c h a lle n g e grants,

c h ild r e n in g rad es K-4 t h r o u g h S a tu r d a y

n e w works, a n d sc holarships.

Local

m o r n i n g cr eative m o v e m e n t classes. I n a

arts in stitu tio n s stretched th e ir bu dg ets to

u n i q u e aspect o f the pr ogra m , exercise an d

If}

U n d e s ig n a te d G ra n ts

d a n c e f u n d a m e n t a l s classes are o f fe r ­

C U L T U R A L

A F F A I R S

ed

at th e s a m e tim e to p a r e n t s a n d

guar dian s.

ar ts efforts in 1992 receiv ed F o u n d a t i o n

m a i n t a i n q u a l i t y , c r e a t i v e p r o g r a m s . In

funding. “Project P athways,” a cooperative

s u p p o r t o f t h e s e ef forts, t h e F o u n d a t i o n

arts e d u c a t i o n p r o g r a m o f th e C l e v e la n d

e n c o u ra g e d a n d fu n d e d collaborative

School o f the Arts, C u y a h o g a C o m m u n i t y

p r o g r a m m i n g in t h e ar ts c o m m u n i t y . To

College, a n d T h e Cleveland Institute o f Art,

h e l p e n s u r e th e f u t u r e h e a l t h o f th e arts,

identifies a n d encour ages talented minority

th e

its

stu de n ts to p u r s u e u n d e r g r a d u a t e degrees

g r a n t m a k i n g in a rts e d u c a tio n an d

in Fine Arts. And, to prom ote a more vibrant

access

s m a ll t h e a t e r s c e n e , a c o a l i t i o n o f n i n e

also

expanded

for u n d e rse rv e d p o p u la tio n s. S i g n i f i c a n t g r a n t s c o n t i n u e d to

n o n p r o f i t t h e a t e r c o m p a n i e s f o rm e d T h e

s u p p o r t m a j o r arts p r o g r a m m i n g , su c h as

Professional Alliance o f Cleve land T h eatres

the

F estival

( P .A . C . T . ) . F i r s t y e a r e f f o r t s i n c l u d e d

a n d t h e P l a y h o u se

creating a centralized box office system an d

G reat

production of

Lakes

O thello ,

T h eater

S q u a r e F o u n d a t i o n ’s f in e arts activities,

/

jo in t a d vertisin g for m e m b e r co m p an ies .

D e sig n a te d G ra n ts T o ta l G ra n ts

Two notable collaborative

t h e l i m i t a n d s o u g h t in n o v a t i v e w ays to

F ou n d atio n

z

v

$ 2 ,416 ,7 15 $7 25 ,7 76 $3 ,142 ,4 91


R e s i d e n t s in n u r s i n g h o m e s a n d s e n io r c e n te r s th r o u g h o u t t h e c i t y e n jo y t h e m u s i c a l e n te r ta in m e n t p r o v id e d b y A c c e s s to t h e A r ts .


C ity o f C le v e la n d Egyptian Festival in Rockefeller Park

■ CULTURAL, AFFAIRS GRANTS

A c c e s s to th e A r ts Start-up support for fine arts program for the elderly A c c o r d A s s o c ia te s , Inc. Transitional support

$15,000 5,000

A fr ic a n A m e r ic a n M u se u m Start-up staff and operating support (over two years)

60,000

B e c k C e n te r f o r th e C u ltu r a l A r ts Staff support and long-range plan

35,000

C a se W e s te r n R e s e r v e U n iv e r sity Field-based studies by Arts M anagem ent Program at the W eatherhead School o f M anagem ent (second year) Guest artist for historic restoration of “Oberon: A Court 19,100 M asque of K ing Jam es” by Ben Jonson C e n tr o C u ltu r a l H is p a n o d e C le v e la n d Inc. Cultural center for Hispanic community (second year)

12,000

C le v e la n d A r tis ts F o u n d a tio n Symposium on impact of work o f Cleveland-area visual artists

22,150

C le v e la n d B a lle t Repertory programs for the 1992-93 season and audience development

175,000

C le v e la n d C e n te r f o r C o n te m p o r a r y A rt Exhibitions for the 1992-93 season and annual lecture series

65.000

C le v e la n d C h ild r e n ’s M u se u m M arketing and public relations project

50.000

5,000

C le v e la n d C o lleg e o f J e w is h S tu d ie s “T he City of David” exhibition

15,000

T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n (In c .) Start-up support for debut concert season of Apollo’s Fire: T he Cleveland Baroque Orchestra Transitional support for Karamu House during organizational assessment and planning activities

20,000

C ity o f C le v e la n d H e ig h ts “Colum bus Discovers Cleveland” summer dance project at Cain Park

100,000

8,000

T h e C le v e la n d I n s titu te o f A rt Start-up support for “Project Pathways,” an initiative for minority students (over two years)

100,000

C le v e la n d In te r n a tio n a l F ilm F e s tiv a l Marketing for festival’s move to Tower City in downtown Cleveland (third year)

35,000

T h e C le v e la n d M u se u m o f A r t Professional artists for “Parade the Circle” festival in University Circle T h e C le v e la n d M u sic S c h o o l S e ttle m e n t Scholarship support for performing arts students and Lila Wallace-Readers Digest challenge grant match C le v e la n d O p e ra Special project support and productions in 1992-93 season C le v e la n d P e r fo r m a n c e A r t F e s tiv a l Inc. Administrative expenses for Cleveland Performance Art Festival (second year)

5,000 33,333

250,000 12,000


T h e C le v e la n d P la y H o u s e New Experimental Theatre ofVolgograd residency Production of three new works in 1992-93 season

I I I

A pro d u ctio n o f Tosca w as one o f sev e ra l exciting offerings in Cleveland O pera’s 1992 season.

17,500 150,00

C le v e la n d P u b lic R a d io Comm unity service project

100,000

C le v e la n d P u b lic T h e a tre , In c. New Playwrights Development Project

35,000

C le v e la n d S ta te U n iv e r sity Barbara Angell commemorative recording Art gallery exhibitions (over 15 months) Commission and world premiere of new work by composer Bernard Rands and residency with Cleveland Cham ber Symphony Orchestra “Saturday in the Studio” dance project for innercity children and their families Tenth anniversary celebration o f Summerdance series and performance at Cain Park C u y a h o g a C o m m u n ity C ollege JazzFest community outreach events in 1993 Restaging of “Showtime at H igh N oon” program for theater critics convention “Showtime at H igh N oon” cultural arts series at Playhouse Square Center D a n c e C le v e la n d Artistic programs for 1992-93 season

2,800 8,000

22,000

12,738 6,277 25,000 2,018 8,700 40,000

E n se m b le T h e a tre Collaborative marketing project for T he Professional Alliance of Cleveland Theatres (PA .C.T.) Staff support and Equity actors in 1992-93 season

19,000 25,000

The Tom E vert D ance C om pany Artistic staff (second year)

25,000

F a ir m o u n t T h e a tr e o f th e D e a f Planning support during merger study Staff support and organizational planning (over two years) T h e F o r tn ig h tly M u s ic a l C lub o f C le v ela n d Special composition and performance project for young musicians by the Cleveland Composers G uild

G re a t L a k e s T h e a te r F e s tiv a l Production of Shakespeare’s Othello

200,000

I n te r m u s e u m C o n s e r v a tio n A s s o c ia tio n , O b erlin , O h io Transitional support and strategic plan (over two years) 80,000 M e tr o p o lita n O p e ra N a tio n a l C o u n c il Metropolitan Opera auditions in Cleveland area

5.000

T h e D a r iu s M ilh a u d S o c ie ty Artistic support for 1992 Centennial Celebration

5.000

M u sic a n d P e r fo r m in g A r ts a t T r in ity C a th e d r a l, Inc. “Get Close to the M usic” project

10,000

T h e M u s ic a l A r ts A s s o c ia tio n Free concert on Public Square

5.000

M u s ic ia n s ' P e r fo r m a n c e P ro je c t, K e n t, O h io Feasibility study and business plan for Touring Network project

5.000

5,000

O h io C h a m b e r B allet, A k r o n , O h io Commission of four new works for 25th anniversary season

60,000

50,000

O h io C h a m b e r O r c h e s tr a S o c ie ty M arketing plan (over two years)

60,000

4,350

O h io D a n ce , C o lu m b u s , O h io Presentation of early Marjorie W itt Johnson dances

5.000


O h io T h e a tr e A llia n c e , In c o r p o r a te d , C o lu m b u s , O h io Staff support for Theatre Enterprise Fund of O hio plan

10,000

R o b e r t P a g e S in g e r s a n d O r c h e s tr a Artistic staff support

2 0 ,0 0 0

P la y h o u s e S q u a r e F o u n d a tio n Fine arts activities and programs Rent subsidy for five constituent performing arts groups at Playhouse Square Center P o e ts ' L e a g u e o f G r e a te r C le v e la n d M arketing of local “Sonic Disturbance� events as part of national new music festival

75,000 100,000

8,700


T h e E le a n o r B. R a in e y M e m o r ia l In s titu te , Inc. Strategic plan 7,000

Cleveland State U n iversity’s “S atu rday in the S tu d io”p ro je c t p ro m o tes dance through c rea tive m ovement classes f o r g ra d e schoolers.

T h e R e p e r to r y P r o je c t Purchase of new modern dance work for the repertory

5,000

R o c k e fe lle r P a r k C u ltu r a l A r ts A s s o c ia tio n Artistic support for “Art Through the Park”

1,000

T h e S c u lp tu r e C e n te r Staff support for Ohio Outdoor Sculpture Inventory Tem porary outdoor sculpture exhibitions

11,708 4,353

S h a lh e v e t In te r n a tio n a l F o lk E n se m b le Ellis Island project “I Have a Dream ” program at the Jewish Comm unity Center

3,000

T h e S in g e r s ’ C lub o f C le v ela n d Centennial concert

15,000

SPAC ES Program support for the 1992-93 exhibition season

30,000

2,000

W e x n e r C e n te r f o r th e A rts , C o lu m b u s, O h io Cleveland artists’ participation at National Performance Network Conference in Columbus

3,500

th e W o rk in g T h e a tre Artistic and production support of two American premieres

10,000

T o ta l U n d e s ig n a te d G ra n ts

$2,416,715

DESIGNATED GRANTS

(The following recipients and programs were designated by donors. Grants are for general support unless otherwise noted.) C le v e la n d B a lle t

$135

C le v e la n d H e a lth E d u c a tio n M u se u m

4,281

T h e C le v e la n d I n s titu te o f M u sic

5,813

T h e C le v e la n d M u se u m o f A r t Purchase of objects of art exhibited at the May Show in memory of Oscar Michael, Jr.

110,850

T h e C le v e la n d M u se u m o f N a tu r a l H is to r y

192,686

500

C le v e la n d O p e r a

135

T h e C le v e la n d P la y H o u s e Experimental dramatic work or scholarship

9,693 1,682

In te r m u s e u m C o n s e r v a tio n A s s o c ia tio n

16,161

K aram u H ou se

129,644

La M e s a E sp a n o la Jessie C. Tucker Memorial Program

429

L a k e w o o d L ittle T h e a tre , In c.

5,746

T h e M u s ic a l A r ts A s s o c ia tio n T he Cleveland Orchestra

110,643

O g le b a y In s titu te , W h eelin g , W e st V irg in ia Cultural and educational activities at Oglebay Park

123,296

T o le d o M u s e u m o f A rt, T o led o , O h io

1,000

T h e W e s te r n R e s e r v e H is to r ic a l S o c ie ty Care of memorabilia of the First Cleveland Cavalry Association

5,947

T o ta l D e s ig n a te d G r a n ts T o ta l C u ltu r a l A ffa ir s G r a n ts — D e s ig n a te d a n d U n d e s ig n a te d

7,135 $725,776 $3,142,491


p r o je c ts t h a t d irectly i m p a c t O h i o - b a s e d in d u stry . A g r a n t to t h e E d i s o n P o l y m e r T h e Clevela nd F o u n d a t i o n focused its 1992

In n ov atio n C o rpo ration ( E P I C ) supported

efforts to streng th en the local e co n o m y by

the creation o f a P olym er Lifecycle C e n te r

w o rk in g th ro u g h m ajo r in term e d ia ries

to l e s s e n t h e e n v i r o n m e n t a l i m p a c t o f

to

local

polymers a n d plastic waste products. Since

G atew ay

its f o u n d i n g in 1984, E P I C h a s attracted

D e v e l o p m e n t C o r p o r a t i o n r eceived a $2

m o r e t h a n $20 m i l l i o n in p u b l i c / p r i v a t e

foster re g io n a l g ro w th

com petitiveness.

The

and

m illio n prog ram -related in vestm ent toward

resources.

co n s tru c tio n o f th e S t a d i u m P laza, o n e o f

F o u n d a t i o n initiative relates to i m p ro v in g

five de signated “p u blic” spaces in the sports

th e p ro d u c tiv ity o f e x istin g b u sin e sse s

com plex. G a t e w a y is expected to e n h a n c e

and

C l e v e la n d ’s im age as a visitor des tin ation,

$175,000 g r a n t to the C lev e la n d A dv an ce d

A n o th er

h e l p i n g to c r e a te

im p o rtan t

new

M a n u fa c tu rin g

E C O N () M I C

D E V E L O P M E

isr

ones. A

Program

fu n d e d the d ev e lo p m e n t of

t

a M a n u fac tu rin g L earn in g c r e a te jo b s, a n d h e lp to r e v ita liz e th e

C e n t e r to b o o s t t h e c o m p e t i t i v e n e s s

Pro spect Avenue corridor,

of

T h e Flats,

C le v e la n d

neig h b o rh o o d -b ased

a t h r i v i n g r i v e r f r o n t d i s t r i c t , is also a n

m a n u f a c tu re rs a n d create tr a in in g p r o ­

im p o rt a n t p art o f d o w n t o w n revitalization.

gram s to provide th e m with skilled workers.

T h e F lats O x b o w A ssociation, w h i c h has

T h e C e n te r p ro v id es college s tu d e n ts

h e l p e d m a i n t a i n a b a lan ce b e tw e e n lo n g ­

w ith h a n d s - o n t r a i n i n g in m a n u f a c ­

sta n d in g in d u stria l residents a n d n ew er

tu rin g .

business establishm ents, received a $68,000

Inc., received a $100,000 g r a n t in su pp ort of

g r a n t to s u p p o r t a m a s t e r p l a n fo r t h e

its public edu catio n projects a n d efforts to

area.

F o u n d a t i o n g r a n t s also w ere

E n te rp rise D evelopm ent,

stim ulate entrepre neu rial developm en t. To

C l e v e l a n d ’s

assist m inority businesses, the F o u n d a t i o n

e c o n o m i c b ase. A $ 1 5 0 ,0 0 0 g r a n t to t h e

p r o v i d e d a s t a r t - u p g r a n t to t h e G r e a t e r

O h i o Aerospac e Institute fu n d ed a p lan to

C l e v e l a n d R o u n d t a b l e fo r its M i n o r i t y

g e n e r a te fed erally sp o n s o re d research

E c o n o m ic O p p o r tu n ity C enter.

aw arded

to

strengthen

U n d e s ig n a te d G ra n ts

$1,512,1

P ro g ra m -R e la te d In v e s tm e n ts

$2 ,450 ,0 '


I I

I i I I I

I i

A M P ’s M a n u f a c t u r i n g e a r n in g C e n te r r e c r u i t s a lle g e s t u d e n t s f o r a n d s - o n s k i l l s tr a i n in g .

I 1

I I

I

I


■ ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GRANI

C le v e la n d A d v a n c e d M a n u fa c tu r in g P ro g ri Establishm ent of a M anufacturing Learning C enter Network and pilot outreach programs in two neighborhoods (over 15 months) C le v e la n d D e v e lo p m e n t F o u n d a tio n Analysis of Build-Up Cleveland Campaign and future community role Long-range plan for air transportation services at Hopkins Airport by G reater Cleveland Growth Association O utreach program to attract large-scale athletic events by Northeast Ohio Sports Commission Public relations and information campaign by the New Cleveland Campaign Start-up support for the G reater Cleveland Bicentennial Planning Commission

$211,500

45.000

N e ig h b o r h o o d P r o g r e s s , Inc. Neighborhood Economy Initiative plan

70,000

65.000

N o r th C o a st H a r b o r , Inc. Operating support (fifth and sixth years)

260,000

25.000

T h e N o r th C u y a h o g a V a lley C o r rid o r, Inc. Creation of a N ational Heritage Corridor

50.000 75.000

T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n (I n c .) Schematic design for Great Lakes Museum of Science, Technology and Environm ent

150.000

E d is o n B io te c h n o lo g y C en ter, Inc. Assessment and administration of loan pool to stimulate technology transfer (over two years)

40.000

E d is o n P o ly m e r In n o v a tio n C o r p o r a tio n Creation of Polymer Lifecycle Center

50.000

E n te r p r is e D e v e lo p m e n t, Inc. Projects for public education and minority entrepreneurial development (third year)

100.000

F la ts O x b o w A s s o c ia tio n Area-wide planning and development projects (over two years)

68,568

G re a t L a k e s M u se u m Pre-opening expenses for Great Lakes M useum of Science, Technology and Environm ent (over two years) G r e a te r C le v e la n d R o u n d ta b le Establishm ent of Minority Economic Opportunity C enter (over 18 months) T h e H is to r ic W a r e h o u s e D is tr ic t D e v e lo p m e n t C o r p o r a tio n o f C le v ela n d Operating support and special projects (third year)

25,000

When com pleted in 1994, Gateway is e x p e c ted to en­ hance Cleveland as a v isito r destination and p ro v id e m uch-needed jobs.

O h io A e r o s p a c e I n s titu te Development of research projects with direct impact on Ohio-based industries (over 18 months)

150,000

O h io CDC A s s o c ia tio n , C o lu m b u s, O h io Ohio M icro-Enterprise Development program for community development corporations

15,000

484,568

U n ite d L a b o r A g en cy , Inc. Operating support for Regional Industry Center (second year)

52,112

125,000

WE CO F u n d , Inc. Im provement of economic conditions on Cleveland’s East Side

55,000

30,000

T o ta l U n d e s ig n a te d G ra n ts

$2,146,748


1 n i

n

a

n u

A M P ’s M a n u f a c t u r i n g e a r n in g C e n te r r e c r u i t s a lle g e s t u d e n t s f o r a n d s - o n s k i l l s tr a i n in g .

3 I

1 ] ] ]

1 ]


■ ECO NOM IC D E V E L O P M E N T G R ANT S

C le v e la n d A d v a n c e d M a n u fa c tu r in g P r o g r a m Establishm ent of a M anufacturing Learning Center Network and pilot outreach programs in two neighborhoods (over 15 months) $211,500 C le v e la n d D e v e lo p m e n t F o u n d a tio n Analysis of Build-Up Cleveland Campaign and future community role Long-range plan for air transportation services at Hopkins Airport by G reater Cleveland Growth Association Outreach program to attract large-scale athletic events by Northeast O hio Sports Commission Public relations and information campaign by the N ew Cleveland Campaign Start-up support for the Greater Cleveland Bicentennial Planning Commission

45,000

N e ig h b o r h o o d P r o g r e s s , Inc. Neighborhood Economy Initiative plan

70,000

65,000

N o r th C o a st H a r b o r , Inc. O perating support (fifth and sixth years)

260,000

25,000

T h e N o r th C u y a h o g a V a lley C o r rid o r, In c. Creation of a N ational Heritage Corridor

75,000

T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n (I n c .) Schematic design for Great Lakes M useum of Science, Technology and Environm ent

150,000

E d iso n B io te c h n o lo g y C en ter, Inc. Assessment and administration of loan pool to stimulate technology transfer (over two years)

40,000

E d iso n P o ly m e r In n o v a tio n C o r p o ra tio n Creation of Polymer Lifecycle Center

50,000

E n te r p r is e D e v e lo p m e n t, Inc. Projects for public education and minority entrepreneurial development (third year)

100,000

F la ts O x b o iv A s s o c ia tio n Area-wide planning and development projects (over two years)

68,568

G re a t L a k e s M u se u m Pre-opening expenses for Great Lakes M useum of Science, Technology and Environm ent (over two years)

484,568

G r e a te r C le v e la n d R o u n d ta b le Establishment of Minority Economic Opportunity Center (over 18 months) T h e H is to r ic W a r e h o u s e D is tr ic t D e v e lo p m e n t C o r p o r a tio n o f C le v e la n d Operating support and special projects (third year)

25,000

50,000

125,000 30,000

When com pleted in 1994, Gateway is e x p e c ted to en­ hance Cleveland as a v isito r i and p ro v id e needed jo bs.

O h io A e r o s p a c e I n s titu te Development of research projects w ith direct impact on Ohio-based industries (over 18 months)

150,000

O h io CDC A s s o c ia tio n , C o lu m b u s, O h io Ohio M icro-Enterprise Development program for community development corporations

15,000

U n ite d L a b o r A g en cy , Inc. Operating support for Regional Industry Center (second year)

52,112

WECO F u n d , Inc. Improvement of economic conditions on Cleveland’s East Side

55,000

T o ta l U n d e s ig n a te d G ra n ts

$2,146,748


The Ohio A erospace Institute

strengthens regional economic perfo rm an ce by stim ulating linkages between research ers, governm ent agencies, and the p r iv a te sector.

â–  PROGRAM-RELATED INVESTMENTS

E d is o n B io te c h n o lo g y C enter, Inc. Loan pool to stimulate commercialization of biotechnological products produced in Greater Cleveland (second and third years)

$150,000

G a te w a y E c o n o m ic D e v e lo p m e n t C o r p o r a tio n Construction of Stadium Plaza area of Gateway development

2,000,000

N e ig h b o r h o o d P r o g r e s s , Inc. Development of a Glenville Enterprise Center

300,000

T o ta l P r o g r a m -R e la te d I n v e s tm e n ts

$2,450,000


T h e election o f a reform slate to the Board o f E d u c a t i o n i n 1991 h e r a l d e d a n e w b e g i n n i n g for t h e b e le a g u e r e d C l e v e la n d P u b l i c Schools, as d i d t h e 1992 h i r i n g o f

M u ltic u ltu r a l T ra in in g In itiativ e and

s u p e ri n t e n d e n t S a m m i e C a m p b e ll Parrish.

a c o m m u n ity /s c h o o l system strateg ic

W h ile m u c h past g r a n tm a k in g has been

p la n called “R e a c h in g H e i g h t s ,” w h ic h

t h r o u g h i n t e r m e d ia r i e s , w o r k i n g directly

p r o m o t e s t h e p u b l i c s c h o o l s a n d strives

w i t h the sc hools to effect c h an g e assu m ed

to s t i m u l a t e c h a n g e i n t h e e d u c a t i o n a l

greater significance in 1992.

process .

Studies

H e l p i n g t e ach ers b r o a d e n

show th a t ch ild re n w ho en ter school

t h e i r skills w as th e focus o f a g r a n t

a c a d e m i c a l ly , socially, a n d n u t r i t i o n a l l y

to th e S h a k e r H e i g h t s C ity S c h o o ls

“re a d y to l e a r n ” h av e g r e a t e r c h a n c e s for

for “T r a n s f o r m i n g M a th e m a tic s I n ­

P R E C O L L E G I A T E

E D U C A T

I

o

]V

s t r u c t i o n , ” a col-

U n d e s ig n a te d G ra n ts

lab o rativ e effort

D e sig n a te d G ra n ts

w ith

T o ta l G ra n ts

th e

E ast

s u c c e s s . B u t p o v erty , o f t e n a f a c t o r for

C l e v e l a n d C i t y S c h o o l s to e n c o u r a g e

ch ildren w h o en ter school lagging in these

d istric ts a n d t e a c h e r s to s h a r e e x p e r ­

a re a s , affects over h a l f th e c h ild r e n

ien ces in i m p ro v i n g s t u d e n t ach ievem en t.

a t t e n d i n g C le v e la n d P u b lic S chools.

A n o th er F o u n d atio n educational

success

a p p r o a c h s u p p o r ts c u r r i c u l a r in n o v a tio n s

require s an inter disciplinary appr oach. T h e

for pop u latio n s w ith special needs. G ran ts

F o u n d a t i o n r e s p o n d e d to t h e s e i s s u e s

fu nd ed such diverse projects as E sp eran za,

Im p ro v in g th e ir e d u catio n al

th r o u g h its g r a n t m a k i n g in early ch ildhood

an e d u c a tio n a l p r o g ra m for H is p a n ic

education.

y o u t h , t h e U r b a n C o m m u n i t y S c h o o l ’s

T h e im p act o f shifting

d em o g rap h ics on u rb a n and su b u rb an

“O u r W i l d e s t D r e a m s ” s u m m e r c a m p to

s c h o o l s y s t e m s is a l s o a F o u n d a t i o n

b uild the self-esteem o f girls, a n d a social

co ncern. G r a n t s to the Cleveland H eig h ts -

b eh av ior tr a i n in g p r o g ra m for H e a d Start

U niversity H e ig h ts City School D istrict

preschoolers c o n du cted by the Society For

s u p p o r t e d t h e S u p e r i n t e n d e n t ’s Five-Year

P r e v e n t i o n O f V iolence.

$1,458,3* $18,5: $1,476,9<


c o ll a b o r a t i v e te a c h i n g p r o j e c t 'tw e e n t h e S h a k e r H e i g h t s a n d i s t C le v e la n d s c h o o l s is h e lp i n g u d e n t s in b o t h d i s t r i c t s b e t t e r e i r m a t h s k i lls .


■ PRECOLLEGIATE ED UC ATION GRANTS

C le v e la n d B o a r d o f E d u c a tio n Joining and Meeting Many Im portant Needs (JAMMIN’) project at Mary Bethune Elem entary School $21,220 C le v e la n d D e v e lo p m e n t F o u n d a tio n Project Real, Cleveland Scholarship Program advisory services at Erieview and Central high schools and Fine Arts Appreciation Program by the Inner-City School Fund

96,739

C le v e la n d E d u c a tio n F u n d Bridges II oral history program and training o f teachers in “Foxfire” teaching methodology (second year) 69,728 Science Collaborative’s Science T eacher Resource Center and teacher training 48,990 Ten-year assessment of impact of programs in Cleveland Public Schools 25,000 T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n (I n c .) Education and administrative strategic plan for Cleveland Public Schools Review o f Cleveland Public Schools strategies for expanding elementary education Review of M arotta Montessori Schools of Cleveland’s pre-school program for Cleveland Public Schools students Teacher relocation expenses for Cleveland Public Schools

100,000 5,000 10,000 5,000

C le v e la n d H e ig h ts -U n iv e r s ity H e ig h ts C ity S c h o o l D is tr ic t Five-year strategic plan (second year)

54,880

C le v e la n d H e ig h ts -U n iv e r s ity H e ig h ts P u b lic S c h o o ls F o u n d a tio n Program support and strategic plan

27,000

T h e C le v e la n d I n itia tiv e f o r E d u c a tio n Consultant assistance for Operations Im provement Comm ittee 55,000 Operating support for Youth Opportunities Unlim ited 300,000


1

I n te r c h u r c h C o u n c il o f G r e a te r C le v ela n d School Adoption Center (third year)

30,000

K e n t S ta te U n iv e r sity F o u n d a tio n , Inc., K e n t, O h io Training by the Center for School Personnel Relations of teachers in Cleveland Public Schools to use the Achievement Formula/TRTVET teaching methodology (fifth year)

150,000 14,000 DESIGNATED GRANTS

M a r o tta M o n te s s o r i S c h o o ls o f C le v ela n d Administrative and classroom instructional costs

Schools superintendent, Samntie Campbell P arrish, stre sse s the im portance o f high stan dard s and enhanced results.

M e tr o p o lita n C le v e la n d A llia n c e o f B la c k S c h o o l E d u c a to r s Summer tutorial program (third year)

70,000 2,400

M o n te s s o r i T e a c h e r E d u c a tio n C o lla b o ra tiv e Teacher and parent in-service for Hicks and Dike elementary schools 22,100

C le v e la n d S ta te U n iv e r sity Diagnostic and remedial materials for the Education Services Center

26,%72

E m m a n u e l B a p tis t C h u rc h Saturday E nrichm ent Program

10.000

G r e a te r C le v e la n d R o u n d ta b le Consultant assistance Program support, parent/citizen leadership development training and community outreach activities by Cleveland Sum m it on Education Staff support for Schools as Neighborhood Resources initiative by Cleveland Sum m it on Education

5,000

L a u rel School Symposium on “Changing Roles, Changing Rules: Preparing O ur Daughters for Life in the 21st Century”

The new Vision 21 education plan p r o p o s e d by Cleveland Public

E s p e r a n z a , Inc. Program support, “Fiesta of H ope” education conference and community outreach activities

In itia tiv e s in U rb an E d u c a tio n F o u n d a tio n W riting project at Trem ont Elementary School

80.000 5,000

N a tio n a l A s s o c ia tio n o f P a r tn e r s in E d u c a tio n , Inc., A le x a n d r ia , V irg in ia Conference on partnerships in education in Cleveland 5,000 P.M. F o u n d a tio n , Inc. “O ur W ildest Dreams” summer camp by Urban Comm unity School S h a k e r H e ig h ts B o a r d o f E d u c a tio n “Transform ing M athematics Instruction” in collaboration with the East Cleveland Board of Education (second year) S o c ie ty F o r P r e v e n tio n O f V io le n c e Social skills training for three East Cleveland Head Start C enter staffs

50.000

T o ta l U n d e s ig n a te d G ra n ts

9,667

88,800

4,973 $1,458,369

(The following recipients and programs were designated by donors. Grants are fo r general support unless otherwise noted.) T h e C le v e la n d E d u c a tio n F u n d

$

1,000

T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n (I n c .) M ajor work award at Oliver Perry School

1,900

C le v e la n d L u th e r a n H ig h S c h o o l A s s o c ia tio n

1,892

H a th a w a y B ro w n S c h o o l

5,000

H aw ken School

1,077

T h e H ill S c h o o l, P o tts to w n , P e n n s y lv a n ia

135

D a n ie l E. M o rg a n S c h o o l Book awards to children

223

T h e P in e y W o o d s C o u n tr y L ife S c h o o l, P in e y W o ods, M i s s is s i p p i U n iv e r sity S c h o o l T o ta l D e s ig n a te d G r a n ts T o ta l P re c o lle g ia te E d u c a tio n G r a n ts — D e s ig n a te d a n d U n d e s ig n a te d

7,171 135 $18,533 $1,476,902


graders p articip ated

in A C E , w h ic h

p r o v i d e s t u t o r i n g in m a t h a n d s c i e n c e and

exposure

to e n g i n e e r i n g

career

By th e year 2000, minorities will comprise

o p p o r t u n i t i e s . C S U ’s S T A R S ( S t u d e n t

o n e - t h i r d o f th e n a t i o n ’s p o p u l a t i o n , b u t

A chievem en t in Research a nd Scholarship)

th e y a re u n d e r r e p r e s e n t e d in h i g h e r

p ro g ra m id en tifies p r o m is in g u n d e r ­

e d u c a t i o n n a t i o n w i d e . I n 1990, A f ri c a n -

g rad u ates a n d e ncou rag es t h e m to p u r su e

A m erican s m a d e u p 11.6 pe rcent o f O h i o ’s

doctoral study. T h e s e efforts, co n du cted in

18 to 24-year-olds, b u t were less t h a n eight

co lla b o ra tio n w ith the O h io B oard of

p e r c e n t o f s tu d e n ts in b a c c a la u re a te

R e g e n ts , s h o u l d e v e n tu a lly le a d to a

program s at public institutions o f higher

stronger minority faculty presence at O h i o ’s

l e a r n i n g . I n 1 99 1 , A f r i c a n - A m e r i c a n s

colleges a n d universities.

co m p rise d only 5 p e r c e n t o f stu d e n ts

p o p u la tio n s b eco m e m o re racially diverse,

As cam pu s

fostering a positive m u ltic u ltu ra l en v ir o n ­

I I

o

h e r

e

d

u

c

a

t

i

o

n

m e n t is c r u c i a l . J o h n C a r r o l l U n i v e r ­ sity, U r s u l i n e C o l l e g e a n d N o t r e D a m e

enrolled

in

program s.

sta te -assisted For

m any

doctoral

C o lleg e of O h i o , schools w h e r e m i n o rity

hig h er

e n r o l l m e n t h as in c r e a se d significantly,

e d u c a tio n in stitu tio n s, im p ro v in g both

received

stu d e n t a n d faculty m ino rity repre sentation

c o lla b o r a tiv e p ilo t in c o n f lic t r e s o l u ­

F o u n d atio n

support

for

a

is a t o p p r i o r i t y . A t t r a c t i n g m i n o r i t y

tio n ,

p reju d ice re d u ctio n , and peer

stu d e n ts a n d p r o m o t i n g th eir success was

conciliatio n.

t h e fo cu s o f t w o i n n o v a t i v e p r o g r a m s at

datio n in 1992 m a d e its first grants to four

T h e C l e v e la n d F o u n ­

Clev ela nd State University (C S U ) to w hich

o f the state’s largest universities u n d e r the

th e F o u n d a tio n m ad e grants. T h e Fenn

new

Col lege o f E n g in e e r i n g ex p an d ed its A C E

S ta te w id e P r o g r a m for B u s in e ss an d

(A ccess program

to

C areers

to in c r e a s e

g u id elin es

o f the

restructured

E n g in e e rin g )

M a n a g e m e n t E d u c a tio n (PB M E ). F u n d i n g

th e n u m b e r o f

will su p p ort institutional efforts to pr epar e

in

m i n o rity stu d e n ts p u r s u i n g careers in this

s t u d e n ts for e m p l o y m e n t in a h ig h ly

field. In 1992, 117 n i n t h t h r o u g h tw elfth

com p etitiv e global economy.

I

r

z

U n d e s ig n a te d G ra n ts D e sig n a te d G ra n ts

$1 ,021 ,6 49 $7 67 ,6 34

T o ta l G ra n ts

$1 ,789 ,2 83

S c h o la rs h ip s

$444,355

S p e c ia l P u rp o s e F u n d s

$1 ,188 ,7 86


C le v e la n d S ta t e A C E s t u d e n t s d o s o m e la s t-m in u te tin k e r in g on t h e i r w in n i n g e n t r y f o r a c ity tv id e e n g in e e r in g c o m p e titi o n .


â&#x2013;  HIGHER

ED U C A T IO N G R ANT S

J o h n C a r ro ll U n iv e r sity Pilot program in conflict resolution, prejudice reduction, and peer mediation in cooperation with Ursuline College and Notre Dame College of O hio (over 15 months) $35,407 C a se W e ste rn R e s e r v e U n iv e r sity Career placement and community research projects of the M andel Center for Nonprofit Organizations Production of Dictionary o f Cleveland Biography and second edition o f Encyclopedia o f Cleveland History> by the Departm ent of History (over three years) Sum ner Canary Lectureship C le v e la n d S c h o la r s h ip P r o g r a m s Campus Representative Program (third and fourth years) Nontraditional Student Program (second year)

109,910 275,000 5,000

73,182 50,000

C le v e la n d S ta te U n iv e r sity Access to Careers in Engineering program at Fenn College of Engineering 43,434 Greater Cleveland Sonia Kovalevsky M athematics Day 900 STARS program to promote minority student participation in doctoral programs (over two years) 108,816 C u y a h o g a C o m m u n ity C olleg e Enhancem ent o f academic programs and student access (over two years) U n ite d N e g ro C o lleg e F un d, In c., N e w Y o rk, N e w Y o rk Presidential Scholars Program (over three years) T o ta l U n d e s ig n a te d G ra n ts

230,000

90,000 $1,021,649

The United Negro College Fund h osts an annual college f a ir and p r o v id e s sch o larsh ips f o r stu dents in terested in attending trad itio n ally black institutions.


I DESIGNATED

G R ANT S

(The following recipients and programs were designated by donors. Grants are fo r general support unless otherwise noted.) A s h la n d L ib r a r y A s s o c ia tio n , A sh la n d , O h io A s h la n d U n iv e r sity , A sh la n d , O h io B a ld w in -W a lla c e C o lleg e U n iv e r s ity o f C a lifo rn ia , B e r k e le y , C a lifo rn ia J o h n C a r ro ll U n iv e r s ity

$4,047 8,095 63,069 186 139

C a se W e s te r n R e s e r v e U n iv e r s ity Adelbert College Franklin Thom as Backus Law School Biological Field Station at Squire Valleevue Farm operated by the Departm ent of Biology Case Institute o f Technology Graduate School Reference books for the Library of W estern Reserve College Social research at the Mandel School o f Applied Social Sciences

10,878 6,479 5,401 24,662 4,454 174,188

C le v e la n d P u b lic L ib r a r y Services to shut-ins

88,354

196 1,323

L a k e E rie C ollege O h io W e sle y a n U n iv e r sity , D e la w a re , O h io

186

P r in c e to n U n iv e r sity , P rin c e to n , N e w J e r s e y

135

S a in t M a ry S e m in a r y S m ith C ollege, N o r th a m p to n , M a s s a c h u s e tts W a y L ib r a r y F o u n d a tio n , P e r r y s b u r g , O h io

1,000

T o ta l D e s ig n a te d G ra n ts T o ta l H ig h e r E d u c a tio n G r a n ts â&#x20AC;&#x201D; D e s ig n a te d a n d U n d e s ig n a te d

186

B a ld iv in -W a lla ce C ollege Scholarship support

2,500

E d u c a tio n a l T e le v is io n A s s o c ia tio n o f M e tr o p o lita n C le v ela n d , W V IZ -T V

135

F en n E d u c a tio n a l F u n d

232

H ills d a le C ollege, H illsd a le , M ic h ig a n

17,151

K e n y o n C ollege, G a m b ie r, O h io

10,878

$767,634

20,000 7,000

C le v e la n d M o n te s s o r i A s s o c ia tio n Scholarship support for Ruffing Montessori (West)

1,500

C le v e la n d S ta te U n iv e r sity Scholarship support

20,000

36,000

D y k e C ollege Scholarship support

9,000

E a s t S u b u r b a n M o n te s s o r i S c h o o l, Inc. Scholarship support

1,500

F a ir m o u n t M o n te s s o r i A s s o c ia tio n Scholarship support at Ruffing M ontessori School (East) 1,500 H u d s o n M o n te s s o r i A s s o c ia tio n Scholarship support W e s ts h o r e M o n te s s o r i A s s o c ia tio n Scholarship support T o ta l U n d e s ig n a te d G ra n ts

1.500 1.500 $174,000

$1,789,283 I DESIGNATED GRANTS

C o n n e c tic u t C ollege, N e w L o n d o n , C o n n e c tic u t

D e n is o n U n iv e r sity , G ra n v ille , O h io

96,370 7,171

139

495

1,827

U n ite d N e g ro C o llege F und , In c.

C le v e la n d S ta te U n iv e r s ity

C u y a h o g a C o u n ty P u b lic L ib r a r y

8,238

U n iv e r sity o f th e P a c ific , S to c k to n , C a lifo rn ia

SCHOLARSHIP GRANTS

C o rn e ll U n iv e r sity , Ith a c a , N e w Y o rk Deanship at Johnson Graduate School of M anagem ent 38,000

191,520

T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n (I n c .) Scholarships for students from the Cleveland area attending Berea College, Kentucky Scholarships for students from the Cleveland area attending H uron Road Hospital School of N ursing Scholarships to graduates of Aurora H igh School

(The following recipients and programs were designated by donors.) $19,000

B e a u m o n t S c h o o l f o r G irls Scholarship support

4,000

B e r e a A r e a M o n te s s o r i A s s o c ia tio n Scholarship support

1,500

J o h n C a r ro ll U n iv e r sity Scholarship support C a se W e ste rn R e s e r v e U n iv e r sity Scholarship support Thom as B. Schneider Scholarship Award for a student at the M andel Center for Nonprofit Organizations

20,000 25,000 5,000

A s h la n d U n iv e r sity , A sh la n d , O h io T he Hazel Myers Spreng Scholarship

$6,476

A v o n L a k e U n ite d C h u r c h o f C h rist, A vo n L a ke , O h io Scholarships for C hristian work

2,674

B a ld w in -W a lla c e C o lleg e T he Hazel Myers Spreng Scholarship C a p ita l U n iv e r sity , C o lu m b u s, O h io T he Frederick R. and Bertha Sprecht M autz Scholarship Fund J o h n C a r ro ll U n iv e r sity James J. Doyle Scholarship


C a se W e s te r n R e s e r v e U n iv e r s ity T he Aloy M emorial Scholarship Fund for women For a female student in foreign study H arriet Fairfield Coit and W illiam Henry Coit Scholarships W illiam Curtis M orton, Maud Morton, Kathleen M orton Fund Scholarships Oglebay Fellow Program in the School of M edicine Scholarships in aerospace or computers Scholarships in Franklin Thom as Backus Law School T he H azel Myers Spreng Scholarship I n e z a n d H a r r y C le m e n t A w a r d Cleveland Public Schools annual Superintendent’s Award

1,270 2,319

I SPECIAL PUR POSE F UND S

T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a t i o n a d m in is te r s tw o

1,480

sp e cial p u r p o s e fu n d s in th e area o f h ig h e r

16,812 73,990 94 10,126 6,476

1,000

V irg in ia J o n e s M e m o r ia l S c h o la r s h ip For furthering the college education of a female graduate of Shaw H igh School

education. T h e F e n n E d u c a t i o n a l F u n d ( F E F ),

2,500

assist in th e d e v e lo p m e n t o f c o o p e ra tiv e

T h e J o n L e w is M e m o r ia l A w a r d For a Cleveland Heights H igh School graduate to pursue further studies

3,000

M a c M u r ra y C ollege, J a c k s o n v ille , Illin o is T he George D. and Edith W. Featherstone Memorial Fund Scholarships

2,674

4,142 1,800

N o r th C e n tr a l C ollege, N a p e r v ille , Illin o is T he Hazel Myers Spreng Scholarship in memory of Bishop Samuel P. Spreng

6,476

T h e C le v e la n d M u s ic S c h o o l S e ttle m e n t T he N ellie E. H inds M emorial Scholarships Scholarships at the Harvard East Branch

4,000 957

O h io W e sle y a n U n iv e r sity , D e la w a r e , O h io The Hazel Myers Spreng Scholarship

6,476

C le v e la n d S c h o la r s h ip P r o g r a m s , In c.

1,000

P u r d u e U n iv e r sity , W e st L a fa y e tte , In d ia n a T he John C. McLean Scholarships in engineering

42,869

T h e M iria m K e r r u is h S ta g e S c h o la r s h ip For Shaker Heights H igh School graduates

10,000

957

D a r tm o u th C ollege, H a n o v e r , N e w H a m p s h ir e T he John M arshall Raible and David G ardner Raible Scholarship Fund 15,982 V in c e F e d e r ic o M e m o r ia l S c h o la r s h ip s For Wickliffe H igh School graduates H aw ken School T he John M arshall Raible and David Gardner Raible Scholarship Fund H ills d a le C ollege, H illsd a le , M ic h ig a n T he John C. M cLean Scholarships to deserving students

4,500

3,295 17,151

and

w o rk -stu d y

program s

at

i n s t i t u t i o n s o f h i g h e r l e a r n i n g in t h e G r e a t e r

p u r p o s e f u n d in e d u c a t i o n , th e S ta te w id e Program

for

B usiness

and

M anagem ent

E d u c a tio n (P B M E ), was established in 1982 with t h e s u p p o r t o f t h e L. D a l e D o r n e y F u n d to

A d a G a te s S te v e n s S c h o la r s h ip For graduates of the public high school of Elyria, Ohio

3,500

U n iv e r sity S c h o o l T he John Marshall Raible and David G ardner Raible Scholarship Fund

800

U r su lin e C ollege Lillian Herron Doyle Scholarship

ed u catio n

C levela nd area. T h e F o u n d a t i o n ’s o t h e r special

T h e C le v e la n d I n s titu te o f A r t Caroline E. Coit F und Scholarships Isaac C. G off Fund Scholarships

C le v e la n d S ta te U n iv e r s ity Scholarships in Cleveland-M arshall College of Law

established in 1971, is designed to p r o m o te an d

1,680

T o ta l D e s ig n a te d G r a n ts

$270,355

T o ta l S c h o la r s h ip G r a n ts — D e s ig n a te d a n d U n d e s ig n a te d

$444,355

strengthen business a n d m a n a g e m e n t ed u catio n at four-year institu tion s in O h io.

I FENN EDUCATIONAL FUND GRANTS (FEF)

B a ld w in -W a lla c e C ollege Special honorary scholarships “W ork Study Plus” Program to prepare students for participation in cooperative education J o h n C a r ro ll U n iv e r sity Special honorary scholarships C a se A lu m n i A s s o c ia tio n Special honorary scholarships Charles J. Stilwell Scholarship at Case Institute ofTechnology

$4,800 13,515 5,000 15,000 5,000


D y k e C olleg e Henry Ford II Memorial Scholarship Job readiness preparation for participation in cooperative education

13,300

T h e L a k e la n d F o u n d a tio n Job developer in cooperative education program at Lakeland Comm unity College

11,584

1,000

N o tr e D a m e C ollege o f O h io Cooperative education program for nontraditionalage students (second year) U r su lin e C olleg e Establishment of cooperative education program (second year) T o ta l F en n E d u c a tio n a l F u n d G ra n ts

13,661 $209,653

STATEWIDE PROGRAM FOR B U SIN E SS

The secon d edition o f the

AND MANAGEMENT EDUCATION (PBME)

Encyclopedia o f Cleveland

C a se W e ste rn R e s e r v e U n iv e r sity Executive education program in the management of technology (MoT) at the W eatherhead School of Management and dissemination of M oT information to business and engineering faculties in Ohio $298,860 (over three years)

will contain thousands o f little-known fa c ts and bits H istory

o f local trivia.

T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n (In c .) 1993 operating budget of the Statewide Program for Business and M anagem ent Education (PBME)

41,045

C le v ela n d S ta te U n iv e r sity Internationalization of curriculum in the John J. Nance College of Business Administration (over two years) 124,550 C a se W e s te r n R e s e r v e U n iv e r sity Assessment of cooperative education, Professional Practicum, and Minority Career Awareness programs R. Earl Burrows M emorial Scholarships

30,446

T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n (In c .) 1993 operating budget of the Fenn Educational Fund

22,500

C le v e la n d S ta te U n iv e r sity Employer development in the cooperative education program (second year) Special honorary scholarships

43,813 18,400

M ia m i U n iv e r sity , M ia m i, O h io Moving Environmental Technology into Business and M anagem ent Education in Ohio (over three years) 265,332

2,000

T h e U n iv e r sity o f T o led o , T o le d o , O h io Establishm ent by the College of Business Administration of an MBA degree in Global M anagem ent of Technology (over three years) T o ta l P BM E G ra n ts T o ta l S p e c ia l P u r p o s e F u n d s G ra n ts

249,346 $979,133 $1,188,786


University H o spita ls o f Clevela nd recently began a concentrated effort to im pro ve th at percentage. In 1992, the hospital received a $ 1 2 5 ,0 00 g r a n t to s u p p o r t t h e D o u g l a s S atch er C le rk s h ip P ro g ra m , w h ic h was I m p r o v i n g a c ce ss to q u a l i t y c a re a n d

established to attract m ore min ority clerks,

s u p p o r tin g adv an ce m e nts in h ealth services

especially

d e l i v e r y r e m a i n e d i m p o r t a n t t h e m e s for

sc ho ols.

The

1992.

m a d e to foster m ore regional ap proaches to

E n h a n c i n g the ability o f te a c h in g and

medical care. M e t r o H e a lt h ’s “Easy Street,”

C lev e la n d F o u n d a tio n

e

a

l

t

h

trad itio n ally

b lack

A n u m b e r o f g ran ts were

research facilities to m e e t co m m u n i t y needs

a r e h a b i l i t a t i o n f a c i l i t y t r e a t i n g 1,2 00

is c r u c i a l to t h i s effort,

victims o f strokes an d other serious injuries

Since the

mid-1980s, T h e Clevela nd F o u n d a t i o n has

a year, provides a s i m u l a t e d e n v i r o n m e n t

prov ided near ly $500,000 to C ase Western

w h e r e p a t i e n t s r e l e a r n e v e r y d a y s k ills

R eserve h

in

from

M ed icin e

U niversity to

help

School

of

u n d e r the su p e rv isio n o f th erap ists.

in crease

its

M e t r o H e a lt h has m a d e “Easy Street,” one

m i n o r i t y e n r o l l m e n t. M o s t o f thes e

o f o n ly th re e su c h fa c ilitie s in O h io ,

f u nd s have been use d for financial aid. T h e

available to patients from other institutions

F o u n d a t i o n ’s s u p p o r t a n d t h e m e d i c a l

to m ax im iz e its use.

s c h o o l ’s c o m m i t m e n t h a v e h e l p e d

to

needs o f c h ild re n an d th e m edically

increase m in ority en r o l l m e n t from 8 to 18

u n d erserv ed w ere equ ally im p o rta n t

A ddressing the

p e r c e n t , a n d a t t r a c t e d a n a d d i t i o n a l $1

t h e m e s i n 1992. G r a n t s e n a b l e d t h e

m i l l i o n in o u t s i d e f u n d i n g .

W hile

D iabetes Association to ex p an d its m inority

m in o ritie s are u n d e r r e p r e s e n t e d t h r o u g h ­

o utreach efforts to the H ispa nic c o m m u n ity

o u t m e d i c i n e , t h e y a r e e s p e c i a l l y so in

a n d p r o v i d e d c o n t i n u i n g s u p p o r t to

a c a d e m i c p o sitio n s , c o m p r i s i n g o nly one

L i f e b a n c ’s b e r e a v e m e n t p r o g r a m

fo r

p e r c e n t o f t h e n a t i o n ’s m e d i c a l s c h o o l

children

th e

faculties. M a n y stu dents are first exposed to

C u y a h o g a C o u n t y Critical I n c id e n t Stress

and

youth.

S im ila rly ,

an academ ic m edical institution th ro u g h a

Debriefing program (CISD) received support

hospital clerkship. W i t h only three percent

for a cr isis i n t e r v e n t i o n a n d c o u n s e l i n g

o f i ts c l e r k s h i p s f i l l e d b y m i n o r i t i e s ,

p rog ram for em er gency services personnel.


Through g ro u p counseling and c risis intervention, CISD helps police, fire , and oth er emergenc services p erson n el cope with stre ssfu l jo b situ ation s.

]

1 1 1 ] ] ] I ]


T h e C le v e la n d S o c ie ty f o r th e B lin d General support

HEALTH GRANTS

A m e r ic a n S o c ie ty o n A g in g , S a n F r a n c is c o , C a lifo r n ia Cleveland participants in N ew Ventures in Leadership program A r th r iti s F o u n d a tio n , N o r th e a s te r n O h io C h a p te r Board retreat C a m p H o M ita K o d a Renovation o f bathhouse facility

T h e C le v e la n d T o m o r r o w P ro je c t, Inc. Cleveland H ealth Quality Choice Project (second grant) $17,670

5,000 30,000

C a se W e s te r n R e s e r v e U n iv e r sity C enter for Adolescent H ealth 38,410 Developm ent of a m ulti-institutional Academic Medical C enter 100,000 M eeting on improving care for the hospitalized elderly 1,800 M inority medical student initiative at the School o f M edicine (over three years) 150,000 University-wide project on urban lead poisoning 2,081 C e n tr a l S c h o o l o f P r a c tic a l N u r sin g , Inc. H om e nursing program

24,400

36,750

100,000

50,000

C u y a h o g a C o u n ty B o a r d o f C o m m is s io n e r s Cuyahoga County T raum a Registry (over 18 months) H ealth priority budgeting system

146,000 24,000

D ia b e te s A s s o c ia tio n o f G r e a te r C le v ela n d M inority outreach program (second grant)

M e tr o H e a lth M e d ic a l C e n te r Perinatal Projects to reduce high infant mortality and morbidity rates (sixth and seventh years)

34,820

T h e N e w Y o rk C o m m u n ity T ru st, N e w Y o rk , N e w Y o rk O perating support for Funders Concerned About AIDS (fourth and fifth years)

F e d e r a tio n f o r C o m m u n ity P la n n in g Transitional support for computerized benefits screening service

3,875

T h e G o ld en A g e C e n te rs o f G r e a te r C le v ela n d , Inc. Comprehensive plan G r a n tm a k e r s in H e a lth , N e w Y o rk , N eiv Y o rk Program support (third and fourth years)

5,000

H e a lth H ill H o s p ita l f o r C h ild re n Child health conference

5,000

65,000

H e a th e r H ill, Inc. Rehabilitation hospital

15,000

H E L P F o u n d a tio n , Inc. H ousing for the mentally retarded and developmentally disabled

50,000

50,000

J e w is h C o m m u n ity F e d e r a tio n Living at H om e project

22,134

2,500

L ife B a n c Bereavement program for children and youth

5,000

25.000 26.000

50,000

C ity o f C le v e la n d Lead abatement program by D epartm ent of H ealth (second year)

C le v e la n d H e a lth E d u c a tio n M u se u m Attendance by children from the neighborhood formerly served by Forest City Hospital

202,740

T h e F re e M e d ic a l C lin ic o f G r e a te r C le v ela n d Expansion of hours 25,000

25,000

125,000

M e tr o H e a lth F o u n d a tio n , Inc. Com m unity use of rehabilitation services Study on cost benefit o f continuous quality improvement by M etroHealth Medical Center

C ritic a l I n c id e n t S tr e s s S e r v ic e s f o r C u y a h o g a C o u n ty , Inc. Start-up support (over two years)

C le v e la n d C h in e s e S e n io r C itiz e n s A s s o c ia tio n Study on needs of elderly Asian Americans in Cleveland

T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n (I n c .) Administrative expenses for the Comm unity AIDS Partnership Project Follow-up on the Study Commission on M edical Research and Education New York Academy of Science Conference in Cleveland by the Association of Cleveland Physiologists, Inc. O perating support for Com m unity AIDS Partnership (fifth year)

M e n ta l H e a lth R e h a b ilita tio n a n d R e s e a r c h , In c. d b a H ill H o u s e Staff support for expansion of the Clubhouse model (over three years)

125,000

N o b le -N e la S e n io r C itiz e n s , Inc. Educational forum for twentieth anniversary o f the Helen S. Brown Senior Citizen Center N u r s in g H o m e O m b u d s m e n d b a L o n g T e rm C a re O m b u d sm e n Policy work (over three years)

57,500

21,705

T h e B e n ja m in R o s e I n s titu te Expansion of case m anagem ent study General support

69,117 36,750

M a x im u m In d e p e n d e n t L ivin g M a n a g e m e n t Development of new housing options for persons with disabilities (over two years)

78,000

S e r v ic e s f o r I n d e p e n d e n t L ivin g , Inc. Technical assistance on Americans W ith Disabilities Act

A. M. M c G re g o r H o m e General support

36,750

S K IP o f O h io , Inc. Transitional support


A m e ric a n V ete rin a ry M ed ic a l A sso c ia tio n F o u n d a tio n , Sch a u m b u rg , Illin o is U n iv e rsity H o sp ita ls o f C leveland

National minority recruitment day Perinatal cocaine intervention program staff at Rainbow Babies and Childrens Hospital (third and fourth years) Program to increase the num ber of minority clerks

5.000 90,000 125,138

U n iv e rsity S ettlem en t, Inc.

A dult day care program

T o ta l U n d esig n a te d G ran ts

5.000 $2,469,647

A.M. M cG regor H om e

7,096

3,800

M e tro H e a lth F o u n d a tio n , Inc.

3,270 2,633 801

C ase W estern R eserv e U n iversity f o r th e S c h o o l o f M edicine Cancer research Medical research and general support O utpatient clinic for dispensary Research in diseases of the eye Scholarships or research

18,679 101,654 53,189 26,724 5,609

The C levela nd Clinic F o u n d a tio n

24,291 14,512

T he D ea co n ess F o u n d a tio n

Deaconess Hospital of Cleveland

W illiam H . Gates bed

F a irv ie w G eneral H o sp ita l Equipm ent Christiana Perren Soyer bed

E quipm ent

H e a lth H ill H o sp ita l f o r C hildren

(The following recipients and programs were designated by donors. Grants are for general support unless otherwise noted.) A k ro n City H o sp ita l, A kro n , O hio Obstetrical division

A m e ric a n C a ncer Society, C u ya h o g a C o unty U nit Research or any other purpose

A m e ric a n H e a rt A sso c ia tio n , N o r th e a s t O hio A ffilia te , Inc. Research or any other purpose

A m e ric a n I.ung A sso c ia tio n o f N o rth e rn O hio

6,901

E lyria M e m o ria l H o sp ita l, E lyria, O hio

D E S I G N A T E D GRANTS

H ig h la n d View H o sp ita l $1,870 120,232 14,986 142,907 14,986 2,067

110

B ellevue H o sp ita l, B ellevue, O hio

G race H o sp ita l u

M a n sfie ld M e m o ria l H om e, M a n sfield , O hio

1,077

Research in diseases of the eye

Creating the Douglas-Satcher Clerkship Program has helped University Hospitals increase the number o f minority clerks it recruits fro m traditionally black medical schools.

21,022

A r th r itis F oun da tion, N o rth e a s te r n O hio C h a p ter

2,000

11,031 57,367 1,019 28,683 3,270

Employees’ Christmas fund

1,641

H oly F am ily C ancer H om e

1,827

H u ro n R o a d H o sp ita l L a ke w o o d H o sp ita l L a ke iv o o d H o sp ita l F o u n d a tio n , Inc. L u th e ra n M ed ica l C enter Conference travel

L u th e ra n M ed ica l C enter F o u n d a tio n

10,335 11,141 101,216 2,577 372 34,286

M etroHealth Medical C enter’s Burn U nit M etroHealth Medical C enter’s N urse Award

R a in b o w B a b ies a n d C h ild re n s H o s p ita l E quipm ent or supplies

90,665 1,480

The B en jam in R o se In s titu te

16,026

S a in t A nn F o u n d a tio n

3,270

S a in t J o h n a n d W est S h o re H o s p ita l S a in t L u k e ’s H o s p ita l St. V incent C h a rity H o sp ita l

Aid for alcoholics and indigent sick Elizabeth Boersig Soyer bed

S a m a rita n H o sp ita l, A sh la n d , O hio Mr. and Mrs. A. N . Myers memorial room

S h rin e rs H o sp ita ls f o r C rip p le d C hildren, Tam pa, F lo rid a U n iv e rsity H o sp ita ls o f C levela nd

Benefit of aged people Cancer research Conference travel Lakeside Hospital M aternity Hospital H enry L. Sanford M emorial bed Spine research in the Departm ent of Surgery Urological or vascular research

The V isitin g N u rse A sso c ia tio n o f C levela nd

20,342 464 7,096 1,319 1,019 16,189 7,171 14,192 9,423 144,588 2,341 546,457 6,237 1,480 12,000 68,224 3,770

T o tal D e sig n a te d G ra n ts

$1,828,934

T o tal H e a lth G ra n ts — D e sig n a te d a n d U n d esig n a te d

$4,298,581


S O C I A L

involved in prostitution. T h e only program o f its k i n d in O h i o , P r o j e c t S e c o n d C h a n c e has “g r a d u a t e d ” 52 w o m e n to date.

Im proving the quality o f life

for d i s a d v a n t a g e d c h i l d r e n a n d y o u t h In

1992,

com m u n ity

organizations

r e m a in e d an i m p o r t a n t in itiativ e. T h e

c o n ti n u e d to feel the stress o f a drastic

C h i l d r e n ’s Defense F u n d - O h io , a child

e co nom ic d o w n t u r n and severe fun d in g

advocacy organization, received a $200,000

cutbacks. United Way Services o f Cleveland

grant to support the efforts o f the Ohio and

failed to reach its $47.5 m illion goal, its

Cleveland offices. Foundation funding also

low e st in seven years, h e i g h t e n i n g th e

supported the Alcohol & D r u g Addiction

strain on already critical resources. T h is

Services Preschool Prevention program and

G eneral

“Project L a tin o ,” a su b stan ce-ab u se

A s s is ta n c e , a n d th e g r o w i n g h o m e l e s s

outreach initiative o f the Hispanic Urban

population made the Poverty Commission’s

M i n o ri ty P ro g ra m .

crisis,

w idespread

c u ts

in

K e e p in g teen

m o t h e r s in sc ho ol is o fte n c r itic a l to

S E R V I C E S

k e e p i n g t h e m o f f w e lfare . T h e O h i o D e p artm ent of H u m a n Services received

r e c o m m e n d a tio n s even m ore im portant.

funding for a research study on participants

In keeping with the F o u n d a tio n ’s

in its L E A P ( L e a r n i n g , E a r n i n g , a n d

s t r a te g i c ob jec tiv e o f i m p r o v i n g th e

P a re n tin g ) project. L E A P requires teen

c o m m u n i t y ’s ability to address c h ronic

m o t h e r s re c e iv in g Aid to D e p e n d e n t

social problems and formulate approaches

Children to be in school or an alternative

to emerging needs, 1992 grants supported

educational or job training program. T he

various front-line programs and projects.

F riendly In n S e ttle m e n t received g ra n t

T h e City Mission received $250,000 for its

sup port for its B abysitting Cooperative,

Transitional and Whole Family Residence

which cares for the children while these

p r o j e c t to p r o v i d e sta b le h o u s i n g for

young mothers attend G E D /A B E classes.

homeless families. Transitional Housin g,

By a d d r e s s i n g this c ritica l n e e d , th e

Inc. received f u nd ing for Project Second

C o o p e r a tiv e a llo w s y o u n g m o th e r s to

Chance, a program providing intervention,

receive the education they need to improve

counseling, and referral services for women

their lives and those of their children.


SO C IA L

S E R V IC E S

GRANTS

A fte r c a r e R e s id e n tia l S e rv ic e s

Start-up support of the H ousing Support Program

A lc o h o l & D rug A d d ic tio n S e rv ic e s B o a rd o f C u ya h o g a C o unty Preschool drug prevention program (second year) Preschool drug prevention program evaluation

A lco h o lism S e rv ic e s o f C levela nd Com puterized assessment system

T he A rt S tu d io , Inc.

Expansion of hours for the Fairhill Art Studio Program

G o o d w ill In d u s tr ie s o f G re a te r C levela nd Strategic plan

$50,000

Staff support for closing of Broadview Development C enter (third year)

70,000 19,500

The C ity M issio n

13,775

C levela nd H o u sin g N e tw o rk , Inc.

15,424

The C levela nd P sy ch o a n a ly tic S o ciety F o u n d a tio n

31,700

Brochure on merger o f Beech Brook and Family H ealth 12,000 Emergency funding for the H epatitis B vaccine

B e llflo w e r C en ter f o r P re ve n tio n o f C h ild A b u se, Inc. T een Moms Project (second year)

B la ck F ocus on th e W est Side, In c o rp o ra te d Strategic plan

5,000

C a th o lic C h a ritie s S e rv ic e s C o rp o ra tio n

Board training and strategic plan (over two years)

The C h ild re n ’s A id S o ciety Strategic plan (over two years)

32,000 5,000

C leveland S ta te U niversity

Research on success factors for African-American males

C levela nd W om en, Inc. db a T em plum H o u se

East Cleveland Domestic Violence Project (third year)

C o m m u nity U nited H e a d S ta rt a n d D ay C are Inc.

250,000 65,000

50,000 5,000 20,000

Study on impact o f General Assistance cuts on recipients Summer youth program by the Youth Services C oordinating Council (third year) Staff support

35,500 60,000

200,000

Start-up support of residential drug treatm ent program for pregnant women

E a st Sid e In te r fa ith M in istrie s Strategic plan

15,358

G a rfie ld H e ig h ts C o m m u n ity Center, Inc. Outreach counseling program (third year)

The In s titu te f o r C rea tive L iving Strategic plan and marketing

Child care scholarships (second year) Volunteer recruitment and placement program (second year)

16,000 48,000 22,380

The J u n io r L ea g u e o f Cleveland, Inc.

Second printing of Cleveland’s Child— A Challengefor Our Future Youth counseling program

L u th e ra n M e tro p o lita n M in istry A sso c ia tio n 20,000 25,000 25,000

Start-up support of W est Side shelter for runaways (over three years)

50,000 12,500 26,742 30,000

246,593

N ew L ife C o m m u nity Staff support (third year)

N o rth c o a st H a rv e st Operating support

N o rth e a s t O hio C o alition f o r th e H o m eless

F rien d ly In n Settlem en t

Baby-sitting cooperative for teen parents in GED/ABE classes

Project Latino alcohol and drug prevention program for children

L esbian-G ay C o m m u n ity S e rvice C enter o f G rea ter C leveland

E a st Sid e C a tholic S h e lter 249,264

49,296

H isp a n ic U rban M in o rity A lco h o lism a n d D rug A b u se O u trea ch P ro g ra m

J e w ish C o m m u nity F e d era tio n o f C leveland

C u ya h o g a C ounty B o a rd o f C o m m issio n ers

E a st C levela nd N e ig h b o rh o o d Center, Inc. 209,377

C h ild re n ’s D e fen se F und, W ashing ton , D.C. Operating support for the Ohio and Cleveland offices (over two years)

Family Development Project (third year)

Prenatal education and support program (second year)

C ase W estern R e s e rv e U n iv e rsity

O perating support for C enter for Urban Poverty and Social Change at M andel School of Applied Social Sciences (second year) O perating support for Cleveland Commission on Poverty’s C om m unity Building Initiative at M andel School o f Applied Social Sciences

Capital campaign for the T ransition and W hole Family Residence

Operating support and program expansion (over two years)

B eech B ro o k

B e lie f a ir e /J e w is h C h ild re n ’s B u re a u

G rea ter C levela nd W elfa re R ig h ts O rg a n iza tio n M innie’s House: A C enter for W om en in the Hough Area (second year)

A s s o c ia tio n f o r R e ta r d e d C itizen s, C u ya h o g a C ounty

30,000

Operating support

O hio D e p a rtm e n t o f H u m a n S e rv ic e s , C olum bus, O hio Learning, Earning, and Parenting (LEAP) service demonstration program for teens

P ro v id e n c e H o u se Strategic plan

S h o e s F or K id s, Inc. 1992 Campaign

35,000


S ta rtin g P o in t

Operating support for child day care resource and referral center (third year)

The Teen F a th e r P ro g ra m Strategic planning retreat

T ra n sitio n a l H o u sin g , Inc.

Project Second Chance (second year)

80,000 5,000 46,700

U nited W ay S e rv ic e s

Greater Cleveland Literacy Coalition merger (over 27 months)

35,875

Project Latino â&#x20AC;&#x153;gradu atesâ&#x20AC;? proudly show o ff the stuffed animals they received fo r completing an educational program about the dangers o f drug abuse.

Plan to address community hunger needs by G reater Cleveland Committee on H unger Project T urning Point

The U rban L ea g u e o f G re a te r C leveland Conference on the African-American family

W est S id e E cu m e n ica l M in istry Family development program

23,820 100,000 5,000 50,000

W om en T o gether, Inc.

Positive Life Connections counseling program by T he Center for Prevention of Domestic Violence (second year)

T o tal U n d esig n a te d G rants

42,000 $2,608,955


%

i ■ D ESIG N A T ED

GRANTS

§

(The following recipients and programs were designated by donors. Grants are for general support unless otherwise noted.) A c h ie v e m e n t C enter f o r C h ild ren E quipm ent

A lc o h o lism S e rv ic e s o f C leveland, Inc. A m e ric a n B ible S o ciety, N ew Y ork, N ew Y o rk A m e ric a n R e d C ross, G re a te r C levela nd C h a p te r B eech B ro o k B e lle fa ire B ig B ro th e r s/B ig S is te r s o f G re a te r C leveland, Inc. Big Buddy/Little Buddy Program

B oy S c o u ts o f A m erica, G re a te r C levela n d C o u n cil No. 440 B o ys a n d G irls C lubs o f G re a te r C leveland, Inc. E liza B ry a n t C enter C a th o lic C h a ritie s C o rp o ra tio n Benefit o f aged persons Benefit o f ParmadaleSt. A nthony Youth Services Village

C en ter f o r H u m a n S e rv ic e s

Counseling Division Day Nursery Association of Cleveland Fam ily Preservation Program

C h ild G u id a n c e C en ter C h ild ren F o re v e r H a ven The C h ild re n ’s A id S o c iety Industrial H om e

C h ild re n ’s S e rv ic e s

£ $16,625 28,683

i

65

i

807

£

6,835

1

57,153

m

7,390 11,146 11,743

The Friendly Inn Settlement’s Babysitting Cooperative provides quality day care fo r children o f teen mothers in the LEAP program.

139 1,078 18,570 3,000 10,892 294 39,718 4,270 2,000 259 823 497 70,928 807

C h rist E p isc o p a l C h urch

1,252

The C h urch H om e

7,096

The C h urch o f th e Sa vio u r, U nited M e th o d ist

6,476

C leveland C h ristia n H om e, Inc.

2,674

City o f C leveland, D ire c to r o f P u b lic S a fe ty Prevention of delinquency among boys

C leveland H e a rin g a n d S p e ec h C enter The C leveland P sy ch o a n a ly tic S o ciety F o u n d a tio n

Research and application of psychoanalysis and support projects

m

■ i i

672 51,197 44 70,252

§ 6

i


The C levela nd S o c iety f o r th e B lind Research or any other purpose Volunteer Braille Transcribers

C o m m u n ity In fo r m a tio n V olun teer A ctio n C enter (C IVAC ) C u ya h o g a C o unty D e p a rtm e n t o f H u m a n S e rv ic e s Special client needs

269,703 14,986 3,270

497 3,270

F a irm o u n t P re sb y te ria n C h urch

10,931

F e d e ra tio n f o r C o m m u n ity P la n n in g

8,850 1,542

The F irst C o n g reg a tio n a l C h urch o f Sonom a, Sonom a, C a lifo rn ia

139

The F irst U nited M e th o d ist C hurch, A sh la n d , O hio

8,095

G o o d w ill In d u s tr ie s o f G rea ter C leveland

1,119

G re a te r C levela nd N e ig h b o rh o o d C en ters A sso c ia tio n

Physical education program for the Julie Billiart School 13,789

2,830

E a st E nd N e ig h b o rh o o d H o u se

Needy and deserving families and children

S is te r s o f N o tre D am e, C h ardon, O hio

10,235

The H eb rew F ree L oan A sso c ia tio n

1,000

H e ig h ts B la u g ru n d L o dge No. 1152 B ’n a i B ’rith

1,827

The H ira m H o u se

2,205

L u th e ra n A g en cies O rg a n ize d in Service The L u th e ra n H o m e f o r th e A g ed

12,416

M a ry c re st S c h o o l

7,096

M issio n a ry S e rv a n ts o f th e M ost H oly Trin ity, S ilv e r Spring, M a ryla n d

4,568

The M o n te fio re H om e

7,096

O ur L ady o f th e W ayside, In c o rp o ra te d , A von, O hio

5,746

P arm ad ale-St. A n th o n y Y o uth S e rv ic e s V illage

14,925

P la n n ed P a re n th o o d o f G rea ter C leveland, Inc. R ose-M a ry C enter St. A n d rew s U nited M e th o d ist C hurch, F indlay, O hio

102,919 2,855 110

St. D o m in ic ’s P a rish

4,568

S t.J o h n L u th e ra n C h urch

1,892

E liza J e n n in g s H om e Equipm ent

23,174 28,683

St. M a r tin ’s E p isc o p a l C h urch

J e w is h C o m m u n ity F ed era tio n o f C leveland Research or any other purpose

14,892 14,986

J o n e s H o m e o f C h ild re n ’s S e rv ic e s

21,898 28,683

Capital improvement

1,892

S o ciety o f St. V incen t d e P a u l

733

S ta rr C o m m o n w ea lth f o r Boys, A lbion, M ich ig a n

1,518

S u n sh in e C h ild re n ’s H om e, M aum ee, O hio

1,000

The T h ree-C o rn er-R o u n d P a ck O u tfit, Inc. Cam ping program

12,904

T rin ity C a th e d ra l

1,750

U nited A p p e a l o f A sh la n d C ounty, O hio, Inc., A sh la n d , O hio

4,047

U nited W ay o f G rea ter Toledo, Toledo, O hio

2,000

U nited W ay S e rv ic e s The V isitin g N u rse A sso c ia tio n o f C levela nd

4,222 Assistance to needy clients of Sunbeam School 1,000 Assistance to needy of Sunbeam School graduating class 1,000

W est S h o re U n ita ria n U n iv e rsa list C h u rch W est Sid e D e u tsc h e r F ra u en Verein, The A lten h eim

139

St. T im o th y E p isc o p a l C hurch, P errysb u rg , O hio

2,500

The Young M en ’s C h ristia n A sso c ia tio n o f C leveland

The S a lv a tio n A rm y

26,191

T he S a lv a tio n A rm y, A sh la n d , O hio

4,047

1,915

L a k e w o o d U nited M e th o d ist C h u rch

7,510

T he S c o ttish R ite B en evo len t F oun da tion, L exin g to n , M a s sa c h u se tts

The H a ttie L a rlh a m F o u n d a tio n , Inc., M an tua , O hio

13,841

S h a k e r H e ig h ts L odge No. 45 FOP A sso c ia te s

2,638

L ittle S is te r s o f th e P o o r

3,135

The S h a k e r One H u n d red , Inc.

2,638

139

3,770

V o ca tio n a l G u id a n ce S e rv ic e s

The Young M e n ’s C h ristia n A sso c ia tio n A sh la n d , O hio

L a k e w o o d C h ristia n C h u rch

383,656

Lakewood Branch W est Side Branch

The Young W om en’s C h ristia n A sso c ia tio n o f C leveland Lakewood Branch

77 9 20,709 4,047 16,662 7,171 14,342 8,615 7,171

T o tal D e sig n a te d G ran ts

51,644,091

T o ta l S o cia l S e rv ic e s G ra n ts — D e sig n a te d a n d U n d esig n a te d

84,253,046


■ T H E L. DALE DOR NE Y FUND

in funding requests and authorized nearly

T h e Dorney Fund was founded as a trust

h a l f a m i l l io n d o lla r s in g r a n ts . As

fund o f T h e Cleveland Foundation in 1977

community needs and demand for support

to serve as a permanent charitable resource

strain the F u nd’s capacity to be responsive,

in

C o u n ty .

the benefits o f establishing a com m unity

Established through a $5-million bequest

Findlay

and

H ancock

f o u n d a t i o n in H a n c o c k C o u n t y have

from long tim e Fin dlay resident L. Dale

become more apparent. T h e newly formed

Dorney, the Fund to date has financed over

Findlay-H ancock C ounty C om m unity

$3 million in grantmaking for programs in

Foundation will build on current activities

education, the arts, economic development,

of the Dorney Fund and be governed by a

health, and social services.

Dorney

n in e-m em b e r advisory board w hich will

stip ulated th at 45 percent o f the F u n d ’s

oversee all g r a n t m a k i n g activities a n d a d m in is tr a tio n o f gifts.

G

E

O

G

R

A

P

H

I

C

F

U

N

D

U n til the

to support grantmaking, the Dorney Fund i n c o m e be e a r m a r k e d for t a x - e x e m p t

will remain the region’s sole funding entity.

private (and in some cases governmental)

G r a n t s in 1992 s u p p o r t e d th e C ity o f

agencies in Findlay and Hancock County.

F i n d l a y ’s C i ti z e n s D i s p u t e S e t tl e m e n t

T h e remaining 55 percent was designated

Program of the Findlay Municipal Court,

to strengthen business education programs

th e a d u l t day care p r o g r a m

at colleges and universities across the state.

A l z h e i m e r ’s R e sp ite C a r e Society o f

Findlay-area grantmaking is overseen by a

Hancock County, and hiring a coordinator

$ 4 5 6 ,7 3 4

T h e L a k e-G ea u g a F u n d

$ 4 2 5 ,1 4 9

o f the

fiv e-m em ber advisory body, the Findlay

for the Fiber Optics Project, a partnership

D i s trib u tio n C o m m itte e , w hich reviews

between O hio Bell, the O h io E duca tio n

grant applications on a quarterly basis and

T e c h n o lo g y E q u i t y C o m m i s s i o n , a n d

presents funding recommendations to T he

Findlay City Schools. One of three distance

C l e v e l a n d F o u n d a t i o n ’s D i s t r i b u t i o n

l e a r n i n g p i lo t p r o je c ts in th e state,

C o m m itte e for approval.

T h e L. D a l e D o r n e y F u n d

new Foundation’s assets grow large enough

S

In 1992,

the Dorney Fund saw a dramatic increase

it

r e p re s e n t s

a

s i g n i f ic a n t

school/

g o v e r n m e n t/b u s in e s s collabo ration .

T h e F in d la y D i s t r i b u t i o n C o m m it t e e

The Hon. Allan H. Davis Chairperson Rev. G. Terry Bard Lee R. L uff The Hon. Keith Romic/{ James W. Specif


H IG H E R

ED U CA TIO N

B lack S tu d ie s a n d L ib ra ry A sso c ia tio n

L. DA LE D O R N E Y F U N D

GRAN TS

■ LAKE-GEAUGA F UND

Supplies, visual aids and books on black history and culture

$13,500

T o tal H ig h e r E d u c a tio n G rant

513,500

T h e Cleveland F o u n d a tio n created the LakeG e a u g a F u n d in 1987 as a distinct fund that could draw u p o n the financial resources and

C ity o f F indla y

Citizens Dispute Settlement Program in Findlay M unicipal C ourt

F in d la y A re a C h a m b er F o u n d a tio n

Architectural fund for downtown revitalization

H a n co ck P a rk D istric t

Design plan for Shelter H ouse # 1 5 Update o f maps for village parks

57,000 8,000

T o ta l C ivic A ffa ir s G ran ts

Artistic programs (over two years)

F in d la y A re a A rts C o uncil

Arts-in-Education Partnership coordinator

7,044 526,044

H a n co ck P a r k s F o u n d a tio n

Riverside Park concert series (over three years)

T o ta l C u ltu ra l A ffa ir s G ra n ts

515,000 3,000

Fiber optics project coordinator (over two years)

T o ta l P re co lleg ia te E d u c a tio n G rant

515,000

i z e d over the p a st t h r e e years.

T o ta l H e a lth G ran t

515,000

applications are reviewed by a se ven-m em ber

11

G rant

SOCIAL SERVI CES

m ake fu nd ing recom m endations on a q u a r te r­

C o uncil on D o m estic Violence, Inc.

ly basis to th e F o u n d a t i o n ’s D i s t r i b u t i o n

$4,500

F am ily S e rv ic e s o f H a n co ck C ounty

Committee. Education and the environment are consistent themes, but support also is provided

Inter-Agency T ask Force’s National Family M onth (over two years)

11,550

for h e a l t h , social se rv ice s, a n d affairs.

In-home parenting education program by the Hancock County Extension Service (over three years) 28,095

U nited W ay o f H a n co ck C ounty

H

cultural

G r a n t s from the L a k e - G e a u g a

Fund in 1992 were awarded to diverse programs including a partn ership between the Board o f Mental Retardation and Wickliffe H igh School

Volunteer Action Center (second year)

T o ta l S o cia l S e rv ic e s G ran ts

11,775

where shop students design and construct special

555,920

electric switches for toys used by mentally and physically impaired children. Funding was also

14,000 3,000 535,000

P R E C O L L E G I A T E E DUCATI ON

F in d la y C ity S ch o o ls

Adult Day Care program

The O hio S ta te U n iv e rsity R e se a rc h F o u n d a tio n , C o lum bu s , O hio

H a n c o c k H is to r ic a l M u seu m A sso c ia tio n Archivist for the Mae H ouston Historical Resource C enter

with more th an $1 m illion in gra n ts a u th o r ­

Child Advocacy Program

CULTURAL AF F A I R S

F in d la y A rea A rts C ouncil

has been a dramatic increase in area grantmaking

A lz h e im e r ’s R e s p ite C are S o c iety o f H a n co ck C ounty

advisory committee o f comm unity leaders who

1,000 3,000

The U n iv e rsity o f F indla y

M aster G ardener Resource Center by Ohio State University Cooperative Extension Service

collective knowledge of local citizens. T h e result

HEALTH

CIVIC AF F A I R S

S P E C I A L P H IL A N T H R O P I C SE RVI CES

provided for the innovative artist-in-residence

The C levela nd F o u n d a tio n (In c.)

program

L. Dale Dorney Fund biennial meeting Establishm ent of Findlay-Hancock County Com m unity Foundation Operating budget of the L. Dale Dorney Fund

i n v o lv in g

M adison,

P a in e s v ille

512,300

Township, and Perry schools. Other grants were

200,000 48,549

made to Holden Arboretum in support of its new Horticulture Science Center, to the Lake Hospital System for a comprehensive community-based

550,421

T o tal S p e cia l P h ila n th ro p ic S e rv ic e s G ran ts

$260,849

h e a l t h p la n , a n d the L a k e l a n d C o m m u n i t y

550,421

T o ta l L. D ale D orn ey F und G ran ts

5456,734

College for its Options for Women program.


T h e L ake G ea u g a C o m m it t e e

EC ONO M IC

DEVELOPMENT

L a ke la n d C o m m u nity College

John Sherwin Jr. Chairperson Charles P. Balder Jr. James K. Collins Jr. Phillip L. Krug Arlene Monroe Holden Molly Offutt James F. Patterson

Staff support for the Lake County Economic Development Center (over two years)

$35,000

T o tal E co no m ic D evelo p m en t G rant

$35,000

P R E C O L L E G I A T E E DUCATION

HEALTH

L a ke C ounty B o a rd o f E d u c a tio n

Artist-in-Residence program for Madison, Painesville Township, and Perry schools

L a ke E d u c a tio n a l A ssista n c e F o u n d a tio n Operating support (third year)

L earn ing A b o u t B u sin ess

â&#x2013;  LAKE-GEAUGA FUND GRANTS

General support

T o tal P reco lleg ia te E d u c a tio n G rants

L a ke H o sp ita l S ystem , Inc. $7,500

Com m unity based health plan

$ 20,000

T o ta l H e a lth G rant

$ 20,000

18,734 SOCIAL SERVI CES

500 $26,734

B oy S c o u ts o f A m erica, N o rth e a s t O hio C ouncil, No. 463 General support

$500

CIVIC AF FAI RS

C am p Su e O sborn

C h ristm a s in A p ril N o rth c o a st Inc.

Refurbishment of homes for needy citizens in Lake County (over two years)

H a b ita t o f P a in e sv ille General support

$10,000 1,000

L a ke M e tro p a rk s

Renovation of community hall by Painesville T ow nship Park District

L e a d e r sh ip L a ke C ounty, Inc.

Transitional support (over two years)

T o tal C ivic A ffa ir s G ran ts

General support

H I G H E R EDUCATION

L a ke E rie College Storrs fine arts series

L a ke la n d C o m m u nity College Options for W omen program

M orley L ib ra ry 10,000

17,000 $38,000

General support

T o ta l H ig h e r E d u ca tio n G rants

$ 12,000 20,000 1,000

$33,000

The H o ld en A rb o re tu m Horticulture science center

L a ke C o unty H isto r ic a l S o ciety General support

$125,000 5,000

M o o re la n d E state, Inc.

Feasibility study on renovation and use o f the Moore Mansion

T o ta l C u ltu ra l A ffa ir s G ran ts

10,000 $140,000

$50,000

L a ke E rie College Scholarship support

L a ke la n d C o m m u nity College

Scholarship support for Painesville area students

The P h illip s-O sb o rn e S ch o o l Scholarship support

T o ta l S c h o la rsh ip G rants

Technology Integration Program with Wickliffe H igh School by Broadmoor School (over two years) Lake County Early Intervention Collaborative (second year)

L a ke C o unty S o c iety f o r R e h a b ilita tio n o f C h ildren a n d A d u lts

General support Prevention-Intervention Program for infants and toddlers (fourth and fifth years)

SCHOLARSHIPS

General scholarships for residents of Painesville not attending Lake Erie College

L a ke C o unty B o a rd o f M enta l R e ta rd a tio n /D e v e lo p m e n ta l D isa b ilitie s

13.000

L a ke C ounty M enta l H e a lth C enter

The C leveland F o u n d a tio n (In c.) CULTURAL AF FAI RS

500

10,000

L a ke C ounty YMCA General support

L a ke E rie G irl S co u t C ouncil General support

5.000

U nited W ay o f L a ke C ounty, Inc.

1.000

T o ta l S o c ia l S e rv ic e s G ran ts

$66,000

General support

T o tal L ake-G eau ga F und G ran ts

13,915

1,000

35.000 1,000

500 1,000

$66,415 $425,149


S P

m o re t h a n 3,880 v isito rs a n d 7,320

E C I

L

I B Another 3,230 people were

As a c o m m u n ity f o u nda tion, the largest

callers.

fu n d e r in O h io and a national leader in

reached

philanthropy, T h e Cleveland Foundatio n

programs or community appearances by its

has a special obligation to promote effective

staff. T h e library received a special award

g r a n t m a k i n g at th e local, re g io n a l a n d

for se rv ice to p h i l a n t h r o p y f r o m th e

through

library -spo n so red

national level. In its role as a philanthropic

Cleveland Chapter of the National Society

leader, the Foundation supports services to

of Fund Raising Executives, and launched

grantseekers and other charitable funders

a Friends o f the Library program.

in the area, particularly those with limited

T h e A n i s f i e ld - W o lf M e m o r i a l Aw ard

or no staff.

for Outstan din g C om m unity Service was

G r a n t m a k e r s F o ru m ,

w h ic h has been su ppo rte d solely by the

p r e s e n t e d to C o m m u n i t y R e -E n t ry , a

Foundation since 1985, is an association of

program for ex-offenders r u n u n d e r the

staff an d tru stees o f fo u n d a tio n s and

auspices

c orpora te giving p rogram s. T h e F o ru m

Ministry Association. T h is project helps

P H I L A N T H R O P I C

of L u th eran

M etro p o litan

S E R V I C E S

sponsored or co-sponsored 34 meetings in

m en and w o m e n recently released from

1992, including a four-part series on ethics

p r i s o n fin d a u se fu l p lac e in t h e i r

in grantmaking and a discussion group for

communities and gain self-esteem through

n e w g r a n t m a k e r s . A j o in t p r o g r a m for

c o m m u n i t y i n v o lv e m e n t. T h e $10,000

grantseekers and grantmakers on the issue

p r i z e is s u p p o r t e d by th e F o u n d a t i o n

of operating support versus project support

a n d a d m i n i s t e r e d by th e F e d e r a t i o n

offered a rare opportunity for issue-oriented

for C o m m u n i t y P l a n n i n g .

dialogue.

A n isfie ld -W o lf B ook Aw ards for works

se r v ic e

T h e Foundation provides to

g rantseeking

nonprofit

o r g a niz ations and regional gra ntm ake rs t h r o u g h its s u p p o r t o f the F o u n d a t i o n C e n t e r â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s C le v e la n d office, the K e n t H. S m i t h L ib ra ry . C e l e b r a t i n g its 15th a n n iv e rs a r y in 1992, the libra ry served

illu m in a tin g

c u ltu ral

div ers ity

The

and

p re ju d i c e w e n t to S a n d r a C isn e r o s for

Woman Hollering Creel\ and Other Stories', Kwame Anthony Appiah for In My Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s H ouse ; a n d M a rija G i m b u t a s for The Civilization o f the Goddess.


Community Re-Entry, which helps adult ex-offenders get a fr e s h start, was honored fo r its special outreach initiative.


Grantmakers Forum site visitors enjoyed a ride through the proposed National Heritage Corridor on the historic Cuyahoga Valley Line.

â&#x2013;  SPECIAL PH ILANTHROPIC SE RVI CE S GRANTS

The F o u n d a tio n C enter, N ew York, N ew Y o rk Operating support of T he Foundation Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Cleveland

The C levela nd F o u n d a tio n (In c.) Anisfield-W olf Comm unity Service and Book awards (over 16 months) Grantm akers Forum Operating budget of The Cleveland Foundation for the year 1993

90,000

$61,400 113,580

W om en & F o u n d a tio n s /C o r p o r a te P h ila n th ro p y , N ew York, N ew Y o rk

4,018,00

T o tal U n d esig n a te d G ran ts

Operating support

5,000

$4,287,980


I I i

“ P E O P L E .

I

THAT

IS

WHAT

MAKES

THE

N E I G H B O R H O O D .”


T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n h a s s e r v e d f o u r g e n e r a tio n s o j r e a te r C le v e la n d e r s â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a n d w ill s till b e h e r e f o r th e s e c h i l d r e n â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s g r a n d c h ild r e n .


F o u n d in g M em bers o f T he Legacy Society

T h e community foundation is as simple a

the F o u n d a t i o n ’s re so u rce s have com e

concept as it is ingenious. It is a means by

t h r o u g h b e q u e s ts , b u t m o re a n d m ore

which those w ho share a com m itm ent to

donors are making gifts during their life-­

the community’s well-being can contribute

time. In order to assist individuals, families,

to b u ildin g a p e r m a n e n t and substantial

a n d c o r p o r a t i o n s w h o w ish to r e m a in

endow m ent, the income

actively involved in g r a n tm a k i n g , T h e

f r o m w h i c h is u s e d to

Cleveland Foundation created the support­

CLEVELAND

make grants for the com­

ing organization — an affiliated fund with

FOUNDATI ON

m u n it y ’s benefit.

its own board of trustees and grantmaking

FUNDS

O F

THE

f

Funds of T h e Cleveland

identity - and, more recently, the donor-

F o u n d a t i o n c o m e in m a n y sizes a n d

advisor f u n d , w h i c h p e rm its the d o n o r

shapes. Because many donors have chosen

to m a k e g r a n t r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s to

to m ake unrestricted gifts, leaving m axi­

the D istrib u tio n C o m m itte e .

m u m d i s c r e t i o n to th e D i s t r i b u t i o n

Legacy Society, composed o f individuals

C o m m itte e , T h e C leve land F o u n d a tio n

who have made plans to leave a gift to T he

enjoys an u n usu a l degree of flexibility in

Cleveland Foundation, was established in

r e s p o n d i n g to e v e r -c h a n g i n g needs. In

1992. While the form of these gifts may dif­

other cases, donors have elected to specify a

fer, taking the shape o f a bequest, trust,

cause - such as the elderly, or disadvan­

annuity or other vehicle, the result is the

taged children - to which the income from

same: providing for the future of Greater

H

The

their gifts is devoted. And still other donors

Cleveland. T h r o u g h T h e Legacy Society,

have designated specific organizations as

we are pleased to recognize such thought­

beneficiaries o f their funds.

ful and generous plan ning and provision.

H

Most of

Miss Ruth E. Adomeit Lewis and Ruth Affelder Mary C. Carter Philip Dawson Patricia Jansen Doyle Doris Anita Evans, M.D. Virginia Q. Foley Mary Louise and Rickard Hahn Holsey Gates Handyside Albert M. and Beverly G. Higley Michael J. Hoffmann Ronald D. Holman

Charlotte S. Levy Mr. and Mrs. G. Russell Lincoln Charles R. McDonald Mary B. Moon J. Howard Morris Jr. Barbara H. Patterson Katherine and James Pender James L. Ryhal Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Edward W. Sloan Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H. Thomas Anonymous (3) As o f April 15, 1993


sr e

N E W P E RMA NE NT F U NDS

Leonard Krieger Fund, $4,821,480

Leonard Krieger Estate Restricted for charitable endeavors related to medical research, education and culture D o n o r:

U s e of in c o m e :

Harley C. Lee and Elizabeth Keedic\ Lee Fund, $30,000

T h e lifeblood o f a community foun­

Harley C. Lee Estate Designated 1/3 each to Mansfield M emorial H om e, Fairm ount Presbyterian Church and The Cleveland Public Library The Lima Community Fund, $130,462 D o n o r : Elizabeth A. Botkin Estate U s e o f I n c o m e : T o be distributed for the benefit of the inhabitants of Li ma, Ohio and the Greater Lima community

d a ti o n is th e g e n e r o u s c o n ti n u i n g

The Homer C. Wadsworth Award, $5,800

D o n o r:

U s e o f In c o m e :

contributions from publie-spirited individuals, fa m ilie s, a n d c o r p o r a ­ tions. We are pleased to report that in

Robert E. Eckardt, Doris A. Evans, M .D., James A. Kelly, Steven A. Minter, Mariam C. Noland and Richard F. Tompkins U s e o f I n c o m e : T he annual H om er C. W adsworth Award will be presented to a person whose work represents the highest level of quality in community service.

1992 m o r e t h a n $11 m i l l i o n was r e c e iv e d in n e w d o n a t i o n s . T h e

A D D I T I O N S TO

largest single gift, $4.8 million, came

PERMANENT FU NDS

from the Leonard Krieger estate.

Charles Rieley Armington Fund, $36,000

s u p p o r t it receiv es in the form o f bequests, m em orial gifts, and other w

g

i e

t

s

D o n o rs:

Elizabeth Rieley Armington Charitable T rust Helen and Ira J. Bircher Fund, $67,000 D o n o r s : Helen and Ira ]$ Bircher D o n o r:

Judge Lillian W. Bur/ye Scholarship Fund, $101 D o n o r:

The Burkes Players Bridge Club

Leyton E. Carter Memorial Fund, $100 D o n o r:

Mary Catherine Carter

Children’s Theatre Endowment Fund—in honor o f Renee L. Snow, $100

D o n o r s : Richard H and Robin Bamberger, Lawrence Coven, Richard L. and W endy Halle, and Alan E. and Marilyn I. Kravitz

Children’s Theatre Endowment Fund—in mcmoiy of Karen Porcelli, $400

Sandra L. Berger, Rebecca G. Borden, Sharon M. Brockman, M ary A. Bruner, Mary C. Darling, Susan C. Emory, Sofia N. Henry, Carole F. Kealy, Leah C. Roth, and Renee L. Snow D o n o rs:

Arthur F. and Gladys D. Connard Fund, $23,219 D o n o r : Gladys D. Connard

Cuyahoga County Public Libraiy Endowment Fund, $578

Brecksville W om en’s Club, Incorporated, and Cuyahoga County Public Library D o n o rs:


Taw Family Salvation Army Endowment,

L. Dale Dorney Fund, $2,115 D o n o r:

L. Dale Dorney Estate

The Vince Federico Memorial Fund, $40,449

La\e-Geauga Fund, $5,000 D o n o r:

Virginia Lois Kennedy

Vincent Federico Memorial Golf Tournam ent Charles H. Gale Fund, $212 D o n o r : Charles H . Gale Estate

Heber McFarland Fund, $236,761

The Holsey Gates Residence Preservation Fund, $19,610

The Northern Ohio Opera Fund, $500

D o n o r:

Ambassador Holsey Gates Handyside Isaac C. Goff Fund, $106,948 D o n o r : Isaac C. G off Estate D o n o r:

Additions to project accounts New donor-advisorfunds Additions to donor-advisorfunds Additions to supporting organizations Total of new gifts

2,559,088 1,203,955 205,411 103,793 $ 11,016,004

D o n o r:

D o n o r:

D o n o r:

Robert A. Burdenski, Hazelmarie Louise Carrabine, Barbara L. and Harry W. Conard Jr., G ilm our Academy, Joie Drouhard Gregor, Alex and Caroline M arzano, Steven A. M inter, Notre Dame College, Robert H . Rawson Jr., Richard C. and Lois Rice, and George J. Thomey D o n o rs:

Albert M. and Beverly G. Higley Fund,

Donald W. McIntyre Estate

Perkins Charitable Foundation

The Public Square Preservation and Maintenance Fund, $12,500

T he John P. M urphy Foundation Demetra A. Sciulli Fund, $38,888 D o n o r : Henry W . and Demetra A. Sciulli D o n o r:

William K. Selman Memorial Fund, $2,193 D o n o r:

William K. Selman Estate

Josephine R. and Edward W. Sloan Jr. Fund, $8,887 D o n o r:

Edward W. Sloan Jr.

Jessie C. Tucker Memorial Fund—in memory of Professor John Culver, $100 D o n o r:

Agnes E. Meyer Herzog Fund-in mempty of Louis E. Herzog, $365

Heber M cFarland Estate

Donald W. McIntyre Fund, $43,390.

Edith M. Medina

United Way Endowment Fund, $186 D o n o r:

Michael J. Hoffmann

Molly Agnes Voinovich Memorial Fund, $5,920

D o n o r s : David B. Bailey, Jane E. Conroy, Julia A. Dobric Estate, Nick and Patricia A. Tom ino, Donald and Nancy Vickers, Janet Voinovich, and Josephine B. Voinovich JaneD. White Fund No. 1, $370,123 D o n o r : Jane D. W hite Lincoln Estate

$ 10,000

Jane D. White Fund No. 2, $370,183

D o n o r:

D o n o r:

Albert M. Fligley Jr.

Rhea Hanna Jerpbal{ Memorial Trust, $80,088 D o n o r : Rhea H anna Jerpbak Estate

Maty Kopec Kreicher Fund, $250 D o n o r:

Dolly M inter

Jane D. W hite Lincoln Estate

The Women’s General Hospital Fund,

$62,458 D o n o r : Dorothy L. Hofrichter Estate Edith Wright Memorial Fund, $47,716 D o n o r : Edith W right Estate

AGENCY

$1,500

E NDOWMENT F U N D S

D o n o r:

The Cleveland Foundation holds and m an­ ages the endowments for a num ber of non­ profit agencies in the Cleveland area, annu­ ally directing the income of the f unds to the organizations for their unrestricted use. The following nonprofit organizations established Agency Endow m ent Funds at the Foundation in 1992 in order to receive gifts from individuals interested in the long-term financial stability of these agen­ cies. These funds may also receive the prin­ cipal of Com m unity Pooled Income Fund gifts after a donor’s lifetime.

Unrestricted Gifts, $3,060

The Cleveland Hearing and Speech Center Fund The Cleveland Institute of Art Fund The Salvation Army of Greater Cleveland Endowment Fund D o n o rs:

Cleo B. and Elinore J. Dolan

ADDITIONAL G I F T S

The Cleveland Foundation (Inc.) $5,000

Society N ational Bank For development and establish­ ment of,the Com m unity Pooled Income Fund Henry C. Doll, $5,162 D o n o r : H enry C. Doll U s e o f in c o m e : For Princeton students’ internships D o n o r:

U s e o f G ift :

Life Insurance Foundation Endowment (LIFE), $7,190

D o n o r s : Graham T. Andrews, B.P. America, Incorporated, Patricia M. and Layton M. Ives III, Lincoln National Corporation, D uane L. Lipps, M utual of New York Foundation, James R. Pender, Christine M. and W illiam C. Robertson, JohaR . Telich Sr., and James D. Yurman and Associates, Incorporated

Dudley J. Taw

American Asset M anagem ent Company, Marjorie M. Carlson, Gail M. and David W . Demming, Gregory T. Holtz, Joel W achs, and Clare C. and James P. W oidke D o n o rs:

In honor of fames J. Dwyer

M argaret M. Caldwell, Robert E. Eckardt, and Steven A. M inter D o n o rs:

In honor ofHeniy J. Goodman D o n o r:

Robert E. Eckardt

In honor ofVictoire and Alfred M. Rankin Jr. D o n o r:

Harry and Marjorie Carlson

■ P E R MA NE NT F U N D S O F T H E CLEVELAND FOUNDATION

Thousands of donors have contributed • to T he Cleveland Foundation since its creation in 1914, most often through bequests, but also through gifts of life insurance policies, stocks, bonds, and real estate. Following is a listing of the perm a­ nent named funds of the Foundation.

PE R M A N E N T F U N D S

Morris Abrams Fund The Adomeit Fund Lewis and Ruth Affelder Fund Rhoda L. Affelder Fund Wichjiam H. Aldrich Fund Rob Roy Alexander Fund The William Hany Alexander Fund The Aloy Memorial Scholarship Fund The Dr. David Alsbacher Fund for Medical Research Raleigh F. Andrie Memorial Fund


The George and May Margaret Angell Trust Anisfield- Wolf Fund Charles Rieley Armington Fund Katherine B. Arundel Fund Walter C. and Lucy I. Astrup Funds (2) Sophie Auerbach Fund Margaret Montgomery Austin and Charles Taylor Austin Memorial Fund Ruth and Elmer Babin Fund

“ L, E l 1 ’ S

The Frederic M. and Nettie E. Backus Memorial Fund The Magdalena Baehr Fund Fannie White Baker Fund Walter C. Baker Fund Walter C. and Fannie White Baker Fund Lilian Hanna Baldwin Fund Mabel R. Bateman Memorial Fund Warner M. Bateman Memorial Fund Cornelia W. Beardslee Fund James C. Beardslee Fund Louis D. Beaumont Fund Robert K. Beck Memorial Fund The Beckenbach Scholarship Memorial Fund Mary Berryman Fund Nestor B. Betzold Trust Ida Beznoska Fund

Big Brothers o f Greater Cleveland Fund The Dr. Hamilton Fisk Biggar Fund Hattie E. Bingham Fund Helen and Ira J. Bircher Fund George Davis Bivin Fund The Martin E. and Evelyn K. Blum Fund Tom L.E. Blum and Martin E. Blum Fund Katherine Bohm Fund Ernest J. Bohn Memorial Fund Roberta Holden Bole Fund Newell C. Bolton Fund Helen R. Bowler Fund The George H. Boyd Fund* Alva Bradley II Fund Jeanette W. Brewer Fund

COME

TOGETHER

AS

Gertrude H. Britton, Katharine H. Perkins Fund Fannie Brown Memorial Fund Marie H. Brown Fund Ada G. Bruce Fund George F. Buehler Memorial Fund Marie I. Buelow Fund Judge Lillian W. Burke Scholarship Fund The Harry F. and Edna J. Burmester Charitable Remainder Unitrust No. 1 , The Thomas Burnham Memorial The Thomas Burnham Memorial Trust Katherine Ward Burrell Fund Edmund S. Busch Fund Janet G. and Maty H. Cameron Memorial'Fund Marian M. Cameron Fund The Martha B. Carlisle Memorial Fund

Edna L. and Gustav W. Carlson Foundation Memorial Fund Alfred J. Carpenter Memorial Fund Leyton E. Carter Memorial Fund Robert and Annie Chrtman Fund The Central High School Endowment Fund The Fred H. Chapin Memorial Fund The George Lord and Elizabeth Chapman Fund* The Frank /• and Nellie L. Chappie Fund* The Children Forever Endowment Fund

PE OPL E

AS

A.

A.E. Convers Fund* Harry Coulby Funds (2f^ Jacob D. Cox Fund S. Houghton Cox Fund The Eileen H. Cramer and Marvin H. Cramer Fund Cuyahoga County Public Library Endowment Fund The William R. and F. Cassie Daley Trust Fund

WHO E E .

The Children’s Theatre Endowment Fund The Adele Corning Chisholm Memorial Fund George W. Chisholm Fund Garnetta B. Christenson and LeRoy W. Christenson Fund Mr. and Mrs. Harold T. Clark Fund J.E.G. Clark Trust Marie Odenbtirk Clark Ptmd Clark-Owen Memorial Fund The Elsa Claus Memorial Fund No. 2 Inez and Harry Clement Award Fund Cleveland: N O W Fund Cleveland Recreational Arts Fund Cleveland War Memorial Clevite Welfare Fund Caroline E. Coit Fund Arthur F. and Gladys D. Connard Fund

NOT

AS

BLACK

Henry G. Dalton Fund Edward H. deConingh Fund Maty E. Dee Memorial Fund James M. and A nn M. Delaney Fund The Howard and Edith Dingle Fund The Carl and Marion Dittmar Fund Edwin A. and Julia Greene Dodd Funds (2) Anna J. Dorman and Pliny O. Dorman Memorial Fund L. Dale Dorney Fund James J. Doyle and Lillian Hetron Doyle Scholarship Fund Charles A. Qriffteld Memorial Fund The Mary and Wallace Duncan Fund The William C. and Agnes M. Dunn Fund Bruce S. Dwynn Memorial Fund


Percy R. and Beatrice Round Forbes Memorial Fund Frances B. and George W. Ford Memorial Fund The Forest City Hospital Foundation Fund Gladys J. and Homer D. Foster Fund Constance C. Frac\elton Funds (4) The. Fannie Pitcairn Frackelton and David W. Frackelton Fund Robert J. Frackelton Fund The George Freeman Charity Fund . Winifred Fryer Memorial Fund Frederic C. Fulton Fund Charles H Gale Fund Frederic H. Gates Fund The Holsey Gates Residence Preservation Fund

Alice McHardy Dye Fund Lyda G. and Horatio B. Ebert Fund Kristian Eilertsen Fund The Emerald Necklace Fund Ada C. Emerson Fund* Irene C. and Karl Emmerling Scholarship Fund Henry A. Everett Trust Homer Everett Fund Mary McGraw Everett Fund The Irene Ewing Trust Charles Dudley Farnsworth Fund

WHITES

AND

EDUCATE

EAC]

Charles Farran Fund The George D. and Edith W. Featherstone Memorial Fund The Vince Federico Memorial Fund Dr. Franks Carl Felix and Flora Webster Felix Fund William S. and Freda M. Fell Memorial Fund The Fenn Educational Funds (4) First Cleveland Cavalry-Norton Memorial Fund William C. Fischer and Lillye T. Fischer Memorial Fund* Fisher Fund Erwin L. Fisher and Fanny M. Fisher Memorial Fund Edward C. Flanigon Fund Mary P. and Edward M. Foley Fund

OTHER.

Robert B. Grandin Fund Harold R. Greene Fund Maxine Y. Haberman Fund The Hortense B. Halle and Jay M. Halle Fund Dorothea Wright Hamilton Fund Edwin T. and Mary E. Hamilton Fund The Lynn J. and Eva D. Hammond Memorial Fund* Leonard C. Hanna Jr. Funds (9) The Leonard C. Hanna Jr. Special Fund William Stitt Hannon Fund Janet Harley Memorial Fund Mr. and Mrs. Roy G. Harley Fund

E V E R YB O D Y

The William F. and Anna Lawrence Gibbons Fund* Emil and Genevieve Gibian Fund Franks S. Gibson Memorial Fund Rose B. and Myron E. Glass Memorial Fund Frederic\ Harris Goff Fund Frederick H. and Frances South worth G off Fund* Isaac C. Goff Fund* Edwin R. Goldfield Fund Lillian F. Goldfield Fund Marie Louise Gollan Fund Dr. Isadore J. Goodman and Ruth Goodman Memorial Fund Julius E. Goodman Fund The George C. and Marion S. GQrdon Fund

HAS

The Louise W. and living K. Heller Fund Mildred Shelby Heller Memorial Fund The William Myron Heller Memorial Fund Warren J. Henderson Fund Iva L. Herl Fund The Clifford B. Hershil( Memorial Fund Agnes E. Meyer Herzog Fund The Siegmund and Bertha B. Herzog Endowment Fund James R. Hibshman Family Trust Highland View Hospital Employeesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Fund Albert M. Higley Memorial

SOMETHING

H. Stuart Harrison Memorial Fund Perry G. Harrison and Virginia C. HarrisOn Memorial Fund The Kate Hanna Harvey Memorial Funds (2) F.H. Haserot Fund Melville H. Haskell, Mary H. Hunter, Gertrude H. Britton, Katharine H. Perkins Funds (2) Henry R. Hatch Memorial Fund Homer H. Hatch Fund John and Helen A. Hay Memorial Fund Lewis Howard Hayden and Lulu May Hayden Fund George Halle Hays Fund Nora Hays Fund The Henry E. Heiner and Marie Hays Heiner Memorial Fund

TO

OFFER.

Albert M. and Beverly G. Higley Fund Maty G. Higley Fund The Hinds Memorial Fund* Suzanne and Michael J. Hoffmann Fund The Hiram House Fund The Jacob Hirtenstein Fund H. Morley and Elizabeth Newberiy Hitchcock^ Fund Reuben W. Hitchcock^ Fund Mr. and Mrs. Arthur S. Holden Fund Helen M. Holland Memorial Dr. John W. Holloway Memorial Fund Mildred E. Horn me I and Arthur G. Hommel Memorial Fund A. R. Horr Trust* Centureena S. Hotchkiss Fund Howard W. Hottenstein Fund Virginia M. Huey Fund


Martin Huge, Martha M. Huge, Theodore L. Huge and Reinhardt E. Huge Memorial Fund The John Huntington Benevolent Fund The A.W .Hurlbut Fund i The Intermuseum Conservation Association Endowment Fund The Norma Witt Jackson Fund Rhea Hanna Jerpbak Memorial Trust Earle L. Johnson and Walter Sawtelle Doan and Ella P. Doan Memorial Fund The J. Kimball Johnson Memorial Fund Sherman Johnson Memorial Fund The Thomas Hoyt Jones Family Fund The Virginia Jones Memorial Fund James S. Jordan Fund Adrian D. Joyce Fund The Frederick W. and Henryett Slocum Judd Fund Hemyett S. Judd Fund Tillie A. Kaley and Warren R. Kaley Memorial Fund Kara mu House Trust Albert B. and Sara P. Kern Memorial Fund Joseph E. Kewley Memorial Fund O'rrin F. Kilmer Fund Lillian E. Kirchner Fund Clarence A. Kirkjtam Memorial Fund John R. Kistner Fund Dr. Emmanuel Klaus Memorial Fund Samuel B. Knight Fund

The Philip E. and Bertha Hawley Knowlton Fund Estelle C. Koch Memorial Scholarship Fund Richard H. Kohn Fund The Otto and Lena Konigslow Memorial Fund* Samuel E. Kramer Law Scholarship Fund Mary Kopec Kreicher Fund Leonard Krieger Fund Elroy J. and Fynette H. Kulas Fund* The Lake-Geauga Funds (5) Kathryn V. Lantz Fund The Arthur A. Lederer and Ruth Lawrence Lederer Fund Harley C. Lee and Elizabeth Keedick Lee Fund The Jon Lewis Fund The Lima Community Fund Martha M. Linden Fund Robert M. Linney Fund Sue L. Little Fund Vida C. Logan Fund Elizabeth T. Lohmiller Fund Meta M. Long Fund Gustave Lorber and Frieda Bruml Lorber Memorial Fund Henry M. Lucas Fund Clemens W. Lundoff and Hilda T. Lundoff Fund FrankJâ&#x2013; Lynch Fund Nellie Lynch Fund The William Fred Mac\ay and Cora Carlisle Mackay Memorial Fund Theresa Mae MacNab Fund Anna Maiy Magee Memorial Fund The Maude F. Majerick Fund Leone R. Bowe Marco Fund Alice Keith Mather Fund The Samuel Mather and Flora Stone Mather Memorial Fund

Ruth A. Matson Fund The Frederick R- and Bertha Specht Mautz Scholarship Fund Eima L. Mawer Fund Harriet E. McBride Fund Malcolm L. McBride and John Harris McBride II Memorial Fund Dr. Jane Power McCollough Fund The Lewis A. and Ellen E. McCreajy Memorial Fund Heber McFarland Fund The John A. and Mildred T. McGean Fund Hilda J. McGee Fund The George W. and Sarah McGuire Fund Donald W. McIntyre Fund Gladys M. McIntyre Memorial Fund W. Brewster McKenna Fund The Katherine B. McKitterick Fund The John C. McLean Memorial Fund Ruth Neville McLean Memorial Fund The Howard T. McMyler Fund The Thomas and Maty McMyler Memorial Fund The Albert Younglove Meriam and Kathiyn A. Meriam Fund Alice Butts Metcalf Fund The Grace E. Meyette Fund Sarah Stem Michael Fund Herman R. and Esther S. Miller Memorial Fund William P. Miller Fund Helen Gibbs Mills Memorial Fund Victor Mills Fund Anna.B. Minzer Fund John A. Mitchell and Blanche G. Mitchell Fund Cornelia S. Moore Fund*

The Mr. and Mrs. Jay P. Moore Memorial Fund John H. and Beatrice C. Moore Fund William Curtis Morton, Maud Morton, Kathleen Morton Fund Mary MacBain Motch Fund E. Freeman Mould Fund Jane C. Mould Fund Frank A. Myers Fund Tom Neal Fund Harold M. Nichols Fund Jessie Roe North and George Mahan North Memorial Fund The Northern, Ohio Opera Fund Fay-Tyler Murray Norton Fund Blanche E. Norvell Fund * Hany Norvell Fund John F. Oberlin and John C. Oberlin Fund The Crispin and Kate Oglebay Trust Ohio Nut and Bolt Company Fund Beulah N. Olinger Fund John G. and May Lockwood Oliver Memorial Fund Clarence A. Olsen Trust Maty King Osborn Fund William P. Palmer Fund ' The Dr. Charles B. Parker Memorial Fund* Erla Schlather Parker Fund


The Joseph K. and Amy Shepard Patterson Memorial Fund Blanche B. Payer Fund Linda J. Peirce Memorial Fund Douglas Perkins Fund The August G. and Lee F. Peterka Fund Grace M. Pew Fund Caroline Brown Prescott Memorial Fund Walter D. Price Fund William H. Price Fund Florence MacKey Pritchard and P.J. Pritchard Scholarship Fund The Public Square Preservation and Maintenance Fund The J. Ambrose and Jessie Wheeler Purcell Memorial Fund* The George John Putz and Margaret Putz Memorial Fund The Fred O. and Lucille M. Quic/{ Fund The Charles GreifRaible and Catherine Rogers Raible Fund The John R. Raible Fund Marion E. Rannells Fund Frances Lincoln Rathbone Memorial Fund Barbara Haas Rawson Memorial Fund Grace P. Rawson Fund Clay L. and Florence Rannells Reely Fund Hilda Reich Fund Leonard R. Rench Fund The Retreat Memorial Fund Marie Richardson Memorial Fund Charles L. Rich man Fund Nathan G. Richman Fund Helen D. Robinson Fund Alice M. Rockefeller Fund Elizabeth Becker Rorabecf{ Fund

Rebecca and Etta Rosenberg Memorial1Fund Edward L. Rosenfeld and Bertha M. Rosenfeld Fund Charles F. Ruby Fund William A. Ruehl and Mary Ruehl Memorial Fund Dorothy and Helen Ruth Fund St. Barnabas Guild for Nursing Fund Virginia Salay Memorial Fund Janet Coe Sanborn Fund Maty Coit Sanford Fund The Mary Coit Sanford Memorial Fund Oliver H. Schaaf Fund Dr. Hemy A. and Mary J. Schlin\ Memorial Fund Otto F. Schramm and Edna H. Schramm Memorial Fund The Robert N. Schwartz Fund for Retarded Children Demetra A. Sciulli Fund William C. Scofield Memorial Fund Alice Duty Seagrave Foreign Study Fund Warner Seely Fund Charles W. and Lucille Sellers Memorial Fund William K. Selman Memorial Fund The Arthur and Agnes Severson Memorial Fund Glenn M. and Elsa V Shaw Fund Franl{ S. Sheets and Alberta G. Sheets Memorial Fund

Franks E. Shepardson Fund Nina Sherrer Fund The Hemy A. Sherwin and Frances M. Sherwin Funds* (3) James Nelson Sherwin Fund The John and Frances W. Sherwin Fund Cornelia Adams Shiras Memorial The John and LaVerne Short Memorial Fund The A.H. and Julia W. ShunF und The Thomas and Anna Sidlo Fund Josephine R. and Edward W. Sloan Jr. Fund Kent H. Smith Fund The Nellie B. Snavely Fund Society for Crippled Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Tris Speaker Memorial Fund A.L. Somers Fund William J. Southworth Fund William P. Southworth and Louisa Southworth Fund Dr. George P. Soyer Fund The John C. and Elizabeth F. Sparrow Memorial Fund Marion R. Spellman Fund Josephine L. Speny Fund The George B. Spreng and Hazel Myers Spreng Memorial Fund

The Hazel Myers Spreng Fund in memory o f her parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. N. Myers Virginia Spriggs Fund The Miriam Kerruish Stage Fund The Dorothy and Oscar H. Steiner Fund for the Conservation o f Abused Children Frederick C. Sterling Second Testamentary Trust Avery L. Sterner Fund Ada Gates Stevens Memorial Fund Catherine E. Stewart, Martha A. Stewart, Judith H. Stewart and Jeannette Stewart Memorial Fund Jessie R. Stewart Fund The Charles J. Stilwell Scholarship Fund Ralph P. Stoddard Memorial Fund Charles L. and Marion H. Stone Fund Esther H. and B.F. Stoner Memorial Fund Harriet B. Stoirs Fund Vernon Stouffer Memorial Fund Leonard F. Stowe Fund Mortimer I. Strauss and Helen E. Strauss and Blanche New Memorial Fund The Ignatz and Berta Sunshine Fund C.F. Taplin Fund Charles Farrand Taplin and Elsie H. Taplin Fund The Alma M. and Hany R. Templeton Memorial Fund Henrietta Teufel Memorial Fund The Katharine Holden Thayer Funds (3) The John H. Thomas Fund Allison John Thompson Memorial Fund A mos Burt and Jeanne L. Thompson Fund Chester A. Thompson Fund Homer F. Tielke Fund


Maude S. Tomlin Memorial Fund Mabelle G. and Finton L. Torrence Fund Stephen E. Tracey and Helen Oster Tracey Fund Jessie C. Tucker Memorial Fund Isabelle Tumpach Fund James H. Turner Fund The Edward A. and Esther T. Tuttle Memorial Fund Rufus M. Ullman Fund Leo W. Ulmer Fund The Endowment Fund for United Way Services Christian and Sophia Vick Memorial Fund Molly Agnes Voinovich Memorial Fund Corinne T. Voss Fund The Homer C. Wadsworth Award John F. and Mary G. Wahl Memorial Fund Jessie MacDonald Walter Memorial Fund The John Mason Walter and Jeanne M. Walter Memorial Funds (2) Philip R. and Mary S. Ward Memorial Fund Cornelia Blakemore Warner Memorial Fund Helen B. Warner Fund Mabel Breckenridge Wason Fund A Mabel Breckenridge Wason Fund B* Stanley H. Watson Memorial Frank Walter Weide Fund Harnett and Arthur Weiland Fund The Harry H. and Stella B. Weiss Memorial Fund Burt Wenger Fund Leroy A. Westman Fund

George B. and Edith S. Wheeler Trust Lucius J. and Jennie C. Wheeler Memorial Fund , Jane D. White Funds (2) Mary C. Whitney Fund The Marian L. and Edna A. Whitsey Fund Edward Loder Whittemore Fund Henry E. and Ethel L. Widdell Fund R.N. and FI.R. Wiesenberger Fund The John Edmund Williams Fund Teresa Jane Williams Memorial Fund Whiting Williams Fund Arthur P. and Elizabeth M. Williamson Funds (2) James D. Williamson Fund Ruth Ely Williamson Fund The George H., Charles E., artd Samuel Denny Wilson Memorial Fund Marjorie A. Winbigler Memorial Edith Anisfield Wolf Funds (2) The Benjamin and Rosemary Wolpaw Memorial Fund The Women’s General Hospital Fund Nelle P. Woodworth Fund David C. Wright Memorial Fund Edith Wright Memorial Fund The W ulf Sisters Memorial Fund Herbert E. and Eleanor M. Zdara Memorial Fund Roy J. Zoof{ and Amelia T. Zook Fund ^ P a r t i a l B e n e f i t s F u n d s provide payments of annuities to certain individuals prior to payment of income to the Foundation. W ith three exceptions, T he Cleveland -Foundation will ultimately receive the entire net income from these funds. The principal amounts of these funds are car­ ried as assets ofT he Cleveland Foundation.

P R O J E C T ACCOUNTS

In keeping with its philanthropic leader­ ship role, The Cleveland Foundation is occasionally called upon to manage pro­ jects. Often these projects are supported by other funders as well as by The Cleveland Foundation. N E W P R O J E C T ACCOUNTS

The Cleveland Foundation-Emergency Needs, $50,000

T he T reu-M art Fund U s e o f In c o m e : T o meet emergency needs of area social service agencies D o n o r:

Cleveland Housing Weatherization Program-Phase 3, $150,000

Comm unity Foundations, Incorporated U s e o f in c o m e : Support o fT he Cleveland Foundation’s participation in the Ohio Comm unity Foundation Partnership Program D o n o r:

Findlay-Hancock County Community Foundation, $20,000

USX Foundation, Incorporated To help establish the Findlay-Hancock County Comm unity Foundation D o n o r:

U s e o f In c o m e :

The Fundfor the City of Cleveland/Cleveland Tree Subfunds, $94,013

D o n o r s : Adas Iron Processors, Incorporated, Cleveland Energy Resources, T he George G und Foundation, and J&J Trucking and Salvage, Incorporated. U s e o f i n c o m e : For the care, preservation, trimming, planting, removal or disposition of trees and shrubs in Cleveland

The Fundfor the City of Cleveland/Recreation Subfund, $7,000

Contemporary Office Products, DocuCopy M anagem ent Services, H ahn Loeser and Parks, H ughie’s Flowers and Film Service, Incorporated. Lawrence Binding Systems, National City Bank, N ational Paper and Packaging Company, and M argaret Ann and Erwin V. Zim m er Jr. U s e o f i n c o m e : For the purchase of fitness equipm ent for Cleveland recreation centers Karamu Mission, $15,000 D o n o r : T he George G und Foundation U s e o f I n c o m e : Consultancy study and eval­ uation of the Karamu mission Starting Point, $5,000 D o n o r : T he Treu-M art Fund U s e o f i n c o m e : For technical assistance to Starting Point in computerizing its data bank D o n o rs:


E ST A B L I S H E D P R O J E C T ACCOUNTS

Community AIDS Partnership-in memory of Charles Andrew Barber $7,198

Doris W. Alburn, Mr. and Mrs. John C. Barber, D. Robert and Kathleen L. Barber, David Bergholz, Roberta F. and Robert V. Bergstrom, Jack A. and Marilyn Bialosky, John R. and.Ctaudia Boatright, Lauren L. Bowen, John J. Boyle III, Mary O. Boyle, Jem and Albert M. Braswell Jr., Robert S. and Sally F. Burton, Judy Butler, Lois L. Butler, Margaret M. Caldwell, Richard and Mary Anne Cavicchi, Frederick K Cox, Henry C. and Mary Doll, Robert E. and Virginia Eckardt, Daniel R. Elliott Jr., Caroline B. Emeny, Richard E. and Deena M. Epstein, Barbara and Irwin Feldman, David B. and Ellen M. Fink, Lawrence E. and Pearl D. Greene, Agnes Gund, Gordon and Llura Gund, Graham and Ann L. Gund, John and N orm a Guyon, M ichael D. and Geraldine V. Hicho, Laura C. Hitchcox, Mary K. Howard, Kathryn P. Jensen, Morse and Betty F. Johnson, Sidney D. and Nina Josephs, Dr. Julian and Dr. Aileen Kassen, W alter C. and Patricia Kelley, Stanley and Suzanne Kent, Gordon D. Kinder, Ilona M. Klein, Dr. Theodore O. and Beverly S. Mason, Deborah McColloch, Elisabeth C. McColloch, Dennis E. and Marcella D. Milota, Steven A. and Dolly M inter, Mary B. Moon, M arian J. Morton, W illiam J. and Almeda J. Novotny, Dr. Oscar D. and M arian F. Ratnoff, Robert H. Rawson Jr., Barbara H . Reichle, Ann C. Rowland, Ragene Rowland, Susan Rowland, Dr. Vernon Rowland, Dr. Sam I. and Sarah N. Sato, Hans E. and Shirley Segal, Benjamin â&#x20AC;˘and Annette Segall, Oliver E. Seikel, Daniel Shapiro, Virginia V. Sides, Nancy King Smith, Robert and M argaret Sullens, Kathryn M. Tawney, Anne G. Terhune, David I. W arren, Stanley E. and Sally H. W ertheim , W eston H urd Fallon Paisley and Howley, David T. and Nancy H . Wild, and Brenda A. W irkus D o n o rs:

A D D I T I O N S TO P R O J E C T ACCOUNTS

American Foundation Fund, $200 D o n o r:

T he American Foundation

The Cleveland Arts Consortium, $137,380

T he Allstate Foundation, Lee and Katherine Chilcote Foundation, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, East Ohio Gas Company, T he Lucille and Robert H. Gries Charity Fund, Heinen's, Incorporated, Michael J. Horvitz, Martha Holden Jennings Foundation, Kaiser Permanente, T he Kulas Foundation, Little Tikes, Thom as W. and Jane A. Morris, The John P. Murphy Foundation, T he Plain Dealer, Reliance Electric, Revco D rug Store, Incorporated, Scholastic Book Fairs, Incorporated, T he Sherwin W illiams Company, Society M anagment Company, T he TRW Foundation, Evan and Brenda T urner, and Thom as W hite Foundation D o n o rs:

Cleveland Housing Weatherization Program-Phase 1, $10,000 C om m unity Foundations, Incorporated D o n o r:

Cleveland Housing Weatherization Program-Phase 2, $38,020

C omm unity Foundations, Incorporated Community AIDS Partnership, $117,500 D o n o r s : The George G und'Foundation, N ational Com m unity AIDS Partnership, The Treu-M art Fund and United Way Services D o n o r:

Community AIDS Partnershipâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Local Match,

$243,956 D o n o r s : Josephine Abady, Anonymous, Elizabeth Arden, Beachwood Board of Education, Bruening Foundation, Case Western Reserve University Charity Choice Program, Robert E. Eckardt, Ida Ruth Franckel Foundation, Garland Floor Company Philanthropic Fund, T he George G und Foundation, David and Barbara M. Jacobs Foundation, David Henry Jacobs, Jewish Comm unity Federation of Cleveland, T he May D epartm ent Stores Foundation, David and Inez Myers Foundation, Barbara Ann Reusch, Robert Stern, Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation, United Way Services, and Thom as H. W hite Fund

Grantmakers in Aging, $1,500

D o n o r : The H enry J. Kaiser Family Foundation

Northern Ohio GIVES, $3,33,4 D o n o r:

Premier Industrial Foundation

Teaching Leadership Consortium o f Ohio, $ 2 ,000,000 D o n o r:

The Ford Foundation

American Foundation Fund The Cleveland Arts Consortium The Cleveland Foundation-Emergency Needs Cleveland Heights High School Model School Program Cleveland Housing Weatherization Programs (3) Cleveland Neighborhood Partnership Program Community AIDS Partnership Community AIDS Partnership-Local Match East Cleveland Mathematics and Science Program Evaluation Energy Conservation Program Findlay-Hancock County Community Foundation Fiscal Officers' Group Project The Fund for the City o f Cleveland/Cleveland Tree Subfunds The Fund for the City of Cleveland/Recreation Subfund Karamu Mission Lima-Alien County Energy Conservation Program Minority Teacher Education Program Neighborhood Funders National Conference Neighbors Against Racial Violence Fund Northern Ohio GIVES Police Community Public Safety Program Starting Point Teaching Leadership Consortium o f Ohio


MARJORIE M. CARLSON

Director o f Donor Relations

An increasing n u m b er of donors are c h o o s i n g to p a r tic ip a te actively in their charitable giving by establishing

Marge Carlson is the primary liaison to current and prospective donors to the Foundation. Prior to joining the staff in 1986, she served in several volunteer leadership posts, including the presidency of the Junior League of Cleveland. She is at present a trustee of the Northern Ohio Planned Giving Council, Musical Arts Association, Judson Retirement Community, Playhouse Square Foundation, and The College of Wooster, her undergraduate alma mater. Carlson holds a master’s degree in speech pathology from Case W estern Reserve University and served for four years as executive director of Grantmakers Forum before assuming her present position in July 1990.

do n o r-ad v iso r funds. A lth oug h t h e F o u n d a t i o n m a i n t a i n s sole responsibility for managing the fund’s a sse ts a n d f i n a l a u t h o r i t y over grantmaking, donors may make grant

DO N O R - A D V I S O R

P U N D s

r e c o m m e n d a ti o n s on up to six percent o f the fund s asset v a lu e in a giv en year. I n a d d itio n ,

t h e f u n d p r o v i d e s m a x i m u m tax benefits to the donor. A donor-advisor fund remains in place for the lifetime of the donor or 25 years, after which t h e n a m e d f u n d c o n t i n u e s in perpetuity as unrestricted endowment o f T h e Cleveland Foundation. 11 In 1992, new funds and additions to existing donor-advisor funds totaled $1,409,366. Grants totaling $1,403,137 w e r e m a d e f r o m th es e f u n d s to a b roa d array o f c o m m u n i ty o r g a n i ­ zations. G ra n ts m ad e in 1992 from T h e W o lp ert F u n d , form erly a s u p p o r tin g o rg a niz ation, a pp ea r in this listing.

MICHAEL J . HOFFMANN

Director o f Philanthropic Services Michael Hoffmann serves as principal staff to the Foundation’s Lake-Geauga Fund, to five of its six supporting organizations, or affiliated funds, and to two major donor-advisor funds. Prior to joining the Foundation’s staff as administrative officer in 1981, he was treasurer of the Cleveland City School District. H e has helped plan and develop operations of the Puerto Rico Comm unity Foundation since its inception in 1985 and has assisted civic leaders on the island of St. Croix in their efforts to establish a community foundation there. A lifelong Cleveland resident, he holds a master’s degree in business administration from Case W estern Reserve University.


A D D IT IO N S TO DON ORADVISOR FUNDS

(Additions are gifts of the donor-advisor unless otherwise noted.) American Cancer Society, Ohio Division, Incorporated, Cancer Research and Education Fund, $31,057 Edward J. and Dorothy F. Malek, and T he Ohio Bell Foundation D o n o rs:

The Edward C. and Jane D. Bloomberg Fund, $5,000 The Campopiano. Family Fund, $540 The Cleveland Foundation Special Fund No. 2, $40,000 The Commerce Club Fund, $1,703 Norman F. Klopp Family Fund, $540 The Lincoln Electric Fundfor Excellence in Education, $ 110,000 The Lincoln Electric Foundation and Emma S. Lincoln D o n o rs:

Thornton D. McDonough Family Fund,

NEW DONOR-ADVISOR FUNDS

$1,080

The Garda Family Fund, $53,955

John P. McWilliams and Broods Barlow McWilliams Fund, $514 Andrea and Elmer Meszaros Fund, $540 F. James and Rita Rechin Fund, $ 100

Annie Lewis J. Garda and Robert A Garda U s e o f i n c o m e : T o be used by the Foundation for its public, charitable, scientific, literary, and educational purposes The Maty B. Moon Fund, $50,000 D o n o r : Mary B. Moon U s e o f i n c o m e : T o be used by the Foundation for its public, charitable, scientific, literary, and educational purposes D o n o rs:

The Lindsay J. and David T. Morgenthaler Fund, $1,100,000

Lindsay J. and David T. M orgenthaler U s e o f In c o m e : To be used by the Foundation for its public, charitable, scientific, literary, and educational purposes and, in addition, donor recommended principal distributions over 5 years D o n o rs:

D o n o r:

Lawrence C. Turnock

Stewart L. and Judith P. Rice Fund, $540 Roulston Family Funds, $6,480 Rugosityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Family Fund, $540 R. H. Smith Family Fund, $540 The Elizabeth M. and William C. Treuhaft Fund, $2,997 Wellman Philanthropic Fund, $540 Wipper Family Fund, $ 1,620 The Robert J. and Janet G. Yaroma Family Fund, $1,080

E S TA B LISH ED DONOR-ADVISOR FUNDS

American Cancer Society, Ohio Division Incorporated, Cancer Research and Education Fund The Edward C. and Jane D. Bloomberg Fund The Campopiano Family Fund Alvah Stone and Adele Corning Chisholm Memorial Fund The Cleveland Foundation Special Fund No. 2 The Cleveland Foundation Special Fund No. 3 The Cleveland Foundation Special Fund No. 5 The Commerce Club Fund The James E. and Isabelle E. Dunlap Fund The Garda Family Fund Griswold Family Fund Norman F. Klopp Family Fund Leaderson Fund Eleanor M. Lewis Fund The Lincoln Electric Fundfor Excellence in Education Robert R. and Ann B. Lucas Fund Thornton D. McDonough Family Fund John P. McWilliams and Broods Barlow McWilliams Fund Andrea and Elmer Meszaros Fund William A. and Margaret N. Mitchell Fund The Maty B. Moon Fund The George L. and Genevieve D. Moore Fund No. 1 The Lindsay /. and David T. Morgenthaler Fund Ohio BelliAmeritech Fund

George ]. Picha Fund F. ]antes and Rita Rechin Fund Stewart L. and Judith P. Rice Fund Roulston Family Fund r Ruhpsky Family Fund R.H. Smith Family Fund The Elizabeth M. and William C. Treuhaft Fund Philip R. Uhlin Fund Paul A. and Sonja F. Unger Fund Wellman Philanthropic Fund Harold L. and Patricia D. Williams Fund Wipper Family Fund The Wolpert Fund The Robert J. and Janet G. Yaroma Family Fund


CULTURAL A F F AI RS GRANTS

A cc e ss to th e A rts A k ro n C ivic T h ea tre, A kro n , O hio

D O N O R-A D V ISO R GRANTS

(The following recipients and programs were recommended by the donor-advisors. Grants are for general support unless otherwise noted.)

The A m e ric a n C ivil L ib e rtie s U nion o f C levela n d F o u n d a tio n Inc. C itize n s L ea g u e R e s e a rc h In s titu te C levela n d C o u n cil on W orld A ffa ir s

250

C levela n d W orks, Inc.

500

N ew U nion o f B la c ks to Im p ro v e A m erica, Toledo, O hio

C levela n d Z o o lo g ica l S o c iety

500

9to5, W orking W om en E d u c a tio n F und

C o lu m b u s Y o u th C orps, Inc., C o lum bu s, O hio

1,500

C o lu m b u s Z o o lo g ica l P ark, C o lum bu s, O hio

10,000

C rim e S to p p e r s

2,000

C rim e S to p p e rs, C olum bus, O hio

1,000 1,000

750

3.500

A rts in M id d leto w n , O hio

2,000

3.300

The C levela nd In s titu te o f A rt

3.000

The C levela nd In s titu te o f M usic

3.300

The C levela nd M u seu m o f N a tu ra l H isto r y

7.500

Plastic binding system for the Harvard Com m unity Service Center

The C leveland M u sic S c h o o l S ettlem en t

4,248

428

C levela nd O pera

6.000

Service C o rps o f R e tir e d E x e c u tiv e s

500

The C leveland P lay H o u se

6.500

S h a k e r L a ke s R eg io n a l N a tu re C enter

550

C leveland R e s to ra tio n S o ciety

T a sk F orce on V iolent C rim e C h a rita b le F und

500

C o lum bu s M u seu m o f A rt, C olum bus, O hio C o m m u nity A rts P roject, C olum bus, O hio

1,000 1,120

25,000

U rban L eag ue o f D ayton, O hio

1,000

The U rban L ea g u e o f G rea ter C leveland

6,000

Z a n e sv ille C ivic L eag ue Center, Z a n esville, O hio

2,000

300

C levela nd C h ild re n ’s M u seu m

500

O p p o rtu n itie s In d u s tr ia liz a tio n Center, Inc.

U n iversity C ircle In c o rp o ra te d

1,000

300

O hio E n v iro n m en ta l C ouncil, C olum bus, O hio

T o led o Z o o lo g ica l Society, Toledo, O hio

NAACP. C levela nd B ra n ch

14,240

15,500

800

2,000

2,000

The C levela nd M u seu m o f A rt

300

M id d fe s t In te rn a tio n a l F o u n d a tio n , M id d le to w n , O h io

50.000

500

FHC H o u sin g C o rp o ra tio n

NAACP, S a n d u sk y , O hio

A rts D ayton, O hio

Educational brochures

F rie n d s o f S h a k e r S q u a re G re a te r C levela nd R o u n d ta b le

2,000

C leveland C enter f o r C o n te m p o ra ry A rt

500

Patron Fund for English-in-Action

A rie l C u ltu ra l & P e r fo rm in g A r ts C entre Inc., G allip olis, O hio

C levela nd B allet

5,000

C ity Club F o ru m F o u n d a tio n , Inc.

E n g lish -S p e a kin g U nion

2,000

C anton Sym p h o n y, C anton, O hio

§1,000

800

A k ro n S ym p h o n y, A kro n , O hio

A via tio n H a ll o f F am e d b a N a tio n a l A via tio n H a ll o f F am e. D ayton, O hio

CIVIC A F F A IR S

$1,000

T o ta l C ivic A ffa ir s G ran ts

$67,498

300 12.000

The M artin Luther King Jr. Performing and Cultural Arts Complex

2,000

C u ltu ra l C enter f o r th e A rts/U n ite d A rts F und, C anton, O hio

1,400

D ayton A rt In stitu te , D ayton, O hio

1.500

F a irm o u n t T h ea tre o f th e D e a f

2.500

F ine A rts A sso c ia tio n

1.000


P RE C O L L E G I A T E E DUCATI ON GRANTS

A u ro ra L ib ra ry T ru st, A u ro ra , O hio

C hildren’s books and programs, and com puter software programs

The G ard en C enter o f G re a te r C levela nd

1,350

G reat L a ke s T h ea ter F estiva l

8,000

H a n co ck H isto r ic a l M u seu m A sso c ia tio n , F indlay, O hio

4,000

K a ra m u H o u se

11,500 467

Neighborhood Artwork Program

The L a ke View C em etery F o u n d a tio n

500

L a n c a ste r C horale, L a n ca ster, O hio

1,200

The Lincoln Center, F indlay, O hio

1,000

M o n d a y M u sica l Club, Y o ung stow n, O hio Grover C. Yaus Scholarship Fund

10,000

The M u sica l A rts A sso c ia tio n

5,000 7,000 7,307

1991-92 Cham ber Music Series Education fund Study of African-American participation in activities o fT he Cleveland Orchestra

50,000

O hio C h a m b er B allet, A kro n , O hio

3,500

O hio H isto r ic a l S o c iety

6,000

P la y h o u se S q u a re F o u n d a tio n

8,000

Sa lem C o m m u n ity T h ea tre, Salem , O hio

250

1,600

S p rin g fie ld M u seu m o f A rt, S p rin g fie ld , O hio

1,700

“Marble Room" renovation project

Young people’s education and recreation program, and yearbook for young people of Aurora

A u ro ra P a re n ts-T e a c h e rs O rg a n iza tio n , A u ro ra , O hio

M ini-grant programs and The Prom etheus Program Supplies for publishing books written by young people, Renaissance Program to recognize achievement, library circulation system and electronic linkages to Aurora High School Library

B ea u m o n t S c h o o l f o r G irls

T oledo B o ta n ica l G arden B oard, Inc., Toledo, O hio

750

The Toledo M u seu m o f A rt, Toledo, O hio

4,000

T oledo O pera A sso c ia tio n , Toledo, O hio

2,500

Toledo O rc h e stra A sso c ia tio n Inc. db a T oledo S y m p h o n y

5,000

T rin ity C a th e d ra l Music Program

500

Y o u n g sto w n P la y h o u se , Y o ung stow n, O hio

250

Y o u n g sto w n S ym p h o n y O rchestra , Y o ung stow n, O hio T o tal C u ltu ra l A ffa ir s G ran ts

S p rin g fie ld S u m m e r A rts F estival, Inc., db a S p rin g fie ld A rts C o uncil S p rin g fie ld , O hio

H e n ry H. S ta m b a u g h A u d ito riu m A sso c ia tio n , Y o ung stow n, O hio

A u ro ra O ne F und , A u ro ra , O hio

750

The H old en A rb o re tu m

15,000

$19,450

1,000 $306,012

26,500

9,500

33,389

Alum ni Fund

250

C h o a te -R o se m a ry H all, W allin gfo rd, C o n n ecticu t

500

C levela nd C enter f o r E co n o m ic E d u c a tio n C levela nd E d u c a tio n F u n d Small Grants Program

C o lum bu s A ca dem y, G ah ann a, O hio

8,500 1,000 25,000

School campaign

1,000

J u n io r A ch iev e m en t o f A kro n , O hio

3,400

J u n io r A ch iev e m en t o f C entral O hio, Inc., C olum bus, O hio

5,500

J u n io r A ch iev e m en t o f C lark a n d C h a m p a ig n C o unties, S p rin g fie ld , O hio

1,200

J u n io r A ch iev e m en t o f D a yto n a n d M ia m i Valley, Inc., D ayton, O hio

3,600

J u n io r A ch iev e m en t o f F o sto ria , O h io

550

ECONOMIC DEVELO PM EN T GRANTS

J u n io r A ch iev e m en t o f F indlay, O hio

900

R o x b o ro C o m m u nity D evelop m en t

J u n io r A ch iev e m en t o f G rea ter C leveland, Inc.

11.000

J u n io r A ch iev e m en t o f M id d le to w n A rea, Inc., M idd letow n , O hio

2,000

Revitalization of land surrounding Roxboro School

$1,000

T o tal E co no m ic D evelo p m en t G rant

$1,000


H I G H E R EDUCATION GRANTS

U n iv e rsity o f A kro n F ou n d atio n, A kro n , O hio

$1,800

C arnegie-M ellon U n iversity, P ittsb u rg h , P en n sy lv a n ia C hair in Entrepreneurship University C enter

x

'

100,000 20,000

J o h n C a rro ll U n iversity J u n io r A c h ie v e m e n t o f N o rth w e ste rn O hio, Inc., Toledo, O hio J u n io r A c h ie v e m e n t o f S a n d u sk y , O hio

4,000 850

J u n io r A c h ie v e m e n t o f S a n d u sk y C ounty, F rem o nt, O hio

800

J u n io r A c h ie v e m e n t o f S ta rk C ounty, Inc., C anton, O hio

2,000

J u n io r A c h ie v e m e n t o f T iffin , O hio

500

J u n io r A c h ie v e m e n t o f Y o u n g sto w n A rea, Inc., Y o u n g sto w n , O hio

1,500

O h io C o u n cil On E co n o m ic E d u ca tio n , C o lum bu s, O hio

6,900

R e a c h in g H e ig h ts, C levela nd H e ig h ts / U n iv e rsity H e ig h ts P u b lic S ch o o ls F o u n d a tio n 1,000 School T eam G rants Program (second year)

1,500

St. D o m in ic C h u rch

School Education Endow m ent Fund

St. D o m in ic S c h o o l

Spanish language program

T rin ity C a th e d ra l Preschool program

U n iv e rsity S c h o o l

T o ta l P re c o lle g ia te E d u c a tio n G ran ts

Franklin Thom as Backus School of Law Capital campaign for M andel School of Applied Social Scicnces Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fund W eatherhead School of M anagement W eatherhead School of M anagem ent Building Fund

C levela nd College o f J e w is h S tu d ie s

Aaron Garber Library

C leveland P u b lic L ib ra ry E d u c a tio n a l T elevisio n A sso c ia tio n o f M e tro p o lita n C leveland, W VIZ-TV

1,000

5,000

10.000

300 1,000

20,000

U n iversity o f R io G rande, O hio

2,000

U rsu lin e College

5,250

T o ta l H ig h e r E d u c a tio n G ran ts

500

C levela nd S c h o la r sh ip P ro g ra m s

O hio U n iversity F und, Inc., A th en s, O hio

25.000 2.000

$470,850

SC H O L A R SH IP GRANTS

C ase W estern R e se rv e U n iversity

51.000

500

The U n iversity f o r Young A m e ric a n s

3.000

O hio S ta te U niversity, C olum bus, O hio M ic h a el J. O w ens T e c h n ic a l College C h a rita b le T rust, Toledo, O hio

Benefit of G reater Cleveland Literacy Coalition

1,500

10,000

3.000

M alone College, C anton, O hio

U nited W ay Services

130,000

15.000

H ig h e r E d u c a tio n C o uncil o f C olum bus, O hio

500

$178,059

U nited N egro College F und, Inc. o f C levela nd 1,000

5.000

L ite ra c y In itia tiv e o f C entral Ohio, D ublin, O hio

2,000

M emorial professorial appointm ent

Passover: Festival o f Freedom video

260

2,500

S ta n fo rd U n iversity, S ta n fo rd , C a lifo rn ia

C ase W estern R e se rv e U niversity

H ira m College, H iram , O hio

U n ited W ay S e rv ic e s

Benefit o f U rban C om m unity School

Pilot program in conflict resolution, prejudice reduction, and peer mediation in cooperation with Ursuline College and Notre Dame College of Ohio

Scholarship in hum anities

C leveland S ta te U n iversity Financial aid awards Scholarship support

T o tal S c h o la r sh ip G ran ts

$3,000 1.500 1.500 1.500 $7,500


J u v e n ile D ia b etes F o u n d a tio n , C levela nd C h a p ter

“Clevelanders W ho C are” Fund for Medical Research

L ife Banc

A lzh e im e r's D ise a se a n d R ela ted D iso rd e rs A sso c ia tio n , Inc. A re a O ffice on A ging o f N o rth w e ste rn O hio, Inc., Toledo, O hio

$300 500 2,900

C ase W estern R eserv e U n iversity f o r th e S c h o o l o f M ed icin e

2,250

ARE

THE

25,000

M a la c h i H o u se o f H o p e

550 3,500

M e tro H e a lth F o un da tion, Inc.

B a rlo w R e s p ir a to r y H o sp ita l, L os A ngeles, C a lifo rn ia

HOSE

Public Awareness Campaign Hospice for the Dying

HEALTH GRANTS

F L O 'Wr E R S

IN

400

Burn/Traum a Center

300

Mt. S in a i M ed ica l C enter Geriatric program

7,500

O hio P re sb y te ria n R e tire m e n t Services, C olum bus, O hio

2,000

R a in b o w B abies a n d C h ildrens H o sp ita l

1,000

The B en jam in R o se In s titu te

1,100

THE

N E IG H B O R H O O D .”

B eech B ro o k

2,330

B e lie fa ire /J e iv ish C h ild re n ’s B u re a u Jewish Day Nursery scholarship fund

300 7,500

B oy S co u ts o f A m erica , C en tra l O hio C ouncil, C o lum bu s , O hio

5,000

C a p ita l A re a H u m a n e Society, C olum bus, O hio

2,500

C a tholic C h a ritie s C o rp o ra tio n (C le ve la n d ) C enter f o r H u m a n S e rv ic e s

C h ild re n ’s H o sp ita l M e d ic a l C enter o f A kro n , O hio The C levela nd C linic F o u n d a tio n Room in Research Building

The C levela nd F o u n d a tio n (In c .) Comm unity AIDS Partnership Project

F a irv ie w G eneral H o s p ita l

1,000 500 500 35,000 10,350 300

U n iversity H o sp ita ls o f C leveland Pilot projects for respiratory health

750 5,481

The V isiting N u rse A sso c ia tio n o f C leveland

1,500

T o tal H e a lth G ran ts

$117,181

SOCIAL SERVICES GRANTS

A ll-A m erican So a p B o x D erby, A kron, O hio A m erica n R ed C ro ss

The F ree M e d ic a l C linic o f G re a te r C levela nd

3,500

H e a lth H ill H o sp ita l f o r C h ildren

2,500

H om e H ea lth Care, Inc.

2,000

A m e ric a n R e d C ross, J e ffe r s o n C ounty C h apter, S teu benville, O hio

H u n tin g to n ’s D ise a se S o ciety o f A m erica , Inc., N ew York, N ew Y o rk

1,500

A rea O ffice on A ging o f N o rth w e ste rn O hio , Inc., Toledo, O hio

J u d so n R etirem e n t C o m m u n ity

5,000

Southeast Cleveland office

Benefit of Retired Senior Volunteer Program o f Toledo

,

800

C h ild G uid ance C enter

1,300

C h ild h o o d L eag ue Inc. d b a C h ild h o o d L eag ue C enter, C olum bus, O hio

5,000

C h ild re n ’s D e fen se F und, W ashing ton , D.C. C en tra l S c h o o l o f P ra c tic a l N u rsin g, Inc.

500

Operating support for the Cleveland office

1,000

C leveland H e a rin g a n d S p e ec h C en ter

4,300

C levela nd In te rn a tio n a l P ro g ra m f o r Y o u th L e a d ers a n d S o c ia l W orkers, Inc.

4,000

The C leveland S o c iety f o r th e B lin d Cleveland Sight Center Eye Bank

4,800 3,500 500

C levela nd W om en. Inc. d b a T em p lu m H o u se

1,000

$500

E a st Sid e C a tholic S h e lte r

250

750 582

E p isc o p a l D io cese o f O hio

1,000

700

500

F a th e r F la n a g a n 's B oys H om e, B oys Town, N e b ra sk a

500

F e d e ra te d C h u rch o f C h a g rin F alls

260

F rien d ly Inn S e ttle m en t

250

G eary F am ily YMCA, F o sto ria , O hio

2,000


G ea u g a C o u n ty YMCA, N e w b u ry , O hio

250

G e sta lt I n s titu te o f C levela n d

500

G o o d ric h -G a n n e tt N e ig h b o rh o o d C enter

250

G o o d w ill I n d u s tr ie s o f G re a te r C levela nd

1,000

G re a te r C levela n d N e ig h b o rh o o d C en ters A sso c ia tio n

3,000

H e ig h ts C o m m u n ity C o n g ress H e ig h ts P a re n t C enter

St. P h ilip ’s C h ristia n C h urch

300

H unger C enter

4,000

The S a lv a tio n A rm y

7,800

The S a lv a tio n A rm y, F indla y, O hio

2,000

S h o e s F or K id s, Inc.

7,500

Drop In/D rop By and Come Play! programs

1,500

S is te r s o f N o tre D am e

H e in ze rlin g M e m o ria l F o u n d a tio n , C o lum bu s, O hio

Julie Billiart School

250

2,500

T ra n sitio n a l H o u sin g , Inc.

250

In te r c h u r c h C o u n cil o f G re a te r C levela nd

500 4,000

U nited W ay S e rv ic e s

Zelm a George Shelter

J e w is h C o m m u n ity C enter J e w is h C o m m u n ity F e d e ra tio n o f C levela nd Hebrew Shelter H om e W elfare Fund

L a ke E rie G irl S c o u t C o uncil “Choices” program for 1992-93

T he H a ttie L a rlh a m F o u n d a tio n , Inc., M a n tu a , O hio N o r th e a s t O hio C o a litio n f o r th e H o m e less Kidsacks program

O h io N e w sb o y s A sso c ia tio n , Inc., C o lum bu s, O hio O hio -W est V irg in ia YMCA, St. G eorge, W est V irg in ia Youth in G overnment Program

O ld N e w sb o y s G o o d fello w A sso c ia tio n o f Toledo, O hio P la n n e d P a re n th o o d o f G rea ter C leveland, Inc. Public affairs programs

P ly m o u th C h u rc h o f S h a k e r H e ig h ts F o u n d a tio n

500

P o rta g e C ounty 4-H Fund, A u ro ra , O hio

Program coordinator for educational, informative and recreational programs for people from Aurora

2,000 4,000 2,000

P ro je c t F rie n d sh ip , Inc.

30,000

P ro v id e n c e H ou se, Inc.

2,000 250 10,000

Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Greater Cleveland Monticello Youth Project

R e c re a tio n U nlim ited F arm a n d Fun, A shley, O hio R e tir e d S e n io r V olun teer P ro g ra m o f C leveland St. B a sil C a tholic C h urch St. B ern a d ette C h urch

Charitable requests and centers for the needy

2,500 500 1,000 1,000 260

St. M a la c h i Center, Inc. Developmental Center

St. M a la c h i C h urch

5.000 2.000

7.500 5.500 y

6,000 1,200

510

Benefit of Starting Point child care resource and referral center Purchase and distribution o f food by G reater Cleveland Comm ittee on H unger

V oca tio n a l G uid ance S e rv ic e s W est Sid e C a tholic C enter

1,000 1,000 320

W om en T o gether, Inc., db a The C enter f o r th e P re ve n tio n o f D o m e stic V iolence

3,500

W om en’s C o m m u n ity F o u n d a tio n

300 v

YMCA - F am ily Y o f L a n ca ster, F a irfie ld C ounty, L a n ca ster, O hio

5.000

T o tal S o c ia l S e rv ic e s G ran ts

$243,366

300 SPE C IA L PH IL A N T H R O P IC GRANTS

3.500

B ra te n a h l C o m m u nity F o u n d a tio n

Food program

4,000

The C leveland F o u n d a tio n (In c .)

10,634

The F o u n d a tio n C enter, N ew York, N ew Y o rk

H um anitarian Fund

500

Food and general needs

St. P a u l’s E p isc o p a l C hurch, C levela nd H e ig h ts St. P a u l C ro a tia n C h urch

41,720

650

Unrestricted purposes

Operating support o fT h e Foundation Center-Cleveland

T o tal S p e cia l P h ila n th ro p ic G ran ts

$1,500 9,871 300 $11,671


j

<0

TH E SH ERW IC K FUND

fi

Affiliated in 1973 John and Frances Wic\ Sherwin, founding donors

<3

John Sherwin Jr., H om er C. W adsworth, James M. Delaney, Russell R. Gifford, Sally K. Griswold T ru ste e s:

<1 i

1 9 9 2 GRANTS

B oy S c o u ts o f A m erica, G re a te r C levela nd C o uncil N o .440

< f o u n d a t i o n in th e U n i t e d State s to affi liate w i t h a c o m m u n i t y f o u n d a t i o n , a n d the T r e u - M a r t StJPPORTING ORGANIZATIONS

4 j

l )

T h e s u p p o r t i n g o r g a n i z a t i o n is a unique form o f charitable giving that e n a b l e s a p r i v a t e f o u n d a t i o n , an individual, or members o f a family to take ad v an tag e o f the professional p ro g ram assistance, adm inistrative se rv ice s, a n d tax s t a tu s o f a com m unity foundation while m a in ­ taining active involvement in grantmaking. A m inim um of $2 million is

I I

i

■I I

B oy S c o u ts o f A m erica , N o rth e a s t O hio C ouncil C am p H o M ita K o da

Renovation of bathhouse facility

Fun d, the n a ti o n ’s first sup portin g org a n iz atio n affiliated with both a community foundation and a Jewish

J o h n C a rro ll U n iv e rsity

c o m m u n ity federation. 11 Each supporting organization has committed its assets to the benefit and

C ase W estern R e se rv e U n iv e rsity

charitable purposes of the F o u n d a t i o n , yet r e ta in s its o w n

C levela nd B allet

i d e n t i ty a n d c h a ri ta b l e p rio rities. E a c h also has its o w n b o a rd o f

C levela nd C h ild re n ’s M useu m

trustees. 11 T h e Wolpert Fu nd, formerly a supporting organization, became a donor-advisor fund in 1992. A listing o f grants can be found in

Institute of Educational Renewal in the Cleveland Public Schools

Encyclopedia of Bioethics, second edition by the School of Medicine

“Save the Ballet” Campaign

People Puzzle outreach program

The C levela nd F o u n d a tio n (In c .)

“Cleveland for Kids” guidebook to cultural institutions by T he Cleveland Arts Consortium Comm unity AIDS Partnership Project 10% of 1991 income for allocation by The Cleveland Foundation Distribution Comm ittee

r e q u ir e d to e stablish a s u p p o rtin g org a niz ation. If Six supp orting

that section.

o rg a n iz a t i o n s were affiliated with T h e Cleveland Foundation in 1992,

C leveland H e a lth E d u c a tio n M u seu m

including two pioneers in the field:

to p r o g r a m s w h ic h b e n e f i t the Gre ater Cleveland community. T h e gra n ts listed below are for general

the Sherwick Fund, the first family

support unless otherwise noted.

The C levela nd M u seu m o f N a tu ra l H isto r y

H

In 1992, support­

ing organizations awarded $1,498,160

The C levela nd M u seu m o f A rt


I

TH E E L IZA B ET H AND ELLERY SEDG W ICK FUND

Established in 1978 by Elizabeth and Ellery Sedgwic\ A d d i t i o n s in 1 9 9 2 : $69,567 Elizabeth and Ellery Sedgwick Elizabeth Sedgwick, Frances M. King, Annie Lewis J. Garda, Steven A. M inter D o n o rs:

T ru ste e s:

C levela n d S c h o la r s h ip P ro g ra m s

2,200

C levela n d Z o o lo g ic a l S o c iety

2,200

E d u c a tio n a l T e le visio n A sso c ia tio n o f M e tro p o lita n C leveland, W VIZ-TV

2,200

F ine A r ts A sso c ia tio n

2,200

T h e F o u n d a tio n C enter, N ew York, N ew Y ork

1 9 9 2 GRANTS

A ccess to th e A rts

Fine arts program for the elderly

$2,000

A m e ric a n C ivil L ib ertie s U nion o f O hio F o u n d a tio n

2,000 5,000

O perating support for T he Foundation Center^Cleveland

2,200

U nited N egro College F und, Inc., N ew York, N ew Y o rk

2,200

A sso c ia tio n f o r V o lu n ta ry S u rg ic a l C o ntra cep tion, N ew York, N ew Y o rk

T he F ree M e d ic a l C linic o f G re a te r C levela nd

2,200

U nited W ay o f L a ke C ounty, Inc.

9,350

B ro a d w a y S c h o o l o f M u sic a n d th e A rts

T he G ard en C enter o f G re a te r C levela nd

2,200

U nited W ay S e rv ic e s

T he G re a te r C levela n d H o s p ita l A sso c ia tio n N ursing articulation model

15,000

The H o ld en A rb o re tu m

2,200 50,000

Horticulture science center

K irtla n d P u b lic L ib ra ry

Furnishings for new building

L a ke C o unty YMCA

T he M u s ic a l A rts A sso c ia tio n N e ig h b o rh o o d H e a lth Care, Inc.

Furnishings for new examination rooms

2,200

P la n n e d P a re n th o o d o f G re a te r C leveland, Inc. P la y h o u se S q u a re F o u n d a tio n

The W estern R eserv e H isto r ic a l S o ciety T o tal S h e rw ic k F u n d G ran ts

25,000 2,200 $439,490

neighborhood centers

A d d i t i o n s in 1 9 9 2 :

2,200 10,940

C hild G uid ance C enter Capital campaign

Goodrich-Gannett and Lexington-Bell

$34,226

1,000

C leveland C h ild re n ’s M useu m People Puzzle outreach program

2,000

The C leveland F o u n d a tio n (In c.)

Curriculum development for Cuyahoga Valley Environmental Educational Center

G rea ter C leveland C o m m u n ity S h a re s

D o n o r s : Robert R. Rhodes Testamentary T rust and Ellen Garretson W ade Memorial Fund T r u s t e e s : S. Sterling McMillan III, Richard W. Pogue, David G. Hill, Ann L. M arotta, Steven A. M inter

3,000

Campaign coordinator

2,000 1,000

After School Prevention Resources program

G o o drich-G an nett N e ig h b o rh o o d C enter

2,200

L exin g to n -B ell C o m m u nity C enter

3,300

T o ta l G o o d rich S o cia l S e ttle m en t G ran ts

$45,000 32,500 $77,500

5,000

H e ig h ts P a re n t C enter L u th e ra n M e tro p o lita n M in istry A sso c ia tio n

1 9 9 2 GRANTS

50,000

1,000

C u ya ho ga V alley A sso c ia tio n , P en in su la , O hio

G ra n t m a k in g in te re st s:

10,000

“Arts Therapies to Children at Risk” program at Miles Park Elementary School

'“Cleveland for Kids” guidebook to cultural institutions by T he Cleveland Arts Consortium

TH E G O O D R ICH SOCIAL SETTL EM E N T

Affiliated in 1979

O hio P re sb y te ria n R e tir e m e n t S ervices, C o lum bu s, O hio Construction of Alzheimer’s day care unit at Breckenridge Village

Capital campaign

30,000

L u th e ra n M e tro p o lita n M in istry A sso c ia tio n T raining m anual and course curriculum for Service to A dult Care H om es programs

U n iversity H o sp ita ls o f C leveland

25,000

Tall T im bers R esea rc h , Inc., T a lla h a ssee, F lorid a Building campaign

U nited W ay S e rv ic e s T o tal S e d g w ic k F u n d G ran ts

,

5,000

10,000 18,000 $57,000


T H E ALTON F . AND CARRIE S. DAVIS FUND

Established in 1979 by Alton F. and Carrie S. Davis

Mary Jane Davis Hartwell, Shattuck W. Hartwell Jr., M .D., John J. Dwyer, Sally K. Griswold, Harvey G. O ppm ann

T ru ste e s:

M a la c h i H o u se o f H o p e

20,000

Bridge funding

19 9 2 ORANTS

B ellflo w e r C enter f o r P re ve n tio n o f C h ild A buse, Inc.

Family planning for T een Moms program

C h ild G uid ance C enter

Resources in Elementary Schools program

$5,000

The F ree M ed ica l Clinic o f G rea ter C leveland Expansion of services for the adolescent clinic (over two years)

T o ta l D a vis F u n d G ran ts

M arketing director position (over two years)

'

C leveland College o f J e w ish S tu d ie s 40,000

“The City ofD avid” exhibition

The C leveland F o u n d a tio n (In c.)

V o ca tio n a l G u id a n ce S e rv ic e s

Electronics job training and placement project for Solon area

C ity Club F oru m F o un da tion, Inc.

21,426

2,100 $47,100

Comm unity AIDS Partnership Project Technical assistance to Starting Point to computerize its data bank

The C leveland P lay H o u se

New Experimental Theatre of Volgograd residency

TH E TREU-M ART FUND

Established in 1980 by William C. and Elizabeth M. Treuhaft as a supporting organization of both The Cleveland Foundation and The Jewish Community Federation of Cleveland

Arthur W. Treuhaft, Mary Louise H ahn, Henry L. Zucker, Jerry V. Jarrett, Frances M. King, Albert B. Ratner, M ilton A. W olf T ru ste e s:-

F ed era tio n f o r C o m m u nity P lanning Materials for Kidsacks project (second year)

H e ig h ts P a re n t C enter

Minority Outreach and Drop-In programs

19 9 2 ORANTS

A cc e ss to th e A rts

Fine arts program for the elderly

J e w is h C o m m u nity C enter

Folktale Theatre and Youtheatre for 1992-93 season

$5,000

B eech B ro o k

C om m unity awareness activities for visit by C aptain Kangaroo

B 'N a i B ’R ith W om en, E a st C en tra l R eg ion H um or Carts for children at local hospitals

12,500 8,700

15,000

S ta rtin g P o in t

25,000 5,000 12,500

24,187

After School Prevention Resources program for high-risk youth

Renovation of Neighborhood Family Practice’s facility Computerization of data bank Operating support for child day care resource and referral center (third year)

Assistance for economically disadvantaged individuals in entering the job market (third year)

Young A u d ie n c e s o f G re a te r C leveland, Inc. “A Book of O ur W orld” project

10,945

T o tal T reu-M art F u n d G ran ts

16,000

TH E MCDONALD FUND

9,500

15,000 103,843 25,000

15,000

11,167

40.000

T o w a rd s E m p lo ym en t

Project T urning Point

21,527

20,000

14,200 ,

U nited W ay S e rv ic e s

L u th e ra n M e tro p o lita n M in istry A sso c ia tio n

C ase W estern R e se rv e U n iversity

Research project on inner-city youth and violence by M andel School of Applied Social Sciences

N e ig h b o rh o o d H e a lth Care, Inc.

J e w ish C o m m u nity F ed era tio n o f C leveland C ultural diversity project with the Cleveland C hapter of the NAACP Integration and acculturation services for Soviet Jewish youth (second year) Jewish cemetery preservation fund

Evaluation of the Learning, Earning, and Parenting Program (LEAP) in Cuyahoga County

30,000

C leveland S ta te U niversity

Getting Along Project by the Street Law Program at the College of Law

M a n p o w e r D e m o n stra tio n R e se a rc h C o rp o ra tio n , N ew York, N ew Y o rk

15.000 50.000 7,000 $553,495

Established in 1984 by Charles McDonald

Small business development in the city of Cleveland T r u s t e e s : Charles A. M cDonald, John J. Dwyer, Gary L. Bleiweiss, David G. H ill, Steven A. M inter G ra n t m a k in g fo c u s:

1 9 9 2 GRANT

C levela nd Sm all B u sin e ss In c u b a to r , Inc. Capital improvements and operating expenses

5323,575

T o tal M cD onald F und G rant

$323,575


■ FIN ANCIAL R E P O R T

■ REPORT OF ERNST & YOUNG

BALANCE S H E E T S I N D E P E N D E N T AUDI T ORS

Primarily Cash Basis The Cleveland Foundation December 31

1992

1991

A sse ts

Cash Certificates of deposit Short-term investments Securities - N ote B: U.S. Governm ent obligations Bonds C om m on and preferred stocks Com m on trust funds Com m on investment funds O ther investments - Note B Property and other assets

$

595,589

S

52,015,100

166,597 1,481,081 64,832,772

31,245,488 29,745,942 285,817,673 122,850,629 179,326,552 648,986,284 7,687,710 991,907 $710,276,590

35,167,769 37,659,853 276,037,258 91,947,201 174,373,875 615,185,956 10,500,547 1,433,905 $693,600,858

$

$

L ia b ilitie s a n d F u n d B alan ces

Accounts payable and accrued expenses Notes Payable Fund balances: Restricted for grantmaking purposes - N ote E Board Designated: For administrative purposes Property See notes to financial statements.

237,098

465,815 83,000

708,406,365

690,938,876

250,725 1,382,402 710,039,492 *710,276,590

706,018 1,407,149 693,052,043 $693,600,858

The C leveland F oundation D istribu tion C om m ittee and Trustee B anks o f T he C leveland F oundation W e have audited the accom panying balance sheets arising prim arily from cash transactions o f T he Cleveland Foundation as o f D ecem ber 31, 1992 and 1991, and the related statem ents o f revenue, expenses and changes in fund balances for die years then ended. T hese financial statem ents are the responsibility of the F ou ndation’s m anagem ent. O ur responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statem ents based on our audits. W e conducted our audits in accord­ ance w ith generally accepted auditing standards. T hose standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about w hether the financial statem ents are free of m aterial m isstatem ent. An audit includes exam ining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the am ounts and disclosures in the financial statem ents. A n audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estim ates m ade by m anagem ent, as well as evaluating the overall financial statem ent presentation. W e believe

that o ur audits provide a reasonable basis for o ur opinion. As described in N ote A, these financial statem ents have been prepared prim arily on the basis o f cash receipts and disbursem ents, w hich is an acceptable com prehensive basis of accounting other than generally accepted accounting principles. In our opinion, the financial statem ents referred to above present fairly, in all m aterial respects, the financial position arising prim arily from cash transactions o fT h e Cleveland Foundation as o f Decem ber 31, 1992 and 1991, and the revenue, expenses and changes in its fund balances for the years then ended, on the basis o f accounting described in N ote A.

'i C leveland, O hio

April 2, 1993


■ NOTES

■ S T A T E M E N T S O F REVE NUE , E X P E N S E S

Primarily Cash Basis The Cleveland Foundation Year Ended December 31 R evenue

Received from donors - N ote B Dividends Interest C om m on trust fund income C om m on investment fund income Partial benefit income - N ote C D istribution of estate income O ther T o ta l R e v e n u e

T o ta l E x p e n s e s E x c e s s o f R e v e n u e O ver E x p e n s e s

N et gains (losses) on securities and other investments - Note B Fund balances at beginning of year Fund balances at end of year See notes to financial statements.

FIN AN CIAL S T A T E M E N T S

T h e financial statem ents include the accounts o f T he Cleveland Foundation (“charitable corporation”), T he G reater C leveland F oundation, T he Cleveland F oundation (“com m unity trust”) and their affiliated supporting organizations: T he Davis F un d , T he G oodrich Social Settlem ent F un d , T he M cD onald F un d , T h e Sedgwick F un d , T he Sherwick F un d and T h e FindlayH ancock C ounty C om m unity F und. T he supporting organizations were established under the provisions o f Section 509(a)(3) o f the Internal Revenue Code. T he Cleveland Foundation is responsible for expenditures o f these supporting organizations for specific charitable purposes. Interorganizational transactions and accounts have been elim inated. T he financial statements are not intended to present financial position and results o f operations in conform ity w ith generally accepted accounting principles on the accrual m ethod; rather, it continues to be the F ou ndation’s consistent policy to prepare its financial statem ents prim arily on the acceptable accounting m ethod o f cash receipts and disbursem ents by w hich certain investm ent revenue and the related assets are recognized w hen received rather than w hen earned and certain expenses are recognized w hen paid rather than w hen the obligation is incurred. C ertain trusts, established for the benefit o f T h e Cleveland Foundation (“com m unity trust”), have been excluded from the accom panying statem ents until such tim e as they have been formally transferred to T h e Cleveland F oundation. C ertain am ounts in the 1991 financial statem ents have been reclassified to conform to 1992 classifications. Note B - C ontributions to T he Cleveland F oundation are recorded at m arket value at the date the contribution is received, w hich becomes cost. Securities and other investm ents are reported at their m arket value. Securities traded on a national securities exchange are valued at the last reported sales price on the last business day o f the year; investm ents traded in the over-the-counter m arket and listed securities for w hich no sale was reported on th at date are valued at fair value based upon the m ost recently reported bid prices. Certificates o f deposit and short-term investments are valued at cost w hich approxim ates m arket. C ertain other investm ents are valued at fair value as determ ined by T h e Cleveland Foundation or its trustee banks. Realized and unrealized gains or losses are determ ined by com parison o f asset cost to net proceeds received at the tim e o f disposal or changes in the difference betw een m arket values and cost, respectively. T hese am ounts are reflected in the financial statem ents as net gains (losses) on securities and other investm ents. Note A -

1992 $ 11,016,004 4,814,107 5,042,247 5,147,369 8,662,509 6,606,462 48,912 69,917 41,407,527

1991 $ 26,204,763 6,772,269 11,029,802 4,066,019 2,991,388 6,556,909 158,153 91,405 57,870,708

E x p e n se s

A uthorized by trustee banks: Trustees’ fees O ther expenses Payments under authorized grants Administrative expenses: Salaries Employee benefits Occupancy and office expenses Professional and consulting fees and staff expenses O ther

TO

T he Cleveland Foundation D ecem ber 31, 1992

AND CHA NGE S I N FU N D BALANCES

2,833,679 86,234 32,760,859

2,569,015 59,797 32,922,727

1,699,405 295,142 687,495

1,724,600 289,035 541,144

519,189 _____380,630 39,262,633 2,144,894

693,512 299,392 39,099,222 18,771,486

14,842,555 693,052,043 $710,039,492

102,016,340 572,264,217 $693,052,043


C ost o f securities and other investm ents are: December 31 U.S. Governm ent obligations Bonds Com m on and preferred stocks C om m on trust funds C om m on investment funds O ther investments

1992

$ 29,146,490 26,964,933 177,789,823 109,024,250 166,883,716 509,809,212 7,746,406 $517,555,618

1991

$ 31,745,704 33,758,130 166,417,107 75,159,334 162,043,137 469,123,412 9,514,797 5478,638,209

T he Cleveland F oundation established two com m on investm ent funds w hich allow for the com m ingling o f various trust assets into a com m on investm ent fund. T he com m on investm ent funds are m aintained at separate trustee banks and investm ent in the funds is lim ited only to the trust funds o f T he Cleveland F oundation. M arket value o f investm ents held by the com m on investm ent funds consists of the following: December 31 Cash Short-term investments U.S. Governm ent obligations Bonds Com m on and preferred stocks Com m on trust funds

$

1992

32,403 2,446,086 36,101,418 28,162,307 109,258,133 3,326,205 *179,326,552

$

1991

852,474 1,304,729 44,406,527 20,997,931 103,829,091 2,983,123 $174,373,875

Partial benefit funds generally provide, each in varying am ounts, for paym ent o f annuities to certain individuals, trustees’ fees and other expenses o f the trusts, prior to paym ent o f the balance o f the incom e to T he Cleveland F oundation (“com m unity trust”). T he total m arket values o f partial benefit funds are included in the accom panying statem ents since T h e Cleveland F oundation (“com m unity trust”) ultim ately will receive the entire incom e of such funds. In 1992 and 1991, T h e Cleveland Foundation (“com m unity trust”) received approxim ately 83% and 85%, respectively, o f the aggregate incom e of the various partial benefit funds. T he m arket value o f partial benefit funds was $179,637,423 at D ecem ber 31, 1992 and $176,488,491 at D ecem ber 31, 1991. N o te C -

Note D - T he Cleveland Foundation has unpaid grant com m itm ents of $21,688,099 and $25,251,265 at D ecem ber 31, 1992 and 1991, respectively.

F un d balances o f the supporting organizations w hich are included in the balance sheet in fund balances restricted for grantm aking purposes o f $708,406,365 and $690,938,876 as o f D ecem ber 31, 1992 and 1991, respectively, are com prised o f the following: Note E -

December 31 T he Davis Fund The Goodrich Social Settlement Fund The McDonald Fund T he Sedgwick Fund T he Sherwick Fund T he W olpert Fund

1992

$ 1,045,141 1,111,971 1,315,216 1,159,132 13,669,480 0 $ 18,300,940

$

1991

990,100 1,114,950 1,320,166 1,163,617 13,743,908 1,007,411 $ 19,340,152

In 1992, T he W olpert F un d was dissolved as a supporting organization under the provisions of Section 509(a)(3) o f the Internal Revenue Code. T h e W olpert F u n d ’s fund balance was transferred to T h e G reater Cleveland F oundation. T h e Findlay-H ancock C ounty C om m unity F u n d was established as a supporting organization under the provision o f Section 509(a)(3) o f the Internal Revenue Code during 1992. It is anticipated the fund will receive assets in 1993. T he T reu-M art F und is a supporting organization o f both T h e C leveland F oundation and the Jewish C om m unity Federation o f Cleveland. Financial transactions and account balances o f the T reu -M art F un d are not included in these financial statem ents. F und Balances o f the T reu -M art F u n d are as follows: December 31 1992 1991 T he Treu-M art Fund $ 11,127,494 $ 11,194,509 Note F - T he Cleveland Foundation has a defined contribution retirem ent plan for employees. R etirem ent plan expense for 1992 and 1991 was $141,918 and $141,724, respectively. All contributions u nd er the plan are funded and vest w ith employees as m ade. Note G - T he Internal Revenue Service has ruled that the com m unity trust, T h e G reater Cleveland F oundation, the charitable corporation and each o f the supporting organizations qualify under Section 501(c)(3) o f the Internal Revenue Code as tax exem pt organizations.


C o n siste n t w ith its origin al design in

1914 as th is c o u n t r y ’s first

co m m u n ity fo u n d a tio n , The Cleveland Foundation shares a joint s t e w a r d s h i p role w i t h its t r u s t e e banks. T h e F o u n d a tio n sets invest­ m ent p o lic ie s and m o nitors p e r f o r m a n c e w h i l e th e t r u s t e e banks and

g en erate

>o

r t

(in m illio n s)

A S S E T V A L U E S AT YEAH EIVD

$710

d i v id e n d

i n t e r e s t i n c o m e u s e d for grantm aking. N e w gifts

INVESTMENT

r e i

th e

GOO

and market appreciation .. .

are added t0 o u r p e r m a ­ n e n t endowment. Thus, superior investment per­ f o r m a n c e a n d n e w gifts are th e F o u n d a t i o n ’s c h i e f sou rc es o f

2 00

00

____

_________

_________

_________

_________

_________

_________

_________

_________

------- I; -_____,_____—L______ ,_______l _ _____(______ J _______,______ J _ _____!_____ I _____,______1_._____ !______Jj_______ ,_____ -i-1983

1984

1985

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

grow th. H T h e F o u n d a t i o n ’s i n v e s t m e n t p o l ic i e s a im fo r real growth in principal while assuring a p red ictab le incom e stream th at maintains and even enhances income a vailable for g r a n t m a k i n g . H T h e investm ent performance of our t r u s t e e b a n k s has b e en exce lle nt. W ith an average annual rate of 13.6 p e r c e n t fo r th e f iv e - y e a r p e r io d e n d i n g 1992, t h e F o u n d a t i o n ’s po rtfolio o u t p e r fo r m s w e ll- k n o w n national benchmarks that reflect this country’s security markets.

_________

J . T. Mu l l e n

Chief Financial Officer/Treasurer J.T. Mullen brought experience in both public- and private sector accounting when he joined the Foundation staff in 1987. A former manager with A rthur Young & Company, he had also worked for the Board of Cuyahoga County Com ­ missioners. H e is a member of the National Nonprofit Quality Reporting Project, the finance committee of Donors Forum of Ohio, and the FASB Response Committee of the Fiscal and Administrative Officers Group of Comm unity Foundations.

1991

_

_____ I 1992


EX ECU TIV E

O F FIC E

Steven A. M inter Executive Director Susan N . Lajoie Associate Director Roberta W. Allport Foundation Secretary and Special Assistant to the Executive Director Leslie A. D unford Senior Administrative Assistant Marvelous Ray Baker Executive Secretary Pierretta H . Wingfield Senior Grants Administrator HEALTH AND SOCIAL SE RVI CE S

Goldie K. Alvis Senior Program Officer, Social Services Robert E. Eckardt Senior Program Officer, Health and the Environment T erri Coleman Program Associate Cindy T ausch Administrative Secretary, Social Services Joyce Schneider Administrative Secretary, Health Mary Frances Knuth Grants Administrator E DUCA TI O N

Joyce R. Daniels Program Officer, Precollegiate Education Carol K. Willen Program Officer, Higher Education Gloria Chatman-Anderson Administrative Secretary/ Grants Administrator Viena R. Melton Administrative Secretary/ Grants Administrator

CULTURAL AFFAIRS

Kathleen A. Cerveny Program Officer, Cultural Affairs Joan M. Cerne Administrative Secretary/ Grants Administrator CIVIC AFFAI RS AND ECONOMIC D E VE L OPM EN T

Jay Talbot Senior Program Officer, Civic Affairs and Economic Development M aureen O. Floyd Program Associate Diane C. Kaszei Administrative Secretary SyMone R. McClain Grants Administrator DONOR RE LA TI O NS

Marjorie M. Carlson Director o f Donor Relations Clare Corrigan W oidke Donor Relations Associate Celene E. Petkash Administrative Secretary P H IL A N T H R O P I C SE RVI CES

Michael J. Hoffmann Director o f Philanthropic Services Principal Staff, The Lake-Geauga Fund and Supporting Organizations Ellen M. Ivory Administrative Secretary/ Grants Administrator FINDLAY AND HANCOCK COUNTY

Barbara M. Deerhake Program Officer, The L. Dale Dorney Fund A D M I N I S TRA TI O N AND FINANCE

J. T. Mullen Chief Financial Officer/Treasurer

D eanne M. Machen Adminstrative Secretary/ Grants Administrator Janet M. Carpenter Office Services Administrator Janice M. Cutright Information Systems Specialist Lynn M. Sargi Human Resources Administrator M artha A. Burchaski Receptionist Carl Curtis Staff Assistant/Records Cleri( Gloria J. Kish Senior Accountant Karen Hooi Jean A. Lang Kathy S. Parker Accountants Edna M. Deal Account Clerk,\ COMMUNICATIONS

Lynne E. W oodman Director o f Communications Dibri L. Beavers Communications Associate Alicia M. Ciliberto Administrative Assistant GRANTMAKERS FORUM

Dorothy E. Weiss Executive Director Dee Groynom Administrative Coordinator

ON LEAVE O F ABSENCE

Patricia Jansen Doyle

Senior Program Officer GENERAL COUNSEL

Malvin E. Bank Thompson, Hine & Floiy The staff list reflects the organization o f the Foundation as o f May 1, 1993.

THE D I S T R I B U T I O N COMMITTEE

Alfred M. Rankin Jr. Chairperson Annie Lewis J. Garda Vice Chairperson Rev. Elm o A. Bean James M. Delaney Doris A. Evans, M.D. Russell R. Gifford Jerry V. Jarrett Adrienne Lash Jones Lindsay Jordan M orgenthaler James V. Patton Charles A. Ratner T R U S T E E S COM MITTEE

Karen N . H orn Ban\ One, Cleveland, NA Richard L. Hargrove First National Bank 째 f Ohio George Brookes Huntington National Ban\ W illiam E. M acDonald III National City Ban^ Henry L. Meyer III Society National Ban\


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F O R MORE I N F O R M A T I O N

...a b o u t a p p ly in g fo r a g ra n t from T h e C lev elan d F o u n d a tio n

Write, call, or stop in for a free copy of

G uidelines for G rant Seekers

Contact Susan N. Lajoie, Associate Director, or the program officerfor the appropriate area

Editor

...a b o u t g iv in g to y o u r c o m m u n ity th ro u g h T h e C le v elan d F o u n d a tio n

Lynne E. Woodman

Write, call, or stop in for a free copy o f

Dibri L. Beavers

Contact Maijorie M. Carlson, Director o f Donor Relations

Alicia M. Ciliberto

G ift o f a Lifetime: G uide to Shaping Y our Legacy

Managing Editor

Associate Editor

Editorial Assistants

Ellen M. Ivory Diane C. Kaszei Mary Frances Knuth Jean A. Lang Symone R. McClain Celene E. Petkash Pierretta H. Wingfield

Design

Epstein, Gutzwiller, Schultz and Partners Inc. Principal Photography

Daniel Milner

Additional Photograp

Janet Centuiy Cleveland Opera Cleveland Public Schi Gateway Economic Development Corporation Grantmakers Forum The Holden Arboretu Shoes For Kids, Inc.

...a b o u t th e L ak e -G ea u g a F u n d of T h e C le v elan d F o u n d a tio n

Write, call, or stop in for afree brochure Contact Michael J. Hoffmann, Director o f Philanthropic Services O T H E R PU B L I C A T I O N S

Available without chargefrom the Office o f Communications A n n u a l R eports Q u a rte rly N e w slette rs K eeping the T rust

News and features about the Foundation and its grantees V entures in Philanthropy

A resourcefor current and prospective donors

The quotes appearing throughout this report are the w ords o f Cleveland's neighborhood people, talk about their com m unities and their hopes fo r the fu tu re.


T HE

C L E V E L A N D

F O U N D A T I O N

cP 1422 E uclid A venue, Suite 1400 C leveland, O hio 44115-2001 Phone: 216. 861. 3810 Fax: 216. 861. 1729


Cleveland Foundation – 1992 Annual Report