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T he Cleveland Foundation 9 the nation’s pioneer

com m unity tru st, h as since 1914 m ade a significant effort to improve and enhance the quality of life for all people of Greater Cleveland. 1 he Foundation provides a singular m eans through which citizens m ay donate m oney — in gifts large and sm all — to m eet everchanging needs in the general areas of civic affairs, social services, cultural affairs, health and education. Foundation grants, in support of both private and public services, are m ade prim arily to tax-exem pt private agencies, and in some cases to governm ental agencies. There are now 262 separate tru st funds in the Foundation plus Com bined Funds for the investm ent of sm aller gifts. Only the incom e from these funds is used in m ost grant m aking; thus, donations to The Cleveland Foundation represent everlasting philanthropy. The Foundation is governed by an 11-member D istribution Com­ m ittee com posed of com m unity leaders. Its m em bers are responsible for policy m aking and the allocation of fund income and principal. They are selected in a variety of w ays for their knowledge of the educational and charitable needs of the community. One m em ber of the D istribution Com mittee is appointed by each of the following: the chief judge of the United States District Court, N orthern D istrict of Ohio, E astern Division; the presiding judge of the Probate C ourt of Cuyahoga County; the m ayor of Cleveland; the president of the Federation for C om m unity Planning; and the chief justice of the C ourt of Appeals for the Eighth Appellate District of Ohio. These five public appointees also select a m em ber with knowledge of G reater Cleveland’s philanthropic community. Five additional m em bers are appointed by the Trustees Committee. Each m em ber is appointed for a five-year term and m ay serve a m axim um of ten years. Foundation assets are overseen by a Trustees Com mittee com ­ prised of the chief executive officers of the five trustee banks. In addition to appointing five m em bers of the D istribution Committee, the Trustees C om m ittee is also responsible for approval of formal affiliations of other tru s t com panies or financial institutions with The Cleveland Foundation, and the nam ing of a trustee bank for any gift for w hich a b an k has not been designated by a donor. The Foundation is m anaged by a professional staff recognized for its expertise in specific areas. The Cleveland Foundation has a cu rren t ruling of the Internal Revenue Service w hich classifies it as a public charity under section 509(a)(1) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 as am ended.

700 N a t i o n a l C i t y B a n k B u i l d i n g , C l e v e l a n d , O H 4 4 1 1 4 T e l e p h o n e (216) 8 6 1 - 3 8 1 0


Table of Contents The C hairm an’s L etter............................ The Director’s R eport.............................. 1981 Grant M aking.................................. Civic A ffairs......................................... Social S ervices..................................... Cultural Affairs..................................... H e a lth .................................................. Education.............................................. Special Philanthropic S ervices......... Thist Funds, Combined Funds and Supporting O rg an izatio n s................ Financial R e p o rt.................................... Giving to The Cleveland Foundation . . Distribution Committee, Trustees Committee and Staff...........

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3 4 5 6 16 26 36 46 56 57 63 67 69


T he Chairman’s Letter T h e C leveland F o u n d atio n c o n tin u e d to m a in ta in its le a d e rsh ip position a m o n g th e c o m m u n ity fo u n d a tio n s of th e n a tio n in 1981 — b o th in th e size a n d n a tu re of its s u p p o rt of th e c h a rita ­ ble n e ed s of th is area. D u rin g 1981 th e D istrib u tio n C om ­ m itte e a u th o riz e d reco rd fu n d in g for n o n p ro fit priv ate a n d g o v e rn m e n tal ag en cies. G ra n ts to taled $19.1 m illion — a d ra m a tic in crease of 42 p e rc e n t over th e a u th o riz a tio n s of $13.5 m illion a y e a r earlier. In a d d itio n , over $1 m il­ lion w as a u th o riz e d from o u r s u p p o rt­ in g o rg an izatio n s. T h e C leveland F o u n d atio n h a s e n ­ jo y e d a g ro w th in a ss e ts a n d sp en d a b le in co m e w hich h a s e n ab led g ra n t m a k ­ in g to k eep a h e a d of th e erosion in th e b u y in g p o w er of th e dollar. In th e last th re e y e ars, for ex am p le, o u r a u th o r i­ zatio n s h a v e grow n tw ice a s fast a s th e in flatio n rate. A u th o riz a tio n s are u p 85 p e rc e n t w hile th e c o n su m e r price in ­ d ex rose 39 p ercen t. T h is h a s o ccu rred b e ca u se g en ero u s d o n o rs h av e c o n tin u e d to leave m oney to T h e C leveland F o u ndation, m o st fre­ q u e n tly a t th e tim e of th e ir d e ath , to b en efit th e c o m m u n ity w hich w as good to th e m d u rin g th e ir lifetim e. T h e C leveland F o u n d atio n received $ 8 .8 m illion in new c o n trib u tio n s from d o n o rs d u rin g 1981. T h is in clu d ed five new tr u s t fu n d s, a d d itio n s to ex istin g tr u s t fu n d s a n d a n a d d itio n of n early $2 m illion to T h e S h erw ick Fund, a su p p o rtin g o rg a n iz atio n of th e F o u n ­ datio n . Total a ss e ts of T h e C leveland F o u n ­ d a tio n a n d o u r six s u p p o rtin g o rg a­ n iz a tio n s h a d a m a rk e t value of $ 2 2 3 ,7 1 3 ,287 a t y e a r end. T he a ss e ts of a s e v e n th s u p p o rtin g o rg an izatio n are h e ld jo in tly w ith th e J e w is h C o m m u ­ n ity F ed eratio n of C leveland. T he a s s e ts d eclin ed 4 p e rc e n t from th e y e ar before in k e ep in g w ith th e g en eral d e ­ cline in th e sto ck a n d bond m a rk e ts. T h is did not, how ever, affect o u r in ­ co m e w h ic h c o n tin u e d to rise. T h e C leveland F o u n d atio n is e s­ p ecially fo rtu n a te th a t so m a n y of o u r d o n o rs h a v e given th e D istrib u tio n C o m m itte e c o n sid erab le discretio n in s p e n d in g th e in co m e from th e ir funds. No o th e r c o m m u n ity fo u n d atio n h a s so m u c h m o n e y available to resp o n d to th e w id e -ra n g in g d e m a n d s of its u rb a n e n v iro n m e n t.

T h is m e a n s we hav e been able to re sp o n d to c h an g in g n eed s a n d to e n ­ co u rag e im ag in ativ e local initiatives. D uring th is period of risin g u n e m p lo y ­ m e n t an d sh iftin g g o v e rn m e n tal s u p ­ port, th e F o u n d atio n fu n d ed a n e n tre ­ p re n e u ria l a n d m an ag erially so u n d m e th o d of d istrib u tin g food to th e h u n ­ gry. We in itiated a p a ce settin g effort to cope w ith local econom ic developm ent, recognizing th a t th e a ttra c tio n a n d m a in te n a n c e of jo b s is as im p o rta n t to th e w ell-being of th is c o m m u n ity as an y ch aritab le activity. O ur su p p o rt of C leveland’s n eig h b o r­ hoods, a n d th e re s u lta n t s tre n g th of neig h b o rh o o d o rg an izatio n s, h a s led to C lev elan d ’s selection as a m ajo r site for w ork b y th e Local Initiatives S u p p o rt T h e F o u n d a tio n h a s C orporation (LISC), a decision w hich e n jo y e d a g r o w t h in h a s b ro u g h t $1 m illion in n atio n al fo u n ­ a s s e ts a n d s p e n d ­ datio n a n d co rporate fu n d in g into a b le in c o m e w h i c h C leveland. O ur su sta in e d effort to build a full ran g e of quality p erform ing a rts h a s e n a b le d g r a n t in stitu tio n s h a s stim u la te d th e e n ric h ­ m a k i n g to k e e p m e n t of local agencies by m ore th a n $8 a h e a d o f th e b u y in g m illion over th re e years. O ur activities p o w e r o f t h e d o lla r. in w orking w ith local g o v ern m en t, In th e la s t th r e e m o st especially in a ssistin g in th e re ­ y e a r s o u r a u th o r i­ covery of C leveland, are u n m a tc h e d z a tio n s h a v e g ro w n an y w h ere in th e country. tw ic e a s f a s t a s t h e O ur a n n u a l b o ard /staff re tre a t co n ­ i n f l a t i o n r a te . tin u e s to be a m ajo r fo rum for fran k d iscu ssio n of ideas a n d fo rm u latio n of policy. We are fo rtu n ate to draw u p o n a n able p rofessional staff, c o n su lta n ts of n atio n al sta tu re , a n d know ledgeable a n d dedicated m e m b e rs of th e D istri­ b u tio n C om m ittee w ho serve w ith o u t com p en satio n . F u rth erm o re, we do so in a lean fashion, o u r o p eratin g e x ­ p en ses re p re se n tin g only 6 p e rc e n t of o u r g ra n t m a k in g in 1981. I w ish to ex p ress m y h e artfe lt a p p re ­ ciation to th re e b o ard m e m b e rs w ho have co m pleted service on th e D is­ trib u tio n C o m m ittee sin ce m y la st a n n u a l letter. T h ey are R obert D. G ries, W illiam J. O’Neill, Sr. a n d T h o m a s W. M astin. We also w elcom e H arvey G. O p p m an n w ho jo in e d th e D istrib u tio n C om m ittee in th e fall of 1981 a n d H en ry J. G oodm an a n d Roy H. H oldt w ho b e ­ cam e m e m b e rs in th e sp rin g of 1982. We ap p reciate th e d iv ersity of e x p eri­ ence an d w isdom all b rin g to th e im p o rta n t w ork of th is fo u n d atio n .

S ta n le y C. Pace J u n e l, 1982 3


T h e D ir e c to r ’s R ep o rt

T h e th e m e so n g f o r th e p r e s e n t a n d f u t u r e is to a c h ie v e m o re w ith le s s . T h a t th e r e w ill be le ss g o v e r n m e n t m o n e y to w o r k w i t h is a p p a r e n t . T h i s m e a n s th e F o u n d a ­ t io n m u s t f o c u s a tte n tio n o n w a y s to im p r o v e s e r v i c e s b y tig h te n in g a g e n ­ c ie s ’ m a n a g e m e n t p r a c tic e s a n d e n ­ c o u r a g in g c o n ­ s o lid a tio n w h e r e fe a s ib le .

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T h is re p o rt of C lev elan d F o u n d a tio n activ ity d u rin g 1981 is m u c h m o re th a n a listin g of w o rth y p ro g ra m s s p o n ­ sored. It is r a th e r a n a s s e s s m e n t of w h a t th is fo u n d a tio n c o n sid e rs im p o r­ ta n t to th e fu tu re of G re ater C leveland. It is o u r effort to re sp o n d w ith in th e m e a n s av ailab le to c o m m u n ity c o n d i­ tio n s of c o n ce rn to all of o u r people. We sp o n so r eco n o m ic s tu d ie s a n d tak e ste p s to m o n ito r eco n o m ic a ctiv ity on a p e rm a n e n t b a sis b e c a u se th e a re a suffers from a recessio n a n d b e c a u se s tre n u o u s effort a n d reliab le in fo rm a ­ tion will be re q u ire d to resto re C lev elan d ’s p o sitio n in n a tio n a l a n d w orld m a rk e ts. We s u p p o rt jo b tra in in g a n d m a n y e d u ca tio n a l a ctiv itie s th a t seek to m a tc h jo b s a n d people. We aid local g o v e rn m e n t in its effort to im ­ prove co m m o n serv ices a n d to c atc h u p w ith a b acklog of d elay ed m a in te ­ n a n c e of public facilities o u t of know ledge th a t th e se are im p o rta n t factors in th e c o m p etitio n b etw een m e tro p o litan areas. We w o rk w ith a m u ltitu d e of n eig h b o rh o o d g ro u p s an d w ith a n a tio n al ag en cy in te re ste d in fostering local in itiativ es b e c a u se we know th a t p e rso n al in v o lv e m e n t is th e key to su ccessfu l re su lts. We aid c u l­ tu ra l p ro g ram s a n d en co u rag e s u p p o rt for o u r m a n y fine in s titu tio n s from n a ­ tional sources, in full know ledge th a t s u c h activities are e sse n tial to th e good life. T he C leveland a re a is deeply affected by th e c u tb a c k of g o v e rn m e n t g ra n ts in th e h u m a n service fields a s well a s in education. We k n o w th a t p riv ate giving a n d fo u ndatio n su p p o rt c a n n o t m ak e u p for th e re d u c tio n s in federal a n d sta te su p p o rt av ailab le for m a n y y e ars to b o th public a n d p riv ate ag en cies. We sh all do o u r b e st to be helpful w here need is m o st critical a n d w e sh all e n ­ courage o th e rs to jo in w ith u s in th is endeavor. It is o u r p re se n t ju d g m e n t th a t th e situ a tio n we deal w ith is n o t a te m p o ­ ra ry one, th a t fiscal c o n stra in t will be a p e rs iste n t fact for m a n y y e ars to com e. T h is sim ply m e a n s th a t we m u s t focus a tte n tio n on w ays to im prove services by tig h te n in g m a n a g e m e n t p ractices, b rin g in g co m p etitio n in to play w here possible to a ssu re q u ality p ro g ram s a t cost-effective prices, a n d e n co u rag in g co n solidation of ag en cies w h erev er th is

m ay be feasible. T h e th e m e so n g for th e p re s e n t a n d fu tu re is to ach ie v e m o re w ith less. T h a t th e re w ill be less g o v e rn m e n t m o n e y to w o rk w ith is a p p a re n t. M uch of th e c u rre n t rh e to ric c o n ­ c e rn s th e m e a n s to a ssig n re s p o n si­ bility for m a n y g o v e rn m e n ta l services to s ta te a n d local a g en c ie s of g o v ern ­ m e n t. Two facto rs of im p o rta n c e d e ­ serv e a tte n tio n h ere. T h e first is th e w e a k e n e d c o n d itio n of local a n d state g o v e rn m e n ta l fin a n c es in view of th e d e p re sse d s ta te of th e econom y. T h ere a re v ery few p laces in th is c o u n try w h ere new resp o n sib ilitie s can be a s ­ s u m e d b y local g o v e rn m e n t w ith o u t a d d e d ta x so u rces. T h e seco n d m a y b e of e q u al im por­ ta n ce , th is b ein g th e im p o rta n c e of d ism issin g “ politics a s u s u a l” if we are to g et a re a so n a b le re tu rn on ta x dol­ la rs in v ested in local services. It is h a rd ly a n ti-d e m o c ratic to su g g est th a t p a tro n a g e politics p ro d u ce sh o d d y re­ s u lts th a t do n o t ad d u p to w h a t is n e ed e d in a p erio d of scarce available fu n d s. T h e C leveland F o u n d atio n considers it a privilege to w ork cooperatively w ith th o se w ho c a rry h e a v y b u rd e n s in the a d m in is tra tio n of m a jo r activ ities in th is area. We sh all go o n b ein g as h elp ­ ful a s possible. T h a t b eg in s w ith liste n in g as carefu lly a s w e can to the p ro p o sals o th e rs b rin g to u s a n d devis­ in g th e m o st th o u g h tfu l a n d incisive re sp o n se s to c u rre n t n eed s. It is a p le asu re to ack n o w led g e our in d e b te d n e ss to Dr. G. B rooks E arn est, soon to retire after a long p erio d of parttim e service. F o rm erly p re s id e n t of Fenn College, E a rn e s t g u id ed th a t in s titu tio n ’s tra n s fo rm a tio n in to Cleve­ lan d S ta te U n iv ersity in 1965. In th a t year, F e n n ’s e n d o w m e n t c am e to th e F o u n d atio n , a n d its b o ard of tru s te e s b ecam e a v a lu ab le a d v iso ry co m m ittee w o rk in g w ith th e F o u n d atio n . E a rn e s t h a s b een th e a rc h ite c t of th e F en n E d u ­ c atio n al F u n d here, th e e a rn in g s of w hich hav e sp o n so re d m a in ly a w ide ran g e of w o rk -stu d y p ro g ra m s for a re a college a n d u n iv e rsity s tu d e n ts . We w ish h im well a n d th a n k h im for his c o m p an y a n d h is service.

((plut/x. C- Un^c^^ny\/f7\ H om er C. W adsw orth J u n e l, 1982


H e alth

$4 ,968,498

Social S erv ice

Civic A ffa irs

E d u ca tio n

2 6 .0 2 %

$4 ,718,367

$3,157,479

$ 2,760,933

C u ltu ra l A ffairs

24.71%

16.54%

14.46%

$2,198,612

S p ecial P h ila n th ro p ic *

11.52%

$1,289,172

6.75%

The Cleveland Foundation 1981 Grant Making Total Grants —$19,093,061

*A dm inistrative expenses in 1981 represented 5.98% of total grants authorized by The Cleveland Foundation.

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Civic Affairs W h en in M arch 1982 C leveland w on th e p re stig io u s A ll-A m erica City A w ard, sp o n so re d by th e N ational M unicipal L eague, for c itizen action, effective o rg a n iz atio n a n d c o m m u n ity im p ro v e m e n t, m o st C levelanders rig h tfu lly felt so m e p rid e in th e a c h ie v e m e n t. J u s t th re e y e a rs ago in th e se p ag es T h e C leveland F o u n d a ­ tio n ’s d ire c to r ch a ra c te riz e d th e sta te of civic d is a rra y th u s: “T h e re c a n be no p eace or h e a lth y c irc u m sta n c e s w h en a n a re a, g en erally p ro sp e ro u s a n d p o s­ se ssin g re so u rc e s of w orld rep u te, c o n ta in s a t th e sam e tim e a c e n tra l city th a t is ro ttin g a n d political in s titu tio n s in c ap a b le of re sp o n d in g to th e p ro b ­ le m s g e n e ra te d by su c h co n d itio n s!’ H as C leveland in fact “ tu rn e d a ro u n d ” sin ce th e n ? T h a t is for fu tu re g e n eratio n s, w ith far m ore p erspective, to d e term in e . B u t th e re is no d o u b t th a t a new sp irit of o p tim ism p erv ad es. A nd m o re im p o rta n t, it is clear th a t tan g ib le a c c o m p lis h m e n ts h av e b een m a d e in sev eral c ru c ial areas, leaving C leveland in a m u c h stro n g e r po sition to control its destiny. In reco g n izin g th e “ tra n sfo rm a tio n from fin an cial d efau lt a n d ch ao s in m u n ic ip a l g o v e rn m e n t (that) h a s ta k e n p la c e ” in C leveland, th e M unicipal L eag u e cited s u c h n o ta b le im p ro v e­ m e n ts a s city a n d citizen efforts in e n d in g d efault, b a la n c in g th e b u d g et, p a y in g off deficits, in sta llin g new fin a n ­ cial m a n a g e m e n t sy ste m s, re b u ild in g C le v ela n d ’s p h y sica l p la n t a n d h o u sin g sto ck , m a k in g g o v e rn m e n t m ore effi­ cien t, s tre a m lin in g C ity C ouncil an d e x te n d in g th e te rm s of m a y o r a n d co u n cil from tw o to four y e ars, an d re n o v a tin g th e la n d m a rk P lay h o u se S q u a re th e a te rs. M ost o f th e se efforts h av e been fu n d e d b y T h e C leveland F oundation. In d eed , F o u n d a tio n in v o lv em en t in s u c h co m p lex a n d pro b lem atic a re a s a s

th e c ity ’s au d ita b ility an d th e d e terio ra ­ tio n of its p h y sical p la n t b eg an in the m id-1970s — as in itiativ es directed by th e D istrib u tio n C om m ittee — d u rin g a period w h en som e of C lev elan d ’s m o st p ressin g p ro b lem s w ere scarcely a c ­ know ledged by public secto r officials. In its 1981 civic affairs ag en d a, the F ou n d atio n c o n tin u e d to play a lead er­ sh ip role in defining, a n d ta k in g step s to ad d ress, th e n eed s of th e city. Major c h allen g es re m a in here, aw ard s n o t­ w ith sta n d in g : a recessed local econom y, h ig h u n e m p lo y m e n t, u n ­ stab le core n eig h b o rh o o d s, a n d u n a c ­ cep tab le police resp o n se tim e are all p ro b lem s d e m an d in g a n sw e rs of m e rit an d su b sta n c e . S everal re c e n t F o u n d a ­ tion-funded p ro jects aim ed a t th ese a n d o th e r a re as of co n cern are d o cu ­ m e n te d below.

R a n d F i n d s a “D y n a m i c ” C levela n d E c o n o m y “ O ur a n aly sis clearly confirm s th a t vario u s p ro b lem s em erg ed in Cleve­ la n d ’s m a n u fa c tu rin g secto r in th e 1970s (including) large losses of e m ­ p lo y m en t in a n u m b e r of C lev elan d ’s h isto rically im p o rta n t in d u strie s (and) new cap ital in v e stm e n t p ro p o rtio n ­ ately far below th e n atio n al average. N evertheless, looking below th e s u r­ face w e have found s u b sta n tia l div ersity in th e p erfo rm an ce of local m a n u fa c tu re rs. . . . T h ere is n o th in g here to su g g est th a t pervasive decline is th e m o st likely outcom e. A broad a rra y of s tre n g th s h a s b een u n co v ered th a t gives c o m m u n ity lead ers so m e­ th in g to w ork w ith !’ So co n clu d ed th e R an d C orporation in its 271-page b aselin e s tu d y of th e C leveland m etro p o litan econom y, co m ­ m issio n ed by T he C leveland F o u n d a ­ tion. T he study, available in full or ab rid g ed form , w as p u b lish e d in early 1982 after 18 m o n th s of w ork by R and, th e e m in e n t not-for-profit ap p lied re ­ sea rc h o rg an izatio n b ased in S a n ta M onica, California. A spects of R a n d ’s look “ below th e su rfa c e ” su rp rise d so m e o b serv ers of th e local econom ic scen e a n d sh a tte re d several m y th s. For in sta n ce , d esp ite form idable co m p etitio n in re c e n t y ears from th e S u n b e lt s ta te s of th e S o u th

H a s C le v e la n d in f a c t “t u r n e d a r o u n d ”? T h a t is fo r fu tu r e g en era ­ t io n s to d e te r m i n e . B u t t a n g ib l e a c c o m ­ p lis h m e n ts h a v e b e en m a d e w h ic h le a v e t h e c i t y in a m u c h s tr o n g e r p o s i­ t io n to c o n tr o l i t s d e s t in y .

C le v e la n d 's d iv e r ­ s i t y in m a n u f a c ­ tu r in g c o n tr a d ic ts p i n - o n l a b e ls s t e r e o ­ ty p in g th e c ity a s a n a u to to w n o r a m i l l to w n .

C le v e la n d M a c h in is t a t W ork: m anufac­

turing, averred Rand, continues to be the best hope fo r the area's economy. 7


E n erg y C o n se r v a tio n Program : saving low-

income hom eowners 30-40 percent in heat consum ption.

A s p e c t s o f R a n d ’s lo o k “b e lo w t h e s u r ­ fa c e ” s u r p r is e d so m e o b servers o f t h e lo c a l e c o n o m ic sc en e a n d s h a tte r e d severa l m y th s .

8

a n d S o u th w e st, R an d m a in ta in e d th a t C le v ela n d ’s lo catio n a t th e c e n te r of th e G re at L ak es in d u s tria l reg io n is still a p lu s factor. A nd d esp ite reg io n al eco n o m ic ills, R an d fo u n d th e C lev elan d m e tro ­ p o lita n e co n o m y to be a “ m a tu re b u t still q u ite d y n a m ic eco n o m ic s y s te m ” w h o se d iv e rsity — p ro d u c in g “ so m e of a lm o s t e v e ry th in g ” — c o n tra d ic ts pinon lab els s te re o ty p in g th e city a s a n a u to to w n o r a m ill to w n . T h a t m e a n s th a t u n lik e D etroit, for ex am p le, C leve­ la n d is n o t largely d e p e n d e n t o n th e h e a lth of a n y o ne sector. Moreover, C le v ela n d ’s m u c h -p u b ­ licized g ro w th in n o n m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u strie s, esp ecially th e serv ice se c ­ tor, w as a d d re sse d b y R an d a s a com plex tre n d — o ne th a t h a s p e rh a p s been m isin te rp re te d a s th e local e c o n ­ o m y ’s p a n ac e a. R an d a ck n o w led g ed th a t service in d u s trie s h a v e b eco m e in creasin g ly im p o rta n t to th e c ity ’s econom ic fu tu re, b u t n o ted th a t C leve­ la n d ’s m o st su cc e ssfu l n o n m a n u fa c ­ tu rin g in d u strie s, s u c h a s tru c k in g a n d w areh o u sin g , are closely tied w ith m a n u fa c tu rin g in d u s trie s — a n d th a t “ th e b u lk of C lev elan d ’s e x p o rts still co n sists of d u ra b le m a n u fa c tu re d goods!’ T h u s m a n u fa c tu rin g , a v erred R and, c o n tin u e s to be th e b e st hope for th e C leveland area. A nd in a c o m p re h e n ­ sive look a t th e m a n u fa c tu rin g sector, w hich R and broke dow n in to 8 4 c o m ­ p o n e n ts, th e s tu d y u n c o v ered a signifi­ c a n t n u m b e r m a k in g p ro d u ctiv e a d a p ­ ta tio n s to c h a n g e s in th e econom y. C leveland m a y be a n ag in g in d u stria l city, b u t a s R and h a s d e m o n strated , it is still resilien t an d kicking. R a n d ’s study, fu n d ed w ith a 1980 C leveland F o u n d atio n g ra n t of $166,392, provided a re m a rk a b ly co­ h e re n t persp ectiv e on recen t, often perplexing, econom ic tre n d s. From th e beginning, how ever, th e F o u n d atio n view ed th e w o rk a s m erely th e p ro ­ logue to a m ore ch allen g in g a ssig n m e n t. A rm ed w ith th e c o m ­ pleted b aselin e s tu d y a n d th e c o m p u terized d a ta b a n k u sed to a s ­ sem b le it, R an d is now en g ag ed — su p p o rte d by a 1981 F o u n d atio n g ra n t of $ 4 0 7 ,3 4 0 — in d esig n in g a p e rm a ­ n e n t m o n ito rin g cap ab ility for u se by all se g m e n ts of th e G reater C leveland com m unity.

W h at is p ro p o sed h e re is a lo n g -term p ro cess — e v e n tu a lly to be ta k e n over by a local in s titu tio n — a im e d a t c re a t­ in g a n im p ro v ed u n d e rs ta n d in g of c h a n g in g eco n o m ic c o n d itio n s. It is a p ro cess w h ich w ill involve c o n tin u a l u p d a tin g a n d a n a ly s is of reg io n al d a ta a n d econom ic tre n d s , a n d w h ich will k eep close tra c k of n a tio n a l econom ic forces a n d th e ir p o te n tia l im p a c t on C leveland. A nd in w h a t is b elieved to be th e first effort of its k in d in th e n atio n , R and will s e t in m o tio n a p la n to a s s is t co m ­ m u n ity le ad e rs in u sin g th e m o n ito rin g c a p a b ility to m a k e in fo rm ed choices affectin g eco n o m ic d ev elo p m en t — ch o ices re g a rd in g policies a n d p ro ­ g ra m s w ith th e p o te n tia l to e n h an c e th e local econom y. P ossible u s e rs of th e m o n ito rin g re ­ so u rc e s in clu d e g o v e rn m e n t en tities re sp o n sib le for e conom ic d ev elo p m en t policy, e d u c a to rs, co rp o ratio n s, asso ­ c iatio n s of sm all b u sin e sse s, both p u b lic a n d p riv ate not-for-profit ag en ­ cies, lo b b y ists, g o v e rn m e n ta l b u d g e t­ in g offices a n d re se a rc h e rs. T h e m o n ito rin g u n it will be equipped to a n aly z e a ra n g e of q u e stio n s from th e se a n d o th e r u se rs. Are th ere, for e x am p le, a n y m a jo r sh o rta g e s of n eed ed o c c u p a tio n a l skill categories in C leveland? W h at c h a n g e s in th e voca­ tio n al e d u c a tio n c u rric u lu m in local p u b lic sch o o ls a n d c o m m u n ity colleges w ould m o s t h elp local econom ic devel­ o p m e n t? W h a t co m b in a tio n of new jo b s, affirm ativ e a ctio n a n d tra in in g policies w o u ld b e s t re d u c e th e ra te of u n e m p lo y m e n t in C lev elan d ’s m inority c o m m u n ity ? W h at p ro b lem s face sm all m a n u fa c tu rin g firm s in C leveland and w h a t c o m m u n ity a ctio n s m ig h t allevi­ ate th o se p ro b le m s? A dm ittedly, C leveland fu n c tio n s as p a rt of a n a tio n a l a n d w orld econom y, a n d m a n y of th e c ity ’s p ro b le m s c a n n o t be solved by local actio n . N evertheless, th e R and p o rtra it of eco n o m ic realities h ere h a s rev ealed a n u m b e r of h id d e n stre n g th s. W ith p ro p e r ex p lo itatio n , th e se could offer c o m m u n ity lead ers a n im p o rta n t edge in a fiercely c o m ­ p etitiv e n a tio n a l a re n a; a s R and observes, th e s tre n g th s provide th e c o m m u n ity w ith “ so m e th in g to w ork w ith !’ In th is period of e m e rg in g p u b ­ lic/private p a rtn e rs h ip s in C leveland, th e tim in g is rig h t to develop th e so u n d econom ic tools th a t p o in t n o t o nly to


difficulties, b u t also to o p p o rtu n itie s to be seized. W ith s u c h tools in h a n d , th e c o m m u n ity will h av e ta k e n th e first ste p to w ard w ise a n d p ro d u ctiv e policy m a k in g for th e 1980s.

L IS C C o m e s t o t h e C i t y ' s N e ig h b o rh o o d s S in ce th e early 1970s, T h e C leveland F o u n d a tio n h a s h eld th a t a C leveland re n a iss a n c e p re su p p o se s th e v itality of its n e ig h b o rh o o d s. T h e core city an d close-in s u b u rb s m u s t be places w here people c a n live com fortably, a t p rices th e y c a n afford, safe on th e stre e ts an d in th e ir h o m es. To th a t end, th e F o u n d atio n h a s su p p o rte d th e th o u g h tfu l a n d widera n g in g efforts of n e arly 25 h o u sin g a n d n e ig h b o rh o o d d ev elo p m en t o rg a ­ n iz a tio n s sp re a d th ro u g h o u t th e city — o rg a n iz a tio n s w h o se activ ities m ay in ­ c lu d e re h a b ilita tin g a n d m a n a g in g so u n d b u t ag in g h o u sin g stock, re ­ v italizin g c o m m e rcial strip s, w orking on n eig h b o rh o o d b e au tificatio n an d safety, p re ssin g for federal re n t s u b ­ sid ies a n d fair h o u sin g , ru n n in g day care c e n te rs a n d a d u lt e d u ca tio n p ro ­ g ra m s, a n d in g en eral p ro m o tin g th e ir n e ig h b o rh o o d s’ in te re sts a t city hall a n d w ith th e b u s in e s s com m unity. B u t su cc e ssfu l a s m a n y of th ese a g en c ie s h a v e b eco m e in m eetin g th e ir ow n c h a lle n g e s a n d , consequently, h e lp in g to reen erg ize th e ag in g in d u s ­ tria l city th e y in h a b it, m a n y of th e m c a m e to view 1981 a s a cro ssro a d s year. T h o u g h a n u m b e r h a d g ained en o u g h e x p erien c e to m ove on to m ore s u b ­ s ta n tia l d e v e lo p m e n t projects, th ey lack ed th e n e c e ssa ry m a n a g e m e n t e x p ertise . Moreover, severe federal c u t­ b a c k s in fu n d s for econom ic a n d c o m m u n ity d e v elo p m en t th re a te n e d th e v e ry e x isten c e of all b u t th e s tro n g ­ e st o rg a n iz atio n s. E n te r th e Local In itiativ es S u p p o rt C o rp o ratio n (LISC), a n a tio n a l n o n ­ profit le n d in g a n d g ra n t-m a k in g in s titu tio n th a t a ss is ts ex p erien ced c o m m u n ity d e v elo p m en t g ro u p s in a c c o m p lish in g th e ir difficult m issions. L a u n c h e d jo in tly in 1980 w ith $4.75 m illio n from T h e Ford F o u n d atio n an d sizab le c o n trib u tio n s from six m ajo r p riv ate, in d u s tria l a n d b a n k in g firm s, LISC d u rin g its first y e a r tack led pro j­ e c ts in th e S o u th B ronx, S a n F rancisco, M in n eap o lis a n d N ew ark, am o n g o th e r cities. T h e C leveland F o u n d atio n in 1981 g ra n te d $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 over tw o y e a rs to

LISC to e sta b lish a C leveland p ro g ram — m a k in g th e city one of LISC’s 13 “a re a s of c o n c e n tra tio n ” — a n d in so doing sp ea rh e a d e d n early $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 in ad d itio n al pledges from local fo u n d a ­ tio n s an d m ore th a n ten co rp o ratio n s. G iven LISC’s policy of m a tc h in g the locally raised funds, a lm o st $2 m illion h a s becom e available h ere for co m m u ­ n ity a n d n eig h b o rh o o d projects. M ost LISC lo an s an d g ra n ts are m o d ­ est, a n d c a n n o t begin to a d d re ss the v a c u u m created by federal c u tb a c k s — b u t th e process is s tru c tu re d so as to provide a m u ch -n eed ed lever capable of p ry in g loose su b sta n tia lly larger c o m m itm e n ts from o th e r sources. T h e key to u n d e rs ta n d in g LISC is to b re a k a p a rt th e acro n y m : offering s u p ­ p o r t to local in itia tiv e s m e a n s exactly th a t. LISC w ould be pow erless w ith o u t th e p articip atio n — even m ore, th e p a rtn e rs h ip — of th e private sector. To th a t ex ten t, th e co n cep t p u ts th e p rin ­ ciples an d goals of W ash in g to n ’s New Federalism to th e test. LISC’s C leveland p ro g ram is u n d e r way, staffed by tw o p ro g ram officers w ho rep o rt to th e M an h a tta n h e a d q u a r­ ters b u t keep close ta b s on n eig h b o r­ hood a n d c o m m u n ity d ev elo p m en t a c ­ tivity here. A lthough all decisions on loans, g ra n ts an d tech n ical a ssista n c e are m ad e b y th e n a tio n al b o ard follow­ ing re c o m m en d a tio n s of th e p ro g ram staff, LISC co n su lts w ith a C leveland A dvisory C om m ittee, co m posed of re p ­ re sen ta tiv e s from c o rp o ratio n s an d fou n d atio n s — in clu d in g T h e C leve­ land F oundation — s u p p o rtin g th e local program . In its first d isb u rs e m e n ts in clu d in g locally raised funds, LISC /C leveland of­ fered several c lu es to its ph ilo so p h y a n d priorities. Of $ 2 7 5 ,0 0 0 released to four local o rg an izatio n s, $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 w as m ad e in th e form of lo an s — n o t g ra n ts. As a LISC p ro g ram officer observes, “We w a n t to e m p h asiz e p ro jects th a t g en erate incom e a n d safeg u ard th e real a sse ts of th e sp o n so rin g o rg an izatio n s. T h a t u ltim a te ly h elp s to m ak e th e g ro u p s less d e p e n d e n t on federal fu n d s a n d p h ila n th ro p y !’ T he la rg e st loan allo cated th u s far — $ 2 0 0 ,0 0 0 to th e C leveland H ousing N etw ork — u n d e rlin e s th e so rt of cre­ ative fin an cin g LISC h o p es to foster

I n w h a t is b e li e v e d to b e t h e f i r s t e f f o r t o f i t s k i n d in t h e n a ­ tio n , R a n d w i l l s e t in m o t i o n a p i a n to a s s is t c o m m u n ity l e a d e r s in u s i n g t h e n e w e c o n o m ic m o n ­ i t o r i n g c a p a b il i ty .

T h e L ocal In itia ­ tiv e s S u p p o r t C o r p o r a tio n (L ISC ) w i ll a s s i s t C le v e ­ l a n d ’s e x p e r i e n c e d c o m m u n ity d e v e l­ o p m e n t g r o u p s in a c c o m p lis h in g th e ir d iffic u lt m i s s io n s .

9


L IS C p r o v id e s a m u c h -n e e d e d le v e r c a p a b le o f p r y i n g lo o s e s u b s t a n t i a l l y la r g e r c o m m it­ m e n ts f r o m o th e r so u rces.

h ere. T h e m o n e y is to h elp c reate a “b le n d e d ra te lo an p o o l” of a p p ro x ­ im a te ly $ 8 5 0 ,0 0 0 ; th e N e tw o rk ’s six h o u sin g o rg a n iz a tio n s w ill u se th e pool for p u rc h a se , re h a b ilita tio n a n d resale of 40 to 70 h o m e s in th e n e ig h b o rh o o d s of H ough, T rem o n t, S t. C lair-S uperior, G lenville, B ro ad w ay a n d th e N ear W est Side. T h e $ 8 5 0 ,0 0 0 p a ck ag e, a sse m b le d by “ b le n d in g ” v a rio u s ra te s of in te re st from sev eral so u rc e s (at 7 p e rc e n t from LISC, 0 p e rc e n t from th e c ity ’s D e p a rt­ m e n t of C o m m u n ity D ev elo p m en t, a n d a clo se-to -m ark et ra te from a local bank), is a m o re so p h istic a te d fin a n c ­ ing a rra n g e m e n t th a n th o se u su a lly em ployed by a re a o rg a n iz atio n s. Its a d ­ v a n ta g e is clear: faced w ith a sc a rc ity of affordable m oney, th e o rg a n iz atio n can u se “ b le n d in g ” to ach iev e a low er av erag e in te re st rate. T h e b o tto m line — th e C leveland H o u sin g N etw o rk ’s o rg a n iz atio n s will be e q u ip p e d to offer lo an s to low -incom e h o m e b u y e rs a t as little a s 5 p e rc e n t p er year. LISC in v o lv e m e n t in C leveland re p ­ re s e n ts a s u b sta n tiv e b lu e p rin t for u rb a n rev italizatio n . It is also th e g ra ti­ fying n e x t ste p for a n u m b e r of ag en cies w hich , w ith C leveland F o u n ­ d atio n a ssista n c e , h av e alre ad y m a d e a la stin g im p a c t on C lev elan d ’s h e a r t­ lan d — its neig h b o rh o o d s.

L e a k y R oofs, G as B ills a n d a C o m m u n ity C e n te r

44T h e k i d s w h o u s e d to b e o u t s i d e b r e a k ­ in g o u r w i n d o w s r e p o r ts a s t a f f m e m b e r a t C u d e ll I m p r o v e m e n t, “a r e n o w i n s i d e e n r o lle d in o u r p r o g r a m s ! ’

10

If LISC’s new p resen ce h ere re p re ­ sen te d T he C leveland F o u n d atio n 's la rg e st m o n e ta ry in v e stm e n t on th e neig h b o rh o o d a n d c o m m u n ity devel­ o p m e n t fro n t in 1981, th e F o u n d atio n n o n e th e le ss b e g an or c o n tin u e d s u p ­ p o rt for 12 neig h b o rh o o d o rg an izatio n s w ith m a n y n eed s a n d co n stitu en c ie s. T h ree cases illu stra te th e d iv ersity of p ro g ram activity. ■ T he nine-year-old L u th e ra n H ousing C orporation u sed a seco n d -y ear F o u n ­ d ation g ra n t of $ 2 5 ,0 0 0 to c o n tin u e its hom e m a in te n a n c e a n d re p a ir p ro g ram for elderly h o m e o w n ers in E a st C leve­ land a n d G lenville. A n atio n al d e m o n stra tio n p roject u n d e rta k e n by th e U. S. D e p a rtm e n t of H ousing a n d U rban D evelopm ent, th e p ro g ram th u s far h a s served 140 low -incom e h o m e ­ ow ners aged 62 a n d over w ho can no

lo n g er keep u p w ith th e le ak y roofs, tro u b leso m e p lu m b in g a n d c ra c k in g p la ste r of th e ir d e te rio ra tin g h o m e s. T h e staff of tw o h a n d y m e n a n d a re p a ir su p e rv iso r in itia lly e n co u n te re d a p p re h e n sio n a n d d is tru s t a m o n g elderly people w h o h a d b e e n fleeced once too often by u n s c ru p u lo u s co n ­ tra c to rs. B u t over th e e n su in g m o n th s, th e p ro g ram a n d its p ra c titio n e rs have b eco m e w elcom e fix tu re s in th e n e ig h b o rh o o d s. ■ T h e N eig h b o rho o d D evelopm ent C en ter of C leveland S ta te U n iv ersity ’s College of U rb a n A ffairs h a s b eg u n a th re e -y e a r p ro ject to p ro te c t h u n d re d s of w ood fram e h o u se s from th e ravages of C le v ela n d ’s cold w e a th e r — an d save h o m e o w n e rs th o u s a n d s of dollars in en erg y bills. T h e new en erg y c o n serv atio n p ro ­ g ra m , w h ich serv es five C leveland n e ig h b o rh o o d s, is in g en io u sly p ack ­ aged. P a rtic ip a tin g low -incom e h o m e o w n e rs are receiv in g “ energy a u ­ d its” w h ich id en tify tro u b le sp o ts c a u s in g h e a t loss. T h e h o m eo w n ers m a y th e n ta k e o u t lo an s a t 3 p ercen t in te re st to c o n tra c t for n e ce ssa ry w e ath e riz a tio n — a n affordable rate m a d e p o ssib le b y c re a tin g a loan pool from Ford F o u n d a tio n m o n ey (at 0 per­ c e n t in terest) a n d a local b a n k (at 1 p e rc e n t below p rim e ra te interest). A m ong th e w e ath e riz a tio n ta ctics to be em p lo y ed are w e a th e rs trip p in g and c au lk in g (w ith m a te ria ls a n d in s tru c ­ tion provided b y th e c ity ’s C o n su m er Affairs D e p a rtm e n t in no-cost or lowc o st k its a n d w orkshops), a ttic a n d wall in su la tio n a n d fu rn a c e in sp ectio n . T h e p ro g ram , p a rtia lly s u p p o rte d by T h e C leveland F o u n d atio n , sh o u ld be fully o p eratio n al in tim e for th e 1982 w inter. It a im s a t sav in g h o m eo w n ers 30-40 p e rc e n t in en erg y c o n su m p tio n . ■ In th e w est side n e ig h b o rh o o d served by th e F o u n d atio n -fu n d ed C udell Im p ro v em e n t, Inc., a n a b a n ­ do ned C leveland school th a t h a d becom e a serio u s n e ig h b o rh o o d lia­ bility h a s b e en tra n sfo rm e d in to a c o m m u n ity c e n te r te e m in g w ith activity. C losed by th e C leveland B oard of E d u catio n in 1978, a n d so o n defaced a n d d a m ag e d by te en a g e v a n d als, th e F ru itla n d E le m e n ta ry School h a s b een ta k e n over by C udell, w h ic h h a s in ­ vested in cap ital im p ro v e m e n ts a n d is


m a k in g a r r a n g e m e n ts to p u r c h a s e th e tw o -b u ild in g c o m p le x . N ow a m u ltip u r p o s e cen ter, th e fa c il­ ity h a s p r o v id e d C u d e ll w ith a p e r m a n e n t h o m e for its a d m in is tr a tiv e o ffic e s a n d a llo w e d for th e e x p a n s io n of s u c h p o p u la r p r o g r a m s a s w o m e n ’s p h y s ic a l fitn e s s , s e m in a r s o n c rim e p r e v e n tio n , tu to r in g a n d a s u m m e r p ro g ra m for c h ild r e n .

W ith one b u ild in g 100 p e rc e n t oc­ c u p ied a n d in u se m ore th a n 68 h o u rs p er w eek — a n d p la n s afoot to utilize th e sec o n d b u ild in g by late 1982 — C udell is c learly s tre n g th e n in g its s e rv ­ ices to th e c o m m u n ity . It is also g a lv an izin g s u p p o rt from th e le ast likely p laces. “T h e k ids w ho u se d to be o u tsid e b re a k in g w in d o w s!’ rep o rted a staff m em b er, “ are now in side enrolled in o u r p ro g ra m s ;’

C o m p u te r s to Im p ro v e P o lic e R e s p o n s e T im e A t a police d e p a rtm e n t, issu e s of public safety are tim e d in sec o n d s — a n d at th e C lev eland Police D e p artm en t, w h e re a s m a n y a s 3 ,0 0 0 calls for help are receiv ed e ac h day, too m a n y sec­ o n d s are b e in g lost. In 1980 th e m a y o r’s O perations Im ­ p ro v e m e n t T ask Force describ ed a police d is p a tc h sy ste m o u tm o d e d in all w ays: “ O p e rato rs reco rd all calls (from th e public) m anually, refer to cross ref­ e re n ce files a n d m a p s for location I.D. (of av ailab le p atro l cars), tra n s m it info on in c id e n t by sh o u tin g , conveyor b elts, bells, fla sh in g lig h ts a n d Morsecoded ta p es. D isp atc h e rs keep m a n u a l a n d m e n ta l co n tro l over available u n its a n d a s s ig n m e n ts in progress. “T h e p ro c e ss!’ co n clu d ed th e Task Force, “ is tim e -c o n su m in g , inefficient a n d , a t tim e s of p e ak d e m a n d , difficult to m a n a g e !’ As th e police d e p a rtm e n t a d m itte d , th e sy ste m ra n th ro u g h “ an a m a lg a m a tio n of h a rd w ork, m a n u a l o p e ra tio n , b ailin g w ire a n d lu ck !’ In R e c o m m e n d a tio n 194, th e O pera­ tio n s Im p ro v e m e n t T ask Force stro n g ly u rg ed , “ Im p le m e n t a n in teg rated police in fo rm a tio n s y ste m !’ In 1981 T h e C lev eland F o u n d atio n g ra n te d $310,000 ov er th re e y e a rs to th e C ity of C lev elan d, D ivision of Police to su p p o rt th is lo n g -overdue effort. T h e g ra n t b u ild s on a long-term F o u n d a tio n in v o lv e m e n t in police d e ­ p a rtm e n t im p ro v e m e n t, in c lu d in g the 1980 fu n d in g of m a n a g e m e n t sy ste m s w h ic h re d u c e d from 9 0 to 30 th e p e r­

W om en’s F itn e s s C la ss a t C udell: transforming an abandoned Cleve­

land school into a com m unity center teem ing with activity.

cen tag e of tim es w h en no police cars are available to a n sw e r th e calls of victim s. T h e new in fo rm atio n sy stem will tak e a d v an ta g e of state-of-the-art co m ­ p u te r technology n o t only to im prove police resp o n se tim e, b u t to e n su re m ore effective allocation of m en an d m aterials, c u t dow n on p aperw ork, an d su p p ly a d a ta b a n k allow ing for faster a n d m ore a cc u ra te investigations. T h ese are crucial issu es in a city w hose violent crim e ju m p e d 8.4 p e rc en t in 1981. In teg rated w ith a c en tral, “ m a in fra m e ” c o m p u te r alread y ow ned by th e city, th e new c o m p u te r h a rd w are will provide w h a t is k n o w n a s a n “ o n -lin e” cap ab ility — th a t is, a d a ta b a n k th a t can be u p d a ted c o n sta n tly w ith new, valuable inform ation. T he sy stem , to be com pletely o p e ra ­ tional by 1985, will be in stalled in several p h ases. C u rre n tly th e d e p a rt­ m e n t is a t w ork on a c o m p reh en siv e geographic b ase file — a com putersto red file listin g all s tre e t ad d re sse s w ith in city lim its. It will provide a rap id identification of each a d d re ss’ patrol zone, c e n su s tra c t an d h isto ry of d istu rb a n ce s. C rim e a n d in c id e n t re p o rtin g p ro ­ ced u res will be im p ro v ed w h en th e police on-line re p o rtin g c o m p o n e n t b e ­ co m es o p eratio n al in fall 1982. D escrip tio n s of all in c id e n ts will be e n ­ tered into th e sy ste m a t once, p roviding

A p o lic e o f f i c e r p r e ­ d ic ts th a t th e n e w in te g r a te d in fo r m a ­ tio n s y s t e m , w i t h i t s s ta t e - o f - th e - a r t c o m p u t e r te c h n o l ­ o g y , "is g o in g to sh o w u s w h a t th e h e ll's g o in g o n in t h i s to w n .”

11


im m e d ia te a c c e ss to specific in fo rm a ­ tio n a n d g e n eral c rim e tre n d s th a t now a re often u n a v a ila b le for m o n th s . C o m p u te r-a ssiste d d is p a tc h is p ro j­ e cted for 1984, a n d so o n th e re a fte r a n on-line b o o k in g c a p a c ity will b e w o rk ­ ing to aid police in c o llectin g a n d d is se m in a tin g in fo rm a tio n on s u s p e c ts a n d a rre ste d p e rso n s — a g re a tly im ­ proved m e th o d , a s a police officer p u ts it, to ask , “ W h at do w e k n o w a b o u t th is guy?” T h e new s y ste m m a y a c tu a lly p re ­ v e n t so m e crim e s. “ It’s go in g to sh o w u s w h a t th e h e ll’s go in g o n in th is to w n !’ sa y s th e officer. “ It will sp o t crim e tre n d s a s th e y develop, m a k in g it possible for u s to s e t u p sp ecial s u r­ veillance u n its in d e sig n a te d a re a s — to p u t so m eb o d y in a n a re a before tro u b le o c c u rs;’ W hile th e In te g ra te d S afety S y ste m does n o t p ro m ise th e final a n sw e r to th e problem of in c re a se d crim e h ere, it does offer a n im p o rta n t b a tte ry of infor­ m atio n a n d c o m m u n ic a tio n s tools to p u s h th e C leveland Police D e p a rtm e n t into th e 1980s. “ My hope,” sa y s a n officer, “ is th a t th e s y ste m will help renew public co n fid en ce in o u r w o rk ;’

N e g le c te d E u clid B e a c h N ow — an d A s ODNR E n v is io n s It: developing for the people a m agnificent tract of land ju s t eight m iles east of Public Square.

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E u c lid B e a c h L a n d Is R e t u r n e d to t h e P e o p l e For 74 y ears, E uclid B each P a rk b ro u g h t C lev elan d ers to g eth er. Its re l­ ish ed p o p co rn balls, “ T h rille r” roller coaster, c a n d y k isses, big b a n d s, frozen c u s ta rd a n d caro u se l c a n still evoke m e m o rie s of th rills, chills, frien d sh ip s, cool lake b re e ze s a n d , for th o se w ho w ere lucky, s u m m e rtim e love. Now, 13 y e a rs a fte r th e closing of th e c o m m e rcial p a rk — b y 1969 a victim of a d eclin in g city p o p u la tio n — a portion of th is m a g n ific e n t tra c t of lan d ju s t e ig h t m iles e a s t of P ublic S q u a re is to be reco v ered for th e people. In 1981, $ 6 7 3 ,8 3 0 from th e S ta te of O h io ’s s h a re of th e F ederal L an d an d W ater C o n se rv a tio n F und, a $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 le a d e rsh ip g ra n t from T h e C leveland F o u n d atio n , a n d a d d itio n a l su p p o rt from th e local p riv a te /c o rp o ra te sectors e n a b le d th e C ity of C leveland to p u r­ c h a se 16 a c re s of th e la n d in clu d in g 6 7 3 feet of b e a c h from its ow ner. An e a s e m e n t a g re e m e n t pro v id es a d d i­ tio n al b e ac h fro n tag e alo n g Lake Erie. T h e C ity of C leveland will lease the land, w h ich re p re se n ts th e la st u n ­ developed p arcel of L ake Erie shoreline w ith in city lim its, to th e Ohio D ep art­ m e n t of N a tu ra l R eso u rces. ODNR will resto re a n d develop th e acreag e as p a rt of th e su ccessfu l, C leveland Foundatio n -fu n d ed C leveland L ak efro n t State P a rk s y ste m th a t a lre ad y in clu d es Edgew ater, G ordon a n d W ildw ood p a rk s (the la tte r a d ja c e n t to th e Euclid B each tract). ODNR officials p la n to develop th e lan d a s a “ p assiv e re c re a tio n ” park, su ita b le for sw im m in g , strolling, fish­ in g a n d b ird w a tch in g , a m o n g o th er activ ities. C o n scio u s of th e la n d 's h is ­ toric im p o rtan c e , ODNR in te n d s to p a tte rn its la n d sc a p in g efforts on th e old p a rk ’s fondly re m e m b e re d im ages, re p licatin g w h e re v e r p ossible th e origi­ n al tre e -p la n tin g sch e m e , for exam ple. Possible re sto ra tio n w o rk in c lu d e s th e fish in g pier, fo u n ta in a n d e n tra n c e arch . A b u ild in g to h o u se E uclid B each m e m o ra b ilia is also en visioned. ODNR will b eg in c lea n in g u p th e overgrow n, n eg lected a re a in s u m m e r 1982. Id entification a n d im p le m e n ta ­ tio n of specific la n d sc a p in g p ro jects will ta k e sev eral y ears.


T h e E uclid B each p ro p e rty w as p u r­ c h a s e d th ro u g h th e T ru st for Public L an d , th e n a tio n a l n onprofit o rg a n iz a ­ tio n th a t a s s is ts g o v e rn m e n ts in o b ta in in g p a rk la n d by w ork in g in d e ­ p e n d e n tly w ith priv ate ow ners.

L e a d e r s F orge C o n s e n s u s a t a R o u n d T a b le D u rin g th e tra u m a tic late 1970s, w h en it see m e d a s th o u g h C lev elan d ’s fabric h a d rip p ed a p a rt, th e irony could not be m issed . H ere, in a c o m m u n ity ra c k ed by fiscal m is m a n a g e m e n t, u n ­ e m p lo y m e n t a n d a n ero d in g p o p u la ­ tio n b a se could be found ta le n t a n d re so u rc e s envied by cities in far less d istre ss. B u t C lev elan d ers w ere n o t w o rk in g together. In 1981, w ith a $ 7 5 ,0 0 0 g ra n t over tw o y e a rs from T h e C leveland F o u n d a ­ tion, a new o rg a n iz atio n co m p rised of c o m m u n ity le a d e rs w as form ed th a t m a y play a key role in p re v e n tin g fu­ tu re civic u p h e a v a l a n d developing a tru e c o n se n s u s for c o m m u n ity actio n th a t tra n s c e n d s special in te re sts. M odeled a fte r a sim ila r effort in De­ troit, th e o rg a n iz atio n — called th e G reater C leveland R o u n d tab le — is a co alitio n of 50 m e n a n d w o m en re p re ­ se n tin g every facet of c o m m u n ity life: b u sin e ss, labor, b la ck a n d w hite, e d u ­ catio n , n eig h b o rh o o d a n d c h u rc h . Its en erg etic director, th e fo rm er executive vice p re s id e n t of W ash in g to n , D .C .’s N ational U rb a n C oalition, labels it a “ fo ru m for d is c u s s io n ” a n d “ a c h an c e to m e n d th e w o u n d s of th e city's fra g m e n ta tio n !’ Its p ro c e ss now in place, th e R o u n d ­ tab le in 1981 identified four m a jo r a re a s of co n cern : ed u ca tio n , h o u sin g an d n eig h b o rh o o d d ev elo p m en t, race re la ­ tio n s a n d econom ic d ev elo p m en t, an d jo b s creatio n . T h e la tte r co m m itte e h a s p ro d u ced th re e su b c o m m itte e s, d e a l­ in g w ith m in o rity econom ic devel­ o p m e n t, y o u th e m p lo y m e n t a n d labor/ m a n a g e m e n t, w h o se m e etin g s b rin g to g e th e r te n ch ief e x ecu tiv e officers a n d te n c h ief la b o r le a d e rs in open — a n d h ith e rto u n p re c e n d e n te d — d iscu ssio n . R o u n d ta b le le a d e rsh ip m a k e s no apologies for th e fact th a t “ We are n o t th e im p le m e n to rs !’ In ste ad , th e group view s itself a s “ c a ta ly tic ” in function. T h ro u g h its c o m m itte e s it will e x am in e city p ro b le m s a n d a lte rn a tiv e a p ­ p ro a c h e s to solving th e m , h elp in g o th e r g ro u p s w ith im p le m e n ta tio n .

G ro w th A s s o c ia tio n S p u rs S e l l i n g to t h e G o v e r n m e n t In 1981 T h e C leveland Foundation, as p a rt of its c o n tin u e d in te re st in e n h a n c ­ ing local econom ic d ev elo p m en t an d jo b s creation, g ra n te d $ 8 5 ,0 0 0 over tw o y ears to th e C leveland D evelop­ m e n t F o u n d atio n (G reater C leveland G row th A ssociation) to e sta b lish the G reater C leveland G o v ern m en t B usi­ n e ss P ro g ram — a n org an ized effort to help C leveland a re a b u sin e ssm e n get a bigger piece of th e g o v e rn m e n t c o n ­ tra c t pie. T h e p ro g ram , believed to be th e only one of its k in d in th e c o u n try offering a full ran g e of co u n selin g services, m a tc h e s th e p ro d u ctio n ability of area b u sin e sse s a n d in d u stry w ith th e nonstrateg ic p ro c u re m e n t n eed s of th e federal g o v ern m en t. “ T he first trick is to find o u t w ho in th e g o v e rn m e n t h a s to b u y w h a t!’ say s a p ro g ram staff m em ber, “ rig h t dow n to th e la st w idget. We check th e co m ­ m o d ity lists of th e m ajo r cen ters, kno w in g th a t th e ir b u y in g p ractices in th e im m ed iate p a st are th e b e st guide to p red ictin g th e fu tu re. C hange in b u y in g p a tte rn s is slow. T he D efense D ep artm en t, for exam ple, m oves like a glacier!’ P ro g ram staff th e n locates a re a b u s i­ n ess a n d in d u stry w ith th e potential, b o th in p ro d u c t a n d te m p e ra m e n t, to co m p ete for c o n tra cts. Special a tte n ­ tion is given sm all- a n d m edium -sized b u sin e sse s in th e 25-250 em ployee ran g e — th e “ little g u y s!’ a s staff notes, “w ho need help m o st!’ T h o u g h th e p ro g ram h a s placed its g re a test e m p h a sis on g a rn e rin g nonstrateg ic defense c o n tra cts, it h a s b e ­ g u n m o n ito rin g th e p ro c u re m e n t n eed s of all o th e r federal agencies. R ecently it help ed a local firm sell p erso n n el lock­ ers to th e G eneral S ervices A d m in is­ tra tio n in a hard-w on a rra n g e m e n t th a t m a k es th e C leveland firm — a n d two o th e rs o u tsid e th e state — v irtu ally th e only GSA s u p p lie rs of th e p ro d u c t for one year. S taff is also h elp in g C leveland firm s le arn to h a rv e st o p p o rtu n ities in s u b ­ c o n tra c tin g by m a tc h in g large “ p rim e c o n tra c to rs” h ere o r o u tsid e Ohio w ith th e cap ab le G reater C leveland s u b ­ c o n tra c to r w ho m a k es ju s t th e rig h t ball b earing.

N o n m a n u fa c tu rin g

I n c r e a s e d U.S. m a rk e t sh are

M a n u f a c tu rin g

C le v e la n d ’s C o m p e titiv e E dge R e m a in s in M an­ u fa ctu rin g : Rand chart

shows the percent of sec­ toral em ploym ent in industries m aintaining or increasing m arket share.

13


T h e CEIP F u n d , In c., B o s to n , M a s s a c h u s e t ts — Environm ental In­ tern Program/Great Lakes Region (fourth y e a r ) ...............................$ 2 0 ,0 0 0

Civic A ffairs G rants

C ity o f C le v e la n d — D evelopm ent and related training costs of inte­ grated safety system in the Cleveland Police D epartm ent over three years .................................................. $ 3 1 0 ,0 0 0 Em ployees A ssistance Program for the Cleveland Police Departm ent (second y e a r ) ............................$ 3 0 , 0 0 0 Equal Em ploym ent Opportunity (EEO) training for city em ployees $ 2 ,0 0 0

C le v e la n d T e n a n ts O r g a n iz a tio n —

Three neighborhood land tru sts w ith­ in the City of Cleveland and a citywide land trust um brella organization (second y e a r ) ....................... $ 2 9 ,7 5 5 Travel and related expenses for the Ad Hoc Housing Study Group . . . $ 1 ,7 5 0 C o n v en tio n a n d V is it o r s B u rea u of G re a ter C le v e la n d , In c. — Visitor

Information Center in the Terminal Tow er....................................... $ 2 5 ,0 0 0 C u d ell Im p r o v e m e n t, Inc. —

Community im provement program (third y e a r).............................. $ 2 8 ,0 0 0

C le v e la n d C o n tr a c to r s A s s is t a n c e C orp oration — Interim support for m inority contractors assistance pro­ gram ................................................$ 5 ,0 0 0

C u yah oga C o u n ty B oard o f C o m m is s io n e r s — Jail Population

C lev ela n d D e v e lo p m e n t F o u n d a tio n (G reater C le v e la n d G row th A sso c ia tio n ) — Greater Cleveland Governm ent B usiness Program over two years .................................................... $ 8 5 ,0 0 0

...................... .................................$ 6 0 ,0 0 0

Leadership Cleveland (fifth and sixth y e a r ) ..............................$ 3 8 ,0 0 0

Project—Phase I, identification of factors contributing to overcrowding in the County Corrections Center National urban fellow placed in Cuyahoga County (second year) .........................................................$ 9 ,4 5 0 T he C u yah oga P la n o f O hio, Inc. —

Staff support over three years .................................................... $ 2 5 ,0 0 0

Services associated with the presidential debate through the New Cleveland C am paign..................$ 5 ,0 0 0

C u yah oga V a lley C o m m u n itie s C ou n cil, Inc. — General support (fourth y e a r ) ........................ $ 1 7 ,5 0 0

T he C lev ela n d F o u n d a tio n (Inc.) — Criminal justice and youth services planning and technical assistance ....................................................$ 3 2 ,2 0 0

D e tr o it S h o r e w a y C o m m u n ity D e v e lo p m e n t O r g a n iz a tio n —

Evaluation of alternative arrange­ m ents for econom ic m onitoring in metropolitan C leveland.............$ 5 ,0 0 0 Project transition costs and monitor­ ing of grant to the City of Cleveland for integrated safety system in the Cleveland Police Department ....................................................$ 3 0 ,0 0 0 Review and evaluation of Work in Northeast Ohio Council over two y ears............................................... $ 5 ,0 0 0 Review of grant to Lincoln Institute of Land Policy for planning of Cleveland land information system developm ent.................................$ 3 ,0 0 0 Rockefeller Park consultant services by William A. Behnke Associates, Inc. ............................................................. $ 5 0 0 C lev ela n d S ta te U n iv e r s ity — Neighborhood Developm ent Program (third y e a r ) ........................... $ 1 2 5 ,0 0 0 Planning sem inar for Cleveland City Council and c a b in e t ..................$ 7 ,5 0 0

Neighborhood revitalization (second year)....................................... $ 4 5 ,0 0 0 T he C ity o f E a st C le v e la n d —

Economic development program $ 8 0 ,0 0 0 T h e C ity o f E u clid — Employee

assistance program in the Euclid Police D epartm ent............... $ 1 5 ,7 0 0 E u clid C o m m u n ity C o n ce r n s —

Community improvement efforts over two y e a r s ................................ $ 2 7 ,0 0 0 F a m ico s F o u n d a tio n , Inc. —

Cleveland neighborhood energy conservation program over three years......................................... $ 7 5 ,0 0 0 C ity o f F in d lay, F in d lay, O hio —

Preparation of a downtown develop­ ment plan* .............................. $ 4 8 ,0 0 0 F o rest H ill P a rk w a y A rea C ou ncil

— Neighborhood preservation project ....

............................................. $ 5 ,0 0 0

F r ien d s o f S h a k er S q u a re , Inc. —

Commercial and residential renewal over two years....................... $ 55,000

14


G o v e r n m e n ta l R e s e a r c h I n s t it u t e Cuyahoga County Auditor salary adm inistration s t u d y .......... $ 4 0 ,0 0 0

M e tr o p o lita n C le v e la n d J o b s C ou n cil — P rogram inform ation sy stem (second y e a r)............ $ 2 4 ,0 0 0

G r e a te r C le v e la n d R e g io n a l T r a n sit A u th o r ity — C om prehensive m anagem ent devel­ opm ent p ro g ra m .................... $ 1 0 ,0 0 0

M id w est R a ilw a y H is to r ic a l Foun­ d a tio n , A k ron , O hio — R efurbishing a v in tag e steam locom otive for C uyahoga Valley L in e ..........$ 3 2 ,0 0 0

G r e a te r C le v e la n d R o u n d ta b le — General support over two years .....................................................$ 7 5 ,0 0 0 H a n co ck P ark D is tr ic t, F in d lay, O hio — Nature interpretation display p a n e ls* ......................................$ 2 0 ,8 0 0 H e ig h ts C o m m u n ity C o n g r e ss — H ousing code com pliance program (second y e a r ) ............................ $ 3 6 ,4 9 4 T h e H o u sin g A d v o c a te s , Inc. — National Citizens Monitoring Project on com m unity developm ent block grants and general revenue sharing (third y e a r ) .................................$ 3 4 ,2 4 1 H o u sin g ou r P e o p le E co n o m ica lly , In c. (HOPE) — Board/staff retreat ......................................................... $ 3 ,0 0 0 T h e J e w is h C o m m u n ity F e d e r a tio n o f C le v e la n d — H eights Area Housing, Inc. renovation project over two years......................... $ 4 0 ,0 0 0 L e a g u e o f W om en V o te r s o f C le v e la n d E d u c a tio n a l F un d, Inc. — Publication and related exp en ses of citizen inform ation guide by the Cleveland Area Voter Information C en ter...........................................$ 1 7 ,7 4 0 L in c o ln I n s t it u t e o f L an d P olicy, In c., C a m b rid g e, M a s s a c h u s e t ts — Planning of Cleveland land inform ation system developm ent .......................................................$ 1 5 ,0 0 0 L o ca l I n it ia t iv e s S u p p o r t C o rp o ra tio n , N ew York, N ew York — Private/public venture for com m u­ nity and neighborhood revitalization in Cleveland over two years $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 L u th e r a n H o u sin g C o rp o ra tio n — Elderly hom e m aintenance dem on­ stration program (second year) .....................................................$ 2 5 ,0 0 0 Video instruction in hom e repair and m a in ten a n ce.............................. $ 9 ,5 0 0

Oak H ill C en ter for E n v ir o n m e n ta l S tu d ie s , A k ron , O hio — Phillis W heatley A ssociation’s energy and w aste m a n a g e m e n t s tu d y a t C am p M u e lle r ........................................ $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 T he Old B ro o k ly n C o m m u n ity D e v e lo p m e n t C orp oration — C apital cam paign for th e B roadvue T h e a te r c o m p le x ......................... $ 5 ,0 0 0 P u b lic In fo rm a tio n C enter, F in dlay, O hio — Public Inform ation C enter (second a n d th ird year)* ............................................ . . $ 3 0 ,0 0 0 The R and C orporation , S a n ta M onica, C aliforn ia — Developing an d testin g a process for ongoing econom ic m onitoring in m etropolitan C le v e la n d ............................. $ 4 0 7 ,3 4 0 R eso u rce — W om en: T h e U n ta p p ed R e so u r c e — P lan n in g a n d e x p an sio n of services over tw o y ears . . $ 6 7 ,0 0 0

W om en sp ace — C u y ah o g a C ou n ty w o m en ’s actio n a g e n d a e m p lo y m e n t project (second y e a r ) ............... $ 1 7 ,8 7 8 “ W om en at W ork” exposition $ 3 ,0 0 0 W om en in A ppointed Office project (third y e a r ) .................................$ 10,000 W ork in N o r th e a s t O hio C o u n cil — G eneral su p p o rt over tw o y e a rs ....................................................$ 9 5 ,0 0 0 TOTAL CIVIC AFFAIRS G RANTS—UNDESIGNATED ............................................ $ 3 ,1 5 7 ,0 9 8 (Following recipient and program designated by donor)

T he W om en ’s C ity C lub o f C lev ela n d — E du catio n al lectu res ............................................................. $ 3 8 1 TOTAL CIVIC AFFAIRS GRANTS — DESIGNATED. . . $ 3 8 1 TOTAL CIVIC AFFAIRS GRANTS — DESIGNATED AND UNDESIGNATED..........$ 3 ,1 5 7 ,4 7 9 *Grant recom m ended by Findlay D istribution C om m ittee o f the L. Dale Dorney Fund

S t. C lair-S u p erior C o a litio n , Inc. — N eighborhood organization an d d e v e lo p m en t.............................. $ 20,000 T rem ont W est D e v e lo p m e n t C orporation — Feasibility stu d y of a low-incom e h o u sin g cooperative

$ 22,000 T ru st for P u b lic L and, S an F ra n cisco , C aliforn ia — A ppraisal and p u rch ase of Euclid Beach property for expansion of Cleveland Lakefront S tate P a rk ..........$ 2 5 5 ,0 0 0 U pper P r o sp e c t A rea A s s o c ia tio n , Inc. — N eighborhood revitalization

$ 10,000 T he U rban L eagu e o f G rea ter C lev ela n d , Inc. — P ublication of the B la ck D irectory........................... $ 2 ,0 0 0 W om en and F o u n d a tio n s/ C orporate P h ila n th ro p y , In c., N ew York, N ew York — S u p p o rt of the G reater C leveland N etw ork of W om en in F o u n d a tio n s ........................... $ 2 ,0 0 0

L u th e r a n M e tr o p o lita n M in istr y A s s o c ia t io n o f G r e a te r C le v e la n d — C itizens of C uyahoga County O m budsm an Project over two years .............................. $ 6 7 ,7 5 0

15


Social Services It w as a g a in s t th e d istre ssin g b ack d ro p of n a tio n a l recessio n a n d C lev elan d ’s loss of a n e stim a te d $ 4 8 m illion in fed eral fu n d s th a t T h e C leveland F o u n ­ d a tio n in 1981 s u rv e y e d its w ork in social services. H ard tim es, to be sure, lay a h e a d for th e G reater C leveland area. As th e F o u n d atio n m oved to w a rd for­ m u la tin g so m e m e a s u re of elastic policy in re sp o n se to th e need, tw o facts b e c a m e a p p a re n t: first, grow ing F o u n d a tio n re so u rc e s w ou ld e n su re th a t th e social serv ices a re a c o n tin u e to receive s u b s ta n tia l fu n d in g . Indeed, so­ cial serv ices g ra n ts to ta le d $4,718,367 in 1981, a n in c re ase of n e arly 50 p e rc e n t over 1980. S eco n d , a lth o u g h th e im p a c t of th e fed eral c u ts on local delivery of services could n o t y e t be p re d ic ted w ith a n y p recisio n , it w as c lea r th a t th e co m ­ b in ed re so u rc e s of C leveland p h ila n ­ thropy, h o w ev er im p ressiv e, could in no w ay m a k e u p for th e re d u c tio n s. It b e a rs n o tin g th a t th e $4 0 billion 1981 fed eral c u tb a c k s in social serv ices a n d c o m m u n ity d e v elo p m en t exceeded by tw en ty fo ld th e to ta l a m o u n t of n a tio n al fo u n d a tio n a n d c o rp o rate s p e n d in g in th e se a re a s annually. For T h e C leveland F o u n d a tio n a n d all g ra n t-m a k in g in stitu tio n s , h a rd ch o ices lay ah ead . T h e F o u n d a tio n h a s tra d itio n a lly p lay ed a n im p o rta n t role in fostering new social service a g en c ie s a n d p ro ­ g ra m s w h e n c irc u m sta n c e s ind icate th is to be desirab le, a n d 1981 w as no ex cep tio n . T h e C hildren Forever H aven, for e x am p le, w h ich a n sw e rs a difficult n e ed in th e lives of G reater C lev elan d ’s p ro fo u n d ly h a n d ic a p p e d a d u lts, w as la u n c h e d th is y e a r w ith F o u n d a tio n su p p o rt. B u t in a ss e ss in g its social services w ork in lig h t of new n a tio n a l policy a n d a p ro b lem atic econom y, th e F o u n d a ­ tio n c o n clu d e d th a t s tre n g th e n in g ex istin g in s titu tio n s m u s t be a prio rity

of th e h ig h e st order. S tre n g th e n in g can tak e m a n y form s, of co u rse, b u t it sh o u ld be seen a s s e p a ra te from — a n d m u c h m ore th a n — su sta in in g . U nder th e form idable p re ssu re s of th e c u rre n t period, ag en cies do n o t re m a in in th e sam e place; th e y e ith e r m ove forw ard or b ack w ard . T h e F o u n d atio n seek s to help o rg an izatio n s m ove forw ard by developing p ro g ram s m ore thoughtfully, m a n a g in g lim ited reso u rces m ore effectively, a n d p ro v id ­ ing services m ore efficiently.

B e lie fa ir e B e g in s 44A c t i o n R e s e a r c h ’ f S ince 1968, B ellefaire/Jew ish C hil­ d re n ’s B u reau h a s offered e x em p lary care to th e ch ild ren of C leveland — first a s a n o rp h an ag e, a n d since W orld W ar II as a n o n d en o m in a tio n al tre a t­ m e n t c en te r for em otionally d istu rb e d eight- to eighteen-year-olds. Its p ro ­ g ram is n atio n ally resp ected , its a cc o m p lish m e n ts in providing a com plex service are real. But, in 1978, B ellefaire’s executive directo r a n d staff d e term in e d th a t a large step m u s t be ta k e n to s tre n g th e n its p ro g ram — th a t th e agency sh o u ld e sta b lish a m ajo r re sea rc h cap acity to s tu d y em o tio n al d istu rb a n ce . To be sure, Bellefaire h a d sp o n so red signifi­ c an t, alb eit isolated, stu d ie s by outside re se a rc h e rs in th e p ast. Now, however, th e goal w as for th e first tim e organic to a n evolving in stitu tio n . Here w as th e o p p o rtu n ity to ad v an ce th e state of know ledge in th e field an d m ak e C leve­ lan d a tre a tm e n t cen ter; b u t even m ore, here w as th e c h an c e to in teg rate re sea rc h w ith th e Bellefaire p rogram , im p ro v in g th e in s titu tio n ’s ow n p ra c ­ tices along th e way. O ver th e n e x t th re e y ears, w ith th e su p p o rt of several C leveland F o u n d a ­ tion p la n n in g g ra n ts, Bellefaire sh ap e d a re se a rc h cap acity g ro u n d ed in th e practical — or, as e x p erts in th e field p u t it, b ased on “ actio n re s e a rc h ’,’ em pirical in fo rm atio n th a t will be applied to real-life p ro g ram s. T he 1981 F o u n d atio n g ra n t of $ 3 9 8 ,8 2 3 over th re e y ears is en ab lin g Bellefaire to p u t th e p ro g ram in place. T h e agency, h av in g co n d u cte d a n in ­ ten siv e n a tio n al search , will soon a p p o in t a re sea rc h directo r a n d is m o v ­ ing quickly to develop a re sea rc h staff

I t w a s c le a r t h a t t h e c o m b in e d r e s o u r c e s o f C le v e la n d p h i l ­ a n th r o p y , h o w e v e r im p r e s s iv e , c o u ld in no w a y m a k e u p fo r th e f e d e r a l r e d u c ­ tio n s .

S tr e n g th e n in g e x ­ i s t i n g s o c ia l s e r v i c e a g e n c ie s is a F o u n ­ d a t io n p r i o r i t y o f th e h i g h e s t o rd e r.

B e lle fa ir e : taking a large step to strengthen its nationally respected treat­ m ent program for em otionally disturbed children. 17


O n g o in g e v a l u a t i o n o / B e l l e f a i r e ’s o w n p r o g r a m s is t h e a g e n c y ’s m a jo r g o a l — a n a t t e m p t to l e a r n “w h a t is b e in g d o n e , h o w w e ll i t w o r k s , a n d w h a t m ig h t be do ne d iffe r e n tly V

w ho w ill w ork closely w ith clinical p e rso n n e l in p ro ject p la n n in g an d im p le m e n ta tio n . A m ong th e re s e a rc h efforts c o n te m ­ p la te d for th e first m o n th s of o p eratio n are a follow-up on B ellefaire’s fa m o u s “ after c a re ” s tu d y of 25 y e a rs ago; a re se a rc h c o m p o n e n t ad d ed to a n alre a d y -fu n c tio n in g p ro ject in th e early c h ild h o o d division, to m e a s u re effects of fam ily v e rs u s in s titu tio n a l d ay care; a n d a n a n a ly sis of a C leveland w elfare a g e n c y ’s role in ch ild ad o p tio n , w ith a n e m p h a sis on p ro c e d u ral safeg u ard s. T h ro u g h re se a rc h , B ellefaire also p la n s to tak e a h a rd look a t how its child-related d ecisio n s are m a d e, sys-

B e lle fa ir e : shaping a major research capacity applied to real-life

programs. te m a tizin g an d p e rh a p s refo rm in g th e criteria involved in deciding, for e x a m ­ ple, w h e th e r a y o u n g ste r is b e st served th ro u g h re sid en tial or d ay care tre a tm e n t. T h e ongoing ev alu atio n of its ow n pro g ram is, as a staff m e m b e r observes, th e m ajo r goal — a n a tte m p t to learn “w h a t is being done, how well it w orks, an d w h a t m ig h t be done differently!’

M erger S tr e n g th e n s T hree K e y A g e n c ie s A m erg er of th re e a re a ag en cies is in th e w orks w h ich could well im prove th e services of all th ree. To be c o m ­ pleted over th e n e x t th re e y ears, th e m erg er u n ite s th e School on M agnolia,

18

a n d th e P a r k v ie w T h e r a p e u tic P re­ s c h o o l w ith in th e o r g a n iz a tio n a l s tr u c tu r e o f th e C h ild G u id a n c e C enter.

All th re e o rg a n iz a tio n s h a v e e s ta b ­ lish ed re p u ta tio n s for ex cellen ce. T h e p restig io u s C hild G u id a n c e C e n te r is one of th e o rig in al 11 d e m o n s tra tio n clinics fo u n d ed in 1924 b y th e N ational C o m m ittee for M ental H e alth a n d th e C o m m o n w e alth Fund; it p ro v id es serv ­ ices to 2 ,0 0 0 c h ild re n a n d fam ilies, o p e ra tin g tw o b ra n c h clin ics in a d d i­ tion to its m a in office on E a st 2 2 n d S treet. T h e 12-year-old S chool on M agnolia, w h ich p ro v id es a n e d u c a tio n a l a lte rn a ­ tive for tro u b led a d o le sc e n ts n o t well serv ed b y e x istin g schools, p lay s a vital role in th e c o m m u n ity , a s does th e P arkview T h e ra p e u tic Preschool, form ed in 1979 w ith C leveland F o u n d a­ tion su p p o rt, w h ic h fo cu ses on em o tio n ally d is tu rb e d c h ild re n aged th re e to six. H ere is w h a t a p p e a rs to be a m erg er m ad e in h e av e n . O n th e m o s t basic level, th e new s tru c tu re m a k e s good econom ic sen se , a s s u rin g th e survival a n d long-term sta b ility of th e two yo u n g , fin an cially v u ln e ra b le agencies. B u t ju s t a s im p o rta n t, th e m e rg e r sh o u ld c reate so m e a m o u n t of synergy, b ro a d e n in g e a c h a g e n c y ’s rep erto ire of services. T h e School on M agnolia, for e x am p le, w h ic h h a s n e v er b eco m e in ­ volved in co u n selin g , s ta n d s to gain im m e a su ra b ly th ro u g h a cc e ss to th e C hild G u id an ce C e n te r’s d iag n o stic tools — especially e d u c a tio n a l e v alu a ­ tion. Fittingly, th e S chool p la n s to place in creased e m p h a s is o n staff develop­ m e n t a n d looks to w a rd s ta te a cc re d ­ itatio n in th e y e a rs to com e. As for th e C hild G u id a n ce Center, it c u rre n tly offers n o th in g co m p arab le to th e tw o school p ro g ram s. For th e first tim e, th e C enter, w h ich a m o n g o th e r p ro g ra m s pro v id es c o n su lta tio n w ith school sy ste m s, will be able to directly aid th o se c h ild ren w ho c a n n o t a d ju st to a re g u la r classro o m . In essen ce, th e C en ter will re m a in a re sp ected m e n ta l h e a lth in s titu tio n — b u t one w ith a stro n g new c a rry o v e r in to ed u catio n al p ro g ra m s it h e lp s sh ap e. In ad d itio n , th e C en ter p la n s to d e­ velop a la b o ra to ry school for th e tre a tm e n t a n d s tu d y of em o tio n al p ro b ­ lem s of c h ild ren a n d y o u th . T h e m erger, im p le m e n te d w ith a F o u n d atio n g ra n t of $170,291 over th re e y ears, will tak e on o rg an izatio n al visibility a s th e 1982 school y e a r begins.


A g e n c ie s Tap L o ca l M anagem ent S avvy W h ere c a n a sm all-staff, sm all-b u d g et h u m a n service a g en cy go for n u ts-an d b o lts h elp in developing a m ore effec­ tive billing s y ste m ? Or in se a rc h in g for a n e x ec u tiv e d ire c to r? Or in strategizin g a fu n d -raisin g p ro g ram ? T h ree notfor-profit o rg a n iz a tio n s w ith th e p ro b ­ le m s ju s t d e sc rib e d are a m o n g th e first to ta p th e c o n su ltin g re so u rce s of U nited W ay’s new M an ag em en t A ssis­ ta n c e P ro g ra m , lin k in g th e m w ith a c c e ss to m a n a g e m e n t sp ec ia lists from th e c ity ’s b u sin e ss, corporate, profes­ sio n al a n d u n iv e rsity sectors. T h e v o lu n te e r c o n s u lta n ts recru ited by U n ited W ay will w ork w ith staff m e m b e rs from selected agencies in th e p ro b lem -so lv in g te c h n iq u e s of good m a n a g e m e n t — on issu e s ra n g in g from fin a n c ial p la n n in g to public relations. T h e re is, how ever, no tex tb o o k for th e c o n su lta n c ie s — or “ e n g a g e m e n ts;’ as th o se in th e field refer to th e services. T h e o rg a n iz a tio n s v a ry from g rass ro o ts to fairly so p h istic a te d in s tru c tu re a n d re so u rce s, a n d U nited W ay a s ­ s ista n c e m u s t therefore be situ atio n al, ta k in g sto c k of each a g en cy “a s it is” a n d m o v in g it forw ard to specific, a tta in a b le goals. B eg u n w ith th e p a rtia l su p p o rt of a C leveland F o u n d a tio n g ra n t of $120,000 over tw o y e ars, th e M anage­ m e n t A ssista n ce P ro g ra m is c u rre n tly in th e pilot stag e, p ro v id in g c o n su l­ ta n ts for te n v aried ag en cies — b o th U nited W ay m e m b e r a n d n o n m e m b e r o rg a n iz atio n s. T hereafter, a U nited W ay c o m m itte e will scree n a p p lic a n ts for te c h n ic a l a ssista n c e . A m ong o th e r criteria, U nited W ay w ill select for th e p ro g ram th o se a g en c ie s th a t m o st clearly d e m o n stra te a c o m m itm e n t to tack le a n in h e re n tly soluble p ro b lem — a n d a p ro b lem s u ita b le for consultancy. For th e first tw o y e a rs of th e p ro ­ g ra m , largely in re sp o n se to th e m o st p re ssin g n e e d s of th e early 1980s, U nited W ay w ill lim it its focus to h u m a n care agencies; it is a n tic ip a te d th a t in th a t tim e 50 o rg a n iz a tio n s will receive s u b s ta n tia l m a n a g e m e n t c o n ­ s u ltin g help. W ith 1,400 h u m a n service ag en cies in C leveland, m a n y of th e m stru g g lin g in th e c u rre n t e n v iro n m e n t, th e re sh o u ld be no d e a rth of re q u e sts.

M ed ia tio n /D iv ersio n : offering citizens the chance to settle their own

disputes away from an intim idating and, by definition, ju d g m en ta l courtroom.

P r o s e c u t o r ' s O ffic e C u t s R e d T a p e in C i t i z e n D i s p u t e s F ran k C. is a 75-year-old lan d lo rd in E a st C leveland. He claim s th a t Jo e F., a 17-year-old lab o rer a n d fo rm er te n a n t, ow es h im $ 5 5 0 to cover d a m ag e s to his a p a rtm e n t a n d th re e w eeks of u n p a id rent. M utual h o stility fills th e J u s tic e C en ­ te r office. A “ m e d ia to r” in tro d u ces h im self a n d inform s th e tw o — th e “c o m p la in a n t” an d th e “ re s p o n d e n t;’ as he identifies th e m — th a t th e re are only tw o ru le s for th e sessio n w h ich is to follow: n e ith e r m a y in te rru p t th e other, a n d b o th m a y sp ea k only to th e m ediator. Fifty m in u te s later, w ith o u t a single ju d g m e n t m ad e by th e m ediator, F ra n k a n d Jo e have b arg a in ed th e ir w ay dow n to a resolution: th e te en a g e r ag rees to pay th e lan d lo rd $ 3 0 0 in $50per-w eek in sta llm e n ts b e g in n in g th e following Friday. T h e m e d ia to r c o n ­ g ra tu la te s th e m for settlin g th e d isp u te a n d s ay s he will follow u p on th e s e s ­ sion w ith a telep h o n e call in tw o w eeks. W ith a 1981 g ra n t of $ 3 5 3 ,7 4 6 over th re e y e ars from T he C leveland F o u n ­ dation, th e City of C lev elan d ’s Office of th e P ro secu to r b eg an a M ediation/ D iversion p ro g ram in J a n u a ry 1982 to h a n d le fam ily or n eig h b o rh o o d m isd e ­ m e a n o rs sim ilar to F ra n k a n d J o e ’s d isp u te — cases in w h ich th e fact th a t th e p a rtie s g en erally know each o th e r gives th e m a stro n g in cen tiv e to solve th e p roblem . In m ed iatio n , a n e u tra l

T h e o r g a n iz a tio n a l m e r g e r o f t h e th r e e a g e n c ie s s h o u l d c r e a te s y n e r g y , b r o a d e n in g e a c h a g e n c y 's r e p e r to ir e o f s e r v ic e s .

T h e r e is n o t e x t ­ b o o k f o r t h e U n ite d W a y c o n s u l ta n c ie s . T h e u s e r a g e n c ie s v a r y , s o U n ite d W a y a s s is ta n c e m u s t ta k e s to c k o f ea ch o n e “as i t i s " a n d m o v e i t f o r w a r d to s p e c ific , a t t a i n a b l e g o a ls .

19


T h e C ity P r o s e c u ­ t o r 's m e d i a t i o n / d iv e r s io n p r o g r a m f o c u s e s o n c a s e s in w h ic h th e f a c t th a t th e p a r tie s k n o w e a c h o th e r g iv e s th e m a s tr o n g in ­ c e n t i v e to s o l v e t h e p r o b le m .

A y o u n g m e d ia to r s a y s t h e “s e s s i o n s r e q u ir e 2 0 p e r c e n t le g a l s k i l l s a n d 8 0 percent c o u n s e lin g V

th ird p a rty a id s th e d is p u ta n ts in fa s h ­ io n in g a m u tu a lly acc e p tab le reso lu tio n . T h e P ro s e c u to r’s Office e stim a te s it will sift th ro u g h 15,000 citizen c o m ­ p la in ts in 1982. Of th e se , m o re th a n 11,000 will receive h e a rin g s a t th e J u s ­ tice C en ter c o n d u c te d b y law s tu d e n ts from th e c ity ’s tw o u n iv e rsity law sch o o ls tra in e d in m e d ia tio n te c h n iq u e — w ith o u t d ra in in g th e tim e of th e c ity ’s a s s is ta n t p ro se c u to rs a n d th e c o u rts. T h e p ro g ram , m o d eled after tw o w ell-estab lish ed efforts in C in cin n ati a n d C o lu m b u s, ach iev ed a n im p ressiv e 87.5 p e rc e n t su c c e ss ra te in th e seco n d m o n th of its o p eratio n here. (At u n s u c ­ cessful sessio n s, th e c o m p la in a n t is ad v ised th a t he m ay still p ro secu te if he chooses.) C learly th e p ro ject is s tre n g th e n in g th e Office of th e P ro se c u ­ tor by m ore effectively allo catin g reso u rces. Moreover, M ediation/D iver­ sion offers citizen s th e c h a n c e to reach th e ir ow n s e ttle m e n t aw ay from an in tim id a tin g an d , by definition, ju d g ­ m e n ta l co u rtro o m . It allow s C leve­ la n d e rs g re a ter access to th e ju stic e sy ste m a t no d irect co st to th e m . S ay s a y o u n g m ed iato r: “A sessio n re q u ire s 20 p e rc e n t legal skills a n d 80 p e rc en t co u n selin g — th e ab ility to d e ­ fuse tw o people in a te n se s itu a tio n , to be sen sitiv e to th e m , a n d y et to m a in ­ ta in n e u tra lity a t all tim es. It’s e x h a u stin g , b u t it w o rk s!’ At th e en d of th e F o u n d a tio n ’s threey e ar funding, th e C ity of C leveland p lan s to c o n tin u e resp o n sib ility for th e program , m ak in g it a p e rm a n e n t p a rt of th e P ro se c u to r’s Office.

G ra n t M a k in g M a r k s th e Y ear o f th e D is a b le d Six h u n d re d m illion people a ro u n d th e w orld — 35 m illion of th e m in A m erica — live w ith m e n ta l or p h y sical d is­ abilities. W hat is in sto re for th e m ? T he y e ar 1981, p ro claim ed In te rn a tio n a l Year of D isabled P erso n s (IYDP) b y th e U nited N ations G eneral A ssem bly, p ro ­ vided a forum for in c re asin g a w are n e ss of b oth th e n eed s a n d cap ab ilities of th e disabled. To help m a rk th e year, th e F oundation su p p o rte d a c o m m u n ity action p lan conceived b y th e F ed era­ tion for C o m m u n ity P lan n in g . T he Federation successfu lly g a th ered an d co m m u n ic ate d IYDP-related in fo rm a ­ tion, prom oted e v en ts a n d celebra-

20

V G R S’ S h e lte r e d W orkshop: the hum of a fa cto ry.

tions, a n d serv ed a s a d v o cate for special p ro g ram s. T h e F o u n d a tio n also ren ew ed its c o m m itm e n t to G re ater C lev elan d ’s d isab led p e rso n s th ro u g h g ra n t m a k ­ in g to m a n y ag en cies, sev eral of w hich fostered e x ce p tio n a l a n d in n o v ativ e p ro g ram s. ■ At th e V ocational G u id a n ce a n d Re­ h ab ilita tio n S ervices, a p io n eerin g sh eltere d w o rk sh o p w h ic h p ro d u ces fu n c tio n a l c lo th in g a n d a d a p tiv e d e­ vices by a n d for th e h a n d ic a p p e d h a s su d d e n ly — after four y e a rs of F o u n d a ­ tion s u p p o rt — b eco m e a big bu sin ess. “ S ty lish y et p ractical, for a n ad d ed m e a su re of co n fid en ce a n d in d e p e n ­ den ce!’ to u ts th e S e a rs 1982 sp rin g catalo g u e b lu rb , d e sc rib in g th e 11 item s (w ith 202 v a ria tio n s in colors a n d sizes) for th e h a n d ic a p p e d it now m e rc h a n ­ dises n a tio n a lly — clo th e s m a d e in C leveland a t th e VGRS co m p lex on E ast 5 5 th S treet. T h e first S e a rs c o n tra c t, w h ich g u a r­ a n tee d VGRS m o re th a n $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 in 1982 o rd e rs on its “ fash io n c a re ’’ label, posed a pro d ig io u s c h allen g e to ag en cy lead ersh ip . VGRS w as p ro d u c in g a b o u t 100 g a rm e n ts p e r w eek w h e n th e a r­ ra n g e m e n t w ith S e a rs b e g a n — h a rd ly th e p ro d u ctiv ity re q u ire d to m e et a n tic ­ ipated d e m an d . H ere w as th e o p p o rtu n ity for th e w o rk sh o p to tak e off, providing in c re ase d e m p lo y m e n t to th e a re a ’s h a n d ic a p p e d a d u lts. B u t only if VGRS staff a cte d swiftly.


W ith a C leveland F o u n d atio n g ra n t of $ 150,000 e a rm a rk e d to co n v ert th e p ro g ra m to m a s s p ro d u c tio n level, VGRS did ju s t th a t — by h irin g 26 a d d itio n a l h a n d ic a p p e d people to sew, cu t, p re ss, p a ck a n d ship; by offering e m p lo y e es th e c h a n c e to in crease e a rn ­ in g s w o rk in g on a piece rate; by m ore th a n d o u b lin g w ork in g sp ace to 7,000 s q u a re feet; a n d by p u rc h a sin g 15 sew ­ in g m a c h in e s w ith special jig s a n d a larg e “ s p re a d e r” th a t c an a u to m a ti­ cally lay o u t a n d c u t h u n d re d s of s h e e ts of m a te ria l in m in u te s. T h e b o tto m line: VGRS is now p ro ­ d u c in g m o re th a n 1,100 g a rm e n ts per w eek ra n g in g from loose-fitting d resses to its to p seller, m e n ’s slac k s w ith drop fro n t flaps, a n d it a im s for 2 ,000 w eekly b y m id -su m m e r 1982. “ U ntil recently, w e w ere p re tty laid b ack up th e re ;’ a d m its a VGRS staffer. “ B ut now y o u c an see, hear, a n d sm ell in d u s ­ try. W e’ve got th e h u m of a fa c to ry :’ ■ W h at h a p p e n s to th e severely re ­ ta rd e d o r h a n d ic a p p e d a d u lt w ho o u t­ lives h is p a re n ts? T h e a n sw e r is u s u ­ ally in stitu tio n a liz a tio n . B ut a gro u p of c o n c e rn e d citizen s, sev eral of w hom h a v e p ro fo u n d ly d isab led offspring of th e ir ow n, are w o rk in g to provide a n ­ o th e r op tion. T h e ir C h ild ren Forever H aven, a soon-to-open re n o v a ted co ttag e at B reck sv ille’s B lossom Hill, is described b y its fo u n d e rs a s a “ h o m e aw ay from hom eT a re sid e n tia l live-in se ttin g w ith 13 b ed s, licen sed p ra c tica l n u rs e s an d aides, a n d a c o n su ltin g psychologist, m ed ical advisor, social w o rk er a n d d i­ e tic ian to h elp provide a c o m p a s­ sio n ate, stim u la tin g life for a n 18-yearsa n d -o ld er p o p u la tio n w ith very difficult n eed s. T h e C leveland F o u n d atio n sta rt-u p g ra n t of $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 h elp ed c u lm in a te a 13y e a r g ra s s ro o ts fu n d -raisin g cam p a ig n by th e H a v e n ’s d ed icated v o lu n teers. ■ A n o th e r ag en c y c o n ce rn e d w ith liv­ in g o p tio n s for severely h a n d ic a p p e d a d u lts — U nited C erebral P alsy A sso­ ciatio n — is m a in ta in in g w ith F o u n d a ­ tio n s u p p o rt a n In d e p e n d e n t Living P ro g ra m in a re c en tly ren o v ated a n d sp ecially d e sig n e d w ing a t H ealth Hill H ospital. T h e p ro g ra m h a s b e en conceived for “ tra n s itio n a l liv in g ” — to p reclu d e fu ­ tu re in s titu tio n a liz a tio n by te a c h in g

cereb ral p alsy v ictim s to cope on th e ir ow n. W hile a t H ealth Hill, u su ally for one an d one-half to tw o y ears, w h eel­ chair-b o u n d clien ts w ith v ary in g degrees of in firm ity receive in stru c tio n in m ak in g travel a rra n g e m e n ts (for e x ­ am ple, how to g et from th e e a st to w est side via rap id transit), n u tritio n , m o n ey m a n a g e m e n t, hy g ien e a n d h a n d lin g th e a n g er a n d fru stra tio n th a t re su lt from th e disability. Self-confidence is instilled, am o n g o th e r m e an s, by te ac h in g social skills. As a staff m e m b e r re m ark ed , “ I t’s im p o rta n t to p o in t o u t th a t a strip ed s h irt m ix es b e tte r w ith plain blue je a n s th a n w ith ch eck ed p a n ts!’ ■ A key to th e fu tu re w ell-being of m a n y h a n d ica p p e d ch ild ren is m ainstre a m in g — in clu d in g th e c h ild ren in th e daily activities of n o n d isab led y o u n g sters a s soon a s possible. T he Society for C rippled C hildren offers a tech n ical a ssista n c e p ro g ram , s u p ­ ported since 1979 by T he C leveland F oundation, to m a in stre a m h a n d i­ capped ch ild ren a s early as day care age. T he p ro g ram , refined th ro u g h th e years, is now a m odel of its type. Staff develops relatio n sh ip s w ith d ay care c en te r an d n u rs e ry school a d m in is tra ­ tors, w orking w ith te ac h in g p erso n n el to prep are th e m a n d th e ir ch ild ren for e n try of a h a n d ica p p e d preschooler. A staff m e m b e r re m a in s in th e classroom for at le ast tw o w eeks after th e child h a s joined. “ It is n o t realistic to believe th a t th ere w o n ’t be p ro b lem s!’ she says. “T he n o n d isab led k id s do notice differences a n d th e y m u s t be allow ed to a sk q u e stio n s!’ P o ten tial p ro b lem s c an be a n tic i­ pated, th o u g h . In th e c ase of a little boy w ho h ad u n d e rg o n e a trach eo sto m y , project staff relieved day care te a c h e rs w ho w ere th e n able to visit th e boy in th e h o sp ital an d learn firsth a n d a b o u t th e o p eratio n a n d w h a t to e x p ec t in class. Project staff a n d te a c h e rs also perform ed th e o p eratio n on a doll in fro n t of th e class so th e ch ild ren w ould learn w h a t th e “ h o le” looked like — all before th e little boy e n tered th e d ay care center.

W ith t h e c o n t r a c t fr o m S e a rs, th e s h e lte r e d w o r k s h o p h a d t h e c h a n c e to t a k e o ff, p r o v i d i n g in c r e a s e d e m p l o y ­ m e n t to t h e a r e a ’s h a n d ic a p p e d a d u lts . B u t o n ly i f V G R S s t a f f a c te d s w i f t l y .

21


A m a sa S to n e H o u se S u p p o r t......................... Operating Support . .

Social S ervice Grants

General ............ $ 5 0 0 $ 3 0 ,0 0 0

T h e A rt S tu d io /H ig h la n d V ie w H o sp ita l — A rt T h e ra p y P ro g ra m a t E a st 5 5 th a n d B roadw ay in affiliation w ith C leveland M usic School S e ttle m e n t (second year) . . . $ 1 3 ,2 1 8 A s s o c ia tio n for R e ta r d e d C itiz e n s , C u yah oga C o u n ty — People First: Self-A dvocacy for D ev elo p m en tally D isabled P e r s o n s . . . . .......... $ 1 7 ,3 9 5

C ity C lub Forum F o u n d a tio n , In c.

— Senior citizen attendance at weekly forum s e r ie s ......... .................. $ 4 ,4 0 0 T h e C ity M is s io n — P u rc h a sin g , ren o v atin g a n d staffing a w o m e n ’s em erg en cy s h e l t e r ..................$ 6 2 ,5 0 0 C ity o f C le v e la n d —

Mediation/diversion program for the Cleveland Prosecutor’s Office over three y e a rs ......................... $ 3 5 3 ,7 4 6 C le v e la n d C o u n cil o f C am p F ire, In c. — Development of membership

Pilot P arent: P eer S u p p o rt for P a re n ts of H an d icap p ed C hild ren . . . $ 1 9 ,4 1 5

base in the City of Cleveland

B e e c h B rook — S ta rt-u p fu n d s for a staff h o m e pro ject for th e m ildly r e t a r d e d ......................................$ 1 5 ,0 9 6

T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n (Inc.) —

B e lle fa ir e /J e w is h C h ild r e n ’s B u reau — D evelopm ent of rese a rc h cap acity to s tu d y em otional d istu rb an c e in ch ild ren over th re e y ears ............... ......................... $ 3 9 8 ,8 2 3 B oy S c o u ts o f A m e r ic a , G re a ter C le v e la n d C ou n cil No. 4 4 0 — S ta rt­ u p fu n d s for Cub S c o u t W orld over two y e a r s ......................................$ 1 7 ,3 1 7 B o y s’ C lubs o f C le v e la n d , Inc. — Youth survival project for inner-city y o u th (third y e a r ) .....................$ 8 7 ,0 0 0 C en ter for H um an S e r v ic e s — E xpansion an d d e m o n stra tio n of the program m o nitoring a n d evaluation system over th ree y ears . . . $ 9 0 ,5 5 0 T raining m aterials for th e E m plo y­ m en t A ssistance P rogram . . . $ 2 ,0 0 0

.....................................................$ 2 3 ,4 0 0

Evaluation of grant to Bellefaire for development of research capacity to study emotional disturbance in children over three years . . . $ 10,000 Evaluation of grant to The Presbytery of the Western Reserve for the learning, vocational and recreational program at Calvary Presbyterian Church over two y e a r s ......... $ 5 ,0 0 0 Evaluation of grant to R.E.A.C.H., Inc. for expansion of services to children from ages six to thirteen . . . . $ 2,000 Monitoring and evaluation of grant to United Way Services for development of a m anagem ent assistance program over two years............................ $ 6,000 Technical assistance to the Cleveland Women’s Counsel for program p lan n in g ..................................... $ 2,000 T h e C le v e la n d S o c ie t y for th e B lin d — General s u p p o rt......... $ 5 0 0

Operating support................... $ 3 0 ,0 0 0 C hild G u id an ce C en ter — M erger of th e School on M agnolia and the Parkview T h erap eu tic Preschool w ith th e Child G uidance C enter over three y e a r s ....................................... $ 1 7 0 ,2 9 1

Development of a consum er law m anual for high school students

C h ild ren F orever H aven — S tart-u p fu n d s for hom e for m en ta lly reta rd e d a n d p h ysically h a n d ic a p p e d a d u lt s ...........................................$ 5 0 ,0 0 0

Development of a street law program for mental health facilities . $ 4 3 ,4 7 9 Sign language and interpreter educa­ tion and workshop training for the deaf com munity (third year) $ 3 0 ,4 9 9

C h ristia n R e s id e n c e s F o u n d a tio n — A ssistance in financial p la n n in g of W ade P ark M a n o r.....................$ 2 7 ,0 0 0

C le v e la n d W om en ’s C o u n se l —

C in c in n a ti I n s tit u te o f J u s t ic e , C in c in n a ti, O hio — T echnical a s sis ­ tan ce to th e C leveland P ro sec u to r’s Office for esta b lish m e n t of a m ed iatio n /d iv ersio n p ro g ram $ 2 ,8 1 0

22

C le v e la n d S t a te U n iv e r s it y — .........................................................$ 2 ,4 5 0

Planning and im plementation of a community divorce education pro­ gram and development of a record keeping system over two years ............................................ .. . $ 1 0 7 ,2 9 9 C u yah oga C o m m u n ity C o lleg e —

Expansion of the foster parent education program (second year).......................................$ 2 0 ,7 5 4


T h e C u y a h o g a C o u n ty B ar A s s o c ia t io n — E xpansion of the Guardian Ad Litem program to include the Juvenile Court and D om estic Relations Court . . $ 4 1 ,2 0 0

T he G olden A ge C e n te r s o f G reater C lev ela n d , Inc. — Technical a ssis­ tan ce for d evelopm ent of a m a n a g e m e n t inform ation system

C u y a h o g a C o u n ty B oard o f C o m m is s io n e r s — Youth Services Coordinating C ouncil’s sum m er youth p r o g r a m ...................... $ 7 5 ,0 0 0

G rady M em orial H o sp ita l, A tla n ta , G eorgia — Sex education series for adolescents: H elping Teens Say “ No” To S exual Involvem ent over two y e a r s ................................ $ 20,000

C u y a h o g a C o u n ty W elfare D e p a r tm e n t — Crippled and handi­ capped children’s f u n d ............ $ 8 ,0 0 0

..........................................$ 10,000

“Give-A-Christmas” program through the Special Opportunity and Service F u n d ............................................... $ 5 ,0 0 0

T he G reater C lev ela n d H o sp ita l A sso c ia tio n — Eye glasses, m edical e q u ip m e n t a n d d e n tu re s for m edically indigent p a tie n ts over two y e a rs ............................................ $ 3 0 ,0 0 0

C u y a h o g a E a s te r S e a l S o c ie t y — Expansion and evaluation of Tim e Out for Parents (TOP) in-hom e respite care for handicapped children over two y e a r s..................................... $ 4 1 ,8 3 0

G rea ter C le v e la n d N eigh b orh ood C e n te r s A s s o c ia tio n — A ctivities in recognition of th e 8 5 th a n n iv e rsary of the se ttle m en t m o v em en t in C le v e la n d ..................................... $ 6 ,6 9 7

C u y a h o g a M e tr o p o lita n H o u sin g A u th o r ity — Cleveland Neighbors C o n feren ce............ ....................$ 3 ,0 0 0

H ancock C ou n ty A lc o h o lism C ou ncil, F in d lay, O hio — Prevention an d ed u cation services* . . . $ 2 0 ,0 0 0

D ial I n d u s tr ie s , Inc. — Retail sales training program for m entally ill clien ts........................................ $ 2 8 ,0 5 0

H aram bee: S e r v ic e s to B lack F a m ilie s — R e c ru itm e n t of black adoptive fam ilies (second y e a r ) ..........................................$ 5 3 ,1 8 7

F e d e r a te d C h u rch o f C h agrin F a lls — General s u p p o r t ....................$ 7 ,5 0 0 F e d e r a tio n for C o m m u n ity P la n n in g — A ssistance to informal care providers to the frail elderly especially addressing the problems of elder abuse (fourth year) . . . $ 3 6 ,8 8 1 Attendance of adolescents at a confer­ ence on teenage se x u a lity .......... $ 4 0 0 C om m unity action plan for the 1981 International Year of Disabled P e r so n s......................................$ 1 8 ,4 5 0 E stablishm ent of the Com m unity Information/Volunteer Action Center over two y e a r s.......................$ 1 2 5 ,0 0 0 Interim funding of C om m unity Volunteer Services. . . ...........$ 1 5 ,5 0 0 Public inform ation program related to cutbacks in funding hum an serv ices............... .........................$ 4 ,9 7 5 Serious juvenile offender inform ation and assistan ce project over fifteen m o n th s ................................... $ 1 3 5 ,0 0 0 G e s ta lt I n s t it u t e o f C le v e la n d — D evelopm ent of a fam ily therapy curriculum for m ental health professionals working with abusive and otherw ise dysfunctional fam ilies........................................ $ 2 9 ,7 0 0

H a r v e st D ay Care C en ter — Interim fu n d in g ........................... $ 5 ,0 0 0 H elp for R e ta r d e d C h ild ren , Inc. — D evelopm ent of technological/ tra in in g program to com p en sate for h earin g loss in HELP children ...........................................$ 10,000 H ill H ou se M en tal H ea lth R e h a b ilita tio n an d R e se a r c h , Inc. — C lient-O riented P rogram E v alu a­ tion (C.O.P.E.)...............".......... $ 1 3 ,6 0 8 H itc h c o ck H ou se — O perating su p p o rt for a halfw ay h ouse for w om en alcoholics (fourth year) ................................................. . $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 J e w is h C om m u n ity C en ter o f C le v e la n d — S enior a d u lt w alk for h e a lth p ro g ra m ........................... $ 3 ,0 0 0 J u d s o n Park — S u p p o rt of Jo rd a n G a rd n e r r e s i d e n ts ................. $ 6 1 ,9 9 8 L a y m e n ’s R e tr e a t P r o jec t, Inc., M entor, O hio — T he Second-25-Y ears C apital C am paign for S h ad y b ro o k H ouse over th re e y e a rs . . . . $ 3 0 ,0 0 0

L u th e r a n M e tr o p o lita n M in is tr y A s s o c ia tio n — E x p an sio n of th e N ursing Hom e O m b u d sm a n P rogram for elderly a n d m en ta lly ill in nonlicensed h o m es over tw o y e a rs ....................................................$ 6 0 ,0 0 0 M atch — In terim fu n d in g . . $ 2 0 ,8 8 3 M ount P le a s a n t Y outh A c tio n C ou ncil, Inc. — P ersonnel su p p o rt for th e Day Care C enter over th ree y e a rs ..........................................$ 3 0 ,0 0 0 The M u sical A r ts A s s o c ia tio n — Pension su b sid y for retired m u sic ia n s of T he C leveland O rc h e s tra . . $ 7 ,4 6 0 C ity o f N orth O lm sted — E xpansion of the Youth D iversion P r o g r a m ...................................$ 1 0 ,0 0 0 N u rsin g H om e A d v iso r y and R e se a r ch C ou ncil, Inc. — R esearch and advocacy efforts on b eh alf of n u rsin g hom e p a tie n ts (fifth year) ......................................................$ 2 5 ,0 0 0 Ohio P r e sb y te r ia n H om es, C olum bus, Ohio — C o m m unity plaza, Senior C itizens C o m m unity C enter of B reckenridge Village ........................................$ 100,000 Ohio S ta te U n iv e r s ity D e v e lo p ­ m en t Fund, C olu m b u s, O hio — C uyahoga C ounty C ooperative E xtension Service e d u catio n program for nonpublic a ssista n c e food sta m p fam ilies........................................ $ 3 8 ,6 8 6 P a rm a d a le-S t. A n th o n y ’s — M atching fu n d s to e sta b lish a fam ily drug tre a tm e n t pro g ram . . . $ 1 5 ,7 8 0 P la n n e d P a r e n th o o d o f C le v e la n d , Inc. — G eneral o p eratin g su p p o rt ............................................

. . .

$ 1,000

P ly m o u th C hurch o f S h a k e r H e ig h ts F o u n d a tio n — G eneral s u p p o r t ..........................$ 8 ,0 0 0 P o lic e A th le tic L ea g u e, Inc. — E stab lish m e n t of PAL c e n te r on th e n e a r w est side of C leveland over tw o y e a rs .......................................... $ 20,000 T he P r e s b y te r y o f th e W e ste r n R e se r v e — L earning, vocational and recreational program at C alvary P resbyterian C h u rch over two y e a r s ................................ $ 9 6 ,0 5 0

T he L egal A id S o c ie ty o f C le v e la n d — Revision a n d pu b licatio n of m a n u a l on confidentiality of reco rd s of m en ta lly disabled p a tie n ts th ro u g h th e Bar A dvocacy P roject . . . $ 7 ,5 0 0

23


V o c a tio n a l G u id a n c e and R e h a b ilita tio n S e r v ic e s — C onversion of th e sew in g /clo th in g for h a n d ic a p p e d p ro g ram to m a ss pro d u ctio n level (fourth year) .................................................. $ 1 5 0 ,0 0 0 R .E .A .C .H ., Inc. — E x p a n sio n of serv ices to c h ild ren from ag es six to t h i r t e e n ....................................$ 1 3 ,8 5 0 T h e B e n ja m in R o se I n s t it u t e — E sta b lish m e n t of a S h a k e r S q u are n eig h b o rh o o d office.............$ 1 3 5 ,2 2 7 O perating s u p p o rt................ $ 3 0 ,0 0 0 S u p p o rt for one p e n s io n e r . . . $ 5 ,2 7 7 S t. P a u l’s E p isc o p a l C h urch , C le v e la n d H e ig h ts , O hio — G eneral su p p o rt a n d th e R everend M cC racken F u n d ...................... $ 2 ,0 0 0 T h e S a lv a tio n A rm y — G eneral s u p p o r t ...................... $ 5 ,0 0 0 T h e S o c ie t y for C rip p led C h ild ren o f C u yah oga C ou nty, Inc. — T echnical A ssistan ce P roject for h a n d ic a p p e d ch ild ren (second y e a r ) .......................................... $ 3 4 ,4 3 1 T e a m ste r s A s s is t a n c e P rogram for S e n io r C itiz e n s , Inc. — E x p an sio n of Project H.O.M.E., a hom e ap p lian ce rep air p ro g ram for sen io r c itizen s over tw o y e a r s ................................ $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 U n ite d C ereb ra l P a ls y A s s o c ia tio n , Inc. o f C u yah oga C ou n ty — In d e p e n d e n t Living P rogram (second year) . . . . $ 2 5 ,7 4 6 U n ite d Fund o f C o llier C ounty, N a p le s, F lo rid a — G eneral s u p p o r t ........................... $ 5 0 0 U n ite d M e th o d ist A lc o h o l and C h em ica l C o u n selin g , Inc. (UMACC) — E x p an sio n of alcohol a n d chem ical ad d ictio n in te rv en tio n a n d ed u catio n p rogram (third a n d fourth y e a r) .......................................... $ 6 0 ,0 0 0 U n ited W ay o f G reater Toledo, Toledo, Ohio — G eneral s u p p o rt.........................$ 1 ,0 0 0 U n ited W ay S e r v ic e s — D evelop­ m en t of a m a n a g e m e n t a ssistan ce p rogram over tw o y e a rs . . . $ 120,000 G eneral op eratin g su p p o rt . . . . $ 5 0 0 T he V a lley P r e s b y te r ia n C hurch — G eneral s u p p o r t ....................$ 1 2 ,0 0 0

T he V o lu n te e r s o f A m e r ic a — E x p an sio n of sh e lte r serv ices a n d inclusio n of w o m en in th e p ro g ra m s .....................................................$ 2 5 ,0 0 0 W e stla k e H e a lth C am p u s A s s o c ia ­ tio n — P la n n in g of a com plete ran g e of social service, m e n ta l h e a lth , a n d h e a lth care services on a single ca m p u s over tw o y e a rs . . . . $ 5 2 ,8 0 0 Young M en ’s C h r istia n A s s o c ia ­ tio n , F in d lay, O hio — In itiatio n of th e “ H eart & S o u l” recreatio n al p rogram for th e elderly over th ree y e a rs * .......................................... $ 3 3 ,6 4 5 Young M en’s C h r istia n A s s o c ia ­ tio n o f L ake C ounty, P a in e s v ille , O hio — O perating s u p p o r t .......................$ 1 ,0 0 0 T he Young W om en ’s C h r istia n A s s o c ia tio n o f C le v e la n d — C ontinued su p p o rt of th e PACT (Peer A pproach: C ounseling by Teens) program (second a n d th ird year) ......................................................$ 9 4 ,5 2 5 Young W om en’s C h r istia n A s s o c ia tio n o f T oledo, T oledo, O hio — G eneral s u p p o r t.......................$ 1 ,0 0 0

B oy S c o u ts o f A m e r ic a , G r e a te r C le v e la n d C o u n cil No. 4 4 0 — General su p p o r t............................ $ 2 9 0 B o y s’ C lu b s o f C le v e la n d , Inc. — General su p p o r t............................... $ 7 5 8 E liz a B r y a n t C e n te r — General s u p p o r t .................... $ 1 3 ,8 6 2 C a th o lic C h a r itie s C o rp o ra tio n — Benefit of aged p e r s o n s .......... $ 3 ,0 0 0 Benefit of P arm adale................... $ 7 ,9 2 8 CEDU F o u n d a tio n , In c., R u n n in g S p r in g s , C a lifo r n ia — General s u p p o r t ........................... $ 4 ,8 6 3 C e n te r for H u m an S e r v ic e s — General s u p p o r t.............................. $ 2 5 7 General support for the Day Nursery A ssociation of Cleveland . . . . $ 3 ,2 8 1 General support for the Family Service A ssociation Division ...................................................... $ 2 8 ,2 7 7 General support for the HomemakerHealth Aide D iv isio n ..................$ 2 ,0 0 0 C h ild G u id a n ce C e n te r — Operating s u p p o r t ..........................$ 2 9 2 T h e C h ild r e n ’s A id S o c ie ty — General su p p o rt...............................$ 3 4 9 General support for the Industrial H o m e ............................................$ 4 9 ,4 6 7 C h ild r e n ’s S e r v ic e s — General su p p o rt............................... $ 6 8 6

TOTAL SOCIAL SERVICES GRANTS—UNDESIGNATED ............................................ $ 3 ,8 2 8 ,2 7 8

C h rist E p isc o p a l C h u rch — General support.............................$ 1 ,0 9 7

(Following recipients and program s designated by donor)

T he C hurch H om e — General s u p p o r t...................... $ 4 ,9 4 9

A lc o h o lism S e r v ic e s o f C le v e la n d , Inc. — G eneral s u p p o rt................. $ 3 7

T he C h urch o f th e Saviou r, U n ite d M e th o d is t — General s u p p o r t .......................$ 3 ,6 7 7

A m erica n B ib le S o c ie ty , N ew York, N ew York — G eneral su p p o rt. . $ 4 5 8 A m erica n R ed C ross, G rea ter C lev ela n d C h ap ter — G eneral S u p p o r t ...................... $ 2 ,9 7 9 B e e c h B rook — G eneral su p p o rt ....................................................$ 4 6 ,9 7 6

C le v e la n d C h r istia n H om e, Inc. — General s u p p o r t......................... $ 2 ,4 0 5 C ity o f C le v e la n d —D iv isio n of P o lic e — Prevention of delinquency am ong b o y s ......................................$ 5 1 7

B e lle fa ir e — G eneral su p p o rt ...................................................... $ 5 ,2 0 6

C lev ela n d P r e s s C h r istm a s Fund — General support for needy and deserving fam ilies and children .........................................................$ 1 ,4 7 7

B ig B r o th e r s/B ig S is te r s of G reater C le v e la n d — G eneral s u p p o r t ....................$ 1 0 ,2 8 2

T he C lev ela n d P s y c h o a n a ly tic S o c ie ty F o u n d a tio n — General su p p o r t................................. $ 2 5 Research and application of p sych o­ analysis and support projects ...................................................... $ 3 0 ,4 3 8

24


T h e C le v e la n d S o c ie t y for th e B lin d — General support. . . $ 2 2 ,2 1 3 Research or any other purpose .....................................................$ 1 2 ,0 2 4 Volunteer braille transcribers $ 2 ,2 8 1 C u y a h o g a C o u n ty W elfare D e p a r tm e n t — Special client n e e d s .................................................. $ 3 5 0

L ittle S is t e r s o f th e Poor — Operating su p p o r t...................... $ 2 ,0 1 2 T h e L u th e r a n H om e for th e A ged — General s u p p o r t...................... $ 9 ,2 1 1 L u th e r a n W elfare Fund — General su p p o rt........................... $ 1 ,916 M a r y cr e st S c h o o l — General s u p p o r t.........................$ 4 ,9 4 9

T h e T h ree-C orner-R ound P ack O u tfit, Inc. — General support for cam ping program ...................... $ 11,220 T rin ity C a th ed ra l — General support............................$ 1 ,7 9 7 U n ite d A p p ea l o f A sh la n d C ounty, O hio, Inc. — General support $ 2 ,2 9 8 U n ite d W ay S e r v ic e s — General su p p o r t.................... $ 2 6 7 ,7 2 2

E a s t E nd N eig h b o r h o o d H o u se — General su p p ort........................... $ 2 ,2 8 1

The M on tefiore H om e — General s u p p o r t.........................$ 4 ,9 4 9

F a ir m o u n t P r e s b y te r ia n C h urch — General su p p ort........................... $ 1 ,6 7 8

Our L ady o f th e W a y sid e, Inc. — General s u p p o r t........................ $ 7 ,2 9 6

F e d e r a tio n for C o m m u n ity P la n n in g — Central Volunteer B u r e a u .......................................... $ 2 ,9 6 6

P a rm a d a le-S t. A n th o n y ’s — Operating su p p ort................. $ 1 0 ,4 7 7

General su p p ort........................... $ 3 ,3 2 1

P la n n e d P a ren th o o d o f C lev ela n d , Inc. — General su p p o rt. . . . $ 1 0 ,4 2 7

T h e F ir s t C o n g r e g a tio n a l C hurch o f S o n o m a , S o n o m a , C a lifo r n ia — General s u p p o r t..............................$ 2 9 0

Assistance to needy of Sunbeam School graduating c la s s ..........$ 1 ,0 0 0

The B en jam in R ose I n s tit u te — General s u p p o r t ...................... $ 1 4 ,3 3 2

General s u p p o r t.......................$ 3 ,3 0 8

T he F ir s t U n ite d M e th o d ist C h urch, A sh la n d , O hio — General s u p p o r t ...................... $ 4 ,5 9 6 G o o d w ill I n d u s t r ie s o f G re a ter C le v e la n d — General support . $ 8 8 2 G re a ter C le v e la n d N eig h b o rh o o d C e n te r s A s s o c ia t io n — General s u p p o r t ...................... $ 9 ,2 2 9 T h e H eb rew F r e e L oan A s s o c ia ­ tio n — General su p p o rt.......... $ 1 ,0 0 0 T h e H iram H o u se — General su p p ort........................... $ 1 ,3 3 5 H om e for t h e A g e d W om en o f C le v e la n d , O hio — General s u p p o r t .........................$ 4 ,9 4 9 E liz a J e n n in g s H om e — E q u ip m e n t.............................. $ 2 7 ,9 8 9 General s u p p o r t.................... $ 2 0 ,5 6 6 J e w is h C o m m u n ity F e d e r a tio n of C le v e la n d — General support . $ 2 5 7 J o n e s H om e o f C h ild r e n ’s S e r v ic e s — Capital im provem ent in building and e q u ip m e n t.......................$ 2 7 ,9 8 9 General s u p p o r t ...................... $ 1 7 ,0 3 6 L a k ew o o d C h r is tia n C h u rch — General s u p p o r t .........................$ 2 ,4 3 3 T h e H a ttie L a rlh a m F o u n d a tio n , Inc., M an tu a, O hio — General s u p p o r t ......................... $ 6 ,9 9 7

T he V is itin g N u rse A s s o c ia tio n of C lev ela n d — General support ........................................................ $ 2 ,7 8 1 V ocation al G u id an ce and R e h a b il­ ita tio n S e r v ic e s — A ssistance to needy clients of Sunbeam School

$ 1,000

R ose-M ary C en ter — General support........................... $ 2 ,1 0 9

W est S id e D e u tsc h e r F ra u en V erein , T he A lte n h e im — General su p p ort........................$ 1 7 ,5 5 1

S t. A n d r ew s U n ite d M e th o d ist C hurch, F in d lay, O hio — General support*............................. $119

Young M en’s C h ristia n A sso c ia tio n , A sh la n d , O hio — General s u p p o r t.......................$ 2 ,2 9 8

S t. Jo h n L u th e r a n C hurch — General su p p o rt........................... $ 1,916

T he Young M en’s C h ristia n A sso c ia tio n o f C le v e la n d — General s u p p o r t......................... $ 2 ,5 8 8

S t. M a rtin ’s E p isc o p a l C hurch — General su p p o rt............................. $ 2 9 0

General support to West Side B r a n c h ........................................$ 1 3 ,9 9 4

T h e S a lv a tio n A rm y — General s u p p o r t...................... $ 2 0 ,2 7 2

Young M en ’s an d Young W om en ’s C h ristia n A s s o c ia tio n — General support to Lakewood Combined B ra n ch .................... $ 1 3 ,9 9 4

T he S a lv a tio n Arm y, A sh la n d , Ohio — General support . . . . $ 2 ,2 9 8 T he S c o ttis h R ite B e n e v o le n t F ou n d ation , L e x in g to n , M a s s a c h u s e tts — General su p p o rt............................. $ 2 9 0 S is te r s o f N otre D am e, C hardon, Ohio — Physical education program for the Julie Billiart S c h o o l. . $ 1 1 ,9 6 7 T he S o c ie ty for C rip p led C h ild ren — E q u ip m en t.........................$ 2 7 ,9 8 9 General s u p p o r t ...................... $ 1 4 ,3 3 9 S o c ie ty o f S t. V in c e n t De P au l — Operating s u p p o r t........................ $ 5 7 9

T he Young W om en ’s C h r istia n A s s o c ia tio n o f C le v e la n d — General su p p o rt.............................. $ 9 9 3 TOTAL SOCIAL SERVICES GRANTS — DESIGNATED ................................................... $ 8 9 0 ,0 8 9 TOTAL SOCIAL SERVICES GRANTS — DESIGNATED AND UNDESIGNATED..........$ 4 ,7 1 8 ,3 6 7 * Grant recom m ended by Findlay Distribution C om m ittee o f the L. Dale Dorney Fund.

S ta r r C o m m o n w ea lth for B o y s, A lb ion , M ich igan — General su p p o rt...........................$1,3 1 3

25


Cultural Affairs On J u n e 3 0 ,1 9 8 2 , C leveland will see th e c u lm in a tio n of a sev en -y ear p ro cess of e v alu a tio n , p la n n in g a n d fund ra is ­ in g th a t h a s sig n ific a n tly a lte red th e profile a n d d e v e lo p m e n t of th e c ity ’s p ro fessio n al p e rfo rm in g a rts. O n th a t date, six o rg a n iz atio n s in clu d e d in th e ad hoc C leveland C on­ so rtiu m for th e P erfo rm in g A rts — G re at L akes S h a k e sp e a re Festival, C leveland B allet, C leveland O pera, K a ram u H ouse, P la y h o u se S q u a re F o u n d a tio n a n d C leveland Play H ouse — m u s t h av e re a c h e d th e ir resp ectiv e fu n d -raisin g goals in th e three-to-one m a tc h in g g ra n t to ta lin g $2 m illion m a d e in O ctober 1979 by th e N ational E n d o w m e n t for th e A rts ($1.75 m illion) a n d T h e C leveland F o u n d atio n ($250,000). T h e ch allen g e, of co u rse, h a s been m et. T h e p e rfo rm in g a rts scen e here h a s b e en e n ric h e d by m ore th a n $8 m illion. F ro m th e b e g in n in g of th e 42.5m o n th ch allen g e period, how ever, m o re th a n a fin an cial b o tto m line w as a t stak e . As early a s th e m id-1970s, C leveland F o u n d a tio n staff p rescrib ed th e n e ed for th e c ity ’s p rofessional a rts o rg a n iz a tio n s to a d d re ss th e quality, ra n g e a n d m a n a g e m e n t of th e ir se rv ­ ices. Two c o m p a n ie s — C leveland B allet a n d C leveland O pera — h a d re ­ c en tly ra ised d e b u t sea so n c u rta in s w ith m a jo r F o u n d a tio n su p p o rt, m a k ­ in g th e se is su e s all th e m o re p e rtin e n t. By 1977, w h e n th e F o u n d atio n a sse m b le d a m e e tin g of th e bo ard c h a irm a n , d ire c to r a n d /o r m a n a g e r of e ac h in s titu tio n , th e g ro u p s w ere read y to ta k e a cold, h a rd look a t th e m selv e s a n d th e ir fu tu re s. T h e self-evaluation p ro c e ss th a t fol­ low ed, m a rk e d by F o u n d atio n -fu n d ed

visits from natio n ally -reco g n ized c o n ­ su lta n ts, econom ic a n a ly se s by F o u n d atio n staff, a n d a review b y a co m m ittee m ad e u p of so m e of th e c ity ’s top co rp o rate ex ecu tiv es a n d civic leaders, w as labor-intensive an d rigorous in its a tte n tio n to detail. Fiscal b aselin e in fo rm atio n w as g ath ered , a r­ tistic m issio n s w ere re a ssessed , an d five-year p la n s w ere e tch e d — in th e case of several o rg an izatio n s, for th e first tim e. T he w ork led to th e creatio n of th e m ore form al C o n so rtiu m , w hich in De­ cem b er 1978 su b m itte d th e C hallenge G ra n t proposal. (A lthough T he C leve­ lan d O rc h estra h a d p a rtic ip a ted in the process a n d su p p o rte d th e c o n so rtiu m application, it did n o t seek federal funding, h av in g received a m ajo r NEA C hallenge G ra n t in 1977.) C lev elan d ’s C hallenge G ra n t a t­ tra c te d n atio n al a tte n tio n for th e co m p leten ess of its vision. Here w as th e first a tte m p t by a m ajo r in d u stria l city to organize a balan ced a n d realistic p lan to serve th e diversity of its per­ form ing a rts in stitu tio n s — a n d its people. Significantly, th e process h a s opened m a n y new doors for th e a rts c o m m u ­ nity, a ttra c tin g co rp o rate s u p p o rt in excess of $2.5 m illion in new or in ­ creased c o n trib u tio n s, or ro u g h ly 33 p e rc en t of th e o rg an izatio n s’ c o n trib ­ u ted incom e d u rin g th e challenge period, as opposed to only 9 p e rc en t d u rin g th e y e a r p reced in g th e fu n d ­ raisin g effort. (It is w o rth n o tin g th a t T he C leveland F oundation reaffirm ed its c o m m itm e n t to th e C o nsortium , g ra n tin g n early $2.5 m illion to the sev en m e m b e r g ro u p s d u rin g th e c h a l­ lenge period.) Of course, even u n d e r th e se b e st of circ u m sta n c e s, th e p erfo rm in g a rts in A m erica trav el a rocky road. T h eir special ex p erien ce is a p ro d u c t th a t w ith few ex cep tio n s c a n n o t be m asspro d u ced — a risk y financial an o m aly in a co u n try c o n su m in g video g am es a n d B etam ax es. W ith o u t ta k in g aw ay from th e C hallenge G ra n t’s co n sid er­ able acc o m p lish m e n ts, p ro d u ctio n

T h e te r m s o f th e C h a lle n g e G r a n t h a v e b e e n m e t. T h e p e r fo r m in g a r ts s c e n e in C le v e la n d h a s b e e n e n r ic h e d b y m o re th a n $ 8 m illio n .

W h a t is m o s t h e a r t ­ e n in g , a s t h e C h a lle n g e G r a n t p ro c e ss re a c h e s its finale, is t h e i n ­ crea sed s ta b ility o f ea ch a r ts o r g a n iz a tio n .

B ro o k s S e r ie s a t t h e P la y H ouse: bring­

ing a charm ing 160-seat theater back to life w ith adventurous new plays. 27


H ere w a s th e f i r s t a t t e m p t b y a m a jo r i n d u s t r i a l c i t y to o r g a n iz e a r e a lis tic p l a n to s e r v e t h e d i ­ v e r s i t y o f i t s m a jo r a r ts in s titu tio n s — a n d i t s p e o p le .

co sts for C le v e la n d ’s a rts in s titu tio n s will c o n tin u e to rise, o u ts trip p in g box office re v e n u e. In co m e g a p s will re m a in . W h at is m o s t h e a rte n in g , th o u g h , a s th e p ro cess re a c h e s its fin a le , is th e in c re ase d sta b ility of e a c h o rg a n iz a ­ tion, b o th a rtistic a lly a n d w ith re g a rd to m a n a g e m e n t. Clearly, th e C h allen g e G ra n t h a s d o n e w h a t NEA a n d C leve­ land F o u n d atio n officials in te n d e d it to do: it h a s serv ed a s a n im p e tu s for red efin in g a rtis tic policies a n d forging a stronger, b ro a d e r a n d m o re reliable fu n d in g b a se w ith in th e c o m m u n ity to keep incom e g ap s a s n a rro w as possible. T h e c h allen g e c o n tin u e s. In 1981, tw o m e m b e rs of th e C o nsor­ tiu m , K aram u H ouse a n d G reat L ak es S h a k e sp e a re Festival, m a d e u se of F o undation s u p p o rt to realize a rtistic goals th a t c an be tra c e d b a c k a t le a s t a s far a s th e five-year p la n s th e o rg a n iz a ­ tio n s d evised for th e F o u n d atio n in 1978. H ere a g ain is ev id en ce th a t th e C hallenge G ra n t a n d th e p ro cess it set in m otion are p ro d u c in g tan g ib le p ro ­ g ra m grow th.

K a r a m u fs D r e a m C o m e s T r u e B uilding on a 5 8-year tra d itio n th a t h a s c o n trib u te d m ig h tily to th e d ev elo p ­ m e n t of A m erica’s b lack d ra m a tic a rt, K aram u H ouse in tro d u ce d in J a n u a r y 1982 its K aram u C o m p an y — th e first professional a ctin g c o m p a n y in its history. Aided by a 1981 g ra n t of $ 6 0 ,0 0 0 from T h e C leveland F o u n d atio n , th e form ation of th e new c o m p a n y — a K aram u d re a m for m a n y y e a rs — is of natio n al significance: it is believed to be th e only b lack pro fessio n al p e rfo rm ­ ing a rts group in th e c o u n try o u tsid e of New York. T he p lan is for th e K aram u C o m p an y to draw on pro fessio n al (A ctors’ E quity) ta le n t from all over th e country. Its director now reg u larly c o n d u c ts a u d i­ tio n s on b o th co asts, e n co u ra g e s local

28

T h e K aram u C om pany: a debut season

celebrating shared hum anity. ta le n t K a ra m u h a s n u rtu re d , a n d on occasio n in v ites d is tin g u is h e d alu m n i to m ak e re tu rn v isits to th e K a ram u stage. T h e K a ra m u C o m p a n y ’s c h a rte r p ro d u c tio n , a revival of L o rrain e H a n s b e rry ’s u p liftin g 1959 d ra m a , A R a is in in th e S u n , d e m o n stra te d how ex citin g th a t c o n c e p t c a n be. S ta rrin g w as B ro ad w ay a c tre s s M innie G entry, w ho p la y ed th e sa m e role a t K aram u 20 y e a rs ago. T h e su p p o rtin g c a s t in ­ clu d ed ex p erien c e d p e rfo rm ers from New York a n d H ollyw ood, a lo n g w ith sev eral gifted y o u n g C leveland acto rs gro o m ed in K a ra m u ’s pro fessio n al tra in in g u n it. T h e n ew tro u p e w as g reeted w ith p a ck e d h o u se s a n d c riti­ cal acclaim . “ T h e K a ram u C o m p an y !’ w rote a lead in g critic, “ is off to a p ro m ­ isin g s ta r t!’ T h e p ro fessio n al com pany, w h ich c o m p le m e n ts K a ra m u ’s c o m m u n ity th e a te r p ro g ram , p erfo rm s a t th e 8 6 th S tre e t lo catio n th a t is th e h o m e for m o st of th e a g e n c y ’s activ ities. K aram u officials, how ever, h o p e to re a ch o u t to


a la rg e r a u d ie n c e th a n c an be serv ed by th e ir 2 2 3 -se at P ro sc e n iu m T h eatre; in 1982, th e y en v isio n special a p p e a r­ a n c e s for th e c o m p a n y a t th e 1,000-seat O hio T h e a tre on P la y h o u se S q u are. S u rely th e la u n c h in g of th e K aram u C o m p a n y is a te s ta m e n t to th e vitality of th e local th e a te r scene. B u t it is m ore th a n th a t. T h e re w as a n infectio u s cele­ b ra tio n of s h a re d h u m a n ity a b o u t th is d e b u t se a so n , w h ic h also in clu d ed th e w orld p re m ie re m u sic a l a d ap ta tio n of Z o ra N eale H u rs to n 's novel, T h e ir E y e s W ere W a tc h in g God, a n d a new version of S h a k e s p e a re ’s T a m in g o f th e S hrew , p e rfo rm ed a s a tu rn -o f-th e -c en tu ry m e d icin e sh o w a n d laced w ith S co tt J o p lin ’s e x u b e ra n t rags. If th e se p la y s w ere linked, quite rightly, b y a b la ck p ersp ectiv e, th ey also d e a lt w ith la rg e r q u e stio n s ask ed b y all m e n a n d w om en. In th a t sense, th e y are no m o re “ b la c k ” th a n O ’C asey is a p la y w rig h t ex clusively for th e Irish, or A risto p h a n e s solely for th e G reeks. As th e c o m p a n y ’s d ire c to r p u ts it, “ K a ra m u is p re s e n tin g th e a te r th a t e x ­ p lo res th e h u m a n c o n d itio n — a s seen th ro u g h th e eyes, a n d felt by th e h e a rts, of th e b e st b e st b la ck a rtis ts in A m e ric a;’

S h a k e s p e a r e F in d s a H om e on P la y h o u se S q u a re S ince its first se a so n in 1962, th e G reat L ak es S h a k e sp e a re F estival h a s p ro ­ d u c ed its c lassical p lay s in a w e st side civic a u d ito riu m lo cated w ith in th e L akew ood H igh School com plex. T he facility is large, m o d e rn a n d co m fo rt­ able, w ith good a c o u stic s a n d a d e q u a te s ig h t lines. W h a t it is not, how ever, is a th eater. D u rin g th e F estiv al’s early y ears, w h e n G LSF of n e c e ssity p re se n te d its p lay s o n a s h o e s trin g b u d g e t, a n d h e n ce p aid s c a n t a tte n tio n to sets, co s­ tu m e s a n d lig h tin g , L akew ood Civic A u d ito riu m serv ed its p u rp o se well. In m o re r e c e n t y e ars, how ever, th e F estival — like th e te e n a g e r stru g g lin g to sq u ee z e in to la st y e a r ’s slac k s has o u tg ro w n th e facility. It h a s developed a la rg e r p ro fessio n al a c tin g com pany. It see k s to e x p a n d th e le n g th of th e s e a ­ son. Its p ro d u c tio n s are m ore elab o rate. It c a n no lo n g er co m p ete

w ith high school c o m m e n c e m e n ts for access to th e stag e. A nd p e rh a p s m o st im p o rtan t, G LSF’s a rtistic d ire c to r e sti­ m a te s th a t d u e to th e sh a p e a n d d esig n of th e Civic, “ 15 p e rc e n t or m o re of a p la y ’s im m ed iate em o tio n al im p a c t is lost th ere!’ C learly th e Festival n eed ed a new h o m e — a p e rm a n e n t h o m e — to fulfill its a rtistic m ission. H appily th e c o m ­ p a n y h a s found one. In J u ly 1982 GLSF will raise th e c u rta in on its 21st seaso n — dow ntow n, on P lay h o u se S q u are, am id th e b eau tifu lly resto red sp len d o r of th e Ohio T h eatre. (In so doing, GLSF beco m es th e first te n a n t for th e Found atio n -fu n d ed P lay h o u se S q u a re center. O th er C o n so rtiu m te n a n ts, in ad d itio n to K aram u , will in clu d e C leve­ lan d O pera a n d C leveland Ballet.) T h e m ove do w n to w n cap s m o re th a n a y e ar of p la n n in g for GLSF. W ith th e aid of a $125,000 g ra n t from th e F o u n ­ dation, th e Festival h a s ta k e n step s to m ax im ize th e O hio’s p o ten tial, b o th o n stag e an d b ack stag e, a s a su p erb forum for classical d ra m a . T h e g ra n t will enable th e Festival to e n h an c e w h a t th e a te r people call its “ p ro d u c ­ tion v alu es” — th e sp ectacle created th ro u g h sets, co stu m es, lig h tin g a n d special effects. T h e Ohio affords GLSF th e first o p ­ p o rtu n ity in its h isto ry to produce u n d e r ideal tech n ical conditions. T he th e a te r b o a sts am p le “ fly sp ace!’ w hich will allow GLSF to create scenic d e­ sig n s of g reater com plexity a n d to m ak e faster, sm o o th e r se t ch an g es. T h e c o m p an y will hav e ap p ro x im ately 25 0 lig h tin g in s tru m e n ts a t its disposal — m ore th a n double th e n u m b e r it could u se in Lakew ood — along w ith its first co m p u terized lig h t board. T he stag e in clu d es m u c h “ tra p p e d ” floor space, u sed for m a k in g e n tra n c e s from below, a n d c o n tain s significantly m ore “w in g ” sp ace th a n th e Civic. On P lay h o u se S q u are, th e p o s­ sibilities for ach iev in g m em o rab le,

T he new K a ra m u C o m p a n y is b e ­ l ie v e d to b e t h e o n l y b la c k p r o fe s s io n a l p e r fo r m in g a r ts g r o u p in t h e c o u n ­ tr y o u ts id e o f N ew Y ork.

T h e O h io T h e a t r e o ffe r s th e S h a k e ­ s p e a r e F e s tiv a l t h e f i r s t o p p o r t u n i t y in i t s h i s t o r y to p r o ­ d u c e u n d e r id e a l t e c h n ic a l c o n d i­ tio n s .

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T h e s c u lp tu r e e x h i­ b itio n a t E d g e w a te r P a r k , s a y s th e p r o j­ e c t d ir e c to r , 44g a v e p e o p le w h o h a d b e e n in tim id a te d b y a r t a c h a n c e to s e e it, a p p r o a c h i t a n d le a r n a b o u t itV

‘A t th e A r a b ic a ’: m ixing poetry a n d fo lk music, the lure of espresso beans and the excitem ent of a radio broadcast.

a rre stin g visu al p ro d u c tio n s a re n early u n lim ited . W ith th e aw esom e N icholas N ic kle b y slated for its in a u g u ra l sea so n a t th e Ohio, th a t is precisely w h a t th e Festival now req u ires.

O h io P o e t s a n d M u s i c i a n s A r e a H it 44A t t h e A r a b i c a ” O ver th e p a st year, a C leveland H eights coffeehouse called A rabica Coffee a n d Tea h a s served a s th e heady, aro m atic se ttin g for a u n iq u e radio p ro g ram sh o w casin g th e w orks of Ohio poets an d folk m u sician s. Offering lively proof th a t New York City a n d S a n F ran cisco do n o t c o rn e r th e m a rk e t on th e coffeehouse scene, “At th e A ra b ic a ” — a s th e half-hour p ro g ram is called — is b e am e d by s a te l­ lite to m ore th a n 50 N ational Public Radio sta tio n s co ast to coast.

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T h e p ro ject, p a rtia lly fu n d e d b y an $18,000 F o u n d a tio n g ra n t, is th e b ra in ­ ch ild of th e C leveland P o etry Project, a relativ ely n ew o rg a n iz atio n ded icated to e n c o u ra g in g a re a p o ets a n d p ro m o t­ in g c o n te m p o ra ry poetry. T h e id ea w as sim ple: co m b in e two h ig h ly c o m p atib le a rts fo rm s a t a loca­ tio n a lre ad y fre q u e n te d b y a b attalio n of C lev elan d ’s w riters, a rtis ts a n d m u si­ cian s. T h e n a d d th e lu re of freshro a sted esp resso b e a n s a n d th e ex cite­ m e n t of a rad io crew (from WCLV-FM, C lev elan d ’s fine a rts statio n ) ta p in g for la te r b ro a d c a s t h ere a n d a cro ss th e country. T he p leasu refu l re su lt, a k in d of th ro w b a c k to th e g olden age of A m eri­ can coffeehouses in th e 1950s a n d 1960s, reg u larly d ra w s u p w a rd s of 200 people to th e F rid ay e v en in g tap in g s. For each p ro g ram , a n Ohio p o et ra n g ­ ing from th e n o ted ed ito r of T h e K en yo n R e v ie w to a less w ell-know n in h a b ita n t of P o m ero y or M arion re a d s from h is ow n w ork, c o m p le m e n te d by a folk a rtis t or g ro u p w h o se rep erto ire could be a n y th in g from A p p a lac h ia n to sw ing.


P o etry P ro ject staff n o te s th a t th o u g h m a n y people co m e to th e A rab ica p ri­ m a rily to h e a r h a m m e r d u lc im e rs an d a co u stic g u ita rs, th e c h a rg e d a tm o s ­ p h e re of th e ta p in g s h a s w on m a n y new fan s for m o d e rn poetry. In th e rig h t place, a fte r all, th e sly e st m e ta ­ p h o r c a n be a s a ccessib le a s a cu p of c ap p u ccin o .

P u b l i c A r t B l o o m s in E dgew ater P a r k A rolling 12-acre tra c t of fields a n d tre e s on th e u p p e r level of E d g e w a ter P a rk b e ca m e a glorious a rt gallery la st s u m ­ m e r for 11 O hio a rtis ts p a rtic ip a tin g in th e “ S c u lp tu re O u tsid e in C lev elan d ” project, a ju rie d sh o w sp o n so re d b y th e New O rg a n iz atio n for th e V isual A rts (NOVA). T h e show, p a rtia lly s u p p o rte d by T h e C leveland F o u n d atio n , b ro u g h t 14 m a s ­ sive e n v iro n m e n ta l s c u lp tu re s — in clu d in g th re e by in te rn a tio n a lly re ­ sp ec te d sc u lp to rs C h arles G innever, W inifred L utz a n d C le m en t M eadm ore to th e a tte n tio n of a b ro a d s p e c tru m of th e public. W ith L ake E rie a n d th e d o w n to w n sk y lin e a s its s tu n n in g back d ro p , th e ex h ib itio n a ttra c te d h u n d re d s of W est S h o rew ay tra v e le rs th ro u g h o u t th e late s u m m e r a n d e arly fall. V isitors could view th e show a t th e ir leisu re a n d on th e ir ow n te rm s, in c o u n te rp o in t w ith su c h b u sin e ss-a s-u su a l p a rk activ ities as jo g g in g, picn ick in g , s u n b a th in g a n d bicycling. As th e p ro je c t’s d ire c to r observed, th e e x h ib itio n “ gave people w ho h a d b e en in tim id a te d by a r t a c h a n c e to see it, a p p ro a c h it a n d le a rn a b o u t it!’ W h en th a t e x p erien c e sp a rk e d “ sp ir­ ited d e b a te r a s it did m a n y tim e s last su m m er, staff k n ew th e y h a d a cc o m ­ p lish e d one of p u blic a r t ’s c e n tra l goals. A sse m b lin g th e show, m o u n te d w ith th e a s s is ta n c e of staff p rim arily from th e C leveland M useum of A rt, w as no e asy ta sk . A fter G innever, L utz an d M eadm ore — serv in g a s ju ro rs — h ad sele c ted th e 11 a rtis ts from m ore th a n 5 0 e n tre e s, th e re w as still th e m a tte r of in sta llin g th e pieces. E ach posed a dif­ fe re n t ch allen g e, d e p e n d in g on th e a r tis t’s m e d iu m ; th e e x h ib itio n in ­ c lu d ed w o rk s m a d e of steel, brick, co n crete, w ood, a lu m in u m , tile, clay,

sn o w fence, fiber glass, rip-stop nylon a n d p o ly ester resin im p reg n a te d w ith iron ore. A special c ra n e cap ab le of lifting 9 ,0 0 0 p o u n d s a n d clearin g 4 0 feet w as re q u ire d for th e steel w orks a n d su c h pieces a s R obert R essler’s to w erin g “ O, D elco” — 28 feet of carv ed sycam ore. W orkm en also u sed a tru ck lo ad of ce­ m e n t a n d su c h exotic e q u ip m e n t a s a back h o e a n d a po sth o le digger. T h e ex h ib itio n w as a focal p o in t of th e 1981 F o u n d atio n -sp o n so red S u m ­ m e r L ak efro n t Festival held at E d g ew ater — now officially C leveland L ak efro n t S tate P ark — an d help ed the p a rk draw a reco rd 4 .6 m illion visitors d u rin g th e sum m er. D espite th e sty listic ran g e of th e 14 w orks, th e ex h ib itio n w as all of a piece, th e w orks linked by large scale dim en-

A t t h e A r a b ic a , m o d e r n p o e t r y ’s s ly e s t m e ta p h o r c a n b e a s a c c e s s ib le as a cup o f c a p p u c c in o .

S c u lp tu r e a t E d gew ater: 14 m assive en­

vironmental works that 'needed all the outdoors to contain them'.

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T h e P la y H o u s e 's B ro o k s s e r ie s m a k e s a n in v e s t­ m e n t in n e w p l a y s a n d th e ir p la y ­ w r ig h ts — th e s tir r in g y o u n g v o ic e s o f t o d a y 's th e a te r , a n d t o m o r r o w ’s.

N ew P la y H ouse: Philip J o h n so n ’s first project fo r his hom etown.

sio n s a n d a n alw ays-provocative u se of o u td o o r m aterials. T h e y all seem ed to belong a t Edgew ater, p e rh a p s becau se, as a local re p o rte r p u t it, “T h ey n eed ed all of th e o u td o o rs to c o n tain th e m !’

A S tu n n in g N ew T h e a te r R is e s a t th e P la y H ou se T h ree 1981 C leveland F o u n d atio n g ra n ts m ad e to th e C leveland Play H ouse illu stra te th e a sto n ish in g ran g e of p ro g ram s going o n a t A m e ric a ’s oldest re sid e n t professional theater. In J a n u a ry 1982, g ro u n d w as b ro k en for a new Play H ouse th e a te r d esig n ed by w o rld -class a rc h ite c t (and n ativ e C levelander) Philip J o h n s o n , an d sch ed u led for co m p letio n in fall 1983. T he F oundatio n g ra n te d $ 2 0 0 ,0 0 0 to ­ w ard th e 652 -seat th e a te r a n d its eq u ip m e n t, w h ich will c o m p le m en t th e R o m an esq u e sty le of th e Play H o u se ’s alread y e x istin g F ran c is E. D ru ry a n d C harles S. B rooks th e a te rs, c re a tin g a v eritable “ th e a te r v illag e” on E a st 8 6 th Street. In this, his first a ss ig n m e n t in his hom etow n, J o h n s o n h a s conceived a new th e a te r of so arin g b e a u ty an d w a rm th . Its facade fe a tu re s a sm all

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to w er a n d im p o sin g ro tu n d a . Its p ro ­ sce n iu m sta g e c o n ta in s a w ide “a p ro n ” floor th a t th r u s ts g racefu lly on a curve in to th e a u d ito riu m . A long th e tw o side w alls of th e h o u se are th re e levels of shallow g alleries w h ic h sh o u ld e n su re ex cellen t a co u stic s. T h e new th eater, w h ic h rep laces th e Play H o u se ’s 7 7 th S tre e t facility, c o n ­ so lid ates th e c o m p a n y ’s o p e ra tio n on a 12-acre site th a t also in c lu d e s a recen tly acq u ired d e p a rtm e n t sto re. T h e sto re ’s 2 0 0 ,0 0 0 feet of in te rio r sp ac e will h o u se a c o m p re h e n siv e P ro d u ctio n C en ter a n d a n ew P lay H ouse Club. J u s t a s th e new P lay H ouse co m p lex ach iev es h a rm o n y in a n e le g a n t an d distin ctiv e c o m b in a tio n of old a n d new a rc h ite c tu re , th e c o m p a n y ’s 1981-82 seaso n su ccessfu lly m ix e d v ery differ­ e n t th e a tric a l e x p erien ces. At one e n d of th e s p e c tru m w as th e Play H o u se ’s m u sic al a d a p ta tio n — w ith th e s u p p o rt of a $21,000 F o u n d a ­ tion ch allen g e g ra n t m a tc h e d b y c o rp o ra tio n s — of D ick en s’ A C h rist­ m a s Carol. T h e Play H ouse v ersio n u ses in v en tiv e c o m m e d ia d e ll’a rte te c h n iq u e to tell its ev er-p o p u lar sto ry th ro u g h th e eyes a n d m in d of Scrooge. D eveloped a s a piece to e n te rta in a b ro ad C leveland au d ien ce, th is C h r is tm a s Carol play ed to sold-out


h o u s e s a n d s e e m s firm ly e sta b lish e d a s a h o lid ay tra d itio n for th e family. A t th e o th e r e n d w as th e seco n d s e a ­ so n of in n o v a tiv e p lay s p re se n te d in th e B rooks T h e a tre . T h e th ree-p lay series, for w h ic h th e F o u n d atio n g ra n te d $ 2 5 ,0 0 0 over tw o years, fills a n im p o rta n t n e ed in th e co m m u n ity , an d in fact, in th e natio n : it m a k e s a n in ­ v e s tm e n t in new p la y s a n d th e ir p la y ­ w rig h ts, th e s tro n g y o u n g voices of to d a y ’s th e a te r — a n d to m o rro w ’s. P raise d by a critic a s th e “ a rtistic s u rp ris e of th e c ity ’s s e a s o n ;’ th e B rooks series h a s also b ro u g h t b a c k to life a c h a rm in g , in tim a te 160-seat th e ­ a te r th a t h a d re m a in e d v irtu ally d a rk for th re e y e ars. T h e sm all-c ast plays selected for p ro d u c tio n th e re h av e b een w ell-suited to th a t e n v iro n m e n t. In 1981-82, th e y ra n th e g a m u t from D erek W olcott’s tw o c h a ra c te r P a n to ­ m im e , w h ic h m a d e lively u se of B ritish m u sic h a ll a s a m e ta p h o r to explore m a ste r-se rv a n t roles, to D a u g h ters, J o h n M organ E v a n s’ fu n n y /sa d tre a t­ m e n t of four g e n e ra tio n s of w o m en in th e sa m e Italian -A m erican hom e.

C h a m b er O rc h e stra G row s in to I ts T e n th S e a s o n A c h a m b e r o rc h e s tra th a t b e g a n life a t B aldw in-W allace College te n y e a rs ago a s a n e n se m b le of s tu d e n ts a n d faculty m e m b e rs is now n o t o n ly a fully profes­ sio n al force in G re ater C le v ela n d ’s c u ltu ra l life; it h a s b eco m e one of th e b u s ie s t o rc h e stra s in Ohio. T h e O hio C h a m b e r O rc h e s tra serv es a s th e official e n se m b le for b o th C leve­ lan d B allet a n d C lev elan d O pera; p erfo rm s a n u m b e r of free o u tre a c h c o n c e rts e a c h y e a r th ro u g h o u t th e c o m m u n ity ; a n d w ith th e s u p p o rt of a C leveland F o u n d a tio n g ra n t of $ 4 5 ,0 0 0 is e x p a n d in g its re g u la r s u b sc rip tio n sea so n from th re e c o n c e rts to five over tw o y ears. All th a t a ctiv ity re su lte d in n e arly 100 a p p e a ra n c e s, n o t c o u n tin g r e h e a rs ­ als, d u rin g th e 1981-82 seaso n . In Ohio, only th e C leveland a n d C in c in n ati or­ c h e s tra s p erfo rm m ore frequently. T h is e n se m b le c o n siste n tly c h a l­ len g es th e c o m m o n ly h eld — an d m is ta k e n — view th a t c h a m b e r m u sic is a n ex clu siv e p ro d u c t of th e bew igged 18th cen tu ry . Its h ig h ly re g a rd ed m u sic d ire c to r p ro g ra m s c o n c e rts th a t sp a n

th e c e n tu rie s from th e B aroque period to la st s e a s o n ’s new w o rk for o rc h e stra a n d so p ran o , specially c o m m issio n ed by OCO from a local com poser.

A n E c le c tic J o u rn a l G oes a fte r Its M arket In a given issue, its p ag es a re a p t to offer in sig h ts on th e p lan ets, m ovable brid g es over th e C u y ah o g a River, a day in th e life of a local co n g re ssm a n , a re tire m e n t p lan for m ajo r league b all­ play ers, o p era librettos, th e s ta te ’s acid p recip itatio n a n d out-of-the-w ay Medi­ te rra n e a n islan d s. It is ap tly titled T h e G a m u t, a n d it is a self-described “jo u rn a l of ideas an d in fo rm atio n ” p u b lish ed th re e tim e s a y e ar sin ce fall 1980 b y C leveland S tate U niversity. W hile th e new jo u rn a l w as lau n ch ed to c o n trib u te to th e in tellectu al life of N o rth east Ohio w ith articles of s u b ­ sta n c e a n d literary value, th e re is n o th in g acad em ic or elitist a b o u t it. In fact, its fo u n d in g ed ito r — a CSU E n ­ g lish professor — is u sin g a tw o-year F o u n d atio n g ra n t of $10,000 to m o u n t an o rg an ized m a rk e tin g cam p aig n aim ed at in c re asin g circulation. A CSU a d v ertisin g a n d m a rk e tin g class c o n d u cte d a telep h o n e su rv ey of G a m u t su b sc rib e rs, w hose reactio n s led to a new logo a n d a brighter, bolder g ra p h ic s ap p ro ach , a m o n g o th e r p ro d ­ u c t refin em en ts. T h ro u g h research , the class also learn ed a G a m u t re a d er is m o st likely to su b sc rib e to th e N ew Yorker a n d /o r S m ith s o n ia n m ag azin es — a fact th a t m ay influence th e new p u b lic a tio n ’s evolving editorial style. So far, th e step p ed -u p pro m o tio n al efforts — in clu d in g d irect m ail an d radio a d v ertisin g — seem to be p ay in g off. From a b ase of less th a n 300 s u b ­ scrib ers, T h e G a m u t now h a s a c ircu latio n of 873 re a d ers an d aim s for 2 ,0 0 0 by n e x t year. T h o u g h th e jo u rn a l m u s t m ak e its w ay in a m a rk e t flooded w ith “ qu ick re a d s;’ T h e G a m u t’s e m p h asis on eclectic pieces of special in te re st to th is region h a s w on it m a n y loyal fans. “ We focus on th in g s h a p p e n in g in N o rth east O hio;’ m a in ta in s its editor, “ w ith o u t bein g p ro v in cial;’

T h e O h io C h a m b e r O r c h e s tr a c o n s i s ­ t e n t l y c h a ll e n g e s t h e c o m m o n l y h e ld — a n d m is ta k e n — v ie w t h a t c h a m b e r m u s i c is a n e x c l u ­ s i v e p r o d u c t o f th e b e w ig g e d 1 8 th c e n tu r y .

T h e r e is n o t h i n g a c a d e m ic o r e l i t i s t a b o u t C S U ’s n e w j o u r n a l o f id e a s a n d in fo r m a t io n .

33


C ultural A ffairs G rants

C ain P ark A m p h im u s ic L e a g u e , In c. — M ostly M odern A m p h im u sic S eries a t C ain P a r k ....................$ 2 ,5 0 0

F a irm o u n t T h e a tr e of th e D e a f — O p eratin g s u p p o rt (th ird year) a n d tech n ical a s s i s t a n c e .............$ 7 2 , 5 0 0

C ase W e ste r n R e s e r v e U n iv e r s it y — F irst C leveland E arly M usic F e s tiv a l...........................................$ 3 ,6 0 0

F in d la y A r e a A r t s C o u n c il, F in d la y , O h io — L ak efro n t Fall Festival in c o n ju n c tio n w ith th e H ancock P ark D istrict* . . ___ $ 4 5 0

C le v e la n d B a lle t — A ssista n c e in m ak in g d a n c e rs’ s a la rie s co m p etitiv e w ith m ajo r regional b allet c o m p a n ie s (second y e a r ) ............................$ 8 5 ,0 0 0

Six-w eek resid e n cy in F in d la y City Schools by R irie-W oodbury D ance C o m p a n y * ................................... $ 2 ,1 0 0

T h e C le v e la n d B ar C h a r ita b le an d E d u c a tio n a l Fund — S c u lp tu re by G eorge Segal a t th e J u s tic e C e n t e r ............................................. $ 1 ,0 0 0 T he C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n (Inc.) — A ssessm en t of B ulkley-Selzer B uilding d ev elo p m en t by th e P lay­ h ouse S q u are F oundation . . . $ 7 ,5 0 0 Feasibility s tu d y for a n a q u a riu m , m aritim e m u se u m a n d related m a t t e r s ..................................... $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 C o m m u n ity sho w in g s of su rre a lism TV p r o g ra m ................................... $ 1 ,0 0 0

F i n d la y C o lle g e , F in d la y , O h io — C u ltu ra l a rts se rie s (second a n d th ird y e a r) * ........................................ $ 3 0 ,0 0 0 F o o tp a th D a n c e C o m p a n y — S u p p o rt for new d a n c e rs . . . . $ 5 ,0 0 0 T h e F r e e M e d ic a l C lin ic o f G r e a te r C le v e la n d — E x p a n sio n of c o m m u n ity a rts p ro g ra m over tw o y e a rs ................. .......................$ 3 0 ,0 0 0 T h e G a r d e n C e n te r o f G r e a te r C le v e la n d — A ddition to th e G arden C enter b u ild in g .......................$ 3 0 ,0 0 0 G eneral o p e ra tin g s u p p o r t. . . $ 1 ,7 5 0

T he C le v e la n d I n s t it u t e o f M u sic — A udition s u p p o r t.....................$ 3 ,5 0 0 R obert C a sa d e su s In te rn atio n a l Piano C o m p e titio n ................................. $ 4 ,2 0 0 C le v e la n d I n te r n a tio n a l F ilm F e s tiv a l — D evelopm ent of festival into a professionally o p erated o rg an i­ zation over th re e y e a rs . . . . $ 4 6 ,6 4 7 T h e C le v e la n d M u seu m o f A rt — G eneral s u p p o rt............................ $ 1 ,0 0 0 In te rn atio n a l sy m p o siu m on C hinese p a i n t i n g .........................................$ 6 ,0 0 0 T he C le v e la n d M u seu m o f N a tu ra l H isto ry — P a rtic ip a n ts’ fees a n d travel for th e Festival of W oodland Indian A r t s ..............................$ 2 5 ,0 0 0 T he C le v e la n d P la y H o u se — Brooks Series of new a n d innovative p lays over tw o y e a rs .........................$ 2 5 ,0 0 0 New th e a te r a n d e q u ip m e n t ................................................. $ 2 0 0 ,0 0 0 1981 production of A C h ristm a s C arol..............................................$ 2 1 ,0 0 0 T he C lev ela n d P o e tr y P r o jec t — “At the A rabica” radio series of Ohio poets a n d folk m u sic ia n s . . . $ 1 8 ,0 0 0 C lev ela n d P u b lic L ib rary — C leveland H eritage Project . $ 2 5 ,0 0 0 C lev ela n d S ta te U n iv e r s ity — M arketing of T h e G a m u t, a new jo u rn a l of ideas an d inform ation over two y e a rs ...................................... $ 1 0 ,0 0 0

34

G r e a t L a k e s S h a k e s p e a r e F e s tiv a l — E n h a n c e m e n t of a rtistic an d pro d u ctio n v a lu e s for first seaso n at Ohio T h e a tr e ......................... $ 1 2 5 ,0 0 0 T h e G r e a t e r C le v e la n d I n te r c h u r c h C o u n c il — 1983 M artin L u th e r King c o n c ert by T he C leveland O r c h e s t r a .................................$ 1 0 ,0 0 0 T ickets for s tu d e n ts a tte n d in g th e 1981 M artin L u th e r K ing c o n cert by T he C leveland O rc h e stra. . . . $ 2 ,5 0 0 H a n c o c k H i s to r i c a l M u s e u m A s s o c ia tio n , F in d la y , O h io — C o n su ltatio n a n d p la n n in g for a c h ild re n ’s h a n d s-o n m u se u m * .......................................................$ 1 ,5 0 0 H a n c o c k P a r k D i s t r i c t , F in d la y , O hio — S pecialized activ ities in creative d ra m a tic s for children* ..............................................................$ 5 0 0 K a r a m u H o u s e — L a u n c h profes­ sional th e a te r c o m p an y . . . . $ 6 0 ,0 0 0 L a k e w o o d L i t t l e T h e a tr e , In c . — T h e M essia h a t th e K en n eth C. Beck C enter for th e C u ltu ra l A rts, c o n d u cted by R obert P age a n d p erform ed by th e C leveland O pera C om pany C h o r u s .................... $ 3 ,5 0 0 L a M e sa E s p a n o la — J e s s ie C. T ucker m em orial l e c t u r e ..........$ 4 0 0 M a lo n e -G ill P r o je c t s , In c ., C a m b rid g e , M a s s a c h u s e t t s — P roduction of film s a n d v id eo c a ssette s of su rre a lism TV p ro g ram . . . $ 5 ,0 0 0


M ich igan A r tr a in In c., D e tr o it, M ich igan — A rtra in v isit to C le v e la n d ........................................ $ 2 0 0 T he M u sic a l A r ts A s s o c ia t io n — A udience d e v e lo p m en t a n d u n d e r­ w riting for G reat P e rfo rm e rs at S everance Hall (second year) .......................................... . . . $ 3 5 ,0 0 0 The C leveland O rc h e stra e d u c atio n a l services for c h ild re n ’s c o n c erts (second y e a r).................................. $ 9 ,2 5 0 T he C leveland O rc h e stra E n d o w m e n t C a m p a ig n .......................................$ 2 ,5 0 0 G eneral o p e ra tin g s u p p o r t . . . $ 1 ,0 0 0 1981 M artin L u th e r King c o n c ert by The C leveland O r c h e s tr a . . . $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 Staff a n d su p p lie s for arch iv al w o rk .............................................. $ 2 0 ,0 0 0 S u stain in g F und of T h e C leveland O r c h e s tr a .................................... $ 5 0 ,0 0 0

U p W ith P e o p le , In c ., T u c s o n , A r iz o n a — P artial sp o n so rsh ip of an 11-day residency in C leveland Public S c h o o ls .........................................$ 1 5 ,0 0 0 V ie tn a m V e te r a n s o f A m e ric a F o u n d a tio n , N ew Y ork, N ew Y ork — T he V ietnam E xperience a rt e x h i b i t ...........................................$ 3 ,9 0 0 T h e W e s te r n R e s e r v e H is to r ic a l S o c ie ty — C leveland Je w ish A rchives over th irty m o n t h s ..................$ 5 0 ,0 0 0 G eneral s u p p o rt............................$ 1 ,0 0 0 Y oung A u d ie n c e s of G r e a te r C le v e la n d , In c. — S tart-u p costs for d evelopm ent of a th e a te r w ing of Young A udiences over tw o years ......................................................$ 1 5 ,0 0 0 TOTAL CULTURAL A F FA IR S G R A N TS—UNDESIGNATED ...............................................$ 1 ,4 4 7 ,3 3 1

T he G arden C en ter o f G reater C lev ela n d — L i b r a r y ............... $ 1 ,5 2 0 K aram u H ou se — G eneral s u p p o r t .......................$ 9 3 ,9 0 5 L ak ew ood L ittle T h e a tr e , Inc. — G eneral s u p p o r t ......................... $ 7 ,2 9 6 The M u sical A r ts A s s o c ia tio n — C hild ren ’s co n certs by T he C leveland O r c h e s tr a ......................................$ 5 ,7 9 2 G eneral su p p o rt for T he C leveland O r c h e s tr a ...................................$ 7 5 ,3 4 7 N orth ern Ohio O pera A s s o c ia tio n — G eneral s u p p o r t ......................... $ 1 9 3 O gleb ay I n s tit u te , W h e e lin g , W est V irg in ia — C ultu ral a n d e d u catio n al activities at Oglebay P ark . $ 1 0 9 ,9 7 5 T he W e stern R e se r v e H is to r ia l S o c ie ty — Care of m em o rab ilia of th e F irst C leveland C avalry A s s o c ia tio n .................................. $ 6 ,3 7 1

C lev ela n d O pera — M usical pro g ram m in g co sts for C leveland Opera over tw o y e a r s .......... $ 1 2 5 ,0 0 0

(Following recipients and program s designated by donor)

The N ew G a lle r y o f C o n te m p o r a ry A rt — Ohio L ights H ap p en in g a s p a rt of C leveland A rt Festival . . . . $ 3 ,5 0 0

A s h la n d L ib r a r y A s s o c ia tio n , A s h la n d , O hio — G eneral s u p p o r t .......................... $ 2 ,2 9 8

TOTAL CULTURAL AFFAIRS GRANTS—DESIGNATED $ 7 5 1 ,2 8 1

N ew O rg a n iz a tio n for t h e V is u a l A r ts — Core s u p p o rt for th e Im age R esource Center, a p h o to -p rin t w orkshop (third y e a r ) .......... $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 1981 C leveland A rt Festival . . $ 3 , 5 0 0

C le v e la n d B a lle t — G eneral s u p p o r t ............................... $ 1 9 3

TOTAL CULTURAL AFFAIRS GRANTS—DESIGNATED AND U N D E SIG N A T E D ............ $ 2 ,1 9 8 ,6 1 2

S cu lp tu re festival in E d g ew ater P ark of the C leveland L ak efro n t S tate P ark .................................................... $ 2 6 ,0 0 0

T h e C le v e la n d M u s e u m o f A r t — G eneral s u p p o r t ....................... $ 1 4 ,0 0 0

Ohio C h am ber O r c h e s tr a — E xpansion of th e c o n c e rt series to four concerts in 1981-82 a n d to five c o n ­ certs in 1982-83.......................$ 4 5 ,0 0 0 O hio-C hicago A rt P r o je c ts , In c. — E xhibition of “T he D in n er P a rty ” .........................................................$ 5 ,0 0 0 P la y h o u s e S q u a re F o u n d a tio n — D evelopm ent of B ulkley-Selzer B uilding in P lay h o u se S q u a re .................................................... $ 7 3 ,3 3 4 T he P o e t s ’ L ea g u e o f G re a ter C le v e la n d — P oetry rea d in g series in co n ju n ctio n w ith a re a a rts o rg a n iz a tio n s.................................$ 1 ,5 0 0 S u m m er M u sic E x p e r ie n c e , Inc. — G uest a rtis ts a n d tu itio n su p p o rt for low -incom e s tu d e n ts a t W estern Reserve A cadem y over tw o y e a rs ............................................. $ 2 5 ,0 0 0

T h e C le v e la n d I n s t i t u t e o f M u sic — G eneral s u p p o rt....................... $ 4 ,9 3 1

G eneral s u p p o rt........................... $ 5 ,1 2 4

*Grant recom m ended by Findlay Distribution C om m ittee o f the L. Dale Dorney Fund.

P u rc h ase objects of a rt e x h ib ited at May Show in m em ory of O scar M ichael, J r . ........................................ $ 5 0 0 C le v e la n d M u s e u m o f N a t u r a l H is to r y — G eneral su p p o rt ................................................... $ 3 2 9 ,6 1 3 P la n e ta riu m .................................$ 2 ,8 9 6 T h e C le v e la n d P la y H o u s e — E xperim ental dram atic w ork or s c h o la r s h ip ................................... $ 1 ,4 9 6 G eneral s u p p o r t ......................... $ 7 ,3 6 2 S h a k e sp ea re an a n d classical p ro d u c ­ tio n s for s tu d e n ts a n d tea c h e rs ........................................................ $ 2 ,8 9 6 C le v e la n d P u b lic L i b r a r y — Services to s h u t-in s ..................$ 7 6 ,3 8 7 C le v e la n d Z o o lo g ic a l S o c ie ty — G eneral s u p p o rt............................$ 3 ,1 8 6

T he T oledo M u seu m o f A rt, T oledo, O hio — G eneral s u p p o r t............... $ 5 0 0

35


Health In th is d iv erse u rb a n a re a, h e a lth deliv­ ery s y ste m s m u s t serv e th e n e e d s of m an y g ro u p s w h o se c irc u m s ta n c e s in life place th e m a t risk or g e n e ra te s p e ­ cial levels of n eed. T h e C leveland F o u n d a tio n ’s 1981 g ra n t m a k in g d e m ­ o n stra te s how v ib ra n t th e ra n g e of services in th e h e a lth field h ere c an be. T he su c c e ss of sev eral p ro je c ts d o c u ­ m en ted in th is re p o rt d e p e n d s on stro n g e le m e n ts of p e rso n -to -p erso n care a n d c o n ce rn . A h o sp ice p ro g ram is h elping te rm in a lly ill p a tie n ts p re p a re for d e ath in th e fa m iliarity a n d com fort of th e ir ow n h o m e s. S e n io r c itiz en s are going door to door, c h e c k in g on th e h ealth n e ed s of elderly n e ig h b o rs in a n im p o v erished p a rt of th e city. Two fa m ­ ily p ra c titio n e rs are a c tin g o n th e n otio n th a t m a n y h e a lth p ro b le m s of th e ir low- a n d m id d le-in co m e p a tie n ts can be tra c e d to u n h a p p in e s s a t hom e. A nd in a pro ject th a t b u ild s on eig h t y ears of F o u n d atio n w ork in p e rin a ta l care, pro fessors from tw o C leveland u n iv ersities are c o n d u c tin g s em in al research to a s s e s s th e school re a d in e ss of ch ild ren b o rn p rem atu rely . T h ese p ag es also in c lu d e a c c o u n ts of several strik in g a n d e x e m p la ry p ro ­ g ra m s in re se a rc h , te a c h in g a n d h igh technology. C le v ela n d ’s only m edical school is re b u ild in g its w hole basic sciences re s e a rc h a n d te a c h in g c ap ab ility to be in th e forefront of n atio n al re s e a rc h in d isease. A w idely resp ected te a c h in g h o sp ita l, w hich serv es a large n u m b e r of C lev elan d ’s in d ig en t p o p u la tio n , is u n d e rg o in g ren o v ation a n d e x p an sio n . B esides m a k in g n o ta b le c o n trib u ­ tio n s to th e h e a lth sce n e in C leveland, th e m e n a n d w o m e n lead in g th e se efforts m a y well see th e ir in s titu tio n s a n d p ro g ram s b eco m e m o re c o m p e ti­ tive in th e n a tio n a l a re n a . T he F o u n d ation re m a in s in te n t on h elp in g forge C le v ela n d ’s rich , evolving re p e r­ toire of h e a lth serv ice s o u t of th e c ity ’s collection of h ig h q u a lity in s titu tio n s a n d people.

P r o je c t G O h: ‘N o th in g g la m o ro u s! s a y s a F o u ndation c o n s u lta n t fo r th is c o m m u n ity self-help effort. ‘J u s t good, d o w n -to -e a rth w ork going on!

H o s p ic e : H e l p in g P a t i e n t s a n d F a m ilie s Cope w ith D e a th Bob, a burly, activ e m a n in his early sixties, learn ed he h a d irrev ersib le c a n ­ cer of th e re c tu m . For th e n e x t two y e ars d o cto rs w ere able to c o n tro l th e disease, b u t th e n Bob b eg an to fail. He a n d h is wife sh a re d resp o n sib ility for eleven c h ild ren from th e ir p rev io u s m a rria g e s. T h e te en a g e rs h a d alw ays b een difficult to discipline, a n d th e c u r­ re n t fam ily crisis only in creased th e tension. A nxiety in th e h o u seh o ld b ecam e nearly u n b e arab le . W here could th e fam ily tu rn d u rin g B ob’s la st m o n th s? In 1981 Bob w as one of 6 50 te rm i­ nally ill p a tie n ts in th e a re a w ho tu rn e d to th e H ospice C ouncil for N o rth ern Ohio for a relatively new ty p e of h e a lth care. “ HospiceT a te rm w hich d u rin g th e Middle Ages signified a restin g place for w eary trav elers, now su g g ests special care sen sitiv e to th e n eed s of dy in g p a tie n ts a n d th e ir loved ones. T h e C ouncil, w h ich a c ts as a coordi­ n a tin g a n d fu n d -raisin g o rg an izatio n for sev en state-certified hospice a g e n ­ cies in G reater C leveland — six hom e care te a m s an d one in p a tie n t facility — co n n ected Bob a n d his fam ily w ith th e hospice reso u rce in th e ir com m unity. O nce assig n ed , th e local team provided a d irectin g p h y sician , a n u rse, a social w orker, a clerg y m an a n d tra in e d v o lu n ­ teer aid es w ho n o t only help ed m ak e B ob’s final six m o n th s com fortable an d free of pain, b u t b ro u g h t his fam ily closer together, offering su p p o rt m o n th s after th e p a tie n t’s death. T he hospice ap p ro ach , now a rapidly grow ing m o v e m e n t in th e U nited S tates, does n o t try to p re v e n t d e ath by focusing on possible cures; in ste ad it seek s to provide a p a tie n t w ith care th a t will im prove th e q u ality of th e life th a t re m a in s. H ospice h elp s a p a tie n t stay in control of h is life a n d in to u ch w ith h is friends, ta k in g p a rt in ev ery ­ day fam ily activ ities a s long as possible in th e e n v iro n m e n t in w hich he feels m o st secure: h is hom e. A ccep tan ce into th e p ro g ram re ­ q u ires so m e to u g h decision m ak in g . T h e p a tie n t an d fam ily — a n d u su ally th e p h y sician — m u s t co n clu d e th a t th e p a tie n t is te rm in a lly ill (usually w ith six m o n th s or less to live) a n d th a t all efforts will b e directed to w ard care a n d relieving sy m p to m s th a t cau se pain, n o t a t h o p eless a tte m p ts to rev erse th e disease.

T h e F o u n d a tio n r e m a in s in te n t o n h e lp i n g f o r g e C le v e ­ l a n d ’s r ic h , e v o l v i n g r e p e r to ir e o f h e a l t h s e r v ic e s o u t o f th e c i t y 's c o lle c tio n o f h ig h q u a l i t y i n s t i t u ­ t io n s a n d p e o p le .

A n x i e t y in t h e h o u s e h o ld b e c a m e n e a r l y u n b e a r a b le . W h e r e c o u ld t h e f a m i ly tu r n d u r in g B o b ’s l a s t m o n t h s ?

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& A c c e p ta n c e in to th e h o s p ic e p r o g r a m re ­ q u ir e s s o m e to u g h d e c is io n m a k in g . T h e p a tie n t, fa m ily a n d p h y s ic ia n m u s t a g r e e t h a t a ll e ffo r ts he d ir e c te d to w a rd c a re a n d re­ lie v in g s y m p to m s th a t c a u se p a in — n o t a t h o p e le s s a t ­ t e m p t s to r e v e r s e t h e d is e a s e .

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T h e p a tie n t’s p h y sic ia n re ta in s his in v o lv em en t, b u t o b serv es th e n a ­ tio n ally reco g n ized g u id e lin e s of th e h o sp ice a p p ro a c h a n d c o n su lts w ith h o sp ice staff. O ne or m o re p e rso n s, u su a lly fam ily m e m b e rs, are id en tified as “ p rim a ry care g iv ers” ; h o sp ice staff in s tru c ts th e m in h a n d lin g su c h dayto-day m a tte rs a s c h a n g in g b a n d a g e s a n d giving sh o ts, a n d even p re p a re s th e m , a s a staff m e m b e r re p o rts, for “w h a t d e a th looks like a n d s o u n d s like!’ More th a n 150 tra in e d v o lu n te e rs re ­ c ru ite d th ro u g h th e C ouncil a ss is t professional staff b y do in g h o u seh o ld e rra n d s a n d v isitin g w ith p a tie n ts. “ We te ac h v o lu n te e rs activ e liste n in g sk ills;’ sa y s a h o m e care te a m director, “ like how to u n co d e a p a tie n t’s m essag e. W hen a p a tie n t g ets a n g ry a b o u t how m u c h h a m b u rg e r costs, for ex am p le, w e know so m e th in g else is really going on a n d w e get h im to ta lk a b o u t it. W h at te rm in a lly ill p a tie n ts n eed to do, above all else, is ta lk a n d really be listen ed to!’ In a d d itio n to th e h o m e care aids, th e C ou n cil’s v o lu n te e r ro ste r in clu d es a dozen clergy, 45 law y ers av ailab le to advise p a tie n ts a n d th e ir fam ilies on legal m a tte rs, sev eral p h y sical th e ra ­ p ists a n d a c u ltu ra l an th ro p o lo g ist. T h e C ouncil, w h ich received 1981 F o u n d atio n g ra n ts to ta lin g $116,140 in su p p o rt of th re e h o m e care ag encies, c an d o c u m e n t th e cost-effectiveness of its program ; w hile 17 d ay s of h o sp ital co n fin e m en t — th e av erag e sta y for final c an c e r ad m issio n s — co sts a b o u t $4,000, tw o m o n th s of hospice care a m o u n t to less th a n $1,000, n o n e of w hich is p assed on to th e family. Not surprisingly, even h ig h ly skilled professional staff find hospice w ork em otionally d rain in g . B esides th e c o n ­ s ta n t ex p o su re to d e ath , staff ta k e s on th e b u rd e n of k eep in g all lines of c o m ­ m u n ic a tio n open — u n d e r in te n se circ u m sta n c e s. “ O ften th e p h y sician an d th e fam ily are re lu c ta n t to a sk direct q u e stio n s or g et d irect a n sw e rs!’ say s a hospice n u rse . “ We h av e to tra n sla te a n d say to th e doctor, 7 know w h a t you said, b u t th is is how th e fam ily h e ard it!” P e rh a p s th e C o u n cil’s b ig g est c u r­ re n t challenge is one of p h y sician an d fam ily educatio n . P a tie n ts in th e a re a are jo in in g th e p ro g ram on a n av erag e of four to six w eeks p rio r to d e a th — n o t enough tim e, in m a n y cases, for h o s ­ pice to focus on a p a tie n t’s (and a fam ily’s) com plex n eed s. A nd th e

H osp ice: providing care to im prove the

quality o f he life that remains. G reater C leveland h o sp ice a g e n c ie s a re receiv in g calls from o n ly 50 p e rc e n t of th e a re a ’s e stim a te d n u m b e r of te rm i­ n ally ill p a tie n ts a n d th e ir fam ilies. In a c o u n try th a t h a s difficulty a c ­ c ep tin g th e in e v ita b ility of d e a th , th e hospice c o n c e p t m a y ta k e so m e g e ttin g u sed to. W h at is clear, how ever, is th a t th e p ro g ra m ’s u n iq u e c o m b in a tio n of p h y sical, em o tio n a l a n d sp iritu a l care a lread y h a s offered so lace to h u n d re d s of G reater C lev elan d ers w h o h a v e com e to view th e ir ow n d e a th s a s p a rt of th e n a tu ra l cycle of life. W h en th e F o u n d a tio n g ra n te d th e H ospice C ouncil first-y ear fu n d in g in 1979, it m a d e fu tu re s u p p o rt c o n ­ tin g e n t on solid ag en c y m a n a g e m e n t, in clu d in g su cc e ssfu l n e g o tia ted a g re e ­ m e n ts w ith “ th ird -p a rty p a y e rs!’ From th e b eg in n in g . F o u n d a tio n sta ff view ed th is ta sk a s th e a g e n c y ’s k ey to su c c e ss — th e facto r w h ic h could m a k e th e local p ro g ram a m o n g th e s tro n g e st in th e country. S ince th e n , th e C ouncil h a s in fact o b ta in e d c o n tra c ts w ith m a jo r in s u re rs to cover th e care a s a b e n efit for G reater C leveland su b sc rib e rs. S e v e n ty p er­ c e n t of local h o sp ice care c o sts a re now re im b u rse d th ro u g h M edicare, M edic­ aid a n d — in a n e x p e rim e n ta l p ro g ra m now in its seco n d y e a r — B lue C ross of N o rth e a st Ohio. R ecen tly th e C ouncil secu red a g re e m e n ts from tw o o th e r n a ­ tio n al in s u ra n c e c o m p an ies.


A S tr o n g e r P ro je c t GOh S e r v e s F a irfa x E ld e r ly T he m o st in n o v a tiv e p ro g ra m s seldom achieve su c c e ss o v e rn ig h t. W h at looks b rillian t on p a p e r falls prey in p ra c tice to su c h v ic issitu d e s a s b u re a u c ra tic d e ­ lay, h u m a n e rro r a n d u n fo reseen c irc u m sta n c e . T h e sh a k e d o w n period m ay ta k e y e ars. Project GOh — for G eriatric O u treach for H ealth — a self-help n e ig h b o rh o o d p ro g ram in th e F airfax a re a of C leve­ land s E a st Side, h a s u n d e rg o n e a sh ak ed o w n of m a jo r p ro p o rtio n s since 1979, w h e n it received a tw o-year s ta r t­ u p g ra n t of $ 2 8 0 ,0 0 0 from T h e C leve­ land F o u n d atio n . (The F o u n d atio n h a d first fu n d ed GOh d u rin g its p la n n in g stage, a y e a r earlier.) W h at b e g an a s a n in trig u in g if loosely o rg an ized project h a s tu rn e d in to a stronger, m ore p ra c ti­ cal delivery s y ste m th a t could prove to be a n atio n a l m odel. P roject GOh w as conceived by a co n ­ so rtiu m of p riv a te a n d p ub lic h e a lth a n d social service ag en cies. E lderly c o m m u n ity re s id e n ts from organized stre e t clu b s w ould be tra in e d to provide sim ple h e a lth a n d social care on 29 stre ets to all th e ir n e ig h b o rs aged 60 a n d over, w ith b a c k u p w h e rev e r p o ssi­ ble from se n io rs’ fam ilies. T he p roject w as d e sig n e d to co m b at n o t only m in o r h e a lth p ro b lem s b u t th e loneliness, fear, fo rg etfu ln ess a n d d e ­ pression th a t are ra m p a n t in th is poor, black, elderly n eig h b o rh o o d . GOh w ould be a “ cost-effective” reso u rce leading to less fre q u e n t a n d m ore a p ­ p ro p riate a d m issio n s to h o sp ita ls an d n u rsin g h o m es. “ P rofessionals h a v e alw ay s said th a t th e b e st w ay to provide th e se services is th ro u g h n e ig h b o rs a n d family,” ob­ served a GOh fo u n d e r w h e n th e p ro g ram w as la u n c h e d , “ b u t we m ay be th e first to a c tu a lly do it!’ T he p ro ject h a d so m e th in g else going for it: th e ra p p o rt of th e s tre e t h e alth w o rk ers w ith th e sen io rs a ssig n e d th em . GOh, a fte r all, re p re se n te d th e elderly h e lp in g th e elderly. C learly th e pro ject d e se rv e d every c h an ce to s u cc e ed . So w h e n o rg a n iz a ­ tional p ro b le m s ty p ical of a n y fledgling h e alth o r social serv ice s a g e n c y b eg an , predictably, to su rfa ce , th e F o u n d atio n acted a t once by h e lp in g tig h te n G O h’s self-m o n itoring p ro c e d u re s a n d by fu n d in g tw o n a tio n a lly re sp e c te d c o n ­ s u lta n ts w ho p ro v id ed te c h n ic a l a s s is t­ ance: th e d e a n of th e school of h e a lth scien ces a t th e U n iv ersity of M as­ s a c h u s e tts (A m herst), a n d th e

a sso ciate d e an of g ra d u a te s tu d ie s a n d re sea rc h a t th e sa m e in stitu tio n . One c o n su lta n t m ad e four site visits to C leveland, th e o th e r th ree. T h e c o n su lta n ts sh a re d th e c o m m u ­ n ity s a d m ira tio n for th e p ro je c t’s goals, b u t a s one c au tio n ed , “A lthough its basic p rem ise — th a t one is b e st k e p t by o n e ’s b ro th e r — is so u n d , th e m a n a g e m e n t fram ew o rk b u ilt a ro u n d th is b iblical ad m o n itio n is w eak an d in co m p lete!’ At first e n c o u n te rin g d is tru s t a n d re s e n tm e n t from v o lu n te e rs w ho th o u g h t we w ould close th e p ro g ram do w n !’ th e c o n su lta n ts over tim e e sta b ­ lished w arm , m u tu a lly can d id re la tio n sh ip s a t th e agency. T h ey found m a n a g e m e n t p ro b lem s in clu d in g in a d ­ e q u ate reco rd sy stem s, co st profiles a n d financial p ro ced u res — a n d a vol­ u n te e r m o rale crisis fueled by th e a g e n c y ’s “ top to b o tto m ” stru c tu re . S everal y ears a n d v o lu m es of rep o rts later, th e se p ro b lem s an d m a n y o th e rs are being a d d re ssed by a ded icated staff. C o m p u terizatio n will a ss is t vol­ u n te e rs in o rg an izin g th e d a ta collected in th e n eig h b o rh o o d visits. P ro g ram u se is u p — GOh now serv es 697 people — a n d co sts in a d m in iste rin g th e p ro j­ ect are dow n. S taff h a s p laced g reater e m p h a sis on n u tritio n a l a ss e ss m e n t a n d co u n selin g in th e hom es. A nd G O h’s n ew director, say s a c o n ­ s u lta n t, h a s tu rn e d a ro u n d th e low v o lu n teer m orale by c re atin g a “ p a ra l­ lel v o lu n te e r stru c tu re . He gives th e s tre e t h e a lth w orkers, w ho are really th e key to th is p ro g ram , a feeling of w o rth a n d u ses th e m to p erform a d ­ m in istra tiv e fu n c tio n s all th e w ay up. In th e p ast, v o lu n te e rs w ere often a t the b e h e st of th e paid people; now it is th e staff w ho serv es in a su p p o rtiv e role!’ T he d irecto r is co nvinced v o lu n teers m u s t be b ro u g h t into “ critical profes­ sio n al o p eratio n s” to e n su re th e a g e n c y ’s su rv iv al in a period of d rastic h e a lth c u tb ac k s. A nd besides, he says, “I see th is a s m ain ly a v o lu n teer p ro ­ g ram . T he o rg an izatio n sh o u ld belong to th e re sid e n ts of Fairfax. My u ltim ate goal is for th e v o lu n te e rs to m a n ag e th e ir ow n o rg an izatio n !’ W ith m o st of its m a n a g e m e n t p ro b ­ lem s u n d e r control, GOh staff is d ev o tin g m ore tim e to p ro g ram devel­ o p m en t. R ecently ad d ed services in clu d e a p h y sician w ho m a k es h o u se calls one day a w eek, v isitin g th o se elderly w ho req u ire professional a tte n tio n .

“T h i s p r o g r a m s h o u l d b e lo n g to th e r e s id e n ts o f F a ir fa x ,” s a y s P r o j­ e c t G O h ’s n e w d ir e c to r . “M y g o a l is f o r t h e v o l u n t e e r s to m a n a g e t h e i r o w n o r g a n iz a tio n

P r o je c t G O h r e p r e ­ s e n t s t h e e ld e r l y h e lp i n g t h e e ld e r ly .

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Is P ro ject GOh — w h ic h h a s b e n e ­ fited to d a ted from $515,572 in C leve­ la n d F o u n d a tio n s u p p o rt — on th e v erg e of b e co m in g a n a tio n a l m o d el for c o m m u n ity self-help? If so, a s a c o n su l­ ta n t p o in ts o u t, th a t will n o t be d u e to “ a n y th in g g la m o ro u s. T h is is ju s t good, d o w n -to -earth w o rk g oing o n !’

M ed ic a l S c h o o l R e b u ild s I ts B a sic S c ie n c e s P r o g r a m

T h e n e w d e a n r e a l­ iz e d t h a t th e f u t u r e o fC W R U ’s m e d ic a l s c h o o l in th e n e x t 2 0 y e a r s o r so r e s te d la r g e ly o n h o w th o s e d e p a r t­ m e n t c h a ir s w e r e fille d .

As a c o m m u n ity tr u s t c o n c e rn e d w ith th e q u a lity of life in a p a rtic u la r geo­ g ra p h ic region, T h e C leveland F o u n d atio n u su a lly does n o t s u p p o rt b iom edical re sea rc h , m a in ta in in g th a t th is s o rt of activ ity is m o re a p p ro p ri­ ately left to fu n d in g so u rc e s w hose province is th e n a tio n a t large. B u t in 1981 sev eral co m p ellin g fac­ to rs converged a t th e n a tio n a lly re sp ec te d C ase W estern R eserve U ni­ v e rsity School of M edicine; a n d after som e m o n th s of ev alu atio n , th e D is­ trib u tio n C o m m ittee m a d e a n e x ce p ­ tio n to policy, a u th o riz in g a $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 g ra n t over th re e y e a rs to s u p p o rt th e S ch o o l’s re se a rc h p ro g ram in th e basic sciences. T h e m a jo r facto rs w ere th ese: th e S ch o o l’s new d e an h a d co g en tly id e n ti­ fied w e ak n e sse s w ith in th e basic sciences p ro g ram w h ich , if th e y re ­ m a in e d u n c h ec k e d , m ig h t d a m ag e

M icrob iology P rogram a t CW RU’s M ed ical S chool: afield increasingly

concerned w ith the processes of disease.

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CW RU’s co m p etitiv e p o sitio n in th e n a ­ tio n al fu n d in g a re n a . W ith fo u r k e y d e p a rtm e n t c h a irs e ith e r e m p ty or a b o u t to be v a c a te d — in m icrobiology, an ato m y , p a th o lo g y a n d p h y sio lo g y — th e d e an realized th a t th e fu tu re of th e School in th e n e x t 2 0 y e a rs o r so re s te d largely on how th o se c h a irs w ere filled. T h e S chool of M edicine s u b m itte d a g ra n t re q u e s t to th e F o u n d a tio n for fu n d s to re b u ild all fo u r re s e a rc h p ro ­ g ra m s th ro u g h re c ru itm e n t of new d e p a rtm e n t c h a irm e n a n d o th e r m e a ­ su re s. T h a t w a s j u s t th e b e g in n in g of th e c o lla b o ratio n b e tw e e n th e F o u n d a ­ tio n a n d th e School. T h e F o u n d a tio n a ssig n e d a 10-memb e r “ site te a m ” of n a tio n a lly ren o w n ed sp e c ia lists w h o for th re e d a y s review ed th e p ro p o sal in in te n siv e m e e tin g s w ith re p re se n ta tiv e s o f th e m e d ic al school. T h e te a m reaffirm ed th e n e e d to s tre n g th e n th e b io m e d ic al d e p a r t­ m e n ts a t once, w hile th e re w as th e c h a n c e to m a k e k ey a p p o in tm e n ts w ith a n overall d e sig n in m in d . T h e te a m ’s rig o ro u s a n a ly sis, h o w ­ ever, c h a ra c te riz e d b o th s tre n g th s a n d w e a k n e sse s of th e re v ita liz a tio n p lan , h elp in g th e School of M edicine clarify goals a n d s tru c tu re . T h e d e a n a g re ed w ith th e te a m th a t sev e ra l u n re so lv e d issu e s — in c lu d in g lo n g -ran g e p la n ­ n in g a n d school-w ide fin a n c in g of th e p ro g ram — sh o u ld be a d d re ss e d d u rin g th e co m in g year. In its final e v a lu a tio n of th e m e d ic al sch o o l’s p ro p o sal, th e D istrib u tio n C o m m ittee ju d g e d th a t th e F o u n d a tio n sh o u ld m a k e a sin g u la r e x c e p tio n to policy b y fu n d in g th e re b u ild in g w ork, a n d th a t s u p p o rt w o u ld be m o s t h elpful if g ra n t a u th o riz a tio n s w ere m a d e o n a p h ase-b y -p h ase b a sis, in c o n c e rt w ith carefu l m o n ito rin g of th e p roject. T h e in itial g ra n t, sm a lle r th a n th e a m o u n t re q u e ste d by th e School, w ould give th e d e a n la titu d e in e s ta b ­ lish in g th e S c h o o l’s h ig h e st p rio ritie s in th e b io m ed ical p ro g ram , a n d give th e U n iv ersity a d d itio n a l tim e to p lan sev eral pieces of th e re b u ild in g w ork th a t m e m b e rs of th e site te a m fo u n d “a m o rp h o u s ” in th e ir p re s e n t form . T h e d e a n id en tified th e m icrobiology p ro g ram a s th e “ first a n d im m e d ia te p rio rity ” to be su p p o rte d by F o u n d a ­ tio n fu n d s. T h e m ed ical sch o o l h a s en g ag ed a s c ie n tis t of n a tio n a l s ta tu re to d irect th e d e p a rtm e n t, w h o se p a rtic ­ u la r e x p ertise lies in gen e e x p re ssio n in m a m m a lia n cells a n d m e th o d s of g e ­ n etic en g in ee rin g called re c o m b in a n tDNA tech n o lo g y — v a lu ab le s tre n g th s


T h e r e s e a r c h c o u ld h a v e d r a m a tic im ­ p lic a tio n s f o r th e e d u c a t io n a n d u p ­ b r in g in g o f a g ro u p o f c h il d r e n w h o d e ­ s e r v e th e m o s t c o m p le te a s s e s s ­ m e n t a n d care.

‘A t R is k ’ B a b y in R a in b o w ’s N e o n a ta l U n it: weighing in to life at less than 3 V2 pounds.

in a field in c re asin g ly c o n ce rn e d w ith u n d e rs ta n d in g th e p r o c e s se s of disease. Microbiology, a v ers th e scie n tist, h a s becom e a n a re a th a t d e m a n d s in te r­ d iscip lin ary a p p ro a c h e s. “ You c a n ’t do w ork like th is in th e confines of one laboratory. T h e re m u s t be a c e rta in ten o r am o n g th e g ro u p to fo ster jo in t projects!’ He h a s fo u n d th a t a tm o s ­ p h ere a t th e U niversity. T he new c h a irm a n h a s b e g u n to re ­ c ru it facu lty for th e s tre n g th e n e d m icrobiology d e p a rtm e n t. T h e C leve­ lan d F o u n d atio n g ra n t also in clu d ed su p p o rt for s p ac e re n o v atio n , e q u ip ­ m e n t a n d sev e ra l in v e stig ato rs.

F iv e - Y e a r - O ld s B o r n a t R i s k A re S u b jec t o f N ew R e se a rc h Since 1974 T h e C leveland F o u n d atio n h a s ev id en ced s tro n g c o n c e rn for th e w ell-being of c h ild re n b o rn “ a t risk !’ In th a t year, th e F o u n d a tio n provided s u b ­ s ta n tia l s ta rt-u p s u p p o rt for th e C leveland P e rin a ta l N etw ork, w hich a m o n g o th e r serv ice s h e lp s o b s te tri­ c ian s a n d fam ily p h y s ic ia n s identify as early a s p o ssib le th o se p re g n a n c ie s likely to re s u lt in m isc a rria g e s, still­ b irth s a n d in fa n ts b o rn w ith p ro b lem s

lead in g to neurological im p a irm e n t, re sp ira to ry failure a n d o th e r serio u s m alad ies. A vital a d ju n c t to th e N etw ork, a F o u n d atio n -su p p o rted follow-up p ro ­ g ra m a t R ainbow B abies & C hildrens H ospital, h a s periodically c h a rte d th e h e a lth of all very low b irth w eig h t in ­ fa n ts — th a t is, in fa n ts w ith b irth w eig h ts less th a n 1,500 g ra m s (about 3V2 po u n d s) — a d m itte d to R ain b o w ’s n e o n ata l in ten siv e care u n it since 1975. T h e p ro g ra m ’s directo r c o n d u cted co m p reh en siv e p h y sical ex am in atio n s of th e ch ild ren a t ages tw o a n d th ree. O ne of h e r objectives w as to a ssem b le a d a ta b a n k of risk facto rs in very low b irth w eig h t c h ild ren th a t could be of u se to th e in ten siv e care u n it. T h e follow -ups te n d ed to diagnose severe dam ag e. Now th a t th e se c h ild ren b o rn in th e m id-1970s are e n te rin g school, a new re se a rc h o p p o rtu n ity h a s su rfaced : th e c h an c e to focus on m ore su b tle dif­ feren ces a m o n g th is g ro u p of ch ild ren w ho are w ith in th e n o rm a l IQ ra n g e b u t w ho m a y fu n ctio n o u tsid e th e n o rm in o th e r im p o rta n t w ays.

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N e ig h b o r h o o d F a m ­ ily P r a c tic e ’s w il li n g n e s s to d ig b e n e a th th e s u r fa c e o f a p a t i e n t ’s p h y s i ­ c a l p r o b le m fr e q u e n tly p ro ­ d u c e s u n e x p e c te d — a n d p r o d u c tiv e — r e s u lts .

K e y to th e n ew re s e a rc h , fu n d e d in 1981 by T h e C lev elan d F o u n d a tio n , is a n asso c iate p ro fesso r of sp ec ia l e d u c a ­ tio n a t C levelan d S ta te U niversity. S h e h a s jo in e d th e follow -up p ro g ra m ’s d i­ re c to r (who also serv es a s a n a s s is ta n t p rofessor of p e d ia tric s a t C ase W estern R eserve U niversity) in fa sh io n in g a n in te rd isc ip lin a ry p ro je c t th a t b e g in s to a d d re ss th e d e v e lo p m e n ta l c o n se ­ q u e n c e s of c h ild re n b o rn “ a t risk !’ T h e ir p roject will d e te rm in e th e deg ree to w hich p re m a tu re c h ild re n d e m o n ­ s tra te s tre n g th s a n d w e a k n e sse s in skills a n d b e h a v io r th a t are closely re ­ lated to school re a d in ess. T h e re s e a rc h e rs a re te stin g 93 of th e “ a t ris k ” ch ild re n b o rn in 1976 a n d c o n se q u e n tly en ro lled in th e follow-up pro g ram . T h e c h ild re n re p re se n t a so ­ cioeconom ic m ix believed to be u n iq u e in stu d ie s of th is ty p e. As one of th e re se a rc h e rs o b serv es, th e sa m p le is “m ag n ificen tly h e te ro g e n e o u s — a good p ictu re of C lev elan d !’ T he re se a rc h e rs h av e co n tro lled th e te stin g situ a tio n by a sk in g each c h ild ’s te a c h e r to iden tify a c la ssm a te of th e sam e sex, race a n d social class w ho will also p articip ate. T h e d e v elo p m en ­ tal sp ecialists c o n d u c tin g th e a c tu a l te sts do so “ d ouble b lin d ” — w ith o u t know ing w h en th e y are e x a m in in g a very low b irth w eig h t child. T he s ta n d a rd iz e d te sts m e a su re a v a ­ riety of skills im p licit in school su ccess, in clu d in g visu al m o to r p erfo rm an ce, cognitive d ev elo p m en t a n d lan g u ag e. In addition, te a c h e rs h av e b een ask ed to com plete a 51-item “ classro o m p er­ form ance in v e n to ry ” w h ich g au g es social a n d ta sk behavior. T h e project will follow th ro u g h on th e c h ild ren a t age 9,1 2 a n d , it is hoped, u p o n g ra d u a tio n from high school. T he w ork could h av e d ra m a tic im plications for th e ed u ca tio n a n d u p ­ b rin g in g of a group of ch ild ren th ro u g h o u t th e w orld w ho deserv e th e m o st com plete a s s e s s m e n t a n d care. T h ere is a g ratifying e lem en t of s y m ­ biosis in th is project, w h ich co m b in es faculty reso u rces of tw o C leveland u n i­ versities. CSU h a s no school of m edicine; likew ise CWRU lack s a d e ­ p a rtm e n t of ed u catio n . Both in stitu tio n s — an d th e c o m m u n ity — b enefit from su ch cooperation.

N ew H e a lth C e n te r F o c u se s on C la r k - F u lto n F a m i l i e s In a ren o v ated r e s ta u ra n t in th e d e ­ p ressed C lark-Fulton a re a of C lev elan d ’s W est Side, tw o fam ily p ra c ­ 42

titio n e rs are re s p o n d in g to c o m m u n ity n e e d s th a t u n til now h a v e b e e n larg ely u n m e t. N eig h b o rh o o d F am ily P ra c tic e is th e o n ly fam ily p ra c tic e w ith in a 10-mile ra d iu s of its S to re r A venue lo catio n . C linics in th e a re a a re a s m a n y a s th re e b u s rid e s a w ay from n e ig h b o rh o o d r e s ­ id e n ts o r a re n o t lin k ed w ith a n y p u b lic tra n s p o rta tio n . “ I t’s really th e n e ig h b o rh o o d ’s ow n p ra c tic e !’ sa y s a p a tie n t, a n d w ith good re a so n . C o m m u n ity re s id e n ts a n d p a ­ tie n ts sit on th e c e n te r’s board; c o m m u n ity v o lu n te e rs perform office d u ties; a n d in a n effort to b re a k dow n th e p ro fessio n al b a rrie rs th a t so often s e p a ra te p a tie n t from p h y sician , no o ne w e a rs a u n ifo rm . “ We believe one e x p e rtise is b ein g a d o c to r!’ e x p lain s a sta ff w orker. “A n o th e r e x p e rtise is oper­ a tin g a drill m a c h in e a t Ford!’ Of th e m o re th a n 2 ,0 0 0 fam ilies serv ed b y th e a m b u la to ry h e a lth care center, m a n y a re a t or n e a r p o v erty level, so fees are c h a rg e d on a slid in g scale b a se d on fed eral g u id e lin e s for n o n fa rm fam ilies. P ro fessio n al sala rie s h av e b e en covered th u s far by th e N a­ tio n al H ealth S erv ices C orps. T h e center, e sta b lish e d w ith F o u n d a ­ tio n su p p o rt, p rid e s itse lf on th e a tte n tio n it gives e a c h m e m b e r of a fam ily a n d its p h ilo so p h y th a t “ h e a lth is m o re th a n th e a b se n c e of illn e ss!’ In a c o m m u n ity d e b ilita te d b y u n e m p lo y ­ m e n t a n d b ro k en h o m es, th e a g e n c y ’s w illin g n ess to dig b e n e a th th e su rfa ce of a p a tie n t’s p h y sica l p ro b lem fre­ q u e n tly p ro d u c e s u n e x p e c te d — a n d p ro d u ctiv e — re su lts. O ne of th e fam ily p ra c titio n e rs found, for e x am p le, th a t a lth o u g h a frail, y o u n g p re g n a n t w o m a n lack in g p ro tein re g u la rly receiv ed c h ee se a n d m ilk from a local social serv ice agency, sh e w as forced to sell th e food to s u p ­ p o rt a n alcoholic h u s b a n d . T h e c e n te r a u th o riz e d a d d itio n a l food for th e e x ­ p e c ta n t m o th er, a n d d ire c ted its pu b lic h e a lth n u rs e to c o u n se l th e family. N eighborhood F am ily P ractice also e m p h a siz e s h e a lth e d u c a tio n , e n co u r­ ag in g its p a tie n ts to b eco m e m o re proficient a t c a rin g for th e m se lv e s a n d o th e r fam ily m e m b e rs. T h e c e n te r's public h e a lth n u rs e offers a se rie s of S a tu rd a y m o rn in g c la sse s o p en to th e co m m u n ity , a n d a n y p a tie n t w ith a ch ro n ic d isease is re q u ire d to a tte n d a t least tw o sessio n s d ealin g w ith h is disease.


H ard-N osed M a r k e tin g C o m b a ts C le v e la n d 's N u rsin g S h o r ta g e A s tu d e n t re c ru itm e n t pro ject la u n c h e d by th e C leveland A rea C itizen s L eague for N ursing is b e g in n in g to a d d re ss G reater C le v ela n d ’s critical n u rs in g sh ortag e, a tre n d th a t is th re a te n in g quality p a tie n t c are in h o sp ita ls a n d h ealth care facilities n a tio n a lly a s well as locally. F unded by a C leveland F o u n d atio n g ra n t of $158,500 over tw o y e ars, th e local re c ru itm e n t effort — o p e ra tin g w ith th e slogan “ N u rsin g N ow ” — h a s a difficult ta sk a h ea d : a 1979 su rv e y in C uyahoga C o u n ty fo u n d th a t v a c a n ­ cies in b u d g e ted p o sitio n s in th e full­ tim e n u rsin g staff of s h o rt-te rm h o sp i­ tals to taled 13.3 p e rc e n t — 17.4 p e rc e n t in the p art-tim e staff. Not su rprisingly, th e n u m b e r of s tu d e n ts enro lled in O hio’s R.N. p re p a ra tio n sch o o ls h a s d e ­ clined c o n siste n tly sin ce 1977. The League, aid ed by a C leveland ad v ertising firm , is c o m b a tin g th o se statistics w ith a ha rd -n o sed , th re e -y e ar m a rk e tin g c am p a ig n d ire c ted to w ard teen ag ers (both m ale a n d female), m inorities a n d w o m e n o p en to a career change. T h e c a m p a ig n ra n g e s from personal c o n ta c t by c o u n se lo rs w ho have already visited d o zen s of a re a ju n io r high a n d h ig h schools, to radio ad v ertising a n d p u b lic service a n n o u n c e m e n ts on te n sta tio n s. Staff ru n n in g th e re c ru itm e n t effort know th e im age p ro b lem th e y are up against: “Too m a n y y o u n g s te rs!’ say s “N ursing N ow ’s” director, “ see n u rs e s as second-class c itiz en s w alking aro u n d w ith a tra y of pills!’ T he C itizens L eague, therefore, h a s assem b led a few m e ssa g e s of its own, som e of th e m su rp risin g : th a t d esp ite a faltering econom y, C leveland n u rs e s are fo u rth h ig h e st p aid in th e c o u n try : th a t n u rs in g sc h e d u le s are flexible, so w om en in th e c a re e r n eed n o t sacrifice fam ily life; th a t 28 n u rs in g schools in G reater C leveland offer a v a rie ty of p ro ­ g ra m s to s u it in d iv id u a l needs; an d th a t th e sev e n -c o u n ty a re a offers o u t­ sta n d in g e m p lo y m e n t o p p o rtu n ities, w ith m o re th a n 55 h o sp ita ls a n d n u ­ m ero u s n u rs in g h o m e s a n d o th e r h e a lth care in s titu tio n s in d e sp e ra te need of skilled n u rs in g care. T h en , too, th e c am p a ig n offers a u s e ­ ful re m in d e r of n u rs in g ’s m o st com pelling a ttra c tio n — one th a t h a s

n o th in g to do w ith flexible h o u rs an d fringe ben efits. “T h is m a y so u n d c o rn y !’ h a z a rd s a teen ag ed boy in one of th e ad s, “ b u t I th in k it’s really great ju s t to h elp people!’

M t. S i n a i M o d e r n i z e s It is th e g en eral policy of T he C leveland F o u n d atio n n o t to en co u rag e re q u e sts for c ap ital g ra n ts. T he F o u n d atio n h as also h a d a n explicit policy for m an y y e ars of n o t fu n d in g acu te h o sp ital re n ­ ovation a n d m o d ern izatio n projects. It is th e F o u n d a tio n ’s position — sh a re d by th e G reater C leveland co m ­ m u n ity it re p re se n ts — th a t th e excess n u m b e r of h o sp ital b ed s in th e a rea are a c o n trib u tin g cau se of sp iralin g cost inflation. Moreover, h o sp ital renovation a n d m o d ern izatio n efforts, if approved by h e a lth p la n n in g agencies, can be fin an ced largely th ro u g h p a y m e n ts for in te re st a n d d ep reciatio n u n d e r thirdp a rty re im b u rs e m e n t a rra n g e m e n ts. In 1981, however, it w as th e ju d g m e n t of th e D istrib u tio n C om m ittee th a t th e proposed ren o v atio n an d m o d e rn iz a ­ tio n of Mt. S inai H ospital of C leveland sh o u ld be tre a ted as a sin g u la r ex cep ­ tion to policy. T he E u g en e S. an d B lanche R. Halle m em o rial fu n d s — w hose reso u rces w ere u sed in au th o riz in g th e F o u n d a­ tio n ’s g ra n t of $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 — are e a rm a rk e d for Je w ish purp o ses; an d C lev elan d ’s Je w ish co m m u n ity clearly view s th e Mt. Sinai project as its h ig h ­ est priority. In addition, th e D istrib u tio n C om m ittee felt th a t the h o s p ita l’s b o ard m erited su p p o rt in lig h t of ren ew ed b o ard c o m m itm e n t to keep th is d istin g u ish ed in stitu tio n in th e core city. Finally, th e Mt. Sinai project sh o u ld m a k e a d e m o n strab le im p a c t on th e city a t large. A n atio n ally respected “ te ac h in g h o sp ita l” w ith m ajo r re ­ se a rc h a n d ed u catio n co m p o n en ts, Mt. S in ai is one of C leveland’s la rg e st p ro ­ v id ers of h e a lth care for th e indigent. T h e ren o v atio n a n d m o d ern izatio n w ork, alread y in pro g ress a n d sc h e d ­ uled for co m p letio n in tw o years, will a d d re ss th e obsolescence of several fa­ cilities b u ilt over a 60-year period. T he m ajo r portion of new co n stru ctio n will be a six-story a cu te care pavilion, h o u s ­ ing a n e x p an d e d d e p a rtm e n t of radiology, th re e in ten siv e care u n its, a su rg e ry suite, th e p u lm o n a ry m edicine p ro g ram a n d p a tie n t room s, a m o n g o th e r facilities.

43


T h e A m e r ic a n C an cer S o c ie ty , C u yah oga C o u n ty U n it — General supp ort......................... $ 1,000 A m e r ic a n H ea rt A s s o c ia t io n , N o r th e a s t O hio A f f ilia t e , Inc. — General su p p o r t............................... $ 5 0 0

Health Grants

B r e n tw o o d H o sp ita l — Jam es Sheldon Rench Memorial Lecture Series in osteopathic m edicine over five y e a r s .................................... $ 3 3 , 5 0 0 E liza B r y a n t C e n te r — Nursing care facility and m ultipurpose senior citizens facility developm ent over three y e a r s ................................$ 7 5 0 , 0 0 0 C ase W e ste r n R e s e r v e U n iv e r s it y — Computer analysis of the G overn­ m ent Accounting Office (GAO) Cleveland elderly study data . $ 3 ,4 6 2 Consultant support in developm ent of an evaluation design for the Doctor of Nursing program in the School of Nursing over 15 m onths . . . . $ 5 ,0 0 0 Programs in the basic scien ces at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine over three years ..................................................$ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 Recruitm ent and establishm ent of two senior neuroscientists in the Department of Neurology . . $ 5 0 ,0 0 0

T he C le v e la n d F ou n d atii c>) E valuation of g ra n t to C ase W estern R eserve U niversity for p ro g ra m s in th e basic sc ie n c es a t th e C ase W estern R eserve U niversity S chool of M edicine $ 5 ,0 0 0 E valuation of g ra n t to T h e C leveland Clinic F o u n d atio n for d e v e lo p m e n t of m edical technology a s s e s s m e n t m o d e l s .........................................$ 5 ,0 0 0 E v aluation of g ra n t to G lenville H ealth A ssociation for four p ro je c ts .........................................$ 3 ,0 0 0 E valuation of g ra n t to N eighborhood H ealth C are, Inc. for e s ta b lish m e n t of a n onprofit a m b u la to ry h e a lth care c e n te r in th e C lark-F ulton a r e a ................................................ $ 1 ,0 0 0 E v alu atio n of g ra n t to U niversity H ospitals of C leveland for th e C enter for th e C ritically 111.................... $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 E v alu atio n of g ra n t to U n iv ersity H ospitals of C leveland for s u p p o rt of a N e u ro m u sc u la r F ellow ................$ 1 ,0 0 0 E v alu atio n a n d review of a d d itio n al fu n d in g re q u e s ts in rela tio n to g ra n t to C ase W estern R eserve U niv ersity for p ro g ra m s in b asic sc ie n c es a t the C ase W estern R eserve U n iv ersity School of M ed icin e..................$ 1 5 ,0 0 0

Strengthening academ ic and adm in is­ trative priorities of the School of Nursing over 27 m onths . . $ 1 0 0 ,0 0 0

Site review a n d e v a lu a tio n of Project GOh, a m odel n e ig h b o rh o o d geriatric o u tre a c h n e tw o rk th ro u g h th e C u y ah o g a C o u n ty H ospital F oundation, In c ............................ $ 6 ,5 0 0

Sym posium honoring Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine Dean E m e r itu s ............................$ 3 ,5 0 0

C le v e la n d H e a lth E d u c a tio n M u seu m — G en eral s u p p o rt . $ 1 ,0 0 0

C en tral S c h o o l o f P r a c tic a l N u rsin g, Inc. — Home nursing program (fifth y e a r )...............$ 2 2 ,3 1 0 C le v e la n d A rea C itiz e n s L ea g u e for N u rsin g — Nursing Student Recruitment Project over two years........................................$ 1 5 8 ,5 0 0 T he C le v e la n d C lin ic F o u n d a tio n — Developm ent of m edical technol­ ogy assessm en t m odels over two y e a r s ..................................... $ 2 5 5 ,0 0 0

Neurosurgery research . . . . $ 3 4 ,9 2 8 C lev ela n d D e v e lo p m e n t F ou n d ation (G reater C le v e la n d G row th A sso c ia tio n ) — Program to develop Cleveland as a health/m edical and high technology center (third and fourth year)..............................$ 7 3 ,6 0 0

C le v e la n d S t a te U n iv e r s it y R esearch on th e im p a c t of v e ry low b irth w eig h t on e d u c a tio n a l d ev elo p m en t a n d im p a c t of iron deficiency a n e m ia on child d e v e lo p m e n t............................$ 6 2 ,6 8 0 C u yah oga C o u n ty H o sp ita l F o u n d a tio n , Inc. — P roject GOh, a m odel g eriatric h e a lth n e tw o rk (third year) ............................. $100,000

G le n v ille H e a lth A s s o c ia t io n — Four projects: te c h n ic a l a ssista n c e in developm ent: s ta rt-u p fu n d in g for o b ste tric s a n d su rg e ry ; fam ily d ev elo p m en t c e n te r p lan n in g ; staff re tre a ts over tw o y e a r s . . . . $ 1 6 8 ,3 2 1 T he G rea ter C le v e la n d H o sp ita l A s s o c ia tio n — H ealth E d u c a tio n Television N e tw o rk ............... $ 3 0 ,0 0 0 H illc r e s t H o sp ita l — H om e C are H ospice P ro g ra m .................... $ 1 5 ,0 0 0 H o sp ic e C ou n cil for N o r th e r n O hio — H ospice care p ro g ra m for th e elderly a n d infirm a t C u y ah o g a C ounty B oard of H ealth.' . . $ 2 6 2 6 8

44


H ospice care p ro g ram for th e elderly a n d infirm a t H om e H ealth Care, In c.................................... $ 3 3 ,9 2 3

A m erica n H eart A s s o c ia tio n , N o r th e a st O hio A ffilia te , Inc. — General su p p o r t....................$ 6 5 ,0 4 3

L ak ew ood H o sp ita l — General s u p p o r t ...................... $ 2 ,6 4 3

Hospice care p ro g ra m for th e elderly and infirm a t th e V isiting N urse A sso ciatio n .............................. $ 5 5 ,9 4 9

Research or any other purpose ......................................................$ 1 2 ,0 2 4

L ak ew ood H o sp ita l F ou n d a tio n , Inc. — General support . . . . $ 9 7 ,1 6 9

A r th r itis F ou n d ation , N o r th e a ste r n O hio C h ap ter — General su p p o rt..............................$ 7 5 8

L u th e r a n M ed ical C en ter — Conference travel . . . . ..................$ 4 0 1 Nurse a w a r d .................................$ 2 ,7 7 9

B e lle v u e H o sp ita l, B e lle v u e , Ohio — General s u p p o r t....................$ 3 ,5 2 8

L u th e r a n M ed ical C en ter F ou n d a­ t i o n — General support . . . $ 2 2 ,6 3 2

C ase W estern R e se r v e U n iv e r s ity for th e S ch o o l o f M ed icin e — Cancer research .........................$ 1 6 ,1 6 6

N orth ern O hio L ung A s s o c ia tio n — General support............................$ 1 ,4 4 2

Medical research and general support ....................................................$ 6 7 ,9 0 0

R ainbow B a b ie s & C h ild ren s H o sp ita l — Equipment or supplies ........................................................ $ 1 ,3 0 6

I n t e r n a t i o n a l C e n t e r f o r A r t if ic i a l O rg a n s a n d T r a n s p l a n t a t i o n — S tart-up su p p o rt over th re e y e a rs .................................................. $ 7 5 ,0 0 0 L a k e C o u n ty M e m o ria l H o s p ita ls , P a in e s v ille , O h io — H a rrie t B. S to rrs M emorial L i b r a r y .....................$ 1 5 ,0 0 0 T h e M t. S in a i H o s p ita l o f C le v e la n d — C o n stru c tio n cam p a ig n ................................................. $ 5 0 0 ,0 0 0 M t. S in a i M e d ic a l C e n t e r — C om puter-assisted in stru c tio n for the D ep artm en t of E m erg en cy M ed icin e...................................... $ 2 1 ,5 0 0 N e ig h b o rh o o d H e a lth C a re , In c . — E stab lish m en t of a nonprofit am bulatory h e a lth care c e n te r in th e Clark-Fulton a re a (second a n d th ird y e a r ) ............................................. $ 4 1 ,5 0 0 P r e te r m C le v e la n d , In c . — Revolving loan fu n d for in d ig en t patients over th re e y e a rs . . $ 1 0 8 ,9 5 5 S a in t A le x is H o s p ita l — Fivehospital cooperative n u rsin g education feasibility s tu d y th ro u g h Council of P hysicians, A d m in istra to rs and Trustees (COPAT).......... $ 3 0 ,0 0 0 U n ite d L a b o r A g e n c y , In c . — M anagem ent S tu d y of th e D urable Medical E q u ip m e n t P ro g ram .................................................... $ 3 2 ,7 8 5 U n iv e r s ity H o s p i ta l s o f C le v e la n d — Capital c a m p a i g n .............$ 1 6 ,0 0 0 C ontinuation of p la n n in g of a critical care p ro g ra m ............................$ 1 7 ,0 0 0 N eu ro m u scu lar Fellow in th e D ep artm en t of N eurology . . $ 2 7 ,8 0 0

Outpatient clinic for dispensary ....................................................$ 3 7 ,0 9 5 Research in diseases of the eye ................................................. .. $ 3 0 ,2 1 0

S a in t A n n F o u n d a tio n — General support............................$ 2 ,2 8 1

C le v e la n d C lin ic — Research in diseases of the e y e ....................$ 1 5 ,1 0 5

S a in t J o h n H o sp ita l — General s u p p o r t......................... $11,913

C lev ela n d C lin ic F ou n d ation — General support........................... $ 1 ,7 9 7

S a in t L u k e ’s H o sp ita l — General su p p o rt.............................. $ 9 6 7

C le v e la n d H ea lth E d u c a tio n M u seu m — General supp ort. $ 2 ,4 3 5

S t. V in c e n t C h a rity H o sp ita l — Aid for alcoholics and indigent s i c k ..................................................$ 1 ,0 9 0

C u yahoga C ou n ty H o sp ita l F ou n d a tio n , Inc. — Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital Nurse A w a r d ............... ..............................$ 8 6 3

General support........................... $ 2 ,2 8 1

Elizabeth Boersig Soyer bed . . . $ 8 9 4 General s u p p o r t......................... $ 4 ,9 4 9

D e a c o n e ss H o sp ita l o f C lev ela n d — General support......................$ 2 ,2 8 1

S a m a r ita n H o sp ita l, A sh la n d , Ohio — Memorial room m aintained in m em ory of Mr. and Mrs. A. N. Myers .......................................................... $ 9 ,1 9 1

T he D e a c o n e s s S o c ie ty — General support of Deaconess H o sp ita l....................................... $ 2 ,6 4 3

S h r in e r s H o sp ita ls for C rip p led C hildren, C hicago, I llin o is — General s u p p o r t......................... $ 6 ,9 9 7

E ly ria M em orial H o sp ita l — William H. Gates b e d .................$ 1 ,3 0 0

U n iv e r s ity H o sp ita ls o f C le v e la n d — Conference t r a v e l..................$ 2 ,5 2 6

General support...........................$ 2 ,2 8 1

General s u p p o r t......................... $ 9 ,8 9 8 F a ir v ie w G en era l H o sp ita l — Christiana Perren Soyer b e d . . . $ 8 9 5

General support for Lakeside Hospital ................................................... $ 4 8 2 ,0 9 3

E q u ip m en t..............................$ 5 5 ,9 7 7

General support for the maternity hospital.......................................... $ 5 ,8 3 8

U niversity H o sp itals of C leveland a n d Case W estern R eserve U n iversity C enter for th e C ritically 111 over 18 m o n th s .................................$ 3 7 5 ,0 0 0

General s u p p o r t.........................$ 9 ,4 2 8

TOTAL HEALTH G R A N TS— U N D E SIG N A T E D .......... $ 3 ,7 9 1 ,4 8 1

H ea lth H ill H o sp ita l for C h ild ren — General support......................$ 2 ,2 8 1

(Following recipients a nd program s designated by donor)

H igh lan d V iew H o sp ita l — Em ployees’ Christmas fund . . . $ 9 3 3

A m e ric a n C a n c e r S o c ie ty , C u y a h o g a C o u n ty U n it — G eneral s u p p o r t ........................$ 6 5 ,0 4 3

H uron R oad H o sp ita l — General s u p p o r t........................ $ 7 ,2 0 8

R esearch or a n y o th e r p u rp o se ...................................................... $ 1 2 ,0 2 4

J e w is h C o m m u n ity F e d e r a tio n o f C le v e la n d — Research or any other p u r p o s e ...........................$ 1 2 ,0 2 4

G race H o sp ita l — E q u ip m en t................................ $ 2 7 ,9 8 9

Henry L. Sanford Memorial bed .............................................. $ 1 ,3 0 6 Urological or vascular research ......................................................$ 5 1 ,1 9 0 TOTAL HEALTH G R A N T S DESIGNATED .................... $ 1 ,1 7 7 ,0 1 7 TOTAL HEALTH G R A N T S DESIGNATED AND UNDESIGNATED............ $ 4 ,9 6 8 ,4 9 8

45


Education The p a st d e c a d e ’s tre n d is u n m is ta k ­ able: th e s tu d e n ts e n te rin g A m e ric a ’s in stitu tio n s of h ig h e r le a rn in g are older. M any are w o rk in g a d u lts w ho for the m o st p a rt n e ed to k eep w o rk in g full tim e w hile in school. Ten y e a rs ago they w ere referred to a s “ n o n tra d itional!’ b u t so m e a n a ly s ts now p re d ic t th a t by th e en d of th e 1980s th e y w ill be in th e m ajority. In 1981 tw o of C le v ela n d ’s m a jo r e d u ­ cational in s titu tio n s — C leveland S ta te U niversity a n d D yke College — re ­ new ed th e ir c o m m itm e n t to s erv e th is rapidly grow ing p o p u la tio n . T h e ir e x ­ citing p rojects w ere su p p o rte d by T h e C leveland F o u n d atio n , w h ic h h a s d e m ­ o n strated a p a rtic u la r in te re s t in alternative s tru c tu re s in h ig h e r e d u c a ­ tion since th e m id-1970s.

C areer A d u lt s M a k e T im e f o r L ib e r a l A r t s a t C SU In J a n u a ry 1981 C leveland S ta te U ni­ versity la u n c h e d its E x te n d e d C am p u s College — a sp ecially d e sig n e d p ro ­ gram th a t allow s w o rk in g a d u lts to com plete a B ach elo r of A rts degree w ith o u t in te rru p tin g th e ir w ork schedules. Its start-u p c o sts p a rtia lly fu n d e d by a $ 200,000 F o u n d a tio n g ra n t, th e CSU program is divided in to tw o levels — three y ears of in tro d u c to ry co u rses, d u rin g w hich s tu d e n ts m e e t all u n iv e r­ sity d istrib u tio n re q u ire m e n ts, a n d tw o y ears of sp ec ializatio n in a s u b je c t area. If th a t s o u n d s like a r a th e r c o n v e n ­ tional college scen ario , c o n sid e r th e in stru c tio n a l m e th o d s devised to m a k e th e m o st of th e se s tu d e n ts ’ lim ited tim e. D u ring th e first th re e -y e a r period, textbook a s s ig n m e n ts a re su p p le ­ m en ted b y telev ised c o u rse s aired at daw n on WVIZ-TV a n d sev e ra l local cable o u tlets. S tu d e n ts a tte n d fo u r-h o u r e v en in g w o rk sh o p s every w eek to d isc u ss co u rse m a te ria l a t a lo cation c o n v e n ­ ien t for th e m ; tw o are located on th e

W est Side, o ne on th e E a st Side an d one d o w n to w n on th e CSU c am p u s. (Sm all g ro u p s are th e ru le for all w o rk ­ shops.) Twice each acad em ic quarter, s tu d e n ts are also ex p ected to a tte n d in ten siv e “ conference c o u rses” held on c a m p u s all day S a tu rd a y a n d Sunday. W h at a b o u t th e c u rric u lu m ? In ord er to re ta in th e b re a d th of su b jec t m a tte r th a t d istin g u ish e s a liberal a rts e d u c a ­ tion — w hile m eetin g th e severe tim e c o n stra in ts on w orking a d u lts — CSU officials h av e carefully c o n stru cte d a seq u e n c e of “ in te g ra te d ” co u rses in th e social sciences, h u m a n itie s an d science a n d technology. All th e co u rses in th is im ag in ativ e in te rd isc ip lin a ry a p p ro a ch are ta u g h t by e sta b lish e d CSU faculty — a n d all th e p ieces are m ad e to fit. A typical social stu d ie s th e m e seq u en ce, for ex ­ am p le, ru n s from “ C ulture, C om ­ m u n ity a n d Id e n tity ;’ ta u g h t by a so ­ ciologist, h isto ria n a n d an th ro p o lo g ist, to “W ork in S o ciety ” (w hose a cco m ­ p a n y in g conference co u rse recen tly focused o n econom ics) an d “D om estic a n d In te rn a tio n a l C onflict!’ W ithin th e se co u rses, s tu d e n ts re ­ ceive “ skills” in stru c tio n in w riting, m a th a n d re sea rc h — all related to th e su b jec t m a tte r a t h a n d . T he eq u iv alen t of S ta tistic s 101, for in sta n ce , is p a rt of th e social stu d ie s w ork. W h en th e w orking a d u lts hav e co m ­ pleted th e th re e in tro d u cto ry years, th e y m ay choose to specialize in a re g u ­ lar u n iv e rsity m ajo r ta k e n in highly c o n ce n tra te d doses; a special E x ten d ed C am p u s College m ajo r s u c h a s public a d m in istra tio n or labor stu d ies; or a neg o tiated p erso n al m ajo r m a tc h ed w ith c aree r goals a n d in terests. W h at k in d s of s tu d e n ts are enrolling in th e new p ro g ram ? CSU officials h ad a n tic ip a te d a n influx of in d u stria l w orkers; in ste a d th e E x ten d ed C am p u s h a s a ttra c te d w o rk in g s tu d e n ts from a v ariety of fields, w ith th e larg est n u m ­ b er co m in g from C lev elan d ’s service in d u strie s. T he c u rre n t crop in clu d es a n a d m in is tra to r from th e Ohio N u rs­ in g A ssociation, a b io m etric re se a rc h e r a t a local h o sp ita l a n d a se c re ta ry a t a c o m m u n ity college. “T h ey are a m b itio u s a n d in tellig en t!’ re p o rts th e p ro g ra m ’s director. “ M any hav e w o rk ed th e ir w ay u p to a low

C S U ’s E x t e n d e d C a m p u s C o lle g e a i m s to r e t a i n t h e b r e a d th o f s u b j e c t m a tte r th a t d is ­ t i n g u i s h e s a lib e r a l a r t s e d u c a t io n w h ile m e e t i n g t h e s e v e r e t im e c o n ­ s tr a in ts o n w o r k in g a d u l ts .

T h e a d u lt s tu d e n ts sh a re a m a tu r ity a n d s e l f- d i s c ip l i n e o f te n l a c k in g in y o u n g er u n der­ g r a d u a te s .

P ro ject S t u d e n t A c h ie v e m e n t: encour­

aging ‘upward m obility' in a new grouping system at Cleveland Heights High School. 47


su p e rv iso ry level a n d n eed a d egree to c o n tin u e p ro g ressin g !’ T h e s tu d e n ts see m to s h a re a n o th e r trait: a m a tu rity a n d self-discipline often lack in g in y o u n g e r u n d e rg ra d u ­ a te s w ho for sev eral y e a rs m a y n o t know w h a t th e y w a n t o u t of college. F rom th e ir first d ay in th e p ro g ram , th e se w ork in g a d u lts k n o w ex actly w h a t th e y w a n t. G ro an ed a 35-year-old:

In 1980 th e F o u n d a tio n p a rtia lly fu n d ed a facilities m a s te r p la n ior th e college. O u t of th a t p ro je c t c a m e D y k e s d ecisio n to a c q u ire th e i n t e r c o n n e c t e d C o lu m b ia a n d M arine b u i l d i n g s tw o g ra n d tu rn -o f-th e -c e n tu ry office b u ild ­ in g s on low er P ro sp e c t A v en u e n e a r P ublic S q u a re — for th e e x p a n s io n of its p ro g ram . A 1981 C lev elan d F o u n d a tio n g ra n t of $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 o v er tw o y e a rs s u p p o rts th e relo catio n effort, s c h e d u le d for co m p le­ tio n in tim e for th e 1983 fall te rm . W hile it is g e n e ra l F o u n d a tio n policy to d isco u rag e g ra n ts for c a p ita l su p p o rt, a n ex ce p tio n w as m a d e h e re d u e to the co m p ellin g role D yke is likely to p lay in a lte rin g th e profile of th e d e p re sse d P ro sp e c t a rea. M ajor re n o v a tio n of th e b u ild in g s will o p en u p 128,000 s q u a re feet for c la ss­ ro o m s a n d offices — th re e tim e s th e sp ace of th e p re s e n t D yke h e a d q u a rte rs on E a st 6 th S tre e t. A la rg e r lib rary re so u rce c e n te r is p la n n e d , a lo n g w ith b e tte r “ la b o ra to ry ” sp a c e for s u c h e s­ s e n tia l b u s in e s s tools of th e 1980s as w ord p ro c e sso rs a n d c o m p u te rs.

H ig h S c h o o l “ G r o u p i n g ” G o a l: E q u a l L e a rn in g O p p o r tu n ity CSU’s E x te n d e d C am pus: serving an older stu d en t population who

know exactly w hat they want.

“A t w ork I’m su p p o sed to p u t to g e th e r p ro p o sals th a t req u ire w ritin g an d re ­ sea rc h , a n d I c a n ’t do e ith e r!’ He e x p ec ts to be ta u g h t.

D y k e G row s D o w n to w n E ight o u t of every te n s tu d e n ts a tte n d ­ ing D yke College are em p lo y ed full or p a rt tim e w hile e arn in g th e sch o o l’s B achelor of S cience or A ssociate d e ­ grees. A nd one-half of th o se w o rk in g s tu d e n ts are em ployed d o w ntow n. So it m ad e good sen se th a t Dyke tru s te e s an d a d m in istra to rs, e n c o u r­ aged by a grow ing d e m a n d for b u sin ess-o rien ted ed u ca tio n on one h a n d b u t h a m p e re d by a n over­ crow ded, in a d eq u a te facility on th e other, w ould seek a new location for th e 133-year-old college — b u t one th a t m a in ta in e d a do w n to w n settin g .

48

To g ro u p o r n o t to g ro u p ? For y e a rs e d u c a to rs h av e p o n d e re d , a n aly z e d a n d d e b ate d th e q u estio n : is it in a s tu d e n t’s b e st in te re st to “ tr a c k ” or “g ro u p ” h im w ith o th e rs of sim ila r ab ility ? O p p o n e n ts of g ro u p in g p o in t to th e sch o o ls’ fre q u e n t lack of objective c ri­ te ria in m a k in g g ro u p a ssig n m e n ts. S tu d ie s h a v e sh o w n th a t m in o rity s tu ­ d e n ts are p a rtic u la rly v u ln e ra b le in a g ro u p ed sy ste m , often b e co m in g tra p ­ p ed in a g ro u p for th e le n g th of th e ir school career. A t C leveland H eig h ts H igh School, e d u c a to rs a re a tte m p tin g to solve th ese p ro b le m s in th e m a jo r re s tru c tu rin g of a g ro u p in g sy ste m w h ic h h a d in fact re su lte d in so m e d egree of racial isolation. In th e new P roject S tu d e n t A chieve­ m e n t, all H eig h ts H igh s tu d e n ts are g ro u p ed — gifted a n d ta le n te d , e x ­ p a n d e d or s ta n d a rd — in e ac h m ajo r su b je c t a re a as d e te rm in e d objectively by th e ir sco res on a reco g n ized te stin g in s tru m e n t w h ich m e a s u re s ac h ie v e ­ m e n t a n d proficiency. (In th e case of


bo rd erlin e sco res, g u id a n ce c o u n selo rs are u su ally in s tru c te d to p u s h th e s tu ­ d en t to th e h ig h e r level.) Being a ssig n e d to a gro u p in th is system is not, how ever, th e sa m e as being co n signed. T h e te sts are a d m in ­ istered a t le a st once a year, s a y s th e school s y s te m ’s a s s is ta n t s u p e rin te n d ­ ent, so th a t “ s tu d e n ts know th e y can m ove from one level to a n o th e r!’ M ovem ent is m a d e all th e m ore p o s­ sible by four “A c h iev em en t C en ters!’ funded by a 1981 C leveland F o u n d atio n g ra n t of $ 7 0 ,4 0 0 . E ach center, a large classroom sp ace located w ith in th e building, serv es th e h ig h sch o o l’s 2,500 s tu d e n ts in one of four su b je c t areas: E nglish, m a th , social s tu d ie s and science. T h e re g u la r c lassro o m teach ers refer to th e c e n te rs th o se s tu ­ d en ts w ho n eed re m e d ial w o rk or could benefit from e n h a n c e d le a rn in g pro j­ ects. F req u en tly th e s tu d e n t h im se lf req u ests th e referral. D epending o n th e ta s k a t h a n d , s tu ­ dents m ay be e x cu se d from a re g u la r class for u p to tw o w eek s a t a tim e to attend a center, or go d u rin g free periods. W hat do th e C leveland H eights te e n ­ agers get in th e c e n te rs th a t th e y can n o t get in th e classro o m ? In d i­ vidualized a tte n tio n from specially train ed te a c h e rs — th e c h a n c e to focus on and m a ste r a n a ca d e m ic ch allen g e at o n e’s ow n ra te of speed. Staff also w elcom e a d o le sc e n ts w ith a failure sy n d ro m e w ho, a s a s u p e r­ visor p u ts it, are “ frig h te n e d a n d discouraged in a re g u la r classro o m . Give th e m a p lace w h e re th e y c a n re ­ ceive one-on-one h elp a n d th e y b loom !’ The A ch iev em en t C en ters, by h e lp ­ ing s tu d e n ts develop or e n h a n c e specific skills, serv e a s im p o rta n t s u p ­ port for th e re g u la r classro o m . T h ey are th e key to e n c o u ra g in g w h a t school officials call “ u p w a rd m o b ility ” w ith in the new g ro u p in g sy ste m . It is a clearly defined p ro cess w hose goal is e q u al le a rn in g o p p o rtu n ity for all s tu d e n ts.

T each ers M ea su re T e x tb o o k T h eo ry vs. B u s in e s s P ra c tic e T he gap b e tw ee n c o n v e n tio n a l c la s s ­ room ed u ca tio n a n d to d a y ’s rap id ly c h an g in g te ch n o lo g y h a s closed a b it in C leveland, th a n k s to a u n iq u e te a c h e r in te rn sh ip p ro g ram conceived b y th e In stitu te for E n v iro n m e n ta l E d u catio n .

L au n c h ed th re e y e ars ago w ith a C leve­ lan d F o u n d atio n g ra n t, th e p ro g ram p a irs qualified sec o n d a ry e d u catio n te a c h e rs w ith G reater C leveland firm s in a collaborative ex p lo ratio n of energy a n d its im p a c t on each em ployer. T each ers sp e n d six to eig h t w eeks of th e ir s u m m e r v acatio n le arn in g th ro u g h firsth a n d ex p erien ce how e n ­ ergy u se relates to o p eratio n s an d m a in te n a n c e , m a n u fa c tu rin g , re sea rc h a n d d ev elo p m en t, a n d sh ip p in g a n d receiving, am o n g o th e r areas. T h e te a c h e rs are en co u rag ed — even exp ected — to seco n d -g u ess th e c o m ­ p a n ies’ en erg y p ractices. A Lakew ood H igh School p h y sics in stru cto r, for e x ­ am ple, sav ed a local firm th o u s a n d s of dollars by solving a lig h tin g problem a n d re c o m m en d in g th a t tw o sep a ra te electrical serv ices be in terco n n ected . O ne firm w as so p leased w ith th e re ­ s u lts th a t every s u m m e r it b rin g s b ack several p a st in te rn s a s p art-tim e em ployees. T h e te a c h e rs hav e gain ed new re ­ sp e c t for C lev elan d ’s b u sin ess com m unity. “ I’ve learn ed how re ­ se a rc h is really d o n e!’ say s one. “Too m u c h tex tb o o k th eo ry can be b ad. T his p ro g ram is b rin g in g m e dow n to e a rth !’ Clearly, b o th co m p an y an d te ac h e r ben efit from th e asso ciatio n — b u t th e re is m ore: each in s tru c to r’s p ra c ti­ cal ex p erien ce u su ally finds its w ay b ack to a ju n io r h ig h or h ig h school classro o m , w h ere s tu d e n ts h e a r th e la te st w ord on p arabolic reflectors a n d solar cookers.

C l e v e l a n d H ig h S c h o o l e r s G e t a T a s t e o f C o lle g e S tu d e n ts from tw o C leveland high schools are th e b en eficiaries of a m o d ­ e st b u t in n o v ativ e p ro g ram th a t u n ite s th e ir schools w ith a n a re a liberal a rts college. In th is d istin ctiv e cooperative arra n g m e n t, professors from th e College of W ooster sp e n d one w eek “in re si­ d e n c e ” a t e ith e r J o h n M arshall or J o h n F. K en n ed y h ig h schools, p la n n in g co u rses a n d te a m te ac h in g w ith th e ir pu b lic school colleagues. Som e college facu lty ap p reciate th is c h an ce to “ d e ­ sce n d from th e ivory to w e r” ; o th e rs

T h ro u g h its e x p a n ­ sio n p ro g ra m , D y k e C o lle g e is l i k e l y to p l a y a c o m p e llin g r o le in a l t e r i n g th e p r o file o f th e d e ­ p re ssed P ro sp ect A v e n u e a rea.

P r o je c t S t u d e n t A c h i e v e m e n t is th e m a jo r r e s t r u c t u r ­ in g o f a g r o u p i n g s y s te m w h ic h h a d r e s u l t e d in s o m e d e ­ g r e e o f r a c ia l is o la tio n .

T h e h ig h s c h o o l te a c h e r s a re e n ­ c o u r a g e d —e v e n e x p e c t e d —to s e c ­ o n d - g u e s s th e c o m p a n ie s ’e n e r g y p r a c t ic e s .

49


F or u r b a n te e n ­ a g ers, m a n y o f w hom have never v e n tu r e d o u ts id e t h e c ity , t h e C o lle g e o f W o o s t e r ’s b u c o lic c a m p u s is a c u l ­ t u r a l e y e -o p e n e r .

W ooster P r o fe sso r ‘In R e s id e n c e ’ in th e C le v e la n d P u b lic S c h o o ls: giving students a

taste of a college-level course. em p h asiz e th e y “ d o n ’t w ater d o w n ” th e ir su b je c ts a t all for th e h ig h schoolers. T h e p ro g ram s h a rp e n s th e h an d s-o n skills of b o th college a n d h ig h school te ac h e rs, w ho w elcom e a w eek of being seen a n d critiq u ed by a colleague after p e rh a p s several y ears w ith o u t c la ss­ room evalu atio n . S tu d e n ts g et a ta ste of w h a t a college-level co u rse is like, a n d a d o u b le role m odel a s th e y w it­ n e ss a c o m m u n ity of (two) sch o la rs in action. E ach y e ar as m a n y as 30 s tu d e n ts from th e sam e tw o high schools are aw ard ed sch o la rsh ip s to a tte n d a

50

“ s u m m e r a ca d e m ic c a m p ” h eld a t W ooster w h ich p ro v id es sm all gro u p e n ric h m e n t a n d re m e d ial ex p erien ces in sev eral su b je c t a re as. T h e w o rk is in ten siv e: s tu d e n ts en ro lled in th e a d ­ v a n c e d m a th group, for in sta n c e , sp e n d h o u rs w ith a c o m p u te r; th o se in th e s tu d y sk ills (w riting) c am p tackle a n e ssa y a day. For u rb a n te e n a g e rs, m a n y of w h o m h av e n e v er v e n tu re d o u tsid e th e city, W o o ster’s bu co lic W ayne C o u n ty c a m ­ p u s is a c u ltu ra l eye-opener. W rote one J o h n F. K en n ed y s tu d e n t a fte r a v isit to a n A m ish c o m m u n ity : “ I w as sta rin g at th e A m ish m a n b e c a u se I h a d never seen a n A m ish before. He w as sta rin g a t m e b e ca u se he h a d n e v e r se e n a b lack before!’ U n d er th e te rm s of th e 1978 d e se g re ­ gation order, a U. S. D istric t C o u rt directed th e C leveland P ublic S ch o o ls to e x p an d its co llab o rativ e a rra n g e -


m en ts w ith in s titu tio n s of h ig h e r learning. T h e W ooster p ro g ram , w h ich for som e m o n th s re p re se n te d th e s y s ­ te m ’s only a sso c ia tio n w ith a college, has n o t only su rv iv e d b u t h a s u n d e r­ gone c o n tin u e d re fin e m e n t a m id a dem oralizing period in p u b lic e d u c a ­ tion here. T he p ro g ram , p a rtia lly fu n d e d th ro u g h o u t its th re e y e a rs b y T h e Cleveland F o u n d atio n , offers in s ig h ts th a t could prove to be u sefu l a s th e C leveland B oard of E d u c a tio n s h a p e s its ag en d a over th e n e x t sev e ra l years.

B e n e d ic tin e , S tr o n g A g a in , H e lp s I t s C i t y N e i g h b o r s In th e m id-1970s, th e F oundationfunded B ish o p ’s T ask Force on C atholic Secondary E d u c a tio n p u b lish e d a c o m ­ prehensive s tu d y p re d ic tin g th a t already a la rm in g e n ro llm e n t declin es would c o n tin u e a t le a s t th ro u g h 1990 — especially for sch o o ls s itu a te d in th e aging cen tral city. B enedictine H igh School, th e 50year-old p re p a ra to ry school for boys, seem ed to e m b o d y th e tre n d . T h e o u t­ m igration of C atholic p a rish io n e rs from th e city h a d h u r t B enedictine, nestled w ith St. A ndrew A bbey on 17 serene acres a t E a s t Blvd. a n d B uckeye Road, in th e h e a rt of th e B uckeyeW oodland n eig h b o rh o o d . By 1974 e n ro llm e n t a t th e h igh school h a d d ro p p ed to ju s t 4 0 0 s tu ­ den ts from a h ig h of 1,115 in 1952 — a n d the 62 m o n k s of C le v ela n d ’s B enedic­ tine Order, w ho o p e ra te th e school a n d the larg est u rb a n ab b ey in th e U nited States, w ere forced to ta k e a h a rd look at the future. D espite its h o n o re d tra d itio n a s a city school d istin g u ish e d in b o th a c a d e m ­ ics an d a th le tics, B en ed ictin e seem ed m ark ed for th e m ove to su b u rb ia . B ut in 1978, th e m o n k s su rp rise d C leveland’s e d u c a tio n a l c o m m u n ity by ad o p tin g a stra te g y for su rv iv al — an d grow th — in th e city. T h e choice, say s th e O rd e r’s d e v e lo p m e n t director, w as clear: “ If w e follow ed th e w h ite flight to th e s u b u rb s, w h a t could w e s ay to th e city, to th e people w ho w ere m o v in g in? T h a t we w ere going to a b a n d o n th e m ? ”

T h e m o n k s s e t th e m se lv e s to th e ta sk of re v e rsin g th e d o w n w ard en ro ll­ m e n t p a tte rn th ro u g h careful p lan n in g , a m o re a g g ressiv e re c ru itin g effort a n d a n e x p a n d e d b u sin g p ro g ram . T h eir d e te rm in a tio n to s ta y in C leveland a p ­ p e a rs to h av e paid off; la st fall, e n ro llm e n t w as u p to 600. T h e O rd er also d ecided to form ulate a m a ste r p la n for B enedictine High School, th e ab b ey a n d n e arb y parcels of lan d . In 1981, T h e C leveland F o u n d a­ tio n su p p o rte d w ork on th e m a ste r plan w ith a tw o-year g ra n t of $25,0 0 0 , rec­ og n izin g th a t B en ed ictin e’s c o m m it­ m e n t to th e core city w a rra n te d special e n co u rag e m e n t. By its very existence, B enedictine is a n anchor, a stab ilizin g force in Buckeye-W oodland, b u t th e O rder feels a social resp o n sib ility th a t goes m u c h further. M onks p a rticip ate in n eig h b o r­ hood im p ro v em e n t efforts. T he sch o o l’s g y m n a siu m a n d au d ito riu m are o p en to th e com m unity. A new p ro g ram will m ak e th e sch o o l’s re c re a ­ tio n facilities available to th e h a n d ica p p e d . In sh o rt, B enedictine reach es out. T h e m a ste r plan, officially a ccep ted by th e m o n k s, calls for $8 m illion in e x p an sio n a n d ren o v atio n of th e high school a n d abbey. An a rc h ite c t h a s b een engaged, a n d c o n tin g e n t on the re s u lts of a feasibility study, officials ho p e to b re a k g ro u n d by w in te r 1983.

D e s p ite i t s h o n o r e d 5 0 -y e a r tr a d itio n a s a c e n tr a l c ity b o y s ' s c h o o l, B e n e ­ d ic tin e se e m e d m a r k e d f o r th e m o v e to s u b u r b ia .

51


A m h e r s t C o lleg e , A m h e r s t, M a s s a c h u s e t ts — G eneral su p p o rt $ 1 7 ,5 0 0 B a ld w in -W a lla c e C o lleg e — Peace With Ju stice P rogram .......... $ 3 5 , 0 0 0

E d ucation G rants

B e n e d ic tin e O rder o f C le v e la n d , Inc. — D evelopm ent of a m aster plan for Benedictine High School over two years...........................................$ 2 5 ,0 0 0 B e r e a C ity S c h o o l D is tr ic t — Developm ent of classroom ach ieve­ m ent m otivation curriculum .................................................... $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 B e tte r B u s in e s s B u rea u o f G rea ter C lev ela n d F o u n d a tio n , Inc. — B usiness TEL-TIPS............... $ 1 5 ,0 0 0 J o h n C arroll U n iv e r s it y — Promotion and developm ent of the second-year program in cooperative education in the undergraduate chem istry curriculum and enlargem ent of com puter science course offerings* * ................. $ 10,000 C ase A lu m n i A s s o c ia tio n — D evelopm ent of cooperative educa­ tion program at Case Western Reserve U niversity’s Case Institute of Technology (third year)* * . . $ 1 4 ,4 0 0 D evelopm ent of Fenn co-op programs and expenses of its first Awards L u n ch eo n * * ..................................$ 5 ,0 5 0 C ase W e ste r n R e s e r v e U n iv e r s ity — Continuing education training pro­ gram at the School of Applied Social Sciences (third y e a r ) ............... $ 1 0 ,3 6 3 Continued developm ent of an encyclopedia of Cleveland history (second y e a r ) .........................$ 4 4 ,3 9 5 Disadvantaged student program (second year).............................. $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 General operating support for the School of M edicine.......................$ 1 ,0 0 0 C itiz e n s ’ C ou n cil for O hio S c h o o ls — Public school vocational education program (third year) and general support..................................... $ 3 0 ,0 0 0 Study of the role of com m unity coalitions in school desegregation within the state of Ohio . . . . $ 2 2 ,0 0 0

C le v e la n d D e v e lo p m e n t s,' o u n d a t io n ( G r e a te r C le v e la n d G r o w th A s s o c ia tio n ) — B lacks in M an ag e­ m e n t corp o rate s u m m e r in te rn s h ip p ro g ram for fac u lty of b lac k colleges an d u n iv ersitie s (fourth year) ....................................................... $ 1 5 ,0 0 0 C le v e la n d B o a rd o f E d u c a ti o n — C leveland S p ace T h e a te r . . $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 E le m e n ta ry law -related e d u c a tio n p ro g ram (third y e a r ) ................$ 9 6 ,6 9 4 D evelopm ent of fin an cial p la n n in g m o d e l ......................................... $ 1 4 5 ,0 0 0 T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n (Inc.) — C o n su lta tio n a n d e v a lu a tio n of g ran t to K ent S tate U n iv ersity F oundation for d e v e lo p m en t of a C e n te r for School L abor R e la tio n s......................... $ 7 ,0 0 0 E v a lu atio n of g r a n t to th e C leveland B oard of E d u c a tio n for e le m e n ta ry law -related e d u c a tio n p ro g ra m (third y e a r)................................... $ 1 ,0 0 0 E v a lu atio n of g ra n t to C leveland H eigh ts-U n iv ersity H eig h ts C ity School D istrict for P roject S tu d e n t A c h i e v e m e n t ............................$ 3 ,0 0 0 E v alu atio n of g ra n t to S h a k e r H eights C ity S chool D istrict for th e Push-E xcel p r o g r a m ......................................$ 5 ,0 0 0 Fenn E d u c a tio n a l F u n d 1982 o p e ra tin g b u d g e t * * .............$ 2 3 ,8 4 2 T echnical a ssista n c e to review c o m m u n ity o p tio n s reg a rd in g a space th e a te r ........................................ $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 Tuition re im b u rs e m e n t to fo rm er F enn fac u lty m e m b e rs* * . . . $ 2 ,0 6 9 C le v e la n d H e ig h ts - U n iv e r s ity H e ig h ts C ity S c h o o l D i s t r i c t — C leveland H eig h ts-U n iv ersity H eights m u ltic u ltu ra l celeb ratio n . . . $ 1 5 ,0 0 0 P roject S tu d e n t A c h ie v em e n t a t C leveland H eig h ts H igh S chool ....................................................$ 7 0 ,4 0 0 C le v e la n d S t a t e U n i v e r s i ty — E x ten d ed C a m p u s College over three y e a r s ......................................$ 2 0 0 ,0 0 0 P lans a n d c u rric u la r d ev elo p m en t for a m ag n e t law a n d p u b lic service high school in C le v e la n d .................... $ 5 ,0 0 0 S c h o larsh ip s for e x e cu tiv e MBA c a n d id a te s from n o n p ro fit o r g o v ern ­ m e n ta l ag en cies in N o rth e a st Ohio (second y e a r ) ......................... $ 3 7 ,5 0 0 S ta rt-u p su p p o rt for th e U rsu lin e College G reater C leveland C onnection program over tw o y e a rs . . . . $ 11,419 C o llie r C o u n ty C o n s e r v a n c y , N a p le s , F lo r id a — G eneral s u p p o r t ..........................$ 5 ,0 0 0

52


The U n iv e r s ity o f C olorado F ou n d ation , In c., D en ver, C olorado

—Mark Chappie Murphy internship in environmental design over three y ears......................................... $ 1 8 ,0 0 0 C ornell U n iv e r sity , Ith a c a , N ew York — Cleveland students’ partici­

pation in a progressive planning summer p ro g ra m .................... $ 4 ,0 0 0 C ouncil for E d u c a tio n a l G ro w th —

Operating support (third year) ....................................................$ 2 8 ,6 3 5 C ouncil G a rd en s — Tuition subsidy

for continuing education courses over two y e a r s .................................. $ 2,000 The C ouncil on H um an R e la tio n s

—Human relations plays in schools.................................. $ 2 8 ,0 0 0 Cuyahoga C ou n ty B oard o f E d u ca ­ tion — Project CARE, a program to

prevent drug abuse in area schools (second and third year) . . . . $ 4 6 ,2 3 5 D enison U n iv e r sity , G ra n v ille , Ohio —General support . . . . $ 7 ,0 0 0 D yke C ollege — Relocation to the

Columbia-Marine Building over two y e a r s .................................. $ 2 5 0 ,0 0 0 Strengthen the cooperative education program (second year)* * . . $ 2 5 ,0 0 0 E d itorial P r o je c ts for E d u c a tio n , Inc., W ash in gton , D.C. — Trial subscriptions of Education W eek

for Cleveland area school personnel

H arvard C am p aign , C am b rid ge, M a s s a c h u s e t ts — General operating support............................................... $ 5 0 H arvard U n iv e r sity , J o h n F. K en n ed y S ch o o l o f G o v ern m en t, C am bridge, M a s s a c h u s e tts — Management training for state and local governm ent officials from Cuyahoga County and Northeast Ohio (third y ea r)........................................ $ 2 2 5 H a th a w a y B row n S c h o o l — General support............................$ 1 ,0 0 0 H athaw ay Brow n S chool’s 1981 collo­ qu iu m , “W atch Your L a n g u a g e ” ........................................................ $ 4 ,0 0 0 T he I n s titu te for E d u c a tio n a l L ea d ersh ip , In c., W a sh in g to n , D.C. — C leveland site of th e E ducation Policy Fellow ship P rogram over two y e a r s ....................................... $ 1 4 4 ,9 8 6 I n s tit u te for E n v ir o n m e n ta l E d u c a tio n — C leveland’s te a c h e r in te rn sh ip p rogram in en erg y (third y e a r ) ............................................... $ 5 ,0 0 0 K en t S ta te U n iv e r s ity F ou n d ation — P lanning an d estab lish in g a C enter for School Labor R elations over two y e a rs ..........................................$ 8 9 ,0 3 6 L ake E rie C ollege, P a in e s v ille , O hio — H arriet B. S to rrs L ectures ........................................................ $ 5 ,0 0 0 T he M a ste r s S ch ool, D ob b s Ferry, N ew York — G eneral operating s u p p o r t............................................... $ 1 0 0

..................................................... $ 2 5 ,0 0 0 F ed eration for C o m m u n ity P lanning — Adequately Prepared Student Project....................... $ 2 0 ,0 0 0 F ran k lin C o u n ty B oard o f E d u cation , C o lu m b u s, O hio —

Development by the Secretary of State and Superintendent of Public instruction of voter education lesson material for grades kindergarten through eight and of book on elections process for use by elem entary school programs.................................. $ 10,000 G reater C le v e la n d N eig h b o r h o o d C en ters A s s o c ia tio n —

WELCOME Leadership Institute (second y e a r ) ....................... $ 3 5 ,6 7 0 H ancock C o u n ty B oard o f E d u cation , F in d lay, O hio —

Expansion of the program for gifted and talented c h ild re n * ............ $ 5 ,6 7 5

M orley L ibrary, P a in e s v ille , Ohio — O perating s u p p o r t ................. $ 1 ,0 0 0 N a tio n a l H isto r y D ay — Program su p p o rt (third y e a r ) ................. $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 N a tio n a l P ea ce E d u c a tio n Fund, W a sh in g to n , D.C. — C leveland C onference of th e N ational A cadem y of Peace a n d Conflict R e s o lu tio n ..................................... $ 1 ,0 0 0 N a tio n a l U rban F e llo w s, In c., N ew York, N ew York — N ational U rban Fellow for S ta te S u p e rin te n d e n t’s A dvisory C om m ission for C leveland Public S c h o o ls........................... $ 1 8 ,0 0 0

O hio C ou ncil on E con om ic E d u ca tio n , C olu m b u s, O hio — P articipation of a re a u n iv ersity faculty in se m in a r on econom ic e d u c a tio n .................................. $ 6 ,0 0 0 Ohio U n iv e r sity , A th e n s , O hio — Scientific film, “ Lucy in Disguised featuring w ork of D onald J o h a n so n of the C leveland M useum of N atural H is to r y ....................................... $ 5 ,0 0 0 P u sh for E x c e lle n c e , Inc. (PushE xcel) — S h a k e r H eights City School D istrict Push-E xcel p ro g ram $ 2 1 ,6 8 5 S t. G eo rg e’s S ch o o l, N ew p ort, R h ode Isla n d — G eneral operatin g s u p p o r t...............................................$ 1 0 0 U n ite d N egro C olleg e Fund, Inc. — G eneral su p p o rt for p red o m in an tly black in stitu tio n s of h ig h er learn in g

$ 6,000 U n iv e r s ity C ircle, Inc. — W riting an d p u b lish in g of a h isto ry of U niversity Circle over tw o y ears ............... ................................ $ 4 4 ,8 0 0 U n iv e r s ity S ch o o l G eneral su p p o rt. . . .

$ 1,000

The C ollege o f W ooster, W ooster, O hio — W ooster-Cleveland A cadem ic E n ric h m en t P rogram (third year) ......................................................$ 9 ,0 0 0 TOTAL EDUCATION GRANTS— UNDESIGNATED..........$ 1 ,8 7 4 ,9 9 5 (Following recipients and program s designated by donor)

A sh la n d C ollege, A sh la n d , O hio — G eneral s u p p o r t .........................$ 4 ,5 9 6 B ald w in -W allace C o lleg e — G eneral s u p p o r t ....................$ 2 9 ,0 3 3 U n iv e r s ity o f C alifo rn ia , B e r k e ley , C a liforn ia — G eneral s u p p o r t ..............................$ 3 8 7 Jo h n C arroll U n iv e r s ity — G eneral s u p p o r t ............................. $ 2 9 0

T h e N orth A m e r ic a n S o c ie ty for O cean ic H istory, Inc., A n n a p o lis, M arylan d — O ceanic h isto ry conference a n d local m aritim e m u se u m c o n s u lta tio n ............... $ 4 ,1 6 6

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D a n ie l E. M organ S c h o o l — Book a w a rd s to c h i l d r e n ......................... $ 2 4 0 O hio W e s le y a n U n iv e r s ity , D e la w a r e , O hio — G eneral s u p p o r t............................ $ 1 ,7 6 4 C ase W e ste r n R e s e r v e U n iv e r s ity — General s u p p o r t ..................$ 6 ,7 7 7 G eneral support for Adelbert C o lle g e ........................................ $ 4 ,8 8 4 General support for Franklin Thom as Backus Law S c h o o l..................$ 4 ,1 2 6 General support for the Graduate S c h o o l......................................$ 1 3 1 ,4 7 4 Reference books for School of Library S c ien ce ................................................$111 Support of field biological station at Squire Valleevue Farm in the Departm ent of Biology . . . . $ 2 2 ,0 0 3 Support of social research at School of Applied Social S c ie n c e s ............ $ 8 4 0 C le v e la n d L u th e r a n H igh S c h o o l A s s o c ia tio n — General su p p o r t............................ $ 1 ,9 1 6 C le v e la n d S t a te U n iv e r s it y — General su p p o r t...............................$ 2 9 0 C o n n e c tic u t C o lleg e , N ew L on don, C o n n e c tic u t — General su p p o r t...............................$ 3 8 7 E d u c a tio n a l R e s e a r c h C ou n cil o f A m e r ic a — General su p p o r t...............................$ 3 8 8 E d u c a tio n a l T e le v is io n A s s o c ia tio n o f M e tr o p o lita n C le v e la n d , WVIZ-TV — General s u p p o r t ...............................$ 1 9 3 F enn E d u c a tio n a l Fund — General su p p o rt...............................$ 4 8 4 H aw k en S c h o o l — General su p p o rt...............................$ 7 5 7

U n iv e r s ity o f t h e P a c ific , S to c k to n , C a lifo r n ia — G eneral s u p p o r t ...............................$ 3 8 7 T he P in e y W oods C o u n try L ife S ch o o l, P in e y W oods, M is s is s ip p i — G eneral s u p p o r t .....................$ 6 ,9 9 7 P r in c e to n U n iv e r sity , P r in c e to n , N ew J e r s e y — G eneral su p p o rt $ 1 9 2 S m ith C o lleg e, N o rth a m p to n , M a s s a c h u s e tts — G eneral s u p p o r t ....................... $ 6 3 ,7 3 0 U n ite d N egro C o lleg e F u n d , In c. — G eneral s u p p o r t .......................... $ 6 ,9 9 7 U n iv e r s ity S c h o o l — G eneral s u p p o r t ............................... $ 1 9 3 TOTAL EDUCATION G RANTS — D E SIG N A T E D ..................... $ 3 0 8 ,2 8 7 TOTAL EDUCATION GRANTS — DESIGNATED AND UN DESIG N ATED.............. $ 2 ,1 8 3 ,2 8 2

Scholarshi B a ld w in -W a lla c e C o lle g e — S c h o larsh ip s u p p o r t .............$ 1 9 ,5 0 0 Special h o n o ra ry s c h o la rs h ip s of th e Fenn E d u c a tio n a l F und* * . . • $ 4 ,2 0 0 B e r e a A r e a M o n te s s o r i A s s o c ia ­ t i o n — S c h o la rsh ip s u p p o rt. . $ 1 ,4 5 7 J o h n C a r r o ll U n i v e r s i t y — Fenn co-op sc h o la rsh ip s* * ............... $ 5 ,0 0 0 S c h o la rsh ip s u p p o r t .............$ 2 0 ,0 0 0 Special h o n o ra ry sc h o la rsh ip s of the Fenn E d u c a tio n a l F und* * . . . $ 4 ,4 0 0 C a s e A lu m n i A s s o c ia tio n — Fenn co-op sc h o la rsh ip s* * ................$ 1 0 ,0 0 0 C a s e A lu m n i A s s o c ia tio n S c h o la r ­ s h ip C o m m itte e — S pecial ho n o rary sc h o la rsh ip s of th e F enn E d ucational F u n d * * ...................................... $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 C harles J. Stilw ell sc h o la rsh ip s at C ase In stitu te of T echnology* * .................................................. .. . $ 4 ,2 0 0 C a s e W e s t e r n R e s e r v e U n i v e r s i ty — F en n co-op sc h o la rsh ip s* * $ 7 ,2 0 0 S c h o larsh ip s u p p o r t .............$ 1 7 ,0 0 0 C le v e la n d A r e a C i t iz e n s L e a g u e fo r N u r s in g — F enn co-op s c h o la r s h ip s * * ............................. $ 9 ,0 0 0 C le v e la n d M o n te s s o r i A s s o c ia tio n — S c h o larsh ip s u p p o rt a t Ruffing M ontessori S chool (W est). . . . $ 1 ,4 5 7 C le v e la n d P u b lic L i b r a r y — M inority s c h o la rsh ip p ro g ra m over th re e y e a r s ................................. $ 3 8 ,1 4 4 C le v e la n d S c h o l a r s h ip P r o g r a m s , In c . — A n n u a l c a m p a ig n o v er two y e a r s .............................................. $ 1 5 ,0 0 0 G eneral s u p p o rt.............................$ 1 ,3 5 5

T h e H ill S c h o o l, P o tts to w n , P e n n s y lv a n ia — General s u p p o r t ...............................$ 1 9 3 H ills d a le C o lleg e, H ills d a le , M ich igan — General su p p ort...................... $ 1 1 ,3 2 2 K en yon C o lleg e, G am bier, O hio — General s u p p o r t..........................$ 6 ,7 7 7 L ake E rie C o lleg e, P a in e s v ille , O hio — General support................$ 5 5 9

C le v e la n d S t a t e U n i v e r s i ty — R e in sta te m e n t of th e Fenn co-op sc h o la rsh ip p ro g ra m s “A " a n d “ D” * * $ 1 0 ,0 0 0 S ch o larsh ip s u p p o r t................ $ 4 2 ,5 0 0 Special h o n o ra ry s c h o la rsh ip s of the Fenn E d u catio n al F und* * . . $ 1 5 ,0 0 0 C u y a h o g a C o m m u n ity C o lle g e — Nelson G. P eck M em orial S ch o larsh ip A w a r d * * ............................................ $ 3 0 0 S ch o larsh ip s u p p o r t ................... $ 6 ,0 0 0

54


D yke C o lle g e — S c h o larsh ip s u p p o rt........................................ $ 7 ,0 0 0

Oglebay Fellowship Program in the School of M e d ic in e .................. $ 6 6 ,0 0 9

F a irm o u n t M o n te s s o r i A s s o c ia tio n — S cholarship su p p o rt at Ruffing Montessori School (East) . . . . $ 1 ,4 5 7

Scholarships in aerospace or c o m p u te r s ........................................... $ 7 4

T he M a ry F r i e r M o n te s s o r i S p e c ia l E d u c a tio n S c h o o l — S ch o larsh ip s u p p o r t........................................ $ 1 ,4 5 6 T he H u d s o n M o n te s s o r i A s s o c ia tio n , H u d s o n , O h io — Scholarship s u p p o r t ............... $ 1 ,4 5 6 L ake E rie C o lle g e , P a in e s v ille , Ohio — S ch o larsh ip s for Painesville and Painesville T ow nship s tu d e n ts at Lake Erie College, G arfield S en io r College a n d o th e r colleges. . $ 3 5 ,0 0 0 N o tre D am e C o lle g e o f O h io — Fenn co-op scholarships* * .............$ 7 ,0 0 0 U rs u lin e C o lleg e — N ursing scholarships* * ......................... $ 5 ,0 0 0 W e s ts h o re M o n te s s o r i A s s o c ia ­ tio n — S ch o larsh ip s u p p o r t. . $ 1 ,4 5 7 TOTAL S C H O L A R S H IPS GRANTS— UNDESIGNATED............... $ 3 0 1 ,5 3 9 (Following recipients a n d program s designated by donor)

A s h la n d C o lleg e , A s h la n d , O h io — The Hazel M yers S p re n g S ch o larsh ip ......................................... .. $ 3 ,6 7 7 A von L a k e U n ite d C h u r c h o f C h ris t — S ch o larsh ip s for C h ristian w o rk ................................................$ 2 ,4 0 5

Scholarships in Franklin Thom as Backus Law School....................... $ 8,114 William Curtis Morton, Maud Morton, Kathleen Morton Fund Scholarships ...................................................... $ 1 5 ,1 0 5 In ez an d H arry C le m e n t A w ard — Cleveland Public Schools annual superintendent’s a w a rd ..........$ 1 ,0 0 0 T h e C le v e la n d I n s tit u te o f A rt — Caroline E. Coit Fund Scholarships ........................................................ $ 1 ,4 0 7 Isaac C. Goff Fund Scholarships $ 1 ,8 0 0 T he C lev ela n d M usic S ch o o l S e t tle m e n t — The Nellie E. Hinds Memorial S ch o la rsh ip s..........$ 4 ,0 0 0 H arry C ou lb y S c h o la r sh ip — For Pickands Mather em ployees’ c h ild r e n ............ .......................$ 7 5 ,0 0 0 D a rtm o u th C ollege, H anover, N ew H a m p sh ire — The John Marshall Raible and David Gardner Raible Scholarship F u n d .................... $ 1 5 ,8 0 0

U n iv e r s ity S ch o o l — T he J o h n M arshall Raible a n d David G ard n er Raible S ch o larsh ip F u n d ..........$ 8 0 0 U r su lin e C ollege — Lillian H erron Doyle S c h o la rsh ip s ....................... $1,812 TOTAL SCHOLARSHIP GRANTS — DESIGNATED ................................................... $ 2 7 6 ,1 1 2 TOTAL SCHOLARSHIP GRANTS — DESIGNATED AND UNDESIGNATED.................. $ 5 7 7 ,6 5 1 TOTAL EDUCATION GRANTS — EDUCATION PROGRAMS AND SCHOLARSHIPS C O M BIN E D ....................$ 2 ,7 6 0 ,9 3 3 *Grant recom m ended by Findlay Distribution C om m ittee o f the L. Dale Dorney Fund. * *Grant recom m ended by the Fenn Educational Fund Executive Board.

H ills d a le C o lleg e, H ills d a le , M ich igan — The John C. McLean Scholarships to deserving stu d en ts..................................... $ 1 1 ,3 2 2 M acM urray C o lleg e, J a c k s o n v ille , I llin o is — The George and Edith Featherstone Memorial Fund Sch olarsh ip s.............................. $ 2 ,4 0 5

C a p ita l U n iv e rs ity , C o lu m b u s , O hio — T he F red erick R. a n d B ertha S p rech t M autz S c h o larsh ip F u n d ................................................ $ 3 ,0 2 3

N orth C en tral C ollege, N a p er v ille , I llin o is — The Hazel Myers Spreng Scholarship in m em ory of Bishop Sam uel P. S p r e n g .................... $ 3 ,6 7 7

J o h n C a r r o ll U n i v e r s i ty — J a m e s J. Doyle S c h o l a r s h ip ........................$ 1 ,8 1 2

O hio W e sle y a n U n iv e r sity , D e la w a r e , O hio — The Hazel Myers Spreng Scholarsh ip................. $ 3 ,6 7 7

For a s tu d e n t of F lora S to n e M ather College in foreign s tu d y .......... $ 2 ,5 0 2

A da G a tes S te v e n s S c h o la r sh ip — For Elyria, Ohio High School g r a d u a t e s .................................. $ 4 ,0 0 0

H aw k en S c h o o l — The John Marshall Raible and David Gardner Raible Scholarship Fund . . . . $ 3 ,2 5 0

B a ld w in -W a lla c e C o lle g e — The Hazel M yers S p re n g S c h o larsh ip ................... .................................. $ 3 ,6 7 7

C ase W e s te r n R e s e r v e U n i v e r s i ty — Aloy M em orial S c h o la rsh ip F und for w o m e n .......................................$ 1 ,0 8 2

T he M iriam K er r u ish S ta g e S c h o la r sh ip — For S h a k e r H eights High School g r a d u a t e s ..........$ 5 ,4 0 0

P u rd u e U n iv e r sity , L a fa y e tte , In d ia n a — The John C. McLean Scholarships in engineering $ 2 8 ,2 9 9

H arriet Fairfield Coit a n d W illiam H enry Coit S c h o la rsh ip s a t F lora Stone M ather C o lleg e ................... $ 1 ,3 0 6 The Hazel M yers S p re n g S c h o larsh ip .......................................................$ 3 ,6 7 7

55


S p e c ia l Philanthropic S e r v ic e s T h e fu n d s e x p en d e d for sp ecial p h il­ a n th ro p ic p u rp o se s go p rim a rily for th e o p e ra tin g c o sts of T h e C leveland F o u n d atio n a n d a w ide v a rie ty of se rv ­ ices for th e b en efit of th e p h ila n th ro p ic c o m m u n ity th ro u g h o u t N o rth e a st Ohio. T h e la tte r in c lu d e s serv ices to o th e r c h a rita b le in s titu tio n s w h ic h do n o t em ploy staff or h av e lim ited staff. T he serv ices in clu d e e v alu a tio n of g ra n t prop o sals a n d m o n ito rin g g ra n ts a s well a s c o n v en in g m e etin g s d ealin g w ith issu e s of c o m m o n c o n ce rn to th e p a rtic ip a tin g fo u n d atio n s. T he F o u n d atio n c o n tin u e d to s u p ­ p o rt th e d e v elo p m en t of th e C leveland regional lib rary a n d field office of th e F ou n d atio n C en ter of New York. T h is K ent H. S m ith lib rary is n a m e d in h o n o r of a fo rm er C leveland F o u n d a ­ tion D istrib u tio n C o m m ittee m em ber. T he tw o-person staff in c lu d e s a p ro fes­ sional lib rarian w ith e x p ertise in fo u n d atio n m a tte rs w ho c o n d u c ts o ri­ en tatio n sessio n s in th e u se of th e lib ra ry ’s reso u rces. T he lib rary h o u se s m a te ria ls d ealin g w ith th e g ra n t-m a k in g pro cess, in c lu d ­ ing a n n u a l re p o rts of n a tio n a l fo undations, In te rn a l R evenue Service re tu rn s of fo u n d a tio n s in Ohio an d n eig h b o rin g sta te s a n d in fo rm atio n on federal an d sta te g o v e rn m e n t fu n d in g . In 1981, 834 p e rso n s a tte n d e d 169 orien tatio n sessio n s te a c h in g g ra n t seek ers how to u se its re so u rce s m ore effectively. A reco rd 2 ,5 0 6 v isito rs from th e C leveland area, o th e r p a rts of Ohio an d th e M idw est u sed th e library, re p ­ re sen tin g a n in crease of 15 p e rc e n t over th e previous year.

G ra n ts T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n (Inc.) — Anisfield-W olf a w a rd s a n d c re a tio n of b ro ch u re p ro m o tin g th e a w a rd s . $ 2 2 , 0 0 0 O p eratin g b u d g e t of T h e C lev elan d F o u n d atio n (Inc.) for th e y e a r 1982 .......................................................... $ 1 ,2 3 6 ,0 0 0 S pecial d isc re tio n a ry g r a n t fu n d . . $ 3 ,8 4 7 T itle se a rc h a n d related e x p e n se s of th e tra n s fe r of title of th e Forest C ity H ospital .........................................................................$ 8 2 5 T h e F o u n d a tio n C en ter, N ew York, N ew York — O p e ra tin g b u d g e t s u p p o rt d u rin g 1982 of F o u n d a tio n C e n te r—C leveland $ 2 6 ,5 0 0 T O T A L .............................................. $ 1 ,2 8 9 ,1 7 2


Trust Funds, Combined Funds and Supporting Organizations

‘T h e L ig h t M ik a d o ’: preserving A m er­ ica’s railroad heritage w ith a vintage steam locomotive that m akes excursion trips betw een Cleveland and Akron. 57


Trust Funds (Growth In 1981 th e c a rry in g v alu e of new fu n d s a n d a d d itio n s to e x istin g fu n d s re c o rd ed by T h e C leveland F o u n d a tio n to ta le d $5,716,638.51.

N e w T r u s t F u n d s R e c e iv e d TH E ALFRED J. CARPENTER MEMORIAL FUND Donor: M arion W allace C a rp e n te r T rust C a rryin g Value: $68,471.97. M a rket V alue 12/31/81: $65,699.01. Use o f Incom e: V arious donorrestric te d p urposes. HOMER EV ERETT FUND Donor: H om er E v erett T rust a n d Flora M. E verett T tu st C arrying Value: $1,273,593.32. M a rk e t V alue 12/31/81: $1,261,738.29. Use o f Incom e: V arious donorrestricted p u rposes. THE GERTRUDE PFEIFFER KAHN FUND Donor: T he E state of G e rtru d e Pfeiffer K ahn a n d Isaac T. K ahn T rust C arrying Value: $818,349.86. M a rket Value 12/31/81: $887,638.23. Use o f Incom e: T he C leveland M useum of N atural History. VIDA C. LOGAN FUND Donor: T he E state of V ida C. Logan C arrying Value: $964,754.26. M a rket Value 12/31/81: $853,985.21. Use o f Incom e: V arious donord esig n ated p u rposes. GUSTAVE LORBER AND FRIEDA BRUML LORBER MEMORIAL FUND Donor: T he E state of C harlene H. Lorber C arrying Value: $626,683.12. M a rket Value 12/31/81: $597,713,87. Use o f Incom e: U n restricted c h a rita b le p u rposes.

A d d i t i o n s to E x i s t i n g T ru st Funds C harles Rieley A rm ington Fund w as increased by a gift of $ 3 6 ,0 0 0 .0 0 to incom e from th e E lizabeth Rieley A rm ington C h aritable Trust. T he Dr. H am ilton F isk B iggar Fund w as in creased by th e gift of $ 5 0 0 .0 0 from Dr. Milton Engel. C leveland R ecreational A rts Fund w as increased by gifts of $ 7 5 .0 0 from T he Louis E. a n d M arcia M. E m sh eim er C h aritable Trust, $100.00 from T he R aym ond J o h n W ean F oundation, a n d $1,000.00 from K urt L. S eelbach.

58

T h e E m e ra ld N ecklace F u n d w a s in ­ creased by gifts of $ 7 5 .0 0 from T he L ouis E. a n d M arcia M. E m sh e im e r C haritab le T rust a n d $ 2 0 0 ,0 0 0 from th e S touffer Foods C orp o ratio n Fund.

MR. AND MRS. ROY G. HARLEY FUND, $10,000.00 Donor: A lbert M. Higley, Jr. Use o f Incom e: U n re stric te d c h a r ita ­ ble p u rp o ses.

T he Fenn E d u catio n al F und w as in ­ creased by a gift of $ 2 4 0 .0 0 from T he H arry F. a n d E d n a J. B u rm e ste r C h a r­ itable R e m a in d e r U niT rust No. 1.

LEONARD R. RENCH FUND, $137,560.32 Donor: T he L eo n ard R. R e n c h T ru st Use o f Incom e: U n re stric te d c h a r ita ­ ble p u rp o ses.

T he N orm a W itt J a c k s o n F und w as in creased by $ 3 2 .5 0 th ro u g h a d is­ trib u tio n from th e estate-of N orm a W itt J a c k so n . S h e rm a n J o h n s o n M em orial F und w as in creased by $30,013.50 by a gift from F ra n ce s M. J o h n s o n T rust. D onald W. M cIntyre F und w as in ­ creased by $54,101.53 th ro u g h a d istrib u tio n from th e D onald W. M cIntyre E state. C harles L. a n d M arion H. S to n e Fund w as in creased by $27,239.75 th ro u g h a d istrib u tio n from th e C h arles L. S tone T e sta m en ta ry T rust F und B. T he A lm a M. a n d H arry R. T em pleton M em orial F und w as in cre ase d by a c o n trib u tio n of $ 9 8 3 ,0 2 9 .5 0

N ew P a r t ia l B e n e f it F u n d R e c e iv e d FREDERICK H. AND FRANCES SOUTHWORTH GOFF FUND Donor: T he E state of F red erick H. a n d F ra n ce s S o u th w o rth Goff C a rrying Value: $832,179.20. M arket Value 12/31/81: $907,668.70. Use o f Incom e: U n restricted c h a rita ­ ble purposes.

CHRISTIAN AND SOPHIA VICK MEMORIAL FUND, $ 2 6 ,6 5 6 .0 0 Donor: G lenn M. S h a w E sta te Use o f Incom e: E d u c a tio n a l a n d h e a lth p u rp o ses. FREDERICK WILLIAM YORK FUND, $ 8 5.00 Donors: G eorge G. M orris, Jr. a n d C arole M. M orris, J o h n G ra u e tte L am b a n d D orothy C. L am b, E m ily E. B lossom Use o f Incom e: U n re stric te d c h a rita ­ ble p u rp o ses.

A d d i t i o n s to E x i s t i n g F u n d s a n d M e m o r ia ls THOMAS BURNHAM MEMORIAL FUND, $3,274.01 Donor: M arie L ouise G ollan-W inston P. B u rto n F und MARY CATHERINE CARTER FUND,

$ 100.00 Donor: M ary C. C a rte r MAVIS COBB FUND, $100.00 Donor: Dr. a n d Mrs. J o h n C. C u tler MARY G. HIGLEY FUND, $ 2 ,0 0 3 .9 0 Donor: E state of M ary G. Higley (final distrib u tio n ) CHALMER F. LUTZ FUND, $7.33 Donor: E state of C h a lm e r F. L utz

Combined Funds Growth D uring 1981 th e C o m b in ed F u n d s g en erated incom e for g ra n t p u r­ poses of $ 737,689.68. M arket value of th e C om bined F u n d s as of D ecem ber 31,1981, to taled $8,571,940.75.

N ew F u n d s a n d M e m o r ia ls THE BECKENBACH SCHOLARSHIP MEMORIAL FUND, $13,307.56 Donor: H om er R. B eckbenbach Intervivos T tust Use o f Incom e: S c h o larsh ip s in th e G reater C leveland area.

JOH N G. AND MAY LOCKWOOD OLIVER MEMORIAL FUND $ 5 0 ,0 0 0 .0 0 Donor: B ard o n s a n d O liver Foundation DOROTHY AND HELEN RUTH FUND, $1,000.00 Donor: D orothy R u th G ra h a m JE S S IE C. TUCKER MEMORIAL FUND, $100.00 Donor: Dr. a n d Mrs. J o rg e M edina DR. EDWARD A. YURICK FUND $20.00 Donor: Dr. E dw ard A. Y urick


Trust Funds A w ide v a rie ty of d o n o rs, d e d i足 cated to T h e C leveland F o u n d a 足 tion as a m e a n s of b e n efitin g th e ir co m m u n ity in y e a rs to com e, have e sta b lish e d th e follow ing tru s t fu n d s. T h e se fu n d s are nam ed e ith e r for th e ir d o n o rs or by th e d o n o r for a m e m o ria l or, in som e in sta n c e s, for th e re c ip ien t organization w h ich th e y e n ric h . Rob Roy A lexander Fund The Aloy M em orial S ch o larsh ip Fund The Dr. David A lsbacher F und for Medical Research The George an d May M argaret Angell T rust Anisfield-Wolf Fund Charles Rieley A rm ington Fund W alter C. and Lucy 1. A stru p F und No. 1 W alter C. an d Lucy I. A stru p F und No. 2 Sophie A uerbach Fund* The Frederic M. an d N ettie E. B ackus Memorial Fund Walter C. and Fannie W hite B aker Fund Lilian H anna B aldw in Fund Mabel R. B atem an M em orial Fund W arner M. B atem an M em orial Fund Cornelia W. B eardslee Fu n d Ja m es C. B eardslee F und Louis D. B eaum ont Fund Mary B errym an Fund Ida Beznoska Fund Big Brothers of G reater C leveland Fund The Dr. H am ilton Fisk B iggar F und George Davis Bivin Fund* K atherine Bohm F und Roberta Holden Bole F und The George H. Boyd Fund* Alva Bradley II F und G ertrude H. B ritton, K ath arin e H. P erk in s Fund Fannie Brown M em orial Fund George F. B uehler M em orial F und The Harry F. an d E d n a J. B u rm e ste r C haritable R em ain d er U niT rust No. 1 T hom as B u rn h am M em orial T rust K atherine W ard B urrell F und The M artha B. Carlisle M em orial Fund The Alfred J. C a rp e n te r M em orial Fund The C entral High School E n d o w m en t Fund The Fred H. C hapin M em orial Fund The F rank J. an d Nellie L. C happie Fund* George W. C hisholm Fund J. E. G. C lark T rust Marie O denkirk C lark Fund The Elsa Claus M em orial F u n d No. 2 Cleveland F oundation C om bined F unds Cleveland: NOW! Fund Cleveland R ecreational A rts Fund Caroline E. Coit F und A. E. C onvers Fund* H arry Coulby Fu n d No. 2 H arry Coulby Fu n d No. 4 Jaco b D. Cox Fund S. H oughton Cox Fund

H enry G. D alton Fund T he H ow ard an d E dith Dingle Fund Edw in A. and J u lia G reene Dodd Fund No. 1 Edw in A. an d J u lia G reene Dodd Fund No. 2 L. Dale D orney Fund T he Mary an d W allace D uncan Fund T he W illiam C. a n d A gnes M. D unn Fund Alice M cHardy Dye Fund T he E m erald N ecklace Fund A da C. E m erson Fund* H enry A. E verett Thast H om er E v erett Fund M ary M cGraw E verett Fund C harles D udley F arn sw o rth Fund T he G eorge D. a n d E dith W. F eatherstone M em orial Fund Dr. F ra n k Carl Felix an d Flora W ebster Felix Fund T he Fenn E ducational F unds (5) F irst C leveland Cavalry-N orton Memorial Fund W illiam C. F ischer and Lillye T. Fischer M emorial Fund* F ish er Fund E rw in L. F isher an d Fanny M. Fisher M em orial Fund E dw ard C. Flanigon Fund Forest City H ospital Foundation Fund C onstance C. F rackelton Fund No. 1 C on stan ce C. Frackelton Fund No. 6 C onstance C. Frackelton Fund No. 7 C on stan ce C. F rackelton Fund No. 8 T h e Fannie P itcairn Frackelton and David W. F rackelton Fund R obert J. Frackelton Fund The George F reem an C harity Fund F rederic H. G ates Fund The W illiam F. a n d A nna Lawrence G ibbons Fund* W illiam A. Giffhorn Fund F rederick H arris Goff Fund F rederick H. an d F rances S outhw orth Goff Fund* Isaac C. Goff Fund* Edw in R. Goldfield Fund Lillian F. Goldfield Fund Marie Louise Gollan Fund Dr. Isadore J. G oodm an an d R uth G oodm an M emorial Fund J u liu s E. G oodm an Fund T he George C. an d Marion S. G ordon Fund R obert B. G randin Fund T he E ugene S. Halle M emorial Fund T he B lanche R. Halle M emorial Fund D orothea W right H am ilton Fund Edw in T. an d Mary E. H am ilton Fund T he L ynn J. an d Eva D. H am m ond M em orial Fund* L eonard C. H anna, Jr. Cleveland F oundation Special Purpose Fund L eonard C. H anna, Jr. C om m unity D evelopm ent F unds (5) L eonard C. H anna, Jr. Fund for C o m m unity C hest L eonard C. H anna, Jr. Fund for United A ppeal W illiam S titt H annon Fund P erry G. H arrison and V irginia C. H arrison M emorial Fund T he Kate H anna H arvey M emorial Funds No. 1 and 2 Melville H. Haskell, Mary H. Hunter, G ertru de H. B ritton, K atharine H. P erkins Fund

George Halle H ays Fund K aufm an H ays M emorial Fund T he Louise W. and Irving K. Heller Fund T he H inds M emorial Fund* T he H iram H ouse Fund The Jaco b H irtenstein Fund H. Morley and E lizabeth New berry H itchcock Fund Mildred E. H om m el an d A rth u r G. H om m el M emorial Fund C en tu ree n aS . H otchkiss Fund M artin Huge, M artha M. Huge, T heodore L. Huge and R einhardt E. Huge M emorial Fund The Jo h n H untington B enevolent Fund The A. W. H urlbut Fund The Norm a W itt Ja c k so n Fund S h erm an Jo h n so n M emorial Fund Caroline Bonnell Jo n e s Fund Ja m e s S. J o rd a n Fund Adrian D. Joyce Fund The Frederick W. and H enryett Slocum J u d d Fund H enryett S. J u d d Fund The G ertrude Pfeiffer K ahn Fund Isaac Theodore K ahn Fund Tillie A. Kaley and W arren R. Kaley M emorial Fund K aram u House Trust Clarence A. K irkham M emorial Fund J o h n R. K ristner Fund The Otto and Lena Konigslow M emorial Fund* Elroy J. and Fynette H. K ulas Fund* The A rthur A. Lederer an d R uth Law rence Lederer Fund M artha M. L inden Fund Robert M. Linney Fund* Sue L. Little Fund Vida C. Logan Fund Elizabeth T. Lohm iller Fund G ustave Lorber an d F rieda B rum l Lorber Memorial Fund Ella L. Low m an Fund H enry M. L ucas Fund Clem ens W. Lundoff and Hilda T. Lundoff Fund F rank J. Lynch Fund* Nellie Lynch Fund T heresa Mae MacNab Fund Leone R. Bowe Marco Fund Alice Keith M ather Fund The S am uel M ather an d Flora Stone M ather M emorial Fund H arriet E. McBride Fund The Lewis A. an d Ellen E. M cCreary Memorial Fund The Jo h n A. and Mildred T. M cGean Fund The George W. and S arah M cGuire Fund Donald W. M cIntyre Fund T he K atherine B. M cKitterick Fund The Jo h n C. McLean M emorial Fund T he T h o m as an d Mary McMyler M emorial Fund The A lbert Younglove M eriam and K athryn A. M eriam Fund Alice B utts M etcalf Fund S arah S tern M ichael Fund Helen G ibbs Mills M emorial Fund Victor Mills Fund A nna B. M inzer Fund Cornelia S. Moore Fund* T he Mr. a n d Mrs. J a y P. Moore M emorial Fund

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W illiam C u rtis M orton, M aud M orton, K athleen M orton Fund E. F ree m a n M ould F und J a n e C. M ould F und Tom N eal F und B lanch e E. Norvell Fund* H arry N orvell Fund T he C rispin an d K ate O glebay TVust C larence A. O lsen T tu st M ary K ing O sborn Fund W illiam P. P alm er Fund T he Dr. C h arles B. P ark er M em orial Fund* T h e Jo s e p h K. a n d A m y S h ep ard P a tte rso n M em orial Fund L inda J. Peirce M em orial Fund D ouglas P erk in s Fund G race M. Pew Fund W alter D. Price Fund W illiam H. Price Fund T he J. A m brose an d Je ssie W heeler Purcell M em orial Fund* T he C harles Greif Raible a n d C atherine Rogers Raible Fund T he J o h n R. R aible Fund Clay L. a n d Florence R annells Reely Fund T he R etreat M em orial Fund C harles L. R ich m an Fund N ath a n G. R ich m an Fund Alice M. Rockefeller Fund C harles F. R uby Fund W illiam A. R uehl an d Mary R uehl M em orial Fund T he M ary Coit Sanford M em orial Fund Mary Coit Sanford Fund Dr. H enry A. a n d M ary J. S ch lin k M emorial Fund W illiam C. Scofield M em orial Fund C harles W. an d Lucille Sellers M emorial Fund* W illiam K. S elm an M emorial Fund F ra n k S. S h eets an d A lberta G. S heets M em orial F und F ran k E. S h ep ard so n Fund T he H enry A. S herw in an d F ran ces M. S herw in Fund* The H enry A. S herw in an d F rances M. S herw in M em orial F und No. 1* T he H enry A. S herw in an d F ran ces M. S herw in M em orial F und No. 2* T he J o h n a n d LaVerne S h o rt M emorial Fund The A. H. an d J u lia W. S h u n k Fund The T h o m as an d A n n a Sidlo Fund K ent H. S m ith Fund T he Nellie B. Snavely Fund A. L. S o m ers Fund W illiam J. S o u th w o rth Fund Dr. George P. Soyer Fund T he J o h n C. an d E lizabeth F. Sparrow M emorial Fund M arion R. S pellm an Fund Jo se p h in e L. S p erry Fund T he George B. S p ren g an d Hazel Myers S preng M emorial Fund The Hazel M yers S p ren g Fund in m em ory of h e r p aren ts, Mr. &M rs. A. N. Myers Frederick C. S terling Second T estam en tary Trust* Avery L. S te rn e r Fund Ada G ates S tevens M em orial Fund C atherine E. S tew art, M artha A. S tew art, Ju d ith H. S tew art an d J e a n n e tte S tew art M emorial Fund Je ssie S tew art Fund C harles L. an d M arion H. S tone Fund

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H arriet B. S to rrs F und L eonard F. Stow e Fund T he A lm a M. a n d H arry R. T em pleton M emorial Fund H enrietta Teufel M em orial F und T he J o h n H. T h o m as Fund Amos B urt an d J e a n n e L. T h o m p so n Fund M aude S. Tomlin M em orial Fund Mabelle G. an d F inton L. T orrence F und J a m e s H. T urner Fund C harles F. Uhl Fund J o h n F. an d Mary G. W ahl M em orial F und Je ssie M acDonald W alker M em orial Fund T he J o h n M ason W alter an d J e a n n e M. W alter M em orial Fund No. 1 T he J o h n M ason W alter a n d J e a n n e M. W alter M em orial Fund No. 2 Mabel B reckenridge W ason F und A Mabel B reckenridge W ason F und B* George B. a n d E dith S. W heeler T rust E dw ard Loder W hittem ore Fund H enry E. an d E thel L. W iddell Fund T he J o h n E d m u n d W illiam s Fund Teresa J a n e W illiam s M emorial Fund A rth u r P. and E lizabeth M. W illiam son Fund* J a m e s D. W illiam son Fund T he George H., C harles E., an d S am uel D enny W ilson M em orial F und E dith Anisfield Wolf Fund * David C. W right M emorial F und E dith W right M emorial Fund

* PARTIAL BENEFITS FUNDS provide p a ym en ts of annuities to certain individuals prior to p a y m e n t o f incom e to the Foundation. W ith three exceptions. The Cleveland Foundation will u ltim ately receive the entire net incom e fro m these fu n d s. The principal am o u n ts o f these fu n d s are carried as assets o f The Cleveland Foundation.

Combined F unds C o m b in ed F u n d s w ere c re a te d w ith in T h e C lev elan d F o u n d a tio n in 1943 to pro v id e a w ay th ro u g h w h ich gifts of a n y size c o u ld be m a d e a n d p u t to w o rk m o re effi­ ciently. S ev eral th o u s a n d d o n o rs h av e c o n trib u te d to C o m b in ed F u n d s sin ce th e ir c re a tio n . G ifts to a C o m b in ed F u n d re ta in th e ir s e p ­ a ra te id e n tity a s m e m o ria ls b u t are c o m m in g le d for in v e s tm e n t p u rp o se s, th e re b y p ro v id in g a large block of c a p ita l for m o re effi­ c ie n t in v e s tm e n t m a n a g e m e n t a n d g re a te r in c o m e p o te n tia l. G ifts to a C o m b in ed F u n d m a y be m a d e in th e n a m e of a n in d i­ v id u al or a s m e m o ria ls. T h e re is no re stric tio n a s to size, a n d a d d i­ tio n s m a y be m a d e a t a n y tim e. D onors are e n c o u ra g e d to m a k e th e ir gifts av ailab le for u n r e ­ stric te d c h a rita b le p u rp o se s, since th is e n ab le s th e F o u n d a tio n to be flexible in m e e tin g c h a n g in g co m ­ m u n ity n e e d s a n d p ro b le m s. If a d o n o r w ish es to e x p re ss a p refer­ en ce a s to how th e in c o m e from his gift sh o u ld be s p e n t, it is s u g ­ g ested th a t one of th e follow ing g en eral C leveland F o u n d a tio n g ra n t categ o ries — Civic Affairs, C u ltu ra l A ffairs, E d u c a tio n , H ealth, Social S erv ices o r Special P h ilan th ro p ic P u rp o se s — be specified. M orris A bram s F und A cadem y of M edicine, H ealth E ducation F oundation Fund R hoda L. Affelder F und W ickham H. A ldrich Fund E unice W estfall Allen M em orial S am uel W estfall Allen M em orial L ydia May A m es Fund Raleigh F. A ndrie M em orial Fund M arguerite E. A nselm M em orial K atherine B. A rundel Fund Leonard P. A yres M em orial R u th a n d E lm er B abin F und A. D. B aldw in M em orial F und Robert K. Beck M em orial Fund T he B eckenbach S c h o larsh ip M em orial Fund Hattie E. B ingham Fund B eulah H olden Bluim M em orial A rth u r Blythin M em orial Robert B lythin M emorial E rn est J. B ohn M em orial F und Helen R. Bowler F und Nap. H. B oynton M em orial F und


Alva B radley M em orial B righam B ritto n Fund C harles F. B u esch er M em orial T hom as B u rn h a m M em orial Fund E lizabeth A. B u rto n M em orial E dm und S. B usch Fund Robert H. B usch S c h o la rsh ip Fund C arm ela Cafarelli Fund M arian M. C am eron Fund E dna L. a n d G u stav W. C arlson Foundation M emorial Fund Leyton E. C arter M em orial Fund Mary C atherine C arter Fund George S. Case Fund Fred H. C hapin M em orial The Adele C orning C hisholm M em orial Fund G arnetta B. C h risten so n an d LeRoy W. C hristenson Fund Mr. and Mrs. Harold T. C lark Fund Inez an d H arry C lem ent A w ard Fund Cleveland C enter on A lcoholism Fund C leveland C onference for E ducational C ooperation Fund Cleveland G uidance C en ter E n d o w m en t Fund Cleveland H eights High School Scholarship Fund Cleveland P sy ch o an aly tic Society Fund The Cleveland Sorosis Fund Cleveland W ar M em orial A rthur Cobb M em orial A rthur Cobb, Jr. M em orial Florence H aney Cobb M em orial Louise B. Cobb M em orial Mary Gaylord Cobb M em orial Percy Wells Cobb M em orial Ralph W. Cobb, Jr. M em orial Dr. Harold N. Cole M em orial Cole National Corp. Fund Lawrence E. C onnelly M em orial Judge Alva R. C orlett M em orial Mary B. Couch Fund Jacob D. Cox, Jr. M emorial Willis B. C rane M em orial Dr. W ilbur S. Crowell M em orial M arianne North C u m m e r M em orial Glenn A. C utler M em orial N athan L. D auby M em orial Mary E. Dee M em orial F und Carl D ittm ar M emorial Magdalene P ahler D onahey Fund A nna J. D orm an an d Pliny O. D orm an Memorial Fund L. Dale D orney M em orial Fund Jam e s J. Doyle an d Lillian H erron Doyle Scholarship Fund Robert J. Drake M em orial C harles A. Driffield M em orial F und K ristian E ilertsen Fund Irene C. and Karl E m m erlin g S ch o larsh ip Fund C harles F arran Fund A rthur H. Feher Fund William S. and Freda M. Fell M em orial Fund Herold and Clara Fellinger C h aritab le F und Sidney B. Fink M emorial K athleen Holland Forbes M usic F und Percy R. and Beatrice R ound Forbes Memorial Fund Frances B. and G eorge W. Ford M em orial Fund Gladys J. and H om er D. Foster Fund H arriet R. Fowler Fund K atyruth S triek er F raley M em orial Annie A. F ran ce Fund H erm ine Frankel M em orial

I. F. Freiberger Fund Mrs. I. F. Freiberger M emorial W inifred Fryer M emorial Fund Florence I. G arre tt M emorial F ran k S. G ibson M emorial Fund Ellen G ardner G ilm ore M emorial F rances S o u th w o rth Goff M emorial Robert B. G randin M emorial J a m e s L. G reene M emorial Bell Greve M emorial Fund Robert H ays G ries M emorial C arolyn K. G rossm an Fund Isador G rossm an M emorial Fund Marc J. G rossm an Fund Je ssie Haig M emorial Florence H am ilton M emorial L eonard C. H anna, Jr. C leveland Play H ouse Fund T he L eonard C. H anna, Jr. Special Fund Mr. an d Mrs. Roy G. H arley Fund Mrs. W ard H arrison M emorial F. H. H aserot Fund H om er H. H atch Fund J a m e s W. H avighurst M emorial S cholarship Fund Lewis H oward H ayden and Lulu May H ayden Fund Nora H ays Fund Iva L. Herl Fund T he S ieg m und an d B ertha B. Herzog E n d o w m ent Fund H ighland View H ospital E m ployees' Fund A lbert M. Higley M emorial Mary G. Higley Fund R euben W. H itchcock Fund Mary Louise Hobson M emorial Fund Mr. an d Mrs. A rth u r S. Holden Fund Cora Millet Holden M emorial G uerdon S. Holden M emorial Helen M. H olland M emorial Dr. J o h n W. Holloway M emorial Fund J o h n W. Holt M emorial Mrs. J o h n H. Hord M emorial A. R. H orr Fund Jo se p h C. H ostetler M emorial G ilbert W. H u m phrey M emorial Fund Mrs. Ray Irvin M emorial T he N orm a W itt Ja c k so n Fund Erie J. J o h n so n an d W alter Saw telle Doan an d Ella P. Doan M emorial Fund J a m e s K. Jo h n so n , Jr. M emorial Fund M inerva B. Jo h n so n M emorial Fund V irginia K. Jo h n so n M emorial Fund Florence J o n e s M emorial T he T h o m as Hoyt J o n e s Fam ily Fund T he V irginia J o n e s M emorial Fund Mr. an d Mrs. S idney D. Jo se p h s Fund A lbert B. an d S ara P. Kern M emorial Fund Jo s e p h E. Kewley M emorial Fund O rrin F. K ilm er Fund D. D. K im m el M emorial Fund Q uay H. Kinzig M emorial T h o m as M. Kirby M emorial Dr. E m m an u el K laus M emorial Fund S am u el B. K night Fund T he Philip E. an d B ertha Hawley Knowlton Fund E stelle C. Koch M em orial S cholarship Fund R ich ard H. K ohn Fund S am u el E. K ram er Law S cholarship Fund G eorge H. L apham Fund Mr. an d Mrs. R obert S. L ath am Fund Dr. an d Mrs. R obert H. L echner Fund M argaret Irene Leslie Fund Mrs. Howell Leuck Fund D aniel W. L oeser F und Meta M. Long Fund

T he C halm er F. Lutz Fund T he W illiam Fred M ackay and Cora Carlisle M ackay M emorial Fund A nna Mary Magee M emorial Fund George A. an d Mary E. M arten Fund Mrs. E. O. M arting Memorial T he Frederick R. and B ertha S pecht M autz S cholarship Fund E rm a L. Mawer Fund Malcolm L. McBride and J o h n H arris McBride II M emorial Fund T hom as M cCauslen Memorial Mrs. E. P. McCullagh Memorial E m m a E. McDonald Fund H eber M cFarland Fund Hilda J. McGee Fund G ladys M. M cIntyre M emorial Fund W. B rew ster M cKenna Fund A nna C urtiss McNutt M emorial C harles E. Meink Memorial William J. Mericka Memorial The G race E. M eyette Fund H erm an R. an d E sth e r S. Miller M emorial Fund Francis C harlton Mills, Jr. Fund E m m a B. M inch Fund Jo h n A. M itchell and B lanche G. Mitchell Fund H arry F. Miter Memorial Helen Moore Fund Daniel E. Morgan M emorial Fund Mary MacBain Motch Fund Ray E. M unn Fund Jo h n P. M urphy Memorial C hristopher Bruce N arten M emorial The N ational City B ank Fund H arlan H. Newell M emorial Harold M. Nichols Fund Jessie Roe N orth an d George M ahan North Memorial Fund J o h n F. Oberlin an d Jo h n C. O berlin Fund Ohio Nut and Bolt C om pany Fund Jo h n G. & May Lockwood Oliver M emorial Fund E thelw yne W alton O sborn M emorial Erla Sch lath er Parker Fund C harles J. and M arian E. P aterson Fund Blanche B. Payer Fund Caroline Brown Prescott M emorial Fund Mary D unham P rescott M emorial The George J o h n P utz an d M argaret Putz M emorial Fund The George F. Q uinn M emorial Scholarship Fund O m ar S. R anney M emorial G race P. Rawson Fund Leonard R. R ench Fund Marie R ichardson M emorial Fund M inerva P. Ridley Fund E dna A. Rink Fund O rra M. R isberg Memorial G ertrude M. R obertson M emorial Clarence A. Roode M emorial Elizabeth Becker Rorabeck Fund Edw ard L. Rosenfeld an d B ertha M. Rosenfeld M emorial Fund Dr. A. T. Roskos Fund D orothy and Helen R u th Fund St. B arnabas Guild for N ursing Fund Mrs. R aym ond T. Saw yer Memorial Oliver H. S ch aaf Fund C ornelius G. Scheid M emorial Fund The R obert N. S chw artz Fund for R etarded Children Alice D uty Seagrave Foreign S tu d y Fund W arner Seely Fund A rth u r H. Seibig Fund Mrs. Louis B. Seltzer M emorial

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T he A rth u r a n d A gnes S ev erso n M em orial Fund A n nette S. S h a g re n M em orial N ina S h e rre r F und J a m e s N elson S h erw in F und T he J o h n an d F ra n c e s W. S h erw in Fund C ornelia A d am s S h ira s M em orial Dr. T h o m a s S h u p e M em orial F und S am u el S ilbert Fund David G. Skall M em orial Mr. a n d Mrs. Paul T. Skove F und Jo se p h in e R. an d E dw ard W. Sloan, Jr. Fund Social W ork S ch o larsh ip Fund Society for C rippled C hildren — Tris S p eak er M em orial Fund Society N ational B ank Fund M eade A. S p en cer M em orial T he M iriam K erru ish S tage Fund Belle B ierce S ta ir M em orial F rederick S. S ta m b e rg e r M emorial Nellie Steele S te w a rt M em orial T he C h arles J. Stilw ell S ch o larsh ip Fund R alph P. S to d d ard M em orial Fund E sth e r H. an d B. F. S to n er M em orial Fund V ernon Stouffer M em orial Fund M ortim er I. S tra u s s an d H elen E. S tra u ss an d B lanche New M em orial Fund T he Ignatz & B erta S u n sh in e Fund Jo se p h T. Sw eeny M em orial C harles F arran d Taplin an d Elsie H. Taplin Fund C. F. Taplin Fund Je ssie Loyd Tarr M emorial E lizabeth B ebout Taylor M emorial Mary J. T ew ksbury Fund Allison J o h n T h o m p so n M emorial Fund C h ester A. T h o m p so n Fund M argaret H ayden T ho m p so n Fund S a rah R. T h o m p so n Fund H om er F. Tielke Fund M aud K erru ish Towson M emorial Je ssie C. Tucker M emorial Fund T he C harles F. Uhl an d Carl F. Uhl M em orial Fund Leo W. U lm er Fund C h ristian a n d S ophia Vick M emorial Fund M alcolm B. Vilas M emorial Philip R. an d M ary S. W ard M em orial Fund C ornelia B lakem ore W arner M emorial Fund H elen B. W arner Fund S tan ley H. W atson M em orial F ran k W alter Weide Fund T he H arry H. an d Stella B. W eiss M emorial Fund Caroline Briggs W elch M emorial S. B u rn s an d S im onne H. W eston Fund L ucius J. an d J e n n ie C. W heeler Memorial Fund Elliott H. W hitlock Memorial Mary C. W hitney Fund T he M arian L. an d E d n a A. W hitsey Fund R. N. an d H. R. W iesenberger Fund Lewis B. W illiam s M emorial W hiting W illiam s Fund A rth u r P. a n d E lizabeth M. W illiam son Fund M arjorie A. W inbigler Memorial J o h n W. W oodburn M emorial Nelle P. W oodw orth Fund D orothy Young W ykoff M emorial L ew ard C. W ykoff M em orial F rederick W illiam York Fund Dr. E dw ard A. Y urick Fund H erbert E. an d E leanor M. Z d ara M emorial Fund

62

S u p p o rtin g O rg a n iz a tio n s Seven su p p o rtin g o rg a n iz a tio n s are affiliated w ith T he C leveland F o u n d a ­ tion u n d e r th e p ro v isio n s of sectio n 509(a)(3) of th e In te rn al R evenue Code. T h ese o rg an iz atio n s h av e agreed to c o m m it th e ir a s se ts to th e benefit a n d c h a rita b le p u rp o se s of T he C leveland F o u n d atio n a n d th e re ­ fore enjoy s u b s ta n tia l a d v a n ta g e s provided by asso ciatio n w ith a public charity, in clu d in g favorable tax s ta tu s an d staff services. T he first private fo u n d atio n in th e c o u n try to seek th is affiliation w ith a c o m m u n ity tru s t w as T h e S h e r w ic k Fund, created by J o h n a n d F ra n c e s W ick Sherw in. In 1973, after 20 y ears a s a fam ily fo u ndation, th e F und b e ­ cam e th e first su p p o rtin g o rg a n iz a ­ tion of T he C leveland F oundation. In 1981, th e tru s te e s of T h e S h er­ w ick Fund au th o rize d 38 g ra n ts totalin g $223,110 in su p p o rt of a v a ri­ ety of ed u catio n al, h ealth , social service an d c u ltu ra l a rts p rogram s. A nother su p p o rtin g o rganization, th e G oodrich S o c ia l S e t t le m e n t , w as also a private foun d atio n p rio r to its affiliation in 1979 w ith T h e Cleve­ land Foundation. T he G oodrichG an n et N eighborhood C enter a n d th e Bell N eighborhood C enter benefit from th is su p p o rtin g org an izatio n . In 1981 four g ra n ts to talin g $ 6 9 ,5 0 3 w ere authorized. T he five rem a in in g su p p o rtin g o rg an izatio n s becam e affiliated w ith th e Foundation w ith o u t a prio r p h i­ lan th ro p ic s tru c tu re . In 1977 T h e W illiam J. and D o r o th y K. O’N e ill, Sr. Fund w as e sta b lish e d by the O’Neills. T he O’Neill F und approved 17 g ra n ts to talin g $615,154 in 1981 for a variety of ed u catio n al a n d social service activities. In 1978 T he E liz a b e th and E ller y S e d g w ic k Fund w as created by th e Sedgw icks a n d in 1981 benefited g e n ­ eral c h aritab le activities in th e C leveland a re a w ith 10 g ra n ts totaling $48,500. C reated in 1979, T h e A lto n F. and C arrie S. D a v is Fund in 1981 s u p ­ ported a v ariety of c u ltu ral an d c h aritab le activities w ith seven g ra n ts to talin g $31,143. T he Treu-M art Fund, e stab lish ed in 1980 by E lizabeth M. a n d th e late W illiam C. T reuhaft as a su p p o rtin g organization of T he C leveland F oun­

d a tio n a n d th e J e w is h C o m m u n i t y F ederation of C leveland, w as th e tirs su p p o rtin g o rg a n iz a tio n in th e c o u n ­ try to b ecom e affiliated w ith b o th a c o m m u n ity fo u n d atio n a n d a n o th e r public charity. In 1981 T h e Treu-M art F und a u th o riz e d 10 g ra n ts for a v a rie ty of c h a rita b le a c tiv itie s in th e C leveland area. T h e W o lp ert F u n d , c re a te d in 1980 by S a m u el a n d R oslyn W olpert to pro­ vide a n a d d itio n a l so u rc e of p h ila n ­ th ro p ic d o llars for th e C leveland area, a u th o riz e d 27 g ra n ts in 1981 to talin g $ 4 8 ,6 5 0 for a v a rie ty of civic, social service, c u ltu ra l a n d e d u c atio n a l p ro g ra m s. D etailed listin g s of th e 1981 g ra n ts of T he S h e rw ick F und, T h e Treu-M art F und a n d T h e W olpert F und m a y be found in a n n u a l re p o rts p u b lish e d se p ara te ly a n d availab le a t T h e Cleve­ lan d F oundation.


Financial Report

N ew y i s i t o r In fo r m a tio n C e n te r in th e T erm in al Tow er: selling Cleveland to

tourists and 125,000 residents a day. (Courtesy of T he C leveland Press.J

63


Decem ber 31

Balance Sheets T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n

1981

A s s e ts $ C ertificates of d e p o s it.................................................. S h o rt-term in v e s tm e n ts ............................................. S ecu rities — Note E: U. S. G o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s ..............................

L ia b ilitie s a n d F u n d B a la n c e s A ccounts payable a n d a c c ru e d e x p e n s e s ............. Fund balances: R estricted for c h a rita b le p u rp o s e s ....................... U n restricted for op e ra tin g p u r p o s e s ..................

$

1,7 7 8 ,2 7 7 1 ,1 2 5 ,0 0 0 2 5 5 ,0 0 0

2 3 ,0 8 2 ,4 0 5 3 8 ,8 5 7 ,2 0 8 8 2 ,9 2 4 ,0 1 4 4 0 ,1 9 5 ,4 8 0 18 5 ,0 5 9 ,1 0 7 1,352,389

19 ,4 2 9 ,1 2 9 3 8 ,9 8 1 ,5 3 4 7 9 ,1 6 9 ,6 4 9 3 6 ,0 9 0 ,5 8 8 173,670,900 1,355,899

162,029

160,760

98,601 5 9 ,6 6 6 $ 1 9 0 ,0 9 6 ,2 2 0

63,530 58,425 $ 1 7 8 ,467,791

$

$

C om m on a n d preferred s t o c k s ............................ C om m on tr u s t fu n d s ................................................ O ther in v e stm e n ts — Note E C ash value of life in su ra n c e — n e t of policy lo an s of $15,934 ($15,078 in 1 9 8 0 )....................... E q u ip m e n t an d leaseh o ld im p ro v e m e n ts — n e t of a c c u m u la te d d e p reciatio n a n d am o rtiz a tio n of $ 6 6 ,2 8 3 ($14,575 in 1980). . . .

3 6 3 ,4 2 8 1.1 5 0 .0 0 0 1.8 5 1 .0 0 0

1980 (R e s ta te d — Note B)

123,581

18 9 ,4 5 5 ,1 0 8 517,531 1 8 9 ,9 7 2 ,6 3 9 $ 1 9 0 ,0 9 6 ,2 2 0

124,008

177,991,361 352,422 178,343,783 $178,467,791

See notes to financial statem ents.

Year E nded D ecem ber 31

Statements of Revenue, Expenses and Changes in Fund Balances T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n

Received from d o n o r s ............................................... Net gain from sale of a s s e t s ..................................... D iv id e n d s ...................................................................... In terest — n et of a m o rtiz a tio n a n d p u rch a se d i n t e r e s t .................................................. C om m on tru s t fund in c o m e ..................................... Partial benefit i n c o m e ............................................... D istribution of estate in c o m e ................................... O th e r ............................................................................... Total R e v e n u e ..............................................................

$

8 ,8 4 3 ,0 9 2 2 ,8 8 2 ,4 8 8 4 ,7 0 3 ,7 8 5

1980 (Restated—Note B)

$

9,994,032 2,218,271 4,359,372

5 ,1 3 8 ,2 2 8 2 ,0 3 4 ,5 6 9 5 ,0 8 0 ,4 4 0 5 0 1 ,1 9 5 157,938 2 9 ,3 4 1 ,7 3 5

4,078,763 1,694,047 4,774,076 126,692 300.150 2 7 ,5 4 5 ,4 0 3

7 7 0 ,2 3 8 60,371

671.472 234.607

15,738,428

11,754.038

E xpenses A uthorized by tru s te e b anks: T rustees’ f e e s ............................................................ O ther tru s t e x p e n se s ............................................... P a y m en ts u n d e r g ra n ts a u th o rize d by T he C leveland F oundation C om m ittee or th e D istribution C om m ittee for ch aritab le p u r p o s e s ............................................... A dm inistrative expenses: S alaries........................................................................ Em ployee b e n e f i t s .................................................. O ccupancy a n d office e x p e n se s ........................... Professional a n d c o n su ltin g fees a n d staff e x p e n s e s ....................................................... O ther .......................................................................... Total E x p e n s e s ....................................................... E x c e s s o f R e v e n u e O ver E x p e n s e s .................

6 3 5 .4 0 6 114.021 177.912

512,174 102.492 161.595

125.737 9 0,766 1 7 ,7 1 2 ,8 7 9 1 1 ,6 2 8 ,8 5 6

161.992 83,282 1 3 ,6 8 1 ,6 5 2 1 3 ,8 6 3 ,7 5 1

F u n d b a l a n c e s a t b e g i n n i n g o f y e a r .......... F u n d b a l a n c e s a t e n d o f y e a r .........................

1 7 8 ,3 4 3 , 7 8 3 $ 1 8 9 ,9 7 2 ,6 3 9

1 6 4 .4 8 0 .0 3 2 $ 1 7 8 ,3 4 3 ,7 8 3

See notes to fina ncial statem ents.

64

1981

R evenue


Notes to Financial Statements The C levelan d F ou n d ation D ecem b er 3 1 ,1 9 8 1

N o te A — T he financial s ta te m e n ts include th e a c c o u n ts of T he C leveland F o undation (“ c h a rita b le c o rp o ra tio n ” ). T h e C leveland F oundation (“ c o m m u n ity t r u s t ” ) a n d th eir affiliated su p p o rtin g org an izatio n s: T he Davis Fund, T he G oodrich Social S e ttle ­ m e n t Fund, T he O ’Neill Fund, T he S ed g ­ w ick F und, T h e S h e rw ick Fund, a n d T he W olpert Fund. In tero rg an izatio n al tra n s a c ­ tio n s a n d a c c o u n ts h av e been elim inated. T h e financial s ta te m e n ts are p rep ared p rim arily on th e b a sis of c a sh receip ts a n d d isb u rse m e n ts, w ith th e ex cep tio n of th e c h a rita b le co rp o ratio n w h ich reco rd s its rev e n u e s a n d e x p e n se s on th e accru al basis. C onsequently, ce rtain rev en u e a n d th e related a s se ts are recognized w h e n re ­ ceived ra th e r th a n w h e n ea rn e d , a n d ce rtain e x p e n se s are recognized w h e n paid ra th e r th a n w h e n th e obligation is in cu rred . Accordingly, th e financial s ta te m e n ts are n o t in te n d e d to p re se n t financial position a n d re su lts of o p eratio n s in conform ity w ith

g enerally accepted a c co u n tin g principles. S ecu rities a n d o th er in v e stm e n ts are m ain ta in e d by five tru ste e b a n k s in v ario u s tru s t fu n d s a n d are carrie d generally a t cost or a m o u n ts d eterm in ed by e sta te s a t the tim e of beq u est. T he resolutions a n d declaratio n s of tru sts, p u rs u a n t to w hich tru s t fu n d s are held, c o n tain provisions th a t allow d istrib u ­ tion of fund p rincipal u n d e r specified conditions. C ertain tru sts, e sta b lish e d for th e benefit of T he C leveland F oundation, have been excluded from th e a cco m p an y in g s ta te ­ m e n ts u n til su c h tim e as th e y have been form ally tra n sfe rre d to T he C leveland F oundation. E q u ip m e n t a n d leasehold im p ro v em en ts are sta te d a t cost less ac cu m u la te d de­ p reciation a n d am ortization. D epreciation a n d am o rtizatio n are co m puted on the straig h t-lin e m eth o d over th e e stim ated useful lives of th e assets.

N o te B — Effective J a n u a r y 1,1981, Cleve­ lan d F ou n d atio n R esources a m e n d e d its A rticles of Incorporation to b ro ad en its p u r­ poses a n d c h an g e its n a m e to T he Cleve­ lan d F ou n d atio n (“ c h a rita b le co rp o ratio n ” ) T he a m e n d m e n t e sta b lish e d charitab le p u rp o se s of th e c h a rita b le corporation w h ich are th e sa m e a s th o se of th e c o m m u ­ n ity tru s t k n o w n a s T he C leveland F oundation. B eginning in 1981, th e assets, fu n d b a la n c e s a n d c h a n g es in fund b a l­ a n c e s of th e c h a rita b le corporation are co m b in ed w ith th o se of th e co m m u n ity

tru s t to reflect in p ractice one organization. T he Davis, G oodrich Social S ettlem en t, O'Neill, Sedgw ick, Sherw ick an d W olpert fu n d s are su p p o rtin g o rganizations u n d e r th e provisions of Section 509(a)(3) of the In tern al R evenue Code. T he C leveland Foundation is responsible for e x p e n d itu re s of th e su p p o rtin g o rganizations for specific ch aritab le purposes. B eginning in 1981, the assets, fund b ala n c e s a n d ch an g es in fund b ala n c e s of th e c o m m u n ity tru s t include th ese su p p o rtin g organizations.

To reflect th e c h a n g e s d escrib ed above, th e financial s ta te m e n ts for 1980 have been restated as follows: January 1

F und b a la n c e s of th e c o m m u n ity tru s t a s previously r e p o r te d ......................... T he c h aritab le corporation (nam e ch an g ed from C leveland F oundation Resources) . . S u p p o rtin g o rg a n iz a tio n s ...................... A d ju stm e n t for in te ro rg a n iz a tio n a l t r a n s a c t i o n s .......................................... F und b a la n c e s r e s ta te d ...........................

1981

1980

$ 1 7 2 ,0 2 4 ,4 3 2

$ 160,633,787

1,404,434 4,79 7 ,9 7 8

870,628 2,947,201

116,939 $ 1 7 8 ,343,783

28,416 $ 1 6 4 ,480,032

N o te C — P artial ben efit fu n d s generally s ta te m e n ts since T he C leveland F o u n d a­ tion ultim ately will receive th e entire provide, e ach in v ary in g a m o u n ts, for p a y ­ incom e of su c h funds. In 1981 a n d 1980 T he m e n t of a n n u itie s to c e rta in individuals, C leveland F oundation received a p p ro x ­ tru s te e s ’ fees a n d o th e r e x p e n se s of the im ately 82 a n d 86 percen t, respectively, of tru s ts, p rio r to p a y m e n t of th e b alan ce of th e aggregate incom e of th e v ario u s p artial th e incom e to T h e C leveland F oundation. benefit funds. T he to tal c a rry in g v a lu e s of p a rtial benefit fu n d s are in clu d e d in th e ac co m p a n y in g T he c a rry in g v alu e of p a rtia l b enefit fu n d s in clu d ed in th e m u ltip le tru ste e sh ip resolution classification is as follows: December 31

A m e riT h is t............................................. N ational City B a n k .............................. C entral N ational B ank of C leveland. Society N ational B ank of C leveland.

1 981

1980

$ 45,85 4 ,7 9 2 6 ,607,636 1,363,509 1,230.000 $ 55,055,937

$ 44,68 4 ,4 9 4 6,596,040 1.332,260 1,221,622 $ 53,834,416

65


N o te D — T he C leveland F o u n d atio n h a s g ra n t c o m m itm e n ts of $11,389,000 a n d

$ 8 ,3 7 3 ,0 0 0 a t D ecem b er 31,1981 a n d 1980, respectively. ______

N o te E — A pproxim ate m a rk e t v a lu e s for se cu rities a n d o th e r in v e s tm e n ts m a in ­ tain e d by th e five tru s te e b a n k s for th e

c h a rita b le co rp o ratio n , th e c o m m u n ity tru s t a n d th e su p p o rtin g o rg a n iz a tio n s are. D ecem b er 31

1980

1981 U. S. g o v e rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s ............................ B o n d s ........................................................................ C om m on a n d preferred s t o c k s ......................... C om m on tru s t fu n d s .............................................

.......... .......... .......... ..........

O ther i n v e s t m e n t s ............................................... .......... Since a p p ro x im ate m a rk e t v a lu a tio n s as of D ecem ber 31,1981 a n d 1980 for o th e r investm e n ts w ith a c a rry in g v a lu e of $146,539 a n d $150,048, respectively, w ere n o t readily

$ 2 0 ,8 1 7 ,3 8 6 2 5 ,6 6 9 ,7 8 6 1 3 6 ,2 0 7 ,8 7 0 4 0 ,0 2 1 ,4 5 7 2 2 2 ,7 1 6 ,4 9 9 9 9 6 ,7 8 8 $ 2 2 3 ,7 1 3 ,2 8 7

(R estated)

$ 1 7 ,2 2 3 ,5 9 0 2 7 ,1 2 7 ,9 2 1 151,3 5 2 ,8 2 1 3 6 ,7 6 2 ,5 6 5 2 3 2 ,4 6 6 ,8 9 7 1 ,0 0 0 ,2 9 9 $ 2 3 3 ,4 6 7 ,1 9 6

o btainable, th e c a rry in g v a lu e of o th e r in v e stm e n ts h a s b e e n in c lu d e d a s th e a p p ro x im ate m a rk e t value,

N o te F — F und b a la n c e s of th e su p p o rtin g o rg an iz atio n s are co m p rised of th e following: D e c e m b e r 31

1981

1980 (Restated)

T he T he T he The T he T he

Davis F u n d ....................................................... G oodrich Social S e ttle m e n t F u n d ............ O’Neill F u n d .................................................... S edgw ick F u n d ............................................ S herw ick F u n d ............................................... W olpert F u n d .................................................

..........

$

.......... .......... .......... .......... $

Report of Ernst & Whinney I n d e p e n d e n t A u d ito r s

$

$

3 2 0 ,9 1 9 5 0 9 ,7 1 4 5 8 4 ,7 6 9 4 6 5 ,3 6 6 2 ,4 1 4 ,8 4 0 5 0 2 ,3 7 0 4 ,7 9 7 ,9 7 8

N o te G — T he C leveland F oundation h a s a n in su red p ension plan for c e rtain em ploy­ ees. P ension ex p en se for 1981 a n d 1980 w as

$69,491 a n d $5 8 ,8 8 8 , respectively. All c o n ­ trib u tio n s u n d e r th e p lan a re fu n d ed a n d vest w ith em ployees a s m ad e.

N o te H — T he In te rn al R evenue service h a s ru led th a t th e c o m m u n ity tru s t, the c h aritab le corporation an d each of th eir su p p o rtin g org an izatio n s qualify u n d e r

S ection 501(c)(3) of th e In te rn a l R ev en u e Code an d are, therefore, n o t s u b je c t to ta x u n d e r p re se n t incom e tax law s.

The Cleveland Foundation Distribution Committee and Trustee Banks of The Cleveland Foundation Cleveland, Ohio

are recognized w h e n p aid r a th e r th a n w h e n th e obligation is in cu rred . A ccordingly, th e a c co m p an y in g financial s ta te m e n ts are n o t in ten d ed to p re se n t financial positio n a n d resu lts of o p eratio n s in con fo rm ity w ith generally accep ted a c c o u n tin g p rin cip les. In o u r opinion, th e financial s ta te m e n ts referred to above p re se n t fairly th e fin an cial position arisin g p rim a rily from c a sh tr a n s ­ actio n s of T he C leveland F ou n d atio n a s of D ecem ber 31,1981 a n d 1980, a n d th e c h an g es in its fund b a la n c e s for th e y e a rs th e n ended, on th e b a sis of a c c o u n tin g described above, w h ich h a s b e e n a p p lied on a c o n sisten t basis after re s ta te m e n t of th e 1980 financial s ta te m e n ts on a co m b in ed basis, w ith w hich we concur, as d e scrib ed in Note B.

We have ex am in ed the balance sh eets, a ris­ ing p rim arily from cash tra n sa c tio n s, of T he C leveland F oundation as of D ecem ber 31,1981 and 1980, a n d th e related s ta te ­ m e n ts of revenue, e x p e n se s an d c h a n g es in fund b alan ces for th e y ears th e n ended. O ur ex a m in atio n s w ere m ad e in acco rd an ce w ith generally accep ted a u d itin g sta n d a rd s and, accordingly, in cluded su c h tests of the ac co u n tin g reco rd s an d su c h o th e r au d itin g pro ced u res as we considered n e c essa ry in the circu m stan ces. T he F o u n d atio n ’s policy is to prepare its financial s ta te m e n ts p rim arily on th e basis of cash receipts a n d d isb u rse m e n ts; co n se­ quently, c ertain rev en u e a n d th e related a sse ts are recognized w hen received ra th e r th a n w h en earned, a n d c e rtain e x p e n se s

66

3 3 9 ,9 4 2 5 0 4 ,1 2 3 5 9 0 ,4 7 4 4 8 3,451 4 ,3 0 8 ,4 1 0 5 2 8 ,2 6 2 6 ,7 5 4 ,6 6 2

7i/> Cleveland, Ohio April 9,1982


Giving to The Cleveland Foundation

S c u lp tu r e a t E d gew ater: helping attract

a record 4.6 million su m m er visitors to Cleveland Lakefront State Park.

67


The Cleveland Foundation is a flexible resource serving m an y donors’ diverse philanthropic goals. A gift established w ith the Foundation enjoys the m ost advantageous tax trea tm en t and the greatest degree of recognition, versatility and perm anence a charitable institution can offer. Gifts to the Foundation m ay be m ade in several ways. Donors m ay direct gifts or bequests to specific agencies or in stitu tio n s or to broad areas of concern, such as education, health or cultural affairs. Many donors, however, provide wholly unrestricted gifts, e n tru s t­ ing to the Foundation’s D istribution C om m ittee the decisions on how these funds will be utilized over the years. The u nrestricted gift provides im portant flexibility and allows the D istribution C om m ittee to respond more effectively to changing com m unity needs as they em erge. A gift to the Foundation m ay be m ade during the donor’s lifetime, or it m ay be established in the donor’s will. It is to be em phasized th at the donor m ay select any nam e for his fund and th a t the fund nam e will accom pany g rant paym ents. There are four basic w ays in w hich donors m ay contribute to The Cleveland Foundation. A separate trust fund m ay be established for a gift of $250,000 or more. Each tru st of this kind is held and m anaged separately by one of the trustee banks. Combined funds provide a cost-effective w ay of receiving and adm inistering gifts of any size. A com bined fund gift retains its separate identity and is an appropriate m eans of m em orializing a deceased friend or family member. A supporting organization provides a m eans w hereby a donor m ay create a separate foundation in affiliation w ith The Cleveland Foundation, or w hereby an already established private foundation m ay affiliate. The supporting organization m aintains both a separate identity and the direct involvem ent of the donor and other family m em bers while enjoying the public charity statu s and staff services of the com m unity foundation. Nontrust contributions m ay be m ade to The Cleveland Founda­ tion in any am ount by individuals, corporations, foundations and other institutions, to be paid out over a relatively lim ited tim e fram e. Foundation staff is always available to provide inform ation in response to inquiries about the m any ways of giving to the Founda­ tion and about the donor’s specific philanthropic goals. It is suggested th at any individual desiring to m ake a gift to The Cleve­ land Foundation confer directly with the Foundation as well as an attorney, financial advisor, or the tru st departm ent of one of the Foundation’s trustee banks.

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D istrib u tio n C o m m itte e

S ta ff

Stanley C. Pace C h airm an M. Brock W eir Vice C h airm an R obert D. G ries Mrs. Bruce G risw old David G. Hill Mrs. D rue King, Jr. V incent G. M arotta T h o m as W. M astin W illiam J. O ’Neill, Sr.

H om er C. W adsw orth D irector S tev en A. M inter A ssociate D irector P atricia J a n s e n Doyle S u s a n N. Lajoie M ariam C. N oland* Carol G. S im o n etti R ich ard F. T om pkins P ro g ram Officers M ichael J. H offm ann A d m in istrativ e Officer J o h n G. Jo y ce M anager, F in an cial S ervices Bill R u d m a n S taff A sso ciate/C o m m u n icatio n s G. B rooks E a rn e st C o n su lta n t B ern ita N. Brooks M arth a A. B u rch ask i J a n e t M. C arp en te r Alicia M. C iliberto C ath y L. C rab tree J a n ic e M. C u trig h t E d n a M. Deal D arlene M. D ow ns K ath leen D rake-S m ith M ichele G ilbert J u n e I. H ow land M uriel H. J o n e s G loria J. Kish J e a n A. L ang Rose M arie Ley Lois E. W eber S u p p o rt Staff

(completed term Sep tem ber 1981)

H arvey G. O p p m a n n (appointed Sep tem b er 1981)

R ichard W. Pogue T h o m as V. H. Vail

T ru ste e s C o m m itte e M. Brock Weir C om m ittee C h a irm a n A m eriT rust C o m p an y of C leveland W ilson M. B row n, Jr. C entral N ational B ank Ju lie n L. McCall N ational City B ank G ordon E. H effern Society N ational B ank of C leveland L ym an H. Treadw ay Union C om m erce B ank

T h o m p so n , H ine a n d Flory Legal C ounsel *Resigned A ugust 1981

1981 A n n u a l R e p o r t

<F

T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n A trust for all time, supported by a nd fo r the people o f Greater Cleveland

Bill R u d m a n E ditor/W riter P atricia J a n s e n Doyle D irector of P u b licatio n s E p ste in a n d Szilagyi D esigners F ra n k A leksandrow icz P rim a ry P h o to g rap h e r M ary B eth C am p Cover P h o to g rap h e r J a n e t M. C arp en te r C ath y L. C rab tree J a n ic e M. C u trig h t E ditorial A ssista n ts



Cleveland Foundation – 1981 Annual Report