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THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION The C leveland F oundation is the o ld est and largest c o m m u n ity fo u n d a tio n in the country. It was established in 1914 to p ro vid e a m echan­ ism th ro u g h w h ic h any d o n o r m ig h t make a g ift o r bequest o f any size fo r the b e n e fit o f the G reater Cleveland c o m m u n ity , certain that c h a n g in g n e e d s w o u ld n o t m a ke th e g ift obsolete. There are n o w 240 separate tru st funds in the F oundation plus a C o m b in e d Fund fo r the in ­ vestm ent o f sm aller gifts. The five trustee banks o f The C leveland Foundation safeguard and in ­ vest the funds w h ic h are allocated several tim es each year by an 1 1-m e m be r D is trib u tio n C o m ­ m ittee. This co m m itte e , assisted by a profes­ sional staff, d istrib u te s the funds in ways both consistent w ith d o n o r wishes and in tune w ith c o n te m p o ra ry p h ila n th ro p ic o p p o rtu n itie s. Some d onors designate specific organizations to receive the g ifts; others lim it gifts to b roader areas o f concern such as civic o r cu ltu ra l affairs, edu ca tio n , health o r social services. M any d o ­ nors give w h o lly unrestricted gifts w h ich p ro vide im p o rta n t fle x ib ility in a llo w in g the D is trib u tio n C o m m itte e to respond e ffe ctive ly to changing c o m m u n ity needs as they emerge. M em bers o f the D is trib u tio n C o m m itte e are selected in a va rie ty o f ways to assure that a cross section o f c o m m u n ity leadership is re­

sponsible fo r d is trib u tio n o f the F oundation's resources. O ne m e m b e r o f the D is trb u tio n C o m ­ m itte e is a p p o in te d by each o f the fo llo w in g : the ch ie f ju d g e o f the U n ite d States D istric t C o u rt, N o rth e rn D is tric t o f O h io , Eastern D iv i­ sion; the presiding ju d g e o f the Probate C o u rt o f Cuyahoga C o u n ty; the m ayor o f C leveland; the p resident o f the Federation fo r C o m m u n ity Planning, and the ch ie f justice o f the C o u rt o f Appeals fo r the Eighth A p p e lla te D is tric t o f O h io . These five p u b lic o fficia ls also select a m em ber w h o is a trustee o r p rin cip a l o ffic e r o f ano the r p h ila n th ro p ic fo u n d a tio n . Five a d d i­ tio na l mem bers are a p p o in te d by the Trustees C om m itte e . Each m em ber o f the D is trib u tio n C o m m itte e is a p p o in te d fo r a five-year term . A m em ber may be reappointed fo r a m axim um o f 10 years o f service. The Trustees C o m m itte e is com posed o f the ch ie f executive officers o f the five trustee banks: The C leveland Trust Com pany, Central N ational Bank o f Cleveland, N ational C ity Bank, Society National Bank o f C leveland and U nion C o m ­ m erce Bank. The Cleveland Foundation received on D e­ cem ber 14, 1971 a cu rre n t ru lin g o f the Internal Revenue Service w h ich classifies it as a p u b lic ch arity under Section 509(a)(1) o f the Internal Revenue Code o f 1954 as am ended.


TABLE OF CONTENTS The C hairm an's L e t t e r ..................................................................

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The D ire cto r's R e p o r t ..................................................................

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G rant S u m m a ry ................................................................................ 6 REPORT O N 1977 GRANTS E d u c a tio n ...........................................................................................

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Social S e rv ic e s ................................................................................... 19 Health

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C ivic A f fa ir s ........................................................................................37 C ultural A f f a ir s .............................................................................

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Special P h ila n th ro p ic S e rv ic e s ......................................................48 FINANCIAL REPORT Trust Fund G r o w t h .......................................................................... 50 Trust Fund L is tin g ............................................................................ 52 S upporting O rg a n iz a tio n s .............................................................54 C o m b in ed Fund G r o w t h ............................................................... 55 C o m b in ed Fund L is tin g ................................................................. 56 Statem ent o f Changes in Fund B a la n c e s ....................................58 Statem ent o f Assets and Fund B a la n c e s ....................................60 CLEVELAND F O U N D A T IO N RESOURCES Funds, G ifts and G r a n ts ..................................................................61 Statem ent o f Changes in Fund B a la n c e s ....................................62 Balance S h e e t ................................................................................... 63 G iving to The C leveland F o u n d a tio n ........................................ 64 The D is trib u tio n C o m m itte e , Trustees C o m m itte e and S t a f f ..............................Inside back co ve r


THE CHAIRMAN’S LETTER

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O ne o f the great strengths o f The Cleveland F oundation over the years has been its w illin g ­ ness to id e n tify some o f the m ost sig n ifica n t p ro ble m s facing the b ro a d e r c o m m u n ity and to help stim u la te the im p o rta n t p u b lic dia log u e such issues require. D u rin g 1977 the Foundation increasingly tu rn e d its a tte n tio n to the study o f such lo n g -te rm p ro ble m s as the e co n o m ic fu ­ tu re o f this region, the v ia b ility o f its higher e du ca tion a l and cu ltu ra l in stitu tio n s, and the m ost e ffe ctive ways to d e live r m edical and so­ cial services to its people. This is n o t to say, o f course, tha t w e neglected the p h ila n th ro p ic needs and o p p o rtu n itie s o f the m o m e n t. In 1977 w e a u th orize d grants to ta lin g nearly $10.1 m illio n , the second year in succession in w h ic h a u th o riza tio n s to p p e d $10 m illio n . W e w e re able to do this w ith co n ­ fid e n c e because o u r in co m e earnings rem ained at an a ll-tim e high despite the c o n tin u in g slide in the stock m arket. F u rthe rm ore, o u r disbursem ents w ere w e ll in excess o f $9.5 m illio n — m ore than in any p re ­ vious year. D isbursem ents usually run less than a u th o riz a tio n s because o f the tim in g o f p ro j­ ects, the necessity o f grant recipients to match ch allenge grant co n d itio n s, and the pattern o f earnings generated by the m ore than 240 trust funds w h ic h co m p rise the Foundation. M o s t o f the grants su pp o rted d ire c t services to p eo p le , especially foste rin g effectiveness and e ffic ie n c y in those services. But it was consistent w ith o u r tra d itio n th a t a small p o rtio n was d ire c te d to w a rd research and d e m on stra tion grants w h ic h address the lo n g -te rm p roblem s and the lik e ly im p lic a tio n s o f b o th p u b lic and p riva te in ve stm en t decisions in seeking to re­ resolve them . C leveland faces a series o f critica l choices in the c o m in g years, choices w h ic h w ill

d e fin e its fu tu re in ways w e may n o t as yet understand. For exam ple, the Foundation a u th orize d a lo o k at the fiscal health o f the region's in s titu ­ tions o f h igher learning, reco gn izin g tha t the d iffic u lty o f m anaging in fla tio n am id d e clin in g e n ro llm e n ts calls in to question the fu tu re n ot o n ly o f existing program s b u t o f existing c o l­ leges and universities. S im ilar concerns as to w h e th e r C leveland's rich cu ltu ra l resources can rem ain v ib ra n t and balanced in the years ahead p ro m p te d a u th o ri­ za tion o f a com prehensive study w h ic h began in 1977 w ith the m a jo r p e rfo rm in g arts o rg a n i­ zations. The Foundation is gathering baseline in fo rm a tio n on the artistic, m anagem ent and fiscal strengths o f these groups and is p ro v id in g incentives fo r them to reassess th e ir ow n m is­ sion and p lo t th e ir ow n future. As g ove rn m e n t has becom e the d o m in a n t fu n d e r o f social services in A m erica, w e have draw n upon in te rn a tio n a l research fin d in g s to recom m end new ways o f m eeting the social service needs o f the peo p le o f Cuyahoga C ounty. This in itia tiv e has stim ulated live ly local debate, positive response fro m co u n ty g ove rn ­ m ent and led to the Foundation w in n in g a fe d ­ eral research and d em on stra tion grant to design a m odel fo r testing new ways o f d e live rin g co unseling and m any o th e r personal social ser­ vices re q uired by in d ivid ua ls and fam ilies in tim e o f special need. In health care, an area in w h ic h n atio n al ex­ penditures have trip le d since 1970, w e have m oved increasingly in to d em o n stra tio n p ro j­ ects aim ed at p re venting illness and m a in ta in ­ ing health. Efforts have centered on a m b u la to ry care, the revival o f the fa m ily d o c to r and, in w h a t may be p o te n tia lly the m ost co st-effe ctive

area o f all, the care o f infants and c h ild re n . The year 1977 also was m arked by increasing interest in regional and e c o n o m ic d e v e lo p m e n t, w ith several research grants d ire c te d to w a rd the analysis o f the m a jo r factors w h ic h a ffe c t the e c o n o m ic life o f the region. In ke eping w ith this interest is o u r c o n v ic tio n th a t b o th the d o w n to w n business d is tric t and its close-in n e ig h b o rh o o d s and suburbs should be seen as allies rather than c o m p e tito rs . T h erefo re , w e w e re pleased to see the successful fru itio n o f o u r c o n tin u in g s u p p o rt fo r n e ig h b o rh o o d d e ­ v e lo p m e n t co rp o ra tio n s and fo r the re b irth o f the d o w n to w n area fro m P ublic Square to Play­ house Square. W e are exceedingly pleased to have served as pioneers in a n u m b e r o f im p o rta n t ventures and th a t o u r seed grants have served as cata­ lysts in a ttractin g extensive local and n atio n al support. As w e go fo rw a rd in o u r c o n tin u in g search fo r answers to the c o m m u n ity 's m a jo r p ro b ­ lems, I m ust express my a p p re c ia tio n fo r the m any hours o f th o u g h tfu l co n sid e ra tio n given by the m em bers o f the D is trib u tio n C o m m itte e , fin e men and w o m e n w h o serve w ith o u t pay, and fo r the o u tsta n d in g w o rk o f the staff, a tru ly ded ica ted group. D u rin g 1977 w e w e re jo in e d by three new m em bers o f the D is trib u tio n C o m m itte e , each o f w h o m brings im p o rta n t strengths: D avid G. H ill, a p ro m in e n t a tto rn e y and fo rm e r p u b lic o ffic ia l; Dr. Thom as W . M astin, chairm an and c h ie f executive o ffic e r o f The L u b riz o l C o rp o ­ ration, and M . B rock W e ir, p re side n t and c h ie f executive o ffic e r o f the C leveland Trust C o m ­ pany. W e w e lc o m e th e ir counsel in the d e c i­ sions w h ic h lie ahead. H. Stuart H arrison M ay 1978


1SIMI

THE DIRECTOR’S REPORT

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There is a te n d e n cy in C leveland fo r its peo p le to a po lo g ize fo r its sh o rtco m in g s; presum ably on the g ro un d tha t its p ro b le m s are u n iq u e to this city. The tru th is o f a d iffe re n t sort. C leve­ land is am ong the m ost e n lig h te n e d cities o f the w o rld . Its w e a th e r is m oderate m ost o f the year, co n tra ry to p o p u la r o p in io n , w ith in fre ­ q u e n t extrem es o f heat o r co ld . Its setting on Lake Erie adds m uch to its charm and enhances the recreational o p p o rtu n itie s fo r its people. Its regional park system is vie w e d by experts as second to none in this co u n try. Its orchestra is w o rld fam ous. Its art gallery has a rem arkable c o lle c tio n o f paintings, scu lp tu re and o th e r art o bjects, b e a u tifu lly housed and m a g n ifice n tly displayed. The range o f edu ca tion a l and cu ltu ra l fa c ilitie s in the U n ive rsity C ircle area o f C leve­ land c a n n o t be m atched by any o th e r co m ­ m u n ity in A m erica. Fine in s titu tio n s and c o m m u n ity services are p ro d u c e d by p eo p le w h o care enough to spend th e ir m oney fo r things w o rth d e v e lo p in g and preserving. C leveland p e o p le give m ore m oney to c h a rity and to e du ca tion a l and c u ltu ra l a ctiv­ ities than p e o p le elsewhere. This is measured by the annual g ivin g to the U n ite d W ay and to a host o f p riva te e du ca tion a l and ch aritab le agencies. It is enhanced by the sig n ifica n t re­ sources held by m o re than 300 fo u n d a tio n s in this city. The C leveland Foundation — the oldest and largest o f the c o m m u n ity fo u n d a tio n s in the n atio n — leads the w ay w ith assets o f $200 m illio n and annual g ivin g o f m ore than $10 m illio n . A ll o f the o ld in d u stria l cities o f the n orth and m id w e s t face d iffic u lt p ro ble m s — p ro ble m s n o t lik e ly to be solved by local e ffo rt alone. They are each paying a large p rice fo r d is c rim in a to ry practices o f lo n g standing. The fin a n c in g o f all

o f th e ir p u b lic services are shaky — in part because o f undue reliance on local p ro p e rty taxes, b u t also because o f a d e c lin in g p o p u ­ lation and the co n tin u e d m o ve m e nt o f c ity peo p le to the suburbs. The obsolescence o f in d ustria l plants and the lack o f an effe ctive national p o lic y to encourage c ity re b u ild in g and the replacem ent o f housing stock play an im p o rta n t part in c o m p o u n d in g the d iffic u ltie s o f these co m m u n ities. C leveland has its share o f such p ro ble m s — no m ore than most, fe w e r than many. W h a t needs to be seen is the essential health o f the Cleveland econom y. E m ploym ent is high even tho u gh u ne m p lo ym e nt, especially am ong young people, is also high. The d o w n to w n area has m ore w orkers than at any tim e in its h istory and is in the m idst o f a vast b u ild in g program in v o lv ­ ing investm ent o f hundreds o f m illio n s o f d o l­ lars, one th a t is lik e ly to c o n tin u e fo r a decade o r m ore. In C leveland, as elsewhere, w e tend to focus far to o m uch a tte n tio n on w h a t happens at c ity hall in the mistaken n o tio n th a t city gove rn m e n t can p ro vid e the leadership to cope w ith local co n d itio n s. The truth is otherw ise. C ity g ove rn ­ m ent is o f m in o r im p o rta nce in the scheme o f things, spends far less m oney and provides far less service than o th e r units o f local g ove rn ­ m ent, and is generally incapable o f response to o u r cu rre n t needs. U ndue a tte n tio n to the inco nse q ue n tial diverts a tte n tio n fro m the re­ form s in local p u b lic service needed to b rin g agencies in to line w ith reality. It is a reasonable guess tha t n o t m uch progress along lines neces­ sary may be anticipa ted u n til the federal g overn­ m e n t decides th a t it can no lo n ge r a ffo rd to d is trib u te large am ounts o f m oney to local agencies w ith o u t re q u irin g adherence to rea­

sonable standards o f p erfo rm an ce . In its fo rm a tiv e years (1914-21) The C leveland Foundation exercised an e no rm o u s in flu e n c e in shaping n atio n al p o lic y and pra ctice, n o ta b ly in the social services b u t e xte n d in g also in to e d u ­ ca tion, health, and c rim in a l ju stice . These w e re lean years fin a n c ia lly b u t it was also an era o f vig o rou s e ffo rt by the F oundation to d e v e lo p new ways to b e tte r serve the needs o f a c o u n try tha t was b e co m in g increasingly urban. M u c h tha t is o u r c u rre n t practice, e specially in the private sector o f p h ila n th ro p y , derives fro m the v ig o r and in itia tiv e o f those years, and especially fro m a w id e range o f studies sponsored in Cleveland. A new tim e o f testing is at hand, re q u irin g co m p arab le research and d e v e lo p m e n t on c o m ­ m u n ity p ro b le m s b u t w ith an added re q u ire ­ m ent, this b e in g to m o u n t s ig n ific a n t e x p e ri­ m ental e ffo rts based on research in fo rm a tio n and subject to suitable co n tro ls. U n lik e the e arlier p e rio d o f C leveland F o un d atio n in itia ­ tive, it is w e ll w ith in o u r resources to u n d e r­ take such a ctivities — som etim es th ro u g h staffd ire cte d program s, aided by consultants — on o th e r occasions, th o u g h existing o rg a n iza tio n s capable o f carrying o u t such e ffo rts at a p p ro ­ priate levels o f excellence. C leveland has the resources and the natural advantages needed to once again assume a p o s itio n o f n atio n al leadership in m any fie ld s o f endeavor and to restructure its e co n o m y to w a rd this end. It is the task o f The C leveland F oundation to encourage such a result, to in ­ vo lve a w id e v a rie ty o f p e o p le in the d o in g , and to fashion the ideas and practices th a t m ake such results possible. W e shall be a b o u t d o in g ju s t this in the p e rio d ahead. H o m e r C. W a d s w o rth M ay 1978

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THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION-SUMMARY OF GRANTS AUTHORIZED —1977 TOTAL GRANTS $10,069,667

SPECIAL PHILANTHROPIC

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EDUCATION

Administrative expense in 1977


EDUCATION


ED U C A TIO N

C leveland faces no m o re crucial test to its fu tu re than h o w w e ll it responds w hen school deseg­ regation begins next fall u nd e r o rd e r fro m the courts. A t stake is n o t o n ly the school system and its 112,000 ch ild re n b u t the re p u ta tio n , e co n o m y and social health o f the c ity and its su rro u n d in g region. For tw o years g ro w in g num bers o f citizens have m o b iliz e d a th o ro u g h , system atic e ffo rt to prepare the co m m u n ity. They have striven to in fo rm the p u b lic o f the h istory o f school d e ­ segregation cases th ro u g h o u t the co u n try, the c o n s titu tio n a l questions in vo lved , the factual situ atio n in C leveland, and, in the process, to in flu en ce the q u a lity o f the rem edy and to p re ­ pare the p e o p le o f this city to accept desegre­ gation p eacefully w hen it comes. The c o m m u n ity n o w know s the broad o u t­ lines o f C leveland's desegregation plan as re­ vealed by Federal Judge Frank J. Battisti in February, 1978, nearly 18 m onths a fter he fo u n d tha t the local and state boards o f edu ca tion had vio la te d the co n s titu tio n a l rights o f ch ild re n by in te n tio n a lly fostering and m a in ta in in g a segre­ gated school system. Up to 30 o f 170 schools co u ld be closed and thousands o f ch ild re n as­ signed to d iffe re n t b u ild in g s th ro u g h the p a ir­ ing o f schools on the p re d o m in a n tly w h ite w est side w ith schools on the p re d o m in a n tly black east side o f C leveland. M a n y ch ild re n w ill reach the n ew ly integrated schools by bus. But the desegregation plan is far m ore than a tra n sp o rta tio n plan. It incorporates educa­ tio n a l and m anagem ent co m p on e nts as w e ll. M any fo llo w suggestions made to the c o u rt by the Study G ro up on Racial Isolation w h ic h , throu g h research and legal analysis, has gen­ erated the m a jo r in fo rm a tio n base fo r p u b lic u nderstanding o f school desegregation in this

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city. The Study G ro u p , co m p o se d o f 19 re p re ­ sentatives o f key o rg an iza tion s, has encouraged rem edial reading and o th e r e d u c a tio n a l p ro ­ grams to o ve rco m e the effects o f p o v e rty and racial segregation; u n ifo rm d is c ip lin e practices to h elp cu rb d ro p o u ts and suspensions; e n ric h ­ m e n t a ctivitie s to be p ro v id e d by business, labor, h ig he r e d u ca tio n a l and c u ltu ra l in s titu ­ tio n s ; hum an re la tion s tra in in g fo r teachers; in ­ creased m anagem ent c a p a b ilitie s fo r the school system as a w h o le , and a m echanism fo r m o n i­ to rin g the progress o f desegregation. C O A L IT IO N FOR PEACEFUL DESEGREGATION The m a jo r o utreach in p re p a rin g the c o m m u ­ n ity fo r school desegregation has been throu g h the G reater C leveland P roject, a c o a litio n o f m o re than 60 o rg an iza tion s — hum an services agencies, churches, c ivic, business, la b o r and c o m m u n ity groups. W ith a sm all professional staff, GCP operates a resource center, publishes in fo rm a tio n , manages a speakers service, and provides w o rk s h o p tra in in g fo r c o m m u n ity based leaders. It has p ro v id e d speakers to m ore th a n 500 m e e tin g s a n d d is tr ib u te d 178,417 pieces o f lite ra tu re upon request. Leaders in its m e m b e r o rg an iza tion s have m ore than d o u b le d the n u m b e r o f m eetings addressed and have w o rk e d in h ig h ly in d iv id u a l ways to reach th e ir o w n n a tu ra l c lie n ts a nd c o n s titu e n ts in th e neigh b orh o o ds. Those w o rk in g p u b lic ly fo r peaceful c o m p li­ ance w ith the law k n o w th a t n e ith e r the y p er­ sonally n o r the organizations th e y represent can gain fro m being o u t fro n t in such a c o n tro v e r­ sial m atter, b u t they are sustained by the hope th a t t h e ir e ff o r t to sp re a d in f o r m a tio n a nd understanding w ill enable peo p le to go b e yo n d


the headlines slogans.

and

avoid

o rg a n izin g around

There also is no illu sio n am ong them that they can change parents' attitudes. But they hope they can a ffe ct th e ir behavior. They are grateful th a t desegregation d id n o t com e in the fall o f 1977 as o rig in a lly expected. For the last fe w m onths the y have observed a change in the neig h b o rh o o d s. A t mass m eetings in p u b lic places and in small gatherings in homes, parents no lo n ge r c o n fin e th e ir reactions to o p p o s itio n to busing. They have m oved beyond tha t issue to such questions as: H o w can I guarantee the safety o f m y child? W h a t q u a lity o f e ducation w ill be at the end o f the bus ride? H o w can w e be sure the school d is tric t w ill spend its m oney wisely? This has been d ra m a tica lly dem onstrated at m eetings sponsored by the N a tio na litie s Serv­ ices C enter am ong some 20 d iffe re n t e th n ic groups. It has made little d iffe re n ce w h e th e r the gatherings in vo lved Italians, Hungarians, Lebanese, o r Slovaks. O p p o s itio n to busing has always surfaced q u ickly, accom panied by c o n ­ cerns fo r the w e ll-b e in g o f c h ild re n and the p reservation o f the e th n ic n e ig h b o rh o o d . But th ro u g h the skill o f tra in e d conveners, the m eet­ ings have m ost o fte n closed w ith discussions as to w h a t w o u ld make desegregation m ore pala­ ta b le : b e tte r teachers, m o re d em an d ing c u rri­ c u lu m , an o verall e du ca tion a l q u a lity co m p a r­ able w ith the best in the suburbs. In the C o llin w o o d area w h e re the ju n io r and se nior high schools already are racially m ixed, p e o p le o f several e th n ic backgrounds throu g h the C o llin w o o d C o m m u n ity Congress fashioned a plan fo r desegregating the area's elem entary schools. That plan, d eve lo p e d w ith research data p ro v id e d by the G reater C leveland Project,

was the o n ly c o m m u n ity plan presented to and accepted by the federal courts as part o f the overall desegregation o f the Cleveland school system. M e a n w h ile , the Bishop's C o m m itte e on D e ­ segregation re d o u b le d its e ffo rt to reach in to C a th o lic parishes in n e ig h b orh o o ds w h e re there appears to be considerable reluctance to accept desegregation. The Bishop's C o m m itte e also held w orkshops fo r 900 persons w h o teach re­ lig io n to C atholics a tte n din g p u b lic schools, convened a conference o f high school students, and began p la nn in g exchange experiences fo r students and parents in vo lved in school p a ir­ ings. Each social service agency o f the Federa­ tio n o f C a th o lic C o m m u n ity Services has as­ signed a staff person to help in d ivid u a ls w h o may have d iffic u lty co p in g w ith desegregation. The Y outh Task Force o f the G reater C leve­ land Inte rch u rch C o u ncil sponsored a w o rk s h o p fo r high school jo u rna lists and has begun id e n ­ tify in g young peo p le to fo rm w e lc o m in g c o m ­ m ittees and sta b ilizin g forces w ith in the senior high schools. In m id -A p ril, 1978, the C leveland Teachers U n io n , in c o n ju n c tio n w ith GCP, spon­ sored an all-d a y w o rksh o p fo r Cleveland teach­ ers w h o are re p orte d to soak up desegregation in fo rm a tio n " lik e sponges." A nd the Cleveland Police D e p artm en t, w ith tech n ica l assistance p ro vid e d by The Cleveland Foundation, is co nside rin g a desegregation plan w h ich begins n o t w ith rio t tra in in g b u t w ith the creation o f "crisis d iso rd e r team s" com posed o f c o m m u n ity leaders as w e ll as p o lice officers. Such teams w o u ld be sent in to n eigh b orh o o ds as tensions arise in an e ffo rt to diffuse em o tion s b efo re the y reach a stage o f violence. The c ity H um an Relations Board, the o n ly p u b lic agency w ith in the GCP c o a litio n fro m


E D U C A T IO N

the outset, is assisting the p o lic e d e p a rtm e n t in p ro v id in g hum an re la tion s tra in in g fo r the en­ tire force. It is pleased th a t p o lic e o ffice rs are b e g in n in g to p a rtic ip a te in n e ig h b o rh o o d d e ­ segregation m eetings and th a t the p o lic e d e ­ p a rtm e n t itse lf has b ecom e the second p u b lic agency to jo in the G reater C leveland Project. The c itiz e n groups recognize th a t the re is a c e ilin g w h ic h can be reached by the private sector in the absence o f sim ultaneous e ffo rt by the p u b lic school system. C onsequently, they are re lieved th a t in the sp rin g o f 1978 the b u r­ den fo r p ro m o tin g o rd e r and p re ve n tin g v io ­ lence is s h iftin g to new structures — in c lu d in g the c o u rt-a p p o in te d d e p u ty su p e rin te n d e n t o f schools fo r desegregation and a desegregation m o n ito rin g co m m ission . Y et the y ca n n o t help b u t take p rid e in the fact th a t these new stru c­ tures are n o t m o vin g in to a vacuum . They can d ra w upon the in fo rm a tio n and leaders w h o have em erged fro m the citize n e ffo rt over the past tw o years. It is n o w possible to id e n tify in all n e ig h b o rh o o d s o f the c ity men and w o m e n w h o can th in k ra tio n a lly a b o u t the m ost im ­ p o rta n t, m ost v o la tile issue to face this c ity in m any years. D u rin g 1977 the F oundation granted $125,000 fo r the G reater C leveland Project, $37,500 fo r the Bishop's C o m m itte e on School Desegrega­ tio n , and $45,927 fo r the Study G ro up on Racial Iso la tio n — raising its su p p o rt fo r study and in ­ fo rm a tio n a l a ctivities co n ce rn in g school deseg­ regation to $485,623 over three years. C A T H O L IC H IG H SCHOOLS Across the c o u n try C a th o lic e d u ca tion is facing a w id e range o f ch a lle n g in g questions as to its fu tu re . The heart o f the m a tte r is w h e th e r it can c o n tin u e to survive, and in w h a t fo rm , am id

10

rising costs and d e c lin in g e nrollm ents. T h e q u e s tio n is e s p e c ia lly im p o r t a n t in G reater C leveland, w ith its large C a th o lic p o p ­ u la tio n w h ic h sends a b o u t o n e -th ird o f its c h il­ dren to church schools. The C a th o lic Diocese o f C leveland, the re fo re, has decide d to take a p en e tra tin g lo o k at the fu tu re o f its edu ca tion a l tro u b le spot — the high schools — and to do so in a process w h ic h is b oth p en e tratin g and open. E nrollm e nt statistics alone w o u ld ju s tify such an exam ination. Since 1966 e n ro llm e n ts in C a th o lic high schools th ro u g h o u t the diocese have d eclin e d fro m 27,503 to 20,760 and the n um be r o f schools have decreased fro m 34 to 28. If national p ro je ctio n s com e tru e in G reater C leveland, the e nro llm e n ts w o u ld d ro p to 14,000 by 1990. O ne can add to this p ro b le m those o f m a l­ d is trib u tio n o f schools resulting in some being h alf e m p ty w h ile others are cro w d e d , the vary­ ing age o f building s, the e ffe ct o f in fla tio n on p la nt o pe ra tio n and salary costs, and the chang­ ing c o m p o s itio n 'o f staff as fe w e r religious are available o r w illin g to serve. A nd there are subjective variables as w e ll w h ic h ca nn o t be ignored — fro m the personal desire o f parents to send th e ir ch ild re n to th e ir alma m ater to the societal im p a ct a m a jo r school plays in sta b iliz ­ ing a n e ig h b o rh o o d threatened w ith decline. It is d iffic u lt, even painfu l, to address the p o ssib ility o f re tre nch m e n t o r changing mission, even in h ig h ly ce ntra lize d institutio n s. H o w m uch m ore so w hen dealing n o t w ith an e d u ­ cational system b u t w ith a co m p le x o f m ostly in d e p e n d e n t schools. O n ly 10 o f the 28 C a tho lic high schools are c o n tro lle d and operated by the diocese under p olicies a dopted by the Diocesan Board o f Education. The re m aining 18 are o w n ed and operated by various religious

orders u nd e r in d e p e n d e n t boards. Yet th ro u g h the leadership o f a b ish o p w h o espouses a p h ilo s o p h y o f "sh a re d responsi­ b ility ," the re was created in M a rch , 1977, a Bishop's Task Force on C a th o lic S econdary E ducation com posed o f pastors, representatives o f the affected re lig io u s c o m m u n itie s , parents and professional educators fro m the e ig h t c o u n ­ ties o f the diocese. The Task Force, as a w h o le and th ro u g h its su bco m m itte e s, spent nearly a year fo rm u la tin g questions it w a n te d addressed in a professional research study. A fte r consensus was reached, the Task Force d e ve lo p e d a 49page proposal fo r fu n d in g w h ic h was circu la te d n a tio n w id e . T w elve o rg a n iza tio n s su b m itte d bids and, in M arch, 1978, the c o n tra c t was aw arded to the C enter fo r th e Study o f M an in C o n te m p o ra ry Society, a research ce nte r based at the U n ive rsity o f N o tre Dame. The study's fiv e m a jo r o b je ctive s are to d e te rm in e : • The general expectations, s u p p o rt and c o m ­ m itm e n t o f the C a th o lic c o m m u n ity to C a th o lic secondary edu ca tion . • The present and fu tu re e n ro llm e n t patterns and p ro files, and the in flu e n c e o f dem og ra p hy on fu tu re re c ru itm e n t and e n ro llm e n t. • Future personnel needs fo r in s tru c tio n a l, sup­ p o rt and a dm in istra tive staff. • Financial patterns and fu tu re fin a n c in g needs and fu n d in g strategies. • S pecific fa c ility related decisions w h ic h m ust be addressed in c o m in g years. The study got und e r w ay in late A p ril, 1978 w ith a survey o f 1,800 C atholics in Cuyahoga C o u n ty w here tw o -th ird s o f the C a th o lic sec­ ondary students live, and o f a n o th e r 1,800 C atholics th ro u g h o u t the rest o f the diocese.


A m o ng the m any answers sought is w h a t m ost influences C atholics w hen d e c id in g w h e th e r to send th e ir c h ild re n to C a th o lic schools. The cu rricu lu m ? The role and extent o f religious personnel? T u itio n costs? As in fo rm a tio n is gathered in each o f the five areas, the fin d in g s w ill be considered by the a p p ro p ria te subco m m itte e s o f the Task Force as part o f the process o f b u ild in g consensus fo r the decisions w h ich m ust em erge fro m the study. W h ile the re have been o th e r C a tho lic high school studies th ro u g h o u t the co u n try, this one is believed to be distinguished by the th o ro u g h process aim ed at assuring im p le m e n ­ ta tio n once the study is co m p le te d . The C leveland Foundation has assisted the p ro je c t fro m its very in ce p tio n , b e g in n in g w ith tech n ica l assistance p ro vid e d d ire c tly by its program staff and c u lm in a tin g in the award o f $50,000 to h elp cover the costs o f a local p ro j­ ect c o o rd in a to r and the fees o f the co ntra ct research agency. The Foundation also granted $75,000 to w a rd re n ova tio n o f the lib ra ry resource center at St. Ignatius High School. The p ro je c t has high p ri­ o rity in the massive m o d e rn iza tio n taking place at the venerable Jesuit prep school w h ic h has d ecide d to stay in O h io C ity as a sta b ilizin g fo rce in th a t aging section o f Cleveland. THE F IN A N C IA L HEALTH OF COLLEGES A N D UNIVERSITIES D u rin g 1977 the D is trib u tio n C o m m itte e au­ th o riz e d $2,040,814 to postsecondary educa­ tio n a l in s titu tio n s, an increase o f 94 p ercent over 1976. Case W estern Reserve U niversity secured $1,051,175, o r 51 p ercen t o f the to ta l, w ith a b o u t h a lf g o in g to its m edical school and d e ta ile d in the health section o f this A nnual

Report. The next largest in s titu tio n a l re c ip ie n t was C leveland State U niversity w ith 10 p ercent o f the authorizations. In the last fo u r years the h igher e ducation grants have gone increasingly fo r c o m m u n ity service, expanding access fo r n o n tra d itio n a l students, and in te rin s titu tio n a l co op e ra tion . There has been a decline in the percentage o f funds going in to in s titu tio n a l d eve lo p m e n t, basic academ ic research, d ire c t fa cu lty o r staff su pport, and e q u ip m e n t and supplies. Yet one small research grant m ade in 1977 may have sig n ifica n t im p a ct fo r the fu tu re — n o t o n ly on the grantm aking practices o f the Foun­ datio n b u t also upon the internal p la nn in g o f the colleges and universities themselves. That grant o f $20,625 is ena b lin g a C ollege o f W o o ste r a d m in istra to r and associated co n s u lt­ ants to deve lo p and analyze data on the fin a n ­ cial health o f the colleges and universities o f this state, especially those in northeastern O h io . The in fo rm a tio n should be im p o rta n t as the p u b lic addresses itself to the p roblem s o f rising costs and d e c lin in g e nro llm e n ts in a state w h ic h has vastly o v e rb u ilt its p u b lic in stitu tio n s and has a large n um be r o f private schools ranging fro m tin y C a tho lic w o m e n 's colleges to the large, prestigious Case W estern Reserve U n i­ versity. The W o o ste r research p ro je c t has three co m p on e nts: • The creation o f a data base on all O h io in s ti­ tu tio n s suitable fo r lo n g itu d in a l studies throu g h the c o lle c tio n o f statistical in fo rm a tio n exte n d ­ ing back several years and to be updated annually. • The redesigning o f standard fin an cia l audits and the d e ve lo p m e n t o f a new kin d o f balance sheet w h ic h w ill make it easier to d ra w co m -

11


E D U C A T IO N

parisons fro m year to year. • A re v ie w o f all g ra nt and loan sources fo r s tu d e n t aid a vailable w ith in each in s titu tio n . The in fo rm a tio n w ill d o ve ta il w ith data gath­ ered fro m an e a rlie r study o f the in d e p e n d e n t colleges o f O h io as w e ll as a study o f 100 private colleges and u niversities d o n e a nn u a lly fo r the A m e rica n A ssociation o f Colleges. O n e o f the p rim a ry o bje ctive s o f the research p ro je c t is to d e v e lo p a m e th o d fo r d e te rm in in g w h e th e r colleges are g e ttin g rich e r o r p o o re r o v e r tim e , as w e ll as w h e th e r the y have ade­ quate c u rre n t assets to m eet th e ir cash flo w re quirem ents. B -W DREAMS A G A IN B a ld w in -W a lla c e C o lle g e in the th riv in g so uth ­ w estern su bu rb o f Berea is the o n ly 4-year in s titu tio n o f h ig h e r learning in the w estern part o f C uyahoga C ounty. This 123-year-old private co llege, steeped in the lib e ra l arts, has a te n ­ ured, o ld e r fa c u lty w h ic h is seeking to co nn e ct w ith the aspirations o f a changing stud e nt body. W h ile the cam pus co u ld a ccom m odate m ore, the e n ro llm e n t has stab ilized at a b o u t the e q u iv a le n t o f 2,400 fu ll-tim e students Forty per­ ce n t n o w co m e fro m fam ilie s w h e re n e ith e r p arent a tte n de d co llege, and the average age is cre e pin g u pw ard , in keeping w ith national trends, as m any p ostp on e co lle ge rig h t after high school o r co m e back later to co m p le te degree w o rk . It is, the re fo re , a stud e nt b o d y m o re o rie n te d to w a rd earning a good livin g as a means to a b e tte r life rather than seeking lib e ra l e n lig h tm e n t as a means in itself. Such a s tu d e n t b o d y requires d iffe re n t c u rric u lu m , tea ch in g approaches, su p p o rt services and even class and lib ra ry hours. The changing stu d e n t m arket is a ke a d y e vi­

12

d e n t on cam pus w h e re the tw ilig h t zo n e is the busiest tim e o f the day. That is w hen the b usi­ ness b u ild in g hum s w ith calculators and c o m ­ puters as students o f all ages comes to class a fte r w o rk. In re co g n itio n o f changing tim es, the entire B aldw in-W a lla ce c o m m u n ity spent a year in intensive self study. This cu lm in a te d in a new m ission statem ent a dopted d u rin g 1976-77 by the faculty, the a d m in istra tio n and the board o f trustees. The statem ent re a ffirm e d the college's emphasis on undergraduate edu ca tion and c o n ­ tin u a tio n o f selected professional offerings, n o ta b ly its Conservatory o f M usic and its master's in business. It also laid o u t an action plan aim ed at reassessing and reapplying the m eaning o f liberal arts and sciences to today's learners, in d iv id u a liz in g in stru ctio n , and p ro v id ­ ing fa cu lty d eve lopm ent. Im p le m e n ta tio n o f the M ission A c tio n P roject began in the sum m er o f 1977 w ith the help o f a Cleveland Foundation grant to ta lin g $75,000 to be spent over three years. The p ro je c t also is p ro vin g h ig h ly co m p e titiv e in a ttractin g national fo u n d a tio n and federal fu n d in g . The funds are fin a n cin g seminars and w orkshops, outsid e consultants, and released tim e and travel fo r faculty. O ne o f the m ost sig n ifica n t events was a w in te r fa cu lty conference w here, in the c lo is ­ tered e n viro n m e n t o f a state park, 125 facu lty and a dm inistrators spent tw o days e xp lo rin g such topics as “ Liberal Arts and Career O rie n ­ ta tio n ." Q uestions crystallized and solutions began to emerge. A m o n g th e m : H o w to struc­ tu re and staff a "w e e k e n d c o lle g e " w h ic h w ill be opened in the fall o f 1978. H o w to assess and p ro vid e c re d it fo r life experiences o f o ld e r students. H o w to vary c u rric u lu m approaches

fo r d iffe re n t students — fro m p re serving the " d is c ip lin e " o f p o litic a l science fo r 1 8-year-olds to d e v e lo p in g such courses as "P o litic s o f the M id d le East," fo r the m o re co n c re te interests o f 35-year-olds. H o w to set the stage fo r success in co lle ge fo r recent high school graduates — fro m the w o rd in g o f the 13 letters n e w students receive b efo re starting classes to an o rie n ta tio n to h elp parents understand the im p a c t th a t a lib ­ eral arts e d u ca tio n may have on th e ir ch ild re n . M e a n w h ile , several fa c u lty m em bers have been given released tim e to d e v e lo p new courses and approaches. A m usic professor is devising a course w h ic h w ill give n on-C onservatory students experiences p la y in g m usical in ­ strum ents and a tte n d in g concerts. A lib ra ry c o m m itte e is e x p lo rin g ways to increase use o f the library. A fte r years o f b e lt tig h te n in g , the M ission A c tio n P roject has a ttracted fu n d in g w h ic h , as one a d m in is tra to r p o in te d o u t, is e n a b lin g the fa c u lty " t o dream a gain."


EDUCATION GRANTS THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION BALDWIN-WALLACE COLLEGE Phase I of implementation of new college mission plan over three y e a r s .............................................................................................................................. $

75,000

THE BAR ASSOCIATION OF GREATER CLEVELAND Halle lectureship program in law over three y e a r s ........................................................................................................................................................................

30,000

CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY Canada-United States Law Institute (second y e a r ) ........................................................................................................................................................................ Distributed m ini-com puter network for instructional purposes over three y e a r s .................................................................................................................... Cleveland Foundation Fellows in advanced management program of School ofManagementover three y e a r s ............................................................. Curriculum development in criminal justice at School of Applied SocialSciences (second y e a r ) ..................................................................................... Study of expansion of educational experiences for dental s t u d e n t s .........................................................................................................................................

10,000 200,000 31,500 22,260 54,800

CATHOLIC DIOCESE OF CLEVELAND Research and planning for overall system of secondary e d u c a t i o n ........................................................................................................................................

50,000

CLEVELAND BOARD OF EDUCATION Education for parenthood program over nineteen m o n t h s ........................................................................................................................................................

29,682

CLEVELAND FOUNDATION RESOURCES Evaluation of grant to Cleveland Heights-University Heights School District fo r school-community p r o g r a m ............................................................... Evaluation of legislation, research and programs for handicapped and learning disabled c h i l d r e n ............................................................................... Evaluation and technical assistance for Cleveland Heights-University Heights School District transitionalyear program at Heights High School Evaluation and technical assistance for external degree program at Dyke C o lle g e .............................................................................................................. Study Group on Racial Isolation in the Public S c h o o l s ............................................................................................................................................................. Technical assistance and research in higher e d u c a tio n ............................................................................................................................................................. Preparation of book dealing with School on Magnolia and other educational c o n c e p t s ....................................................................................................

1,500 5,000 4,000 3,000 45,927 62,500 2,600

CLEVELAND HEALTH MUSEUM AND EDUCATION CENTER Creation of teaching theatre-classroom for the physically handicapped over two y e a r s ....................................................................................................

20,000

CLEVELAND HEIGHTS-UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT School-com munity program (second y e a r ) ..................................................................................................................................................................................

40,000

CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART Central Renaissance Conference over two y e a r s ........................................................................................................................................................................

3,000

THE CLEVELAND MUSIC SCHOOL SETTLEMENT Consortium bachelor’s degree program in music therapy (third y e a r ) ...................................................................................................................................

5,182

CLEVELAND STATE UNIVERSITY Career literature for career services center of department of cooperative e d u c a tio n ......................................................................................................... Video equipment to upgrade interview skills of cooperative education s t u d e n t s ................................................................................................................... Materials for Cleveland-Marshall College of Law L i b r a r y ........................................................................................................................................................ Utilization of mass media by ethnic g r o u p s .................................................................................................................................................................................. Greater Cleveland Connection Program for student volunteers over eighteen m o n th s ......................................................................................... " . . .

1,500* 3,000* 100,000 1,000 10,570

COMMISSION ON CATHOLIC COMMUNITY ACTION Bishop’s Committee on School Desegregation (second y e a r ) ...................................................................................................................................................

37,500

CUYAHOGA COMMUNITY COLLEGE Cooperative education p ro g ra m s ........................................................................................................................................................................................................

12,600

DENISON UNIVERSITY, Granville, Ohio General s u p p o r t ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

1,000

13


E D U C A T IO N

DYKE COLLEGE External degree program over eighteen months (third y e a r ) .................................................................................................................................................... A ccreditation p l a n n i n g ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION ASSOCIATION OF METROPOLITAN CLEVELAND, WVIZ-TV Post-high school and higher educational television p ro g ra m m in g ...............................................................................................................................................

o’cnn 2,500

p non

GREATER CLEVELAND INTERCHURCH COUNCIL The Greater Cleveland Project (second y e a r ) ...............................................................................................................................................................................

125,000

HARVARD UNIVERSITY, Cambridge, Massachusetts Development of volume analyzing methods to encourage initiative and active concern fo r others in children under 11 years of a g e .....................

100,000

INSTITUTE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION Environmental intern program serving Lower Great L a k e s .........................................................................................................................................................

4i,yoO

INTERNATIONAL SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING FAIR, INC. 28th International Science and Engineering Fair over six m o n t h s ...............................................................................................................................................

5,000

JOHN CARROLL UNIVERSITY 10 000* Program development in cooperative e d u c a t i o n ......................................................................................................................................................................... KENT STATE UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION M otor Development Center for children with m otor d i s a b i l i t i e s .............................................................................................................................................. Exploration of Early or Middle Cypriot Bronze Age s i t e ..............................................................................................................................................................

4 000

LAKE ERIE COLLEGE Harriet B. Storrs L e c t u r e s ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... THE NATURE CONSERVANCY, Arlington, Virginia Environmental Education Program (second y e a r ) ......................................................................................................................................................................... NORTH OLMSTED CITY SCHOOLS Project Earth Study over eighteen m o n t h s ................................................................................................................................................................................... OHIO ASSOCIATION OF PROBATE AND JUVENILE COURT JUDGES Law Day activities and joint conferences for Painesville area s t u d e n t s ....................................................................................................................................

5,000

THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY General support fo r Ohio Moral Education A s s o c ia t io n .............................................................................................................. ...............................................

4,700

THE OLDMAN TRANSITIONAL SCHOOL Specialized program for children with learning p r o b l e m s ........................................................................................................................................................

10,000

OHIO COLLEGE OF PODIATRIC MEDICINE Special s u p p o rt.......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

30’000

SAINT IGNATIUS HIGH SCHOOL Conversion and renovation of learning resources center and l i b r a r y .........................................................................................................................................

75,000

THE SCHOOL ON MAGNOLIA Operating support and services of child analysts (second y e a r ) ..............................................................................................................................................

11,500

SOUTHEAST SPECIAL CLASSES FOR RETARDED CHILDREN, INC. Staff and program support over two y e a r s ..................................................................................................................................................................................

5,200

WILLOUGHBY-EASTLAKE CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT Development of economic education instructional g u id e .............................................................................................................................................................

20,000

14


UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN AT GREEN BAY Study of Wyandot Indians in Northeast Ohio over

eighteen m o n t h s ......................................................................................................................................

7,334

THE COLLEGE OF WOOSTER, Wooster, Ohio Development and analysis of data on institutions

of higher education in O h i o ..................................................................................................................

20,625

Total Education Grants — U n d e s ig n a te d ........................................................................................................................................................................................ $1,520,165 (Following recipients and programs designated by donor) ASHLAND COLLEGE, Ashland, Ohio General s u p p o r t .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. $

3,943

BALDWIN-WALLACE COLLEGE General s u p p o r t ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

24,910

CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY General s u p p o r t .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. General support fo r Adelbert C o lle g e ............................................................................................................................................................................................. General support fo r Franklin Thomas Backus Law S c h o o l ........................................................................................................................................................ General support fo r the Graduate S c h o o l........................................................................................................................................................................................ Reference books fo r School of Library S c ie n c e ............................................................................................................................................................................. Support of field biological station at Squire Valleevue Farm for School of M e d i c i n e ........................................................................................................... Support of social research at School of Applied Social S c ie n c e s ..............................................................................................................................................

5,707 3,697 3,163 109,206 81 18,546 542

CLEVELAND LUTHERAN HIGH SCHOOL ASSOCIATION General s u p p o r t ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

869

DANIEL MORGAN SCHOOL Book awards to c h i l d r e n ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................

155

EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION ASSOCIATION OF METROPOLITAN CLEVELAND, WVIZ-TV General s u p p o r t ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

595

HAWKEN SCHOOL General s u p p o r t ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

534

THE HILL SCHOOL, Pottstown, Pennsylvania General s u p p o r t ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

595

HILLSDALE COLLEGE, Hillsdale, Michigan General s u p p o r t ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

15,929

KENYON COLLEGE, Gambier, Ohio General s u p p o r t ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

5,707

LAKE ERIE COLLEGE General s u p p o r t ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

405

OHIO WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY, Delaware, Ohio General s u p p o r t ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

1,651

PINEY WOODS COUNTRY LIFE SCHOOL, Piney Woods, Mississippi General s u p p o r t ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

5,136

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY, Princeton, New Jersey General s u p p o r t ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

595

15


E D U C A T IO N

SMITH COLLEGE, Northampton, Massachusetts General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

39,141

UNITED NEGRO COLLEGE FUND General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

5,136

UNIVERSITY SCHOOL General s u p p o r t .......................................................................... .........................................................................................................................................................

595

Total Education Grants — D e s ig n a te d ...............................................................................................................................................................................................$ 246,838 Total Education Grants — Designated and Undesignated...............................................................................................................................................................$1,767,003 SCHOLARSHIPS BALDWIN-WALLACE COLLEGE S c h o la rs h ip s ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................$

14,300

BEREA AREA MONTESSORI ASSOCIATION S c h o la rs h ip s ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

1,408

CASE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE Charles J. Stilwell S c h o la r s h ip s ........................................................................................................................................................................................................

3,600*

CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY Fenn co-op scholar program “ E” s c h o la r s h ip s .............................................................................................................................................................................. S c h o la rs h ip s .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

7,200* 8,955

CLEVELAND AREA LEAGUE FOR NURSING Nursing s c h o la rs h ip s .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................

7,000

CLEVELAND COMMISSION ON HIGHER EDUCATION Reorganization p ro g ra m ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................

2,000

CLEVELAND FOUNDATION RESOURCES Special scholarships in cooperative e d u c a tio n ..............................................................................................................................................................................

25,200

CLEVELAND SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAMS, INC. Counseling and scholarship programs in s u b u r b s ........................................................................................................................................................................

523

CLEVELAND STATE UNIVERSITY Fenn co-op s c h o l a r s h ip s .................................................................................................................................................................................................................. S c h o la rs h ip s ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

12,000* 16,965

CUYAHOGA COMMUNITY COLLEGE S c h o la rs h ip s ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

9,070

DYKE COLLEGE S c h o la rs h ip s ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

4,200

HUDSON MONTESSORI ASSOCIATION S c h o la rs h ip s ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

1,408

JOHN CARROLL UNIVERSITY S c h o la rs h ip s ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

15,900

LAKE ERIE COLLEGE/GARFIELD SENIOR COLLEGE Scholarships fo r Painesville and Painesville Township students at Lake Erie College, Garfield Senior College and other c o lle g e s ..........................

26,000

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MONTESSORI SPECIAL EDUCATION SCHOOL S c h o la rs h ip s .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

1,409

NOTRE DAME COLLEGE Fenn co-op s c h o l a r s h ip s ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................

7,000*

RUFFING MONTESSORI SCHOOL S c h o la rs h ip s .......................................... ..................................................................................................................................................................................................

1.409

UNITED NEGRO COLLEGE FUND General s u p p o r t ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

5,000

Total Scholarship Grants — U n d esig n ate d ........................................................................................................................................................................................$ 170,547 (Following recipients and programs designated by donor) ASHLAND COLLEGE, Ashland, Ohio Hazel Myers Spreng S c h o la rs h ip ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... $

3,155

BALDWIN-WALLACE COLLEGE Hazel Myers Spreng S c h o la rs h ip .......................................................................................................................................................................................................

3,155

CAPITAL UNIVERSITY, Columbus, Ohio S c h o la rs h ip s ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

2,132

CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY Aloy Memorial Scholarship Fund fo r w o m e n .................................................................................................................................................................................. For a student of Flora Stone Mather College in foreign s t u d y ................................................................................................................................................... Harriet Fairfield Coit and William Henry Coit Scholarships at Flora Stone Mather C o lle g e ............................................................................................... Hazel Myers Spreng S c h o la rs h ip ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... Oglebay Fellowship Program in School of M e d ic in e .................................................................................................................................................................. Scholarships in aerospace or c o m p u te r s ........................................................................................................................................................................................ Scholarships in Franklin Thomas Backus Law S c h o o l................................................................................................................................................................... William Curtis Morton, Maud Morton, Kathleen Morton Fund S cho la rsh ip s..............................................................................................................................

771 1,613 990 3,155 55,641 69 5,481 12,538

INEZ AND HARRY CLEMENT AWARD Cleveland Public Schools annual superintendent’s a w a r d ........................................................................................................................................................

1,950

CLEVELAND INSTITUTE OF ART Caroline E. Coit Fund S c h o la rs h ip s ..................................................................................................................................................................................................

1,067

THE CLEVELAND MUSIC SCHOOL SETTLEMENT Nellie E. Hinds Memorial S c h o la rs h ip s .............................................................................................................................................................................................

4,000

HARRY COULBY SCHOLARSHIP For Pickands Mather employees’ c h ild re n ........................................................................................................................................................................................

40,000

DARTMOUTH COLLEGE, Hanover, New Hampshire The John Marshall Raible and David Gardner Raible Scholarship F u n d ....................................................................................................................................

8,478

HAWKEN SCHOOL The John Marshall Raible and David Gardner Raible Scholarship F u n d ....................................................................................................................................

1,420

HILLSDALE COLLEGE, Hillsdale, Michigan John C. McLean S c h o la rs h ip s ............................................................................................................................................................................................................. JOHN CARROLL UNIVERSITY James J. Doyle S c h o la r s h ip s .............................................................................................................................................................................................................

15,929 1,168

17


E D U C A T IO N SHERMAN JOHNSON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP For medical students from Lake and Geauga counties

13,200

NORTH CENTRAL COLLEGE, Naperville, Illinois Hazel Myers Spreng Scholarship in memory of Bishop Samuel P. Spreng

3.155

OHIO WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY, Delaware, Ohio Hazel Myers Spreng S c h o la rs h ip ...............................................................

3.155

PURDUE UNIVERSITY, Lafayette, Indiana John C. McLean Scholarships in e n g in e e r in g .....................................

39,822

THE MIRIAM KERRUISH STAGE SCHOLARSHIP For Shaker Heights High School g r a d u a t e s ................................ ADA GATES STEVENS SCHOLARSHIP For Elyria, Ohio High School g r a d u a t e s ............................................... UNIVERSITY SCHOOL The John Marshall Raible and David Gardner Raible Scholarship Fund URSULINE COLLEGE Lillian Herron Doyle S c h o la r s h ip s ..........................................

3,600 4,000 800 1,168

Total Scholarship Grants — Designated.....................................

$ 231,612

Total Scholarship Grants — Designated and Undesignated

$ 402,159

.

Total Education Grants — Education Programs and Scholarships Combined ‘ Grants recommended by the Fenn Educational Fund Executive Board

$2,169,162


SOCIAL SERVICES

"Services as presently org an ize d d o n ot co nstitute a n a tio n al, co h e re n t system w h ic h is sim ple to a dm inister a nd fair to all A m e rica ns." HEW Human Development Services lune, 1977

The year 1977 was one o f national re co g n itio n and local fru stra tio n fo r a d aring in itia tiv e aim ed at re stru ctu ring personal social services in Cuya­ hoga C o u n ty in to a co o rd in a te d d e live ry system. The U.S. D e p a rtm e n t o f Health, Education and W elfare, th ro u g h its O ffic e o f Hum an D e ve lo p m e n t Services, recognized the u n iq u e ­ ness o f the local co n ce p t as w e ll as the p ivo ta l role played by The C leveland Foundation. In late Septem ber, as the cu lm in a tio n o f a national search, it awarded the Foundation a grant to d evelop a strategy and fo rm a t fo r testing the co n ce p t in several A m erican co m m u n ities. Iro n ica lly, w h e th e r G reater Cleveland w ill be am ong them still hangs by fragile threads strained by p o litic a l developm ents. For some tim e there has been a g ro w in g awareness th a t w h ile g ove rn m e n t has becom e the m a jo r fu n d e r o f social services in A m erica its c o m p e titiv e ways o f dispensing funds have pushed both private and p u b lic agencies in to a grantsm anship game w h ich has encouraged costly d u p lic a tio n w ith o u t fillin g gaps in serv­ ices. Even T itle XX o f the Social Security A ct — at least as handled in O h io — has aggravated rather than relieved fra gm en tatio n already b u ilt up throu g h the p ro b le m -b y -p ro b le m response o f Congress to aging, drug abuse, ju v e n ile d e lin ­ quency and m ental illness. The C leveland co nce p t is based upon the

20

prem ise th a t peo p le w o u ld be b e tte r served and tax d ollars b e tte r spent if basic personal services w ere p ro v id e d d ire c tly by local g o v e rn m e n t — in this case, Cuyahoga C o u nty — and located in area service centers close to w h e re p e o p le live. The centers w o u ld be staffed by generalists w h o , like fa m ily p ra ctitio n e rs in m e d icin e , w o u ld deal w ith p eo p le as w h o le beings and w h o le fam ilies. The generalist w o u ld lo o k beyond the need w h ic h b ro u g h t the c lie n t th ro u g h the d o o r, be it day care fo r the p re scho o ler o f a w o rk in g m o th e r, meals on w heels fo r an aging parent, o r co un se lin g in a d isin te g ra tin g m ar­ riage. The generalist w o u ld gather and dispense in fo rm a tio n , assess the to ta lity o f the fa m ily needs, and p u t to g e th e r a package o f services to be p ro v id e d e ith e r d ire c tly by ce nte r staff or, in a p p ro p ria te cases, by private agencies und e r g o ve rn m e n t contracts. The area service center staff also w o u ld establish links w ith o th e r hum an s e rv ic e s in th e c o m m u n ity : health, e du ca tion , housing, in co m e m aintenance and e m p loym en t. A first-sto p center is p a rtic u la rly vita l to the p oo r, the m in o ritie s , the less educated, the ill, and those w ith no p rio r service experience — the very peo p le w h o o fte n d o n o t k n o w w h e re to tu rn in tim e o f need. Since personal p roblem s are n o t co n fin e d to the p o o r alone, the co n c e p t envisions tha t services w o u ld be made available to all citizens, and tha t fees w o u ld be charged based upon a b ility to pay. M e a n w h ile , the p riva te social service agen­ cies, b oth sectarian and nonsectarian, w o u ld be freed to d e ve lo p expertise and d ep th in the special areas and fo r the special clients o f th e ir greatest concern. The p u b lic sector w o u ld c o n ­ tin u e to purchase these specialized services


fro m m any p riva te agencies. The local co n ce p t stem m ed fro m the in te r­ national research o f A lfre d H. Kahn, a d is tin ­ guished social w o rk professor at C o lu m b ia U niversity. Since 1976 Foundation fu n d in g has enabled Dr. Kahn to serve as p rin cip a l co n su lt­ ant to Cuyahoga C o u nty in exam ining h ow both p u b lic and private social services w ere being p ro v id e d and to an ad hoc co m m itte e in recom ­ m e n d in g the creation o f a u n ifie d p u b lic system fo r d e live ry o f the basic social services. The c o n c e p t was approved in p rin c ip le by the Board o f C o u n ty C om m issioners w h ich circu la te d the plan am ong o p in io n leaders and a uth orize d the firs t phase o f a fe a s ib ility study. Phase I, dealing w ith legal ra m ifica tio ns, was co m p le te d in June, 1977. Then, am id p o litic a l co m p lica tio n s, the plan was shoved to the back b u rn e r w here it has sim m ered u nattended by the co u n ty ever since. In fact, the flam e m ig h t have gone o u t a lto ­ gether had it n o t been fo r the $86,600 research and d e v e lo p m e n t grant fro m HEW's O ffic e o f H um an D e v e lo p m e n t Services w h ic h has been s u pp le m e nte d by $16,900 fro m The C leveland Foundation. Planning has m oved ahead throu g h a p ro je c t team headed by a Foundation program o ffic e r w o rk in g in c o n ju n c tio n w ith the A m e ri­ can P ublic W e lfa re A ssociation. The team has w ritte n a m a n uscript w h ic h n o t o n ly describes the p h ilo s o p h y o f the proposed new d e live ry system b u t details h o w an ideal m odel co uld be o rganized and staffed. The w o rk has been review ed by a n atio n al advisory panel and by some 230 social w e lfa re leaders w h o convened in C leveland in M ay, 1978 to discuss the m anu­ script, establish crite ria fo r test sites, and help id e n tify c o m m u n itie s a p p ro p ria te fo r testing va ria tion s o f the ideal m odel.

N a turally any c o m m u n ity selected w o u ld have obstacles to overcom e. Q uestions in C leve­ land revolve around w h e th e r a u n ifie d p u b lic system can em erge in a c ity w h ich has a long tra d itio n o f strong private agencies as w e ll as established p u b lic agencies in aging, m ental health, m ental retardation, yo uth services and p u b lic w e lfa re tha t have th e ir ow n c o n s tit­ uencies. A m o ng the cu rre n t co m p lica tin g factors: • The u nce rta in ty o f the local health and w e lfa re levy election. • The very real p ro b a b ility that the co unty's a llo catio n fro m T itle XX o f the Social Security A ct w ill decline $4.4 m illio n in 1978 fro m the 1977 level. Agencies in itia lly w illin g to try the new co nce p t may n o w w a ive r as decreased fu n d in g destroys o r cripples hom em aker ser­ vices, day care, cam ping and even the small, b u t e ffective a d o p tio n program fo r hard to place children. • The state legislature's large a u th o riz a tio n fo r m ental health, n o w at 30 percent o f all T itle XX funds in O h io . This heavy fu n d in g makes m ental health m ore crucial in social service pla nn in g even though there are debates as to w h e th e r m ental health is p rim a rily a m edical o r a social service. W h ile the Board o f C o u nty C om m issioners has said that a u n ifie d social service delivery system operated by the co u n ty makes sense in theory, it is lik e ly to w a it fo r the re so lutio n o f some o f these tensions before m ovin g ahead. But catalysts fo r social change must be optim ists. Those w h o have helped design the Cleveland co n ce p t still believe tha t this c o m m u n ity w ill fin d a w ay to stay in the fo re fro n t if and w hen the p io n e e rin g co n ce p t is tested th ro u g h o u t the country.

21


SOCIAL SERVICES

M E NO RAH PARK OPENS D AY CARE TO SEVERELY HANDICAPPED T ypical o f the special services w h ic h private agencies can p ro vid e fo r special clie n ts is the w o rk o f M enorah Park H om e fo r the Aged. This extended care fa c ility has gained a national re p u ta tio n in p ro v id in g m edical, psychiatric, nursing, re h a b ilita tive and social service p ro ­ grams fo r e ld e rly Jewish men and w o m e n o f all e co n o m ic and cu ltu ra l backgrounds. It n o t o n ly provides housing fo r some 280 in d ivid u a ls but, fo r nearly 10 years, has operated a day-care center fo r fra il and m ild ly confused e ld e rly w h o still live alone o r w ith relatives. A fte r three years o f p la n n in g and e xp e rim e n ­ ta tio n , M enorah Park in July, 1977 expanded day-care services to severely handicapped per­ sons w ith the help o f ope ra tio na l su p p o rt fro m The Cleveland Foundation. The program n o w enrolls persons ranging in age fro m 31 to 85 w h o com e fro m one to fo u r days a w eek, d e p e n d in g upon th e ir needs. Those in w heelchairs o r on crutches arrive in a bus e qu ip p ed w ith a h yd ra u lic lift. They begin each day w ith a co n tin e n ta l breakfast and a gro up discussion. As they share " p e t peeves," they receive b oth re lie f and su p p o rt by learning they are n o t alone in th e ir feelings. Then they go on to e n jo y some o f the personal pleasures o f the day: A shave fo r the men. M akeup o r hair g ro o m in g fo r the w o m e n. A bath in a w h ir l­ p o o l tu b e qu ip p ed w ith a h yd ra u lic chair. O r an o p p o rtu n ity to play cards (a w o o d e n h o ld e r is p ro vid e d fo r those w ith use o f o n ly one hand) o r do n e e d le w o rk o r even earn m oney in a sheltered w o rksh op . Then there are m edical and the ra p eu tic aspects to the day. A nurse takes b lo o d pressures, urine samples and w eights upon request fro m private physicians.

22

Therapists help the h a n d ica p p e d relearn chores o f everyday liv in g : H o w to p u t on trousers and b u tto n a shirt. H o w to c o o k and keep house. Even h o w to w a lk again. O ne o f the h ig h lig h ts o f the w e e k is the c o o k in g school. There was m uch e x cite m e n t the day the p a rticip a n ts learned to m ake an o m e let. A w o m a n in a w h e e lc h a ir w o rk e d in her lap, c u ttin g o n io n s and peppers w ith a special kn ife w h ic h rocks on a c u ttin g board, assem bling the eggs and vegetables in a skillet, and then liftin g the s k ille t fro m lap to stove top w ith the aid o f a special han d le and p o th o ld e r. A man w h o had lost the use o f an arm suc­ ceeded in flip p in g his o m e le t w ith the fla ir o f a m aster chef. There is m uch jo y in achievem ents large and small. A man w ith m u ltip le sclerosis had such' a tre m o r he c o u ld n o t feed h im s e lf u n til an o c c u p a tio n a l th e ra p ist tau g ht h im to use a ro u nd scoop dish w ith a n on skid b o tto m . A w om a n w h o re p o rte d ly has had Parkinson's disease lo n ge r than any o th e r liv in g person — fo r 44 years — re q u ire d som eone on each side o f her to h elp her w a lk w h e n she entered the day-care center. N o w she can take 37 steps alone — all the w a y to the b a th ro o m . A nd a 6 1-year-old man w h o had n o t been able to get o u t o f his w h e e lc h a ir since su ffe rin g a stroke n o w is g e ttin g a b o u t on crutches and has even e n ro lle d in a course at the c o m m u n ity college. The goal o f the new day-care p rogram is to return each handicapped person to as fu ll a social and physical p erfo rm a n ce level as pos­ sible and, in the process, to keep each o u t o f a residential in s titu tio n as lo n g as possible. M A D E BY A N D FOR THE H ANDICAPPED H andicapped persons w ith h u m p backs, para­


lyzed arms, a rth ritic hands and a host o f o th e r disabling c o n d itio n s o fte n re q uire special c lo th ­ ing as w e ll as special e q u ip m e n t to cope w ith d aily living. Since such item s fre q u e n tly m ust be custom fitte d and do n o t lend them selves to assembly line p ro d u c tio n , the y have been ignored by co m m e rcia l m anufacturers. H ow ever, the V oca ­ tio n a l G uidance and R e h a b ilita tio n Services in Cleveland has pio ne e red in the p ro d u c tio n o f such fu n c tio n a l c lo th in g fo r the handicapped. VGRS — an in te rn a tio n a lly kn o w n agency w h ich provides com p re he n sive services fo r m ore than 5,000 Clevelanders a year — has decided to go big tim e w ith the c lo th in g p ro j­ ect. It has asked its designers and patternm akers to begin d e v e lo p in g a lin e o f goods fo r national m a rke tin g and has e m p lo ye d its firs t sales rep­ resentatives, in C leveland and then in Chicago, to begin d e te rm in in g sales p o te n tia l. In the process VGRS is cre a ting a d d itio n a l tra in in g and w o rk o p p o rtu n itie s fo r h an dicapped persons. In its sheltered w o rk s h o p at the VGRS c o m ­ plex on East 55th Street, h an dicapped persons are n o w at w o rk at p o w e r sew ing machines s titc h in g such item s as loose fittin g dresses and gow ns, to te bags fo r w h eelchairs and clo th covers fo r plaster casts. The w o rke rs in clu d e in d iv id u a ls w h o have been id e n tifie d throu g h the Bureau fo r V o ca tio n a l R e h ab ilita tio n and CETA (C om prehensive E m p lo ym en t and T ra in ­ ing A ct). Some have e m o tio n a l and m ental re tarda tio n p ro b le m s as w e ll as physical h a n d i­ caps b u t all have the g oo d eye-hand c o o rd i­ n atio n needed to ope ra te p o w e r sew ing e q u ip ­ m ent. The p ro je c t is being undertaken w ith a $135,800 grant fro m The C leveland Foundation to be used o ver tw o years. It is part o f a m a jo r

VGRS focus aim ed at m aking the handicapped m ore p ro d u ctive and self-sufficient. VGRS already has o ccup a tion a l program s in business procedures, electronics, custodial serv­ ices and m achine shop operations n o w graduat­ ing a b o u t 260 disabled persons a year. It has in itia te d a "p ro je c ts w ith in d u s try " program p ro v id in g o n -th e -jo b tra in in g fo r a no the r 150 persons in tw o in d ustria l firm s. But the need is m uch, m uch larger. It is estim ated tha t in the Cleveland area there are nearly 55,000 disabled persons, und e r the age o f 65, w h o are n o t in the la b or force. FOR THE DEAF A N D BLIND In 1977 a graduate student in social w o rk, w h ile in fie ld p lacem ent at The Cleveland Foundation, surveyed the services available fo r the deaf. This group, o fte n o ve rlo o ke d am ong the h a n d i­ capped, num bers a bo u t 23,000 in Cleveland. As a result o f the survey, a new area o f Foun­ d atio n concern emerged. The deaf often lead lives o f sile n t isolation. They ca nn o t hear and fre q u e n tly ca nn o t speak. C onsequently, m any norm al means o f c o m m u ­ nica tio n are shut o ff to them . An im p o rta n t one is the telephone. H ow ever, throu g h a te le ty p e ­ w rite r, a m achine adapted fro m W estern U n io n, deaf persons can tra nsm it w ritte n messages over regular te le p h o n e lines to any place w h ic h has a sim ila r m achine. It was discovered tha t receiv­ ing e q u ip m e n t existed in o n ly h alf a dozen p u b lic places — the C leveland Police D e p a rt­ m ent's d o w n to w n o ffice , the sheriff's o ffice , C le v e la n d M e tr o p o lita n G e n e ra l H o s p ita l, CMED em ergency am bulance service, M e lrid g e School, and the Cleveland Hearing and Speech Center. A $20,000 grant was made to C leveland


SOCIAL SERVICES H earing and Speech C enter to enable the a d d i­ tio n o f e q u ip m e n t at m ore than 50 o th e r p u b lic places such as hospitals, g o ve rn m e n t offices, p o lic e and fire stations, the a irp o rt, the Regional Transit A u th o rity , social service agencies, lib ra ­ ries and u tility com panies. The funds also are being used to purchase 10 o th e r te le typ e w rite rs to loan to deaf p e o p le in tim es o f special needs. In a no the r grant, the C leveland H earing and Speech C enter was aw arded $11,000 to install a b attery o perated generator and a visual fire alarm system at its fa cility. The C leveland F oundation granted su p p o rt to the C leveland Society fo r the B lind fo r a special radio station w h ic h broadcasts readings fro m newspapers and o th e r p u b lic a tio n s to a b lin d audience. It also granted $30,000 to w a rd the capital d rive fo r a new re h a b ilita tio n and tra in in g residence und e r co n stru ctio n at the Sight Center. ENRICHING C H ILD DAY CARE The co u n ty w e lfa re d e p a rtm e n t was granted $100,000 to w a rd a com prehensive tra in in g p ro ­ gram aim ed at e n rich in g the learning and social experiences o f ch ild re n in day-care settings th ro u g h o u t the county. The grant helped sub­ sidize a d d itio n a l staff as w e ll as a co n tra ct w ith a private firm w h ic h deve lo p ed p io n e e rin g c h ild e n ric h m e n t m aterials fo r the state o f W est V irg in ia und e r a $2 m illio n federal grant. For Cuyahoga C ounty, the firm has adapted the tra in in g m aterials fro m th e ir o rig in a l rural focus to an urban one. Since the co u n ty is the largest single p u r­ chaser o f services fro m fa m ily care homes, it began the tra in in g here w ith 35 w o m e n w h o take care o f ch ild re n in th e ir homes. These w o m e n learned such things as h o w to ta lk to

24

infants, in itia te learning games and han d le d is c i­ p lin e problem s. The c o u n ty n o w has m oved in to tra in in g supervisory and a d m in is tra tiv e staff w h o , in tu rn , w ill take the tra in in g p ro gram to both p u b lic and p riva te c h ild care agencies th ro u g h ­ o u t the co un ty. M any p eo p le w h o w o rk in c h ild care have lim ite d e d u ca tio n and lim ite d reading a b jlity and, th e re fo re , m uch o f the tra in in g m aterial has been d e ve lo p ed in an audio-visual le a rn -a t-y o u r-o w n -p a c e form a t. C O N T IN U E D A D V O C A C Y A N D SERVICES A m o n g the $2,337,843 a u th o riz e d by the D is tri­ b u tio n C o m m itte e fo r social services d u rin g 1977 w e re grants w h ic h c o n tin u e d the Foun­ d a tio n 's s u p p o rt fo r advocacy and d ire c t serv­ ices fo r p e o p le w h o are v u ln e ra b le because o f age, illness o r d iffic u lt circum stances. The grants in c lu d e d those c h a m p io n in g the rights and needs o f the ill and e ld e rly in nursing hom es; ch ild re n separated fro m th e ir natural parents th ro u g h foster care, a d o p tio n o r in s titu tio n a li­ z a tio n ; runaw ay y o u th ; w o m e n battered by spouses o r v ic tim iz e d by rapists; a lc o h o l and d ru g add icts; fo rm e r m ental patients and c o n ­ victs re tu rn in g to society.


SOCIAL SERVICES GRANTS THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION AMASA STONE HOUSE General s u p p o r t .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. $

15,000

BELLEFAIRE General s u p p o r t ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

5,000

THE BENJAMIN ROSE INSTITUTE General s u p p o r t ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... Support fo r nursing home patients and p e n s io n e r.............................................................................................................................................................. .

15,000 6,496

BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA - GREATER CLEVELAND COUNCIL NO. 440 Community resource workers for inner-city scouting p ro g ra m ...................................................................................................................................................

44,000

CALVARY TOWERS, INC. Facilities m a in te n a n c e .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................

10,000

CENTER FOR HUMAN SERVICES Counseling services in southwestern communities in Cleveland over two years (third and fourth y e a r )............................................................................

37,500

CHILD ABUSE PREVENTION CENTER, Toledo, Ohio General s u p p o r t ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

200

CITY OF CLEVELAND - MAYOR’S COMMISSION ON AGING Development of registry of outreach workers fo r e ld e r ly ..............................................................................................................................................................

7,700

CLEVELAND FOUNDATION RESOURCES National dem onstration program to develop alternative integrated social service delivery m o d e ls ............................................................................... Technical assistance to Cuyahoga County in implementing grant to develop alternative models fo r delivering social s e r v i c e s .......................... Evaluation of grant to Legal Aid Society for Tremont Child Care Cooperative Center .................................................................................................... Evaluation of grant to Vocational Guidance and Rehabilitation Services fo r productivity development program fo r h a n d ic a p p e d ...........................

16,900 9,200 1,500 2,000

CLEVELAND HEARING AND SPEECH CENTER Supplementary battery and visual alarm system for hearing impaired p e r s o n s .................................................................................................................... Teletypewriter telephone devices for hearing impaired p e r s o n s ..............................................................................................................................................

11,000 20,000

THE CLEVELAND INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM G eriatric outreach services through the Mayor’s Commission on A g in g ...................................................................................................................................

13,500

CLEVELAND RAPE CRISIS CENTER Operating support (second y e a r ) ........................................................................................................................................................................................................

40,000

THE CLEVELAND SOCIETY FOR THE BLIND Radio reading services fo r handicapped p e r s o n s ........................................................................................................................................................................ Rehabilitation Training Residence building f u n d ........................................................................................................................................................................

17,592 30,000

COUNCIL FOR ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES IN GREATER CLEVELAND Delinquency and truancy crim e prevention p r o g r a m ...................................................................................................................................................................

1,389

CUYAHOGA COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS Alternate model fo r social services delivery s y s t e m ................................................................................................................................................................... Family education program of Cooperative Extension Service (second y e a r ) ......................................................................................................................... Child development staff training project in the Welfare Department over eighteen m o n t h s ..............................................................................................

58,298 33,153 100,000

CUYAHOGA COUNTY COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH AND RETARDATION BOARD Adolescent alternative services program, a federally funded drug abuse prevention project (second y e a r ) ...............................................................

22,000

CUYAHOGA COUNTY WELFARE DEPARTMENT, VOCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY FUND “ Give-a-Christm as” program (second y e a r ) ................................................................................................................................................................................... Crippled and handicapped children’s fund (second y e a r)..............................................................................................................................................................

2,200 3,500

25


SOCIAL SERVICES FAMILY HEALTH ASSOCIATION, INCORPORATED Series of personal growth groups at senior citizen c e n te r s ..........................................................................................................................................................

2,473

FAR WEST INFORMATION AND COUNSELING CENTER O perating support over two years (third and fourth y e a r)...............................................................................................................................................................

52,500

FEDERATION FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING Com m unity involvement and delinquency prevention p ro g ra m .................................................................................................................................................... Inform ation resource f i l e .................................................................................................................................................................... ! ! ! ! ! ! ' ! !

12,500 5,000

THE FREE MEDICAL CLINIC OF GREATER CLEVELAND Safe Space Station, a runaway youth program over two years (second and third y e a r ) ....................................................................................................

102,000

GREATER CLEVELAND INTERCHURCH COUNCIL Com m unity education and advocacy program on causes of poverty over two y e a r s ...............................................................................................................

28,000

GREATER CLEVELAND NEIGHBORHOOD CENTERS ASSOCIATION Pilot foster care network fo r youth status offenders at Murtis H. Taylor M ulti-Services Center, West Side Ecumenical M inistry and Augustine Society Group Homes, Inc. over two y e a r s .............................................................................................. HELP FOR RETARDED CHILDREN, INC. Residential center fo r retarded a d u lt s .............................................................................................................................................................................................. HOUSING OUR PEOPLE ECONOMICALLY, INC. Youth service d i r e c t o r ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................... INNER CITY PROTESTANT PARISH Professional development of inner-city ministers over two y e a rs ............................................................................................................................................... INSTITUTE FOR CHILD ADVOCACY Child advocacy program with particular emphasis upon services fo r “ separated” children through foster care, adoption and residential care . JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER OF CLEVELAND General support of the medical and other senior adult f a c i lit ie s .............................................................................................................................................. KENT STATE UNIVERSITY Handicapped persons’ transportation p r o g r a m .............................................................................................................................................................................. Study of nature, extent and problems of alcoholism among deaf persons in Northeast O h i o .......................................................................................... HATTIE LARLHAM FOUNDATION General s u p p o r t .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. THE LEGAL AID SOCIETY OF CLEVELAND Operating support fo r the Tremont Child Care Cooperative Center (second y e a r ) ............................................................................................................... Project Renaissance, walk-in center for ex-mental p a tie n ts ......................................................................................................................................................... LUTHERAN METROPOLITAN MINISTRY ASSOCIATION C itizens’ volunteer nursing home ombudsman p r o g r a m ..............................................................................................................................................................

65,800 40,000 1,250 65,000 40,000 1,262 12,000 42,355 2,500 48,934 45,000 22,000

MAN-TO-MAN/WOMAN-TO-W OMAN, Columbus, Ohio Volunteer program fo r released adult o f f e n d e r s ........................................................................................................................................................................

16,195

MENORAH PARK JEWISH HOME FOR AGED Demonstration day care program fo r physically handicapped over three y e a r s ....................................................................................................................

71,453

MT. PLEASANT YOUTH ACTION COUNCIL, INC. Child development p r o g r a m .............................................................................................................................................................................................................

15,000

NURSING HOME ADVISORY & RESEARCH COUNCIL, INC. Research and advocacy efforts on behalf of nursing home patients (third y e a r ) ...................................................................................................................

50,640

OHIO CITIZENS’ COUNCIL FOR HEALTH AND WELFARE, Columbus, Ohio Publication of Administrative Report, a semi-monthly publication on state adm inistrative a c t i o n s ...............................................................................

15,000

26


PANTA RHEI, INC. Residential program fo r form er mental p a tie n ts ...............................................................

20,721

PEOPLE’S BUSING PROGRAM, INC. Transportation for visitation of inmates of Ohio p r is o n s ...............................................

3.000

PLANNED PARENTHOOD OF GREATER TOLEDO, Toledo, Ohio General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................................................

250

POPULATION EDUCATION, INC. Cleveland segment of Project on Human Sexual D evelopm ent.....................................

40.000

REGIONAL COUNCIL ON ALCOHOLISM Employment of fa cility planner fo r residential treatment c e n t e r ................................

25.000

TRUE SISTERS NURSERY SCHOOL, INC. General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................................................

2,500

UNITED COMMUNITY BLOOD CENTER Blood donor p r o g r a m .............................................................................................................

27.000

THE UNITED WAY/CRUSADE OF MERCY, Toledo, Ohio General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................................................

1.000

VISITING NURSE ASSOCIATION OF CLEVELAND Assessment of the need fo r social work s e r v i c e s .........................................................

29,820

VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE AND REHABILITATION SERVICES Productivity development program for handicapped over two y e a r s ..........................

135,800

WOMEN TOGETHER, INC. Shelter and supportive services fo r battered women and their children (second year)

55.000

YOUNG MEN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, Toledo, Ohio General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................................................

1,000

YOUNG WOMEN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION Collinwood-East Cleveland c a m p o u t ...............................................................................

5,594

Total Social Services Grants — U n d e s ig n a te d ...............................................................

$1,626,675

(Following recipients and programs designated by donor) AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY, New York, New York General s u p p o r t ...................................................................................................................

$

393

AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY, INC. General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................................................

39,141

AMERICAN NATIONAL RED CROSS, GREATER CLEVELAND CHAPTER General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................................................

2,252

BEECH BROOK General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................................................

34,157

BELLEFAIRE General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................................................

4,182

BENJAMIN ROSE INSTITUTE General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................................................

6,414

BIG BROTHERS OF GREATER CLEVELAND General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................................................

6,924 27


SOCIAL SERVICES BOYS’ CLUB OF CLEVELAND, INC. General s u p p o r t .....................................................................

535

CALVARY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH General s u p p o r t .....................................................................

3,155

CATHOLIC CHARITIES CORPORATION Benefit of P a rm a d a le ............................................................... Benefit of aged p e r s o n s ..........................................................

8,307 3.000

CENTER FOR HUMAN SERVICES General s u p p o r t ..................................................................... General support for Day Nursery Association of Cleveland General support for the Family Service Association Division General support for the Homemaker-Health Aide Division

160 2.853 23,094 2.000

CHILD GUIDANCE CENTER General s u p p o r t .....................................

214

CHILDREN’S AID SOCIETY General s u p p o r t ..................................... General support for the Industrial Home

247 40,197

CHILDREN’S SERVICES General s u p p o r t .....................................

304

CHRIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH General s u p p o r t .....................................

811

CHURCH HOME General s u p p o r t .....................................

4,021

CLEVELAND CENTER ON ALCOHOLISM General s u p p o r t .....................................

27

CLEVELAND HUMANE SOCIETY CORPORATION General s u p p o r t ....................................................................

160

CLEVELAND POLICE DEPARTMENT JUVENILE BUREAU Prevention of delinquency among boys

358

CLEVELAND PRESS CHRISTMAS FUND General support for needy and deserving fam ilies and children

1,087

CLEVELAND PSYCHOANALYTIC SOCIETY FOUNDATION General s u p p o r t .................................................................................... Research and application of psychoanalysis and support projects

18 54,146

CLEVELAND SOCIETY FOR THE BLIND General s u p p o r t .................................................................................... Research or any other p u r p o s e .......................................................... Volunteer braille tra n s c r ib e rs ...............................................................

17,235 14,308 1.853

CUYAHOGA COUNTY WELFARE DEPARTMENT Special client n e e d s ...............................................................................

246

EAST END NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSE General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................

1.853

ELIZA BRYANT CENTER General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................

10,753

28


ELIZA JENNINGS HOME E q u ip m e n t .................................................................................................... General s u p p o r t ..........................................................................................

20.543 5,521

FAIRMOUNT PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH General s u p p o r t .........................................................................................

1,128

FEDERATION FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING Central Volunteer B u r e a u ......................................................................... General s u p p o r t .........................................................................................

1,719 2,156

FIRST METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH, Ashland, Ohio General s u p p o r t .........................................................................................

3,943

GOODWILL INDUSTRIES OF CLEVELAND General s u p p o r t .........................................................................................

826

GREATER CLEVELAND NEIGHBORHOOD CENTERS ASSOCIATION General support for East End Neighborhood C e n t e r ..........................

6,414

HATTIE LARLHAM FOUNDATION, Mantua, Ohio General s u p p o r t .........................................................................................

5,136

HEBREW FREE LOAN ASSOCIATION General s u p p o r t .........................................................................................

1,000

HIRAM HOUSE General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................

903

HOME FOR AGED WOMEN OF CLEVELAND, OHIO General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................

4.021

JEWISH COMMUNITY FEDERATION General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................

160

JONES HOME OF CHILDREN’S SERVICES Capital improvement in building and e q u ip m e n t................................ General s u p p o r t .................................................................................... ....

20.543 15,465

LITTLE SISTERS OF THE POOR General s u p p o r t .........................................................................................

1,454

LUTHERAN HOME FOR THE AGED General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................

6,703

LUTHERAN WELFARE FUND General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................

869

MARYCREST SCHOOL General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................

4.021

MONTEFIORE HOME General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................

4.021

PARMADALE-ST. ANTHONY’S General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................

8,465

PLANNED PARENTHOOD OF CLEVELAND, INC. General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................

8,520

ROSE-MARY CENTER General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................

1,447

29


SOCIAL SERVICES ST. ANDREW’S UNITED METHODIST CHURCH General s u p p o r t .....................................................................................

77

ST. JOHN LUTHERAN CHURCH General s u p p o r t .....................................................................................

.

.

869

SALVATION ARMY General s u p p o r t .....................................................................................

.

.

15,327

SALVATION ARMY OF ASHLAND General s u p p o r t .....................................................................................

.

.

1,971

SISTERS OF NOTRE DAME Physical education program fo r the Julia B illiart School . . . . SOCIETY FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN E q u i p m e n t ............................................................................................... General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................

.

.

9,165

. .

. .

20,543 10,625

SOCIETY OF ST. VINCENT DE PAUL General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................

.

.

422

STARR COMMONWEALTH FOR BOYS, Albion, Michigan General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................

.

.

991

THREE-CORNER-ROUND PACK OUTFIT, INC. General support fo r camping p r o g r a m ...............................................

.

.

8,568

TRINITY CATHEDRAL General s u p p o r t .........................................................................................

.

.

991

UNITED APPEAL OF ASHLAND COUNTY, Ashland, Ohio General s u p p o r t .................................................................................... ....

.

.

1,971

UNITED TORCH SERVICES, INC. General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................

.

.

189,424

VISITING NURSE ASSOCIATION OF CLEVELAND General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................

.

.

2,353

. .

. .

.

.

1,000 1,000

2,514

.

.

8,737

.

.

1,971

. .

. .

1,971 10,272

.

.

10,272

.

.

751

. .

. $ 711,168 . $2,337,843

VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE AND REHABILITATION SERVICES Assistance to needy of Sunbeam graduating c la s s .......................... Assistance to needy clients of Sunbeam S c h o o l............................... General s u p p o r t ......................................................................................... WEST SIDE DEUTSCHER FRAUEN VEREIN, THE ALTENHEIM General s u p p o r t ........................................................................................ YOUNG MEN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, Ashland, Ohio General s u p p o r t .................................................................................... YOUNG MEN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, Cleveland, Ohio General s u p p o r t ........................................................................................ General support to West Side B r a n c h ............................................... YOUNG MEN’S AND YOUNG WOMEN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION General support to Lakewood combined b r a n c h .......................... YOUNG WOMEN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION General s u p p o r t ......................................................................................... Total Social Services Grants — D e s ig n a te d ..................................... Total Social Services Grants — Designated and Undesignated

30


HEALTH


HEALTH

People have begun to rediscover the fa m ily physician at a tim e w hen he was b e co m in g a va nishing breed. M a n y have c o n clu d e d , o fte n after the cost and fru stra tio n o f m aking the rounds o f specialists, th a t th e y needed som e­ one w h o co u ld treat the w h o le being and the w h o le fam ily. There is, conse q ue n tly, a national m o ve m e nt to increase the su pp ly o f fa m ily physicians. In O h io , the legislature has p ro v id e d fin an cia l incentives fo r the state-supported m edical schools to create fa m ily p ractice p ro ­ grams. A nd c o m m u n itie s are b e g in n in g to fin d ways to encourage yo un g d octo rs to take up fa m ily practice in th e ir areas. Fairview General H ospital, a p riva te c o m m u ­ n ity hospital serving 22,000 patients a year fro m C leveland and its w estern suburbs, has taken the lead in establishing one o f the firs t fa m ily prac­ tice residency program s in G reater Cleveland. It d id so after n o tin g th a t its fa m ily physicians w ere g ro w in g o ld and d yin g off. In a decade, the n um be r on the active staff had d eclin e d fro m 61 to 15, and the mean age cre p t up to 61, despite the trem endous p o p u la tio n g ro w th in th a t part o f m e tro p o lita n C leveland. A fte r care­ fu l study, the board o f trustees n o t o n ly pushed fo r creation o f the residency program b u t au­ th o rize d a substantial investm ent by fu rn ish in g a fa m ily practice c lin ic , adding fu ll-tim e teach­ ing and clin ica l staff, and a ttractin g lecturers o f regional and national stature. The D e p artm en t o f Family Practice also a ffilia te d w ith the Case W estern Reserve U niversity School o f M e d icin e . A local w om a n physician was e m p loye d to d ire c t the program . A fte r years o f private prac­ tice, she was w illin g to turn her patients over to residents, thereby accelerating the im p le m e n ta ­ tio n o f the new program . In re co g n itio n o f her c o n trib u tio n , she has been named 1978 “ c lin i­ 32

cian o f the y e a r" by the C leveland A cad e m y o f M e d icin e . The program began w ith tw o residents in the sum m er o f 1976, added three in 1977, and ex­ pects to add at least tw o fu ll-tim e and tw o parttim e residents in 1978. Each resident spends three years at the hospital, caring fo r a b o u t 75 fam ilie s in the firs t year and 150 in the re m ain­ ing tw o . U n d e r staff supervision, each resident keeps o ffic e hours at the c lin ic and makes hos­ p ita l rounds, house calls and nursing hom e vis­ its. A resident does e ve ryth in g fro m d e live rin g babies to easing the aches and pains o f grand­ m others. In the process, he b u ild s a p ro file on the genetic and e n v iro n m e n ta l ills o f the fam ily, and observes h o w the fa m ily lives and interacts affects the physical and e m o tio n a l w e ll-b e in g o f its m em bers. Fairview G eneral hopes th a t at the end o f the three years m ost residents w ill take th e ir pa­ tients w ith them and set up p riva te practice e ith e r on the w est side o f C leveland o r in such u n d e rsu p p lie d suburbs as Bay V illa g e o r N orth O lm sted. W ith little m ore p ro m o tio n than w o rd o f m o u th , the program n o w has m ore than 200 fam ilie s on its w a itin g list. But it has fallen short o f its goal to a ttract six new residents a year. The n atio n al p o o l may n o t be as large as a n tic i­ pated and m any m edical school graduates may still p re fe r residencies in the large teaching hos­ pitals w h ic h em phasize specialties. Fairview General intends to rem ain choosey. It w ill not accept graduates o f fo re ig n m edical schools, b u t it is b e g in n in g to re c ru it at schools o f osteo­ pathy. In the long run it expects th a t its ow n residents w ill be its best recruiters. Such a program has substantial start-up costs. F a ir v ie w G e n e r a l a lr e a d y has c o m m it t e d


$252,867 o f its o w n resources and The C leve­ land F oundation assisted w ith a first-ye a r grant o f $100,000. This in tu rn helped a ttract federal fu n d in g w h ic h w ill reduce the need fo r local subsidy in fu tu re years. The program co in cide s w ith the Foundation's c o n tin u in g interest in enco u ra gin g a m ore effective and e ffic ie n t system fo r d e live rin g q u a lity m edical care to all Am ericans. C learly an im p o rta n t role can be played by the fa m ily physician — n ot o n ly as the p ra c titio n e r p re ­ pared to diagnose and tre a t some 90 p ercent o f the m edical ills e nco u nte re d b u t also as the person w h o id e ally is suited to refer patients to the a p p ro p ria te specialty care w hen com plex m edical p ro ble m s arise. AM BU LATO R Y A N D PERINATAL CARE GET FINE T U N IN G The health a ctivitie s o f The C leveland Founda­ tio n d u rin g 1977, to ta lin g $1,967,055, w ere dis­ tin guished by the fin e tu n in g o f p io n e e rin g p ro ­ grams fu n d e d in previous years. C o n vince d tha t the p re ve n tio n o f illness and the m aintenance o f health c o n stitu te the m ost effective w ay to im p ro ve health care in A m erica, the Foundation granted $158,651 to CW RU m edical school to be spent over the next three years to w a rd im p ro v in g the d e live ry o f a m b u ­ la tory care th ro u g h o u t the m e tro p o lita n area. The w o rk is being spearheaded by a new asso­ ciate dean w h o was e m p lo ye d as d ire c to r o f a m b u la to ry care p la n n in g th ro u g h a 1976 grant. The new p la n n in g o ffic e is assisting U n iv e r­ sity H ospitals in c o n v e rtin g o u tp a tie n t services fo r c h ild re n in to a p riva te g ro up p ractice run by p ed ia tricia n s on the m edical school faculty. W h ile co nve rsio n a ctivitie s focus p rim a rily on a d m in istra tive , fiscal and m edical record details,

the results u ltim a te ly should be fe lt in hum an terms. C h ild re n — the p o o r as w e ll as the m o n ­ e y e d — w ill be treated the same — as private patients. They w ill have an o p p o rtu n ity to b u ild a c o n tin u in g re la tion sh ip w ith one d o c to r rather than be seen as a series o f o ne -tim ers at the em ergency room d oo r. The pediatrics co nve r­ sion is expected to serve as a m odel fo r o th e r m edical school departm ents n o t o n ly at U n i­ versity Hospitals b u t at o th e r teaching hospitals as w e ll. It also a nticip a te d a recent C arter A d ­ m in istra tio n proposal w h ic h co u ld p ro vid e m il­ lions to in n er cities fo r sim ila r conversions o f hospital o u tp a tie n t clin ics in to private group practices. The a m b u la to ry care p la nn in g o ffice also has p ro vid e d assistance to local p u b lic and private agencies in p reparing a pp lica tio ns fo r govern­ m ent and national fo u n d a tio n fu n d in g . O f para­ m o u n t im p o rta nce was an a p p lica tio n to the R obert W o o d Johnson Foundation fo r creation o f a regional n e tw o rk to im p ro ve basic health care fo r in d ige n t, aged and w o rk in g p o o r w ith in the c ity o f Cleveland. M e a n w h ile , the Cleveland Perinatal N e tw o rk, established tw o years e arlier w ith a $2.2 m illio n grant fro m the Robert W o o d Johnson Founda­ tio n , has em erged as a national pacesetter in the e ffo rt to fin d b ette r ways to organize m e d i­ cal care fo r expectant w om e n and infants whose lives and health care are im p e rile d . O ne o f the key co m p on e nts is a co m p u te rize d m edical records system w h ic h helps physicians id e n tify p roblem s as early as possible in a pregnancy and transfer vita l data to all w h o treat patients both before and a fte r delivery. In 1977 The C leveland Foundation granted $20,000 each to Fairview General and St. Luke's Hospitals to e n ­ able these tw o large private c o m m u n ity h osp i­

tals to secure c o m p u te r e q u ip m e n t essential to p a rtic ip a tio n in the n e tw o rk . As a result 10 hos­ pitals in Cuyahoga C o u nty, h a n d lin g 80 p e rce n t o f all births, are n o w o n -lin e in the p erina ta l n etw o rk. The Foundation also granted $25,000 to e q u ip a m ic ro c h e m is try la b o ra to ry at the M e tro p o lita n General H ospital Perinatal C enter and released to CW RU m edical school, the n e tw o rk 's a d m in ­ istrator, a to ta l o f $200,000 set aside e a rlie r in C leveland F oundation Resources fo r a ctivitie s w h ich w o u ld em erge as vita l to the successful ope ra tio n o f the Regional Perinatal N e tw o rk . LENS O N DISABLED CHILDREN It is estim ated th a t one o u t o f every 10 c h ild re n in this c o u n try has a h a n d ica p p in g c o n d itio n o r c h ro n ic a ilm e n t. W h e th e r the c h ild suffers fro m diabetes, co ng e nita l heart disease o r a h ea rt­ re n d in g d is a b ilit y such as c e re b ra l p a ls y o r cystic fibrosis, he and his fa m ily are lik e ly to re q uire a w id e range o f m edical and social services. In 1977 a grant o f $191,942 was made fo r an im p o rta n t study as to h o w co m p re he n sive care is p ro vid e d in such cases in G reater C leveland. The study w ill in vo lve 1,700 disabled c h ild re n and w ill be co n d u cte d by an in te rd is c ip lin a ry team p u t to g e th e r by the CW RU d e p a rtm e n t o f c o m m u n ity health and the Harvard School o f P ublic Health. O ne o f the premises to be tested is w h e th e r m edical sp ecialization has resulted in a fra g ­ m e n ta tio n o f services w h ic h leaves patients and th e ir fam ilies n o t o n ly w ith o u t adequate p r i­ m ary health care b u t w ith o u t adequate links to hum an services w h ic h c o u ld p ro v id e re h a b ilita ­ tio n to a fflic te d c h ild re n and e m o tio n a l re lie f to the e n tire fam ily.

33


HEALTH GRANTS THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION - NORTHEAST OHIO AFFILIATE, INC. Cardiopulm onary resuscitation program (second y e a r ) ...............................................................................................................................................................' CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY fo r the School of Medicine Am bulatory health care program over three y e a r s ..................................................... ..... . ..................................................................................................... Comparative study needs of crippled, handicapped and disabled children and their fam ilies with existing health service programs in Cleveland over two y e a r s .......................................................................................................................................... Demonstration parenting program for prevention of child abuse (third y e a r ) .......................................................................................... , ............................. Health planner and related activities in field of mental health services for c h ild re n ............................................................................................................... Research activities of the division of geographic medicine over two y e a r s ............................................................................................................................... Research on federal health p o l i c y ................................................................................................................................................................................................... Research on h e m o c h r o m a to s is ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... Youth Spine Center school screening p r o g r a m .............................................................................................................................................................................. CLEVELAND FOUNDATION RESOURCES n Evaluation of grant to Cuyahoga County Hospital Foundation for m icrochem istry l a b o r a t o r y .......................................................................................... Evaluation of “ hom e-like” delivery and modernization program at Booth Memorial H o s p i t a l .......................................................................................... Mental health services for c h ild r e n .................................................................... .............................................................................................................................. Planning, development and evaluation of Cleveland Foundation supported child health programs over two y e a r s ....................................................... Visiting scholar in health and social s e rv ic e s ...................................................................................................................................................................................

35000

20 000 5 000 15 272 11 231

i ’ koo

3 852 i a ’nnn 3 000

CLEVELAND METROPOLITAN GENERAL HOSPITAL Planning fo r a center fo r research in human d e v e lo p m e n t......................................................................................................................................................... CLEVELAND OSTOMY ASSOCIATION, INC. General support over two years (second and third y e a r ).............................................................................................................................................................. CUYAHOGA COUNTY HOSPITAL FOUNDATION, INC. M icrochem istry laboratory at Metropolitan General Hospital Perinatal C e n te r ......................................................................................................................... FAIRVIEW GENERAL HOSPITAL 000 Family practice residency p r o g r a m ................................................................................................................................................................................................... Implementation of the Cleveland regional perinatal program over two y e a r s ........................................................................................................................

on nnn ^u,uuu

GLENVILLE HEALTH ASSOCIATION - M.I.G.H.T. GROUP PRACTICES Neighborhood-based health care s e rv ic e s ........................................................................................................................................................................................ Research and treatm ent of hypertension in the black c o m m u n ity ..............................................................................................................................................

'

THE GREATER CLEVELAND HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION Patient education television n e t w o r k ............................................................................................................................................................................................. Eyeglasses, dentures, and sim ilar appliances fo r medically indigent adults and c h i l d r e n ....................................................................................................

on non ^u.uuu

HOSPITAL RESEARCH AND EDUCATIONAL TRUST National conference of the Commission on Public General Hospitals in C le v e la n d ..............................................................................................................

^u.uuu

THE KOLFF FOUNDATION Financial information and control r e v ie w ........................................................................................................................................................................................ PRETERM - CLEVELAND Revolving loan fund for indigent abortion patients over four y e a r s ......................................................................................................................................... ST. LUKE’S HOSPITAL Implementation of the Cleveland regional perinatal program over two y e a r s .........................................................................................................................

*u,uuu

Total Health Grants - U n d e s ig n a te d .............................................................................................................................................................................................$1,145,019

34


(Following recipients and programs designated by donor) AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY General s u p p o r t ............................................................................................... Research or any other p u r p o s e ....................................................................

$

991 14.308

AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION, NORTHEAST OHIO CHAPTER, INC General s u p p o r t ............................................................................................... Research or any other p u r p o s e ....................................................................

40,131 14.308

BELLEVUE HOSPITAL, Bellevue, Ohio General s u p p o r t ..............................................................................................

2,407

CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY for the School of Medicine Cancer research .............................................................................................. Medical research and general s u p p o r t .......................................................... Outpatient clinic for d is p e n s a r y .................................................................... Research in diseases of the e y e ....................................................................

10,294 13,971 30,144 25,076

CLEVELAND CLINIC Research in diseases of the e y e ....................................................................

12,538

CLEVELAND CLINIC FOUNDATION General s u p p o r t ..............................................................................................

991

CLEVELAND HEALTH MUSEUM AND EDUCATIONAL CENTER General s u p p o r t ..............................................................................................

1,765

CUYAHOGA COUNTY HOSPITAL FOUNDATION, INC. General s u p p o r t .............................................................................................. Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital nurse award

1.853 557

ELYRIA MEMORIAL HOSPITAL William H. Gates b e d .....................................................

1,300

EVANGELICAL DEACONESS HOSPITAL General s u p p o r t ..........................................................

1.853

THE EVANGELICAL DEACONESS SOCIETY General support of Deaconess Hospital . . . .

2,772

FAIRVIEW GENERAL HOSPITAL Christiana Perren Soyer b e d ..................................... E q u i p m e n t .................................................................... General s u p p o r t ..........................................................

678 41,086 1.853

GRACE HOSPITAL E q u i p m e n t ....................................................................

20,543

HEALTH FUND OF GREATER CLEVELAND General s u p p o r t ..........................................................

534

HEALTH HILL HOSPITAL FOR CONVALESCENT CHILDREN General s u p p o r t ..........................................................................

1.853

HIGHLAND VIEW HOSPITAL Employees’ Christmas F u n d ....................................................

676

35


HEALTH

HURON ROAD HOSPITAL General s u p p o r t .....................................................................................

5,857

JEWISH COMMUNITY FEDERATION OF CLEVELAND Research or any other p u rp o s e ...............................................................

14,308

LAKEWOOD HOSPITAL General s u p p o r t .....................................................................................

2,772

LAKEWOOD HOSPITAL FOUNDATION, INC. General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................

47,784

LUTHERAN HOSPITAL Conference T r a v e l.................................................................................... Nurse a w a r d ...............................................................................................

247 1,792

LUTHERAN HOSPITAL MEDICAL STAFF General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................

31,857

RAINBOW HOSPITAL Equipment or s u p p l i e s .......................................................................... General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................

990 1,853

SAINT ANN FOUNDATION General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................

1,853

ST. JOHN’S HOSPITAL General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................

9,149

ST. VINCENT CHARITY HOSPITAL Aid for alcoholics and indigent s i c k .................................................... Elizabeth Boersig Soyer b e d ............................................................... General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................

805 678 4,021

SAMARITAN HOSPITAL OF ASHLAND, Ashland, Ohio Memorial room maintained in memory of Mr. and Mrs. A. N. Myers

7,886

SHRINERS HOSPITAL FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN, Chicago General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................

5,136

TUBERCULOSIS & RESPIRATORY DISEASES ASSOCIATION General s u p p o r t ....................................................................................

1,171

UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS OF CLEVELAND Conference t r a v e l .................................................................................... General s u p p o r t .................................................................................... General support for Lakeside Hospital .......................................... General support for the maternity h o s p i t a l ..................................... Henry L. Sanford memorial b e d ......................................................... Urological or vascular r e s e a r c h .........................................................

1,610 8,043 383,549 5,984 990 41,219

....................................................

$ 822,036

Total Health Grants — Designated and U n d e sig n a te d .....................

$1,967,055

Total Health Grants — Designated

36


C IV IC AFFAIRS From P ub lic Square to the Cuyahoga Valley, m any p e o p le are engaged in civ ic a ctivitie s aim ed at stre n g th e n in g the e conom y, housing, safety and e n v iro n m e n t o f this region. Especially cru cia l is the fe rm e n t ta kin g place in the core o f the c ity w h e re b o th the d o w n to w n area and its s u rro u n d in g n e ig h b o rh o o d s share a co m m o n destiny. R e in fo rcin g grants made o ver several years are b e g in n in g to show results. The m u lti-m illio n d o lla r m o d e rn iz a tio n o f P ublic Square began in 1977 w ith a sym b o lic tree p la ntin g . A film study u tiliz in g in n o v a tiv e tech n iq ue s has revealed the d e s ira b ility o f co n ve rtin g Euclid A venue in to a lim ite d tra nsit m all m ore h osp ita ble to pedes­ trians. Playhouse Square has begun to score as an e n te rta in m e n t, d in in g and re ta ilin g mecca, w hose successes are d eta ile d in the cu ltural affairs section o f this A nn u al Report. O u t in the n eig h b o rh o o d s, local d e ve lo p m e n t c o rp o ra tio n s have p ro v id e d s ta b ility and co n ­ tin u ity in p la n n in g w h ic h appear to have sur­ vived changes at C ity Hall. N o t o n ly are neigh ­ b o rh o o d business d istricts being spruced up th ro u g h c o m m u n ity d e ve lo p m e n t b lo c k grant funds b u t o th e r re vita lizin g signs have em erged. Local m erchants are a ttra ctin g lo w -in te re st loans fro m the Small Business A d m in is tra tio n . The D e tro it-S h o re w a y area has draw n its first n ew d o c to r in years and co n fo u n d e d co nve n ­ tio n a l practice by a ttra ctin g a new bank after one a bandoned the area. O h io C ity is going a fte r federal m a tching funds fo r m a jo r co m m e r­ cial reinvestm ent. Fairfax is p ro v id in g housing re h a b ilita tio n and related jo b tra in in g in its p re d o m in a n tly black n e ig h b o rh o o d . A nd Shaker Square is w o o in g new ow ners fo r d e te rio ra tin g b u ild in g s in this still fashionable sh op p in g center.

38

D u rin g 1977 T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n a w a rd e d $ 20 4 ,3 5 8 to seven n e ig h b o rh o o d d e v e lo p m e n t co rp o ra tio n s plus $55,000 to the D o w n to w n C leveland C o rp o ra tio n . The Cuyahoga Plan, su pp o rted p rim a rily by local fo u n d a tio n s in a massive e du ca tion a l e ffo rt to open new co m m u n itie s to m in o ritie s, was given a fo u rth -y e a r grant o f $60,000 am id e n ­ co uraging news tha t su p p o rt was sh iftin g to the co u n ty and suburban cities seeking to co m p ly w ith federal open housing directives. Past city park studies came to a successful co nclusio n as the city's la ke fro n t parks, yacht clubs and marinas w e re transferred fro m the C ity o f Cleveland to the State o f O h io w h ic h is pre pa rin g to make m u lti-m illio n d o lla r im ­ provem ents in these lo n g-neglected assets on the shore o f Lake Erie. A grant o f $100,000 was made to the Trust fo r Public Land to accelerate the a cq u isitio n o f 30,000 acres fo r the new Cuyahoga V alley N ational Recreation Area. T w o grants also w ere made tow ard sparing the p e rim e te r o f the new park fro m co m m e rcia l e x p lo ita tio n . The C leveland Foundation began to take a hard lo o k at the e co n o m ic v ita lity and d e ve lo p ­ m ent o f the region throu g h grants in vo lvin g Cuyahoga C ounty, Northeast O h io A reaw ide C o o rd in a tin g Agency and C leveland State U n i­ versity. In a d d itio n , an O b e rlin C ollege e co n o ­ mist, n o w a visitin g professor at Harvard U n i­ versity, is researching w h ich factors in flu en ce a fa m ily w hen selecting a hom e o r d e cid in g to move. A m o ng the $1,679,725 a uth orize d fo r civic affairs in 1977, perhaps no grant b ette r d e m o n ­ strated the effectiveness o f citize n in vo lve m e n t than the one to Rapid Recovery, Inc.

RAPID RECOVERY C leveland has one o f the m ost co n v e n ie n t, lo w fare rapid transit systems in the co un try. It carries n o t o n ly some 60,000 co m m u te rs a day b u t also thousands o f visitors a year w h o travel fro m a irp o rt to d o w n to w n fo r o n ly 35 cents in less than 30 m inutes — and can even c o n tin u e on to Shaker Heights o r to U n ive rsity C ircle and beyond. But w h a t an im pression the ride makes. Trains speed th ro u g h a "castaw ay a lle y ," fo r the rig h to f-w a y along the 30 m iles o f tra ck has lo n g been the d u m p in g g ro un d fo r garbage, beer cans, tires, even o ld w ashing machines. D u rin g the B icentennial year a g ro up spear­ headed by a C leveland n e w co m e r began to explore w h a t citizens c o u ld do. Rapid Recovery was born. It in c o rp o ra te d , attracted a highpow ere d board and engaged architects to sur­ vey every fo o t o f the rig h t-o f-w a y and to pre­ pare sketches o f rapid stops, underpasses and gro un d areas. A rtists and landscape architects c o n trib u te d designs fo r b e a u tify in g the route fro m one end to the oth e r. By m id-1977 rapid transit was tra nsfo rm e d fro m being n ob o dy's business to being e verybody's business. A t the T riskett stop on the w est side, fo r in ­ stance, tw o disparate o rg anizations, an e n v iro n ­ m ental g ro up and a M a rin e Corps b atta lio n, agreed to becom e jo in t hom esteaders. They w o u ld d eve lo p and m aintain in p e rp e tu ity a garden spot. O thers helped too . Boy Scouts cleared away the rubbish, the Regional Transit A u th o rity m ended the fence, a c o n stru ctio n com p an y c o n trib u te d a large co ncrete planter, and a flo ris t donated flo w e rin g plants. A 160' x 4 0 ' concrete w a ll at the base o f the East N in th Street Bridge in the Flats becam e w h a t may be the w o rld 's largest p a in t-b y -n u m -


bers m ural. It to o k 75 professional painters only 48 minutes' to fill in the co lo rs fo r this m ural designed by a C leveland State art professor. Paint, sca ffo ld in g brushes, tape and o th e r sup­ plies w ere don a te d by 24 civ ic -m in d e d c o m ­ panies and groups. A m a jo r tu n n e l at T e rm in a l T o w e r is being decorated w ith a lu m in o u s m ural w h ile the u nd e rg ro un d stop at H o p kins In te rn a tio n a l A ir­ p o rt awaits som eone d aring enough to p ro vid e the fib re o p tic tubes designed to b rig hte n its walls and ceiling. Industries and h om eo w n ers are cleaning up th e ir o w n backyards and, in some cases, la n d ­ scaping the rig h t-o f-w a y w h ic h a djoins th e ir property. The program is a b o u t to expand in to C leve­ land area high school art and d ra ftin g classes throu g h c u rric u lu m m aterials d eve lo p ed by the O h io State U niversity d e p a rtm e n t o f landscape architecture. Businessmen also are p la n n in g to address co nvo ca tion s and civic classes to e n ­ courage yo u n g p e o p le to respect the rapid route once it has made its recovery. The C leveland F oundation encouraged Rapid Recovery w ith an in itia l $10,000 p la n n in g grant fo llo w e d by $40,000 to w a rd professional staff. The p ro je c t has generated $150,000 in cash plus $148,000 in CETA jo b s fo r u n e m p lo ye d m in o ri­ ties in a d d itio n to all the v o lu n te e r tim e , e q u ip ­ m ent and supplies c o n trib u te d at the various p ro je c t sites. Rapid Recovery has a ttracted the a tte n tio n o f the W h ite House and is slated to becom e a n atio n al d e m o n s tra tio n as to h o w citizens can w o rk to g e th e r to im p ro v e th e ir co m m u n ity. C R IM IN A L JUSTICE Efforts to h elp the p u b lic sector im p ro ve fro m

w ith in co n tin u e d to be a p rim a ry focus as m ore than $750,000 was a u th orize d in 1977 fo r c rim i­ nal ju stice a ctivities am ong the civic affairs, social services and edu ca tion grants. Low -key relationships resulting fro m national consultants w o rk in g over a long term w ith p u b lic servants c o n tin u e d to survive p o litic a l tu rm o il. Despite th e re v o lv in g d o o r at th e c h ie fs o ffic e , th e Cleveland Police D e p a rtm e n t has m oved fo r­ w ard w ith o ffic e r tra in in g and p la nn in g fo r school desegregation. D u rin g 1977 the sheriff's o ffice accepted a re co m m e nd a tion fro m the Foundation's special citizens co m m itte e tha t it e m p lo y a d ire c to r o f co rre ctio ns to oversee the m anagem ent o f the co u n ty ja il and all its p ro ­ grams. The Foundation funded a national search and helped screen 100 a pp lica tio ns fo r the im ­ p o rta n t new p osition. In the private sector, the C rim in a l Justice In fo rm a tio n C enter so lid ifie d its m anagem ent and m oved in to co lla b o ra tive activities w ith the co un ty, its agency on aging and area school sys­ tems. A fte r extensive e xp lo ra tio n , the Founda­ tio n d e c id e d a g a in s t fo s te rin g a p ro p o s e d university-based crim in a l ju stice in stitu te and instead decided to concentrate on strengthen­ ing existing research and technical assistance services w ith in the co m m u n ity.


CIVIC AFFAIRS GRANTS THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION THE ACADEMY FOR CONTEMPORARY PROBLEMS, Columbus, Ohio Study of institutionalized juvenile population of O h i o ....................................................................................................................................................................$

18,000

AMERICAN JEWISH COMMITTEE Management Action P r o g r a m ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................

1,000

BROADWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION Neighborhood commercial r e n e w a l...................................................................................................................................................................................................

28,350

THE BUCKEYE-WOODLAND COMMUNITY CONGRESS Citizen participation program (third y e a r ) .........................................................................................................................................................................................

45,000

CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY Cleveland Area S u r v e y ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Third Annual Law and Housing C o n fe r e n c e ...................................................................................................................................................................................

25,000 1,000

CITY CLUB FORUM FOUNDATION Operating s u p p o r t .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

1,000

CLEVELAND ACTION TO SUPPORT HOUSING (CASH), INC. Housing rehabilitation loan p r o g r a m .............................................................................................................................................................................................

50,000

CLEVELAND DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION Leadership C le v e la n d ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. Cleveland Convention and Visitors B u r e a u ...................................................................................................................................................................................

35,250 25,000

CLEVELAND FOUNDATION RESOURCES Criminal justice planning and community technical assistance program including juvenile justice, public defender program and the sh eriff’s office Evaluation of grant to Case Western Reserve University for Cleveland Area S u rv e y .............................................................................................................. Evaluation of grant to Cleveland State University for Cleveland regional economic development p l a n .......................................................................... Technical assistance to Cleveland Police Department and feasibility study fo r criminaljustice i n s t i t u t e .......................................................................

77,190 1,200 5,000 138,620

CLEVELAND HEIGHTS, CITY OF Operating support for two projects: 1) preferred agents program and 2) elderly housing assistance program (second y e a r).....................................

30,400

CLEVELAND INTERFAITH HOUSING CORPORATION Partial payment of delinquent taxes of Interfaith-owned housing p r o p e r t y ..............................................................................................................................

6,000

CLEVELAND STATE UNIVERSITY Cleveland regional economic development plan by Institute of Urban Studies over two y e a r s ......................................................................................... Street law program for inmates and staff of Cleveland House of C o r re c tio n s .........................................................................................................................

60,000 21,920

CLEVELAND TENANTS ORGANIZATION Operating support for developing institution (third y e a r ) .............................................................................................................................................................

35,000

CRIMINAL JUSTICE PUBLIC INFORMATION CENTER Operating support for developing institution (third y e a r ) .............................................................................................................................................................

60,000

CUYAHOGA COUNTY, BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Overall economic development plan for Cuyahoga C o u n t y ........................................................................................................................................................ Training program by County Public Defender C o m m is s io n ........................................................................................................................................................

20,000 29,750

CUYAHOGA COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE Training and consultant assistance for corrections p ro g ra m ........................................................................................................................................................

57,378

THE CUYAHOGA PLAN OF OHIO, INC. Comprehensive open housing program for metropolitan Cleveland (fourth year)

60,000

40

..............................................................................................................


CUYAHOGA VALLEY ASSOCIATION Cuyahoga Valley National Recreation Area perim eter protection p r o j e c t ..............................................................................................................................

5,000

DETROIT-SHOREWAY COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATION Neighborhood commercial renewal (second y e a r ) ........................................................................................................................................................................

24,508

DOWNTOWN CLEVELAND CORPORATION Ecosystem study of Euclid A v e n u e ................................................................................................................................................................................................... Operating support and schem atic design study of Public Square central unifying e le m e n t ...............................................................................................

15,000 40,000

EUCLID DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION Neighborhood housing rehabilitation and commercial and industrial r e n e w a l ....................................................................................................................

10,000

FAIRFAX FOUNDATION, INC. Neighborhood housing rehabilitation and commercial re n e w a l...................................................................................................................................................

50,000

FOREST HILL CHURCH HOUSING CORPORATION Loan guarantee fund for housing rehabilitation and p re s e r v a tio n ..............................................................................................................................................

50,000

FRIENDS OF SHAKER SQUARE Neighborhood commercial renewal (second y e a r ) ........................................................................................................................................................................

39,000

HARVARD UNIVERSITY, Cambridge, Massachusetts The Economics of Neighborhood Choice: a Cleveland case study by the Harvard department of city and regional p la n n in g .....................................

34,506

HEIGHTS COMMUNITY CONGRESS Citizen planning p r o g r a m ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................

27,890

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS OF CLEVELAND EDUCATIONAL FUND, INC. Publication and distribution of governmental guide, “ Here’s Cuyahoga County” .................................................................................................................... Publication and distribution of “ How to Participate in Cleveland Government” .................................................................................................................... “ Deadline for C ities” speakers p r o g r a m ........................................................................................................................................................................................

8,085 3,725 7,000

LUTHERAN HOUSING CORPORATION Mortgage foreclosure prevention and housing insulation p ro g ra m ..............................................................................................................................................

50,000

NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSING SERVICES OF CLEVELAND, INC. Addition to high-risk revolving loan f u n d ........................................................................................................................................................................................

25,000

NORTHEAST OHIO AREAWIDE COORDINATING AGENCY Five county overall economic development p r o g r a m ...................................................................................................................................................................

35,000

OHIO CITY REDEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION, INC. Neighborhood commercial renewal for Lorain-West 25th Street a r e a ...................................................................................................................................

25,000

OHIO CONSERVATION FOUNDATION Land use planning and m a n a g e m e n t .............................................................................................................................................................................................

15,000

THE OLD BROOKLYN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION Neighborhood commercial r e n e w a l..................................................................................................................................................................................................

27,500

PERLIS REMOTIVATION CENTER Demonstration and research project in remotivation of female offenders over two y e a rs ....................................................................................................

78,674

PLUS CLUB, INC. OF CLEVELAND Community Kid W illing Workers p r o g r a m ........................................................................................................................................................................................

30,000

41


C IV IC AFFAIRS

RAPID RECOVERY, INC. Clean-up and beautification of Regional Transit A uthority rapid transit right-of-way

50.000

THE TRUST FOR PUBLIC LAND Cuyahoga Valley National Recreational Area land a c q u is it io n .....................................

100,000

UNIVERSITY CIRCLE, INCORPORATED Planning of large-scale redevelopment p r o g r a m ..........................................................

50.000

VIADUCT VIEW, INC. Conversion of Superior Viaduct into a p a r k ...............................................................

10.000

THE WOMEN’S CITY CLUB OF CLEVELAND Cuyahoga riverfront im p r o v e m e n t ............................................................................... “ Wednesday’s Women” speakers p r o g r a m ...............................................................

33,000 3,500

Total Civic Affairs Grants — Undesignated.....................................................................

. $1,679,446

(Following recipient and program designated by donor) THE WOMEN’S CITY CLUB OF CLEVELAND Educational le c t u r e s ......................................................................................................... Total Civic Affairs Grants — D e s ig n a t e d .................................................................... Total Civic Affairs Grants — Designated and U nd esig n ated .....................................

42

. $

279 279

. $1,679,725


CULTURAL AFFAIRS


C ULTUR AL AFFAIRS

W h a t co n stitu te s a balanced and realistic c u l­ tu ra l fare in a m a ture A m e rica n c ity w h ic h has lo n g respected q u a lity in the arts? W ith such a q u e stio n in m in d , the D is trib u tio n C o m m itte e in m id -1 9 77 a u th o rize d a C leveland C u ltu ra l Re­ sources Study as part o f its c o n tin u in g assess­ m e n t o f life in G reater C leveland. The study is to be co n d u cte d in three phases: • The m a jo r professional p e rfo rm in g arts. • The museum s and sm aller professional p e r­ fo rm in g groups. • The c o m m u n ity and n e ig h b o rh o o d arts o r­ ganizations as w e ll as in d iv id u a l artists. It was easy to d e te rm in e w h e re to begin. W h ile C leveland is strivin g to ro u nd o u t its per­ form a n ce o ffe rin g s w ith new b a lle t and opera com panies, its long-established as w e ll as new groups are sh ow ing the strains o f cu rre n t o r p ro je c te d fin an cia l crises. Rising costs c o n tin u e to o u ts trip w h a t can be earned at the box office. A nd w h ile su p p o rt fro m tra d itio n a l patrons has held, the increasing costs have created a gap w h ic h has n o t been fille d by e ith e r the c o rp o ­ rate w o rld o r local g overnm ent. It was clear tha t all the p e rfo rm in g arts groups need to expand th e ir audience base as w e ll as fin d new sources o f c o n trib u te d in co m e if they are to m aintain o r im p ro v e th e ir q u a lity and a va ila b ility in the years ahead. Phase I o f the C leveland C u ltu ra l Resources S tudy began in N o ve m b e r,1977 w hen the board ch airm en and d ire ctors o f seven m a jo r p e rfo rm ­ ing org an iza tion s gathered to m eet a p rin cip a l c o n su lta n t w h o b ro u g h t a national perspective fro m having served as d ire c to r o f program p la n ­ n ing fo r the N ational E ndow m ent fo r the Arts. A fte r in tro d u c tio n s — sig n ifica n tly, m any pres­ e nt d id n o t k n o w one a n o th e r — representatives te n ta tiv e ly began to share th e ir anxieties and

44

hopes. There w e re sim ila ritie s despite the great d isp a rity in the age and d e v e lo p m e n t o f each o p e ra tio n . Three have been p a rt o f the C leve­ land scene fo r m ore than h a lf a ce n tu ry; three fo r five years o r less. T h e ir budgets range fro m $128,190 fo r the ca utio u sly in itia te d N e w C leve­ land O pera C om p an y to $7.5 m illio n fo r the w o rld re n ow n e d C leveland O rchestra. O thers p a rtic ip a tin g in the study are the C leveland Bal­ let, the C leveland Play House, the G reat Lakes S ha ke sp e a re F e stiva l, th e P la y h o u s e S qu a re Foundation and Karamu House. The la tte r has lo n g been a national tra in in g g ro un d fo r p ro ­ fessional black artists and n o w is co n te m p la tin g the creation o f its first fu lly professional thea­ tre unit. From the outset each g ro up has been asked to furnish base line in fo rm a tio n as to its cu rre n t artistic, m anagem ent and fin an cia l health as w e ll as prepare com prehensive plans fo r the futu re . Both the basic data and the plans can becom e the basis fo r annual review. C learly the d e ve lo p m e n t o f a long-range plan has been the m ost ch allen g in g assignment. In response, each g ro up is h o ld in g a retreat at w h ich key board m em bers and staff are reas­ sessing the m ission o f th e ir o rg an iza tion and b e g in n ing to b u ild a consensus on goals to be achieved in the next five to 10 years. The groups are e xp lo rin g such questions as: W h a t kinds o f audiences do w e w a n t to reach? W h a t kin d o f re p e rto ire do w e w a n t to offer? H o w d o w e wish to rank artistically? H o w m ig h t w e use new means, such as television, to reach new a u d i­ ences? As the goals are honed on the sharp edge o f fin an cia l reality, it is expected each gro up w ill d e te rm in e w h a t a rtistic staff, m anagem ent, board and v o lu n te e r strength w ill be needed to achieve the objectives.

To h elp the seven groups the F o un d a tio n is p ro v id in g d ire c t tech n ica l assistance in p rogram p la n n in g and m anagem ent m atters as w e ll as e na b lin g each g ro up to e m p lo y n a tio n a lly rec­ o gnized fa c ilita to rs fo r th e ir retreats and c o n ­ sultants fo r issues varying fro m design o f new p e rfo rm in g spaces to reevaluating program s fo r school c h ild re n . The F oundation is ta kin g the leadership in creating a c o m m itte e o f c o m m u n ity and c o rp o ­ rate leaders to assist in re v ie w in g the progress o f the study. It is a n tic ip a te d th a t one o f the m a jo r outcom es w ill be increased in v o lv e m e n t by and su p p o rt fro m the co rp o ra te c o m m u n ity — an e ffo rt perhaps to be stim u la ted by fo u n ­ d atio n su p p o rt and the lik e ly p rospect o f a to ta l c o m m u n ity plan fo r re vie w by the N ational En­ d o w m e n t fo r the Arts. In the m eantim e, the Foundation d u rin g 1977 responded to requests fro m the seven o rg a n i­ zations w ith grants to ta lin g $331,395, o r nearly h a lf the c u ltu ra l affairs c o n trib u tio n s fo r the year fro m nondesignated funds. UPBEAT AT PLAYHOUSE SQUARE For h a lf a dozen years a g ro up o f d e te rm in e d citizens arm ed w ith m ore o p tim is m than m oney have striven against eno rm ou s odds to save the sp le nd id art deco theatres in Playhouse Square fro m the w re cke r's ball. T hrough a n o t-fo rp ro fit fo u n d a tio n the y n o t o n ly ke pt alive the hope o f restoring the theatres b u t began p ro ­ g ra m m in g them w ith arts and e n te rta in m e n t as a means o f re v ita liz in g a crucial area o f d o w n ­ to w n Cleveland g ro w n seedy fro m neg le ct and abandonm ent. They attracted p e o p le fro m all walks o f life back to the c ity at n ig h t by b o o k in g “ big nam e” entertainers, d ra w in g nearly 500,000 patrons to Playhouse Square d u rin g 1977.


The significant b re a kth ro u g h , how ever, came late in the year, in N o vem ber, ju st days b efore the Playhouse Square enthusiasts w ere a bo u t to lose th e ir o p tio n to purchase the Loew's b u ild in g w h ic h houses the O h io and State Thea­ tres. The Cuyahoga C o u n ty Board o f C o m m is­ s io n e rs v o te d to p u rc h a s e th e b u ild in g fo r county o ffice space and to lease the tw o theatres back to the Playhouse Square Foundation. D u r­ ing 1977 th a t fo u n d a tio n also secured a lo n g ­ term lease on the adjacent Palace Theatre and began to seek c o n tro l o f the A lle n Theatre, the fo u rth theatre in Playhouse Square's "s u p e r­ b lo c k ." The Cleveland Foundation assisted Playhouse Square w ith grants to ta lin g $95,395 d u rin g th e year, raising its overall su p p o rt to $168,145 since 1972. The largest grant d u rin g 1977 fu n d e d the executive d ire c to r and related staff o f the Play­ house Square Foundation over 18 m onths. Funds also w e re p ro v id e d to enable Playhouse Square's m aster a rch ite ct to co m p le te co n ce p t designs fo r the e n tire area — fro m the theatres, to a retail "u rb a n ro o m ," to a h ote l, even to a museum fo r "th e c ity o f lig h t." The designs are p ro vin g an im p o rta n t catalyst in stim u la tin g the interest o f n atio n al developers as w e ll as local civic and g o ve rn m e n t leaders. As a d ire c t s p in -o ff o f the p e rfo rm in g arts study described e arlier, the seven m a jo r p e r­ fo rm in g o rg an iza tion s plus n e ig h b o rin g C leve­ land State U n ive rsity are e x p lo rin g h o w each m ig h t use the theatres in Playhouse Square, th e ir interest heigh ten e d by the lik e lih o o d tha t m ore than $3 m illio n in p u b lic w o rks m oney w ill b ecom e available in 1978 fo r re n ova tin g the Loew's b u ild in g . In o th e r c u ltu ra l e ffo rts related to the re v ita li­ zation o f d o w n to w n C leveland, the F oundation

granted $25,000 to the J u n io r League o f C leve­ land fo r re fu rb ish in g o f the h is to ric Samuel M a th e r m ansion on the C leveland State cam pus as a c o m m u n ity co nfe re nce center. The Foun­ d a tio n a u th o rize d $100,000 to w a rd p u b lic art by n a tio n a lly and re g io n a lly recognized artists fo r the new state o ffic e b u ild in g n o w u n d e r c o n ­ stru ction . It also p a rtic ip a te d in the u n v e ilin g o f "S e n tim en ta l Scale and W e d g e ," a m a jo r b ro nze scu lp tu re at the new Justice Center. The w o rk is by Richard H u n t o f C hicago, a m a jo r A m e rica n s c u lp to r and the firs t black o f such stature in the art w o rld . IN TO SCHOOLS A N D N E IG H BO R H O O D S The exposure o f school c h ild re n and n o n tra d itio n a l audiences to first-ra te c u ltu ra l fare c o n ­ tin u e d to be an interest o f the F oundation. D u rin g 1977 the D is trib u tio n C o m m itte e au­ th o riz e d th ird and fo u rth -y e a r su p p o rt to C ircle C enter fo r C o m m u n ity Programs o f U n ive rsity C ircle, Inc., a p ro je c t serving as lin k betw een the o utsta n d in g c u ltu ra l and e du ca tion a l in s ti­ tu tio n s w ith in C leveland's c u ltu ra l heart to the school ch ild re n and adults in the su rro u n d in g in n e r-c ity n eigh b orh o o ds. It p ro v id e d secondyear su p p o rt to the C leveland Area A rts C o u n ­ cil's e ffo rt to b ro k e r professional artists and small arts groups in to schools, and fu n d e d an a c tiv ity th ro u g h w h ic h the Heights G u ild o f Artists and Artisans to o k professional visual artists in to e lem entary schools o f the C leveland H eig hts-U niversity Heights school system. Em­ ergency su p p o rt was granted to Karamu House w h ic h , in a d d itio n to m o u n tin g o u ts ta n d in g black c o m m u n ity theatre, provides day care, se ttle m e n t house and c o m m u n ity arts a ctivitie s to residents o f its su rro u n d in g Fairfax n e ig h b o r­ hood.

45


CULTURAL AFFAIRS GRANTS THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION AMERICAN SOKOL, INC. Additional restoration of Bohemian National H a i l ......................................................................................................................................................................... $ THE ARTS, EDUCATION AND AMERICANS, INC. Ohio study and conference on arts in e d u c a tio n .............................................................................................................................................................................. CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY Honoraria fo r speakers at American Theatre Association regional conference in C l e v e l a n d .......................................................................................... CLEVELAND AREA ARTS COUNCIL Core operating support (seventh y e a r ) .............................................................................................................................................................................................. Arts Connection brokerage for artists serving schools (second y e a r)......................................................................................................................................... CLEVELAND BALLET O perating support fo r developing institution (third y e a r ).............................................................................................................................................................. CLEVELAND FOUNDATION RESOURCES Study of professional performing arts and other cultural in s titu tio n s ......................................................................................................................................... Public art fo r Ohio State Office Building in C le ve la n d ................................................................................................................................................................... Feasibility study for redevelopment of Playhouse Square a r e a ................................................................................................................................................... CLEVELAND HEIGHTS-UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT Visual Arts Resource project for elementary schools by Heights Guild of Artists and A rtis a n s .......................................................................................... THE CLEVELAND PLAY HOUSE Operating support for special n e e d s .................................................................................................................................................................................................. GREAT LAKES SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL Additional m ajor production in 1978 .................................................................................................................................................................................................. THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF MIDDLEBURG HEIGHTS Completion of remodeling of Little Red S ch o o lh o u se ...................................................................................................................................................................

13,500 5,000 3,000 30,000 13,000 50,000 30,000 100,000 5,000 23,200 26,000 30,000 8,400

THE JUNIOR LEAGUE OF CLEVELAND, INC. Furnishings for Cleveland State University conference center inthe Samuel Mather M a n s io n ...........................................................................................

25,000

KARAMU HOUSE Operating support fo r special n e e d s ..................................................................................................................................................................................................

25,000

THE MUSICAL ARTS ASSOCIATION Sustaining Fund of the Cleveland O r c h e s tr a ..................................................................................................................................................................................

70,000

THE NEW CLEVELAND OPERA COMPANY Operating support fo r developing institution (second y e a r ) ........................................................................................................................................................

40,000

THE NEW GALLERY OF CONTEMPORARY ART Assistance to area artists with exhibition expe n ses........................................................................................................................................................................

1,000

NEW ORGANIZATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS (NOVA) Operating and special project support over 16 m o n t h s ............................................................................................................................................................ Cleveland in New York, an exhibition space for area a r t is t s ......................................................................................................................................................

16,000 9,000

OBERLIN COLLEGE, Oberlin, Ohio Start-up costs and underwriting for production of The Underground Railway Puppet T h e a te r .........................................................................................

10,000

OHIO CHAMBER ORCHESTRA Operating support fo r developing institution (second y e a r ) ........................................................................................................................................................

10,000

PLAYHOUSE SQUARE FOUNDATION A rchitectural design fo r Playhouse S q u a r e .................................................................................................................................................................................. Executive director and related staff over 18 months (second y e a r ) .......................................................................................................................................

20,000 70,395

46


THE TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART, Toledo, Ohio General s u p p o r t ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. UNIVERSITY CIRCLE, INC. Circle Center fo r Community Programs fo r neighborhood children and adults over two years (third and fourth year s u p p o r t ) ............................... THE WESTERN RESERVE HISTORICAL SOCIETY Ohio Canal Sesquicentennial a c tiv itie s .............................................................................................................................................................................................

1,000 37,000 5,000

Total Cultural Affairs Grants — U n d e s ig n a te d ............................................................................................................................................................................. $ 676,495 (Following recipients and programs designated by donor) ASHLAND LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, Ashland, Ohio General s u p p o r t .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. $ CLEVELAND BALLET General s u p p o r t .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. THE CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART General s u p p o r t .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. Purchase of objects of art exhibited at annual May Show in memory of Oscar Michael, J r.................................................................................................. CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY General s u p p o r t .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. P la n e ta r iu m ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. THE CLEVELAND PLAY HOUSE General s u p p o r t .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. Experimental dram atic w ork or s c h o la r s h ip ................................................................................................................................................................................... Shakespearean and classical productions for students and te a c h e rs ......................................................................................................................................... CLEVELAND PUBLIC LIBRARY Services to s h u t - i n s ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. CLEVELAND ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY General support .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. GARDEN CENTER OF GREATER CLEVELAND Library .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. KARAMU HOUSE General s u p p o r t ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

1,971 595 11,145 500 97,659 2,245 1,724 1,265 2,245 55,794 2,245 1.178 75,250

THE MUSICAL ARTS ASSOCIATION General support of the Cleveland O r c h e s tr a ................................................................................................................................................................................... C hildren’s concerts by the Cleveland O rc h e s tra .............................................................................................................................................................................

50,291 4,490

NORTHERN OHIO OPERA ASSOCIATION General s u p p o r t ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

595

OGLEBAY INSTITUTE, Wheeling, West Virginia Cultural and educational activities at Oglebay P a rk ........................................................................................................................................................................

92,719

THE WESTERN RESERVE HISTORICAL SOCIETY Care of M em orabilia of First Cleveland Cavalry A s s o c ia tio n ........................................................................................................................................................ 6,731 General s u p p o r t ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 595 Total Cultural Affairs Grants — D e s ig n a t e d ................................................................................................................................................................................... $ 409,237 Total Cultural Affairs Grants — Designated and U n d e s ig n ated ................................................................................................................................................... $1,085,732

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SPECIAL PHILANTHROPIC SERVICES The fun d s expended fo r special p h ila n th ro p ic purposes go p rim a rily fo r the o p e ra tin g costs o f The C leveland Fo un d atio n and a w id e va rie ty o f services fo r the b e n e fit o f the p h ila n th ro p ic c o m m u n ity th ro u g h o u t N ortheast O h io . The la tte r in clu de s services to m any p riva te fo u n d a ­ tio n s w h ic h d o n o t e m p lo y staff o r have lim ite d staff. The services in c lu d e e valuation o f grant proposals and m o n ito rin g o f grants as w e ll as c o n v e n in g m eetings d ea lin g w ith issues o f c o m ­ m on concern to the p a rtic ip a tin g fo u n d a tio n s. The cost o f some o f these services is reim bursed in p a rt by the re c ip ie n t fou n d a tio n s. O n e o f the m ost useful d eve lo p m en ts fo r g ra nt seekers was the e m p lo y m e n t o f p rofes­ sional staff fo r the C leveland regional library and fie ld o ffic e o f the Foundation C enter o f N ew York. The lib ra ry m oved to expanded quarters in N o ve m b e r and was nam ed the Kent

H. Sm ith Library in h o n o r o f this fo rm e r m e m ­ ber o f The C leveland Foundation D is trib u tio n C o m m itte e w h o was in stru m e nta l in the o p e n ­ ing o f the branch in C leveland in 1961. The lib ra ry n o w has tw o fu ll-tim e staff m e m ­ bers, in c lu d in g a professional lib ra rian w ith ex­ pertise in fo u n d a tio n m atters w h o conducts o rie n ta tio n sessions in the use o f the lib ra ry resources. The lib ra ry houses m aterials dea lin g w ith gra ntm a kin g , annual reports o f national fo u n d a tio n s, Internal Revenue Service returns o f fo u n d a tio n s in O h io and n e ig h b o rin g states and, fo r the first tim e , provides in fo rm a tio n on federal and state g o ve rn m e n t fu n d in g . O n January 1 ,1978 The C leveland Foundation transferred the m anagem ent o f the lib ra ry to the Foundation C enter b u t plans to co n tin u e annual su p p o rt fo r its o pe ra tio n.

S PE C IA L P H ILA N TH R O P IC SER VICES G RANTS THE C LE V E LA N D FO U N D A TIO N CLEVELAND FOUNDATION RESOURCES Operating budget of Cleveland Foundation Resources fo r the year 1978 .............................................................................................................................. $ 746,827 Operating budget of the Fenn Educational Fund of The Cleveland Foundation fo r the year 1978 .................................................................................... 23,212* Special discretionary grant f u n d ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 44,111 THE FOUNDATION CENTER, New York Operating budget support of Foundation Center-Cleveland for 1978 .........................................................................................................................................

15,000

STATE OF OHIO, Columbus, Ohio Third Edition, Charitable Foundations Directory of O h i o .............................................................................................................................................................

1,000

TOTAL SPECIAL PHILANTHROPIC SERVICES G R A N T S ............................................................................................................................................................. $ 830,150 *G rant recommended by the Fenn Educational Fund Executive Board

48


FINANCIAL REPORT

P hotograph b y lo h n W rig h t


TRUST FUND GROWTH OF THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION In 1977, the ca rryin g value o f n e w fun d s and a d d itio n s to existing fun d s re co rd ed by The C leveland Fo un d atio n to ta le d $2,876,123.79. N e w gifts and a d d itio n s to the C o m b in e d Fund in c lu d e d in th a t to ta l w e re $239,409 and are re p o rte d in d e ta il b e g in n in g on page 55.

NEW TRUST FUNDS RECEIVED MABEL R. BATEMAN M E M O R IA L FUND D o n o r : M abel R. Bateman Trust. C arrying V alue : $319,915.01. M a rke t V alue 1 2 /3 1 /7 7 : $391,587.67. Use o f in co m e : M e d ica l research. THE M ARY A N D WALLACE D U N C A N FUND D o n o r : Last W ill and Testam ent o f M ary Spaidal D uncan. C arrying V alue: $63,227.28. M a rke t V alue 1 2 /3 1 /7 7 : $63,227.28. Use o f in 足 co m e : For the p ro m o tio n o f research and e d u 足 cation in the m edical fie ld and, in p articula r, in o rtho p ed ics. DR. ISADORE J. G O O D M A N A N D RUTH G O O D M A N M E M O R IA L FUND D o n o r: Isadore J. G oodm an Trust. C arrying V alue: $547,339.46. M a rke t V alue 1 2 /3 1 /7 7 : $704,327.00. Use o f in co m e : V arious d o n o rdesignated purposes. THE LOUISE W . A N D IRVING K. HELLER FUND D o n o r: Irvin g K. H e lle r Trust. C arrying Value: $20,624.67. M a rke t V alue 1 2 /3 1 /7 7 : $19,510.24. Use o f in co m e: U nrestricted ch aritab le purposes.

50

HARRIET E. McBRIDE FUND D o n o r: H a rrie t E. M c B rid e Trust. C a rrying V alue: $96,305.08. M a rk e t V alue 1 2 /3 1 /7 7 : $119,506.91. Use o f in c o m e : U n re stricte d ch a rita b le purposes. THE JO HN C. McLEAN M E M O R IA L FUND D o n o r : John C. McLean Trust. C a rrying V alue: $1,159,732.97. M a rk e t V alue 1 2 /3 1 /7 7 : $1,159,293.65. Use o f in c o m e : V arious d on o r-d e sign a ted purposes. VIC TO R MILLS FUND D o n o r: Last W ill and Testam ent o f V ic to r M ills. C arrying V alue: $53,122.91. M a rk e t V alue 1 2 /3 1 /7 7 : $53,122.91. Use o f in co m e : U n re stricte d ch a rita b le purposes.


ADDITIONS TO EXISTING TRUST FUNDS The George and May M a rg a ret A ngell Trust was increased by $181.13 th ro u g h a d is trib u tio n fro m the G eorge H. A ng e ll Estate. Charles Rieley A rm in g to n Fund was increased by a g ift o f $36,000.00 to in co m e fro m the Elizabeth Rieley A rm in g to n C h a rita b le Trust. The Dr. H a m ilto n Fisk Biggar Fund was increased by a g ift o f $500.00 fro m Dr. Paul V. Lemkau. C leveland Recreational A rts Fund was increased by a g ift o f $100.00 fro m The Raym ond John W eam F oundation. The Emerald N ecklace Fund was increased by a to ta l o f $496.95 fro m 22 co n trib u to rs . Fenn E ducational Fund was increased by a g ift o f $1,000.00 fro m the Chester A. Thom pson Estate. Sherman Johnson M e m o ria l Fund was increased by a g ift o f $9,625.00 fro m Frances M . Johnson.

Isaac T h eo d ore Kahn Fund was increased by $71.80 th ro u g h a d is trib u tio n fro m the Isaac T h eo d ore Kahn Trust. D o n a ld W . M c In ty re Fund was increased by $60,925.98 th ro u g h a d is trib u tio n fro m the D o n a ld W . M c In ty re Estate. Linda J. Peirce M e m o ria l Fund was increased by a g ift o f $3,010.13 fro m G ilb e rt S. Peirce. Clay L. and Florence Rannells Reely Fund was increased by $36,450.00 th ro u g h a d is trib u tio n fro m the Florence R. Reely Estate. W illia m K. Selman M e m o ria l Fund was increased by $2,019.08 th ro u g h a d is trib u tio n fro m the W illia m K. Selman Estate. Charles L. and M a rio n H. Stone Fund was increased by $3,807.25 th ro u g h a d is trib u tio n fro m the Charles L. Stone Estate. M aude S. T o m lin M e m o ria l Fund was increased by $222,260.37 th ro u g h a d is trib u tio n fro m the M aude S. T o m lin Estate.

51


THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION TRUST FUNDS A w id e variety o f donors, dedicated to The Cleveland Foundation as a means of benefiting th e ir com m u nity in years to come, have estab足 lished the fo llo w in g trust funds. These funds are named either fo r th e ir donors or by the do no r fo r a m em orial or, in some instances, fo r the recipient organization w hich they enrich.

Cleveland Foundation Com bined Funds Cleveland Recreational Arts Fund Caroline E. C oit Fund A. E. Convers Fund* Harry C oulby Fund No. 2 Harry C oulby Fund No. 4 Jacob D. Cox Fund S. Houghton Cox Fund

Rob Roy Alexander Fund The A loy M em orial Scholarship Fund The George and May Margaret Angell Trust A n is fie ld -W o lf Fund Charles Rieley A rm ington Fund W alter C. and Lucy I. Astrup Fund No. 1 W alter C. and Lucy I. Astrup Fund No. 2 Sophie Auerbach Fund*

Henry G. Dalton Fund The Howard and Edith Dingle Fund Edwin A. and Julia Greene Dodd Fund No. 1 Edwin A. and Julia Greene Dodd Fund No. 2 The Mary and W allace Duncan Fund Alice M cHardy Dye Fund

The Frederic M. and Nettie E. Backus M em orial Fund W alter C. and Fannie W h ite Baker Fund Lilian Hanna Baldwin Fund Mabel R. Bateman M em orial Fund W arner M. Bateman M em orial Fund C ornelia W . Beardslee Fund James C. Beardslee Fund Mary Berryman Fund Ida Beznoska Fund Big Brothers o f Greater Cleveland Fund The Dr. H am ilton Fisk Biggar Fund George Davis Bivin Fund* Katherine Bohm Fund Roberta Holden Bole Fund The George H. Boyd Fund* Alva Bradley II Fund G ertrude H. Britton, Katharine H. Perkins Fund Fannie Brown M em orial Fund George F. Buehler M em orial Fund Thomas Burnham M em orial Trust Katherine W ard Burrell Fund The M artha B. Carlisle M em orial Fund The Central High School Endowment Fund The Fred H. Chapin M em orial Fund The Frank J. and N ellie L. Chappie Fund* George W . Chisholm Fund J. E. G. Clark Trust M arie O denkirk Clark Fund The Elsa Claus M em orial Fund No. 2

The Emerald Necklace Fund Ada C. Emerson Fund* Henry A. Everett Trust Mary McGraw Everett Fund Charles Dudley Farnsworth Fund Dr. Frank Carl Felix and Flora Webster Felix Fund The Fenn Educational Fund First Cleveland Cavalry-Norton M em orial Fund W illiam C. Fischer and Lillye T. Fischer M em orial Fund* Fisher Fund Erwin L. Fisher and Fanny M. Fisher M em orial Fund Edward C. Flanigon Fund Constance C. Frackelton Fund No. 1 Constance C. Frackelton Fund No. 6 Constance C. Frackelton Fund No. 7 Constance C. Frackelton Fund No. 8 The Fannie Pitcairn Frackelton and David W. Frackelton Fund Robert J. Frackelton Fund The George Freeman Charity Fund Grace Jordan Gardner Fund Frederic H. Gates Fund The W illiam F. and Anna Lawrence Gibbons Fund* W illiam A. G iffhorn Fund Frederick Harris G off Fund Edwin R. G oldfield Fund Lillian F. G oldfield Fund M arie Louise Gollan Fund Dr. Isadore J. Goodman and Ruth Goodman M em orial Fund

Julius E. Goodman Fund The George C. and M arion S. Gordon Fund Robert B. Grandin Fund The Eugene S. Halle M em orial Fund The Blanche R. Halle M em orial Fund Edwin T. and Mary E. H am ilton Fund The Lynn J. and Eva D. Hamm ond M em orial Fund* Leonard C. Hanna, Jr. Cleveland Foundation Special Purpose Fund Leonard C. Hanna, Jr. C om m unity Developm ent Fund Leonard C. Hanna, Jr. Fund fo r C om m unity Chest Leonard C. Hanna, Jr. Fund fo r U nited Appeal W illia m Stitt Hannon Fund Perry G. Harrison and V irginia C. Harrison M em orial Fund The Kate Hanna Harvey M em orial Funds No. 1 and 2 M e lville H. Haskell, Mary H. Hunter, Gertrude H. Britton, Katharine H. Perkins Fund George Halle Hays Fund Kaufman Hays M em orial Fund The Louise W. and Irving H. Heller Fund The Hinds M em orial Fund* The Hiram House Fund The Jacob Hirtenstein Fund The H. M orley H itchcock Fund M ildred E. Hommel and A rthur G. Homm el M em orial Fund Centureena S. Hotchkiss Fund M artin Huge, Martha M. Huge, Theodore L. Huge and Reinhardt E. Huge M em orial Fund The John Huntington Benevolent Fund The A. W. H urlbut Fund Sherman Johnson M em orial Fund Caroline Bonnell Jones Fund James S. Jordan Fund Adrian D. Joyce Fund The Frederick W . and Henryett Slocum Judd Fund Henryett S. Judd Fund Isaac Theodore Kahn Fund T illie A. Kaley and Warren R. Kaley M em orial Fund Karamu House Trust Clarence A. Kirkham M em orial Fund John R. Kistner Fund The O tto and Lena Konigslow M em orial Fund* Elroy J. and Fynette H. Kulas Fund*


Martha M. Linden Fund Robert M. Linney Fund* Sue L. Little Fund Elizabeth T. Lohm iller Fund Ella L. Lowman Fund Henry M. Lucas Fund Clemens W. Lundoff and H ilda T. Lundoff Fund Frank J. Lynch Fund* Nellie Lynch Fund Theresa Mae MacNab Fund Leone R. Bowe M arco Fund Alice Keith M ather Fund The Samuel M ather and Flora Stone M ather M em orial Fund Harriet E. M cBride Fund The Lewis A. and Ellen E. McCreary M em orial Fund The George W. and Sarah M cG uire Fund Donald W. M cIntyre Fund The Katherine B. M cK itterick Fund The John C. McLean M em orial Fund The Thomas and M ary M cM yle r M em orial Fund The A lbert Younglove M eriam and Kathryn A. Meriam Fund Alice Butts M etcalf Fund Sarah Stern M ichael Fund V ictor M ills Fund Anna B. M inzer Fund Cornelia S. M oore Fund* The Mr. and Mrs. Jay P. M oore M em orial Fund W illiam Curtis M orton, M aud M orton, Kathleen M orton Fund E. Freeman M o u ld Fund Jane C. M o uld Fund Tom Neal Fund Blanche E. N orvell Fund* Harry N orvell Fund The Crispin and Kate Oglebay Trust Clarence A. Olsen Trust Mary King O sborn Fund W illiam P. Palmer Fund The Dr. Charles B. Parker M em orial Fund* The Joseph K. and Am y Shepard Patterson M em orial Fund Linda J. Peirce M em orial Fund Douglas Perkins Fund

Grace M. Pew Fund W alter D. Price Fund W illiam H. Price Fund The J. Ambrose and Jessie W heeler Purcell M em orial Fund* The Charles Greif Raible and Catherine Rogers Raible Fund The John R. Raible Fund Clay L. and Florence Rannells Reely Fund The Retreat M em orial Fund Charles L. Richman Fund Nathan G. Richman Fund Alice M. Rockefeller Fund Charles F. Ruby Fund W illiam A. Ruehl and Mary Ruehl M em orial Fund The Mary C oit Sanford M em orial Fund Mary C oit Sanford Fund Dr. Henry A. and Mary J. Schlink M em orial Fund W illiam C. Scofield M em orial Fund Charles W. and Lucille Sellers M em orial Fund* W illiam K. Selman M em orial Fund Frank S. Sheets and Alberta G. Sheets M em orial Fund Frank E. Shepardson Fund The Henry A. Sherwin and Frances M. Sherwin Fund* The Henry A. Sherwin and Frances M.Sherwin M em orial Fund No. 1* The Henry A. Sherwin and Frances M. Sherwin M em orial Fund No. 2* The John and LaVerne Short M em orial Fund The A. H. and Julia W. Shunk Fund The Thomas and Anna Sidlo Fund The N ellie B. Snavely Fund A. L. Somers Fund W illiam J. Southworth Fund* Dr. George P. Soyer Fund The John C. and Elizabeth F. Sparrow M em orial Fund M arion R. Spellman Fund Josephine L. Sperry Fund The George B. Spreng and Hazel Myers Spreng M em orial Fund The Hazel Myers Spreng Fund in m emory o f her parents, Mr. & Mrs. A. N. Myers Frederick C. Sterling Second Testamentary Trust*

Avery L. Sterner Fund Ada Gates Stevens M em orial Fund Catherine E. Stewart, M artha A. Stewart, Judith H. Stewart and Jeannette Stewart M em orial Fund Jessie Stewart Fund Charles L. and M arion H. Stone Fund Harriet B. Storrs Fund Leonard F. Stowe Fund Henrietta Teufel M em orial Fund The John H. Thomas Fund Amos Burt and Jeanne L. Thompson Fund Maude S. Tom lin M em orial Fund M abelle G. and Finton L. Torrence Fund James H. Turner Fund Charles F. Uhl Fund John F. and Mary G. W ahl M em orial Fund Jessie M acDonald W alker M em orial Fund The John Mason W alter and Jeanne M. W alter M em orial Fund No. 1 The John Mason W alter and Jeanne M. W alter M em orial Fund No. 2 Mabel Breckenridge Wason Fund A Mabel Breckenridge Wason Fund B* George B. and Edith S. W heeler Trust Edward Loder W hittem ore Fund Henry E. and Ethel L. W id d e ll Fund The John Edmund W illiam s Fund Teresa Jane W illiam s M em orial Fund James D. W illiam son Fund The George H., Charles E., and Samuel Denny W ilson M em orial Fund Edith Anisfield W o lf Fund* David C. W right M em orial Fund Edith W right M em orial Fund

PARTIAL BENEFITS FUNDS *These trusts provide payments o f annuities to certain individuals p rio r to payment o f incom e to the Foundation. W ith tw o exceptions, The Cleveland Foundation w ill ultim ately receive the entire net incom e from these funds. The principal amounts o f these funds are carried as assets o f The Cleveland Foundation.

53


SUPPORTING ORGANIZATIONS U n d e r the p ro visions o f Section 509(a)(3) o f the Internal Revenue C ode, it is possible, u nd e r certain co n d itio n s, fo r an o rg a n iza tio n w h ic h w o u ld o th e rw ise be co nsidered a p riva te fo u n ­ d a tio n to be classified instead as a tax-exem pt s u p p o rtin g o rg an iza tion o f a p u b lic charity. The su p p o rtin g o rg an iza tion p ro visio n allow s re te n tio n o f a separate id e n tity and perm its

c o n tin u in g in v o lv e m e n t in its affairs by fo u n d e rs o r th e ir designees. U n lik e a p riva te fo u n d a tio n , h ow ever, the o rg a n iza tio n is no lo n g e r su b je ct to federal excise tax on net in ve stm e n t in co m e, certain restrictions on ope ra tio ns, and rather c o m p lic a te d r e p o r tin g a nd r e c o r d - k e e p in g requirem ents. To q u a lify as a s u p p o rtin g o rg a n iz a tio n sev­ eral c o n d itio n s m ust be satisfied. The m ost im p o rta n t are the a d o p tio n o f general ch aritab le purposes id e n tica l to those o f The C leveland F oundation and the a p p o in tm e n t o f a m a jo rity o f the o rg an iza tion 's trustees by the D is trib u tio n C o m m itte e o f The C leveland F oundation fro m am ong its m em bers. In 1973 The S herw ick Fund, fo rm e rly a private fa m ily fo u n d a tio n created tw e n ty years earlier by John and Frances W ic k S herw in, becam e a su p p o rtin g o rg an iza tion o f The C leveland Foun­ d atio n . In 1977, tw e n ty - o n e g ra n ts to ta lin g $97,575 w ere a u th o rize d by the Fund's trustees in s u p p o rt o f a va rie ty o f e du ca tion a l, health, social service and c u ltu ra l arts program s. A d eta ile d listin g o f 1977 grants may be fo u n d in the separately pub lish e d S herw ick Fund annual report. In 1977 a second su p p o rtin g o rg an iza tion jo in e d The C leveland Foundation. The W illia m J. and D o ro th y K. O 'N e ill, Sr. Fund was created by the O 'N e ills and w ill, w ith g ro w th over tim e , p ro vid e an a d d itio n a l source o f p h ila n th ro p ic d ollars fo r the Cleveland area. A ny private fo u n d a tio n c o n sid e rin g e ith e r transfer o f its assets to The Cleveland Founda­ tio n — a p u b lic ch arity und e r the pro visio ns o f the Tax Reform A ct o f 1969 — o r w is h in g to dis­ cuss the p o s s ib ility o f a ffilia te status sh ou ld c o n ­ tact the D ire c to r o f The C leveland Foundation.

54


COMBINED FUND GROWTH OF THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION The C o m b in e d Fund was created w ith in The Cleveland F o un d atio n in 1943 to p ro v id e a w ay through w h ic h gifts o f any size c o u ld be made and p ut to w o rk m o re e ffic ie n tly . Several th o u ­ sand d onors have c o n trib u te d to the C o m b in e d Fund since its creation. G ifts to the C o m b in e d Fund retain th e ir separate id e n tity as m em orials b ut are co m m in g le d fo r in ve stm en t purposes, thereby p ro v id in g a large b lo c k o f capital fo r m ore e ffic ie n t in ve stm en t m anagem ent and greater in co m e p o te n tia l. D u rin g 1977 the C o m b in e d Fund generated incom e fo r grant purposes o f $404,552.20. M a r­ ket value o f the C o m b in e d Fund at D ecem ber 31, 1977 to ta le d $7,320,452.01. N e w funds and m em orials and a d d itio n s to already established funds and m em orials, n o t p re viou sly re ported, a m ounted to $239,408 in 1977. G ifts to the C o m b in e d Fund may be m ade in the name o f an in d iv id u a l o r as m em orials. There is no re strictio n as to size, and a d d itio n s may be m ade at any tim e . D o n ors are e n c o u r­ aged to m ake th e ir gifts available fo r u nre ­ stricted ch a rita b le purposes, since this enables the F oundation to be fle x ib le in m e e ting chang­ ing c o m m u n ity needs and problem s. If a d o n o r wishes to express a preference as to h o w the inco m e fro m his g ift sh ould be spent, it is sug­ g e s te d t h a t o n e o f th e f o l l o w i n g g e n e r a l C leveland F oundation grant categories — Edu­ ca tion , C u ltu ra l A ffairs, H ealth and Social Ser­ vices, C ivic A ffairs, and Special P h ila n th ro p ic Purposes — be specified.

NEW FUNDS AND MEMORIALS Ruth and Elmer Babin Fund, $25,000 D o n o r: Elmer and Ruth Babin Fund o f The Jewish C o m m u n ity Federation o f Cleveland Use o f in co m e: U n re stricte d ch aritab le purposes. Charles A. D riffie ld M e m o ria l Fund, $10,000 D o n o r: Estate o f Charles A. D riffie ld Use o f in co m e: U n re stricte d ch aritab le purposes. The A rth u r and Agnes Severson M e m o ria l Fund, $60,000 D o n o r : Estate o f Agnes M . Severson Use o f in co m e: C rip p le d , retarded, hearing im p a ire d ch ild re n . Samuel S ilbert Fund, $500 D o n o r: Estate o f Samuel S ilbert Use o f in co m e: U n re stricte d ch aritab le purposes. Chester A. Thom pson Fund, $10,000 D o n o r: Estate o f Chester A. Thom pson Use o f in co m e: U n re stricte d ch aritab le purposes. W h itin g W illia m s Fund, $10,000 D o n o r: Estate o f W h itin g W illia m s Use o f in co m e: V arious d o n o r-d e sign a ted purposes.

M iscellaneous c o n trib u tio n s to The C o m b in e d Fund u nd e r the 1977 R esolution and D e claration o f Trust, $500.

ADDITIONS TO EXISTING FUNDS AND MEMORIALS R obert K. Beck M e m o ria l Fund, $500 D o n o r: D o ro th y S. Beck Ernest J. Bohn M e m o ria l Fund, $20,715 D o n o r: Estate o f Ernest J. Bohn Thom as Burnham M e m o ria l Fund, $581 D o n o r: M ary Louise G ollan — W in s to n P. Burton Fund Frank S. G ibson M e m o ria l Fund, $300 D o n o r: Dr. M a ie r M . D riv e r Dr. John W . H o llo w a y M e m o ria l Fund, $707 D o n o r: Estate o f Sue A. W o o d fo rd Josephine R. and Edward W . Sloan, Jr. F u n d ,$500 D o n o r: Josephine R. and Edward W . Sloan, Jr. A rth u r P. and Elizabeth M . W illia m s o n Fund, $100,000 D o n o r: Elizabeth M . W illia m s o n Dr. Edward A. Y u rick Fund, $10.00 D o n o r: Dr. Edward A. Y urick

D o ro th y Y oung W y k o ff M e m o ria l, $95 D o n o r: Various donors Use o f in co m e: U nre stricte d ch aritab le purposes. 55


THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION COMBINED FUND M orris Abrams Fund Academ y o f M edicine, Health Education Foundation Fund Rhoda L. A ffe ld e r Fund W ickham H. A ld rich Fund Eunice W estfall A llen M em orial Samuel W estfall A llen M em orial Lydia M ay Ames Fund Raleigh F. A ndrie M em orial Fund M arguerite E. Anselm M em orial Katherine B. A rundel Fund Leonard P. Ayres M em orial Ruth and Elmer Babin Fund A. D. Baldwin M em orial Fund Robert K. Beck M em orial Hattie E. Bingham Fund Beulah Holden Bluim M em orial A rth u r Blythin M em orial Robert Blythin M em orial Ernest J. Bohn M em orial Fund Helen R. Bowler Fund Nap. H. Boynton M em orial Fund Alva Bradley M em orial Brigham Britton Fund Charles F. Buescher M em orial Thomas Burnham M em orial Fund Elizabeth A. Burton M em orial Edmund S. Busch Fund Robert H. Busch Scholarship Fund Carmela Cafarelli Fund Edna L. and Gustav W. Carlson Foundation M em orial Fund Leyton E. Carter M em orial Fund George S. Case Fund Fred H. Chapin M em orial The Adele C orning Chisholm M em orial Fund Garnetta B. Christenson and LeRoy W. Christenson Fund M r. and Mrs. Harold T. Clark Fund Inez and Harry Clem ent Award Fund Cleveland Center on Alcoholism Fund Cleveland Conference fo r Educational Cooperation Fund Cleveland Guidance Center Endowment Fund Cleveland Heights High School Scholarship Fund Cleveland Psychoanalytic Society Fund The Cleveland Sorosis Fund

56

Cleveland W ar M em orial A rth u r Cobb M em orial A rth u r Cobb, Jr. M em orial Florence Haney Cobb M em orial Louise B. Cobb M em orial M ary Gaylord Cobb M em orial Percy W ells Cobb M em orial Ralph W. Cobb, Jr. M em orial Dr. Harold N. Cole M em orial Lawrence E. Connelly M em orial Judge Alva R. C orlett M em orial Mary B. Couch Fund Jacob D. Cox, Jr. M em orial W illis B. Crane M em orial Dr. W ilb u r S. Crowell M em orial Marianne North Cumm er M em orial Glenn A. C utler M em orial Nathan L. Dauby M em orial Mary E. Dee M em orial Fund Carl D ittm ar M em orial Magdalene Pahler Donahey Fund Anna J. Dorman and Pliny O. Dorman M em orial Fund L. Dale Dorney M em orial Fund James J. Doyle and Lillian Herron Doyle Scholarship Fund Robert J. Drake M em orial Charles A. D riffie ld M em orial Fund Kristian Eilertsen Fund Irene C. and Karl Emmerling Scholarship Fund Charles Farran Fund A rthur H. Feher Fund W illiam S. and Freda M. Fell M em orial Fund Herold and Clara Fellinger Charitable Fund Sidney B. Fink M em orial Percy R. and Beatrice Round Forbes M em orial Fund Frances B. and George W. Ford M em orial Fund Gladys J. and Homer D. Foster Fund Harriet R. Fowler Fund Katyruth Strieker Fraley M em orial Annie A. France Fund Hermine Frankel M em orial I. F. Freiberger Fund Mrs. I. F. Freiberger M em orial W inifred Fryer M em orial Fund Florence I. Garrett M em orial Frank S. Gibson M em orial Fund Ellen Gardner G ilm ore M em orial

Frances Southw orth G off M em orial Robert B. Grandin M em orial James L. Greene M em orial Bell Greve M em orial Fund Robert Hays Gries M em orial Carolyn K. Grossman Fund Isador Grossman M em orial Fund MarcJ. Grossman Fund Jessie Haig M em orial Florence H am ilton M em orial Leonard C. Hanna, Jr. Cleveland Play House Fund The Leonard C. Hanna, Jr. Special Fund Mrs. W ard Harrison M em orial F. H. Haserot Fund Hom er H. Hatch Fund James W. Havighurst M em orial Scholarship Fund Lewis Howard Hayden and Lulu M ay Hayden Fund Nora Hays Fund Iva L. Herl Fund The Siegmund and Bertha B. Herzog Endowment Fund Highland View Hospital Employees' Fund A lbert M. Higley M em orial M ary G. Higley Fund Reuben W. H itchcock Fund Mary Louise Hobson M em orial Fund M r. and Mrs. A rth u r S. Holden Fund Cora M ille t Holden M em orial Guerdon S. Holden M em orial Helen M. H olland M em orial Dr. John W. H ollow ay M em orial Fund John W. H olt M em orial Mrs. John H. Hord M em orial A. R. H orr Fund Joseph C. Hostetler M em orial Mrs. Ray Irvin M em orial The Norma W itt Jackson Fund Earle J. Johnson and W alter Sawtelle Doan and Ella P. Doan M em orial Fund James K. Johnson, Jr. M em orial Fund Minerva B. Johnson M em orial Fund Virginia K. Johnson M em orial Fund Florence Jones M em orial The Thomas Hoyt Jones Family Fund Mr. and Mrs. Sidney D. Josephs Fund A lbert B. and Sara P. Kern M em orial Fund Joseph E. Kewley M em orial Fund


Quay H. Kinzig Memorial Thomas M. Kirby Memorial Dr. Emmanuel Klaus Memorial Fund Samuel B. Knight Fund The Philip E. and Bertha Hawley Knowlton Fund Estelle C. Koch Memorial Scholarship Fund Richard H. Kohn Fund Samuel E. Kramer Law Scholarship Fund George H. Lapham Fund Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Latham Fund Dr. and Mrs. Robert H. Lechner Fund Margaret Irene Leslie Fund Daniel W. Loeser Fund Meta M. Long Fund The W illiam Fred Mackay and Cora Carlisle Mackay Memorial Fund Anna Mary Magee Memorial Fund George A. and Mary E. Marten Fund Mrs. E. O. Marting Memorial The Frederick R. and Bertha Specht Mautz Scholarship Fund Malcolm L. McBride and John Harris McBride II Memorial Fund Thomas McCauslen Memorial Mrs. E. P. McCullagh Memorial Emma E. McDonald Fund Hilda J. McGee Fund Gladys M. McIntyre Memorial Fund Anna Curtiss M cNutt Memorial Charles E. Meink Memorial William J. Mericka Memorial The Grace E. Meyette Fund Herman R. and Esther S. M iller Memorial Fund Emma B. Minch Fund John A. Mitchell and Blanche G. M itchell Fund Harry F. M iter Memorial Helen Moore Fund Daniel E. Morgan Memorial Fund Mary MacBain Motch Fund Ray E. Munn Fund John P. Murphy Memorial Christopher Bruce Narten Memorial The National City Bank Fund Harlan H. Newell Memorial Jessie Roe North and George Mahan North Memorial Fund John F. O berlin and John C. Oberlin Fund

Ethelwyne Walton Osborn Memorial Erla Schlather Parker Fund Charles J. and Marian E. Paterson Fund Blanche B. Payer Fund Caroline Brown Prescott Memorial Fund Mary Dunham Prescott Memorial The George John Putz and Margaret Putz Memorial Fund The George F. Quinn Memorial Scholarship Fund Omar S. Ranney Memorial Grace P. Rawson Fund Marie Richardson Memorial Fund Minerva P. Ridley Fund Edna A. Rink Fund Orra M. Risberg Memorial Gertrude M. Robertson Memorial Clarence A. Roode Memorial Elizabeth Becker Rorabeck Fund Edward L. Rosenfeld and Bertha M. Rosenfeld Memorial Fund Dr. A. T. Roskos Fund Dorothy and Helen Ruth Fund St. Barnabas Guild for Nursing Fund Mrs. Raymond T. Sawyer Memorial Oliver H. Schaaf Fund Cornelius G. Scheid Memorial Fund The Robert N. Schwartz Fund for Retarded Children Alice Duty Seagrave Foreign Study Fund Warner Seely Fund Arthur H. Seibig Fund Mrs. Louis B. Seltzer Memorial The Arthur and Agnes Severson Memorial Fund Annette S. Shagren Memorial Nina Sherrer Fund The John and Frances W. Sherwin Fund Cornelia Adams Shiras Memorial Dr. Thomas Shupe Memorial Fund Samuel Silbert Fund David G. Skall Memorial Mr. and Mrs. Paul T. Skove Fund Josephine R. and Edward W. Sloan, Jr. Fund Social W ork Scholarship Fund Society for Crippled Children — Tris Speaker Memorial Fund Society National Bank Fund Meade A. Spencer Memorial The Miriam Kerruish Stage Fund

Belle Bierce Stair Memorial Frederick S. Stamberger Memorial Nellie Steele Stewart Memorial The Charles J. Stilwell Scholarship Fund Ralph P. Stoddard Memorial Fund Esther H. and B. F. Stoner Memorial Fund Vernon Stouffer Memorial Fund M ortim er I. Strauss and Helen E. Strauss and Blanche New Memorial Fund Joseph T. Sweeny Memorial Charles Farrand Taplin and Elsie H. Taplin Fund C. F. Taplin Fund Jessie Loyd Tarr Memorial Elizabeth Bebout Taylor Memorial Mary J. Tewksbury Fund Allison John Thompson Memorial Fund Chester A. Thompson Fund Margaret Hayden Thompson Fund Sarah R. Thompson Fund Homer F. Tielke Fund Maud Kerruish Towson Memorial Jessie C. Tucker Memorial Fund The Charles F. Uhl and Carl F. Uhl Memorial Fund Leo W. Ulmer Fund Malcolm B. Vilas Memorial Philip R. and Mary S. Ward Memorial Fund Cornelia Blakemore Warner Memorial Fund Helen B. Warner Fund Stanley H. Watson Memorial Frank Walter Weide Fund The Harry H. and Stella B. Weiss Memorial Fund Caroline Briggs Welch Memorial S. Burns and Simonne H. Weston Fund Lucius J. and Jennie C. Wheeler Memorial Fund Elliott H. W hitlock Memorial Mary C. W hitney Fund The Marian L. and Edna A. Whitsey Fund R. N. and H. R. Wiesenberger Fund Lewis B. Williams Memorial W hiting Williams Fund Arthur P. and Elizabeth M. Williamson Fund Marjorie A. W inbigler Memorial John W. Woodburn Memorial Nelle P. W oodworth Fund Dorothy Young W ykoff Memorial Leward C. W ykoff Memorial Dr. Edward A. Yurick Fund Herbert E. and Eleanor M. Zdara Memorial Fund

57


STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES THE

CLEVELAND FOUNDATION

Year ended December 31, 1977

P R IN C IP A L

B a la n ce s at J a n u a ry 1 ,1 9 7 7 IN C R E A S ES IN FUND B A LA N C E S R e ce ived fro m d o n o rs G ain (loss) fro m sa le o f assets D ivid e n d s In te re s t—net o f a m o rtiz a tio n and p u rch a se d in te re s t P erson a l In ve stm e n t T ru s t Fund in co m e C o m m o n tru s t fu n d c e rtific a te in co m e P a rtia l b e n e fit in co m e R ental in co m e R eturn o f unused p o rtio n o f p rio r y e a rs ’ g ra n ts D is trib u tio n o f e sta te in co m e O the r T O T A L INCREASES IN FUND B A LA N C E S TRAN SFER S From in co m e to p rin c ip a l DECREASES IN FUND B A LA N C E S A u th o riz e d by tru ste e ban ks: T ru s te e s ’ fees O th e r tru s t expenses P aym ents u n d e r g ra n ts a u th o rize d by The C le ve la n d F o u n d a tio n C o m m itte e o r th e D is trib u tio n C o m m itte e : For c h a rita b le p urpo se s T o C le ve la n d F o u n d a tio n R esources fo r a d m in is tra tiv e purpo se s O th e r T O T A L DECREASES IN FUND BALA N C E S B a la n ce s at D e ce m b e r 31, 1977

58

1914 RESOLUTION

MULTIPLE TRUSTEESHIP RESOLUTION

COMBINED FUND RESOLUTION

TOTAL PRINCIPAL

$21,410,405

$110,827,868

$6,881,311

$139,119,584

96,805 312,805

2,503,910 813,052

1,432

9,950

844

12,226

411,042

3,326,912

229,121

3,967,075

239,409 (11,132)

1,759

2,840,124 1,114,725

1,759

41,718

192,537 24,905

17,213

251,468 24,905

60,000

2,625

4,633

67,258

850

15 8,572

102,568

228,654

21,846

353,068

$21,720,638

$113,926,126

$7,088,586

$142,735,350

865 8,572


IN C O M E 1914 RESOLUTION

MULTIPLE TRUSTEESHIP RESOLUTION

COMBINED FUND RESOLUTION

TOTAL INCOME

TOTAL PRINCIPAL AND INCOME

$ 457,846

$1,563,812

$336,857

$2,358,515

$141,478,099

36,000

2,876,124 1,114,725 3,128,141 2,696,365 427,643 237,289 3,579,265 40,828 54,334 295,546 12,226

36,000 717,541 683,563 222,655

2 , 201,211

201,224 1,961 1,183 3,527

1,785,513 204,988 200,787 3,378,041 38,867 52,114 287,626

1,831,654

8,185,147

209,389 227,289

1,037 4,393

3,128,141 2,696,365 427,643 237,289 3,579,265 40,828 54,334 295,546

478,610

10,495,411

36,502

(1,759)

(1,759)

14,462,486 -

0

-

58,254 1,216

183,945 8,320

16,403 23

258,602 9,559

510,070 34,464

1,675,293

6,690,793

485,933

8,852,019

8,919,277

123,101

541,470

57,620

722,191

723,056 8,572

1,857,864

7,424,528

559,979

9,842,371

10,195,439

$ 429,877

$2,324,431

$255,488

$3,009,796

$145,745,146

59


STA i civiti'i i w r ASSETS AND FUND BALANCES

STATEMENT OF ASSETS AND FUND BALANCES THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION December 31,1977

A SSETS T ru s t Funds: 1914 R e s o lu tio n : Cash S e c u ritie s : U.S. G o ve rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s B onds C om m on and p re fe rre d s to cks P erson a l Inve stm e n t T ru s t Fund c e rtific a te s o f The C le ve la n d T ru st C o m p an y M u ltip le T ru s te e s h ip R e so lu tio n : Cash S e c u ritie s : U.S. G o ve rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s B onds C om m on and p re fe rre d sto cks P ersonal Inve stm e n t T ru st Fund c e rtific a te s o f The C le ve la nd T ru s t C o m p an y C om m on tru s t fu n d c e rtific a te s o f the tru s te e banks O th e r in ve stm en ts C o m b in e d Fund R e so lu tio n : Cash S e c u ritie s : U.S. G o ve rn m e n t o b lig a tio n s B onds C om m on and p re fe rre d s to cks C om m on tru s t fu n d c e rtific a te s o f the tru s te e banks O th e r in vestm ents

NOTE—Since approximate market valuations as of December 31,1977 for other investments were not readily obtainable, the carrying value of other investments has been shown in the approximate market column.

60

FUND B A LA N C E S T ru s t Funds: P rin c ip a l Inco m e

nr rnvjAr MATE M A R K E T-

Note

98,236

98,236

3,443,735 7,074,666 7,984,778

3,462,004 6,691,186 15,605,146

3,549,100

4,385,255

22,150,515

30,241,827

1,086,349

1,086,349

13,463,942 34,995,092 57,122,454

13,362,108 32,008,215 94,300,110

4,871,437

5,166,388

3,336,005

3,213,398

114,875,279 1,375,278

149,136,568 1,375,278

116,250,557

150,511,846

222,201

222,201

1,055,967 1,963,555 3,677,793

1,050,139 1,812,843 4,111,046

424,047

462,565

7,343,563 _________511

7,658,794 _________511

7,344,074

7,659,305

$145,745,146

$188,412,978

$

$142,735,350 3,009,796 $ 145 ,745,146


REPORT CLEVELAND FOUNDATION RESOURCES C leveland F oundation Resources serves as the a dm in istra tive arm o f The C leveland Founda­ tio n . It is a n o n p ro fit c o rp o ra tio n , organized under Section 509(a) (3) o f the Internal Revenue Code as a s u p p o rtin g o rg a n iza tio n o f The Cleveland Foundation. It th e re fo re has id e ntica l ch aritab le purposes and its g ove rn in g b o d y has the same m em b e rship as the F o undation's D is­ trib u tio n C o m m itte e . Besides its a d m in istra tive role, Cleveland Foundation Resources is used as a ve hicle fo r h o ld in g grants fro m The C leveland Foundation d u rin g the d e v e lo p m e n t and early im p le m e n ­ ta tio n stages o f various p ro jects and regranting them at the a p p ro p ria te tim e . H ow ever, it is n o t ty p ic a lly a g ra ntm a kin g o rg an iza tion .

G RANTS C LE V E LA N D FO U N D A TIO N RESOURCES CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY Cleveland Regional Perinatal N e tw o r k ..............................................................................................................................................................................................$ 200,000 Social service delivery in B r i t a i n ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4,805 CLEVELAND FOUNDATION RESOURCES Ohio Foundation Conference, 1977 ...................................................................................................................................................................................................

2,000

INSTITUTE FOR DEVELOPMENT OF EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES, INC., (I/D /E /A ) , Dayton, Ohio Citizen information center fo r O h i o ...................................................................................................................................................................................................

7,500

MERSHON CENTER, Columbus, Ohio General support fo r W omen’s Ohio Volunteer Employment Network ( W O V E N ) ....................................................................................................................

7,500

NATIONAL COUNCIL ON PHILANTHROPY, New York General s u p p o rt........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

5,000

UPPER PROSPECT AREA ASSOCIATION Neighborhood Commercial R e v ita liz a tio n .........................................................................................................................................................................................

4,000

WOMEN’S CITY CLUB “ Wednesday’s W omen” (second-year s u p p o r t ) ..............................................................................................................................................................................

4,000

TOTAL G R A N T S ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................$ 234,805

61


STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES CLEVELAND FOUNDATION RESOURCES Year ended December 31,1977

RESTRICTED FUNDS

B a la n c e at J a n u a ry 1, 1977 R e c e ip ts : S p e c ia l a d m in is tra tiv e g ra n ts In v e s tm e n t in co m e e arne d Fee in c o m e fro m The C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n Fee in c o m e fro m a d m in is te re d p ro g ra m s C o n trib u tio n s O th e r in co m e D is b u rs e m e n ts: G ra nts D e s ig n a te d p ro g ra m s S p e c ia l p ro g ra m s A d m in is tra tiv e expe n ses

CUSTODIAL FUNDS

CONTRI­ BUTIONS FOR DESIGNATED PROGRAMS

CONTRI­ BUTIONS RESTRICTED FOR SPECIAL PROGRAMS

OTHER GRANT FUNDS

UNRESTRICTED OPERATING FUNDS

$127,261

$379,148

$471,358

$ 54,740

$145,389 77,064 61,412 645,205

378,942

601,007

4,200

112,377

10,809 50 1,326

506,203

980,155

475,558

167,117

941,255

127.048 203.616

808.725 127.048

506.554

203.616

116.155

808.725

379,155

473,601

271,942

50,962

132,530

60,281

(60,281) $ 50,962

$132,530

T ra n s fe r o f fu n d s to d e s ig n a te d p ro g ra m s fro m s p e c ia l p ro g ra m s — net B a la n c e at D e c e m b e r 31, 1977

62

116.155 506.554

$379,155

$533,882

$211,661


BALANCE SHEET CLEVELAND FOUNDATION RESOURCES December 31, 1977

ASSETS Cash C e rtific a te s o f d e p o s it S h o rt-te rm in ve stm e n ts F u rn itu re and e q u ip m e n t O th e r a ssets

$

2,053 750,000 598,953 1 45,220 $1,396,227

L IA B IL IT IE S A N D FUND B A LA N C E S A c c o u n ts p a y a b le and a c c ru e d expe n ses Fund b a la n c e s : R e stricte d C u s to d ia l F unds C o n trib u tio n s fo r d e sig n a te d p ro g ra m s C o n trib u tio n s re s tric te d fo r s p e c ia l p ro g ra m s O th e r g ra n t fu n d s U n re s tric te d —a v a ila b le fo r o p e ra tin g p u rp o s e s

$

88,037

$379,155 533,882 211,661 50,962 1,175,660 132,530 $1,396,227


GIVING TO THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION G ifts to The C leveland Foundation may be made in several ways. A ll gifts, regardless o f size, are used fo r the ch aritab le needs o f the G reater C leveland co m m u n ity. D o n ors to the Foundation may d ire c t gifts or bequests to sp ecific agencies o r in stitu tio n s o r to broad areas o f concern, such as e ducation, health and s o c ia l se rvice s, c iv ic o r cu ltural affairs. M any d onors p ro vid e w h o lly unrestricted gifts, e ntru stin g to the Foundation's D is trib u tio n C o m m itte e the decisions on h o w these funds shall be u tiliz e d over the years. The unrestricted g ift provides im p o rta n t fle x ib ility and allow s the D is trib u tio n C o m m itte e to respond m ore effec­ tively to changing c o m m u n ity needs as they emerge. There are three basic ways in w h ich donors may c o n trib u te to The Cleveland Foundation: • The Separate Trust Fund is generally estab­ lished fo r a g ift o f $250,000 o r more. Each trust o f this kind is held and managed separately by one o f the five banks w h ich serve as Foundation trustees. A d m in istra tive costs make it m ost e f­ fective o n ly fo r m ore sizable gifts. • The C o m b in e d Fund provides a m ore cost e ffective w ay o f receiving and a dm iniste ring gifts o f any size. Either large o r m odest gifts may be received und e r this plan because the trustee banks co m b in e in d ivid u a l c o n trib u tio n s and in ­ vest them as a w h o le. This procedure n ot o nly serves to increase the p o te n tia l fo r overall in ­ vestm ent return, b u t it also reduces the cost o f a dm iniste ring the d o n o r's gift. The C o m bined Fund is also an a p p ro p ria te means fo r m e m o ria l­ izing a deceased frie n d o r m em ber o f the fam ily. • The S upp orting O rg an iza tio n , und e r p ro v i­ sions o f Section 509 (a)(3) o f the Internal Rev­ enue Code, as a m e n d e d , p ro v id e s a means

fo r private fo u n d a tio n s to a ffilia te w ith The C leveland Foundation. In accordance w ith these provisions, the D is trib u tio n C o m m itte e o f The C leveland F oundation has d e fin e d ce rtain c o n ­ d itio n s w h ic h m ust be satisfied. A m o n g these are: (a) a m a jo rity o f the g o v e rn in g b o d y o f the su p p o rtin g o rg a n iza tio n is a p p o in te d by the D is trib u tio n C o m m itte e fro m a m ong its m e m ­ bers; (b) the assets o f the s u p p o rtin g o rg a n iza ­ tio n are to be managed as an agency a cco u n t by one o r rhore o f the trustee banks o f The C le ve ­ land F o un d atio n ; and (c) the s u p p o rtin g o rg a n ­ ization is re q uired to u tiliz e the professional staff services o f The C leveland F o un d atio n , w ith annual fees fo r those services co m p a ra b le to th o s e assessed o th e r C le v e la n d F o un d atio n funds. W h e th e r th ro u g h a separate tru st fu n d o r throu g h the C o m b in e d Fund, an in d iv id u a l g ift may be made e ith e r as a d ire c t bequest d u rin g the d o n o r's life tim e , o r it may be established in the d o n o r's w ill. F oundation staff is always available to p ro v id e in fo rm a tio n in response to in q uirie s a b o u t the a lterna tive m ethods o f giv­ ing to the Foundation and a b o u t the d o n o r's specific p h ila n th ro p ic objectives. It is suggested th a t any in d iv id u a l desirin g to make a g ift to The C leveland F oundation c o n fe r w ith an attorney, fin an cia l advisor, o r the tru st d e p a rtm e n t o f one o f the fiv e p a rtic ip a tin g tru s­ tee banks—Central N ational Bank o f C leveland, The Cleveland Trust C om pany, N a tio na l C ity Bank, Society N a tio na l Bank o f C leveland, o r U n io n C om m erce Bank.


1977 DISTRIBUTION COMMITTEE H. Stuart Harrison, C hairm an* W a lte r O. Spencer, V ice C hairm an* Mrs. Scott R. York, V ice C hairm an George B. Chapm an, Jr.* Robert D. Gries David G. H ill Appointed April 1, 1977 Frank E. Joseph Completed term March 31, 1977 George F. Karch Completed term March 31, 1977 Mrs. D rue King, Jr. Thomas W . M astin Appointed April 1, 1977 W illia m J. O 'N e ill, Sr.* Thomas F. Patton Completed term March 31, 1977 Thomas V. H. V ail* M. Brock W e ir Appointed April 1, 1977 *Members of the 1914 Foundation Committee and the Combined Fund D istribution Committee

TRUSTEES COMMITTEE

STAFF

M. Brock W e ir, Chairm an President and C hief Executive O ffic e r The C leveland Trust C om pany

H o m e r C. W a d sw o rth , D ire c to r T im o th y D. A rm b ru ster, Program O ffic e r Patricia Jansen D oyle, Program O ffic e r Patrick J. Henry, Program O ffic e r M u rie l H. Jones, M anager, O ffic e Services John G. Joyce, M anager, Financial Services G lo ria Kish, A c c o u n ta n t Henry J. Kubach, A c c o u n ta n t Steven A. M in te r, Program O ffic e r M ariam C. N oland, Program O ffic e r Richard F. T om pkins, Program O ffic e r

John A. G elbach C hairm an o f the Board and C h ie f Executive O ffic e r C entral N ational Bank o f C leveland Claude M. Blair C hairm an o f the Board and C h ie f Executive O ffic e r N ational C ity Bank J M a u rice Struchen C hairm an o f the Board and C hief Executive O ffic e r Society N ational Bank o f C leveland Lyman H. Treadw ay C hairm an o f the Board, President and C h ie f Executive O ffic e r U nion C om m erce Bank

G. Brooks Earnest, C o n sulta n t Barbara H. Rawson, C o nsultant Ernst & Ernst, A u d ito rs Thom pson, H ine & Flory, Legal Counsel

1977 A N N U A L REPORT Patricia Jansen D oyle, Editor John F. M o rre ll, A rt D ire c to r Frank A le ksa n d ro w icz, P rim ary P hotographer Janice C. M ille r, E ditorial Assistant THE CLEVELAND F O U N D A T IO N 700 N ational C ity Bank B uildfh g Cleveland, O h io 44114 T e le ph o ne : (216) 861-3810



Cleveland Foundation – 1977 Annual Report