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THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION The Cleveland Foundation is the oldest and one o f the largest c o m m u n ity fou n da tio ns in the country. It was established in 1914 to p ro vide a mechanism throu g h w h ic h any d o n o r m ig h t make a g ift o r bequest of any size fo r the b enefit o f the Greater Cleveland co m m u n ity, certain tha t changing needs w o u ld n o t make the g ift obsolete. There are n o w 234 separate trust funds in the Foundation plus a C o m b in ed Fund fo r the in ­ vestm ent of smaller gifts. The five trustee banks of The Cleveland Foundation safeguard and in ­ vest the funds w h ic h are allocated several times each year by an 1 1-m em ber D istrib u tio n C o m ­ mittee. This co m m itte e, assisted by a profes­ sional staff, distributes the funds in ways both consistent w ith d o n o r wishes and in tune w ith co nte m p orary p h ila n th ro p ic opportunities. Some donors designate specific organizations to receive the gifts; others lim it gifts to broader areas o f concern such as civic or cultural affairs, e ducation, health or social services. M any d o ­ nors give w h o lly unrestricted gifts w h ich provide im p o rta n t fle x ib ility in a llo w in g the D istribu tio n C o m m itte e to respond effectively to changing c o m m u n ity needs as they emerge. M em bers o f the D istribu tio n C o m m itte e are selected in a variety of ways to assure that a

cross section of c o m m u n ity leadership is re­ sponsible fo r d istrib u tio n of the Foundation's resources. O ne m e m b e ro f the D is trib u tio n C o m ­ m ittee is appo in te d by each of the fo llo w in g : the chief judge o f the United States District Court, Northern D istrict o f O h io , Eastern D iv i­ sion; the presiding judge of the Probate Court of Cuyahoga C ounty; the m ayor of Cleveland; the president of the Federation fo r C o m m u n ity Planning, and the chief justice of the C ourt of Appeals fo r the Eighth A ppellate D istrict of O h io . These five p u b lic officials also select a m em ber w h o is a trustee or principal officer of another p h ila n th ro p ic founda tio n. Five a d d i­ tional members are appointed by the Trustees Committee. Each m em ber of the D istribution C om m itte e is appo in te d fo r a five-year term. The Trustees C om m itte e is composed of the chief executive officers of the five trustee banks: The Cleveland Trust Company, Central National Bank o f Cleveland, National City Bank, Society National Bank o f Cleveland and Union C o m ­ merce Bank. The Cleveland Foundation received on D e ­ cember 14,1971 a current ruling o f the Internal Revenue Service w h ich classifies it as a p ub lic charity under Section 509(a)(1) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 as amended.


CONTENTS The Chairman's L e t t e r ..................................................................

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4 Grant Summary ............................................................................. 6 The D irector's R e p o r t ..................................................................

REPORT O N 1976 GRANTS

7 Health ................................................................................................. 17

Education

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Social Services ..................................................................................25 Civic Affairs ...................................................................................... 35 Cultural A f f a i r s .................................................................................. 41 Special Philanthropic Services .................................................... 48 FINANCIAL REPORT Trust Fund G r o w t h ........................................................................... 50 Trust Fund L i s t i n g ............................................................................. 52 The Sherwick F u n d ........................................................................... 54 C o m bined Fund G r o w t h ................................................................ 55 C o m bined Fund L i s t i n g .................................................................. 56 Statement o f Changes in Fund B a la n c e s .....................................58 Statement o f Assets and Fund B a la n c e s .....................................60 CLEVELAND F O U N D A T IO N RESOURCES Funds, Gifts and G r a n t s ................................................................... 61 Statement of Changes in Fund B a la n c e s ..................................... 62 Balance S h e e t ..................................................................................... Giving to The Cleveland F o u n d a t i o n ............................................64 The D istribu tio n C om m ittee, Trustees C o m m itte e and S t a f f ..............................Inside back cover


THE CHAIRMAN’S LETTER It is a m atter o f great fo rtu n e that The Cleveland Foundation, fo u n d e d in 1914 and nursed by g e n e r a tio n a fte r g e n e r a t io n o f its c itiz e n s , should come to its full flo w e r at a tim e w h e n the city needs such an agency as never before. The Foundation's assets are n o w $209 m illio n — an increase o f $66 m illio n over the past five years. The D is trib u tio n C o m m itte e a uth orize d $10.3 m illio n in grants d u rin g 1976, an increase of alm ost tw o m illio n dollars above the previous high figure a uthorized in 1975. The Foundation continues to g ro w each year, throu g h p ru de n t m anagem ent o f its assets by the participating banks and by new gifts fro m Clevelanders w h o give back to the c o m m u n ity some part of w h a t the c o m m u n ity has given to them. The Cleveland Foundation does n o t th in k its mission is one o f m eeting the annual operating costs o f c o m m u n ity agencies. This is an im p o r­ tant task to be handled in o th e r ways, notably throu g h U nited Torch. W e k n o w that fo u n d a ­ tio n spending is a small part o f the vo luntary giving o f private citizens and the organizations they create — a mere 7.5% o f all such giving in the nation in 1975. O u r special task is to re­ ward p eople and institutions that seek new and better answers to the many pro ble m s that living in cities presents to all o f us. Cleveland is at a critical ju n c tu re in its history — a c o n d itio n n o t u nlike that c o n fro n te d by all o f the old industrial cities o f the nation. W e are losing p o p u la tio n . Those w h o have remained are scattered over a large land area — a fact that complicates all forms o f p u b lic service and fo re ­ shadows new difficulties as w e begin to face up to the shortage o f energy resources. O u r in dus­ trial plant is old and constantly must be re­ newed. New forms o f transportation and n ew sources o f raw materials have erased the early advantage o f river and lake transport. O u r labor

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pro ble m s and splintered local governments, t o ­ gether w ith the enorm ous co m p lica tion s that stem fro m highly partisan politics, suggest cau­ tion to those w h o have investm ent decisions to make. Clearly, the road ahead fo r Cleveland w ill be a rocky one, req uirin g a laying on o f all hands to match the successes o f the past. All o f o u r cities c o n fro n t m o n um en tal ques­ tions in human affairs n ot easily resolved. The m atter o f desegregating o u r schools is a case in p o in t that is dealt w ith elsewhere in this re­ port. The same is true o f the delivery o f social services, in c lu d in g those necessary to cope w ith illness and disability, paying the cost thereof, and fin d in g ways to prevent such p roblem s to the extent possible. School and college fin a n c ­ ing, greatly exacerbated by in flationary c o n d i­ tions and by the decline o f the n u m b e r o f 18-22 year olds in the p o p u la tio n , presents new and staggering problem s. The cultural services have never been in a healthy c o n d itio n , d e p e nd in g as they must upon the sale o f tickets and the pa­ tronage o f the relatively fe w for th e ir nurture. W h a t is o f im p o rta nce in the Cleveland c o m ­ m u n ity is that w e do n o t c o n fro n t these matters em pty-ha n de d . The resources o f The Cleveland Foundation, and the partnership we have deve l­ oped w ith a n u m b e r o f private foundations, make possible a constant study of o u r c o n d i­ tion, e xpe rim en ta tion w ith ways o f dealing w ith the facts b ro u g h t to light, the training o f the youn g in institutions o f high q ua lity w ith a sim i­ lar focus on matters o f c o m m o n concern, and the e ncouragem ent o f many o th e r parties to open w id e in q u iry on questions begging for b etter solutions than we n o w have. This is w h y The Cleveland Foundation is n o w fostering m a jo r c o m m u n ity efforts in crim inal justice, re h ab ilita tio n o f o u r housing stock, eco­ n o m ic re d e ve lo p m e n t o f n e ig h b o rh o o d sub­

centers, im p o rta n t experim ents in social service delivery, new artistic endeavors in the fields of dance and opera along w ith co ntin u ed support o f distinctive w o rk in music and the theater. Hard choices w ill always be necessary— there w ill never be enough m oney to su pp o rt all that people aspire to accomplish. It is a curious fact, however, that there is often more m oney to w o rk w ith than there are creative efforts headed by people w ith good promise. W h a t is in p le n ti­ ful supply are " g o o d " programs that need sup­ p o rt of various kinds b ut are much m ore the province of a U nited Torch agency or g overn­ m ent than a c o m m u n ity fou n da tio n. To direct fo u n d a tio n su pport to good programs is to miss the p o in t of o u r being and to miss the o p p o r ­ tunities fo r imaginative service that seems to be especially ours to supply. The Cleveland Foundation has been the b en ­ eficiary o f great service by outstanding citizens over its 63-year history. Three o f o u r current members com pleted ten years of service at the end o f March, 1977. They are Frank E. Joseph, George F. Karch and Thomas F. Patton. W e o w e much to these fine men. Their co ntribu tio ns have gone a long way to shape o u r m a jo r p o li­ cies and to assure that the Foundation serves well its responsibility to the public. Their c o u n ­ sel w ill be greatly missed.

H. Stuart Harrison May, 1977

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DIRECTOR’S REPORT The history of every city in A m e ric a reveals critical junctures at w h ic h the ju d g m e n t exer­ cised by its leaders spelled the d iffe re n ce be ­ tween progress and chaos. Cleveland is at such a crucial p o in t in its history. The c o m m u n ity must fin d app ro p ria te ways o f responding to a Federal C o u rt fin d in g that its p u b lic schools are s e g re g a te d by race and t h a t an a p p r o p r ia t e remedy must be d eveloped and im p le m e n te d . H o w can a c o m m u n ity fo u n d a tio n play a use­ ful role in a c o m m u n ity faced w ith so m o m e n ­ tous a decision? It can ignore the p ro b le m and confin e its interest to the tra dition a l forms of charity. It can line up w ith one o f the parties to the c o u rt action. It can seek in various ways to bring light on the matters at issue, k n o w in g that in a d e m o cra tic system w e must depend on the c o m m o n sense and decency o f o u r p eo p le to arrive at w o rk a b le answers to the questions at issue. The latter has been o u r course over the past tw o years. W e have s u pported legal review of the desegregation arg um en t before the federal courts since 1954. W e have m o n ito re d the suit b ro u g h t by the NAACP against the Cleveland Board o f Education and the O h io Board o f Edu­ cation. W e have sponsored co n tin u o u s study by a responsible group o f citizens, each o f them h o ld in g positions o f p ro m in e n ce in civic and social welfare and e ducation agencies in the Cleveland area. W e have arranged fo r in fo rm e d people fro m o th e r c o m m u n itie s facing similar problem s to visit w ith us here, and have ar­ ranged fo r Clevelanders to visit o th e r cities at­ te m p tin g to respond to c o u rt orders. W e have issued grants to church organizations and e th ­ n ic g ro u p s and n e i g h b o r h o o d o r g a n iz a t io n s sponsoring discussions o f the various ways in w h ich Cleveland m ig h t respond to the o rd e r o f the court. Perhaps no o ther Am erican city has

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d evoted so m uch tim e and e ffo rt to review of the question o f school desegregation p rio r to a decision o f a case before a Federal D istrict C o u rt and p rio r to the a d o p tio n o f a remedy fo r the lia b ility d ete rm in e d by c o u rt decision. These activities, to g e the r w ith the w o r k o f the local news media in re p orting this story in c o n ­ siderable d epth, assure a w e ll in fo rm e d general p u b lic and a leadership w e ll aware o f the expe­ rience o f o th e r cities facing similar situations. It w ill be interesting to note w h e th e r a serious educational e ffo rt o f this sort makes any d iffe r­ ence in the w ay in w h ic h a c o m m u n ity responds to a p ro b le m o f such enorm ous com plexity. O u r review o f Am erican experience in the field o f school desegregation indicates that a successful e ffo rt depends upon cooperative e n ­ deavors by all o f the parties involved to carry o u t the m andate o f the co urt and to seek im ­ p ro v e m e n t o f school perform ance in the p ro c­ ess. No one can guess h o w this w ill w o r k o u t in Cleveland, and especially p rio r to a decision by an Appeals C o u rt on a school board request fo r review o f the o rd er o f the D istrict Court. H o m e r C. W a d sw o rth May, 1977

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THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION-SUM M ARY OF GRANTS AUTHORIZED-1976 TOTAL GRANTS $10,355,071

SPECIAL PHILANTHROPIC

Administrative expense in 1976 represented 6.74% of total grants authorized by The Cleveland Foundation.


EDUCATION


E D U C A TIO N

" A ffirm a tiv e leadership is crucial to the achievem ent o f sch oo l desegregation in a c o m m u n ity ." U.S. Civil Rights Commission August, 1976

The same m o n th this statement was issued, a federal ju d ge in Cleveland fo u n d that the lo ­ cal and state boards o f education had violated the constitu tion a l rights o f children " b y in te n ­ tio na lly fostering and m a in tain in g a segregated s c h o o l system w i t h i n th e C le v e la n d p u b l i c schools." The ju d ge o rdered that desegregation begin no later than September, 1977. In the m onths before and since the c o u rt d e c i­ sion, there have been men and w o m e n w illin g to abandon the c o m fo rt o f silence to w o r k fo r peaceful co m p lia nc e w ith the law. They have studied o bjectiv e data and have taken the cause into churches, clubs and homes. These u n o ffi­ cial leaders, th r o u g h in d iv id u a l co nta cts and o rg a n iz a tio n s , have reached th o u s an d s u po n thousands o f their fe llo w men in w h a t may well be the most organized citizen outreach tow ard p ea ce fu l d e se g re g a tio n o f the schools w h ic h has occurred in any A m erican city. O n ly tim e w ill tell w h e th e r such an e ffort can prevent "a n o th e r B oston." Certainly Cleveland is p o te n tia lly as volatile as any city facing courtordered desegregation. It is peopled by blacks and by w h ite ethnics, separated, fo r the most part, by a river. W h ile the total school district e n ro llm e n t is 59 percent black (3 percent His­ panic and nearly 2 percent other minorities), nearly 90 percent of the children attend onerace schools. In such an e n viro n m e n t men and w o m e n of good w ill are d o in g w h a t they can. The Cleveland Foundation has funded fo u r of

these citizen efforts — the Study G ro u p on Ra­ cial Isolation in the Public Schools, the Greater Cleveland Project, the Bishop's C o m m itte e on School Desegregation and the Nationalities Services Center program. A total o f $136,854 was granted to the first tw o in 1975 and $140,342 to ail fo u r in 1976, w ith expanded fun d in g authorized fo r 1977. STUDY GROUP O N RACIAL ISOLATION The Study G ro up on Racial Isolation in the Pub­ lic Schools is a congress o f 19 representatives of key c o m m u n ity organizations. Since its incep­ t io n in th e s u m m e r o f 1975, th e g r o u p has progressed fro m the e xploration o f m a jo r court cases and p u b l i c re a c tio n in o t h e r c itie s — actually visiting five cities to learn abo u t deseg­ regation realities firsthand — to sophisticated analysis o f the various plans being subm itted to the c o u rt in Cleveland. The group, w h ic h meets every o th e r week, has been assisted by private la w y e rs a n d f o u r p ro fe s s o rs f r o m C le v e la n d State University. The Study G ro up has emerged as the co m ­ m unity's m a jo r source fo r accurate and highquality in fo rm a tio n on school desegregation. Its materials and reports have been reprinted and w i d e l y d is t r i b u t e d as a p a r t o f th e C itiz e n s ' Council fo r O h io Schools Citizens' Guide to Desegregation and the Greater Cleveland Proj­ ect's Bulletin and pamphlets. M on th s before the c o u rt rendered its deci­ sion, the Study G ro up on Racial Isolation stim ­ ulated lo w -p ro file discussions and conferences w ith the business, labor, media, religious, u n i­ versity and elected leadership o f Cleveland. It subsequently encouraged the d e v e lo p m e n t of the citizen outreach into the n eighborhoods. A d e s e g re g a tio n e x p e r t f r o m a n o t h e r c it y re c e n tly o b s e rv e d t h a t th e S tu d y G r o u p has


d e v e lo p e d th e m o s t c o m p r e h e n s iv e data on school desegregation fo u n d in any American city. A panel o f consultants led b ya distinguished Yale law professor has given the group high marks fo r its efforts, a ffirm in g its neutrality and indicating that it has an im p o rta n t role to play in e x p l a in in g and in t e r p r e t i n g even ts in th e future. GREATER CLEVELAND PROJECT The Greater Cleveland Project is an in d e p e n ­ d en t c o a litio n of m ore than 60 c o m m u n ity and n e ig h b o rh o o d organizations striving to create a c lim a t e f o r p e a c e fu l d e s e g re g a tio n in all n e igh b orh o o ds of the city. It evolved fro m in i­ tial efforts by the Greater Cleveland Interchurch C o u n c il and b e c a m e f u l l y o p e r a t io n a l in the spring o f 1976. D u rin g its first year, the Greater Cleveland Project p ro vide d speakers fo r m ore than 200 c o m m u n ity meetings and distributed m o re th a n 6 5,0 00 p ie ce s o f lit e r a t u r e (som e printed in Spanish) to thousands of individuals and m ore than 180 organizations. Its "C he cklist fo r Assessing School Desegregation Plans" is being re produced nationally. The professional staff, w h ic h is expanding fro m three to six persons, is m ulti-racial and e x p e r ie n c e d in u rb a n e d u c a t i o n , le a d e rs h ip training and c o m m u n ity organization. It is c o n ­ vinced that it has a b o u t saturated the city w ith speakers and, consequently, has moved into t r a in in g s ta ff a nd v o lu n t e e r s o f its m e m b e r organizations in h o w to c o n d u c t inform al dis­ cussions in n e ig h b o rh o o d homes. It also is be­ gin nin g to p ro v id e technical assistance to those w ishing to m o b iliz e fo r peaceful im p le m e n ta ­ tion o f w h a te ve r desegregation plan is finally adopted by the courts. The Greater Cleveland Project, fo r example, has aided the massive in fo rm a tio n program of

the YW CA, has trained m ore than 60 nuns to w o r k in the p r e d o m i n a n t l y C a t h o lic , w h i t e w o rk in g class n eighborhoods of the West Side, and is helping the N e ig h b o rh o o d Centers Asso­ ciation plan fo r pairing 1,000 black and w h ite children for get-acquainted activities this c o m ­ ing summer. Reaching into neighborhoods has an almost invisible quality about it. It doesn't get into the n e w s p a p e rs . B ut GCP's w o r k w i t h M e r r i c k House is illustrative o f the q uiet ripple effect that the Greater Cleveland Project can create. M e rric k House is a settlement house in the d e ­ pressed, p re d o m in a n tly w h ite T rem ont-C larkFulton area, the type o f c o m m u n ity w h ic h could becom e explosive once school buses begin to roll. M e r r i c k H o u se in v it e d GCP to c o n d u c t a training w o rks h o p fo r its board in the summer o f 1976. Subsequently the settlement house as­ signed its assistant director, w ith the help o f an undergraduate intern fro m Case Western Re­ serve University, to begin gathering the names o f residents w h o m ig h t be receptive to a ra­ tional discussion o f school desegration. Since then residents in groups of 10 or less have gathered in living rooms and around d in ­ ing room tables to talk about the co urt decision, the various desegregation plans being p ro ­ posed, and their reaction to all that is h appen­ ing. As in oth e r parts of the city, parents in this c o m m u n ity most often express fear abo u t the safety o f their children. Next, they express c o n ­ cern that the quality o f education w ill be d im in ­ ished. However, when few showed up fo r a much publicized meeting on q uality education, M e rric k House leaders co ncluded that concern over q uality education was merely a p o lite way o f saying: " I d o n 't w a n t my children bused." W h ile discussions often begin heatedly, there

The C le v e la n d P lain D e a le r

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E D U C A TIO N

appears to be a g ro w in g band o f parents w illin g to accept the realities o f a c o u rt o rd er and to c o m p ly w ith w hatever school desegregation plan emerges. M e a n w h ile , M e rric k House is p u ttin g to g e th ­ er a small c o m m u n ity su pp o rt group com posed o f area ministers and organizational leaders w h o plan to fo rm w e lc o m in g com m ittees and to pro vide m o n itors on school buses and in the streets once desegregation begins. The settle­ m e n t house recently invited principals fro m nearby schools to a bra insto rm ing session and, undaunted that o n ly one show ed up, w ill try again. It also is pla nn in g a sum m er cultural ex­ change w ith y o uth fro m a black n e ig h b orh o o d. C A TH O L IC A C T IO N Even before the federal c o u rt issued its d e ci­ sion, the C atholic Bishop o f Cleveland firm ly a nnounced that the parochial schools w o u ld n ot become a haven fo r children fleeing deseg­ regation— a significant stance in a heavily Cath­ o lic city w h e re the o ve rw h e lm in g m a jo rity of C atholic pupils are in the p u b lic schools. Since last O ctob e r, the Bishop's C o m m itte e on School Desegregation has p rovided training fo r m ore than 60 nuns and 50 priests and pas­ toral ministers to foster equal and quality e du ­ cational o p p o rtu n itie s fo r all children. The co m m itte e has p roduced a 21-m inute slide and tape show entitled Desegregation: Cleveland Challenge 1977 w h ic h is addressed to "p e o p le o f fa ith ." The presentation is being used n ot only fo r Catholic audiences but also fo r Lutheran and Episcopal ones and, in m o d i­ fied form , by the City C o m m u n ity Relations Board, the Cleveland Public Library and the Federation fo r C o m m u n ity Planning. The show is a discussion opener, closing w ith a slide w h ic h invites its viewers " t o talk." 1 0

The Bishop's C o m m itte e also has d eve lo p e d a loose-leaf h an d b o o k fo r parishes w h ic h in ­ cludes n ot only constantly updated in fo rm a tio n b u t also s a m p le s e rm o n s f o r p r ie s t a n d lay preachers. A fte r the desegregation plan is an­ nounced, the c o m m itte e plans to m o b iliz e its faith fu l fo r peaceful and p ro d u c tiv e im p le m e n ­ tation o f the plan. REACHING ETHNICS Just as the C atholic Church is reaching o u t to its constituency, the N ationalities Services Cen­ ter is beg in n ing to spread in fo rm a tio n and rein­ force respect fo r the law a m ong the city's very large fo re ig n -b o rn p o p u la tio n and its descen­ dants. Recent im m igrants include many young families w ith c h ild re n in the p u b lic schools—people w h o came to this c o u n try to escape in ­ justices and w h o w a n t to becom e good citizens but, center leaders believe, may be confused by the reactions o f some o f th e ir neighbors. The Nationalities Services C e n te r has spon­ sored several meetings in recent weeks in vo lv­ ing 18 d iffe re n t natonalities. Invitations have been issued along n e ig h b o rh o o d rather than straight ethnic lines. The first m ee ting fo r the C o llin w o o d -M u rra y H ill- N o r w o o d area, fo r ex­ ample, in cluded Lithuanians, Slovenians and Ita lia n s , w h i l e c o n t a c t was k e p t w i t h b la c k neighbors attending separate meetings spon­ sored by black organizations. The center's d irector, w h o is a representative to both the Study G ro up on Racial Isolation and the Greater Cleveland Project, also is searching for ethnic leaders w h o w ill be w illin g to serve as peacemakers if resistance to desegregation erupts. As September, 1977 draws nearer, individuals w o rk in g w ith the ethnics, blacks, Catholics and the broader c o m m u n ity have observed that


both black and w h ite parents w a n t to meet faceto-face to share the ir concerns w ith one an­ other, and they appear grateful and relieved that som eone has fin a lly opened up the o p p o r ­ tu n ity fo r them to participate in some way in the pla nn in g w h ic h is taking place. CLEVELAND HEIGHTS-UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS This close-in suburban school district has been experiencing an influx o f black residents during the last several years. Efforts to ease resulting tensions have been c o m p lica te d by d iffering perceptions in its tw o separate cities and by the educational expectations o f both newcomers and the original p o p u la tio n , w h ic h is heavily Jewish and includes many professors, physi­ cians, musicians and artists w h o like to live near University Circle. F o llo w in g an explosive year at Heights High, in ru m o r as w e ll as in fact, the school system created a s c h o o l-c o m m u n ity relations program aimed at in v o lvin g the p u b lic m ore closely in the schools. D u rin g the 1976-77 year, citizen cadres w ere fo rm e d in each o f the 11 ele m en ­ tary schools. A ru m o r co n tro l n e tw o rk was p ut in t o p la c e . A " s c h o o l i n e " was c re a te d and staffed to give citizens a place to call fo r answers to the ir questions and concerns. The program has stim ulated greatly expanded after-school use o f school buildings by both parents and children, and has p ro vide d technical assistance to com m ittees and w o rk s h o p participants ex­ p lo rin g ways to v o lu n ta rily correct the racial imbalance w h ic h has developed in the school system, n o w o n e -th ird black in enrollm ent. A t Heights High a n u m b e r o f learning alter­ natives have been created to meet the diverse needs o f the 2,800 students in grades 10 through 12. These in clu de a variety o f minicourses, sev­ eral w o rk -s tu d y programs, a new vocational

w in g , an in d ep e nd e nt study tutorial program, and tw o “ co m m u n ities o f learners" w h ic h p r o ­ vide an unstructured e nviro n m e n t in w h ich highly m otivated students help select their o w n faculty, w rite the ir o w n courses and use the c o m m u n ity as a laboratory. A third " c o m m u n ity of learners" was estab­ lished in 1976-77. This one created a highly structured e n viro n m e n t fo r students w h o were underachieving or failing as they entered the 11th grade. A faculty of five, assisted by tw o graduate interns fro m Indiana University, struc­ tured counseling and learning experiences in English, history, social studies, math and science fo r the group. O f the 125 students accepted into the program, 108 participated th ro u g h o u t the year. Several others elected to remain w ith the rest o f the ir class and a half-dozen or so dro pp e d o u t or w e n t into the military. The group q u ick ly established a cohesiveness — "a sense o f fa m ily ," as one described i t — w earing "C O L II I" buttons and publishing w h a t was regarded as the best student newspaper in the school. Absenteeism dropped. Grades and c o n s e q u e n t ly c re d its e a rn e d in c re a se d . The principal believes the program n ot only sal­ vaged a high school education for some b ut also im p ro ve d the learning e n viro n m e n t fo r the e n ­ tire school. COL III participants w ill rejoin their classmates fo r the ir senior year and a new group w ill be selected fo r next year. The Foundation pro vide d n ot only staff but also c o n s u lt a n t s u p p o r t to b o th th e s c h o o lc o m m u n ity program and COL III. Consultants especially helped the COL III faculty develop rapport and pla nning expertise as w e ll as read­ ing tests and oth e r instruments fo r measuring the effectiveness o f the program.

N O N T R A D IT IO N A L HIGHER E D U C A TIO N As higher education costs accelerate and the pool o f tra dition a l students, 18 to 22 years old, declines, the Foundation is d e vo tin g funds to the study o f im p o rta n t p o lic y issues and the o p e n in g o f o p p o r t u n i t i e s f o r n o n t r a d i t i o n a l students and life tim e learners. The Brookings Institution has em barked on an im p o rta n t national study in vo lvin g p u b lic p o licy and private higher education und e r a grant fro m the A n d re w M e llo n Foundation. A supplem entary grant fro m The Cleveland Foun­ dation is enabling several O h io scholars to take an in-depth lo o k at the situation in this state and c o n trib u te tw o chapters to the fo rth c o m in g Brookings report. In seeking ways to serve n on tra d itio n a l stu­ dents, tw o local private colleges have created options enabling o ld e r students to reduce the tim e and e ffo rt it takes to earn a bachelor's d e ­ gree. Such students are given cre d it throu g h advanced placem ent examinations, fo r relevant w o rk experience and fo r approved off-cam pus activities as w e ll as fo r classroom w o rk . The lo c a l v a r ia t io n s o f th is " u n i v e r s i t y w i t h o u t w a lls " co nce p t supported by the Foundation are at Dyke and Ursuline colleges. The Foundation also supported several re­ w a rd in g efforts at Case Western Reserve U n i­ v e rs ity . O n e is th e A d v a n c e d M a n a g e m e n t Program w h e re rising executives sharpen th e ir skills by attending academic sessions on 26 Fri­ days w h ile h o ld in g d o w n th e ir jobs the rest of the week. The three Cleveland Foundation A d ­ vanced M anagem ent Fellows d u rin g 1976-77 were the d ire c to r o f Karamu House, the police chief fo r University Circle Inc., and the execu­ tiv e d i r e c t o r o f C o m m u n i t y G u id a n c e a nd Human Services Center. 1 1


EDUCATION GRANTS THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION AMERICAN FORUM FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDY Support a program of African and intercultural studies for Cleveland t e a c h e r s ...............................................................................................................$

40,000

ANTI-DEFAMATION LEAGUE OF B’NAI B’RITH General s u p p o r t ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

2,500

BALD WIN-WALLACE COLLEGE Case study of long-term consequences of d e s e g r e g a tio n .........................................................................................................................................................

5,500

THE BROOKINGS INSTITUTE Study of public policy toward private higher e d u c a t i o n .........................................................................................................................................................

12,500

CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY Development of specialization in criminal justice at School of Applied Social S c i e n c e s ............................................................................................... Support of Canada-United States Law Institute at School of L a w ......................................................................................................................................... Support of summer academic f e s t i v a l ........................................................................................................................................................................................ Support of three Cleveland Foundation Fellowships in School of Management advanced management p r o g r a m ..................................................... Partial support of visiting professorship at School of Applied Social S c i e n c e s ............................................................................................................... Toward support of degree program in construction engineering.............................................................................................................................................. To partially finance preparation of proposal to National Science Foundation for establishment and operation of submicron electronic d e v i c e s ......................................................................................................................................... CITIZENS COUNCIL FOR OHIO SCHOOLS Operating s u p p o r t ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ CLEVELAND BOARD OF EDUCATION Support of innovative program in social studies using dramatic te c h n iq u e s ......................................................................................................................... Support of “ Living Seminars in Current Affairs” at the City C l u b ......................................................................................................................................... Support of project, “ Literature, a Shared Experience” ......................................................................................................................................................... CLEVELAND CENTER FOR ECONOMIC EDUCATION Operating s u p p o r t ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ CLEVELAND COMMISSION ON HIGHER EDUCATION Support of reorganizational a c t i v i t i e s ....................................................................................................................................................................................... CLEVELAND FOUNDATION RESOURCES Evaluation of grant to Cleveland State University for support of Greater Cleveland Connection p r o g r a m ................................................................. Evaluation of grant to Cleveland Heights-University Heights City School D i s t r i c t ......................................................................................................... Evaluation of grant to American Forum for International S t u d y ............................................................................................................................................. Evaluation of grant to Positive Education P r o g r a m .................................................................................................................................................................. Evaluation of Greater Cleveland Project of Greater Cleveland Interchurch C o u n c il......................................................................................................... Support initial efforts of citizens advisory committee on access to postsecondary education for nontraditional s t u d e n t s ....................................... Support of greater involvement by Cleveland’s ethnic communities inpublic educational i s s u e s ................................................................................ Support of Study Group on Racial Isolation in the Public S c h o o l s ........................................................................................................................................ Support the creation of specific essays on Northeast Ohio in study by The Brookings Institution of public policy toward private higher e d u c a tio n ....................................................................................................................................................................... Technical assistance and evaluation by consultants for grants to Ursuline and Dyke colleges for external degree p ro g ra m s ................................

20,102 7,500 37,000 9,000 9,000^ 8,270* 5,000 60,000 15,960 7,730 16,208 20,000 2,000* 5,000 6,000 2,000 1,500 3,000 5,000 10,000 85,478 2,500 1,500

CLEVELAND HEIGHTS-UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS CITY SCHOOL DISTRICT Establish and implement a school-community relations p ro je c t............................................................................................................................................. Initiation of transitional, structured academic year at Heights High S c h o o l........................................................................................................................

50,000 83,000

THE CLEVELAND MUSIC SCHOOL SETTLEMENT Support of consortium bachelor’s degree program in music t h e r a p y ..................................................................................................................................

17,684

CLEVELAND REGION, OHIO COOPERATIVE EDUCATION ASSOCIATION Support of w o r k s h o p .....................................................................................................................................................................................................................

12

2,200*


CLEVELAND STATE UNIVERSITY Aid in promoting and developing cooperative programs with business and industry, and acquisition of literature for career services center of the department of cooperative e d u c a t i o n .............................................................................................................................. Support of Greater Cleveland Connection p r o g r a m .................................................................................................................................................................. Support of street law program of Cleveland-Marshall School of L a w .................................................................................................................................. Toward a program to determine psychological types of engineering s tu d e n ts ................................................................................................................... Support the project, “ Literature, a Shared Experience” .............................................................................................................................................................

6,500* 62,974 22,200 1,000* 15,870

CLEVELAND STATE UNIVERSITY DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION Support of Albert A. Levin chair of urban studies and public s e r v i c e ..................................................................................................................................

30,000

COMMISSION ON CATHOLIC COMMUNITY ACTION Support of action plan of Bishop’s Commission on School D e s e g r e g a t io n ........................................................................................................................

30,000

DENISON UNIVERSITY, GRANVILLE, OHIO General s u p p o r t ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

1,500

DYKE COLLEGE Additional support of external degree p r o g r a m .................................................................................................................. ....................................................

31,200

EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION ASSOCIATION OF METROPOLITAN CLEVELAND, WVIZ Higher educational television p ro g ra m s ......................................................................................................................................................................................

2,000*

GARDENVIEW HORTICULTURAL PARK, INC. Capital s u p p o r t ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

31,750

GREATER CLEVELAND INTERCHURCH COUNCIL Support for Greater Cleveland P r o j e c t ......................................................................................................................................................................................

22,500

THE HOLDEN ARBORETUM Support for educational development p r o g r a m .......................................................................................................................................................................

225,000

INROADS/CLEVELAND, INC. Start-up costs for an INROADS project recruiting minority college students for orientation to the business w o r l d ...............................................

5,000

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY Development of guide for self-study of racial discrimination in local educational a g e n c i e s ......................................................................................... Development by John Gray Foundation of guide for self-study of discrimination on basis of sex in institutions of higher e d u c a tio n .....................

17,049 4,800

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR URBAN REGIONALISM Support for education s u r v e y ......................................................................................................................................................................................................

25,000

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION Support of senior guest student p ro g ra m ...................................................................................................................................................................................... Stark Campus bicentennial e x h i b i t i o n ....................................................................................................................................................................................... For archaeological e x p lo ra tio n ......................................................................................................................................................................................................

7,575 200 2,500

LAKE ERIE COLLEGE Harriet B. Storrs le c tu re s .................................................................................................................................................................................................................

3,000

LAKELAND COMMUNITY COLLEGE Toward development of co-op p ro g ra m s......................................................................................................................................................................................

5,000*

MORLEY LIBRARY Capital campaign for library e x p a n s io n ....................................................................................................................................................................................... THE NATURE CONSERVANCY Support for environmental education program for nature conservancy preserves in O h i o ..............................................................................................

30,000

NOTRE DAME COLLEGE Instructional project sponsored by Council for Advancement of Small C o lle g e s ..............................................................................................................

4,975

40,000

13


E D U C A TIO N POSITIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM Establishment of early intervention project for behavior-disordered/developmentally delayed c h ild r e n ....................................................................

105,266

PROJECT FOR EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Training program in institutional development for postsecondary e d u c a t i o n ....................................................................................................................

16,980

THE SCHOOL ON MAGNOLIA Toward operating support and increased services by child a n a ly s t s ...................................................................................................................................

11,500

SOCIETY FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN Consulting services in development of receptive-expressive language training p r o g r a m ...............................................................................................

5,000

UNITED NEGRO COLLEGE FUND Operating support of predominately black institutions of higher e d u c a tio n .........................................................................................................................

5,000

URSULINE COLLEGE Aid in the takeover of nursing program from St. John College.............................................................................................................................................. Further implementation of extended learning p r o g r a m ..............................................................................................................................................................

10,000* 23,000

Total Education Programs — U n d e s ig n a t e d ............................... ............................................................................................................................................. $1,357,471 (Following recipients and programs designated by donor) ASHLAND COLLEGE, ASHLAND, OHIO General s u p p o r t ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. $

5,047

BALDWIN-WALLACE COLLEGE General s u p p o r t .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

23,996

CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY General s u p p o r t ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. General support for Adelbert C o l l e g e ....................................................................................................................................................................................... General support for Franklin Thomas Backus Law S c h o o l ................................................................................................................................................... General support for the Graduate S c h o o l ................................................................................................................................................................................. Suport of field biological station at Squire Valleevue Farm for School of M e d i c i n e ......................................................................................................... Support of social research at School of Applied Social S c i e n c e s ........................................................................................................................................ Toward purchase of reference books for School of Library S c i e n c e ................................................................................................................................... CLEVELAND LUTHERAN HIGH SCHOOL ASSOCIATION General s u p p o r t ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ DANIEL E. MORGAN SCHOOL Book awards to c h i l d r e n ................................................................................................................................................................................................................

5,347 3,417 3,004 103,284 16,349 498

68 766 142

HAWKEN SCHOOL General s u p p o r t ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

413

KENYON COLLEGE, GAMBIER, OHIO General s u p p o r t ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................

5,347

LAKE ERIE COLLEGE General s u p p o r t ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................

343

OHIO WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY, DELAWARE, OHIO General s u p p o r t ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................

2,216

PINEY WOODS COUNTRY LIFE SCHOOL, PINEY WOODS, MISSISSIPPI General s u p p o r t ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................

4,318

14


SMITH COLLEGE, NORTHAMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS General s u p p o r t ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. UNITED NEGRO COLLEGE FUND General s u p p o r t .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

26,886 4,318

Total Education Programs — D e s ig n a t e d .................................................................................................................................................................................. $ 205,760 Total Education Programs — Designated and U n d e s ig n a t e d ............................................................................................................................................... $1,563,231 SCHOLARSHIPS BALDWIN-WALLACE COLLEGE S c h o la r s h ip s ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... $

4,500

BEREA AREA MONTESSORI ASSOCIATION S c h o la r s h ip s ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

1,724

CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY Fenn co-op scholar program “ E” scholarships............................................................................................................................................................................ S c h o la r s h ip s ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

6,600* 8,360

CLEVELAND AREA LEAGUE FOR NURSING Nursing s c h o la r s h ip s ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................

6,000*

CLEVELAND FOUNDATION RESOURCES Cleveland State University or Cuyahoga Community College students engaged in work-study program with Calvary Presbyterian Church

.

.

8,000*

CLEVELAND SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAMS, INC. Continued scholarship assistance for students fromCleveland Public S c h o o l s ......................................................................... .................................... Counseling and scholarship programs in s u b u r b s ............................................................................................................................................. ..... . . .

20,000 756

CLEVELAND STATE UNIVERSITY Fenn co-op s c h o la rs h ip s ................................................................................................................................................................................................................. S c h o la r s h ip s ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... Scholarships for co-op students enrolled in fields of education, health sciences, psychology, social services, sociology, speech and related f i e l d s ............................................................................................................................................................

14,000* 15,900 8,400*

CUYAHOGA COMMUNITY COLLEGE S c h o la r s h ip s ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

9,240

DYKE COLLEGE S c h o la r s h ip s ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

1,320

HUDSON MONTESSORI ASSOCIATION S c h o la r s h ip s ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

1,724

JOHN CARROLL UNIVERSITY S c h o la r s h ip s ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

5,000

LAKE ERIE COLLEGE/GARFIELD SENIOR COLLEGE Scholarships for Painesville and Painesville Township students at Lake Erie College, Garfield Senior College and other c o lle g e s .....................

26,000

MONTESSORI SPECIAL EDUCATION SCHOOL S c h o la r s h ip s ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

1,725

NOTRE DAME COLLEGE Fenn co-op s c h o la rs h ip s .................................................................................................................................................................................................................

7,000*

Total Scholarships — U n d e s ig n a te d ............................................................................................................................................................................................ $ 146,249

15


E D U C A T IO N (Following recipients and programs designated by donor) ASHLAND COLLEGE, ASHLAND, OHIO Hazel Myers Spreng S c h o la r s h ip ...................................................................................................................................................................................................$

4,038

BALDWIN-WALLACE COLLEGE Hazel Myers Spreng S c h o la r s h ip ..................................................................................................................................................................................................

4,038

CAPITAL UNIVERSITY, COLUMBUS, OHIO S c h o la r s h ip s ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY Aloy Memorial Scholarship Fund for w o m e n ............................................................................................................................................................................. For a student of Flora Stone Mather College in foreign s t u d y ............................................................................................................................................... Harriet Fairfield Coit and William Henry Coit Scholarships at Flora Stone Mather C o lle g e ............................................................................................... Hazel Myers Spreng S c h o la r s h ip .................................................................................................................................................................................................. Oglebay Fellowship Program in School of M e d icin e ........................................................................................................................................ 49,050 Scholarships in aerospace or co m puters....................................................................................................................................................................................... Scholarships in Franklin Thomas Backus Law S c h o o l .............................................................................................................................................................. William Curtis Morton, Maud Morton, Kathleen Morton Fund S cho la rsh ip s.........................................................................................................................

1,649

993 1,481 927 4,038

49 4,871 12^156

INEZ AND HARRY CLEMENT AWARD Cleveland Public Schools Annual Superintendent’s A w a r d ...................................................................................................................................................

1,500

CLEVELAND INSTITUTE OF ART Caroline E. Coit Fund S c h o la r s h ip s .............................................................................................................................................................................................

1,009

CLEVELAND MUSIC SCHOOL SETTLEMENT Nellie E. Hinds Memorial S c h o la rs h ip s .......................................................................................................................................................................................

4,000

HARRY COULBY SCHOLARSHIP For Pickands Mather employees’ c h ild r e n ..................................................................................................................................................................................

28,530

JOHN CARROLL UNIVERSITY James J. Doyle S c h o l a r s h i p s .......................................................................................................................................................................................................

1 072

SHERMAN JOHNSON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP For medical students from Lake and Geauga C o u n t y .............................................................................................................................................................

15 800

NORTH CENTRAL COLLEGE, NAPERVILLE, ILLINOIS Hazel Myers Spreng Scholarship in memory of Bishop Samuel P. S p r e n g ........................................................................................................................

4,038

OHIO WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY, DELAWARE, OHIO Hazel Myers Spreng S c h o la r s h ip ................................................................................................................................................................................................

4 033

THE MIRIAM KERRUISH STAGE SCHOLARSHIP For Shaker Heights High School g raduates.................................................................................................................................................................................

3 900

ADA GATES STEVENS SCHOLARSHIP For Elyria, Ohio High School g ra d u a te s ......................................................................................................................................................................................

4 qoo

URSULINE COLLEGE Lillian, Herron Doyle S cholarships................................................................................................................................................................................................

1 Q73

Total Scholarships — Designated................................................................................................................................................................................................ $

152 249

Total Scholarships — Designated and U n d e s ig n a te d ............................................................................................................................................................$

298,498

Total Education — Education Programs and Scholarships C o m b i n e d ............................................................................................................................ $1,861,729 *Grants recommended by the Fenn Educational Fund Executive Board.

16


HEALTH


HEALTH O n e o f the most pressing needs in A m erica tod a y is to p ro vid e all p eople w ith access to d e c e n t m e d ic a l ca re w h i l e k e e p in g costs in check throu g h m ore efficien t use o f health m an­ p o w e r and facilities. The so lu tion revolves not solely around the controversial issue o f w h o pays the bill — the private o r p u b lic sector — b u t w h e th e r there develops a system fo r d e liv e r­ ing health care w h ic h assures that a patient can m ove fro m solo p ra c titio n e r fo r ro u tine a il­ ments to specialized intensive care teams in times o f crisis. Since 1974 The Cleveland Foundation has sought to lin k practitioners, clinics, laboratories, hospitals and the health training schools into regional delivery systems serving Greater Cleve­ land and, in some cases, all o f N orthern O hio. The m a jo r thrust has been in maternal and child care and is just b eginning to move into am b ula ­ tory care fo r the entire family. The reason fo r the Foundation's involvem ent in these areas is th re e fo ld : • National studies indicate that children are the short-changed group in American medical prac­ tice. They are less likely to receive care and, w h e n they do, the care is less likely to be of as high q ua lity or effectiveness as that provided o th e r age groups. This is especially so if the ch ild re n happen to be p o o r or minorities. • In v e s tm e n ts in m a te rn a l and c h ild h e a lth , genetics, am b ula to ry care and, to a certain ex­ tent, child abuse programs are preventive in nature. W h e n successful, they reduce the need fo r costly medical care and institutionalization in the future. • Local talent, both in the Case Western Reserve University medical com plex and in c o m m u n ity settings, is outstanding and highly com p etitive nationally.

18

BIRTHS AT RISK The keystone o f c o m m u n ity w id e im p ro v e m e n t in the care o f pregnant w o m e n and the ir babies is the d e v e lo p m e n t o f the Cleveland Regional Perinatal N e tw o rk. The n e tw o rk helps o b ste tri­ cians and fa m ily physicians id e n tify as early as possible those pregnancies likely to result in miscarriages, still births and infants born w ith problem s leading to mental retardation, respira­ tory failure and o th e r serious maladies. The program links physicians and the ir patients to laboratory tests and m o n ito rin g e q u ip m e n t to help d eterm ine the p ro b le m and most advan­ tageous tim e fo r delivery, to specialists w h o can p ro vide emergency treatm ent and, when necessary, to the Perinatal Centers at the tw o teaching hospitals — University and Cleveland M e tro p o lita n G e n e ra l— w h e re infants at high risk can be taken im m ed ia tely fro m the w o m b into an intensive care nursery w h e re life su pport is pro vide d a ro u n d -th e -clo ck by special e q u ip ­ ment and staff. A crucial c o m p o n e n t o f the n e tw o rk is a c o m puterized in fo rm a tio n system w h ic h in ­ cludes 10 d iffe re n t check lists on the health of the m o th e r and her infant — fro m the pregnant w om an's second visit to her d o c to r throu g h the infant's first year after discharge fro m the hos­ pital. The u nifo rm record system is n o w being used by seven hospitals, 17 o u tp a tie n t clinics and 80 private physicians in the ir offices as well as by fu ll-tim e staff physicians in the hospitals. As a result, m ore than 60 percent o f the some 23,000 pregnancies and births handled each year in Cuyahoga C ounty are n o w m o n ito re d as a part o f the network. It is anticipated that 80 per­ cent w ill be in the system w ith in a few months. In add itio n to the principal teaching hospi­ tals, the five c o m m u n ity hospitals w h ich have already im p le m e n te d the inform a tion system

are Mt. Sinai, Kaiser, Fairview General, St. Luke's, and Booth M e m o ria l hospitals. Some p ro b le m pregnancies are n o t detected until the expectant m o th e r enters the hospital and, consequently, the n e tw o rk has developed an emergency transport system to transfer the m ost critical cases fro m the c o m m u n ity hospi­ tal to the Perinatal Center at e ith e r University or M e tro p o lita n General hospitals. Because m in ­ utes can make a diffe re n ce as to w h e th e r an in fant survives and thrives, ambulances are now transporting w o m e n d u rin g labor rather than w a itin g to m ove the babies after delivery. The Cleveland Foundation has devoted both financial and staff assistance to the regional perinatal co n c e p t since 1974. It has w o rke d closely w ith the Robert W o o d Johnson Founda­ tion — the nation's largest fo u n d a tio n w o rk in g exclusively in the health fie ld — w h ich subse­ q ue n tly p ro v id e d Case Western Reserve medical school w ith m a jo r fu n d in g to oversee creation o f the regional n e tw o rk fo r Cuyahoga County. D u rin g 1976 the staff m o n ito re d im p le m e n ta ­ tion o f an earlier Cleveland Foundation grant to Fairview General Hospital w h e re 4,200 babies are delivered annually. The grant has enabled the hospital to handle some o f the m ore d iffi­ cult cases by b rin ging its intensive care u nit for new bo rn infants up to n ationally recom m ended standards. The staff also w o rk e d closely w ith o ther c o m m u n ity hospitals expected to receive grants during 1977 to im p le m e n t th e ir p artici­ pation in the perinatal in fo rm a tio n system. REGIONAL GENETICS CENTER A m o n g the $1,914,361 auth orize d by the Dis­ trib u tio n C o m m itte e fo r health programs d uring 1976, the largest single grant o f $350,000 w e n t to the School o f M e d icin e at Case W estern Re­ serve University to develop a regional genetics


program fo r Northeast O hio. The new program com p lem en ts and enlarges the scope o f the perinatal n e tw o rk since most high-risk pregnancies involve problem s w h ic h are hereditary in origin. The new program was nurtured by a planning grant in 1975 and is an o u tg ro w th o f earlier fo u n d a tio n support o f u n i­ versity genetic diagnostic and counseling clinics at Cleveland M e tro p o lita n General and U n ive r­ sity hospitals. The counseling experience d re w attention to the lack of k n ow led g e a bo u t ge­ netic screening and tre atm e n t by the general p u b lic and the medical profession and the frag­ mentary way in w h ic h the health care delivery system deals w ith genetic defects in children — defects w h ic h often play havoc w ith the e m o ­ tional health o f the entire family. A m o n g the best k n o w n o f genetic maladies are D o w n 's syndrom e (or M o n g o lo id is m ), sickle cell anemia am ong blacks, and Tay Sachs dis­ ease, a fatal degenerative disease afflicting Jewish males o f Eastern European extraction, as well as m ore c o m m o n d ia be tic and coronary problems. W h ile the grant is to be expended over a three-year period , the new Regional Genetics Center has made considerable progress since its in ce ptio n in July, 1976. It has achieved the fo llo w in g : • E d u c a tio n — The Center has sponsored a post­ graduate course fo r obstetricians, pediatricians and fam ily practitioners taught by distinguished v is it in g p ro fe s s o rs as w e ll as m e d ic a l s c h o o l staff; a w o rk s h o p fo r inner-city nurses and social w o rke rs; w e e kly seminars fo r faculty and in te r­ ested professionals, and m ore than 25 educa­ tional presentations th ro u g h o u t the c o m m u n ity on topics ranging fro m the psychological effects o f a defective ch ild on the fam ily to rehabilita­ tio n service fo r cleft palate.

• Outreach — The Center has helped establish and service genetics clinics at Children's Hos­ pital in A kro n and fo r the Rehabilitation Service o f N orth Central O h io in Mansfield, and Tay Sachs screening programs at Mt. Sinai Hospital in Cleveland and at St. Elizabeth's Hospital in Youngstown. • L a b o ra to rie s — There continues to be a sig­ nificant increase in laboratory testing at M e t r o ­ p o lit a n G e n e ra l and U n iv e r s it y h o s p ita ls , especially in chrom osom e analysis and alphafeto protein tests p erform ed on a m n iotic fluid taken fro m the w o m b o f the expectant mother. The grant has enabled the Genetics Center to purchase special e q u ip m e n t to im prove its test­ ing services. • Counseling — A central office has been cre­ ated fo r the tw o diagnostic and counseling clinics. The grant has enabled the e m p lo ym e n t o f three fu ll-tim e professionals trained in patient intake, medical history evaluation, social serv­ ices, f a m ily h is t o r y t a k in g and f o l l o w - u p activities. • E v a lu a tio n and M o n i t o r i n g — A s y s te m a tic data collection system is being developed w h ic h w ill enable evaluation of the effectiveness of patient care, and an advisory c o m m itte e is be­ ing form e d w h ich w ill be composed o f both health care providers and consumers th ro u g h ­ o u t Northeast O hio. EMERGENCY A N D INTENSIVE CARE FOR CHILDREN A N D YOUTH A ccidents and suicides remain the largest cause o f death fo r children and youth. The m o to r car is the No. 1 killer and maimer. But poisons and burns also take the ir toll, especially among small children, as motorcycles and self-inflicted w o u nd s do among preadolescents and teen­ agers. The crisis illnesses o f ch ild h o o d most

19


HEALTH fre q u e n tly involve acute infections and obstru c­ tions to breathing, w h e th e r caused by the croup or by bits o f fo o d or pebbles getting lodged in the w in d p ip e . W h ile the last ten years have seen extensive d e v e lo p m e n t o f emergency and intensive care fo r adults w ith coronary and o th e r medical problems, relatively less investm ent has been made in handling these c h ild h o o d problems. Children are dying or suffering brain damage or perm anent d isfigurem ent because o f inade­ quate emergency room care or insufficient re­ ferral to app ro p ria te personnel, e q u ip m e n t and facilities to meet the ir special intensive care needs. In December, 1976 the D is trib u tio n C o m m it­ tee made a planning grant to Case Western Reserve medical school to d evelop a n e tw o rk o f pediatric emergency care fo r Northeast O hio. O ne o f the first activities w ill be to develop emergency room procedures fo r handling the crises described above. In the case o f m o to r car victims, fo r example, emergency room per­ sonnel must k n o w n ot only h o w to reduce trauma in children b ut that fractures may re­ quire special handling because children's bones and tissues are still growing. Emergency room staff and ambulance drivers are learning where to send children w ith special needs, such as fire victims to the burn center at M e tro p o lita n General. As a part o f its interest in pediatric crisis care, the Foundation also made a challenge grant for creation at Rainbow Babies and Childrens Hos­ pital o f a pediatric intensive care facility to serve the entire Northeastern O h io region. A M BULATO RY CARE As one considers h o w to im prove the organiza­ tio n o f health care fo r all Americans, it becomes 2 0

apparent that the emphasis m ust sh ift fro m treatm ent o f advanced illness, w h ic h is usually accom panied by expensive h o sp ita liza tion , to the m ore cost effective p re v e n tio n o f illness and maintenance o f health. Recognizing this need, a $55,415 grant was made to Case Western Reserve m edical school in late 1976 to e m p lo y an a m b u la to ry care d ire c­ to r to begin pla nn in g a system fo r Cuyahoga County. The new d ire ctor, an associate dean w h o previously im p le m e n te d such a system for child re n in upper M anhattan o f N e w York City, has begun surveying the resources w h ic h exist in Greater Cleveland. This is an essential step before designing linkages between physicians, social workers, nutritionists, mental health spe­ cialists, educators, and city clinics and hospital o u tp a tie n t departments. A t the m o m e n t there is n ot adequate data to d ete rm ine w h e re physicians practice, w h a t kinds o f practices they have o r the tim e and distance it takes patients to see them, n o r is there ade­ quate data to indicate w h y so many parents no longer innoculate the ir ch ild re n against such serious illnesses as p o lio and measles. There are indications that the schools o f this m e tro po lita n area could do much m ore to teach lifetim e health habits to children w h ile physicians and clinics could be more e xplicit in the directions they give concerning m edication. The new am bulatory care d ire c to r also is p ro ­ vid in g assistance to specific projects: the dental fee pro ble m o f the group practice o f the n o n ­ p ro fit G lenville Health Association; the separa­ tion o f the o u tp a tie n t clin ic fro m University Hospitals in such a way that all patients w ill be treated as private patients, even w h e n the ir services are paid by M edicare o r M e d ic a id ; and the d eve lo p m en t of fam ily practice departm ents at M e t r o p o l i t a n G e n e r a l a n d U n i v e r s i t y


hospitals. THE AMBULANCE RIDE A ll a m b u la n c e s and h o s p ita ls in C u y a h o g a C o u nty are linked by te le p h o n e and radio into a single emergency co m m u n ic atio n s system kn o w n as CMED. Every day CMED handles a b o u t 200 te lep h on e calls, each answered by a certified medical technician w h o seeks enough in fo rm a tio n to dispatch the nearest ambulance to the scene of an accident o r the hom e or office o f a vic tim o f heart attack, stroke or oth e r medical emergency. W h ile the patient is in transit, ambulance technicians may be receiving instructions from physicians or hospital personnel and may be in ­ fo rm in g the receiving room as to w h a t e q u ip ­ ment and care should be ready fo r the patient's arrival. If the hospital is full, CMED knows where to d ive rt the patient to a facility w ith space. O r if the hospital lacks b lo o d o r special drugs, CMED w ill locate the m edicatio n and speed it to the patient. CMED also has voice linkages w ith PEERS, the Psychiatric Emergency and Evaluation Referral System, fo r ro u n d -th e -c lo c k counseling fo r per­ sons threatening suicide, and w ith the American Red Cross fo r severe w e a th e r warnings and d i­ saster procedures. A grant fro m The Cleveland Foundation kept this m o d el am bulance dispatch system alive d u rin g a six-m onth interim fro m the tim e start­ up fu n d in g fro m the Robert W o o d Johnson Foundation expired and the Board o f County Commissioners decided to assume the costs for the system. W HEN ELDERLY LEAVE THE HOSPITAL W h e n in n er-city senior citizens are discharged fro m the hospital, they often are too weak to

live alone, yet neither need nor can afford nurs­ ing hom e care. Therefore, St. V in ce n t Charity Hospital has developed a unique program in w h ic h healthy inner-city residents, preferably senior citizens themselves, take patients into their hom e fo r a convalescent period o f one to three weeks. This program is believed to be the o n ly p r o j­ ect of its kind in the co un try and has received hopeful inquiries fro m N ew York to California. It is still full of promise, but has proved much more d iffic u lt to im p le m e n t than originally anticipated. It to o k a full seven months fro m the tim e St. V in cen t staff started lo o kin g fo r foster homes to the pla cem ent of the first patient — a cancer victim in her late sixties. The program has had to overcom e reluc­ tances rooted in fear — the reluctance o f innercity residents to w e lco m e strangers into their homes, the reluctance of insurance companies to provide lia b ility coverage at less than slum rates, and the reluctance of inner-city patients to leave their homes or apartments unguarded any longer than necessary. The foster hom e care program is being sup­ ported by a three-year grant of $104,753 and includes a substantial c o m p o n e n t fo r research and evaluation. If it succeeds it could become an im p o rta n t model fo r the nation.


HEALTH AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION, NORTHEAST OHIO AFFILIATE, INC. Support of cardiopulmonary resuscitation p r o g r a m ........................................................................................................................................................................ $

56,000

THE ART STUDIO, HIGHLAND VIEW HOSPITAL Development of graduate programs in art therapy and r e h a b i l i t a t i o n .........................................................................................................................................

7,500

CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY for School of Medicine Development and implementation of regional genetics center for northern O h i o .................................................................................................................... Support of program to improve quality of ambulatory health c a r e .............................................................................................................................................. Second-year support of demonstration parenting program for prevention of child abuse by department of p s y c h i a t r y ................................................ Design of countywide consumer health information and education system by department of community h e a lth ............................................................... Planning of regional program in emergency pediatric c a r e ......................................................................................................................................................... Pilot program of research and service in continuing medical e d u c a t i o n .................................................................................................................................... Study of public attitude toward delegation of medical tasks by department of p e d ia tric s ....................................................................................................

350,000 55,415 35,000 78,241 50,944 4,370 3,325

CLEVELAND FOUNDATION RESOURCES Evaluation of grant to Case Western Reserve University for parenting p r o g r a m .................................................................................................................... Evaluation of grant to Case Western Reserve University for regional genetics c e n te r.............................................................................................................. Evaluation of grant to Federation for Community Planning for aged and chronically i l l ......................................................................................................... Evaluation and review of grants to Glenville Health Association for medical and dental group p r a c t i c e s .......................................................................... Evaluation of grant to St. Vincent Charity Hosiptal for foster care for a g e d .............................................................................................................................. Evaluation of overall potential of Cleveland Foundation support for family practice residency programs at Fairview General Hospital and elsewhere in Northeast O h i o .......................................................................................................................................................................................................

5,000 5,000 2,000 10,000 2,000 3,000

CLEVELAND OSTOMY ASSOCIATION, INC. General s u p p o r t .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

4,560

CMED, INC. Interim operating support for Cuyahoga County Emergency Medical Communications s y s t e m .........................................................................................

70,000

CUYAHOGA COUNTY HOSPITAL FOUNDATION Support of black lung disease p r o g r a m ............................................................................................................................................................................................. FEDERATION FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING Support of research, planning and community involvement in health and social well-being of aged and chronically i l l ............................................... FREE CLINIC OF LAKE COUNTY, INC. Matching support for mobile outreach p r o g r a m .............................................................................................................................................................................

30,471 100,000 2,579

THE FREE MEDICAL CLINIC OF GREATER CLEVELAND Partial support of hypertension treatment and control program among low-income p e rs o n s ..............................................................................................

26,210

GLENVILLE HEALTH ASSOCIATION Capital support for purchase of present facility for M.I.G.H.T. medical and dental group p r a c t i c e s .................................................................................... Support of M.I.G.H.T. administration and marketing e ffo rts.............................................................. ............................................................................................. Support of continuing education in health care financial m anagem ent........................................................................................................................................

50,000 50,000 1,750

GREATER CLEVELAND HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION Support of feasibility study for regional health data s y s t e m ........................................................................................................................................................ Analysis of educational film d is trib u tio n ............................................................................................................................................................................................ Support of a patient education program in basic n u tritio n ............................................................................................................................................................ HEATHER HILL, INC. Expand skilled nursing f a c i l i t y ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... Symposium on development of skilled nursing facility . . ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ...................................................................................

22

30,000 2,900 15,000 75,000 5,000


NORTHERN OHIO CHAPTER, THE NATIONAL HEMOPHILIA FOUNDATION Support for replacing mobile lab used to extract blood clotting agent RAINBOW BABIES AND CHILDRENS HOSPITAL Support of pediatric intensive care u n i t ............................................... ST. VINCENT CHARITY HOSPITAL Establishment and operation of medical foster care program for aged Total Health Programs — U n d e s ig n a te d ............................................... (Following recipients and programs designated by donor) AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY General s u p p o r t .................................................................... AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION, NORTHEAST OHIO CHAPTER, INC. General s u p p o r t .............................................................................................. BELLEVUE HOSPITAL, BELLEVUE, OHIO General s u p p o r t .............................................................................................. CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY for School of Medicine Support of cancer r e s e a r c h ..................................... Support of medical research and general support General support of outpatient clinic for dispensary Support of research in diseases of the eye . . . CLEVELAND CLINIC Support of research in diseases of the eye . . . CLEVELAND CLINIC FOUNDATION General s u p p o r t .......................................................... CLEVELAND HEALTH MUSEUM AND EDUCATION CENTER General s u p p o r t ............................................................... CUYAHOGA COUNTY HOSPITAL FOUNDATION, INC. Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital nurse award General s u p p o r t ............................................................... ELYRIA MEMORIAL HOSPITAL Support for William H. Gates b e d ............................... EVANGELICAL DEACONESS HOSPITAL General s u p p o r t ............................................................... FAIRVIEW GENERAL HOSPITAL Equipment .................................................................... General s u p p o r t ............................................................... Support for Christiana Perrin Soyer b e d ..................... GRACE HOSPITAL E q u ip m e n t.......................................................................... HEALTH FUND OF GREATER CLEVELAND General s u p p o r t ...............................................................

14,211 35,000 104,753 . $1,285,229

. $

950 27,836 2,239 10,911 12,149 28,417 24,311 12,156 950 1,494 511 1.747 1,300 1.747 34,545 1.747 651 17,273 414

23


HEALTH HEALTH HILL HOSPITAL FOR CONVALESCENT CHILDREN General s u p p o r t ...............................................

1,747

HIGHLAND VIEW HOSPITAL Support of employees’ Christmas fund . . HURON ROAD HOSPITAL General s u p p o r t ...............................................

5,522

LUTHERAN HOSPITAL Conference t r a v e l .......................................... Nurse a w a r d ....................................................

227 1,645

SAMARITAN HOSPITAL, ASHLAND, OHIO Memorial room in memory of Mr. and Mrs. A. N. Myers

573

10,094

SHRINERS HOSPITAL FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN, CHICAGO General s u p p o r t .......................... ..... . SAINT ANN FOUNDATION General s u p p o r t ..................................... ST. JOHN’S HOSPITAL General s u p p o r t .....................................

5,745

ST. VINCENT CHARITY HOSPITAL Aid for alcoholics and indigent sick . General s u p p o r t ..................................... Support for Elizabeth Boersig Soyer bed

844 3,791 652

TUBERCULOSIS & RESPIRATORY DISEASES ASSOCIATION General s u p p o r t ..............................................................................

1,104

UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS OF CLEVELAND General s u p p o r t ..................................... Conference t r a v e l ............................... General support for Lakeside Hospital General support for the maternity hospital . Support for Henry L. Sanford Memorial bed Equipment for supplies for Rainbow Babies & Childrens Hospital General support for Rainbow Babies & Childrens Hospital Support of urological or vascular research .

4,318 1,747

7,582 1,479 353,009 5.637 928 928 1,747 38,465

Total Health Programs — Designated

$ 629,131

Total Health Programs — Designated and Undesignated

$1,914,361

24


SOCIAL SERVICES


SO CIAL SERVICES

26

Few c o m m u n i t i e s in A m e r ic a , if any, have d eve lo p ed a systems approach fo r deliverin g social services to the p ub lic. O n e o f the m ajor reasons fo r this s h o rtco m in g has been the lack o f c o o rd in a tio n at the federal level arising from the p ro b le m -b y -p ro b le m response o f Congress to such varied personal concerns as aging, child care, crime, drug abuse and mental health. State and local agencies — b oth p u b lic and private — have been so busy scram bling after the greatly in c re a s e d fe d e ra l d o lla r s t h a t th e y have e x ­ panded and adapted the ir mission in to a crazy q u ilt o f d u p lica tin g and o ve rlap p in g services w h ile o th e r needs have gone unmet. As T he C le v e la n d F o u n d a t io n a u t h o r iz e d $3,126,394 to social service endeavors d u rin g 1976, it co ntin u ed to use its lim ite d resources to foster co o rd in a tio n , efficiency and im agina­ tio n on the local scene. It supported new efforts to p ro vide ro u n d -th e -c lo c k assistance to people in tim e o f crisis and to im p le m e n t re co m m e n ­ dations o f its citizens c o m m itte e on crim inal justice. It p ro vide d su p p o rt fo r the task force w h ic h was c o m p le t in g its s tu d y o f ways f o r U nited Torch Services to strengthen the process fo r d istrib u tin g vo lu n ta rily raised c o m m u n ity dollars fo r health and social services. A nd in the p o t e n t i a l l y m o s t s ig n if ic a n t a c t i v it y o f a ll, it u n d e rw ro te creation o f a daring strategy fo r restructuring the delivery o f all personal social services in Cuyahoga C o u nty — both p u b lic and p r iv a t e — in t o a c o o r d in a t e d system w h ic h could becom e an im p o rta n t model fo r the rest o f the country.

hoga C o u nty d u rin g 1976: • O ne in nine persons was over 65 years o f age. • O ne in tw o marriages was e n d in g in divorce. • Four in ten w o m e n w e re e m p lo y e d fu ll time. • M o re than 500 cases o f c h ild abuse w ere re­ ported. • M o re than 300 cases o f runaw ay y o uth were reported. Clearly there are many e ld e rly w h o need a variety o f hom em aker, n u tritio n a l and recrea­ tional services if they are to co n tin u e to live at hom e and remain in d ependent. There are many families w h ic h need guidance in times o f m ari­ tal c o n flic t and divorce. There are many w o r k ­ ing m others w ith pre-school children w h o need c h i l d c a r e a r r a n g e m e n t s . T h e r e a re m a n y families and individuals w h o need supportive services fo r alcoholics and d rug users and for persons w h o are otherw ise physically, e m o tio n ­ ally or m en ta lly handicaped. W h ile there are many excellent p u b lic and volu nta ry social service agencies in Cuyahoga County, the overall service is fragmentary. Some sections o f the co u n ty o ffe r m any services. O t h ­ ers have none. Some agencies make access very simple by being responsive to clients, p ro vid in g i n f o r m a t i o n , re fe r ra l a n d f o l l o w - u p . O t h e r agencies offer very specialized services and are n ot equ ip p ed to help clients w h o have other needs or do not meet e lig ib ility standards. Since there is no c o u n ty w id e system, there is no way o f k n o w in g the n u m b e r o f p e o p le w h o are ef­ fectively served, p o o rly served o r never served at all.

T O W A R D A C O U N TY DELIVERY SYSTEM — N O T FOR THE POOR ALONE The g ro w in g need fo r social services among all segments o f the p op u la tio n — n ot just the p oo r — is clearly indicated by the fact that in Cuya­

These conclusions w e re expressed in a re­ cent report to the Board o f C o u nty C o m m is ­ sioners fro m its A d Hoc C o m m itte e on Public Social Services. The co m m itte e, com posed o f local social service leaders, spent six m onths developing a proposal fo r creation o f a c o o rd i-


n a te d d e l iv e r y system f o r all o f C u y a h o g a County. It was assisted by a distinguished social w o r k professor fro m C o lu m b ia University, an international expert whose p h ilo so p h y is sum­ marized in the title of one of his books, N o t for the Poor Alo ne. The expert d re w upon his five years o f research into the delivery o f social serv­ ices in the U nited States and nine o th e r c o u n ­ tries in presenting pla nn in g concepts to the co m m itte e and to co un ty officials. The c o m m it­ tee also was p ro vide d technical expertise by professors fro m Case Western Reserve U n ive r­ sity and staff o f the C o u nty W elfare Departm ent. The Board o f C ounty Commissioners n o w is seeking w id e p u b lic reaction to the re co m m e n ­ dations o f the co m m itte e. These re co m m e nd a ­ tions call for: • A re a S ocial S e rvic e C e n te rs — T he c o u n t y should develop and adm inister social service centers in all geographic areas o f the county, these centers to be open to any citizen regard­ less o f p ro b le m , in co m e o r o th e r e lig ib ility fac­ tor. Trained social w o rkers in the area centers w o u ld assess needs, p ro vide crisis intervention, connect p e o p le to specialized services and p r o ­ vide o n g o in g service fo r some. W orkers in the centers w o u ld be responsible n ot o n ly fo r in d i­ viduals living in the area b u t also w o u ld have relationships w ith area institutions such as hos­ pitals, schools and nursing homes. • U nified C o u nty A d m in is tra tio n — The co un ty w o u ld create a co u n ty adm inistrative office fo r social services to p ro vide overall planning, o p ­ eration su p p o rt and a c cou n ta b ility fo r the area centers. • P u b lic - V o lu n t a r y P a r tn e rs h ip — W h i l e th e county's area centers w o u ld p ro vide many core services n o w p ro vid e d by a variety of agencies, there w o u ld be an anticipated increase in d e ­ mand fo r specialized services p rovided by v o l­

untary agencies, often on a contract basis. The plan addresses the increasing interest am ong social welfare, political and civic lead­ ers to create a m ore effective system o f social services t h a t c a p ita liz e s u p o n th e s p ecial strengths of both the p u b lic and volu nta ry sec­ tors. The payoffs could be tremendous. The p ro ­ posed delivery system could enable o p tim u m use o f the talent in the co m m u n ity's excellent private and p u b lic social service agencies and o f th e m il lio n s o f so c ia l s e rvic e d o lla r s e x­ pended annually in Cuyahoga County. It could mean that many people w h o n o w do not kn o w w h e r e to t u r n f o r h e lp o r w h o have been thw arted in trying to understand the c o m p li­ cated requirements of diffe re n t agencies w o u ld have an o p p o rtu n ity to reach those w h o can assist them in tim e o f personal need. The Cleveland Foundation co n trib u te d $47,014 fo r the consultants and technical assistance for the w o rk o f the ad hoc c o m m itte e and the county. UNITED TORCH PRIORITIES Near the end o f 1976 an in d ep e nd e nt c o m m it­ tee of leading citizens c om pleted a two-year study o f ways to im p ro ve the allocation of the vast sums raised each year by United Torch for some 160 voluntary health and social service agencies. In G re a te r C le v e la n d — the h o m e to w n o f the united giving c o n c e p t— individuals and co rp oratio n co n trib u te d $27.6 m illio n to U nited Torch Services in 1976, the highest per capita giving in America. The Allocations Guidelines Project re co m ­ m ended new procedures w h ic h have been ac­ cepted in p rin cip le by the board o f UTS w h ich is b e g in n in g to i m p le m e n t m a n y o f th e m . U nited Torch has appo in te d a 36-m em ber Pri­

orities D e te rm in a tio n C o m m itte e and has re­ structured its panels to review agencies in terms o f the services they render rather than in terms o f the ir straight budgetary requests as in the past. It also is e xp e rim en tin g w ith models fo r assessing service effectiveness and fo r revising financial accountability. A m a jo r issue yet to be resolved is w h e th e r changes w ill be made in the special arrange­ m e n ts — in some cases, fixed percentages o f total c o n trib u tio n s raised — agreed upon w h e n m a jo r agencies jo in e d the united appeal a n u m ­ ber o f years ago. These agencies include the American Cancer Society, the Am erican Heart Association, the A m erican Red Cross, C atholic Charities, the Federation fo r C o m m u n ity Plan­ ning, the Health Fund and the Jewish C o m m u ­ nity Federation. The Foundation co n trib u te d $226,020 to the p ro ject over tw o years, matched by in -kin d staff services fro m UTS and the Federation fo r C o m ­ m u n ity Planning. IN TIMES OF PERSONAL CRISIS The b r e a d w in n e r w h o has lo s t his j o b a nd threatens suicide. The lonely w id o w w h o has slashed her wrists and then regrets it. The y o uth w h o has taken an overdose of drugs. The o v e r­ w o rke d executive w h o cannot cope w ith busi­ ness c o m p e titio n and is falling apart. The w o ­ man w h o has been abducted and raped. The battered w ife w h o has fled the home. There are thousands such individuals in crisis in Greater Cleveland each year. Some are living lives o f q uiet desperation, w ith d ra w in g fro m contact w ith oth e r hum an beings. Some are crying o u t fo r help throu g h aggression against others. Some are caught unawares. Some have been c o n te m p la tin g suicide fo r a lo ng tim e, and finally try it. W h e n the m o m e n t o f crisis comes,

27


there may be o n ly a fe w minutes o r a few hours in w h ic h ano the r human being can p ro vide the e m p a th y or reassurance or medical a ttention needed to halt a loss of life o r connect a person w ith the counseling or m e d icatio n that may brin g him back to a socially accepted level of behavior. Such crises are n ot co nfin e d to the 9-to-5 w o rkd ay. They are as likely to occur at m id n ig h t as at noon. Consequently, fo r the past tw o years a great deal of tim e and energy has been spent by the City o f Cleveland, the County Mental Health and Retardation Board, the area mental health centers, the Psychiatric Emergency and Referral Service (PEERS) and the Crisis Inter­ ve n tio n Team, Inc., in establishing a 24-hour c o u n ty w id e emergency phone and face-to-face crisis interven tio n service. W h ile such a service n orm a lly is the respon­ sib ility of county governm ent, im p le m e n ta tio n was held up fo r lack o f adequate state a p p ro ­ priations. Therefore, the Foundation provided start-up su pp o rt fo r tw o key com ponents later to be fun d ed by government. The first was a grant to PEERS w h ic h enabled the p ho n e service to becom e operational in January, 1977. The grant funded the e m p lo y ­ m e n t o f professional staff at night and on w e e k ­ ends to answer the phones w ith crisis assess­ ment, counseling and referral. The service ties in n ot o n ly to mental health centers but also to hospitals and CMED, the c o u n ty w id e em er­ gency am bulance system. Cleveland has there­ fore becom e the first large m e tro p o lita n area in the c o u n try to have such psychiatric-medical transport cooperation. PEERS, fo rm e rly k n ow n as the Suicide Pre­ vention Center, handles about 4,000 cases a year — 60 percent o f them suicidal. In addition to answering its o w n seven telep h on e lines, it

28

also takes after-hours calls fo r the Crisis In te r­ ventio n Team, the West Side M ental Health Center, C o m m u n ity Guidance and Hum an Serv­ ices, the G le nville M ental Health Center and the M u rtis H. Taylor Multi-Services Center. This service is p e rfo rm e d on a shared-staff, sharedcost basis. The second c o m p o n e n t was a grant to p ro ­ vide after-hours professional staff so the Crisis Intervention Team co uld p ro vide face-to-face counseling around the clock. This was essential to crisis service because CIT covers the 60 per­ cent of the county's residents living outside the areas served by Cleveland's three mental health centers, handling m ore than 4,000 cases d u rin g 1976. Its staff counsels n o t o n ly in the office but goes to homes, motels, police stations and hos­ p itals— w h erever people are in crisis. The incidence of crises has increased signifi­ cantly w ith the release o f many persons fro m state psychiatric hospitals. Because some fo rm e r mental patients feel more co m fo rta b le in a less structured environ m e n t, the Foundation c o n tin ­ ued second-year fu n d in g to a w a lk -in center kn ow n as Project Renaissance operated by the Legal A id Society o f Cleveland. The Foundation also supported crisis in te r­ vention services w h ich dovetail w ith its interest in programs dealing w ith w o m e n and crim inal justice. A grant was made to create the Rape Crisis Center, whose staff and volunteers ac­ com pany rape victims to the hospital, help as­ sure that evidence needed fo r prosecution is gathered by the police, and p ro vide counseling over tim e to ease the to rm e n t w h ic h often comes in the wake of such an em otional experi­ ence. It also supported W o m e n Together, Inc., in o pening an e ig ht-b e droo m house to provide emergency shelter fo r battered wives and c h il­ dren seeking to escape the vio lence in flicted by

the men in th e ir lives. Early in 1976 the Foundation's citizens c o m ­ m ittee on crim inal ju stice noted the lack of emergency shelter and counseling fo r runaway youth in Greater Cleveland. The Free M edical Clinic, a private agency w h ic h is contacted by abo u t 400 runaway y o uth a year, m ost between the ages of 12 and 18, responded by o p e n in g a Safe Space Station. A Cleveland Foundation grant o f $75,000 su pp o rted creation o f Safe Space Station, w h ic h provides n o t only em e r­ gency housing b ut also operates a telephone hot line, health care, and in d ivid ua l and fam ily counseling fo r runaways.


SOCIAL SERVICES GRANTS THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION AMASA STONE HOUSE General s u p p o r t ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... $ AMERICAN CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION OF OHIO FOUNDATION, INC. Partial support of pilot project on rights of in s t itu tio n a liz e d ........................................................................................................................................................ THE BENJAMIN ROSE INSTITUTE General s u p p o r t ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... Support for nursing home clients and p e n s io n e r ............................................................................................................................................................................ BIG BROTHERS OF GREATER CLEVELAND Establishment of Big Sister p r o g r a m ................................................................................................................................................................................................. CAMP HO-MITA-KODA Capital s u p p o r t ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... CAMP NUHOP, INC. Partial support of summer camp for learning-disabled c h ild re n .................................................................................................................................................. CATHOLIC SERVICE BUREAU OF LAKE COUNTY Support for training program in family therapy for social service agencies in Lake C o u n t y .............................................................................................. CENTER FOR HUMAN SERVICES Second-year support of counseling services for children and families in the southwestern communities of Greater C l e v e l a n d ............................... Support for completion of administrative and service delivery re o r g a n iz a t io n ........................................................................................................................ CHILD GUIDANCE CENTER Support staff training in family t h e r a p y ............................................................................................................................................................................................ CLEVELAND FOUNDATION RESOURCES Assistance to volunteer offenders program at Probation Friend P r o g r a m ............................................................................................................................. Edith Anisfield-Wolf community service a w a r d ....................................................................................................................................... .................................... Evaluation of grant to Center for Human Services for counseling services in southwestern communities of Greater C l e v e l a n d ................................. Evaluation of grant to Legal Aid Society of Cleveland for walk-in center for ex-mental p a tie n ts ......................................................................................... Evaluation of grant to WomenSpace and other foundation-funded women’s p r o g r a m s ................................................................................................... Evaluation of Tremont Cooperative Child Care C e n t e r .................................................................................................................................................................. Assistance to Welfare Department in developing alternative models for delivering social services inCuyahoga County................................................ CLEVELAND HEALTH MUSEUM AND EDUCATION CENTER Completion of construction of four “ Theatres of Social Concern” ............................................................................................................................................. THE CLEVELAND INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM Work experience grants for international youth leaders and social w o r k e r s ........................................................................................................................

15,000 30,000 15,000 4,327 45,000 3,982 9,000 18,975 42,500 150,000 6,000 1,000 5,000 1,000 1,000 2,000 1,000 47,000 16,250 14,600

CLEVELAND RAPE CRISIS CENTER Establishment of the c e n t e r .................................................................................................................................................................................................................

31,200

CLEVELAND SOCIETY FOR THE BLIND General s u p p o r t ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... Toward purchase of specialized equipment for sheltered w o r k s h o p ........................................................................................................................................

15,000 12,914

COUNCIL ON ADOPTABLE CHILDREN Support for Adoption Listing Service of Ohio

............................................................................................................................................................................

18,000

CRISIS INTERVENTION TEAM, INC. Operation of around-the-clock, face-to-face emergency s e r v i c e s .............................................................................................................................................

66,500

CRUSADE OF MERCY OF TOLEDO General s u p p o r t ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

1,500

CUYAHOGA ASSOCIATION FOR RETARDED CITIZENS Third-year support of education services p r o g r a m .......................................................................................................................................................................

23,500

29


S O CIAL SERVICES CUYAHOGA COUNTY BOARD OF MENTAL RETARDATION Partial support of in-service training for management p e r s o n n e l ..............................................................................................................................................

^,ouu

CUYAHOGA COUNTY WELFARE DEPARTMENT . Establishment of crippled and handicapped children’s fund for special needs not met by public p r o g r a m s ...............................................................

nnn °>uu

DEACONESS-KRAFFT RETIREMENT CENTER „ nnn Capital s u p p o r t .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

^ ° ’uuu

ECUMENICAL YOUTH MINISTRY, INC. Expand outreach efforts to youth on Cleveland’s West S i d e .........................................................................................................................................................

44 qnn

ELDER LOT, INC. on nnn Second and third-year support of multiservice day care center for the e ld e r ly ......................................................................................................................... ELIZA BRYANT CENTER 75 0Q0 Social services program and facility d e v e lo p m e n t ........................................................................................................................................................................ FAR WEST INFORMATION AND COUNSELING CENTER 63 0Q0 Second-year operating s u p p o rt............................................................................................................................................................................................................ FEDERATION FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING , . . . Partial support of neighborhood-based summer youth programs of the Youth Planning and Development Commission in 1976 and 19/ /

o7c nnn

FLORENCE CRITTENTON SERVICES OF GREATER CLEVELAND, INC. Expand group home s e r v i c e s ............................................................................................................................................................................................................ THE FREE MEDICAL CLINIC OF GREATER CLEVELAND q „ 00 Development and establishment of comprehensive runaway youth p r o g r a m .........................................................................................................................

/a,uuu

GEAUGA CENTER FOR YOUTH AND YOUNG ADULTS _ 00Q Support for mobile service unit p ro g ra m ............................................................................................................................................................................................ GOLDEN AGE CENTER OF GREATER CLEVELAND, INC. Provide social services to elderly residents of University Circle a r e a ........................................................................................................................................

GOODWILL INDUSTRIES OF CLEVELAND Support for attended collection center syste m .................................................................................................................................................................................. GREATER CLEVELAND INTERCHURCH COUNCIL Toward emergency food stuffs for needy fa m ilie s ............................................................................................................................................................................ GREATER CLEVELAND NEIGHBORHOOD CENTERS ASSOCIATION Toward extended day care s e r v i c e s .............................................................. .................................................................................................................................. Support of five-year planning study for the association’s member a g e n c i e s ........................................................................................................................

o ^ 7 nn ^o,/uu

HATTIE LARLHAM FOUNDATION, MANTUA, OHIO Partial support of capital c a m p a i g n ................................................................................................................................................................................................. Second-year support of crisis care facilities for handicapped c h i l d r e n ...................................................................................................................................

« nnn o,uuu

HEIGHTS COMMUNITY CONGRESS Toward better use of community responsive transit for elderly

i,uoy

1 nfiq .................................................................................................................................................

INNER CITY PROTESTANT PARISH Partial second-year support of professional development program in social

4^,uu

. . services for inner-city m in is t e r s ................................................................

w,uuu

KENT STATE UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION Toward construction of King-Kennedy Community Center in McElrath Park community in Ravenna, O h i o .....................................................................

^o,uuu

LAKE ERIE GIRL SCOUT COUNCIL Support for activities in C o l l i n w o o d ................................................................................................................................................................................................ LAKELAND COMMUNITY COLLEGE Lake County alcoholism treatment tra in in g .................................................................................................................. ...................................................................

30

o.^uu


LEGAL AID SOCIETY OF CLEVELAND Support of Tremont Cooperative Child Care C e n t e r ........................................................................................................................................................................ Toward a walk-in center for ex-mental p a t i e n t s ............................................................................................................................................................................. LEXINGTON SQUARE COMMUNITY CENTER Toward building renovation and purchase of custodial s e r v i c e s .............................................................................................................................................. THE LORAIN COUNTY FEDERATION FOR HUMAN SERVICES Support for pilot phase of Lorain County Federation for Human S e r v i c e s .............................................................................................................................. LUTHERAN CHILDREN’S AID SOCIETY Second-year support of special adoption p r o je c t ............................................................................................................................................................................ NORTHEAST LORAIN COUNTY HUMAN RESOURCES CENTER, INC. Support for a volunteer training p r o g r a m ....................................................................................................................................................................................... PARMADALE Evaluation of programs designed to assist children with special n e e d s ................................................................................................................................... THE PHILLIS WHEATLEY ASSOCIATION Toward modernization of elevator service in senior citizen re sid e n ce ........................................................................................................................................ PROBATION FRIEND PROGRAM Support of released adult offenders p r o g r a m .................................................................................................................................................................................. PSYCHIATRIC EMERGENCY EVALUATION AND REFERRAL SERVICE Toward 24-hour, on-site emergency psychiatric s e r v i c e ............................................................................................................................................................. THE SALVATION ARMY Third-year funding of Harbor Light Alcohol Detoxification C e n te r............................................................................................................................................. UNITED TORCH SERVICES, INC. Second-year support of Allocation Guidelines P r o j e c t .................................................................................................................................................................. Establish revolving loan program to assist agencies funded by United Torch which have serious recurring cash flow p r o b le m s ............................... VOCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY FUND OF THE CUYAHOGA COUNTY WELFARE DEPARTMENT Give-A-Christmas program for widows with dependent c h i l d r e n ............................................................................................................................................. THE VOLUNTEERS OF AMERICA Building repairs at the Men’s R esidence............................................................................................................................................................................................ WARRENSVILLE CENTER Support of staff t r a i n i n g ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................... WOMENSPACE Support of women’s c e n t e r ................................................................................................................................................................................................................. WOMEN TOGETHER, INC. Partial support of crisis housing program for w o m e n ....................................................................................................................................................................... YOUNG MEN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION OF PAINESVILLE Second-year support for community relations p r o g r a m .............................................................................................................................................................

59,812 28,134 11,500 30,000 13,500 1,800 25,000 38,500 63,000 63,485 99,810 123,820 71,250 1,900 25,000 10,000 128,000 32,000 12,000

YOUNG WOMEN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION Implementation of restructuring p r o g r a m ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 45,688 Total Social Services — U ndesignated............................................................................................................................................................................................ $2,513,916 (Following recipients and programs designated by donor) THE ALTENHEIM General s u p p o r t ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... $ AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY General s u p p o r t .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

8,028 503

31


S S S ! SOCIAL SERVICES / / / . AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY, INC. ( ( ( 1 General s u p p o rt....................................................................................................

26,886

/ / ( (

/ AMERICAN NATIONAL RED CROSS, GREATER CLEVELAND CHAPTER <General s u p p o rt.....................................................................................................

2,150

I I <i

I BEECH BROOK <General s u p p o rt.....................................................................................................

33,372

BELLEFAIRE General s u p p o rt...............................................................................................

3,870

BENJAMIN ROSE INSTITUTE General s u p p o rt..............................................................................................

4,960

BIG BROTHERS OF GREATER CLEVELAND General s u p p o rt..............................................................................................

6,994

BOYS’ CLUB OF CLEVELAND, INC. General s u p p o rt..............................................................................................

413

CALVARY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH General s u p p o rt..............................................................................................

4,038

* ' *

CENTER FOR HUMAN SERVICES General s u p p o rt.............................................................................................. General support for Family Service Association D iv is io n ..................... General support for the Homemaker-Health Aide D iv is io n ..................... General support for the Day Nursery Association of Cleveland . . . . CHILD GUIDANCE CENTER Operating s u p p o r t ......................................................................................... CHILDREN’S AID SOCIETY General s u p p o rt.............................................................................................. General support for Industrial H o m e ......................................................... CHILDREN’S SERVICES General s u p p o rt.............................................................................................. CHRIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH General s u p p o rt.............................................................................................. CHURCH HOME General s u p p o rt.............................................................................................. CLEVELAND HUMANE SOCIETY CORPORATION General s u p p o rt.............................................................................................. CLEVELAND CENTER ON ALCOHOLISM General s u p p o rt.............................................................................................. CLEVELAND POLICE DEPARTMENT JUVENILE BUREAU Prevention of delinquency among b o y s .................................................... CLEVELAND PRESS CHRISTMAS FUND General support for needy and deserving families and children . . . . CLEVELAND PSYCHOANALYTIC SOCIETY FOUNDATION General s u p p o rt.............................................................................................. Research and application of psychoanalysis and support projects . . . CLEVELAND SOCIETY FOR THE BLIND General s u p p o rt.................................................................................................. General support for volunteer Braille t r a n s c r ib e r s ...............................

32

79 21,823 2,000

2.747 195 190 37,895 288 871 3,791 79 23 335 884 15 53,385 17,740 1.747


CUYAHOGA COUNTY WELFARE DEPARTMENT Special client n e e d s ............................................................................... EAST END NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSE General s u p p o rt......................................................................................... ELIZA BRYANT CENTER General s u p p o rt......................................................................................... ELIZA JENNINGS HOME E q u ip m e n t......................................................................................... ..... . General s u p p o rt......................................................................................... FAIRMOUNT PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH General s u p p o rt......................................................................................... FEDERATION FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING General support for Central Volunteer B u re a u ..................................... General s u p p o rt......................................................................................... FIRST METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH General s u p p o rt......................................................................................... GOODWILL INDUSTRIES OF CLEVELAND General s u p p o rt......................................................................................... GREATER CLEVELAND NEIGHBORHOOD CENTERS ASSOCIATION General s u p p o rt......................................................................................... HATTIE LARLHAM FOUNDATION, MANTUA, OHIO General s u p p o rt......................................................................................... HEBREW FREE LOAN ASSOCIATION General s u p p o rt......................................................................................... HIRAM HOUSE General s u p p o rt......................................................................................... HOME FOR AGED WOMEN OF CLEVELAND, OHIO General s u p p o rt......................................................................................... THE JEWISH COMMUNITY FEDERATION General s u p p o rt......................................................................................... JONES HOME OF CHILDREN’S SERVICES Capital im p ro v e m e n t............................................................................... General s u p p o rt......................................................................................... LITTLE SISTERS OF THE POOR Operating s u p p o r t .................................................................................... LUTHERAN HOME FOR THE AGED General s u p p o rt......................................................................................... LUTHERAN WELFARE FUND General s u p p o rt.......................................................................................... MARYCREST SCHOOL General s u p p o rt.......................................................................................... MONTEF.IORE HOME General s u p p o rt......................................................................................... PARMADALE Operating s u p p o r t ....................................................................................

191

1,747 10,064 17.273 4,986 959 1,827 2,049 5,047 1,089 4,961 4,318

1,000 883 3.791 79 17.273 6,478 1,253 6,553 766 3.791 3.791 7,981 33


SOCIAL SERVICES PLANNED PARENTHOOD OF CLEVELAND, INC. General s u p p o rt..........................................................................................

8,022

ROSE-MARY HOME General s u p p o rt..........................................................................................

1,272

ST. JOHN LUTHERAN CHURCH General s u p p o rt.........................................................................................

766

SALVATION ARMY General s u p p o rt.........................................................................................

15,736

SALVATION ARMY, ASHLAND, OHIO General s u p p o rt.........................................................................................

2.524

SISTERS OF NOTRE DAME Physical education program for Julia Billiart S c h o o l..........................

7,437

SOCIETY FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN E q u ip m e n t................................................................................................... General s u p p o rt......................................................................................... SOCIETY OF ST. VINCENT DE PAUL Operating s u p p o r t ................................................................................... STARR COMMONWEALTH FOR BOYS, ALBION, MICHIGAN General s u p p o rt......................................................................................... THREE-CORNER-ROUND PACK OUTFIT, INC. General support for camping p r o g r a m ............................................... TRINITY CATHEDRAL General s u p p o rt......................................................................................... UNITED APPEAL OF ASHLAND COUNTY, ASHLAND, OHIO General s u p p o rt......................................................................................... UNITED TORCH SERVICES, INC. General s u p p o rt......................................................................................... VISITING NURSE ASSOCIATION OF CLEVELAND General s u p p o rt.........................................................................................

17,273 8,463 398 950 8,110

950 2.524 164,963 2,247

VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE AND REHABILITATION SERVICES Assistance to needy of Sunbeam graduating c l a s s .......................... Assistance to needy clients of Sunbeam S c h o o l............................... General s u p p o rt.........................................................................................

2,354

YOUNG MEN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION OF ASHLAND, OHIO General s u p p o rt.........................................................................................

2.524

YOUNG MEN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION OF CLEVELAND, OHIO General s u p p o rt......................................................................................... General support of West Side B ra n c h ....................................................

2.524 8.636

YOUNG MEN’S AND YOUNG WOMEN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION General support to Lakewood Combined B ra n c h ...............................

8.636

YOUNG WOMEN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION General s u p p o rt........................................................................................ Total Social Services Programs — D e s ig n a te d ............................... Total Social Services Programs — Designated and Undesignated

34

1,000 1,000

717 $ 612,478 $3,126,394


CIVIC AFFAIRS


C IV IC AFFAIRS W h e th e r an aging in d u stria l city such as C leve­ land can be reconstructed in to an appealing place to live, w o rk and play depends to a large e xte n t upon h o w w e ll p u b lic o fficials exercise the p o w e r o f g ove rn m e n t purse strings and p riva te citizens exert an interested and e n ­ lig h te n e d in flu e n ce upon w h a t they do. The F o un d atio n , the re fo re , has w o rk e d w ith p u b lic o fficia ls as w e ll as supp o rted the in itia tive s o f c itiz e n p a rtic ip a tio n groups seeking to co n tro l th e ir o w n destiny. Such a d e m o cra tic process is n o t always tid y, yet there have em erged m u tu a lly acceptable strategies fo r re vita lizin g and enha ncing life in C leveland's n e ig h b o r­ hoods, its d o w n to w n and along its la kefront. D u rin g 1976 th e D is t r ib u t io n C o m m itte e a u th o riz e d $1,371,868 in civic affairs grants fo r such c o n tin u in g concerns as re h a b ilita tio n o f n e ig h b o rh o o d housing, reclam ation o f parks, im p ro v e m e n t in p u b lic tra nsp o rtatio n , safer streets and m ore e ffective crim in a l justice, and respect fo r the law in such sensitive areas as open housing. The Foundation supported an im p o rta n t d e m o n stra tio n p ro je c t dealing w ith rent subsidies fo r the p o o r w h ich may u ltim a te ly in flu en ce national housing p o lic y w h ile its grants to n e ig h b o rh o o d organizations, such as Friends o f Shaker Square, are p ro v id in g te ch ­ nical expertise needed to make the m ost o f c o m m u n ity d e ve lo p m e n t funds set aside by the c ity fo r reviving residential com m ercial districts. SHAKER SQUARE A N D N E IG H B O R H O O D COMMERCE Shaker Square once was one o f the most elegant s h op p in g centers in the nation. Its grassy spaces w e re canopied by arching elm trees and its stately red b rick b uilding s o f G eorgian a rch i­ tectu re housed shops catering to d iscrim in a tin g tastes. A fte r nearly 50 years the Square has run

36

d o w n . M o st o f its elms have d ie d, its sidewalks are cru m b lin g , its p a in t trim is peeling, and some o f its storefro n ts are vacant o r o ffe rin g sm all-change services. Even part o f the w h ite ra iling atop the Square's m a jo r restaurant has fallen away and n o t been replaced. W h ile lo c a te d e n tir e ly w it h in th e c ity o f C leveland, Shaker Square serves as gateway to one o f the area's finest suburbs, Shaker Heights, w h ich has accepted m a tu rity and in teg ra tio n w ith grace. Furtherm ore, it is rim m ed by a h e a vy c o n c e n tr a tio n o f s p a c io u s y e t a g in g apartm ents. C onsequently, the Square's v ia b il­ ity is im p o rta n t to the s ta b ility o f b oth the city and suburban n eig h b o rh o o d s w h ich b o rd e r it. Its merchants, like small businessmen m ost places, have n ot been in a p o sitio n to create an overall strategy fo r re vita lizin g the entire busi­ ness district. Yet Shaker Square still has fin e shops and neighbors w h o care. In M arch, 1976 a bo u t 700 citizens— some as ind ivid ua ls, others as representatives o f a bo u t 20 area organizations convened to fo rm Friends o f Shaker Square. S ince th e n h u n d re d s have p a r tic ip a te d in p ro fessionally-run w orkshops, p ro b in g w h a t they w o u ld like to see happen at the Square, or have served on task forces dealing w ith secur­ ity, tra ffic congestion, parking, b e a u tifica tio n , activities and co m m ercial mix. T heir ideas w ere translated in to architectural sketches w h ich , after reaction fro m the c iti­ zenry, w ere refined in to an action plan. The plan was received enthusiastically w hen it was unveiled at the first annual m eeting o f Friends o f Shaker Square in A p ril, 1977. A d iffe re n t kind o f Shaker Square is in the w in d — m ore live ly than elegant, w here jeans w ill be m arketed as w e ll as gems, and w here o u td o o r d in in g , art shows and live m usic may encourage people gathering a la Toronto.

The c ity o f Cleveland has agreed to p la n t new shade trees and is expected to help w ith such p u b lic im p ro ve m e nts as sidew alks and streetlig h tin g , benches and b icycle racks. S ecurity is to be increased in the parking lots and im p ro v e ­ ments made at the rapid stop. The Regional Transit A u th o rity may even be asked to m ove the tu rn a ro u n d fo r its trains away fro m the center o f the Square. Planning has been overseen by the Friends o f Shaker Square staff consisting o f an executive d ire c to r, executive assistant and an architect. T h eir first-ye a r a ctivities have been supported by m a tching grants o f $39,000 each fro m the Foundation and the C ity o f Cleveland as w e ll as several thousand dollars fro m in d ivid ua ls and firm s. Friends o f Shaker Square is one o f seven n e ig h b o rh o o d d e v e lo p m e n t groups given fo u n ­ d atio n fu n d in g in the past year o r so to prepare them to spend e ffe c tiv e ly $2 m illio n in federal c o m m u n ity d e v e lo p m e n t funds the c ity plans to share am ong them d u rin g 1977. The o th e r co m m ercial districts are in the Buckeye, Fairfax, O ld B rooklyn, U p p e r Prospect, O h io C ity and D e tro it Shoreway neigh b orh o o ds. RENT SUBSIDIES The p o o r and the near p oo r, especially m em ­ bers o f large fam ilies, single w o m e n w ith c h il­ dren, the disabled and the e ld e rly, have always had d iffic u lty fin d in g a dece n t place to live. Public housing has tended to co nce n trate such in d ividuals, o fte n exacerbating th e ir d e p e n ­ dency; and so, am id w idespread dissatisfaction, there has been a m o ra to riu m on co n s tru c tio n o f p u b lic housing fo r several years. In 1974 Congress a u th o rize d a new program w h ic h is receiving m uch national a tte n tio n be­ cause fo r the first tim e it provides subsidies fo r


lo w and m oderate in co m e persons to rent housing in the p riva te m arket place. Know n as Section 8 o f the H ousing and C o m m u n ity D e ­ ve lo p m e n t A ct, the program is adm inistered lo ca lly by the Cuyahoga M e tro p o lita n H ousing A u th o rity w ith funds and guidelines p ro vid e d by the U.S. D e p a rtm e n t o f H ousing and Urban D e ve lo p m e n t. Since February, 1976 C M H A has issued certificates to m ore than 4,100 persons and fam ilies, givin g them 60 days to shop any­ w h e re in the c o u n ty fo r houses o r apartm ents offe re d at " fa ir m a rke t” rents. If they secure such housing, renters pay no m ore than 25 per­ cent o f th e ir m o n th ly in co m e to w a rd rent. The federal g o ve rn m e n t pays the d iffe re n ce d ire c tly to the la n d lo rd . It soon becam e apparent, how ever, n o t o n ly in G reater C leveland b u t th ro u g h o u t the c o u n ­ try, th a t the m arket place was n o t y ie ld in g fast enough. M a n y la n dlo rd s o fte n refused to see Section 8 c e rtifica te holders, w h ile m any p ro ­ spective renters d id n 't k n o w w h e re to lo o k fo r housing o r h o w to present them selves favorably. Some feared the e xp e rim e n t was d o o m e d to failu re, in part because federal g uidelines d id n o t a llo w adequate a d m in istra tive expenses to p u b lic iz e the program and counsel d iffic u lt-to place applicants. C M H A and The C leveland Foundation, th e re fo re , to o k the in itia tiv e in p u ttin g to g e th e r a one-year d e m o n stra tio n p ro j­ ect s u p p o rte d by $78,500 fro m the Foundation, $25,000 each fro m the G eorge G und and Ford fo u n d a tio n s and $50,000 fro m C M H A . A local co n su lta n t firm w ith expertise in real estate and fair housing was engaged to w o rk intensively w ith b o th la n dlo rd s and renters. The firm has surveyed managers o f large rental h old in g s and has co n d u cte d personal in ­ terview s and seminars to fa m ilia riz e managers w ith h o w the rent subsidy program w orks. It

also has fo llo w e d up on 3,500 classified ads in m e tro p o lita n and suburban newspapers to reach ow ners o f in d iv id u a l houses and small a part­ m e n t buildings. In the process it has b u ilt a list o f available units and has w o n a d is crim in a tio n suit against a m a jo r a partm ent com plex. In its w o rk w ith p o te n tia l renters, the firm conducts w orkshops open to all recipients o f certificates. C e rtifica te holders are in fo rm e d o f th e ir rights, given h e lp fu l hints on h o w to ap­ proach landlords, and su pplied w ith packets co n ta in in g p ro files o f a pp ro xim a te ly 20 local co m m u n itie s — fro m Lakewood to East Cleve­ land, Parma to C o llin w o o d — d escribing the a va ila b ility o f rental housing as w e ll as the loca­ tio n o f schools, churches and p u b lic tra nsp o r­ tatio n . The professional staff o f e ig h t also provides intensive counseling and assistance to those w h o seek it. The staff m em bers som etim es make te le p h o n e calls, escort ce rtifica te holders to v ie w rentals, and help negotiate leases. They even a u d it p ro p e rty managers to see if they are screening o u t applicants by the accent o f th e ir voice o r the c o lo r o f th e ir skin. The fo llo w in g sum m ary indicates the progress as o f M arch 31, 1977. It shoud be noted tha t C M H A issued its first certificates in February, 1976 and that the d em on stra tion co n tra ct p ro j­ ect began fu ll o pe ra tio n the fo llo w in g fall. • A total o f 1,582 persons had o bta in ed sub­ sidized housing. This represents a success ratio o f 36 percent fo r all ce rtifica te recipients, a fig u re com parable to the national experience. O f those placed, 63 p ercent w ere w h ite , 44 per­ cent w ere elderly. • A total o f 226 o f those placed had been given intensive co unseling and assistance by the co n tra ct firm . This represented 33 percent o f those given such special assistance. O f the

37


C IV IC AFFAIRS 226 h elp e d , 74 p ercen t w e re black, 68 p ercent w e re fem ale heads o f households, and 21 p e r­ ce n t w e re e ld erly. W h ile the success o r fa ilu re o f the p ro je c t is s till u ncertain — and w ill be su bject to analysis by n atio n al consultants — some interesting o b ­ servations have em erged. The Cuyahoga C o u nty program appears to be m ore successful in upgrading liv in g co nd itio n s. W h ile n a tio n a lly a b o u t h alf the subsidized re n t­ ers rem ain in th e ir same units, here m ore than tw o -th ird s have m oved in to d iffe re n t and better housing — thus fu lfillin g a p rim a ry in te n t o f Congress. In G reater Cleveland blacks w a n t to m ove m ore than w hites. Som etim es they seek safer n eig h b o rh o o d s and b ette r schools. H o w ­ ever, they are m uch m ore like ly than w hites to rate th e ir c u rre n t residence as "v e ry substan­ d a rd " — a place tha t is d irty , o r w h e re the doors and w in d o w s w o n 't lo ck securely, o r the p lu m b ­ ing and heating is defective, o r the stove and re frig e ra to r are inadequate. W h ile the intensive counseling placem ent falls s lig h tly short o f national placem ents, the d em o n stra tio n may w e ll be regarded as success­ ful fo r it is w o rk in g w ith in d ivid u a ls m ost often shut o u t fro m decent housing — m in o ritie s, and those in fam ilies w h ich are large o r headed by w o m e n. In fact, single black w o m e n w ith tw o o r three ch ild re n are the m ost d iffic u lt o f all to place. G he tto landlords appear as p re ju d ice d as anyone against w h a t they perceive as an im ­ m oral, w e lfa re lifestyle, even w hen applicants are w o m e n w ith respectable, steady e m p lo y ­ m ent. Big fam ilies alm ost always are rejected by a pa rtm e n t com plexes and require painstaking search to fin d single houses w ith enough space. The experience should be useful as the new a d m in is tra tio n and Congress in W ashington conside r strategies fo r m eeting needs o f less

38

advantaged A m ericans, in c lu d in g the proposal fo r p ro v id in g the needy w ith d ire c t housing allow ances th ro u g h w e lfa re reform . The expe­ rience here w o u ld suggest tha t m oney alone w ill n o t open up b ette r housing to all those w h o w a n t it. In at least one aspect, the subsidized rent program in Cuyahoga C o u n ty has been a fa il­ ure. It has n o t dispersed m in o ritie s. Less than 10 o f the 586 black fam ilies placed have m oved in to n eig h b o rh o o d s w h e re they had n o t been w e lco m e before. The Foundation c o n tin u e d its interest in open housing w ith a th ird -ye a r grant o f $115,000 to the Cuyahoga Plan w h ic h has w o rke d w ith the media, realtors, co rp o ra tio n s and n e ig h b o rh o o d organizations to open up new n e ig h b orh o o ds th ro u g h o u t the county. There has been m uch frie n d ly persuasion and some m o n ito rin g o f d is c rim in a tio n co m p laints b u t fe w blacks have b o u g h t homes in n o n tra d itio n a l neighborhoods. Interest in m a in ta in in g the close-in suburb o f Cleveland Heights as a viable, integrated c o m ­ m u n ity w h e re all races and lifestyles are w e l­ com e was co n tin u e d w ith a grant to the city gove rn m e n t to 1 ) train "p re fe rre d " real estate agents in th e ir co m m itm e n ts to show prospec­ tive buyers all houses w ith in th e ir price range and interest and 2 ) p ro vid e housing assistance to the elderly. THE LAKEFRONT A N D OTHER PARKS The la ke fro n t continues to be Cleveland's m ost neglected scenic and recreational asset. In 1976 the Foundation p ro vide d the M ayor's Lakefront Task Force w ith funds to e m p lo y a planning firm to d ete rm ine the capital expenditures re­ q uired to b rin g Edgewater and G ordon Parks on the shores o f Lake Erie back to first-class c o n d itio n . The data is essential to co m p lete

neg o tiatio n s fo r the transfer o f the parks fro m the c ity to e ith e r the State o f O h io o r the C leve­ land M e tro pa rks System. The study p in p o in te d m ore than $13 m illio n in capital o u tla y to h alt disastrous erosion along the shoreline as w e ll as to create o r im p ro ve beaches, boat marinas, fish in g places, paths, p ic n ic areas and pla ying fields. The e ffo rt is an o u tg ro w th o f the fo u n d a tio n fun d ed Cleveland Parks and Recreation Study pub lish e d early in 1976. D u rin g the year grants also w e re made to co nstru ct a d em o n stra tio n D iscovery Park fo r c h ild re n in W o o d la n d H ills, p ro v id e a parkm o bile and a solar energy house fo r the C leveland M e troparks, and c o n tin u e the efforts o f citizens m o n ito rin g the d e v e lo p m e n t o f the Cuyahoga V alley N ational Park. C R IM IN A L JUSTICE C rim in a l ju stice c o n tin u e d to be a m a jo r p rio rity fo r the Foundation as the D is trib u tio n C o m m it­ tee a u th o rize d $547,637 in civic and social service grants to im p le m e n t recom m endations o f its Special C o m m itte e o f Citizens C oncerned a bo u t C rim in a l Justice in C leveland. M o st civic affairs grants w ere d evoted to the p u b lic sector, to activities w ith the courts, the C leveland Police D e p a rtm e n t and the Cuyahoga C ounty sheriff's o ffice and new p u b lic d e fe n d e r agency. The grants fun d ed the e m p lo y m e n t o f co n ­ sultants to help d evelop procedures and p o lic y manuals, prepare plans fo r o p e ra tin g the new c o u n ty ja il, and establish g uidelines fo r the new p u b lic d efe nd e r agencies, as w e ll as p ro ­ vide in-service tra in in g fo r p o lic e officers, ja il em ployees and ju v e n ile w orkers.


CIVIC AFFAIRS GRANTS THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION AMERICAN NEGRO EMANCIPATION AUTHORITY — OHIO DIVISION Update docum entary film “ Not With Empty Hands” ........................................................................................................................................................................$ BUCKEYE AREA DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION Operating s u p p o r t .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. BUCKEYE-WOODLAND COMMUNITY CONGRESS Second-year support fo r citizen participation in neighborhood g o v e r n a n c e ......................................................................................................................... CLEVELAND CITIZEN ACTION FOUNDATION Staff s u p p o r t ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ CLEVELAND COUNCIL ON WORLD AFFAIRS Staff development over three y e a r s .................................................................................................................................................................................................. CLEVELAND DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION Toward Woodland Hills Discovery P a r k ............................................................................................................................................................................................. CLEVELAND FOUNDATION RESOURCES Consulting services and adm inistrative costs of crim inal justice p ro je c ts .............................................................................................................................. Development of in-service training program for patrol officers in Cleveland Police D e p a rtm e n t......................................................................................... Other high priority programs in crim inal j u s t i c e ............................................................................................................................................................................. Consulting services to assess feasibility of renewed effort toward regionalgovernment for Metropolitan C le v e la n d ....................................................... Continuing evaluation of Buckeye-Woodland Community Congress g r a n t .............................................................................................................................. Evaluation of grant to Cuyahoga Metropolitan Housing A u t h o r it y ............................................................................................................................................. Reprinting of “ Cleveland Parks and Recreation Study” .................................................................................................................................................................. Capital improvement study for upgrading Gordon and Edgewater P a rk s ................................................................................................................................... CLEVELAND HEIGHTS, CITY OF Support for two housing projects: 1) preferred agents program and 2) elderly housing assistance p ro g ra m .................................................................... CLEVELAND METROPARKS SYSTEM Location of model solar energy house in North Chagrin Metropark for public educational p u rp o s e s ................................................................................ Support of parkmobile p r o g r a m ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... CLEVELAND MUNICIPAL COURT Interim support for victim s service u n i t ............................................................................................................................................................................................ CLEVELAND TENANTS ORGANIZATION Partial support of second-year o p e ra tio n s ....................................................................................................................................................................................... COMMISSION ON CATHOLIC COMMUNITY ACTION Third-year support for pre-trial supervised release p ro je c t............................................................................................................................................................. COURT OF COMMON PLEAS, JUVENILE COURT DIVISION Development of documentation management program and policy and procedure m anuals.................................................................................................... Expansion of training capacity of juvenile court over two y e a rs ................................................................................................................................................... CUYAHOGA COUNTY, BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Technical assistance to Task Force on a Public Defender’s O ffic e ............................................................................................................................................. CUYAHOGA COUNTY POLICE CHIEFS ASSOCIATION Matching funds for operating s u p p o rt.................................................................................................................................................................................................. CUYAHOGA METROPOLITAN HOUSING AUTHORITY Partial support of Section 8 Housing Assistance Service Program, a demonstration program of Department of Housing and Urban Development to provide rental assistance for lower income persons, to stabilize neighborhoods and prevent b lig h t............................................................................... THE CUYAHOGA PLAN OF OHIO, INC. Third-year support of comprehensive open housing program for Metropolitan C le ve la nd .................................................................................................... CUYAHOGA VALLEY ASSOCIATION Operating support of the Cuyahoga Valley Park F e d e ra tio n ........................................................................................................................................................ DETROIT SHOREWAY COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATION Toward operating costs of a neighborhood renewal p ro g ra m ........................................................................................................................................................

11,435 20,000 70,000 15,000 65,000 25,000 20,000 64,175 32,086 7,500 3,000 2,500 2,392 5,000 62,515 30,000 42,300 1,625 36,000 13,200 31,500 18,275 18,525 4,316

78,500 115,000 20,000 28,712

39


C IV IC AFFAIRS DOWNTOWN CLEVELAND CORPORATION Second-year s u p p o r t ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 30,000 FAMICOS FOUNDATION Toward housing acquisition and rehabilitation in Hough a r e a ......................................................................................................................................................... 50,000 FRIENDS OF THE LANDMARKS Toward preservation of St. Agnes Bell T o w e r ................................................................................................................................................................................... 9,000 FRIENDS OF SHAKER SQUARE Support for preservation and revitalization e f f o r t s ........................................................................................................................................................................ 39,000 GOVERNMENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE 30,000 Partial support for crim inal justice seminars and events associated with the Justice Center d e d ic a tio n ........................................................................... GREATER CLEVELAND CORRECTIONAL ASSOCIATION Toward publication of correctional association n e w s le tte r-m a g a z in e ................................................................................................................................... 4,600 GREATER CLEVELAND NEIGHBORHOOD CENTERS ASSOCIATION Second-year support for housing repair and rehabilitation program of West Side Community H o u s e ............................................................................... 31,344 GREATER CLEVELAND REGIONAL TRANSIT AUTHORITY Support for a workshop on Community Responsive Transit for elderly and h a n d ic a p p e d .................................................................................................... 7,500 THE INSTITUTE OF CULTURAL AFFAIRS Support for Town Meeting-U.S.A. s e rie s ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 10,000 JEWISH VOCATIONAL SERVICE Third-year support for RESOURCE, a job development program for w o m e n .............................................................................................................................. 20,040 LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS OF CLEVELAND EDUCATIONAL FUND, INC. Second-year support for Cleveland Area Voter Information S e r v ic e ........................................................................................................................................ 34,500 THE LUTHERAN HOUSING CORPORATION Toward capital purchase and staff s u p p o r t....................................................................................................................................................................................... 32,000 Support for home painting project in East C leveland....................................................................................................................................................................... 23,450 MOUNT PLEASANT COMMUNITY COUNCIL, INC. Support for building renovation p r o g r a m ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 19,350 THE NATIONAL JUNIOR TENNIS LEAGUE Partial support for the Junior Tennis League p r o g r a m .................................................................................................................................................................. 10,000 OFFICE OF THE COUNTY SHERIFF Assistance in improving county jail rules, regulations, etc., for upgrading training of correctional p e r s o n n e l............................................................... 42,264 OHIO CITY REDEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION, INC. Assistance in planning and operational costs for neighborhood commercial revitalization . ............................................................................................... 21,000 REAL PROPERTY INVENTORY OF METROPOLITAN CLEVELAND Project s u p p o r t ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 24,000 CITY OF ROCKY RIVER Partial support for juvenile diversion program by Division of P o lic e ............................................................................................................................................. 20,000 UNITED LABOR AGENCY, INC. Second-year support for Project Awareness of the Criminal Justice Public Information C e n t e r ......................................................................................... 50,000 UPPER PROSPECT AREA ASSOCIATION, INC. Toward preparation of final working drawings for street improvements on Prospect A ve n u e .............................................................................................. 20,000 Total Civic Affairs Programs — U ndesignated.................................................................................................................................................................................$1,371,604 (Following recipient and program designated by donor) WOMEN’S CITY CLUB Educational L e c t u r e s ............................................................................................................................................................................................................... ..... . $ 264 Total Civic Affairs Programs — D e s ig n a te d .................................................................................................................................................................................$ 264 Total Civic A ffairs — Designated and U n d e s ig n a te d .................................................................................................................................................................$1,371,868 40


CULTURAL AFFAIRS


CULTURAL AFFAIRS In 1976 the curtains rose on tw o new resident com panies — the C leveland Ballet and the N ew C leveland O pera C o m p an y — fillin g voids in the o th e rw ise rich p e rfo rm in g arts life o f the c o m m u n ity . The p re m ie re seasons w e re greeted by se llo u t audiences, standing ovations, e n th u ­ siastic critica l reviews, and the re a lization that b oth new and fa m ilia r patrons o f the arts had o p tim is m in the fu tu re o f C leveland. A t the same tim e the established cu ltu ra l in ­ s titu tio n s w e re assessing th e ir long-range needs and m o vin g to c o rre ct the fin an cia l pressures o ve rta kin g them . Cleveland has m any first-class, in so m e cases w o r ld - r e n o w n e d , in s titu tio n s . O n ly the Cleveland M useum o f A rt, how ever, has e n d o w m e n t large enough to secure its fu ­ ture. The others have becom e concerned a bo u t the q u a lity and range o f th e ir services as costs increasingly o u tstrip w h a t they can earn at the box o ffice o r receive in gifts fro m tra d itio n a l donors. Therefore, the C leveland O rchestra launched a $20 m illio n e n d o w m e n t d rive ; the C leveland M useum o f Natural H istory, an $8 m illio n e n ­ d o w m e n t and o pe ra tin g fu n d d riv e ; the W estern Reserve H istorical Society, a $6 m illio n capital e x p a n s io n and e n d o w m e n t d riv e , and th e Cleveland Play House began assessing its needs fo r capital and o pe ra tin g funds. The C leveland Foundation has fo u n d ways to su p p o rt these efforts w h ile m a in tain in g its long established p o licy co nce rn in g capital and en­ d o w m e n t g if t s , a p o l ic y w h ic h has b e e n review ed and reaffirm ed by the D is trib u tio n C o m m itte e in recent m onths. The Foundation supports capital projects o n ly w hen new b u ild ­ ings and e q u ip m e n t are essential to carrying o u t sig n ifican t and pro m isin g programs. The Foun­ datio n does n o t c o n trib u te to endow m ents. The latter p o lic y arises fro m the re co gn itio n that

m any d onors have entrusted th e ir p h ila n th ro p ic d ollars to The C leveland F o un d atio n w ith little o r no strings attached because th e y k n o w that over the years c o m m u n ity needs change and priva te and g ove rn m e n t fu n d in g patterns shift. Even w hen d onors designate re c ip ie n t in s titu ­ tions, they expect the F oundation to m o n ito r use o f the funds. In gra ntin g $1.2 m illio n to c u ltu ra l affairs d u rin g 1976, the D is trib u tio n C o m m itte e was especially responsive to the needs o f m ajor cu ltu ra l in s titu tio n s , h e lp in g preserve w ith in U n ive rsity C ircle one o f the fin est clusters o f cu ltu ra l, edu ca tion a l and m edical in stitu tio n s in the w o rld . The Foundation also saw the fru i­ tion o f pastgrants to the G reat Lakes Shakespeare Festival and the Kenneth C. Beck C enter fo r the C u ltu ral Arts on the w est side, and supported the d e v e lo p m e n t o f the Cleveland on Stage program at John C arroll U niversity serving the eastern suburbs. It c o n tin u e d to encourage the use o f artists and arts groups in the schools, the cu ltu ra l and aesthetic re vita liza tio n o f d o w n ­ to w n C leveland and the restoration o f a rch i­ te c tu ra lly and h is to ric a lly sig n ifica n t buildings. NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM The Cleveland M useum o f N atural H istory has grow n in to one o f the m a jo r in s titu tio n s o f its kind in the co un try. Its m ore than one m illio n items range fro m an 8 0 -fo o t d in osa u r to exquis­ ite M ississippi River pearls no lo n ge r produced in nature, and in clu d e the w o rld 's largest c o l­ le ctio n o f hum an and p rim a te skeletons — a valuable research to o l fo r physicians, dentists and anthropologists. Each year m ore than 300,000 visito rs to u r the h an d som ely-m ounted p erm a ne n t displays d e a l­ ing w ith man and his re la tio n sh ip to plants, animals and the physical universe, o r v ie w


special e x h ib itio n s such as the cu rre n t one d e a l­ ing w ith the d ive rsity o f A frica n cultures. A recent e x h ib itio n recreated the e xcitem en t o f the discovery in E thiopia o f the bones o f “ Lucy" and a fa m ily o f man's early ancestors, three m illio n years o ld — a d iscovery w h ic h cata­ pulte d the m useum 's d ire c to r o f physical an­ t h r o p o lo g y in t o w o r ld p r o m in e n c e . T h e e x h ib itio n c o in c id e d w ith the d e d ica tio n o f a new physical a n th ro p o lo g y la b o ra to ry fun d ed , in part, by The C leveland Foundation. The m ain fa c ility o f the C leveland M useum o f Natural H istory, located on 11 acres w ith in U niversity C ircle, contains 137,000 square feet o f e x h ib itio n , la b o ra to ry, research, lib ra ry and o ffice space, and is staffed by 60 persons. In a d d itio n , the m useum operates the C leveland A qu a riu m and manages over 1,000 acres o f nat­ ural areas w h ic h serve as o u td o o r laboratories. Since its m a jo r expansion in 1972, how ever, there has been an explosion in u tility , m a in te ­ nance and staff costs. The m useum began in ­ c u rrin g d e fic its in 1975, a nd its lo n g -ra n g e forecast w a rn ed o f serious re tre n ch m e n t unless the m useum strengthened its fin an cia l base. In response, a w e a lth y trustee offe re d to c o n trib u te $3 m illio n if the m useum raised an a d d itio n a l $2 m illio n in e n d o w m e n t and $3 m illio n in new o pe ra tin g m oneys over the next five years. In 1976 The C leveland Foundation responded w ith $300,000 to w a rd o pe rations, to be d is trib ­ uted to sp ecific p ro jects at the rate o f $60,000 a year. The firs t year the Foundation is su p p o rtin g a ctivities o f the m useum 's O h io P re-H istory Center, its g e o lo g y/m in e ra lo g y c o lle c tio n and its A q u a riu m . O h io is one o f the richest states in the union fo r Indian rem ains, having served as m a jo r h u n t­ ing and gath erin g te rrito ry fo r 10 to 15 centuries b efo re trib e s settled in to se m i-p e rm a n en t camps

a b o u t 1,000 B.C. Tw o years ago the State o f O h io designated the museum as its p re -h istory center fo r lo ca tin g early Indian sites in a nine co u n ty area ru n n in g east to the Pennsylvania b orde r. G overnm ental agencies and industries, seeking to c o m p ly w ith new federal and state legislation, are ca llin g upon the center's staff to d ig up artifacts and record data before the sites are destroyed by m odern man. The center c u r­ re n tly is d o in g w o rk fo r the new Cuyahoga V alley N ational Park, the U.S. Steel p la nt to be b u ilt at C onneaut, and the Dayton Power and Light generator p la n t to be b u ilt along the O h io River. M useum staff also is supervising im p o rta n t archaeological digs at an ancien t burial ground 40 m iles south o f C olum bus. As a second part o f its grant, the Foundation is s u p p o rtin g the cataloging o f the museum 's m ineral and rock c o lle c tio n — one o f the best in the M id w e st — so tha t it w ill be useful to scholars and the men and w o m e n w h o belong to the some 25 or m ore rock clubs th ro u g h o u t G reater Cleveland. A t the Cleveland A qu a riu m in G ordon Park, the grant is h e lp in g p ro vid e new plants fo r fresh w a te r fish tanks, a new d arkro om w here in fo rm a tio n slides are made, and m uch needed b u ild in g and tank m aintenance. A lth o u g h m o d ­ est in size, the A qu a riu m attracts m ore than 150,000 visitors a year. Long-range questions are b e g in n ing to be asked as to h o w fin e an aquarium Cleveland wants and is w illin g to support. FOR PRESERVING ROOTS The W estern Reserve H istorical Society is C leve­ land's o ldest cu ltu ra l in stitu tio n . Like its n e ig h ­ b o r, th e N a tu ra l H is to ry M u s e u m , it is a $1 m illio n a year o pe ra tio n fo u n d e d upon the

43


CULTURAL AFFAIRS rem arkable acquisitiveness o f early Cleveland co lle ctors. It provides e x h ib itio n and research space fo r a co n g lo m e ra tio n o f m aterials, fu r n i­ tu re and m e m o ra b ilia o f h isto ric interest. The historical society has clearly o u tg ro w n its m ain co m p lex — tw o Flo re n tine mansions c o n ­ nected by m o d ern e x h ib itio n galleries — and storage room s all over to w n . A new lib ra ry a d d itio n , the re fo re , is to be co nstructed fo r the m useum 's c o lle c tio n o f rare books, m anuscripts, engravings, lithographs, pho tog ra p hs and new s­ papers relating to the h istory o f C leveland, the d e ve lo p m e n t o f the region and, in general, the g ro w th o f Am erica. It has am ong the fin est co lle ctio n s in the c o u n try dea lin g w ith genealogy and certain aspects o f the C ivil W ar, and its c o lle c tio n o f Shaker m anuscripts is u np a ralleled. In recent years the h istorical society has pio ne e red in b u ild in g black and e th n ic archives and has be­ gun Jewish archives. It houses the records o f m any Cleveland organizations and re ce ntly re­ trie ve d fro m the basements o f C ity Hall the papers o f the mayors o f C leveland. Those o f Tom L. Johnson, Cleveland's fam ed progressive m ayor o f 1901-09, had been rain-soaked and w ere c ru m b lin g , and so have ju st been p re ­ served on m ic ro film . Clevelanders have long been interested in searching fo r th e ir roots — nearly 5,000 persons a year using the historical society's genealogy co lle ctio n . A n o th e r 3,000 use o th e r research materials. T h e C le v e la n d F o u n d a t io n has g r a n te d $150,000 to w a rd the capital expansion cam ­ paign. Besides the new lib ra ry stacks and read­ ing room s, the five -le vel a d d itio n is to contain a new central lobby, adm inistrative offices, ship­ ping, receiving and storage areas and an a u to ­ m o b ile restoration shop fo r the C ra w fo rd A uto

FROM BALLET TO OPERA W ith a red carpet ro lle d o u t and a flo o d lig h t p ie rc in g the n ig h t sky, the C leveland Ballet opened its firs t professional season on N o ve m ­ ber 19, 1976 in d o w n to w n C leveland. But the real m agic was inside the Hanna Theatre w here the new com p an y o f 26 dancers p e rfo rm e d w ith exceptional a b ility am id co stu m in g and lig h tin g w o rth y o f Broadway. The yo u n g com pany has an e le c trify in g verve and an e c le c tic re p erto ire , f r o m o n p o in t s c la s s ic is m to th e b a r e f o o t touches o f m o d ern dance. The C leveland Ballet aspires to be the m ajor com p an y o utsid e N ew Y ork w ith a d istin ctive lo o k all its ow n. C onsequently, 11 o f the 12 ballets presented d u rin g the prem iere season w ere ch oreographed e ith e r by the com pany's resident ch oreo g ra ph e r o r its Cleveland-reared artistic d ire c to r. For the 12th, Agnes d e M ille came to Cleveland to teach her Three Virgins and a Devil, fe a tu rin g Cleveland Ballet's ch ore ­ o grapher w h o danced the devil in A m erican Ballet Theatre's 1973 revival o f the co m ic w o rk. Ballet com panies are expensive ventures c a ll­ ing fo r acts o f fa ith on the part o f donors. The Cleveland Foundation p ro v id e d the m a jo r u n ­ d e rw ritin g fo r la u nching the new com pany by a u th o riz in g in 1975 a grant o f $120,000 tow ard the preseason and inaugural season expenses. Since then the com pany has exceeded its ow n goals fo r tic k e t sales and c o n trib u tio n s fro m in d ividuals, co rp o ra tio n s and fou n d a tio n s. Its o p e ra tin g b u d g e t is e x p e c te d to rise a b o v e $600,000 next season, how ever, as its adds dancers and m ore live music. The Foundation a n tic ip a te s th a t c o n tin u e d s u p p o r t w il l be needed fo r some tim e to come. The N ew Cleveland O pera C om pany em erged m ore suddenly and m ore m odestly. Local opera lovers, w h o longed fo r m ore than the som e­ times annual visit o f the M e tro p o lita n to P ublic


Hall, seized upon the o p p o rtu n ity p ro vide d w hen an experienced yo un g opera d ire c to r d e ­ cided to make the C leveland area his hom e after a te a c h in g -d ire c tin g s tin t at nearby O b e rlin College. The co m p an y p re m ie re d w ith tw o beloved o p e r a s , b o t h s u n g in E n g lis h — P u c c in i's Madame B utterfly and Rossini's Barber o f Seville. Its singers, m any yo u n g graduates o f N o rth ­ eastern O h io 's conservatories o f m usic, in clu d e d several fin e singers w h o had p e rfo rm e d the p rin cip a l roles in o th e r resident opera co m ­ panies th ro u g h o u t the co u n try. U n d er cons tr a in ts o fa tig h tb u d g e t,th e o p e r a s w e r e presented in an a ttractive b u t lim itin g ju n io r high school a u d ito riu m in suburban Shaker Heights w h e re a cham ber orchestra, u nd e r the baton o f a fo rm e r M e t coach, played fro m be­ hind the stage. The th irs t fo r local opera was so great that tickets sold early and hundreds w e re turne d away. As O pera News p e rce p tive ly re p o rte d : "T he m ost s trikin g th in g a b o u t the firs t sea­ son o f the N ew Cleveland O pera C om pany may n ot have been the tw o actual p ro d u ctio n s suc­ cessfully m o u n te d b u t the deep hunger fo r q u a lity h o m e -g ro w n opera revealed by the city's response.'' The new com pany's o n ly sig n ifica n t vo te o f co nfid e nce fo r the inaugural p ro d u c tio n s — outside o f its board o f trustees — came fro m The C leveland Foundation. The prom ise n o w dem onstrated has led the F oundation to in ­ crease its su p p o rt fo r the second season and others to jo in in u n d e rw ritin g this new venture. N A T IO N A L B O H E M IA N HALL There is a special p rid e and self-reliance in the w ay m em bers o f Sokol G reater C leveland are restoring the N a tio na l Bohem ian Hall. The once s p le n d id b u ild in g , d ed ica ted in 1897, was am ong

some 60 to 70 such halls p ro v id in g social co ­ hesion fo r the city's im m ig ra n t groups at the tu rn o f the century. O n ly a half dozen remain today. Tw o years ago the Sokols, a gym nastic and educational o rg an iza tion w hose m em bers had scattered to the suburbs, decided to return to the heart o f the city by purchasing the hall th e ir Czech ancestors had b u ilt. W ith soap, p a in t and thousands o f v o lu n te e r m anhours they have w ip e d away the soot w h ic h settled d u rin g dec­ ades o f p o llu tio n fro m nearby steel m ills and the m ore recent years o f disuse. The new ow ners firs t transform ed the h on e y­ com b o f lodge room s on the fo u rth flo o r in to s p a c io u s , c h e e rfu l g y m n a s tic c e n te rs w h e re mem bers, th e ir ch ild re n o r friends com e alm ost d a ily to exercise on balance beams, vaults, bars and rings. Next they co nverted a fo rm e r class­ room in to a lib ra ry fo r Czech materials. Then they tackled the p rid e o f the b u ild in g , the grand staircase and second flo o r b a llro o m /th e a tre w ith its im pressive stage, gold trim m e d boxes, V ic ­ toria n chandeliers and high ce ilin g o f embossed tin. From the grim e em erged a b rig h t room o f gold and beige accented w ith m aroon d ra p ­ eries. The o ld fire curtain w h ic h separates the stage fro m the a u d ito riu m was cleaned and displays, in o rig in a l colors, a v ie w o f o ld Prague and the Charles Bridge over the Vltava River. The Sokols w e re assisted by restoration ex­ p e rts fro m th e W e s te rn Reserve H is to ric a l Society and an in te rio r design gro up fro m Kent State U n ive rsity w h ile a grant fro m the Founda­ tio n paid fo r the paint, lu m ber, ele ctrical w irin g , ca rp etin g and draperies.


CULTURAL AFFAIRS GRANTS THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION AMERICAN SOKOL, INC. Toward renovation of theater and entrance of Bohemian National H a ll.........................................................................................................................................$

17,671

ASIAN BICENTENNIAL CELEBRATION COMMITTEE Bicentennial a c tiv itie s .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................

3,215

CLEVELAND AREA ARTS COUNCIL Support for Cleveland Restoration F e s tiv a l........................................................................................................................................................................................ Toward broker for artists and art organizations serving s c h o o ls ................................................................................................................................................... General s u p p o rt.......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

32,500 15,000 50,000

CLEVELAND INSTITUTE OF MUSIC Toward operating expenses of Cleveland Opera Theater E n s e m b le .........................................................................................................................................

22,650

CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY Project support over five y e a rs .............................................................................................................................................................................................................

300,000

THE CLEVELAND PLAY HOUSE Development of architectural designs for new theater and c lu b h o u s e ........................................................................................................................................

50,000

JOHN CARROLL UNIVERSITY Toward audience development in suburban communities for Cleveland on Stage program over two y e a r s ..................................................................................................................................................................................

28,000

THE MUSICAL ARTS ASSOCIATION Toward sustaining fund of Cleveland O r c h e s tr a .............................................................................................................................................................................

70,000

NATIONAL GUILD OF COMMUNITY SCHOOLS OF THE ARTS, INC. Partial support for internship program at Cleveland Music School S e ttle m e n t.........................................................................................................................

6,000

NEW CLEVELAND OPERA COMPANY Toward two premiere season p ro d u c tio n s .......................................................................................................................................................................................

13,500

THE NEW GALLERY OF CONTEMPORARY ART General operating support over two y e a r s .......................................................................................................................................................................................

26,000

OBERLIN COLLEGE Support for student theatrical company tour of mental hospitals, youth homes and sim ilar in s titu tio n s ................................................................................ THE OHIO CHAMBER ORCHESTRA General s u p p o rt...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... OHIO FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS, INC. Support for survey of ethnic and folklo ric arts in Greater C le v e la n d ........................................................................................................................................ PLAYHOUSE SQUARE FOUNDATION Toward staff and consulting s e rv ic e s .................................................................................................................................................................................................

750 12,500 6,000 20,000

POET’S LEAGUE OF GREATER CLEVELAND Support for Poetry in Transit p r o je c t .................................................................................................................................................................................................

6,300

THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION Support for bicentennial exhibition and lecture, “ Art and the Written Word,” in C le v e la n d ..............................................................................................

1,000

TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART General s u p p o rt.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

1,000

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WESTERN RESERVE ACADEMY Partial support for Summer Music Experience p ro g ra m ..................................................................................................................................................................

5,000

THE WESTERN RESERVE HISTORICAL SOCIETY Toward construction of a new library and expansion of exhibition s p a c e .............................................................................................................................. Toward research and preparation of history of architecture in Cleveland from 1876-1976 ....................................................................................................

150,000 7,300

Total C ultural Affairs — U n d e s ig n a te d ............................................................................................................................................................................................ $ 844,386 (Following recipients and programs designated by donor) ASHLAND LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, ASHLAND, OHIO General s u p p o rt...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... $

2,524

CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART General s u p p o rt...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... Purchase of objects of art exhibited at annual May Show in memory of Oscar Michael, J r...................................................................................................

10,666 500

CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY General s u p p o rt...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... Operating s u p p o r t ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. Support for p la n e ta riu m .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................

36,747 51,609 2,100

CLEVELAND PLAY HOUSE Shakespearean and classical productions for students and te a c h e rs ........................................................................................................................................ Experimental dram atic work or sc h o la rs h ip ....................................................................................................................................................................................... General s u p p o rt......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

2,100 1,115 1,481

CLEVELAND PUBLIC LIBRARY Service to shut-ins p ro g ra m .................................................................................................................................................................................................................

53,477

CLEVELAND ZOO General s u p p o rt......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

2,100

GARDEN CENTER OF GREATER CLEVELAND Support for l i b r a r y .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

1,100

KARAMU HOUSE General s u p p o rt....................................................................................................................................................................................................... ...... ........................

72,037

LA MESA ESPANOLA Jessie C. Tucker Memorial Lecture e x p e n s e ..................................................................................................................................................................................

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THE MUSICAL ARTS ASSOCIATION For ch ild re n ’s concerts by the Cleveland O rc h e s tra ....................................................................................................................................................................... General support of Cleveland O r c h e s t r a .......................................................................................................................................................................................

4,200 40,345

OGLEBAY INSTITUTE, WHEELING, WEST VIRGINIA Operating support for Oglebay P a r k ..................................................................................................................................................................................................

81,736

WESTERN RESERVE HISTORICAL SOCIETY Care of m emorabilia of First Cleveland Cavalry A s s o c ia tio n ........................................................................................................................................................

5,000

Total C ultural A ffairs — D e s ig n a te d ..................................................................................................................................................................................................$ 368,880 Total C ultural A ffairs — Designated and U ndesignated.................................................................................................................................................................. $1,213,266

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SPECIAL PHILANTHROPIC SERVICES The funds expended fo r special p h ila n th ro p ic purposes go p rim a rily fo r the o p e ra tin g costs o f The C leveland F oundation and a w id e va riety o f services fo r the b e n e fit o f the p h ila n th ro p ic c o m m u n ity t h r o u g h o u t N o rth e a s t O h io . T he la tte r includes services to m any private fo u n d a tio n s w h ic h do n o t e m p lo y staff o r have lim ite d staff. The services in clu d e evaluation o f grant proposals and m o n ito rin g o f grants as w e ll as m eetings dea lin g w ith issues o f co m m o n co ncern to the p a rtic ip a tin g fou n d a tio n s. The cost o f som e o f these services is reim bursed in part by the re c ip ie n t fou n d a tio n s. I n la te 1 9 7 6 T h e C le v e la n d Fou n d a t io n granted funds to greatly expand the regional

lib ra ry it operates in c o n ju n c tio n w ith the Found a tio n C enter o f N ew York. The grant has enabled the leasing o f separate quarters adjacent to th e f o u n d a tio n o ffic e s and w ill fu n d th e e m p lo y m e n t o f a fu ll-tim e lib ra rian and lib ra ry assistant d u rin g 1977. The lib ra ry is o f p rim a ry b e n e fit to persons and o rg anizations seeking funds b u t also provides reference services fo r fo u n d a tio n officials. The lib ra ry w ill co nta in materials dealing w ith grantm aking, annual reports o f national fou n d a tio n s, Internal Revenue Service returns o f fo u n d a tio n s in O h io and neighb o rin g states and, fo r the firs t tim e , w ill p ro vid e in fo rm a tio n on federal and state g ove rn m e n t fu n d in g available to grant-seekers.

SPECIAL PHILANTHROPIC SERVICES THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION CLEVELAND FOUNDATION RESOURCES Anisfield-W olf Award Committee, Princeton, New Jersey to provide awards for the books that have contributed most to improve intergroup relations in 1976 ............................................................................................................................................................................ $ 10,000 Federation for Community Planning expenses in connection with selection of Anisfield-W olf Community Service Award r e c i p i e n t ................................................................................................................................................................................................................

1,500

Support for a regional community workshop on foundations and minority g r o u p s ............................................................................................................

2,500

Support for a series of conferences to assess Cleveland area needs in community research and a n a ly s is ............................................................... Support for first-year operations of expanded Foundation Center library s e r v i c e s .......................................................................................................

25,000 60,000

Support of the operating budget of Cleveland Foundation Resources for the year 1977

..............................................................................................

721,723

Support of the 1977 operating budget of the Fenn Educational Fund of The Cleveland F o u n d a tio n ..............................................................................

21,730*

UNITED TORCH SERVICES. INC. Sponsor a series of community meetings in conjunction with the 1976 Torch D r i v e ........................................................................................................

25,000

Total Special Philanthropic S e r v ic e s ...........................................................................................................................................................................................$867,453 â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Grant recommended by the Fenn Educational Fund Executive Board

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CUYIUH IBIS'

FINANCIAL REPORT


TRUST FUND GROWTH OF THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION In 1976 the ca rryin g value o f new funds and a d d itio n s to existing funds recorded by The C leveland Fo un d atio n to ta le d $5,558,461.88. N ew gifts and a d d itio n s to the C o m b in e d F u n d in c lu d e d in th e t o t a l a b o v e w e r e $749,876.40 and w ill be re p orte d in detail be足 g in n in g on page 55.

NEW TRUST FUNDS RECEIVED THE GEORGE A N D M A Y MARGARET ANGELL TRUST D o n o r: Last W ill and Testam ent o f G eorge H. A ng e ll. C arrying V alue: $295,349.41. M a rke t V alue 12/31/76: $324,295.54. Use o f Incom e: U nre stricte d ch a rita b le purposes. D O N A L D W . MclNTYRE FUND D o n o r: Last W ill and Testam ent o f D o n ald W . M c In ty re Fund. C arrying Value: $65,991.60. M a rke t Value 12/31/76: $65,991.60. Use o f Inco m e : U nrestricted ch a rita b le purposes. SARAH STERN M ICHAEL FUND D o n o r: Last W ill and Testam ent o f Sarah Stern M ichael. C arrying V alue: $22,112.66. M a rke t V alue 12/31/76: $23,168.49. Use o f Incom e: Assistance to art and social services. THE CHARLES G. A N D CATHERINE R. RAIBLE FUND D o n o r: John Raible Foundation. C arrying Value: $233,651.15. M a rke t V alue 12/31/76: $310,673.04. Use o f Incom e: Establishing scholarships fo r edu ca tion o f yo un g men.

50

THE JO HN R. RAIBLE FUND D o n o r: John Raible F o un d atio n . C a rrying V alue: $365,738.10. M a rk e t V alue 1 2/31/76: $528,838.74. Use o f In co m e : V arious d o n o rdesignated purposes. W IL L IA M K. SELMAN M E M O R IA L FUND D o n o r: Last W ill and T e s ta m e n to f W illia m K. Selman. C arrying V alue: $119,674.23. M a rke t V alue 12/31/76: $123,850.46. Use o f Incom e: Assistance to aged persons. M A U D E S. T O M L IN M E M O R IA L FUND D o n o r: M a ude S. T o m lin Trust. C arrying Value: $3,498,188.52. M a rk e t V alue 12/31/76: $3,780,538.49. Use o f In co m e : V arious don o r-d e sig n a te d purposes.


AD DITIO N S TO EXISTING TRUST FUNDS CHARLES RIELEY A R M IN G T O N FUND was increased by a g ift o f $36,000.00 to inco m e fro m the Elizabeth Rieley A rm in g to n C h a ritab le Trusts. WALTER C. A N D LUCY I. ASTRUP FUND NO . 2 was increased by $91,608.37 th ro u g h a d is trib u tio n fro m the estate o f W a lte r C. and Lucy I. A strup. W ARNER M . BATEMAN M E M O R IA L FUND was increased by $6,608.01 th ro u g h a d is trib u tio n fro m the Last W ill and Testam ent o f W a rn e r M . Bateman. CLEVELAND RECREATIONAL ARTS FUND was increased by a tota l o f $1,175.00 throu g h c o n trib u tio n s fro m K urt L. Seelbach ($1,000.00), Raymond John W ean F oundation ($100.00), and Louis E. and M arcia M. Emsheimer C h a ritab le Trust ($75.00).

THE EMERALD NECKLACE FUND was increased by a tota l o f $2,180.00 fro m 155 co n trib u to rs. JULIUS E. G O O D M A N FUND was increased by $20,617.52 throu g h a d is trib u tio n fro m the Estate o f Julius E. G oodm an No. 9. THE HAZEL MYERS SPRENG FUND in m em ory o f her parents, M r. and Mrs. A. N. M yers, was increased by $34,953.48 th ro u g h a d is trib u tio n fro m the Hazel Myers Spreng Trust. CHARLES L. A N D M A R IO N H. STONE FUND was increased by $14,700.00 th ro u g h a d is trib u tio n fro m the Charles L. Stone Estate. THE JO HN M ASO N WALTER A N D JEANNE M. WALTER M E M O R IA L FUND NO . 2 was increased by $37.43 throu g h a d is trib u tio n fro m the Jeanne M. W a lte r Estate.


THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION TRUST FUNDS A wide variety of donors, dedicated to The Cleveland Foundation as a means of benefiting their community in years to come, have established the follo w ing trust funds. These funds are named either for their donors or by the donor for a memorial or, in some instances, for the recipient organization which they enrich. Rob Roy Alexander Fund The Aloy Memorial Scholarship Fund George and May Margaret Angell Trust Anisfield-W olf Fund Charles Rieley Armington Fund W alter C. and Lucy I. Astrup Fund No. 1 Walter C. and Lucy I. Astrup Fund No. 2 Sophie Auerbach Fund* The Frederic M. and Nettie E. Backus Memorial Fund Walter C. and Fannie W hite Baker Fund Lilian Hanna Baldwin Fund Warner M. Bateman Memorial Fund Cornelia W. Beardslee Fund James C. Beardslee Fund Mary Berryman Fund Ida Beznoska Fund Big Brothers of Greater Cleveland Fund The Dr. Hamilton Fisk Biggar Fund George Davis Bivin Fund* Katherine Bohm Fund Roberta Holden Bole Fund The George H. Boyd Fund* Alva Bradley II Fund Gertrude H. Britton, Katharine H. Perkins Fund Fannie Brown Memorial Fund George F. Buehler Memorial Fund Thomas Burnham Memorial Trust Katherine Ward Burrell Fund The Martha B. Carlisle Memorial Fund The Central High School Endowment Fund The Fred H. Chapin Memorial Fund The Frank J. and Nellie L. Chappie Fund* George W. Chisholm Fund J. E. G. Clark Trust Marie Odenkirk Clark Fund The Elsa Claus Memorial Fund No. 2 Cleveland Foundation Combined Funds

52

Cleveland Recreational Arts Fund Caroline E. Coit Fund A. E. Convers Fund* Harry Coulby Fund No. 2 Harry Coulby Fund No. 4 Jacob D. Cox Fund S. Houghton Cox Fund Henry G. Dalton Fund The Howard and Edith Dingle Fund Edwin A. and Julia Greene Dodd Fund No. 1 Edwin A. and Julia Greene Dodd Fund No. 2 Alice McHardy Dye Fund The Emerald Necklace Fund Ada C. Emerson Fund* Henry A. Everett Trust Mary McGraw Everett Fund Charles Dudley Farnsworth Fund Dr. Frank Carl Felix and Flora Webster Felix Fund The Fenn Educational Fund First Cleveland Cavalry-Norton Memorial Fund W illiam C. Fischer and Lillye T. Fischer Memorial Fund* Fisher Fund Erwin L. Fisher and Fanny M. Fisher Memorial Fund Edward C. Flanigon Fund Constance C. FrackeltonFund No. 1 Constance C. FrackeltonFund No. 6 Constance C. FrackeltonFund No. 7 Constance C. FrackeltonFund No. 8 The Fannie Pitcairn Frackelton and David W. Frackelton Fund Robert J. Frackelton Fund The George Freeman Charity Fund Grace Jordan Gardner Fund Frederic H. Gates Fund The W illiam F. and Anna Lawrence Gibbons Fund* W illiam A. Giffhorn Fund Frederick Harris Goff Fund Edwin R. Coldfield Fund Lillian F. Coldfield Fund Marie Louise Gollan Fund Julius E. Goodman Fund The George C. and Marion S. Gordon Fund

Robert B. Grandin Fund The Eugene S. Halle Memorial Fund The Blanche R. Halle Memorial Fund Edwin T. and Mary E. Hamilton Fund The Lynn J. and Eva D. Hammond Memorial Fund* Leonard C. Hanna, Jr. Cleveland Foundation Special Purpose Fund Leonard C. Hanna, Jr. Community Development Fund Leonard C. Hanna, Jr. Fund for Community Chest Leonard C. Hanna, Jr. Fund for United Appeal W illiam Stitt Hannon Fund Perry G. Harrison and Virginia C. Harrison Memorial Fund The Kate Hanna Harvey Memorial Funds No. 1 and 2 M elville H. Haskell, Mary H. Hunter, Gertrude H. Britton, Katharine H. Perkins Fund George Halle Hays Fund Kaufman Hays Memorial Fund The Hinds Memorial Fund* The Hiram House Fund The Jacob Hirtenstein Fund The H. Morley Hitchcock Fund M ildred E. Hommel and Arthur G. Hommel Memorial Fund Centureena S. Hotchkiss Fund Martin Huge, Martha M. Huge, Theodore L. Huge and Reinhardt E. Huge Memorial Fund The John Huntington Benevolent Fund The A. W. Hurlbut Fund Sherman Johnson Memorial Fund Caroline Bonnell Jones Fund James S. Jordan Fund Adrian D. Joyce Fund The Frederick W. and Henryett Slocum Judd Fund Henryett S. Judd Fund Isaac Theodore Kahn Fund Tillie A. Kaley and Warren R. Kaley Memorial Fund Karamu House Trust Clarence A. Kirkham Memorial Fund John R. Kistner Fund The O tto and Lena Konigslow Memorial Fund* Elroy J. and Fynette H. Kulas Fund* Martha M. Linden Fund Robert M. Linney Fund*


Sue L. Little Fund Elizabeth T. Lohmiller Fund Ella L. Lowman Fund Henry M. Lucas Fund Clemens W. Lundoff and Hilda T. Lundoff Fund Frank J. Lynch Fund* Nellie Lynch Fund Theresa Mae MacNab Fund Leone R. Bowe Marco Fund Alice Keith Mather Fund The Samuel Mather and Flora Stone Mather Memorial Fund The Lewis A. and Ellen E. McCreary Memorial Fund The George W. and Sarah McGuire Fund Donald W. McIntyre Fund The Katherine B. McKitterick Fund The John C. McLean Memorial Fund The Thomas and Mary M cM yler Memorial Fund The Albert Younglove Meriam and Kathryn A. Meriam Fund Alice Butts Metcalf Fund Sarah Stern Michael Fund Anna B. Minzer Fund Cornelia S. Moore Fund* The Mr. and Mrs. Jay P. Moore Memorial Fund William Curtis Morton, Maud Morton, Kathleen Morton Fund E. Freeman Mould Fund Jane C. M ould Fund Tom Neal Fund Blanche E. Norvell Fund* Harry Norvell Fund The Crispin and Kate Oglebay Trust Clarence A. Olsen Trust Mary King Osborn Fund W illiam P. Palmer Fund The Dr. Charles B. Parker Memorial Fund* The Joseph K. and Amy Shepard Patterson Memorial Fund Linda J. Peirce Memorial Fund Douglas Perkins Fund Grace M. Pew Fund W alter D. Price Fund W illiam H. Price Fund

The J. Ambrose and Jessie Wheeler Purcell Memorial Fund* The Charles Creif Raible and Catherine Rogers Raible Fund The John R. Raible Fund Clay L. and Florence Rannells Reely Fund The Retreat Memorial Fund Charles L. Richman Fund Nathan G. Richman Fund Alice M. Rockefeller Fund Charles F. Ruby Fund W illiam A. Ruehl and Mary Ruehl Memorial Fund

Catherine E. Stewart, Martha A. Stewart, Judith H. Stewart and Jeannette Stewart Memorial Fund Jessie R. Stewart Fund Charles L. and Marion H. Stone Fund Harriet B. Storrs Fund Leonard F. Stowe Fund Henrietta Teufel Memorial Fund The John H. Thomas Fund Amos Burt and Jeanne L. Thompson Fund Maude S. Tomlin Memorial Fund Mabelle G. and Finton L. Torrence Fund James H. Turner Fund Charles F. UhI Fund

The Mary Coit Sanford Memorial Fund Mary Coit Sanford Fund Dr. Henry A. and Mary J. Schlink Memorial Fund W illiam C. Scofield Memorial Fund Charles W. and Lucille Sellers Memorial Fund* W illiam K. Selman Memorial Fund Frank S. Sheets and Alberta G. Sheets Memorial Fund Frank E. Shepardson Fund Henry A. Sherwin and Frances M. Sherwin Fund* Henry A. Sherwin and Frances M. Sherwin Memorial Fund No. 1* Henry A. Sherwin and Frances M. Sherwin Memorial Fund No. 2* The John and LaVerne Short Memorial Fund The A. H. and Julia W. Shunk Fund The Thomas and Anna Sidlo Fund The Nellie B. Snavely Fund A. L. Somers Fund W illiam J. Southworth Fund* Dr. George P. Soyer Fund The John C. and Elizabeth F. Sparrow Memorial Fund Marion R. Spellman Fund Josephine L. Sperry Fund George B. Spreng and Hazel Myers Spreng Memorial Fund The Hazel Myers Spreng Fund in memory of her parents Mr. & Mrs. A. N. Myers Frederick C. Sterling Second Testamentary Trust* Avery L. Sterner Fund Ada Gates Stevens Memorial Fund

John F. and Mary G. Wahl Memorial Fund Jessie MacDonald Walker Memorial Fund The John Mason Walter and Jeanne M. Walter Memorial Fund No. 1 The John Mason Walter and Jeanne M. Walter Memorial Fund No. 2 Mabel Breckenridge Wason Fund A Mabel Breckenridge Wason Fund B* George B. and Edith S. Wheeler Trust Edward Loder Whittemore Fund Henry E. and Ethel L. W iddell Fund The John Edmund Williams Fund Teresa Jane Williams Memorial Fund James D. Williamson Fund The George H., Charles E., and Samuel Denny Wilson Memorial Fund Edith Anisfield W o lf Fund* David C. W right Memorial Fund Edith W right Memorial Fund

PARTIAL BENEFITS FUNDS *These trusts provide payment of annuities to certain individuals prior to payment of income to the Foundation. W ith two exceptions, The Cleveland Foundation w ill ultimately receive the entire net income from these funds. The principal amounts of these funds are carried as assets of The Cleveland Foundation.

53


THESHERWICK FUND In 1973 The S herw ick Fund becam e a s u p p o rt­ ing o rg a n iza tio n o f The C leveland Foundation u n d e r the p ro visions o f Section 509(a)(3) o f the Internal Revenue Code. The S herw ick Fund, created in 1953 to serve the general ch a rita b le needs o f M e tro p o lita n C leveland, changed its status fro m th a t o f a p ri­ vate fo u n d a tio n to a p u b lic ch a rity by agreeing to c o m m it its assets to the b e n e fit and ch aritab le

purposes o f The C leveland F o un d atio n . W h ile re tainin g its separate id e n tity , the Fund is no longer su bject to federal excise tax on net in ­ vestm ent incom e, restrictions on o pe ra tio ns, or ra th e r c o m p lic a te d r e p o r tin g a nd r e c o r d ­ keeping requirem ents. In o rd e r to q u a lify as a s u p p o rtin g o rganiza­ tio n o f the F oundation, The S herw ick Fund was re q uired to satisfy certain co n d itio n s. Foremost am ong them w e re the a p p o in tm e n t by the D is­ trib u tio n C o m m itte e o f The C leveland Founda­ tio n o f a m a jo rity o f the Fund's trustees; the annual p ro visio n o f at least 20 p ercen t o f the Fund's in co m e to The C leveland Foundation fo r g rantm aking, w ith o u t re strictio n , by the D is tri­ b u tio n C o m m itte e ; and agreem ent to tu rn over its assets to The C leveland Foundation at the end o f 25 years o r upon the death o f the p rin ­ cipal donors, w h ic h e v e r event occurs last. The S herw ick Fund has since b en e fite d fro m assistance p ro vid e d by the F oundation's profes­ sional staff in id e n tify in g those program s and in s titu tio n s w hose efforts are m ost lik e ly to re­ sult in the greatest b e n e fit to the co m m u n ity , and The Cleveland Foundation has had a d d i­ tio na l fin an cia l resources at its disposal. T w entythree grants to ta lin g $89,250 w ere a u th orize d by the Fund in 1976 to s u p p o rt a va rie ty o f educa­ tio n , health, social service, and c u ltu ra l p ro ­ grams. A listing o f 1976 grants may be fo u n d in the separately p ub lished S herw ick Fund annual report. A n y p riv a te fo u n d a tio n c o n s id e rin g e ith e r transfer o f its assets to The C leveland Founda­ tio n — a p u b lic ch arity u nd e r the p ro visions o f the Tax Reform A ct o f 1969 — o r w is h in g to dis­ cuss the p o ssib ility o f a ffilia te status sh ould c o n ­ tact the D ire c to r o f The Cleveland Foundation.


COMBINED FUND GROWTH OF THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION The C o m b in e d Fund was created w ith in The C leveland F oundation in 1943 to p ro vid e a way th ro u g h w h ic h gifts o f any size co uld be made and p u t to w o rk m o re e ffic ie n tly . Several th o u ­ sand d onors have c o n trib u te d to the C o m b in e d Fund since its creation. G ifts to the C o m b in ed Fund retain th e ir separate id e n tity as m em orials b ut are c o m m in g le d fo r investm ent purposes, thereby p ro v id in g a large b lo c k o f capital fo r m ore e ffic ie n t in ve stm en t m anagem ent and greater in co m e p o te n tia l. D u rin g 1976 the C o m b in e d Fund generated incom e fo r grant purposes o f $342,265.15. M a r­ ket value o f the C o m b in e d Fund at D ecem ber 31, 1976 to ta le d $7,737,326.52. N ew funds and m em orials and a d d itio n s to already established funds and m em orials, n o t pre viou sly re ported, a m ounted to $749,876.40 in 1976. G ifts to the C o m b in e d Fund may be made in the nam e o f an in d iv id u a l o r as m em orials. There is no re strictio n as to size, and a dd itio n s may be m ade at any tim e. D onors are e n c o u r­ aged to m ake th e ir gifts available fo r u nre ­ stricted ch a rita b le purposes, since this enables the F oundation to be fle x ib le in m eeting chang­ ing c o m m u n ity needs and problem s. If a d o n o r wishes to express a preference as to h o w the incom e fro m his g ift should be spent, it is sug­ geste d th a t o n e o f th e f o llo w in g g e n e ra l C leveland F oundation grant categories — Ed­ ucation, C u ltu ra l A ffairs, H ealth and Social Services, C ivic A ffairs, and Special P h ila n th ro p ­ ic Purposes — be specified. NEW FUNDS A N D M EM O RIALS Ernest J. Bohn M e m o ria l Fund, $98,000.00 D o n o r: Ernest J. Bohn Use o f In co m e : Social Services— care o f the aged.

L. Dale D o rn ey M e m o ria l Fund, $1,373.30 D o n o r: L. Dale D orney Use o f Incom e: V arious d on o r-designated purposes.

Irene C. and Karl E m m erling Scholarship Fund, $336,039.58 D o n o r: Irene C. E m m erling Use o f Incom e: E ducational-financial aid fo r form a l education.

M r. and Mrs. A rth u r S. H olden Fund, $7,500.00 D o n o r: A rth u r S. H olden Use o f Incom e: U nrestricted ch aritab le purposes.

V irg in ia K. Johnson M e m o ria l Fund, $315.00 D o n o r: 14 c o n trib u to rs Use o f Incom e: U nrestricted ch aritab le purposes.

The Thomas H o yt Jones Family Fund, $344.52 D o n o r: Katharine Brooks Jones Use o f Incom e: U nrestricted ch aritab le purposes.

H ilda J. M cG ee Fund, $35,000.00 D o n o r: Last W ill and Testam ent o f H ilda J. M cG ee Use o f Incom e: H ealth— hospitals fo r special projects.

V ernon S touffer M e m o ria l Fund, $100,000.00 D o n o r: Estate o f V ernon S touffer Use o f Incom e: U nrestricted ch aritab le purposes.

The H arry H. and Stella B. W eiss M e m o ria l Fund, $7,500.00 D o n o r: Estate o f Harry H. Weiss Use o f Incom e: U nrestricted ch aritab le purposes.

A rth u r P. and Elizabeth M. W illia m s o n Fund,

$ 100,000.00

D o n o r: Elizabeth M . W illia m s o n Use o f Incom e: U nrestricted ch aritab le purposes.

A D D IT IO N S TO EXISTING FUNDS A N D MEMORIALS M ary G. H igley Fund, $5,500 D o n o r: M a ry G. H igley

Dr. John W . H o llo w a y M e m o ria l Fund, $55,800.00 D o n o r: Sue A. W o o d fo rd

D o ro th y and Helen Ruth Fund, $500.00 D o n o r: D o ro th y Ruth Graham

Josephine R. and Edward W . Sloan, Jr. Fund, $500.00 D o n o r: Josephine R. and Edward W . Sloan, Jr.

H o m e r F. T ielke Fund, $1,494.00 D o n o r: H om er F. Tielke

Dr. Edward A. Y urick Fund, $10.00 D o n o r: Dr. Edward A. Y urick


THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION COMBINED FUND Morris Abrams Fund Academy of Medicine, Health Education Foundation Fund Rhoda L. Affelder Fund Wickham H. Aldrich Fund Eunice Westfall Allen Memorial Samuel Westfall Allen Memorial Lydia May Ames Fund Raleigh F. Andrie Memorial Fund Marguerite E. Anselm Memorial Katherine B. Arundel Fund Leonard P. Ayres Memorial A. D. Baldwin Memorial Fund Robert K. Beck Memorial Hattie E. Bingham Fund Beulah Holden Bluim Memorial Arthur Blythin Memorial Robert Blythin Memorial Ernest J. Bohn Memorial Fund Helen R. Bowler Fund Nap. H. Boynton Memorial Fund Alva Bradley Memorial Brigham Britton Fund Charles F. Buescher Memorial Thomas Burnham Memorial Fund Elizabeth A. Burton Memorial Edmund S. Busch Fund Robert H. Busch Scholarship Fund Carmela Cafarelli Fund Edna L. and Gustav W. Carlson Foundation Memorial Fund Leyton E. Carter Memorial Fund George S. Case Fund Isabel D. Chamberlin Fund Fred H. Chapin Memorial The Adele Corning Chisholm Memorial Fund Garnetta B. Christenson and LeRoy W. Christenson Fund Mr. and Mrs. Harold T. Clark Fund Inez and Harry Clement Award Fund Cleveland Center on Alcoholism Fund Cleveland Conference for Educational Cooperation Fund Cleveland Guidance Center Endowment Fund Cleveland Heights High School Scholarship Fund Cleveland Psychoanalytic Society Fund The Cleveland Sorosis Fund Cleveland War Memorial

56

Arthur Cobb Memorial Arthur Cobb, Jr. Memorial Florence Haney Cobb Memorial Louise B. Cobb Memorial Mary Gaylord Cobb Memorial Percy Wells Cobb Memorial Ralph W. Cobb, Jr. Memorial Dr. Harold N. Cole Memorial Lawrence E. Connelly Memorial Judge Alva R. Corlett Memorial Mary B. Couch Fund Jacob D. Cox, Jr. Memorial W illis B. Crane Memorial Dr. W ilbur S. Crowell Memorial Marianne North Cummer Memorial Glenn A. Cutler Memorial Nathan L. Dauby Memorial Mary E. Dee Memorial Fund Carl Dittmar Memorial Magdalene Pahler Donahey Fund Anna J. Dorman and Pliny O. Dorman Memorial Fund L. Dale Dorney Memorial Fund James J. Doyle and Lillian Herron Doyle Scholarship Fund Robert J. Drake Memorial Kristian Eilertsen Fund Irene C. and Karl Emmerling Scholarship Fund Charles Farran Fund Arthur H. Feher Fund W illiam S. and Freda M. Fell Memorial Fund Herold and Clara Fellinger Charitable Fund Sidney B. Fink Memorial Percy R. and Beatrice Round Forbes Memorial Fund Frances B. and George W. Ford Memorial Fund Gladys J. and Homer D. Foster Fund Harriet R. Fowler Fund Katyruth Strieker Fraley Memorial Annie A. France Fund Hermine Frankel Memorial I. F. Freiberger Fund Mrs. I. F. Freiberger Memorial W inifred Fryer Memorial Fund Florence I. Garrett Memorial Frank S. Gibson Memorial Fund Ellen Gardner Gilmore Memorial Frances Southworth Goff Memorial

Robert B. Crandin Memorial James L. Greene Memorial Bell Greve Memorial Fund Robert Hays Gries Memorial Carolyn K. Grossman Fund Isador Grossman Memorial Fund Marc J. Grossman Fund Jessie Haig Memorial Florence Hamilton Memorial Leonard C. Hanna, Jr. Cleveland Play House Fund The Leonard C. Hanna, Jr. Special Fund Mrs. Ward Harrison Memorial F. H. Haserot Fund Homer H. Hatch Fund James W. Havighurst Memorial Scholarship Fund Lewis Howard Hayden and Lulu May Hayden Fund Nora Hays Fund Iva L. Heri Fund The Siegmund and Bertha B. Herzog Endowment Fund Highland View Hospital Employees' Fund Albert M. Higley Memorial Mary G. Higley Fund Reuben W. Hitchcock Fund Mary Louise Hobson Memorial Fund Mr. and Mrs. Arthur S. Holden Fund Cora M ille t Holden Memorial Guerdon S. Holden Memorial Helen M. Holland Memorial Dr. John W. Holloway Memorial Fund |ohn W. Holt Memorial Mrs. John H. Hord Memorial A. R. Horr Fund Joseph C. Hostetler Memorial Mrs. Ray Irvin Memorial The Norma W itt Jackson Fund Earle L. Johnson and Walter Sawtelle Doan and Ella P. Doan Memorial Fund James K. Johnson, Jr. Memorial Fund Minerva B. Johnson Memorial Fund Virginia K. Johnson Memorial Fund Florence Jones Memorial The Thomas Hoyt Jones Family Fund Mr. and Mrs. Sidney D. Josephs Fund Albert B. and Sara P. Kern Memorial Fund Joseph E. Kewley Memorial Fund


Quay H. Kinzig Memorial Thomas M. Kirby Memorial Dr. Emmanuel Klaus Memorial Fund Samuel B. Knight Fund The Philip E. and Bertha Hawley Knowlton Fund Estelle C. Koch Memorial Scholarship Fund Richard H. Kohn Fund Samuel E. Kramer Law Scholarship Fund George H. Lapham Fund Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Latham Fund Dr. and Mrs. Robert H. Lechner Fund Margaret Irene Leslie Fund Daniel W. Loeser Fund Meta M. Long Fund The W illiam Fred Mackay and Cora Carlisle Mackay Memorial Fund Anna Mary Magee Memorial Fund George A. and Mary E. Marten Fund Mrs. E. O. Marting Memorial The Frederick R. and Bertha Specht Mautz Scholarship Fund Malcolm L. McBride and John Harris McBride II Memorial Fund Thomas McCauslen Memorial Mrs. E. P. McCullagh Memorial Emma E. McDonald Fund Hilda J. McGee Fund Gladys M. McIntyre Memorial Fund Anna Curtiss M cNutt Memorial Charles E. Meink Memorial W illiam J. Mericka Memorial The Grace E. Meyette Fund Herman R. and Esther S. M iller Memorial Fund Emma B. Minch Fund John A. M itchell and Blanche G. M itchell Fund Harry F. M iter Memorial Helen Moore Fund Daniel E. Morgan Memorial Fund Mary MacBain Motch Fund Ray E. Munn Fund John P. Murphy Memorial Christopher Bruce Narten Memorial The National City Bank Fund Harlan H. Newell Memorial Jessie Roe North and George Mahan North Memorial Fund

John F. Oberlin and John C. Oberlin Fund Ethelwyne Walton Osborn Memorial Erla Schlather Parker Fund Charles J. and Marian E. Paterson Fund Blanche B. Payer Fund Caroline Brown Prescott Memorial Fund Mary Dunham Prescott Memorial The George John Putz and Margaret Putz Memorial Fund The George F. Quinn Memorial Scholarship Fund Omar S. Ranney Memorial Grace P. Rawson Fund Marie Richardson Memorial Fund Minerva P. Ridley Fund Edna A. Rink Fund Orra M. Risberg Memorial Gertrude M. Robertson Memorial Clarence A. Roode Memorial Elizabeth Becker Rorabeck Fund Edward L. Rosenfeld and Bertha M. Rosenfeld Memorial Fund Dr. A. T. Roskos Fund Dorothy and Helen Ruth Fund St. Barnabas Guild for Nursing Fund Mrs. Raymond T. Sawyer Memorial O liver H. Schaaf Fund Cornelius G. Scheid Memorial Fund The Robert N. Schwartz Fund for Retarded Children Alice Duty Seagrave Foreign Study Fund Warner Seely Fund Arthur H. Seibig Fund Mrs. Louis B. Seltzer Memorial Annette S. Shagren Memorial Nina Sherrer Fund The John and Frances W. Sherwin Fund Cornelia Adams Shiras Memorial Dr. Thomas Shupe Memorial Fund David G. Skall Memorial Mr. and Mrs. Paul T. Skove Fund Josephine R. and Edward W. Sloan, Jr. Fund Social Work Scholarship Fund Society for Crippled Children â&#x2013; â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tris Speaker Memorial Fund Society National Bank Fund Meade A. Spencer Memorial The Miriam Kerruish Stage Fund

Belle Bierce Stair Memorial Frederick S. Stamberger Memorial Nellie Steele Stewart Memorial The Charles J. Sti Iwell Scholarship Fund Ralph P. Stoddard Memorial Fund Esther H. and B. F. Stoner Memorial Fund Vernon Stouffer Memorial Fund Mortim er I. Strauss and Helen E. Strauss and Blanche New Memorial Fund Joseph T. Sweeny Memorial Charles Farrand Taplin and Elsie H. Taplin Fund C. F. Taplin Fund Jessie Loyd Tarr Memorial Elizabeth Bebout Taylor Memorial Mary J. Tewksbury Fund Allison John Thompson Memorial Fund Margaret Hayden Thompson Fund Sarah R. Thompson Fund Homer F. Tielke Fund Maud Kerruish Towson Memorial Jessie C. Tucker Memorial Fund The Charles F. Uhl and Carl F. Uhl Memorial Fund Leo W. Ulmer Fund Malcolm B. Vilas Memorial Philip R. and Mary S. Ward Memorial Fund Cornelia Blakemore Warner Memorial Fund Helen B. Warner Fund Stanley H. Watson Memorial Frank Walter Weide Fund The Harry H. and Stella B. Weiss Memorial Fund Caroline Briggs Welch Memorial S. Burns and Simonne H. Weston Fund Lucius J. and Jennie C. Wheeler Memorial Fund Elliott H. W hitlock Memorial Mary C. W hitney Fund The Marian L. and Edna A. Whitsey Fund R. N. and H. R. Wiesenberger Fund Lewis B. Williams Memorial Arthur P. and Elizabeth M. Williamson Fund Marjorie A. W inbigler Memorial John W. W oodburn Memorial Nelle P. W oodworth Fund Leward C. W ykoff Memorial Dr. Edward A. Yurick Fund Herbert E. and Eleanor M. Zdara Memorial Fund

57


STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION Y ear ended D ecem ber 31, 1976

PRINCIPAL

B alances at January 1,1976 INCREASES IN FUND BALANCES Received from donors Gain from sale of assets D ividends Interest— net of am ortization and purchased interest Personal Investm ent Trust Fund incom e Comm on tru st fund c e rtifica te incom e Partial benefit incom e Rental incom e Return of unused portion of p rio r ye a r’s grants A m ortization of bond prem ium D istrib ution of estate incom e O ther TOTAL INCREASES IN FUND BALANCES TRANSFERS From incom e to principal DECREASES IN FUND BALANCES A uthorized by trustee banks: T rustees’ fees O ther trust expenses Payments under grants authorized by The C leveland Foundation Com m ittee or the D istrib ution Com m ittee: For ch a rita b le purposes To Cleveland Foundation Resources fo r adm inistrative purposes O ther TOTAL DECREASES IN FUND BALANCES Balances at Decem ber 31, 1976

1914 RESOLUTION

MULTIPLE TRUSTEESHIP RESOLUTION

COMBINED FUND RESOLUTION

TO TA L PRINCIPAL

$21,093,938

$105,631,364

$6,084,304

$132,809,606

434,368

4,772,585 600,978

749,876 59,354

5,522,461 1,094,700

1,560

7,657

855

10,072 5,080

5,080 435,928

5,386,300

810,085

1,637

1,637

34,595

182,300 5,985

85,000

1,500

1,500 3 121,098 $21,410,405

6,632,313

11 189,796 $110,827,868

12,925 152

229,820 6,137

86,500

1

1,500 15

13,078

323,972

$6,881,311

$139,119,584


INCOME 1914 RESOLUTION

$

330,803

MULTIPLE TRUSTEESHIP RESOLUTION

COMBINED FUND RESOLUTION

TOTAL INCOME

TOTAL PRINCIPAL AND INCOME

$1,340,451

$548,017

$2,219,271

$135,028,877

36,000

5,558,461 1,094,700 2,853,314 2,413,499 335,426 204,054 3,457,710 38,506 24,195 10,072 390,648 5,080

36,000 688,735 628,352 193,464 188,041 5,000 (1,597)

1,701,995

1,988,327 1,591,045 141,962 170,153 3,269,669 33,506 25,792

176,252 194,102 33,901

2,853,314 2,413,499 335,426 204,054 3,457,710 38,506 24,195

316,901

73,747

390,648

7,573,355

478,002

9,753,352

(1,637)

$

(1,637)

16,385,665

0

55,868 2,297

167,403 2,802

14,774 13

238,045 5,112

467,865 11,249

1,399,488

6,727,229

628,642

8,755,359

8,841,859

115,662

452,560

45,733

613,955

615,455 __________ 15

1,573,315

7,349,994

689,162

9,612,471

9,936,443

457,846

$1,563,812

$336,857

$2,358,515

$141,478,099

59


A PPR O XI­ MATE M ARKETNote

STATEMENT OF ASSETS AND FUND BALANCES

STATEMENT OF ASSETS AND FUND BALANCES THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION D ecem ber 31,1976

ASSETS Trust Funds: 1914 R esolution: Cash S ecurities: U.S. G overnm ent o b lig a tio n s Bonds Com m on and preferred stocks Personal Investm ent Trust Fund ce rtifica te s of The C leveland Trust Com pany O ther investm ents

$

185,071

$

185,071

3,141,003 7,972,310 7,489,163

3,271,671 7,607,564 16,930,222

3,061,199

3,979,420

21,848,746 19,505

31,973,948 19,505

21,868,251 M u ltiple Trusteeship R esolution: Cash S ecurities: U.S. G overnm ent oblig ations Bonds Common and preferred stocks Personal Investm ent Trust Fund ce rtifica te s of The C leveland Trust Com pany Common tru st fund ce rtifica te s of the trustee banks O ther investm ents Com bined Fund R esolution: Cash S ecurities: U.S. G overnm ent oblig ations Bonds Common and preferred stocks Common tru st fund certificates of the trustee banks O ther investm ents NOTE— Since approxim ate m arket valuations as of D ecem ber 31, 1976 fo r other investm ents were not readily obtainable, the carrying value of o th e r investm ents has been shown in the approxim ate m arket colum n.

60

FUND BALANCES Trust Funds: Principal Incom e

1,261,464

31,993,453 1,261,464

10,426,582 36,545,017 55,401,765

10,846,856 34,078,378 113,673,678

4,042,445

4,395,189

3,351,566

3,293,371

111,028,839 1,362,841

167,548,936 1,362,841

112,391,680

168,911,777

291,952

291,952

840,452 2,216,838 3,444,870

868,719 2,087,043 4,344,679

423,545

481,287

7,217,657 ________ 511 7,218,168

8,073,680 ________ 511 8,074,191

$141,478,099

$208,979,421

$139,119,584 2,358,514 $141,478,098


REPORT CLEVELAND FOUNDATION RESOURCES O n J a n u a r y 1 , 1 9 7 6 C le v e la n d F o u n d a t io n R e so urce s s u c c e e d e d th e G re a te r C le v e la n d Associated F oundation as the a dm in istra tive arm o f The C leveland Foundation. A n o n p ro fit O h io c o rp o ra tio n , C leveland F oundation Resources is a s u p p o rtin g o rg a n iza tio n o f The C leveland F oundation u nd e r Section 509(a)(3) o f the In ­ ternal Revenue Code. As such, it shares id e ntica l ch aritab le purposes; and its g ove rn in g body, the Board o f Trustees, has the same m em bership as the D is trib u tio n C o m m itte e o f The C leveland Foundation. D u rin g 1976 C leveland Foundation Resources received the fo llo w in g c o n trib u tio n s fo r u nre ­ stricted ch a rita b le purposes: $26,000.00 fro m The S herw ick Fund, $8,186.00 fro m The John R. R a ib le F o u n d a tio n , and $ 5 ,0 0 0 .0 0 fro m th e A lb e rt M. H igley Com pany. It also received the fo llo w in g gifts fo r o p e r­ a tin g s u p p o rt o f c o o p e ra tiv e p h ila n t h r o p ic activitie s: $500.00 fro m The A m erican Founda­ tio n ; $1,000 fro m The George W . C o d rin g to n C h a ritab le F oundation, and $600.00 fro m the S. Livingston M a th e r C h a ritab le Trust.

FUNDS A N D GIFTS OF CLEVELAND F O U N D A T IO N RESOURCES George H. and M ay M argaret A ngell Trust Fund G ift C leveland A dve rtising C lub Fund Elizabeth C. Eastwood G ift G orm an-Lavelle P lum bing C om pany Fund G reater Cleveland Bar Fund The A lb e rt M . H igley C om pany Fund T. D ixon and Ellen C. Long G ift The John R. Raible Foundation G ifts The Reinberger Foundation G ift Shaker Heights C h ild re n 's Theater Fund G ift The S herw ick Fund G ift

G R A N TS CLEVELAND FOUNDATION RESOURCES CLEVELAND FOUNDATION RESOURCES Toward support of consolidated budget of The Cleveland Foundation/Cleveland Foundation Resources for the year 1977 ..................................................................................................................................................................................................$ 99,926 LAWYERS’ COMMITTEE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS UNDER LAW Operating s u p p o rt....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... SHAKER HIGH SCHOOL DRAMA STUDENTS D r a m a awards for C hildren’s Theater of Shaker H e ig h t s ...................................................................................................................................................................

3,000 50

TOTAL G RANTS............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ $102,976

61


STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES CLEVELAND FOUNDATION RESOURCES Y ear ended D e c e m b e r3 1 ,1976

RESTRICTED FUNDS

Balance at January 1, 1976 R eceipts: Investm ent incom e earned Fee incom e from The C leveland Foundation Fee incom e from adm inistered program s C ontrib utions O ther incom e Disbursem ents: G rants Designated program s Special program s A d m in istra tive expenses

COMBINED FUNDS— CUSTODIAN FOR THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION

CONTRI­ BUTIONS FOR DESIGNATED PROGRAMS

$280,720

$ 859,697

$— 0

OTHER GRANT FUNDS

A D M IN IS­ TRATIVE OPERATING FUNDS— 1976

$111,051

$148,532

A D M IN IS ­ TRATIVE OPERATING FUNDS— 1977

$— 0

UNRESTRICTED OPERATING FUNDS

$ 73,312

65,618 535,940

52,107

401,733

200,000

332,827

1,261,430

200,000

86,777

8,878 7,582 3,100

76,533

197,828

769,650

76,533

73,312

143,088

205,566 431,338 179,586

697.574 205,566

431,338

179,586

143,088

697.574

127,261

830,092

20,414

54,740

72,076

76,533

73,312

(450,944)

450,944 (72,076)

31,926

40,151

$108,459

$113,463

Transfer of funds from designated program to special program s Transfer of operating funds Balance at Decem ber 31,1976

CONTRI­ BUTIONS RESTRICTED FOR SPECIAL PROGRAMS

$127,261

$ 379,148

$471,358

$ 54,740

$— 0


BALANCE SHEET CLEVELAND FOUNDATION RESOURCES D e cem b er31, 1976

ASSETS Cash C ertificates of deposit S hort-term investm ents R eceivable from The C leveland Foundation F urniture and equipm ent O ther assets

$

36,422 975.000 250.000 67,782 1 32,329

$1,361,534

LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES A ccounts payable and accrued expenses Fund balances: R estricted C om bined funds— custodian for The C leveland Foundation C o n trib u tio n s fo r designated program s C o n trib u tio n s restricted for special program s O ther grant funds A d m in istra tive operating funds U n restricted— available fo r operating purposes

$

107,105

$127,261 379,148 471,358 54,740 108,459

1,140,966 113,463 $1,361,534

63


GIVING TO THE CLEVELAND FOUNDATION G ifts to The C leveland F o un d atio n may be m ade in several ways. A ll gifts, regardless o f size, are used fo r the ch a rita b le needs o f the G reater C leveland co m m u n ity . D o n ors to the F oundation may d ire c t gifts o r bequests to sp ecific agencies o r in s titu tio n s o r to broad areas o f concern, such as e d u ca tion , health and social services, civic o r cu ltural affairs. M a n y d on o rs p ro vid e w h o lly unrestricted gifts, e ntru stin g to the Foundation's D is trib u tio n C o m m itte e the decisions on h o w these funds shall be u tiliz e d over the years. The unrestricted g ift provides im p o rta n t fle x ib ility and a llow s the D is trib u tio n C o m m itte e to respond m o re e ffe c­ tive ly to changing c o m m u n ity needs as they emerge. There are three basic ways in w h ic h donors may c o n trib u te to The Cleveland Fo un d atio n : • The Separate Trust Fund is generally estab­ lished fo r a g ift o f $250,000 o r m ore. Each trust o f this kind is held and managed separately by one o f the five banks w h ic h serve as Foundation trustees. A d m in istra tive costs make it m ost e f­ fective o n ly fo r m ore sizable gifts. • The C o m b in e d Fund provides a m ore cost effective w ay o f receiving and a dm iniste ring gifts o f any size. Either large o r m odest gifts may be received und e r this plan because the trustee banks co m b in e in d iv id u a l c o n trib u tio n s and in ­ vest them as a w h o le . This pro ced u re n ot o n ly serves to increase the p o te n tia l fo r overall in ­ vestm ent return, b u t it also reduces the cost o f a d m in iste rin g the d on o r's gift. The C o m bined Fund is also a p o p u la r means fo r m e m o ria lizin g a deceased frie n d o r m em ber o f the fam ily. • The S upporting O rganization, under p ro v i­ sions o f Section 509 (a)(3) o f the Internal Rev­ e n u e C o d e , as a m e n d e d , p ro v id e s a m eans

64

f o r p riv a te fo u n d a tio n s to a f f ilia t e w it h T h e C leveland Foundation. In accordance w ith these p rovisions, the D is trib u tio n C o m m itte e o f The C leveland Foundation has d e fin e d ce rtain c o n ­ d itio n s w h ic h m ust be satisfied. A m o n g these are: (a) a m a jo rity o f the g o ve rn in g b o d y o f the s u p p o rtin g o rg anizations is a p p o in te d by the D is trib u tio n C o m m itte e fro m am ong its m e m ­ bers; (b) the assets o f the su p p o rtin g o rg an iza ­ tio n are to be managed as an agency a ccou n t by one o r m o re o f the trustee banks o f The C leve­ land F o u n d a tio n ; and (c) the su p p o rtin g org an ­ iza tio n is re q uired to u tiliz e the professional staff services o f The C leveland F oundation, w ith annual fees fo r those services co m p arab le to th o s e assessed o th e r C le v e la n d F o u n d a tio n funds. W h e th e r th ro u g h a separate tru st fu n d or throu g h the C o m b in e d Fund, an in d iv id u a l g ift may be made e ith e r as a d ire c t bequest d u rin g the d o n o r's life tim e , o r it may be established in the d o n o r's W ill. Foundation staff is always available to p ro v id e in fo rm a tio n in response to specific d o n o rs ' in q u irie s a b o u t the a lternative m ethods o f giving to the Foundation and a b o u t the d o n o r's specific p h ila n th ro p ic objectives. It is suggested th a t any in d iv id u a l desiring to make a g ift to The Cleveland Foundation c o n fe r w ith an a ttorney, fin an cia l advisor, o r the trust d e p a rtm e n t o f one o f the five p a rtic ip a tin g tru s­ tee banks— C entral N ational Bank o f C leveland, The C leveland Trust C om pany, N a tio na l C ity Bank, Society N ational Bank o f C leveland, or U n io n C om m erce Bank.


1976 DISTRIBUTION COMMITTEE H. Stuart H arrison, C hairm an* W a lte r O. Spencer, V ice C hairm an* Mrs. Scott R. Y ork, V ice C hairm an George B. Chapm an, Jr.* Frederick M. C olem an* Com pleted term March 31, 7976 Robert D. Gries Frank E. Joseph George F. Karch Mrs. Drue King, Jr. W illia m J. O 'N e ill, Sr.* Thomas F. Patton Thomas V. H. V ail* A p p o in te d A p r il 1,1976 *Members of the 1914 Foundation Committee and the Combined Fund Distribution Committee.

TRUSTEES COMMITTEE M. Brock W e ir, Chairm an President and C hief Executive O ffic e r The C leveland Trust C om pany John A. G elbach C hairm an o f the Board and C h ie f Executive O ffic e r Central N ational Bank o f Cleveland Claude M. Blair C hairm an o f the Board and C h ie f Executive O ffice r N ational C ity Bank J M aurice Struchen C hairm an o f the Board and C hief Executive O ffice r Society N ational Bank o f Cleveland Lyman H. Treadw ay C hairm an o f the Board, President and C hief Executive O ffice r U nion C om m erce Bank

STAFF H om er C. W a d sw o rth , D ire c to r T im o th y D. A rm b ru ster, Program O ffic e r Anne F. C o u gh lin , Program O ffic e r* Patricia Jansen D oyle, Program O ffic e r Patrick J. Henry, Program O ffic e r** M u rie l H. Jones, M anager, O ffic e Services John G. Joyce, M anager, Financial Services** H enry J. Kubach, A c c o u n ta n t Steven A. M in te r, Program O ffic e r M ariam C. N oland, Program O ffic e r Jane F. Reisinger, A c c o u n ta n t Robert F. Risberg, M anager, Financial Services* Richard F. T om pkins, Program O ffic e r *Resigned, 1976 **A p p o in te d , 1976

G. Brooks Earnest, C o nsultant Barbara H. Rawson, C onsultant Ernst & Ernst, A u d ito rs Thom pson, H ine & Flory, Legal Counsel

1976 A N N U A L REPORT Patricia Jansen D oyle, Editor John F. M o rre ll, A rt D ire c to r Frank A le ksan d ro w icz, Prim ary P hotographer

THE CLEVELAND F O U N D A T IO N 700 N ational C ity Bank B uild in g Cleveland, O h io 44114 T e le ph o ne : (216) 861-3810


Cleveland Foundation – 1976 Annual Report  
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