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CLC PROGRAMS DEGREES CERTIFICATES

Great Careers

Begin at CLC Business Architecture | Construction Information Technology Education Health Science Law | Public Safety Manufacturing Service Technologies Science | Technology Arts | Communication Natural Resources Hospitality Human Services

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10 REASONS YOU CAN COUNT ON CLC’S PROGRAMS

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Prepare for transfer or learn a great career in two years Earn an associate degree that will provide strong credentials for transfer almost anywhere or entry into a well-paid, in-demand career. Great teaching Learn from CLC professors who are evaluated on teaching not research, though many also publish in their fields. In career program areas, many instructors have industry experience. Learn, earn: come back to learn more Build educational credentials one block at a time. To learn job skills quickly, complete a short-term certificate program. Acquire work experience, then return to CLC to pursue a more advanced certificate or degree. You’re a name, not a number Forget dark large lecture halls; our average class size is just 21 students.

Array of academics Choose from more than 100 degrees and certificates.

Simple savings solution Save on tuition and fees, which are much lower than at public or private universities. Financial aid, a payment plan and scholarships which are also available. Convenient campus locations Attend on the Grayslake campus, the Lakeshore Campus in Waukegan or the Southlake Campus in Vernon Hills. Convenient classes Enjoy flexibility; classes are offered during the day, evening, weekend and online.

At your service Get a boost from our support services. We offer counseling, advisement, career placement, tutoring and more. Fun Stuff Meet new friends, and reconnect with old ones, at events like “Welcome Week,” “Fat Tuesday,” Kwanzaa celebrations and the Latino Talent Contest. With more than 40 student clubs and organizations, plus intercollegiate sports teams, there are plenty of ways to get involved.

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CAREER CLUSTERS

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Business, Management, Marketing and Finance

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Architecture and Construction

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Information Technology

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Education and Training

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Health Science

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Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security

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Manufacturing

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Service Technologies

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Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics

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Arts, Audio Visual Technology and Communication

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Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources

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Hospitality

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Human Services

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[Career Personality: Analytical, Innovative, Organized, Adept Leaders]

Business, Management, Marketing and Finance From delivering services to manufacturing products, business is the engine that drives the American economy. No question, business offers a universe of job opportunities in every size enterprise, from small start-ups to multinational corporations. And even in the public sector (in local, state and federal government) business skills are in demand. Business careers draw on a range of talents—analytical thinking, leadership and organizational skills as well as innovation and creativity. And the educational preparation required is also wide-ranging. Some careers in business require a bachelor’s or graduate degree; others require only an associate degree or career certificate, depending upon the size of the business and scope of responsibilities. At CLC, students can complete the first two years toward a bachelor’s degree in business administration or accounting, or they can complete an Associate in Applied Science degree or career certificate in business management, accounting or administrative office systems preparing them for careers as business managers, bookkeepers, marketers and administrative assistants.

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DEGREES / CERTIFICATES Transfer Track Leading to a bachelor’s degree:

Associate in Arts • Accounting • Business Administration

Career Track* Associate in Applied Science & Career Certificates • Accounting • Marketing • Administrative Office Systems • Supervision • Small Business Management


LEARN MORE ONLINE Business, Management, Marketing and Finance

Fact sheets and detailed information are available online. For a complete listing of all CLC programs, visit clcillinois.edu/academics

SAMPLE CAREERS Business Management or Business Administration (general and operations managers, management analysts, budget analysts): Plan, organize and supervise a business operation or area, leading work teams, analyzing data and solving business problems.

Marketing (advertising or marketing manager, creative director, sales manager): You’ll work in advertising, sales, pricing and distribution, may hold positions with a creative, managerial or data focus or combination of all three. clcillinois.edu/programs/bus

Accounting (bookkeepers, accountants, Certified Public Accountants): Examine, analyze and interpret accounting records for the purpose of giving advice and preparing statements. clcillinois.edu/programs/acc

Administrative Support (administrative assistants, secretaries): Support all business functions, using strong organizational skills and software knowledge to maintain office databases and prepare reports, letters, spreadsheets and presentations. clcillinois.edu/programs/aos

WHAT DO THEY EARN? Occupation

Educational Level

Median Salary

First-line Supervisor

Associate degree

$48,800

Accountant

Bachelor’s degree

$62,700

Administrative Assistant

Varies—from vocational education to community college; a certificate or degree often enhances career prospects.

$44,300

*Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) degrees were not designed for transfer to four-year schools. However, courses in A.A.S. programs may transfer to specific institutions. See clcillinois.edu/info/transfer/aas for details.

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[Career Personality: Creative, Detail-Oriented, Organized, Mathematical, Hands-on]

DEGREES / CERTIFICATES

Architecture and Construction

Career Track* Associate in Applied Science and Certificates

Have you ever looked at a cool skyscraper, house or bridge and wondered how the structure held together? If you’re such a person, a career in architecture or construction may be right for you. Professionals in these fields are the brains—and hands—behind the world’s structures. Everything, of course, starts with a design prepared by architects and engineers, who combine creativity and technical training from a bachelor’s degree program. Architects and engineers, who are both required to obtain state professional registration, may work at private firms or at government agencies. A variety of professionals with a two-year degree or certificate also play a major role in transforming a design into a reality. In addition to strong technical skills, these professionals bring attention to detail, mathematical skills and a liking for hands-on work to their jobs. CLC offers Associate in Applied Science degree and certificate programs to prepare students for careers in these fields.

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• Construction Management Technology • Architectural Technology • Civil and Environmental Technology • CAD Drafting Technology—Architectural/Civil • CAD Drafting Technology—Graphics, Animation and Presentation


LEARN MORE ONLINE Architecture and Construction

Fact sheets and detailed information are available online. For a complete listing of all CLC programs, visit clcillinois.edu/academics

SAMPLE CAREERS SAMPLE CAREERS Architecture (architects): Design buildings and other structures to be safe, functional and aesthetically attractive. Generally requires completion of a five-year bachelor’s degree program and state licensure (registration). Construction Management (construction managers, construction inspectors, estimators): Coordinate and supervise the construction process from the design stage through final construction, working with owners, engineers, architects and contractors. clcillinois.edu/credit/programs/cmt.asp Architectural Technology and CAD Drafting Technology (architectural technologists, architectural drafters): Use computer assisted design (CAD) software to prepare architectural drawings and renderings. clcillinois.edu/programs/arc

Civil and Environmental Technology (civil drafters, surveyors, construction inspectors): Prepare drawings and maps used in major construction or civil engineering projects. Perform surveying to collect pre- and post-construction data. Perform preliminary design work for subdivision and site layout, utility design and stormwater management. clcillinois.edu/credit/programs/civ

WHAT DO THEY EARN? Occupation

Educational Level

Median Salary

Architect

Bachelor’s degree and state licensing

$67,400

CAD Drafter

Varies—from vocational education Bachelor’s Degree to a certificate or associate degree

$51,200

Construction Manager

Bachelor’s degree

$93,100

*Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) degrees were not designed for transfer to four-year schools. However, courses in A.A.S. programs may transfer to specific institutions. See clcillinois.edu/info/transfer/aas for details.

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[Career Personality: Logical, Tech Savvy, Scientific]

DEGREES / CERTIFICATES

Information Technology

Transfer Track

From laptops to computer networks, Internet surfing to computer gaming, life in the 21st century runs on bits and bytes. Making sure that computers, and their networks, are satisfying today’s thousands of business and entertainment needs is the job of computer and information technology (IT) professionals. Even with outsourcing certain jobs overseas, the digital age is continuing to create many well-paid job opportunities in this challenging field here in the U.S. Computer-related jobs are available at schools, businesses and government agencies. Self-employment is also an option. To succeed in the IT field, it takes more than a strong interest in computers. Problem-solving and communication skills are critical. Programmers, systems analysts and computer forensics professionals need analytical skills, attention to detail and the ability to think logically. Other specialties, such as computer game designers, need a combination of programming skills and creativity. Regardless of the specialty, an interest in continuing education is essential—to keep current with technology that changes constantly. At CLC, students can complete the first two years toward a bachelor’s degree in computer information technology. Or they can earn an associate degree or career certificate in several specialties, from programming to game development to computer forensics. Many IT careers now require earning at least a bachelor’s degree.

“In the workplace today, it’s all about continuing education. Technology changes so fast you can be obsolete if you don’t stay current. I took classes at CLC in computer forensics, Java and C++. The first time I stepped on CLC’s campus I was very impressed. The equipment is modern, the software is current and lots of hands-on instruction made it interesting.” —Doug Egan, senior sales engineer

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Leading to a bachelor’s degree

Associate in Science • Computer Science • Computer Information Technology

Career Track* Associate in Applied Science and Career Certificates • C++ Programmer • Java Programmer • Visual Basic Programmer • Web Programmer • Computer Forensics • Network Administration and Security • Office Application Specialist • Game Development

Career Certificates • Oracle Administrator Certified Associate • Oracle Administrator Professional Associate • PC Technician • Security Administration


LEARN LEARN MORE MORE ONLINE ONLINE Information Technology

Fact sheets and detailed information are available online. For a complete listing of all CLC programs, visit clcillinois.edu/academics

SAMPLE CAREERS Network Administration (network administrators): Make sure an organization’s computers are working together— protected from hackers and viruses.

Programming (programmer analyst, programmer): Write, test, debug/troubleshoot and update source code used in creating computer programs.

Computer Forensics (computer forensics technician): Detect and prevent cybercrime. Find, preserve, analyze and present digital evidence for law enforcement and the corporate world. Computer Game Development (game programmer, game designer): Design game concepts, develop and refine characters, create special effects and animation to make a game come to life.

Office Application Support (help desk specialist, computer specialist, applications specialist): Provide user support, installing software and trouble shooting problems.

Database Administration (database administrators): Organize and store data using a relational database such as Oracle. Troubleshoot problems and manage database security.

PC Repair and Service (computer technician, field service technician): Install and troubleshoot personal computer hardware and software. clcillinois.edu/programs/cit

WHAT DO THEY EARN? Occupation

Educational Level

Median Salary

Help Desk Specialist

Associate degree

$48,700

Network Administrator

Bachelor’s degree

$73,200

Computer Forensics Technician

Associate degree

$50,000

Computer Programmer

Bachelor’s degree

$69,300

*Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) degrees were not designed for transfer to four-year schools. However, courses in A.A.S. programs may transfer to specific institutions. See clcillinois.edu/info/transfer/aas for details.

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[Career Personality: Caring, patient, loves sharing knowledge]

Education and Training Whether they are helping a dyslexic child blossom into an avid reader or a college student overcome math anxiety, teachers are visionaries who share knowledge to help realize the potential of students. All teachers need creativity, mastery of their disciplines and strong communication skills to share knowledge and inspire students. The best employ an arsenal of teaching strategies to reach students with different learning styles and cultural backgrounds. At CLC, students can complete the first two years of a bachelor’s degree in education, or they can earn a certificate or associate degree preparing them to work in early childhood centers or classrooms.

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DEGREES / CERTIFICATES Transfer Track Leading to a bachelor’s degree

Associate in Arts Early Childhood Education

Associate in Arts in Teaching Early Childhood Education Special Education

Associate in Arts, Associate in Science (Majors in the liberal arts and sciences that transfer towards a bachelor’s degree.)

Career Track* Associate in Applied Science • Early Childhood Education

Certificates • Administration and Leadership in Early Childhood Education • Early Childhood Education • Home-Based Child Care • Infant-Toddler Specialist • School-Aged Child Care • Paraprofessional Educator


LEARN LEARN MORE MORE ONLINE ONLINE Education and Training

Fact sheets and detailed information are available online. For a complete listing of all CLC programs, visit clcillinois.edu/academics

SAMPLE CAREERS Early Childhood Education (teacher—associate degree): Teach young children to develop social, emotional, language, early literacy and other skills.

Early Childhood Education (teacher—state-certified: birth to age 8): More and more early childhood teachers are required to have a bachelor’s degree and state certification, allowing them to teach kindergarten through third grade.

Elementary Teacher (state-certified, kindergarten through ninth grade): Introduce and build skills in mathematics, language, science and social studies. A bachelor’s degree is required.

High School Teacher (Secondary Teaching Credential—sixth to 12th and bachelor’s degree required): High school teachers generally teach a specific discipline such as English, mathematics, etc.

K-12 Administrator (Principal, Superintendent—requires state certification plus a graduate degree): Administer a school or district.

K-12 Paraprofessional (Teacher’s Aide or Assistant): Support a classroom teacher helping children to learn class material following curriculum plans. Qualifications vary by school district. clcillinois.edu/programs/ece

clcillinois.edu/credit/programs/edp.asp

WHAT DO THEY EARN? Occupation

Educational Level

Median Salary

Teacher’s Aide

Varies—from vocational education to at least come college

$22,200

High School Teacher

Bachelor’s degree or higher

$77,340

Master’s or doctorate degree; College Professor industry experience helpful in business or technical fields

Varies from $58,000 to $123,000, depending on the subject, the college and years of experience.

*Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) degrees were not designed for transfer to four-year schools. However, courses in A.A.S. programs may transfer to specific institutions. See clcillinois.edu/info/transfer/aas for details.

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[Career Personality: Scientific, Thorough, Compassionate]

DEGREES / CERTIFICATES

Health Science

Transfer Track Associate in Science

Do you enjoy learning about the human body—the world’s most incredible machine—and the fascinating, ever-changing world of health care and medical advances? Then explore a career in health care, one of the largest industries in the U.S. An aging population has created a huge demand for health care workers—not just physicians, nurses and other patient-care professionals but also behind-the-scenes workers in such fields as medical billing and coding. By the year 2014, about 3.6 million more jobs will be created in this growing field, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. In addition to hospitals and clinics, health care professionals work at schools, insurance agencies and fitness centers. They’re promoting wellness, caring for the sick or making sure that patient care is documented properly for insurance coverage. The education required ranges from a bachelor’s degree, medical school, internship and residency for physicians to an associate degree for professions like nursing to a career certificate for nursing assistants and phlebotomists.

• Pre-Dentistry • Pre-Medicine • Pre-Occupational Therapy • Pre-Pharmacy • Pre-Physical Therapy • Pre-Veterinary Medicine

Career Track* • Dental Hygiene • Emergency Medical Technology • Health & Wellness Promotion • Health Information Technology • Massage Therapy • Medical Assisting • Medical Imaging • Nursing • Phlebotomy Technician • Surgical Technology

CLC offers pre-professional degrees for students interested in eventually becoming a physician, dentist or veterinarian. (See clcillinois.edu/programs.) The college offers a wide array of health career preparation programs requiring an associate degree or career certificate. These programs lead to many well-paid, rewarding careers in settings ranging from hospitals to doctor’s offices to spas and health and wellness centers.

LEARN MORE ONLINE Health Science

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clcillinois.edu/programs/health Fact sheets and detailed information are available online. For a complete listing of all CLC programs, visit clcillinois.edu/academics


SAMPLE CAREERS Dental Hygiene (dental hygienists): Brighten countless smiles by cleaning teeth, providing preventive care and teaching patients good oral hygiene.

Emergency Medical Technician (EMT): Treat accident victims, deliver babies and handle countless other emergencies in this fast-paced, high-adrenaline career.

Health Information Technology (medical coders, transcriptionists): Manage patient information, including the coding of diagnoses and procedures for services provided to the patient. Work in hospitals, doctor’s offices and insurance companies. Health and Wellness Promotion (wellness coaches): Coach others on eating healthy foods, starting/maintaining a fitness program and finding balance between work, family and personal growth.

Massage Therapy (massage therapists): In an age of hectic schedules and sore muscles, relieve pain and help others relax. Medical Imaging (radiologic technologist): A radiologic technologist takes radiographic images of the human body to assist the radiologist in diagnoses.

Medical Assisting (medical assistants): From doctor’s offices to chiropractic clinics, draw blood samples, record a patient’s vital signs, maintain medical records, schedule patients and much more.

Nursing (registered nurses): Record patient symptoms, assist doctors during treatments and exams, administer medications and offer advice and emotional support to patients’ family members. Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA): Record a patient’s temperature, blood pressure and help patients eat, dress and bathe. Pharmacy Technician: Handle the administrative details of a pharmacy, from checking insurance records to ringing up the sale. Phlebotomy Technician (Phlebotomists): Collect blood and non-blood specimens for patient care facilities, outpatient clinical sites and donor centers. Eligible for national certification after eight weeks of classroom instruction plus three weeks of clinical internship. Surgical Technology (surgical technologists): Be a critical part of a surgical team before, during and after surgery. Help create and maintain a sterile environment in the operating room.

Pre-Professional Programs: Complete the first two years toward a bachelor’s degree leading to entrance into a medical, dental, physical therapy, pharmacy or veterinary medicine program of study.

WHAT DO THEY EARN? Occupation

Educational Level

Median Salary

Physician

Doctor of Medicine (M.D.)

$149,100

Registered Nurse

Associate degree

$65,800

Dental Hygienist

Associate degree

$71,100

*Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) degrees were not designed for transfer to four-year schools. However, courses in A.A.S. programs may transfer to specific institutions. See clcillinois.edu/info/transfer/aas for details.

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[Career Personality: Public-service minded, sound judgement, detail-oriented]

Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security, Fire Science How safe and secure would your community be without adequate police and fire protection, solid legal advice and an efficient court system? Their work may not always be as pulse-pounding as a TV crime drama, but real-life professionals in law and public safety careers work daily to battle fires, fight crime, prosecute criminals or defend your rights. Law-enforcement and public-safety careers require critical thinking— often on one’s feet—along with attention to detail and desire to serve the public. Educational requirements vary by profession. Attorneys and judges must hold a law degree; paralegals, who assist lawyers, and police, who enforce laws, can qualify with an associate degree. Law enforcement and law-related fields are expected to grow at an average or above-average pace through 2018, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The highest growth is expected for private detectives, investigators and paralegals. Fire fighting and fire-related fields are also expected to remain in demand at current or increased levels for the next several years. Prospects will remain strong in the combination area of fire fighting/ emergency medical services as communities strive to maintain current or improved levels of service to citizens. At CLC, students can complete the first two years of a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice or another transfer subject. (A bachelor’s degree is required for law school admission.) The criminal justice transfer degree is also for those who ultimately wish to enter law enforcement management, probations careers or service as an agent with the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The Associate in Applied Science option prepares students for careers as police and security officers. Those in the Fire Science program can complete the requirements of an Associate in Applied Science and can then apply for transfer to select four-year institutions to complete bachelor’s degree requirements. Completing both degrees enhances a student’s marketability for local, state or federal positions in the field of fire fighting, codes and standards, fire investigation and fire prevention.

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DEGREES / CERTIFICATES Transfer Track Leading to a bachelor’s degree

Associate in Arts • Criminal Justice

Career Track* Associate in Applied Science and Certificate • Criminal Justice • Paralegal Studies • Fire Science Technology • Emergency and Disaster Management


LEARN LEARN MORE MORE ONLINE ONLINE Law and Public Safety

Fact sheets and detailed information are available online. For a complete listing of all CLC programs, visit clcillinois.edu/academics

SAMPLE CAREERS Law (Attorneys): Present evidence and argue in court to support a client. Counsel people on legal rights and courses of action in business and personal matters. Judge: Preside over trials or hearings and listen as attorneys represent their clients. Rule on the admissibility of evidence and ensuring that rules and procedures are followed. clcillinois.edu/transfer Paralegal or legal assistant (paralegals): Work under the supervision of an attorney to prepare for closings, hearings, trials and corporate meetings. Investigate the facts of cases, identify appropriate laws and prepare written reports and legal documents as directed by an attorney. clcillinois.edu/programs/pls

Law Enforcement (police officers): Apprehend individuals who break the law and then issue citations or give warnings; maintain detailed records of incidents; educate the public on crime prevention. Detectives and investigators: Connect clues to uncover facts about legal, financial or personal matters, from insurance fraud to background checks to computer crimes.

Corporate security manager: Conduct internal and external investigations on cases ranging from employee/customer theft to drug use, cyber crimes and more. clcillinois.edu/programs/crj Firefighting (firefighters): Extinguish fires, perform rescues, manage hazardous material (HazMat) emergencies and educate the public on fire prevention. clcillinois.edu/programs/fst

WHAT DO THEY EARN? Occupation

Educational Level

Median Salary

Attorney

Juris Doctorate

$134,350

Paralegal

Associate degree

$52,530

Police Officer Varies, from Associate Degree vocational education to associate degree

$52,530

Fire FIghter Varies, from Associate Degree vocational education to associate degree

$61,900

*Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) degrees were not designed for transfer to four-year schools. However, courses in A.A.S. programs may transfer to specific institutions. See clcillinois.edu/info/transfer/aas for details.

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[Career Personality: Hands-on, fascinated with how things work]

DEGREES / CERTIFICATES

Manufacturing

Career Track* Associate in Applied Science and Certificates

From air conditioners to zippers, just about everything in daily life has been manufactured. And if you think the opportunities in this diverse field are low-paying, “dirty jobs,” think again.

• CAD Drafting Technology-Mechanical • Computerized Numerical Control

Technicians in manufacturing or service industries are skilled professionals who work in mostly clean environments using a monitor and a computer keyboard along with hand tools. And although some manufacturing jobs have been outsourced to other countries, many careers maintain a strong presence in today’s workforce.

• Mechanical Service Technician • Welding • Electrical/Electronic Maintenance

CLC offers certificates and associate degree programs to prepare students for manufacturing careers in a variety of industries.

Certificates

Credits from the following A.A.S. degrees are accepted by Northern Illinois University or Southern Illinois University. Contact CLC’s Engineering, Math and Physical Sciences Division for details: • Mechanical Engineering Technology • Architectural Technology • Electronics Engineering Technology • Computer Numerical Control • CAD Drafting • Civil/Construction Technology

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LEARN LEARN MORE MORE ONLINE ONLINE Manufacturing Fields

Fact sheets and detailed information are available online. For a complete listing of all CLC programs, visit clcillinois.edu/academics

SAMPLE CAREERS Computer Aided Design (CAD): Prepare technical drawings and plans. clcillinois.edu/credit/programs/cad.asp CNC Programming (computer controlled machine tool operators): Operate a computerized milling and turning machine that cuts and shapes all kinds of products, from toasters to automotive parts. clcillinois.edu/credit/programs/cnc.asp

Electrical/Electronic Maintenance: Maintain and repair a factory’s electrical equipment, from robots to industrial fan motors. Note: This career is different from an electrician, who installs and maintains a building’s electrical wiring. Machine Tool Trades (machinists, tool and die makers): Use a machine to produce metal or plastic products, from cell phones to automotive parts. Careers are available in both machine setup and operation/maintenance. clcillinois.edu/credit/programs/mtt.asp

Welding: Build ships, automobiles, buildings, bridges, pipelines and thousands of other products. clcillinois.edu/credit/programs/wld.asp

WHAT DO THEY EARN? Occupation

Educational Level

Median Salary

Machinist Varies, from vocational education to community college

$35,150

Varies, from CNC Operator vocational education to community college

$36,000

Varies, from Welder vocational education to community college

$36,000

*Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) degrees were not designed for transfer to four-year schools. However, courses in A.A.S. programs may transfer to specific institutions. See clcillinois.edu/info/transfer/aas for details.

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[Career Personality: Hands-on, customer-focused]

Service Technologies Do you enjoy tinkering with car engines? Ever wondered how technicians can turn a rusty or dented car into something that looks brand new? When you look at an office tower or large campus, are you curious as to what goes into keeping a building comfortable—especially in extreme climates such as Chicago’s? If you enjoy hands-on, mechanical work and enjoy working with customers, a career in service technologies may be for you. The work of an auto mechanic, now known as an automotive service technician, has gone through exciting changes. The increasing use of computers, electronic systems and gas/electric hybrids has created a need for workers who can use computerized shop equipment and work with electronic components— while maintaining their skills with traditional hand tools. Collision repair technicians also must enjoy working with their hands and, like repair technicians, be comfortable standing for long periods of time. Refrigeration and air-conditioning technicians must also have problem-solving skills and need to stay current, as “green” technologies such as wind and solar-based heating become increasingly popular. At CLC, students can complete an Associate in Applied Science degree or career certificate to learn a career in the service sector.

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DEGREES / CERTIFICATES Career Track* Associate in Applied Science and Certificates • Automotive Collision Repair • Automotive Technology • Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning • Electronic Systems Technology


LEARN LEARN MORE MORE ONLINE ONLINE Service Technology

Fact sheets and detailed information are available online. For a complete listing of all CLC programs, visit clcillinois.edu/academics

SAMPLE CAREERS Automotive Collision Repair (technicians): Use paints, high-tech spray guns and creativity to transform a dented or drab looking car into a beauty with a showroom shine. clcillinois.edu/credit/programs/abr

Automotive Technology (auto mechanics): Fix traditional cars and trucks or the new gas/electric hybrids. Work as a generalist or specialize in areas such as brakes, suspension or transmissions. clcillinois.edu/programs/aut Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (mechanics and installers): Install and maintain the equipment that keeps people comfortable—and preserves perishable products—in homes, businesses and industry. clcillinois.edu/credit/programs/het

WHAT DO THEY EARN? Occupation

Educational Level

Median Salary

HVAC Mechanic

from AssociateVaries, Degree vocational education to associate degree or career certificate

$52,400

Automotive Technician

from Bachelor’sVaries, Degree vocational education to associate degree or career certificate

$40,340

*Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) degrees were not designed for transfer to four-year schools. However, courses in A.A.S. programs may transfer to specific institutions. See clcillinois.edu/info/transfer/aas for details.

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[Career Personality: Inventive, curious, problem-solver]

Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics From discovering cancer-fighting medicines to new sources of energy, science, technology, engineering and mathematics are essential to making life on Earth better. Success in science, mathematics, engineering and technology starts with an aptitude for math and a curiosity for how things work. Scientists combine research skills and logical thinking, specializing in chemistry, biology, physics, geology or other sciences. Mathematicians, like scientists, can work on theoretical problems or applied research. Engineers, in contrast to scientists, apply science and math to designing real-world applications like highways, bridges, machinery and electronic devices. Technicians work with engineers in a variety of fields. In electronics, they need a strong background in physics, electrical circuits and computer hardware. Civil or architectural technicians should have a solid foundation in trigonometry and construction principles. Mechanical technicians need a strong background in mechanical design and also in CAD applications. All careers in the science/math/technology cluster need a combination of problem-solving ability, attention to detail and communication skills. At CLC, students can complete the first two years toward a bachelor’s degree in science, math and engineering. Or, they can complete an associatedegree or career certificate in many technology specialties, from laser, photonics and optics to wireless networks and robotics.

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DEGREES / CERTIFICATES Transfer Track Associate in Science • Chemistry • Physics • Biology • Mathematics

Associate in Engineering Science • Engineering

Career Track* Associate in Applied Science and Certificates • Electronic Information Technology • Electrical Engineering Technology • Mechanical Engineering Technology • Nanoscience (substantial course work at CLC; degree awarded by Harper College)

Career Certificates • Photonics • Mechanical Engineering Technology Certificates


LEARN MORE ONLINE Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics

Fact sheets and detailed information are available online. For a complete listing of all CLC programs, visit clcillinois.edu/credit/academics

SAMPLE CAREERS Scientist: Work in a lab or in the field, studying plants, animals or the physical world, and making new discoveries on everything from medicines to new planets. Mathematician: Use formulas, mathematical theories and the latest computer technology to solve theoretical and applied problems.

Actuary: Work in the insurance industry, using knowledge of statistics and business to determine the risk of events occurring. Laser/Photonics/Optics Technician: Install and troubleshoot lasers and optical systems used in many industries. clcillinois.edu/programs/lpo Nanoscience technology (technicians): Use high-end technology to work at the nanoscale (at the molecular and atomic levels) in research and development in medicine,defense or manufacturing. See our Nanoscience Technology fact sheet. clcillinois.edu/programs/nan

Electronic Information Technology (technicians): Design, install and support local area networks, wide-area networks, network segments and the infrastructure for Internet or intranets.

clcillinois.edu/credit/programs/eit.asp

Electrical Engineering Technology (technicians): Work with engineers on the design, assembly and testing of a universe of products, from cell phones to life-saving medical equipment. Careers are also available in sales.

clcillinois.edu/programs/elt

Mechanical Engineering Technology: Design, test and troubleshoot machines, mechanisms and other hot technology in the areas of robotics, mechatronics and automated systems.

WHAT DO THEY EARN? Occupation

Educational Level

Median Salary

Actuary

Bachelor’s degree or higher

$85,200

Physicist

Doctorate degree

$110,200

Photonics Technician

Associate degree

$55,400**

*Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) degrees were not designed for transfer to four-year schools. However, courses in A.A.S. programs may transfer to specific institutions. See clcillinois.edu/info/transfer/aas for details. **Source: The National Center for Photonics Education at op-tec.org/2009survey.php

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[Career Personality: Creative; curious; media and software savvy]

Arts, Audio-Visual Technology and Communication Are you intrigued by the power of words, pictures, audio and video to inform or entertain? Thrilled at the chance to perform on a stage, singing, acting or making music? Or maybe you have a creative spirit that longs to produce a jaw-dropping sculpture or painting. Consider a career in the visual arts, performing arts or communications. From technical writers to videographers to Web designers, many exciting careers are available. Jobs are in marketing or training departments, advertising and public relations agencies and at Web design firms. Newspapers, television stations, film studios, live theatres and publishing companies also employ people in the creative arts. Many are self-employed as freelancers. Successful communicators combine strong verbal or visual skills, creativity, curiosity and an ability to convey complicated ideas simply. Specialized skills depend on the career, from acting to Web design to marketing copywriting. At CLC, students can complete the first two years of a four-year degree in English/journalism, art, communications and the performing arts. Also, certificates and associate degrees prepare students for a wide range of careers in multimedia applications.

“Even though I have solid experience in traditional printing and pre-press work, such as keylining, I needed to go back to learn skills that will take me to the next level. These skills include designing animations and 3D illustrations, and creating websites using Dreamweaver. In the Digital Age, it’s a never-ending learning curve.” —Guillermo Galinda, Digital Media and Design graduate

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DEGREES / CERTIFICATES Transfer Track Associate in Arts • English (includes journalism) • Art • Theatre • Music

Career Track* Associate in Applied Science and Certificates • Digital Media & Design • Digital A/V Production & Editing • Technical Communication


LEARN MORE ONLINE Arts, Audio-Visual Technology and Communication

Fact sheets and detailed information are available online. For a complete listing of all CLC programs, visit clcillinois.edu/academics

SAMPLE CAREERS Web designer: Create and maintain websites that captivate visitors and help market an organization. Graphic designer: Combine words and pictures in an eye-catching design on printed materials, from brochures and posters to books.

Animator: Create eye-popping 2D and 3D images used in marketing materials, training modules or motion pictures. Videographer: Produce videos for marketing campaigns, websites, weddings or more. Marketing copywriter: Promote products and services through the power of the written word, in marketing literature, websites and broadcast scripts. Most copywriting jobs require a four-year degree in a communications-related field. Technical writer: Write user manuals, instructional CDs and online training modules that help customers operate a product or understand a scientific/technical process.

WHAT DO THEY EARN? Occupation

Educational Level

Median Salary

Web Designer

Bachelor’s degree

$60,000**

Graphic Designer

Bachelor’s degree

$44,900

Technical Writer

Bachelor’s degree

$60,700

*Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) degrees were not designed for transfer to four-year schools. However, courses in A.A.S. programs may transfer to specific institutions. See clcillinois.edu/info/transfer/aas for details.

**Median salary for the East North Central U.S region, based on a 2008 survey by AIGA, an organization representing design, graphic and creative professionals. View the full survey at www.aiga.org.

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[Career Personality: Hands-on, creative, likes the outdoors]

Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Do you enjoy working with plants and trees — a world that will wow your five senses in a way that the latest DVD, website or computer game can’t match? In a natural resources career, come to work in your jeans, designing and installing flower displays, patios, shrubbery, ponds and much more. Also maintain beautiful natural areas for hiking, biking and wildlife watching. Successful natural resources professionals combine knowledge of plant, flower and tree species with creativity and attention to detail. Also needed is an interest in sustainable (environmentally friendly) living and willingness to work outdoors—in all kinds of weather. At CLC, students can complete a two-year degree in horticulture or natural resources management. Also, certificates and associate degrees prepare students for a wide range of careers, from landscape contractor to florist.

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DEGREES / CERTIFICATES Career Track* Associate in Applied Science • Horticulture

Certificates • Landscape Design • Landscape Maintenance • Floral Design • Arboriculture • Natural Areas Management


LEARN MORE ONLINE Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources

Fact sheets and detailed information are available online. For a complete listing of all CLC programs, visit clcillinois.edu/academics

SAMPLE CAREERS Horticulture: Arborist: As a “tree doctor,” diagnose and manage tree insects and diseases; maintain pruning and other preventive maintenance.

Florists and floral shop owner: Create eye-opening arrangements of live and artificial flowers. Manage employees, inventory, marketing and more.

Forester: Help keep forests free from disease, harmful insects and damaging wildfires. This career requires at least a four-year degree. Landscape contractor: Beautify interior and exterior landscapes by designing flower beds, shrubbery, ponds and more. Landscape designer: Design outdoor spaces that are attractive and functional. Unlike a landscape architect, who focuses on site engineering, a landscape designer usually concentrates on flower and plant-related design aspects.

Natural areas manager: Help preserve land in its natural state, maintaining native plant and animal species. clcillinois.edu/programs/hrt

WHAT DO THEY EARN? Occupation

Educational Level

Median Salary

Bachelor’s degree

$62,500

Floral Designer

Associate degree or certificate

$23,800

Natural Areas Manager

Bachelor’s degree

$56,900

Landscape Architect

(for conservation scientist)

*Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) degrees were not designed for transfer to four-year schools. However, courses in A.A.S. programs may transfer to specific institutions. See clcillinois.edu/info/transfer/aas for details.

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[Career Personality: Creative, customer-focused, organized]

DEGREES / CERTIFICATES

Hospitality

• Hospitality and Culinary Management

Career Track* Associate in Applied Science Certificates

Do you enjoy cooking for others? Fascinated by the art — and clockwork organization — behind a restaurant meal, banquet or catered event? Looking for a career that combines creativity with business skills in marketing, managing and more? Consider a career in hospitality management or culinary arts. From restaurants to hotels, convention centers to food wholesalers, the hospitality industry is booming and serves up a smorgasbord of careers. Working in a kitchen requires the ability to prepare attractive meals quickly and efficiently, while standing for long periods of time. Office-related careers require planning skills, an attention to detail, sales savvy and ability to work with others. All hospitality careers require willingness to work nights and weekends, plus a strong customer-focused attitude. At CLC, students can prepare for these careers by earning a certificate or an associate degree.

“I definitely recommend CLC’s hospitality management program. The instructors have realworld experience, and each brings a different perspective. The program gives you a solid foundation in both the culinary side and management side. I plan to continue my education at the French Culinary Institute of New York. Eventually, I’d like to operate my own restaurant.” —JazMine Evans, 2009 graduate 26

• Baking and Pastry Assistant • Professional Cook • Professional Chef • Hospitality Supervisor • Hospitality Manager


LEARN MORE ONLINE Hospitality

Fact sheets and detailed information are available online. For a complete listing of all CLC programs, visit clcillinois.edu/academics

SAMPLE CAREERS Hospitality Careers: Executive Chef: Manage kitchen staff, develop new recipes, plan menus and order ingredients. Restaurant/Food Service Manager: Manage daily operations, food inventory, employees and ensure that customers are satisfied with their dining experience.

Restaurant or catering-business owner: Combine cooking expertise with skills in small business management, including planning, marketing, supervising and more.

Catering Manager: Coordinate an event’s menus, meeting location, speakers, entertainment, printed materials, audio-visual equipment and more.

Sales: Convince wholesale and retail decision makers to use your company’s line of food products. Pastry Chef: Combine baking ingredients with creativity to produce artistic, mouth-watering cakes, pies, custards, éclairs, chocolates, candies and much more. clcillinois.edu/programs/hcm

WHAT DO THEY EARN? Occupation

Educational Level

Median Salary

Varies, from on-the-job training to Hotel Manager associate or bachelor’s degree

$44,500

Varies, from on-the-job training to Chef a culinary degree or certificate

$32,900

Varies, from on-the-job training to a Cook culinary degree or certificate

$22,300

*Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) degrees were not designed for transfer to four-year schools. However, courses in A.A.S. programs may transfer to specific institutions. See clcillinois.edu/info/transfer/aas for details.

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[Career Personality: Caring, excellent listener, patient]

DEGREES / CERTIFICATES

Human Services and Social Work

Transfer Track Associate in Arts

Do you find great reward in helping others? If so, a career in human services may be right for you. This field provides many career choices in helping professions that benefit everyone from children to senior citizens. Graduates from the human services program work in nursing homes; treatment programs for alcohol and substance abuse; institutions for the developmentally disabled, community human service programs and more. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in the next decade, the number of social and human service assistants is expected to grow much faster than the average for all occupations. This is due in large part to the aging population and increased demand for mental health and substance abuse treatment. In addition to a solid foundation in psychology, social work, sociology and addictive disorders, a successful human services professional is well-organized, an excellent listener, compassionate but assertive, too. At CLC, students can complete the first two years toward a bachelor’s degree in social work or human services. Or they can complete an associate degree or career certificate in a counseling or social services-related field.

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• Social Work

Career Track Associate in Applied Science* • Children and Adolescents • Adult Services • Alcohol, Substance Abuse and Addictive Disorders • Correctional Counseling • Trauma, Prevention and Victim Services

Certificates • Alcohol, Substance Abuse and Addictive Disorders • Correctional Counseling • General Human Services • Trauma, Prevention and Victim Services


LEARN MORE ONLINE Human Services and Social Work

Fact sheets and detailed information are available online. For a complete listing of all CLC programs, visit clcillinois.edu/academics

SAMPLE CAREERS Human Services Careers: Substance Abuse/Addictions Counselor: Help others recover from addiction to alcohol, drugs and other harmful substances.

Social services aide: Assist clients with coping skills and assist drug treatment counselors. Case management aide: Monitor and keep case records, referring clients to social service agencies; process eligibility forms. Youth worker: Help operate a group home or supervise activities for grade school, middle school and high school students. Gerontology aide: Work in a retirement community, social service agency or nursing home to help meet the social and emotional needs of senior citizens. clcillinois.edu/programs/hus

Human Services Careers requiring more education: Clinical Counselors, Psychologists, and Licensed Social Workers: These careers, which focus on diagnosing and treating mental and behavioral problems and disorders, generally require a master’s degree or doctorate.

WHAT DO THEY EARN? Occupation

Educational Level

Median Salary

Psychologist

Master’s degree

$83,000

Addictions Counselor

Associate degree or higher

$32,100

Social Worker

Bachelor’s degree or higher

$53,900

*Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) degrees were not designed for transfer to four-year schools. However, courses in A.A.S. programs may transfer to specific institutions. See clcillinois.edu/info/transfer/aas for details.

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TOP 20 BACHELOR’S DEGREE OR HIGHER OCCUPATIONS

20

Fastest Growing Occupations*

20

1. Computer software engineers-applications 2. Computer software engineers-systems software 3. Network systems and data communications analysts 4. Substance abuse and behavioral disorder counselors** 5. Forensic science technicians 6. Physical therapists 7. Computer systems analysts 8. Mental Health and substance abuse social workers 9. Occupational therapists 10. Physician Assistants 11. Personal financial advisors 12. Marriage and family therapists 13. Mental health counselors 14. Employment, recruitment and placement specialists 15. Mining and geological engineers 16. Computer and information scientists 17. Surveyors 18. Chiropractors 19. Network and computer systems administrators 20. Special education teachers

Occupations with Most Openings*

30

20

Occupations with Largest Employment*

20

1. Postsecondary teachers 2. Secondary school teachers (except special and vocational education) 3. Accountants and auditors 4. Elementary school teachers, except special education 5. General and operations managers 6. Lawyers 7. Management analysts 8. Computer programmers 9. Middle school teachers, except special and vocational 10. Financial Managers 11. Computer systems analysts 12. Physicians and surgeons 13. Securities, commodities and financial services sales agents 14. Computer software engineers 15. Chief executives 16. Child, family and school social workers 17. Sales managers 18. Computer software engineers, systems software 19. Clergy 20. Market research analysts

Highest Paying Occupations*

1. Anesthesiologists - $166,400 1. Secondary school teachers, 2. Internists, general - $166,400 except special/vocational 3. Obstetricians and gynecologists - 166,400 2. Postsecondary teachers 4. Orthodontists - $166,400 3. Elementary school teachers, expect special education 5. Surgeons - $166,400+ 4. Accountants and auditors 6. Physicians and surgeons, all other - $154,800 5. General and operations managers 7. Family and general practitioners - $153,200 6. Computer systems analysts 8. Judges, magistrate judges, magistrates - $151,600 7. Management analysts 9. Chief executives - $149,200 8. Computer software engineers, applications 10. Dentists, all other specialists - $147,100 9. Lawyers 11. Dentists, general - $146,400 10. Computer software engineers, systems software 12. Natural sciences managers* - $127,700 11. Middle school teachers 13. Lawyers - $125,700 12. Securities, commodities and financial services 14. Airline pilots, copilots and flight sales agents engineers - $118,800 13. Physicians and surgeons 15. Law teachers, postsecondary - $115,400 14. Computer programmers 16. Engineering managers - $110,700 15. Employment, recruitment and 17. Computer and information systems placement specialists managers - 110,400 16. Network and computer systems administrators 18. Physicists - $108,000 17. Network systems and data 19. Financial managers - $104,900 communications analysts 20. Pharmacists* - $104,800 18. Child, family and school social workers 19. Education administrators, *CLC offers transfer program options that can be applied toward a bachelor’s degree in virtually all these fields. elementary and secondary 20. Financial managers **In Illinois, someone who has earned CLC’s A.A.S. degree in addictions can become certified and work as a Certified Alcohol Drug Counselor.


TOP 20 ASSOCIATE DEGREE OCCUPATIONS

20

Fastest Growing Occupations

20

20

Occupations with Largest Employment

1. Veterinary technologists 2. Physical therapist assistants 3. Dental hygienists* 4. Gaming dealers 5. Surgical technologists* 6. Preschool teachers, except special education* 7. Registered nurses* 8. Fitness trainers* 9. Skin care specialists 10. Cardiovascular technologists and technicians 11. Radiation therapists 12. Emergency medical technicians* 13. Respiratory therapists 14. Make up artists 15. Paralegals* 16. Medical equipment repairers 17. Nursing aides* 18. Medical records and health information technicians* 19. Nuclear medicine technologists 20. Diagnostic medical sonographers

Occupations with Most Openings

20

1. Registered nurses* 2. Nursing aides* 3. Automotive service technicians* 4. Licensed practical nurses 5. Computer support specialists* 6. Preschool teachers, except special education* 7. Insurance sales agents 8. Fitness trainers* 9. Library technicians* 10. Hairdressers 11. Legal secretaries 12. Emergency medical technicians* 13. Medical records and health information technicians* 14. Welders* 15. Bus and truck mechanics 16. Dental hygienists* 17. Paralegals* 18. Real estate sales 19. Heating, air conditioning and refrigeration mechanics* 20. Medical and clinical laboratory technicians*

*CLC offers a career preparation program in this field. Data compiled from acinet.org. Based on data from the Illinois Department of Employment Security. Occupational outlook information is constantly changing. For up-to-date information, visit acinet.org or http://stats.bls.gov.

1. Registered nurses* 2. Nursing aides* 3. Automotive service technicians* 4. Licensed practical nurses 5. Hairdressers 6. Computer support specialists* 7. Insurance sales agents 8. Preschool teachers, except special education* 9. Welders* 10. Legal secretaries 11. Fitness trainers* 12. Emergency medical technicians* 13. Real estate sales agents 14. Bus and truck mechanics 15. Heating, air conditioning and refrigeration mechanics* 16. Library technicians* 17. Medical records and health information technicians* 18. Telecommunications equipment installers and repairers 19. Medical and clinical laboratory technicians * 20. Paralegals*

Highest Paying Occupations 1. Nuclear technicians - $82,000 2. Computer specialists, all other * - $74,900 3. Radiation therapists - $72,900 4. Nuclear medicine technologists - $70,100 5. Diagnostic medical sonographers - $70,100 6. Dental hygienists* - $65,700 7. Funeral directors - $63,100 8. Registered nurses* - *62,400 9. Electrical and electronics drafters - $61,500 10. Electrical and electronics repairers, powerhouse, substation and relay - $60,800 11. Telecommunications equipment installers and repairers - $59,00 12. Engineering technicians, except drafters* - $57,700 13. Geological and petroleum technicians - $57,100 14. Aircraft mechanics and service technicians - $56,200 15. Radiologic technologists and technicians* - $56,200 16. Occupational therapist assistants - $54,900 17. Electrical and electronic engineering technicians* - $54,800 18. Electrical and electronics repairers, commercial and industrial equipment - $52,700 19. Respiratory therapists - $52,600 20. Paralegals* - $51,100

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Other Important Information

Grayslake

Start college early with Dual Enrollment/Dual Credit. The College of Lake County offers high school students an opportunity to earn college credit prior to graduating from high school. Through formal agreements with individual high schools, CLC can offer courses that cover content not offered at the local high school. Other dual credit options provide college-level credit for course work completed at the Lake County High Schools Technology Campus. For information, contact CLC’s Assistant Vice President for University Transfer at (847) 543-2407.

19351 W. Washington St. Grayslake, IL 60030 (847) 543-2000

Transferring Credits CLC’s transfer programs (leading to an Associate in Arts, Science, Engineering or Fine Arts degree) are designed for transfer to a four-year bachelor’s degree program. In many cases, credits from CLC career programs (leading to an Associate in Applied Science degree) can also transfer toward bachelor’s degree programs offered by specific universities. Visit clcillinois.edu/transfer for information about these options.

Practical Work Experience: Co-Ops and Internships College courses provide the foundation, but practical work experience offers on-the-job, real-world experience that you can list on a resume. Internships offer work experience at no-credit, while co-op typically involves more hours, more structure and college credit. For information, contact the faculty department chair for your chosen field.

Perkins Grant The Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Grant, funded by the U.S. Department of Education, provides a variety of services for qualifying students enrolled in career and technical education programs. Visit clcillinois.edu/perkins for information.

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Lakeshore 33 North Genesee St. Waukegan, IL 60085 (847) 543-2191

Southlake 1120 South Milwaukee Ave. Vernon Hills, IL 60061 (847) 543-6501

clcillinois.edu

CLC Career Brochure  

Great careers begin at the College of Lake County!

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