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STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELC MITTED + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + CHALLENGING + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + AS CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLIN FACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEA WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORT SE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPOR CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + PLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY MULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMIN MITTED + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + CHALLENGING + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + AS CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLIN FACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEA WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORT SE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEA SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEAN UE + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INT NGING + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE NG + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIV + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACET Y + CHALLENGING + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + S + CARING + COMMITTED + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + CHALLENGING + STIMULATING + L + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIO DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + ME ALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGF COMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY O + DISCIPLINED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERS

College of Lake County

MAKING THE CONNECTIONS

2011-2012 Annual Report

STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELC MITTED + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + CHALLENGING + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + AS CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLIN FACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEA WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORT SE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPOR CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + PLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY MULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMIN MITTED + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + CHALLENGING + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + AS CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLIN FACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEA WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORT SE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEA SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEAN UE + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + PR PLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY MULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMIN


ON THE COVER | Words that Connect

ONLINE |

In the last few years, the College of Lake County has conducted focus groups, interviews and surveys to discover more about what the CLC experience means to students, the community and the faculty and staff who work at the college.

Videos that Expand the Connection

Though the exact words used varied, we found that similar meanings emerged, creating a vocabulary to describe the CLC experience. Our faculty and staff are knowledgeable, stimulating and committed. The atmosphere on campus is welcoming, supportive and caring. Academic programs are challenging, meaningful and worthy of value. Students leave the college prepared, confident and ready for life. These, and the others displayed on our cover, are shorthand for describing the college. They are also a connection between the CLC of today and the CLC we are building for tomorrow. No matter how technology and curriculum change, our mission will always be to ensure students leave the college “prepared, confident and ready for life.”

Learn more about how the College of Lake County is “making the connections” by viewing our videos online. Access the videos on your smart phone or tablet using the QR codes included with several of the stories in this annual report. Or type in the URLs also provided.


FROM THE BOARD CHAIR FROM THE PRESIDENT

CONNECTING | STUDENTS + KNOWLEDGE Honors Scholars | Enrichment + Challenges

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College Completion | Early Alert + Tracking Progress

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Linking | Lake County + The World

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NSF Grant | Powerful Academics + Caring Support

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CONNECTING | STUDENTS + CAREERS Prairie Restaurant | Student Run + Locally Grown

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Learning to Earn | Online + More

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Health Care | Rigor + Impressive Test Scores

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CLC FINANCIAL STATEMENT CONNECTING | PLANNING + FUTURE Conservative Budgets + Investment in the Future

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FROM THE FOUNDATION FOUNDATION FINANCIAL STATEMENT CONNECTING | STUDENTS + OPPORTUNITY Ryan Stivers | Foundation for the Next Step

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Paulina Kulesza | A Good Start

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Charlene Biondo | Career Success

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CLC FOUNDATION BOARD DONORS

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PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED NARY + CHALLENGING + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL

FROM THE BOARD CHAIR

WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORT ARED + SERIOUS + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + INTRIGUING + AS CHALLENGING + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + INTERDISCIPLINARY + CHALLENGING + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + ASPIRATIONAL + PRI + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIP

Connecting | LEADERSHIP + ACCOUNTABILITY Each year at graduation, the members of the Board of Trustees join with faculty and staff in celebrating the success of our students. We are all very proud of our graduates and how the College of Lake County has supported their efforts to achieve a better future. Faculty and staff support that future in classrooms and offices, teaching, encouraging and guiding. The board, too, has a role, one focused on policy, oversight and taxpayer accountability. Though students may never meet us, we approach each decision with students’ success foremost in our minds. Funding and resources are essential to that success, and fiscal concerns remained important this year. State payments continued to be uncertain, and we began to grapple with the possible costs of proposals to shift pension financing to community colleges. While dealing with these issues, we also faced the need to complete our campus master plan for facilities improvements, including long-deferred infrastructure repairs. We dealt with these issues in several ways. We updated our three-year fiscal plan, factoring in the latest projections for tuition, state and local revenue.


MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISC SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLIN

HY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED PIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + PROFESSION DEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + MULTIFACETED + NARY + CHALLENGING + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL

We built a conservative budget for the year and kept expenditures well below revenues. As a result of these steps, we ended the fiscal year with a $5.2 million surplus, most of which was put aside to add to our “rainy day” fund balance to help finance the campus master plan and absorb the local costs of pension reform.

Pictured left to right:

We also took another step to control costs: applying for and successfully obtaining a AAA bond rating from Moody’s. The AAA, a designation enjoyed by only a small percentage of community colleges in the nation, will significantly reduce costs as, over time, we pursue implementation of our campus master plan.

Richard A. Anderson, Chairman

The board’s leadership is just one of the ways the college is “making the connections” to help students and our community achieve a strong future. We invite you to read about many others in this year’s annual report.

Amanda D. Howland, Secretary

Richard Anderson Chair 3

Theresa Westberg, Student Trustee John W. Lumber Lynda C. Paul

Barbara D. Oilschlager Jeanne T. Goshgarian William M. Griffin, Ed.D., Vice Chairman


PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED NARY + CHALLENGING + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL

FROM THE PRESIDENT

WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORT ARED + SERIOUS + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + INTRIGUING + AS CHALLENGING + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + INTERDISCIPLINARY + CHALLENGING + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + ASPIRATIONAL + PRI + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIP

Connecting | NEW + TRADITIONAL A little over a decade ago, most university and college classrooms were places where professors lectured and students took notes. Today at the College of Lake County, learning is more dynamic and the pedagogy is made more robust with collaborative discussions enhanced by many learning materials—not just printed textbooks but also a vast array of websites, videos and other engaging digital resources. And increasingly the classroom is not physical but virtual, with students participating in part or entirely online. Though much has changed, more is in the offing. We will need to change to meet increased competition from online for-profit schools and public universities offering new open online courses. And we will need to change to meet our own expectations for increasing the learning, success and graduation rates of our students. Expanding access to college, though still important, is not enough. More students must leave us having earned a degree or certificate— credentials that attest that they are fully prepared for transfer or to meet employers’ expectations.

We are tackling these challenges on several fronts. Through external funding, for example, we are leveraging the strength of our expert faculty and staff. In one grant, we are working with institutions throughout Illinois to develop new online options in green technology fields, offering displaced workers greater flexibility in re-training. Through other grants, we are developing options in emerging high-demand manufacturing fields such as laser photonics and mechatronics, and computer-operated manufacturing. We are also developing new tools that will allow students to check their program progress and other information, not just online, but right on their cell phone with the CLC Mobile app. Other new software will allow counselors more effectively to manage student progress and communicate with those who are in danger of dropping out. And we are using technology to hold ourselves accountable for increasing graduation and transfer rates as well as the success of all students by using

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a new data warehouse system that is providing real-time data on how well our strategies are working. But technology is only a part of the answer, and we are continuing to offer and strengthen individually-focused student support services and programs. Inside this annual report, you will read about how we are combining the new and traditional, technology and one-on-one personal attention, to connect students with a powerful learning experience.

Jerry W. Weber, Ph.D. President


MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISC SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLI

Connecting | STUDENTS

+ KNOWLEDGE

HY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTE PIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + PROFESSIO DEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + MULTIFACETED + NARY + CHALLENGING + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFU

Look through the literature from almost any college or university and you’ll read inspiring words describing the educational opportunity they offer—phrases like “academic excellence,” “exciting program choices” or “learning with a competitive edge.” CLC uses phrases like these, too. We talk about our success in helping students “grow and develop” or “prepare for fulfilling careers.” But in the last two years we’ve been on a quest to learn more about the college, to discover what makes CLC different and special. We’ve conducted interviews, focus groups and surveys. Analyzed research reports. Done quite a lot of soul-searching. What we’ve learned comes down to this: The educational opportunity at CLC is different, and it’s different for many reasons. Tuition value and convenient locations. Academic programs that are challenging but manageable. Faculty who are giving of their time, patient and caring. A commitment to proactively helping students succeed. Over and over, our students told us that CLC is a place to build a future, ready when they’re ready to begin or begin again. In this section you’ll read some examples of how CLC is helping different kinds of students prepare for what’s next in their lives.


CLC University of Chicago Visit

“I could imagine myself sitting in that stunning library, looking over my physics book.” — Caleb Town HONORS SCHOLAR STUDENT


HONORS SCHOLARS | Enrichment + Challenges

Awash in the bluish light shining through its gothic windows, the reading room of the University of Chicago’s Harper Memorial Library reminded Caleb Town of the fantasy settings in the “Harry Potter” books. But if Town’s associations involved wizardry, it was that of the imagination. “I could imagine myself sitting in that stunning library, looking over my physics book,” he said. Town is now a second-year pre-dentistry student in the Honors Scholar program. As a first-year Honors Scholar, he visited the University of Chicago in the 2011-2012 academic year to participate in mock admission interviews with university seniors. The event was one of many enriching experiences offered to students admitted to the college’s Honors Scholars program, a supplement to the college’s Honors program. Honors Scholars began in 2009 as an initiative to encourage CLC students to apply for transfer to top-tier colleges and universities. Students who participated in the program during the 2011-2012 academic year were accepted for transfer to institutions that included the University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign, American University, the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Georgetown University and Lake Forest College.

The Honors Scholars program scholarship offers tuition and books, challenging honors courses, faculty mentoring, relevant on-campus work experience and a variety of on- and off-campus cultural opportunities. In addition, the students work oneon-one with faculty on independent research projects that have included such topics as bio fuels, robotics, speech dialects and U.S. policies on Iran. Conor Hughes, who did the project on Iran, is now studying international relations at American University in Washington, D.C. He said attending CLC and participating in the Honors Scholars Program turned out to be “the best decision I’ve made in my life.” He said the program prepared him exceptionally well for his studies at American University, citing the “tons of research” he did at CLC.

“I wouldn’t have gotten into American right after high school with a 3.2 GPA. Nothing stood out then, but with CLC, I was totally confident that I’d be accepted,” Hughes said. “The scholars also gave back by volunteering at CLC outreach events and participating in clubs. They were a really fine group of students whose academic skills grew throughout the year,” said Dr. Nick Schevera, Honors program coordinator and professor of English.

Meet Honors Program Coordinator Nick Schevera, three honors professors — Martha Lally, Phyllis Soybel and John Tenuto—and sit in on some of the classroom discussions that are typical of CLC honors classes. www.clcillinois.edu/ar/knowledge

“Other students look to me for information,” he said. “If I’d never been in the Honors Scholar Program, I’d be completely overwhelmed right now. It definitely prepared me, and I have confidence in myself. It was an invaluable experience.”

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HONORS SCHOLARS | 2011-12 Transfers

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MADISON Katarzyna Leus (Buffalo Grove) Major: International Business LAKE FOREST COLLEGE Jeff Smeland 1 (Zion) Major: Philosophy NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY Pablo Astudillo 2 (Vernon Hills) Major: Accounting UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO Vivian Sandoval (Mundelein) Major: Engineering

AMERICAN UNIVERSITY Conor Hughes (Grayslake) Major: International Relations

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS— URBANA-CHAMPAIGN

GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY (fall 2013) Nathan Wegbreit (Wadsworth) Major: International Relations Currently volunteering in Guatemala

Ryan Becker 3 (Grayslake) Major: Chemical Engineering Amanda Collins (Grayslake) Major: Speech/Language Pathology

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Received full scholarship

2

Received $2,000 scholarship

3

Received $5,000 scholarship


COLLEGE COMPLETION | Early Alert + Tracking Progress

President Barack Obama has issued a challenge to U.S. higher education: by 2020 raise graduation rates so that the U.S. once again leads the world in its proportion of college graduates. Raising graduation rates is an ambitious challenge, particularly for community colleges, which traditionally have measured their success more by providing broad access to higher education than to the numbers of students who actually earn degrees. Community college students often attend college part time. Many enroll with the intention of gaining employment skills rather than a degree. Many others transfer to another college or university without completing an associate degree. All of these trends impact community college graduation rates. But institutions like the College of Lake County are committing themselves to increase graduation rates. This year, CLC made progress on two projects that show promise in making a difference on graduation rates.

One of these projects—called Barriers to Completion—is focused on developing early alert processes that combat one of the issues affecting graduation rates— students dropping out when they get into academic difficulties. “CLC has many intervention programs to help students,” said Karen Hlavin, assistant vice president for student development, who is one of its leaders. “We have counseling, advising, tutoring, academic coaches—lots of services, but students don’t always know about these services, or they don’t access them early enough, before they get so behind they can’t succeed.” CLC plans to implement an open-source software program developed by Sinclair Community College to use as a tool for monitoring at-risk students’ performance. It is also developing a process and protocol for working with the students on a “case management” approach, she said. Another project is a new “degree audit” system being launched in the spring and fall 2013 semesters. “Advisers and students will be able to do ‘what if’ simulations to see how changing an academic program major

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affects meeting degree requirements,” said Erin Fowles, a student development administrator who worked on implementing the system. “This is important because most students change their majors several times before deciding on their final choice.” More significant for completion rates, the college will be able to use the new system to increase the numbers of degrees awarded. “For various reasons, many students don’t go through the process to file a petition to graduate, even though they have actually earned all the credits required,” Fowles said. “They don’t realize that receiving an associate degree or certificate can help their employment prospects.” With the new system, CLC will be able to identify such students and award them the credentials they have earned. Fowles estimates that awards of associate transfer degrees could increase by 10 percent.


LINKING | Lake County + The World

With the June 2012 opening of a College of Lake County-sponsored American culture center at Xi’an International University in Xi’an, China, CLC has joined a select group of colleges and universities working with the U.S. State Department to build understanding in China of the American way of life.

American cultural centers in China. Funding for CLC’s Xi’an American culture center has come from three sources: an $81,000 grant from the State Department, $30,000 from Xi’an International University and $7,000 from CLC. The CLC cultural center is located in an 8,600-square-foot space in the library of Xi’an International University, an institution with about 36,000 students. The center includes books—rich in pictures to minimize language barriers, magazines, DVDs and posters. Subjects and topics range from slavery and Jim Crow laws to the Marx Brothers and baseball.

CLC has offered study abroad opportunities at Xi’an International University since 2008, and the cultural center is an outgrowth of the relationship that has developed between the two institutions. CLC is one of only 12 American colleges and universities—and the only community college—selected to be partner institutions in a State Department program to establish

Students from 40 countries attended CLC in the 2011-2012 academic year. (Map shows the number of students from each country.)

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CLC’s international studies program offers students the opportunity to gain a perspective through overseas study opportunities and actively recruiting international students to study at the college.

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4

1 1

1

Scandinavia (12) Japan (26)

China/Tibet (21)

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1

38 4

22 1

1 6

2 4

5

1 2 1

1

1

1 10

Costa Rica (13)

3 Israel 4 Jordan 3 Palestine 1

1 2 1 1 1 1 1

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This year 98 CLC students traveled to: Cuba (26)

Increasing the cultural understanding between the U.S. and China is the main reason the State Department is funding the cultural centers, according to Dr. Li-hua Yu, a Chinese-born CLC sociology professor who has led CLC students on 14 study trips to China and spearheaded the college’s efforts to obtain the $150,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Education, which began CLC’s semester abroad program in Xi’an. Since 2008, 63 students have participated, and three CLC professors have accompanied the students and taught classes at Xi’an. The next CLCsponsored semester abroad in Xi’an will occur in fall 2013.

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1

1

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NSF GRANT | Powerful Academics + Caring Support

Twice a week, Omar Zamora and Rogelio Flores power down with other engineering students to solve differential equations and tackle physics problems. They’re participating in a special study hall that’s part of a program to encourage the success of engineering and computer science majors offered by the College of Lake County with funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF). “Without the study hall, I would be studying on my own,” Zamora said. “It’s nice to have study groups to help you prepare for things like the differential equations test that I have this week.” Zamora, who is a mechanical engineering major, and Flores, who is a biomedical engineering major, are two of 16 students participating in the NSF-funded program in fall 2012. CLC was awarded a five-year grant this summer for $586,076 from the NSF to fund scholarships and provide support services to recruit engineering and computer science students and encourage their success by offering an integrated program of scholarships, tutoring, advising, mentoring and transfer assistance. The grant is the second CLC has received for the program. The first, for $499,194, was awarded in 2006 and served 64 students over five years.

“Receiving a second grant from the National Science Foundation is an affirmation of the quality of the academic programs at CLC and also the need for engineering and computer science graduates,” said Professor Robert Twardock, who applied for the grant and is now serving as the acting dean of the Engineering, Math and Physical Sciences division. In addition to support services, the grant is funding scholarships of up to $10,000 each calendar year for as many as 25 students each semester, Twardock said.

math concepts. Equally important, the students gain powerful, motivating support. “I have become involved in a community of engineering students,” Flores said. “We hang around, help each other with homework and build relationships.” The long-term success of the program can only be measured by the number of participating students who eventually become working engineers and computer scientists, Twardock said. Doing that involves tracking students after they transfer from CLC, and that can be challenging, he said.

Nationally, engineering programs have about a 30 percent attrition rate. “Many students face problems entering and persisting in these programs. The disciplines are difficult, and money can be a major roadblock. For women, traditional gender roles can create another barrier,” said Amy Curry, mathematics professor and the principal investigator for the NSF grant.

However, an analysis of data on student performance during the first grant shows some positive outcomes, he said. Students who participated in the grant earned higher GPAs, completed more credit hours and had lower course repeat rates than a comparison group of non-NSF participating engineering/ computer science students.

The NSF grant is aimed at eliminating such barriers. For example, the scholarships allow students to spend more time on their studies. “Without the scholarship, I would have had to work more hours per week and become a part-time student,” said Zamora.

“Receiving a second grant from the NSF is an affirmation of the quality of the academic programs at CLC…. ”

Faculty work with the students in the study halls, and the students also help each other master difficult science and

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— Robert Twardock ACTING DEAN, ENGINEERING, MATH AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES DIVISION


Why is STEM Education Important?

The United States is now 27th among Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development countries in the proportion of its college graduates in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields. This low standing is disturbing, according to a report prepared for the U.S. Congress Joint Economic Committee, because traditionally the U.S. has produced the world’s top research scientists and engineers and technological innovation has been a major driver of the U.S. economy.

Though STEM graduates are important to the continued economic competitiveness of the U.S., the country is not keeping up with the need. That, the report argues, is not only harmful to the U.S., but also to individuals. STEM fields had lower unemployment rates than non-STEM fields during the recent economic downturn, and employees in STEM occupations earned more— 26 percent more than non-STEM workers in 2010.

57 percent of all bachelor’s degrees are awarded to women.

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But only percent of engineers are women.

How the U.S. Compares with Other Countries: STEM Graduates as a Percent of Total Bachelor’s Degrees South Korea

Source: STEM Education: Preparing for the Jobs of the Future, a report prepared for the U.S. Congress Joint Economic Committee, April 2012.

33% Germany

29%

France

27% Mexico

25%

Spain

Sweden

24%

24%

Switzerland

U.K>

23%

23%

Canada

Italy

22%

22% Australia

19%

Turkey

18% U.S.

15%

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MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISC SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLI

Connecting | STUDENTS

+ CAREERS

HY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTE PIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + PROFESSIO DEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + MULTIFACETED + NARY + CHALLENGING + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFU

In one way or another, college is about preparing students for life’s work, both the very real challenge of earning a good livelihood and the ongoing quest to find meaning and purpose. Our general education courses are largely about the latter. In them, we consider many of life’s “big questions,” but we also work on a lot of the “soft skills” employers are seeking—capabilities like teamwork, critical thinking and the ability to write well and communicate clearly. In our career preparation programs we focus on preparing students for the realities of work and being prepared for the challenges of the 21st century workplace. The last few years have shown us that workers and educators need to think differently about career preparation. As manufacturers bemoan the lack of skilled technicians, workers need to accept that career education has become a life-time pursuit. And educators must become more adaptable, meeting workers’ needs for a new model of learning that goes beyond the confines of the traditional 16-week semester. In this section you will read about ways that CLC is adapting its career preparation programs to the new realities of today’s workplace.


CLC Prairie Restaurant Experience

“All that experience makes me more employable. Eventually, I would like to open my own restaurant.” —Emily Sanscrainte HOSPITALITY AND CULINARY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM STUDENT


PRAIRIE RESTAURANT | Student Run + Locally Grown

Prairie, the new student-managed restaurant on the College of Lake County’s Grayslake campus, opened in September 2012 and quickly earned the thumbs-up from customers, who are looking forward to the restaurant expanding its hours of operation. The opening of the restaurant followed about six months of planning and refurbishing of facilities on campus. About $10,000 in kitchen equipment was added and the previous Willow Room dining area was remodeled. The resulting 50-seat Prairie was open on Wednesdays and Thursdays for lunch during the fall semester, but will also be open on Friday in the spring 2013 semester. “We are averaging 75 guests per day, which is right in line with our projections,” said Chef Rob Wygant, co-chair of the college’s hospitality and culinary management program. Customers are enjoying Prairie’s food and service. “My salmon was nice and crispy, the biscotti dessert was excellent and the Egyptian mint tea was refreshing,” said Jessie Gong, a Champaign, Ill., restaurant manager who visited the restaurant in September. While customers have enjoyed the cuisine, CLC students appreciate the opportunity to gain hands-on experience in running a restaurant. Emily Sanscrainte, a hospitality and culinary management

major, said she’s developing a variety of restaurant skills by working at Prairie.

winter squash and herbs like rosemary, thyme, sage and tarragon.

“I’ve learned the front of the house (serving customers) and the back of the house (kitchen duties), and we’ve rotated supervisory roles, too,” she said. “All that experience makes me more employable. Eventually, I would like to open my own restaurant.”

The CLC farm has been delivering 10-25 pounds of produce a week to Prairie, with the goal of supplying 20 percent of the restaurant’s produce needs, according to Gianna Fazioli, CLC’s local foods coordinator.

Sporting earth tones and prairie-themed decor, Prairie also offers a high-tech twist: wait staff who take and send orders to the kitchen using iPads. Top selling entrees, according to Wygant, have been the signature Prairie Burger, followed by fresh seafood dishes like crab cakes with hericot verts and roasted seafood brandade with cod, crab and shrimp. Wygant and his students have been carefully listening to customer feedback, making adjustments such as expediting service and adding piped-in music. Prairie’s menu, which changes weekly, is designed by the culinary arts students, Wygant said. The operation of Prairie also integrates with the college’s new academic program in sustainable agriculture. Many of the restaurant’s vegetables come from the campus garden where horticulture students plant, water and harvest the produce, which ranges from head lettuce, radishes, bell peppers and broccoli to red beets, 15

“The average bite of food has traveled 1,500 miles before it goes into your mouth, said Rory Klick, department chair of the horticulture program. “Traditional food is typically grown with added pesticides and chemical fertilizers, in farms with equipment needing fossil fuels, and then shipped to us using fossil fuels. Compare that environmental footprint to raising food right here on campus using natural fertilizers such as compost, no pesticides and hardly any fossil fuel,” she said. Aside from the reduction in carbon footprint, using locally grown food is most obviously about taste, according to Chef Wygant. “Every chef should be on board with it, even if it’s for the flavor alone,” he said. Take a behind-thescenes look at the student chefs and servers working at Prairie, CLC’s student-managed restaurant.

www.clcillinois.edu/ar/careers


LEARNING TO EARN | Online + More

When Terri Berryman worked for Lake County as director of workforce development, she often saw people coming into her department’s offices in desperate need of jobs. “We saw people who were unemployed for six months or longer, on food stamps or in danger of losing their houses because they couldn’t afford the payments,” she said. “Many of these people needed to re-train to be more competitive, but so many of the academic programs available are offered on a traditional semester schedule. Unemployed people need training when they need it, not when college terms start.” Now employed by the College of Lake County as project director of an initiative called Career Pathways, Berryman is working to do something about providing better training options for displaced workers. Her project is one of several CLC is pursuing to provide more convenient training options that will lead to good careers. “We’ve secured several grants that are allowing us to develop new models of workforce training,” said CLC President Jerry Weber. “Through the Department of Labor’s Trade Adjustment Act (TAA) program, we’ve obtained grants for sustainability-related career training

and manufacturing-focused training in computerized numerical controls and a new field called ‘mechatronics.’ Through the National Science Foundation, we’ve also secured funding for a program in photonics and lasers.” Berryman’s project is the largest—a three-year $19.37 million grant awarded to CLC on behalf of the Illinois Green Economy Network, a consortium of community colleges working to develop the green economy in the state. The project is in its second year; at the end of the grant, 33 new degree and certificate programs will be developed state-wide in alternative energy technologies like solar and wind turbines and bio fuels as well as sustainability applications like auto recycling and building deconstruction remediation. What’s new about these programs is how they are being developed and how they will be offered. “Everything we are developing will be offered using open-source software,” Berryman said. “That means the training modules will be available to any institution, anywhere. Instead of individual colleges developing their own curricula, we’ll be sharing our programs. We believe this approach will allow us to speed up developing new programs and respond quicker to changes in the marketplace.”

16

The courses will be offered using a new instructional development platform called nTER, developed for the Department of Labor by SRI, a research thinktank affiliated with Stanford University. “This platform allows students to practice technical skills using simulations and to work at their own pace. That can speed up completion time,” Berryman said. Another TAA grant has funded development of a new program in mechatronics —a multi-skilled field involving mechanical, electronic and computer technology skills used to install, maintain, modify and repair automated “intelligent” machinery. This program will be launched in the spring 2013 semester, and courses will be offered in an open-entry format, allowing students to start the program any time. Similar options are now being developed in computerized numerical controls and photonics and lasers.

Sample interactive videos of online courses are available at www.nterlearning.org/about.


The new approaches to career preparation being developed through College of Lake County’s Department of Labor grants address a number of trends facing higher education.

The Internet is providing more and more options for learning. Colleges and universities are not the only game in town. With the rise of Massively Open Online Courses (MOOCs), learning options are exploding. The nTER platform used in the TAA green technologies grant encourages incorporating this content into the curriculum. This allows face-time with instructors to be used to discuss and analyze this content.

We want to learn and study according to our own schedules— where and when we want. One goal of CLC’s TAA grants is to provide more options for flexible learning—for working adults, this is often the only way to earn a degree or certificate.

We want more challenge-based and active learning. The nTER platform offers the option

Technologies are increasingly cloud-based. The TAA green technologies grant programs will be offered using nTER, a cloud-based learning platform.

6 Trends Affecting How We Learn

of 3D content to support virtual learning. Students will be able to practice real workplace skills like conducting an energy audit online.

Our work world is increasingly collaborative. The degrees and certificates being developed under the TAA grants are open-source—available to everyone. That means faculty from different colleges are working collaboratively and sharing curriculum.

Educational paradigms are changing—online and hybrid options are often replacing face-to-face education.The degrees and certificates being developed under the TAA grants are combining online learning with in-class instruction as appropriate. In class learning allows for face-to-face work with instructors; online learning offers students maximum convenience.

These trends are based on “Key Trends” reported in the 2012 Horizon Report, published by the New Media Consortium and EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative.


HEALTH CARE | Rigor + Impressive Test Scores

“I don’t like needles!” asserted 16-yearold Ryan as medical assistant Michaela Hartzer prepared a syringe inside a clinic examination room. “We’ll be done before you know it,” said a smiling Hartzer, as she rubbed Ryan’s upper arm with an alcohol wipe. Having administered hundreds of shots, Hartzer has calmed many a skittish patient. Reassuring an ill-at-ease patient is one example of practical skills that Hartzer gained in CLC’s medical assisting program. It’s one of the college’s 11 health care academic programs, which range from two-year associate degree programs like registered nursing to four-week certificates like phlebotomy. The rigor of CLC’s health care programs is clearly evident in student certification test scores. In nine fields, CLC students this year scored higher than the national average on professional certification exams. In the medical assisting program, students learn a combination of clerical skills, such as medical transcription, and clinical skills such as taking blood pressure and administering shots, said Deb Haasch, an instructor and department chair. “All of the classes stress the safety of the worker and patient,” added Hartzer, who earned a medical assistant certificate in 2012.

Instruction that uses the latest technology also contributes to students’ success on the certification exams. In registered nursing, for example, students practice skills using computer-programmed mannequins. Students also have opportunities to view live video feeds of Mayo Clinic surgeries, and instead of heavy print texts, they use digital reference books. “We try to keep up with national standards and simulate for the students what’s really in the workplace when they get there,” said Deb Jezuit, Ph.D., director of nursing education, which has upgraded its curriculum over the past three years. Similarly, the health information technology program emphasizes teaching students to use software applications that are widely in use in the health care industry for processing insurance claims. “Information technology systems are a big component of the national RHIT exam,” according to department chair Margaret Kyriakos. “Our students’ exposure to these programs has helped them succeed.” Technology is similarly integrated into the dental hygiene program in which students learn using the latest digital imaging, an intraoral camera, panoramic radiography and advanced dental software. Instructors with broad-based clinical experience and opportunities 18

to practice skills through volunteering at clinical sites are also important, according to instructor Mary Jacobs. “We believe that along with advanced technology, strong curriculum and experienced instructors, students succeed if they develop attitudes of social responsibility,” she said. Each year, students from the dental hygiene program volunteer for a project to bring dental treatment to remote parts of Tennessee, she said. Participating in this project, Jacobs said, not only sharpens students’ clinical skills, it also nurtures compassion, which she and fellow instructor Sue Nierstheimer believe is as important as technical competency. “Exams don’t test compassion, but everyone wants to be treated by someone who really cares about their well-being,” Nierstheimer said.

“We try to keep up with national standards and simulate for the students what’s really in the workplace when they get there.” — Deb Jezuit, Ph.D. DIRECTOR, NURSING EDUCATION


CLC Health-Care Graduates are Well Prepared

CLC meets or exceeds the national pass rate in healthcare programs. CLC pass rates

National pass rate

100%

Dental Hygiene - National Written Exam

95%

Dental Hygiene - Clinical Board Exam

90%

Health Information Technology

Massage Therapy

75%

100%

Medical Assisting

Medical Imaging

Nursing (RN)

Phlebotomy

95%

94%

95%

Massage Therapy

100%

Personal Training and Wellness

100%

Health care fields continue to offer great opportunities for graduates with associate degrees, and CLC’s pass rates on national licensing exams show that our graduates are well prepared for these jobs. CLC offers career preparation programs in several fields ranked as “Best Jobs in Healthcare 2013” by U.S. News and World Report. Among the top 25 are registered nurse, dental hygienist, radiologic technologist, medical assistant, clinical laboratory technician, massage therapist, paramedic and nursing aide. For more information about CLC’s healthcare programs, visit: www.clcillinois.edu/health.


College of Lake County Financial Statement Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2012

Education Fund

Operation and Maintenance Fund

Total Operating Funds

$ 19,882,441

$ 8,885,779

$ 28,768,220

Local Resources

$ 44,204,526

$ 14,930,563

$ 59,135,089

State Resources

6,218,650

6,218,650

7%

0%

28,195,939

28,195,939

30%

Interest on Investments

32,704

32,704

0%

Other

45,561

41,874

87,435

0%

$ 78,697,380

$ 14,972,437

$ 93,669,817

100%

$ 38,980,526

$ 38,980,526

45%

4,215,549

4,215,549

5%

Student Services

7,164,817

7,164,817

8%

Public Services

2,066,431

2,066,431

2%

7,923,263

7,923,263

9%

22,903,227

3,280,961

26,184,188

30%

166,501

166,501

0%

$ 75,497,051

$ 11,204,224

$ 86,701,275

100%

Beginning Fund Balance

Percent of Total

Revenues

Federal Resources Tuition and Fees

Total Revenue

63%

Expenditures Instruction Academic Support

Operations/Maintenance of Plant Institutional Support Scholarships/Waivers Total Expenditures Operating Transfers Ending Fund Balance

(3,000,738 )

(3,600,000 )

$ 20,082,032

$ 9,053,992

20

(6,600,738 ) $ 29,136,024


MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISC SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLIN

Connecting | FINANCIAL PLANNING

+ THE FUTURE

HY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTE PIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + PROFESSION DEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + MULTIFACETED + NARY + CHALLENGING + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL

Good financial planning is an important behind-the-scenes connection between students and educational opportunity. Without it, CLC could not continue to offer affordability and educational value to students. Tuition and fees would quickly soar, or instructional quality would suffer. In this section you will read about the college’s efforts in recent years to build up a healthy fund balance reserve while also coping with uncertainties in state funding, pension fund liabilities and the need to maintain and upgrade campus facilities. Our story is about achieving balance— between conservative budgeting and making appropriate investments in the future.

At left: Careful financial planning resulted in revenues exceeding expenditures in FY 2012.


“All our financial plans, everything we do to ensure the college’s financial stability, is about providing the resources needed to offer the kind of education that can help create a better future for our students.” — David Agazzi VICE PRESIDENT FOR ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS


A STRONG PLAN | Conservative Budgets + Investment in the Future

When David Agazzi, the College of Lake County’s vice president for administrative affairs, talks about finances, he does so with a passion and enthusiasm that goes beyond money. “All our financial plans, everything we do to ensure the college’s financial stability, is about providing the resources needed to offer the kind of education that can help create a better future for our students,” he said. Over the last several years, Agazzi and his financial staff, under the leadership of the president and Board of Trustees, have been taking steps to address looming financial challenges like unpredictable state funding, the possible shifting of pension costs and the need to repair aging infrastructure while also preparing to meet future facilities needs. After working with campus and community stakeholders, a preliminary plan was developed calling for a significant investment in new buildings and improvements including new science and student services buildings on the Grayslake campus and expansion of the Lakeshore Campus. “We vetted the plan with the board of trustees, and they agreed that many of the needs identified in the plan should be addressed, but they asked us to find ways to reduce the project’s scope,” Agazzi said.

Agazzi and his team, along with Legat Architects, sharpened their pencils to reduce the plan’s cost. Among the efficiencies identified were renovating the B and C wings on the Grayslake campus to create the student services building and reducing future bonding costs. The financing cost savings were made possible, Agazzi said, by reducing the debt repayment time for part of the project from 20 years to 10 years, which would save $5 million. Perhaps most significantly, the college was able to lower the financing costs by successfully seeking an upgrade in its bond rating from Moody’s to “AAA.” “To get the AAA, we had to have financial policies for fund balance, budgeting and debt management in place, and we had to show a constant trend of healthy fund balances and demonstrated conservative financial planning over multiple years,” he said. “Affirmation of the AAA rating, Moody’s highest quality rating, reflects the district’s large, diverse and affluent tax base located in Lake County… very healthy financial profile supported by healthy reserves and substantial alternate liquidity and conservative management team with strong internal controls,” Moody’s said in a news release.

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“The AAA rating is a great feather in CLC’s cap,” Agazzi said. “But most importantly, it means savings to the college.”

Vice President David Agazzi explains the key elements of the new master plan, including improvements in student services areas, energy efficiency and more. www.clcillinois.edu/ar/future


OPERATING EXPENDITURES | Building a Rainy Day Fund

In 2006, the Board of Trustees approved a policy setting the goal of maintaining a fund balance of at least 25 percent of annual operating expenditures as a financial safety net. Since then, the college has exceeded this goal, and in Fiscal Year 2012, the fund balance was about one-third of operating expenditures.

%


PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED NARY + CHALLENGING + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFU

FROM THE FOUNDATION PRESIDENT

WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WOR ARED + SERIOUS + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + INTRIGUING + AS CHALLENGING + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + INTERDISCIPLINARY + CHALLENGING + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + ASPIRATIONAL + PR + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIP

Connecting: GOALS

ASSISTANCE

As I complete my second year as Foundation Board President, I am reminded of the many ways the CLC Foundation assists our students and the college community. During this past fiscal year, the Foundation made scholarship awards totaling $518,792 to 673 students. Also, it provided over $40,000 to support the Robert T. Wright Community Gallery of Art and more than $21,000 for educationally-enriching projects, through our institutional grants program. Beyond this, our Changing Lives Scholarship Campaign has generated over $1 million in gifts and pledges, proving that, even in difficult economic times, donors are willing to support worthwhile, difference-making endeavors, like student scholarships. It has been my privilege to work with a Foundation Board that is committed to seeing students succeed and providing opportunities for hundreds of students to reach their educational goals. The CLC Foundation Board truly has a “heart for education,” and the time, talent and treasure that each board member has devoted to CLC is sincerely appreciated. I am a 1979 graduate of the College of Lake County, and I am honored to have been given the distinct privilege to serve as Foundation Board President these past two years. We are continuing to grow the assets of the Foundation, and we are actively seeking to create new and innovative partnerships with individuals, organizations, businesses and corporations throughout Lake County to provide the funding necessary for all of our Foundation initiatives. On behalf of the Foundation Board of Directors, thank you, our generous donors, for your confidence and support. With your help, we will continue to make a significant impact on our students’ lives and our community.

Carol Passalaqua President CLC Foundation Board of Directors 25


College of Lake County Foundation Financial Statement Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2012 Assets Cash and cash equivalents

$ 247,485

Investments

2,408,640

Other receivables

2,750

Deferred expense

9,125

Total Assets

$ 2,668,000

Liabilities and Net Assets Liabilities Accounts payable

15,661

Miscellaneous payable

10,892

Deferred revenue

Student Expenditure Restricted Grants

Cultural Enrichment

Grants and scholarships payable Due to College of Lake County

2,065 Institutional Development

-

Other payables

695

Total Liabilities

$ 29,313

Operational Expenses

Net Assets Unrestricted

$ 322,386

Temporarily restricted

1,514,293

Permanently restricted

802,008

Total Net Assets

2,638,687

Total Liabilities and Net Assets

$ 2,668,000

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MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISC SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLIN

Connecting | STUDENTS

+ OPPORTUNITY

HY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTE PIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + PROFESSION DEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + MULTIFACETED + NARY + CHALLENGING + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL

Even though the College of Lake County strives to keep tuition costs as low as possible, many students still struggle to afford their education. Likewise, as costs continue to rise, the college faces the ongoing challenge of preserving the hallmarks of an excellent education—employing outstanding faculty, keeping ever-changing technology current and maintaining facilities that enhance and encourage learning. The College of Lake County Foundation was established to help. It is a 501 (c)(3) tax-exempt charity that raises funds for scholarships and other institutional needs. By far, scholarships receive the largest proportion of the funds raised by the Foundation. Today, about one in four CLC students receive some form of financial aid—federal, state or Foundationsupported. Because so many students struggle to pay even CLC’s relatively affordable tuition, the Foundation has launched the Changing Lives scholarship campaign. To date, over $1 million has been raised. In this section you will read about the impact the Foundation’s scholarship support is making on real students, past and present.


CLC FOUNDATION

“The CLC scholarships were essential to my success.” —Ryan Stivers COCA-COLA COMMUNITY COLLEGE AND JACK KENT COOKE FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENT


THE FOUNDATION FOR THE NEXT STEP | Ryan Stivers

Ryan Stivers (’12) admits that six years ago, he was a struggling student at Mundelein High School before finally dropping out. Three years later, he decided to earn a GED diploma at CLC and give college a try. At CLC, Stivers found an environment that nurtured a major turnaround, culminating in his receiving two important honors: being named a 2012 Coca-Cola Community College Academic Team Gold Scholar and receiving a Jack Kent Cooke Foundation scholarship. Being named a Coca-Cola Scholar brought with it a $1,500 scholarship and having his name listed in the April 23 issue of USA Today. The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Scholarship is a national award carrying a $30,000 scholarship. Stivers is using the scholarships to help finance his further education at Lake Forest College, where he is now a junior with a double major in history and secondary education. “I got the (Jack Cooke) scholarship largely because of things I had done at CLC,” Stivers said, noting that the application process was based on academic achievements, leadership and community service. Stivers, who earned a 4.0 GPA at CLC, also was

president of the World Politics Organization, through which he organized two “green” events to beautify the campus landscape. He also participated in Waukegan’s “Paint the Town” initiative and various charity walks. Stivers said he was able to be active at CLC because he received scholarship support from the CLC Foundation. “The CLC scholarships were essential to my success,” he said, noting that he juggled a full-time load of honors courses, a job and campus involvements like being a member of the Alpha Alpha Pi chapter of the Phi Theta Kappa honor society and serving as vice president of the Student Government Association (SGA). “Any financial aid that I received meant fewer hours that I had to work. Without those scholarships, I wouldn’t have been as involved in extracurricular activities.” Academically, Stivers appreciated the chance to build a solid foundation at CLC and said he feels well-prepared for Lake Forest College because of faculty like English Professor Tamara Wolff.

29

“She proofread and offered feedback that helped me develop my writing talents,” he said. “She also encouraged me to be involved in the Honors program as well as student government. “SGA taught me a variety of skills, such as how to effectively organize a group with diverse opinions toward a common goal.” Eventually, Stivers would like to teach high school or college history, paying forward the guidance that he received. “CLC kind of turned my life around,” he said.


A GOOD START | Paulina Kulesza

Determining the kind of poison used in a murder. Analyzing the chemical makeup of a hazardous substance. Searching for the cause of a deadly fire. These are the kinds of life-and-death mysteries that Paulina Kulesza wants to someday solve as a police detective with a background in forensic chemistry.

solving, chemistry and criminal justice. She plans to transfer to Western Illinois University, which offers a B.S. in forensic chemistry. The $2,500 scholarship paid for Kulesza’s first year of college, greatly alleviating her family’s financial burden.

“Solving a puzzle interests me – learning the whole story, not just from the lab, but also from the victim. I want to help provide peace of mind for them,” she said.

“It definitely helped out,” she said. “It gives me peace of mind to have this awesome scholarship and know that someone took the time to review my application and that they thought I’d be the perfect recipient. I appreciate it.”

As a Wauconda High School senior in 2011, Kulesza received the CLC Foundation Superintendent’s Scholarship. In her second year of studies at CLC, Kulesza is combining her interests in problem

Two of Kulesza’s favorite instructors are Frank Zera (criminal justice) and Dr. Jeanne Simondsen (chemistry). Zera infuses the reality of criminal

investigations into his classes, thanks to his many years as criminal prosecutor for the Cook County State’s Attorney and for the Illinois Attorney General. Simondsen’s easy-going approach to teaching chemistry and always being available to answer questions made a big difference to Kulesza, especially when she needed help mastering difficult concepts. “What I like about CLC is the smaller classes and that the teachers have more time to help me with my interests,” she said.

CLC FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP AID An Increasing Need Even though CLC is more affordable than other options, many students still struggle to afford their tuition, and applications for financial aid have more than doubled from 2008 to 2012. In 2008, 6,163 students applied for financial aid, and by 2012 that number had increased to 12,927. Of course, not all students who apply qualify (currently about one in four CLC students actually receives some form of financial aid). However, the increase in applicants is a measure of the financial pressures on students and their families.

30


CAREER SUCCESS | Charlene Biondo

“I’m in so much pain. Please help me,” begged one of Charlene Biondo’s post-operative patients during the middle of the night. The woman had called the nursing desk to complain of her pain, and the newly hired nurse was determined to provide comfort. “I took the time to talk with her and ask where the pain was. I had her point to the area that hurt, and I asked if it would help if I rubbed it. She said yes. So I massaged the area, and it relieved the pain,” Biondo said. “Then I talked to her a little bit more and she went to sleep. That’s what I want to do— relieve pain and anxiety—and I felt good about that.” Yet while she was a CLC nursing student, Biondo had her own anxieties, such as how to pay for college, keep up with her school work and care for her husband and six children, ages 15-21. Earning two CLC Foundation scholarships provided sorely needed financial assistance. Biondo used her Academic Achievement Scholarship in 2010-11 to cover the cost of equipment such a stethoscope and nursing uniforms. Last year, a Foundation scholarship provided funds for a technical emergency.

“Attending college involves the use of technology daily. BlackBoard (the college’s course management system) provides our PowerPoints, our assignments and our syllabus,” Biondo said.

Former Foundation scholarship winners Ryan Stivers and Charlene Biondo talk about how earning CLC scholarships impacted them.

www.clcillinois.edu/ar/opportunity

“Teachers communicate via email. Research papers need to be written. Assignments need to be typed. A computer is indispensable! My computer broke down this semester, and the Ella G. Studer Trust Scholarship I received paid for the new one! This was especially helpful because it allowed me to be home with my children while completing my assignments.” Biondo began working part time at Victory Lakes Continuing Care in September 2012. She’s enrolled in an online Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.) program from Illinois Wesleyan University, one of CLC’s B.S.N. program partners. Recalling the persevering model of her CLC nursing instructors, who had also juggled the demands of work, family and college, Biondo said she is determined to get her B.S.N. “Since I’m already in learning mode, I might as well continue while everything is fresh in my mind,” she said.

31


College of Lake County Foundation Board, Trustees and Ambassadors

Board of Directors

The Board of Ambassadors

Kathryn M. Allen

Christopher Piazzi

Dale E. Barina

Ben Randazzo Immediate Past President

Phillip L. Batchelor Brandon Bennett Wendy Brown Tyrone Burno Dr. Philip J. Carrigan Linda S. Dunn

Barbara Richardson Secretary Joanna P. Rolek 1st Vice President President-Elect

Brad Hanahan

Kenneth Rosko Fred Scheu Sandra Shinksy

Judy Haga Robert W. Hauswirth

Karen Silverberg

Darrell Katz

Amy Spitzer

Holly Kerr

Bill Tate

Timothy B. Klein Treasurer

Lisa Dooley Trace

Peter P. Krupczak

Michael S. Trimble

Senator Terry Link

Sam Valenti Bryan Winter

David M. Lutrey

Evelyn Tribbs

Joseph Massarelli

Robert R. Worobow

Ed Oilschlager CLC Alumni Association President

Jannes E. Zobus

Carol L. Passalaqua President

David Agazzi College of Lake County

Dr. Nancy C. McNerney

Kathryn M. Allen Allen Investments

Bruce L. Osborne Retired, Discover Financial Services

Dr. Denise Anastasio College of Lake County Rich Babjak World Equity Group Inc. Connie Bakker College of Lake County Brandon Bennett Aon Hewitt

Dick Morehead

Carol L. Passalaqua Morgan Stanley Smith Barney Inc. Dr. DeRionne Pollard Montgomery College Barbara Richardson Retired, Lake County Coroner

Dr. Philip J. Carrigan

James D. Rock Ancel, Glink, Diamond, Bush, DiCianni & Krafthefer, P.C.

Darl E. Drummond College of Lake County

J. Kenneth Rosko J. Kenneth Rosko, Ltd.

Ed Duffy

Tom Schwartz Retired, First Midwest Bank

Paul Blumberg Mesirow Finance

Judy Haga Dr. Richard J. Haney College of Lake County Lourdene Huhra College of Lake County Joseph J. Legat Legat Architects

Delores Spapperi Doug Taveirne Dam, Snell, Taveirne Dr. Jerry Weber College of Lake County Robert R. Worobow

Peggy McClain

CLC Board of Trustees Liaisons

Ex-Officio Members

William M. Griffin, Ed.D. Lynda C. Paul

Dr. Jerry Weber, President William L. Devore, CFRE, Executive Director CLC Foundation Julie B. Shroka, Director Alumni Relations and Special Events Beverly H. Hubbard, Development Officer


DONORS | College of Lake County Foundation

Abbott Fund Matching Grant Plan Academic Coaching Services Ace Hardware - Grayslake Ace Hardware - Round Lake Active Electric, Inc. Pamela N. Adams Adlai Stevenson High School David Agazzi Teresa Aguinaldo David and Suzanne Aho Air Con Refrigeration and Heating, Inc. Ashley Alden Jimmie Alford and Maree Bullock Kathryn M. Allen, CPA Catherine Almanzo Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority American United Life Insurance Company Amgen Foundation Matching Gifts and Staff Volunteer Programs Dr. Denise Anastasio and Mr. Patrick Sarto John and Ellen Anderson Richard and Helene Anderson Robert Anderson and Cheena Wade Sally Joy Andersson Sharron Andresen Roger Andrews Anonymous Janet Antal Roger and Shirley Antes Antioch Community High School Nelly Aquino Juan-Carlos and Kelly Arce Joann Archer-Fleming Frank Ardito Armor Systems Holly Arnold Ahmad Audi Jim and Linda Ayers

Tabinda Azam Rich and Margaret Babjak Bake’s Sports Theme Restaurant Connie Bakker Dale and Kara Barina Marc and Judith Baron Lamont Barrientos David and Joan Barron Charles and Teresa Bartels Phil and Cathy Batchelor Ben and Martha Kelly Bates Baxter International Foundation Baxter International, Inc. Richard and Jo Ann Beaulieu Mark Bechtold Maryann Beckman-Berman Thomas and Jo Beckwith Sharon Beitel (deceased) Andre Bennatan Brandon and Susan Bennett Steve and Barb Berger Bernardi Securities Jim Bernardi Theresa Berryman Bill’s Pub North Richard and Kerry Biordi William P. Bird Terry and Dorae Block Paul and Lisa Blumberg Bob Chinn’s Crabhouse Bob Michel VA Clinic Staff Boller Construction David Bolton Mr. and Mrs. T. M. Bond, Sr. Derick and Adriana Bonewitz Robert Booker Books Are Fun, Ltd. Joanne Boros Bowes Enterprise LLC Kimberly Shryock-Boyke Dale and Jane Brandt Nathan Breen Thomas and Elaine Brettmann

Bretzlauf Foundation Corporation Mary Ann Bretzlauf Marilyn Brincat Diane Broege Gwethalyn Bronner Siu Lin Brown Margaret Scanlan Brown Sandy Brown Wendy Brown and Ted Hazelgrove James and Candace Brownlee Brownullstrup Dr. Shari Brueske Susan Brugioni Laura Bryce Buffalo Grove Golf Club Buffalo Wild Wings Vernon Hills Dr. Carole Bulakowski Carolyn and Tyrone Burno Tamaura E. Burns Dr. and Mrs. William Burns Kevin and Susan Butler Dan Byrne Jim Byrne Mary Byrne Cafe Pyrenees Cancer Federation, Inc. Caribou Knitters Steve and Peg Carlson Car-Min Construction Company, Inc. Philip J. Carrigan, Ph.D. and Mary Clare Jakes Christy Carter-Pennington Casa Bonita Amanda Cash Jason Cashmore Bianca Casso CenterStage in Lake Forest Central Illinois Manufacturing Co. Centre Club Gurnee Allen and Barbara Chandler Lyla Chandy Mary Charuhas 33

Louis and Karen Chauvin Chicago Architectural Foundation Chicago Botanic Garden The Chicago Trust Company Chicago White Sox Cisco Steven Clark College of Lake County - Alumni Association - Biological and Health Sciences division - Bookstore - Business division - Career and Placement Services - Communication Arts, Humanities and Fine Arts - Counseling, Advising, and Transfer Center - Educational Affairs - EMPS - Federation of Teachers - Foundation Office - Institutional Effectiveness, Planning and Research - James Lumber Center for the Performing Arts - Libraries and Instructional Services - New Faculty 2012 - Office of the President - Robert T. Wright Community Gallery of Art - Southlake Campus - Special Projects and Outreach - Specialist Senate - Student Government Association - Wellness Lab Clear Pipe Inc. Coalicion Latinos Unidos de Lake County George and Virginia Coil Reginald Coleman

Dr. Cathy Colton Deborah Colver The Comfort Suites Grayslake Computer Power Systems, Inc. Concierge Unlimited International, Inc. Gerry and Susan Cook Shelley Cook Gregory and Laura Corcoran Dr. and Mrs. Michael Corn Sandra Cosner Mark Coykendall Sonia Crosier Crowe Horwath LLP Steve Cummins Ryan and Jennifer Cumpston Lawrence and Yvonne Curley Amy Curry Dr. Viki S. Cvitkovic Marjorie Czop David and Janet Czosek Kristen Dahl Dante Daniels Paul and Sue Dasso Deerfield Italian Kitchen Deerpath Inn Marcia Degner Adelia Delao Glenn and Shirley DeMichele Nancy DeMuro Charles and Debra Denison John DeSanto and Michelle Anderson Herman and Ellen Deutsch Bill and Jan Devore Dr. and Mrs. Gehl Devore Jeison Diaz Peter and Deborah Diedrich Robert and Molly Diedrich Suzanne Dinardi Discover Financial Services


DONORS | College of Lake County Foundation

Bill Dixon and Deb Swambar Dan Docel Robert Dodd Stephanie Dodson Gene and Patricia Doll Darl Drummond Edward and Nancy Duffy Michael and Linda Dunn Dr. Tana Durnbaugh Ellen Dykeman Robert and Rita Eastburg Clint Eastwood John Edwards and Sharon King Egg Harbor Cafe Charles and Vickie Eiden Einstein Brothers Bagels Peter and Sharon Eisendrath Bill Eiserman Ella G. Studer Trust The Estate of Joan Enggaard Chef Clay Erickson Dr. and Mrs. Richard Erzen Sandra Evans Elizabeth Everitt Russell and Patricia Fahrner G. Scott Falknor Fifth Third Bank Kurt and Doria Filiatreault Teresa Filicette David and Lisa Fink First Bank of Highland Park Foundation First Midwest Bank William and Joan Flader Flemmings Neil Flynn The Forge Club Claire Formilan Tom Fortman Michael and Vicki Francis Friends of Lake County Discovery Museum Jack and Jan Frigo

Fuqua, Winter and Stiles Ltd. Donna Gabriel Lily Gaines R.J. Galla Company, Inc. Richard and Annette Galla Felicia Ganther Eduardo and Joyce Gatto Edwin George and Arlene Santos-George Gewalt Hamilton Associates, Inc. Louis and Tina Giamrusti Glen Flora Country Club Linda Gmitter Barbara Jean Goetz Roger and Joan Gold Abe J. Goldsmith Chad Good Gregory Gordon Barbara Gosh John and Jeanne Goshgarian Thomas and Katherine Gourley G. Gary and Donna Grace Dixie Graham John Graham Grainger Grainger Matching Charitable Gifts Program Graphic Partners, Inc. Brandon and Stephanie Gray Grayslake Fire Department Grayslake Greenery Garden Club Grayslake Rehabilitation and Complete Physical Therapy, LLC Great Expectations Green Promoting Greenleaf Family Foot Care Aaron and Dee Grice Dr. William Griffin Griffith, Grant & Lackie Realtors

Dr. David Groeninger Anthony and Jeanne Gundrum Thomas and Deidreann Gutantes Peter Haack Hans Habeger Judy Haga Robert and Susan Hamilton Brad Hanahan Mary Beth Hand Dr. and Mrs. Richard Haney Richard and Annette Haney Hank’s Cleaners Steven Hannick and Nancy Lyons Hannick David Hanson Harbor Shores on Lake Geneva George Harlow Jason and Kim Hasbrouck James and Jacquelyn Hassett Robert and Kelly Hauswirth Bill Haworth Here’s Wings, Round Lake Beach, LLC. Alice Hernandez Sherry and Pat Hernandez Douglas Hess III Paul and Mary Ann Hettich Eleonara Hicks Hinshaw & Culbertson, LLP Beth Hirose Bob and Karen Hlavin Michael and Laura Hobart Sean and Jane Hogan Steve Holman Tammy Hood Michael Horton Amanda Howland Pearl Hoy Tracey Hoy HR Plus Kurt and Beverly Hubbard Lourdene Huhra Wilma Hull

34

Frederic and Adriane Hutchinson Richard and Janice Hyde Illinois Bone and Joint Institute Sandy Incando Susan Ipsen Iskalis American Floor Show J J Porter Construction Co. Branko Jablanovic Kenneth and Sheryl Jacobs Bill and JoAnn Jakubowski Jen Z’s JKR Financial Consultants, Ltd. Joel Kennedy Constructing Corp. Beverly Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Johnson Darryl and Elrose Johnson Sylvia Johnson Ted and Heidi Johnson Agnes Jones John and Linda Jones Carla Jourdan-Heern Linda Jovanovic Joyce D. Campbell Agency, Inc. Phil Judson Randy Justus Robin Kacel Sirisha Kairamkonda Ann Kakacek Nick and Kim Kallieris Darrell and Wendy Katz Ruth Kauffmann Larry and Charmaine Kaufman Elizabeth Keats Nancy Keenan Kemper Lakes Golf Club Kenall Manufacturing Company Janet and Joe Kennedy Holly Frost Kerr John and Lorena Killebrew

Jimmy Kimmel Peter and Patricia King Anna Witt Kite Barry and Doe Kittay KJWW Engineering Consultants Timothy and Susan Klein Kay Klemens Kenneth and Rory Klick Feliks Kravets Jerry Kroll Norman and Susan Kronowitz Krueger International Elizabeth Kubota Sanjay Kumar Eric Kurtz Christopher and Margaret Kyriakos La Michoacana Lake County Art League Lake County Building and Construction Trades Council Lake County Council Navy League Lake County Farm Bureau Lake County Grading Company Lake County Regional Office of Education Lake County Women’s Coalition Lake Forest Bank and Trust Company The Lake Forest Shop Lake Forest Symphony Lake Lawn Resort Martha Lally Mark Lambert Dr. Elaine Lamberts Kelly Land Michael and Janette Lapke Meg Largay Hugh and Sara Larkin Tony and Sara Latham Michael Latza Matt Lauer


DONORS | College of Lake County Foundation

Rob and Meredith Laughlin Steven Le Robert and Gloria Learmont Nicole Leconte Holly Ledvina Justin Lee Legat Architects Suzanne Leibman Leland Partners, Inc. Leno’s Subs Larry and Carmen Leon Lesser, Lutrey and McGlynn, LLP Rick and Terry Lesser Eric and Melissa Leuck Richard and Mary Lou Levin Jurius Lewier Bobby Lewis Dr. Martin Ley, Jr. Liberty Auto City Libertyville Bank and Trust Libertyville Sports Complex Libertyville Woman’s Club Senator and Mrs. Terry Link Literacy Volunteers of Lake County Marilyn E. Little Gladys Lookabaugh Lauren LoPresti Robert Lossmann Kathleen Lovelace Loves Yogurt and Salads Barbara Lovsin Kevin and Diana Lowry John Lucio John Lumber David and Jane Lutrey Lynfred Winery James and Michele Lyons Donna MacCartney Cindy MacDonald Polly Machak

Wayne and Cheryl Machnich Bruce and Gail Mack Chester Macrowski Shannon Maczko Daniel and Janet Maher Michael A. Malan Manhard Consulting, Ltd. Maria Manterola David Marino Marriott Lincolnshire Resort Marriott West Palm Beach Christopher Martin Elisabeth Martin, Ph.D. Roneida Martin Stephen and Marjorie Martin David Martinez Mary’s Family Beauty Salon Mary’s Unisex Vasilka Maslanka Mark and Janet Mason Massarelli Charitable Foundation Joe and Margie Massarelli Raymond and Diane Mattison Robert and Beth Mayo Robert and Cynthia Mayo MB Financial Bank Margaret (Peggy) McClain Mario McDonald James R. McGrain Dr. Phil McGraw Nancy McGuire Michael and Linda McKown Mega 95.5 Clear Channel Radio Richard and Joan Meginnis Dave and Linda Mehnert Paul and Rita Meintzer Robert and Judith Melius Dr. Irwin Menachof Kenneth and Carol Mendelson Peyton and Mary Metzel Jay David Meyer

Michael Meyer Bill and Linda Meyer Mark and Debbie Michelini Midwestern Regional Medical Center Mike and Debra Mieszala Brenda Miller Doris Miller Gayle Miller Peggy Miller Roland Miller and Amy Morton-Miller Vanessa Miller David and Laurie Misic Roberta Monroe Katherine Moore Russell and Katherine Moore Phil Moran and Dr. Nancy McNerney Richard and Cindy Morehead Morgan Stanley Smith Barney The One Eleven Group at Morgan Stanley Smith Barney Gary and Launa Morgan Bill and Sue Morris Kirk and Vickie Morris Mortenson Construction Leon Muff Cindy Munda Rosalind Munoz Jesse Murayama, D.N. D. P. Murphy Ambulance Scott Murphy Dr. Sean Murphy Marvin and Annette Nehring New Way of Life Church of God in Christ Mr. and Mrs. Torrie Newsome NICASA Nicole’s Jewelry Peter and Terrie Nierenberger 35

Jorge Nieto David and Robin Nikolai Robert Nimits Bertine A. Nixon Christopher and Jill Noon North Chicago Center for the Arts North Shore Garden Club North Shore Trust and Savings Northbrook Bank & Trust Northern Illinois Funeral Services, Inc. Angela Norwood Charlie Nystrom Mark and Alyssa O’Brien Octagon Spa & Salon Marcia O’Day Siu Odonnell OfficeMax Office Plus of Lake County Oheka Castle Frances O’Hern Ed Oilschlager and Denise Williams Robert and Barbara Oilschlager Shari Oliver Aldona Olson Randy Olson Steve Olson Lori Opitz David and Lori Oriatti Daniel Orlando Esmeralda Orozco Bruce and Janelle Osborne Douglas and Diane Ower Oxford Financial Group, Ltd. Paddock Publications, Inc./ Daily Herald Media Group Pane-lessly Clean Karilyn Parrott Pasquesi Sheppard, LLC Carol Passalaqua Christine Patrick Daniel and Monica Patterson

Cliffton and Lynda Paul Donald Paulson Pauly Toyota Peacock Family Restaurant Peerless Planning, LLC Pepsi Cola Co. Kathleen Peralte Faith L. Peters Dr. Walter Petersen Daniel Petrosko Christopher and Kathleen Piazzi Anthony and Maureen Pintozzi Elizabeth Pirman Mike and Chris Piskule Burnestein Pitts PMA Financial Network, Inc. Warren Michael and Monica Polley The Popcorn Factory Margie Porter Ted and Margene Poulos Celeste Pregracke Joe Price Mary Price Don and Kari Proft Progressive Components Suzanne Pryga Dr. Diane Puklin John and Yazy Raclawski Douglas Raffel Ben and Linda Randazzo Miesha Ransom Thelma Ransom Stephen and Diane Rarick Sandra Rebechini Mr. and Mrs. Scott Reed James and Deborah Reinemann Rob Reiner Carol Remter Barbara Richardson James and Martha Richter Ricoh Americas Corporation Sherry Ridge


DONORS | College of Lake County Foundation

Mike Rigali and Julie Kanak Riley Construction Robert and Laurie Riley Steven and Lynn Rindfleisch Mary Rinehart Rinkside Family Entertainment Center Robbins, Schwartz, Nicholas, Lifton and Taylor, Ltd. Barbara Roberts Joan Robertson David and Debra Robins Douglas Rockenbach Joanna Rolek Rollins Family Dental Dr. Merwin Rosen J. Kenneth and Cherie Rosko Katherine RothwellFrancis Philip and Laura Rovang Erick Rowe Rodolfo and Theresa Ruiz-Velasco Mike and Melanie Rummel Timothy and Jerri Ryan Raymond Saesan Inderjit Saini Dr. Rai Salazar San Luis Obispo Coast District Parks and Recreation Dept. Donna Sands Kam and Netali Sanghvi Santa Anita Bakery Stephen and Marilyn Sarich Concetta Savovich Lydia Sawyer Mary Schaeffer John and Susan Schaper Barbara Schau Scheduled Construction Corporation

Fred and Amy Scheu Evelyn Schiele Clarence and Hilary Schnadt Linda Schumacher Cheryl Schuster Robert and LaNita Schuster Kim M. Schwaderer Thomas and Barbara Schwartz Rebecca Schwarz John and Evelyn Schweig Karen Seagren-Rasmussen Theresa Sebastian Paul and Iris Seeley Mary Beth Selbo Nancy A. Semerau Anthony and Eva Sereno Patricia Sewell Jim and Darlene Shackelford Gaylis Ingram Shakir Shangri-Lon Shawall Temple #165 John G. Shedd Aquarium Mike Sheehy John and Alvera Shelton Douglas and Terry Sherman Sherwin Williams Automotive Finishes Corp. Sandra Shinsky Taj Showers Ken and Julie Shroka Roger Shule Edward and Janice Shultis William and Kim Sims Richard and Mary Slavik Brian and Kathleen Smith Stephanie Smith Susan Smith Lynne Snyder Somethings Brewing South Gate Grill Dr. Phyllis Soybel Dolores Spapperi Amy Spitzer

Tommy Spolar Lars Sponberg Dr. Janakimala Srinivasa Dr. Jennifer Staben Stan Auto, Inc. Stanczak Family Fund John and Pamela Stanley Theodore and Patricia Stanulis Larry and Kathryne Starzec State Bank of the Lakes Theodore Stefaniak Patrick Stegman Barry N. Stein D.D.S. The Steiner Kerman Foundation James and Anita Stephens Jeffrey Sterett Shari Stodola Annemarie Stohl Dr. Jeffrey Stomper and Elizabeth Pope Dr. M. Lee Stone Keith Straka Strang Funeral Chapel and Crematorium Ltd. Mickele Stroyny Michael and Carolyn Sullivan Supermercado Mas for Menos Inc. Supermercado Y Taqueria Villasenor, Inc. Samuel and Jean Suter Chris and Laura Sweeney Kerry and Leticia Swift Synergy Diagnostic and Therapy Center, LLC The Synergy Group Bill and Debbie Tate Douglas and Linda Taveirne Christine Taylor TDS Terryberry, Inc. Dr. Jacinta Thomas Tipperary, Inc. Uri Toch and Susan Kaplan-Toch 36

Tom and Eddie’s Tony’s Butcher Shop Heather June Toser David and Lisa Trace Paul and Evelyn Tribbs Michael Trimble John Trinca True North Retirement Partners of Raymond James & Associates Lee Truger Robert Twardock Uniquely Sweet Mary Urban Mandi Urban-Lester Anastasia Usova USPT Gear VAC of Lake County Sam Valenti Sue Valentine-French Marilyn Vancrey Vanguard Archives Bill Vargas Luis Vazquez Verizon Foundation Village Optical Shop The Vine Marc and Sally Violante Vista Health System Wayne and Kimberly Voss Jane and Steve Waldeck John and Sarah Walters Martin and Nancy Ward Jeffrey and Liliana Ware Waukegan Baptist Bible Church Waukegan Citizens Police Academy Alumni Association Waukegan Hospital Corporation Waukegan Park District Dr. and Mrs. Jerry Weber Julie Webster Sam and Elizabeth Wegbreit Mitch West West Insurance Agency, Inc.

White Deer Run Golf Club Roosevelt and Tonitta White Eva Wilczenski Robert Wiley Brian Will Andy and Beth Williams Bill and Ronda Wilson Jerry Winslow and Diane Donaldson Bryan and Diane Winter Mark and Mary Winter Mark and Pavla Winter Dr. Griff Winters Guy Winters Klaus and Karin Wisiol Alice Witt Diane Wolter Poh-Tin Wong Roycealee J. Wood World Equity Group, Inc. Bob Worthington Rob Wygant Yang Xiang Olivia Yanez Susan Yasecko Dr. Li-hua Yu Zanies Comedy Club Arthur and Mary Zenner Frank Zera Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Inc. Zion Benton High School Zion Park District Jan and John Zobus


The College of Lake County is governed by a seven-member board of trustees, elected from among the citizens of Community College District 532, to ensure accountability. In addition, a CLC student is appointed each spring for a one-year term, casting advisory votes. The 2011-2012 Annual Report was produced by the Office of Public Relations and Marketing. 1/13 2000


STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELC MITTED + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + CHALLENGING + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASP CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLIN D + INTERDISCIPLINARY + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFU COMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY O TIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WE MMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + PROFESSIONA ARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + CHALLENGING GUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + CO ALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + CHALLENGING + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL EDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + DIVERSE + MU NARY + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE RDISCIPLINARY + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUP CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + CHALLENGING GUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + CO L + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + PROFESSIO PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + CHALLEN INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING THY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + CHALLENGING + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + P NOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + DIVERSE RDISCIPLINARY + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUP CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + + INTERDISCIPLINARY + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLI SCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINA

STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELC MITTED + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + CHALLENGING + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASP CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLIN FACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEA WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORT SE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORT CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + PLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY MULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMIN MITTED + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + CHALLENGING + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASP CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLIN FACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEA WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORT SE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY + STIMULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEA SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMING + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEAN UE + CARING + COMMITTED + PROFESSIONAL + DISCIPLINED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + PRO PLINED + PREPARED + SERIOUS + FOCUSED + MEANINGFUL + WORTHY OF VALUE + DIVERSE + MULTIFACETED + INTERDISCIPLINARY MULATING + INTRIGUING + ASPIRATIONAL + PRIDEFUL + CONFIDENT + KNOWLEDGEABLE + MEANINGFUL + SUPPORTIVE + WELCOMIN


2011-2012 Annual Report