TOWN Magazine - Nov. 2021

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HOPE HEALING LOVE



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Joan Herlong, Greater Greenville’s Number One Realtor of the Decade. Source: MLS Sales Volume 2010-2019.




First Glance

Photograph by Jason Tarr, courtesy of Explore Asheville

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Asheville’s North Carolina Arboretum is a must-see for fall colors, exhibiting elegant, bloom-filled beds that connect to woodland trails for exploring the Blue Ridge Mountains (for more, turn to page 51).

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PLAC ES TO PLAY E MBRAC E T HE F UN YOU C RAVE

THE HARTNESS TEAM OF EXPERTS DEDICATED TO GUIDING YOUR CLIENTS HOME

MARCIA SIMMONS

DAVID ROBERT SON

T RACY HARRIS

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The Hartness Team understands what Greenville families want—a beautiful home in an amenity-rich community without sacrificing convenience. That’s why this proven group of industry leaders has joined forces to help you discover the perfect home in the Upstate’s most distinctive neighborhood.


Whether you’re young or old, everyone needs a place to play. From a competitive match to a leisurely outing, play brings balance to your life. But let’s be honest, loading up and heading out often makes us postpone the fun we desire. That’s why Hartness created a community that makes playing easy. From pools, ponds, and trails to a sports garden, racquet club, and fitness center, new pleasures await you daily. So ride, fish, hike, kayak, volley, and hoop to your heart’s content. And then stroll to your back door, with the satisfaction of knowing you’ve found a place to play.

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Contents

40 VISUAL DISTINCTION Greenville artists once again welcome the curious into their creative homes for the Metropolitan Arts Council’s Open Studios weekend. by J. Morgan mccallum

“The best thing about Open Studios is that you’re getting to walk backstage. You’re really seeing where everything happens, getting to meet the individual artists.” —Alice Ratterree, director of operations, MAC

Cover art by Judy Verhoeven; artwork (this page) by Jane Doyle

ON THE COVER

Feeding Frenzy by multimedia artist Judy Verhoeven, a participant in this year’s Greenville Open Studios weekend.

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BY THE HAND From kids’ classes to sharing studio space, Mark and Sarah Batory mold Hollowed Earth Pottery into an open artistic haven. by BETH BROWN ABLES

14 EDITOR’S LETTER 19 THE LIST 25 ON THE TOWN 33 WEDDINGS 74 MAN ABOUT TOWN 109 DINING GUIDE 118 TOWNSCENE 126 SECOND GLANCE 128 GUIDE TO GIVING

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Photograph courtesy of Asheville Proper

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Photograph by Will Crooks

Contents

AUTUMN BEAUTY

Revel in the best of fall with an Asheville adventure featuring new eateries, neighborhood strolls, and a wealth of seasonal color. by ABBY MOORE KEITH

39 5155 59 655 785 99 TOWNBUZZ

ESCAPE

SPORT

STYLE

MAC gives the inside scoop on this year’s Open Studios Greenville, November 13–14; Atlantic Packaging’s Wes Carter works to shift the supply chain with sustainable options; for 200 years, Christ Church Episcopal has been a force for good in Greenville; and Hollowed Earth Pottery makes clay accessible for all.

For an easy autumn getaway, book a luxury bed and breakfast experience in Asheville’s Montford Historic District; Aiken, South Carolina, brings Gilded Age glamor to bear with its historic hotel and equestrian legacy.

Through Ducks Unlimited Greenville, Will Kittredge and Rob Coleman ensure our wetlands and more remain wild; and get tactical with top-notch ’nocs, scopes, and more from Palmetto State Armory.

Kathryn McMahon brings needlepoint back into fashion through her Landrum-based shop, Stitching Fox; enjoy an evening with Southern baking star Cheryl Day and her new cookbook, courtesy of M. Judson Booksellers.

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2021 CHARITABLE GIVING AWARDS Through this year’s Charitable Giving Awards, the Community Foundation of Greenville honors the expansive, ambitious, and sympathetic souls that are shaping our city for good.

EAT + DRINK

Skip the kitchen chaos this Thanksgiving with an easy pear and cranberry galette; at Mountain Goat GVL, your latte, lager, and even Belgian waffle help fund outdoor adventures for atrisk kids; and vegans rejoice! Plant-based bakeries are abounding in the Upstate.


We let our clients do the talking.

“You are the consummate consultants; recognizing that our new home purchase was not simply a real estate transaction but a life transition. That perspective was evident throughout the process. No detail was too small, and you were responsive to all our questions and concerns. You were always professional, knowledgeable, positive, authentic and an absolute delight to be with.” – B.Hohman, Buyer/Asheton

PATRICK FURMAN

SAMANTHA SNYDER

BROKER ASSOCIATE

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TheFurmanGroupSC.com Each affiliate independently owned and operated.


Editor’s Letter

Morrison, Colorado, September 2021

PATH OF GIVING

Y

ou never know what connections await in the next moment, or in what ways the Universe is rearranging the world in your favor. This past August, I received a call from a reader named Joe White. Joe explained that he saw our recent issue featuring Jay Haas Jr. and wanted to know if I’d like to play in an upcoming (and inaugural) charity golf tournament that he and his wife, Letta Greer White, recently organized. Truth be told, my once-competitive game is now a rusty clunker, but I said “yes” without hesitation. A past version of myself would’ve allowed fear and ego to get in the way of a new and rewarding experience. Knowing the goodness that comes from being open and leading with heart, I allowed myself to bring my current game—to play, have fun, and meet new friends, all for the benefit of raising funds for a worthy cause. Joe and Letta created the Larry M. Greer Invitational in response to a gap left by the Bi-Lo Charity Classic, which raised millions of dollars for Upstate food charities. Larry, Letta’s father, was a notable Greenville businessman, volunteer, philanthropist, and co-founder of the popular tournament. After Larry passed away this past January, Joe and Letta wanted to champion his charitable efforts and give a nod to his favorite sport. As successful as their first go was, the tournament can only gain

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momentum—and, surely before next year’s invitational, my game will too. When we create space for an opportunity—that is, when we intentionally open ourselves to something without knowing the outcome—we gain much more than we thought possible. In a complementary sense, Joe and Letta created a space to honor, gather, and help others in the spirit and well-worn charitable path of Larry Greer. Our annual Giving Issue is my favorite issue of the year because it reminds us of our community’s commitment to service, of the goodness that courses through our streets and neighborhoods and rural places. We couldn’t possibly fit in all who deserve presence here, but the stories we tell are worthy examples and slices of charitable acts that make Greenville thrive. There is a magnifying aspect to giving and paying it forward. Once you do, you’re hooked—the feeling is addictive, expansive, and joyful. Just make room and watch your world fill to the brim with lifechanging magic. Blair Knobel, Editor in Chief blair@towncarolina.com


THANK YOU!

2021 Art for Greenville donors 2020 Visionaries

AFAD Weekend Sponsor

35th

AVX/Kyocera Foundation The Daniel-Mickel Foundation Gay and Frank Fowler Deborah Gibson and Tom Styron The Reverend William M. Gilfillin Gordon and Sarah Herring Lucy and Jack Kuhne Arthur and Holly Magill Foundation Rachelle and Charlie Mickel United Community Bank Foundation Anne Woods

Wyeth Dynasty Lead Donors Dan Adams Laura E. duPont Priscilla and John Hagins Libby and Bill Kehl Sydney and Ed Taylor The Wallace Foundation

Friends of Jamie Wyeth

gcma.org

Mr. and Mrs. Scott Christopher Heather and Glenn Hilliard Mary Burnet and Ellis Johnston II Mary and Jeff Lawson Deborah Gibson and Tom Styron In honor of our grandchildren: Francesca Redmon, India Redmon and Jacob Bloom

Chairman’s Circle Falls L. Harris

GCM-21-18-TOWN Donors Thank You Ad.indd 1

Director’s Circle Louise and Roger Ables Betsy and Kenneth Cates Deborah Gibson Design Rosa Eisenstadt Julie and Berry Garrett Bill and Jan McCrary Dr. Alexander M. Patrick Janet and Steve Sumner Wilson’s on Washington

Friends of Mary Cassatt Cathy and Brad Campbell Malinda and Marshall Coleman W. Larry and Diane Gluck Becky and Bobby Hartness Mr. and Mrs. Earle Hungerford Heather and Bill Marchbanks Nachman Norwood & Parrott Wealth Management Consultancy Ramage Lewis LLC Farrah, Mike, Francesca, and India Redmon Jane R. Roy Minor and Hal Shaw Terri and Richard Steck Abbe and Patrick Weston

Grand Benefactors Karen and Jim Akerhielm Ginnie and David Beard BMW Manufacturing Co., LLC Terry Grayson-Caprio and Mike Caprio CarolinaPower, Inc. Anne Maddrey Carpenter Jane Rush Davenport and Jim Musselwhite Bunny and Bob Hughes Susan and Scott Kilgore Nancy and Erwin Maddrey Angela and Brian Murphy Francie Staub and Anthony Kent Jennifer and Steve Yarborough

With Special Thanks Duke Energy The Greenville Journal Metropolitan Arts Council Publix Super Markets Charities

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Mark B. Johnston

PUBLISHER mark@communit yjournals.com

Blair Knobel

EDITOR IN CHIEF blair@towncarolina.com

Paul Mehaffey

ART DIRECTOR

Leigh Savage

MANAGING EDITOR, COMMUNITY JOURNALS CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Kathryn Davé, Ruta Fox, Andrew Huang, Abby Moore Keith, M. Linda Lee, Laura Linen, Steven Tingle, Stephanie Trotter, Jac Valitchka & Ashley Warlick CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

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Chelsey Ashford, Timothy Banks, Robin Batina-Lewis, David & Sarah Bonner, Katie Charlotte, Will Crooks, Whitney Fincannon, Jason & Tara Massey & Eli Warren

Holly Hardin

VICE PRESIDENT, OPERATIONS GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Kristy Adair, Michael Allen & Haley Young Donna Johnston

MANAGER OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES

Sangeeta Hardy, Billy Leach & Heather Propp Hays Sligh

SALES OPERATIONS MANAGER

Allison Gambone

ACCOUNT MANAGER CLIENT SERVICE MANAGERS

Lizzie Campbell, Sheldon Hubbard & Camden Johnson

FREE childcare for household memberships while you workout & so much more!

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Kristi Fortner

ACCOUNTING & HUMAN RESOURCES

Sue Priester

CONSULTING MEMBER

Susan Schwartzkopf

GENERAL MANAGER

Sherry Jackson

VICE PRESIDENT, CONTENT & DIGITAL

Douglas J. Greenlaw CHAIRMAN TOWN Magazine (Vol. 11, No. 11) is published monthly (12 times per year) by TOWN Greenville, LLC, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, (864) 679-1200. If you would like to have TOWN delivered to you each month, purchase an annual subscription (12 issues) for $65 at towncarolina.com/subscribe. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA.

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30 Full-Time Agents. 26 Community Partners. Our Community Matters. Philanthropic at heart, Wilson Associates is actively involved in serving the community as an agency and individually. Our vision as an independent real estate firm reflects our commitment to exceed client expectations and a desire to contribute to the growth of the Greenville community. Our select team of dedicated real estate professionals are passionate about Greenville because we live here, too. We are proud to be a recipient of the Business of Integrity Award for Outstanding Community Service by the Better Business Bureau of the Upstate.

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THE LIST T H E M O N T H ’ S M U S T- D O S

JAMES TAYLOR & HIS ALL-STAR BAND WITH JACKSON BROWNE Legendary singer-songwriter James Taylor will be going to Carolina in more than just his mind for this one-night performance at The Well. As if watching the six-time Grammy winner perform hits like “Fire and Rain” and “Sweet Baby James” isn’t enough reason to grab a ticket to the concert before it sells out, Taylor’s special guest will be soulful Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Jackson Browne. How sweet it is! Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Tues, Nov 16, 7:30pm. Tickets start at $60. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

Photograph of James Taylor by Norman Seeff

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The List CHRISTMAS AT BILTMORE

GREENVILLE CRAFT BEER FESTIVAL

OKLAHOMA!

You may not have space for 62 decorated Christmas trees in your home, but the Biltmore House sure does. The largest of them all is the 35-foot-tall Fraser fir in the Banquet Hall, which shows off no less than 500 ornaments. Wrap yourself in the magic of the season at George Vanderbilt’s Gilded Age estate, adorned with tens of thousands of twinkling lights, more than 13,000 sparkling ornaments, and some 1,200 poinsettias. 1 Lodge St, Asheville, NC. Nov 5–Jan 9. Daily, hours vary. Daytime tickets, $106-$126; Candlelight Evening tickets, $119-$139 (admission fee includes a self-guided tour of the house, and access to the grounds, shops, and winery). (800) 411-3812, biltmore.com

Paradise for beer lovers, the Upstate’s premier craft beer festival returns to Fluor Field with more than 120 different beers from local, regional, and national breweries. Entertainment for the day includes live bands, Blade & Bull axe throwing, juggling clowns, and plenty of food to soak up all those suds. Get your tickets before they sell out.

According to the reviews when this revival of the 1943 musical debuted on Broadway, you might almost mistake the bold twenty-firstcentury reimagining for an entirely new show. If you saw the original version, the first musical ever written by Rodgers and Hammerstein, you may be jolted by Daniel Fish’s dark and sexy production, which won a Tony Award for Best Revival of a Musical.

CREATIVE

by DESIGN

PelhamArchitects.com

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Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Nov 17–21. Wed, 7:30pm; Thurs, 1:30pm & 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 1pm & 6:30pm. Tickets start at $35. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

Photograph by Little Fang Photo

Photograph courtesy of The Biltmore Company

Fluor Field at the West End, 945 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, Nov 6, noon–5pm. $20-$75. (864) 240-4509, gvlbeerfest.com


Photograph courtesy of The Makers Collective

INDIE CRAFT PARADE SHOP

SHUCK CANCER

Missed the Indie Craft Parade back in September? Don’t fret—you’ll have plenty of opportunities to peruse and purchase wares by many of the Parade’s talented makers every weekend from November 5 until the weekend before Christmas. In addition, three outdoor Mini Markets (Nov 27, Dec 4 & 11) will each feature a new set of artists. Shop local this holiday and feel good that you’re supporting area artists. 2909 Old Buncombe Rd, Greenville. Nov 5–Dec 19. Fri– Sun, 11am–5pm. makerscollective.org/indiecraftparade

An oyster roast is reason enough to celebrate, but when you throw in adult beverages and additional food, live entertainment, and a terrific silent auction, well, that’s just icing on the cake. Join the folks on Camperdown Plaza for an evening of shucking, sipping, and honoring the efforts of the American Cancer Society’s Real Men Wear Pink candidates, men who take a leadership role in the fight against breast cancer. Camperdown Plaza, corner of S Main St & Broad St, Greenville. Sun, Nov 7, 5–8pm. Tickets start at $100. (704) 674-3214, bit.ly/shuckcancer

NORMAN ROCKWELL’S HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS Best known for the magazine covers he created during his 47-year affiliation with The Saturday Evening Post, artist and illustrator Norman Rockwell (1894–1978) captured the essence of early twentieth-century life in America. In partnership with the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, the Upcountry History Museum will display 40 of Rockwell’s most memorable holiday illustrations, which still strike a chord in contemporary hearts. Upcountry History Museum–Furman University, 50 Buncombe St, Greenville. Nov 13–Feb 13. Tues–Sat, 10am–5pm; Sun, 1–5pm. Adults, $10; children 4-18, $8. (864) 467-3100, upcountryhistory.org

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The List

Quick HITS THE OTHER PLACE

z Nothing is as it seems in this riveting drama, part of the Prisma Health Fringe Series. A brilliant research scientist, Juliana Smithton is promoting her groundbreaking drug for the treatment of neurological disorders when she begins to lose her own grasp on reality. Past and present finally collide through fragments of memories in “the other place,” a cottage on the shores of Cape Cod that her family once owned. (Masks required.) Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Nov 2–3 & 9–10. Tues & Wed, 7pm. $18.50. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

ICE ON MAIN

Meredith Skinner, The Café, courtesy of the Metropolitan Arts Council

z Grab the family, lace up your ice skates (or rent a pair on-site), and hurry down to Greenville’s answer to Rockefeller Center, the winter ice-skating rink on the Village Green. The rink is open through January, so you’ll have plenty of opportunities to brush up on your camel spins and double axels, and sip hot chocolate afterwards. S Main St, adjacent to the Courtyard by Marriott, Greenville. Nov 12–Jan 31. Hours vary (core hours: Mon–Fri, 2–9pm; Sat & Sun, 11am–10pm). Adults, $10; children 3-12, $8. (864) 467-4355, greenvillesc.gov/1654/UCB-Ice-on-Main

SENSE AND SENSIBILITY

z Adapted for the stage by actor and playwright Kate Hamill, Jane Austen’s beloved novel tells the story of Elinor and Marianne Dashwood, who are left nearly penniless after their father’s sudden death. The two sisters, one a pragmatist and one a romantic, struggle to find a place for themselves in a society obsessed with reputation. Will their heads or hearts ultimately win out? Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St, Greenville. Nov 19–Dec 19. Thurs–Sat, 8pm (no performance on Nov 25; Sat, Nov 27, shows at 2pm & 8pm); Sun 3pm. General admission, $35; reserved seating, $40. (864) 235-6948, warehousetheatre.com

TREES UPSTATE TURKEY DAY 8K

z Make Turkey Day guilt-free by running this 8K—or 5K Fun Run and Walk—before you indulge in that Thanksgiving feast. As the race returns to in-person this year, participants will choose their starting time and corral based on their expected finish time; each corral will be limited to 300 people. So get out there and do your part to help Trees Upstate plant, protect, and promote trees in our area. Downtown Greenville. Thurs, Nov 25, 8am. 8K & 5K Fun Run, $30; ages 10 and under, $20. (864) 313-0765, treesupstate.org/td8k

ANNIE

z It’s a hard-knock life for a plucky young orphan named Annie, until she is adopted by billionaire Daddy Warbucks and lands in the lap of luxury. Based on the Tony Award-winning musical, Annie is an uplifting show that spells fun for the whole family. Spoiler alert: if you’re not familiar with the plot, the ending leaves no doubt that the sun will come out tomorrow. South Carolina Children’s Theatre, 153 Augusta St, Greenville. Nov 26–Dec 19. Fri, 7pm (extra 2pm matinee on Nov 26); Sat, 2pm; Sun, 2pm. $22. (864) 235-2885, scchildrenstheatre.org

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Greenville Open Studios The Upstate’s favorite art weekend returns to its original format this year, with a two-day self-guided tour of artists’ studios, plus a preview day featuring select artists on November 6 (10am–6pm). Grab an Open Studios catalog or download the app to plan your route and visit your picks among the 139 participating artists in 96 locations around the area. It’s a great opportunity to meet local artists and maybe make a purchase or two. Various locations including Greenville, Easley, Greer, Simpsonville, and Travelers Rest. Nov 13–14. Sat, 10am–6pm; Sun, noon–6pm. Free. (864) 467-3132, greenvillearts.com/greenville-open-studios

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N O V E M B E R 17-21 JASON ISBELL AND THE 400 UNIT

PINK MARTINI

FEATURING CHINA FORBES

UPCOMING EVENTS PINK MARTINI FEATURING CHINA FORBES November 1

LESLIE ODOM JR. “THE CHRISTMAS TOUR” December 14

2021-2022 PEACE BROADWAY

FINE ARTS CENTER

FINE ARTS CENTER

THE KNIGHTS WITH AARON DIEHL January 24

JAZZ ALL STARS November 10

JAZZ ALL STARS December 15

2021-2022 PEACE BROADWAY

AN INTIMATE EVENING WITH DAVID FOSTER: HITMAN TOUR December 20

RODGERS & HAMMERSTEIN’S OKLAHOMA! November 17-21 JASON ISBELL AND THE 400 UNIT November 28

TOOTSIE January 4-9

AQUILA THEATRE

THE GREAT GATSBY January 30-31 AQUILA THEATRE

CIRQUE DREAMS HOLIDAZE December 21-22

MACBETH February 1

OLD CROW MEDICINE SHOW: THE BACK IN THE SADDLE TOUR December 27

BALLET FOLKLÓRICO DE MÉXICO DE AMALIA HERNANDEZ February 1

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On theTown THE ROSE BALL

Will and Reed Murphy

SEPTEMBER 24, 2021

Guests reveled on September 24 at The Rose Ball, which had its 50th anniversary at the Poinsett Club. Greenville’s longest-running charitable event has raised more than $4 million, and this year will provide grants to 12 nonprofits, including Foothills Family Rescue, Safe Harbor, and United Ministries. Clarence and Arteka Sevillian

Laetten and Taylor Galbraith with Mike and Natasha Ferguson

By JACK ROBERT PHOTOGRAPHY

Peter and Jean Helwing with Liz and Wick Warrick

Anita and Mark O’Halla

Wendey and David Wilson and Linda Grandy

Bob Morris and Lesley Pregenzer

Donnie and Melissa Smith

Caroline Brackett and Jorah Mullinax

Don and Kimberly Cooley with Heather and Craig Hooks

Kyle Putnam and Cheyenne Miranda

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On the TOWN

EUPHORIA’S TASTE OF THE SOUTH SEPTEMBER 17, 2021

hair makeup nails accessories

This signature event, held at Wyche Pavilion and TD Stage, brought numerous chefs together to showcase Southern food in all its glory, along with craft brews and signature cocktails. Steel Toe Stiletto provided lively entertainment for a night of dining, dancing, and sipping. Photography by BONFIRE VISUALS

Devin Byrne and Emmie Wood

Sheldon Early, Megan Early Soppa and Krista Lawrence Katie Trombly and Amber Hanson

Parker and Virginia Milner

Greenville’s Salon

Vikki Woodard, Karen Weirtz and Alison Garand

WILSON’S ON WASHINGTON 794 E Washington Street

864.235.3336

wilsonsonwashington.com @wilsononwashingtonsc

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Steve and Lawton Hirsch


On the TOWN

EUPHORIA’S SUNDAY SUPPER

Roy and Melissa Janse

SEPTEMBER 19, 2021

accessories hair makeup nails

The final event of a jam-packed euphoria weekend, Sunday Supper at the Barn at Sitton Hill Farm ended the celebration on a laid-back note, with former Certified South Carolina chef ambassadors teaming up to create an unforgettable meal using SC-grown products. Bourbon, cocktails, beer, and wine enhanced the experience, along with music from the Jamie Wright Band. Photography by BONFIRE VISUALS

Gena and Frederick Turner Alex Burnikle, Dianna Clark and Taylor Clark

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WILSON’S ON WASHINGTON 794 E Washington Street

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On the TOWN

SET FREE ALLIANCE FUNDRAISING GALA

SEPTEMBER 30, 2021

Set Free Alliance held its annual fundraising gala at the Greenville Convention Center. The Greenvillebased nonprofit, which focuses on rescuing children from slavery and providing fresh water and medical aid to Africa and India, updated attendees on global accomplishment this year, including the organization’s selection as a finalist for Fast Company magazine’s World Changing Ideas awards.

Nate and Erin Hamblen

By CHELSEY ASHFORD PHOTOGRAPHY

Tiffani and Stephen Stokes Kim and Greg Szabo

Tim and Alison Lowry

105 Augusta Street, Greenville 864-271-4332 • PinkBeeGVL.com Christina Hamilton, Barbi Haase, Laura Baker and Holly Fossett

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Joanna and Rich Butler


On the TOWN

Please Join Us for the 11th Annual

BAKOVA GALLERY LAUNCH PARTY AT WOODSIDE MILL

Hope and Help for the Holidays and Beyond

David Hawkins and Nanite Rogers

SEPTEMBER 30, 2021

A grief seminar for the community and professionals

Bakova Gallery, formerly located in Hillsborough, North Carolina, hosted a launch party to celebrate its relocation to Woodside Mill in the Village of West Greenville Arts District. Gallery View is a new concept featuring multiple galleries, artists, and designers, along with a cocktail bar.

Tuesday, November 16, 2021 8:30am - 4:15pm For anyone who has experienced loss and grief in their own life, as well as professionals who help grieving individuals and their families.

By JACK ROBERT PHOTOGRAPHY

Joseph and Leah Smolin with Zach Lowe

Karee White and Kory Keefer

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Kenneth J. Doka leading expert on grief counseling & therapy General Keynote Session: Grief & Coping With Loss at the Holidays Small Group Topics to Include: When the Earthquake Comes: The Spritual Journey of Grieving Grieving Hearts: Creating Safe Spaces for Sorrow Through Group Art Therapy Covid-19 and Disenfranchised Grief Suicide Loss Enhancing Resilience in Young Children/Children Experiencing Grief & Loss Caregiving and Anticipatory Grief Grief 101: Applying the Six Needs of Mourning to Your Grief Journey

Hope and Help for Grief and Loss Related to Addition the Hoand lidaOverdose ys and Beyond Closing Session: A Time to Remember (optional sharing of photos A seminar for loss, hope and healing and names of loved ones we’ve lost)

Presented by

Tuesday, November 11, 2014 9 a.m. -for 3 p.m. There is no charge for this seminar. CEU’s professionals available, also at no charge.

First Baptist Greenville, Fellowship Hall

847 Cleveland St. For detailed class information Greenville, SC 29601 and to register, go to:

RSVP by Friday, November 7

UpstateGriefSeminar.com

This seminar is for anyone who has experienced loss and grief, as well as professionals

This year’s seminar will be such virtual. who help grieving individuals, as Nurses, Counselors and Therapists, Social Workers, Chaplains, Clergy Members, Guidance Counselors, Psychologists and Educators. ( 4 .0 hrs. Continuing Education Credit available. More information upon request. )

Presented by

GREENVILLE MEMORIAL GARDENS

Presented by

and

WOODLAWN

Ric Standridge with Jen and Caelan Belshe

Brando Zellars and Travis Yahuw

Memorial Park, Funerals and Cremations

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weddings C O U P L E S & C E L E B R AT I O N S

Lowndes Grove was the perfect backdrop for KIMBERLY COLEMAN & JORDAN ROPER to say “I do.” Photograph by Angela Zion

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Weddings

KIMBERLY COLEMAN & JORDAN ROPER JUNE 15, 2021

S

ince she didn’t follow sports in high school, Kimberly never realized that Jordan, a star on the school basketball team, had a crush on her. Nonetheless, the two struck up a friendship, which was interrupted when Jordan graduated and went to play basketball at Clemson. Kimberly headed to the University of South Carolina the following year, and despite their going to different schools, they continued to stay in touch. Luck smiled on them when Jordan accepted a job in Columbia after college, and they reconnected in the same

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city where they started dating. Three years later, when Jordan proposed in Charleston, it marked the first time Kimberly had ever seen him nervous. In an intimate, family-focused ceremony, Jordan’s grandmother married the couple at Lowndes Grove in Charleston, where they spent the day enjoying the company of both their entire families. The pair lives in Greenville, where Kimberly is a Spanish teacher and Jordan works at Clemson. —Kathryn Norungolo By Angela Zion Photography


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Weddings

BREE HAGGARD & JOE SANDERS JUNE 12, 2021 Bree and Joe grew up going to school together in Commerce, Georgia. What started as a crush in the eighth grade turned into a relationship when the pair entered high school in 2006. Some 13 years later, Joe and Bree were back in Commerce visiting their parents and decided to go on an evening walk—something they had done since college—around Joe’s parents’ land. As the sun was setting over the trees, Joe asked Bree to be his wife—no bells and whistles, just the two of them in a place that was so dear to them. Naturally, they were married in their hometown, as their parents had been before them. Nearly 300 guests attended the ceremony at the First Baptist Church of Commerce, where Bree said “I do” in a lovely gown from Dimitra Designs and her mother’s wedding veil. Following the reception at the Commerce Civic Center, the couple sped away in a 1958 Cadillac Fleetwood 60 Special that Joe’s dad had restored. Though the couple plan to stay in the Greenville area, Joe and Bree will always have a special place in their hearts for their hometown in Georgia.—KN By Chelsey Ashford Photography

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REBECCA STODDARD & TOM TURNBULL MAY 15, 2021 After Rebecca moved to Atlanta for work, she joined the nearby rockclimbing gym, figuring it would be a good place to make friends. There she found a welcoming and supportive group of people, Tom being one of them. It wasn’t until she made a mistake on a group backpacking trip, which Tom responded to with kindness and patience, that Rebecca started to see him as more than just a friend. When the pandemic hit, Rebecca never dreamed an engagement was in the cards, but Tom had other plans. During a backpacking trip at Black Mountain State Park, Tom popped the question at sunset, his face lit with a huge childlike grin. Rebecca married Tom at Westminster Presbyterian Church, followed by a reception at the Poinsett Club where King of Pops—a nod to their hometown of Atlanta— served popsicles. The couple recently purchased a home in Roswell, Georgia, right outside Atlanta.—KN By Chelsey Ashford Photography

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town buzz INTERESTING PEOPLE, PLACES & THINGS

Peek behind the artistic curtain at GREENVILLE OPEN STUDIOS, celebrating its 20th year.

Artwork Ballast (Poppy, Wahoo, Forget-Me-Nots) by Lisa Shimko, courtesy of the Metropolitan Arts Council

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TB • OUTSIDE THE BOX

VISUAL DISTINCTION OPEN STUDIOS IS BACK IN PERSON THIS YEAR—AND PROMISES TO BE BETTER THAN EVER by J. Morgan M c Callum

A

fter an all-virtual 2020, Open Studios is returning the second weekend in November as an in-person event. As an artist myself, I know how much it means to Greenville’s creative community to be able to welcome our friends and neighbors back into our studios for a peek behind the curtain. “There are a lot of people who are really ready for this,” says Alice Ratterree, director of operations at the Metropolitan Arts Council. “Circumstances have changed, of course, but for the most part, everyone is incredibly excited. The best thing about Open Studios is that you’re getting to walk backstage. You’re really seeing where everything happens, getting to meet the individual artists.” The very first Open Studios event in 2002 had 48 participating artists. This year, the weekend (including a bonus

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Sneak Preview Day on November 6th) will include almost 100 open doors and 139 smiling faces. “What’s really cool is how this event inspires young and emerging artists to join in,” says Alan Ethridge, executive director of MAC. “They see how successful the weekend is, and it encourages them to apply. Just this year, we have 26 new artists. That’s a great thing from a longevity standpoint.” Although MAC is encouraging everyone to wear masks this year, every artist will determine their own protocols, so rules on social distancing, masking, and visitor capacity will vary from studio to studio. “Some of these studios are simply a repurposed bedroom in someone’s home, whereas others, like ArtBomb, are huge open spaces,” adds Ratterree. So in short, be prepared to adhere to different guidelines across locations. “It’s also a great chance to explore the city, to see neighborhoods in Greenville you might have otherwise never had a reason to visit,” says Erin Turner, director of marketing at MAC. “A lot of the artists you’ll see during Open Studios don’t participate in events like the First Friday Art Walks, so this is a really special weekend, a rare chance to see their work and meet them.” Five artists you’ll want to keep an eye on this year are the Dwain Skinner Open Studios Fellows, participating in the event for the first time. These up-and-coming artists were handselected by the MAC executive committee for their diverse

Photographs courtesy of the Metropolitan Arts Council

Arresting abstracts by Katie Walker (above, left), whimsical depictions of the natural world by Diane Kilgore Condon (above), and intricate canvases by Patricia Kilburg (opposite) illustrate the range of works you’ll see at Open Studios.


Photographs courtesy of the Metropolitan Arts Council

portfolios. The fellowship is named in honor of much-loved local artist Dwain Skinner, a gifted designer and sculptor who passed away unexpectedly in 2019. If this is your first-ever Open Studios, the team at MAC highly recommends visiting these five established artists, too—a talented group who have been participating in the event from the very beginning: Paul Flint, Diane Kilgore Condon, Lynn Greer, Shannon McGee, and Pat Kilburg. If you’re still feeling a little overwhelmed by the choices when plotting your weekend, Ethridge invites you to make the MAC Gallery your first stop. “We always want people to stop in and see the opening exhibit. You can see all of the participating artists’ work in person and figure out which studios you want to visit.” Ready to dive in? Download the Open Studios App, or grab a copy of the official catalog, which is distributed all across town. “The app allows you to filter artists by medium, by who will be open on the Sneak Preview Day, by wheelchair accessibility . . . you can save favorites and the app will generate a map for you,” Turner adds. The MAC team insists on one thing above all: enjoy the adventure. “Plan out your route if you’re a planner, don’t plan it out if you’re not. You can use the app to decide as you go. You can see one studio, or twenty. Make your own way,” smiles Ratterree. Ethridge adds, “My advice? Just go and have a good time. It’s always a great experience.” Greenville Open Studios 2021, Nov 13–14. Sneak preview day, Sat, Nov 6, 10am–6pm. greenvilleopenstudios.com

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TB • VISIONARIES

DOWN TO EARTH WES CARTER TACKLES THE ISSUE OF POLLUTION HEAD-ON AS PRESIDENT OF ATLANTIC PACKAGING by Stephanie Trotter • photography by Katie Charlotte

W

es Carter is riding a wave of environmental concern. It’s a totally different balancing act than surfing his beloved Carolina shore, or the coastlines he’s skimmed along in Africa, Costa Rica, and Indonesia. Right now, the Wilmington native’s not riding for his life, but for the Earth’s life. And the chop’s so thick, he’s utilizing his three-generation family business to generate the energy needed to stay afloat, ahead of the curling wall of water that could come crashing down at any moment. The irony is that the industry the 43-year-old operates within is part of the pollution problem. That’s like taking a header inside the barrel for the president of Atlantic Packaging. It hurts. Wes is eager to chat about his hope to save the oceans for all, with A New Earth Project.

I can hear the urgency in your voice when you talk about the Earth. When you look at all the hurricanes, wildfires, and melting Arctic ice caps, the Earth is sending us signals that are a serious issue. Unfortunately, climate change can get politicized, but you can’t ignore pollution. Just travel around and it’s hard to deny. I focus on the pollution piece of this because of the business I’m in.

Your grandfather founded a small newspaper in Tabor City, North Carolina, that grew into Atlantic Packaging. You’re now president of the company, which has 1,435 employees across 28 locations and is on track to earn $830 million in revenue this year. I took over when I was 36 or 37. I knew I was standing in the shadow of two giants. My grandfather was a larger-than-life guy, sort of a legend, and my father was an incredible entrepreneur.

Your grandfather famously fought the KKK and won a Pulitzer Prize in 1952, the first to ever go to a weekly newspaper. And

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Packaging executive and avid surfer Wes Carter is building a wave of support to fight plastic pollution through A New Earth Project, a collaboration with the global surfing community.


#1 AGENT

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your dad recognized changes in the textile market to help Atlantic diversify and grow into what it has become. The part that gets me misty-eyed is my grandfather’s work and the moral imperative to fight injustice with the newspaper. I feel the same way about sustainable packaging. As the largest private packaging company in the United States, we have a moral obligation to care about environmental issues.

If folks order from Williams- Sonoma, Urban Outfitters, QVC, Bass Pro Shops, or Procter & Gamble, they’re most likely handling packaging you’ve produced? Yes. It’s humbling. We recognize we have a seat at the table and if we can influence these companies and others, it can have a global impact. Our key customers are all major consumer-product companies in food, beverage, and e-commerce. If the supply chain doesn’t shift, nothing will change.

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In addition to guiding companies to use sustainable packaging, like your new fish-bone carrier to replace plastic six-pack rings, you’re collaborating with the world’s surfing community on A New Earth Project. Fifty percent of the plastic in the ocean is from fishing nets. I don’t have the ability to reverse that. The thing I see beyond fishing gear is single-use packaging in particular, and that’s my business. Plastic takes 400 years to degrade. Those six-pack rings? They’ve been choking turtles my whole life. A friend who knows I surf introduced me to surf documentarian Peter King, who wanted to raise global awareness for the plastic pollution problem. I’m very excited to bring the surfing community together with the industrial packaging supply chain to fight this.

A New Earth Project has spawned the Zero-Waste Offshore campaign. But specifically, what can viewers expect with the documentary? It’s surfers transcending their sport and becoming advocates. They see the ocean more than anybody and have a unique view of the problem. It also presents consumers with sensible things we can all do. We’re in discussion with multiple streaming platforms to bring this to as many homes as possible.

The stats are frightening. The Ocean Conservancy reports 8 million metric tons of plastic hit the ocean each year, joining the 150 metric tons already there. Straws, grocery bags, bottles. At the end of the day, the Earth is going to be just fine. Humans may not be. The thing that is encouraging is that we live in an age where major collaboration, across huge geographic areas, has never been easier. With innovative spirits, and everyone moving in the right direction, we can fix this. Cleaning up the planet is our generation’s moon landing. If we do this right, generations after us will say, ‘Look what they did for the planet.’ I see no greater privilege.

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TB • COMMUNITY

LEGACY OF HOPE FOR THE PAST 200 YEARS, CHRIST CHURCH EPISCOPAL HAS BEEN A FAITHFUL PARTNER IN GREENVILLE by M. Linda Lee

T

he little village of Greenville Court House was still in its infancy when Reverend Rodolphus Dickerson established St. James Episcopal Mission in Greenville in 1820. The mission held services in a log courthouse on Court and Main streets, attended by a handful of families from Charleston who summered in the Upcountry to escape the heat on the coast. Five years later, entrepreneur and landowner Vardry McBee, who is buried in the churchyard, deeded four acres to St. James Mission on which to build a brick church. The modest mission was received into the Diocese of South Carolina in 1826 as Christ Church Parish. Over the past 200 years, Christ Church has ministered to the community by helping establish such entities as the Sterling Hope Center for after-school education programs, and the Greenville Free Medical Clinic. “Christ Church has a long history of concern for the community, so we want to be faithful to that tradition and move it forward,” says The Reverend Dr. Harrison McLeod, who has served as the parish pastor since 2008.

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A pandemic during their bicentennial year did not prevent parishioners from reflecting on how 200 years of history has shaped the church, though it did impact several of their planned projects. As gathering in person was not an option last year, parishioners were forced to think outside the pulpit. When COVID-19 shut things down, many of the feeding ministries in Greenville shut down as well. To meet that need, the parish used their kitchen to prepare meals for the hungry and homeless in partnership with Project Host, providing 170,000 lunches to date. As part of their bicentennial 20 For 20 program, parishioners were asked to volunteer 20 hours in the community during 2020. “Many folks were able to do that in the first quarter of the year, but once March rolled around, that effort became more difficult,” reports the pastor. Yet other projects, such as the development of a piece of property the church owned in the Sterling community, were completed. Partnering with Habitat for Humanity, Christ Church built six new single-family homes on the street they call Joshua’s Way. In January, Dr. McLeod hopes to launch the Church Street Chorale Academy, which has been delayed by the spread of COVID-19. Based on a transformational program the pastor implemented at his previous parish in Texas, the Chorale Academy will invite 30 third graders from underserved Greenville County schools to participate in music education. “We’ll pick up those kids a couple of days [each week] after school and bring them to our campus, offer them tutoring in their academic classes, serve them a meal, offer them piano and voice lessons, and they’ll sing with us on Sunday morning.” Despite the challenges posed by the pandemic, Christ Church has continued to be a force for good, crafting solutions to address unmet needs in the community. “I want Christ Church to become a beacon of hope,” Dr. McLeod declares. “We want to be a safe place for people to come and experience healing and God’s grace in their lives, while working together for a better future.”

Photographs courtesy of the Greenville County Historical Society

The cornerstone for the original brick church was laid in September 1825. Though the physical building has undergone many changes over the years, Christ Church Episcopal has remained steadfast in its service to the community.


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TB • BY DESIGN

EARTH ANGELS MARK AND SARAH BATORY CRAFT A GENEROSITY OF SPIRIT AT HOLLOWED EARTH POTTERY by Beth Brown Ables • photography by Will crooks

E

ntering Hollowed Earth Pottery’s bustling space at Hampton Station is to step into a hive of activity. To the right, a wheel class is in session, students hunched over spinning lumps of wet clay as they learn to make a bowl for the first time. To the left, a retail space stocked with handmade pottery tempts with each glance. Behind partitions, studio members work on their own craft, pulling pots on wheels or dipping kilndried pieces into liquid glaze, chatting and sharing tips with one another. The air itself hums with creativity.

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“What’s great about this is that it’s just a regular day here,” says Mark Batory as he looks around the space with satisfaction. Mark and his wife, Sarah, carefully crafted their lives to create the hub of collaboration thrumming around them today. A cart full of Mark’s mugs, glazed in gradients of deep greens and blues, sits beside him, and he picks one up. Each is stamped with the Hollowed Earth logo, but Mark’s name is intentionally left off. “An environment that is healthy and good is where so much learning comes from,” he says. Sarah explains, “Anyone who comes to Hollowed Earth knows that this is a place where there is no place for competition or hoarding ideas. This is a place for everyone.” While Mark was the first of the couple to fall in love with clay, the business itself is most assuredly an even deal. Sarah’s razor-sharp business mind and retail background lent a framework to Mark’s artistic talent and passion for teaching.


Mark and Sarah Batory (opposite) spin a space to learn where clay is accessible for all at their ceramics studio and classroom, Hollowed Earth Pottery.

text here

Together, the couple built Hollowed Earth into what it is today. From a garage studio and the craft-show circuit to the space and independence they enjoy today was a hard-earned grapple of working themselves perilously close to burnout. They credit hiring Annie Singletary, herself a local ceramic artist, and Barb Blair, beloved Greenville creative and former shop owner, as the foundation on which to mold a life where both Batorys again have creative margin to give back to the clay community. “We love visiting other studios and getting in there to help out a fellow potter who might be swamped with an order. Getting to do that is just the absolute best,” Sarah shares. It’s that particular generosity of spirit that shapes how the Batorys built their entire business. Mark opens his strong hands wide, “Only I have these hands, right? So only I can make pots the way I make them. But even better is that I can teach you to make your own work with your own hands, and then together we elevate and teach each

other. Always innovate and then out-innovate yourself.” Seasonal classes, kids’ camps, a retail shop, and take-home kits provide the outside community opportunities to enjoy the artistry and fun of clay. Through studio memberships, ceramic artists take the next step, taking classes from one another and sharing lessons learned through personal practice. “The whole purpose of Hollowed Earth is to make pottery accessible for everyone,” says Sarah, and Mark adds, “We’ve carefully created an environment to make everyone feel comfortable. We want to show you how this all works.” As he’s speaking, someone steps over to ask Sarah a question and deftly lifts the Batorys newborn daughter from her stroller in one fluid motion. Here it seems, it’s all a generous family affair. “That is what our dream is, right there,” shares Mark. “A creative life where we all take care of one another and help each other succeed.” For more about studio memberships, wheel classes, and other offerings, visit hollowedearthpottery.com.

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Schedule your Discovery Tour to begin a life well-lived. ExploreBRMC.com | sales@brmountainclub.com | 828.520.2508 Obtain the Property Report required by Federal law and read it before signing anything. No Federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. This information shall not constitute a valid offer in any state where prior registration is required. © 2021 Blowing Rock Resort Venture, LLC.


ESCAPE R E G I O N A L P L A C E S & G L O B A L D E S T I N AT I O N S

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Cozy B&Bs, awardwinning architecture, and proximity to the Blue Ridge Parkway distinguish a weekend in Asheville’s Montford Historic District. For more, turn to page 52.

Snaking along the BLUE RIDGE PARKWAY makes the quintessential fall road trip.

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ESCAPE • 24 HOURS IN

AUTUMN BEAUTY THE BEST OF FA LL UNFOLDS IN MONTFOR D, ASHEV ILLE’S NATIONA L REGISTER HISTOR IC DISTR ICT

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he mountains in the fall are heaven on earth. I know this because my family has trekked to the Blue Ridge every autumn for decades. Perhaps it’s the first inhale of crisp mountain air, or the glorious sight of orange and gold tumbling down ridge after ridge. Call it nostalgia, call it magic—there’s a reason millions flock here when the leaves start changing. That’s why my husband and I plan an overnight in the Montford area of Asheville in early fall—we want all the seasonal feels without the long apple-picking lines. Montford is a dreamy district just north of downtown.

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As soon as we turn onto its quiet streets, canopied by ancient trees and lined with charming old homes, I am captured—and only more so when we roll up to our bed and breakfast. The Applewood Manor, a brick Colonial Revival– style home (c. 1912), possesses all the romance of an old house (the stairs have a pleasant creak), but with the approachable luxury of a boutique hotel. This is an intentional strategy from Stephen and Robin Collins, who bought the property in 2020. Beautiful antiques are complemented by eclectic modern pieces throughout the downstairs area and six guest rooms—an ode to Robin’s skill as an interior designer. She’s also an ingenious baker, a fact we discover when we bite into her homemade chocolate chip cookies.

Photography (clockwise from left) by

by Abby Moore Keith


Photography (clockwise from left) by Aaron Hogsed; Tim Robison; Explore Asheville; Tim Robison

EVENING / Once we settle into the French wine-countrythemed York Imperial Suite (all the rooms are named for apples), the Collins pass along a list of their favorite area eateries. We take their advice on Asheville Proper, a live-fire dining experience at the Grove Arcade, a 15-minute stroll from the B&B. Proper is barely a year old, but from its locally sourced dishes to décor and cocktails to customer service, quality and intentionality are paramount. While steaks are their specialty, sides like the crispy confit potatoes are not to be skipped, and we enjoy watching the flames flicker on the hardwoodfueled grill in-between bites. While one could easily continue the evening at one of Asheville’s countless breweries, we head back, soaking in the crisp, cool air the entire way. A nightcap at

Within walking distance of downtown Asheville, Applewood Manor is a charming bed and breakfast with modern amenities; indulge in fall color along the North Carolina Arboretum’s numerous nature trails; The Grove Arcade’s Asheville Proper ups the ante on steakhouse fare.

Applewood will be a possibility in the near future (their beer and wine license is pending), but satiated, we sink into the Duxiana king mattress and are soon asleep.

morning / “As a bed and breakfast, you sure have the beds and breakfast down,” a fellow guest tells Robin the next morning. I can only nod in agreement, as my mouth is blissfully full of her sourdough bread. In addition, our menu includes Due South coffee, an egg soufflé with leeks and potatoes, a fresh fig salad, and Hickory Nut Gap bacon—all organic or sourced from local farms. We ease into the morning with a stroll through the neighborhood, enjoying the charming gardens and homes, several of which are winners of the Griffin Award from the Preservation Society of Asheville Buncombe. The

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multi-use trail known as the Reed Creek Greenway is accessible from Applewood, and while it’s tempting to walk its length to the Botanical Gardens at UNC-Asheville, we’re itching for our fall fix. There are countless opportunities for autumnal adventure mere minutes away, and with time limits, it’s impossible to experience them all well. Do you hit the Blue Ridge Parkway for a leisurely drive? Maximize views and adventure with a hike up to Craggy Gardens? Perhaps you stroll around the Biltmore Estate, or brave the orchard crowds for an apple-cider doughnut. I like plants. So, if, like for me, a meander through beds bursting with blooms or a short hike into the depths of the Blue Ridge woodland sound like a dream, the mere $16 entrance fee to the North Carolina Arboretum is worth every penny—especially for their bonsai exhibition. I could drink in the majesty of the falling leaves, the goldenrod and the asters, for hours, but reluctantly, I’m pulled away for lunch.

afternoon / Downtown Asheville is bursting with funky, eclectic spots, and it can be hard to nail down lunch. I’m pleased when we find ourselves in the recently restored S&W cafeteria, now a food hall called the S &W Market. The old building’s Art Deco elegance has been tastefully

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Craft cocktails complement locally sourced dishes at Asheville Proper (left); from its Duxiana mattresses to in-room fireplaces, luxury and comfort coalesce at Applewood Manor.

accentuated, and there’s plenty of seating. My husband opts for Buxton Chicken Palace, and I enjoy a bao from Thai concept Bun Intended, but there are plenty of other options, including Highland Brewing. After a stroll around downtown, and a stop at Malaprop’s Bookstore, we head back to the B&B and take full advantage of the porches, which are made for comfy socks, cups of coffee, and a good book. Our room (and the living room downstairs) have a fireplace, and it’s so cozy, we hesitate to begin packing our things. Reluctantly, we say our goodbyes and head back to Greenville, with one last stop on the way home. After a year of closure, The Taproom at Sierra Nevada is open once again for reservations. Though the menu is smaller, the staples are still there, and my husband and I toast our adventure with a celebratory seasonal ale. As the evening darkens, we stroll through the restaurant’s garden. The leaves crunch beneath my feet, and there’s a brief chill in the air. I snuggle deeper into the cocoon of my jacket. This is the magic of fall.

Photography (left to right) by Tim Robison; Aaron Hogsed

ESCAPE • 24 HOURS IN


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ESCAPE • FIELD GUIDE

HORSE AROUND A IKEN, SOUTH CA ROLINA, DELI VERS HISTOR IC CHA R M A ND THOROUGHBRED R ACING by Libby McMillan Henson

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Photograph by Adam Ingrid

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n its early days, Aiken attracted some of America’s scions of industry with its mild winters. Families with names such as Whitney, Vanderbilt, and Astor created a “Winter Colony” here, fueled by William Aiken’s rail line that chugged into the area in 1833. Many of those wealthy families brought their horses with them, and Gilded Age trappings like private clubs, equestrian sports, and golf courses became de rigueur in the “Newport of the South.” The horsey set soon discovered that Aiken’s soft, loamy soil was perfect for training Thoroughbreds, spurring the industry that characterizes the town today. It’s not unusual to see folks walking around town in riding boots, and nearly every downtown shop I visit offers equine-themed items. Curiosity leads me down a winding residential street in a nearby neighborhood, where each historic estate has its own horse barns, if not a paddock or two. Walls, hedges, and iron gates cordon off the massive “cottages,” as the winter homes are called, erected by Aiken’s early residents. As I step inside the legendary Willcox Hotel, with its clubby wood-paneled lobby and twin fireplaces, I sense it’s going to be a special stay. It’s easy to picture turn-of-the-nineteenth-century luminaries sipping whiskey at the small bar. Winston Churchill once checked in, and Franklin D. Roosevelt is rumored to have secretly entered the back of the hotel from his private rail car to meet his mistress.

S TAY

E AT

The Willcox Hotel

Malia’s

Welcoming guests since 1900, The Willcox still reigns as Aiken’s most luxurious retreat. Snag a seat at the lobby bar for prime people-watching.

Seek out Chef Malia Koelker’s restaurant for impeccably sourced food, perfect acoustics for conversation, and the lovely outdoor courtyard.

100 Colleton Ave, Aiken. (803) 648-1898, thewillcox.com

120 Laurens St, Aiken. (803) 6433086, maliasrestaurant.com

The Whitney Restaurant and Bar Dark and sexy, The Whitney offers elevated cuisine and a staff who knows their wine.

148 Laurens St SW, Aiken. (803) 226-0911, thewhitneyaiken.com

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June Star Gazing


Photograph by Adam Ingrid

Once a winter playground for some of America’s wealthiest families, Aiken flaunts its storied past in beguiling historic homes, a 2,100-acre urban forest, and a continuing legacy of Thoroughbred horse racing.

The hotel’s longtime manager offers me Champagne and tells me I’ll be staying in the Chef’s Cottage, a newly renovated accommodation housing five rooms and a chef’s kitchen, fronted by a gated garden. Historic rooms in the hotel itself are equally gracious, and the entire property is dog-friendly. The next day, I set out to explore Hitchcock Woods, the largest privately owned urban forest in the United States, established as a hunting ground by the wealthy elite in the 1890s. This is where pampered Aiken horses and riders pass their time, but hikers and birders also take advantage of the 70 miles of sandy trails crisscrossing these tranquil 2,100 acres, which are punctuated by whimsically named areas like Whisper and Ruby’s Place, Jack Rabbit Field, and Mrs. Ewings’ Ride. Aiken’s equestrian story unfolds at the Thoroughbred Racing Hall of Fame. I’ve luckily come when Denny Duerksen, president of the board of directors of the Aiken Symphony Orchestra, is here. A font of Aiken information, Denny educates me about the city’s equestrian scene. Each November, he tells me, a new crop of young Thoroughbreds—some of whom go on to compete in Triple Crown races—begin their careers at the Aiken Training Track. Aiken’s temperate climate has drawn these young contenders since 1941, but the track’s quiet location is also key. Like children, two- and three-year-old horses have limited attention spans and are easily spooked in noisy environments. I take Denny’s advice and visit the historic Horse District, its streets unpaved to accommodate hooves. South Boundary Street’s tunnel-like oaks give way to one large, low-slung horse barn after another, each more elegant than the last. When I arrive at the Training Track, there is but one lone horse exercising. I lean on the rail with a cup of coffee in the quiet morning, taking note of the live oak in the middle of the track. Called Blue Peter’s Tree, it shades the beloved Thoroughbred champion buried beneath it. My evening is spent at the welcoming Willcox lobby bar, aka “Aiken’s living room,” where the gentleman next to me has played polo internationally and is talking about his friend Tito, who has a vodka company. I sip my zinfandel and imagine the fascinating conversations that have taken place within these walls over the decades. In the morning, nearby La Parisienne beckons, owned by yet another polo player, this one French. The walls of his authentic bakery/bistro are lined with black-and-white photos from Saratoga, Sarasota and other famous horse tracks. I savor my pastry and reluctantly say “au revoir” to this lovely city.

P L AY

Aiken Thoroughbred Racing Hall of Fame and Museum

Aiken Training Track

Discover Aiken horseracing history, and leave time to explore adjacent Hopelands Gardens.

Go on mornings in early March to watch Thoroughbreds train for the Aiken Triple Crown.

135 Dupree Pl, Aiken. (803) 6427631, aikenracinghalloffame.com

538 Two Notch Rd, Aiken. (803) 648-4631, aikentrainingtrack.com

The Capital Corporation strives to support the importance of education through local and state non-profits for the educational growth of our children in our communities.

Congratulations to Dr. Marjorie Jenkins Education Spirit Award recipient Dean of UofSC School of Medicine Greenville & Chief Academic Officer for Prisma Health-Upstate! N OVEM B ER 2021 I

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SPORT T H E B E S T S T O R I E S O F L A N D & W AT E R

A good dog is essential for successful duck hunting, as is an eye toward conservation (pictured: Will Kittredge’s English setter, Dot).

The Club shoe by Armin Oehler, $295.

For the conservation group DUCKS UNLIMITED GREENVILLE, fall heralds hunting season.

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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SPORT • PEOPLE

DUCK HUNT W ILL K ITTREDGE A ND ROB COLEM A N KEEP CONSERVATION AT THE FOREFRONT OF DUCKS UNLIMITED by Bo Wood • photography by Paul Mehaffey

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all in the Upstate is signaled by crisp air and leaves transforming into a vibrant array of orange, gold, and red. The season, the height of waterfowl migration, also marks one of the busiest times of the year for Will Kittredge and Rob Coleman, co-chairs of Ducks Unlimited Greenville. For each of them, waterfowl hunting season means much more than toting their shotguns through frigid waters into duck blinds—it’s also about a lifelong commitment to conservation. “The best thing for wildlife is a good hunter, a conservationist,” says Kittredge. “Someone that is going to give back more than they take and leave the land better than they found it.” After a multi-year hiatus, the avid outdoorsmen brought the Greenville, South Carolina, chapter of Ducks Unlimited back to their hometown with energy and enthusiasm. Their devotion is evident in their altruistic approach to making sure the privilege of hunting waterfowl, or other animals, never subsides in the area where both men were born and raised.


JOIN THE FLOCK “A lot of people get this tunnel vision that Ducks Unlimited only benefits waterfowl and wetlands,” observes Coleman. “But the positive by-product is that we improve the surrounding habitat, which helps countless other species in nature.” To date, Ducks Unlimited has poured nearly $64 million into conservation efforts in South Carolina and secured 210,000 acres of land for natural habitats. In 2020 alone, other chapters in South Carolina raised $1.8 million, while Ducks Unlimited put $5.8 million into the dirt. Kittredge and Coleman are adamant that responsible hunting starts with conservation education and grassroots efforts to put more money into the land they care for than what they

By reviving the Greenville chapter of Ducks Unlimited, Will Kittredge (opposite left) and Rob Coleman (above)—who hunts with his two golden retrievers—are striving to raise money and awareness for conservation efforts and education in the Upstate.

Interested in getting involved in Ducks Unlimited Greenville? Start by coming out to one of the events to learn what’s happening locally and nationally. Kittredge and Coleman’s goal is to attract people from all walks of life who have similar conservation values and can drive future success. “It’s about getting like-minded people together, and once they start talking, opportunities to hunt, fish, and experience wildlife come up,” notes Coleman. “Our events are not all about the ducks, it’s about all types of wildlife and learning from each other.” Ducks Unlimited’s focus is on protecting animals and sharing best practices that allow winged and four-legged creatures to thrive in the Upstate. “Our generation of hunters is continuing to learn and improve from the people who came before them,” Kittredge says. “Those stories and wisdom are so critical; it’s a generational effort. The best advice for someone getting into hunting is to find a mentor who is willing to share.” Upstate businesses took notice of the rejuvenated efforts of Greenville Ducks Unlimited, too. Duke Energy recently donated $25,000 to the Beaverdam Creek Wildlife Management Area project in Anderson County. The enhancement of this wildlife sanctuary will provide public access for hunting, birding, photography, education, and research. Find information about how to volunteer or contribute to the cause at ducks.org/southcarolina, or through the Ducks Unlimited social media channels.

take out. “Wetland habitats are not only critical to waterfowl,” Kittredge explains. “They are vital to deer, turkey, pretty much every wild animal we have in the state.” Over the years, Ducks Unlimited chapters have come and gone in Greenville, and finding the right people to lead the celebrated charitable endeavor is key to its success. The first banquet Kittredge and Coleman held as co-chairs three years ago raised $50,000—a record for the chapter—and the past three event seasons have set records year over year, raising an excess of six figures. Participation from the community is at an all-time high because it is not just about monetary donations. They need you to get your hands dirty, too. “Opportunities to help care for our land are out there,” says Coleman. “It’s about the legacy, and we thank those who laid the groundwork before us as we continue to improve the land for generations to come.”

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SPORT • GEAR

ZOOM CALL SHA RPEN YOUR FIELD FOCUS W ITH THESE HIGH-TECH OPTICS by ABBY MOORE KEITH • photograph by Paul Mehaffey

1 1. A good scope will

get the target in your crosshairs, but a great one guarantees the ideal shot. The Viper PST GEN II riflescope from Vortex Optics offers crisp images across the zoom range, a wide field of view, and enough adjustment capacity to dial in on longrange shots $800.

2

3

2. Leupold’s RX-1300I TBR rangefinder is a bowhunter’s best friend. With half-yard accuracy out to 1,300 yards, and true ballistic range to 800 yards, this lightweight tool is ideal for gauging game size and distance.$300. 3. ’Nocs are a necessary friend for hunters and explorers alike, and the BX-1 McKenzie HD 10x50mm from Leupold provides excellent magnification in a lightweight package.$200.

+

All products are available at Palmetto State Armory, palmettostatearmory.com.

New to hunting in the Carolinas? For big game, November means deer season, but head to South Carolina’s Department of Natural Resources’ website for all the info you need on zones, permits, tags, and more: sc.dnr.gov.

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STYLE

ALL THINGS STYLISH / UNIQUE / EXTRAORDINARY Color your world on canvas in a kaleidoscope of thread from The Stitching Fox needlework shop.

New to Landrum, THE STITCHING FOX caters to devotees of needlepoint.

Photograph by Will Crooks

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STYLE • THE SHOP Kathryn McMahon’s (left) whimsical needlepoint shop Stitching Fox is a colorful addition to Landrum, offering classes and community for a craft that calms and delights those who pursue it.

What attracted you to needlepoint? I was in college and that first project gave me a creative outlet outside of my classes, allowing my mind to drift while being productive with my hands. I suffered from bouts of panic attacks in my mid-twenties, and needlepoint was a way to wind down in the evenings. After that first canvas, I just always had a project I was working on.

BY A THREAD K ATHRY N M c M A HON IS STITCHING HER WAY TO SUCCESS AT HER NEW SHOP IN L A NDRUM by Valerie Pascoe • photography by Will Crooks

The first Stitching Fox shop opened in June 2020 in a 700-square-foot cabin at the Tryon International Equestrian Center in Mill Springs, North Carolina. After eight months, the business had taken off and sales skyrocketed. [So] my husband and I purchased and renovated a 2,100-squarefoot building in Landrum to give the existing needlepoint community more space to gather and create together.

What was your professional career before opening Stitching Fox?

S

outherner turned New Yorker turned Southerner again, Kathryn McMahon owns Stitching Fox, a needlepoint shop in Landrum, South Carolina, that attracts clients from Tennessee all the way to the Carolina coast. After a year of booming sales online, McMahon is helping to build the area’s largest multi-generational stitching community, one witty hand-painted canvas at a time.

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What prompted you to open a needlepoint shop?

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After college, I moved to New York City and worked in sales and marketing with several luxury home brands. My first position was with Scully & Scully on Park Avenue, where I soon became a national sales director with Hermès in their corporate office. I was traveling about 70 percent of the time and needlepoint always accompanied me on flights, commutes, and in hotel rooms. After nearly 13 fast-paced


years in New York City, I longed for a change in lifestyle, so I moved back south (I’m originally from Augusta, Georgia) to slow down and regain some much-needed balance. I met my husband and started pursuing nonprofit work, truly becoming a part of the community.

How does someone get started in needlepoint? It has been my experience that everyone can learn to stitch. Needlepoint is an activity that spans all ages and allows people to develop great hand-eye coordination and to build new pathways in the brain. It is one of the easiest needlework activities. You only need a canvas, fiber, and a needle. It’s portable and great for when you’re waiting in line, traveling, or just need to relax without endless scrolling on an electronic device.

What should customers expect when they visit Stitching Fox? I want people to experience more than just the retail side of the store. I want them to experience the inclusivity our community of stitchers creates. The shop is my vision of a happy space for people looking for a creative outlet that also allows them to practice self-care and be in the moment. Stitching Fox, 22349 Asheville Hwy, Landrum. (828) 222-5018, stitchingfox.com. Check out the latest canvases and classes on Instagram: @stitchingfoxnc.

Southerner turned New Yorker turned Southerner again, Kathryn McMahon owns Stitching Fox, a needlepoint shop in Landrum, South Carolina, that attracts clients from Tennessee all the way to the Carolina coast. After a year of booming sales online, McMahon is helping to build the area’s largest multigenerational stitching community, one witty hand-painted canvas at a time.

What attracted you to needlepoint?

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EXTRA • BOOKS

Cheryl Day’s Treasury of Southern Baking is a field guide of old-fashioned recipe reimagining. Join her in conversation at M. Judson Booksellers on November 18.

GIMME SUGAR CHERYL DAY’S POPULAR SAVANNAH BAKERY INSPIRES A NEW COOKBOOK by Ashley Warlick

T

he first time I found myself in line at Back in the Day Bakery in Savannah, I thought I was there for the cookies. The chocolate chip cookies, with a light dusting of fleur de sel, first eaten at my friend Kelley’s house, after she called and said I should drive across town right that moment because these were the best cookies she’d ever made. Which was correct. They were lightly colored, crisp on the outside, chewy inside, with chunks of good chocolate and a salty crunch— exactly the kind of kitchen alchemy that keeps people with busy lives baking for themselves, their friends and families.

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Kelley had gotten the recipe from The Back in the Day Bakery Cookbook, which I bought and read cover to cover, thoroughly falling in love with its author, Cheryl Day. Cheryl is a self-taught scratch baker who, with her husband Griff, opened Back in the Day Bakery almost twenty years ago, filling the case in their funky storefront with cookies, muffins, biscones (which are a crafty combination of biscuits and scones), cold-oven pound cake and fruit pies, as well as Griff’s magnificent breads. Customers lined up around the block. My wait that afternoon in Savannah for a cookie ended up earning me a boxful, plus a crumble-topped peach pie that actually made it home. This fall, Cheryl debuts a new cookbook, Cheryl Day’s Treasury of Southern Baking. It’s a field guide of old-fashioned recipe reimagining, Sally Lunn and hummingbird cake, cathead biscuits, chess pie and cheese wafers (with Rice Krispies, of course.) Cheryl’s roots in Southern baking run deep; her own great-great grandmother was an enslaved person famous for her biscuits and cakes, a through line that gives her work ballast. She’s now a cofounder of Southern Restaurants for Racial Justice, and a founding member of the leadership committee for the James Beard Foundation Investment Fund for Black and Indigenous Americans. There’s an extension of an idea here, too, that a life spent baking makes for a goodness you can share. Don’t miss Cheryl in conversation at M. Judson Booksellers on November 18. Cocktails & Conversation with Cheryl Day is an evening in celebration of Cheryl’s new cookbook, Cheryl Day’s Treasury of Southern Baking, on November 18th at 7pm. Tickets include a copy of the book, a treat made from one of Cheryl’s recipes, and a glass of bubbly. Tickets and more details available at mjudsonbooks.com.


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A Child’s Haven • Allen Temple CEDC • Alston Wilkes Society • Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Upstate • Blue Tent • Camp Opportunity • Camp Spearhead • Camperdown Academy • Carolina Family Services • Catholic Charities, Diocese of Charleston • Center for Developmental Services • Children’s Cancer Partners of the Carolinas • City of Greenville Parks and Recreation Department • City of Greenville Police Department • Clarity • Clement’s Kindness Fund for the Children • Conestee Foundation • Diligent Hands Gracious Hearts • FAVOR Faces And Voices Of Recovery • Feed & Seed • Foothills Family Resources • Fostering Great Ideas • Friends of the Reedy River • Furman University Bridges to a Brighter Future • Gateway House • Generation Group Homes of Greenville • Girl Scouts of SC, Mountains to Midlands • Graduate Greenville • Greenville Area Interfaith Hospitality Network • Greenville Center for Creative Arts • Greenville County Schools Food & Nutrition Services • Greenville County Schools Lifelong Learning • Greenville Free Medical Clinic • Greenville Literacy Association • Greenville Theatre • Greenville Rape Crisis & Child Abuse Center • Greenville Zoo FoundationHArvest Hope Food Bank • Greer Community Ministries • Habitat for Humanity • Harvest Hope Food Bank • Homes of Hope • Jasmine Road • Julie Valentine Center • Legacy Charter School • Legacy Early College High School • LiveWell Greenville • Loaves & Fishes • Meals on Wheels of Greenville • Mental Health America, Greenville County • Metropolitan Arts Council • Meyer Center for Special Children • Mill Community Ministries • NAMI National Alliance on Mental Illness, Greenville • Naturaland Trust • Pendleton Place • Phillis Wheatley Association • Pleasant Valley Connection • Project HOPE Foundation • Project Host • Public Education Partners Greenville County • Rebuild Upstate • Safe Harbor • Salvation Army Boys and Girls Club • SC First Steps to School Readiness • Senior Action • Soteria at Work • South Carolina Children’s Theatre • Speech, Hearing and Learning Center • St. Anthony of Padua Catholic School • Surgeons for Sight • SWITCH • Taylors Free Medical Clinic • The Family Effect • The Frazee Center • The Generous Garden Project • The Music Club of Greenville for Tanglewood Middle School • The Turning Point of South Carolina • The Warehouse Theatre • TreesUpstate • Triune Mercy Center • United Ministries • Upstate Forever • Urban League of the Upstate • Washington Center • Welvista • YMCA Teen Services Branch • YouthBASE • YWCA

$7 Million • 134 Grants • 86 Non-Profits Giving Collectively | Granting Strategically | Growing a Greater Greenville

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Time to get to know you. Time to get to know your goals. Time to plan a successful strategy. Our first meeting with you is simple: we get to know each other and determine if there is a good fit. That’s all. We don’t try to sell you anything. There are no investment recommendations, no product discussions nor papers to sign. At the end of the day, we want a WIN-WIN situation. That’s why we don’t put pressure on you to commit at first glance. In other words, our second meeting is up to you. We will wait for you to contact us when you’re ready. At the Poplin Financial Strategies Group we are connected to you through community and friendship. We act as trusted advisors and work collaboratively to build solid bonds to help us understand how we can manage your investments to help achieve your goals. Keep your financial picture in focus with comprehensive planning to build, manage, preserve and transition your weath.

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Man About TOWN

CLEANING HOUSE WHILE SELLING HIS MOM’S HOME, THE M A N CONSIDERS THE BUR DEN OF THINGS by Steven Tingle

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ast month I sold my mom’s house. It’s a strange thing to sell someone’s home without them knowing it. After moving my mom into a memory-care facility last spring, it came down to me, her only child, to tie up some of the loose ends of her former life. One of those ends being a large house situated on the side of a mountain in western North Carolina. “I can’t help but feel a bit guilty about this,” I said to the attorney who drafted the closing documents. He shrugged, adjusted his mask, then pushed a stack of papers toward me. As I signed them, the pit in my stomach grew. The last document was an agreement to have all personal property removed from the house within sixty days. That’s when I almost threw up. It’s shocking how many things a person can collect over 81 years of life. My mom wasn’t a hoarder. I think casual accumulator is a more accurate term, but her house was absolutely crammed full of stuff. Every drawer, every cabinet, every shelf held a cache of ephemera. If I were retired and had the luxury of time, say a solid eighteen months, I probably could have set up an eBay store and made a small fortune selling off the clutter my mom had amassed. Instead, I hired an estate company to take all of the furniture, hauled dozens of boxes of clothes, dishes, and décor to local charities, then

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rented a one-ton capacity dumpster and filled it four times. I called my daughter when I finished the job. “I literally threw out four tons of junk from Nana’s house,” I said. “And I don’t mean literally the way you use the word—I mean literally literally.” During the disposal process, I repeated a mantra to myself: I’m never going to put my loved ones through this. I made a promise that when I returned home to Greenville, I would begin discarding all of the useless crap I’ve collected so when my time comes, hopefully later rather than sooner, Jess and my kids won’t be left with the burden of getting rid of it. But while I found throwing out my mom’s stuff to be a mindless task, throwing away my things is a bit more challenging. Every item I start to toss in the trash seems, upon further reflection, worthy of keeping. Ten-year-old issues of The New Yorker? There are some good cartoons in those. A MacBook Pro that hasn’t worked since 2013? That could be a collectable one day. Fifteen identical Allen wrenches for Ikea furniture I no longer own? Better to have them and not need them. Deep down I know a lot of my stuff belongs in a dumpster. But I’m afraid someone else is going to have to put it there. Steven Tingle is the author of recently published novel Graveyard Fields and is the monthly contributor to this column. Find more at steventingle.com.



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Elliott Davis was founded over 100 years ago on the ideal of serving others. Our mission is to make a positive impact on our customers, our people, and our communities. We know that living up to this principle will always be the most important work we do.


2021 CHARITABLE GIVING AWARDS

Torchbearers and groundbreakers. Nurturers and light-bringers. We celebrate the generosity of spirit and action that lifts up our community, out of darkness and Into the Light. BY Beth Brown Ables, Andrew Huang, John Jeter, Abby Moore Keith, M. Linda Lee, and Angie Toole Thompson

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY Eli Warren


Artwork (Spotted Wings I) by Judy Verhoeven

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A Message of Hope NAMI GREENVILLE PROVIDES ESSENTIAL HELP FOR THOSE STRUGGLING WITH MENTAL ILLNESS BY M. Linda Lee

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arland Mattox had never heard of the National Alliance on Mental Illness until her son became ill. Mattox, a full-time artist who has served on NAMI’s board of directors for seven years, had no idea where to turn for help, until a nurse she called in Boston suggested she contact NAMI. “I went to the mailbox that day and got my bulletin from Westminster Presbyterian Church,” Mattox recalls, “and on the back, it said ‘Mondays at 6:15 – NAMI.’ So it was a resource that had been there, but I never knew about it.” Established in 1986, NAMI Greenville (one in an alliance of 600 local affiliates) improves the quality of life and treatment for those living with mental illness. But it also improves life for their families through education, support, and advocacy. “The most transformative moment for me was when my husband and I took NAMI’s Family to Family course,” says Mattox. As a physician, her husband felt he had little to learn from the class—designed to help families understand mental health diagnoses, medications, and the brain, as well as how to care for struggling loved ones. But he ultimately admitted he learned more about mental illness in those 12 weeks than he had in four years of medical school. “NAMI not only changed our family’s life, it also affected my husband’s medical practice because it opened his eyes. It’s really had a profound impact on both of us, personally and professionally.” It’s all about connecting people to local resources, asserts Ken Dority, the executive director of NAMI since 2013. Many folks don’t know where to start when they experience a mental health crisis. NAMI not only

helps families navigate a health care system that’s not designed with the mentally ill in mind, but also connects them to legal resources, if needed. Through education and advocacy efforts, NAMI strives to remove the stigma associated with mental illness—one which often prevents people from seeking treatment. “NAMI’s real strength is that it’s a grassroots organization—people with lived experience help others,” explains Dave Stafford, chief human resources officer for Michelin North America who has served on both the NAMI Greenville and NAMI national boards. “This shared-experience model means that to teach a class or facilitate a support group, not only do you have to go through education to learn how to do those things, but you must have experienced them yourself,” adds Dority. “We start with empathy at the highest level.” “Ken lives the heart of NAMI every day,” observes Stafford. “He was named Executive Director of the Year by NAMI national in 2020, the same year NAMI Greenville was recognized as the country’s top affiliate.” During Dority’s tenure, NAMI has significantly expanded its reach, in part by establishing partnerships with other community organizations. In 2012, the year he came to NAMI Greenville, Dority saw just over 1,200 people participating across all their programs. In 2020, that number had risen to 8,000. “We are so grateful to receive this award,” Dority says. “Our staff and volunteers work hard to serve this community and to deliver a message of hope, help, and encouragement. And it all has a ripple effect— when NAMI changes one life, it changes other lives around them.”

“KEN DORITY IS A TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADER WHO HAS EXPANDED ACCESS TO SERVICES, TREATMENT, AND RESEARCH FOR THOSE WITH MENTAL ILLNESS BY BUILDING BRIDGES ACROSS ORGANIZATIONS AND INTO UNDERSERVED COMMUNITIES.” —Mark O’Halla, president & CEO, Prisma Health

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As a primary community resource for those battling mental illness (and their families), NAMI Greenville provides a range of programs to help educate, support, and advocate for mental health. Through Ken Dority’s leadership as executive director, the nonprofit has greatly expanded its reach and services, providing help and hope for countless individuals.


HEALTHCARE TRANSFORMATION AWARD / NAMI

THE HEALTHCARE TRANSFORMATION AWARD HONORS AN OUTSTANDING INDIVIDUAL OR ORGANIZATION THAT ACTIVELY AND COMPASSIONATELY WORKS TO TRANSFORM THE HEALTH OF OUR COMMUNITY THROUGH CONTRIBUTIONS OF TIME, TALENT, AND TREASURE.

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RUTH NICHOLSON AWARD / LESA KASTLER

THE RUTH NICHOLSON AWARD IS THE HIGHEST HONOR PRESENTED BY THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION EACH YEAR AND HONORS THE VOLUNTEER WHO HAS MADE SIGNIFICANT CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE GREENVILLE COMMUNITY THROUGH VOLUNTEER WORK FOR THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OR TO ONE OF ITS PROJECTS, PROGRAMS, OR AREAS OF EMPHASIS.

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Trail Blazer WITH DECADES OF SERVICE IN MANY UPSTATE ORGANIZATIONS, LESA KASTLER PAVES THE WAY FOR COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT WITH HUMILITY, PERSEVERANCE, AND GRACE BY Abby Moore Keith

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For three decades, Lesa Kastler has effectively utilized her education and leadership abilities to energize countless Upstate organizations. Her capital campaign work for A Child’s Haven, as well as her most recent tenure leading the Community Foundation through the COVID-19 pandemic, has provided many lives with essential funds and resources.

hen you meet Lesa Kastler, it’s clear from the get-go she’s not interested in talking about herself. The mother of two, now an empty nester, is a calming presence, and it makes sense her colleagues choose words like “humble” and “graceful” to describe her. But ask Lesa about the nonprofit work she’s been involved with over the last 30 years, and the quiet demeanor shifts. In fact, she has quite a lot to say. Lesa and her husband rooted themselves in Greenville in the 1990s, when Bill’s job transferred the family to South Carolina from Texas. Bill launched into a successful career as a tax partner with PricewaterhouseCoopers, while Lesa took “the road less traveled,” as she says, referencing the proverbial Robert Frost line. “Moving here with the boys being as young as they were and my husband’s work being very demanding, I just ended up on a different pathway— being involved in nonprofits and applying my degree in a different way.” Lesa simply began investing in what was in front of her, but her graduate and doctoral degrees in education certainly came in handy. When her fouryear-old needed therapy, she volunteered with the Speech, Hearing, and Learning Center. Recognizing a community need for expanded services, she rallied a planning committee, and helped launch the Center for Developmental Services, now a multifaceted cooperative meeting essential needs for young children in our community. Following her passion for childhood intervention, she joined the advisory council for A Child’s Haven, a local nonprofit working with preschoolers with

behavioral delays. Lesa chaired the organization through their capital campaign, raising $5.5 million to help build a new facility and expand their services. She served as president of the Junior League, joined the Rose Ball committee, the Boy Scouts board for Troop 11, and the elder board at Fourth Presbyterian Church— she even became the unofficial communications director for Greenville High’s lacrosse team. Wherever Lesa touched, committees formed, groups became activated, and organizations transformed for the better. “Whenever Lesa serves on a board, within two or three years she’s going to be president,” says Kimberly Cooley, who has served with Lesa at A Child’s Haven and Junior League. “She possesses all of the leadership qualities—commitment, dedication, and grace.” Now, Lesa’s sons are grown, and with her husband’s recent retirement, the two are transitioning into life as empty nesters. But that hasn’t dampened Lesa’s passion for her city or her heart for others. Most recently, her efforts have been focused on the Community Foundation, helping them navigate providing resources during the tumultuous events of 2020. “I had the good fortune of serving as the vice chair of the Community Foundation during Lesa’s tenure as chair,” says Liz Seman, current chair of the foundation. “She did an amazing job leading our organization— especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.” It’s tempting to ask Lesa to talk more about her successes, and the legacy she has established in the Upstate community. But that would be incongruous. Instead, her message is for others. “Everyone has gifts and abilities they can contribute,” Lesa says. “There’s a role for all of us to play to achieve good outcomes for our community. It matters.”

“LESA’S EXCEPTIONAL LEADERSHIP DURING THE PANDEMIC AND STOCK MARKET DECLINE ALLOWED US TO INCREASE OUR GIVING FOR FOOD, HOUSING, AND COMMUNITY CENTERS ACROSS GREENVILLE COUNTY. HER CALMING PRESENCE SERVED TO KEEP THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION FOCUSED ON OUR LONG-TERM STRATEGIES WHILE RESPONDING WITH COMPASSION.” —Bob Morris, president of the Community Foundation of Greenville

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Bountiful Harvest ROOTED DEEP IN GREENVILLE’S UNDER-RESOURCED AREAS, MILL VILLAGE MINISTRIES UNDERSTANDS LASTING COMMUNITY CHANGE COMES FROM THE GROUND UP BY Beth Brown Ables

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aith goes into planting a garden: you bury a seed, water, and wait. Planting teaches what it means to live life on this Earth, how tending and listening, learning and connection are not just good things, but vital. After a missional gap year in the Lowcountry, Dan Weidenbenner set down roots in Greenville’s Greater Sullivan neighborhood, joined Long Branch Baptist Church, and began listening, learning, and connecting with his neighbors and church family. What grew from those choices now flourishes as Mill Village Ministries, a burgeoning microcosm of farming, cycling, entrepreneurship, and faith. Weidenbenner’s year after graduating from Furman University was a fruitful one. “As Christians, we’re called to one another, to break down walls of race and poverty,” lessons he learned during his experience living and working in Allendale, South Carolina, through a program with Grace Church. “I knew there was a need for this [in Greenville], that I had more to learn and also skills to offer.” No doubt you’ve heard of Mill Village Farms. Maybe you’ve passed a plot of land in the Pendleton, White Horse Road, or Sullivan communities. Perhaps you’ve stopped by the Village Wrench in West Greenville to get your bike repaired or donate your old one. Possibly you’ve stumbled upon the Third Thursday Market in Poe West, chatted and shopped the stalls offering wares from the entrepreneurs with Village Launch. But if this is all new to you, let it be known: Mill Village Ministries is a model of what can be when people of faith link arms, look outside of themselves, and see how they can help a fellow neighbor. Long Branch Baptist pastor Sean Dogan (Mill Village Ministries’ board chair) saw the sincerity in what Weidenbenner was doing. Greater Sullivan, as with the majority of Greenville’s mill villages, is in what is considered a food desert, a place where fresh produce and/or groceries cannot be found within walking or biking distance. Most families resort to convenience stores to supply food for their tables. Dogan and Weidenbenner connected an empty plot of land with church members’ knowledge of

gardening and found a simple solution: teach local kids how to grow and harvest nutritious food. That first summer, Mill Village Farms hired four teenagers, and now employs quadruple that number. The idea took root and held. Once the farm teens were earning a paycheck, it became evident they lacked financial literacy, so classes on banking, saving, and taxes began. At Mill Village farmer’s markets, customers arrived on broken and faulty bicycles, so a few supporters set up free repair stations, the beginning of Village Wrench. Like a flourishing garden, the programs grew with the needs. COVID-19 changed things. Boxes from Mill Villages’ FoodShare program (including farm produce) ballooned from 200 boxes per week to a thousand. Village Wrench repaired over 1,000 bicycles as public transportation grew more limited. Unemployment meant that for many a side hustle became a main source of income, meaning Village Launch has more interest than ever, educating new entrepreneurs while keeping money in the community. Village Engage, under the umbrella of Village Community, continued their work of justice and compassion, memorializing victims of racial terror in the midst of 2020’s racial reckoning. Tabita Romera, a former Mill Village student, finds visible satisfaction in her work. “I really like how everything connects. [As a student], I liked how my work was being shown in the community. I knew that the produce we were harvesting, it was going to help the community.” Now a freshman at North Greenville University, Romera is majoring in education, a track that she sees as divinely ordained. “God put me here, and building relationships with Mill Village students helps me be confident to build connections with my future classroom.” From a fresh-out-of-college idea to the present, Mill Village Ministries continues the Good Work, strengthening and connecting Greenville’s communities, starting at the root. “We know what works now,” says Weidenbenner. “We all have a giftedness to share, to give to others. We will continue to build more partnerships and grow and deepen our current relationships.”

“ON BEHALF OF FIRST HORIZON, WE ARE HONORED TO SUPPORT THE CHARITABLE GIVING AWARDS AGAIN THIS YEAR AND RECOGNIZE MILL VILLAGE MINISTRIES, AND EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR DAN WEIDENBENNER, AS THE COMMUNITY SPIRIT AWARD WINNER. WE SUPPORT THEM IN THEIR EFFORTS AND TAKE PRIDE IN OUR COMMITMENT TO WORK WITH LIKE-MINDED ORGANIZATIONS CONTINUING THE GROWTH AND SUCCESS OF THE GREENVILLE COMMUNITY.” —Sam Erwin, executive vice president / mid-Atlantic regional president of First Horizon Bank

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Dan Weidenbenner launched Mill Village Farms in 2012 in response to a lack of fresh food in his neighborhood. His ideas then flourished into Village Wrench, Village Launch, and more, each effort designed to strengthen Greenville’s communities.


COMMUNITY SPIRIT AWARD / MILL VILLAGE MINISTRIES

THE COMMUNITY SPIRIT AWARD IS GIVEN TO AN OUTSTANDING NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION THAT SERVES THE COMMUNITY THROUGH ITS VITAL PROGRAMS AND THROUGH ITS EXCEPTIONAL EFFORTS TO COMMUNICATE AND PARTNER WITH OTHER NONPROFITS.

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PHILANTHROPIC SPIRIT AWARD / TD BANK

THE PHILANTHROPIC SPIRIT AWARD HONORS AN OUTSTANDING INDIVIDUAL OR ORGANIZATION THAT FOSTERS CHARITABLE GIVING AND IS DEDICATED TO GIVING BACK TO THE UPSTATE IN A SIGNIFICANT MANNER.

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Banking on Benevolence AS ONE OF OUR CITY’S LEADING FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS, TD BANK SETS A HIGH BAR FOR GENEROSITY AND COMMUNITY SERVICE BY John Jeter

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text here David Lominack (left, pictured here with TD Bank staff members Jessica Grella, Chris Fincher, and Nikki Phillips) oversees his bank’s contribution of $1 million per year through its charitable foundation.

he signs of its largesse are everywhere. From an afternoon at the ballpark to an evening of music under the stars, even a springtime festival showcasing homegrown artists, TD Bank’s sponsorship signs appear everywhere. And those signs point to why the Community Foundation of Greenville and Community Journals honor the bank with this year’s Philanthropic Spirit Award. “It’s on behalf of our customers and our employees that we accept this recognition and any recognition for what we do out in the community,” says David Lominack, the bank’s South Carolina market president. “Things go full circle, right? When we give back to the community, the community does better, we all do better.” Across the Palmetto State, 3,000 bank employees, of which 2,200 work in the Upstate, are known for “rolling up their sleeves,” he says. They volunteer thousands of hours each year, planting more than 250 trees, coaching Little League, and serving on boards, among other roles. Lominack himself co-chairs the Greenville Racial Equity and Economic Mobility Commission, which the Greenville Chamber of Commerce, United Way of Greenville County, and the Urban League of the Upstate launched in 2020. Merl Code, the prominent Greenville lawyer who chairs REEM alongside Lominack, says the organization never would have gotten off the ground without the bank’s financial support. “They believe in equality, they believe in inclusiveness, they believe in allowing all of those in the community to grow and prosper,” Code says.

“We are so fortunate to have TD Bank as a citizen and as a community partner. They have opened their doors to philanthropic giving. And their personnel get involved in the kind of activities that enhance our community.” By the end of this year, REEM aims to present recommendations for social- and economic-justice initiatives, Code says. Notably, he adds, the report will focus strictly on Greenville: “Who better to go to but the people who live in this community?” Lominack credits the bank’s customers and employees for providing TD Bank the opportunities to contribute $1 million every year through sponsorships and grants from the TD Bank Charitable Foundation. Those include the TD Stage at the Peace Center, the TD Saturday Market, a partnership with the Greenville Drive, and many more. Gifts have benefited such nonprofits as the Metropolitan Arts Council, Habitat for Humanity, Goodwill Industries, YMCA of Greenville, the Urban League, and United Way, among dozens of others. Artisphere, which produces the hugely popular spring arts fair, has received TD Bank’s support for 17 years, says Kerry Murphy, the festival’s executive director. “You don’t have to look far around Greenville and the Upstate to see their commitment,” she says. “TD Bank’s contribution to the social and economic vitality of our community has played a critical role in the thoughtful development of a growing city where people are proud to live.” And, as Lominack concludes, “There are just so many great organizations that are doing a ton of good work, and it’s just fun to be a part of it.”

“FOR MANY YEARS, TD BANK HAS BEEN VERY GENEROUS WITH THEIR RESOURCES TO ASSIST AND HELP OUR GREENVILLE COMMUNITY IN EVERY WALK OF LIFE. THEIR INVESTMENT HAS CONTRIBUTED SIGNIFICANTLY IN MAKING OUR GREENVILLE COMMUNITY A BETTER PLACE IN WHICH TO LIVE. TD BANK CONTINUES TO BE FOREVER MINDFUL OF THE NEEDS OF OTHERS.” —Howard Einstein, division president, Marsh McLennan Agency

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Common Knowledge AS DEAN AT THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE GREENVILLE, DR. MARJORIE JENKINS IS A GUIDING LIGHT FOR STUDENTS BY Angie Toole Thompson

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hat do you want to be when you grow up?” It’s a question full of possibility, full of the weight of choices and chances. When Marjorie Jenkins’ grandfather asked her this question, she was only five years old—one of eight children in a poor, single-parent Appalachian family. “I want to be a doctor like you,” young Marjorie answered her grandfather. He worked at a hospital, she thought, so he must be a doctor. “He always seemed like the smartest person in the room,” she remembers. It was years later that Marjorie found out that her grandfather wasn’t a doctor at all, but a coal miner turned hospital janitor. What really stuck was his work ethic—and that of her hardworking, widowed mother. Marjorie’s grandfather’s question echoed with her through challenges and odds, and now? Well, you can call her Dr. Marjorie Jenkins, MD, MEdHP, FACP. In 2019, Dr. Jenkins made a life-shifting move to Greenville, South Carolina. She had spent the prior four years directing health and policy research initiatives at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Office of Women’s Health. “[My husband] Steve and I were planning the move back to West Texas, where I would resume a full-time academic role within Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center and the Laura Bush Institute.” She had previously achieved tenure at Texas Tech, where she founded the Laura Bush Institute for Women’s Health. Dr. Jenkins’ husband encouraged her to apply for a deanship at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville, and when her colleagues at Texas Tech emailed her the same position, she knew she had to apply. “From my first visit . . . it was evident that this was a school with a passion for its students and the community,” Dr. Jenkins explains. “From that point, I was all in.” Dr. Jenkins came to Greenville with a squall of experience in her sails. Throughout her tenure as

a professor of medicine at Texas Tech University, Dr. Jenkins also served as the Associate Dean for Women in Medicine and Science. It’s clear that she is an enthusiastic proponent of the power of a good program, because in addition to growing the Laura W. Bush Institute across five Texas Tech campuses and beyond, she also spearheaded the U.S. Sex and Gender Medical Education Summit. Her work in both women’s health and sex and gender inclusion is, perhaps, her signature in the field. This important work has made waves not only in medical research, but in the ways in which clinicians assess, diagnose, and treat all patients. “The best-kept secret in medicine is the fact that over thousands of years, scientific research has ignored sex and gender,” she explains, “two foundational variables that all humans have without fail. Yet, scientists have ignored studying differences due to sex and gender when conducting medical research.” Not under her watch. “One driver for my career in sex and gender medicine was ensuring the tens of billions of dollars spent each year on research within the U.S. could be applied to all and not just benefit a certain group of people,” she says. An equal motivator for the doctor is ensuring that evidencebased differences would be applied meaningfully in clinical settings—for the medical, nursing, and pharmacy students who are headed into the field. Dr. Jenkins is vigilant about preparing the next generation of healthcare workers. “Our state tracks in the bottom ten states for negative health outcomes,” she says, though her optimism is secure. “[School of Medicine Greenville] students learn from top-notch clinicians who are Prisma Health physicians, in addition to training around high-value care and improving the health of a population.” Dr. Jenkins is the right captain for the ship, believing unflinchingly in a better state of health for South Carolina. “We have met and exceeded many expectations,” says Dr. Jenkins confidently. “There is more work to do.”

“DR. MARJORIE JENKINS NEVER LOST SIGHT OF HER DREAM OF BECOMING A DOCTOR. THROUGH HER PERSEVERANCE, SHE ACHIEVED HER DREAM AND HAS PROVEN HERSELF IN MEDICAL ACADEMIA. AS DEAN OF USC SCHOOL OF MEDICINE GREENVILLE, PASSION DRIVES HER TO SUPPORT THESE STUDENTS WHO WANT TO ACHIEVE THIS SAME DREAM.” —Dan Adams, president and CEO,The Capital Corporation

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From humble beginnings, Dr. Marjorie Jenkins has risen beyond her childhood dream of being a doctor to become a gifted educator and advocate for women’s health.


EDUCATION SPIRIT AWARD / DR. MARJORIE JENKINS

THE EDUCATION SPIRIT AWARD RECOGNIZES AN INDIVIDUAL OR ORGANIZATION DEDICATED TO THE BETTERMENT OF YOUTH AND THE EDUCATION EXPERIENCE FOR THE UPSTATE.

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LEADERSHIP IN ARTS AWARD / METROPOLITAN ARTS COUNCIL

THE LEADERSHIP IN ARTS AWARD RECOGNIZES AN ORGANIZATION THAT SERVES OUR COMMUNITY THROUGH OUTSTANDING ARTS LEADERSHIP AND OUTREACH PROGRAMMING, THEREFORE ELEVATING THE ARTISTIC OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE IN OUR COMMUNITY.

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Cultural Riches THE METROPOLITAN ARTS COUNCIL PROVIDES A BEDROCK FOR SUSTAINING GREENVILLE’S ARTS COMMUNITY BY Andrew Huang

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text here As executive director of MAC for nearly two decades, Alan Ethridge shepherded the organization through the worst of the pandemic. Last year, MAC raised and distributed relief funds to nearly three dozen local arts groups.

ny statistician worth their salt would say correlation is not causation, and they’d be right. But it’s hard not to see a link between the tandem growth of Greenville’s art community and its rising national prominence as one of the best places to live, work, and visit. “There’s no better example than Greenville of how the arts can transform a community,” says Alan Ethridge. “All this started when the Peace Center opened in 1990, and you see the profound effect it and other arts organizations have had. Greenville has experienced a true renaissance, and I think the arts have played a huge part in that.” Ethridge would know. He’s served as executive director of the Metropolitan Arts Council (MAC) since 2006, and in that role, he’s helped shape the local arts landscape for nearly two decades. MAC’s core function is a simple one. As an umbrella arts organization, it provides funding to individual artists, arts organizations, and art education initiatives. However, funding is simply a means to an end. “Our underlying philosophy is that the arts are for everyone,” Ethridge explains. In practice, that means ensuring artists have the resources to create and express. It also means prioritizing access, so that arts experiences are available to as diverse a cross-section of the public as possible. But most importantly, it means nurturing the arts community so that it can continue growing and thriving into future generations. In 2009, the MAC Endowment for the Arts was created with that future in mind. “As Greenville grows, there are going to be more and more

initiatives, and there is going to have to be a stable source of funding for everyone,” says Ethridge. “And what a wonderful thing to have an endowment, because it will continue to be a source of funding, long after we’ve gone.” By the end of 2019, the endowment counted over $1 million on its books. But then the world ground to a halt in March 2020. “We weren’t going to take any withdrawals until we met our initial $3 million goal, but when COVID-19 came, we knew this was the perfect time for MAC to step up to the plate,” says Ethridge. “When we saw how hard artists and organizations were getting hit by the pandemic, we worked very closely with the board to make a plan. Since the pandemic began, we’ve withdrawn about $300,000, but we also sought out foundations and partners to match or augment our withdrawals.” With contributions from The Graham Foundation, Hollingsworth Funds, the Community Foundation of Greenville, and the Canal Charitable Foundation, MAC has been able to distribute over $660,000 in COVID-19 relief funds to 33 local arts organizations. “Alan’s hard work paid off as evidenced by MAC’s ability to support so many of Greenville’s arts organizations challenged during the pandemic,” says Mark Johnston, publisher of Community Journals and longtime friend and supporter of MAC. “I know firsthand how critical this lifeline was for many of them.” Despite the immense challenges presented by the pandemic, the Metropolitan Arts Council closes out 2021 even better positioned to support the artistic and cultural expressions that help make Greenville such an enviable place to be.

“ALAN IS A PASSIONATE BELIEVER IN, AND POWERFUL ADVOCATE FOR, THE ARTS AND ITS POWER TO TRANSFORM COMMUNITIES. AND THROUGH HIS LEADERSHIP AT MAC, HE HAS PLAYED A TREMENDOUS ROLE IN BUILDING AND NURTURING OUR LOCAL ARTS SCENE, WHICH IS VITAL TO RESIDENTS’ QUALITY OF LIFE, TOURISM, AND OUR LOCAL ECONOMY.” —Susan Lambert, board president and CEO, The Graham Foundation

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DJ RAMA, PRESIDENT OF AURO HOTELS AND RECIPIENT OF THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION’S VISIONARY LEADERSHIP AWARD, ILLUMINATES THE CITY WITH HIS CREATIVITY. BY Stephanie Trotter PHOTOGRAPHY BY Paul Mehaffey

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The son of immigrants whose first U.S. business endeavor was a 40-room motel in California, hotelier and philanthropist DJ Rama recognizes the importance of helping others to succeed.

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In the design of Auro’s new AC Hotel, DJ Rama (opposite) honors elements of Greenville’s past, including The Greenville News, the textile industry, and the arts.

and compromises, where we try to ensure each generation is set up for success tomorrow.” The sprawling Rama family strives not only for individual success, but for the success of strangers and the community at large. Philanthropy is a primary component within the Auro Hotel group’s operating manual. “At the end of the day, all of us have always received help,” Rama notes. He describes how outsiders backed his father and uncles when they raised $19,000 to make their first purchase—a 40-room strip motel in Pomona, California—in 1973. “We can never forget to do our part to help others succeed in life, too.” As the recipient of this year’s Community Foundation’s Visionary Leadership Award, honoring community involvement and lifelong service to others, Rama states that he does not stand alone. “I wish all the best to family members, and those who have received it in the past, and leaders of the future, who hopefully will keep giving back to Greenville.” This conversation, like most with DJ, blends past with present and future.

DJ Rama surveys the horizon from Juniper, Greenville’s hottest new gathering spot, which towers over Main Street. A peachy sunset bathes the Blue Ridge in the distance, while folks gather below, at the entrance to the AC Hotel. Dozens of thoughts race through Rama’s mind, including gratitude. The hotelier may be standing atop the $70 million complex, his latest creation in Greenville, but he’s still the little boy afraid of snakes, living behind his family’s coke and candy shop in Malawi, the African nation where he was born. “It was simple living,” the entrepreneur recalls. “It was very modest. Our home was connected to the store and there was a jungle out back. You had your business that you protected . . . because you were the manpower. You ran the place.” Today, Dharmendra “DJ” Rama runs Auro Hotels, a privately owned company with 41 properties, 4,300 employees, and 6,000 rooms around the world. Rama’s ascent in the industry represents the quintessential American Dream: immigrant family hits U.S. shores, works hard, and builds a hotel empire. “When you put that all in front of me, starting with my grandfather’s mango and rice farm in India, it’s a great journey,” the 53-year-old confides. “Forty-seven years of hard work, by all the family members. So many sacrifices

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The Past / Early in the new millennium, Main Street development was moving past the Reedy River into the West End. The Hyatt Regency, the original catalyst for the downtown renaissance, sat neglected at the opposite end of town. DJ’s family business purchased the place in 2011, injecting money, energy, and vision that once again lured people to North Main Street. Mayor Knox White witnessed Rama “bringing the Hyatt into the modern era” with his attention to detail and keen eye. “When the Hyatt was built, it was like it was hermetically sealed because you didn’t want to see Main Street,” White says. “Originally, the restaurant was deep inside. DJ recognized this and brought a whole new perspective by pulling the restaurant outside to reflect the new Main Street. That’s the kind of thing he understands. It’s a classic DJ observation.” “We felt like we were trustees of what started downtown growth,” reveals Rama. “I’ve had only two events like that come up in my life.” The second was the new AC Hotel on sparkling Camperdown Plaza. “We went to the drawing board with a lot of depth. We wanted to make sure we put our pillars in that hotel, commemorating The Greenville News, the textile industry, the arts and theater, and nature.” In just a year’s time, the result has become a magnet for the masses. Brody Glenn, president of Centennial American Properties, worked with Rama for almost five years on the project. “DJ is one of my favorite people to do business with because he has a vision and sense of calm in figuring out solutions,” the developer shares. “He’s the type of person with observations that create a new experience. He always challenges what exists to create what the city needs.” The Present / One of Rama’s initial moves when he took over the family business in 2012 was formalizing its philanthropic arm, by creating O.N.E. (Outreach, Nurture and Encourage). The guiding principle is to donate 1 percent of profits, 1 percent of produce, and 1 percent of personnel to meet the needs of the underserved. Currently, Auro Hotels is supporting one of Rama’s favorite projects to date: Unity Park. “It’s a very unique touchpoint,” the president and CEO divulges. “The word unity is so powerful. The inclusiveness and togetherness. The word sparked me right away.”


“DJ HAS A QUIET MANNER THAT OFTEN MEANS HIS LEADERSHIP IS NOT EVEN APPARENT ALONG THE WAY, BUT THEN WE SEE A MARVELOUS OUTCOME, AND WE RECOGNIZE ONLY DJ HAS THAT KIND OF VISION.” —RICK DAVIS, CEO, ELLIOTT DAVIS Ten minutes into a park-funding pitch, Rama committed $500,000 to build Auro Bridge in the heart of the 60-acre site. White says that was a first. “He knew we were trying to tell a story,” the Mayor explains. “It’s a story about the diversity of Greenville and our different communities. The Indian community has been here a long time and has been very successful. This bridge sponsorship now gives a chance to tell that story.” Auro Bridge will provide a way for pedestrians to cross the Reedy River, linking north with south, while creating a panoramic vantage point of the park. The Future / Although economic survival was paramount when the family immigrated, education was equally important. “Education is something all of us will never lose, right?” Rama asks. “It remains with you.” Greenville Heroes is one of the biggest recipients of

O.N.E. funding, providing scholarships for children of first responders. Heather Whitley, the corporate director of communications for Auro Hotels, helped mold O.N.E. “I think DJ, and his family, have a deep-seated belief that education is the key to a better life,” she says. “It can open doors to a brighter future. This belief has shaped their giving for years.” When asked if he’s a hotelier, a philanthropist, or an educator, Rama pauses. “I believe all three,” he admits. “Without one, the other cannot happen. More than building a business, it’s our responsibility to teach and make sure the next generation has opportunities. We can lead and show them. I’m also thankful for this community. We didn’t know Greenville would be our final stop, as we moved so much as we purchased properties. But Greenville welcomed us with open arms. That’s how this community operates. I feel like I’m a Greenvillian, and I take a lot of pride in that.”

NOMINATED BY THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION AND VOTED ON BY A COMMITTEE MADE UP OF EXECUTIVES REPRESENTING THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION AND TOWN, THE VISIONARY LEADERSHIP AWARD HONORS LIFELONG SERVICE TO OTHERS THROUGH BOTH INDIVIDUAL ENDEAVORS AND COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT, AND IS A GIFT THAT SPANS A LIFETIME.

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Cultivating Purpose.

R eflecting Our Values .

Partnership, stewardship, equity and integrity are our values. The Community Foundation of Greenville is thankful that the Greenville community shares these values. We celebrate all who give generously and compassionately to make Greenville County a thriving community where everyone can reach their full potential. To donate or learn more, visit our website at www.CFGreenville.org.

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10/13/21 4:24 PM



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eat drink F O O D F I N D S & C A N ’ T- M I S S D I S H E S

These elegant, yet easy, pies will amplify any autumn meal. For the recipe, turn to page 101.

Fall into the easy comfort of PEAR CRANBERRY GALETTE, a rustic, freeform take on pie.

Photograph by Jivan Davé

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E D • KITCHEN AID

Seasonal pears and cranberries dance in this rustic yet elegant fall dessert.

HOME SLICE TA KE THE PRESSURE OFF A ND REL A X W ITH THIS BEAUTIF UL A ND EASY PEA R CR A NBER RY GA LETTE by kathryn davé • photography by jivan davé

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kitchen is like a church—come as you are. It welcomes your frozen waffles, your fancy dinner parties, even your takeout containers. November, of course, is game time for people who like to cook. Food magazines orient their whole year around this month and the next: Thanksgiving menus start flying around; holiday cookies are on the horizon. But maybe you, like many of us, are bone-tired this year. It’s a heavy time and hard to summon quite the same enthusiasm for extra effort. And yet—creating is one way to pierce the clouds. I still want to cook my way to beauty, but I don’t have the reserves for banging out a buffet of pies or a complicated new turkey recipe. Turn with me, then, to the classics. To comfort. First stop is the galette, a rustic, freeform version of pie that delivers the best parts of a homemade pie with less fuss. This version combines pears with fresh cranberries in a lovely pas de deux of seasonal flavor, but really any fall fruit will do. The filling is flexible and the crust is forgiving. It doesn’t take long to mix up the pastry crust. You can do it. Turn on a podcast or some jazz while you roll it out. While you’re at it, invite a friend for dinner. Who cares what you’re having—you’re having galette! Days are long, life is short, and the moments you spend in the kitchen often lead to the moments you remember. It’s nice if the memories include a warm slice of pear cranberry galette.

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PEAR CRANBERRY GALETTE

Yield: 1 12-inch galette or 4 mini galettes

INGREDIENTS:

1 ½ c. all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting work surface ¼ c. sugar ¼ tsp. kosher salt ½ c. (1 stick) cold unsalted butter, cubed ¼ c. (plus more, as needed) ice water 4 Bosc pears, sliced thinly ¾ c. fresh or frozen cranberries 2 tsp. fresh lemon juice 1 ½ tsp. vanilla ½ c. brown sugar 1 tsp. cinnamon 1 egg, beaten vigorously Turbinado sugar, for sprinkling

INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Stir together flour, salt, and sugar in a large bowl. Using a pastry cutter or a couple of forks, cut in the butter until the mixture resembles coarse, pea-sized crumbs. Add the water and stir until the flour is moistened, adding more water one tablespoon at a time as needed until the dough begins to come together in a shaggy clump. Turn out onto a floured work surface and gently knead the dough a few times until it all comes together. Form the dough into a ball and flatten it into a thick disk. Wrap it in plastic wrap and refrigerate it for at least 1 hour and up to 3 days (or freeze for up to 3 months). 2. Meanwhile, gently combine pear slices, cranberries, brown sugar, cinnamon, lemon juice, and vanilla in a large bowl. Chill, covered, until ready to assemble the galette. 3. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. 4. On a floured surface, roll the disk out into a large 12-inch circle. (Alternatively, divide the disk into four equal pieces and roll each out into a 5-inch circle before proceeding.) Gently fold the dough circle over and transfer it to the parchment paper. Arrange the pearcranberry filling in the center of the dough, making sure to leave any pear juices behind in the bowl so the crust doesn’t get soggy. 5. Fold the edges of the dough over the filling, overlapping as necessary, and brush with the egg wash. Sprinkle the washed edges liberally with turbinado sugar for sparkle.

I still want to cook my way to beauty, but I don’t have the reserves for banging out a buffet of pies or a complicated new turkey recipe.

6. Bake for 50–60 minutes (40–50 for smaller galettes) until the crust is deep golden brown and the filling is bubbling. Let cool for 10 minutes. Serve warm or at room temperature with vanilla ice cream, fresh whipped cream, or nothing at all. FOR MORE RECIPES: TOWNCAROLINA.COM

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E D • CITY DISH

At Mountain Goat, owners Chrissy McCrary (above) and her husband, Ryan (opposite right), brew community while providing free outdoor experiences and job training for local at-risk youth; don’t miss Waffle Wednesdays when the shop features addictive Belgian waffles in sweet and savory combinations.

GOOD TO THE LAST DROP A FIXTURE IN GREEN V ILLE’S POE MILL COMMUNIT Y, MOUNTA IN GOAT GVL IS MORE THA N A COFFEE SHOP by Beth Brown Ables • photography by Paul Mehaffey

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n any given Friday afternoon in the Poe Mill area of Greenville, a patio full of friends enjoy a drink together at an old body shop with the garage doors rolled up. Pass the same spot on your morning commute and you’ll notice customers cozied up inside with a latte and laptop, enjoying hushed coffee shop vibes. Is that a bike shop, too? But wait—what about Tuesday night trivia, the space vibrant with music and laughter? And, oh goodness gracious, have you had one of their waffles yet? A bar? A coffeehouse? A bike shop? Waffle stand? Well, yes, all of the above: this is Mountain Goat, a gathering space founded by husband-and-wife team Ryan and Chrissy McCrary. While at first glance it is both a coffee shop and bar, at its heart, Mountain Goat solely exists to house and fund Great Outdoor Adventure Trips (or GOAT). Founded by Ryan in 2008 as a nonprofit offering free outdoor trips for at-risk kids in Greenville, GOAT believes that the outdoors provide a unique


Mountain Goat GVL is equal parts café, bar, and bike shop, all to benefit at-risk youth.

environment for students to get out of their comfort zones and try something new. As a Christian-based organization, GOAT staff share the gospel with students and provide them with mentors, jobs, and purpose. Many GOAT students become trip guides, wanting to share their life-changing experiences with friends and neighbors. Operating Mountain Goat invites the greater community into the McCrarys’ calling. “We want everyone to be a part of this mission with us,” Chrissy shares. This means that the profits from that cortado or IPA you enjoy go directly to fund another adventure. It’s a for-profit for a nonprofit, or as the Mountain Goat website says, “Drink up, you’re changing the world.” Wednesdays at Mountain Goat offer a particularly heady experience. A cloud of vanilla, yeast, and butter envelop and guide you inside: it’s Waffle Wednesday. Not any run-of-the-mill box-mix batter, these Liège waffles are a singular treat, born out of a COVID project

when the McCrarys shuttered the shop for several months. Pressed on an 80lb cast waffle iron imported from Belgium, the dough alone takes two days to prepare. The brioche is studded with pearl sugar that melts upon touching the iron, creating a waffle with a caramelized exterior and a stretchy, laminated interior. Delicious as is, Mountain Goat’s kitchen staff up the ante by offering various sweet or savory toppings that rotate with the seasons. Can a food be life-changing? Heavenly? Addictive? Ask anyone behind the bar, and they’ll tell you they’ve heard it all. The McCrarys plan to begin serving the waffles every day in the near future, with dinner waffle pop-ups monthly. In addition to waffles, yogurt parfaits, scones, and muffins fill the pastry case. The more you enjoy, the more you’re benefitting future generations. That’s something to cheers about. Mountain Goat GVL, 120 Shaw St, Greenville. (864) 735-0821, mountaingoatgvl.com; for more on GOAT, go to goatgvl.org

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E D • SWEET SPOT

VEG OUT A HA NDF UL OF GREEN V ILLE BA KER IES A RE TRENDING TOWA R D PL A NT-BASED DIETS by Ariel Turner • illustration by Timothy Banks

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n the spring of 2020, amid the intensity of a pandemic and global unrest, a new all-vegan bakery operation called basta. gained a following as a result of the owner’s desire to bring comfort food to friends and customers. But basta. isn’t the first Greenville bakery offering items made with plant-based ingredients; for several years, vegan-friendly baked goods have been available on a variety of menus around town. Today, 6 percent of U.S. consumers profess to be vegan, a 500 percent increase over the last seven years. Greenville continues to ride this wave that’s sweeping the country, bolstered in 2020 by a growing focus on sourcing sustainable ingredients. Here are some standouts that either specialize in vegan items or continue to innovate and expand their plant-based options—which taste just as good as their conventional counterparts:

Keeping pace with the growing popularity of plantbased eating, tasty vegan baked goods are popping out of ovens in bakeries around Greenville.


Designs that

Reflect Your Life

basta.

Vegan banana bread as a cure for global ills? It might be, if baker Alexis Krcelic has her way. She started baking vegan banana bread in 2020 to raise money to help restore the damage done by the wildfires in Australia. She chose the name “basta” (“enough” in Italian) as an expression of how she feels about many worldwide problems—enough is enough; it’s time to do something about it. Each month, Krcelic chooses a different charity to receive a percentage of sales from her custom orders, pop-ups, retail accounts and farmers market appearances. Keep up with monthly changing flavor announcements via her website. bastabakery.com

Bossy Bakers

A self-professed lover of butter, Jeannie Hall turned her pop-up bakery into a brick-and-mortar shop two years ago with a goal of catering to dietary restrictions. While the majority of Bossy Bakers’ menu is not vegan, Jeannie continues to include vegan items, such as naturally leavened breads and the chocolate buckwheat cookies that are a menu staple. Vegan custom orders are also an option. 1540 Wade Hampton Blvd, Ste G. bossybakers.com

Exchange Coffee Co.

A pastry case brimming with vegan baked goods awaits customers each day at Exchange Coffee Co., where owners Michael and Roxanne Bacaro determined at the outset that their allergen-free cupcakes, cinnamon rolls, and other confections needed to taste as good as the “real deal” if they were to make the menu. The assortment of seasonal vegan and non-vegan items varies daily at their coffee shop, which is open for breakfast and lunch. 110 S Main St, Simpsonville. exchangecoffeeco.com

Jenauri’s Vegan Bakery

820 S. Main St., Unit 101, Greenville | Tues. - Fri. 11-5, Sat. 10-3 864-597-9494 | HennesseeHaven.com

BOURBON • BUBBLES • BON BONS Because life is so much more than just a box of chocolates

Jen Evans started a from-scratch special-order vegan bakery to recreate her favorite desserts with all-natural ingredients and no animal products. Cupcakes, cake pops, and chocolate chip cookies all figure on her weekly pick-up menu. Otherwise, you can find Jen’s chocolate chip cookies at Wing Crave (155 Augusta St) in downtown Greenville, and Moe Joe’s coffee shop in Clemson carries her cupcakes (gluten-free and regular), chocolate chip cookies, and brownies. jenaurisveganbakery.com

Swamp Rabbit Café & Grocery

One word: stecca. Swamp Rabbit Cafe’s baguette-like “stick” bread has developed an almost cult following over the last decade and is appreciated by the local vegan community as well. The grocery store and café, a popular stop along the Prisma Health Swamp Rabbit Trail, also keeps a rotation of vegan sweets on the menu, like the wildly popular peanut butter chocolate chunk cookies and seasonal donuts, all of which are also gluten-free. 205 Cedar Lane Rd. swamprabbitcafe.com

NOW ACCEPTING HOLIDAY PREORDERS

The Spatula Café

Just around the corner from Swamp Rabbit Café sits The Spatula Cafe, opened by Roberto Gonzalez, a nonvegan chef from Mexico City, and Dionisio Camacho, a vegan musician from Miami. The Spatula was created to connect Greenville’s vegan and non-vegan communities, and to be a place where all can enjoy a diverse selection of pastries—don’t miss the vegan cinnamon rolls—and savory dishes. Check out the weekly specials posted on their social media. 118 Smythe St. thespatulacafe.com

A Chocolate Bar Open Monday-Wednesday 3-7; Thursday-Saturday 1-9

Poe West | 556 Perry Avenue Suite B115 864-263-7083 | LaRueFineChocolate.com N OVEM B ER 2021 I

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YOUR REAL ESTATE GOAL IS OUR MISSION. A DEDICATED MANAGEMENT TEAM HERE TO EMPOWER AND ENHANCE YOUR EXPERIENCE AS AN AGENT OR ADVISOR IN RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE.

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Virtual Visits for a Healthy You Health has taken on a new importance these days. But at Bon Secours, yours has always been our top priority. And we’re as committed as we’ve always been to providing you with high-quality, personalized care—whether safely in our clean facilities or virtually from the comfort of your own home. Visit bonsecours.com/primarycare to connect with a primary care provider today.

PRIMARY CARE FOR THE UNIVERSE OF YOU


PRESENTED BY

Join us as we celebrate the lighting of our House with a celebration filled with holiday splendor!

WHEN YOU KNOW, YOU JUST KNOW. Finding the one is kind of a big deal.

Your real estate agent, that is. The agents at Griffith Real Estate Advisors are ready to help you navigate some of the biggest decisions you’ll ever make. We offer home buying and selling assistance with local agents who know, serve, and love the Greenville, South Carolina area.

Friday, November 19 6:30PM COCKTAILS • 7:30PM DINNER The Terrace at Embassy Suites by Hilton Greenville Golf Resort & Conference Center

OPEN BAR • LIVE ENTERTAINMENT • MOONLIGHT DINNER DANCING • PRE-EVENT ONLINE AUCTION

www.GriffithRealEstateAdvisors.com Lisa Griffith LisaGRealtorSC@gmail.com 864.616.0791 Chuck Griffith Katina Shirley GriffithChuck@hotmail.com KatinaShirley@gmail.com 864.505.8086 864.423.3553 Heather Rhoden HeatherDRhoden@gmail.com 864.616.5662 David Porter Jessica Snyder d.porter4583@yahoo.com JessicaNSnyder@gmail.com 864.346.5477 864.906.5889 Chandler Rushing ChandlerBrookeRushing@gmail.com 864.351.8041

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WEBSITES | DIGITAL MARKETING


Dining Guide

T HE BE S T B A R S, C A F É S & RE S TAUR A N T S

AMERICAN The Anchorage With a focus on local produce, Chef Greg McPhee’s globally influenced menu changes almost weekly. A hoard of fresh harvest arrives daily from area growers, like Horseshoe Farm in Travelers Rest, which informs McPhee’s creative dishes. The restaurant’s menu and stellar cocktail program are updated regularly, and The Anchorage hosts frequent wine dinners. $$-

$$$, D. Closed Sun–Mon. 586 Perry Ave. (864) 219-3082, theanchoragerestaurant.com

Augusta Grill Augusta Grill is a Greenville institution featuring upscale comfort food. At the bar or in the intimate dining room, patrons can enjoy dishes such as the wild mushroom ravioli with pancetta and roasted garlic cream, or the sautéed rainbow trout with crabmeat beurre blanc. The lineup changes daily, but diners can always get Chef Bob Hackl’s highly sought-after blackberry cobbler. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sun &

Mon. 1818 Augusta St. (864) 242-0316, augustagrill.com

Bacon Bros. Public House You might think you know what meat lover’s heaven looks like, but if you show up at Bacon Bros. Public House gastropub, you’ll know for sure. From a board of cured, smoked, and dried meats, to a specialty sandwich, there’s no shortage of mouthwatering selections. The drink menu mirrors the food, featuring whiskeys, bourbons, bacon-infused liquors, and even smoked sorghum syrup. $$-$$$, L, D.

Closed Sunday. 3620 Pelham Rd. (864) 297-6000, baconbrospublichouse.com

The Burrow The comfort of a home-cooked meal, plus the ease of an elevated dining experience: the newest restaurant from Josh Beeby of Barley’s and Trappe Door fame does it all. A cozy setting encourages conversation and gathering, while artful dishes and cocktails serve a sense of indulgence. You can’t miss with the chargrilled octopus or the whiskey sour. $$, D, SBR. 2017A Augusta St. (864)

412-8677, theburrowgville.com

N E W CAMP Tucked into one of the “jewel box” spaces on Camperdown Plaza, CAMP is the newest venture from the Table 301 group. The menu, designed by executive chef Drew Erickson, sparkles with regional American small plates—Wagyu beef corndog, Yucatán-style pork tostadas, stuffed calamari—reimagined with twists inspired by the four years Erickson spent working with über-chef Thomas Keller at The French Laundry in California.

$$-$$$, D, SBR. Closed Mon. 2 E Broad St, Greenville. (864) 514-2267, campgvl.com

Fork and Plough The quintessential farm-to-fork partnership between Greenbrier Farms and Chef Shawn Kelly, with its casual, family-friendly feel, Fork and Plough brings a butcher shop, market, and restaurant to the Overbrook neighborhood. Chef Kelly masterminds an ever-changing roster of locally sourced dishes. $$$, L, D, SBR.1629 E North St. (864)

609-4249, forkandplough.com

Foxcroft Wine Co. Charlotte-based Foxcroft Wine Co. transformed the West End space vacated by Brazwells Pub into a lovely wine bar decorated with warm woods, a barrelvaulted ceiling, and racks of wine. On the menu are tasty flatbreads and truffle fries, as well as signature lamb sliders and panseared scallops to pair with a generous list of wines by the glass. $-$$, D. Closed Mon. 631 S Main St. (864) 906-4200, foxcroftwine. com/greenville

GB&D The restaurant’s description itself—Golden Brown & Delicious—tells you all you need to know about this joint. Locally sourced dishes of American favorites—like the killer burger on a house-made brioche bun—star at lunch. Check out the extended menu at dinner, which features an impressive repertoire of creative dishes, from its new location at The Commons. $$-$$$, L, D, SBR. 147 Welborn St, Ste B1. (864) 230-9455, eatgbnd.com

Halls Chophouse The renowned Charleston steakhouse puts down roots along the Reedy River with a selection of wet- or dry-aged steaks (USDA Prime beef flown in from Chicago’s Allen Brothers). Try a Durham Ranch elk loin with root vegetable hash, and don’t miss the lavender French toast at brunch. $$$$, L (Fri– Sat), D, SBR. 550 S Main St. (864) 335-4200, hallschophousegreenville.com

Home Team BBQ Anchoring the new Holland Park development, Home Team BBQ is the brainchild of Chef Aaron Siegel, who founded it in Charleston in 2006. Choose among pulled pork, chicken, and brisket in incarnations from sliders and sandwiches to tacos and nachos. Enjoy the screened porch with a Game Changer, Home Team’s refreshing frozen mix of two kinds of Caribbean rum, pineapple and orange juices, and cream of coconut. $$. L, D.

Closed Mon & Tues. 815 Laurens Rd. (864) 686-7427, hometeambbq.com/location/ greenvillesc

Larkin’s on the River Located between the Peace Center and the Reedy River, Larkin’s balances upscale dining with comfort. Start with the she-crab soup, then select an entrée from the day’s

offerings—or opt for an aged filet mignon with mashed potatoes and asparagus. Enjoy the river view on the enclosed outdoor patio and the extensive wine list. $$$-$$$$,

L (Mon–Fri), D (daily), SBR. 318 S Main St. (864) 467-9777, larkinsontheriver.com

Northampton Wine + Dine Linger in the relaxed atmosphere of Northampton’s wine bar, where elegant bar bites accompany wines by the glass or bottle. Or, stay for dinner and select from an ever-changing menu, which includes seafood, beef, and wild game. The outdoor patio is a relaxing location for a meal or a glass of wine. $$-$$$$, L, D. 211-A E Broad St. (864) 271-3919, northamptonwineanddine.com

Oak Hill Café & Farm A former faculty member in Furman University’s environmental science department, Lori Nelsen blazes a new trail in the restaurant world with co-owner Chef David Porras. The duo fulfills a long-time dream of creating a healthy, sustainable, and quality dining experience with an on-site farm and culinary research lab. Lovers of food innovation will not want to miss their multicourse tastings. $$-$$$$, D (Wed–

Sat); L, SBR (Fri–Sun). 2510 Poinsett Hwy. oakhillcafe.com

Reid’s Fine Foods Whether it’s a salmon plate, a bottle of wine, or a delectable pastry, Reid’s has everything a foodie heart could desire. Opened in the former Caviar & Bananas space, this Charlotte staple is a one-stop shop for breakfast, lunch, and a last-minute dinner party cheese board. Grab anything on the menu to go, or settle into the likes of a flatiron steak with squash & Brussels sprouts hash, chimichurri butter, and a truffle cabernet sauce. B, L, D. $-$$. 1 N Laurens St.

Soby’s Local flavor shines here in entrées like crab cakes with remoulade, sweet corn maque choux, mashed potatoes, and haricot verts. Their selection of 700 wines guarantees the perfect meal complement. Featuring different weekly selections, the Sunday brunch buffet showcases the chefs’ creativity. $$$-$$$$, D, SBR. 207 S Main St.

(864) 232-7007, sobys.com

Tandem Creperie & Coffeehouse Tandem lures Swamp Rabbit cyclists with aromas of Counter Culture Coffee and a happy stomach guarantee. Try The Lumberjack (cornmeal crêpe, ham, bacon, eggs, cheese, bechamel, and maple syrup) or the tasty banana nut crêpe. Stuck between savory and sweet? Split one of each with a friend in the Tandem spirit: “Together is best.” $, B, L, SBR. 2 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2245, tandemcc.com

Topsoil Kitchen + Market If they can grow it, locally source it, or make it in-house, they will. Located in the former Williams Hardware space in Travelers Rest, and just off the Swamp Rabbit Trail, this restaurant and market combo serves up fresh and modern veggie-driven dishes. Find unique wines and cocktails on the menu, too. $-$$$, D. Closed Mon–Wed. 13

S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 517-4617, topsoilrestaurant.com

Urban Wren This newcomer in the historic Markley Station fashions a chic city atmosphere where the food takes its cues from the restaurant’s carefully curated wine selection. Round up some friends and share a selection of seasonal small plates, such as cauliflower drop dumplings and rye whiskey beef short ribs.

(864) 283-0940, reids.com

$$$-$$$$. D. Closed Tues. 116 N Markley St. (864) 867-1081, urbanwrenwinery.com

Restaurant 17 Restaurant 17 blends contemporary European bistro with Blue Ridge bliss. The menu changes seasonally, but expect dishes from Executive Chef Haydn Shaak (formerly of The Cliffs) like the wood-fired octopus with pine nut romesco, baby beets, and Georgia olive oil or the Johnny Cake with country-style prosciutto. $$$-$$$$, D, SBR.

Woodside Bistro Down-home comfort food gets a fresh spin here, where portobello burgers, wedge salads, pesto chicken sandwiches, and rainbow vegan bowls color the menu. A casual go-to spot, Woodside aims to be a welcoming dining destination for all— whether you’re a vegan or meat lover.

Closed Mon. 10 Road of Vines, Travelers Rest. (864) 516-1254, restaurant17.com

Rick Erwin’s West End Grille This downtown mainstay has been nationally recognized as one of America’s Top Steakhouses by Open Table and holds the rare Best of Award of Excellence by Wine Spectator. Find aged, prime beef and fresh seafood as staples on the menu complemented by Italian offerings and daily seasonal features. $$-$$$$, D. Closed Sun. 648 S Main St. (864) 232-8999, rickerwins.com

$, L. Closed Sun. 1112 Woodside Ave. (864) 203-2333, woodsidebistro.com

KEY: Average price of a dinner entrée (lunch if dinner isn’t served): Under $10 = $ $10–$15 = $$ $16–$25 = $$$ $25+ = $$$$ Breakfast = B Lunch = L Dinner = D Sat or Sun Brunch = SBR

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BARS & BREWERIES Bar Margaret This craft-cocktail bar takes over the former Village Grind and GB&D space on Pendleton Street with a funky fresh vibe and an eclectic variety of drinks, paired with elevated bar food. Co-owners Sarah Cochran and Chris George shepherd the cocktail program, and while curated creations are their speciality (try the cOlá fashioned), patrons can find approachable brews, wine, and non-alcoholic bevs. $-$$.

MAULDIN THEATRE COMPANY

L, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 1269 Pendleton St, Greenville. barmarg.com

The Community Tap / Tap Trailside Convenience, expertise, and atmosphere collide at The Community Tap. Choose from a wide selection of local, national, and international brews—or have a glass from one of the ever-rotating beer and wine taps. Check out their second location at The Commons and enjoy a glass with food from Automatic Taco, GB&D, or Methodical Coffee. 217 Wade

N E W Pangaea Brewing Community, quality, and sustainability are at the core of Pangaea Brewing, which sits just off the Prisma Swamp Rabbit Trail, surrounded by what is soon to be Unity Park. Named for the supercontinent that broke apart 175 million years ago to create the continents we know today, Pangaea borrows inspiration and techniques from around the globe to bring you brews that roam from Thai-inspired wheat beer to citrus gose and Kveil pale ale.

s in'

NEW

Double Stamp Brewery Missing the ’90s? Head over to this new brewery, next door to Home Team BBQ in Holland Park. Inside, a vivid mural by local artist Lacey Hennessey depicts pop images from ’90s -era film, TV, music, and sports, while approachable brews such as Show Me the Money Pilsner and Wasssup! Farmhouse Ale fill the taps. Weather permitting, the rooftop patio is the place to be. $. L, D. Closed Mon. 819 Laurens Rd. facebook.com/doublestampbrewery

Quest Brewing Co. Eco-minded Quest satisfies your beer cravings and environmental enthusiasm in a single sip. Grab a pint of QBC’s signature West Coast–style Ellida IPA, packing a punch of flavor, or venture to the dark side with the Kaldi imperial coffee stout (crafted with locally roasted beans). Stop by for an afternoon tour, then follow up with an evening full of food truck fare and live music. Wed–Sat. 55 Airview Dr, Greenville.

(864) 272-6232, questbrewing.com

N E W Servus Biergarten Housed in a former feed and seed in downtown Simpsonville, Servus Biergarten adds an international accent to the new Warehouse at Vaughns, a smorgasbord of family-friendly eateries with plenty of indoor and outdoor seating. From doppelbock to dunkel, German beers flow freely here, so stake out a seat at the bar to discover your new favorite. Of course, you’ll want to pair it with menu items such as bretzels, wurst platters, and more authentic Saxon fare. $. L, D. Closed Mon.

109 W Trade St, Simpsonville. (864) 7571660, servusgreenville.com

N E W EXILE There’s a new bar in town, with nary a television or wing in sight. If you’re craving an expertly crafted cocktail (or a local beer) in a space with style, this will become your go-to spot. Ideal for a predinner stop, an after-work drink, or for a nightcap. Closed Sun–Tues. 9 Anderson

Swordfish Cocktail Club The term cocktail club calls to mind a time in history when pre- (and post-) dinner drinks were not only expected but revered among friends for an evening of fun. Swordfish resurrects this perspective in downtown Greenville, with a classic collection of handcrafted cocktails and small plates that are as stunning as they are delectable. $$, D. 220 E Coffee St.

St. exilegvl.com

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$. L, D. Closed Mon. 115 Wellborn St. pangaeabrewing.com

Eighth State Brewing Call them untraditional, but Cameron Owen and Adam Cribbs let their brewing skills go wild in the former Claussen Bakery space, in taps filled with off-beat libations such as Blue Skies (sour ale fruited with blueberries and passionfruit) and Abiogenesis (Imperial stout with Tahitian vanilla and banana). Also on the menu are smoothie-style hard seltzers infused with creative combinations of exotic ingredients (Morello cherry, raspberry, and lemon, anyone?). Savory accompaniments run the gamut from seasonal salads to stecca sammies. $-$$, L, D. Closed Mon–Wed.

400 Augusta St, Ste 140. (864) 609-4590, eighthstatebrewing.com

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N E W Juniper Hop on the outdoor elevator at Camperdown Plaza to reach Juniper, the rooftop lounge atop the new AC Hotel. Expansive views abound, whether you’re sipping cocktails on the “lawn” at the Secret Garden, sharing modern American dishes in the plant-bedecked Greenhouse, or noshing on stone-fired pizza at Fire Box. True to its name, Juniper rolls out a bar program highlighting gin-based libations— complete with a gin trolley for tableside pours. $$-$$$. D. Closed Sun. 315 S Main

St. junipergvl.com

Hampton Blvd. (864) 631-2525; Tap Trailside at The Commons, 147 Welborn St. thecommunitytap.com

Christmas

fireforge.beer

Carolina Bauernhaus Enjoy the delights of autumn with good friends and good beer at Carolina Bauernhaus. Now open in the new Poe West area, this brewery sports an impressive tap list, as well as wicker picnic tables, hanging chair swings, and a smorgasbord of yard games. Take a load off in their outdoor patio space while sipping your favorite ale. $, L, D. Closed Mon & Tues. 556 Perry Ave. (864) 553-4371, carolinabauernhaus.com

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Fireforge Craft Beer Fireforge brings a boozy twist to the phrase “small but mighty.” The smallbatch craft brewery made a home for itself in downtown Greenville in late June 2018, and founders Brian and Nicole Cendrowski are on a mission to push the boundaries of beer. We recommend The Fixer Smoked Baltic Porter—a smooth lager with a hint of cherrywood-smoked malt. 311 E Washington St. (864) 735-0885,


Wed–Sat, 5pm–12am. (864) 434-9519, swordfishcocktails.com

Tasting Room TR Wind down on the weekend at this combination gourmet wine shop, beer tap, and sampling space. With nearly 200 wines and 150 craft beers for sale, there’s something to satisfy every palate. Not sure what vino revs your engine? Taste-test a few by the glass and pick up a favorite. Enjoy cheese and charcuterie while you sip. $$, L (Sat–Sun), D (Wed–Sat), Closed Mon– Tues. 164 S Main St, Ste C, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2020, tastingroomtr.com

N E W Taxi House Wines The bright yellow sliver of a building in the Village’s plaza was once the neighborhood taxi stand, hence this curated shop’s moniker, Taxi House Wines. Now, in collaboration with The Anchorage, the vino destination offers more than 80 unique wine selections, chosen from small, familyowned wineries that focus on sustainability.

Closed Sun & Mon. 586 Perry Ave. Tues–Sat, noon–8pm. (864) 207-0685, taxihousewines.com

The Whale Originating in Asheville, this craft joint comes to South Main with a plethora of whale brews—rare and sought-after beers like the exclusive Spreadsheets and Deadlines hazy IPA, brewed just up the mountain in North Carolina. Having a hard time choosing? Knowledgeable staff are on hand to help you find the beer just for you. 1108 S Main St, Ste #116. (864) 263-7529, thewhalegvl.com

CAFÉS Bridge City Coffee A coffee shop with a mission, Bridge City’s philosophy is all in the name. The local roaster seeks to uphold community values by partnering with area organizations to offer employment opportunities for underresourced teens and adults. The fresh space presents a variety of drinks crafted with in-house roasted beans. Getting hangry? A selection of treats is also available. $-$$. B, L. Closed Sun. 1520 Wade Hampton Blvd. bridgecity.coffee

Coffee Underground Coffee Underground boasts a wide selection of specialty coffees and dreamy desserts like the peanut butter pie with graham cracker crust and a peanut butter and vanilla mousse. If you’re craving more substantial fare, choose from a splendid breakfast-anytime option, sandwiches, soups, salads, and more. $-$$, B, L, D, SBR. 1 E Coffee St. (864) 2980494, coffeeunderground.info

Cohesive Coffee Take a seat and sip on a drinkable work of art at Cohesive Coffee at The Junction. Choose from a varied mix of coffee and tea creations to enjoy while working and studying—or book the shop as a unique venue for your next event. From a new coffee drinker to a coffee connoisseur, there’s a little something for everyone. $, B,

L, D. Closed Sunday. 301 Airport Rd Unit 1. (864) 202-6538, cohesivecoffee.com

Due South Coffee Roasters Birds Fly South Ale Project no longer has a monopoly on cold brews now that Due South has set up shop in Hampton

Station. The coffee shop sports a café vibe, with baked goodies like Swamp Fox Doughnuts complementing espresso drinks and cold brew nitro (infused with nitrogen). Beans, sourced from around the globe, are roasted on-site. $, B, L. 1320 Hampton Ave Ext, 4B. (864) 283-6680, duesouthcoffee.com

Grateful Brew A brew joint where you can enjoy both the non-alcoholic and alcoholic varieties, Grateful Brew provides guests with made-to-order Counter Culture espressos, pour-overs, and locally crafted beer. Enjoy food trucks most nights, or bring your own grub. The Brew welcomes every member of the family, even those of the four-legged sort. $, B, L, D. Closed Sunday.

Love is in the Giving

501 S Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 558-0767, gratefulbrewgvl.com

Kuka Juice Created by nutrition mavens Abigail Mitchell and Samantha Shaw, Kuka doles out coldpressed craft with health-minded passion. Grab the ginger binger juice, or dig into a made-to-order bowl. Paninis, soups, toasts, smoothies, and more are also available. $, B,

L. 580 Perry Ave, Greenville. (864) 905-1214, kukajuice.com

Methodical Coffee Whether it’s the white marble countertops or the gleaming Slayer espresso machine, Methodical is a coffee bar built for taste. Coffee guru Will Shurtz, designer Marco Suarez, and hotelier David Baker ensure there’s plenty of substance to go with style. With single-origin espressos, wine varieties, and now a café menu, it’s all worth the rave. $-$$, B, L. 101 N Main St, Ste D; 207

Located in the Historic Village of West Greenville.

1250 PENDLETON STREET, GREENVILLE PaceJewelers.com • 864-232-3436 •

@pacejewelers

Wade Hampton Blvd; 147 Welborn St. methodicalcoffee.com

Mountain Goat Greenville A destination for brews and bikes, Mountain Goat proudly serves Methodical Coffee, along with more than 40 types of beer and wine. The sleek, industrial space provides a friendly atmosphere to sip on your beverage of choice, but be sure to check the food truck schedule. Plus, every purchase helps provide tutoring, mentoring, and job opportunities for at-risk youth in the community.

283-6702, ochateabaronline.com

Giving That Makes a Difference. Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow.

Old Europe Located in the West End, Old Europe satisfies your sweet tooth with dozens of decadent pastries and desserts. Éclairs and cookies pair well with an extensive coffee selection, while savory breakfast items are always on hand. Sink into a slice of opera cake, paired with a glass of Champagne.

TRANSFORM YOUR GIFT INTO YOUR LEGACY.

$-$$. B, L, Closed Sunday. 120 Shaw St. mountaingoatgvl.com

O-CHA Tea Bar A trip to O-CHA will have you considering tea in an entirely new light. This sleek space, located right on the river in Falls Park, specializes in bubble tea—flavored teas with chewy tapioca pearls. For a more intense cooling experience, try the mochi ice cream. The dessert combines the chewy Japanese confection (a soft, pounded sticky rice cake) with ice cream fillings in fun flavors: tiramisu, green tea chocolate, mango, and more. $, B, L, D. 300 River St, Ste 122. (864)

$, B, L, D. 716 S Main St. Sun–Thurs, 8am– 9pm, Fri–Sat, 8am–11pm. (864) 775-0210, oldeuropedesserts.com

The Fraziers

To learn more about gifts that last forever, call (864) 233-5925 or visit www.cfgreenville.org.

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The Spatula Café It can be challenging to find a lunch spot that satisfies both meat-lovers and vegans, but Spatula Café does, and then some. Open for breakfast and lunch, seven days a week, Spatula offers dishes like a tofu scramble wrap alongside a prosciutto bagel, and duck alongside marinated tempeh. Don’t just focus on the meals, though, because their baked goods truly shine. Check out the vegan cinnamon roll, delectable to any type of eater. $, B, L. 118 Smythe St, Greenville. (864) 236-7467, thespatulacafe.com

Southern Pressed Juicery A healthy-eaters haven, Southern Pressed Juicery offers super-food fans organic smoothies, bowls, juices, and more. Try a power-packed energy bowl like the dragon blood, a hot-pink concoction of dragon fruit, almond milk, banana, layered with buckwheat granola, raw honey, coconut chips, kiwi, and bee pollen. $-$$, B, L. 2 W Washington St. (864) 729-8626, southernpressedjuicery.com

Sun Belly Café Week by week, the full plant-based menu at this westside spot changes to accommodate seasonal dishes and fresh, wholesome ingredients. The wild mushroom pho is all the rage, but if you’re on the go, pick up a tasty $6 vegan salad. Options for meal prep and family-sized lasagnas mean healthy cooking is always on the table. $-$$, B, L. Closed Sunday.

1409 West Blue Ridge Dr. (404) 309-7791

Swamp Rabbit Café & Grocery Grocery store, neighborhood café. Local produce, delicious food. These intersections are what make the Swamp Rabbit Café a staple. But new to the operation is wood-fired pizza. Sourcing every ingredient from area vendors, the ever-changing toppings feature local cheeses and fresh-from-the-farm produce. Beer taps flow with excellent local suds.

$, B, L, D. 205 Cedar Lane Rd. (864) 2553385, swamprabbitcafe.com

The Village Grind Tucked between art galleries and eclectic shops in the heart of Pendleton Street, The Village Grind is a cheerful, light-filled space for java lovers. Emphasizing community, the coffeehouse brews up beans by a variety of local roasters and serves flaky treats. $, B, L.

1258 Pendleton St. (864) 915-8600

Two Chefs Catering & Café Count on this deli for fast, high-quality food, from homemade soups to a traditional grinder and a turkey melt. Grab “crafted carryout” entrées and sides, or impress last-minute guests with roasted turkey and Parmesan potatoes. Choose from the menu, or check back for daily specials. $-$$, B, L, D. Closed Sun. 644 N Main St, Ste 107. (864) 370-9336, twochefscafeandmarket.com

Upcountry Provisions Serving up gourmet sandwiches on freshmade bread, Upcountry Provisions is well worth a trip to Travelers Rest for breakfast or an extended lunch break. Snack on the shop’s daily crafted cookies, scones, and muffins, or bite into a devil dog BLT with hormone-free meat on just-baked white focaccia. $, B, L, D. Closed Sundays. 6809 State Park Rd, Travelers Rest. (864) 8348433, upcountryprovisions.com

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ETHNIC Asada Asada, a brick-and-mortar taqueria on Wade Hampton Boulevard, serves traditional Mission-style fare. Grab a bite of flavor with the grilled sweet potatoes & leeks sopes, a savory vegan dish served on scratch-made sopes topped with homemade charred red peppers and guajillo romesco salsa, and queso fresco for the dairy-inclined. $-$$, L, D. Closed

Sun & Mon. 903 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 770-3450, asadarestaurant.com

Asia Pacific Deemed the largest Asian supermarket in Greenville, Asia Pacific also doubles as a restaurant with a host of authentic cuisine. The menu is pages long, with more than 100 options and a multitude of soups, noodles, and combinations. If you’re planning a visit, be sure your stomach is as big as your eyes. $-$$, L, D, Mon–Sun

10am–9pm. 420 N Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 603-1377, asiapacificgreenville.com

Mekong Taste the nuances of fine Vietnamese cuisine at Mekong. Favorites include the grilled pork vermicelli: marinated pork, lettuce, cucumber, bean sprouts, mint, cilantro, peanuts, and crispy shallots, and the spring and summer rolls. Also try the Vietnamese crêpes or the pho, which is flavored with fresh herbs from the restaurant’s home-grown herb garden. $, L, D. Closed Mon. 2013

Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 244-1314, mekongrestaurantgreenville.com

N E W Parsley & Mint Mediterranean favorites like savory hummus and crispy falafel feature prominently at this brand-new eatery, while tangy tzatziki pairs perfectly with mouthwatering citrus chicken and tender lamb kofta. Homemade dressings elevate herbed flavor profiles to new heights. $, L,

D. 600 S Main St, Unit 101. (864) 412-8199, parsleyandmint.com

Pita House The Pita House has been family-operated since 1989. Inside, it’s bare bones, but the cognoscenti come here for tasty Middle Eastern fare such as hummus, falafel, kibbeh, and shwarma. And save room for baklava and other Mediterranean sweets for dessert. Also, check out the grocery in the back of the restaurant for some homemade inspiration. $, L, D. Closed Sun. 495 S Pleasantburg Dr, #B. (864) 271-9895, pitahousesc.com

Sacha’s Café Bright walls and a long, inviting bar make a sunny backdrop in which to chow down on authentic Colombian food, like arepas and patacones, at Sacha’s. Hungry groups can order the fiesta platter, a sampler that serves six people. To drink, try one of the natural fruit juices, or the imported cervezas. $, L, D. 1001 N Pleasantburg Dr.

(864) 232-3232, sachascafe.com

Swad Tucked off of Laurens Road, this venerable family-run Indian restaurant hones in on vegetarian cuisine. South Indian specialties such as idli (steamed rice cakes) and dosas (thin rice crepes) served with sambar (lentil stew) delight regulars, while those biding their budget go for the value meals that


come with basmati rice or naan. $, L, D. 1421 Laurens Rd. (864) 233-2089

TruBroth TruBroth takes healing arts and blends them seamlessly into deliciously crafted meals. Appease your curiosity with a visit to this Travelers Rest gem, which offers a varied mix of Vietnamese staples, healthhappy bites, and coffee. $$, L, D. 36A S Main St, Travelers Rest. Sun–Thurs. (864) 610-0513, trubrothcoffee.com

EUROPEAN Bake Room The final addition to The Commons food hall, Bake Room provides a tasty touch. Naturally leavened breads and handmade pastries are baked in Wade Taylor’s German deck oven and Swedish rack oven, and are the perfect

complement to a coffee from Methodical, strategically placed right next door. $, B, L. 147 Welborn St, Greenville. Wed–Sun, 8am–3pm. @sc_bakeroom

Jianna With stellar views of Main Street from its wrap-around terrace, this modern Italian osteria offers patrons daily house-made pastas, the region’s freshest seasonal ingredients, and, of course, oysters—all led by famed chef Michael Kramer. Grab a cocktail or a glass of wine, and nosh on pasta dishes like potato gnocchi, radiatori, or tonnarelli. $$-$$$, L (Sat–

Sun), D. 207 S Main St. (864) 720-2200, jiannagreenville.com

The Lazy Goat The Lazy Goat’s tapas-style menu is distinctly Mediterranean. Sample from the Graze and Nibble dishes, such as the crispy Brussels sprouts with Manchego

Remember the moments.

TM

Losing a loved one is never easy... We are here to help every step of the way. We can help you celebrate the life, the memories and the moments that made them special.

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Preplanning | Burial | Cemetery | Aftercare Mausoleum | Cremation Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

L’INCANTO When their lease at Da Vinci’s restaurant on Pleasantburg Drive was up in 2018, Chef Carlos Echeverri and his wife, Kristi, relocated to the up-and-coming town of Greer, where they opened L’Incanto. A wine list strong in regional Italian varietals complements Northern Italian dishes such as house-made agnolotti filled with butternut squash, snapper piccatta, and Vitello Kristi (veal scallopini topped with eggplant, prosciutto di parma, fresh tomatoes, and Danish fontina in a marsala wine sauce), or the soft organic egg yolk raviolo, with spinach, ricotta, Parmigiano, nutmeg, and fresh black truffle peelings with brown truffle butter (above). $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 117 E

Poinsett St, Greer. (864) 479-9333, lincantosc.com

Downtown Easley • 864.859.4001 Powdersville Road • 864.442.1800 Duckett-Robinson • Central-Clemson 864.639.2411 or 864.654.4495

RobinsonFuneralHomes.com Proudly serving Greenville, Pickens, Anderson and Oconee Counties N OVEM B ER 2021 I

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shavings and sherry glacé. For a unique entrée, try the duck confit pizza with a sour cherry vinaigrette and a farm egg. An extensive variety of wine is available in addition to a full bar. $$-$$$, L, D. 170

BRANDED CONTENT

health & wellness

River Pl. (864) 679-5299, thelazygoat.com

How technology is improving stretching and mobility

Limoncello This latest Larkin’s spot serves up Italian cuisine on the corner of River and Broad streets. The menu ranges from pesto pizzas to chicken marsala to classics like spaghetti and meatballs—but the real winner is an all-Italian wine list. Cap off your meal with the housemade limoncello gelato. $$-$$$, L, D. 401 River St. (864) 263-7000, limoncellogvl.com

There’s no wonder this stretching Luna Rosa company keeps The Luna Rosa family celebrates the winning The concept that community starts in the Best of the kitchen, and they welcome you into theirs Upstate Award for a meal. From cool gelato options— in Greenville. think exotic mango or piña colada—or a Routine stretching warm Monte Cristo. There’s plenty of flavor to fulfill your cravings. $-$$, L, D. Closed is essential to Monday. 123 S Main St. (864) 241-4040, maintaining lunarosagelato.com mobility through the years, but most N E W Paloma people don’t know The wraparound bar of this new restaurant which areas need the in the chic AC Hotel takes center stage in most attention until the stunning space, where glass walls open pain and stiffness onto a small covered patio. Charcuterie kick in. Targeting and cheese boards and Spanish-inspired specific problem small plates by Chef Fernando Coppola areas can increase range of motion, complement house cocktails such as the Wild Flower, a vibrant coral-colored quaff improve posture, reduce pain and stiffness made with peach vodka, Aperol, and or prevent it altogether. Now, there is new lemon, garnished with edible flowers. technology that pinpoints those areas $$-$$$. D. 315 S Main St. (864) 720-2950, that need attention before they become a palomagvl.com noticeable issue. The MAPS machine, exclusively Ristorante Bergamo patented to Stretchlab, measures the Open since 1986, Ristorante Bergamo body’s quality of movement and provides focuses on fresh produce and Northern instant results that allow professional Italian cuisine: fresh mussels sautéed in flexologists to target any pain or tightness. olive oil, garlic, and white wine, veal with MAPS stands for mobility, activation, homegrown organic herbs, and pasta posture and symmetry. The machine creations such as linguine with shrimp illustrates how stretching affects each person positively. “We love and mussels. The bar fronts 14-foot windows along Main Street, making it a our MAPS machine,” says Ashley Gondi, owner of StretchLab in Greenville. prime location for enjoying a glass while “You not only feel the difference, but now you can see the difference.” people-watching. $$$, D. Closed Sun Using 3D sensor technology, the MAPS & Mon. 100 N Main St. (864) 271-8667, machine provides results for the entire body, ristorantebergamo.com showing everything from arthritis to hip flexors to general tightness. All it takes to get the results Stella’s Southern Brasserie is three simple squats with the help of a Boasting French flair and fare, this sister flexologist. It is 100% safe, using only infrared to Stella’s Southern Bistro is the second of lights and sensors, and the results can be instantly Jason and Julia Scholz’s eateries. Stationed sent through email. The most improvement is in Hollingsworth Park, French staples like usually shown after about one month of routine blue-black mussel shells with smoked stretching. tomato broth, Marsala-spiked onion soup gratinée, and roasted game hen are served "We walk you through it,” says Gondi. “It’s up daily in a lively, chic environment. basically taking a picture of your whole body. Don’t miss the breakfast pastries. $$-$$$. It’s pretty impressive.” At StretchLab, use of the B, L, D, SBR. 340 Rocky Slope Rd, Ste 100. MAPS machine is free with any stretch session. (864) 626-6900, stellasbrasserie.com Professionally trained flexologists can then work on any problem areas to improve balance, posture, recovery time and mobility. P I Z &Zrange A of motion • Increase flexibility • Improve posture & relaxation Coastal Crust • Improve sports performance Now & in joint the Village • Reduce muscle pain of West Greenville, these Neapolitan-style pizza pies are baked in a wood-fired brick oven and topped with local produce from Reedy Book Your Stretch! Contact us to book your stretch!Contact Us to River Farms. Check out the aptly-named 1922 AugustaWest St.,Village Suite 111 pie, a classic pepperoni pizza 1922 Augusta Street | Suite 111 | Greenville Greenville, SCpunched 29605 up with burrata, caramelized Greenville@StretchLab.com | 864.808.3125 greenville@stretchlab.com | (864) 808-3125 onions, sautéed peppers, and sausage. @stretchlabgreenville | stretchlab.com $$, L, D. 1254 Pendleton St. (843) 654-9606,

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D’Allesandro’s Pizza Hailing from Charleston, D’Allesandro’s brings dough heaven to Greenville. The D’Allesandro brothers’ philosophy is simple—if the pizza is good and the beer is cold, people will come. The shop pushes out pies in the North Main area, where guests can enjoy savory pizzas, calzones, and signature CalJoes. $$, L, D. 17 Mohawk

Dr, Greenville. (864) 252-4700, dalspizzagvl.com

Sidewall Pizza Company This pizza joint is a fast favorite with its handcrafted, brick-oven pies made from local ingredients. But their salads are nothing to ignore, not to mention dessert: the homemade ice cream will make you forget about those fellas named Ben & Jerry. $$, L, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 35 S

Main St, Travelers Rest, (864) 610-0527; 99 Cleveland St, (864) 558-0235; 3598 Pelham Rd, (864) 991-8748, sidewallpizza.com

World Piece From the owners of downtown’s beloved Coffee Underground, World Piece brings Chicago-style pizza to Stone Avenue. Offering a line-up of draft beers and menu features like buffalo chicken wings, salads, burgers, french fries, and, of course, savory pies, this pizza joint ensures there’s something for everyone. $-$$. L, D. 109 West Stone Ave, Ste A1. (864) 568-5221, worldpiecemenu.com

TA C O S

Automatic Taco Since 2015, Nick Thomas has delivered new wonders and old favorites from his food truck, treating the tortilla as a work of art. From its new brick-and-mortar spot in The Commons, Auto continues to serve up creative takes on tacos, with standout chips and guacamole, salsa, sides, and cocktails. $-$$, L, D. 147 Welborn St. (404) 372-2266, automatictaco.com

Papi’s Tacos Jorge “Papi” Baralles brings family tradition and the familiar childhood flavors of Cuautla, Mexico, to this walk-up taqueria on the Reedy River. Get your tacos with shrimp, barbacoa, al pastor, carne asada, carnitas, or chicken and chorizo, then sample some gelato. $, L, D. 300 River St.

(864) 373-7274, eatpapistacos.com

White Duck Taco Shop White Duck sets up shop at Hampton Station in the Water Tower District next to Birds Fly South Ale Project. Try the Bangkok shrimp taco or the mushroom potato with romesco, and pair with their fresh peach sangria or an ale from Birds Fly South’s rotation. $-$$, L, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 1320 Hampton Ave Ext, Ste 12B. whiteducktacoshop.com

Willy Taco Much like its Spartanburg-based sister, Greenville’s Willy Taco is a straight-up Mexican fiesta. Choose from a variety of taco flavors; we suggest the mother clucker—topped off with a margarita. $-$$,

L, D. Closed Mon. 217 Laurens Rd. (864) 412-8700, willytaco.com

TOWN accepts no compensation for Dining Guide reviews and selects entries by its editorial discretion. Reviews are conducted anonymously.


Brewpub - 91 Biltmore Ave. Funkatorium - 147 Coxe Ave. Asheville, NC @wickedweedbrewing

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Brewpub - 91 Biltmore Ave. Funkatorium - 147 Coxe Ave. Asheville, NC @wickedweedbrewing

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Thru Nov 7

THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES Would you still want to inherit the family fortune if it came with a deadly curse? Based on the eponymous book, considered to be Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s greatest mystery, this spine-tingling show at the Greenville Theatre puts Sherlock Holmes’s detective skills to the test when Sir Henry becomes heir to the Baskerville fortune and faces death at the fangs of a demonic hound.

Uncovered: The Ken Burns Collection | Thru January 30

Greenville Theatre, 444 College St, Greenville. Thurs, 7:30pm; Fri & Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $30. (864) 233-6238, greenvilletheatre.org

Upcountry History Museum – Furman University, 540 Buncombe St, Greenville. Tues–Sat, 10am–5pm; Sun, 1–5pm. Adults, $10; children 4–18, $8. (864) 467-3100, upcountryhistory.org

Nov 2–3 & 9–10

THE OTHER PLACE Nothing is as it seems in this riveting drama, part of the Prisma Health Fringe Series. A brilliant research scientist, Juliana Smithton is promoting her groundbreaking drug

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Photograph courtesy of The Biltmore Company

NOVEMBER

Thru Jan 30

UNCOVERED: THE KEN BURNS COLLECTION Acclaimed filmmaker and beloved chronicler of American history, Ken Burns has been collecting hand-sewn quilts for more than 40 years, and quilts in his private collection date from the 1850s to the 1940s. The 26 examples currently on display at the Upcountry History Museum reflect Burns’ appreciation for this American artistic medium, which he considers to be “the most authentic expression of who we are as a people.”

Sand Dollars, maker unknown, made in the United States, circa 1880–1900, from Ken Burns’s private quilt collection

Town Scene


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Sand Dollars, maker unknown, made in the United States, circa 1880–1900, from Ken Burns’s private quilt collection

2909 Old Buncombe Rd, Greenville. Fri–Sun, 11am–5pm. makerscollective.org/ indiecraftparade

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Nov 5–Dec 19

INDIE CRAFT PARADE SHOP Missed the Indie Craft Parade back in September? Don’t fret—you’ll have plenty of opportunities to peruse and purchase wares by many of the Parade’s talented makers every weekend from now until the weekend before Christmas. In addition, three outdoor Mini Markets (Nov 27, Dec 4 & 11) will each feature a new set of artists. Shop local this holiday and feel good that you’re supporting area artists.

CHRISTMAS AT BILTMORE You may not have space for 62 decorated Christmas trees in your house, but the Biltmore House sure does. The largest of them all is the 35-foot-tall Fraser fir in the Banquet Hall, which shows off no less than 500 ornaments. Wrap yourself in the magic of the season at George Vanderbilt’s Gilded Age estate, adorned with tens of thousands of twinkling lights, more than 13,000 sparkling ornaments, and some 1,200 poinsettias.

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Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Tues & Wed, 7pm. $18.50. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

Nov 5–Jan 9

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for the treatment of neurological disorders when she begins to lose her own grasp on reality. Past and present finally collide through fragments of memories in “the other place,” a cottage on the shores of Cape Cod that her family once owned. (Masks required.)

One Lodge St, Asheville, NC. Daily, hours vary. Daytime tickets, $106-$126; Candlelight Evening tickets, $119-$139 (admission fee includes a self-guided tour of the house, and access to the grounds, shops, and winery). (800) 411-3812, biltmore.com

Nov 6

FALL FESTIVAL AND HOLIDAY MARKET While parents browse the more than 30 craftsmen’s booths to find cool gifts for everyone on their list—even the family dog—kids will find hours of fun

Christmas at Biltmore | November 5—January 9

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Town Scene at the KidZone, between bouncing on inflatables, taking pony rides ($5), and getting their faces painted. Once they work up an appetite, everyone can chow down on goodies ranging from burritos and barbecue to homemade pies and caramel apples.

is a great place to start your quest for one-of-a-kind handmade gifts. Glass, leather, ceramics, oil paint, and fiber are just a sampling of the mix of media you’ll find as you’re browsing the booths of more than 120 top artisans. Enjoy live music while you shop and be sure to catch some of the artist demonstrations.

Greenville Classical Academy, 2519 Woodruff Rd, Simpsonville. Sat, 10am–3pm. Free. (864) 329-9884, greenvillefallfestival.com

Greenville Convention Center, 1 Exposition Dr, Greenville. Sat, 10am–6pm; Sun, 11am–5pm. $6. (864) 244-1271, artisanville.net

Nov 6

GREENVILLE CRAFT BEER FESTIVAL Paradise for beer lovers, the Upstate’s premier craft beer festival returns to Fluor Field with more than 120 different beers from local, regional, and national breweries. Entertainment for the day includes live bands, Blade & Bull axe throwing, juggling clowns, and plenty of food to soak up all those suds. Get your tickets before they sell out. Fluor Field at the West End, 945 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, noon–5pm. $20-$75. (864) 240-4509, gvlbeerfest.com

Nov 6–7

ARTISANVILLE It’s time to start thinking about holiday shopping, and this village of creatives

Artisanville | November 6—7

Old Cigar Warehouse, 912 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 12:30–5pm; Sun, 10:30– 2pm. Bourbonpalooza, $55; Brunch, $50. (864) 305-4142, hogandbarrelfestival.com

spreading kindness

CHRIST CHURCH EPISCOPAL SCHOOL Visit cces.org or call 864.331.4223 | discover your why CCES admits students of any race, color, religion, sexual orientation, and national or ethnic origin.

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Hog and Barrel Festival photograph by Anna Rice

HOG AND BARREL FESTIVAL Bourbon, BBQ, and bacon: if that’s not the perfect trifecta, we don’t know what is! Start out on Saturday at the main event, Bourbonpalooza, where chefs serve up their favorite hog recipes, bartenders sling some fine bourbon cocktails, and mechanical bulls and live music add to the excitement. Then come back Sunday for Apple Cider Bourbon Mimosas, Bourbon Bloody Marys, and show-stopping morning fare at the Makin’ Bacon Bourbon Brunch.

Scarlet Reflections, watermedia and collage by Jane Todd Butcher

Nov 6–7


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includes a taste of all the wines offered plus your choice of one of the books presented.

M. Judson Booksellers, 130 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, 7pm. $30. (864) 603-2412, mjudsonbooks.com Hog and Barrel Festival photograph by Anna Rice

Scarlet Reflections, watermedia and collage by Jane Todd Butcher

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Camperdown Plaza, corner of S Main St & Broad St, Greenville. Sun, 5–8pm. Tickets start at $100. (704) 674-3214, bit.ly/shuckcancer

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SHUCK CANCER An oyster roast is reason enough to celebrate, but when you throw in adult beverages and additional food, live entertainment, and a terrific silent auction, well, that’s just icing on the cake. Join the folks on Camperdown Plaza for an evening of shucking, sipping, and honoring the efforts of the American Cancer Society’s Real Men Wear Pink candidates, men who take a leadership role in the fight against breast cancer.

Nov 11

PAGE PAIRINGS You’ve no doubt paired wine with food, but how about pairing wine with books? Join in this engaging evening when local distributor Mission Grape pairs boutique wines with books that share the same spirit. The pairing might hinge on flavors, or on similarities between the book’s plot and the story behind the wine. Your ticket

Nov 11–13, 19, & 21

GREENVILLE SWAMP RABBITS Calling all hockey fans: come root for the home team and catch all the ECHL ice action as the Greenville Swamp Rabbits continue their 2021 season. The Swamp Rabbits play five games on their home ice this month, when they take on the Jacksonville Icemen (Nov 11), the Florida

Hog and Barrel Festival | November 6—7

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Town Scene Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Fri & Sat, 7:05pm; Sun, 3:05pm. Tickets start at $18. (864) 241-3800, swamprabbits.com

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IB Theatre at the Somerville Center, 2172 River Rd, Greer. Fri & Sat, 7pm; Sun, 3pm. $50. (864) 879-9404, internationalballetsc.org

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Nov 12–14

L’AUTOMNE The International Ballet’s season kicks off with this annual mixedrepertoire showcase of dance and live music. This year, internationally acclaimed guest artists Sebastian Vinet and Cara Marie Gary (an IB alumna) join the International Ballet Company to perform works from classical ballets as well as compelling contemporary pieces under the direction of IB founder Lena Forster and artistic director Vlada Kysselova.

L’Automne | November 12—14

to Rockefeller Center, the winter ice-skating rink on the Village Green. The rink is open through January, so you’ll have plenty of opportunities to brush up on your camel spins and double axels, and sip hot chocolate afterwards. S Main St, adjacent to the Courtyard by Marriott, Greenville. Hours vary (core hours: Mon–Fri, 2–9pm; Sat & Sun, 11m–10pm). Adults, $10; children 3-12, $8. (864) 467-4355, greenvillesc.gov/ 1654/UCB-Ice-on-Main

Nov 13–14

GREENVILLE OPEN STUDIOS The Upstate’s favorite art weekend returns to its original format this year, with a two-day self-guided tour of artists’ studios, plus a preview day featuring select artists on November 6 (10am–6pm). Grab an Open Studios catalog or download the app to plan your route and visit your picks among the 139 participating artists in 96 locations around the area. It’s a great opportunity to meet local artists and maybe make a purchase or two.

Nov 12–Jan 31 NOVEMBER 26 - DECEMBER 19 ICE ON MAIN Grab the family, lace up your ice skates (or rent a pair on-site), and hurry down to Greenville’s answer

Various locations including Greenville, Easley, Greer, Simpsonville, and Travelers Rest. Sat, 10am–6pm; Sun, noon–6pm. Free. (864) 467-3132, greenvillearts.com/ greenville-open-studios

Photograph by Jerry Finley

Everblades (Nov 12 & 13), the South Carolina Stingrays (Nov 19), and the Atlanta Gladiators (Nov 21).

NOVEMBER 26 - DECEMBER 19

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The tradition continues on the Rock after going virtual! Bring The traditionthe continues the Rock afterdazzling going virtual! Bringcelebration, whole on family to this holiday thePlayhouse-style! whole family to thisShowcasing dazzling holiday celebration, a cast of Flat Rock favorites, this Playhouse-style! Showcasing a castisofsure Flat Rock favorites, song and dance revue to bring you this great holiday joy! song and dance revue is sure to bring you great holiday joy!

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Nov 13–Feb 13

NORMAN ROCKWELL’S HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS Best known for the magazine covers he created during his 47-year affiliation with The Saturday Evening Post, artist and illustrator Norman Rockwell (1894–1978) captured the essence of early twentieth-century life in America. In partnership with the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, the Upcountry History Museum will display 40 of Rockwell’s most memorable holiday illustrations, which still strike a chord in contemporary hearts. Upcountry History Museum – Furman University, 50 Buncombe St, Greenville. Tues–Sat, 10am–5pm; Sun, 1–5pm. Adults, $10; children 4-18, $8. (864) 467-3100, upcountryhistory.org

Photograph by Jerry Finley

Nov 13

HARTNESS HALF MARATHON & 5K Bet you never thought you could run a foot race and house hunt at the same time. Sign up for the half marathon or 5K course that weaves across paved roads, dirt trails, gravel roads, and grassy fields through the planned community of Hartness,

and take a gander at the real estate as you run. It’s all for a good cause: registration fees benefit the child development center at A Child’s Haven. Hartness, 3500 S Hwy. 14, Greenville. Sat, 8am–noon. 5K registration, $30; half marathon, $75; half-marathon relay, $99. hartnesshalf.com

Nov 16

JAMES TAYLOR & HIS ALL-STAR BAND WITH JACKSON BROWNE Legendary singer-songwriter James Taylor will be going to Carolina in more than just his mind for this one-night performance at The Well. As if watching the six-time Grammy winner perform hits like “Fire and Rain” and “Sweet Baby James” isn’t enough reason to grab a ticket to the concert before it sells out, Taylor’s special guest will be soulful Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Jackson Browne. How sweet it is!

Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Tues, 7:30pm. Tickets start at $60. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

Nov 17–21

OKLAHOMA! According to the reviews when this revival of the 1943 musical debuted on Broadway, you might almost

Hartness Half Marathon & 5K | November 13

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Nov 18

MERCYME Formed in 1994 in Oklahoma, the American contemporary Christian band MercyMe burst on the music scene in 2001 when their crossover single, “I Can Only Imagine,” went triple platinum. Since then, the band has been nominated for several Grammys and has won eight Dove Awards. Come hear cuts from their latest studio album, Inhale (Exhale), along with the Christian pop music stylings of guest artist Micah Tyler.

Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Thurs, 7pm. Tickets start at $27. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

MercyMe | November 18

SENSE AND SENSIBILITY Adapted for the stage by actor and playwright Kate Hamill, Jane Austen’s beloved novel tells the story of Elinor and Marianne Dashwood, who are left nearly penniless after their father’s sudden death. The two sisters, one a pragmatist and one a romantic, struggle to find a place for themselves in a society obsessed with reputation. Will their heads or hearts ultimately win out?

Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St, Greenville. Thurs–Sat, 8pm (no performance on Nov 25; Sat, Nov 27, shows at 2pm & 8pm); Sun 3pm. General admission, $35; reserved seating, $40. (864) 235-6948, warehousetheatre.com

Nov 23-31

UPSTATE HOLIDAY LIGHTS SHOW Racing enthusiast or not, you’ll want to take a lap around the track at Greenville-Pickens Speedway to see this holiday light extravaganza. Tune your radio to 92.1FM for the kids’ show or 104.3FM for traditional Christmas music and drive around the track as many times as you like. Though Santa Land and the skating rink will be closed due to COVID, you can still feed the animals from your car in the drive-thru petting zoo.

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SA R K ISST UDIO.COM/R ESTOR E

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Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Wed, 7:30pm; Thurs, 1:30pm & 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 1pm & 6:30pm. Tickets start at $35. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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mistake the bold twenty-first-century reimagining for an entirely new show. If you saw the original version, the first musical ever written by Rodgers and Hammerstein, you may be jolted by Daniel Fish’s dark and sexy production, which won a Tony Award for Best Revival of a Musical.

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Greenville-Pickens Speedway, 3800 Calhoun Memorial Hwy, Easley. Sun–Thurs, 6–10pm; Fri–Sat, 6–11pm. $30/car. (864) 295-5764, greenvillepickens.com/upstate-holidaylight-show

Nov 25–Dec 25

150 Rose Valley Blvd., across from Anderson Civic Center, Anderson. Open nightly, 5:30–10pm. $10/car. (864) 437-8412, andersonchristmaslights.org Photograph by Patrick Collard

Photograph courtesy of CMA Media Promotions

ANDERSON CHRISTMAS LIGHTS Talk about dazzling. This annual holiday lights extravaganza covers 2.5 miles of road and encompasses 45 acres with nearly 300 different displays, requiring more than three million light bulbs. This year, Santa’s Village is back with new features, in addition to food, live entertainment, and crafters. Santa himself will even be on-hand, with special COVID procedures in place. You’ll want to make this festive display a part of your holiday tradition.

Nov 25

TREES UPSTATE TURKEY DAY 8K Make Turkey Day guilt-free by running this 8K—or 5K Fun Run and Walk—before you indulge in that Thanksgiving feast. As the

race returns to in-person this year, participants will choose their starting time and corral based on their expected finish time; each corral will be limited to 300 people. So get out there and do your part to help Trees Upstate plant, protect, and promote trees in our area.

Downtown Greenville. Thurs, 8am. 8K & 5K Fun Run, $30; ages 10 and under, $20. (864) 313-0765, treesupstate.org/td8k

Nov 26–Dec 19

ANNIE It’s a hard-knock life for a plucky young orphan named Annie, until she is adopted by billionaire Daddy Warbucks and lands in the lap of luxury. Based on the Tony Award– winning musical, Annie is an uplifting show that spells fun for the whole family. Spoiler alert: if you’re not familiar with the plot, the ending leaves no doubt that the sun will come out tomorrow.

South Carolina Children’s Theatre, 153 Augusta St, Greenville. Fri, 7pm (extra 2pm matinee on Nov 26); Sat, 2pm; Sun, 2pm. $22. (864) 235-2885, scchildrenstheatre.org

Annie | November 26—December 19

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Second Glance

HEROES OF THE FIELD AS 100,000 MEN PREPA RED FOR W W I, HUNDREDS OF NURSES FOUGHT THEIR OW N BATTLES

At Camp Sevier, on the southeast slope of Paris Mountain, tens of thousands of men prepared for battle while hundreds of nurses treated their injuries and illnesses— including the deadly Spanish flu.

Photograph courtesy of the Greenville County Historical Society

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etween 1917 and 1919, on 2,000 acres along the slopes of Paris Mountain, an estimated 100,000 men trained for World War I at Camp Sevier, drilling on artillery and honing machine gun skills. Some of these men went on to break through the Hindenburg Line in 1918, helping turn the tide of the war. Less mentioned are the nurses who staffed the facility’s four medical buildings. At Base Hospital No. 128, a designated U.S. Army medical unit, the nurses of Camp Sevier treated the injuries and illnesses common to military training in addition to dealing with the Spanish flu pandemic, which killed more than 50 million people worldwide in 1918. Military camps were hit hard, but the nurses’ commitment to keeping soldiers healthy became another battlefield, one that helped evolve medical practices that are still used today—in a field just as challenging as it was one hundred years ago.—Leigh Savage

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Alexis Furman, Realtor® Big houses & small, Alexis sells them all. In fact, she sold over 10 Million in 2020. Let her help you find your home this year! 1 McDaniel Greene, Greenville, SC 29601 | 148 Thomas Green Blvd., Clemson, SC 29631

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Artwork (Spotted Wings II) by Judy Verhoeven

2021 GUIDE TO GIVING

ASBURY HILLS CAMP & RETREAT CENTER 129 BARBARA STONE FOUNDATION 130 CAROLINA BALLET THEATRE 131 CENTRE STAGE 132 CENTER FOR DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES 134 THE FAMILY EFFECT 135 FAVOR GREENVILLE 136 FIVE OAKS ACADEMY 137 GREENLAW FOUNDATION 138 GREENVILLE LITERACY ASSOCIATION 139 HABITAT FOR HUMANITY 140 INTERNATIONAL BALLET THEATRE 142 JULIE VALENTINE CENTER 143 JUNIOR LEAGUE 144 MEYER CENTER 145 MEALS ON WHEELS 146 NAMI GREENVILLE 147 PENDLETON PLACE 148 PROJECT HOPE FOUNDATION 149 PROJECT HOST 150 PUBLIC EDUCATION PARTNERS 151 RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE CHARITIES 152 ROPER MOUNTAIN 153 SOUTH CAROLINA OVARIAN CANCER FOUNDATION 154 SALVATION ARMY 156 ST. FRANCIS FOUNDATION 157 SHRINERS HOSPITAL 158 UNITED MINISTRIES 159 UNITED WAY OF GREENVILLE COUNTY 160 UPSTATE FATHERHOOD 161 WAREHOUSE THEATRE 162 WALT’S WALTZ 164

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“Asbury Hills develops the whole child, focuses on spiritual growth, love for the Lord, and the traditional camp experience. Overall, it is an experience that will last a lifetime.” Our mission is to serve all people for Christian birth, growth, and renewal. We strive to live out that mission no matter who walks through our gates, sleeps in our cabins, hikes our trails, sails on our zip lines, or swims in our lakes. Sleep away camp has proven over and over to provide most of the essential growing characteristics that our kids need today. Help us say yes to children calling out for such an experience regardless of their ability to pay.

SC United Methodist Camps & Retreat Ministries 5 Century Drive, Suite 250 Greenville, SC 29607 www.sccarm.org | 864.298.0125


Meet Greenville’s

There’s great

for People with

in a shared

CHAMPION

POWER PURPOSE

DISABILITIES

From its humble beginnings, the Barbara Stone Foundation was a membership of parents to children with disabilities, each one passionate about seeing their son or daughter receive equitable services in Greenville. Today, the Barbara Stone Foundation looks for gaps in the services and resources available to the disability community. We work with local leaders, business professionals, and organizations to raise funds toward innovative programs and initiatives that empower individuals with disabilities and enlighten the community.

Individuals with disabilities, their families and friends, are Greenville. Join Us and TOGETHER we will serve as Champions for Individuals with disabilities.

Give. Inspire. Support Us Today. Learn more about the Barbara Stone Foundation’s mission, our work through Greenville Can, and other successful initiatives.

barbarastonefoundation.org



CAPTIVATE. CULT


LTIVATE. INSPIRE.

Join us! Call or go online for tickets!

864.233.6733 | CentreStage.org 501 River Street, Greenville, SC 29601


CDSprovides provides access access to children CDS to healthcare healthcarefor forover over8,000 8,000 children each year who have developmental delays and disabilities. each year who have developmental delays and disabilities. Pleaseconsider consider making making aa gift season. Please giftto toCDS CDSthis thisholiday holiday season.

CDServices.org | 864.331.1300 CDServices.org | Greenville, 864.331.1300 29 North Academy Street, SC 29601 29 North Academy Street, Greenville, SC 29601


Blossoming in

RECOVERY Who We Are: The Family Effect works to reduce family collapse and harm to children. We do this by addressing one of the biggest indicators of abuse and neglect, problematic substance use in the home. The Family Effect recruits volunteers, raises community awareness, and solicits donations to support the work of the Phoenix Center. Impact: Approximately 5,000 individuals are served each year through the Phoenix Center’s broad continuum of services. An additional 3,000 children are impacted by these life-saving services because they live in the home of an individual who is in our care. Families are stronger when they are able to manage their substance use. If you or someone you know needs treatment, call The Phoenix Center helpline at 864-467-3790.

1400 Cleveland Street, Greenville, SC 864.467.3790 | TheFamilyEffect.org The Family Effect is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, Federal ID # 57-1129751. All contributions are tax-deductible as allowed by Federal law.




Freedom of the Press. Freedom to Help. Freedom to Choose. None of those ‘FREE’doms are truly FREE – they all have a cost.

HELP US HELP VETERANS. VISIT THEGREENLAWFOUNDATION.ORG TO LEARN MORE GreenlawFound_fp_TOWN Nov21.indd 1

10/15/21 12:16 AM


Your Gift Will Help Us...

“I want my story to be an inspiration for others.”

REALIZE A COMMUNITY WHERE EVERY ADULT HAS THE OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN, GROW, AND SUCCEED.

Nyasia graduated from GLA’s GED Bootcamp in January 2021. Today, she is pursuing her degree in Human Services and intends to use her experiences and education to help others. At age 29, Nyasia decided to complete her GED. This is something she has failed to do in prior attempts until she found GLA’s GED Bootcamp. The program provided her with the focus and support to complete. She admits being an adult learner is hard. But her desire to be a role model to her children and community is everything to her. “What keeps me going”, she said, “is that my story will be an inspiration for others”.

John D. Jaraczewski, Executive Director 225 South Pleasantburg Drive, Suite C-10 Greenville, SC 29607 www.greenvilleliteracy.org 864-467-3556

GLA provides Pre-GED, GED Preparation, English as a Second Language, and College and Career Transitions for Adults in the Upstate. Our services are provided regardless of learning or socioeconomic levels.


STRENGTH With opportunity, we all have the potential to stand on our own.

S

STABILITY

Strong and stable families help to build strong and stable communities.

Habitat for Humanity builds strength, stability, and self-reliance through shelter. Everyone deserves a decent place to live, and everyone can do something today to help make that possible for another family. People in our community and worldwide partner with Habitat for Humanity to build or improve a place they can call home. Habitat homeowners help to build or improve a place they can call home. Habitat homeowners help build their own homes alongside volunteers and pay an affordable mortgage. With our help, Habitat homeowners achieve the strength, stability, and self-reliance they need to make a better life for themselves and their families.


SELF-RELIANCE Habitat homeowners receive financial education, help build their houses and pay an affordable mortgage.

SHELTER Decent shelter is something we all need to thrive.

(864) 370-4787 To donate:

habitatgreenville.charityproud.org/donate To volunteer:

habitatgreenville.org/get-involved/volunteer1


Nutcracker the

presents

PEACE CONCERT HALL | DECEMBER 10-12

The holiday classic returns to the Peace Concert Hall featuring principal guest artists Cara Marie Gary and Lucas Segovia accompanied by the Greenville Symphony Orchestra. Guest artists sponsored by Greta and Graham Somerville. Jerry Finley Photography

To buy tickets visit peacecenter.org.


PLEASE JOIN US ON MONDAY, FEBRUARY 14TH AT NOON GREENVILLE CONVENTION CENTER PURCHASE TICKETS NOW HOMETOWN HEROES This year’s Julie Valentine Luncheon will take you through the healing journey of five incredible Hometown Heroes. It takes incredible courage to begin the journey of hope and healing and as you will see, it is well worth the fight to the finish. Renee Shaw, Kira Hendricks, Anna Miller, KC Cox, and Cindy Robinson will share the power of hope and determination in the healing process. Whether you attend the luncheon as a supporter, a survivor, a family member or friend of a survivor, or an advocate for survivors, know that you are not alone. Survivors, know that you are believed and supported. Family and friends, know that your support is invaluable and that sometimes your presence is the most important gift you can give. Advocates, know that your work is making a difference and that sometimes our impact is measured in decades not days. We look forward to experiencing this healing journey with you.

PRESENTING SPONSOR

THE CASTELLANI FAMILY

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT JULIEVALENTINECENTER.ORG


The Junior League of Greenville, Inc. engages in projects and partnerships that help women in our community overcome barriers, focusing on Human Trafficking and Economic Mobility.

OUR COMMUNITY PARTNERS

OUR SIGNATURE EVENTS

LEARN MORE www.jlgreenville.org

@ reenville

@jlgreenvillesc


Thanks4Giving

During the time of year when we are all giving thanks for our blessings, we want to say Thanks for Giving! We are grateful to the community for supporting the life-changing mission that Dr. Leslie Meyer began over 67 years ago. Your gift of time, talent or financial support gives us the opportunity to serve children with disabilities today and for years to come!

What we accomplished this year with your help! 104 STUDENTS SERVED | 14,914 THERAPY SERVICES | CELEBRATED 20 GRADUATES PROVIDED 4,407 NURSING SERVICES | BUSES TRAVELED 34,206 MILES TRANSPORTING STUDENTS

Why we need your help! 37 STUDENTS ARE ON THE WAITING LIST 48% QUALIFY FOR FREE/REDUCED LUNCH | 9% HOUSEHOLDS HAVE ENGLISH AS SECOND LANGUAGE OUR CHILDREN CANNOT WAIT. EARLY INTERVENTION IS THE KEY TO OVERCOMING CHALLENGES AND REACHING THEIR MAXIMUM POTENTIAL!

Interested in learning more about the Meyer Center or seeing your gift in action? Contact us for a tour. 864.250.0005 ext. 210 | meyercenter.org

1132 Rutherford Road, Greenville, SC 29609 | 864.250.0005


We Deliver More Than Meals When you support Meals on Wheels of Greenville, you help us deliver much more than meals.

Did you know

1 in 5 people in our community are homebound? We are proud to say that we make sure our 1,500 homebound clients are not forgotten. Emergency meal kits, pet food, birthday cakes and semi-annual holiday bags are just a few of the ways we provide #MoreThanMeals to make our clients feel special and loved.

Thank you to our gracious financial supporters

and loyal network of volunteers who help us fulfill our mission of enhancing the quality of life among our homebound neighbors in Greenville County.

YOU CAN PROVIDE

DONATE

More Than Meals TOO VOLUNTEER

REFER

For more information please visit:

MEALSONWHEELSGREENVILLE.ORG 15 Oregon Street • Greenville, SC 29605 864-233-6565 • www.MealsonWheelsGreenville.org


Do You See What We See? Change is in the air. From a place of darkness to one of hope, NAMI Greenville is transforming the way we see mental health. Please consider a donation and join us as we work to bring light to a subject too important to ignore. You have the power to change a life – and it’s amazing when you see it.

Change Your Mind About Mental Illness. To donate and learn about risk factors and warning signs, visit www.namigreenvillesc.org

Join us in the fight to bring hope and help for mental health. 130 Industrial Drive, Suite A Greenville SC 29607 • (864)331-3300


SAVE THE DATE

Pendleton Place Annual Bene t ene it Zen Greenville 7 PM -

PM

February 4, 2022 MARK YOUR CALENDAR FOR A 7 S-THEMED FUNDRAISING CELEBRATION IN HONOR OF OUR FOUNDING IN

7

Peace, Love, Pendleton Place WWW . PENDLETONPLACE . ORG



PROJECT HOST

PROJECT HOST

BUILDING BC OU MI LMD IUNNGI T Y THROUGH FOOD

COMMUNITY THROUGH FOOD

At Project Host, our mission is to use food as a tool to nourish the hungry and train the unemployed. We believe food insecurity can only be addressed by the whole community, and we engage the people of Greenville in every step of the process.

At Project Host, our mission is to use food as a tool to nourish the hungry and train the unemployed. We believe food insecurity can only be addressed the whole community, we engage the people Feeding thebyHungry Training &and Educating Payingofit forward Greenville in every step of the process. Soup Kitchen Cooking for Kids

CC Pearce Culinary School

HostMobile The Bakery Gardening for Good

Feeding the Hungry

Training & Educating

Paying it forward

Soup Kitchen Cooking for Kids

CC Pearce Culinary School

HostMobile The Bakery Gardening for Good

VOLUNTEER | DONATE | PARTNER Learnmoreabouthowtogetinvolvedatwww.projecthost.org

VOLUNTEER | DONATE | PARTNER Learn more about how to get involved at www.projecthost.org


Founded in 1985, Public Education Partners has a mission to lead our community in acting collectively to support, strengthen, and advance public education and student achievement in Greenville County Schools.

ELEVATING TEACHERS

EMPOWERING ADVOCATES

ENGAGING COMMUNITY

No single factor has a bigger impact on student achievement than having a high quality teacher in the classroom, which is why PEP has made it a top priority to focus on strategic investments in teacher recruitment, retention, and morale. We have invested more than $1.3 million in education innovation grants, and have helped bring more than 100 educators into our schools through our support of the Greenville Alternative Teacher Education (GATE) program. PEP’s professional development offerings touch hundreds of educators each year, and our awards and outreach platforms celebrate teachers and the positive impact they have on students.

Public education needs people like you. We have built a space for the community to learn, engage, and lift their voices in support of public schools. PEP is engaging on critical issues by growing a corps of community advocates, informing equitable and inclusive policy decisions at the state and local level, and empowering new leaders. Since 2018, more than 2,500 education champions have signed up for our action alerts and sent thousands of letters to their representatives. Our annual Policy Priorities and award-winning website InformEdsc.org are powerful tools that empower people to confidently advocate on behalf of Greenville’s public schools.

Fostering strong, authentic connections in our community is key to supporting Greenville’s students, teachers, and public schools. PEP’s Make Summer Count family literacy initative has reached more than 145,000 children and distributed over 1.2 million books to reduce summer slide and grow home libraries. Our strategic partnership with programs like OnTrack Greenville keep middle schoolers on the path to high school graduation, and our co-leadership of the Ten at the Top Education Spectrum leverages our 35+ years of expertise and insights to identify cross-sector issues and develop solutions, with a current focus on teacher recruitment.

2020-21: IMPACT HIGHLIGHTS

THANK YOU

$48,000

550+

36,000

Awarded to Teachers and Schools Through Grant Programs

Educators and Community Advocates Trained

Books Distributed Though Make Summer Count

We would like to thank all of the donors who have invested in Public Education Partners this year! If you would like to learn more about opportunities for engagement or support, please contact our Director of Development Casey Brewer at casey@pepgc.org or visit pepgc.org/donate.

Learn more at pepgc.org @pepgreenville


#KeepingFamiliesClose

FUND A NIGHT

FUND A WEEKEND

$89

$267 FUND A WEEK

$623

The mission of Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Carolinas is to keep families with critically ill and injured children together and near the care and resources they need. Today, RMHCC of the Carolinas has served close to 13,000 families from the Upstate, our surrounding states and beyond our country’s borders. Giving today will help keep hundreds of families together during life’s most critical moments.

Together we can help.

rmhc-carolinas.org


Roper Mountain is the place of “yes” where visitors and students alike are encouraged to touch, experience, look at situations from multiple standpoints, and question the world around them.

We invite you to participate in the month of giving to support Roper Mountain and our continued growth and expansion of public programs. With your support, we will provide more one-of-a-kind interactive, permanent and traveling exhibits — as well as operating hours and programs for the larger community. SCAN ME

Learn more and give today: GiveToRoperMountain.org


Carry Hope Wherever You Go o

Carry Hope Wherever You Go Carry Thank you to all of our Sponsors, Donors, and Volunteers that supported us in 2021.

We are dedicated to improving the health of women through education on the warning signs of ovarian cancer, support of those diagnosed with the disease, and promotion of ovarian cancer research.

o

Carr

Carr

TO DONATE AND FOR MORE INFORMATION www.SCOvarianCancer.org email: info@scovariancancer.org


o ry Hope Wherever You Go

e ,

Thank you to all of our Sponsors, Donors, and Volunteers that supported us in 2021.

rry Hope Wherever You Go

We are dedicated to improving the health of women through education on the warning signs of ovarian cancer, support of those diagnosed with the disease, and promotion of ovarian cancer research.

Thank you to all of our Sponsors, Donors, and Volunteers that supported us in 2021.

rry Hope Wherever You Go We are dedicated to improving the health of women through education on the warning signs of ovarian cancer, support of those diagnosed with the disease, and promotion of ovarian cancer research.

Thank you to all of our Sponsors, Donors, and Volunteers that supported us in 2021.

TO DONATE AND FOR MORE INFORMATION www.SCOvarianCancer.org email: info@scovariancancer.org

We are dedicated to improving the health of women through education on the warning signs of ovarian cancer, support of those diagnosed with the disease, and promotion of ovarian cancer research.

TO DONATE AND FOR MORE INFORMATION www.SCOvarianCancer.org email: info@scovariancancer.org


WHEN PROBLEMS FEEL

TOO BIG TO CONQUER HOPE MARCHES

N

As we continue to recover from the pandemic, many hardworking families are falling behind on bills. With a gift of $25 a month, you can help them keep up and keep going.

SalvationArmyUSA.org


View Christmas Trees November 19 - December 28 AT

Courtyard by Marriott Greenville Downtown

Embassy Suites by Hilton Greenville Downtown Riverplace

Hyatt Regency Greenville

All proceeds from the 2021 Bon Secours Festival of Trees will support Project SEARCH.


injury care orthopedics motion analysis center prosthetics & orthotics rehabilitation specialty clinics

The most

AMAZING CARE

anywhere.

Why Choose Us Experience

Home to the largest team of pediatric orthopedic surgeons in the Carolinas, with over 150 years combined experience.

Award Winning

Repeated recognition for outstanding Patient Experience by Press Ganey and recipient of the Certified Zero Harm Award for patient safety by the South Carolina Hospital Association.

From Routine to Rare

Shriners Children’s Greenville specializes in over 85 different pediatric orthopedic conditions, from sprains to scoliosis.

Do You Know a For a consultation, or to refer a patient, call: Child We May Be Shriners Children’s Greenville Able to Help? 864-271-3444

To make a donation visit: ShrinersGreenville.org or call 864.255.7850

facebook.com/shcgreenville twitter.com/shcgreenville instagram.com/shcgreenville




THE JOY OF

FATHERHOOD

Upstate Fatherhood Coalition is all about the importance of present, involved and responsible fathers. Through one on one goal setting and coaching; Peer group sessions on parenting, relationships, and economical mobility; Health and employment services, upstate Fatherhood Coalition equips men — many who have never had a positive parental role model in their own lives — for their critical jobs as fathers, partners and community members.

Find out more and support Upstate fathers at UpstateFathers.org/donate





MAKE TRACTION A TRADITION. Start a new holiday tradition with a gift card to the BMW Performance Center that’s good toward any class. Your loved one will be all smiles as they experience a 503-horsepower M car on the track. It’ll be a gripping holiday season. Get 20% off a gift card with code 21TMHOL20, now through 12/31/21.* Call 888-345-4269 to purchase or visit BMWPerformanceCenter.com for more information.

*Excludes M4 GT4, Race License and private instruction. ©2021 BMW of North America, LLC. The BMW name, model names and logo are registered trademarks.


Forevermark Icon™ Collection

A GIFT TO BE CHERISHED FOREVER

761 Verdae Blvd, Greenville, SC 29607 (864) 297-5600 | halesjewelers.com