Page 1

the

Giving Issue

CELEBRATING THE LIVES OF THOSE WHO LIFT UP OUR COMMUNITY

NOVEM B ER 2 016 TOWNCAROLINA.COM

TOWN_NOV_COVER.indd 1

10/14/16 2:34 PM


Obtain the Property Report required by federal law and read it before signing anything. No federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. This is not an offer where registration is required prior to any other offer being made. Void where prohibited by law. In South Carolina, Cliffs Realty Sales SC, LLC, 635 Garden Market Drive, Travelers Rest, SC 29690, Harry V. Roser, Broker-in-Charge and Cliffs Realty Sales, SC, LLC, 341 Keowee Baptist Church Road, Six Mile, SC 29682, Marc H. Wilson, Broker-in-Charge. In North Carolina, Walnut Cove Realty, 158 Walnut Valley Parkway, Arden, NC 28704, Dotti Smith, Broker-in-Charge.

TOWN_blank page.indd 6

10/13/16 10:15 AM


the

S E V E N

T IME S

HOME

When families build at The Cliffs they’re creating more than a home, they’re building friendships and indelible memories — because from the moment you join, you belong. The Cliffs are seven vibrant communities, three on Lake Keowee, four high up in the cool mountain air, all with spectacular vistas. There isn’t one that’s best, but whichever you choose to call home, the amenities of all seven are yours to enjoy. Come, be our guest and discover why we say, “There’s life, and then there’s living.” 866.411.5771 | CliffsLiving.com Homes and Homesites at Seven Carolina Lake and Mountain Communities

35 e.

G L A S SY

TOWN_blank page.indd 7

M O U N TA I N PA R K

WA L N U T COV E

K E OW E E V I N E YA R D S

VA L L E Y

K E OW E E FA L L S

K E OW E E S P R I N G S

10/13/16 10:15 AM


S:19.25”

The BMW X5

century-bmw.com 855-261-2676

Autotrader is a registered trademark of TPI Holdings, Inc. used under exclusive license. ©2016 BMW of North America, LLC. The BMW name, model names and logo are registered trademarks.

TOWN_blank page.indd 6

FS:9.205”

10/11/16 9:04 PM


S:19.25”

T:13” S:12.25”

“FROM THE DRIVER’S SEAT, IT DOESN’T GET MUCH BETTER THAN THIS.” - Autotrader

It’s easy to talk about the BMW X5 when you’re behind the wheel. With its unmatched power, uncompromised space, and the kind of legendary performance you expect from BMW, you may find yourself unable to talk about anything else.

Special lease and finance offers will be available by Century BMW through BMW Financial Services.

Century BMW

2934 Laurens Road

Greenville, SC 29607

855-261-2676

century-bmw.com

Meet the all-new Center of Excellence management team providing a true BMW experience.

TOWN_blank page.indd 7

FS:9.045”

10/11/16 9:04 PM


AugustaRoad.com Realty LLC OLF

G ON

…where listings actually SELL, too.

, NIS OURT N E L, T LL C POOKETBA BAS

SE UR

CO

ON

LF

GO

RSE

U CO

CHANTICLEER SECTION 10

18 ACRES, IN-TOWN ESTATE

CHANTICLEER

509 Hidden Hills Dr $1,999,605

102 Lakewood Dr $1,995,607

100 Chamberlain Ct $1,499,605

GREENVILLE COUNTRY CLUB

PARKINS MILL AREA

CHANTICLEER SECTION 9

45 Rock Creek $1,299,605

21 Collins Creek $1,175,607

12 Lawson Way $1,149,605

6 Bedrooms, 5 Bathrooms, 2 Half Bathrooms

4 Bedrooms, 4 Bathrooms, 3 Half Bathrooms

6 Bedrooms, 5 Bathrooms, 2 Half Bathrooms

R’S ME LDE L HO I U B ONA S E PR

5 Bedrooms, 5 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

4 Bedrooms, 5 Bathrooms

5 Bedroom, 6 Bathrooms

ST ! GUECRES , L A POOSE, 2 U HO

CHANTICLEER

AUGUSTA ROAD AREA

CHANTICLEER

25 Club Forest Ln $1,148,605

155 Faris Circle $1,000,605

171 Chapman Rd $899,605

5 Bedrooms, 5 Bathrooms, 3 Half Bathrooms

ON

COLLINS CREEK

CLEVELAND PARK

SE

GCC AREA

333 Riverside Dr $859,605 5 Bedrooms, 5 Bathrooms

2045 Cleveland St Ext $773,607 172 Ridgeland Dr Unit 100 $749,601 4 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

EW

DN

RAN

B

4 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms, 2 Half Bathrooms

UR

O FC

L

GO

6 Bedroom, 6.5 Bathrooms

AUGUSTA CIRCLE AREA

114 Melville Ave $739,605

4 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

TOWN_blank page.indd 6

Joan Herlong, Owner, BIC 864-325-2112 AugustaRoad.com

GREENVILLE COUNTRY CLUB AREA

347 Riverside Dr $624,605 4 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms

10/12/16 12:24 PM


The Word on the Street … in 29650

5

s

s

01

m

AugustaRoad.com Realty LLC Joan Herlong Owner, Broker in Charge 864-325-2112 | Joan@AugustaRoad.com *Greenville’s Number One Realtor, for the past FOUR years. Source: MLS Sales Volume, 2015, 2014, 2013 & 2012

TOWN_blank page.indd 7

10/12/16 12:24 PM


1 NORTH LAURENS STREET | CAVIARANDBANANAS.COM

HOLIDAY WITH US

Autumn spice, brined roast turkey? Rosemary and sea salt rubbed rack of lamb? We’ve got everything you’re hungry for this holiday season – from main courses and sides to decadent desserts – all made from scratch. Let us make your holidays enjoyable, and unforgettable. And don’t forget the wine.

TOWN_blank page.indd 6

10/11/16 9:12 PM


TOWN_blank page.indd 7

10/13/16 6:22 PM


FIRST

Glance

8 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_First Glance.indd 8

10/14/16 2:00 PM


Retro Reflectors: Where: Denny’s Plaza in downtown Spartanburg, one of the four cities selected to be a part of the Bloomberg Philanthropies’ Public Art Challenge. What: Mobile Suspension, one of nine LED light installations in the “Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light” exhibit by artist Erwin Redl. For the story, see page 58. Photograph by Andrew Huang

St. Francis treats heart attacks 3x faster than the national standard of 90 minutes. stfrancishealth.org/heartfacts

NOVEMBER 2016 / 9

TOWN_NOV_First Glance.indd 9

10/14/16 2:00 PM


TOWN_blank page.indd 6

10/13/16 8:28 PM


TOWN_blank page.indd 7

10/13/16 8:28 PM


Contents

14 21

EDITOR’S LETTER The democracy of giving.

81

THE LIST

See, hear, read, react. The month’s must-dos.

29

ON THE TOWN

90

45 51

WEDDINGS

93

70 76

Pics of the litter: Upcountry fêtes & festivities.

TOWNBUZZ

Mixed-media artist appears on the Upstate landscape; DC’s Melrose Georgetown is a capital establishment; Spartanburg lights up for crime prevention; Greenville Tech’s Julio Hernandez is an educational inspiration; and more.

TOWN EXTRA

With a dedication to artistic design and comprehensive craft, The Oriole Mill is reimagining how quality materials are made.

SIDEWAYS

Renowned for its gold-filled hills and world-class wineries, Dahlonega, Georgia, is a must for fall.

115 121 128 164

STYLE CENTRAL

Put the puff in your chest with designer down vests; booties are a clear call for fall fashion; and fine wine your friends with classic crystal glasses.

MAN ABOUT TOWN

Down on his lottery luck, the Man learns that losing is a better life lesson.

PLACE HOLDER

A writer condemns the faceless lot that preys on his elderly father for charitable donations.

EAT & DRINK

Dive ‘n’ Boar gets a makeover by a high-class chef; pork chops are a dinner date you won’t regret committing to.

DINING GUIDE TOWNSCENE

Got plans? You do now.

SECOND GLANCE

6 9 10 1

STROKES OF KINDNESS

When we extend our hands to give, we do not withdraw them empty, an elegant action well-understood by our Charitable Giving Award winners. / by Jennifer Oladipo // photography by Will Crooks

ADOPTED SON

When Nathan Einstein married into Greenville’s insurance scene, his father-in-law modeled a communityminded spirit. Inspired by his mentor, Einstein is the embodiment of generosity, an ideal recipient for the Lifetime of Charitable Giving Award. / by Stephanie Trotter // photography by Paul Mehaffey COVER: Finches in Flight, 36” x 36”, oil on wood panel; by local artist Joseph Bradley. Artwork courtesy of the artist THIS PAGE: North Carolina’s Linville Gorge at the peak of autumn brilliance. For more, see “Grand Canyon,” page 64. Photograph by Daniel Burleson

Greenville Open Studios presents the public with premier access to the area’s most outstanding artists.

November 12 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_TOC.indd 12

10/14/16 11:17 AM


Athletic. Adventurous. And arguably the most advanced SUV on the road. The 2017 GLE350 SUV. The premium SUV that invented its class nearly 20 years ago still leads the way in every arena of driving, and from every angle of its design. From its iconic Star to its sleek LED taillamps, the future of the SUV has never looked brighter. From industry-leading safety systems to its advanced yet user-friendly technologies, the GLE turns innovation you never imagined into benefits you won’t want to go anywhere without. Starting at $52,000.

CARLTON MOTORCARS www.CarltonMB.com | (864) 213-8000 | 2446 Laurens Road, Greenville, SC 29607

TOWN_blank page.indd 7

10/13/16 10:16 AM


EDITOR’S

Letter Greenville artist Kent Ambler’s work appears in our feature story “Strokes of Kindess,” on page 96; (right) Days End. Woodcut, 52” x 32”; artwork courtesy of the artist.

Photograph by Will Crooks

))) For digital extras— go to TOWNCAROLINA.COM

@towncarolina @towncarolina facebook.com/towncarolina bit.ly // towniemail

The Democracy of Giving

T

he Giving Issue is our yearly celebration and reflection of the humbling acts of charitable donation, work, and time. Perhaps more than recent years, the theme resonates keenly as we stand on the brink of new leadership for our country. Though, at this printing, the outcome remains unclear, one thing appears certain: we have an undercurrent of dissonance, which destroys rather than strengthens. There are many potential reasons for discord, but my intention isn’t to propose them. What I would like to suggest is a means of repair, something that I believe to be the restorative salve for our times, for anytime. Perhaps the most crucial, singular thing that anyone can do is to be kind. It’s an egalitarian action that we all can enjoy and which can lead—almost immediately—to a positive result. While giving takes many shapes, from donations to volunteerism, we each have the power and opportunity to choose kindness. It is the simplest, most affordable, effective, available, and doable thing. We celebrate individuals and organizations who have made giving a prominent part of their lives, if not the most important. But the fact is, we do not need anything to be kind. It begins with our attitude. Our presence. Our action. With us, quite literally. We can change the world with kindness. It sounds campy, for sure. Cliché, certainly. Idealistic, absolutely. What’s wrong with that? It is the most accessible, democratic form of giving. We all can do it. All of us. With a nod, a gesture, a smile. An acknowledgment of life, rather than an action that cuts, depletes, and diminishes. Why, then, would we choose to put cruelty above care, grudges over olive branches? We have our reasons, no doubt. I’m no stranger to destructive feelings and experiences. But the more I think of it, the more it makes absolute sense: to be kind, to take the high road, to remain just, to acknowledge the aspect of humanness in another is the finest expression of self, the purest—and most vital—opportunity to give. And to receive, too.

International artist Erwin Redl’s light-centric installations span ten neighborhoods in Spartanburg. For the story, turn to page 58.

Photograph by A ndrew Huang

Blair Knobel Editor-in-Chief Twitter / Instagram: @LBKNOBEL

14 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_Ed Note.indd 14

10/14/16 11:17 AM


WYETH DYNASTY Andrew Wyeth N.C. Wyeth

Jamie Wyeth

Carolyn Wyeth

Henriette Wyeth

opening november 16, 2016 In celebration of the centennial of Andrew Wyeth’s birth, the Greenville County Museum of Art presents Wyeth Dynasty, a retrospective of Andrew Wyeth’s art complemented by works of his father, N. C., his son Jamie, and his sisters Carolyn and Henriette. More than 80 examples are featured in this exhibition of works by the first family of American painting.

Exhibition presented by

TOWN Wyeth Dynasty 1st page.indd 1

TOWN_blank page.indd 7

10/13/16 4:35 PM

10/13/16 6:22 PM


Andrew Wyeth, born (1917-2009) Fred Olson, 1985 ŠAndrew Wyeth

TOWN_blank page.indd 6 TOWN Wyeth Dynasty 2-3 pages.indd 2

10/13/16 6:23 PM


Jamie Wyeth, born 1946 The Albino Tortoise, 2014 ©Jamie Wyeth

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1pm - 5 pm

TOWN_blank page.indd 7

admission free

10/13/16 6:23 PM 10/13/16 4:36 PM


Mark B. Johnston PUBLISHER & CEO mark@towncarolina.com

WHAT ARE YOU MOST GRATEFUL FOR THIS YEAR?

Blair Knobel EDITOR-IN-CHIEF blair@towncarolina.com Paul Mehaffey ART DIRECTOR

“Family, friends, and food. In that order unless I’m hangry and then well, food and only food.”

Laura Linen STYLE EDITOR ABBY MOORE KEITH EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

“Friends who feel like family gathered around my table. And grapefruit vodka.”

“People who help me with my blind spots in life, since there’s no app for that yet.”

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Ruta Fox M. Linda Lee STEVEN TINGLE Jac Valitchka HEIDI CORYELL WILLIAMS

“Lexapro.”

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS MARY CATHRYN ARMSTRONG Kathryn Davé, Scott Gould, Kathleen Nalley, Lindsay Niedringhaus, JENNIFER OLADIPO, Emily Price, Stephanie Trotter & Allison Walsh

“When the presidential CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS election is over. & DESIGNERS I feel like our Chelsey Ashford, Robin Batina-Lewis, country needs a Matthew Franklin Carter, Will Crooks, nice hot bubble Jivan Dav é , Whitney Fincannon, TJ Grandy, bath when this is Jake Knight & Eli Warren finally done.”

EDITOR-AT-L ARGE Andrew Haung Holly Hardin OPERATIONS MANAGER GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Kristy Adair Michael Allen

109 CLEVELAND STREET, GREENVILLE, SC 864-255-5699 | MEANDMEDESIGNS.COM

MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Donna Johnston, Annie Langston, Nicole Mularski, LINDSAY OEHMEN & Emily Yepes

“My Lord and Savior and the health and safety of my family.”

Kate Madden DIRECTOR, EVENTS & ACCOUNT STRATEGY kate@towncarolina.com Danielle Car DIGITAL OPERATIONS MANAGER Kristi Fortner EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT

109 CLEVELAND STREET, GREENVILLE, SC 864-255-5699 | MEANDMEDESIGNS.COM

Lorraine Goldstein, Sue Priester & Hal Weiss CONSULTING MEMBERS Douglas J. Greenlaw CHAIRMAN

TOWN Magazine (Vol. 6, No. 11) is published monthly (12 times per year) by TOWN Greenville, LLC, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, (864) 679-1200. If you would like to have TOWN delivered to you each month, you may purchase an annual subscription (12 issues) for $65. For subscription information or where to find, please visit www.towncarolina.com. Postmaster: Send address changes to TOWN, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA.

18 TOWN / towncarolina.com Me&Me_hlfV_TOWN Nov16_opt.indd 1 TOWN_NOV_Masthead_use.indd 18

10/12/16 10:01 AM

10/14/16 2:56 PM


Marguerite Wyche and Associates.

THE NAME TO KNOW.

120 E. Round Hill Road | Green Valley | $2,495,000 5 bedooms, 5 full baths, 23 acres | MLS 1317041

101 Woodland Way | Alta Visa Area | $1,550,000 5 bedooms, 4 full baths, 1 half bath | MLS 1322062

111 Rockingham Road | Parkins Mill | $2,250,000 5 bedooms, 5 full baths, 2 half baths | MLS 1312091

221 Cureton Street | Augusta Road Area | $967,500 5 bedooms, 5 full baths, 2 half baths | MLS 1313889

20 Ferncreek Lane | 3+ acres | $979,500 3 bedooms, 3 full baths, 1 half bath

607 McDaniel Avenue | Alta Vista | $998,500 4 bedooms, 3 full baths, 1 half bath | MLS 13063041

R UNDE

401 Crepe Myrtle Ct. | Willow Creek | $487,000 4 bedooms, 4 full baths | MLS 1319890

17 W. Prentiss Avenue | Augusta Road Area | $895,000 4 bedooms, 3 full baths, 2 half baths | MLS 1316669

T

NTRAC

R CO UNDE

12 Landsdown | Alta Vista | $463,500 3 bedooms, 3 full baths | MLS 1327925

TOWN_blank page.indd 7

312 Crescent Avenue | Alta Vista | $949,500 3 bedooms, 5 full baths | MLS 1329569

CT

NTRA

R CO UNDE

213 Collins Creek Drive | Collins Creek | $785,000 4 bedooms, 3 full baths, 2 half baths | MLS 1310241

16 W. North Street Greenville, SC 29601 www.wycheco.com 864.270.2440

RACT

CONT

114 Woodland Way | Alta Vista | $954,500 4 bedooms, 3 full baths, 1 half bath | MLS 1327445

Marguerite Wyche

Laura McDonald

864-270-2440 mwyche@wycheco.com

864-640-1929 lmcdonald@wycheco.com

Bobbie Johnson

Suzy C. Withington

864-630-0826 bjohnson@wycheco.com

864-201-6001 swithington@wycheco.com

10/11/16 9:14 PM


The Always Open Dry Cleaner is Here. It’s true! The door to Majik Touch Lockers is always open, and we’re always ready to serve your laundry needs. Expanding our traditional dry cleaning operations in Greenville, this new location within Legacy Square at Verdae is set up to provide our great service on your time schedule... anytime.

DROP OFF

PLACE ORDER

PICK UP

Available 24/7, get superior quality dry cleaning and laundry service without the hassle of rushing to the cleaners. Simply... register, drop, lock and go. It’s so easy!

Send us a TEXT with your locker number and we’re on the job! When your order is complete, you’ll receive a TEXT message from us with complete pick up information.

With your pick up detail in hand, arrive anytime to collect your professionally laundered order. Payment is easy too! We use your authorized card on file to process each of your drop off orders.

Need to make a special request? No problem. Just leave a note with your drop off and we’ll take care of it.

Visit Majik Touch Lockers at

340 Rocky Slope Road, #102 Greenville, SC 29607

majiktouchlockers.com

TOWN_NOV_THE LIST.indd 201 Verdae_TOWN_MajikTouch.indd

10/12/16 4:42 10/12/2016 11:22:40 AMPM


List z

THE z

TOP OF THE

List

November 2016

AN EVENING WITH GLADYS KNIGHT

First, she was the acclaimed frontwoman of The Pips. Next, she was flying high on a solo career with hits like “That’s What Friends Are For” and “I Don’t Want to Know.” But no matter the circumstance, she’ll always be the ultimate Empress of Soul. Join the legendary musician, actress, businesswoman, and activist as she stops off in the Upstate for a once-ina-lifetime live show that will highlight the decades of soul, funk, and style she’s shared with so many generations.

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, Nov 10, 7:30pm. $65-$85. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

NOVEMBER 2016 / 21

TOWN_NOV_THE LIST_ImagePlaced.indd 21

10/14/16 1:17 PM


List z

The American Chamber Players will once again take the stage with gifted violinist Janet Sung in this special evening of talent. Please your ears with the tunes of Johannes Brahms’ Piano Quintet, before indulging in other pieces by Paul Schoenfield, Arthur Foote, and Wolfgang Mozart. Flutist Sara Stern will also be spotlighted during the performance.

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, Nov 3, 7:30pm. $45. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

TOWN_NOV_THE LIST_ImagePlaced.indd 22

NEEDTOBREATHE

POETIC CONVERSATION: THE GIFT OF GRATITUDE

The second edition of the Seneca quartet’s “Tour de Compadres” jaunt through the U.S. finds the Christian rock band linking up with singer Mat Kearney, bluesy crooners Welshly Arms, and pop rockers Parachute. The April release of Hard Love was the sixth studio album for the band, a 12-track fusion of country, pop, and rock that climbed one rung higher on the Billboard 200 than Rivers in the Wasteland’s number-three slot in 2014. It’s time to show these South Carolina boys some love, native to native.

What’s the best way to get a dialogue going between people from all walks of life? Hint: it’s easier than you think. Just start talking! In this vein, the Peace Center’s Poetic Conversation series invites bright poets from around the country to share their ideas and words with others. Author Ross Gay will be the guest of honor for this edition, reading selected pieces from his original, awardwinning books. It’s food for your brain and for your ears, so why miss out?

Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Fri, Nov 11, 7pm. $34-$54. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

Huguenot Mill at the Peace Center, 101 W Broad St, Greenville. Wed, Nov 16, 6:30pm. Free. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

MASTERPIECES: MAJOR, MINOR, AND MODERN

Photograph courtesy of the Bon Secours Wellness Arena

THE

10/14/16 1:17 PM


A THOUSAND CRANES

Based on the children’s novel Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes, this Studio 52 production tells the tragic tale of a young girl seeking hope in a time of darkness. At age 12, Sadako is diagnosed with radiation sickness, a byproduct of the United States’ bombing on Hiroshima in 1945. Believing the legend that any person who folds 1,000 paper cranes gets one wish, Sadako begins her work in the hospital. It’s a true testament to the strength of the human spirit, and we can all learn a lesson from one little girl. Flat Rock Playhouse Downtown, 125 S Main St, Hendersonville, NC. Nov 11–20. Fri, 7pm; Sat, 2pm & 7pm; Sun, 2pm. $10-$18. (828) 693-0403, flatrockplayhouse.org

TOWN_NOV_THE LIST_ImagePlaced.indd 23

Our community is famous for many things: a hip downtown environment, thriving local businesses, and enough scenery that Bob Ross could paint for decades. But below the surface lies a buzzing art scene, one that has steadily blossomed over the years. This annual event sheds light on Upstate visual artists, opening the doors of 133 studios in downtown and beyond, inviting visitors to take a behind-the-scenes look at the magic behind the craft. Locations vary. Nov 4–6. Fri, 6–9pm; Sat, 10am–6pm; Sun, 12–6pm. Free. greenvillearts.com

REEDY REELS FILM FESTIVAL

From restaurants to entertainment, festivals to sports teams, Greenville seems to have a little bit of everything. The city adds one more hit to the list with Reedy Reels, a celebration of Upstate independent filmmakers and the talent they bring to the table. Held downtown at the Peace Center, the fest will screen works from selected artists, serving a dual purpose in providing much-needed exposure for rising directors and education for locals on the hunt for the next big thing. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Nov 4–5. Fri–Sat. $10-$50. reedyreels.com

Ceramic vase by Darin Gehrke; photograph courtesy of the Metropolitan Arts Council

zWhat-Not-To-Miss / GREENVILLE OPEN STUDIOS

November 2016 S

M

T

W

T

F

S

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

10/14/16 1:17 PM


List z

THE

Quick HITS (UN)COMMON SPACE(S)

z It’s no secret that our world is in a state of constant construction, building upwards to meet the needs of a growing population and commerce. As our natural resources continue to dwindle, one group of Upstate artists is taking stock of the parallels between man and Mother Nature in this exhibition. Featuring a media hodgepodge of works by Jeff Pullen, Pamela Winegard, Matthew Mitros, and seven other artists, (Un)Common Space(s) is an introspective look at how we as humans are shifting our habitat—for better or worse. Spartanburg Art Museum, 200 E St John St, Spartanburg. Thru Dec 8. Tues–Sat, 10am–5pm; Sun, 1–5pm. Free. (864) 582-7616, spartanburgartmuseum.org

HOPE RELAY

Photograph by Bob Mussell, courtesy of the Peace Center

z While our school day relays usually consisted of trying not to melt in the hot sun and hoping you didn’t get stuck with a grape Popsicle, this race has a lot more impact. In support of Project HOPE’s programs to fund autism research and support in the community, runners will race in teams in either the 20k, Boot Camp 5k or regular 5k, beginning at the Kroc Center and winding through downtown Greenville. The classic-style relay will be broken up into different legs, with separate divisions for athletes of any skill. Salvation Army Kroc Center, 424 Westfield St, Greenville. Sat, Nov 12, beginning at 7:30am. (864) 907-8449, hoperelay.org

SLOW FOOD EARTH MARKET

z Let’s be honest: one of the best parts of fall is enjoying all the fresh fruits and veggies that the season has to bear. But there’s no need to venture way out for your basket-load of produce; local farmers are bringing their gifts here to you. While the Slow Food movement continues to grow, so does customer want, and this market provides all the clean, local, chemical-free goods you can think of. This is the last Earth Market of the year, so make it count! Swamp Rabbit Cafe and Grocery, 205 Cedar Lane Rd, Greenville. Thurs, Nov 17, 2–6pm. Free. slowfoodupstate.com/earthmarket.htm

DISNEY ON ICE

z There’s no need to dust off those old VHS tapes, ’90s kids; you’ll be able to see all of your favorite Disney characters live and on ice at the Well. “Dream Big” is the idea behind these figure-skating follies, which will feature stories of grit, gumption, and true love, as told by the wonderful world of Disney. Join Olaf, Ariel, Tiana, Jasmine, Elsa, and the rest of the gang as they glide their way into Greenville—and into our hearts. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Nov 23–27. Wed, 7:30pm; Fri–Sun, 1pm & 5pm. $15-$55. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

Goo Goo Dolls Though they formed in 1986, it would take nearly a decade for the Goo Goo Dolls to find mainstream success with their brand of alternative rock tunes. With a slew of charttoppers under their hats—“Iris,” “Slide,” “Here Is Gone,” and “Name,” to mention a few—Johnny Rzeznik and company have proved their staying power since that initial triumph. This past May marked the debut of a new album Boxes, a more mature exploration into the band’s signature altrock sound. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Wed, Nov 23, 7:30pm. $45-$65. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

November 2016 S

M

T

W

T

F

S

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

24 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_THE LIST_ImagePlaced.indd 24

10/14/16 1:17 PM


Eric Brown Design NE W YORK

|

GREENVILLE

|

T O R O N TO

|

NAPLES

101A AUGUSTA ST., GREENVILLE, SC ERICBROWNDESIGN.COM | 864.233.4442 |

Eric fp TOWN page.indd TOWN_blank Mar16.indd 7 1

as bespokebloke

2/16/16 11:04 10/11/16 9:16 PM


TOWN_blank page.indd 6

10/12/16 12:12 PM


TRIPLE PLAY BONUS

1

Bring this ad in right now for Guaranteed Lowest Price Ever!

2

No Down Payment and No Interest ‘til December 2018

3

Receive an additional $200 in-store gift card with all of Sony’s best 55” and larger XBR series 4K TVs

The must-see TV of the year Z-series Master LED TV

If TVs are measured on picture quality, then the Sony Z9D stands alone. Near perfect black level is combined with the ability to reproduce the brightness and color of the real world, while your favorites get upscaled and enhanced to look like 4K-HDA. It’s a viewing experience that can’t be replicated.

Local family-owned and operated since 1951 17 Roper Mountain Road | Greenville, SC 29607 | 864-268-3101 | www.jefflynch.com SHOWROOM HOURS: MONDAY-FRIDAY 9-6, SATURDAY 9-5, SUNDAY-HOME WITH FAMILY!

TOWN_blank page.indd 7

10/12/16 9:47 AM


Marc White

Audi_fp_TOWN TOWN_blank page.indd Apr16.indd 6 1

10/11/16 3/17/16 9:56 9:15 AM PM


Town

ON THE

Euphoria’s Sunday Supper

Jeremy & Haley Byrd

September 25, 2016

Kate Townsend & Don Richardson

Chris & Lauren Doar Linda & Mike Riley

What better way to cap off a weekend of culinary excellence than with the full spread of a traditional Sunday supper? Done “family style,” diners packed the Wyche Pavilion to indulge in a savory menu of Southern staples, uniquely curated by Greenville chefs Anthony Gray and Michael Kramer alongside Hot and Hot Fish Club guest chef Chris Hastings. Brews and booze were provided by Palmetto Brewery and Kentucky’s Heaven Hill Distillery. Photography by Chelsey Ashford ))) FIND MORE PHOTOS TOWNCAROLINA.COM

Jody Johnson & Anna Pretulak Amanda Arscott & Liza Wilson

Cele & Lynn Seldon

Rachelle & Richard Shirley

Henry Jamieson & Kim Jamieson

Dan & Kim Eades

McFaddin & Deana Blanding

Bryant & Jon-Mikel Bryne Jeff and Rushell Bennie with Shannon Floyd

Jade & Curt Hall

Anthony Wayne & Christina Sharp

Sandra & Chris Stone

Kurt and Catherine Schumacher with Taryn and Adam Scher NOVEMBER 2016 / 29

TOWN_NOV_OTT WF.indd 29

10/14/16 1:19 PM


ON THE

Town

Clark & Rikke Gillespy with Doug Tate

Reception for Maestro Edvard Tchivzhel at Genevieve’s September 25, 2016

Julie Garrett & David Beard

Nick & Emilie Theodore Lee & Margaret Dixon

Russell Stall & Henry Parr

Susie & Andy White

Lil Parr & Beth Lee

In honor of Greenville Symphony Orchestra’s Maestro Edvard Tchivzhel’s defection from the Soviet Union in 1991, Genevieve’s theater lounge hosted a special celebration to reflect on the contributions of this exceptional man. The cocktail-and-appetizer reception was held following the afternoon GSO performance of The Great Escape, a Masterworks concert spotlighting the Maestro’s compelling journey through the world of music. Photography by Jake Knight

Rick & Nancy Pennell

Jerry Tuck and Shirley Rowe with Bev & Bob Howard

Mary Ann Pires & Chandra Dillard

Don Nickell & John Humeniuk

Rosa Eisenstadt & Anne Barr

Sarah Mobley & Debbie Mobley

David Wilkins, Susan Wilkins, Rhett Leonard & Paula Noble

Ellis & Mary Johnston

Linda Elliot, Mary Anne Sanford & Jean Nickell

Kenneth Cates, Betsy Cates, Nancy Stanton & Debra Strange

Paul Hyde & Stephanie Sullivan

30 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_OTT WF.indd 30

10/14/16 1:43 PM


United Community Bank Ice on Main, a winter wonderland in the heart of downtown

From friends to family to functions, the holidays are a time for togetherness. But when was the last time just the two of you got away to get into the spirit of the season together? Whether you meander Main Street sipping cocoa, cozy up in a horse-drawn carriage, or spend it skating under the stars, come discover the place where every night is a great night for date night. Give hustle and bustle a few days off. Spend your romantic, winter weekend in Greenville, SC. Yeah, THAT Greenville. To learn more, call 800.717.0023.

TOWN_blank page.indd 7

10/13/16 11:07 AM


Indie Craft Parade VIP Gala September 16, 2016

Scott & Susan Simmons

Sean Ward & Erica Young

Craft fans and admirers of all-thingsartisan feasted on more than just handmade works of art at this special sneak preview to the seventh annual Indie Craft Parade. Some 80 makers showcased a melange of uncommon, homespun wares for patrons to peruse while jamming to the tunes of The Snopes Family Band. King of Pops, Methodical Coffee, Milltown Meadery, CakeSmith, and GB&D helped keep the shop-til-you-drop appetites at bay. Photography by Chelsey Ashford

Jennifer Howe, Amy Walcher, Kerri Griffith & Joy Sturdevant

Irina & Dustin Smerdon

Sarrin Warfield, Blair Knobel & Kate Dabbs

Rena Stevens & Nathalie Morgan 32 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_OTT WF.indd 32

10/14/16 1:18 PM


ON THE

Town

Smart Home Security From the Ground Up

St. Anthony’s School Gala September 17, 2016

St. Anthony’s largest fundraiser got the Hollywood treatment this year, with a crowd of more than 600 supporters hitting the TD Convention Center in their most glamorous redcarpet attire. The fun began with a silent auction over cocktails and hors d’oeuvres, followed by a gourmet seated dinner, live bidding, and a DJ that kept the party going late into the evening. Funds from the gala will provide for student scholarships, salaries, equipment, and school enhancements.

Grace Mosley & John Marone Kelley Oliver, Michael Oliver & Pamela Solbery

Photography by Chelsey Ashford Lindsay & Mike Muir

Frank Dowling, Katelyn Dowling, & Jimmy Dowling Rebecca Shafer, Jeff Crouch & Patrick Shamroe with Dan & Mary Catena

Lillie Golden & Chris Lovallo

We don’t sell systems, we create security solutions.

Michael & Susan Cinquemani with Pamela & Brent Dunlap

A subsidiary of Blue Ridge Electric Co-op

1-888-407-SAFE (7233) blueridgesecuritysolutions.com NOVEMBER 2016 / 33

TOWN_NOV_OTT WF.indd 33

10/14/16 1:44 PM


FEATURED LISTINGS IN THE UPSTATE’S MOST DESIRED AREAS

Reception for Liz Rundorff Smith at the Metropolitan Arts Council

RIVER RESERVE

August 12, 2016

Darin Gehrke & Tod Tappert Hannah & Mel Dias

139 RESERVE DRIVE $589,900

The Metropolitan Arts Council hosted a reception for artist Liz Rundorff Smith and the opening of her exhibit titled Sea Change, which was sponsored by TD Bank. The 150 guests in attendance enjoyed the display of her work with refreshments provided by the artist. In addition to making art, Rundorff Smith is the art school director at the Greenville Center for Creative Arts. Photography by Jake Knight

4 bedrooms / 4 bathrooms 1 half bathroom / 4,000+ sq. ft. Kami Schmitt, Chelsea Rosen, Mercedes, PJ Rosen & Matt McClain

AUGUSTA ROAD

19 ROCK CREEK DRIVE $624,000

4 bedrooms / 2 full bathrooms / 2 half bathrooms / 3,000-3,199 sq. ft.

Live Local. Love Local. Viktor Schuck & Marlowe Whitaker Nancy & Harvey Sanders

www.VirginiaHayes.com 864.313.2986

Rakam Draz & Kate Furman

34 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_OCT_OTT WF.indd 34

9/21/16 12:00 AM


SUDDENLY ‘GOING OUT TO DINNER’ takes on a whole new meaning.

AWARD-WINNING SOUTHERN RESORT | EXCLUSIVE REAL ESTATE OPPORTUNITIES JACK NICKLAUS GOLF | SPORTING CLAYS | FINE DINING | RACQUET SPORTS | WATER DIVERSIONS RESERVE YOUR STAY AT MONTAGE PALMETTO BLUFF, CALL 855.437.1493 OR VISIT PALMETTOBLUFF.COM/RESERVATIONS Obtain the Property Report required by federal law and read it before signing anything. No federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. This does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of any offer to buy where prohibited by law. The complete offering terms are in an offering plan available from sponsor. File no. H-110005

TOWN_NOV_OTT WF.indd 35

10/13/16 9:48 AM


Distinguished Gentleman’s Ride September 25, 2016 Tom Snider & Jeff Bates Kerry Castle

The worldwide Distinguished Gentleman’s Ride made its Greenville debut, inviting motorcyclists to dapper up in support of men’s health awareness. Beginning at Touring Sport before roping its way through downtown Greenville and culminating at Mac’s Speed Shop, the ride featured 50 participants dressed-to-impress atop classic and vintage-style bikes. All proceeds raised from DGR benefit the Movember Foundation that tackles male cancers, mental health, and suicide prevention. Photography by TJ Grandy

Lydia Winslow & Skip Wilkenson

Craig Adrien & Michele Dunn

Jack Frasher & Kevin Burnett

Mike Stewart 36 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_OTT WF.indd 36

10/13/16 12:20 PM


ON THE

Town

River Falls Spa’s 10th Anniversary September 29, 2016

River Falls Spa celebrated ten years as the Upstate’s premier “downtown destination” for pampering, inviting clients new and old to discover true relaxation in the heart of Main Street. When they weren’t dancing the night away to the tunes of the Ashford Band, guests were treated to a Champagne toast, appetizers, and tasty desserts.

Shelly Massey & Noah Fetherston Katie Pernotto & Eric Pernotto

Photography by Jake Knight

Susan Beam & Lauren Siddens

Erica Cossio & Rita Cossio

Rebecca Bradshaw & Yelena Crosston

Eli Miller, Sarah Woods & Amanda Roeben

Vickie Fowler, Susan Beam, Kathy Gerwig, Jessica Reeves, Sharon Connor, Amber Heneck & Cheryl Hill NOVEMBER 2016 / 37

TOWN_NOV_OTT WF.indd 37

10/13/16 12:20 PM


ON THE

Town

Glenn & Mary Cockburn

David & Franca Dowe

The Cliffs IMBIBE Grand Tasting Event October 1, 2016 Bill & Carmen Rhoden Becky & Steve Terry with Melissa & Ken Pharo

Mike Chaney & Katie Gray

Sarah Bultmann & Rachel Acord Kathy & Phil Urban

Fall was teasing as the Cliffs wrapped up its yearly IMBIBE Wine and Food Festival, uniting the best of the dining and drinking scene at Mountain Park. In between noshing on specialty dishes crafted by Cliffs’ executive chefs, sampling libations from the Carolinas and beyond, and mingling with guests from Fisher Vineyards and Paul Hobbs Winery, foodie fans took in various cooking demonstrations to expand their palates. Photography by Jake Knight

Mike Hufler & Glenn Cockburn

Pam Harey & Lin Boggs Amanda Smith, Stephanie Caruso, Ann Moss & Kelsey McBride

Vaughn & Anna Deasy Craig & Ruthann Weida

David King, Lisa Mash, Pam Mash & Mike Mash

Cathy & Mark Davis

Kara Candler & Ashley Brown

Rick & Pattiann Short with Alan & Chris Miller

Ruthie & Mike Ivester 38 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_OTT WF.indd 38

10/13/16 12:21 PM


ON-ROAD PERFORMANCE AND OFF-ROAD CAPABILITY ARE NO LONGER MUTUALLY EXCLUSIVE.

LEVANTE. THE MASERATI OF SUVs. STARTING FROM $72,000* The all-new 2017 Levante goes far beyond the limits of ordinary SUVs, combining sports-car performance and off-road capability with the luxury and exclusivity of a Maserati. The Levante and Levante S feature a powerful Ferrari-built, 3.0-liter, twin-turbocharged V6 engine and Maserati Q4 intelligent all-wheel drive for sure-footed traction in virtually all conditions. Standard five-way air suspension adjusts within milliseconds for seamless driving dynamics on- and off-road, while Maserati Skyhook adaptive dampers deliver the comfort of a luxury SUV with the handling agility of a sports car. Meanwhile, distinctive Italian styling, a luxurious interior and a unique exhaust note affirm its Maserati heritage. Go beyond the limits of ordinary and arrive at Levante. By Maserati.

MASERATI GREENVILLE 1450 Laurens Road, Greenville, SC 29607 / 864.255.3593 / www.MaseratiGreenville.com *Maserati Levante MY2017 base MSRP $72,000; Maserati Levante S MY2017 base MSRP $83,000. Not including dealer prep and transportation. Actual selling price may vary. Taxes, title, license and registration fees not included. ©2016 Maserati North America, Inc. All rights reserved. Maserati and the Trident logo are registered trademarks of Maserati SpA. Maserati urges you to obey all posted speed limits.

Attention: Production Manager TOWN_blank page.indd 7

Publication: Town Magazine Publication Date: October 2016

Client: Maserati Greenville - Tori Frasher <tori@landrovercarolinas.com> Color: 4C

Product: Levante17 - On-Road Performance Size: 7.5” x 10”

9.30.16 10/11/16 9:17 PM


Fall Flavors: A Historic Dining Experience at the Vardry McBee Home and Farm Signe & Ron Cann

Katherine Gouch & Camilla Pitman

Sold out long before food hit the table, this distinct dining experience took guests for a time warp back to the nineteenth century at the home of one of Greenvilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most famous forefathersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Vardry McBee. The historic grounds were once again opened to public guests for an exploration into the past that included educational tours, centuriesold cocktails, and authentic edibles even the Father of Greenville himself would have appreciated. Photography by Jake Knight Betsy & Lee Norwood

Meadors & Marie Tanner John Mills & Catherine Daniels

Rosalind & Ted Tedards

Edward & Erin Mercer III

Andy and Susan Douglas with Susie and Andy White

40 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_OTT WF.indd 40

10/13/16 12:21 PM


ON THE

Town Debra Strange & Debra Fisher

Symphony Tour of Homes Patron Party October 4, 2016

The Guild of the Greenville Symphony kicked off the weekend of its 38th annual Symphony Tour of Homes with an elegant cocktail party held at the home of Randy and Debra Fisher. The sprawling, French Chateau–style home in Green Valley Estates set the perfect backdrop for Guild supporters to socialize, sip Champagne, indulge in splendid hors d’oeuvres, and enjoy live music. Photography by Jake Knight

Terry & Margaret Ann Bailey Walter & Carol Hinton

Joe & Carol Blake

Phyllis Wilkes, Linda Grandy & Ellie Mioduski

Jim & Judy Kay Kyker

Christina and Robert Lowry, Donna Comstock & Edvard Tchivzhel Sharron Glickman & Susie White

Betsy Cates, Barbara Hyde White & Charlie Sabo NOVEMBER 2016 / 41

TOWN_NOV_OTT WF.indd 41

10/13/16 12:21 PM


Photography by T.J. Getz

Frame Designs

www.framedesignsedhouse.com

37 YEARS EXPERIENCE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; RESIDENTIAL/COMMERCIAL ART CONSULTATION & FRAMING 864-242-2255 | Park Square | 1322 E. Washington St., B1 | Greenville, SC | Tues.-Fri. 10am-5pm; Sat. 10am-3pm

SHOES HANDBAGS ACCESSORIES

864.271.9750 MUSESHOESTUDIO.COM 2222 AUGUSTA ROAD GREENVILLE Photography by @deco.creative

42 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_blank page.indd 2

10/13/16 6:21 PM


TOWN_blank page.indd 7

10/13/16 10:18 AM


TOWN_NOV_Profile.indd 66

10/12/16 4:38 PM


TOWN

Weddings

/ by Olivia McCall

Flint and Tinder Gather close and snuggle up. There’s more to winter warmth than the fire.

Carlie Eastman & Jeremy Gilbert May 21, 2016

The waiting game was one Carlie Eastman was willing to play when it came to Jeremy Gilbert. The two dated for eight years and even endured a year on opposite coasts, but it was surely worth it when Jeremy’s Litchfield Beach proposal was set into action. Carlie, oblivious, had packed his bags and spied no clue of a ring. Little did she know, however, that she would be looking for many more clues on their first day on the beach. Playing along with the idea of a scavenger hunt for Jeremy’s nieces, Carlie followed along to each ‘X’ in the sand. After digging with no treasure to be found, she reached the last ‘X’—and found a ring! Jeremy asked her to marry him there on the beach, surrounded by elated family members. Following their yearlong engagement, the couple said their vows at the charming Hotel Domestique in Travelers Rest. Carlie works for SYNNEX and Jeremy for BMW. FAMZING PHOTOGRAPHY

NOVEMBER 2016 / 45

TOWN_NOV_Weddings.indd 45

10/14/16 1:18 PM


TOWN

Weddings

Carrie Musselwhite & Willz Tolbert May 28, 2016 After meeting at Clemson University and dating for two years, a surprise trip to Chicago held another bombshell for Carrie Musselwhite: an engagement ring. Willz Tolbert’s plans led them to the South Pond Pavilion, where he got down on one knee and asked Carrie to be his wife. After she said yes, their day was filled to the brim with more excitement: a walk through Lincoln Park Zoo, a visit to Chicago’s Clemson bar, a romantic dinner with breathtaking views of the skyline, and rooftop drinks with friends and family. Their wedding ceremony was held at the Tolbert Family Farm in Anderson, where guests danced the night away to tunes from The Root Doctors and received an unexpected guest—a cow! The fence-hopper surely just wanted in on the fun, and was definitely a cause for a night to remember. The couple now lives in downtown Greenville, where Carrie is a dental hygiene student and Willz is a commercial real estate broker at Lee & Associates. CHELSEY ASHFORD // CHELSEY ASHFORD PHOTOGRAPHY

Courtney Jerman & Chase Andrew Madeira July 16, 2016 When Chase Madeira committed to taking Courtney Jerman to the prom, he had little notion he was committing to the best relationship of his life. What started out as just a date led to a long friendship and, eventually, a heartfelt engagement. Chase took Courtney to Atlanta for the day, and while exploring Olympic Park, he popped the question in the SkyView Ferris wheel. The two exchanged their vows on the porch of The Gassaway Mansion, a charming Greenville home from the 1920s, and Jon Williamson, an important figure from Courtney’s childhood, officiated. Their picturesque ceremony will certainly be an exquisite memory. Courtney is a student at North Greenville University and a personal beauty consultant with Mary Kay, while Chase is in personal finance with Day Title Loans. The couple lives in Greer. BRITTNEY NAYLOR // BRITTNEY NAYLOR PHOTOGRAPHY

Cara Ansley Harris & Mark Andrew Brewton June 5, 2016 They met in elementary school, but little did these two lovebirds know their paths would cross again many years later. The very week Mark Brewton asked Cara Harris out on their first date, however, she was moving out of town. But they must have hit it off pretty well, because Mark and Cara dated long distance for six months before Cara returned to Greenville. A year later, Mark proposed in Historic Brattonsville, the location of one of their earliest dates, and the wedding planning began. The ceremony took place at the historic J.C. Stribling Barn in Clemson, where they anxiously faced the threat of rain. Luckily, no raindrops fell, and their bluegrass band and Masters-themed menu were a hit. The couple concluded the evening marvelously, performing I’ll Fly Away (Mark on mandolin and Cara singing) for the guests just before their exit. Mark and Cara reside in Greenville, where he is a market development specialist at Hubbell Lighting and she is a marketing coordinator at LS3P. LUKE CLELAND // CLELAND STUDIOS HEARING WEDDING BELLS? TOWN Magazine wants to publish your wedding announcement. If you currently live or grew up in the Upstate and were recently married, please write to us at TOWN Magazine, Attn: Weddings, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, or e-mail abby@towncarolina.com. Due to space constraints, inclusion is not guaranteed. 46 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_Weddings.indd 46

10/13/16 9:33 PM


Essential Gear. Recon 8842, $795, Ultra-Light Carbon Reinforced Case, Rotating diver bezel, Alarm, Protected Crown, Sapphire Crystal, 10 ATM water resistance tested, Swiss Made.

743 Congaree Road | Greenville | 864.288.2501 | ShopSkatells.com Custom Jewelry Design & CAD Services | Jewelry Repairs on Premises | Appraisal Service

TOWN_blank page.indd 7

10/11/16 9:20 PM


TOWN_blank page.indd 6

10/13/16 11:04 AM


HIGHLANDS TRESTLE TABLE BY STICKLEY

Impressively modern, the Highlands Dining Collection strikes the right balance of clean lines, bold angles and insightful details.

A breathtaking blend of now and forever.

3411 Augusta Road | Greenville, SC 29605 | 864-277-5330 | oldcolonyfurniture.com TOWN_blank page.indd 7

10/13/16 8:30 PM


Relationships are the Foundation for Strong Communities

ours last a lifetime

“The Marchant Company would like to congratulate our colleague, Gordon Seay, for being named South Carolina Realtor® of the Year by the South Carolina Association of Realtors (SCR). With over 19,000 Realtor members, the award is given to the Realtor who participates in Realtor associations at the local, state, and national levels and works to improve the real estate profession and community. Gordon has been a part of The Marchant Company since its founding and is an active advocate for his colleagues and clients in the real estate business. Thank you Gordon for all you do for our industry, we are so proud of you!” — Seabrook Marchant, President and Broker in Charge of The Marchant Company

100 West Stone Avenue, Greenville, 29609

www.MarchantCo.com | 864.467.0085 RESIDENTIAL | COMMERCIAL | NEW HOME COMMUNITIES | PROPERTY MANAGEMENT | FORECLOSURES | LAND & ACREAGE | MOUNTAIN PROPERTIES

Marchant fp TOWN TOWN_blank page.indd Nov16.indd 6 1

10/13/16 10/11/16 10:21 6:15 PM AM


TOWN

Buzz

INTERESTING PEOPLE, PLACES & THINGS

Fresh Talent:

Photograph by Eli Warren

Meredith Piperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s organic paintings and abstract weavings reflect a diverse body of work pulled from an early art education.

First Impressions Art Crossing introduces mixed-media maker Meredith Piper to the Upstate art scene

NOVEMBER 2016 / 51

TOWN_NOV_Town Buzz.indd 51

10/13/16 9:27 AM


Hom e i s... their happy place.

Proud supporters of the American Dream

TOWN_blank page.indd 7

www.cbcaine.com

10/13/16 10:22 AM


TOP

Bunk

ft)

N

Capital Affair

ew York may be the city that never sleeps, but Washington, DC, is the city of sleepless nights. Amid its beautiful streets, stately monuments, and diverse culture, its denizens are fiercely at work, crafting legislation, lobbying Congress, or roaming the West Wing. But for visitors to our nation’s capital, the experience is quite different. Epic walks, Georgetown shops, marble icons, and eclectic neighborhoods bleed into nights of dynamic bars and world-class food. At a respectable hour, those free of arduous tasks get to rest their heads in king-sized beds with pillow-top mattresses. (I enjoyed the experience so much at the Melrose Georgetown, a 4-star boutique hotel on the edge of the city’s upscale, historic neighborhood, that I added “sleep” to my to-do list.)

The Melrose Georgetown Hotel is a glamorous anchor in DC’s frenetic pace / by Blair Knobel

54 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_Top Bunk.indd 54

10/14/16 2:49 PM


Photographs courtesy of The Melrose Georgetown Hotel

Marble Marvel: The Melrose Georgetown offers stately luxury on Pennsylvania Avenue, at the edge of the city’s historic and affluent Georgetown neighborhood. At the hotel, enjoy boutique amenities, attentive service, and memorable cuisine.

Georgetown dates back to 1751, when it was established as a municipality of the Province of Maryland. In 1871, the City of Washington assumed the port as a federal district, when Congress created the District of Columbia. Its Old Stone House, constructed in 1765, remains the “oldest unchanged building” in DC, and George Washington purportedly had meetings there, its address at 3051 M Street NW. Georgetown’s buildings now house major retail brands, antiques and fine arts shops, and cafés. The bustle of the neighborhood, more than 200 years later, seems to parallel its historical counterpart. The Melrose Georgetown feels a marriage of past and present, as well. The lobby, lounge, and acclaimed restaurant Jardenea are a mix of stately and chic design, simultaneously evoking warmth and luxury. The elegant, art-filled lobby is sectioned into appealing sitting areas, perfect for relaxing with coffee and a book from the hotel’s library. Rooms are likewise considered, making smart use of space with a classical-contemporary sensibility. At almost

the top floor of eight, my executive suite affords a panel window of Pennsylvania Avenue, which I keep open from day to night, a personal view of Washington’s kinetic energy. Though DC is generally known for its world-class museums and monuments, you could visit the city for the food alone. Its restaurant and bar scene has exploded in the last decade, with notable chefs and can’t-miss places. Thankfully, one is right at my hotel: Jardenea, French for “garden,” combines the best of seasonal produce with global cuisine. Restaurant and lounge manager Millian Palma warmly greets me with a glass of Prosecco, while executive chef Nelson Erazo shares his latest menu inspired by the flavors of fall. With memorable tastes like the Autumn Harvest Brussels Sprouts (with soft chèvre crumble and truffle essence) and the Kettle Seared Duroc Pork Belly (with Chapel’s Country Creamery Bay Blue cheese, date purée, baby arugula, and aged balsamic glaze—a clever rendition of a “Devil on Horseback”), it’s clear that one of DC’s finest meals is right where I’ll rest my head, while the city keeps watch.

The Melrose Georgetown offers several deluxe accommodations packages, including one for the forthcoming presidential inauguration: Jan 13–25, 2017. Rates for the package start at $599 per night. The Melrose Georgetown, 2430 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington, DC; (202) 955-6400, melrosehoteldc.com NOVEMBER 2016 / 55

TOWN_NOV_Top Bunk.indd 55

10/14/16 2:49 PM


Untitled-13 1 page.indd 6 TOWN_blank

10/13/16 10/11/16 10:23 6:07 PM AM


Untitled-16 1

TOWN_blank page.indd 3

N O V E M B E 10/12/16 R 2 0 1 64:48/ PM 57

10/13/16 10:24 AM


Buzz

TOWN

All Aglow: The C.C. Woodson Recreation Center (left) in the Forest Park neighborhood of Spartanburg is one of the nine community sites Erwin Redl chose to install his fluorescent formations. This piece, Benchmark Spartanburg, is a bench with an LEDlit acrylic backing.

Let There Be Light Famed international artist Erwin Redl brings Spartanburg’s neighborhoods into color ful clarity / by Mary Cathryn Armstrong

O

// photograph by Andrew Huang

n October 4th, the lights came on in downtown Spartanburg. Brilliant pops of pigment—yellow, orange, red, green, and blue—exploded against the sky, an optical illusion from every angle as the colorful strands yielded movement to an early fall breeze. Radiating even brighter that evening? The community that made it happen. At the core of this reinvigorated sense of Hub City pride is “Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light,” a collection of nine public art installations constructed throughout ten of the city’s surrounding neighborhoods. In its simplest description, the project is an exploration into the use of light as an art form; each site features some variety of LED, video display, flashlight, or high-powered lighting that has been designed to mirror both the natural and social makeup of its unique community. All nine were lit during a special ceremony held this past October, but according to Chapman Cultural Center president and CEO Jennifer Evins, the grand debut was only a piece of this “transformative” journey—one that has been well over a year in the making. “The entire community has been involved with this project since day one,” she explains. “Using the creative components of art, we’ve been able to build trusting relationships between neighborhoods, between the city and the police department. All of these original thoughts bubbled out from everyone working and communicating as one with the artist.” She’s referring to Erwin Redl, an international artist that specializes in inventive LED and other digital media creations. For Evins, it was Redl’s immediate openness to involving the public in each step of the artworks’ development that cemented his role in the project. For Redl, it was the community’s enthusiasm and the idea of a “sheer

challenge” that would force him to cultivate ideas outside of his signature style. The goal was five installations. But after hearing ten neighborhoods’ proposals for their respective communities, Redl decided each was worthy of a piece they would outline, construct, and maintain together (one installation spans two neighborhoods). It was the biggest project of his career, but Redl says with the unwavering support and “positive commitment” of Spartanburg’s residents, there was never a moment that he doubted its success. “This project involved a lot of firsts for me,” Redl admits. “But I think it’s greatly essential for a community to have something to gather around. A kind of common goal that leads to the future and gets people involved physically, aesthetically, emotionally, even spiritually. Art has that position where it can be all-encompassing.” One of four nationwide cities chosen as winners of Bloomberg Philanthropies’ Public Art Challenge, “Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light” has received full funding from the art sector of the foundation, which Evins says is rarely available at the local level for Southern communities. Seven of the installations will remain permanent, with the two temporary exhibitions lasting until April 2017. Tuesday night trolley rides from the Chapman Cultural Center have been implemented to take visitors to each of the nine locations. “Once the lights turned on, it was just an affirmation that the process of developing those intimate relationships really worked,” Evins says. “Now, the true outcome will be if those relationships are held strong, and how people coming to our community embrace that positive spirit and that sense of collaboration that transformed these light projects into more than just art installations.”

58 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_TB_ERWIN.indd 58

10/14/16 11:24 AM


“Purveyors of Classic American Style” 23 West North St. | Downtown Greenville 864.232.2761 | rushwilson.com

FOR MEN & WOMEN

TOWN_blank page.indd 7 Rush_FP_TOWN Nov16_opt2.indd 1

10/13/16 10:23 AM 10/12/16 12:19 PM


TOWN

Buzz

T

Ticket to Ride DGR brings manners, men’s health awareness, and dapper style to the local motorcycle scene / by Emily Price

// photograph by Paul Mehaffey

here’s just something about a man in a suit. Especially when he’s riding a rare vintage or classic-styled motorcycle, such as Jim Oden’s 2013 Triumph Bonneville—which looks exactly like the original Triumph made in 1959, aside from a bit of modernization such as fuel injectors, and is “customized to the max, but not overdone. Just one of a kind,” he says. Or Greenville native Joe Barnes’s 1972 BSA Thunderbolt, a rare model that’s “a survivor” from the last year the renowned British manufacturer produced bikes, and which was originally Barnes’s late father’s. Barnes got his license on it, and it became his graduation present. He’s completely restored it over the past year. This distinct brand of unparalleled, masculine swagger—and even more so, the opportunity to celebrate the tradition of dapper style with attention to classic details—is the allure of the Distinguished Gentleman’s Ride (DGR), an international charity event that raises awareness and funds for the Movember Foundation, the largest organization to exclusively serve men’s health initiatives such as prostate cancer and suicide prevention.

60 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_TB_MOTO.indd 60

10/14/16 2:29 PM


Gentlemen, Start Your Engines: Joe Barnes (left) and James “Jim” Oden orchestrated Greenville’s first Distinguished Gentleman’s Ride, a global initiative to raise funds and awareness of men’s health issues.

Held the last Sunday of September each year in cities from Singapore to Slovakia to Sydney, this year’s DGR boasted 57,477 registered riders and has raised more than $3.5 million. In order to maintain the integrity of the ride, the route details are kept secret until you register and sign a waiver on the official site. The ride is free, but each rider is given a profile and can set a fundraising goal to share with family and friends upon registration. DGR motorcycled its way through the streets of Greenville for the first time on September 25 thanks to Oden, a retired manufacturing manager who made his way to the Upstate by way of Shreveport and then Texas, the official local host who organized the 17-mile ride along with the help of his co-host and friend, Barnes. The two had met at a local bike shop and bonded over their shared bucket-list dream of riding in a DGR. Aside from their joint efforts in remodeling vintage British bikes and their shared passion for the “freedom” of riding they both developed as kids, their efforts in bringing DGR to town had a lot to do with the formation of their close friendship.

They only had four weeks to plan, but they pulled it together with enthusiasm and support. The United States ranks first for DGR riders in the world with more than 9,000 participants; Greenville finished in the top 50 cities in the U.S. for number of riders and raised $3,000. When asked about what constitutes a distinguished gentleman, Oden says, “It’s about character. A gentleman wants to leave the Earth in a better place than when he came in it. He wants to help. He loves to help. Pretty much that’s what it’s all about: thinking of someone else before yourself. “Next year we are going to go hard. I don’t want to turn anyone away—borrow a bike or volunteer. Even if we have five riders, let’s keep the integrity of the ride. Distinguished. That’s what it’s all about.” Find out more about DGR at gentlemansride.com; more on the Movember Foundation at https://us.movember.com

NOVEMBER 2016 / 61

TOWN_NOV_TB_MOTO.indd 61

10/14/16 2:49 PM


Fashion on the TOWN Style Picks

“A sincere ‘thank you’ to our associates, business partners, and the Greenville community for your continued support and unwavering spirit of giving. Together we are changing lives.” – Peter Larocque, President, North American Technology Solutions and Founder of SYNNEX Share the Magic

Uncle Frank Faux Leather Lace Up Dress $148; Uncle Frank Fur Coat $168 21-C Augusta St., Greenville | ShopCocobella.com @cocobellagirl Cocobella boutique |

Shop local. Shop year ’round.

Copyright 2016 SYNNEX Corporation. All rights reserved. SYNNEX, the SYNNEX Logo, SYNNEX Share the Magic and other SYNNEX company, product and services names and slogans are trademarks or registered trademarks of SYNNEX Corporation. Reg. U.S. Pat. & Tm. Off. Other names and marks are the property of their respective owners.

62 TOWN / towncarolina.com Cocobella_FOTT hlfV_TOWN Nov16.indd 1 TOWN_blank page.indd 2

10/11/16 1:37 PM

10/13/16 6:19 PM


IT’S TIME TO MOVE IMAGINE HAVING A LAWYER AND A REALTOR TO ADVISE YOU. Whether buying a new home, selling your current home or both, Laura can offer you an edge that other real estate professionals cannot offer. She will provide valuable advice, will assist you with contractual negotiations and understands she has an exclusive duty to you as the client.

LAURA McDONALD Realtor Associate 864-640-1929 LMcDonald@WycheCo.com Laura’s Bio: WycheCo.com

Untitled-16 1

TOWN_blank page.indd 3

MORE THAN JUST A REALTOR

NOVEMBER 2016 / 63 10/12/16 4:48 PM

10/13/16 10:26 AM


At JHM Hotels, we strive to positively impact Greenville through our community outreach program ONE. Supporting cancer research and survivorship through GHS Cancer Institute’s Dragon Boat Race

Making home ownership possible through Habitat for Humanity

Supporting first responders through educational scholarships We were honored to serve the following organizations in 2016 on behalf of the community: American Heart Association Cancer Society Euphoria GHS Cancer--Dragon Boat Greenville Tech Foundation Harvest Hope Food Bank Let There Be Mom Mill Village Farms NAACP SCRLA United Ministries Urban League

j h m h ot e l s . co m

TOWN_blank page.indd 6

Ancient Order of Hibernians Community Foundation of Greenville Family Effect Greenville City Police Foundation Habitat for Humanity Homes of Hope Loaves & Fishes Miracle Hill Ronald McDonald House Sheriff’s Foundation United Way YouthBase

|

Camperdown Academy Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Generations Group Home Greenville Co Schools Harold C Jennings Foundation Legacy Charter School Meals on Wheels Mission Backpack Salvation Army The Children’s Museum Upstate Warrior Solutions

HYATT REGENCY • MARRIOTT GREENVILLE • FAIRFIELD INN • COURTYARD MARRIOTT ON THE PARKWAY

10/13/16 10:21 AM


TOWN

Profile

Stair Master: The average weekday for Julio Hernandez is jampacked with school visits, community outreach, and PTA meetings, a reflection of a get-it-done ethic derived from his hardworking parents.

Breaking Barriers

FIRST GENERATION Today, he’s been asked to sit down with a group of Latino Greenville Tech campus director Julio students, seniors whose GPAs indicate they may be at risk of checking out because the barriers between them and college Hernandez inspires students to push seem insurmountable. through the obstacles that stand As the first in his family to graduate college—and the first to graduate high school—this is a subject in which Julio is between them and a higher education well-versed. He grew up in San Antonio, the son of Mexican / by Allison Walsh // photography by Matthew Franklin Carter immigrants. His parents worked hard; the income from his mother’s job as a janitor and his father’s as a welder wasn’t enough to cover expenses, so the two of them cleaned banks and offices after hours. As a teenager, Julio spent much of his time on the streets of San Antonio and saw a lot of hopelessness. alking the halls of Carolina High School with Hernandez knows these kids; he was these kids. He doesn’t Julio Hernandez early on a Thursday morning, stand at a podium and expound on what the American dream one gets the sense of running with a celebrity can do for you. He rolls a desk chair right into the middle of squad. His business card reads Campus Director. the circle and starts asking questions about what they want to It’s a job that puts him at the helm of the Northwest Campus do with their lives, and what they believe is standing in their of Greenville Technical College, serving Travelers Rest, Berea, way. He responds with a straightforward understanding of these and West Greenville. But no title can encapsulate Julio: He is obstacles, a specific course of action to overcome them, and a energy personified, and he views his job as sharing a little of that passion—for his work, for the promise of education, for life itself— personal promise to help. “He does what he says he’s going to do, and that’s very with everyone he encounters. In return, he is greeted with big important to us,” says Marjon Ford, one of the assistant principals smiles, hugs, high fives, and countless requests for his time from at Carolina High. students seeking a better life for themselves and their families.

W

NOVEMBER 2016 / 67

TOWN_NOV_Profile.indd 67

10/13/16 9:59 AM


Profile

TOWN

J ulio’s reputation for availability and reliability means he packs a lot into a day. He’s up at 4 a.m., exercising at 5, and then puts in a full day running the show at his Greenville Tech campus, regularly spending his evenings speaking at the invitation of PTAs and community groups.

REACHING OUT Carolina is just one of the schools Julio drops in on during his morning rounds. He spends the first couple of hours each day visiting the elementary, middle, and high schools that surround Greenville Tech’s White Horse Road campus. Community outreach makes up only a fraction of his job responsibilities. But it is a fraction Julio believes is vital to the success of any community college, and one close to his heart. “I love doing this because it keeps me grounded, it keeps me on the pulse of what’s really going on,” he explains. “Sometimes it’s easy to make decisions from the top without really knowing what’s going on in the community.” Julio’s reputation for availability and reliability means he packs a lot into a day. He’s up at 4 a.m., exercising at 5, and then puts in a full day running the show at his Greenville Tech campus, regularly spending his evenings speaking at the invitation of PTAs and community groups. “I always tell people the best inheritance my parents gave me was a work ethic,” he says, chuckling as he recalls his childhood chagrin at being made to cut grass early on Saturday mornings while his friends slept in or goofed off. “But that feeling of, I’m the only one out there . . . I am so exposed, so vulnerable, and I’m doing the things no one is doing. That’s the kind of training that my parents gave me.” HIGHER EDUCATION That work ethic is what led Julio to discover his passion for working in post-secondary education. He enrolled in San Antonio’s University of the Incarnate Word with a plan to major

Dream Job: Much of Julio’s role involves engaging with students, providing a listening ear, and encouraging them in their pursuit of future careers—an easy sell, as he is living proof of someone who has paved a successful path for himself.

in international business and become a foreign aid officer. Along the way he volunteered in the student affairs and public relations offices and took a work study assignment in the financial aid office, where his enthusiasm for the job led to him being offered a salaried position during his junior year. “On my lunch break I would see all these recruiters and admissions counselors give tours of the campus. I was overhearing their tours and I went to the director of tours and I said, ‘I would just like to let you know I’ve been hearing some of the tours you guys give and they’re really terrible,’” Julio remembers. This was met with an invitation to volunteer, and his tours proved so popular that the admissions office hired him away from the financial aid office and put him on the road as a recruiter during his senior year. While he eventually earned that international business degree, the most important thing he learned in college was that he never wanted to leave it, so he might as well set his sights on becoming president of one. Little surprise: he plans to pursue his doctorate in educational leadership next fall. Another “first” that will undoubtedly be met with boundless energy and inspire others along the way.

68 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_Profile.indd 68

10/14/16 11:24 AM


807 S Main St Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 534-1510 www.splashonmain.com

Splash on Main

NOVEMBER 2016 / 69

TOWN_NOV_Profile.indd 69

10/12/16 4:39 PM


TOWN

Extra

Material Instincts Heirloom textiles from Hendersonvilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oriole Mill envision and execute fabric as art / by Heidi Coryell William s // photography by Mat thew Franklin Carter

70 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_Town Extra_hcw.indd 70

10/13/16 11:53 AM


By a Thread: (opposite, top left) Knit braid and bias are combined to make the unique edging on Oriole’s throws; in its new apparel product line, an unstructured, unlined fabric is constructed into a unique kimonostyle jacket. A handful of employees on the mill floor run the giant looms that comprise this smallscale textile operation, including production assistant Elizabeth Wilson (above) and overhauler Barry Conner (opposite).

t

here was an era when everyday textiles were designed to be handed down from generation to generation, when they were made to endure. And endure they did, and not because they were placed on a shelf or sealed in a box only to be trotted out for special occasions. They endured in our grandmothers’ wardrobes, on their grandmothers’ tables, atop the beds of our ancestors. The pieces that lasted were carefully considered for usefulness, scoured over for beauty, made with equal parts time and talent, and constructed of materials coming straight from the earth. A modern-day classic in league with these ancestral treasures is hard to determine—and even harder to find. But up the road a stretch, in Hendersonville, North Carolina, new American heirloom textiles are being crafted—carefully, thoughtfully, intentionally—by a uniquely blended team of tradespeople and artisans. Coverlets, tablecloths, shams—these pieces and more are envisioned in an artist’s mind and woven on room-size looms reclaimed from abandoned textile mill floors. Items are constructed so well—from French seam to knit-braid trim and handmade bias to the Jacquard-woven cloth itself— there is almost no discerning inside from out. Cotton is woven to feel like silk. Layers of thread, because of their unique tying, become an undulating stitch seemingly blooming into a work of art. Patterns are so intricate with hues so saturated that the eye sees colors and contours that aren’t even there. The fact these pieces exist at all inspires awe. But they do, at The Oriole Mill, and they are exquisite. NOVEMBER 2016 / 71

TOWN_NOV_Town Extra_hcw.indd 71

10/14/16 2:37 PM


THE SMALL BUT MIGHTY CREW THAT MAKES UP THE ORIOLE MILL INCLUDES NANCY RAMEY, WARPING FINISHING JOEL MORALES, PHYSICAL PLANT KELLY HOPKIN, PRODUCTION MANAGER ELIZABETH WILSON, PRODUCTION ASSISTANT BARRY CONNER, OVERHAULER JOSH DURHAM, FIXER

“We start with a fabric in mind and go forward, so it’s completely different. If you start with a product and go backward, you’ve greatly constrained the designer of the fabric.” —Bethanne Knudson, The Oriole Mill

Delicate Details: A collection of Jacquard and high-speed Dobby looms actively weave fabrics at The Oriole Mill. In-house warping, winding, finishing, and sewing facilities support the weaving process to produce high-end, luxury fabrics and home goods. Rather than source trims and bias, the mill makes their own.

NOVEMBER 2016 / 73

SNACK INFO SNACK INFO TOWN_NOV_Town Extra_hcw.indd 73 SNACK INFO SNACK INFO

10/14/16 11:19 AM


TOWN

Extra

Even when looms are in full swing, the air is clean, a byproduct of their process’s sustainability. “Originally, we wanted to make beautiful fabric. We just didn’t find people who could figure out what to do with our fabrics,” Michelson says. “It became clear we were going to have to make product.” Now, by “doing it all in one place”—designing and creating the fabric and then turning it into a finished product under the same roof—they’ve closed the gap between design and production. On the factory floor, this means the equipment and the small team of people who arrive daily to operate it, are capable of transforming the world’s best cotton thread—extra-long staple Giza cotton—by blending it with wool, alpaca, linen, and bamboo among others, to create a collection of exceptional and sustainable fabrics. In their raw form, they’re so luxurious, so transformative, that a designer is inspired to create product around the fabric, rather than the reverse. “We start with a fabric in mind and go forward, so it’s completely different,” Knudson says. “If you start with a product and go backward, you’ve greatly constrained the designer of the fabric.” Consider a traditional mill environment, where each factory floor has an overhauler who repairs and rebuilds textile machinery and equipment, adjusting rollers and cylinders, aligning and leveling the intricate parts of the loom and its frames, separate from anything that happens on the design and creative end. The Oriole Mill also has an overhauler, a man named Barry Conner who is in charge of keeping the equipment going. But rather than being sequential, he works in concert with the design from beginning to end. Barry and Bethanne are in lockstep throughout the entire process. All of that, completely imperceptible from the average retail display, matters.

A M A K E R S ’ M O V E M E N T Discerning how to take Knudson’s designs and execute them on the loom is as much science as art. More intricate and textured designs might make their way to pillow shams and throws. These smaller pieces are typically made from something she calls tatting fabric, an antique lace technique that transforms into a luxurious textured fabric when interpreted on a much larger scale on a Jacquard loom. But be it a large piece or a small one Knudson says, “The whole mill pays the price if a design doesn’t work well.” Every item in The Oriole

Better Together: (top) The Chesapeake Collection blends wool, linen, and layers of sophisticated pattern to make a subtle yet stunning bedding collection. Designs are the brainchild of Bethanne Knudson (above) with partner Stephan Michelson.

Find The Oriole Mill’s products at Homestead Fine Linens, 10 N Main St, Hendersonville, NC. (828) 697-8787, theoriolemill.com

Mill’s collection has been designed around the fabric, so if it doesn’t work, “I haven’t done my job.” This delicate balance has moved them slowly but surely toward a niche market, encompassing all things the handcrafted movement holds dear. With prices reflecting the quality and workmanship with which pieces are made—throws average around $400, while coverlets are more than $1,000— the investment can be felt and appreciated both immediately and over time. Materials are generally reversible and extremely versatile; layers of weaving make a natural insulation that is lightweight but substantial. The mill is now transitioning into apparel items, including scarves and outerwear equally versatile—a kimono-style jacket, for example, has been tailored to fit right-side up and upside down, fitting equally well in either direction. A top of the table line has started to take off with napkins so beautiful, “you’d be afraid to wipe your mouth on them,” Michelson says. Except you can, because that’s what they’re designed to do. “We’re doing stuff nobody has thought of before,” Michelson says. “We keep pushing at the boundaries,” he offers. “There are things we’re producing now that we hadn’t dreamed of before. But that’s what keeps us alive.”

74 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_Town Extra_hcw.indd 74

10/14/16 11:19 AM


Congratulations To Our Beautiful Kaitlin On Her Wedding! You Looked Great!

Every bride wants to look their best on her wedding day. I was worried about my facial skin. Thankfully, the Advanced Cosmetic Surgery team gave me a Forever Young Peel to dramatically improve my skin tone and texture. I had one, easy treatment and I returned to work the next day. The recovery was quick and I would do it again instantly. I also had microblading to my brows and now they look permanently great. They gave me the confidence that every bride should have on her big day! I am so happy that I did it!

BEFORE

AFTER

BEFORE

AFTER

— Kaitlin Stevens Front Desk Coordinator

BEST COSMETIC SURGEON

Thomas C. McFadden, Jr., MD, MBA, FACS Board Certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery Visit us online for a full list of services

AdvancedCosmeticSurgerySC.com 29 Rocky Slope Road, Greenville

864.242.3223 (FACE)

TOWN_blank page.indd 7

10/17/16 9:49 AM


Ways

From Gold to Grape A north Georgia town famous for its golden glory days transforms into a wine wonderland / by M. Linda Lee

ou might want to pay attention to where you put your feet when you visit Dahlonega, Georgia. In 1828, so the story goes, Benjamin Parks was hunting deer in this mountainous part of north Georgia and stumbled over a small rock. Upon closer inspection, he found it was streaked with gold, an accidental fortune that ignited a frenzied search for the precious metal. Between 1829 and 1849—the year of the Gold Rush in California— miners rushed to the area, lured by the siren call of 98-percent pure gold. By 1839, Dahlonega produced so much of the metal that the federal government established a U.S. Mint branch in what is today Price Memorial Hall at the University of North Georgia, whose 7,200 students outnumber Dahlonega’s 6,000 residents. Price Hall’s dome, visible from the town square, gleams with the Dahlonega gold leaf.

During the small town’s heyday, more than 250 gold mines pocked the hills and valleys of north Georgia, two of which have survived and are now open to visitors. At Crisson open-pit mine, established in 1847 and the only working gold mine left in Georgia, you can witness a 130-yearold stamp mill pulverize quartz rocks to release tiny particles of gold. Make sure to try your hand at panning for loose specks in water troughs on-site. Peer deeply into the heart of mining on a 40-minute guided tour at Consolidated Gold Mine, which contains a 22-foot-thick vein of quartz—one of the largest gold-bearing veins in

Photog r aph s ( lef t to r ig ht) cour tes y of Mont alace Wi ner y; Wol f Mount ai n Vi neyard s ; and t he Cit y of Dah lonega

SIDE

76 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_Side Ways.indd 76

10/14/16 1:19 PM


and t he Cit y of Dah lonega

the world. Some 200 feet underground in the dark, damp shaft, you’ll glean nuggets about the hazards of mining, a job from which many men failed to retire. Prolonged exposure to rock dust, the cyanide and mercury refining process, not to mention the dangers of blasting subterranean rock faces with dynamite to expose veins, all of these threats claimed a heavy toll. The buildings lining Dahlonega’s public square, which was laid out in 1833, date from the golden days of the 1840s to 1880s. Given their age, it’s not surprising these structures are considered haunted, and guests can revel in the spookiest stories during an evening ghost expedition with Dahlonega Walking Tours. An 1836 brick courthouse squats in the square’s center, and is now home to the Dahlonega Gold Museum. Locals allege that some of the building’s bricks, fashioned from the mud of nearby Cane Creek, are flecked with gold. Clustered on and around the square are 18 independently owned restaurants, seven tasting rooms representing Georgia’s best wines, and a bevy of shops. During the Old Fashioned Christmas celebration, Dahlonega twinkles with 72,000 white lights—which sparkle from the Friday after Thanksgiving into January. Though Dahlonega holds fast to its precious metal heritage—the town’s largest annual festival is appropriately dubbed Gold Rush Days—David Zunker, Dahlonega’s tourism director, likes to say “wine is the new gold” these days. Six wineries cluster the hills around town, and more may be coming soon. Local vintners anxiously await their area’s official designation as the Dahlonega Plateau AVA (American Viticultural Area) from the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, a title that will literally put them on the American wine map.

Gold Standard: Originally celebrated for its precious gold, Dahlonega now sparkles with quaint shops and sophisticated wineries, such as: Montaluce (opposite), a Tuscan-style winery offering five reds and five whites, including a sparkling mead, Wolf Mountain Vineyards (above), boasting a variety of bold reds, and Paul Thomas Chocolates (above right), a necessary sweet stop, bonbons included.

Dahlonega’s oldest winery, Three Sisters, was incorporated in 1996 as Lumpkin County’s first legal winery since Prohibition, taking its name from the trio of peaks rising above the 184-acre farm. Owners Sharon and Doug Paul grow nine varietals (three whites and six reds), including Norton (aka Cynthiana), an indigenous American wine grape named for Dr. Daniel Norton, who introduced the vinifera and wild grape hybrid vitis aestivalis in Virginia in 1821. “Cynthiana will be the shining example of Georgia grapes in years to come,” predicts Sharon, whose 19 wines include a Georgia Port made from Touriga Nacional grapes. Next door—as the crow flies—the contemporary farmhouse hosting Frogtown Cellars Vineyards looks as if it’s been plucked from a hillside in Napa Valley. Cherokee for “Place of the Frog,” Frogtown grows 25 different grape varietals on 44 acres. Owner and winemaker Craig Kritzer crafts estategrown and bottled dry wines in the French style for his Frogtown label. Among the best sellers are the Bordeaux-style red called Propaganda, and Shotgun, a bold red blend. NOVEMBER 2016 / 77

TOWN_NOV_Side Ways.indd 77

10/14/16 1:19 PM


Ways

SIDE

Stay / Mountain Laurel Creek Inn & Spa Rustic luxury resides on 14 acres at this gracious B&B, which hides an expansive day spa downstairs. All six rooms boast antique furnishings, a jetted tub, and a balcony. 202 Talmer

Grizzle Rd, Dahlonega, GA. (706) 867-8134, mountainlaurelcreek.com

N Chestatee St, Dahlonega, GA. (706) 867-1313, dahlonegasquarevilla.com

Eat / Le Vigne at Montaluce Hillsides of vines cascade below the dining room at Montaluce Winery, where the new chef, Chris Matson, brings New York savoirfaire to dishes such as honey-roasted pork loin spiced with juniper and anise. 946 Via Montaluce, Dahlonega, GA. (706) 8674060, montaluce.com

Corkscrew Café Try the tasty Mediterraneaninfluenced small plates at this cozy café, whose building encompasses the town’s 1850s jail cells— now used for storing wine and other provisions. 51 W Main St, Dahlonega, GA. (706) 867-8551, thecorkscrewcafe.com

Rock Bottom: To discover more about Dahlonega’s fascinating history, browse the Gold Museum (above top) or experience it hands-on with a tour of the Consolidated Gold Mine (below); Kaya Vineyard and Winery (above-middle) is perched atop a 1,600-foot-high ridge, and features six wines finished in stainless steel, with new oak-aged offerings this fall.

Shop / Paul Thomas Chocolates Paul Hoffman handcrafts delectable bonbons in the shop he owns with his wife, Lori. Wrapped in shiny gold foil, his Dahlonega Gold Bars fold golden raisins and Georgia pecans into milk or dark chocolate. 102

Public Square N, Dahlonega, GA. (706) 864-6333, paulthomaschocolates.com

Brad Walker Pottery Watch Walker throw bowls, mugs, and more on the pottery wheel at his small studio and shop, where he has worked for 41 years. Vivid hues color his finished pieces. 70 Public Square

N, Dahlonega, GA. (706) 864-7130

Listen / The Crimson Moon Lodged in an 1848 building on the square, this intimate listening room hosts nationally known and up-and-coming folk, bluegrass, blues, and country musicians. The pine ceiling, floor, and walls create outstanding acoustics. 24 N Park St,

Dahlonega, GA. (706) 8643982, thecrimsonmoon.com

BURROWED DEEP IN THE HILLS OF NORTHERN GEORGIA, DAHLONEGA IS AN EASY DRIVE FROM GREENVILLE, ITS SCENIC MOUNTAIN VISTAS AND EXCELLENT VINEYARDS WELL WORTH THE 2-HOUR TRIP DOWN I-85.

Nearby Kaya Vineyard and Winery has recently risen on the former site of Blackstock Vineyards. From atop a 1,600-foot-high ridge, the new tasting room and terrace on the renovated property relish views of the vineyard and mountains beyond. Kaya currently makes eight wines—all finished in stainless steel—and will add six oak-aged releases this fall. Ambitious plans call for a future 22-room hotel and event facility. At 1,800 feet, the southwest-facing slopes of Wolf Mountain Vineyards are best suited to growing red-grape varietals—Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah, Mourvèdre, Tannat, Petit Verdot, Malbec, and Touriga Nacional—which are used to blend Wolf Mountain’s Estate Red Wines. After a tasting here, linger over a duck barbecue sandwich or a fig, pear, and prosciutto pizza in the window-lined Vineyard Café. Vines cling to the stucco façade of Montaluce, a striking Tuscan-style winery resting on a 400-acre estate, where the tasting room currently offers five reds and five whites—including a rare sparkling mead. In addition to Pinot Grigio and Sangiovese, Montaluce produces a smoky Syrah and a Cabernet Franc aged in oak for 18 months. The area’s youngest winery, Cavender Creek Vineyards, opened in 2011. Owner Claire Livingston crafts both dry and sweet wines, many of the dry reds blended with Norton grapes. Named for one of the resident creatures, the Donkey Hotie Red is an earthy blend of predominantly Norton with Cabernet Franc. Next to the tasting room, an 1820s log cabin, restored with two bedrooms and two baths, is available for rent. Livingston, a newcomer to Dahlonega, moved to these magical mountains a year ago from Dublin, Georgia. When asked how she likes her new hometown, she waxes poetic: “I feel like heaven opened up and a little piece fell out as Dahlonega.” Pure gold.

Photog r aph s (top and bot tom) cour tes y of t he Cit y Of Dah lonega ; (m idd le) K aya Vi neyard and Wi ner y

Dahlonega Square Hotel & Villas Located a block from the square, this hotel and specialevent venue occupies a lovingly renovated 1880s home with 13 spacious new rooms.135

78 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_Side Ways.indd 78

10/14/16 1:19 PM


Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lay a foundation of healing and hope

TOGETHER

Help Us Grow

Donate today at www.Rmhc-Carolinas.org/CapitalCampaign

RMH-1011-CapitalCampaignAd-TOWN_9.25x12.25.indd 1

TOWN_blank page.indd 7

9/27/16 11:38 AM

10/13/16 10:48 AM


The legacy of giving is a most valuable lesson. Giving is what sustains the future of our communities and helps us build a stronger, more caring way of life.

elliottdavis.com

TOWN_blank page.indd 6

10/14/16 1:58 PM


STYLE CENTRAL ALL THINGS STYLISH / UNIQUE / EXTRAORDINARY

On Johnny (outer to inner): Meridian blue altitude down vest, $150. By Southern Tide, Southern Tide Store; Gray down sweater vest, $179. By Patagonia; Blank nano puff vest, $149. By Patagonia; Bamboo long-sleeved fiber tee, $50. By Free Fly, all from Half Moon Outfitters. G-Shock watch, modelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own.

Vested Interest

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey; model: Johnny Urbon

Take to the chill in rugged style

NOVEMBER 2016 / 81

TOWN_NOV_Style Central.indd 81

10/14/16 2:39 PM


THE LOOK

Urban Legend The classic puffer vest hits the mark for town (and country)

ON JOHNNY: Altitude vest in navy, $150; High ropes plaid shirt in tsunami, $99; Classic brown leather belt, $65. All from Southern Tide, Southern Tide Store; Revolvr tech pant, $75. By Kuhl; BL585 pull-on boot, $179. By Blundstone, all from Halfmoon Outfitters. G-Shock watch, modelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own.

Smart (Re) investment: In between a coat and a jacket? The puffer vest finishes the look, especially for chilly fall outings.

Special thanks to model Johnny Urbon ; make-up and hair by Isabelle Schreier / Belle Maquillage

/ by Laura Linen // photograph by Paul Mehaffey

82 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_The Look.indd 82

10/14/16 2:28 PM


Fashion on the TOWN Style Picks

Discover the glamour and artistry of modern cinematic couture with 43 period costumes from 26 films depicting five centuries of history, drama, and comedy.

November 18, 2016 – February 19, 2017 1515 Main Street in Columbia, SC | 803-799-2810 | columbaimuseum.org Presented by Exhibits Development Group in cooperation with Cosprop, Ltd., London England

Presenting Sponsors

Jacket and top by Elizabeth and James $395, $255; Retro Leather Legging $72

Hannah and Ron Rogers

2222 Augusta St., #7, Greenville | twillsc.com |

Twill |

@twillsc

AND C O U

TH

NA

SO

U

Y

RI

HL

NT

C

Grantors

CARO

LI

The Duchess (2008) 18th Century. Keira Knightley as Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire. Courtesy of Photofest. Costume Design by Michael O’Connor. Academy Award and BAFTA Award for Best Costume Design.

Shop local. Shop year ’round. NOVEMBER 2016 / 83

TOWN_blank page.indd 3

Twill_hlfV_TOWN Nov16.indd 1

10/10/16 5:04 PM 10/13/16 8:32 PM


THE ITEM

Short Stack Find your footing in fall’s best booties / stylist Laura Linen // photograph by Paul Mehaffey

HEEL YES !: (From top to bottom) Stop By cutout side bootie, $278. By Diba True; Suede peep-toe bootie, $150. By Vaneli Bisa, all from Monkee’s of the West End; Faythe layered bootie, $159. By Vince Camuto, from Muse Shoe Studio; Elsy gray boot, $278. By Deekeller, from Monkee’s of the West End.

84 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_The Item.indd 84

10/14/16 1:46 PM


Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve Earned a Maintenance-Free Lifestyle

Award-Winning 2 and 3-Bedroom Designs in Simpsonville NewStyleCommunities.com | Levi Weisser 864-207-8094 AN EPCON COMMUNITIES FRANCHISE.

9 Layken Lane | Simpsonville, SC

NOVEMBER 2016 / 85

TOWN_NOV_The Item.indd 85

10/13/16 11:02 AM


TOWN_blank page.indd 6

10/13/16 10:27 AM


TOWN_blank page.indd 7

10/13/16 10:27 AM


THE OBJECT

Clear Cut

From Champagne to Cabernet, your top bottles deserve a great glass / styled by Laura Linen // photograph by Paul Mehaffey

DRINK TO THAT: (Left to right) Schott titanium Burgundy glass, $16 ; Schott titanium Riesling glass, $14; Schott titanium Champagne flute, $14. All by Fortessa, from The Cookâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Station; Gatsby Champagne flute, 4 for $80. From We Took to the Woods.

88 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_The Object.indd 88

10/14/16 1:46 PM


GAMAY THAT WINE: (Left to right) Icy pine balloon glass,​ 4 for $94; Diamond Bordeaux glass, 4 for $80. All from We Took to the Woods; Schott titanium tumbler, $11; Schott titanium Beaujolais glass, $14. All by Fortessa, from The Cook’s Station.

NOVEMBER 2016 / 89

TOWN_NOV_The Object.indd 89

10/13/16 3:28 PM


MAN

About TOWN

Each month, the Man About TOWN will share his Upstate rendezvous, which may or may not involve cocktails.

Money Pit The Man contemplates the lasting effects of winning

O

n a recent drive to North Carolina, I stopped for gas at a convenience store just south of the state line. A sign taped to the pump indicated the card reader was not working and that customers should come inside to pay. This was a small momand-pop store and offered only the essentials. Bags of potato chips and beef jerky sat next to three-liter bottles of soda and quarts of motor oil. A small rack held a few magazines, mostly hunting and gun titles mixed among a couple of gossip publications, which only helped confirm my belief that no matter where you go on this planet you cannot escape Kanye West. While the store didn’t sell beer or wine, other vices were wellrepresented. Behind the counter, cartons of cigarettes were stacked high next to a Plexiglass cabinet displaying what looked like forty different types of lottery scratch tickets. A young girl stood behind a cash register, while across from her, and with his back to me, an old man in overalls hunched over the counter. At first I thought he was signing a credit card receipt, but as I approached I noticed a pile of scratch tickets in front of him. I watched as he robotically scraped them with what looked to be a guitar pick. He caught me staring and said, “I won $5,000 last month. Bought a brand-new Martin guitar. It’s a beauty.” The man’s statement made me recall a conversation I’d had with some friends around the time the Powerball lottery was approaching $400 million. We were sitting around a fire pit drinking wine and

discussing how we would each spend the jackpot. We talked about traveling the world in first-class luxury and buying villas and penthouses in exotic locations. One man, a friend of a friend, said that winning the lottery would most likely not make any difference in our lives because studies show that after the initial excitement wears off, the vast majority of lottery winners are no more happy than they were before they won. I remember looking at him across the fire pit and wondering, “Who invited this guy?” As I paid for my gas, I asked the girl behind the counter for a Powerball ticket, and when I turned to walk out of the store I nodded at the old man and wished him good luck. Back in my car I threw the ticket on the passenger seat and thought for a moment about winning the jackpot. Would I purchase a chateau in Provence or a villa on Lake Como? Probably both, along with a Gulfstream to quickly jet between the two. But did it really matter? Would it make me happy? Would I sip Champagne on my verandas and eat foie gras in my jet but still wish for something more, something new, something different? As I started the car, I looked back toward the store and I could see the old man through the window. I tried to imagine what his home looked like, and I pictured a guitar case leaning up against a wall in a small living room. Inside the case a beautiful Martin guitar lay silent. Its owner was not home. He was hunched over the counter at a convenience store. Still not satisfied. Still scratching.

90 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_MAT.indd 90

10/14/16 1:46 PM


PHOTO BY WILL CROOKS

We’re powered by what’s most important. At Duke Energy, we care about making a difference. Whether we’re volunteering with local charities, funding science and engineering programs in schools or investing in the future workforce with career training programs, we’re always powered by what’s most important – you. Learn more about how we’re powered by you at duke-energy.com/Community.

2222 Augusta Street, Suite 7 Greenville, SC 29605 864.520.2486 NOVEMBER 2016 / 91 Twill hlfV TOWN Nov16.indd 1 TOWN_blank page.indd 3

10/10/16 10:47 AM

10/13/16 10:31 AM


SAVE 10% OFF or letterpress business cards when you mention Town Magazine ad. SOME RESTRICTIONS APPLY

82 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_Place_Holder.indd 92

10/13/16 9:34 AM


PLACE

Holder

Trust Funds: When it comes to donorship, the elderly Mr. Gould is at the mercy of smooth-talking sales ladies.

I

Taking the Bait A writer’s elderly father proves an easy target for unsolicited charitable asks / by Scot t Gould

// illustrations by Alice Rat terree

magine you drive down to Lake Murray to visit your dad. He’s eighty-three years old, but it doesn’t surprise you to pull in the driveway and catch him arm-wrestling with a chain saw or spinning donuts on the riding mower or hunkered over his lathe. He keeps the future at bay with a little yardwork, a little woodwork. That evening, just as the two of you sit down to dinner, the phone rings. The landline. Yes, he still has a landline. You’ve tried to tell him the only calls that still buzz through a land line are the kind you don’t want to answer, but the old yellow push-button phone is a piece of the past he insists on protecting. And not because he avoids technology. This is the guy—the eighty-three-year-old guy—who texts you and wants to know how to upload photos from his iPhone to his Instagram account. But still. At least he uses the decade-old portable sometimes when the landline rings. He always pushes the button for the speaker phone because he likes everyone to enjoy his phone conversations. Today, you hear a woman on the other end of the line, a woman with a grandma-smooth voice. You listen to her ask your dad how he’s doing, if he’s having a good weekend. He tells her his son is visiting and NOVEMBER 2016 / 93

TOWN_NOV_Place_Holder.indd 93

10/14/16 1:20 PM


PLACE

Holder

he has to go. But she keeps him on the line, thanks him for his last contribution, tells him that it’s so simple to do even more. Oh, she’s good, you think. She knows how to string a conversation. Somehow, she senses how much your father enjoys talking on the phone. Across the room, you make hand signals like a third-base coach, pantomiming for him to hang up on her, to cut it short. The burgers are getting cold. They always call at suppertime. You’ve heard this all before. You know what he’s going to tell her. You’ve heard your father have these conversations so many times. He’s going to say (politely) that he sits down once a year and writes checks for his charitable contributions. He’s going to ask her not to call him until the end of the year, that he’s done all he’s going to do at this time. And she’s going to say something like, “Well, Mr. Gould, you don’t have to sit down at all. We can help with that. You can send us money automatically, every month!” She is so cheerful as she reels him in. The more he protests, the more syrupy sweet her voice. And before you know it, he’s asked her to mail him more information. She promises she will. And you know she’ll call again. And again. Your father is too nice to these people. He possesses patience you’ll never have. The next morning you walk to the top of the driveway and retrieve his mail. On the way down, you sort through the envelopes. A half dozen of them carry the postmark of a charitable organization. They are slick direct-mail solicitations, asking for more. And more. The envelopes are stuffed with tear-stained narratives of the needy and the saved. It would be so simple for you to toss them into the outside garbage can. You wonder what happens when you’re not around, when you’re not there to make wild hand signals from the dining room table or open envelopes in the driveway. You are sure the calls come through like clockwork, always those uber-friendly people who ask how you are, then “How much can you give?” He doesn’t give these people much. Each year, he spreads a few bucks over a number of organizations, writes checks to the ones that hone in on a major organ or a debilitating disease. He does it because he’s a nice guy. He’s not trying to personally fund a miracle. He pays to

honor the wife he lost to leukemia or the younger brother whose lungs gave out too soon. But you know once those checks are cashed, the onslaught begins. The landline rings. The mailbox fills up. You’d be willing to bet those people on the other end of the line somehow know your old man has a big, soft heart. And you’d wager they have figured out he’s eighty-three years old and doesn’t mind spending a few minutes on the phone in the afternoons. You wonder if they realize that your father, while not a wealthy man, can be convinced to crack the piggy bank for a cause that puts a ripple in his heart. You wonder if they have demographics for those sorts of things, if they’ve put him on a special list. And you wonder if that list is long Tough Calls: and filled with the names of other older Protecting elderly folks, people who have landlines and will parents from hip fractures is one always answer them, no matter what time thing, but staving they ring, no matter who’s on the other off relentless attacks end of the line. from crafty charity The next afternoon, you walk in the telemarketers is a whole different story. kitchen when the phone rings. Your father sits outside, rocking in the porch swing. You’re packed and trying to hit the road, but you decide to answer it for him. It’s one of those people. You hear it in her voice. “Is this Mr. Gould?” she says. She is younger than the last one, you think, perkier. You don’t lie. “Yes, this is Mr. Gould.” She wants to know how you are doing this fine day, and instead of answering the question, you simply ask, “Why are you calling?” You want to hear her say it right off the bat. You want her to be up front for once. You want a confession. You want this woman to say: Well, Mr. Gould, we know you’re eighty-three years old, and because of that, you have a big old target on your back. We are positive you don’t have the energy to say no. We can wear you down. We have you, Mr. Gould, and we’re never, ever going to let you go. But she doesn’t utter anything close to that. Rather, she thanks you for your generous contributions in the past. So you repeat yourself, “Why are you calling?” She says that you are in a special group of contributors because of how many years you’ve supported their causes. When she pauses to breathe, you say, “Why are you calling? Really, why?” You don’t feel the need to say anything else. Just that one, simple, direct question. By now, she thinks you are having a stroke or some sort of psychotic break. “Mr. Gould?” she asks, and you reply, “Why are you calling? She’s says she’ll try again later “when you’re feeling better,” and quickly hangs up. Your father strolls in just as you hang the yellow push-button-phone-from-the-70s back on its receiver. You can’t be here all the time, screening calls and sorting mail. You can’t protect him from the world, from the smooth-voiced hucksters who put him directly in their fund-raising crosshairs. You hate that he’s just there for the taking. Those people, they are so good at what they do. There should be a law, you think. When good people with big hearts hit seventy-five years old, the vultures should go circle somewhere else. “Who was that?” he asks. “Nobody important,” you tell him. “Funny thing, they couldn’t say why they called.”

94 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_Place_Holder.indd 94

10/14/16 1:20 PM


I’ve got Sunshine… 5% of all November proceeds will go to local charities.

…on a Cloudy Day

Since 1948

Fine home furnishings. Exceptional prices.

PACE JEWELERS

875 NE Main Street, Simpsonville | Mon-Fri 9-5 & Sat 9-3 1914 E Main Street, Spartanburg | Mon-Fri 10-5 & Sat 10-3 864.228.1619 | www.CarolinaConsignmentLLC.com

1250 PENDLETON STREET, GREENVILLE PaceJewelersInc.com • 864-232-3436

Pace_qtrS_TOWN Nov16.indd 1

10/10/16 4:33 PM

Beautify with Tile and Stone…Inside and Out THE UPSTATE’S LEADING TILE DISTRIBUTOR FOR OVER FIFTY YEARS

GREENVILLE 535 Woodruff Road 864.288.6290

GREENVILLE 7 Task Industrial Court 864.297.1496

ANDERSON 1718 Pearman Dairy Road 864.225.0884

SPARTANBURG 530 S. Blackstock Road 864.587.9732

ClaytonTileCo.com NOVEMBER 2016 / 95

TOWN_NOV_Place_Holder.indd 95

10/13/16 5:56 PM


Kent Ambler, Warm Winter. Woodcut, 36 in. x 36 in.; artwork courtesy of the artist

2016 CHARITABLE GIVING AWARDS

TO GI VE I S TO R ECEI VE I S TO G IV E â&#x20AC;&#x201D; LIK E T H E R H Y T H M O F B IR D S , T H E I R WI NG S I N CONS TA NT, LYRIC AL M OT I ON. T HE R EC OV E RY S T RO K E IS T H E MO S T V U LNE R A B L E PA RT OF FL I G H T, B UT ALSO THE M OS T B EAU T I FU L . LIK E WISE , T H E 2016 C H A R ITA B LE G IV ING AWA R D R E CI P I E NTS H AVE FOUN D P OW ER AN D GRAC E IN T H E IR R E C OV E RY ST RO K E S , IN T H E ACT OF G I VI NG. I N TH E I R

STROKES OF

KINDNESS PROFILES BY JENNIFER OLADIPO

PORTRAI T S B Y W I L L C RO O K S

96 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_F_GB_use2.indd 96

10/14/16 11:59 AM


APRIL JU E 2012 NOVEM BN ER 6 / 7 93 7

TOWN_NOV_F_GB_use2.indd 97

10/14/16 11:59 AM


TESTING GROUND GRIER MULLINS OF PUBLIC EDUCATION PARTNERS HAS BEEN IMPROVING GREENVILLE COUNTY SCHOOLS FOR MORE THAN TWO DECADES

CAP & GOWN: Grier Mullins has guided Public Education Partners for much of her career, and as retirement approaches, she graduates with a long legacy of education advocacy.

98 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_F_GB_use2.indd 98

10/14/16 1:20 PM


EDUCATION SPIRIT AWARD // GRIER MULLINS

P

atience and enthusiasm, when mixed like baking soda and vinegar, can make things bubble up and change dramatically. These two vital attributes have helped Public Education Partners, a local education fund, outlast dozens of similar organizations around the country under the leadership of long-time executive director Grier Mullins. PEP formed among a wave of 125 similar groups in the 1980s, half of which have since disappeared. Positioning itself as the research and development arm of Greenville County public schools, many of PEP’s initiatives have been adopted over the years, including teacher training, leadership development, political forums, and summer literacy programs. The work is strongly guided by data, such as graduation and teacher-turnover rates, alongside feedback from stakeholders including parents, principals, and business leaders. PEP board member Ed Good says Grier’s patient persistence throughout her 24-year tenure was key to the organization’s continual growth and impact. “A lot of people tend to burn out after a few years, and that’s a real problem. But she has stuck with it and has been determined to make a difference in our schools,” says Good. He and others point out that Mullins also outlasted six superintendents, each with their own strong personalities. Grier is a skilled persuader. She was involved in political campaigns after college, enjoying advocacy and public policy. “But as I fine-tuned my interests and where I wanted to be involved,” she says, “I really see public schools as the place where lives are going to be changed more than any other place.” Strategy melded with passion, she continued to adjust PEP’s activities to deliver the most impact, even with a small staff.

It’s something Neil Grayson can attest to. After hearing Mullins talk about PEP in a presentation to his Leadership Greenville class, he knew he would dedicate himself to improving public schools. He, too, joined the board, and two terms into his service, Grayson remains impressed at Grier’s deep knowledge of the education world, far beyond her county and state. But to Mullins, PEP’s work means, “being a critical friend of the schools, but also asking tough questions.” She favors behind-the-scenes conversations and resourcesharing over public op-eds to effect change. She has managed to be influential and open, confronting sometimes politicallycharged education issues. “Skin in the game is important. You can’t just criticize: you’ve got to be in there helping.” Even as she prepares for retirement, Mullins is as enthusiastic about education issues and solutions as a recent college grad. She still pauses to think about questions she has answered countless times by now, and makes big, strong hand gestures that mirror the insightful answers coming from her lips. It’s hard to keep Mullins talking about herself for even a few minutes. Her “I” shifts almost imperceptibly to “we” when she looks back on the impact PEP has had. She says she’s learned, over years of collaboration and influencing, that more voices need to be at the table. Linda Hannon, district manager, She expects PEP to continue to be an open, Duke Energy Carolinas informed, and committed education advocate. “Our capacity is only limited by our vision,” she says.

“THE IMPAC T THAT PUBLIC EDUCATION PARTNERS CONTINUES TO HAVE IN OUR COMMUNIT Y IS TREMENDOUS, AND THAT DOESN’T HAPPEN WITHOUT THE ENTHUSIASM AND DRIVE OF PEOPLE LIKE GRIER MULLINS.”

THE EDUCATION SPIRIT AWARD RECOGNIZES AN INDIVIDUAL WHO HAS DEDICATED HIS OR HER CAREER TO THE BETTERMENT OF YOUTH AND THE EDUCATION EXPERIENCE FOR THE UPSTATE.

NOVEMBER 2016 / 99

TOWN_NOV_F_GB_use2.indd 99

10/14/16 1:20 PM


SURE & STEADY THIS YEAR’S RUTH NICHOLSON AWARD RECIPIENT DOUG KROSKE EMBODIES HARDWORK AND DEDICATION

B

ack in 2008, people were panicking. budgets looked bad—at work and at home—and for people in the banking business, it was downright dreadful. But anyone who was in the room with Doug Kroske will tell you he was not among the panicked at that time. Kroske was the vice-president of investments at RBC Liberty Life Insurance Company and treasurer and chair of the finance and investment committee at the Community Foundation of Greenville. In his thoughtful, diligent way, he convinced his fellow board members to trust the solid plan already developed, even as the financial crises deepened. The steady approach paid off, and is one reason the foundation’s assets have more than doubled in recent years. It’s hard to get Kroske to take much credit for that, however. “Doug isn’t going to mention a whole lot about himself. You’d have to drag it out of him,” says former Liberty Life colleague, Porter Rose. “He’s the smart guy who will usually come up with the right answer, but he’s not very quick to jump to the conclusion. He comes to the right answer in the right way. He spends a lot of time getting supportive data for whatever it is he is proposing.” Fellow committee member Bill Bridges agrees that Kroske is methodical, but says it in no way implies he is slow. In fact, Kroske is known for running efficient meetings. “He’s good at bringing people back on topic with a gentle reminder about why we’re there.” Kroske excels at confirming the group has reached a consensus, “and if there’s not one, working out the differences, and making sure the consensus is based on sound logic, not just what was read in the headlines that morning.” Even when it comes to leisure activities, Kroske makes sure things get done right. He’s

the one who sends the email reminder for the weekly social meetup of retired and current financial professionals in the Greenville area. Interestingly, the way he describes his work with the Community Foundation is almost exactly the way colleagues describe his execution of most things: the words “safe and prudent” are the first to roll off of his tongue. But that doesn’t mean he’s not having a good time. “It’s really fun,” says Kroske. “It’s my way of keeping involved in the investment world. It’s really my first love.” He also sees his board service as a way to pay homage to Francis Hipp, one of the founders of the Community Foundation and former chairman of Liberty Corporation. “I feel like I have some duty to help see that his and other founders’ visions for improving the community live on. I would like to think they’d be impressed by the impact that the organization has,” he says. Kroske sees the Foundation as a bit of a hidden gem, and an efficient, hard-working, behind-the-scenes catalyst that probably deserves more recognition after decades of effort. Its work is important, if sometimes quiet. He says this with complete sincerity, and with a smile, seemingly unaware that it’s exactly what other people think about him.

“IT’S INCREDIBLE TO HAVE SOMEONE WITH DOUG’S E XPERIENCE LEAD OUR FINANCE AND INVESTMENT COMMIT TEE. HE IS E XCEPTIONALLY BRIGHT AND IS VERY EFFECTIVE IN HIS ROLE AS OUR TREASURER. I AM VERY GR ATEFUL TO DOUG AND OUR OTHER BOARD MEMBERS FOR THEIR GENEROSIT Y.” Bob Morris, president of the Community Foundation of Greenville

THE RUTH NICHOLSON AWARD IS THE HIGHEST HONOR PRESENTED BY THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION EACH YEAR AND HONORS THE VOLUNTEER WHO HAS MADE SIGNIFICANT CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE GREENVILLE COMMUNITY THROUGH VOLUNTEER WORK FOR THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OR TO ONE OF ITS PROJECTS, PROGRAMS, OR AREAS OF EMPHASIS.

100 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_F_GB_use2.indd 100

10/14/16 1:21 PM


RUTH NICHOLSON AWARD // DOUG KROSKE

GIVING CREDIT: As treasurer and chair of the Community Foundation’s finance and investment committee, Doug Kroske has consistently offered his time, talent, and wisdom to benefit the foundation’s countless charitable activities.

NOVEMBER 2016 / 101

TOWN_NOV_F_GB_use2.indd 101

10/14/16 11:59 AM


TA K I N G C A R(E) AUTOMOTIVE POWER COUPLE WILLIAM AND ANNETTE BRADSHAW SUPPORT THE LIVES OF CHILDREN

T

here are more and more havens in our community where children can go to be safe, healthy, and whole. A mini house on wheels allows them to step inside and explore potential dangers they then learn to avoid at home. Fire stations have become spots where parents can guarantee car seats work and fit correctly in their vehicles. A Smithsonianaffiliated museum lets kids take on fun roles normally reserved for grownups. Even at home, a nurse might visit to see what’s needed to prevent future hospital visits. These places and experiences exist in part because of the Bradshaw family and their devotion to the community they love. Annette and William Bradshaw have donated millions to groups that make Greenville a safer, healthier city to grow up in. As they sit side-by-side, filling in each other’s thoughts and sentences, the two say they give simply because they can. Back in 1979 when they bought their first OldsmobileCadillac dealership in Greer, philanthropy wasn’t necessarily an option. “For a lot of our business career we owed a lot of money and didn’t have a lot of extra to give back,” says William. “We didn’t have the resources early on to make a huge impact.” That dealership became Bradshaw Automotive Group, now with four locations. It’s still family-run as the second generation (son and son-in-law) begins taking leadership and supporting giving. The Bradshaws have worked with Safe Kids Upstate for more than 15 years, starting with an initiative that creates car-seat checkpoints throughout the Upstate. And this year, an undisclosed, seven-figure gift to Greenville Health System made headlines as the largest in the hospital’s history, creating the Bradshaw Institute for Community Child Heath and Advocacy at GHS. The Bradshaws wanted to keep their names undisclosed, too. But William Schmidt, chairman

of the department of pediatrics, helped the couple understand how their giving inspires others. “We want other people in the community to look at them and say, if the Bradshaws can do that, what can we do?” It’s not just about the money: The Bradshaws are beloved for sticking around long after checks are signed and cashed. “People don’t realize [they] are so giving of their time and talent, as well,” says Nancy Halverson, president and CEO of the Children’s Museum of the Upstate. “They stay engaged and do the hard work by your side.” She says the Bradshaws, founding supporters, helped underwrite and design an exhibit where children learn science and math through playing at racecar driving. “Of course the day that it opened, who was here but Annette and William playing with kids in the exhibit,” says Halverson. The Bradshaws are known for connecting the dots. Annette was key in joining Safe Kids with GHS, and then extending that partnership for a safety exhibit at the Children’s Museum. “Now we’ve seen a whole other avenue where kids fall through the cracks,” Annette says of the GHS gift, noting health issues a grandchild and foster child in their own family have faced. William says it’s others’ gifts that motivate him. “Our little bit that we do really doesn’t go that far. It takes a lot of people to make a difference, and I think Greenville’s blessed in that we really do have a generous community.”

“WILLIAM AND ANNET TE BR ADSHAW ARE A COUPLE WHOSE GIF TS OF TIME, TALENT, AND TREASURE THROUGHOUT THE L AST 20 YEARS HAVE BOTH SAVED AND ENHANCED THE LIVES OF OUR CHILDREN SERVED BY ORGANIZATIONS IN THE UPSTATE, AND WHO COMMIT TED THIS YEAR TO CONTINUE THEIR LEGACY OF GIVING WITH THE PERMANENT ESTABLISHMENT OF THE BR ADSHAW INSTITUTE FOR COMMUNIT Y CHILD HEALTH AND ADVOCACY WITHIN GHS CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL.” George F. Maynard, III, vice-president of institutional advancement, Greenville Health System

THE HEALTHCARE TRANSFORMATION AWARD HONORS OUTSTANDING INDIVIDUALS OR AN ORGANIZATION THAT ACTIVELY AND COMPASSIONATELY WORKS TO TRANSFORM THE HEALTH OF OUR COMMUNITY THROUGH CONTRIBUTIONS OF TIME, TALENT, AND TREASURE.

102 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_F_GB_use2.indd 102

10/14/16 1:21 PM


HEALTHCARE TRANSFORMATION AWARD // WILLIAM AND ANNETTE BRADSHAW

HEART HEALTHY: Blessed by the success of the Bradshaw Automotive Group, William and Annette have focused their efforts on improving the Upstate community, specifically by partnering with GHS in the area of childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health.

NOVEMBER 2016 / 103

TOWN_NOV_F_GB_use2.indd 103

10/14/16 12:00 PM


M A G I C TOUCH TECH COMPANY SYNNEX CARES FOR KIDS WITH ITS SHARE THE MAGIC INITIATIVE

A DAYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S WORK: Peter Larocque, SYNNEX president of North American distribution, led the effort to create the Share the Magic initiative, which benefits four local organizations working to serve children in difficult situations.

104 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_F_GB_use2.indd 104

10/14/16 12:00 PM


PHILANTHROPIC SPIRIT AWARD // SYNNEX

I

n six years of monthly meetings about Share the Magic, SYNNEX’s president of North American technology solutions hasn’t missed a single one. Amid serving at top echelon of a Fortune 250 company, Peter Larocque is always there to lead the charge on the largest one-day fundraiser in South Carolina, which has raised more than $5.1 million for charities helping kids face life’s toughest challenges. It’s a rare display, says Velda Hughes, owner and CEO of the Hughes Agency. Her company does public relations work for SYNNEX, but Hughes says Larocque’s smiling face at each meeting, and readiness to hit the phones alongside staff in the interim, encourages her to go the extra mile for Share the Magic. “I’ve probably done 250 major events, but I’ve never been involved with a company that the event starts at the top. And Larocque is 100 percent involved with all aspects.” The commitment goes deep. Larocque’s office walls display letters from parents and children who have benefitted from Share the Magic. “What I don’t have up is corporate propaganda,” says Larocque, who doesn’t mince words. The notes are uplifting, but also can be sobering. “Some of these kids don’t make it, and it’s gut wrenching.” Share the Magic, a SYNNEX-sponsored program and component fund of the Community Foundation, benefits four organizations. Clement’s Kindness supports children affected by cancer and serious blood disorders. A Child’s Haven and Pendleton Place both help repair young lives marred by abuse and neglect. Make-A-Wish creates joyful experiences for children with life-threatening illnesses, and also was the starting point for Share the Magic. Larocque had served on the board of Make-A-Wish’s South Carolina chapter, but he thought he could do more by recusing himself

to leverage SYNNEX resources instead. President and CEO Kevin Murai approved and came to an agreement. “If I and others committed time, effort, and our own personal assets to it, then SYNNEX would do the same,” Larocque says. Murai also allowed flexibility to bring other organizations into the group, adding even more community assets to the effort. During the six years Share the Magic has been in action, SYNNEX has been recognized as a top employer in South Carolina. Larocque says employees are an important part of giving. A 65-member community-involvement committee drives the engagement, letting management know where help and funds should go. It’s not uncommon to see SYNNEX t-shirts at fundraising events throughout Greenville. SYNNEX also responded to floods in the Philippines and New Jersey, where the company sent a 40-foot trailer loaded with supplies that SYNNEX associates and their network had collected. The money can be counted, but the impact it has on recipients and volunteers is immeasurable. Hughes believes that, as a father of three, Larocque’s drive to see Share the Magic succeed comes from a deeply personal place. But he puts it a little differently. “We care about the community and take our involvement as seriously as we take our business,” Larocque says. “We’re not just trying to get color commentary about the company, quite frankly. We’re trying to change the lives of these Velda Hughes, Hughes Agency children.” And they do: month after owner and CEO month, year after year.

“PE TER AND HIS TE AM CARE DEEPLY ABOUT OUR COMMUNIT Y AND HAVE TRULY MADE A DIFFERENCE IN THE LIVES OF COUNTLESS CHILDREN IN NEED ACROSS THE UPSTATE. OUR COMMUNIT Y SIMPLY WOULD NOT BE THE SAME WITHOUT PE TER’S CONTINUED EFFORT S TO HELP MAKE IT A BE T TER PL ACE.”

THE PHILANTHROPIC SPIRIT AWARD HONORS A BUSINESS THAT FOSTERS CHARITABLE GIVING THROUGH EMPLOYEE INCENTIVE PROGRAMS AND IS DEDICATED TO GIVING BACK TO THE UPSTATE IN A SIGNIFICANT MANNER.

NOVEMBER 2016 / 105

TOWN_NOV_F_GB_use2.indd 105

10/14/16 12:00 PM


LOOK I N G HOMEWA R D TRIUNE MERCY CENTER OFFERS MORE THAN MEALS TO ITS TRANSIENT MEMBERS—IT GIVES THEM A SENSE OF PLACE

T

he spirit of a community thrives in its stories, even when they are difficult to tell, or to hear. At Triune Mercy Center, people’s stories are heard, amplified, and sometimes rewritten forever. The church’s main ministry is to those who are homeless, but people from all stations and walks of life come together as worshippers to rebuild the sense of connectedness that homelessness often destroys. One of the primary avenues where people bond at Triune—learning about each other and themselves—is through the arts. In the art room, artists who might not have a home teach or paint alongside college students and established artists who work in carefully appointed studio spaces. Homeless individuals lead parts of the weekly worship, taking the stage during musical ministry. Players enact personal stories others have shared, combating the pervasive feeling of invisibility that many among the homeless population experience. “You’ll see homeless people worshiping with lawyers, prosecutors—just whole cross sections of Greenville,” says Chip Price, who originally arrived at Triune as a legal service volunteer. He has now been a regular worshiper for three years. “I had always thought of Triune as just kind of a soup kitchen: give ’em food, give ’em clothes, pat ’em on the back, see you later. But that was a total misconception. We’re not just into the giveaways, we want to help people who want to help themselves get out of poverty, or do whatever it is they can do.” Pastor Deb Richardson-Moore says she also entered with the wrong idea 11 years ago. “When middle-class people began showing up for that worship service, I think I said, ‘What are you doing here?’ But without fail they said, ‘I think this is what the kingdom of God looks like.’”

Triune does offer conventional services for those without homes, providing 2,000 free meals and 100 boxes of food each month. Healthcare providers park dental vans and mobile medical units in the parking lot, or come inside to donate services alongside other organizations. After more than a decade on the job, Richardson-Moore says one point of pride is the twice-weekly social worker roundtable meetings that shepherd people through small steps on the road to stability. “A lot of times, by the time they get to us they’re overwhelmed, jobless, no family, no address, no transportation,” says RichardsonMoore. But the social workers help them answer the questions, “What is my next step? What can I accomplish this week?” People who are highly motivated can then move into a yearlong support circle of volunteers to brainstorm future plans. “The most exciting part is seeing people move on,” says Richardson-Moore. All parishioners are called to explore the paths they should take. “I’m reluctant to assign people a volunteer job. What I prefer is for you to come here, hang out, and then tell me what you want to do,” says Richardson-Moore. It’s not for her to decide how people add their line to the collective story, whether it’s by making paintings, playing guitar, joining a 12-step group, or doing eye exams. It’s her job to leave space on the page. “All I have to do is say yes when they want to come in,” she says.

“WE, THE MEMBERS OF CASCADES VERDAE, ARE VERY PLE ASED TO SUPPORT THE TRIUNE MERCY CENTER. WE ARE PROUD TO HAVE THE OPPORTUNIT Y TO ASSIST THIS WORTHY ORGANIZ ATION CONTRIBUTE SO MUCH TOWARD EMPOWERING AND ENABLING GREENVILLE RESIDENT S DURING STRESSFUL TIMES, SO THAT THE Y CAN RESUME CARING FOR THEMSELVES.” Leah Parisi, chair, Cascades Resident’s Advisory Council

THE COMMUNITY SPIRIT AWARD IS GIVEN TO AN OUTSTANDING LOCAL NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION THAT SERVES THE COMMUNITY THROUGH ITS VITAL PROGRAMS AND THROUGH ITS EXCEPTIONAL EFFORTS TO COMMUNICATE AND PARTNER WITH OTHER NONPROFITS.

106 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_F_GB_use2.indd 106

10/14/16 1:21 PM


COMMUNITY SPIRIT AWARD // TRIUNE MERCY CENTER

MAKING ROOM: As a pastor and community member, Deb RichardsonMoore understands the needs of her parishioners. Whether or not they have a physical dwelling place, Triune Mercy Center offers its people something priceless â&#x20AC;&#x201D;the feeling of being home.

NOVEMBER 2016 / 107

TOWN_NOV_F_GB_use2.indd 107

10/14/16 12:00 PM


Celebrate the holiday season in the West End as we bring you fun events and great shopping. Different events each week starting November 13th â&#x20AC;&#x201C; from Craft Day to Yuletide Market to Wining your Way through the West End.

TOWN_blank page.indd 6

10/14/16 1:57 PM


s nd.

YULETIDE IN THE WEST END â&#x20AC;&#x201C; November 13th through the New Year TOWN_blank page.indd 7

10/14/16 1:57 PM


Good Spirit: The Lifetime of Charitable Giving Award honors local heroes, like Nathan Einstein, who have dedicated their lives and resources to improving our community.

6 56 8 TOWN / townc ga r er o e lni vn ial l. ec .ocmo m

TOWN_NOV_F_Lifetime_USE.indd 110

10/14/16 9:11 AM


AD OPTED�

SON

I N S P I R E D B Y M E N T O R S , I N S U R A N C E E X E C U T I V E N AT H A N E I N S T E I N M O D E L S T H E G I V I N G S P I R I T

T H E Y E A R : 1 9 5 5 . NAT H A N E I N S T E I N C O U L D N ’ T H E L P B U T N OT I C E T H E AT T R AC T I V E S O P H O M O R E H E PA S S E D E AC H DAY A S H E L E F T H I S B U S I N E S S L E T T E R W R I T I N G C L A S S AT T H E U N I V E R S I T Y O F A L A BA M A . O N A L A R K , T H E J U N I O R L I N G E R E D O N C E , L O N G E N O U G H TO S T R I K E U P A C O N V E R S AT I O N. “ I S A I D H E L L O,” H E R E M E M B E R S W I T H A S M I L E . “ N E X T T H I N G I K N E W, W E W E R E D O I N G H O M E WO R K TO G E T H E R , N E X T T H I N G I K N E W W E W E R E DAT I N G. W E DAT E D A L M O S T E V E RY DAY F O R T WO Y E A R S .” A N D T H AT ’ S H OW A N A L A BA M A B OY C A M E TO M A R RY A C A RO L I NA G I R L . BY Stephanie Trotter

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

Paul Mehaffey

NOVEMBER 2016 / 111

TOWN_NOV_F_Lifetime_USE.indd 111

10/14/16 11:20 AM


I

IN REALITY, NATHAN DIDN’T JUST MARRY SUGIE ROSENFELD. HE EMBRACED HER CITY AS HIS OWN, AND HAS SPENT 59 YEARS SUPPORTING GREENVILLE’S PEOPLE, CULTURE, AND B USINESSES. TODAY, HE’S SILENCED WITH HUMILITY BY THE FACT THAT HE’S A COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF GREENVILLE LIFETIME OF CHARITABLE GIVING AWARD RECIPIENT, BEHIND SUCH NOTABLES AS RICHARD RILEY, VIRGINIA ULDRICK, AND DR. BILL KELLETT. “I WAS ABSOLUTELY FLOORED,” SHARES THE B USINESSMAN OF HEARING THE NEWS. “THAT’S NOT MY CUP OF TEA, BEING IN THE LIMELIGHT. I LIKE TO BE QUIET ABOUT IT. IT’S PART OF GIVING BACK TO THE COMMUNITY. I DO IT BECAUSE IT MAKES ME FEEL GOOD.” SUGIE IS EQUALLY HONORED, ADDING, “HE CAME TO GREENVILLE NOT KNOWING ANYBODY RIGHT BEFORE WE WERE MARRIED. B UT HE’S A HARD WORKER AND HAS ACCOMPLISHED A LOT. I’M VERY PROUD OF HIM.” The Boss' s Daughter Nathan and Sugie settled in Greenville after he graduated and served a brief time in the Army. The newlywed started working for his father-in-law at an insurance agency. “Basically, he taught me all the rules of being successful in business,” Nathan recalls. “He was my mentor. Wherever he went, I went too.” Bill Rosenfeld not only taught Nathan the ins and outs of insurance. He modeled how to support and provide structure to his hometown. “He was president of the Community Foundation, president of what is now the United Way. He was president of the Kiwanis Club. I listened to what he said, and if you know anything about mentoring, it rubs off on you.” His wife recalls those early days, saying, “They had a special relationship. He admired the fact my dad was like that and he learned watching my dad, and following his way of thinking.” He followed in Bill’s philanthropic footsteps, serving as president of the Kiwanis Club of Greenville, sitting on committees for the Community Foundation, and joining the United Way’s Tocqueville Society. “That’s our largest personal giving society for individuals who give $10,000 or more a year,” explains United Way of Greenville County president Ted Hendry. “There is a humbleness about Nate in what he’s accomplished, and the man always has a smile on his face. When he walks into a room, you know he’s arrived. He’s smiling, laughing, or telling a story, and he makes everybody feel special and comfortable in his presence.”

Greenville’s adopted son became an invaluable player in the non-profit world and a huge asset at work. William Rosenfeld Insurance became Rosenfeld Einstein, with Nathan serving as co-founder and president. Every time Main Street moved toward the future, Rosenfeld Einstein did, too. “When I arrived, Greenville was known as the textile capital of the world,” the executive recalls. “Everything was around textiles and the principle clientele we had in that era was in the textile business. Little by little, the textile business moved away and we had leaders who rolled up their sleeves and made this community what it is today.” Nathan collaborated with those leaders, revering the way they put city before business. He recruited new mentors by the names of Max Heller, Tommy Wyche, and Buck Mickel. “You talk about learning,” he says of Mickel. “Gee whiz. He was a mentor’s mentor! He was that type of individual. You learned and it wasn’t about money, it was about building our community. What an honor to work alongside these men. They made it happen.” Nathan made it happen, too, sharing his growing wealth and stature with dozens of groups across the Upstate. Spreading the Wealth Trying to pinpoint a target for the Einstein’s generosity is like asking Nathan to name his favorite son. “Oh, I just can’t do it,” he jokes. No niche is too far off the non-profit path. “I think the best terminology about our participation is that we sprinkle it around,” he reveals. “We basically give to multiple charities. My wife and I sprinkle our resources with the Greenville Tech Foundation, Safe Harbor, Greenville Little Theatre. We don’t just give to children, or education. Everyone needs help.” Hendry describes that diversity-in-giving as one of the insurance professional’s most valuable attributes. “It’s really important in the non-profit sector for donors to look at the big picture and understand it’s not about one cause, one agency. It’s about the system of serving people that’s important. There is a greater value in supporting a number of causes. All groups need support in order to advance the improvement of human condition.” hile Nathan’s involvement with the United Way is wellknown, he demonstrates his appreciation for music and his heritage in subtle ways. Many years ago, Nathan served on the board for the Greenville Chorale and developed a friendship with long-standing artistic director and conductor Dr. Bingham Vick. That relationship led to the Einsteins providing an annual academic scholarship to a deserving music student at Furman University, where Vick retired as professor emeritus. It also assisted the Greenville Chorale in transcending religious boundaries. Last month, the 200-member group performed Jewish Musical Monuments at the Peace Center. The show featured selections by two Jewish composers, showcasing traditions of the faith with universal meaning. Nathan and Sugie sponsored that event, along with their sons Howard and Dan, and the boys’ wives. Since 1957, the Einsteins have belonged to both Temple of Israel and Congregation Beth Israel in Greenville. Nathan says back in the ’50s, he never balked at moving to the so-called buckle of the Bible belt, and prides himself on building liaisons that cross religions. “You basically do what you think is the right thing to do,” he shares. “You deal with every walk of life, and you deal with every religion, and you deal with every belief. You don’t have to agree with someone, but, by in large, you respect what they say.” He also respects those walking different stations in life, and never hesitates to meet them on their individual level.

Nominated by the Community Foundation of Greenville and voted on by a committee of executives representing the Community Foundation and TOWN magazine, the Lifetime of Charitable Giving Award honors lifelong service to others through both individual endeavors and community involvement, and is gift that spans a lifetime.

W

112 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_F_Lifetime_USE.indd 112

10/14/16 11:20 AM


Crowded Hallways The Rosenfeld Einstein offices are cool, sleek, and adorned with Nathan’s stunning photography from around the world. When the chairman leaves the building at the end of the day, he doesn’t always go straight home. Sometimes he heads to the harried halls inside the Greenville Free Medical Clinic, where 500 volunteers (most of them medical staff) treat 4,000 patients a year. “You can be on a board, you can serve on a committee, but until you are hands on, you don’t realize and understand the value of what you’re participating in,” he guides. So the long-time clinic supporter mixes with the masses to provide relief. “You walk into the waiting room, and there must be 75–100 people. They’re from every walk of life, every age, every skin color, and the only reason they’re there, is because they are sick. They have no insurance. They have no money. They have no place to go.” Executive director Suzie Foley describes Nathan as one of the clinic’s biggest advocates, even though his time on the board ended years ago. “He was not a stranger then, and he’s not a stranger now,” she declares. “I got the impression his work in insurance made him attuned to the gap that exists between the lowest income individual and a lack of coverage, and thus access to care. He really puts his faith into action and does something to be part of the resolution.” When thinking about the impoverished individuals he meets, Nathan grows quiet. “If you could see what the money’s going for, and what the business of charity is, I want to tell you something, it would break your heart. When I say break your heart, I mean break your heart.” Unfortunately, the stream of poverty and hardship he encounters runs as long as the Reedy. Thus, he’s instilled in his sons their grandfather Rosenfeld’s mandate: to make the community a better place to live.

The Next Generation Howard and Dan lead much of the daily activity at the insurance agency, brokerage, and consulting firm. Their father is delighted to see them take over Rosenfeld Einstein, a Marsh & McLennan Agency Company, saying, “To have two of my sons in practice with me? They’re the third generation! Many family businesses don’t make it one. And we have a fourth generation that may one day join us, too.” ore important, the latter generations are as philanthropic as the first, serving and giving to A Child’s Haven, Cancer Society of Greenville, Christ Church Episcopal School, and the Carolina Youth Symphony, among others. “We get calls every day.” Nathan is relaxing in the conference room at the family business. “Folks need help. Being ever mindful of the needs of others is the most important criteria I can think of.” When reflecting upon his relationship with the city that adopted him, Nathan feels gently secure about his legacy. “I’ve given of myself, my time, energy, and resources. I feel like I have contributed to make the community a better place in which to live.” And by mimicking his mentors, he’s ensured Greenville’s future, by molding others to do the same.

M

“CARING. That is the word I believe best describes Nate Einstein. Any time I am around Nate it is evident that he truly cares about people in a genuine way. He always asks about our family and how everyoneHeisCHARMS doing, THE PORTRAITbut not just to make WORTHY with conversation. You his rhetoric. “Sometimes can actually see how these much hewhen caresI meet in how older ladies he looks at you as heand we’re joking around, is listening to every I’ll RECITE some word you say.” of these great Russian poems by —Rick Davis, PUSHKIN AND managing LERMONTOV,” shareholder, Kirby. Elliottsays Davis

Birthrights: Following in the altruistic footsteps of his successful father-inlaw, Nathan Einstein is proud his sons, too, have not only inherited a knack for the insurance business, but also their grandfather’s philanthropic spirit.

NOVEMBER 2016 / 113

TOWN_NOV_F_Lifetime_USE.indd 113

10/14/16 11:20 AM


Creative and delicious catering…made from scratch…for any occasion…to satisy every taste! Let our professional culinary team help you create the perfect menu to make your event memorable. CORPORATE | WEDDINGS | PRIVATE EVENTS | HOLIDAY PARTIES 1054 E. Butler Road, Greenville, SC | Café Open Monday – Friday 864-297-6516 | SeasonsCafeAndCatering.com | Info@SeasonsCafeAndCatering.com TOWN_blank page.indd 6

10/13/16 6:18 PM


EAT&

Drink

FOOD FINDS & CAN’T-MISS DISHES

Changing Hands:

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

Chef Adrian Carpenter, former executive chef at the late High Cotton Greenville, has transformed the menu at Dive ‘n’ Boar, on Pleasantburg Drive, focusing on local produce and cuisine. For more, see page 116.

Fresh Take

Chef Adrian Carpenter reinvents the look and flavor of Dive ‘n’ Boar NOVEMBER 2016 / 115

TOWN_NOV_Eat & Drink.indd 115

10/13/16 12:19 PM


SIDE

Dish

High Dive

T

Dive ‘n’ Boar’s newest chef makes a splash with his fine-dining cuisine / by M. Linda Lee // photography by Paul Mehaf fey

he small fried spheres of trout brandade are a play on texture—crispy on the outside, yielding to a smooth emulsion of smoked trout and potatoes within. A take on the classic Mediterranean dish, traditionally made with salt cod, these white-anchovy-crowned orbs provide a scintillating hint of the new menu at Dive ‘n’ Boar. As of mid-September, a new chef and a new look are also key elements to the revamp of Southern Culture’s little sister on Pleasantburg Drive. Call it Dive ‘n’ Boar 2.0. Gone is the graffiti on the poplar-plank-lined walls, which now boast local artwork. Jars of house-made pickles stock shelves over the wraparound bar—setting the stage for the craft-cocktail program—and a kitchen counter welcomes diners to watch Chef Adrian Carpenter (former executive chef at the late High Cotton) and his team craft their next plate. Built out of 100-year-old reclaimed wood, low tables stand in for the former high tops. And at the back of the restaurant, garage doors open to reveal a narrow dining porch decorated with tall herb-filled planters. Gone are the chicken wings and nachos, replaced on the menu by crispy frogs’ legs and gougères stuffed with a goat cheese mixture whimsically dubbed “boarsin.” Hot buttered buns, lightly toasted bread specially made for the restaurant

by Upcountry Provisions in Travelers Rest, enfold a refreshing blue crab salad or house-cured peppered lamb pastrami. Carpenter, who recently returned to Greenville after a four-month sojourn through the Southwest, thoughtfully executes gastropub fare—think April Bloomfield’s The Spotted Pig in New York City—with an emphasis on tapas-style shared plates and local, organic ingredients. The menu is divided into categories and holds a well-balanced variety of meat, fish, and vegetables. The beauty of it is, you can mix and match as many or as few dishes as your appetite dictates. As an experienced chef, Carpenter’s cuisine dazzles with its finesse and classical technique. Duck rillettes cozy up to port-poached figs; tuna carpaccio, strewn with chunks of sweet potato and crispy hominy, is

116 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_Side Dish.indd 116

10/13/16 10:58 AM


New Skill(et)s: Chef Adrian Carpenter (above) is bringing fine cuisine to Dive ‘n’ Boar’s high class cocktail menu. His diverse dishes include (from far left) Eggplant & Butternut Squash with golden raisins, capers, and pumpkin seed pesto, gougères of goat cheese “Boarsin,” and Crispy Frog Legs with charred okra and Tabasco brown butter.

drizzled with aji Amarillo chile crema. Blackstrap molasses gives an earthy-sweet punch to a fluffy buttermilk biscuit served in a mini cast-iron skillet. Next to it on the plate, a tangle of tender young collards spiked with country ham appreciates a douse of house-made red jalapeño vinegar. Golden raisins, briny capers, and a smear of pumpkin-seed pesto complement tiny light bulbs of baby eggplant and cubes of roasted butternut squash, while intrigue colors a heap of blistered “mystery peppers,” so-called because one in every dozen is a fiery one. For less adventurous palates, the basics are not lost. The Large Plates list includes a burger—a daunting double cheeseburger, to boot—as well as a bistro steak, gussied up with charred red onions, chimichurri, and fingerling potatoes. Dive ‘n’ Boar’s owner, Omar Naji, connected with Carpenter through a mutual friend while the chef was traveling. “I wanted to bring some heart and soul to the restaurant,” Carpenter says, “and Omar is open to doing things outside the box.” As for Naji, he is pleased to have realized his true intention for Dive ‘n’ Boar: “It’s all about the food.”

NOVEMBER 2016 / 117

TOWN_NOV_Side Dish.indd 117

10/14/16 1:22 PM


KITCHEN

Aid

118 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_Kitchen Aid.indd 118

10/13/16 10:00 AM


Old Flame These golden pork chops will have you falling for a childhood classic all over again / by Kathryn Davé // photograph by Jivan Davé

M

uch nonsense has been written about the incredible powers of engagement chicken. I find eliciting a marriage proposal, much less a lifelong commitment, to be a hefty job for any roast chicken, no matter now sublime. Truthfully, I am far more interested—and have been for years—in what we cook once the rings are already on. I am interested in what we cook for the people we love most. Simple dishes come to mind. Soups and casseroles and grilled cheese sandwiches, punctuated by birthday cakes and big steak dinners once in a while. Pork chops. Pork chops seem like a dinner your mom would serve you after a good report card or a hard day. Pork chops make fine comfort food, and in late fall, when dinnertime comes after dark, it’s hard to want anything else. These golden, pan-seared pork chops—a far cry from the thin, tough Winn-Dixie versions of the past—are delicious alone, but genius when paired with a swoonworthy apple-rosemary sauce. The secret is to treat your pork chop like a steak. Buy heritage, farm-raised pork. Bring the chops to room temperature before cooking and shower quite liberally with freshly ground salt and pepper. Get your skillet good and hot for a beautiful sear. And, for the love of all things precious, don’t overcook it. You don’t need a magical recipe to cook for someone you care about. You just need a reason. And if love is your reason, no food in your pan can outshine that—be it scrambled eggs, pork chops, or even roast chicken.

PORK CHOPS WITH APPLE-ROSEMARY SAUCE AND CRISPY SHALLOTS Serves 2

INREDIENTS

2 bone-in, thick-cut heritage pork chops 2 shallots, minced 1 shallot, sliced ½ c. applesauce ¾ c. red wine ¼ tsp. fresh rosemary, plus extra sprigs 2 Tbs. canola oil Kosher salt and pepper to taste

“You don’t need a magical recipe to cook for someone you care about. You just need a reason. And if love is your reason, no food in your pan can outshine that.”

INSTRUCTIONS 1. Bring pork chops to room temperature before cooking. Season very generously on both sides with kosher salt and freshly ground pepper. 2. Heat oil in a cast-iron skillet over medium–high heat. Add sliced shallots and fry until crispy and deep golden brown, turning evenly. Remove to a paper towel. Drain oil, reserving 1 Tbs. in the pan. 3. Return skillet and reserved oil to medium–high heat. Add pork chops and sear for about 1 minute, until golden brown. Flip and cook for another minute. Continue this process, turning every minute until the pork chops develop a deep golden brown crust and a meat thermometer reads 135°F, about 8–10 minutes. 4. Remove pork chops and let them rest for 10 minutes. Meanwhile, add the minced shallots to the skillet and sauté until golden brown. Add rosemary, a pinch of salt, and the red wine, scraping up any browned bits. After the sauce has simmered for a minute or two, stir in the applesauce. Allow the sauce to cook down for a minute; it should be jam-like when done. 5. Spoon sauce over pork chops; garnish with crispy shallots and fresh rosemary. Save any remaining sauce for later to serve over roasted root vegetables or winter squash.

))) FOR MORE RECIPES TOWNCAROLINA.COM

NOVEMBER 2016 / 119

TOWN_NOV_Kitchen Aid.indd 119

10/14/16 11:21 AM


Fashion on the TOWN Style Picks

Shop local. Shop year ’round. Monkees FOTT_Template_FP TOWN_NOV_Dining Guide.inddTOWN.indd 120 1

Brynn Romper by Tularosa, $218; “Iggy” Heeled Sandal by Schutz, $200.00; Bag is Vintage Chanel – call for details. 103-A Augusta St., Greenville | MonkeesoftheWestEnd.com @MonkeesoftheWestend Monkees of the West End |

10/13/16 6:07 4:18 PM


DINING

Guide BARS, CAFÉS & RESTAURANTS

AMERICAN AMERICAN GROCERY

American Grocery offers refined American cuisine and a changing menu that emphasizes quality ingredients from local and regional producers. Begin with the fried aged goat cheese: caña de cabra, piquillo-shallot jam, lemon agrumato, and pea tendrils; next, have an entrée of saltcrusted grassfed ribeye with pomme purée, onion soubise, and red win jus, and finish with the banana pudding cake. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 732 S Main St. (864) 232-7665, americangr.com AUGUSTA GRILL

Ink N Ivy Located in the space formerly occupied by Corner Pocket, Ink N Ivy boasts a menu of American fare with an emphasis on fresh seafood. Lunch features staple items like the charred salmon salad, wok-blackened and served over crisp greens, sweet peppers, and leeks, as well as daily specials that include house-made meatloaf and fried chicken. The evening menu tacks on a few more robust entrées, like the Chicken Ivy, folded with gruyere cheese and cuts of Capicola, and the grilled scallops, topped with lime cilantro butter, and served on wilted chives, baby spinach, and roasted peppers. Check out the rooftop for a prime downtown view. $$, L, D (Mon–Sun), SBR (Sat–Sun). 21 E Coffee St, Greenville. (864) 438-4698, greenville.inkanivy.com

The unassuming Augusta Grill is home to owner Buddy Clay’s vision of upscale comfort food. From cozy booths to the intimate dining room, patrons can enjoy dishes such as the breaded artichoke and leek-stuffed chicken breast. The lineup of entrées and appetizers changes daily, but regulars can always get Chef Bob Hackl’s highly sought-after blackberry cobbler. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 1818 Augusta St. (864) 242-0316, augustagrill.com BACON BROS. PUBLIC HOUSE

You might think you know what meat lover’s heaven looks like, but if you show up at Chef Anthony Gray’s gastropub, you’ll know for sure. From a board of house-cured, smoked, and dried meats, to a glass-walled curing room display, there’s no shortage of mouthwatering selections. The menu’s flavor profiles extend to cocktails, which heavily feature whiskeys, bourbons, bacon-infused liquors, and even smoked sorghum syrup. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 3620 Pelham Rd. (864) 297-6000, baconbrospublichouse.com BRAZWELLS PUB

Channeling the fun-loving legacy of the original Billy “Braz” Brazwell, this pub is an optimal pick for your next food memory. Brazwells steps up game day with an appetizer of thinly sliced, sesameencrusted tuna seared to perfection—along with crowd favorites like spicy buffalo wings (available by the pound) and, of course, a mile-long list of burgers. $$, L, D. 631 S Main St. (864) 568-5053, brazwellspub.com DIVE ‘N’ BOAR

Don’t be fooled by its title—this establishment is much more than a traditional dive-bar. With a smashing cocktail program and Chef Adrian Carpenter’s fine fair, Dive ‘n’ Boar makes quite the splash. Try the Oxtail and Potato Gnocchi or the Crispy Frog Legs with charred okra and Tabasco brown butter.

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

$-$$, D. Closed Sunday. 2541 N Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 509-0388, divenboar.com GB&D

The restaurant’s description itself—Golden Brown & Delicious—tells you all you need to know about this West Greenville KEY: Average price of a dinner entrée (lunch if dinner isn’t served): Under $10 = $, $10-$15 = $$, $16-$25 = $$$, $25+ = $$$$ Breakfast = B Lunch = L Dinner = D Sat or Sun Brunch = SBR NOVEMBER 2016 / 121

TOWN_NOV_Dining Guide.indd 121

10/14/16 2:50 PM


DINING

Guide

establishment. On tap are fresh takes on American favorites, fast-casual meals that are tasty and affordable, such as well-crafted salads, sandwiches (like the sweat-inducing double cheeseburger on a homemade brioche bun), sides, and other seasonal specials, using local ingredients from Upstate suppliers. And don’t miss the addictive chicken & waffle sandwich with a fried egg and maple hot sauce. It’s totally worth the 1,000 napkin deaths. $, L. Closed Sunday & Monday. 1269 Pendleton St, Greenville. (864) 230-9455, eatgbnd.com HALLS CHOPHOUSE

The renowned Charleston steakhouse puts down roots in the former High Cotton space on the Reedy River. Indulge in a selection of wet- or dry-aged steaks (USDA Prime beef, flown in from Chicago’s Allen Brothers), or try a Durham Ranch elk loin with root vegetable hash and pine nut relish. $$$$, D, SBR. 550 S Main St. (864) 335-4200, hallschophousegreenville.com HENRY’S SMOKEHOUSE

Though this barbecue joint has since branched out, Henry’s original location has long set the standard. A Greenville institution, the smokehouse specializes in slow-cooking meat in open pits over hickory logs. Sure, there’s more on the menu, but their succulent ribs with beans and slaw will transport you to hog heaven. $, L, D. 240 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 232-7774, henryssmokehouse.com KITCHEN SYNC

A straight farm-to-table concept, Kitchen Sync relies heavily on natural, fresh ingredients. The crispy kale plate appetizer is sourced from local farmers, and the Banh Mi salad comes loaded with bean sprouts, cashews, garden herbs, and rice noodles, topped with pulled pork or tofu. Try the cracklin’ chicken thighs: spiced with a no-tell “magic” dust, served with seasoned collards and roasted veggie mac ‘n cheese.

Mondays. 109 N Main St, Ste A, Greenville. (864) 520-2579, oakbluekitchen.com OJ’S DINER

OJ’s is not a restaurant. It’s an Upstate institution. The old-school meat-andthree dishes up homestyle favorites on a daily basis, but every weekday comes with specials: lasagna and porkchops on Mondays, turkey and meatloaf Tuesdays, and more. Don’t forget to dig into a mess of sides: the mac ‘n’ cheese tastes the way mama made it and the way God intended. $, B, L. Closed Saturday & Sunday. 907 Pendleton St. (864) 235-2539, ojs-diner.com RESTAURANT 17

Tucked away in Travelers Rest, Restaurant 17 blends contemporary European bistro with the Blue Ridge foothills. Pick up fresh-baked bread from the café (open daily) or peruse the market’s wine selection. The menu changes seasonally, but expect dishes like sweet corn beignets and a dry-aged pork chop with pumpkin seed pesto. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 10 Road of Vines, Travelers Rest. (864) 516-1715, restaurant17.com

RICK ERWIN’S NANTUCKET SEAFOOD

Greenville may be landlocked, but Rick Erwin’s restaurant takes us seaside. The day’s fresh catch comes grilled, seared, broiled, blackened, or in chef-designed specialties. Try the fried lobster bites with a drink at the elegant bar, pre- or post-Peace Center performance. Ideal for group dinners or quiet date nights, Nantucket offers both an intimate and entertaining atmosphere. $$-$$$$, D, SBR. 40 W Broad St. (864) 546-3535, nantucketseafoodgrill. com RICK ERWIN’S WEST END GRILLE

$$, D (Tues-Sun), Closed Mondays. 1609 Laurens Rd, Greenville. (864) 5688115, kitchensyncgreenville.com

Traditional surf-and-turf meets upscale dining at Rick Erwin’s. The dining room is decorated in rich, dark woods that, along with low lighting, create an intimate, stylish atmosphere. Entrées range from sashimigrade tuna and pan-seared sea bass, to certified Angus beef.

LARKIN’S ON THE RIVER

$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday. 648 S Main St. (864) 232-8999, rickerwins.com

Located between the Peace Center and the Reedy River, Larkin’s balances upscale dining with comfort. Start with the shecrab soup, then an entrée from the day’s selections—or opt for an aged filet mignon with mashed potatoes and asparagus. Enjoy the river view on the enclosed outdoor patio, and polish off your meal with a selection from the extensive wine list. $$$-$$$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (daily), SBR. 318 S Main St. (864) 467-9777, larkinsontheriver.com NOSE DIVE

The Nose Dive is city bar meets corner bistro. Beer, wine, and craft cocktails complement an ambitious menu of “urban comfort food.” Look for an elevated gastropub experience at every meal, from fried chicken and waffles to a customized grits bar at brunch. Located on Main Street between ONE City Plaza and the Peace Center, this gastropub is downtown hotspot and neighborhood hangout, in one. $-$$, L, D, SBR. 116 S Main St. (864) 373-7300, thenosedive.com OAKBLUE KITCHEN

Smoked, hand-pulled BBQ is a glowing centerpiece of this local eatery. Although it serves up plenty of homestyle dishes, like the Tabasco-breaded hot chicken sandwich and pimento cheese appetizer, don’t be afraid to sample some of the more “worldly” flavors. The Korean BBQ sandwich features a hefty short rib with pickled Daikon radish and spicy Gochujang aioli.

ROOST

This nod to the enterprising farm-to-table trend lends a modern, tasty addition to North Main. With a promise to provide food with a limited distance from producer to consumer, Roost’s ingredients are sourced from nearby areas in South and North Carolina. In good weather, try to snag a spot on the patio overlooking NoMa Square. $$-$$$, B,L, D, SBR. 220 N Main St. (864) 298-2424, roostrestaurant.com SMOKE ON THE WATER

Located in the West End Market, Smoke on the Water has a homey feel, with separate street-side dining and covered patio tables overlooking Pedrick’s Garden. Choose something from the smoker (beerbutt chicken), or pick from sandwiches, burgers, or salads. Sides vary from mac ’n’ cheese to a bowl of greens. $-$$$, L, D. 1 Augusta St, Ste 202. (864) 232-9091, saucytavern.com SOBY’S

Local flavor shines here in entrées like crab cakes with remoulade, sweet corn maque choux, mashed potatoes, and haricot verts. Their selection of 700 wines guarantees the perfect meal complement. Featuring different selections every week, the Sunday brunch buffet showcases the chefs’ creativity. $$$-$$$$, D, SBR. 207 S Main St. (864) 232-7007, sobys.com

$$, L (Tues–Sun), D (Tues–Sat), Closed 122 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_Dining Guide.indd 122

10/14/16 2:50 PM


THE SHUCKIN’ SHACK

Sailing down the Eastern seaboard on a fresh beach breeze, the Shuckin’ Shack Oyster Bar has made its way to Greenville. Explore the heart of the sea with their signature oyster sampler, served raw, steamed, and chargrilled. If shellfish aren’t your thing, grab another quintessential coastal delight like the Shack’s lobster roll.

$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 3620 Pelham Rd, Ste 4. (864) 335-8975, theshuckinshack.com

BEER AND PUBS LIBERTY TAP ROOM BAR & GRILL

Located next to Fluor Field, Liberty Tap Room Bar & Grill is both pre-game watering hole and after-work hangout. Dinner choices range from classic burgers and juicy steaks to spinach pizza. Gather with friends at the long bar to enjoy one of 50 brews on tap. $-$$$, L, D, SBR. 941 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 770-7777, libertytaproom.com MAC’S SPEED SHOP

Across from Liberty Tap Room, Mac’s is for the Harley-set as well as the post-Drivebaseball crowd, with plenty of brisket, ribs, and beer-can chicken. Try a plate of Tabasco-fried pickles, washed down with one of the 50 craft beers on tap. With outdoor seating, you’ll likely want to lay some rubber on the road to grab your spot. $-$$$, L, D. 930 S Main St, (864) 239-0286 macsspeedshop.com THE PLAYWRIGHT

The Playwright’s hearty dishes—homemade lamb pot pie or a classic Reuben—are perfect soul-warming remedies. Designed to transport guests to Ireland, the pub features Dublin-crafted bar and booths, famous literary figures that adorn the walls and menus, and a warm spirit of hospitality. $-$$, L , D, SBR. 401 River St, Greenville. (864) 241-3384, theplaywrightpub.com UNIVERSAL JOINT

Everyone needs a neighborhood bar. Where better to cheer (or heckle mercilessly) with your friends? This hangout is in walking distance of North Main, featuring a covered outdoor patio and roll-up garage doors. Rotating bottle and draft selections and plenty of outdoor seating keep things fresh. $-$$, L, D. 300 E Stone Ave, Greenville. (864) 252-4055, ujgreenville.com THE VELO FELLOW

Cozy in a funky way, this hip pub is right under the Mellow Mushroom. The menu has burgers, sandwiches, fish and chips, shepherd’s pie, falafels, and more. In addition to craft brews on tap, the Velo Fellow offers traditional absinthe service, complete with a silver-plated brouilleur. $-$$$, L, D, SBR. 1 Augusta St, Ste 126, Greenville. (864) 242-9296, thevelofellow.com

B REAKFAST/LUNCH THE BOHEMIAN CAFÉ

Treat taste buds and ears at the Bohemian Café, side-by-side with the legendary Horizon Records. This eclectic café with an international flair serves curry and pasta, and for Sunday brunch, treat yourself to a Bloody Mary bar, or indulge your sweet tooth with a slice of homemade rum cake.

$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Monday. 2 W Stone Ave, Greenville. (864) 233-0006, thebohemiancafe.com CHICORA ALLEY

Chicora Alley’s Caribbean riff on traditional Mexican and Southern fare offers signature crab cakes or mountain-high nachos, shrimp

and chicken burritos, quesadillas, and more. Be sure to drop by on Sundays for brunch.

$-$$$, L, D, SBR. Closed Monday. 608-B S Main St, Greenville. (864) 2324100, chicoraalley.com EGGS UP GRILL

If your name has “eggs” in it, you’d better know your eggs. Eggs Up Grill doesn’t disappoint. From classic over-easy eggs to Patty-o-Sullivan omelets (grilled corned beef hash with melted swiss cheese), this breakfast joint has you covered. Not a fan of eggs? Try classic diner fare like pancakes, waffles, burgers, and French toast. $-$$. B, L. 31 Augusta St, Greenville. (864) 520-2005, eggsupgrill.com THE GREEN ROOM

The Green Room has a revamped menu, which presents Southern fare and American cuisine with a bent towards sustainably raised meat and fish, as well as local produce. Try the pan-seared New York duck breast with rainbow Swiss chard, beech mushrooms, sweet potato purée, and cherry Cognac glacé, or the wild-caught shrimp and grits, with local Adluh Mills grits, pepper confetti, Andouille sausage, charred okra, and a shellfish broth. $$-$$$, L, D, SBR. 116 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 335-8222 MARY BETH’S

Breakfast is an essential meal, and Mary Beth’s treats it accordingly. Take your pick: biscuits, omelets, eggs Benedict, waffles, crepes, and pancakes populate the breakfast menu. Or don’t pick—get the Mega Breakfast for a hearty menu sampling. For something later in the day, Mary Beth’s also has lunch and dinner menus that include sandwiches, rack of lamb, and salmon.

$$-$$$, B, L, D (Thurs–Sat). 500 E McBee Ave, Greenville. (864) 242-2535, marybethsatmcbee.com

The Taste of Ireland in the Heart of Greenville HAPPY HOUR: 4-7pm DAILY • 36 Beers on Tap WEDNESDAY: 2 Tacos for $5 All Night • DJ Trivia @ 7pm THURSDAY: Lips Sync Battle @ 9pm FRIDAY: #FlashbackFridays by DJ Black Caesar @ 9pm (80s/90s Music Complete with Their Videos) • Kitchen Open Until Midnight SATURDAY: Clemson/South Carolina on 120” Big Screen • DJ Video Dance Party @ 9pm • Kitchen Open Until Midnight SUNDAY: Brunch Menu from 10am-3pm • Blood Mary and Bottomless Bubbly Bar • Live Acoustic Music • Panthers Game on 120” Big Screen

MARY’S AT FALLS COTTAGE

Located in historic Falls Cottage, Mary’s offers brunch and lunch with a charm perfect for leisurely weekends. The menu includes the ultimate Reuben and quiches, as well as Southern comfort favorites like the Fountain Inn salad and hot chicken salad. $-$$, L, SBR. Closed Monday & Tuesday. 615 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 298-0005, fallscottage.com TANDEM CREPERIE & COFFEEHOUSE

Tandem lures Swamp Rabbit cyclists with aromas of Counter Culture Coffee and a happy stomach guarantee. Try the lumberjack (cornmeal crepe, ham, bacon, eggs, cheese, bechamel, and maple syrup) or the tasty banana nut crepe. Stuck between savory and sweet? Split one of each with a friend in the Tandem spirit: “Together is best.” $, B, L, SBR. 2 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2245, tandemcc.com TUPELO HONEY CAFÉ

Big Southern charm comes in forms of steaming hot biscuits at Tupelo Honey. Indulge in sweet potato pancakes (topped with pecans and peach butter of course), available all day, or try a mouthwatering sandwich like the Southern fried chicken BLT with maple-peppered bacon.

Pet-Friendly Patio • River Street Parking Garage Across Street Swamp Rabbit Cyclists and Runners Are Welcome 401 River Street, Greenville, SC 29601 | 864-241-3384 playwrightpub | playwrightpubsc PlayWrightPub.com | M-W 3pm – close; Th-F 11am – close; Weekends 10am – close

$$, B, L, D. 1 N Main St, Suite T, Greenville. (864) 451-6200, tupelohoneycafe.com

CAFÉS

COFFEE UNDERGROUND

Coffee Underground boasts a wide selection of specialty coffees, adult libations, and dreamy desserts like the peanut butter pie with graham cracker crust and a peanut butter and vanilla mousse. If NOVEMBER 2016 / 123

TOWN_NOV_Dining Guide.indd 123

10/14/16 2:50 PM


DINING

Guide

you’re craving more substantial fare, choose from a splendid breakfast-anytime option, sandwiches, soups, salads, and more. $-$$, B, L, D, SBR. 1 E Coffee St, Greenville. (864) 298-0494, coffeeunderground.info METHODICAL COFFEE

Whether it’s the white marble countertops or the gleaming chrome Slayer espresso machine, Methodical is a coffee bar built for Instagram. Tastemaker Will Shurtz, designer Marco Suarez, and hotelier David Baker ensure there’s plenty of substance to go with style. With single-origin espressos, house-made shrub sodas, and homemade treats, there’s plenty to rave about. $-$$, B, L, D. 101 N Main St, Ste D, Greenville. methodicalcoffee.com THE VILLAGE GRIND

Tucked between art galleries in the heart of Pendleton Street, the Village Grind is essential for Greenville coffee lovers. Emphasizing community, the coffeehouse uses all things local—from milk and syrups to beans from Due South Coffee. Enjoy drinks with friends on the mid-century couch or solo at the pallet-inspired window bar. $, B, L. 1263 Pendleton St, Greenville. (864) 915-8600, facebook.com/ thevillagegrind

DELIS & SANDWICHES CAVIAR & BANANAS

A Charleston-based fresh-food fantasy, Caviar & Bananas has answered Greenville’s gourment prayers with a whopping selection of salads, sandwiches, and baked goods galore, not to mention a fine selection of beer and wine. But don’t miss weekend brunch! We suggest the B.E.L.T.: bacon duo, fried egg, arugula, tomato, and black pepper aioli, on grilled sourdough bread. $-$$. B, L, D, SBR. 1 N Laurens St. 864) 235-0404, caviarandbananas.com

last-minute guests with roasted turkey and Parmesan potatoes. Choose from the daily menu, or check back for daily specials.

$-$$, B, L, D. Closed Sunday. 644 N Main St, Suite 107, Greenville. (864) 370-9336, twochefscafeandmarket.com

ETHNIC ASADA

Vibrant Latin culture comes to Greenville by way of ASADA. Grab a bite of Latin flavor with the chayote rellen de camarones (a Nicaraguan dish of chayotes stuffed with sautéed shrimp in creamy spciy ChipotleGuajillo suace); or see a trans-Pacific collaboration at work with the chicken karaage taco, which features Japanese-style fried chicken and a Latin-Asian slaw. $-$$, Closed Sunday & Monday. 903 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864)-770-3450, asadarestaurant.com BANGKOK THAI CUISINE

Bangkok Thai makes a standout version of pad Thai, everyone’s favorite noodles. The curries are a surefire hit, though the green curry is the only one made from fresh chilies. For a different dining experience, take a seat on the floor pillows in the back room. $$, L (Mon–Fri), D (Mon–Sat), Closed Sundays. 1440 Pelham Rd, Ste M. (864) 458-7866, bangkokgreenville.com CANTINA 76

Tex-Mex has a new home in Greenville with the addition of Cantina 76. Although the menu is ripe with golden-brown chimichangas and zesty enchiladas, the real star is the taco selection. Play it safe with classic handhelds like fried tilapia and ground beef with lettuce, tomatoes, and shredded cheese. Then, turn up the heat with fried chicken doused with jalapeño aioli or the chicken teriyaki topped with feta, sweet chile sauce, and grilled onions.

$, L, D. Mon-Sun. 103 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 631-2914, cantina76.com

RICK’S DELI & MARKET

For a filling, gourmet lunch on the go, the artisanal sandwiches and salads at this West End deli hit the spot. Try the Classic Reuben, with corned beef piled high on toasted marbled rye with sauerkraut, Swiss cheese, and Russian dressing or the Rick’s Chopped Salad, with turkey, bacon, and ham. For dinner, fish and chips, herb crusted salmon, and chicken piccata make the cut.

$-$$, L,D. Closed Sunday. 101 Falls Park Dr. (864) 312-9060, rickerwins.com SOBY’S ON THE SIDE

SPONSORED BY MCDONALDS OWNER OPERATORS OF GREENVILLE, SPARTANBURG, ASHEVILLE

Located around the corner from Carl Sobocinski’s restaurant, Soby’s on the Side adds speed and efficiency to high-quality food. From BBQ Monday to Grilled Cheese Wednesday, add a spontaneous element to your lunch, or enjoy a hot breakfast.

$-$$. B, L. Closed Sunday. 22 E Court St, Greenville. (864)-271-8431, sobysontheside.com SULLY’S STEAMERS

When considering the perfect sandwich, steam isn’t the first (or even last) thing to come to mind. For Robert Sullivan, hot air is the key to handheld nirvana. With a smorgasbord of ingredients like cut meats, veggies, and homemade cream cheeses, Sully’s serves bagel sandwiches piping hot and always fresh.

$, B, L, D (closed Sunday evenings). Open until 3am on Friday & Saturday. 6 E Washington St, Greenville. (864) 5096061, sullyssteamers.com TWO CHEFS DELI & MARKET

Count on this deli for fast, high-quality food, from homemade soups to a traditional grinder and a turkey melt. Grab “crafted carryout” entrées and sides, or impress

HANDI INDIAN CUISINE

At lunch, sample items from a reasonably priced buffet with choices that change daily. Try the Handi Special: a sampler of tandoori chicken, lamb kabobs, lamb or chicken curry, and vegetable korma, served with basmati rice, naan, and dessert. $$-$$$, L, D. 18 N Main St. (864) 241-7999, handiindiancuisine.net IRASHIAI SUSHI PUB & JAPANESE RESTAURANT

Splashes of red and lime green play off the blend of traditional and modern influences at this sushi restaurant. Chef and owner Keichi Shimizu exhibits mastery over his domain at the bar, but also playfully blends modern-American elements into his menu. $$, L (Closed Sat), D (Daily). 115 Pelham Rd. (864) 271-0900, irashiai. com KIMCHEE KOREAN RESTAURANT

Kimchee’s kimchi keeps locals coming back. Try the Kalbi short ribs (marinated in soy sauce, onions, and sesame seeds) or bibimbap (served in a hot stone bowl for crispy rice). All dishes come with ban chan, side dishes that include kimchi, japchae (glass noodles), marinated tofu, and more. $$-$$$ L, D. Closed Sunday. 1939 Woodruff Rd Ste B. (864) 534-1061, kimcheekoreanrestaurant.com MEKONG

Chef Huy Tran delivers the nuances of fine Vietnamese cuisine at Mekong. Favorites include the grilled pork vermicelli: marinated pork, lettuce, cucumber, bean sprouts, mint, cilantro, peanuts, crispy shallots, and sauce. For textural variation, try the broken rice platter: julienned pork,

124 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_Dining Guide.indd 124

10/14/16 2:50 PM


$, L, D. 2013 Wade Hampton Blvd, Greenville. (864) 244-1314, mekongrestaurantsc.com

YELLOW GINGER ASIAN KITCHEN

Here, Chef Alex Wong and wife Dorothy Lee have managed to reinvent the conventional. Start off with the homemade pot stickers, or dive right into the soul-satisfying mee goreng, with fresh lo mein noodles, tofu, bean sprouts, green onions, and shrimp with an unctuous soy tomato chili sauce, then topped with a fried egg. $-$$, L, D. Closed Monday. 2100 Poinsett Hwy, Ste J. Greenville. (864) 605-7551, yellowgingerasian.com

EUROPEAN DAVANI’S RESTAURANT

Heaping portions and a menu that mixes inventive flavors with customer favorites make Davani’s a Greenville mainstay. The friendly staff doesn’t hurt, either. Try the Muscovy duck, pan-seared with port wine and a sundried cherry demi-glacé, or the veal Oscar, topped with crab meat, asparagus, and hollandaise. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sunday. 1922 Augusta St, Ste 111A, Greenville. (864) 373-9013, davanisrestaurant.com THE LAZY GOAT

The Lazy Goat’s tapas-style menu is distinctly Mediterranean. Sample from the Graze and Nibble dishes, such as the crispy Brussels sprouts with Manchego shavings and sherry glacé. For a unique entrée, try the duck confit pizza with a sour cherry vinaigrette and a farm egg. An extensive variety of wines is available in addition to a full bar. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 170 River Pl, Greenville. (864) 679-5299, thelazygoat.com PASSERELLE BISTRO

Gaze over the lush Falls Park scenery while enjoying mouthwatering French-inspired cuisine. Make a lunch date to enjoy lighter dishes like the arugula salad, or go for the bistro burger with its caramelized leeks and mushrooms, arugula, Gruyere, and garlic aioli. At night, the bistro serves up romance à la Paris, with items like escargot and mussels. Don’t miss brunch on the weekend. $$-$$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (Mon–Sat), SBR (Sat–Sun). 601 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 509-0142, passerelleinthepark.com PITA HOUSE

The Pita House has been family-operated since 1989. Inside, it’s bare bones, but the cognoscenti come here for tasty Middle Eastern fare such as hummus, falafel, kibbeh, and shwarma. And save room for baklava and other Mediterranean sweets for dessert. Also, check out the little grocery in the back of the restaurant for some homemade inspiration.

$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 495 S. Pleasantburg Dr, #B, Greenville. (864) 271-9895, pitahousesc.com POMEGRANATE ON MAIN

Pomegranate serves traditional Persian cuisine in an eclectic Eastern ambience. Attentive service, reasonable prices, and a flavorful variety, such as the slow-cooked lamb shank or the charbroiled Cornish hen kabobs, make this an excellent spot for lunch or dinner. Be sure to sample from the martini menu at the aquamarine-tiled bar, or head outside to the street-side patio facing Main. $$-$$$, L, D. Closed Sunday. 618 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 241-3012, pomegranateonmain.com

RISTORANTE BERGAMO

Ristorante Bergamo, open since 1986, focuses on fresh produce and Northern Italian cuisine: fresh mussels sautéed in olive oil, garlic, and white wine, veal with homegrown organic herbs, and pasta creations such as linguine with shrimp and mussels. The bar fronts 14-foot windows along Main Street, making it a prime location for enjoying a glass while people-watching. $$$, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 100 N Main St, Greenville. (864) 271-8667, ristorantebergamo.com THE TRAPPE DOOR

A rathskeller vibe pervades this underground tavern that boasts an incredible beer program, with 10 on tap and more than 150 bottles. Belgian specialties include waterzooi (a creamy seafood stew) and carbonnades flamandes (beef stew braised in Belgian beer). For dessert—you guessed it—Belgian waffles are the ticket. $$, L, D. Closed Monday. 23 W Washington St, Greenville. (864) 451-7490, trappedoor.com

Come watch your favorite teams at Chicora! Try our new wing specials for football season! GREAT Burgers, Crab Cakes, Shrimp & Grits, Cubans, Salads, Nachos, Cold Beer, Sunday Brunch, and More!

PIZZA

Book your private party with us! Up to 75 people in Greenville • Up to 100 people in Mauldin • No rental fees on Sunday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday

BARLEY’S TAPROOM & PIZZERIA

Pizza and beer—flowing from more than 27 taps downstairs and another 31 upstairs—are what bring students and young revelers to Barley’s. Besides the tap, there’s a list as long as your arm of selections by the bottle. Try the classic New York–style pizzas, or go for one of Barley’s specialty pies. Afterwards, make your way upstairs to the billiards tables and the dartboard lanes.

116 North Main · Mauldin · 864.991.8863 608B South Main St. · Downtown Greenville · 864.232.4100 Hours: Sunday Brunch (both locations) 11 am till 2:30 pm; Tuesday–Saturday 11:30 am ‘til late; Closed Monday

www.ChicoraAlley.com

$-$$, L, D. 25 W Washington St, Greenville. (864) 232-3706, barleysgville.com

2MA15

grilled pork chop, and steamed pork omelet over broken rice.

MELLOW MUSHROOM

Greenville’s West End outpost of this beloved pizza joint is perfect for families,Chicora 4thS Town v2.indd parties, duos, or flying solo. Try the kosmic karma with sundried tomatoes, feta, and pesto, or the house special, stacked with three meats, veggies, and extra cheese.

1

9/17/15 11:09 PM

$-$$$, L, D. 1 Augusta St, Ste 101, Greenville. (864) 233-9020, mellowmushroom.com/greenville SIDEWALL PIZZA COMPANY

Located in a renovated tire shop on the main drag of Travelers Rest, on Cleveland Street in downtown, and soon to open on Pelham Road, this pizza joint is a fast favorite with its handcrafted, brick-oven pies made from local ingredients. But don’t neglect dessert: the homemade ice cream is a throwback that’ll make you forget about those fellas named Ben & Jerry.

Because Everything

$$, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 35 S Main St, Travelers Rest, (864) 610-1406; 99 Cleveland St, Greenville. (864) 558-0235, sidewallpizza.com VIC’S PIZZA

The sign that says “Brooklyn, SC” at this walk-up/take-out joint makes sense when you see what you’re getting: piping hot New York–style pizza, served on paper plates. Purchase by the (rather large) slice, or have entire pies delivered (as long as your home or business is within three miles). $, L, D. Closed Sunday & Monday. 12 E Coffee St. (864) 232-9191, vicspizza4u.com

TOWN Magazine accepts no compensation for Dining Guide reviews and selects entries by its editorial discretion. Reviews are conducted anonymously. ))) FIND MORE RESTAURANTS TOWNCAROLINA.COM NOVEMBER 2016 / 125

TOWN_NOV_Dining Guide.indd 125

10/14/16 3:07 PM


ADVERTISEMENT

Coast Apparel

Greenville Concierge

Black Tulip

F O C U S : M e n ’s S o u t h e r n A p p a r e l

FOCUS: Lifestyle Management

F O C U S : W o m e n ’s A p p a r e l & D e c o r

A D D R E S S : 3217 Augusta Street Greenville, SC 29601

A D D R E S S : 106 West Broad St. Greenville, SC 29601

ADDRESS: 127 North Main Street Fountain Inn, SC 29644

E S T. : 2 0 0 9

E S T. : 2 0 1 6

E S T. : 2 0 1 5

T L

ooking for the perfect go-to shirt for your Fall wardrobe? Look no further!

The Coast Apparel 100% Pima Cotton tee is a must-have for the season. With a variety of different colors and graphics, there’s a shirt for everyone to enjoy. Did we mention they are also made in America with locally grown Cotton?

he holiday season is fast approaching.

We know you have plenty of things to accomplish- but do you have the time do it all? Wouldn’t it be nice to relax and Enjoy Life with your family and friends this holiday season? Greenville Concierge can help you! Let us: • Do your grocery shopping and put your groceries away • Shop for your presents

Coast Apparel is a team and family of “coastal living” enthusiasts. We grew up as so many did, spending summer vacations and long weekends with our families, and friends lying on the beach, playing in the ocean, dining on seafood and enjoying every moment of every day.

• Get your car cleaned and maintained

Coast is a way of life. It’s an attitude, and our clothing projects this lifestyle! If you are ready to Coast – then visit us at CoastApparel.com and receive 10% off your purchase all month with code TOWN10 or stop by our retail store and mention this ad. See you soon!

• And so much more!!

• Run your errands • Make reservations • Drop off and pick up your dry cleaning • Take care of your pets

B

lack Tulip represents the very best in living well.

Always gracious, and never pretentious, we keep customers in the finest design, fashion, decorating and more, inspiring them with beauty and elegance. Black Tulip is both an ideas showcase and a deeply pleasurable escape, a place where you feel as good as you look. Our collections of timeless, updated classics and authentic pieces provide a unique point of view and an unmatched combination of inspired design, exceptional quality and unparalleled value. Each season brings a wealth of new ideas curated from our exclusive partnerships with the world’s most renowned artisans, allowing us to showcase their unique products, passion and vision. Featuring: Galway… The iconic signature leather GORE-TEX Dubarry Boot.

Give us a call today so we can give you more time to ENJOY LIFE!

PRICE: $32.00

P R I C E : Va r i e s

WEB: CoastApparel.com

PRICE: $489.00

WEB: GreenvilleConcierge.com

WEB: blacktulipsc.com

TOWN_BoutiquePg_Nov16.indd TOWN_blank page.indd 6 1

10/13/16 8:37 PM


SERVING GREENVILLE SINCE 1979

Love Your Carpet…

Again!

IKE’S

CORPORATE/BUSINESS • ESTATE PLANNING • LITIGATION PROBATE ADMINISTRATION • REAL ESTATE • TAXATION

128 Poinsett Hwy., Greenville

864-232-9015 www.ikescarpet.com

CARPET • RUG • UPHOLSTERY CLEANING

MCLEOD & HAYNSWORTH, LLC — ATTORNEYS AT LAW — bmemhlaw.com

———— RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL ————

Ikes_qtrS_TOWN Apr16.indd 1

BROWN, MASSEY, EVANS

3/18/16 10:16 PM

Retirement living as you’ve always imagined. Free yourself from the burdens of traditional home-ownership and begin enjoying the retirement you deserve. Cascades Verdae, a safe, maintenence-free, lifestyle rich community. 10 Fountainview Terrace Greenville, SC

Call Today: (864) 606-3055 or Visit: Cascades-Verdae.com NOVEMBER 2016 / 127

TOWN_blank page.indd 3

10/13/16 10:33 AM


TOWN

Scene

Thru Nov 12

NOVEMBER

z ot Do N

Thru Nov 9

Miss

LUNA GALE

(UN)COMMON SPACE(S) Thru Dec 8th Tues–Sat, 10am–5pm; Sun, 1–5pm. Free. Spartanburg Art Museum An exploration into the continuous construction of our material world, the (Un)Common Space(s) exhibit spotlights the complex relationship between mankind and Mother Nature.

Community Based. Community Focused.

As part of Centre Stage’s popular “Fringe” series of plays, this drama written by Rebecca Gilman sheds light on the shifty politics of community welfare. When a young baby is dropped into social worker Carolina’s lap, she goes to great extremes in order to protect the infant—often to the detriment of her very own life. Unearthing age-old secrets and risking it all for Luna Gale, the audience will be left wondering if it was worth the cost. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Tues–Wed, 7pm. $10-$15. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

Thru Nov 13

I’LL BE BACK BEFORE MIDNIGHT So, you don’t like mazes and break out in hives if you even get near a haunted hayride? Have no, er, fear—the Greenville Little Theatre is here to satisfy all of your spine-tingling needs. Set in a farmhouse out in the middle of nowhere (because what could possibly go wrong here), Midnight spins a yarn about a young couple who find themselves in

HAS YOUR MARBLE FLOORING LOST ITS SHINE AND SPARKLE?

In 2015 Spinx donated over a quarter of a million dollars to local South Carolina charities. Because when we say we’re here to make our customers lives easier, we mean it. When we talk about community involvement, we mean it. And when we say ‘thank you,’ we mean it.

The World Leader in Marble Restoration and Polishing RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL GRANITE • LIMESTONE • MARBLE TERRAZZO • TRAVERTINE

Call today for a FREE ESTIMATE! 888-388-7730

www.marblelife-carolina.com

Proud Sponsor of the Charitable Giving Awards 128

TOWN / towncarolina.com

Untitled-7 1 TOWN_NOV_Town Scene_ImagesPlaced.indd 128

10/11/16 Marble9:58 TOWN AM Sept16 lady.indd 1

8/18/16 10:10 AM 10/14/16 3:05 PM

“Utopian Urban Forest,” wood sculpture and audio equipment by Richard Herzog and Mark Dancigers. Photograph courtesy of Spartanburg Art Museum; (right) Artwork by Louise Pile Kirk, courtesy of the Metropolitan Arts Council

JEKYLL & HYDE THE MUSICAL

The harrowing tale of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is an all-too-familiar one; man is a successful scientist, man turns into murderous wretched creature at night, man ends life. If you’ve ever thought, “Hey, this would make a great musical!” then do we have good news for you. Steve Cuden and Frank Wildhorn have adapted the Robert Louis Stevenson novella into a deliciously poppy musical production, crafting a delightful romp that toys with good, evil, and everything in between. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $17-$35. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org


CAN’T-MISS CULTURE / EVENTS / ATTRACTIONS the midst of murder and mayhem while on a relaxing country vacation. There’re ghosts. There’re dead bodies. There’s a creepy old farmer. Watch if you dare. Greenville Little Theatre, 444 College St, Greenville. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. (864) 233-6238, greenvillelittletheatre.org

Thru Dec 8 “Utopian Urban Forest,” wood sculpture and audio equipment by Richard Herzog and Mark Dancigers. Photograph courtesy of Spartanburg Art Museum; (right) Artwork by Louise Pile Kirk, courtesy of the Metropolitan Arts Council

(UN)COMMON SPACE(S)

It’s no secret that our world is in a state of constant construction, building upwards to meet the needs of a growing population and commerce. As our natural resources continue to dwindle, one group of Upstate artists is taking stock of the parallels between man and Mother Nature in this exhibition. Featuring a media hodgepodge of works by Jeff Pullen, Pamela Winegard, Matthew Mitros, and seven other artists, (Un)Common Space(s) is an introspective look at how we as humans are shifting our habitat— for better or worse. Spartanburg Art Museum, 200 E St John St, Spartanburg. Tues–Sat, 10am–5pm; Sun, 1–5pm. Free. (864) 582-7616, spartanburgartmuseum.org

MAJOR, 3 MASTERPIECES: MINOR AND MODERN The American Chamber Players will once again take the stage with gifted violinist Janet Sung in this special evening of talent. Please your ears with the tunes of Johannes Brahms’ Piano Quintet, before indulging in other pieces by Paul Schoenfield, Arthur Foote, and Wolfgang Mozart. Flutist Sara Stern will also be spotlighted during the performance. Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, 7:30pm. $45. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

z ot Do N

Miss

4–6 GREENVILLE OPEN STUDIOS Our community is famous for many things: a hip downtown scene, thriving local businesses, and enough scenery that Bob Ross could paint for decades. But just below the surface lies a buzzing art scene, one that has steadily blossomed over the years. This annual event sheds light on Upstate visual artists, this year opening the doors to 133 studios in downtown and beyond, inviting visitors to take a behind-the-scenes look at the magic behind the craft. Locations vary. Fri, 6–9pm; Sat, 10am–6pm; Sun, 12–6pm. Free. greenvillearts.com

GREENVILLE OPEN STUDIOS Nov 4–6 Fri, 6–9pm; Sat, 10am– 6pm; Sun, 12–6pm. Free. Locations vary. A rare glimpse into the genius behind the craft, Open Studios offers the public an opportunity to experience Upstate art in its most intimate setting—the artist’s creative home.

www.madabolic.com NOVEMBER 2016 / 129

TOWN_NOV_Town Scene_ImagesPlaced.indd 129

10/14/16 3:06 PM


ce

Pla

sta

u ug

A Rd

REELS FILM 4–5 REEDY FESTIVAL

A

107 E TALLULAH DRIVE $609,000: 5BR/4BA. Charming and unique 1940s home with 2900 SF and renovated kitchen. MLS#1330637

18 SOUTH MAIN STREET $1,380,000: 3BR/2.5BA. Unique Downtown condo living. Open floor plan with 16 ft ceilings, walnut floors and surround sound. Kitchen is a chef’s dream. MBR suite with built-in desk opens to outdoor terrace. MBR with shower/steam system and sauna. Downstairs loggia features gardens, community room, and wine cellar. MLS#1325221

ew

ice

Pr

N

223 TUXEDO LANE $569,000: Master on main, 6 bedrooms, 3 full and one half bath, approximately 4500 sq. ft. MLS#1320025

From restaurants to entertainment, festivals to sports teams, Greenville seems to have a little bit of everything. The city adds one more event to the list with Reedy Reels, a celebration of Upstate independent filmmakers and all the talent they bring to the table. Held downtown at the Peace Center, the fest will screen works from selected artists, serving a dual purpose in providing muchneeded exposure for rising directors and education for locals on the hunt for the next big thing. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Fri–Sat. $10-$50. reedyreels.com

4–13

Outstanding Service, Excellent Results! A Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, C. Dan Joyner, realtors® Top Producer!

GINGER SHERMAN, realtor

®

GingerSherman.net | 864.313.8638

GingerSherman_qtrS_TOWN Nov16.indd 1

Scene

10/11/16

A FEW GOOD MEN

Yes, it was indeed a play before Jack Nicholson convinced us all we couldn’t handle the truth back in 1992. Comprised of equal parts intrigue and adrenaline-pumping suspense, the Aaron Sorkin original tells the inside story of high-profile crime in the armed forces court martial. When a major conspiracy is uncovered during a routine murder trial, the disciplined structure of the U.S. Marines begins to unravel—as do those in its path. Chapman Cultural Center, 200 E St John St, Spartanburg. Fri, Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $20-$25. (864) 542-2787, chapmanculturalcenter.org 11:36 AM

FALL FESTIVAL AND 5 GCA HOLIDAY MARKET

Food, fun, and shopping? What more does a fall festival need? The Greenville Classical Academy– sponsored event will feature hayrides, flavorful concessions, games, face painting, farm animals, and much more. It’s a one-stop-shop for visitors to snap up anything from locallycrafted goods a la The Tattered Traveler, Caro Designs, Postcard Pillows, and The Herb Garden, to

WE PROVIDE ONE-ON-ONE PERSONAL SERVICE FOR ALL OF YOUR LIGHTING NEEDS

z ot Do N

Miss

A PREMIER SOURCE FOR UNIQUE LIGHTING Specializing in Exterior, Landscape, and Interior Lighting. Whatever your needs, Harrison has the lighting solution for you! Lamps & Shades • Repair & Restoration • Custom Design Lighting • Consultation

3021 Augusta St., Greenville, SC 29605 harrisonlighting.com | 864.271.3922

retail items like Scentsy and Jamberry Nail Wraps. Greenville Classical Academy, 2519 Woodruff Rd, Simpsonville. Sat, 10am–3pm. Free. (864) 3299884, greenvillefallfestival.com

5K 5 RUN4LIFE Whether you’re a Greenville native or just visiting for the weekend, it’s not hard to spot the many impacts Caine Halter had on community businesses, outreach, athletics, and progress. Though he passed away in 2007, Halter continues to give back through this annual event, which has raised hundreds of thousands for lung cancer, a number that continues to climb with a goal of $120,000 set this year. There’s nothing better than a jaunt through Cleveland Park on a crisp fall day— especially in remembrance of a man who gave so much to the Upstate. Caine Halter Family YMCA, 721 Cleveland St, Greenville. Sat, 8:30am. Free-$25.

5–6

GENIUS AGAINST TYRANT

What do you get when you pit a dictator against a prodigy? One wild evening of passionate, dynamic music. Ukrainian pianist Dmitri Levkovich will take on one of composer Dmitri Shostakovich’s most gripping pieces— Symphony No. 10—in celebration of the master musician’s 110th birthday. Faced with the oppressive regime

GENIUS AGAINST TYRANT November 5th & 6th Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. The Peace Center Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 10 expresses the fear and turmoil of Stalin’s oppressive rule. Ukrainian pianist Dmitri Levkovich will present a virtuosic performance. Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

k Par

TOWN

rea

ain

M on

130 TOWN / towncarolina.com Harrison_qtrS_TOWN Feb16.indd 1 TOWN_NOV_Town Scene_ImagesPlaced.indd 130

1/15/16 3:47 PM

10/14/16 3:06 PM


of Josef Stalin in his Soviet Union homeland, Shostakovich crafted this work of art, telling a striking narrative through the power of music. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $18-$69. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

NE W

NEW 8 BRAND As veterans

CONTOURING REDEFINED

11 NEEDTOBREATHE The second edition of the Seneca quartet’s “Tour de Compadres” jaunt through the U.S. finds the Christian rock band linking up with singer Mat Kearney, bluesy crooners Welshly Arms, and pop rockers Parachute. The April release of Hard Love was the sixth studio album for the band, a 12-track fusion of country, pop, and rock that climbed one rung higher on the Billboard 200 than Rivers in the Wasteland’s number-three slot in 2014. It’s time to show these South Carolina boys some love, native to native. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Fri, 7pm. $34-$54. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

JOLLY 11–13 HOLLY HOLIDAY FAIR

The first and only FDA-approved nonsurgical treatment that contours and improves the appearance of submental fullness, sometimes referred to as “double chin”.

2015

of festivals like Warped Tour and Bamboozle—along with a certain penchant for skinny jeans—Brand New has often found themselves the victims of the “emo” label. But this gang of New York natives has shown nothing but versatility in the last decade-anda-half, evolving their sound from skate-punk darlings to certified giants of rock. Having confirmed rumors of a breakup this past June, the band will be joined by The Front Bottoms and Modern Baseball for a final tour, which will wind up next spring. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Tues, 7pm. $36, $43. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

TM

FOR HER

Dr. Leslie Poinsette Voted Best of the Upstate 2015

FOR HIM

Dr. Matthew Miller The only Dermatologist provider for Kybella™ in the Upstate

Our retail shop carries Obagi, Neocutis, Revision, and more.

369 Woodruff Rd 864.242.587 greenvilledermatology.com

Unless you’re a Grinch with a heart two sizes too small, prepping for Christmas really is the most wonderful time of the year. Fortunately, the Holly Jolly Holiday Fair has all the supplies you need: local crafts, decorations, gourmet eats, and gifts will be on display for shoppers as well as special holiday-themed entertainment. Snap up a few trinkets for the kiddies before heading to meet Santa for this year’s Christmas card—a little bribery can go a long way. Anderson Civic Center, Martin Luther King Jr Blvd, Anderson. Fri, 5–9pm; Sat, 10am–6pm; Sun, 1–5pm. Adults, $5; seniors, $3; under 12, free. hollyjollyholidayfair.com

RELAY 12 HOPE While our school-day relays usually consisted of trying not to melt in the hot sun and hoping you didn’t get stuck with a grape Popsicle, this race has a lot more impact. In support of Project HOPE’s programs to fund autism research and support in the community, runners will race in teams in either the 20k, Boot Camp 5k, or regular 5k, beginning at the Kroc Center and winding through downtown Greenville. The classicstyle relay will be broken up into different legs, with separate divisions for athletes of any skill. The Salvation Army Kroc Center, 424 Westfield St, Greenville. Sat, 7:30am. hoperelay.org

TOWN_NOV_Town Scene_ImagesPlaced.indd 131

NOVEMBER 2016 / 131

10/14/16 3:06 PM


TOWN

Campaign for the Second Century

Scene

Miss

15

EVANESCENCE Nov 16th. Wed, 7:30pm. The Peace Center If you were waiting for the perfect moment to express your inner teenage angst, the opportunity has arrived in the form of Evanescence’s hard-hitting vocals and foreboding lyrical tunes.

EN GARDE ARTS: BASETRACK LIVE

Scripts, sets, and plot lines may be the formula for most performances, but that isn’t the case for this multimedia powerhouse production. Developed for the stage by Edward Bilous, BASETRACK Live is an indepth, captivating perspective on the physical and emotional wear experienced by military families during wartime. Scored by a team of top composers and supplemented with photos from independent photographer Balazs Gardi, Basetrack’s intensely raw depiction of military life is sure to stay with you long after the lights dim. Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Tues, 7:30pm. $45. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

Change for the Good You shared our vision of transforming health care—and you gave. Now, you’re transforming the lives of friends with cancer and Parkinson’s disease, parents who’ve had heart attacks and strokes, children with complex health conditions and so many others. You’re transforming our lives as we push forward into our second century: Your gift encourages and motivates us to keep caring, treating, researching and healing. And, we believe, you’re transforming your own life even as you’re helping transform our community: Giving changes every life that’s touched. Greenville Health System’s Campaign for the Second Century: Transforming Health Care has received $90,740,697 from the generous people of the Upstate, reaching our goal one year earlier than planned. We thank you.

ghs.org 16-0755

15 PENTATONIX The word “penta” directly translates as “having five,” so no need to count when these Arlington acapellas hit the stage at the Well. Part percussion, part pop, and part beatboxing, Pentatonix have become YouTube sensations with their unique, energetic tributes to musicians like Daft Punk, Beyonce, Katy Perry, Imagine Dragons, and more. They even earned Grammys in 2015 and 2016 for best arrangement. California folk-rockers Us the Duo will serve as openers for the show. Bon Secours

Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Tues, 8pm. $33-$89. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

16 POETIC CONVERSATION:

THE GIFT OF GRATITUDE What’s the best way get a dialogue going between people from all walks of life? Hint: it’s easier than you think. Just start talking! In this vein, the Peace Center’s Poetic Conversation series invites bright poets from around the country to share their ideas and words with others. Author Ross Gay will be the guest of honor for this edition, reading excerpts from his original, award-winning books. It’s food for your brain and for your ears, so why miss out? Huguenot Mill at the Peace Center, 101 W Broad St, Greenville. Wed, 6:30pm. Free. (864) 4673000, peacecenter.org

16 EVANESCENCE For every angsty, forlorn teenage girl seeking a personalized MySpace song back in 2003, Evanescence’s “Bring Me to Life” was the clear winner. Ever since the smashing success of their debut album Fallen, the rock band

Photograph courtesy of the Bon Secours Wellness Arena

z ot Do N

Photograph courtesy of the Peace Center

Transforming Health Care

132 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_Town Scene_ImagesPlaced.indd 132

10/14/16 3:06 PM


has amassed countless fans and music awards for their unexpected combinations of thunderous guitar riffs, melodic strings, and lead singer Amy Lee’s concrete vocal prowess. Following a brief hiatus in 2010, Evanescence has surged back to the forefront of the genre with 2011’s selftitled album, which debuted at number one on the Billboard 200 chart. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Wed, 7:30pm. $45-$65. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

FOOD 17 SLOW EARTH MARKET Let’s be honest: one of the best parts of fall is enjoying all the fresh fruits and veggies that the season has to bear. But there’s no need to venture far for your basket-load of produce; local farmers are bringing their gifts here to you. While the Slow Food movement continues to grow, so does customer demand, and this market provides all the clean, local, chemicalfree goods you can think of. Perfect for those light alfresco recipes or healthy eats any day of the week. Swamp Rabbit Café and Grocery, 205 Cedar Lane Rd, Greenville. Thurs, 2–6pm. Free. slowfoodupstate.com/ earthmarket

Photograph courtesy of the Flatrock Playhouse

A CHRISTMAS CAROL Nov 17–Dec 17 Wed–Thurs, 2pm & 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 2pm. Flatrock Playhouse

17–Dec 17

A CHRISTMAS CAROL Truth? A Christmas Carol has been put through the wringer too many times. We should have known things had gone too far when the Muppets got involved. However, this Dickens’ tale of a soul reborn is a holiday classic with a wonderful message. Albeit a little revamped, this year’s version promises to unite all of your favorite characters from Tiny Tim to

Jacob Marley in an uplifting story of love and life. And don’t be afraid to get a little jolly during the carol singalongs—you never when the spirits of the season will come to visit. Flat Rock Playhouse, 2661 Greenville Hwy, Flat Rock, NC. Wed–Thurs, 2pm & 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 2pm. $15-$40. (828) 693-0731, flatrockplayhouse.org

MOZART 18–20 DIVINE Ever wondered to yourself what an entire evening of Mozart would sound like? The Greenville Symphony Orchestra is here to answer. This homage to the original Amadeus will showcase some of the composer’s most memorable works of music, including Symphony No. 35, The Marriage of Figaro, and Horn Concerto No. 4, among others. Orchestra principal horn Anneka Zuehlke-King will feature prominently in the performance, which will run throughout the weekend. Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St. Fri–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $44. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

z ot Do N

Miss

If holiday shopping is in danger of pulling out your inner Scrooge, never fear! This jolly carol of a play will bring your spirit back to Christmas cheer.

TOWN_NOV_Town Scene_ImagesPlaced.indd 133

NOVEMBER 2016 / 133

10/14/16 3:06 PM


Scene

18–Jan 17

z ot Do N

SHADRACK’S CHRISTMAS WONDERLAND

Miss

The famous Shadrack’s Christmas Wonderland may have locations from Pennsylvania to Alabama, but you don’t have to travel far to get into the holiday spirit this year. Voyage through countless glittering lights as you make your way through this whimsical land of Yule, stopping off to pick up a steamy mug of cocoa or hark the heralds of local carolers. And, yes, even the big man in red will be there, making his list and checking it twice. Heritage Park Amphitheater, 861 SE Main St, Simpsonville. Mon–Sun, Dusk–10pm. $25$80. shadrackchristmas.com/ greenville-sc/

EVENING WITH 19 AN LORETTA HOLLOWAY

South Carolina’s official “First Lady of Song” Loretta Holloway will be in a New York state of mind when she takes the stage at Rainer’s intimate listening room. This special one-night performance will feature “Autumn in New York,” “I’ll Take Manhattan,” Duke Ellington gems, a dash of Billie Holiday, and a salute to Ol’ Blue Eyes himself, Frank Sinatra. Enjoy New York–themed cocktails, including Loretta’s signature Champagne Delight. Reservations are required. Rainer’s Café and Bar, 610-

DISNEY ON ICE November 23–27, Wed, 7:30pm; Fri–Sun, 1pm & 5pm. Bon Secours Wellness Arena Whether you are “wishing upon a star” or “letting it go,” this frozen affair offers fairytale fans premier access to their favorite happily-ever-after in classic Disney style.

Photograph courtesy of the Bon Secours Wellness Arena

TOWN

Karina Grimaldi Rachel Pally 203 N Main Street Greenville, SC 29601

Yumi Kim McGuire Denim KREWE du Optic Finders Keepers Keepsake Generation Love Cotton Citizen Current Elliott MISA Los Angeles Nanette Lepore Elliatt Parker

864.240.7366 shopjbritt.com

& many more!

134 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_Town Scene_ImagesPlaced.indd 134

ComfortKeepers 4thS Town Jan16.indd 1

12/2/15 4:30 PM 10/14/16 3:06 PM


A S Main St, Greenville. Sat (two sets) 8pm and 10pm, $20 per show. (864) 232-1753, rainerscafeandbar.com/cafe

19

GREENVILLE CRAFT BEER FESTIVAL

Turn your nose up at the mere thought of a Bud Light? Then this is the event for you. Spotlighting the not-so-average world of craft brewing, guests can imbibe in ales from Abita, Thomas Creek, Quest, Oskar Blues, Lagunitas, and others, as well as participate in special “Beer College” classes to up your kegbased knowledge. Pro tip: start your education before you start sipping. No one likes a slurring student. Fluor Field at the West End, 945 S Main St, Greenville. Sat, 12pm. $20-$100. greenvillecraftbeerfestival.com

19

NATIVE AMERICAN CELEBRATION AT HAGOOD MILL Native American culture is deeply entrenched in South Carolina’s history. In celebration of this, the Hagood Mill presents one of its most popular annual events. Musical performances, food, and traditional customs are on the day’s bill, which will also include free visits to the mill’s petroglyph site, where the heritage of the past meets with the eyes of the future through Native American carvings. Hagood Mill, 138 Hagood

5pm. $15-$55. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

Mill Rd, Pickens. Sat, 10am– 4pm. Free. (864) 898-3936, visitpickenscounty.com

GOO DOLLS 23 GOO Though they formed in 1986, it took nearly a decade for the Goo Goo Dolls to find mainstream success with their brand of alternative rock tunes. With a slew of chart-toppers under their hats—“Iris,” “Slide,” “Here Is Gone,” and “Name,” to mention a few— Johnny Rzeznik and company have proved their staying power since that initial triumph. This past May marked the debut of a new album Boxes, a more mature exploration of the band’s signature alt-rock sound. The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Wed, 7:30pm. $45-$65. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

26–Dec 10

SIMPSONVILLE HOLIDAY MARKET Nabbing the perfect gift for your impossible-to-please aunt doesn’t require a trip down Woodruff Road. This holiday market makes things easy, offering distinct gifts handmade by local artisans. Holiday tradition is alive and well here, with hot cider to dispel the winter chill, seasonal tunes, twinkling lights, and

ON ICE 23–27 DISNEY There’s no need to

delicious treats. Downtown Simpsonville. Sat, 5–8pm. Free. simpsonvillechamber.com

29–Dec 4

AN AMERICAN IN PARIS This Gershwin-built musical follows the journey of an American soldier named Jerry Mulligan as he takes on the City of Light post World War II. Directed and choreographed by Christopher Wheeldon, Paris perfectly combines elements of romance, comedy, and drama with a fun, frisky musical flair. C’est bon! The Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Tues–Thurs, 7:30pm; Fri, 8pm; Sat, 2pm & 8pm; Sun, 1pm & 6:30pm. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

dust off those old VHS tapes, 90s kids, you’ll be able to see all your favorite Disney characters live and on ice at the Well. “Dream Big” is the idea behind these figure skating follies, which will feature stories of grit, gumption, and true love, as told by the wonderful world of Disney. Join Olaf, Ariel, Tiana, Jasmine, Elsa, and the rest of the gang as they glide their way into Greenville—and into our hearts. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Wed, 7:30pm; Fri–Sun, 1pm &

A fine collection of jewelry inspired by historic wrought iron gates throughout the South.

䜀爀攀攀渀瘀椀氀氀攀ᤠ猀 猀愀氀漀渀  猀琀愀渀搀愀爀搀 樀甀猀琀 最漀琀 愀渀

HOLIDAY SALES EVENT ~ DECEMBER 4 AND 5

Clark’s Fine Jewelers

唀倀䜀刀䄀䐀䔀⸀

679-B Fairview Rd., Simpsonville, SC 864-228-2920 clarksfinejewelers.com

㠀㘀㐀⸀㘀 ㌀⸀㄀㘀㌀㌀ 猀椀砀瀀攀渀挀攀猀愀氀漀渀⸀挀漀洀 NOVEMBER 2016 / 135

Clark 4thS Town Nov15.indd 1 TOWN_NOV_Town Scene_ImagesPlaced.indd 135

10/16/15 1:26 PM

10/14/16 3:06 PM


12 Kings Grant Way, Greenville

109 Fall Breeze Trail, Travelers Rest

5BR, 6BA, 3Hf BA · MLS#1331216 · $3,500,000

6BR, 6BA, 2Hf BA · MLS#1328787 · $1,895,000

Wilson Associates Linda O’Brien (864) 325-0495 wilsonassociates.net

The Cliffs Vince Roser (864) 516-1683 cliffsliving.com

18 S. Main St. Unit 403, Greenville

329 Sorono Dr., Greenville

3BR, 3BA, 2Hf BA · MLS#1323314 · $1,650,000

5 Gaujard Ct., Greer

5BR, 5BA, 2Hf BA · MLS#1320265 · $1,750,000 Wilson Associates Kathryn Curtis (864) 238-3879 wilsonassociates.net

4 Heather Way, Greenville

4BR, 4BA, 2Hf BA · MLS#1328559 · $1,100,000

3BR, 3BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1330556 · $963,000

719 Brixton Cir., Simpsonville

21 Chestnut Ridge Rd., Greenville

611 Highridge Parkway, Marietta

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS® Carole Atkison (864) 787-1067 SpauldingGroup.net

Coldwell Banker CAINE Jane McCutcheon (864) 787-0007 cbcaine.com/Agents/JaneMcCutcheon

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS® Wanda Reed (864) 270-4078 wandareedpartners.com

212 Bentwood Way, Salem

7 Broadstone Ct., Simpsonville

10 Hollingsworth Dr., Greenville

The Cliffs Marc Wilson (864) 660-8401 cliffsliving.com

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS® Carole Atkison (864) 787-1067 SpauldingGroup.net

Coldwell Banker CAINE Jane McCutcheon (864) 787-0007 cbcaine.com/Agents/JaneMcCutcheon

Wilson Associates Sharon Wilson (864) 918-1140 wilsonassociates.net

4BR, 4BA, 2Hf BA · MLS#1328770 · $945,000

4BR, 4BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#20166595 · $849,900

Estates TOWNEstatespage.indd TOWN_blank Nov16.indd6 2

The Marchant Company Valerie Miller (864) 430-6602 ValerieJSmiller.com

6BR, 5BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1323161 · $915,000

4BR, 3BA · MLS#1330113 · $550,000

Wilson Associates Flynn Lambert (864) 593-8404 wilsonassociates.net

4BR, 4BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1309173 · $899,000

3BR, 2BA, 1Hf BA · MLS#1323854 · $484,900

TOWN Estates is a monthly feature of TOWN Magazine. To advertise your listing in TOWN Estates, contact Annie Langston at 864.679.1224 or alangston@communityjournals.com 10/13/16 8:36 5:50 PM


Manage wealth wisely, and the rewards are timeless. At BB&T Wealth, we’ve spent more than 140 years sharing knowledge and strategies to help clients build, preserve and transfer wealth. Getting to know you and your family as well as we know your life goals. With the strength of our experience on your side, you have the confidence to make the best financial decisions, from one generation to the next. BBT.com/Wealth

864-282-3161 • 416 E North Street, Greenville, SC 29601 Proud Sponsor of the Charitable Giving Awards

Check out the full schedule: mauldinculturalcenter.org | 864.335.4862

BB&T Wealth is a division of Branch Banking and Trust Company, Member FDIC. Only deposit products are FDIC insured. Investment solutions are provided by Branch Banking and Trust Company and BB&T Investment Services, Inc., a wholly owned broker-dealer subsidiary of Branch Banking and Trust Company, Member FINRA/SIPC. Securities and investment products or services are: not a deposit, not FDIC insured, not insured by any federal government agency, may go down in value, not guaranteed by the bank. © 2016, Branch Banking and Trust Company. All rights reserved.

The Military Order of the Purple Heart presents

COMEDY Huguenot Loft at The Peace Center Tickets are $35.00 at the Peace Center Box Office or www.PeaceCenter.org

NIGHT Monday, Nov. 7th Reception at 6pm • Show at 7pm

Please join us for a HILARIOUS evening of amateur joke telling! All proceeds benefit Combat Wounded Veterans. Doug_MOPH_hlfH TOWN Nov16.indd 1

TOWN_blank page.indd 3

NOVEMBER 2016 / 137 10/10/16 12:39 PM

10/13/16 10:35 AM


TOWN MAGAZINE 2016 G uide to G iving

Giving Legacy The Community Foundation of Greenville celebrates 60 years

and allocate funds to organizations that will improve a specific place. Since its founding in 1956, the CFG has given more than $100 million to hundreds of organizations and projects across the community—investments that have been nothing less than transformative, not only to the community itself, but to the countless lives each of its recipient organizations serve. “If you were to add up all the philanthropic investments in Greenville County that came through the Community Foundation over the past 60 years, their total impact would be truly staggering,” says Sue Priester, donor, fund-holder, and current vice chair of CFG. “This community would be so much the poorer—actually unrecognizable—without them.” In celebration of its 60th anniversary, the CFG recently gave $600,000—$100,000 for each decade—to four Greenville nonprofits: Greenville Center for the Creative Arts, Camperdown Academy, the Greenville Free Medical Clinic, and the S.C. Children’s Theatre. Of course, none of this would be

possible without funds coming into the foundation. Throughout its history, the CFG has served as a tax-efficient and costeffective means for individuals, businesses, and charitable organizations to provide the financial resources critical to improving the lives of Greenville residents. “Unrestricted gifts allow us to be responsive to the ever-changing needs of our community,” says Bob Morris, CFG president since 1999. “In 2005, a bequest from Jean Harris Knight provided match-funding to establish Greenville Women Giving, which today is one of the largest funders in Greenville, comprised of more than 540 women who are informed philanthropists focused on the betterment of the community. Ten years later, a bequest from Gil Gilfillin is making possible an investment in OnTrack Greenville, which aims to help middlegrade students stay on track towards high school graduation,” he says. A community that takes care of itself? Perhaps this is what truly makes a community a community.

Kent Ambler, Begin the Journey. Woodcut ; 32”x24”; artwork courtesy of the artist

/ by Kathleen Nalley Have you ever asked yourself what makes a community a community? Sure, location has a lot to do with it. As does a common infrastructure: roads, buildings, perhaps a Main Street or a central hub. Beyond that, it’s the intangibles: a sense of safety, access to goods and services, opportunities, common values, relationships. One needn’t look too far to recognize that Greenville is an exceptional community. And while many cite proper planning and management of Greenville’s growth as responsible for building the community we have today, the scope and reach of one dedicated and visionary organization has impacted more facets than one may know. This year, the Community Foundation of Greenville (CFG) celebrates its 60th anniversary—six decades of providing for and helping to build the safety, access, opportunities, and relationships communities require. The foundation, one of 700 of its kind in the nation, is designed to pool investments

Community Foundation Opener Nov 2016.indd 1

10/14/16 2:48 PM


8th ANNUAL 8th November

17

Thursday, November 17, 2016 from 6pm-10pm Peace Center, Huguenot Loft 101 W. Broad Street • Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 242-0676 • www.bbbspeprally.com

Come and join in the games, music, and silent acution. Enjoy tailgating food,

Proceeds benefit Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Upstate

beer, and wine. Get a group together and make up a cheer...you just might win the prize. Be sure to wear your school colors...of course! RAFFLES

AUCTION

GAMES

GAME HIGHLIGHTS

BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS OF THE UPSTATE Serving Greenville, Spartanburg, Anderson, Laurens, Oconee and Pickens Counties. SPARTANBURG

864.542.9328

ANDERSON

864.965.0505

GREENVILLE

864.242.0676

FOOD AND DRINK

MUCH MORE…

MISSION: Provide children facing adversity with strong and enduring, professionally supported one-to-one relationships that change their lives for the better, forever.

LOCAL FACTS: Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Upstate has provided one-to-one mentoring services since 1974 serving over 10,000 youth.

LITTLE BROTHERS AND LITTLE SISTERS ARE: 46% less likely to use drugs 27% less likely to use alcohol

www.bbbsupstate.com

TOWN_blank page.indd 7

52% less likely to skip school

10/13/16 10:47 AM


WHEN YOU DONATE BLOOD, you change someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s view on life.

Learn more about donating

Schedule your donation today by visiting thebloodconnection.org or calling 1.800.392.6551.

TOWN_blank page.indd 6

10/13/16 10:36 AM


WINDOWS INTO THE

PAST FRAMEWORK FOR THE

FUTURE Understanding the past and the foundation we build on sharpens and inspires our vision for the future. European Old Master paintings and antiquities reveal past people and diverse cultures—their fashion, architecture, values, innovations, mistakes, and triumphs. Visit and support M&G, an internationally respected collection— you’ll help strengthen and further Greenville’s

reputation

around

the world and help M&G continue making a difference for students of all ages, including thousands of Upstate K-12 and college students.

Unlike many museums, M&G is not endowed, and we rely largely on donor contributions to cover the costs to sustain the museum and to help students learn through the proven, effective teaching methods of arts integration. The Bob Jones University Museum & Gallery, Inc. is a public 501(c)(3) non-profit and a separate independent organization from Bob Jones University. Gifts made to M&G exclusively support the services, collections, and operations of the Museum & Gallery.

TOWN_blank page.indd 7

10/13/16 10:36 AM


TOWN_blank page.indd 6

10/13/16 10:46 AM


Creating a space for Hope and Healing The Cancer Survivors Park will be a special place for healing. Designed as a place for respite, education and celebration, it will serve as an ever-present beacon of hope for anyone touched by cancer. Help us bring light to the journey through cancer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Get On Boardâ&#x20AC;? by purchasing a commemorative plaque along the boardwalk in honor of or gratitude to someone in your life. Let them know they do not walk this journey alone.

CancerSurvivorsPark.org | 864.255.5010 | TOWN_blank page.indd 7

10/13/16 10:38 AM


“Why we love The Chandler School…” “There is no better place to teach and learn than The Chandler School. Multi sensory, hands-on learning, a dedicated staff, the wisdom of Headmaster Dana Blackhurst, and an exquisite environment all come together to create an educational estuary like no other. I love this place with all of my heart.” – Teacher “They (faculty) understand how I think, and so, they know how to teach me, so I can learn. At The Chandler School, they get it.” – Student “The Chandler School has changed our lives, and I don’t say that lightly. Chandler is so much more than just a school. The staff at Chandler has a tremendous gift for understanding children and their individual learning styles. They put together a plan to help each child succeed.” – Parent “The Chandler School is a unique school, unlike any other, that has changed my life and made me a better person.”

– Alum

“The teachers at this school are awesome, the best in the world. They really make it their first priority for every kid to be successful.” – Alum

At The Chandler School we are committed to producing students who are South Carolina’s future explorers, engineers, artists, doctors, and leaders of tomorrow.

One student at a time.

TOWN_blank page.indd 6

10/13/16 6:24 PM


2900 Augusta Road, Greenville, SC 29605 864.991.8443 | TheChandlerSchool.org

TOWN_blank page.indd 7

10/13/16 6:24 PM


Ignite a passion for learning... Give to our Annual Fund.

$25 $50 $100 $200

admits an underprivileged family of three purchases supplies for one week of programming buys six new STEAM-based books for TCMUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s literacy program admits a Title 1 school class for a one-day field trip

Visit TCMUpstate.org/support to give now.

300 COLLEGE STREET GREENVILLE | TCMUPSTATE.ORG

TOWN_blank page.indd 6

10/13/16 6:25 PM


TOWN_blank page.indd 7

10/13/16 10:46 AM


I am taught in a nurturing environment that fosters my individual learning style. I am able to advance in curricular areas of strength while receiving individualized guidance in areas where I need support. I am a confident learner. I am Five Oaks Academy. I am a Montessori Student.

Toddler through Middle School

Toddler through Middle School 1101 Jonesville Road 1101 Jonesville Road Simpsonville, SC (864)Simpsonville, 228-1881 SC

(864) 228-1881 Minds Opened Here! FiveOaks fp non bld Town Nov15.indd 1

TOWN_blank page.indd 6

Minds Opened Here!

10/19/15 10:00 AM

10/13/16 11:30 AM


Sponsored by

Christmas Chorale with the

Friday, December 9, 2016 d 7:30PM d McAlister Auditorium, Furman University BING VICK, JR., CONDUCTOR

Greenville Chorale, joined by the Hendersonville Symphony Orchestra, sings in the season with one of the Upstate’s finest holiday traditions.  Enjoy thrilling seasonal music along with the beloved audience sing-along carols! For tickets call 864-467-3000.

The Graham

Foundation GvlChorale_fp_TOWN TOWN_blank page.inddNov16.indd 7 1

10/13/16 10/11/16 10:39 6:27 PM AM


TOWN_blank page.indd 6

10/13/16 6:25 PM


Everyone knows that Habitat for Humanity builds affordable homes. But, do you know what affordable homes build? Affordable homeownership helps families build strength, stability and self-reliance. And, the stability of homeownership is recognized as the leading factor in children’s academic success! In fact, in our 2016 Homeownership Impact Survey, 67% of Habitat Greenville homeowners reported that their children’s grades improved since moving into their home, and 70% said a family member has attained a degree.

That’s the impact of Habitat Greenville. Call us today to find out how you can help build a better Greenville, one family at a time.

Contact Barbara Martin, Vice-President of Development (864) 370-1458

habitatgreenville.org

Habitat_fp_TOWN TOWN_blank page.indd Nov16.indd 7 1

10/13/16 10/12/16 10:40 9:24 AM


Your support brings the beauty and inspiration of International Ballet to the Greenville Community each year... OUTREACH PROGRAMS

Storytime Ballet Scholarship Program Special Needs Program

Vlada Kysselova, Artistic Director Peace Center Resident Company Established 2003

Don't miss

The Nutcracker guest starring

Veronika Part Principal Ballerina, American Ballet Theatre

Edvard Tchivzhel, Conductor

Storytime at the Ballet

Saturday, November 12

MAINSTAGE PRODUCTIONS Fall Chamber The Nutcracker Spring Ballet

Swan Lake and Other Works

April 21-22 Gunter Theatre

Sponsored by Charlie & Pam Walters

Sponsored by Graham & Greta Somerville

EVENTS & FUNDRAISING

DEC 10 -11

Nutcracker Tea - Dec. 4 Passport to Dance - Apr. 7 Artisphere - May 12-14

Peace Center For tickets: Concert Hall 864-467-3000 peacecenter.org Learn more and subscribe:

INTERNATIONALBALLETSC.ORG Photos: Veronika Part © Kent G. Becker, others © Jerry Finley Photography

International Ballet is a 501(c)(3) organization and relies on the financial support of donors like you to help us bring professional quality performances, outreach programming, and artistic collaboration to Greenville. Remember us on November 29 1018 S. Batesville Rd. 1B, Greer, SC 864-879-9404 info@internationalballetsc.org

TOWN_blank page.indd 6

THANK YOU Larkin's On the River Metropolitan Arts Council Jack & Sandy Halsey for support of our Season Opener and Fall Chamber Concert

10/13/16 10:43 AM


The Blackfish: A Story of Survival and Leadership, presented by Allison Black Cornelius Allison Black Cornelius is the President of Blackfish Strategies, formerly Blackboard Consulting. The firm is nationally recognized for its consulting to nonprofit organizations, executive coaching, and executive education. Her work includes a professional speaking and training tour that numbers over 100 public appearances each year to groups throughout the United States Join us onand abroad. She also lecturers regularly for schools of education, nonprofit February 14th for the 7th Annual Julie Valentine Center Luncheon to hear the remarkable story of an amazing woman. Allison Black Cornelius, is described studies, leadership studies, women’s issues, and business at some of as a “breathing, adaptable, inspirational, motivational, God-as-my-witness nearAmerica’s most prestigious colleges. She has appeared on Oprah, the Today mythical example of what the human spirit can suffer, endure and conquer.” Show, Donahue, Nancy Grace, and had articles published in the Wall Street Journal, People, the Chronicle of Philanthropy and USA Today. At age seven, Allison was raped and molested by her Sunday school teacher. Too small to do anything about it then, she tried her best to forget it. Twenty years Ms. Cornelius has trained thousands of board members of both nonprofit later cameand for-profit corporations, successfully completed more than 200 Allison’s day of reckoning. Allison along with more than 50 additional nonprofit mergers and turn-arounds, and assisted the policy offices of twenty-six U.S. Governors. She victims came forward. In a landmark case that drew widespread attention from the has advised and consulted with national championship football, baseball, and basketball teams and two national media, Allison put her rapist behind bars and became one of the nation’s White House cabinet members. Ms. Cornelius has been recognized as being among the most strongest advocates for victims’ and community rights. She spearheaded the passage experienced nonprofit governance consultants in the United States. Her awards include recognition of Megan’s Law, creating the country’s first Sex Offender Registry. from the White House, the Olympics, and numerous national associations and civic clubs. She assisted with the writing, organization and passage of Megan's Law in thirty-six states (including the original As President of Blackfish Strategies, Allison has carried the Olympic torch, trained legislation in New Jersey), Alabama's Constitutional Amendment for Victim's Rights, and the legislation more than 700 nonprofit boards and raised more than $30 million for charity that created the Alabama Department of Children’s Affairs. She architected the Office of Faith Based and through her public presentations. She advanced her studies at Harvard, and her Community Initiatives for 26 United States Governors and founded Court Appointed Special Advocate speaking engagements have taken her to the Kennedy Center, professional sports (CASA) programs and child advocacy centers all over the country. teams, celebrity foundations, and the White House. She is what the best of us aspire to be, but She was recently named one of Alabama’s Most Motivational Women and received Birmingham’s 12 few have the grit to become. Smartest Women Award for her advocacy work for women and children and her efforts to improve leadership development opportunities for young professionals and nonprofit executives. Allison and her husband Jeff have five grown children and four rescue dogs.

ALLISON BLACK CORNELIUS GUEST SPEAKER

PLEASE JOIN US ON THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14TH AT NOON 11:30 CHECK-IN • TD CONVENTION CENTER RSVP BY JANUARY 31 TICKETS & SPONSORSHIPS AVAILABLE @ JULIEVALENTINECENTER.ORG TOWN_blank page.indd 7

10/14/16 1:59 PM


Making the healthy CHOICE the easy CHOICE Help Us Build A Culture of Health throughout Greenville County.

Join the Movement Annual Giving Campaign: October 15th – January 15th

Making the healthy CHOICE the easy CHOICE Making the healthyMaking CHOICE the the healthy easy CHOICE CHOICE the easy CHOICE Help Build Culture Health throughout Greenville County. Help Us Build A CultureHelp of Health UsUs Build throughout AA Culture Greenville ofof Health throughout County. Greenville County.

Join theMovement Movement Join the Join Movement the Together Childhood Obesity We Can Reduce in Greenville County. th – January Annual Giving October th – January th – th th Annual Giving Campaign: Annual October Giving Campaign: 15Campaign: October 15th 1515 January 1515

Studies conducted by LiveWell Greenville’s evaluation team have shown alarming trends in childhood obesity. In 2014, 35.7% of Greenville County youth were overweight or obese. Many Greenville County neighborhoods lack safe, accessible parks and healthy food outlets.

Making the healthy CHOICE the easy CHOICE Making the healthy CHOICE the easy CHOICE

LiveWell Greenville supports community-wide initiatives that promote healthy eating and active living. The Join The Movement campaign provides funding to increase access to healthy foods and physical activity a priority on highest need neighborhoods. Help Us with Build A Culture of Health throughout Greenville County.

Help Us Build A Culture of Health throughout Greenville County.

the Movement Join Join the Movement There are three simple ways to Join the Movement:

Consider a Monthly Recurring Gift

A monthly gift goes a long way to help reduce

Annual Giving Campaign: October chronic 15thth–illness January 15ththroughout our & obesity rates Annual Giving Campaign: October 15 – Januarycommunity. 15 1. Go to the iOnGreenville app on your mobile device. Click th on LiveWell Greenville, then Join the Movement. Follow the

Together We Can Reduce Childhood Obesity Greenville County. prompts.Childhood er We Can Reduce Together We Can Reduce Obesity Childhood in Greenville Obesity County. in in Greenville County.

2. Makeconducted an online contribution through the website atevaluation team have shown alarming trends in Studies LiveWell Greenville’s cted by LiveWell Studies Greenville’s conducted evaluation byby LiveWell team Greenville’s have shown evaluation alarming team trends have in shown alarming trends in livewellgreenville.org/donate. childhood obesity. In 2014, 35.7% of Greenville County youth were overweight obese. Many sity. In 2014,childhood 35.7% of Greenville youth overweight or youth obese. Many obesity. InCounty 2014, 35.7% ofwere Greenville County were overweight or or obese. Many Greenville County neighborhoods lack safe, accessible parks and healthy food outlets. nty neighborhoods lack safe, neighborhoods accessible parkslack and healthy food outlets. Greenville County safe, accessible parks and healthy food outlets. 3. Submit a check by mail or in person made payable to:

LiveWell Greenville. supports In the subject line, please write Join the LiveWell Greenville community-wide initiatives that promote healthy eating and active ville supports community-wide initiatives that promote healthy eating and activehealthy LiveWell Greenville supports community-wide initiatives that promote eating and active living. The Join The Movement campaign provides funding increase access healthy foods and Movement. Checks may be mailed to:increase PO Boxprovides 2284, The Movement campaign provides funding to access to healthy foods and living. The Join The Movement campaign funding to to increase access to to healthy foods and physical activity with a priority on highest need neighborhoods. SC 29602. y with a priority onGreenville, highest need neighborhoods. physical activity with a priority on highest need neighborhoods.

Become a LiveWell Champion.

Join the Movement.

There three simple ways are three simpleThere ways are toare three simple ways to to Consider a Monthly Recurring Gift Consider a Monthly Recurring Consider Gift a Monthly Recurring Gift Join the Movement: Join the Movement: Join the Movement:

A monthly goes a long way to help reduce A monthly gift goes a long way to A help monthly reduce giftgift goes a long way to help reduce chronic illness & obesity rates throughout 1. Go to the iOnGreenville app your mobile device. chronic illness &Click obesity chronic illness our & obesity rates throughout ourour eenville app on 1. Go your tomobile the iOnGreenville device. Click app on on on your mobile device. Click on on rates throughout community. LiveWell Greenville, then Join Movement. Follow community. community. lle, then Join theLiveWell Movement. Greenville, Followthen the Join thethe Movement. Follow thethe prompts. conductedprompts. by LiveWell Greenville’s evaluation team have shown alarming trends in

www.livewellgreenville.org gether We Can Reduce Childhood Obesity in Greenville County. www.livewellgreenville.org/donate n Reduce Childhood Obesity in Greenville County.

TOWN_blank page.indd 6 LWG-1008-JointheMove Ad-TOWN_10.25x13.25_10.14.indd 1 ood obesity. In 2014, 35.7% of Greenville County youth were overweight or obese. Many

10/13/16 6:26 PM 10/14/15 6:46 PM


TOWN_blank page.indd 7

10/13/16 10:43 AM


Untitled-10 1 page.indd 6 TOWN_blank

10/11/16 10:48 10/13/16 12:10 AM PM


OPENS Nov. 8

to an e v i r d A short

E L B A T T E G R O F ence

225 No 0001

UN liday Expeursieum.org Ho

at scm s t e k c i t e Purchas

NOV. 4 THRU JAN. 1 VISIT SCMUSUEM.ORG

301 GERVAIS ST â&#x20AC;¢ COLUMBIA

Untitled-12 1 page.indd 7 TOWN_blank

10/13/16 10/11/16 10:49 5:14 PM AM


Engage Nurture Transform

Open House Opportunities: Fri., Nov.4 Fri., Dec.9 at 9:00 a.m. 2211 Woodruff Road · Simpsonville, SC 29681 · (864)234-7575

SouthsideChristian.org TOWN_blank page.indd 6

10/13/16 10:49 AM


Discover

the Advantage

• Small, single gender middle school classes • Caring, invested teachers

• Culture of exploration, wonder, and discovery • Opportunities to play competitive sports

Open House

for Grades 6-12 at 1:00 PM on Sunday, November 13 TOWN_blank page.indd 7

#DiscoverStJoes www.sjcatholicschool.org

10/13/16 10:49 AM


ST. FRANCIS FOUNDATION

Martinis & Mistletoe THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1 | 7:00-9:00 Hyatt Regency Greenville, Studio 220 $50 PER PERSON

Teddy Bear Luncheon SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3 LUNCH & ENTERTAINMENT BEGINS AT 11:00 Hyatt Regency Greenville $15 FOR ADULTS | $10 FOR CHILDREN (ages 3-12)

Any child who donates a new stuffed animal will get a photo with Santa.

All proceeds from the 2016 Festival of Trees will benefit the St. Francis Chest Pain Center.

Tickets available at stfrancisfoundation.com or Eventbrite For more information, call 864-255-1040

Greenville RiverPlace

Untitled-8 TOWN_blank 1 page.indd 6

Greenville Downtown

10/11/16 10/13/16 10:00 10:50 AM AM


PLANT PROMOTE PROTECT Help us Plant a Tree.  Donate Now.   www.treesgreenville.org

TreesGreenville is a countywide 501 c3 founded in 2005. Our mission is to plant, promote, and protect trees in Greenville County.   We have: planted 4,425 trees, had 247 tree plantings, and planted 84 different species. 

TOWN_blank page.indd 7

10/13/16 10:50 AM


The Holiday Honor Card A N A LT E R N AT I V E H O L I D AY G I F T

United Ministries serves and empowers those on the transformative journey to self-sufficiency. Our vision is a community working together to ensure that everyone has the opportunity to thrive in Greenville. Won’t you be part of making this vision a reality?

moved to Gre enville mmunity. Her desire d family as pr iorities, g later in life, first in s are both re alistic

t Gallery Gui ld of ears, winning the ward in 2013 . Her ed exhibit for the the Artispher e of

d gazes up fr om s’ Holiday Hon or he Reedy Riv er. e card, and th e

those on the in downtow n g for 46 years ited Ministries y p rovi d in g employment move forward

“I don’t know where we would be right now without the help of GAIHN and United Ministries.” —Jameice Robison and her daughters

32.6463

“The Gift” — painting by local artist, Glenda Cooper

Honor your clients, business associates or friends by making a gift to United Ministries. Your donation will help to ensure that everyone has the opportunity to thrive in Greenville.

By sending United Ministries’ Honor Cards, you honor not only someone special to you, but also someone who needs assistance in our community. This year’s art by local artist Glenda Cooper features a woman holding her baby and gazing up from an open card on the table. The card is United Ministries’ Holiday Honor Card from last year with art depicting Falls Park on the Reedy River. A donated box of food sits on the table next to the card, and the room is decorated humbly for Christmas.

Orders of 100 or more may be customized! Call, email, or visit our website today. United-Ministries.org | 864.335.2614 | rragland@united-ministries.org

TOWN_blank page.indd 6

10/13/16 10:51 AM


EXERCISE YOUR HEART

IN MORE WAYS THAN ONE. 60,000+

HOUSEHOLDS served annually

8,100 1,100

CHILDREN CHILDREN AND FAMILIES

assisted through

SLIDING SCALE

scholarships annually

234

participated in WATER SAFETY WEEK

More than 60 ADULTS

WITH DIVERSE-ABILITIES

BENEFIT FROM R.E.C.E.S.S.,

learning healthy lifestyles,

WORKING TOGETHER as

volunteers, and practicing

independent living AND SOCIAL SKILLS

OVER 8 VOLUNTEERS serve within

our youth sports program More than 1,400 HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS and 350 MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS participate in the Model

COMMUNITY VOLUNTEERS Legislature and Court programs and conferences.

serve in

leadership roles on 8

BRANCH BOARDS

MORE THAN 400 UNDER RESOURCED STUDENTS are

500+ VOLUNTEER HOURS

served through TEEN

served through Y TOGETHERHOODâ&#x201E;¢

career readiness programs.

VOLUNTEER projects

ACHIEVERS college and

At the Y, children learn what they can achieve, families spend quality time together, and we all build relationships that deepen our sense of belonging. For more than a workout. For a better us.

YMCA OF GREENVILLE |

TOWN_blank page.indd 7

ymcagreenville.org | (864) 412-0288

10/13/16 6:27 PM


SECOND

Glance

Art for All

I

t’s a common belief: art is capable of bringing life to a community. If artists have the ability to reach out with their work, if they have the opportunity to inspire, convict, and motivate their cities and neighborhoods, then real change can manifest. Through Greenville Open Studios, the Metropolitan Arts Council is facilitating this energetic environment. In one weekend, more than 130 artists will open their studio doors, inviting the public to venture in and experience the beauty of creating. From photography to watercolor, ceramics to printmaking, Greenville’s greater art community offers us the possibility to participate in something powerful.—Abby Moore Keith

Greenville Open Studios will take place on November 4–6, Friday, 6–9pm, Saturday, 10am–6pm, and Sunday, Noon–6pm. For maps of participating studios, visit greenvillearts.com/mac-programs/open-studios/

(clockwise from top left): John Pendarvis, Music Men 1. Acrylic; 22” x 18”; Angie Carrier, Contemplation. Acrylic; 40” x 30”; Darryl DeBruhl, I am Prey. Screenprint and acrylic; 24” x 24”; Michelle Jardines Simpson, Series II: Southern Storm. Oil on linen; 20” x 20”. All courtesy of the Metropolitan Arts Council

Greenville Open Studios allows easy access to more than 130 of the area’s premier artists

164 TOWN / towncarolina.com

TOWN_NOV_Second Glance.indd 164

10/14/16 9:44 AM


A Century of Suds.

Greenco_History TOWN_blank page.indd full_TOWN.indd 6 2

10/11/16 10/4/16 6:36 9:37 PM


THE DAY-DATE 40 The international symbol of performance and success, reinterpreted with a modernized design and a new-generation mechanical movement. It doesn’t just tell time. It tells history.

OYSTER PERPETUAL DAY-DATE 40 IN 18 KT WHITE GOLD

rolex

TOWN_blank page.indd 6

oyster perpetual and day-date are

®

trademarks.

10/13/16 10:51 AM

Profile for Community Journals

TOWN Nov. 2016  

TOWN Magazine published monthly in Greenville, South Carolina by Community Journals. Visit us at TOWNCarolina.com

TOWN Nov. 2016  

TOWN Magazine published monthly in Greenville, South Carolina by Community Journals. Visit us at TOWNCarolina.com

Profile for cjdesigns