TOWN Magazine - August 2021

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ART, CULTURE, STYLE OF THE PROGRESSIVE SOUTH

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THE MEN’S ISSUE

THE LONG GAME G R E E N V I L L E ’ S J AY H A A S J R . D R I V E S TO T H E H E A RT O F H I S G O L F L E G AC Y

AUGUST 2021

TOWNCAROLINA.COM


A LIFE TO LOVE DISCOVER T HE WONDERS OF HART NESS

THE HARTNESS TEAM OF EXPERTS DEDICATED TO GUIDING YOUR CLIENTS HOME

MARCIA SIMMONS

DAVID ROBERTSON

T RACY HARRIS

ST EVE BROWN

The Hartness Team understands what Greenville families want—a beautiful home in an amenity-rich community without sacrificing convenience. That’s why this proven group of industry leaders has joined forces to help you discover the perfect home in the Upstate’s most distinctive neighborhood.


VISIT HART NESS TODAY TO DISCOVER A LIF E TO LOVE We often depend on inspiration to help us savor life. We foster the connections that sustain us and champion the experiences that renew us—making the most of every moment. Yet, finding a Greenville home that’s serene and harmonious with our day-to-day lives is rare, to say the least. That’s why Hartness created a neighborhood that makes it easy to embrace beauty, find balance, and make memories with the ones you love. Rather than spending valuable time looking for places to go and things to do, at Hartness you simply just step out your door. With boundless natural wonders and limitless options for relaxation, recreation, and fun, Hartness makes it easy to live the life you love.

HARTNESS -LIVE THE LIFE YOU LOVE 864.920.0375 / HARTNESSLIVING.COM Information is deemed reliable but not guaranteed. All properties are subject to prior sale, change or withdrawal notice. Prices and availability subject to change. All specifications supplied by builder/seller, and subject to change or modification. It is the responsibility of the buyer or buyer’s agent to verify. Equal housing opportunity – Dan Collins, Broker-in-Charge / Collins & Fine, LLC


Got You Covered, Upstate! City Living, Suburbia, Lake Life, Equestrian, Mountains

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I N S P I R I N G I N EV E RY D I R E C T I O N

Obtain the Property Report required by federal law and read it before signing anything. No federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. This is not an offer where registration is required prior to any other offer being made. Void where prohibited by law. In South Carolina, Cliffs Realty Sales SC, LLC, 635 Garden Market Drive, Travelers Rest, SC 29690 and 3430 Walhalla Highway, Six Mile, SC 29682, Lauren Fine Buckland, Broker-in-Charge. In North Carolina, Cliffs Realty Sales NC, LLC, 1908 Brevard Road, Arden, NC 28704, Lauren Fine Buckland, Broker-in-Charge. Copyright: © 2021 Cliffs Land Partners, LLC. All rights reserved.


First Glance

Photograph courtesy of The Swag

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OXB THE

OXFORD BARBER CO.

WHERE CLASSIC MEETS MODERN

Photography by Rony Rivera insta. @ronyriverx

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REAL LIFE,

Real Style Interior design with Nandina means experiencing design consulting that is personalized, collaborative, principled, and focused on creating real homes for those who live real lives.

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Contents

AUGUST 2021

70 LINKED LEGACY

Jay Haas Jr.’s ties to golf run deep, but his swing is entirely his own. Now head of instruction and coaching at Greenvillebased Haas Family Golf, he aims to be the top instructor in the state. by STEPHANIE TROTTER

“When I was young, I just assumed I would play golf when I got older. It’s really a privilege to get to play, and I want to help players improve as golfers, and most importantly find more enjoyment in the game. It’s my dream.” — Jay Haas Jr.

By Jack Robert Photography

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ON THE COVER

Jay Haas Jr. photographed on July 13, 2021, by Paul Mehaffey.


The 2021 A 220 SedAn

Action for the asking. The A 220 Sedan is an advanced mobile device that can really move you. Its groundbreaking voice control responds to you in ways no car ever has. And its turbo power is delivered with bold style, innovative luxury, and advanced safety.

CARLTON MOTORCARS www.CarltonMB.com

(864) 213-8000 2446 Laurens Road | Greenville, SC 296


The Swag, a quaint inn in Waynesville, NC, offers rustic luxury in the wild beauty of the Great Smoky Mountains. by m. Linda Lee

16 EDITOR’S LETTER 21 THE LIST 27 ON THE TOWN 35 WEDDINGS 66 EXTRA 68 MAN ABOUT TOWN 85 DINING GUIDE 92 TOWNSCENE 100 SECOND GLANCE

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SOUL GETAWAY

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Photograph by Will Crooks

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Photograph courtesy of The Swag

Contents

SHARPER IMAGE When it comes to style, local principal Charles Davis Jr. is at the top of the class, and his men’s boutique, A Polished Man, gets high marks. by STEPHANIE TROTTER

41 5155 55 615 77 TOWNBUZZ

ESCAPE

SPORT

STYLE

EAT + DRINK

Mimi Wyche’s creativity extends beyond the stage; take a walk down the runway with Greenville Fashion Week founder Maegan Heinz; golfing buddies provide an easy and affordable way to get out on the green with the Traveling Country Club.

For a quiet retreat, majestic mountain magic awaits at The Swag, a luxurious hideaway in Waynesville, North Carolina.

Hit the links in a pair of local designer Armin Oehler’s sleek golf shoes; disc golf may seem like an unconventional sport, but throwing frisbees at these Upstate courses will have you hooked.

From pocket squares to bow ties, Charles Davis Jr. offers quality men’s accessories at A Polished Man; vintage glassware is reborn through Estelle Colored Glass.

Experience an evening of elegance and intrigue (and some fine drinks) at Greenville’s best-kept secret; this locally made ginger beer has tropical ties; celebrate the fruits of summer with a succulent tomato pie.


THE

FURMAN GROUP The Smart Money is on The Furman Group

TheFurmanGroupSC.com

45 Thruston Street Augusta Row Townhomes Listed at $537,605 2 Bedroom Unit Townhome, Caribbean Heart Pine Flooring, Fisher + Paykel Appliances, high end finishes, private 2 stall garage. Available NOW.

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Each affiliate independently owned and operated.

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Editor’s Letter

EIC Blair Knobel, age 9, teeing off at Anderson Country Club, circa 1990.

FAIRWAYS & GREENS

I

t began at my grandmother’s home. Pre-smartphone, computer, or digital anything, summer days unfolded in the grass, in the creek, in the sun. One day while playing outside, I discovered her set of golf clubs. An avid player, she demonstrated her swing, then passed me a wedge. I pulled back and through, smacking the little white ball clear over her roof. Then and there, at 9 years old, I unlocked a passion for the game that’s 30 years in the making. My grandmother became my greatest champion and coach. We would play together multiple times a week—usually every day during the summer. Eventually I competed in junior tournaments and joined my high school’s varsity team. Sometimes when I catch a whiff of freshly cut grass, the scent takes me back to practice rounds after school. Time stands still, and in that moment I’m back on the tee or on the bus with my team, laughing with my whole body, feeling the ease of it all. I didn’t find the game. Somehow it found me, and I’m thankful it took hold when I was young. Similarly, golf became a natural path for Jay Haas Jr. and his brother, Bill, sons of PGA Tour champion Jay Haas. Each played for high school and college teams, then

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on the PGA Tour. Eventually Haas Jr. began caddying for his brother, helping him clench a tour win at the 2011 FedEx Cup. Now, after a successful career caddying on both the PGA and Champions tours, Haas Jr. has swung in another direction as head of instruction and coaching at Haas Family Golf, a premier range and teaching facility in Greenville. The elder Haas son has a natural penchant for guiding players to be their best (“Linked Legacy,” page 70). In our annual Men’s Issue, we present a variety of takes on this sport that so many of us love (and loathe). Once you catch the fever, though, the game is difficult to deny. It’s the pleasure of the outdoors, a superbly designed course, the camaraderie, challenge, and ever elusive hole-in-one that drives golfers of every age, young and younger, to keep at it. And whenever I play, I remember the advice of my grandmother, who’d always remind me to “put some authority behind” my swing. Wise words—both on and off the course. Blair Knobel, Editor in Chief blair@towncarolina.com


SOUL DEEP.

Growing up in Florence, South Carolina, William H. Johnson (1901-1970) dropped out of school to work for the railroad, helping his family and saving to go to New York. Once there, he took a series of odd jobs to pay for classes at the National Academy of Design. One of his instructors, Impressionist painter Charles Hawthorne, helped fund Johnson’s first trip to Paris. From there he traveled throughout Europe and North Africa, experimenting with modernist styles and palettes. After years of critical and commercial success in Scandinavia, Johnson and his wife returned to the U.S. just ahead of World War II. The GCMA is home to the largest collection of work by William H. Johnson outside the Smithsonian Museum of American Art. Since 1986, the Museum’s annual fund-raising campaign, Art for Greenville, has raised more than $11 million to purchase important works by America’s greatest artists. The 2021 campaign will help underwrite the addition of more than 30 artworks by 18 African-American artists. The exhibition Soul Deep: African-American Masterworks includes such well-known artists as David Drake, Leo Twiggs, William H. Johnson, Henry Ossawa Tanner, and Hale Woodruff along with many others. Please help us continue to grow this extraordinary educational and cultural asset—a world-class collection that’s right at home in Greenville. To learn more, visit gcma.org/support.

William H. Johnson, 1901-1970 Flowers in a Gray Vase, circa 1933

The GCMA is grateful for the continuing support of United Community Bank Foundation.

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org

Corporate Partner

GCM-21-09-Johnson_Flowers Soul Deep TOWN Ad.indd 1

Temporarily closed for construction

6/2/21 4:24 PM


Mark B. Johnston

PUBLISHER mark@communit yjournals.com

Blair Knobel

EDITOR IN CHIEF blair@towncarolina.com

Paul Mehaffey

ART DIRECTOR

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Kathryn Davé Ruta Fox Andrew Huang Abby Moore Keith M. Linda Lee Laura Linen Steven Tingle Stephanie Trotter Jac Valitchka Ashley Warlick

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

MOVE MORE NOW One-on-One, Duo, Small Group, or Virtual Personal Training

J. Morgan McCallum, Kathryn Norungolo & Sydney Taylor CONTRIBUTING DESIGNERS, PHOTOGRAPHERS & STYLISTS

Chelsey Ashford, Timothy Banks, Robin Batina-Lewis, David & Sarah Bonner, Jack Connolly, Will Crooks, Whitney Fincannon & Jason & Tara Massey Maddie De Pree

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Holly Hardin

VICE PRESIDENT, OPERATIONS GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Kristy Adair & Michael Allen Donna Johnston

MANAGER OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES

Sangeeta Hardy, Billy Leach, Mary Placito & Heather Propp Hays Sligh

SALES OPERATIONS MANAGER

Allison Gambone

ACCOUNT MANAGER

Group Classes like Yoga or Beast Mode at ZERO EXTRA COST ™

FREE childcare for household memberships while you workout & so much more!

CLIENT SERVICE MANAGERS

Lizzie Campbell, Sheldon Hubbard & Camden Johnson Kristi Fortner

ACCOUNTING & HUMAN RESOURCES

Sue Priester

CONSULTING MEMBER

Susan Schwartzkopf

Start today & join the Y!

ymcagreenville.org/join

GENERAL MANAGER

Douglas J. Greenlaw CHAIRMAN TOWN Magazine (Vol. 11, No. 8) is published monthly (12 times per year) by TOWN Greenville, LLC, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, (864) 679-1200. If you would like to have TOWN delivered to you each month, purchase an annual subscription (12 issues) for $65 at towncarolina.com/subscribe. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA.

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THE LIST THE MONTH’S MUST-DOS

AN EVENING WITH MICHAEL BUBLÉ A four-time Grammy winner, Canadian singer/songwriter Michael Bublé has dedicated himself to keeping the timeless classics of the American Songbook alive, while breathing new life into them through his singular style. The legendary crooner, who has sold over 40 million records worldwide, topped the Billboard charts with albums such as Call Me Irresponsible (2007) and Crazy Love (2009). Don’t miss this opportunity to see him at The Well. Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Sat, Aug 14, 8pm. $74-$154. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

Photograph of Michael Bublé by Evaan Kheraj

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The List TD SATURDAY MARKET

AOIFE O’DONOVAN

If your mom couldn’t convince you to eat your vegetables, maybe a trip to Greenville’s favorite farmers market will. Set your alarm on Saturday mornings and get downtown early to shop for a variety of summer produce, including seasonal delights such as blueberries, peaches, squash, and tomatoes. Being healthy never tasted so good!

The daughter of two musicians, Aoife O’Donovan spent summers studying traditional Celtic music in Ireland while in high school before attending the New England Conservatory of Music. She was a founding member of the alt-bluegrass band Crooked Still and the trio I’m With Her, and has produced three critically acclaimed solo albums. As part of the White Claw concert series, the Grammy Award–winning singer/ songwriter will shine on the TD Stage for one night only.

Main St at McBee Ave, Greenville. Thru October. Saturdays, 8am–noon. (864) 467-4494, saturdaymarketlive.com

TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sun, Aug 1, 6:30pm. Lawn, $40; Genevieve’s, $60. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

MY WAY

Photograph by Rich Gilligan

At long last, Centre Stage is thrilled to be reopening its theater with a musical tribute to Frank Sinatra. This intimate, jazz-club-style revue, conceived by David Grapes and Todd Olson, features a live jazz band and the smooth stylings of a small cast of virtuoso performers singing some of the tunes that made “Ol’ Blue Eyes” a legend. Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Thru Aug 8. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $32-$35. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

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Jay doesn’t take himself Too seriously, But he’s serious about his business. *In purchase volume. As reported by Marketrac, powered by CoreLogic® for purchase units nationally for 2012-2017. All loans subject to credit approval. Rates and fees subject to change. ©2020 PrimeLending, a PlainsCapital Company. (NMLS: 13649) Equal Housing Lender. PrimeLending is a wholly owned subsidiary of a state-chartered bank and is an exempt lender in SC. V010918

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STOMP

CHRIS TOMLIN AT HERITAGE PARK

JEANET DRESKIN: 100 YEARS

If you’ve ever wondered what all the noise is about, be sure to catch one of STOMP’s performances at the Peace Center. This is not your mama’s musical: there’s no story line in STOMP, and the cast uses matchboxes, brooms, garbage cans, and hubcaps—among other untraditional objects—to create electrifying rhythms onstage. We dare you to sit still during the riveting combination of dance, music, and theatrical performance in this high-energy audience favorite.

Lovers of contemporary Christian music should grab a ticket to this concert before it sells out. Among his countless accolades, native Texan, acclaimed singer/songwriter, and worship leader Chris Tomlin has garnered 23 Gospel Music Association Dove Awards, plus a Grammy for his 2012 album And If Our God Is for Us. His performance at the CCNB Amphitheatre promises to be as inspirational as it is delightful to the ear. CCNB Amphitheatre at Heritage Park, 861 SE Main St, Simpsonville. Sat, Aug 28, 7pm. Lawn tickets start at $52; amphitheatre seats start at $91. (864) 296-6601, ccnbamphitheatre. com/eventstickets

To honor painter Jeanet Dreskin’s 100th birthday this year, Hampton III Gallery is exhibiting a retrospective of her work. Four distinct bodies of Dreskin’s work will be displayed, from her early seascapes to her Sere paintings, which express the dilemma of overpopulation and the destruction of the environment. Meet this accomplished artist, whose work hangs in the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American Art—among other noted museums—at the reception on August 7 (3–5pm). Hampton III Gallery, 3110 Wade Hampton Blvd, Ste 10, Taylors. Thru Aug 21. Tues–Fri, 10am–5pm; Sat, 1–5pm. Free. (864) 268-2771, hamptoniiigallery.com

August 2021 Photograph courtesy of Schmidt Relations

Photograph by Steve McNicholas

Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Aug 24–25, Tues & Wed, 7:30pm. $45-$65. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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The List

Quick HITS THE DIXIE SWIM CLUB

z Five Southern women, whose lifelong friendships were forged on their college swim team, take a break from their husbands, kids, and jobs every summer at the same cottage on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Spanning a period of 30 years, this witty and touching comedy dives into the dynamics of friendship, as the women ride the waves of ups and downs in their lives. Greenville Theatre, 44 College St, Greenville. Thru Aug 15. Thurs, 7:30pm; Fri & Sat, 8pm. $30. (864) 233-6238, greenvilletheatre.org

REALLY GOOD, REALLY BIG, REALLY CHEAP BOOK SALE

z Stock up on good summer reads for the whole family and support the Greenville Literacy Association as they celebrate the 20th anniversary of their popular book sale. GLA launches the weekend with a Preview Party on Friday, Aug 6 ($50) and opens to the public on Saturday (arrive early to get the best selection). Go back on Sunday for the Bag Sale clearance, when you can fill a designated bag with books for just $10. McAlister Square, 225 S Pleasantburg Dr, Ste C-10, Greenville. Aug 6–8. Sat, 8:30am–4pm; Sun 11am–4pm. Free. (864) 467-3456, greenvilleliteracy.org/upcoming-events/book-sale Photograph by James Morton of Spencer Stanton Photography

MAC LEAPHART WITH THE PINK STONES

z Hit The Radio Room over the weekend to catch awardwinning singer/songwriter and South Carolina son Mac Leaphart deliver a darn good time with his hook-heavy roots songs. Catch tunes from his latest album, Music City Joke, and sway to the cosmic country beats of special guests The Pink Stones. The Radio Room, 110 Poinsett Hwy, Greenville. Sat, Aug 7, 8pm. $12 advance; $15 day of show. freshtix.com/events/ mac-leaphart-at-radio-room-wsg-the-pink-stones

GLOW LYRIC FESTIVAL: ROCK OPERA

z Face it, the past year’s been a doozy, but you can soothe your psyche at the Glow Lyric Theatre’s mix of song, dance, and poetry. Rock Opera confronts our recent trifecta of weathering a pandemic, racial reckoning, and cultural chaos through hits from Queen and Foreigner, songs from such musicals as Jesus Christ Superstar and Rent, and pieces from classic operas Carmen and Tosca. In-between, cast members share their personal perspectives. Kroc Center, 424 Westfield St, Greenville. Aug 19–29. Thurs–Sat, 7:30pm; Sun, 3pm. Premium seats, $48; main, $43; gallery, $38. (864) 558-4569, glowlyric.com

SUN & SEA 2021

z This group exhibit, featuring visual and sound arts, is a

one-day event to promote ocean awareness. At 6pm and 8pm, Ian Morris, founder of ListeningToSmile.com, will perform a 30-minute sonic meditation. Then local DJs will turn up the party at 9pm and entertain guests until midnight. Artisan Traders, 1274 Pendleton St, Greenville. Thurs, Aug 26, 4pm– midnight. Donations welcome. (864) 905-0166

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Greenville Fashion Week Can’t make it to New York’s Fashion Week this September? Never fear, you can enjoy all the fashion-forward fun in Greenville a month earlier. The premier four-day event struts its stuff as models rock the runway with the help of top-notch hair and makeup artists, emerging designers showcase their talent, and local fashion boutiques offer the latest trends for sale. Zen, 924 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs–Sun, Aug 12–15, times vary. $25–$75. (864) 704-7710, gvlfashionweek.com

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THE MUSICAL

FOR THE FIRST TIME IN FOREVER Broadway magic returns to Greenville! Become a season ticket holder to experience it all with the best prices, extended payment plans, and guaranteed seating for nine spectacular shows.

SINGLE TICKETS ON SALE AUGUST 6* *Frozen and Hamilton are not included


TAKE CONTROL.

LIVE PAIN FREE.

At Carolina Orthopaedic and Neurosurgical Associates, we are committed to getting you back to doing what you love. Our fellowship trained Orthopaedic Surgeons, Neurosurgeons, Pain Specialists, and Physical Therapists understand and cater to your unique needs. From sports injuries, to joint replacement, to advanced spine surgery we can offer you a care and rehabilitation plan that gets you the results you want. Call today for an appointment with one of our highly trained specialists at one of our three convenient upstate locations. We also offer Ortho Urgent Care at our Greenville and Spartanburg locations from 8 am – 4 pm Monday through Friday for unexpected orthopaedic injuries.

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Greenville 220 Roper Mountain Rd. Extension Greenville, SC 29615 Duncan 115 Deacon Tiller Ct. Duncan, SC 29334

864-583-CONA | www.cona.care


On theTown Justin & Kacie Wright

Tiffane & Charles Davis

EUPHORIA’S TAPAS & TINIS JULY 9, 2021

Gearing up for the long-awaited September food fest, guests gathered at Zen for Euphoria’s annual Tapas & Tinis event. Chef Tony Schmidt of Performance Foodservice provided tasty treats paired with summer cocktails from Tito’s Handmade Vodka & Larceny Bourbon. The 275 attendees danced the evening away to beats by Java Entertainment.

Savannah & Jonathan Porter

By JACK ROBERT PHOTOGRAPHY

Kenny Ridgell & Hillary Emanuel Daniel Napoli, Hannah Napoli & Dan Pope Matt & Mary Placito

Adam Semones & Kylie Flynn Marcus Tate, Ariel Turner, Adriana Brooks, Jacqueline Shapiro & Tyler Center

Rachel Henderson & Brandon Reese

Elizabeth White & Eugene Kim

Kevin & Jaci Totherow

Sibila Vargas & Taylor Murray

Austin Booth & Katherine Rainey AU GU ST 2021 I

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On the TOWN

Alice & Ken Littlejohn

Kristen Austin, Lillian Darby & Amy Reddick

Kelly Nunn, Megan Byrd, Fabian Unterzaucher & Lynn Greer

SHOES Art & Robin Schubert

HANDBAGS ACCESSORIES

2222 AUGUSTA ROAD, GREENVILLE 864.271.9750 INSTAGRAM @ MUSESHOESTUDIO Carlos Escobar, Katherine Escobar, Mary Evans Giles & Matt Giles

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On the TOWN CELEBRATE THE ARTS, HOSTED BY THE METROPOLITAN ARTS COUNCIL

Gerri & Terry Green

JUNE 17, 2021

Kicking off the summer season in style, the Metropolitan Arts Council thanked donors, board, staff, and officials with a celebratory fête at Avenue. The 250 patrons nibbled on delectable bites from Table 301, while swaying to lively tunes by Phat Lip. Celebrate the Arts was organized to give special appreciation to donors who continued their generous support through the pandemic.

A Touch of Kindness

Photography by BONFIRE VISUALS

Aida M. Gonzalez

Bi-Lingual Funeral Director (Español)

Anne Woods, Alan Ethridge, & Sharron Glickman

Kelly & Katherine Odom

It takes a special person to consistently show kindness, and to help families find beauty during a difficult time. But it’s second nature for Aida Gonzalez, a licensed funeral director, who views her work as not just a job, but a calling. She enjoys “finding the perfect approach for the needs of my families, allowing me to honor their loved one in a special way.” A mom of four, she loves to paint in her spare time, and is also bilingual, which allows her to bring her touch of kindness to even more families. The families Aida assists are invariably touched by her compassion and personal attention to every detail. As one family said of Aida, “You made it easy for me and sincerely joyful.”

Beverly Howard, Bob Howard, Beth Lee, Kacee Lominack & Susan Fox Leigh Irwin & Keri Hall

Sherry Smith & Mary Jane Spurgeon

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THERE’S SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE AT GCCA’S 6TH

On the TOWN

Cheryl & Steve Taylor

Lara Larson, Betsy Exton & Julia Fuller Benji Smith & Jack Smith

OPENS AUGUST 6, 6-9 PM Thomas & Ashley Gondi

Pam Sims & Jan Walker Shonna Felkel, Carolina Chandler & Kaley Sellery

Art Exhibitions, Live Music, Artist Demos, and More! The Annual Showcase is GCCA’s premiere event for artists and art lovers of all ages! We hope you’ll join us on First Friday for a new exhibition featuring more than 100 local artists, a display of youth artwork created during GCCA’s Summer Art Camps, live artist demos, the launch of our fall schedule of classes, visits with 15 studio artists—plus live music, a raffle drawing, refreshments, and more! You’ll also see a special exhibit from the 2020-21 Brandon Fellows and the announcement of artists selected for this year’s Fellowship program.

SPONSORED BY

ARTCENTERGREENVILLE.ORG 101 ABNEY ST GREENVILLE, SC 29611 Sangeeta Hardy & David Hawkins

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Allison Gambone, Victor Sanchez & Donna Johnston


On the TOWN

LIVE LOCAL RELEASE PARTY

Emma Francis

JUNE 22, 2021

In celebration of all things local, Community Journals hosted a grand time in the Village of West Greenville for the release of its 2021 Live Local publication. Guests, including business owners featured in the publication, sipped local brews at Carolina Bauernhaus while enjoying music by The Side Porch Swings. Live Local is an annual publication featuring the best businesses in the Upstate.

dedicated to the extraordinary. the exceptional. the unique.

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Amy Hammond

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Angelika Nyblom & Taylor Nyblom

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John Zimmerman & Rhett Brown

Fran Patterson & Coty Murphy

Steve Koenemann & Susan Schwarzkopf AU GU ST 2021 I

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On the TOWN

C.O.R.E. GROW STRONG VIP GRAND OPENING JUNE 17, 2021

Robert Dayton & Dianece Dayton

With the launch of its new location in Overbrook Village, C.O.R.E. Grow Strong threw a VIP Grand Opening party to celebrate the new, expanded space. Guests enjoyed a sneak peek of the facility—which includes a movement studio and a plant-based market—along with class demos. Tasty As Fit and Kuka Juice provided clean eats and drinks. By DOVE LIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY

Kristi Arledge, Haley Anderson & Emily Timms

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Jane Garrett, Jennifer Arends, Dianece Dayton, Robert Dayton, Currie Gossett, Shirlee Schuester, Liz Parker, Louis Zoorhees II & Bobby Pawell

John Concklin & Lauren Maxwell


On the TOWN

CONCERT FOR A CAUSE AT JEFF LYNCH JUNE 19, 2021

Jeff Lynch Appliance Center hosted an evening full of rock and roll for their fourth Concert for a Cause benefitting Miracle Hill’s Overcomers program, an addiction recovery center for men. In Jeff Lynch’s parking lot, guests vibed to live tunes from classic rock group Concealed Damage, while enjoying food vendors on site.

Tricia Yazici & Lori Lewallen

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75

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ANNIVERSARY

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FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK AND INSTAGRAM FOR SPECIAL SAVINGS AND EVENTS THROUGHOUT THE YEAR. Complimentary ASID Design Service (In-store or In-home) • Furniture, Accessories, Rugs, Bed Linens, Lighting, & Fabric Serving Greenville for 75 years • Third Generation, Family-owned • Best Brands, Competitive Prices Experience, Knowledge, Reputation • Website w/Live Instagram Feed oldcolonyfurniture.com | 3411 Augusta Road | Greenville, SC 29605 | 864-277-5330


weddings C O U P L E S & C E L E B R AT I O N S

New York lovebirds ALLIE STERN & MATTHEW SCHROTH returned home for an elegant celebration. By Gabrielle Grace Photography

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Weddings

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ALLIE STERN & MATTHEW SCHROTH MAY 8, 2021

T

he Stumble Inn, a boisterous bar on the Upper East Side in New York City, is the last place you’d expect to meet your future husband. But that’s where Allie met Matt one night when she and her girlfriends decided to pop in for a drink. He asked for her number, and the next week they went on their first official date. About three-and-a-half years later, Matt surprised Allie with a trip to Palm Beach for her birthday. Unbeknownst to her, Matt had planned an elaborate weekend surrounding his surprise proposal. While on a walk in a garden near the Brazilian Court Hotel, Matt asked Allie to be his wife. Westminster Presbyterian Church, Allie’s childhood church in Greenville, was the backdrop for their lovely ceremony. At the reception, a nod to New York—Matt’s hometown and the place they call home—was de rigueur, so they served Manhattans and peppered the décor with likenesses of the Statue of Liberty. Charleston-based band High Society, which includes Allie’s oldest brother, kept the party going all night long. After the festivities, Allie settled into work as a global influencer marketing manager for Clinique, and Matt as an attorney.—Kathryn Norungolo

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e opy, or’s

Weddings

KARISSA GARZONY & AIDEN MONDEAU JUNE 7, 2021

Karissa was only sixteen when she met Aiden, on the first day of her first job at Fuddruckers. He showed her around and ended the day by treating her to a cookie. She was smitten, but as she was in high school, her parents weren’t crazy about the idea of her dating. Once they got to know Aiden, however, they realized he was her perfect match. Four years later, Aiden picked the Riverbanks Botanical Gardens as the site of his proposal, in deference to Karissa’s love of plants. As they strolled along the flowerlined path to the fountain in the garden’s center, Aiden got down on one knee. True to her passion for plants, Karissa chose the Venue at Rose Springs Farm for their ceremony. The reception kicked off with a snowcone hour, followed by an elaborate grazing table for guests to enjoy. It was a true family affair, with many relatives having a hand in the big day. The couple is planning to live in Taylors.—KN By Jack Robert Photography

KATIE SPAETH & MANOJ JAIN JUNE 5, 2021 Katie and Manoj were introduced by a mutual friend—a smart friend, it seems, because just a year after they started dating, Manoj started working on an epic proposal. He originally planned a trip to New York City, but as with most travel in 2020, the pandemic cancelled their trip. Not without a backup plan, Manoj popped the question on a hike to Issaqueena Falls in Walhalla, and Katie couldn’t wait to say “yes.” Their intimate wedding ceremony on the terrace of their home in downtown Greenville was exactly as they pictured it. Manoj’s father performed the ceremony, and in her custom Gregory Ellenburg pantsuit, Katie said, “I do.” Maestro’s Bistro catered food for the small crowd, and the close-knit family enjoyed an evening of celebration. The pair remains in Greenville.—KN By Jack Robert Photography

CAROLINE HENDRICKS & JAMES MOORMAN APRIL 17, 2021 Of all the dating apps out there, Coffee Meets Bagel happens to be the one that brought Caroline and James together. Just a year after their first date, James invited Caroline to dinner downtown but instead surprised her with his signature, scratch-made eggplant parmesan at his apartment. The proposal was intimate and private, followed by a celebration the next day with both of their families. As a violin and cello duo played Bach’s cantata Wachet auf, Caroline walked down the aisle of Mitchell Road Presbyterian Church in a gown from The Poinsett Bride and an heirloom headpiece previously worn by her mother and grandmother. The reception heralded a newly opened post-COVID world, where guests enjoyed a seated dinner at The L and a party afterward fueled by DJ Jumping Jukebox. The couple lives in Greenville, where Caroline works as a physician, and James is an engineer.—KN By Ryan & Alyssa Photography hearing wedding bells? TOWN Magazine wants to publish your wedding announcement. If you currently live or grew up in the Upstate and were recently married, please write to us at TOWN Magazine, Attn: Weddings, 581 Perry Ave, Greenville, SC 29611, or e-mail weddings@towncarolina.com. Due to space constraints, inclusion is not guaranteed.

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town buzz INTERESTING PEOPLE, PLACES & THINGS

Actor and artist MIMI WYCHE explores the world of abstract landscapes.

Artwork by Mimi Wyche; photograph by Will Crooks

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TB • OUTSIDE THE BOX

SECOND ACT WHETHER PERFORMING ON STAGE OR SHAPING CANVASES IN HER ART STUDIO, MIMI WYCHE THRIVES IN THE CREATIVE REALM by M. LINDA LEE • photography by Will Crooks

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imi Wyche can’t remember a time when creativity wasn’t central to her life. Engaging in creative endeavors—from singing and acting to painting and sculpting—has long been the space where she felt most comfortable. “I was always making art, making messes, and doing theater at the Greenville Little Theatre back when I was as young as six or seven years old,” she recalls. These days her paintings take center stage, in the form of ethereal abstract landscapes that reflect a mood or a memory. She finds that the format of a landscape gives the viewer a place to enter the piece: “Here’s the ground, here’s the sky—the rest is up to your imagination.” She plays with texture by mixing cold wax with oil paint. Building up thin layers of wax and paint produces the luminous quality her work exhibits, while color, be it subtle or bold, sets the mood.


Using color and texture, Mimi Wyche (below) creates alluring abstract landscapes that invite the viewer to step inside and go where their imagination takes them.

Mimi’s path to painting has been a circuitous one. Though she majored in art at Stanford University in California, while there, she also took acting classes and voice lessons. “[Visual arts] was where I thought I was headed,” she says, “but [after college] I got an opportunity to go to New York and study with [celebrated Metropolitan Opera soprano] Eleanor Steber.” Mimi worked in New York for 20 years, appearing on Broadway and off, and as a soloist with the New York City Symphony, among other regional companies. But during intermittent periods of unemployment, her artwork was always waiting in the wings. In the past 15 years since she’s been back in her hometown of Greenville, Mimi has found herself drawn more to the visual arts. Through the interplay of ground and sky, her canvases invite viewers to launch their own exploration through the worlds she imagines.

Sharing her artwork, however, is a recent experience, and one that makes her feel vulnerable—a surprising sentiment for someone who has performed in myriad theater productions and done six one-woman shows. “To me, theater is very much about community . . . ,” the artist muses. “In singing, you’re sharing your inner self and in acting you’re sharing your emotions, but it’s always through the framework of a character—even if that character is me singing a song, I’m telling the story of that song. In painting I’m also telling a story, but it feels much more intimate.” Whether the curtain’s up or down, it’s the creative process that thrills her. “And when I’m in the flow of it, everything in the universe syncs up,” Mimi shares. “I feel connected to everything in a way that I don’t feel at any other time.” Check out Mimi Wyche’s work at mimiwychestudio.com, or at Mary Praytor Gallery, 26 S Main St, Greenville; marypraytorgallery.com

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TB • UPTOWNER

FASHION FORWARD GREENVILLE FASHION WEEK RETURNS THIS MONTH WITH FOUNDER MAEGAN HEINZ READY FOR THE RUNWAY by Stephanie Trotter • photograph by Eli Warren

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uh-bye yoga pants. Buh-bye slippers, sweatshirts, and PJs. We’re pushing the official uniform of 2020 to the back of the closet to make way for new styles coming with the return of Greenville Fashion Week. COVID forced founder and executive director Maegan Heinz to pivot with the city’s premier style event, now in its fourth year, but the result is as tight as a Miyake pleat. The Upstate native provided us with a sneak peek of the runway.

GFW is back! Yes. We are so excited! Typically, we’re on the Village Green. But 500 people under a tent in August would be a heat pocket, so we are holding it at Zen. There will be 100 looks in each show. We have 130 adult models, and 101 kids and tween models for the matinee children’s apparel show.

A seed was planted for the event while you were attending College of Charleston. Was it a hard sell to Greenville in 2016? Honestly, it was very challenging. I was 27, and here’s this young blonde walking in to solicit corporate sponsors. I knew I could do it, but it’s hard to pitch an idea that has never been done

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”I was 27, and here’s this young blonde, walking in to solicit corporate sponsors. I knew I could do it, but it’s hard to pitch an idea that’s never been done before.”—Maegan Heinz


Maegan Heinz launched Greenville Fashion Week in her late twenties out of a growing passion to establish a premier style event in her hometown. This month, the young mom will host GFW, August 12–15, at Zen.

You can’t get anything past Matt.

before. Carl Sobocinski served as a mentor and attended my very first meeting with the city. I hope I can serve in that capacity to help young entrepreneurs realize their dreams.

Tell us about your dreams growing up in Easley. Is it true your Green Wave classmates at Easley High voted you ‘best dressed’? Yes! I’ve always loved fashion. I majored in communications and thought I wanted to be a news anchor. And then I went back to school to be a nurse, but during clinicals realized I didn’t. I ended up marketing aesthetics and then decided to create Greenville Fashion Week.

Along the way, you’ve modeled and competed in pageants? I grew up in a dance world and started doing pageants in high school. I represented South Carolina at Miss United States and placed in the top 10. My background in dance and pageants gave me the skill set to put together GFW, which includes 500 people and [lots of] moving parts.

Any disasters? Back in 2019, the generator malfunctioned and the lights went out during the swimsuit portion of the show. I had a melt-down moment. All of a sudden, the attendees pulled out their cell phones and lit the runway for the models. It turned out to be a monumental moment.

How has Greenville’s fashion sense evolved since GFW began? We are a very Southern, conservative city, but we’re becoming more progressive in style trends as people move here from all over. GFW has opened up the city to other areas of fashion that folks don’t normally see and we’ve featured some great emerging designers. The first year, the new designers did not want to take risks, but now we see them putting out things you don’t typically see. That’s exciting.

SALE PENDING 23 Bingham Way

AUGUSTA ROW

Only 1 Townhome Left!

Tell us about this year’s signature awards. What can we expect? Each year, we have a top model, emerging designer, even a signature cocktail. This year, for our Wonder Women, we’re honoring essential workers. They are the true heroes, the true Wonder Women.

You’re a Wonder Woman yourself, pulling this off with a newborn. Thank you. Blakely Ann just turned eight months old. It’s funny, most people think I’m Gucci and Prada, but I am a bargain shopper, and especially now that I’m a mom, I’ve learned to take the heels off. Greenville Fashion Week, Aug 12–15, at Zen, 924 S Main St. For more information on ticket availability and show times, visit gvlfashionweek.com.

864.906.1052 | mattnocks.com | Realtor® Matt.Nocks@JHA-SothebysRealty.com AU GU ST 2021 I

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TB • COMMUNITY GETTING STARTED Membership: $95/ month or $950/year One-time Initiation Fee: $60, includes a swag kit plus your GHIN handicap system Serious Perks: Unlimited play at affiliated courses with golf carts included, exclusive events and tournaments, special discounts and gear pricing, and more

The TCC is hosting The 2021 Coastal Classic, their inaugural member/member or member/guest tournament, August 14–15, at two Top 100 courses, True Blue (left) and Caledonia, on Pawleys Island. This premier event will bring together members from major Southeastern cities.

THE IRON IS HOT THE TRAVELING COUNTRY CLUB CONNECTS GOLFERS AND MAKES THE GAME MORE ACCESSIBLE THAN EVER by J. Morgan M c Callum

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f you’ve spent any time on the green or around passionate golfers, you know that lifelong friendships are forged on the course. And long-time buddies Michael Maness, Ross VanDyck, and Eric VanDyck, the three owners of the Traveling Country Club, want to help make more of those connections happen. The idea for their fast-growing network of members and affiliated courses was hatched over Thanksgiving in 2018, and hasn’t stopped evolving or expanding since. “We had kicked around a few business ideas before, but nothing stuck,” reflects Ross. “Then my brother Eric pitched us the idea behind the TCC, and we said, ‘Wow—this is the one!’” The three men met through golf, playing together at the University of South Carolina, so they saw the power the game has to create meaningful connections between people. As their careers moved them around the country, golf was the thread that kept them in contact, until they saw an opportunity to make the lifestyle they loved more accessible than ever. “When you join a club, you meet new people, go to events, build your business network,” Ross says, “but the reality is that not very many people—especially younger folks—are capable of

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joining an expensive private club. That’s why we set out to create the TCC, to help the golf courses fill their unused tee times, and create a network that is very inclusive, affordable, and fun. We host tournaments and leagues, like many private clubs do, but make it easy for anyone to get involved.” Ross credits his lifelong passion for golf and Michael Maness’s background in the game—Maness caddied for Bill Haas and Kevin Chappell between his own pro tours—as the reason they’re able to leverage the insights that make TCC memberships an incredible value. “We started here in Greenville, and now we’ve expanded to Charleston and Charlotte. We’ve got courses in Myrtle Beach and Columbia as well,” shares Michael. In addition to giving members access to unlimited play across a portfolio of challenging and fun courses, the trio saw this as a way to preserve green spaces in danger of disappearing. “At the time, in 2018, the industry was not looking good,” Ross explains. With new home construction booming and less people playing, courses were starting to close down holes and sell their acreage. “We saw this as our opportunity to help the golf courses, especially the public courses. By filling those unused tee times, our members help keep the golf courses busy and profitable.” And getting back out on the green is beautifully simple with the TCC Clubhouse app. “You can literally pull into the parking lot of a golf course, sign up on the app within minutes, and head onto the course. You can book a tee time and play with new people, or with your buddies,” Michael adds. Whether you’re a local or a road warrior, the Traveling Country Club was designed to keep passionate golfers engaged and excited. “Ideally, anywhere you travel as a member of this network, you can find an affiliate course, or meet other members who want to play. That’s our vision,” says Michael. “You’ll never be bored.” Find out more at travelingcountryclub.com.


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ESCAPE R E G I O N A L P L A C E S & G L O B A L D E S T I N AT I O N S

Picture yourself here: from an elevation of 5,000 feet in the Great Smoky Mountains, The Swag’s sweeping views will take your breath away.

Nestled in the Smokies, THE SWAG combines a rustic mountain setting with luxe amenities.

Photograph courtesy of The Swag

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ESCAPE • TOP BUNK

SOUL GETAWAY LONG A PL ACE OF BEAUT Y A ND TR A NQUILIT Y, THE SWAG ENTERS ITS 40TH SEASON W ITH NEW OW NERS A ND ENHA NCED A MENITIES

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t was the stunning splendor of the land that Deener Matthews and her husband, Dan, discovered in the Great Smoky Mountains near Waynesville, North Carolina, in 1969 that led them to purchase 250 acres here. It proved the perfect site for the eight-bedroom log house they built as a family getaway on the bald at 5,000 feet, named for the dip, or swag, between two mountains. In 1982, by popular demand, the Matthews began to welcome guests at their home, unintentionally kicking off nearly 40 years of running The Swag as an inn. Dan and Deener finally decided to retire in 2018, around the same time that Annie and

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David Colquitt were looking to buy a business. Though Annie’s grandfather had been good friends with Dan Matthews for decades, it wasn’t until their honeymoon in 2011 that she and David first visited The Swag. There they fell in love again—this time with the land’s natural beauty and what Annie calls the site’s “true deep-soul rest.” When they heard The Swag was for sale, they jumped at the chance to carry on the warm hospitality for which the Matthews were known. Over the past couple of years, the new owners have made some changes to enhance the guest experience. For starters, you now check in at the new welcome cabin, where a glass of wine sets the mood for your visit. After parking your car, you and your luggage are transported via golf cart up to the original dogtrot cottage that serves as the inn’s main building. The addition of a gorgeous outdoor dining porch enabled the Colquitts to open last summer

Photography courtesy of The Swag

by M. Linda Lee


ASK AN EXPERT Never fear that you’ll be bored at The Swag. A wildlife expert can guide you on a hike; an Appalachian singer/ songwriter may regale you with music by the fire; or a seasoned chef will hone your skills in the kitchen—The Swag’s Experts in Residence program offers excellent options for maximizing your stay. This program, started by the original owners and expanded by the Colquitts, also features watercolorpainting lessons and talks on Appalachian history and local folklore.

Photography courtesy of The Swag

Whether you’re exploring the property, enjoying craft cocktails and farm-totable cuisine, or relaxing in your thoughtfully appointed room or suite, you’ll find a soul-satisfying respite at The Swag.

during the pandemic, and the bar adjoining the living room has become a favorite gathering spot for guests (try The Swag 75, a refreshing cocktail made with gin, lemon, seasonal fruit syrup, and Cava). A new spa downstairs in Chestnut Lodge offers facials and massages—much appreciated after a day of hiking. Below the main lodge, the Colquitts built a fire pit; plans for next season include a hot tub and workout room. Among the things that haven’t changed is the final two-mile approach to the lofty lodging. The sign claiming that steep, narrow Swag Road accommodates two-way traffic as it winds like a rattlesnake up to the welcome cabin is wildly optimistic. Annie and David also kept beloved Swag traditions like the Wednesday (and now Saturday, too) lunchtime picnic atop lovely Gooseberry Knob, the Thursday night outdoor barbecue, and evening wine and hors d’oeuvres on the dogtrot.

Set in historic chink-log cabins relocated to this site, 16 rooms are scattered around the grounds. Rooms have no TVs, enabling guests to completely unwind and disconnect from everyday life. That’s easy to do here, as the property borders Great Smoky Mountains National Park, just steps from a web of hiking trails. “We don’t want to change the heart of The Swag, that feeling of community,” says Annie. “For The Swag’s next chapter, we want to continue the Matthews’ legacy of welcoming, rest, and community, and elevate them.” The couple’s contemporary amenities complement the rustic charm of The Swag, enveloped, as it has always been, by lines of majestic ridges that seem to stretch on forever.

The Swag, 2300 Swag Rd, Waynesville, NC. (828) 926-0430, theswag.com

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I AM MADE OF RISING EXCELLENCE. I AM SOUTH CAROLINA. The University of South Carolina is home to a community of lifelong learners. With more than 60 nationally ranked programs — including #1 programs in international business, sport science and online nursing — South Carolina is preparing today’s students to become tomorrow’s leaders.

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SPORT T H E B E S T S T O R I E S O F L A N D & W AT E R

The Club golf shoe, by Armin Oehler, $295; for to page 56. Themore, Clubturn shoe

by Armin Oehler, $295.

Greenville shoe designer ARMIN OEHLER creates stylish comfort for the course.

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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SPORT • GEAR

SOLE IN ONE GREEN V ILLE DESIGNER A R MIN OEHLER L AUNCHES A NEW LINE OF GOLF SHOES by m. linda lee • photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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f, to paraphrase a popular adage, shoes make the man, then Armin Oehler creates quite the fashionable first impression. He’s always been crazy about shoes—high-end, stylish shoes, to be exact. That’s not surprising, given the fact that he grew up working in his family’s nearly 200-year-old tannery in Marbach, Germany, which supplies leather and suede for the world’s top luxury brands. An engineer by degree, Armin began sketching designs for men’s dress shoes ten years ago, and launched Oehler, LLC, in 2016. Grounded by COVID-19 last year, he built a golf simulator in his Greenville warehouse to explore his idea for golf shoes. “We made several prototypes to test in the simulator,” he says. “I didn’t want to do a traditional golf shoe; I wanted one that was more fashionable.” The version he finally settled on integrates functionality with fashion. “It’s a shoe that goes from the fairway to the clubhouse,” he says of the hybrid he calls The Club. “It’s the little black dress of golf shoes,” adds Armin’s wife, Sara, driving home the point. A line of matching belts is currently in production. As a small-batch producer, the Oehler brand is sold in men’s boutiques, where it capitalizes on its cachet—an irresistible marriage of European tradition and Southern flair. You can find Armin Oehler golf shoes locally at Rush Wilson Ltd. and Smith & James, or via arminoehler.com.

• The sole is cushioned with foam and lined above and below with luxe naturally breathable leather from the Oehler family’s tannery.

• The Club sports lean lines, setting it apart from more boxy American sneakers.

• The cross pattern on the bottom of the Vibram pro-golf rubber sole grips the green as you rotate with your swing.

Available in five colors, the sides of the leather uppers are embossed with an alligator print—a nod to the South Carolina Lowcountry. Other exotic animal prints will follow; ostrich is next in line for the fall.

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Tranquility and calmness. Cascade Collection - The Cascade Collection creates an elegant - yet livable retreat from our modern day, fast-paced lifestyles. Characterized by its light and airy neutral color palette and use of mixed materials including oak, lacquered burlap, metal accents and champagne-tone hardware.

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SPORT • PLAY

ON THE FLY A F UN, FAST-GROW ING SPORT, DISC GOLF DELI VERS ON COMPETITION A ND CA M A R A DER IE A LIKE by J. Morgan M c Callum • illustration by Timothy Banks

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T

he first time I gripped, and attempted to rip, one of the colorful discs that are the hallmark of this sport, I nearly whacked a family of five. Lesson learned: just like in traditional golf, a cautionary shout of “fore!” and time spent practicing your drive are fundamental to having fun and avoiding concussions. Along with a healthy dose of swearing, disc golf rewards hours of challenging play with personal growth and companionship on the course. Some sports, with their rigid, technical rules and time-honored traditions, feel too confining.


If you’re seeking a fun and inexpensive outdoor activity the whole family can enjoy, disc golf may be the sport for you.

TOP 10 UPSTATE COURSES as Ranked by UDisc App

Hampton Park DGC / Greenville Timmons Park / Greenville Dolly Cooper Park / Greenville Century Park / Greer Dacusville DGC / Easley The Gospel Discovery / Simpsonville Foothills DGC / Easley Holmes Park / Greenville Gower Park / Greenville Furman University / Greenville

A WORLD CHAMP LIVES HERE Maybe you’ll run into Ricky Wysocki on the course, the #2 World Champion, based out of Fort Mill, South Carolina. The Ricky Wysocki Grenade Putter, a line of discs manufactured by Innova Discs in North Carolina, is named after him.

3 FAST FACTS Disc golf is the fourth fastestgrowing sport in the United States. In 2019, there were more than 150,000 players and active members of PDGA. Ken Climo holds the record for most Championship and Masters titles at 15 total.

With its youthful enthusiasm, active experimentation, and approachable cost of entry, disc golf often falls into the basket of a game more than anything else. And not surprisingly, the game itself is played much like golf; only, rather than a ball and clubs, players use a flying disc. Formalized in the 1970s, the sport shares with traditional golf the object of completing each hole in the fewest strokes (or, in the case of disc golf, fewest throws). This is generally accomplished with three kinds of discs: putters, mid-range, and drivers, which come in a wide variety of colors, weights, and materials. With

With more than 7,000 disc golf courses in the United States and 10,000 worldwide—most of which are free to play— chances are high that there’s a course nearby.

more than 7,000 disc golf courses in the United States and 10,000 worldwide—most of which are free to play—chances are high that there’s a course nearby. The sport’s recent explosion in popularity wouldn’t have fazed the “Father of Disc Golf,” Ed Headrick, who was passionate in his belief that the game held enormous appeal. A prolific inventor nicknamed “Steady Ed,” he held dozens of patents, including two paramount to the sport: the original Frisbee in 1966 as an employee at Wham-O, and the Disc Golf Pole Hole in 1975. Headrick went on to design and install the first courses (many of which are still played today), helm the first official championship tournament, and ultimately founded the PDGA (Professional Disc Golf Association). As more new players step onto these courses—often more wooded, rambling parks than open and manicured green spaces—love for the sport, and the friendships it fosters, continues to spread across the globe. Sure, some of that interest stems from viral YouTube videos, like a recent mindblowing, 247-foot birdie thrown at the Disc Golf Pro Tour by James Conrad, or the zinger thrown by Philo Brathwaite in 2016, which has now been seen by tens of millions of people and even covered on Comedy Central. But the majority of the interest comes from families, kids, and new players of all fitness levels drawn to a healthy, inexpensive outdoor activity that transforms a beginner’s concentration and commitment into new skills, new strengths, and a lifelong love for the game. For players like me, only just cutting their teeth on a set of colorful putters, I’ve got a long way to go before I’m on par with my peers (and not just fishing discs out of creek beds). The good news? Every round is a win if you’re in good company, the weather cooperates, and you’re there to have fun. Just take it from me: until your aim is true, avoid playing too close to the playground.

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Bl ackstream®

Summer Soirée We had a blast celebrating the amazing work our Blackstream | Christie’s Residential and SVN | BlackStream Commercial agents and advisors have put in over this last year. Thank you for all that you do. Your hardwork never goes unnoticed!

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STYLE

ALL THINGS STYLISH / UNIQUE / EXTRAORDINARY Ranging from wine glasses to cake stands, this line of vintageinspired glassware is handcrafted by artisans in Poland.

Charleston-based ESTELLE COLORED GLASS will dress up any table in a kaleidoscope of color.

Photograph courtesy of Estelle Colored Glass

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STYLE • THE FIND

Entrepreneur Stephanie Hall is constantly adding new hues to her line of handmade glassware, as her palette rounds the color wheel from soft pastels to bold shades like forest green (left) and midnight blue.

TRUE COLORS ESTELLE COLORED GL ASS LI VENS UP THE TA BLE OR BA R CA RT by M. Linda Lee

Find Estelle Colored Glass locally at Paula Rallis Home (629 Augusta St), or at estellecoloredglass.com.

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Photography courtesy of Estelle Colored Glass

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mong Stephanie Hall’s fondest childhood memories are the afternoons she spent combing through antique shops near her home in Holly Hill, South Carolina, with her grandmother, Estelle. There, in the Lowcountry, Estelle would hunt for pieces to add to her collection of colored glass, which crowded into two china cabinets in her home. Known for her warm hospitality, Estelle would pull out the vintage glassware for Sunday family dinners. Paying homage to that tradition spurred Stephanie to start her own colored-glass collection. She had been working as an attorney in Washington, DC, when she decided to move back to Charleston in 2010. There, she began searching for contemporary colored-glass pieces for her own home, and coming up empty-handed, she launched Estelle Colored Glass in 2019. Named for her grandmother and inspired by her collection of antique glassware, Estelle Colored Glass features cake stands, decanters, wine glasses, rocks glasses, and Champagne coupes and flutes in a rainbow of 20 shades— and counting. “We are intent on making our way around the color wheel,” Stephanie declares. A self-proclaimed serial entrepreneur who had started a side event-rental business while working in DC, Stephanie collaborates with a 100-year-old glassmaking company in Poland to craft her artisanal products, which she describes as “vintage-inspired, yet refined and modern.” She wants her pieces to become treasured heirlooms, much as her grandmother’s glassware is to her: “I hope [Estelle Colored Glass] adds fun to customers’ tablescapes and home entertaining and adds a memorable touch to family gatherings that stays engrained for a lifetime.”


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STYLE • THE EYE Using accessories to his best advantage, Charles Davis Jr. takes dressing for success to new heights with his soon-toopen men’s boutique, A Polished Man.

C

harles Davis Jr. is accustomed to every head turning when he walks into the room. It’s usually a classroom at Brushy Creek Elementary, where the 42-year-old has served as principal for the past decade. But in reality, the fashionforward educator turns heads in every room he enters, due to his towering height and snappy dress. “I’ve always been able to transform a room with my personality,” he reveals with a humble smile. “My sense of fashion complements my personality very well. I’ve always had a passion for fashion.” He’s taken that passion to a new level this year by opening A Polished Man. “It’s been a goal of mine for quite some time to open a men’s specialty store,” he shares. “Most men’s stores carry everything, and the small things are sometimes neglected. We want to focus on the small things and help men express themselves through accessories.” Carrot & Gibbs pocket squares, Edward Armah bowties, and Saphir shoe polish are just a few of the quality items A Polished Man carries. Rarely caught walking the halls without a bowtie and a pocket square, Davis has long shown young boys the art of dressing well, and now he’s teaching the masses. “When a man feels good about how he looks, he shows up in a very different way,” he instructs. Growing up in rural Marlboro County, South Carolina, Davis admits he was shy. Over time the self-taught fashion aficionado learned to look for small things to add a little pop and color to his wardrobe. Now, as a newlywed, he also tries to complement what his wife, Tiffane, is wearing. (Never straight-up match—pull in one subtle color to hint at your outfits.) “We met on a low-key night at Breakwater,” Davis recalls. “I was wearing jeans and a button-up white shirt and summer blazer. She said my pocket square was one thing she noticed about me.” Together, they’ve created A Polished Man online, as well as pop-up shops, and this fall will open a brick-and-mortar establishment in the ONE Building in downtown Greenville. “There will always be a place for a polished man,” Davis predicts. “Men, and women who shop for men, will always need a place where they can get pocket squares, ties, underwear, a bright pair of socks, and a cool wallet. You can always transform something simple by adding a quality accessory, and we will be there to show you how to do it.” To shop, get more information, or donate a Confidence Box to a first-generation college student, visit apolishedman.com. Check out A Polished Man’s next pop-up, Sunday, August 8, at M. Judson Booksellers, 130 S Main St, Greenville, from 11am–3pm.

SHARPER IMAGE FASHION CONNOISSEUR CHA R LES DAV IS JR. CHA MPIONS MEN’S ACCESSOR IES V I A HIS BUSINESS, A POLISHED M A N by Stephanie Trotter • photograph by Will crooks

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POCKET SQUARE 101

THE PRESIDENTIAL FOLD Clean and sophisticated, for an interview or formal event. Typically displayed with a white silk, linen, or cotton pocket square. An easy, go-to fold.

THE PUFF FOLD A casual fold that can work at formal and informal events. A good way to display different patterns, like paisley, or polka dots.


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EXTRA • BOOKS

MAN OF HIS WORDS AUTHOR STEVEN TINGLE, AKA OUR MAN ABOUT TOWN, CHRONICLES HIS TRAJECTORY FROM GOLF COURSE MANAGER TO NOVELIST by Jac Valitchka • portrait by Paul Mefhafey

what to do and asked me, ‘What is something people get paid for that you would do for free?’ I loved reading, especially detective fiction, mysteries, thrillers, and I also love long-form journalism like what Esquire used to do, or The New Yorker, and I said, ‘I’d love to do that, but I don’t know how you do that.’ And she said, ‘Here’s what you do: you get a business card that says “Steven Tingle, Writer,” and you stop whining and start writing.’

T

o try to outwrite Steven Tingle is like inviting Tim McGraw to karaoke. So for the record, no matter how hard I try here, please know that if he himself were writing this about himself, it would be just that much better. Writing about himself, however, has been exactly the kind of self-reflective therapy Tingle found in the “Man About TOWN” column that runs every month in this magazine. Now, with the release of his first novel, detective fiction entitled Graveyard Fields, out this month, as well as its sequel, Cruel River, out next year—the martini-tippling, maybe-more-than-a-little-hypochondriacal miner of words of self-deprecating gold—who isn’t nearly as insecure as he plays on the page—doesn’t even balk when you pull out a Sharpie and ask him to autograph his 100th column. Tingle, we’re glad we knew you when!

As I writer I must say that when I read your stuff it’s annoying how good you are! How do you do it? (long silence) That’s very kind. I do really appreciate that. I don’t know. I came at it late. I was in my forties when I started. I’d been in the golf business for a long time. My parents owned a golf course outside of Asheville, and I was the general manager and co-owner for years, but in 2008, I decided to switch gears. My girlfriend at the time knew I was struggling to figure out

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Yes. I was so naive I thought, ‘Okay, that’s what I’ll do! I guess you just email these magazines.’ So I emailed Rolling Stone, Esquire, GQ . . . every magazine I loved, I started emailing them just waiting for the phone to ring. No, oh my. And, of course, you know . . . nothing. So I started working down the list and then finally an editor from Golfdom, a trade magazine for golf course superintendents, emailed me and he said he would give me a shot to write 600 words on employee compensation.

Oh wow, good! I was euphoric for about five minutes and then I hung up the phone and thought [expletive], and honest-toGod, I googled “How to Write a Magazine Article,” because I’d just been living in my head that I could do this, and now I had an assignment and a deadline. And then I was googling “How Do You Quote People.” I had no idea how to do any of this stuff. I finished it and sheepishly sent it off, and he sent me a check and another assignment. And then you started writing for TOWN and moved down here from Asheville. Yes, and then I asked Blair [TOWN’s editor-in-chief] if I could do “Man About TOWN” and do things around Greenville and write about them. She said ‘Sure, we’ll give it a shot.’ So I booked a whole-body exfoliation at the River Falls Spa and wrote about it. That was my first one.


Photograph courtesy of Steven Tingle

With the debut of his first work of detective fiction, Graveyard Fields, Steven Tingle, our Man About TOWN, finds his true calling.

And you wrote about it and now here we are, 100 of them later. I did it like that for a while, and then something happened, and I ended up writing more of a personal thing that wasn’t about an experience in Greenville, but just thinking about childhood or something, and I sent it and Blair said, ‘Do more of these.’ So that’s how it’s been ever since.

So when did the idea for the book happen? When Tempus [a magazine for which Tingle also wrote] folded in March 2016. I had just finished reading whatever the latest Michael Connelly book was and I loved it, and then I got jealous because I thought, you know, he’s a writer, I’m a writer, but this magazine stuff’s a lot of work! But this Connelly guy just gets to make s—t up! I want to try that. So I just started writing. And I didn’t tell anybody, really. I didn’t want anyone to know because I really didn’t think I would ever finish it. And, now, it’ll be out this month. Congratulations! How are you feeling about it? When I signed with [Crooked Lane Books],

“I hung up the phone and honest-to-God googled ‘How to Write a Magazine Article,’ because I’d just been living in my head and now I had an assignment and a deadline.” —Steven Tingle

it was a two-book deal. They wanted a sequel. So the sequel was due at the end of July.

Did you start it immediately? (laughs) Who do you think you’re talking to? Steven Tingle’s first novel Graveyard Fields will be published this month. Join him at M. Judson Booksellers on August 10 for a book-release party. For more, go to steventingle.com.

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Man About TOWN

COURSE CORRECTION THE M A N PONDERS HIS ON-AGA IN, OFF-AGA IN REL ATIONSHIP W ITH GOLF by Steven Tingle

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n a newspaper article printed during my competitive golfing career, a sportswriter with the Orlando Sentinel Star gave me the nickname “Titanic Tingle.” The piece went on to say: “The North Carolina strongman generated a near gale with his air-beating practice swings. And his bold and sometimes gambling shots eventually cost him the lead.” By the last hole of that tournament, I was in shambles. I was frustrated, exhausted, and just wanted to go home. I placed third, and immediately announced my retirement. I had more important things ahead of me, like first grade. My attitude towards golf has not changed much since my days as a fiveyear-old playing in Pee Wee tournaments. That is to say, I consider golf to be like bluegrass music, something that’s relatively enjoyable for about twenty minutes, after which I want to jump off a cliff. It’s always the same. On the first tee I’m excited and optimistic. But by the fourth green I’m ready to launch my golf bag into the nearest pond and myself into the nearest bar, where I’ll drown my sorrows and swear off golf forever, knowing full well I will eventually crawl back with my tail between my legs. For the first forty years of my life, the game was impossible to escape. My parents owned a golf course, and I grew up washing carts and mowing greens. I could play golf anytime I wanted, but I rarely took advantage of the opportunity, which seemed to perplex the course’s members. “Would you rather your parents owned a bowling alley?” they would ask. The answer was often, “Yes.” At least a bowling alley would have a juke box and be air-conditioned.

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In my twenties I became the superintendent of my parents’ course, and by the time I was thirty, I was the general manager of the facility. For me, golf was a job, not a leisure activity. But it was a job I took seriously, and at one point my handicap dropped down to a five. I considered getting my PGA card and becoming a teaching professional, which I thought might eventually lead to me getting my tour card and a shot at fame and fortune. I applied for PGA membership and swaggered up to the first tee for the Playability Test, two consecutive eighteen-hole rounds a player must complete in under a certain score. I hit my first drive out of bounds, and my second, and my third. I took a ten on the first hole, ending any reasonable hope of qualifying for membership. I shook my fist at the sky and the golf gods responded with a complacent smirk. When I left the golf business at age forty, I stored my clubs and barely touched them for the next twelve years. But last month I signed up for a lesson at the Furman golf course, just to see if anything resembling a golf swing still lived somewhere deep inside me. A kind and patient PGA professional named Tim met me on the range and asked me to hit a few balls to show him my ability. “You’re a natural,” Tim said. “It won’t take you long to get your handicap down into single digits.” I appreciated the positivity, but I knew what the golf gods were doing. Tim’s words were like a late-night text from a toxic old flame: I miss you. Let’s try again. I’m different now; we can make it work. An hour later, I walked off the range, drove home, and gently placed my clubs in the corner of the garage, where they’ll remain untouched for months, or maybe years, until the itch becomes so irritating that I have no choice but to scratch it again.


“Purveyors of Classic American Style” 23 West North St. | Downtown Greenville 864.232.2761 | rushwilson.com


by KATHRYN DAV É

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photography by PAUL MEHAFFEY


The oldest of the Haas boys swings for the green, as he transitions from player to caddie to coach—and positions himself as the go-to golf instructor in the state.

Son of longtime PGA Tour player Jay Haas, Jay Haas Jr. came to golf naturally.

BY S T E P H A N I E T R O T T E R I P O RT R A I T S BY PA U L M E H A F F E Y

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THE EARLY YEARS

IT +It all started, and almost ended, with the creek. The shallow, murky water ran alongside the fifth hole at Green Valley Country Club, and the Haas brothers couldn’t stay out of it.“Dad kept saying,‘Come on, come on. Ready golf.’

But we spent the entire hole playing down in the creek, with our golf shoes on and everything,” recalls Jay Haas Jr. “He came home and told our mom, ‘That’s it. I’m never taking them to play again.’ He told us, ‘Let me know when you really want to play, and I’ll take you then.’” Luckily for golf fans, and Greenville, the Haas boys returned to the sport a few years later, and today, they’re forging a link in a golf legacy that spans generations.

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“Dad didn’t push us into it,” shares Jay Jr., who is now director of instruction & coaching at Haas Family Golf on Pelham Road. Dad is Jay Haas Sr., winner of nine PGA tournaments, who now competes on the PGA Tour Champions (for players over 50). Although Jay Jr. and his younger brother, Bill, didn’t feel pressure from their parents, fellow players dispensed quite a bit when the boys started competing in their teens. “You’d get to the tournament and hear folks whispering, ‘That’s Jay Haas’s son,’” his oldest child remembers. “We weren’t as good as the kids who’d been playing since they were six, because we’d focused on other sports. It was frustrating because I didn’t want to embarrass myself, but as I got older, I got over it.” Both of the boys’ games also got better when they started training at Thornblade Country Club. Enough so that they helped guide Riverside High to state titles in 1999 and 2000. Jay Jr. would go on to play at Augusta State (now Augusta University) and Bill at Wake Forest, before going pro. Their father reflects upon the siblings’ successful careers with pride. “My ‘goal’ for them was to learn the game at a young age, as I had, so it would be beneficial in their lives in the business world,” Haas Sr. reveals. “I had no idea those days of hitting balls would lead to both Jay Jr. and Bill becoming professional golfers.” THE TOUR

Jay Jr. spent eight years playing professionally. By 2011, he’d married a Greenville gal (Carolyn Haas, co-owner of Twill Boutique) and missed a tour cut by two strokes, after three three-putts on the back nine. His dad suggested he caddie for his brother, simply to bank some cash for the newlyweds. The pairing worked well, with Bill finishing high in competition for about three years. “As a caddie, you have to think like a player, and be a psychologist, and be a parent, and also be able to tell them whatever it is they’re doing wrong at the time,” Jay Jr. explains. “Or, if they’re doing good, reinforce that.”

E

ventually, with brothers being brothers, and competitive ones at that, the time came (mid-tournament on the sixteenth hole at the Copperhead Course in Tampa) to part ways. “As brothers, we don’t have issues saying things to each other,” the oldest admits with a laugh. “Over two-and-a-half-years-plus of being together all the time? Think about that. We were like a married couple, but at least a married couple displays a little decorum.” Jay Jr. continued caddying until 2018, while delivering guidance for other players including Tim Clark, Scott Stallings, and his dad, Jay Sr. By then, his Greenville home was calling with three young children and a new career in coaching.


Family life lured Jay Jr. off the pro golf circuit in 2011, when he pivoted to being a caddie.

Hometown GREENVILLE, SC HEAD OF

INSTRUCTION & COACHING

HAAS FAMILY GOLF

PGA

TOUR CADDIE

2011-2018 PLAYED PROFESSIONALLY FOR

8 years

PLAYED FOR AUGUSTA STATE UNIVERSITY

"as a caddie, you have to think like a player, and be a psychologist, and be a parent . . . " — jay haas jr.

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th e

THE HOME COURSE

“Hi, Coach!” A pack of summer campers blows through the pro shop at Haas Family Golf on their way to the hitting bays. Jay Jr. tips his branded cap with a wave. “I see myself more as a teacher and coach now, as opposed to anything else,” he says. “All I can think about is what I’ve taught my students, and what they’re doing during the week. I’m working with 6- to 80-year-olds, and I’d like to eventually teach guys who are out on the tour.” When in town, his father typically stops by the center to fine-tune his stroke with his namesake. “I enjoy talking swing theory with him, and I’m surprised at how much knowledge he has gained in just a short time,” reveals Jay Sr. “The boys have different personalities. Jay seemed to always want to know how things worked, and Bill just knew they did. One’s the mechanic, the other’s the artist. It’s not surprising to see the different paths they’ve taken. Jay wants to know how the swing works, so that makes for a great instructor.”

swe e t

Thousands of golfers have trekked down Pelham Road over the past three decades on a quest to improve their game. They first visited the practice range operating under the name Pelham Tee and then the Eagle Zone. Now, weekend warriors, rookies, and pros head to Haas Family Golf, with its magic elixir for a smooth stroke with pinpoint aim. About 2018, Jay Haas Sr. approached his sons, asking if they wanted to invest in the Eagle Zone, where they’d all hit together when the boys were young. “One of my earliest memories is hitting balls at a driving range near my childhood home in Belleville, Illinois,” Haas Sr. recalls. “I’ve always thought it was a great starting point for my game. The first time I visited Pelham Tee, I thought it had good bones and great potential, and I could see myself owning a place like it one day.” The day had arrived. The range had fallen on hard times. Membership was in decline and the grounds looked like the course in Caddyshack . . . at the end of the movie. Three years ago, the Haas family, along with other investors, purchased the 23-acre facility for

H

is little brother, Bill, who still plays on tour, is also impressed. “Jay Jr. has found his calling in sharing his knowledge of the game by teaching,” Bill shares. “Whether players are high handicappers or aspiring professionals, he has a lot of knowledge that has trickled down from the family.” That family of professionals actually branches way beyond Jay Sr. The patriarch’s uncle, Bob Goalby, won the Masters in 1968. Jay Jr.’s uncle on his mother’s side, Dillard Pruitt, played on the tour for 12 years, and his dad’s brother, Jerry Haas, bounced back and forth from the Nike and PGA tours before coaching at Wake Forest. Weighing his legacy on and off the course, and having just turned 40, Jay Jr. doesn’t consider himself at the midpoint in life, but only mid-way through the front-nine. “I feel like each time I entered a new facet of the business, it was like starting over,” Jay Jr. explains. “I still caddy now and then, and when I’m 50, hope to play on the Champions Tour, but I’ve found a real love with teaching.”

The scratch golfer plays now and then, but considers himself an instructor above all else. “When I was young, I just assumed I would play golf when I got older,” he remembers thinking.“That’s what Dad does and it’s the family business. Growing up around it, you don’t realize how good they are. But golf is undoubtedly a special game to my family, and I want to share that with this community. It’s really a privilege to get to play it, and I want to help players improve as golfers, and most importantly find more enjoyment in the game. It’s my dream.” 74

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$1.8 million, and pumped another $250,000 into improvements. Mid-deal came word that Top Golf was moving in just down the road. The family considered taking a mulligan. But a few phone calls to other practice ranges revealed the sporting venue’s arrival typically increased sales. (Players want to practice to play well, before dropping serious cash on interactive golf and video games with friends.) Top Golf, the Haas name, and COVID have all helped to double activity at the 80-hitting-bay golf center, since it opened under the new ownership. It’s the largest practice facility in the Southeast and continues to experience upgrades, many based upon ranges the Haases have used around the country. “It’s been fun to see the improvements and to hear positive comments from our clients,” says Jay Sr. “In the 38 years since Jan and I have lived in Greenville, we’ve seen amazing growth and development. My hope and dream for Haas Family Golf is for it to continue to improve and be a place where people of all ages and backgrounds are introduced to the great game of golf.” And where you can get a hand from a Haas on how to hit better.

"Jay Jr. has found his calling in sharing his knowledge of the game by teaching. Whether players are high handicappers or aspiring professionals, he has a lot of knowledge that has trickled down from the family." — BILl Haas

Haas Family Golf, 8000 Pelham Rd, Greenville. (864) 288-0001, haasfamilygolf.com

(left) Coaching is what really drives Jay Jr.; (right) caddying for his brother, Bill, who took home the first-place trophy at the 2011 FedEx Cup.

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Have confidence in buying, selling, and investing in South Carolina real estate

Sam Hankins

Broker Associate BHHS C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS® 3539 Pelham Rd Greenville, SC 29615 864.561.8119 shankins@cdanjoyner.com mygreenvilleschouse.com @realtorsamhankins


eat drink FOOD FINDS & CAN’T-MISS DISHES

Shake up your cocktail rut at the hands of the skilled mixologists at this clandestine lair.

Hidden away in the new AC Hotel, THE PRESS ROOM exudes an intimate speakeasy vibe.

Photograph by Paul Mehaffey

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E D • CITY DISH

TOP SECRET NEWSWORTHY LIBATIONS A ND DELECTA BLE DISHES TELL A R ICH STORY AT THE PRESS ROOM by J. Morgan M c Callum • photography by Paul Mehaffey

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here’s something fiendishly intentional about drinking establishments like The Press Room. Something radically different from wide-open, well-lit taprooms or sprawling, stained-carpet pool halls, where elbows jostle and beverages are held as if spillage is not only accepted, but expected. Curated spaces like these demand your attention: not just to the stories being told in cheeky paintings and mixed mid-century modern furniture, but to the curious libation in your hand and to the (hopefully) synapse-firing, stimulating conversations unfolding around you.

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You might have ventured out tonight to get away and disconnect, but instead, you find yourself fully invested in the moment—complicit in allowing a clandestine experience pull you into a can’t-stoptalking-about-it, maybe-I-should-write-murder-mysteries kind of night. And the team at The Press Room, Greenville’s much-anticipated, exclusive new speakeasy inside the AC Hotel, is unabashedly guilty of making magic moments like that happen. From the second you step off the elevator, into a 1920s newspaper editor’s office and through the sliding, James Bond-esque door, there’s no turning back the page. You’re a character in the story, and this story is about to get good. For the talent behind The Press Room—including general manager John Deck and master mixologist Kelan Akers, who worked together to bring the creative vision to life—every single detail reflects both the storied history of the building and the future of modern, speakeasy-style bars. In 1919, the building became home to the newly named Greenville News, and just one year later in 1920, Prohibition


Though The Press Room is swathed in secrecy, it’s no mystery that the speakeasy’s inspired small plates and distinctive cocktails like Seeing Bowties (opposite, right), which is dubbed a “reverse Manhattan,” and Hot Off the Press margarita (left) stir up a delightful evening.

GENTLEMEN'S NIGHT OUT Striking venues for cocktails and camaraderie

EXILE

A getaway that feels like coming home is a rare find, but a very real experience at EXILE. Outside of wildly fun, beautifully crafted cocktails and had-a-helluva-day beer and whiskey pairings, the vibe in this tucked-away spot is at once familiar, like an old friend invited you in, while still somehow a departure from the ordinary night out. I blame the big imaginations, and even bigger grins, of the proprietors. 9 Anderson St, Ste B, Greenville; exilegvl.com

Swordfish Cocktail Club

Sometimes, you and your crew want to dress for the kind of polished-copper setting and eye-opening libations that could be caught on camera and mistaken for a scene from Ocean’s 11. Swordfish Cocktail Club delivers on just that: elevated, intentional service, daring suggestions, and perfect small plates—all with speakeasy details that leave guests feeling like they share a secret. 220 E Coffee St, Greenville; swordfishcocktails.com

Vault & Vator

Who knew a list of rules could be so fun? If you’re lucky enough to actually find the entrance to Vault & Vator, you’re in for an elevated and creative experience. There’s a reason this speakeasy, hidden behind the chaos of Main Street and complete with century-old details, insists on rules like no standing or cell phones—it ensures your night out is second to none. Pro tip: ask for the Dealer’s Choice. 655 S Main St, Greenville; vaultandvator.com

began. If you look closely at the framed clippings on the walls of The Press Room, you’ll notice that not only are they real artifacts, but they’re also over a century old. Playful, inspired glassware is informed by the names of Akers’s inventive cocktails, with staff favorites being the Extra Extra! and the 1874. The menu of small plates and desserts changes constantly and with the seasons, celebrating fresh berries in summer, floral ingredients in spring, and pomegranates and apples in winter—and the welcome cocktail that guests are handed as soon as they arrive is different every day. Akers delights in the unexpected—like using chemistry to alter his signature Hot Off the Press margarita—but saves the details of how, exactly, for the moment you’re sitting across from him, and he can tell you the story himself. If you’re longing to know more, you’ll simply have to seek out a rare reservation—after all, secrecy and mystery are at the heart of The Press Room experience. With only 30 seats, this little nook is designed to feel like a total departure at a different pace from its sister destinations of Juniper and Paloma. In fact, with time to unwind and take in the elevated, transportive speakeasy atmosphere around you, you’ll quickly notice that the sounds of the outside world have slipped away. If you hadn’t been paying attention on the way in, you might even start to wonder if you’re still in the AC Hotel at all. So when you’re ready for a plot twist, go looking for The Press Room. No spoilers here, but what happens next promises to be both memorable and delicious. The Press Room, inside the AC Hotel, 315 S Main St, Greenville; pressroomgvl.com

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E D • OPEN BAR British West Indies Trading Company CEO Georgia Dunn preserves a family legacy, brewing Islander Ginger Beer and other Harriott’s beverages in Greenville .

ISLAND TIME A CENTUR IES -OLD GINGER BEER TR A DITION FINDS ITS WAY TO GREEN V ILLE FROM CA R IBBEA N SHORES by Kathryn Davé • photography by Paul Mehaffey

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t doesn’t take long for things to get lost in the passage of time. Georgia Dunn, the founder and CEO of the British West Indies Trading Company, never intended to become a producer of ginger beer. But then, while working in Turks and Caicos, she began interviewing her grandparents and realized the traditional island ginger beer was vanishing with their generation. Armed with a recipe assembled from family interviews and archival research, Dunn began hand-bottling her first ginger beer, made with fresh produce, cane sugar, and Caribbean spices—as had been the tradition for hundreds of years. “I encourage everyone to talk to their elders about their food traditions so we can preserve the uniqueness of every community,” Dunn says. Her family, who founded the Turks & Caicos salt business that would eventually become Morton Salt Company, can trace its lineage directly back to Thomas

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Harriott, the English explorer who mapped much of the East Coast in the 1500s. Their family tradition of fermenting fresh ginger beer dates back almost as far. Dunn revived the original brewing process as an act of preservation and considered her cultural imperative fulfilled. “Not so fast,” said Dunn’s U.S. friends and family, who encouraged her to bring her ginger beer to the States. Rapid success after being stocked at Harris Teeter meant Dunn suddenly needed to scale production up significantly. Singing the praises of Greenville, South Carolina’s incredible water quality, the Bacardí family (yes, that one) helped Dunn connect with Thomas Creek Brewery, a family-owned beverage company that prizes quality as highly as Dunn does. Now brewed and bottled in Greenville, Harriott’s Islander Ginger Beer is nothing like the artificially sweetened, spicy, non-alcoholic ginger beer we’re used to consuming. Made only with hand-prepped lemons and limes, ginger, cane sugar, and Caribbean spices, Dunn’s ginger beer is warm and complex, with just enough alcohol (5 percent) to enjoy cold on its own or as a mixer for a Moscow or Kentucky Mule. Its immediate success prompted the creation of two new Harriott beverages—Harriott’s Hard Lemonade and Mango Mimosa—both crafted with the same commitment to whole fruit and cane sugar. No one in the Harriott family—including Dunn—could have imagined a lively beverage business growing from their traditional family leisure-time drink. But their way of life made it possible. As Dunn always says: “We are all standing on the shoulders of giants who came before us.” Find Harriott’s products locally at Harris Teeter and other select stores. For more, go to harriottslegacy.com.

A century ago, alcoholic ginger beer was the single most popular drink in America, with more than 1,500 brewers producing the low-alcohol brew. Prohibition changed all that, practically wiping the beverage from popular culture— until craft producers like Harriott’s began reviving it.


Passport to Dance 2021

T O B E N E F I T I N T E R N A T I O N A L B A L L E T

This event is not to be missed! With auctioneer Matt Holiday leading the fun, you'll enjoy a fabulous live and silent auction, delicious food catered by Chef360, and coffee bar provided by Synergy Coffee. Featured performances by dancers from International Ballet will capture your heart. The Passport to Dance bar is generously sponsored by the IB Adult Ballet Class. Tickets are $100 and Table Sponsorships 1reserved table for 62 are available for $ 0. Join us for a magical night!

SEPT 17 • GREER CITY HALL • 6:30 PM

• TICKETS ON SALE NOW •

INTERNATIONALBALLETSC.ORG/PASSPORT

Generously Sponsored By: A S S E M B L É

G U I L D


E D • KITCHEN AID

This classic tomato pie, packed with ripe fruits and pimiento cheese, is the essence of summer in a sumptuous mouthful.

PIE CHART SUMMER’S BOUNTIF UL TOM ATO CROP COOKS UP IN A PIE THAT’S A TRUE SOUTHER N CL ASSIC by Sydney Taylor • photography by Paul Mehaffey

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hile we never ate tomato pie growing up, I was always interested in the concept—a savory pie made with the garden’s endless tomato supply, held together with flaky crust and sharp cheddar. It wasn’t until I started working at Kitchen Sync that I learned the most important technique of all: draining the tomatoes. Every tomato pie I had made up until then had a beautifully crisp pie crust on the edges, and a soggy waterlogged crust on the bottom. Draining your tomatoes prevents the dreaded soggy bottom, and the homemade pimiento cheese base is the insurance policy for that crisp crust. This tomato pie is my version of a classic, and I love it for its potential of versatility. Put your own stamp on it by adding jalapeños, bacon, or roasted garlic in the pimiento cheese; or substitute your favorite cheese and scatter fresh herbs over it. Whether you serve the pie for lunch or dinner, I do think a glass of iced tea is customary.

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CLASSIC TOMATO PIE Serves 4

INGREDIENTS:

Pie Crust 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour 1 tsp. salt ¼ cup cold unsalted butter, cut into cubes ¼ cup ice water, plus more as needed Filling 3–5 large tomatoes, sliced 4 oz. cream cheese, softened 12 oz. sharp cheddar cheese, shredded ¼ cup mayonnaise 2 Tbs. pimientos 2 cloves garlic, minced ½ tsp. salt, plus more for tomatoes ¼ tsp. black pepper Hot sauce, to taste

INSTRUCTIONS:

For the pie crust, combine all-purpose flour, salt, and cold, cubed butter in a bowl. Using your fingers, rub the butter into the flour until it is broken down into smaller pieces. Stop when the butter is about pea-sized. Gradually add ¼ cup of ice water and mix together until mixture starts to form a dough, adding more water, 1 Tbs at a time, if needed. Wrap dough in plastic wrap and chill in the refrigerator for 1 hour, or overnight. Dough can be made 2–3 days in advance. Preheat oven to 375°F. On a floured surface, roll dough in a ¼-inch-thick circle. Place in a 10-inch pie plate. There should be excess dough hanging over. Trim to even the ends, if needed, then fold the excess dough underneath the sides, going all the way around the pie plate. Using your thumb and index finger on one hand and your thumb on the other hand, crimp the dough. Prick the bottom of the dough with a fork. Chill in the refrigerator for about 15 minutes, until dough is firm again. Line pie tin with parchment paper and fill with pie weights. Bake for 15–25 minutes, until crust is golden around the edges and cooked through on the bottom. Remove the pie weights and allow the crust to cool. While the crust cools, cut tomatoes into ¼-inch-wide slices. Shingle tomatoes on a tray lined with paper towels to allow any excess moisture to be released. Salt tomatoes liberally. Set aside.

I was always interested in the concept—a savory pie made with the garden’s endless tomato supply, held together with flaky crust and sharp cheddar.

Combine cream cheese, 8oz cheddar, mayonnaise, pimientos, garlic, salt, pepper, and hot sauce in a bowl. Mix well. Spoon into the bottom of the prepared pie shell. Layer the drained tomatoes on top, alternating with layers of the remaining shredded cheddar. Top with cheddar. Bake for another 25-30 minutes, until the tomatoes are juicy and the cheese is melted. Serve warm. FOR MORE RECIPES: TOWNCAROLINA.COM

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Good food. Good music. Good people giving back. FEAST BY THE FIELD in partnership with Lowes Foods

SATURDAY & SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER ��-��

TICKETS ON SALE NOW

euphoriagreenville.com


Dining Guide

T HE BE S T B A R S, C A F É S & RE S TAUR A N T S

AMERICAN The Anchorage With a focus on local produce, Chef Greg McPhee’s globally influenced menu changes almost weekly. A hoard of fresh harvest arrives daily from area growers, like Horseshoe Farm in Travelers Rest, which informs McPhee’s creative dishes. The restaurant’s menu and stellar cocktail program are updated regularly, and The Anchorage hosts frequent wine dinners. $$-$$$, D, SBR. Closed Mon–

Tues. 586 Perry Ave. (864) 219-3082, theanchoragerestaurant.com

Augusta Grill Augusta Grill is a Greenville institution featuring upscale comfort food. At the bar or in the intimate dining room, patrons can enjoy dishes such as the wild mushroom ravioli with pancetta and roasted garlic cream, or the sautéed rainbow trout with crabmeat beurre blanc. The lineup changes daily, but diners can always get Chef Bob Hackl’s highly sought-after blackberry cobbler. $$$-$$$$, D. Closed Sun &

Mon. 1818 Augusta St. (864) 242-0316, augustagrill.com

Bacon Bros. Public House You might think you know what meat lover’s heaven looks like, but if you show up at Bacon Bros. Public House gastropub, you’ll know for sure. From a board of cured, smoked, and dried meats, to a specialty sandwich, there’s no shortage of mouthwatering selections. The drink menu mirrors the food, featuring whiskeys, bourbons, bacon-infused liquors, and even smoked sorghum syrup. $$-$$$, L, D.

Closed Sunday. 3620 Pelham Rd. (864) 297-6000, baconbrospublichouse.com

The Burrow The comfort of a home-cooked meal, plus the ease of an elevated dining experience: the newest restaurant from Josh Beeby of Barley’s and Trappe Door fame does it all. A cozy setting encourages conversation and gathering, while artful dishes and cocktails serve a sense of indulgence. You can’t miss with the chargrilled octopus or the whiskey sour. $$, D,

SBR. 2017A Augusta St. (864) 412-8677, theburrowgville.com

N E W CAMP Tucked into one of the “jewel box” spaces on Camperdown Plaza, CAMP is the newest venture from the Table 301 group. The menu, designed by executive chef Drew Erickson, sparkles with regional American small plates—Wagyu beef corndog, Yucatán-style pork tostadas, stuffed calamari—reimagined with twists inspired by the four years Erickson spent working with über-chef Thomas Keller at The French Laundry in California.

$$-$$$, D, SBR. Closed Mon. 2 E Broad St, Greenville. (864) 514-2267, campgvl.com

Fork and Plough The quintessential farm-to-fork partnership between Greenbrier Farms and Chef Shawn Kelly, with its casual, familyfriendly feel, Fork and Plough brings a butcher shop, market, and restaurant to the Overbrook neighborhood. Chef Kelly masterminds an ever-changing roster of locally sourced dishes. $$$, L, D, SBR.1629 E North St. (864) 609-4249, forkandplough.com

Foxcroft Wine Co. Charlotte-based Foxcroft Wine Co. transformed the West End space vacated by Brazwells Pub into a lovely wine bar decorated with warm woods, a barrelvaulted ceiling, and racks of wine. On the menu are tasty flatbreads and truffle fries, as well as signature lamb sliders and pan-seared scallops to pair with a generous list of wines by the glass. $-$$, D. Closed Mon. 631 S Main St. (864) 906-4200, foxcroftwine.com/greenville

GB&D The restaurant’s description itself—Golden Brown & Delicious—tells you all you need to know about this joint. Locally sourced dishes of American favorites— like the killer burger on a house-made brioche bun—star at lunch. Check out the extended menu at dinner, which features an impressive repertoire of creative dishes, from its new location at The Commons. $$-$$$, L, D, SBR. 147 Welborn St, Ste B1. (864) 230-9455, eatgbnd.com

Halls Chophouse The renowned Charleston steakhouse puts down roots along the Reedy River with a selection of wet- or dry-aged steaks (USDA Prime beef flown in from Chicago’s Allen Brothers). Try a Durham Ranch elk loin with root vegetable hash, and don’t miss the lavender French toast at brunch. $$$$, L (Fri–Sat), D,

SBR. 550 S Main St. (864) 335-4200, hallschophousegreenville.com NEW

Husk Smokin’ Barbeque After spending a few months off the docket, this West End staple returns with a refreshed menu focused on all things meat. Continuing in their sustainable partnerships and quality craft, pitmaster David Jensen throws out ribs, brisket, pulled pork, and more, plus a host of scrumptious sides. Expect a heavy tribute to bourbon and whiskeys at the bar, and don’t worry, you can still order a side of those famous pork rinds. $-$$. L, D, SBR.

722 S Main St, Greenville. (864) 6270404, huskbbq.com

Larkin’s on the River Located between the Peace Center and the Reedy River, Larkin’s balances upscale dining with comfort. Start with the she-

crab soup, then select an entrée from the day’s offerings—or opt for an aged filet mignon with mashed potatoes and asparagus. Enjoy the river view on the enclosed outdoor patio and the extensive wine list. $$$-$$$$, L (Mon–Fri), D (daily),

SBR. 318 S Main St. (864) 467-9777, larkinsontheriver.com

Northampton Wine + Dine Linger in the relaxed atmosphere of Northampton’s wine bar, where elegant bar bites accompany wines by the glass or bottle. Or, stay for dinner and select from an ever-changing menu, which includes seafood, beef, and wild game. The outdoor patio is a relaxing location for a meal or a glass of wine. $$-$$$$, L, D. 211-A E Broad St. (864) 271-3919, northamptonwineanddine.com

Oak Hill Café & Farm A former faculty member in Furman University’s environmental science department, Lori Nelsen blazes a new trail in the restaurant world with co-owner Chef David Porras. The duo fulfills a long-time dream of creating a healthy, sustainable, and quality dining experience with an on-site farm and culinary research lab. Lovers of food innovation will not want to miss their multicourse tastings. $$-$$$$, D (Wed–Sat); L, SBR (Fri–Sun). 2510 Poinsett Hwy. oakhillcafe.com

N E W Reid’s Fine Foods Whether it’s a salmon plate, a bottle of wine, or a delectable pastry, Reid’s has everything a foodie heart could desire. Newly opened in the former Caviar & Bananas space, this Charlotte staple is a one-stop shop for breakfast, lunch, and a last-minute dinner party cheese board. Grab anything on the menu to go, or settle into the likes of a flat-iron steak with squash & Brussels sprouts hash, chimichurri butter, and a truffle cabernet sauce. B, L, D.

$-$$. 1 N Laurens St. (864) 283-0940, reids.com

Restaurant 17 Restaurant 17 blends contemporary European bistro with Blue Ridge bliss. The menu changes seasonally, but expect dishes from Executive Chef Haydn Shaak (formerly of The Cliffs) like the woodfired octopus with pine nut romesco, baby beets, and Georgia olive oil or the Johnny Cake with country-style prosciutto. $$$-$$$$, D, FSBR. Closed Mon. 10 Road of Vines, Travelers Rest. (864) 516-1254, restaurant17.com

Rick Erwin’s West End Grille Traditional surf-and-turf meets upscale dining at Rick Erwin’s. The dining room is decorated in rich, dark woods that, along with low lighting, create an intimate, stylish atmosphere. Entrées from Chef Scott Kroener range from sashimi-grade tuna and pan-

seared sea bass, to certified Angus beef. $$-$$$$, D. Closed Sun. 648 S Main St. (864) 232-8999, rickerwins.com

Soby’s Local flavor shines here in entrées like crab cakes with remoulade, sweet corn maque choux, mashed potatoes, and haricot verts. Their selection of 700 wines guarantees the perfect meal complement. Featuring different weekly selections, the Sunday brunch buffet showcases the chefs’ creativity. $$$-$$$$, D,

SBR. 207 S Main St. (864) 232-7007, sobys.com

Tandem Creperie & Coffeehouse Tandem lures Swamp Rabbit cyclists with aromas of Counter Culture Coffee and a happy stomach guarantee. Try The Lumberjack (cornmeal crêpe, ham, bacon, eggs, cheese, bechamel, and maple syrup) or the tasty banana nut crêpe. Stuck between savory and sweet? Split one of each with a friend in the Tandem spirit: “Together is best.” $, B, L, SBR. 2 S Main St, Travelers

Rest. (864) 610-2245, tandemcc.com

Topsoil Kitchen + Market If they can grow it, locally source it, or make it in-house, they will. Located in the former Williams Hardware space in Travelers Rest, and just off the Swamp Rabbit Trail, this restaurant and market combo serves up fresh and modern veggie-driven dishes. Find unique wines and cocktails on the menu, too. $-$$$, D. Closed Mon–Wed.

13 S Main St, Travelers Rest. (864) 517-4617, topsoilrestaurant.com

Urban Wren This newcomer in the historic Markley Station fashions a chic city atmosphere where the food takes its cues from the restaurant’s carefully curated wine selection. Round up some friends and share a selection of seasonal small plates, such as cauliflower drop dumplings and rye whiskey beef short ribs. $$$-$$$$. D. Closed Tues. 116 N Markley St. (864) 867-1081, urbanwrenwinery.com

Woodside Bistro Down-home comfort food gets a fresh spin here, where portobello burgers, wedge salads, pesto chicken sandwiches, and rainbow vegan bowls color the menu. A casual go-to spot, Woodside aims to be a welcoming dining destination for all—whether you’re a vegan or meat lover. $, L. Closed Sun. 1112 Woodside Ave. (864) 203-2333, woodsidebistro.com

KEY: Average price of a dinner entrée (lunch if dinner isn’t served): Under $10 = $ $10-$15 = $$, $16-$25 = $$$, $25+ = $$$$ Breakfast = B Lunch = L Dinner = D Sat or Sun Brunch = SBR

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SUMMER LOVIN' IN THE...

BARS & BREWERIES Bar Margaret This craft-cocktail bar takes over the former Village Grind and GB&D space on Pendleton Street with a funky fresh vibe and an eclectic variety of drinks, paired with elevated bar food. Co-owners Sarah Cochran and Chris George shepherd the cocktail program, and while curated creations are their speciality (try the cOlá fashioned), patrons can find approachable brews, wine, and non-alcoholic bevs. $-$$.

L, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 1269 Pendleton St, Greenville. barmarg.com

Rhett Brown and Kirby Stone helped us through one of the biggest transitions of our lives - moving back home after years of serving in the military. Being first time home buyers, while living across the country, Rhett and Kirby were by our side every step of the way. They are professional, kind and so easy to work with. We couldn’t have asked for a better experience. -LISA & WILL CLEVELAND

Carolina Bauernhaus Enjoy the delights of autumn with good friends and good beer at Carolina Bauernhaus. Now open in the new Poe West area, this brewery sports an impressive tap list, as well as wicker picnic tables, hanging chair swings, and a smorgasbord of yard games. Take a load off in their outdoor patio space while sipping your favorite ale. $, L, D. Closed Mon & Tues. 556 Perry Ave. (864) 553-4371, carolinabauernhaus.com

The Community Tap / Tap Trailside Convenience, expertise, and atmosphere collide at The Community Tap. Choose from a wide selection of local, national, and international brews—or have a glass from one of the ever-rotating beer and wine taps. Check out their second location at The Commons and enjoy a glass with food from Automatic Taco, GB&D, or Methodical Coffee. 217 Wade

Hampton Blvd. (864) 631-2525; Tap Trailside at The Commons, 147 Welborn St. thecommunitytap.com

N E W Eighth State Brewing If a flight of naturally blue, green, and orange beers sounds intriguing, you’d best make a beeline for Eighth State Brewing. Call them untraditional, but Cameron Owen and Adam Cribbs let their brewing skills go wild in the former Claussen Bakery space, in taps filled with off-beat libations such as Blue Skies (sour ale fruited with blueberries and passionfruit) and Abiogenesis (Imperial stout with Tahitian vanilla and banana). Also on the menu are smoothie-style hard seltzers infused with creative combinations of exotic ingredients (Morello cherry, raspberry, and lemon, anyone?). Savory accompaniments run the gamut from seasonal salads to stecca sammies. $-$$, L, D. Closed Mon–Wed.

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s ori e m ade m

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400 Augusta St, Ste 140. (864) 609-4590, eighthstatebrewing.com

864-467-0085 | MARCHANTCO.COM | INFO@MARCHANTCO.COM PHOTO CREDIT: KIM DELOACH PHOTOGRAPHY

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N E W EXILE There’s a new bar in town, with nary a television or wing in sight. If you’re craving an expertly crafted cocktail (or a local beer) in a space with style, this will become your go-to spot. Ideal for a predinner stop, an after-work drink, or for a nightcap. Closed Sun–Tues. 9 Anderson

Fixer Smoked Baltic Porter—a smooth lager with a hint of cherrywood-smoked malt. 311 E Washington St. (864) 735-0885, fireforge.beer

N E W Juniper Hop on the outdoor elevator at Camperdown Plaza to reach Juniper, the rooftop lounge atop the new AC Hotel. Expansive views abound, whether you’re sipping cocktails on the “lawn” at the Secret Garden, sharing modern American dishes in the plant-bedecked Greenhouse, or noshing on stone-fired pizza at Fire Box. True to its name, Juniper rolls out a bar program highlighting gin-based libations— complete with a gin trolley for tableside pours. $$-$$$. D. Closed Sun. 315 S Main

St. junipergvl.com

Quest Brewing Co. Eco-minded Quest satisfies your beer cravings and environmental enthusiasm in a single sip. Grab a pint of QBC’s signature West Coast–style Ellida IPA, packing a punch of flavor, or venture to the dark side with the Kaldi imperial coffee stout (crafted with locally roasted beans). Stop by for an afternoon tour, then follow up with an evening full of food truck fare and live music. Wed–Sat. 55 Airview Dr, Greenville.

(864) 272-6232, questbrewing.com

N E W Servus Biergarten Housed in a former feed and seed in downtown Simpsonville, Servus Biergarten adds an international accent to the new Warehouse at Vaughns, a smorgasbord of family-friendly eateries with plenty of indoor and outdoor seating. From doppelbock to dunkel, German beers flow freely here, so stake out a seat at the bar to discover your new favorite. Of course, you’ll want to pair it with menu items such as bretzels, wurst platters, and more authentic Saxon fare. $. L, D. Closed Mon.

109 W Trade St, Simpsonville. (864) 7571660, servusgreenville.com

Swordfish Cocktail Club The term cocktail club calls to mind a time in history when pre- (and post-) dinner drinks were not only expected but revered among friends for an evening of fun. Swordfish resurrects this perspective in downtown Greenville, with a classic collection of handcrafted cocktails and small plates that are as stunning as they are delectable. $$, D. 220 E Coffee St. Wed–Sat, 5pm–12am. (864) 434-9519, swordfishcocktails.com

Tasting Room TR Wind down on the weekend at this combination gourmet wine shop, beer tap, and sampling space. With nearly 200 wines and 150 craft beers for sale, there’s something to satisfy every palate. Not sure what vino revs your engine? Taste-test a few by the glass and pick up a favorite. Enjoy cheese and charcuterie while you sip. $$,

St. exilegvl.com

L (Sat–Sun), D (Wed–Sat), Closed Mon– Tues. 164 S Main St, Ste C, Travelers Rest. (864) 610-2020, tastingroomtr.com

Fireforge Craft Beer Fireforge brings a boozy twist to the phrase “small but mighty.” The smallbatch craft brewery made a home for itself in downtown Greenville in late June 2018, and founders Brian and Nicole Cendrowski are on a mission to push the boundaries of beer. We recommend The

N E W Taxi House Wines The bright yellow sliver of a building in the Village’s plaza was once the neighborhood taxi stand, hence this curated shop’s moniker, Taxi House Wines. Now, in collaboration with The Anchorage, the vino destination offers more than 80 unique wine selections, chosen from small, family-


owned wineries that focus on sustainability. Closed Sun & Mon. 586 Perry Ave. Tues–Sat, noon–8pm. (864) 207-0685, taxihousewines.com

The Whale Originating in Asheville, this craft joint comes to South Main with a plethora of whale brews—rare and sought-after beers like the exclusive Spreadsheets and Deadlines hazy IPA, brewed just up the mountain in North Carolina. Having a hard time choosing? Knowledgeable staff are on hand to help you find the beer just for you. 1108 S Main St, Ste #116. (864) 263-7529, thewhalegvl.com

CAFÉS Bridge City Coffee A coffee shop with a mission, Bridge City’s philosophy is all in the name. The local roaster seeks to uphold community values by partnering with area organizations to offer employment opportunities for underresourced teens and adults. The fresh space presents a variety of drinks crafted with in-house roasted beans. Getting hangry? A selection of treats is also available. $-$$. B, L. Closed Sun. 1520 Wade Hampton Blvd. bridgecity.coffee

Coffee Underground Coffee Underground boasts a wide selection of specialty coffees and dreamy desserts like the peanut butter pie with graham cracker crust and a peanut butter and vanilla mousse. If you’re craving more substantial fare, choose from a splendid breakfast-anytime option, sandwiches, soups, salads, and more. $-$$, B, L, D, SBR. 1 E Coffee St. (864) 2980494, coffeeunderground.info

Cohesive Coffee Take a seat and sip on a drinkable work of art at Cohesive Coffee at The Junction. Choose from a varied mix of coffee and tea creations to enjoy while working and studying—or book the shop as a unique venue for your next event. From a new coffee drinker to a coffee connoisseur, there’s a little something for everyone. $, B,

L, D. Closed Sunday. 301 Airport Rd Unit 1. (864) 202-6538, cohesivecoffee.com

Due South Coffee Roasters Birds Fly South Ale Project no longer has a monopoly on cold brews now that Due South has set up shop in Hampton Station. The coffee shop sports a café vibe, with baked goodies like Swamp Fox Doughnuts complementing espresso drinks and cold brew nitro (infused with nitrogen). Beans, sourced from around the globe, are roasted on-site. $, B, L. 1320

Hampton Ave Ext, 4B. (864) 283-6680, duesouthcoffee.com

Grateful Brew A brew joint where you can enjoy both the non-alcoholic and alcoholic varieties, Grateful Brew provides guests with made-to-order Counter Culture espressos, pour-overs, and locally crafted beer. Enjoy food trucks most nights, or bring your own grub. The Brew welcomes every member of the family, even those of the four-legged sort. $, B, L, D. Closed Sunday. 501 S Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 558-0767, gratefulbrewgvl.com

Kuka Juice Created by nutrition mavens Abigail Mitchell and Samantha Shaw, Kuka doles out cold-

pressed craft with health-minded passion. Grab the ginger binger juice, or dig into a made-to-order bowl. Paninis, soups, toasts, smoothies, and more are also available. $, B,

L. 580 Perry Ave, Greenville. (864) 905-1214, kukajuice.com

Methodical Coffee Whether it’s the white marble countertops or the gleaming Slayer espresso machine, Methodical is a coffee bar built for taste. Coffee guru Will Shurtz, designer Marco Suarez, and hotelier David Baker ensure there’s plenty of substance to go with style. With single-origin espressos, wine varieties, and now a café menu, it’s all worth the rave. $-$$, B, L. 101 N Main St, Ste D; 207 Wade Hampton Blvd; 147 Welborn St. methodicalcoffee.com

Mountain Goat Greenville A destination for brews and bikes, Mountain Goat proudly serves Methodical Coffee, along with more than 40 types of beer and wine. The sleek, industrial space provides a friendly atmosphere to sip on your beverage of choice, but be sure to check the food truck schedule. Plus, every purchase helps provide tutoring, mentoring, and job opportunities for at-risk youth in the community. $-$$. B, L, Closed Sunday. 120 Shaw St. mountaingoatgvl.com

O-CHA Tea Bar A trip to O-CHA will have you considering tea in an entirely new light. This sleek space, located right on the river in Falls Park, specializes in bubble tea—flavored teas with chewy tapioca pearls. For a more intense cooling experience, try the mochi ice cream. The dessert combines the chewy Japanese confection (a soft, pounded sticky rice cake) with ice cream fillings in fun flavors: tiramisu, green tea chocolate, mango, and more. $, B, L, D. 300 River St, Ste 122. (864) 283-6702, ochateabaronline.com

Old Europe Located in the West End, Old Europe satisfies your sweet tooth with dozens of decadent pastries and desserts. Éclairs and cookies pair well with an extensive coffee selection, while savory breakfast items are always on hand. Sink into a slice of opera cake, paired with a glass of Champagne. $, B, L, D. 716 S. Main St. Sun–Thurs, 8am– 9pm, Fri–Sat, 8am–11pm. (864) 775-0210, oldeuropedesserts.com N E W The Spatula Café It can be challenging to find a lunch spot that satisfies both meat-lovers and vegans, but Spatula Café does, and then some. Open for breakfast and lunch, seven days a week, Spatula offers dishes like a tofu scramble wrap alongside a prosciutto bagel, and duck alongside marinated tempeh. Don’t just focus on the meals, though, because their baked goods truly shine. Check out the vegan cinnamon roll, it’s delectable to any type of eater.

$, B, L. 118 Smythe St, Greenville. (864) 2367467, thespatulacafe.com

Southern Pressed Juicery A healthy-eaters haven, Southern Pressed Juicery offers super-food fans organic smoothies, bowls, juices, and more. Try a power-packed energy bowl like the dragon blood, a hot-pink concoction of dragon fruit, almond milk, banana, layered with buckwheat granola, raw honey, coconut chips, kiwi, and bee pollen. $-$$, B, L. 2 W Washington St. (864) 729-8626, southernpressedjuicery.com

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Hope...

Sun Belly Café Week by week, the full plant-based menu at this westside spot changes to accommodate seasonal dishes and fresh, wholesome ingredients. The wild mushroom pho is all the rage, but if you’re on the go, pick up a tasty $6 vegan salad. Options for meal prep and family-sized lasagnas mean healthy cooking is always on the table. $-$$, B, L. Closed Sunday.

Kairos Greek Kitchen This Charleston-originated spot serves up heaping portions of traditional Mediterranean cuisine, like slow-roasted kabobs that explode with flavor even before you dip them into the tzatziki sauce. Their choose-your-own approach leads to creative salad combos, and you can also turn any meal into a pita wrap, bowl, or platter. $-$$, L, D. 1800 Augusta St. (864)

Swamp Rabbit Café & Grocery Grocery store, neighborhood café. Local produce, delicious food. These intersections are what make the Swamp Rabbit Café a staple. But new to the operation is wood-fired pizza. Sourcing every ingredient from area vendors, the ever-changing toppings feature local cheeses and fresh-from-the-farm produce. Beer taps flow with excellent local suds.

Mekong Taste the nuances of fine Vietnamese cuisine at Mekong. Favorites include the grilled pork vermicelli: marinated pork, lettuce, cucumber, bean sprouts, mint, cilantro, peanuts, and crispy shallots, and the spring and summer rolls. Also try the Vietnamese crêpes or the pho, which is flavored with fresh herbs from the restaurant’s home-grown herb garden. $, L, D. Closed Mon. 2013

1409 West Blue Ridge Dr. (404) 309-7791

$, B, L, D. 205 Cedar Lane Rd. (864) 2553385, swamprabbitcafe.com

The Village Grind Tucked between art galleries and eclectic shops in the heart of Pendleton Street, The Village Grind is a cheerful, light-filled space for java lovers. Emphasizing community, the coffeehouse brews up beans by a variety of local roasters and serves flaky treats. $, B, L.

1258 Pendleton St. (864) 915-8600

As the purse is emptied, the heart is filled.

It is with great pleasure we announce our return to hosting an in-person event for our 15th Annual Handbags for Hope Purse Auction!

“Best Girls’ Night Out”

Thursday, September 30, 2021 • 6 PM - 9 PM The Huguenot Loft at The Peace Center Greenville, SC Purchase tickets for $40 online at SCOvarianCancer.org Proceeds benefit the South Carolina Ovarian Cancer Foundation.

– TO DONATE AND FOR MORE INFORMATION –

www.SCOvarianCancer.org email: info@scovariancancer.org

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Two Chefs Catering & Café Count on this deli for fast, high-quality food, from homemade soups to a traditional grinder and a turkey melt. Grab “crafted carryout” entrées and sides, or impress last-minute guests with roasted turkey and Parmesan potatoes. Choose from the menu, or check back for daily specials. $-$$, B, L, D. Closed Sun. 644 N Main St, Ste 107. (864) 370-9336, twochefscafeandmarket.com

Upcountry Provisions Serving up gourmet sandwiches on freshmade bread, Upcountry Provisions is well worth a trip to Travelers Rest for breakfast or an extended lunch break. Snack on the shop’s daily crafted cookies, scones, and muffins, or bite into a devil dog BLT with hormone-free meat on just-baked white focaccia. $, B, L, D. Closed Sundays. 6809 State Park Rd, Travelers Rest. (864) 8348433, upcountryprovisions.com

ETHNIC

520-1723, kairosgreekkitchen.com

Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 244-1314, mekongrestaurantgreenville.com

Pita House The Pita House has been family-operated since 1989. Inside, it’s bare bones, but the cognoscenti come here for tasty Middle Eastern fare such as hummus, falafel, kibbeh, and shwarma. And save room for baklava and other Mediterranean sweets for dessert. Also, check out the grocery in the back of the restaurant for some homemade inspiration. $, L, D. Closed Sun. 495 S Pleasantburg Dr, #B. (864) 271-9895, pitahousesc.com

Sacha’s Café Bright walls and a long, inviting bar make a sunny backdrop in which to chow down on authentic Colombian food, like arepas and patacones, at Sacha’s. Hungry groups can order the fiesta platter, a sampler that serves six people. To drink, try one of the natural fruit juices, or the imported cervezas. $. L, D. 1001 N Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 232-3232, sachascafe.com

Swad Tucked off of Laurens Road, this venerable family-run Indian restaurant hones in on vegetarian cuisine. South Indian specialties such as idli (steamed rice cakes) and dosas (thin rice crepes) served with sambar (lentil stew) delight regulars, while those biding their budget go for the value meals that come with basmati rice or naan. $, L, D.

1421 Laurens Rd. (864) 233-2089

Asada Asada, a brick-and-mortar taqueria on Wade Hampton Boulevard, serves traditional Mission-style fare. Grab a bite of flavor with the grilled sweet potatoes & leeks sopes, a savory vegan dish served on scratch-made sopes topped with homemade charred red peppers and guajillo romesco salsa, and queso fresco for the dairy-inclined. $-$$, L, D. Closed

N E W TruBroth TruBroth takes healing arts and blends them seamlessly into deliciously crafted meals. Appease your curiosity with a visit to this Travelers Rest gem, which offers a varied mix of Vietnamese staples, healthhappy bites, and coffee. $$, L, D. 36A S Main

Sun & Mon. 903 Wade Hampton Blvd. (864) 770-3450, asadarestaurant.com

EUROPEAN

Asia Pacific Deemed the largest Asian supermarket in Greenville, Asia Pacific also doubles as a restaurant with a host of authentic cuisine. The menu is pages long, with more than 100 options and a multitude of soups, noodles, and combinations. If you’re planning a visit, be sure your stomach is as big as your eyes. $-$$, L, D, Mon–Sun

Bake Room The final addition to The Commons food hall, Bake Room provides a tasty touch. Naturally leavened breads and handmade pastries are baked in Wade Taylor’s German deck oven and Swedish rack oven, and are the perfect complement to a coffee from Methodical, strategically placed right next door. $, B, L. 147 Welborn

10am–9pm. 420 N Pleasantburg Dr. (864) 603-1377, asiapacificgreenville.com

St, Travelers Rest. Sun–Thurs. (864) 610-0513, trubrothcoffee.com

St, Greenville. Wed–Sun, 8am–3pm. @sc_bakeroom


Jianna With stellar views of Main Street from its wrap-around terrace, this modern Italian osteria offers patrons daily house-made pastas, the region’s freshest seasonal ingredients, and, of course, oysters—all led by famed chef Michael Kramer. Grab a cocktail or a glass of wine, and nosh on pasta dishes like potato gnocchi, radiatori, or tonnarelli. $$-$$$, L (Sat–

Sun), D. 207 S Main St. (864) 720-2200, jiannagreenville.com

The Lazy Goat The Lazy Goat’s tapas-style menu is distinctly Mediterranean. Sample from the Graze and Nibble dishes, such as the crispy Brussels sprouts with Manchego shavings and sherry glacé. For a unique entrée, try the duck confit pizza with a sour cherry vinaigrette and a farm egg. An extensive variety of wine is available

in addition to a full bar. $$-$$$, L, D. 170 River Pl. (864) 679-5299, thelazygoat.com Limoncello This latest Larkin’s spot serves up Italian cuisine on the corner of River and Broad streets. The menu ranges from pesto pizzas to chicken marsala to classics like spaghetti and meatballs—but the real winner is an all-Italian wine list. Cap off your meal with the housemade limoncello gelato.

Save Time. Save Money.

$$-$$$, L, D. 401 River St. (864) 263-7000, limoncellogvl.com

Luna Rosa The streets of Italy intersect the streets of Greenville at Luna Rosa’s fresh spot on South Main, bringing more than just tasty gelato to the table.The Luna Rosa family celebrates the concept that community starts in the kitchen, and they welcome

Fresh, Healthy, Convenient. Now Open at: 2017-B Augusta St. Greenville, SC 29605 864.509.6730 Photograph by Cameron Reynolds

PARSLEY & MINT Mediterranean favorites like savory hummus and crispy falafel feature prominently at this brand-new eatery, while tangy tzatziki pairs perfectly with mouthwatering citrus chicken and tender lamb kofta. Homemade dressings elevate herbed flavor profiles to new heights. Bonus: the Main Street spot features a floor-to-ceiling plant wall, making it the perfect spot for lunch and a selfie. $, L, D. 600 S Main St, Unit 101. (864) 412-8199, parsleyandmint.com

5018 Old Spartanburg Rd. Taylors, SC 29687 864.252.4227

For menu and online ordering visit www.leankitchencogvl.com Find us on Instagram @leankitchenco.gvl

You select. We deliver.

Chef driven meals that are made from scratch and packed with protein. Delivery Available. AU GU ST 2021 I

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you into theirs for a meal. From cool gelato options—think exotic mango or piña colada—or a warm Monte Cristo. There’s plenty of flavor to fulfill your cravings. $-$$, L, D. Closed Monday. 123 S Main St. (864) 241-4040, lunarosagelato.com

Pasta Addict This Italian haven satisfies at West End outdoor food hall Gather GVL. From gnocchi to tortellini, indulging in cheesy goodness is easy out of their iconic cone containers. Pair your favorite bottle of vino with a bowl of fresh spaghetti alla chitarra, featuring San Marzano D.O.P. tomatoes, fresh mozzarella, toasted breadcrumbs, and Addict oil. $, D, Sun lunch. Closed Mon. 126 Augusta St. (864) 404-0095, pastaddict.com

N E W Paloma This restaurant on the ground floor of the chic AC Hotel is a new hotspot in downtown Greenville. The wraparound bar takes center stage in the stunning space, where glass walls open onto a small covered patio. Charcuterie and cheese boards and Spanish-inspired small plates by Chef Fernando Coppola complement house cocktails such as the Wild Flower, a vibrant coral-colored quaff made with peach vodka, Aperol, and lemon, garnished with edible flowers. $$-$$$. D. 315 S Main St.

Mike Avants wearing icBerlin

GARRISON OPTICIANS Fine European Eyewear

McDaniel Village | 1922 Augusta Street, Suite 109 Monday-Friday by appointment

864-271-1812 | GarrisonOpticians.com

(864) 720-2950, palomagvl.com

Ristorante Bergamo Open since 1986, Ristorante Bergamo focuses on fresh produce and Northern Italian cuisine: fresh mussels sautéed in olive oil, garlic, and white wine, veal with homegrown organic herbs, and pasta creations such as linguine with shrimp and mussels. The bar fronts 14-foot windows along Main Street, making it a prime location for enjoying a glass while people-watching. $$$, D. Closed Sun

& Mon. 100 N Main St. (864) 271-8667, ristorantebergamo.com

Stella’s Southern Brasserie Boasting French flair and fare, this sister to Stella’s Southern Bistro is the second of Jason and Julia Scholz’s eateries. Stationed in Hollingsworth Park, French staples like blue-black mussel shells with smoked tomato broth, Marsala-spiked onion soup gratinée, and roasted game hen are served up daily in a lively, chic environment. Don’t miss the breakfast pastries. $$-$$$. B, L, D, SBR. 340 Rocky

Greenville’s Underground Jazz Series

Slope Rd, Ste 100, Greenville. (864) 6266900, stellasbrasserie.com

THE WHEEL SESSIONS “you’ll be amazed” Featuring regional and international jazz artists

August 19 - Jorge Garcia Quartet

TICKETS AND SHOW DETAILS:

Jorge Garcia

kmkorschgen@gmail.com | 312-520-2760 www.wheelsessions.com

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Coastal Crust Now in the Village of West Greenville, these Neapolitan-style pizza pies are baked in a wood-fired brick oven and topped with local produce from Reedy River Farms. Check out the aptly-named West Village pie, a classic pepperoni pizza punched up with burrata, caramelized onions, sautéed peppers, and sausage.

Dr, Greenville. (864) 252-4700, dalspizzagvl.com

Sidewall Pizza Company This pizza joint is a fast favorite with its handcrafted, brick-oven pies made from local ingredients. But their salads are nothing to ignore, not to mention dessert: the homemade ice cream will make you forget about those fellas named Ben & Jerry. $$, L, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 35 S

Main St, Travelers Rest, (864) 610-0527; 99 Cleveland St, (864) 558-0235; 3598 Pelham Rd, (864) 991-8748, sidewallpizza.com

Stone Pizza Serving both Neapolitan- and New York–style pizzas, this spot is ideal for a classic family outing or catching the game with a few friends. Stone and its fire-inspired pies are crafted with housemade mozzarella, San Marzano tomatoes, Caputo flour, and baked in a wood-fired oven. $$, L (Sat & Sun), D. 500 E Park Ave.

(864) 609-4490, stonepizzacompany.com

World Piece From the owners of downtown’s beloved Coffee Underground, World Piece brings Chicago-style pizza to Stone Avenue. Offering a line-up of draft beers and menu features like buffalo chicken wings, salads, burgers, french fries, and, of course, savory pies, this pizza joint ensures there’s something for everyone. $-$$. L, D. 109 West Stone Ave, Ste A1. (864) 568-5221, worldpiecemenu.com

TA C O S Automatic Taco Since 2015, Nick Thomas has delivered new wonders and old favorites from his food truck, treating the tortilla as a work of art. From its new brick-and-mortar spot in The Commons, Auto continues to serve up creative takes on tacos, with standout chips and guacamole, salsa, sides, and cocktails. $-$$, L, D. 147 Welborn St. (404) 372-2266, automatictaco.com

Papi’s Tacos Jorge “Papi” Baralles brings family tradition and the familiar childhood flavors of Cuautla, Mexico, to this walk-up taqueria on the Reedy River. The menu is short and to the point. Get your tacos with shrimp, barbacoa, al pastor, carne asada, carnitas, or chicken and chorizo, or sample some gelato in the display case. $, L, D. 300 River

St. (864) 373-7274, eatpapistacos.com

White Duck Taco Shop White Duck sets up shop at Hampton Station in the Water Tower District, and feels right at home next to Birds Fly South Ale Project. Try the Bangkok shrimp taco or the mushroom potato with romesco, and pair with their fresh peach sangria or an ale from Birds Fly South’s rotation. $-$$, L, D. Closed Sun & Mon. 1320 Hampton Ave, Ext Ste 12B. whiteducktacoshop.com

$$, L, D. 1254 Pendleton St. (843) 654-9606, coastalcrustgreenville.com

September 17 - Tom Wright

Reimagining Billy Joel

PIZZA

guests can enjoy savory pizzas, calzones, and signature CalJoes. $$, L, D. 17 Mohawk

D’Allesandro’s Pizza Hailing from Charleston, D’Allesandro’s brings dough heaven to Greenville. The D’Allesandro brothers’ philosophy is simple—if the pizza is good and the beer is cold, people will come. The shop pushes out pies in the North Main area, where

TOWN accepts no compensation for Dining Guide reviews and selects entries by its editorial discretion. Reviews are conducted anonymously.


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CREATIVE

by DESIGN

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MY WAY At long last, Centre Stage is thrilled to be reopening its theater with a musical tribute to Frank Sinatra. This intimate, jazz-club-style revue, conceived by David Grapes and Todd Olson, features a live jazz band and the smooth stylings of a small cast of virtuoso performers singing some of the tunes that made “Ol’ Blue Eyes” a legend.

Centre Stage, 501 River St, Greenville. Thurs–Sat, 8pm; Sun, 3pm. $32-$35. (864) 233-6733, centrestage.org

Thru 15 My Way | Thru August 8

Come Visit Us And See Our Progress! We will remain open during construction to improve our store for the years to come.

THE DIXIE SWIM CLUB Five Southern women, whose lifelong friendships were forged on their college swim team, take a break

art

visual & sound

Multiple

Artists

exhibit

Greenville Theatre, 44 College St, Greenville. Thurs, 7:30pm; Fri & Sat, 8pm. $30. (864) 233-6238, greenvilletheatre.org

Thru 21

JEANET DRESKIN: 100 YEARS To honor painter Jeanet Dreskin’s 100th birthday this year, Hampton III Gallery is exhibiting a retrospective of her work. Four distinct bodies of Dreskin’s work will be displayed, from her early seascapes to her Sere paintings, which express the dilemma of overpopulation and the destruction of the environment. Meet this accomplished artist, whose work hangs in the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American Art— among other noted museums—at the reception on August 7 (3–5pm).

Artisan Traders

1274 Pendleton St. Greenville, SC 29611

SUN&SEA 2021 AUG26 Village of West Greenville

4th Thursday

scan with your phone

Located in the Historic Village of West Greenville. Parking available across Irvine Street below the church during construction.

1250 PENDLETON STREET, GREENVILLE PaceJewelers.com • 864-232-3436 •

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@pacejewelers

6PM & 8PM SONIC MEDITATION

Ian Morris, founder of listeningtosmile.com DJ(s) 9PM to Midnight

Promoting Ocean Awareness Donation $ Appreciated. DOORS OPEN at 4PM

Mini Sere XX, by Jeanet Dreskin, courtesy of Hampton III Gallery

ons

AUG

Photograph by Escobar Photography

T MI N’

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from their husbands, kids, and jobs every summer at the same cottage on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Spanning a period of 30 years, this witty and touching comedy dives into the dynamics of friendship, as the women ride the waves of ups and downs in their lives.

AUGUST

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Town Scene


Hampton III Gallery, 3110 Wade Hampton Blvd, Ste 10, Taylors. Tues–Fri, 10am–5pm; Sat, 1–5pm. Free. (864) 268-2771, hamptoniiigallery.com

Mini Sere XX, by Jeanet Dreskin, courtesy of Hampton III Gallery

Thru 25

KAT DE LA CRUZ EXHIBITION When she’s not practicing her Jedi engineering skills fixing bikes at the Village Wrench, Kat De La Cruz creates art from discarded and recycled goods. Her exhibition at GCCA this month envisions a sustainable and collaborative future where members of the community put all their resources to good use. Education, exploration, and empowerment are recurring themes in her work. Greenville Center for Creative Arts, 2nd-floor Community Gallery, 101 Abney St, Greenville. Tues–Fri, 9am–5pm, Sat, 11am–3pm. Free. (864) 735-3948, artcentergreenville.org

Thru Sept 4

SALLEY MAVOR: SOCIAL FABRIC The Upcountry History Museum has partnered with award-winning fiber artist Salley Mavor on a second exhibition project: Social Fabric.

Salley’s rich miniature worlds are bursting with hand-stitched characters, props, and scenery, all crafted with her distinctive blend of materials and personal style. The exhibition offers a three-dimensional look at cultural diversity, migration, and the beauty of humanity—making it a perfect artistic experience for all ages.

Upcountry History Museum, 540 Buncombe St, Greenville. Tues–Sat, 10am–5pm. Adults, $10; children (4-18), $8. (864) 467-3100, upcountryhistory.org

Thru Sept 4

REFLECTIONS ON A SOUTHERN SUMMER Reminisce on the relaxed, leisurely days of summer with The Johnson Collection Library’s presentation: Reflections on a Southern Summer. The exhibition will showcase works that view the South as a summer destination and others that illustrate it as one’s homeplace. Featured artists include Eugene Thomason, Spartanburg native Margaret Law, and more. TJC Gallery, 154 W Main St, Spartanburg. Wed–Fri & 1st Sat of month, noon–4pm. (864) 594-5834, thejohnsoncollection.org/ exhibitions

Jeanet Dreskin: 100 Years | Thru August 21

Family Owned & Operated for 60 Years

GREENVILLE 535 Woodruff Road 864.288.6290 GREENVILLE 7 Task Industrial Court 864.297.1496 ANDERSON 1718 Pearman Dairy Road 864.225.0884 SPARTANBURG 530 S. Blackstock Road 864.587.9732 PHOTO BY SPEARTEK TILE

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DRIVE After being benched last season owing to COVID, the Greenville Drive is back at the bat and raring to hit one out of the park. Come on out to the ballgame to watch the Drive play at their home field and appreciate all those things you missed last summer about baseball in Greenville: hotdogs, beer, the scale model of Fenway Park’s Green Monster, and, of course, Reedy Rip’It. Fluor Field, 945 S Main St, Greenville. Dates & times vary. General admission, $10. (864) 240-4500, greenvilledrive.com

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AOIFE O’DONOVAN The daughter of two musicians, Aoife O’Donovan spent summers studying traditional Celtic music in Ireland while in high school before attending the New England Conservatory of Music. She was a founding member of the alt-bluegrass band Crooked Still and the trio I’m With Her, and has produced three critically acclaimed solo albums. As part of the White Claw concert series, the Grammy Award-winning singer/ songwriter will shine on the TD Stage for one night only.

TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Sun, 6:30pm. Lawn, $40; Genevieve’s, $60. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

4–25

GREENVILLE HERITAGE SOUNDCHECK Put your hands together for live concerts! This series of outdoor concerts takes the TD Stage behind the Peace Center on Wednesday evenings through September. This month’s band-width ranges from the party bands Hot As A Pepper and Trey Francis and Baby Freak, to the country stylings of the Kenny George Band. Seating is available in T-Mobile Safe Space Pods of four people each or general admission (free) on the lawn. TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Wednesdays, 6–9pm. Pods, $10 each; sold in groups of 4. (864) 232-2273, greenvillesc.gov/ 1814/Greenville-Heritage-Sound-Check

4–25

SIMPSONVILLE SUMMER MUSIC SERIES & FOOD TRUCK RODEO Summer sizzles in Simpsonville with music and food trucks in Heritage Park. In August, the sounds include R&B by Chocolate Chip & Company, the country crooning of the Luke

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Photograph by Barry Peters

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Aoife O’Donovan | August 1

Thru Sept 5


Smith Band, classic rock from the Reservoir Dogs, and Randomonium’s mix of songs from all decades and genres. So bring your blankets, stake out a socially distanced circle on the lawn, and rock on.

Really Good, Really Big, Really Cheap Book Sale | August 6–8

CCNB Amphitheatre at Heritage Park, 861 SE Main St, Simpsonville. Wednesdays, 6–9pm. Free. (864) 838-8051, svillesummerseries.com

Photograph by Barry Peters

6–8

REALLY GOOD, REALLY BIG, REALLY CHEAP BOOK SALE Stock up on good summer reads for the whole family and support the Greenville Literacy Association as they celebrate the 20th anniversary of their popular book sale. GLA launches the weekend with a Preview Party on Friday, Aug 6 ($50), and opens to the public on Saturday (arrive early to get the best selection). Go back on Sunday for the Bag Sale clearance, when you can fill a designated bag with books for just $10.

McAlister Square, 225 S Pleasantburg Dr, Ste C-10, Greenville. Sat, 8:30am–4pm; Sun, 11am–4pm. Free. (864) 467-3456, greenvilleliteracy.org/upcoming-events/ book-sale

6–15

IN THE MOOD, MAULDIN THEATER COMPANY If the sounds of Glenn Miller, Benny Goodman, and Duke Ellington make you nostalgic for the golden age of Big Band music, take a trip down memory lane at the Mauldin Cultural Center. A full cast of singers and dancers will whisk you back to the 1930s and ’40s, when the Big Band sound was broadcast via radio to homes across America. You’re sure to get in the swing at this live musical revue.

Mauldin Cultural Center, 1010 E Butler Rd, Mauldin. Fri, 7:30pm; Sat, 3pm & 7:30pm; Sun, 3pm. $15. (864) 288-4910, cityofmauldin.org/event/mauldin-theatrecompany-presents-in-the-mood

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6–27

SOUNDS OF SUMMER MUSIC SERIES, FOUNTAIN INN Fresh air, live music, good company— what better way to spend a summer Friday evening? Grab the family, load up your lawn chairs, and head for Commerce Park to hear some of your favorite bands. The August lineup starts out hot with the Latin sounds of Son de Callao, and ends up the month with the dance band Night Affair. The fun continues every Friday through September 10.

Mac Leaphart with The Pink Stones | August 7

The Radio Room, 110 Poinsett Hwy, Greenville. Sat, 8pm. $12 advance/$15 day of show. freshtix.com/events/mac-leaphartat-radio-room-wsg-the-pink-stones

MOVIES IN THE PARK AT TRAILBLAZER PARK Watching movies under the stars makes great free family entertainment on a Saturday evening. All you need to bring are chairs and/or blankets; food trucks are on hand for dinner— including ice cream for dessert. Two fantastical movies bookend the series, which kicks off with the classic monster film Godzilla vs Kong and winds up at the end of August with the animated Raya and the Last Dragon.

Trailblazer Park, 125 Trailblazer Dr, Travelers Rest. Saturdays, movies start at 8:30pm. Free. (864) 834-8740, travelersrestsc.com/visit/trailblazer-park/ movies-in-the-park

FREEWHEELING EXHIBITION The Allure of the Automobile in Contemporary Art May 11 - August 21, 2021 TM

Learn more by visiting TheBascom.org | 323 Franklin Road, Highlands, NC 28741 | 828.526.4949

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Photograph courtesy of Glow Lyric Theatre

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MAC LEAPHART WITH THE PINK STONES Hit The Radio Room over the weekend to catch award-winning singer/songwriter and South Carolina son Mac Leaphart deliver a darn good time with his hook-heavy roots songs. Catch tunes from his latest album, Music City Joke, and sway to the cosmic country beats of special guests The Pink Stones.

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Photograph by Gabe Ford

Commerce Park, 110 Depot St, Fountain Inn. Fridays, 7–9:30pm. Free. (864) 724-8044, fountaininn.org/201/Special-Events


Photograph courtesy of Glow Lyric Theatre

GREENVILLE FASHION WEEK Can’t make it to New York’s Fashion Week this September? Never fear, you can enjoy all the fashion-forward fun in Greenville a month earlier. The premier four-day event struts its stuff as models rock the runway with the help of top-notch hair and makeup artists, emerging designers showcase their talent, and local fashion boutiques offer the latest trends for sale.

Zen, 924 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs–Sun; times vary. $25–$75. (864) 7047710, gvlfashionweek.com

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Greenville Triumph, 22 S. Main St, Greenville. Sat, Aug 7, 7pm; Sun, Aug 22, 7pm. $10-$25. (864) 203-0565, greenvilletriumph.com

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AN EVENING WITH MICHAEL BUBLÉ A four-time Grammy winner, Canadian singer/songwriter Michael Bublé has dedicated himself to keeping the timeless classics of the American Songbook alive, while breathing new life into them through his singular style. The legendary crooner, who has sold over 40 million records worldwide, topped the Billboard charts with albums such as Call Me Irresponsible (2007) and Crazy Love (2009). Don’t miss this opportunity to see him at The Well.

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GREENVILLE TRIUMPH If you’re searching for the perfect summer evening, look no further. Our advice? Ditch your midweek worries and head to the sprawling Greenville Triumph stadium (family and friends optional). Once you’re there, take it easy: grab a beer, kick back, and admire the fancy footwork of Greenville’s favorite soccer superstars.

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Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N Academy St, Greenville. Sat, 8pm. $74-$153.50. (864) 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com

19–29

GLOW LYRIC FESTIVAL: ROCK OPERA Face it, the past year’s been a doozy, but you can soothe your psyche at the Glow Lyric Theatre’s mix of song, dance, and poetry. Rock Opera confronts our recent trifecta of weathering a pandemic, racial reckoning, and cultural chaos through hits from Queen and Foreigner, songs from such musicals as Jesus Christ Superstar and Rent, and pieces from

Glow Lyric Festival: Rock Opera | August 19–29

Now Open at 2204 Augusta Street Our lobby is open for business! For over 20 years, we've been a part of the Upstate community. ww w.gra ndso ut h .com

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TOMMY EMMANUEL As a child in Australia, Tommy Emmanuel taught himself music, exploring the interior architecture of songs through musical competitions with his brother. Now considered to be one of the world’s greatest guitarists, Emmanuel lays down flawless multidimensional arrangements on his acoustic guitar. His propensity to chase joy through his music proves infectious to his audiences, a fact you’ll no doubt discover at this outdoor concert. TD Stage at the Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Thurs, 7:30pm. Lawn, $35; Genevieve’s, $55. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

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FRESH FRIDAYS AT HARTNESS Head over to the Hartness community on Greenville’s eastside to check out the farmers market on the Grand Lawn. The last Fresh Fridays market for this

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Hartness, 2000 Society St, Greenville. Fri, 5:30–8:30pm. (864) 920-0375, hartnessliving.com

24–25

STOMP If you’ve ever wondered what all the noise is about, be sure to catch one of STOMP’s performances at the Peace Center. This is not your mama’s musical: there’s no story line in STOMP, and the cast uses matchboxes, brooms, garbage cans, and hubcaps—among other untraditional objects—to create electrifying rhythms onstage. We dare you to sit still during the riveting combination of dance, music, and

Photograph coutesy of Schmidt Relations

Kroc Center, 424 Westfield St, Greenville. Thurs–Sat, 7:30pm; Sun, 3pm. Premium seats, $48; main, $43; gallery, $38. (864) 558-4569, glowlyric.com

summer features produce from Mill Village Farms, whose staff oversees the community’s on-site garden plot, along with other food vendors. You can even shop for fresh flowers and hand-crafted items including soap, candles, and jewelry.

Photograph by Steve McNicholas, courtesy of the Peace Center

STOMP | August 24–25

classic operas Carmen and Tosca. In-between, cast members share their personal perspectives.


Photograph coutesy of Schmidt Relations

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CHRIS TOMLIN AT HERITAGE PARK Lovers of contemporary Christian music should grab a ticket to this concert before it sells out. Among

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Tryon International Equestrian Center, 25 International Blvd, Mill Spring, NC. Thurs–Sat, times vary. General admission 3-day pass, $195. (828) 863-1000, nightinthecountry.org

CCNB Amphitheatre at Heritage Park, 861 SE Main St, Simpsonville. Sat, 7pm. Lawn tickets start at $52; amphitheatre seats start at $91. (864) 296-6601, ccnbamphitheatre.com/eventstickets

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NIGHT IN THE COUNTRY CAROLINAS MUSIC FESTIVAL Calling all country music fans: head to Tryon for three days of country headliners in the Blue Ridge foothills. Stars like Miranda Lambert, Old Dominion, Chris Young, Big and Rich, Chris Janson, and Chase Rice will take the stage at the inaugural Night in the Country Carolinas. In addition to raising money for local nonprofits, the three-day event will include other festivities and attractions, along with plenty of food and beverages.

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Peace Center, 300 S Main St, Greenville. Tues & Wed, 7:30pm. $45-$65. (864) 467-3000, peacecenter.org

his countless accolades, native Texan, acclaimed singer/songwriter, and worship leader Chris Tomlin has garnered 23 Gospel Music Association Dove Awards, plus a Grammy for his 2012 album And If Our God Is for Us. His performance at the CCNB Amphitheatre promises to be as inspirational as it is delightful to the ear.

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theatrical performance in this highenergy audience favorite.

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BREWS, BLUES + BBQ: TEN AT THE TOP Regional collaboration is not only the mission of Ten at the Top; it’s the theme for the nonprofit’s outdoor networking extravaganza. Brooks Dixon and Mac Arnold & Plate Full O’ Blues will provide the live music, while representatives from each of the Upstate’s ten counties will serve up BBQ and brews. Held in one of the parking lots at GSP Airport, the festival will also feature a business expo for the organization’s partners. GSP International Airport, 2000 GSP Dr, Greer. Mon, 3:30–7:30pm. $30. (864) 235-8330, tenatthetop.org/events

Chris Tomlin at Heritage Park | August 28

AWARD WINNING TELEVISION ICONS “TWO JEWS TALKING” A staged reading

written by Ed. Weinberger

One Weekend Only!

Ed Asner

From The Mary Tyler Moore Show

SEPT. 2-4

828.693.0731 / flatrockplayhouse.org

Jamie Farr From M*A*S*H

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Second Glance

REAR VIEW FA MED PHOTOGR A PHER ALFRED WILLIS CA PTURED THE A DVENTUROUS SPIR IT OF EA RLY T WENTIETH CENTURY SPA RTA NBURG, SOUTH CA ROLINA

Indian Scout bikes, like the one pictured, were designed and built by the Indian Motorcycle Company in the early to mid-twentieth century. Wildly popular among cyclists for several decades, the 101 Scout is still considered one of the greatest motorcycles of all time.

Photograph courtesy of the Herald-Journal Willis Collection, Spartanburg County Public Libraries

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ne of the first commercial photographers in the Upstate, Alfred Willis (1880–1945) is recognized for recording Spartanburg’s past. Remembered for his jovial personality and sense of humor, Willis once claimed, “I was made with a craving for adventure.” Such daring drove him to capture fleeting moments of everyday life, whether it meant scaling a water tower or leaning out of a helicopter to capture the perfect shot. This circa 1920 photograph of an unidentified man riding his early model Indian Scout on the streets of Spartanburg reflects both the photographer’s penchant for portraits and his personal fascination with motorcycles. Today, the extensive Willis Collection of prints and glass-plate negatives—including those taken by Alfred’s son, Bob, who continued to chronicle life in Spartanburg after his father’s death—is owned by the Spartanburg Herald-Journal.—M. Linda Lee

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FEED THE BEAST This BMW M3 is hungry for some speed, and it needs you to harness all of its 503 horsepower on our closed track at the BMW Performance Driving School. Grab the wheel and take it through sweeping high-speed turns, maneuver deftly through cones in our autocross and drift around on our wet skid pad.

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