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MISS HILTON HEAD URGES CYCLE SAFETY PAGE 7

PROAXIS FINDS NICHE IN PHYSICAL THERAPY

SCHOOL CREDIT UPHELD FOR BIBLE CLASS

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SPARTANBURGJOURNAL Spartanburg, S.C. • Friday, July 6, 2012 • Vol.8, No.27

I N J U R E D V ET S F I N D

‘HEALING WATERS’ Fishing offers renewal and camaraderie to wounded warriors

PRINTMAKERS DISPLAY RANGE OF TALENT

PAGE 8

PAGE 15

KEVIN CLINTON

MASTER OF PUPPETS FOR ‘THE LION KING’ PAGE 17

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

PHOTO BY ED FELKER COURTESY OF PROJECT HEALING WATERS

Project Healing Waters participant Staff Sgt. Travis Green, USMC, fishes for trout.


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Spartanburg Journal locally owned and operated since 1999 For delivery requests, call 679-1240 Publisher

Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@thespartanburgjournal.com editor/editorial page

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Cindy Landrum clandrum@thespartanburgjournal.com April A. Morris amorris@thespartanburgjournal.com Charles Sowell csowell@thespartanburgjournal.com

When you are done reading this paper, please recycle it.

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Greg Beckner gbeckner@thespartanburgjournal.com news layout

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The news you want. The answers you need. journalwatchdog.com 2 SPARTANBURG Journal | JULY 6, 2012


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“For a change, I could actually concentrate on something other than the pain that I was in.”

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Ryan Ferre, an Iraq veteran, on the joy of fly-fishing with Project Healing Waters.

“It’s something that I will always carry with me, and he has six kids who no longer have a father.” Miss South Carolina contestant Maegan Garner, on the fatal motorcycle crash she witnessed that inspired her campaign for helmet laws in South Carolina.

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“Physical therapy is very much like a health club in that any more than 10 minutes out becomes a barrier for people to want to come.” Bob Leonard of Proaxis Therapy, on the company’s decision to locate multiple clinics conveniently scattered across several cities and counties.

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Free Art & History On the first weekend of each month—Thurs.-Sat., July 5-7—both the Spartanburg Art Musuem and the Spartanburg Regional History Museum are free, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.… thanks to a generous donor! Taking Flight Local artists Jane Frost and Susan Hopps will exhibit their work July 2-27 in the Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg’s gallery at the Chapman Cultural Center. Open daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m., but closed on Sundays. Auto Racing Spartanburg was once at the hub of auto racing. The Spartanburg Regional History Museum presents an exhibit featuring artifacts, trophies, and the development of the auto racing industry, June 19-Sept. 1, Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Fine Furniture Exhibit Master woodcraftsman Michael McDunn presents Function & Awe, a large sampling of his handmade fine furniture in the Spartanburg Art Museum. It is both heirloom and contemporary. Tues.-Sat., May 22-Aug. 4, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Children’s Art Exhibit Children from the COLORS program present their colorful and innocent works of art, Mon.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m., June 12-Aug. 1. Free. Printmakers Exhibit 15 printmakers from the Upstate have come together to create a unique and vastly diverse exhibit of handmade prints in Shifting Plates. The exhibit is in support of a project that collected works for the true “art collector.” Presented by the Spartanburg Art Museum, Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Ends: Aug. 25. Call for Artists The Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg is now accepting submissions for its 2012 39th annual juried show, which will Sept. 20-Nov. 3. More than $4,000 will be awarded in various categories. Submission deadline: Aug. 1. An Original Musical by Teenagers That Awkward Stage, a Greenville-based theatre troupe of teenagers, will present Composed in Memories in the David Reid Theatre at the Chapman Cultural Center on Friday, July 6 at 7 p.m. and Saturday, July 7 at 2 and 7 p.m. First Saturday at Historic Price House Visit the Price House Saturday, July 7, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. to learn something new and historic about Upstate South Carolina. Fun for the whole family. Presented by the Spartanburg County Historical Association.

542-ARTS ChapmanCulturalCenter.org 200 E. Saint John St. Spartanburg

4 SPARTANBURG Journal | JULY 6, 2012

Mary Black Foundation names interim president Search for Philip Belcher’s replacement underway By april a. morris | staff

The Mary Black Foundation has announced that as of Aug. 15, Director of Programs Molly Talbot-Metz will serve as interim foundation president while the board seeks a replacement for President Philip Belcher, who will step down in August. Talbot-Metz has worked with the foundation since 2001, assuming the director of programs post in 2007. “I look forward to leading the foundation during this time of transition,” Talbot-Metz said. “We have many ex-

citing projects in progress, including a Quality Rating and Improvement System for childcare centers and our work on Spartanburg’s Northside. I anticipate continuing Philip’s Molly Talbot-Metz, thoughtful leader- interim president, ship to accomplish Mary Black our mission of Foundation health and wellness for the people of Spartanburg County until we have a new president in place.” Belcher has served as foundation president for 12 years and announced his departure in early May. During his tenure, Belcher helped the foundation focus on active learning and early childhood development and expand

its impact, according to the foundation. Belcher will take a position as vice president of programs at The Community Foundation of Western North Carolina. The board of trustees’ search committee is in the process of hiring a search firm to handle the recruitment process. The firm should be selected within the next month, said foundation communications officer Cate Brandt Ryba. The search firm will set a timetable for the selection of a new president, Ryba said. Founded in 1996, the Mary Black Foundation is an independent private foundation focusing on the health and wellness of Spartanburg County residents. To date, the foundation has awarded more than $36 million in grants. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@thespartanburgjournal.com.

Carp: the next big sport fish? 44-hour tournament will be held on Lake Blalock in July By Cindy Landrum | staff

The Carolina Carp Cup is the South Carolina equivalent of a fishing marathon. Two-man teams will fish for carp from the shores of Lake Blalock in Spartanburg County next month for 44 straight hours. “Carp fishing is a different type of fishing,” said Jason Bernhardt, a co-director of the tournament and co-owner of Wild Carp Companies, an Upstate New York-based company that advocates carp fishing. “It’s almost like camping. You fish by the river, you sleep by the river, you eat by the river.” Fishermen in the Carolina Carp Cup, which could attract fishermen from across the country but is expected to feature a lot of local fishermen as well, will fish from the same spot on shore for the entire tournament. Carp are bottom-feeders and fishermen create bait piles to attract the fish. Then they wait for the fish to bite. When they do, an alarm sounds so the fisherman can reel them in.

“You can manage to get some sleep,” said Bernhardt, who said he has fished in tournaments that were even longer in duration, including a 100-hour world championship. Bernhardt said Lake Blalock was chosen for the group’s first tournament in South Carolina because it has an ample supply of big fish and enough bank space to host a large tournament. The lake has common and mirror carp that can get in excess of 30 pounds. A water body record will be set during the July 19 through 22 tournament because none has been officially recorded before. All fish caught in the tournament will be weighed and released unharmed, Bernhardt said. Unlike bass tournaments participants, fishermen in the Carolina Carp Cup will be able to weigh more than five fish. The team that has the highest combined weight for their four largest carp will win $10,000. The tournament will pay for the 25 largest carp caught during the nearly two days. “Conceivably, one team could win all the prizes, but that’s extremely unlikely,” Bernhardt said. Although carp are used for food in some countries, it is the world’s No. 1 freshwater sport fish, Bernhardt said. “Bass was considered a trash fish when Ray Scott formed Bassmasters and look

how it’s regarded today,” he said. “Carp has already proven its value overseas; now it is time to start capitalizing on this abundant resource.” Bernhardt said carp fishing is a huge sport in the South although many don’t realize it. He said there are more than 200 carp pay lakes in the Carolinas and many run daily or regular carp tournaments. He said thousands of fishermen in the Carolinas compete in pay lake tournaments. One reason carp fishing is popular is that it doesn’t require expensive equipment, he said. While some carp fishermen can spend up to $5,000 on gear, others can go to Wal-Mart and spend less than $200. David Smith, owner and editor of USCarpPro Magazine, called carp fishing the last frontier of competitive fishing in the United States. Twenty-eight teams have registered for the Carolina Carp Cup so far. Registration is $550 for a two-person team. Registration deadline is July 6. More information is available at www.wildcarpcompanies.com. Lake Blalock is 1,105 acres and has about 45 miles of shoreline. Spartanburg Water owns it. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@thespartanburgjournal.com.


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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OPINION

VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

It’s time for ethics reform In the lessons-learned category, there is much to take away from the historic hearing that ended with the dismissal of ethics charges last week against Gov. Nikki Haley by the House Ethics Committee. Not least of these is the value of transparency: The Ethics Committee’s decision to hear testimony in open session gave state residents the chance to judge the issues for themselves unfiltered by politicians or the media. Most notably, the public proceedings afforded a clarifying view of the loophole-ridden ethics laws that allow our elected leaders to hide far more of their personal economic interests than they reveal. Legislators from both parties are promising to introduce “far-ranging ethics reform” next year in the wake of the hearing’s revelations. How they will define “far-ranging” remains an open question – but at the very least, state residents are owed enough sunshine to judge for themselves the potential for unseemly interactions between private business relationships and public voting records. Because right now, that clarity is wholly absent. For all the legal bans on gifts, money and self-beneficial lobbying, state law deliberately skirts the kind of detail that would reveal potential conflicts of interest with anything approaching transparency. Ethics laws do not even require lawmakers to name their employers – which is why Haley, as a legislator, could work as a consultant for a Columbia engineering firm that receives state contracts without disclosing that information. The law is also muddy enough to allow Haley to take a paycheck as fundraiser for a Lexington hospital foundation while promoting, as a legislator, the hospital’s bid to open a heart-surgery center. As the governor said, quite rightly, she broke no disclosure laws and did nothing illegal. But Rep. Laurie Funderburk, the sole Ethics Committee member to vote against Haley on one of the seven charges, also rightly says that the public would be better served if Haley had “erred on the positive side” and disclosed her consulting fees – as would befit a governor who campaigned on transparency as fervently as Haley did. Haley is among those promising to take a hard look at ethics reforms this summer. Full disclosure on employment history is a good place to start. Nothing in state law prevents lawmakers from working for companies that lobby the Legislature. Granted, a legislator is barred from lobbying on behalf of his employer – but nothing in the law prevents him from promoting a bill that benefits that employer’s industry. Consequently, state Rep. Jim Merrill could pocket $160,000 in consulting fees from a PAC run by the S.C. Association of Realtors last year while he sponsored and delivered the Point of Sale Reform, which substantially reduced property taxes on commercial real estate. What’s more, he didn’t have to disclose a bit of it. Just because something is legal doesn’t make it right, as the saying goes, and the fact that Merrill sees “nothing unethical about this whatsoever” is revealing. Even if it remains legal, any reforms that force Merrill and others like him to automatically disclose such relationships would help the public accurately weigh the voting records that follow. Legislators will always be attractive potential employees for reasons the Realtors’ CEO Nick Kremydas put so well in The State newspaper: “If you don’t have a seat at the table, then you’re on the menu.” But if the result is a legislator who works for two masters, both masters deserve to know. It’s time for ethics reform.

The threat of underage drinking My teenage daughter died in an alcoholrelated automobile crash. After her death 13 years ago, I joined a coalition in Greenville that is trying to reduce underage drinking in our community. Nationally, alcohol is the No. 1 killer of teens. The combination of alcohol and driving is especially risky for teens. Most of the fatalities in alcohol-related crashes involving teen drivers are the drivers themselves and their passengers. From 2006 to 2010, more than 750 South Carolinians died as a result of a vehicle crash involving an underage driver who had drunk alcohol, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). In 2010 alone, 122 South Carolinians died as a result of a vehicle crash involving an underage driver who had drunk alcohol (NHTSA). These fatalities occurred despite the fact that it is illegal for persons under 21 to possess, purchase or consume alcohol, and it is illegal for persons to sell or give alcohol to persons under 21. For almost a decade, the Greenville County Enforcing Underage Drinking Laws Coalition has been working to reduce youth access to alcohol and underage drinking in our community. The coalition is composed of representatives from the Greenville County Sheriff ’s Office, law enforcement from all municipalities in the county, the Greenville school district, Greenville health and human services agencies, The Phoenix Center (the legislated authority on substance abuse for Greenville County) and community volunteers. I am a volunteer member of this coalition. To save lives, the Greenville EUDL Coalition has started a new campaign called Underage Drinking/Adult Consequences. During this campaign, law enforcement officers will be targeting underage drinkers, underage drinking and driving, and the parents and other adults who provide the alcohol. Our coalition is one of only four recipients in the United States to receive the funds from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration for the Underage Drinking/Adult Consequences campaign. This campaign started in late April and resulted in 149 arrests or citations in a twoweek time period. A second wave of concentrated law enforcement began on June

IN MY OWN WORDS by LINDA LESLIE

18. Enforcement waves of two-week durations will occur approximately every other month through January of next year. As part of this campaign, Greenville officers recently participated in training on fake IDs and in methods to safely disperse parties with underage drinkers. When the law enforcement officers find an underage drinker, they will search for the source of the alcohol and also bring charges against the person or merchant who illegally provided the alcohol. Officers are also increasing compliance checks, during which a young person under the age of 21, in cooperation with law enforcement, purchases alcohol from bars, restaurants, convenience stores or other alcohol establishments. The merchants who sell illegally are charged with crimes. The Greenville EUDL Coalition has conducted 2,000 compliance checks in the past year. These checks have been effective in reducing the sale of alcohol to underage persons. Near the time of the Greenville EUDL Coalition’s creation, the underage buy-rate from merchants in Greenville County was 45 percent. By 2011, the youth buy rate from merchants had been reduced to approximately 12 percent. In addition to compliance checks, law enforcement officers are conducting public safety checkpoints and party patrols. Officers are watching for parents who provide alcohol or host drinking parties for underage teens. Officers are using contacts with youth to find adults who sell or transfer alcohol to persons under 21. Underage drinking is illegal and can have deadly consequences. For further information, go to www.facebook.com/underagedrinking.adultconsequencesGreenvilleCounty. Linda Leslie is a Simpsonville attorney who volunteers with the Greenville County Enforcing Underage Drinking Laws Coalition. She can be reached at leslielindalaw@gmail.com.

IN MY OWN WORDS FEATURES ESSAYS BY RESIDENTS WITH PARTICULAR EXPERTISE WHO WANT TO TELL READERS ABOUT ISSUES IMPORTANT TO THEM. THE JOURNAL ALSO WELCOMES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR (MAXIMUM LENGTH OF 200 WORDS). PLEASE INCLUDE ADDRESS AND DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER. ALL LETTERS WILL BE CONFIRMED BEFORE PUBLICATION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT ALL LETTERS FOR LENGTH. PLEASE CONTACT SUSAN SIMMONS AT SSIMMONS@THESPARTANBURGJOURNAL.COM.

6 SPARTANBURG JOURNAL | JULY 6, 2012


Sudden death lesson Traffic accident leads Miss South Carolina contestant to advocate helmet safety By givens parr | contributor

Greenville Technical College student Maegan Garner did not expect to encounter tragedy on Nov. 19, 2010, as she flipped the left blinker of her car to make a turn. But when a motorcyclist collided with the rear of her vehicle, she witnessed death firsthand. The cyclist was not wearing a helmet and died on the spot. Encountering death on the road, especially preventable death, filled Garner with grief and shock. At the time, she held the Miss Easley title and participated in a few preliminary events for the Miss South Carolina pageant. However, she discovered she “was not physically or mentally ready” to compete after the accident and chose to step back and reassess.

Miss Hilton Head Island Maegan Garner fits a Croswell Elementary School student with a new helmet. Safe Kids Upstate and Baptist Easley Hospital Foundation recently partnered to provide 500 free bicycle helmets to children in six elementary schools across Pickens County.

Now, re-entering pageant competition as the 2011 Miss Hilton Head Island, Garner is determined to use her painful experience to promote helmet safety. “Everything happens for a reason,” she told the Journal. “I feel like I have a purpose now to share that story, hopefully to

educate others on how important it is to wear a helmet, whether riding a motorcycle or a bicycle.” Each of the 48 Miss South Carolina contestants will compete on a personal platform. As Miss Hilton Head Island, Garner has spoken about her Smart Rider platform at bike rallies and schools. She said children often choose not to wear helmets because they don’t want to look uncool, while motorcyclists may prefer riding helmetless for the stress relief the “free” sensation provides. However, Garner is convinced that the positives of helmet use outweigh the negatives, and pleads for riders to understand they are not the only ones affected in an accident. The death of the motorcyclist in her accident is “something that I will always carry with me,” she said, “and he has six kids who no longer have a father.” Although state law mandates seatbelt use for persons riding in a moving car, South Carolina does not regulate helmet usage for children riding bikes or for motorcyclists over 20 years old. Nineteen states and Washington, D.C., have universal helmet laws for motorcyclists, with good reason, Garner said. “The Facts Hurt: A State-byState Injury Prevention Policy Report” by the Trust for America’s Health found motorcycle helmets saved an estimated

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8,000 lives from 2005 to 2009. Garner said motorcycle-related deaths are growing in the state; the Highway Patrol reports 102 motorcycle fatalities in 2011, compared with 82 in 2010. A helmet law was introduced but did not pass this year. Even if helmet legislation never passes, Garner said she hopes lawmakers will eventually require motorcyclists to pass a safety course similar to drivers’ education classes. Currently, motorcyclists are encouraged, but not obligated, to take the Highway Safety Department’s Ride Smart program offered at local technical colleges. Ride Smart provides instruction on how to ride properly and handle a bike in dangerous situations. The program strongly suggests that bikers wear helmets. Garner, who is currently enrolled in the nursing program at Greenville Tech, will compete in the Miss South Carolina pageant July 10 through 14. She said winning the title would give her a greater opportunity to advocate statewide for helmet use. She said regardless of where pageantry takes her, she will continue to advocate helmet safety in her nursing career. Contact Givens Parr at gparr@thespartanburgjournal.com.

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Fly-fishing offers renewal, camaraderie for injured vets Project Healing Waters to launch new chapter in Clemson By april a. morris | staff

Jennifer Bourcq / Contributor

The music of a rushing stream, the expectation of the strike and the stillness of fly-fishing can offer any fisherman a day of tranquility. For wounded and disabled veterans, the banks of a river are a long way from the hospital or rehab clinic visits that can fill their days. To transport veterans away from their daily concerns for a little while, the nonprofit Project Healing Waters partners with local conservation organizations and fly-fishing guides to teach those interested in a recuperative getaway everything from fly-tying and -casting basics to advanced skills. After a bit of basic training, they set out on regular fishing outings. Founded in 2005 by Captain Ed Nicholson at Walter Reed Military Medical Center in Washington, D.C., Project Healing Waters has grown to more than 100 chapters nationwide. “Nicholson realized that fly-casting provided rehabilitation for veterans,” said Cherokee chapter program leader Ryan Harman. The Cherokee group, which is based in Asheville, has up to 20 participants during their regular meetings and serves “everyone from wheelchair-bound veterans to those with PTSD and amputees,” Harman said. Their excursions draw up to 50 veterans from Upstate South Carolina, Western North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia and Virginia, he said. The group outfits them “with all the gear they need to tie flies as well as go

out fishing” at no cost, he said. Since the program’s beginnings in Asheville, the Cherokee chapter has served nearly 1,000 veterans of all ages, he said. “We’ve had some participants who are World War II veterans. We’ve had ages 19 to 93.” Harman said what’s most interesting about this particular service for veterans is that “Project Healing Waters is not really about fishing.” The groups go out to fish, but it’s the camaraderie and interaction among the participants that help them to mend, he says. “Fishing gives us a chance to break down some barriers so they can heal—not only physically, but also mentally.” The intrinsic motions of fly-tying and -casting also offer therapy, Harman said. “We’ve had tremendous success with veterans who have hand and wrist issues. It really builds up their dexterity. If you look at the therapy exercises in the hospital, they are really emulated in fly-casting.” Quadriplegic John Therrell of Fletcher, N.C., can attest to the therapeutic value of fly-fishing. Therrell has limited dexterity since an auto accident when he was serving as a school administrator at Ft. Campbell, Ky. He has been fishing with Project Healing Waters for about two years and has learned everything from how to use equipment to technique, he said. The program offers him the inclusion that he sometimes misses. “It’s helped me enjoy what I was doing before my accident and I became a quadriplegic. When you fish, you have this experience that you don’t feel left out anymore.” Therrell recently returned from fishing trips at the Firehole River in Wyoming and the Black River in Arizona. Locally, he favors the Davidson River and Lake Lure. He uses a grasping cuff to gain a tighter grip on the rod. “It’s helped me to

Project Healing Waters participant Steve Felix smiles as he holds a large trout he caught while fellow fly-fisherman Jesse Conner looks on.

stay more flexible. When you fly-fish, you use your entire body,” he said. Accessing mountain streams or rivers could pose a problem for some disabled veterans, but the organization has discovered suitable spots, often private waters offered by their owners, Harman said. “We have one participant who is on crutches; in the water and on the bank, he gets around better than I do. He’s like a billy goat.” Ryan Ferre, an Iraq veteran and Army staff sergeant, encountered Project Healing Waters in 2009 during his recuperation at Walter Reed Medical Center. “I saw these guys practicing fly-casting out on the lawn,” he said. “I wanted to learn that, too.” Ferre joined the Walter Reed Project Healing Waters group and began going out with the Cherokee chapter after moving to Greenville. “For a change, I could actually concentrate on something other than the pain that I was in,” he said about fly-fishing.

“I was just so happy after each trip; it was really a morale booster for me.” Upstate veterans who were traveling to the nearest chapters in Asheville or Columbia to participate in meetings, workshops and regular fishing trips will soon have the option of attending a new chapter in Clemson. Project Healing Waters is partnering with the Chattooga River chapter of Trout Unlimited to form a new chapter within the next few months, said Chattooga River Trout Unlimited chapter president Captain Brian Petersen, a fishing guide and fly-fisherman for more than 43 years. Petersen said the more than 250 members of his chapter are already offering to volunteer during the up to eight outings planned each year for veterans. “We’re very excited to be starting a Project Healing Waters chapter. The beauty is that it’s going to have the strength of our existing organization.” The Chattooga River chapter has already contacted Veterans Affairs offices and hospitals to spread the word, he said. Any veterans in the area are invited to participate. Ferre says he, too, is ready to volunteer. “If I can help anyone else get to know the sport, I will. That’s how therapeutic I think it is.” Therrell sums up his philosophy regarding fly-fishing as, “You tie the flies on the bad days and you fish on the good days.” For more information about Project Healing Waters, visit www.projecthealingwaters.org. For information about the new Clemson chapter, contact Brian Petersen at 864-346-4310 or visit www. chattoogatu.org. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@ thespartanburgjournal.com

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journal community News and information from Spartanburg Regional

healthmatters employees receive honors Spartanburg Regional congratulates the following employees for their commitment to excellence: Employee of the Year: Annetta Lipscomb, rehabilitation technologist, Pediatric Rehab Leader of the Year: Heather Bendyk, director, Quality and Data Management Physician Leader of the Year: Brian Fowler, M.D., Spartanburg Inpatient Specialists

Spartanburg Regional Weight Loss Services’ newest program is designed to help patients lose weight quickly and safely.

landmark partnership will expand expertise, clinical research in the upstate

Based on a low glycemic index diet, weekly visits keep patients accountable and allow our nurse practitioner to support the patient’s weight loss efforts. Patients receive a B12/lipotropic injection, weight loss medications (if appropriate) and urine checks for ketones. Included in the program are structured group classes (Healthy Lifestyle Program).

Spartanburg Regional’s Gibbs Cancer Center, a partner with the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and an affiliate of MD Anderson Physicians Network, has joined forces with Bon Secours St. Francis Health System to expand world-class oncology services and clinical research in the Upstate.

By following the program’s guidelines, patients are able to maintain their new weight using the tools they’ve acquired. Incorporating healthy eating with regular exercise also helps patients reach and maintain their desired weight.

Gibbs is home to a growing clinical research division. The alignment of the two systems will advance clinical integration, bolster quality and extend new opportunities for both patients and providers for advanced treatment and research unparalleled in the area.

new rapid weight loss program is fast and safe

The Rapid Weight Loss program is intended for short-term use. By following our program’s guidelines, participants will be able to achieve their goal weight by making lifestyle changes. Positive side effects include reducing medical conditions associated with obesity, such as cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes, pre-diabetes, hypertension or elevated cholesterol. For more information, visit spartanburgweightloss.com or call 864-560-7070.

gibbs offers cancer survivorship clinic Nearly 30 million people around the world are alive today after being diagnosed with cancer. That’s a testament to advances in medicine. However, a cancer diagnosis is a life-changing event for many, and Gibbs Cancer Center understands. The center offers a Survivorship Clinic for cancer survivors completing treatment. This clinic is intended to be a one-time visit for cancer survivors to meet with a nurse practitioner and a nurse navigator with extensive training in survivorship issues. The visit should last 60 to 90 minutes, and it is covered by most insurance companies. Cancer survivors often experience fatigue, pain, poor appetite, depression and a fear that cancer might return. Gibbs Cancer Center’s Survivorship Clinic is designed to address these and other concerns facing survivors. Each survivor visiting the clinic receives a personalized survivorship care plan that includes the stage of cancer, summary of treatment received and a “roadmap” for follow-up care. Survivors also receive a copy of their pathology reports. This information is also available electronically through security-encrypted flash drives. A copy of this plan will be sent to the survivor’s primary care physician and oncologist. Call 864-560-7050 to for more information.

The partnership is rooted in shared goals for the further development of research and cancer services, with an eye toward increased efficiency and reduced costs and seamless transitions of care. “This is a collaboration to fight cancer,” Bruce Holstien, president and CEO of Spartanburg Regional, said. “Opening new doors in the fight against this dreadful disease means many things: improved access, personalized cancer care and the best new treatments. Joining forces with St. Francis is about the best of the best working hard to get even better at combating cancer.” The relationship between Gibbs and St. Francis is organized around shared goals of new clinical services and programs, supportive care services, operational support, quality support, research, education and community outreach. A combination of administrators and physicians will help in the continuing investigation of potential treatments that can be offered through the partnership. For more information, visit gibbscancercenter.com. MKTG72I

Tune in To HealTH MaTTers on WSPA’s 6 and 11 p.m. newscasts to learn more about the latest advances in medical care at Spartanburg Regional.

10 SPARTANBURG Journal | JULY 6, 2012


School district can award credit for off-campus religious education By Cindy Landrum | staff

Spartanburg School District 7 may award academic credit for off-campus religious education, the U.S. Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled. Parents Robert Moss and Ellen Tillett and the Wisconsin-based Freedom From Religion Foundation sued District 7 in 2009, saying that offering credit for a course taught by Spartanburg County Bible Education in School Time at a church next door to Spartanburg High was unconstitutional. Moss’ daughter, Melissa Moss, became a plaintiff after she graduated from high school. A district court had ruled in favor of the district’s policy. In 2006, South Carolina became the second state in the nation to allow public schools to grant elective credit to students who leave campus for Bible education when the Released Time Credit Act became law. Released Time dates back to 1914, when the Gary, Ind., school superintendent established a program in Christian education.

It peaked in 1947 with 2 million students enrolled nationwide, according to the Released Time Bible Education website. In 1948, the Supreme Court ruled against Released Time classes being held in school buildings. Four years later, the program was ruled not to violate separation of church and state as long as the classes were held off campus, no public funding was used for the program and participation was voluntary. The Bible course taught by SCBEST focused on the Bible, its history and its application to modern Christian life. SCBEST has an arrangement with Oakbrook Preparatory School where Oakbrook agreed to review and monitor Spartanburg Bible School’s curriculum, teacher qualifications and educational objectives, and to award course credit and grades given by the Bible School. The arrangement is consistent with District 7’s practice of receiving grades awarded by a private school, including grades for religious courses, when a private school transfers to public school, the court said. The ruling said Spartanburg High

never actively or directly promoted the course. The course was not listed in the school course catalog and the Bible School wasn’t permitted to advertise to Spartanburg High classrooms. Counselors were not allowed to discuss the course or pass out flyers to parents and students unless they had expressed an interest in learning about it. The Bible School did have an informational table at the high school’s annual registration open house, along with military and college recruiters. “We see no evidence that the program has had the effect of establishing religion or that it has entangled the School District in religion,” the Appeals Court wrote in its ruling. “As was the General Assembly and school district’s purpose, the program properly accommodates religion without establishing it, in accordance with the First Amendment.” Released time programs are offered in Greenville and Anderson county schools as well. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@thespartanburgjournal.com

our community

community news, events and happenings

Carolina Alliance Bank will host a book signing for Pam Stone as she signs her first book, “I Love Me a Turkey Butt Samwich: Finding a Farm Life After Hollywood,” from 3-5:30 p.m., on July 12, in the bank’s lobby. This event is free and is open to the public. Stone, a comedian, actress and radio host, best known for her role on the ABC sitcom “Coach,” followed a self-imposed vow not to turn 40 in Hollywood and moved to Spartanburg County nearly 12 years ago. Now writing a syndicated column, “I’m Just Saying,” Stone has selected her readers’ favorites and compiled them into her first book. Books will be sold at the book signing. Carolina Alliance is located in downtown Spartanburg at 200 South Church Street. For additional information, call 864-208BANK (2265) or visit www.carolinaalliancebank.com . The Avon Foundation for Women recently awarded Amanda Welch, of Cowpens, S.C., with an Avon Representative Scholarship for the 2012 academic year. The scholarship is designed to assist Avon sales representatives who are enrolled (or who plan to enroll) in an undergraduate or graduate course of study leading to a degree in a field that allows them to advance their careers. Scholarship recipients are selected on the basis of a variety of criteria including academic record, demonstrated leadership and participation in school and community service,

work experience, and outside appraisal. The Avon Foundation annually awards up to 100 scholarship awards of either $1,500 or $2,500 to Avon sales representatives. “We are so pleased to be able to award Amanda Welch with this scholarship to further her education,” said Carol Kurzig, president of the Avon Foundation for Women. The Avon Foundation for Women, founded in 1955, is the world’s largest corporate-affiliated philanthropy focused on issues that matter most to women. The Glendale Outdoor Leadership School will lead a Lake Jocassee paddle trip on July 21. This trip offers a chance to beat the summer heat with this lake paddle that also visits waterfalls. For more information, call 864-529-0259 or visit www.palmettoconservation.org. Bring your lunch to the West Wing conference room at the Chapman Cultural Center for an informative hour with Dr. Sheila Breitweiser, the executive director of the Spartanburg Regional Foundation, who will discuss the duties of the Regional One helicopter personnel. This Lunch and Learn event will be on Friday, July 27, 12:30-1:30 p.m. It is presented by the Spartanburg County Historical Association and admission is $5. For more information, call 864-542-ARTS.

If you are sponsoring a community event, we want to share your news. Submit entries to: Spartanburg Journal, Community Briefs, 148 River St., Suite 120, Greenville, SC 29601 or e-mail: spartanburgcommunity@thespartanburgjournal.com

journal community

upcoming events lapband® information session

Wednesday, July 11 • 6:30-9 p.m. Family Medicine Conference Room, Regional Outpatient Center

This free class covers detailed information about gastric banding surgery. For more information or to register, visit spartanburgweightloss.com or call 560-7070.

gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy information session Wednesday, July 18 • 6:30-9 p.m. Family Medicine Conference Room, Regional Outpatient Center

This free class covers detailed information about Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy weight loss surgeries. For more information or to register, visit spartanburgweightloss.com or call 560-7070.

grief support group

Tuesdays, July 24-August 28 6-7:30 p.m. Spartanburg Regional Hospice Home Grief support groups provide a safe and supportive environment to talk about thoughts, feelings, and to find support. The groups meet for six weeks. Please call 560-5641 to register.

meet the robot

Saturday, July 28 • 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday, July 29 • 1-4 p.m. Regional Outpatient Center 853 North Church Street

Bring the whole family to meet the robot as we celebrate 3,000 robotic surgeries. Kids can dress up like surgeons and be photographed. All attendees can test-drive the robot. Light refreshments will be served.

safe kids car seat inspection

Monday, July 30 • 2-5 p.m. Bearden-Josey Center for Breast Health parking lot

Please call 560-6845 to make an appointment.

service of remembrance

Monday, July 30 • 6 p.m. Spartanburg Regional Hospice Home The service remembers those who have passed on, while encouraging and supporting grieving families and loved ones. Please call 560-5641 for more information.

spartanburgregional.com MKTG72I

JULY 6, 2012 | SPARTANBURG Journal 11


journal business

Journal business Finding their niche Proaxis Therapy expanding fast with even more ‘room to grow’ By Dick Hughes | contributor

Greg Beckner / Staff

Proaxis Therapy physical therapist Tom Denninger works with a patient, former Lt. Gov. Nick Theodore.

Proaxis Therapy has traveled from the dawn of sports medicine at the 1984 Winter Olympics to youth soccer fields and steady work as a primary physician-referral provider for physical therapy in the Upstate. Proaxis is a rapidly growing company that expanded to Spartanburg from Vail, Colo., in 2004 and moved a year later to Greenville to link up with the Greenville Hospital System. Moving to Greenville gave the company access to the athletic training network developed by GHS and the Steadman-Hawkins Clinic of the Carolinas, with which it has a long historical link. It is the nation’s second-largest sports training network. The GHS connection and Proaxis’ outreach to the vast sports universe of people – primarily kids and their parents – have created a “unique niche in the sports medicine orthopedic world,” said Bob

Leonard, vice president for marketing and public relations. From one clinic with two employees in Spartanburg, Proaxis today has 15 clinics, 150 employees in the Upstate and ambitious plans for more growth, including a clinic opening this month in Charleston. In 2005, the company had 20,000 patient visits at three clinics. By 2011, the number had grown to 130,000 patient visits at 14 clinics. “To date,” said Leonard, “we have over 1,800 different physicians who have referred to us in the Upstate.” Proaxis recently opened its 15th clinic at Travelers Rest, and on June 15 held a grand opening at a four-clinic physical therapy company it acquired in Raleigh, N.C., its first venture in that state. Having multiple clinics conveniently scattered across multiple cities and counties is critical to patients and referring

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journal business physicians, Leonard said. “Physical therapy is very much like a health club in that any more than 10 minutes out becomes a barrier for people to want to come, and people want to see our folks from two to three times a week.” It also fits Proaxis’ “goal to treat physical therapy almost like a dental practice” and get people to think of muscles in the same way that they return for regular dental checkups. “I’d rather see a patient in six months to make sure he is not going backward and catch something on the front end,” said Leonard, who is a licensed physical therapist. In February, Proaxis moved its corporate office to prime space in downtown Greenville. It bought the building on the north side of the soon-to-bespiffed-up Bergamo Plaza. “The move for us was based on a need for more business space,” Leonard said. “Coupled with that, we wanted to be more a part of the community. I can’t think of more ‘heart of the community’ than right here.” The new quarters offer “room to grow,” from the 40-50 em-

ployees now in the business office, he said. “We have more and more things happening in the next six to 12 months that will require more space.” Proaxis added 20 employees in the past five months and made 12 offers in mid-June, primarily to physical therapists, Leonard said. He expects to need another 10 to 12 in the next two to three years. The growth of Proaxis and other physical rehabilitation providers is fueled in large part by recognition that physical therapy speeds recovery from muscular maladies and saves money by shortening hospital stays and providing preventive care. “The profession has continued to impress on the side of getting quality outcomes,” said Leonard. “From our perspective, it is getting folks better faster. That’s important to insurance companies. They don’t want to see things lingering forever.” If someone gets injured at work, at home or on the playing field, “he could walk into one of our locations. We are going to quickly address that injury and also figure out if there is any more to it” and

“Physical therapy is very much like a health club in that any more than 10 minutes out becomes a barrier for people to want to come, and people want to see our folks from two to three times a week.” Bob Leonard, vice president for marketing and public relations at Proaxis, on why the company offers multiple convenient locations in many cities.

refer to a physician if more diagnosis is needed. “Insurance companies dig that,” he added. “That is a money-saver. Most people are insured who come through our doors, and mostly they are coming through physicians.” According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of physical therapists is increasing “much faster than the average for all occupations” – an increase of 39 percent by 2020. The demand is coming in large part from baby boomers, who are staying active longer than previous generations, and by the aging that puts them more at risk for “heart attacks, strokes and mobility-

related injuries that require physical therapy for rehabilitation,” the bureau says. A therapist at Proaxis earns a salary in the low- to- mid $50,000 range, while someone in a leadership role “can double that,” Leonard said. The statistics bureau said the median pay nationally in 2010 was $76,310 a year. Leonard said while Proaxis does occupational therapy, its stays focused on its niche in the sports medicine orthopedic world. That specialty and integration of physical therapy in traditional medical care is a legacy of its founders, who are credited with creating “much of what sports medicine is today,” as Proaxis’ sister website in Vail puts it.

The bloodline is traced to Topper Hagerman, John Atkins and Dr. Richard Steadman, who were principals on the medical team for the U.S. ski team that surprised the world with three gold and two silver medals at the Sarajevo Olympics in 1984. Steadman, an orthopedic surgeon, was team physician; Atkins was trainer and conditioning coach and Hagerman directed sports physiology. In 1990, Steadman teamed up with Dr. Richard Hawkins to establish the Steadman-Hawkins Clinic at the Vail Valley Medical Center, and Atkins and Hagerman provided therapy for its patients. When Hawkins, who is considered one of the top orthopedic surgeons in the world, relocated to the Upstate in 2004 to establish the Stedman-Hawkins Clinic of the Carolinas, Atkins and Sean McEnroe, who is chief executive officer of Proaxis, followed along with Proaxis. Contact Dick Hughes at dhughes@ thespartanburgjournal.com.

The fine print by dick hughes

Woodruff Wins HUD Grant

The City of Woodruff has received a federal Community Development Block Grant of $451,350 for upgrading the Davins Road pump station, the S.C. Department of Commerce announced. The grant for Woodruff was one of 28 awarded in statewide competition for $11 million in the current round. The grants are funded by the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development. The state administers the program. Communities are required to provide 10 percent matching funds for accepted projects. Commerce said approximately 87 percent of the funds will be invested within counties that are not considered “developed” and 70 percent will assist lower-income residents.

Greer Chamber in Finals

The Greater Greer Chamber of Commerce is one of five finalists for the Outstanding Chamber of the Year designation by the Carolinas Association of

Chamber of Commerce Executives. The Greer chamber also is a finalist for the association’s Communication Award. Allen Smith, president and chief executive officer, said while the recognition by peers is an honor, “having our members and community succeed is the highest honor.”

AFL Recognized for Worker Safety

AFL, the Duncan-headquartered maker of fiber optic cables and accessories, has received a BB&T Lighthouse Beam Safety Award for keeping worker injuries at a minimum. The award is presented to companies with a workers’ compensation loss ratio lower than 10 percent, a workers’ comp experience modification rate below 0.84 and an incident rate 15 percent below industry average. “We are not at zero injuries yet, but the injuries that have occurred, fortunately, have been minor,”

said Doug Hoffman of AFL. “Only four other companies in the State of South Carolina won the award in 2011,” said BB&T-CIC Insurance Services, AFL’s broker for workers’ compensation.

Spartanburg Hotel Honored

The Holiday Inn Express & Suites, Spartanburg North, has received a national award for excellence by the InterContinental Hotels Group. The Torchbearer Award was presented during an IHG Americas conference in Las Vegas. Kirk Kinsell, president of IHG Americas, said the award recognizes the Spartanburg hotel as “one of the finest hotels in our industry.” The Holiday Inn Express & Suites is owned by Pinnacle Hospitality of Spartanburg. Fine Print continued on page 14

JULY 6, 2012 | SPARTANBURG Journal 13


journal business

The fine print by dick hughes

Fine Print continued from page 13

Urgent Care Clinic Opens

Doctors Care has opened a seven-day urgent care clinic at 1762 East Main St. in Spartanburg. Dr. Steve Parks, regional medical director, said Doctors Care is “eager to have the opportunity to expand our services in the Spartanburg community and surrounding area.” The facility will be open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visits can be made with or without appointment. Doctors Care recently opened clinics in Greenwood and Rock Hill. It has more than 20 clinics in South Carolina.

A First on Denny’s Menu

Denny’s has opened its first restaurant in the Dominican Republic as part of the company’s effort to build a presence in Central America. The restaurant is located in the food court of the Las Americas International Airport in Santo Domingo. It is Denny’s first airport location anywhere.

The restaurant will be operated under a franchise agreement with Grupo Nahas. Steve Dunn, senior vice president of global development, said Denny’s is “fortunate to work with such an experienced franchise group that also owns and operates some of the most prominent hotels on the island.”

Bank Sets Sights on Coast

CertusBank plans to open its first branch in coastal South Carolina with an office in Charleston next spring. “The move aligns perfectly with our plan to increase our presence in the Lowcountry and establish brand roots more prominently with this market,” said Angela Webb, CertusBank president. Certus is leasing space in a four-story office building to be built on Meeting Street. Certus will have a branch at ground level and offices on the second floor. Ground was broken for the new building June 28 with completion scheduled for the first quarter of 2013.

Lake Homes Edge Closer to Water

The Reserve at Lake Keowee has opened a new development of lakefront homes at a starting price in the B:10” mid-$600,000s. T:10”

The new neighborhood will comprise 14 homes “a stone’s throw from the community’s amenity-centric waterfront village,” the developer said. “Never before have we been able to sell property so close to the water at this price point,” said Chuck Pigg, community manager of the Reserve at Lake Keowee and vice president of Greenwood Communities and Resorts. He said “it feels great to be officially back in the development business, bringing this new product to market after prudent dormancy during the real estate recession.”

Island Resort Takes Out Loan

Professional Mortgage Co. of Greenville has arranged a $12.4-million loan for Fripp Island Resort on the barrier island off the South Carolina coast. The loan is structured “with significant flexibility to accommodate future growth of the island’s amenities and property offerings,” Professional Mortgage said. The loan, which was provided by an unnamed insurance company, is secured by two golf courses, a marina and beach club. Professional Mortgage will service the loan on behalf of the lender.

S:9.5”

LET’S HIT 350 3

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14 SPARTANBURG Journal | JULY 6, 2012

TICKETS AT GREENVILLEDRIVE.COM Friday: Post-game Fireworks Saturday: National Juggling Act David Burlet Sunday: Kids Eat Free

T:5.445”

GAMES THIS WEEKEND Drive vs. Rome Braves

B:5.445”

Home Series: July 6th - 8th

S:4.945”

This year, the Greenville Drive is giving back to the community through our rallying cry of, “Let’s hit 350.” Help us hit 350,000 in attendance this season and give back to the community in some pretty amazing ways. It all starts with you this weekend.


Journal Sketchbook

Print exchange turns into traveling exhibition ‘Shifting Plates’ includes 15 Upstate printmakers By Cindy Landrum | staff

Tanisha, LaDerrick and Quinn, three foster siblings from Alabama, featured in the National Heart Gallery exhibition.

Finding their forever families National Heart Gallery uses professional portraits to help foster children find their permanent homes By Cindy Landrum | staff

Octavia wants to become a lawyer. Deshon plans to own a cleaning business. Javan aspires to be a doctor. And, when she grows up, Keyonna wants to be a butterfly or mermaid. While their future aspirations differ, the four siblings all want the same thing for

the present – a permanent home. Their portrait will be one of 50 oversized photographs displayed at the Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg from July 9 through Aug. 24 as part of a National Heart Gallery Exhibit that features professionally photographed foster children from across the country who need a permanent home. The Heart Gallery is a traveling exhibit

created to find families for children in foster care. On display are portraits – some lively, some somber, all moving – of children who are waiting to be adopted but are considered harder to place because of their ages, special medical needs or desire to be placed as a sibling group. The pictures, taken by professional photographers who donate their time, Foster continued on page 16

“Shifting Plates” started as a way for 15 printmakers in the Upstate to exchange their work among themselves – and morphed into a traveling exhibition. Steven Chapp, a printmaker who lives in Easley, was looking for a project after he retired from teaching in the Greenville County Schools. “I knew a lot of printmakers in the area,” he said. “They are artists I respected who were producing exciting works.” So he started an exchange with 15 artists. Each artist was to produce 15 original numbered hand-pulled prints – one for each participant. They printed one more for the exhibition, an idea spawned after Chapp talked to Kim Sholly, project director at the Metropolitan Arts Council. Each artist also made an additional eight prints to include packaged in portfolios to be sold for $1,500 each – an opportunity Chapp called “a steal.” The exhibition will run through Aug. 25 at the Spartanburg Art Museum. It includes a second piece by each artist that hangs side-by-side with the portfolio piece. In addition to Chapp, artists participating in the project are Wells Alewine, Kent Ambler, Andrew Blanchard, Jim Campbell, Marty Epp-Carter, Kevin Clinton, prints continued on page 16

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Spartanburg Regional • 101 East Wood St. • Spartanburg SC 29303 • 1.877.455.7747 • gibbscancercenter.com JULY 6, 2012 | SPARTANBURG Journal 15


JOURNAL SKETCHBOOK

U P S T A T E

DINING

See what you’ve been missing

CELEBRATE THE 4TH WITH A GREAT MEAL! RESTAURANTS featured: Adams Bistro American Grocery Arizona’s Blockhouse Blue Ridge Brewing Company The Bohemian Brick Street Café The Brown Street Club Cafe at Williams Hardware Chophouse ‘47 CityRange Davani’s Devereaux’s Fonda Rosalinda’s Ford’s Oyster House The Galley Restaurant The Green Room Handi Indian Cuisine Hans & Franz Biergarten Harry & Jean’s John Paul Armadillo Oil Company The Lazy Goat Liberty Tap Room & Grill Mary Beth’s The Mellow Mushroom Midtown Deli Nami Asian Bistro Nantucket Seafood Grill Northampton Wine Café Nose Dive On The Border Open Hearth Steak House P. Simpson’s The Plaid Pelican Portofino’s Italian Restaurant Rick Erwin’s West End Grille Ristorante Bergamo Roman’s Macaroni Grill Runway Café Ruth’s Chris Steak House Saffron’s West End Café Sassafras Southern Bistro Smoke on the Water Soby’s New South Cuisine Stax Billy D’s Stax Omega Diner Stella’s Southern Bistro Stellar Restaurant & Wine Bar Thaicoon Ricefire &Sushi Bar The Trappe Door Travinia Italian Kitchen Trio A Brick Oven Café Yia Yia’s

UpstateFoodie.com Feed Your Inner Food Enthusiast

16 SPARTANBURG JOURNAL | JULY 6, 2012

FOSTER continued from PAGE 15

show children with big grins, brothers and sisters laughing together and a boy holding his pet white rat. One child or group of siblings from each state is represented in the National Heart Gallery Exhibit. Octavia, Deshon, Javan and Keyonna — who are identified only by first name as are the rest of the children chosen for the display — are South Carolina’s representatives. Greenville wedding and newborn photographer Catherine Tolbert photographed them. A professional photographer in Santa Fe, N.M., came up with the idea for the first Heart Gallery in 2001 when she was considering adopting a child and was flipping through a book of small snapshots of that state’s available children. She worked with Diane Granito, an adoptions recruiter for the New Mexico Department of Children, Youth and Families, to get professional photographers to

SO YOU KNOW WHAT: National Heart Gallery exhibition WHO: an exhibit of portraits of foster children from across the country who are in need of permanent homes WHERE: Chapman Cultural Center, 200 E. Saint John St., Spartanburg WHEN: July 9 through Aug. 24, Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. INFORMATION: 542-ARTS

take portraits of children who were available for adoption and needed permanent homes. The portraits were displayed in a chic art gallery. Three kids were adopted because of the opening night. There are now more than 120 Heart Galleries across the country, including one in South Carolina. There are nearly 500,000 children in foster care in the United States. More than half of them will never return home. More than 123,000 children need adoptive homes right now. According to the National Heart Gallery, more than 29,000 foster children who turned 18 in 2008 aged out of the system without ever finding a permanent home. According to the Children’s Defense Fund, there were 4,938 children in foster care in South Carolina in 2010. Nearly 1,700 of them were waiting to be adopted and 513 found a “forever home.” In South Carolina, children stay in foster care an average of nearly three years. After the age of 9, the likelihood of being adopted drops significantly for a child. Patricia Byrd, a board member for the South Carolina Heart Gallery Foundation and sales manager for the Spartanburg Convention & Visitors Bureau, helped bring the national exhibit to the Upstate. “Generating awareness about children in foster care is one of my passions, and so is tourism, and I thought I could bring them together with this project,”

she said. “Housing these photos in the elegance of the Chapman Cultural Center will only enhance the already mindblowing exhibit experience.” Steve Wong, marketing director for the Chapman Cultural Center, called the exhibit both beautiful and heartbreaking. “This is one of those cases where art will touch you deeply,” he said. “We sincerely hope because of this exhibit, waiting children and parents are brought together to form permanent homes. This is a most impressive show.” The exhibition is free and open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. beginning July 9. A reception will be held on July 19 during the Spartanburg Art Walk. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@thespartanburgjournal.com. wood engraving to linocuts to solar plate intaglio prints.” The exhibit, which is open Tuesdays through Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., has already been shown at the Metropolitan Arts Council and the Fine Arts Center in Greenville and at Coastal Carolina University. Chapp said he did not know how long the exhibit would continue to travel.

PRINTS continued from PAGE 15

Katya Cohen, Jim Creal, Syd Cross, Daniel Cvammen, Phil Garrett, Luis Jaramillo, Catherine Labbé and Mark Mulfinger. The exhibit shows a wide range of styles and techniques employed in printmaking. Some of the styles are highly detailed and colorful. Others are basic and bold. Some used traditional printmaking techniques such as wood etching; others used more modern methods such as monotypes, where only one print is normally made. All pieces are done on 7.5-inch by 10inch paper. Any print medium could be used and pieces could have any subject matter. “Interesting enough, none of us knew what the others were working on over the several months, but many of the works have similar subject matter – figures, skeletons, birds,” Chapp said. “We as artists all kind of respond to the same events in the world.”

Kansas foster kids Alexander, Diana and Sephiroth are featured in the National Heart Gallery exhibition.

Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@thespartanburgjournal.com.

SO YOU KNOW: Print by Catherine Labbé

Chapp said the exhibit is designed to educate people on the process of printmaking and the variety of those processes. “This show provides a real wide range from screen printing to woodcuts and

WHAT: “Shifting Plates: South Carolina Upstate Printmakers” WHO: 15 Upstate artists WHERE: Spartanburg Art Museum, 200 E. Saint John St., Spartanburg WHEN: through Aug. 25 INFORMATION: 542-ARTS


JOURNAL SKETCHBOOK

Puppets make ‘Lion King’ animals come to life

A ‘Sound of Music’ moment on Roan Mountain By CHARLES SOWELL | staff

By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

After Mark David Kaplan landed the role of Zazu in the national tour of Disney’s blockbuster musical “The Lion King,” he spent hours and hours in front of a mirror. He was partly looking at himself. But he was mostly practicing to learn how to maneuver the expressions and actions of the bird puppet he would have on his hand. Like a dancer practicing his steps, Kaplan was trying to master the strings and levers that make the hornbill blink and move his mouth, head, neck and wings – all while staying in character, since “The Lion King” makes no effort to hide the puppeteers. “You have to get to the point where you’re not thinking about the mechanics of the puppetry so you can free your brain to perform,” he said. “It’s a lot of work, but it’s so worth it.” More than 230 puppets and masks are used to bring to the stage Disney’s hit animated movie telling the story of a young lion’s coming of age and taking his place in the world. They range from the miniscule to the massive, including four towering 18-foot giraffes played by actors trained in stiltwalking to a 13-foot-long, 9-foot-wide elephant guided by four people. The show also includes 52 wildebeests, 39 hyenas, 15 gazelles and an assortment of other animals. Once actors begin mastering their puppet or mask, they next learn the choreography. It takes about two months to master the puppetry because Disney casts actors who are taught puppetry rather than casting puppeteers who are taught to act. “We have to be a quadruple threat,” Kaplan said. “We have to sing, dance and act and do a puppet.” Kaplan’s character, which he describes as the majordomo, royal sidekick to lion ruler Mufasa, has calm moments of the stuffiness and sophistication of a finicky British butler and moments of sheer panic and wing-flapping. Kaplan rejoined “The Lion King” tour last year. He toured in the original company in the second national tour from 2003 to mid-2006. He was a principal standby then, covering the comic relief characters – Zazu, Timon the meerkat and Pumbaa the warthog.

Actor and puppeteer Mark David Kaplan with Zazu, his character in the current production of “The Lion King” now showing at the Peace Center for the Performing Arts.

“The Lion King” doesn’t try to hide the mechanics of the puppets or the humans who control them or wear the animal masks. “It’s what Julie Taymor, the director of ‘The Lion King,’ calls the ‘dual event,’” said Michael Reilly, puppet supervisor for the tour. “You have the visual of a lion but you still have an actor who can portray emotion, sing and act and all that stuff.” Kaplan said having people say they stopped looking at him is the ultimate compliment. “I love it when people say, ‘You were great. After a while, I didn’t notice you were there. I looked at the puppet the whole time,’” he said. “You realize that that means you’re doing your job, that you did it right.” With the success of “The Lion King” and other shows such as “Avenue Q,” Broadway performers are more accepting of roles that include puppets. “There are some who still shy away from those roles,” Kaplan said, “but to me, it just adds another tool in my toolbox.” “The Lion King” ends its four-week run at the Peace Center on July 8. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@thespartanburgjournal.com.

Roan Mountain’s highest point slips up on you, barely discernible among a clutter of towering peaks when seen from below at tiny Roan Mountain, Tenn. Tennessee State Route 143 creeps 3,000 feet up the mountain from the pocket community, through Roan Mountain State Park and up a winding path to Carver’s Gap at 5,500 feet. Along the way, a revelation occurs for the visitor passing through humdrum hardwood forest to the zone where mountain ash thrives: a pinnacle reward of the largest bald area in the Appalachians and the largest natural rhododendron garden in the world. It’s a “Sound of Music” moment set to the whisper of a gentle wind. The garden covers 600 acres in three patches of “Cloudland,” as the area is known. Often the rhododendrons are above the cloud layer, or hidden by it. Roan is a remote place – Greenville is about 150 miles away – and the parking area reflects the sparse visitation, with the exception of the Roan Mountain Rhododendron Festival, which can draw thousands. The roadside parking area can comfortably hold about 50 cars at the intersection of State Route 143 and the Appalachian Trail. A doe dashes out onto the highway and turns in a couple of frantic circles before skittering back into the dense balsam and rhododendron forest that cloaks Roan High Knob, the highest point on Roan Mountain at 6,285 feet. Roan is a massif (a block of the earth’s crust bounded by faults and shifted to form peaks of a mountain range) and much of the rock that underpins it is on the order of one billion years old – rocks first formed on a seabed that predates the Appalachians themselves. Roan is made up of cranberry gneiss, a metamorphic rock that is one of the old-

Gray’s Lily, named for Harvard botanist Asa Gray, pops up from time to time as the trail climbs to the 5,826-foot tall Round Bald.

HOW TO GET THERE • Follow Interstate 26 to Unicoi, Tenn., and exit at State Route 173; turn right • Turn right onto Erwin Hwy/State Route 173 • Turn left onto State Route 107 E • Turn left onto State Route 173 E/ Simerly Creek Road • Turn left to stay on 173 E/Simerly Creek Road • Turn right to stay on 173 E/Simerly Creek Road • Turn right onto State Route 37 S/ US-19E S • Turn right onto Main Street at Roan Mountain, Tenn. • Turn right on State Route 143 and follow it to Carver’s Gap

est in the United States. Roan gneiss, another type of metamorphic rock found on Roan, is about 800 million years old and Beech granite, a type of igneous rock, is about 700 million years old. The mountains themselves were formed between 200 million and 400 million years ago when the North American plate and African plate collided, thrusting the former seabed upward. Taking the Appalachian Trail north toward Round Bald, the visitor winds through a zone of knee-high grasses and shrubs before entering a dense stand of balsam. Past the trees the trail runs through a fenced zone used to protect the fragile mountaintop from tramping boots. Roan’s ridgeline hovers just below, at slightly higher than 6,000 feet. This elevation is known as the Canadian Zone, where plants common to Arctic boreal forest can be found. Gray’s Lily, named for Harvard botanist Asa Gray, pops up from time to time as the trail climbs to the 5,826-foot tall Round Bald. Gray’s Lily is uncommon to the area except around high mountain peaks. The two-foot-tall flower with its scarlet blossom is common along the border with Canada. Round Bald has panoramic views of North Carolina and Tennessee. Mt. Mitchell, the highest point in North Carolina, is visible about 40 miles away from the bald. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@thespartanburgjournal.com.

JULY 6, 2012 | SPARTANBURG JOURNAL 17


journal sketchbook

scene. here.

Ah, Summer!

the week in the local arts world

Remember running barefoot, eating popsicles, and playing kick the can until you were called home for dinner. Today, summer has lost much of its allure Lee Yarborough when days are spent inside looking at a computer instead of outside next to a pool. Last week, I took off early one day and played with my 5 year old while eating a snow cone. I felt like a kid again. Summer is more than a season; it is a feeling and a memory. Truthfully, we all need a little bit of “summer” each year to keep us sane and to keep our priorities in check. How can we run businesses and manage employees in a summer mentality, yet stay professional? After my snow cone last week, I have been trying to come up with ideas to help our whole staff feel like its summer at Propel HR. • Summer hours – can your business meet demands and allow employees flexible summer hours? Many companies offer employees shorter work hours on Fridays, but keep the office covered through a rotation. A few extra hours a week to go to the pool or lake adds wonders to employee morale.

University of South Carolina Upstate associate professor of music and director of jazz studies Gregg Akkerman will hold a reading and book signing for “The Last Balladeer: The Johnny Hartman Story.” Akkerman’s first book is also the first book to trace the complete story of the singer’s life, and includes interviews with musicians Tony Bennett, Jon Hendricks and Bill Taylor. The event will be held on July 10 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the Hub City Bookshop in Spartanburg. Visitors to the Historic Price House on July 13 can learn about firefighting past and present, become a part of a bucket brigade and see a Poplar Springs Fire Department truck – if it isn’t out on a call. The gates open at 7:30 p.m. for tours and s’mores. Stories and talk begin at 8:30 p.m. Admission for ages 18 and over is $5. Ages 5 through 17 is $3. Call 576-6546 or email pricehouse@ spartanburghistory.org for more information. Doyle Boggs, author of “Historic Spartanburg County: 225 Years of History,” will discuss and sign his book at the Hub City Bookshop July 18 from 5-6 p.m. The book follows the history of Spartanburg County from before the Revolutionary War to the present, and includes dozens of photographs. Boggs is the associate vice president for communications and marketing for Wofford College.

ramics show and sale featuring co-op artists Bryan Davis, Tracie Easler, Jason Galloway, Al Hofmann, Agnes Martin, Terry Murdock, Teresa Prater, Katherine Rausch, Rebecca Savage, Garry Turpin, Holly Williamson, Nancy Williamson and Kathy Wofford. The exhibit, on display July 19 through Aug. 11, will feature functional stoneware and earthenware pottery, decorative wall art and sculptural work. An opening reception will be on Thursday, July 19, from 5-9 p.m., during Spartanburg’s Art Walk. The public is invited and refreshments will be served. West Main Artists Co-op is located at 578 West Main St, Spartanburg. Call 864-804-6501 for additional information. The Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg is now accepting submissions for its 2012 39th annual juried show, which will be in the Spartanburg Art Museum at the Chapman Cultural Center, Sept. 20-Nov. 3. An opening reception and awards ceremony is scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 29, 6-8 p.m. The show is open to all artists in South and North Carolina and Georgia. More than $4,000 will be awarded in various categories. The deadline to submit work for consideration is Aug. 1. Media categories are 2-D Painting, 2-D Drawing and Mixed Media, 2-D Photography, and 3-D Sculpture, which includes ceramics and jewelry. For more details, please visit www.artistsguildofspartanburg.com, contact director Robin Els at 864-764-9568 or email artistsguildofspartanburg@gmail.com.

The West Main Artists Co-op will host Pottery Palooza, a ceSend us your arts announcement. E-mail: spartanburgarts@thespartanburgjournal.com

• Sweet treats – who says kids are the only ones who need an ice cream break? Make your own Sundaes or call the ice cream truck to come to your office. It is a huge hit and brings laughter to your staff. • Summer vacations – many employees will be taking time off this summer, so make sure your shifts are filled and that your clients’ needs are being met. Prepare for this by cross training and communicating schedules to the staff. • Summer social –whether a cook-out or a potluck, celebrate the season with a social for your team. Get creative and have fun!

669 N. Academy St., Greenville, SC 864.679.6055 | 800.446.6567 www.propelhr.com

18 SPARTANBURG Journal | JULY 6, 2012

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Unfortunately, work has taken the place of our summers off, but there is no reason we can’t still have a little summer fun at the office. It will make you feel like a kid again!

children

c o x p h o t o g r a p h y. n e t


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JOURNAL SKETCHBOOK

THE WEEK IN PHOTOS

LOOK WHO’S IN THE JOURNAL THIS WEEK Teacher Natasha Ferguson cuts out pieces for her art project during The Muse Machine Summer Institute 2012 weeklong class at the Chapman Cultural Center’s David Reid Theatre lobby. Twenty-five teachers from throughout South Carolina took part in the class, which is designed to help teachers discover new ways to teach their students.

Crossword puzzle: page 22

Sudoku puzzle: page 22

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JULY 6, 2012 | SPARTANBURG JOURNAL 21


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Across 1 “The Godfather” actor 5 Furry ‘80s fad items 13 Protest of a kind 17 Gymnast Korbut 18 One dealing with spirits 19 “Kinsey” star Neeson 20 “That dress is perfect!” 21 It may be uncharted 22 Korea divider, briefly 23 Anti-apartheid org. 24 Outing that includes birding 29 Tony Award won four times by Tommy Tune 31 Spillane’s “__ Jury” 32 Postwar British leader 33 Peach or plum 36 National Soccer Hall of Famer since 1993 38 Cold War enemy, informally 43 Prereqs for some Harvard applicants 45 One looking for stars 47 Flies across the Atlantic?

49 Caspian country 50 Hawaiian coffee region 51 Volcano output 53 Made a touchdown 54 Timecard abbr. 55 Vel attachment? 56 __ Bora: Afghan region 60 Marge Simpson’s mother-in-law 61 Foofaraw 62 Harley-Davidson’s NYSE symbol 63 All-in-one Apple 64 City SSW of Moscow 65 __ Tin Tin 66 Old comm. giant 67 The Sunni, e.g. 68 Pointed 71 Mideast pooh bah 72 Small combo 73 Equitably divided 76 Survey an enemy position 79 Rhett’s last words 80 Fine-tune 84 Tenn. neighbor 85 Gym safety item 86 What a criminal might be on? 88 Aptly named shaving lotion 90 1983 World Series champs

93 Miner’s dream 97 College sr.’s challenge 98 Classic Jaguar 100 “Hi, sailor!” 101 Up and running 106 Lawn liming target 107 Spanish saint who wrote the encyclopedic “Etymologiae” 108 Leader after Mao 109 Mete (out) 110 More spirited 111 Sommer of Berlin Down 1 Hardly friendly 2 Out on __ 3 Visually rapt 4 ‘60s-’70s theater, briefly 5 Lock up 6 Ones trying to get picked up 7 Stanford-Binet nos. 8 It borders It. 9 Cutesy-__ 10 Mock tail? 11 1992 presidential also-ran 12 Scottish royal family 13 Texter’s hedge 14 Looped handle 15 Move, as merchandise 16 “Star __”

23 When many retire 25 Jacques of “Jour de Fête” 26 Cramming, say 27 Scoreboard initials 28 Lace place 30 Burglar’s undoing 33 Experiences

Very Hard

34 Jeep or Land Rover, briefly 35 Mountain road feature 36 Room with a sofa 37 “Seinfeld” role 39 13th/14th-century German mystic

40 Desperate 41 Talks and talks 42 Tony winner Hagen 44 Word with analysis or significance 45 Italian lover’s coo 46 Removed by hand, in a way 48 Put up points against 51 Very spicy fare 52 Slow equine pace 55 Bell 57 Mario Puzo novel 58 More likely to be R-rated 59 One playing a part 69 “I don’t believe it” 70 Remote insert 71 Tarzan creator’s monogram 73 Cooking spray 74 Old vitamin bottle letters 75 Meal starter? 77 7 on the Beaufort scale 78 How ballerinas dance 81 Violist’s clef 82 Fired 83 Colossal 87 Laugh syllable 89 Not so flexible 91 Word relative 92 Short-legged lizard 93 Inn employee 94 Quite 95 Labor 96 University of Chicago site __ Park 99 Sphere’s lack 102 Cinque e uno 103 Man cave staples 104 Slowing, on a score: Abbr. 105 Member of The Whiffenpoofs 106 Soft drink ending Crossword answers: page 21

Sudoku answers: page 21


JOURNAL SKETCHBOOK

IN MY OWN WORDS BY ASHLEY HOLT

The first cut is the deepest I’ve always set extreme limitations when it comes to styling my hair. As a kid, I had the prerequisite Beatle bangs that every American boy had in the Nixon era, which got parted down the middle during the ‘80s in keeping with legal requirements. As puberty inspired the need to start a rock band, longer hair became an imperative. But because the hair on top would simply explode in a mushroom cloud of curls (I had what was known as “ELO hair”), the conservative approach was to only let the hair in the back grow, which is how millions of young boys with similar follicle conditions independently engineered the mullet. No one knew it was a mullet back then and ignorance was bliss. The evidence, unfortunately, is preserved in hundreds of high school yearbooks. At no point did I subject myself to dyes or other complicated treatments, nor did I become inspired to design my hair in some ridiculous MTV fashion. I did, however, fall victim to Morrissey hair. Specifically, I fell victim to Paolo Licciardi, sometime drummer in my sometime rock band. He’d just given himself the Morrissey treatment – buzzed back and sides, piled high on top – and was eager to do the same number on my head. When his first attack with the clippers resulted in “uh oh,” I headed to the closest barber shop to have the damage repaired. There, I received the best haircut of my life. It was a manly establishment, with cheap wood paneling on the walls and back issues of Penthouse in the waiting area. The only other feminine element was a nail technician stationed in the corner; a woman with the mannerisms of a Wild West madam. She smiled to show off her eyebrow pencil beauty mark as I sat down. The barber was a study in manliness by virtue of his Navy tattoos and lit cigar. I noticed that the only décor on the walls was a framed portrait of Franklin Roosevelt. Barber Manly inspected the gash in my head with a wince and went to work. In a burst of violence, his fingers locked onto my skull while the other hand scraped layers of skin with the clippers. A cloud of hair and cigar ash enveloped my head as he wrestled my disobedient hair into submission. Just as

I was about to protest, he was done. The fog of hair lifted and I saw in the mirror that, amazingly, the haircut was perfect. “Now you look like a respectable college kid,” he said, having never asked if I was attending college. The nail madam smiled her approval. I have spent the last 25 years trying to recreate that haircut, like a junkie trying to revisit that first high. I seek out the manliest barber shops, hoping to find someone with the brutal artistry of that tattooed genius, but it never works out. So I go crawling back to the sissy beauty parlors, where excitable young girls try to coax me into exotic waves and gel sculpting. They do their best to work the clippers with their delicate technique, but they’ll never deliver the satisfaction of that brilliant beast who touched me in my youth. Sometime I wish I would just go bald. At least then I’d know the dream is finally over. But for now, with my mass of unruly hair still needing regular attention, I’ll continue to seek the perfect haircut. These days, I try to jinx the barbershop visits in my favor with a supernatural talisman: Before any stylist begins to work on my amber waves of mane, I insist they hang a picture of FDR. Ashley Holt is a writer and illustrator living in Spartanburg. His neurotic quirks and extreme sensitivity to broad social trends are chronicled in The Symptoms, an illustrated blog. Check out his website at www.ashleyholt.com.

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JULY 6, 2012 | SPARTANBURG JOURNAL 23


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July 6, 2012 Spartanburg Journal  

Weekly newspaper for Spartanburg, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

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