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DEMANDING ANSWERS FROM THE DISABILITIES BOARD: W H AT’S AT S TA K E, A ND W HO’S T O BL A ME? PAGE 12

GREENVILLEJOURNAL Greenville, S.C. • Friday, April 6, 2012 • Vol.14, No.14

Fighting for her son JERRI GR AY’S ONLY REGRE T IS

‘THEY CAUGHT ME’ PAGE 8

THE LION IS COMING

Will penguins fall backwards if they look up?

Zoo Camp 2012

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Jerri Gray practices a song she will sing in concert at the Triune Mercy Center.

The Peace Center has added 1,600 more seats for the biggest Broadway show to ever hit Greenville . PAGE 16

S R E T S U B Y TH TRUTH OR MYTH ANIMAL M

Children ages 3 to 14 are invited to join us at the zoo as we learn animal truths or myths! Camps begin June 11, 2012. For more info, call 864-467-4850 or visit us online at www.greenvillezoo.com.


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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

WORTH REPEATING THEY SAID IT

9.1%

“Some were literally banging on trash cans and calling it entertainment. What started happening was the talent changed to the point where it got edgy.”

The state jobless rate at the end of February, down from 9.3 percent at the beginning of the month, with an increase of 9,864 additional employed people driving the decline. It was the third largest month-tomonth gain in employment since 1976.

Angie Prosser, City of Greenville director of public information and events, on the city’s decision to discontinue the Acoustic Café.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

Jerri Gray on her decision to flee South Carolina with her 550 lb., 14-year-old son in 2009 after learning the state was going to take him away from her.

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

“I am a really good mom. I made that one mistake. I let his weight get out of control. God has forgiven me, but man has to hurt each other.”

“Greenville, South Carolina. Do you wear shoes down there?” Comment from a San Francisco art director that led Erwin-Penland owner Joe Erwin to found the five-year-old Food For Thought conference.

“We may have spoken softly and quickly (in reporting the results of the executive session), but we did it.” Disabilities and Special Needs Board secretary Judith Gibson, on how the DSN board met state open meetings laws when it fired former director Brent Parker.

“The South has become shorthand for a lot of things wrong with America.” Dr. Molly McGehee, assistant professor of English at Presbyterian College.

“We really should take our time with any issues dealing with weapons.” Charleston Rep. Wendell Gilliard, on the state House vote to approve a bill allowing holders of concealed weapons permits to take their guns into restaurants that serve alcohol.

1,600

Number of additional tickets available for “The Lion King” after the Peace Center has added extra seating areas. To accommodate the animal parade, seats had to be removed from the Concert Hall. A record-breaking ticket on-sale event and an overwhelming demand for tickets caused the Peace Center to review its seating map and add seats.

83-7

The result of a S.C. State House vote to send a bill to the Senate that would allow holders of concealed weapons permits to take their guns into restaurants that serve alcohol with the restaurant’s permission, as long as they do not drink while carrying. The overwhelming majority in support of the bill underscores S.C.’s longstanding pro-gun posture.

APRIL 6, 2012 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL 3


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March of Dimes ambassador family from left to right, Nicole Gilbert, Aidan Gilbert 2, Teagan Gilbert 15 months, Jackson Gilbert and Cian Gilbert 2. Twins Aidan and Cian were born 12 weeks premature.

April 28 event to raise funds, awareness about prematurity By leigh savage | contributor

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Nicole Gilbert was shocked when, at 28 weeks pregnant, her doctor told her it was time to deliver her babies. One of her twin boys, Aidan, was experiencing heart and lung failure due to a complication called twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome, creating “a matter of life or death,” Gilbert said. The boys were born weighing just 3 lbs. 6 oz. (Aidan) and 2 lbs. 3 oz. (Cian). Their tiny, underdeveloped lungs, eyes and brains required monitoring and numerous interventions during four months in the Neonatal Intensive Care

Unit at Greenville Hospital System. Fortunately, her boys made it through the ordeal and are looking forward to celebrating their third birthday this June. Throughout the frightening experience, the Gilberts saw firsthand all that the March of Dimes does for families who experience prematurity. “We started receiving cards and letters,” Gilbert said. “When Aidan had surgery at one month old, they offered us support and gave him a stuffed animal. They were thinking of us even before we knew much about them.” To return the favor, the Gilberts offered to become a March of Dimes Ambassador Family, raising awareness

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and funds and helping to publicize the Greenville March for Babies, set for April 28 at CU-ICAR. The event brings together families, individuals and corporations for a four-mile walk, followed by a celebration with free food, live music and activities for the kids. “We want to celebrate all babies, sick or healthy, and we’d love to have the community come join us,” said Lisa Green, state March for Babies director. The majority of funds raised stay in South Carolina to fund local programs, including research grants to Clemson University, USC and Greenville Hospital System. According to the March of Dimes, more than half a million babies are born too soon in the U.S. each year, and the premature birth rate has risen by 36 percent in the past 25 years. Prematurity is the No. 1 killer of newborns and can lead to severe health problems and disabilities. A big component of the March of Dimes’ mission is prevention, funding research to help mothers reach full term and sponsoring legislation that improves health care for expectant women. In up to 40 percent of cases, the cause for prematurity is unknown, so funds raised by the March of Dimes go toward research to pinpoint causes as well as treatments for common complications.

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One major breakthrough was surfactant treatment, which helps underdeveloped lungs and reduces breathing problems in many babies, including Aidan and Cian. Other March of Dimes successes include developing the Salk Polio Vaccine (1955), discovering the dangers of fetal alcohol syndrome (1973) and launching the folic acid awareness campaign (1996-2002). Gilbert was surprised to learn that March of Dimes created the first Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in 1976. “They were the ones who realized theses babies needed more,” she said, including specialized equipment and customized care. Previously, preemies had gone into the same ICU as adults. At March for Babies, registration begins at 8 a.m. with the walk kicking off at 9 a.m. More than 4,000 people and 260 companies participated last year, raising more than $650,000. Green hopes the event raises $670,000 this year. Gilbert will be there with her team, which will include her boys riding in a stroller, though she says Cian will likely want to walk most of the way. She’s proud to represent an organization with a track record of breakthroughs that help babies – including hers. “If it wasn’t for the March of Dimes,” she said, “who knows?”

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APRIL 6, 2012 | Greenville Journal 5


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OPINION

VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

How to define self-defense In his heart of hearts, state Rep. Bakari Sellers must know that the bill he filed March 22 to undo portions of South Carolina’s 2006 “stand your ground” law will never exit the judiciary committee. He has no co-sponsors. Last Thursday, his House colleagues firmly underscored the Palmetto State’s pro-gun posture with a vote to send to the Senate a bill that would allow holders of concealed weapons permits to take their guns into restaurants that serve alcohol – if the restaurant agrees, and they don’t imbibe while packing. The vote was 83-7 – heedless of a lonely warning from Charleston Rep. Wendell Gilliard that “we really should take our time with any issues dealing with weapons” in light of the Trayvon Martin case in Sanford, Fla. Sellers openly admits the 17-year-old’s death is why he filed the bill. Martin was shot Feb. 27 by a self-appointed neighborhood watch captain while walking back to his father’s fiancee’s house in a gated community after a trip to buy Skittles and sweet tea. The incident quickly morphed into a national obsession, with round-the clock media coverage and waves of protest marches across the Upstate and the nation. Florida’s stand-your-ground law – the model for South Carolina’s version – is seen as a key reason why the shooter, who claimed self-defense, has not been charged. Sellers said a re-examination of the law may be “a knee-jerk reaction, but I think it’s warranted.” What Sellers wants is a conversation – and in light of some of the ways South Carolina’s expanded self-defense law has been put to use, that conversation is overdue. South Carolina has long given state residents the explicit right to use deadly force to protect themselves from intruders inside their homes. But outside, citizens generally had “a duty to retreat” until 2006, when legislators revised the law to say anyone attacked in a place he “has the right to be” – home, car or business – can use deadly force without retreat if he fears for his life. At least 22 other states have done the same, for arguably rational reasons. Many cited carjackings as a major factor. For most, the core dilemma was domestic violence, where the attacker isn’t an intruder, but a spouse. Abusers don’t always keep the violence at home, as the Upstate has painfully witnessed. In 2003, a man shot his girlfriend to death at a Greenville BiLo store behind the deli where she worked. Last December, a man knifed his wife to death at a Berea bank where she worked. In such cases, retreat plainly isn’t possible. But sometimes it is. Martin’s killer exited his car and pursued the teenager after the police told him not to. Last year, a Lexington County homeowner killed a man he caught breaking into his truck. The Post & Courier reported another case in North Charleston where a man caught a teenager trying to steal a bicycle chained outside his door, and shot the boy in the back as he fled. Self-defense, police said. No charges were filed. This is called stretching self-defense completely out of shape. A law that is too elastic becomes cover for vigilante justice. Sellers is right: South Carolina needs to re-examine how it defines self-defense.

Charities must collaborate At the turn of the last century, charities became a large part of our country’s infrastructure, providing services to less fortunate people who were unable to provide for themselves. Today, the number of charitable organizations in the United States has grown to over 1.5 million. The recent downturn in our economy has not only been devastating to families, but has created unique challenges for the charitable organizations that provide them with relief. Budget cuts and funding shortfalls are forcing nonprofit groups to cut programs or limit services to the communities they serve. Many more are forced to close. Sadly, this comes at a time when unemployment is high and there are an increasing number of people who need help providing the essentials of food, clothing and shelter for their families. The effect the poor economy is having on nonprofit organizations is a relatively new phenomenon for many executive directors. From about 1985 through 2008, the low unemployment rates and overall health of the economy produced donors who gave more than enough money to provide services for those clients that were seeking help. Through this time, charities implemented a variety of programs in an attempt to serve the community in a more holistic fashion. Because funding was more available, it became standard practice for many charities to maintain programs without evaluating the cost or overall impact they were making in the community. It wasn’t long before these “extra” programs began to erode the core purpose of the charities providing them, leading many nonprofits to offer services well outside their individual missions. In today’s economy, that approach is no longer an option. A new way of doing charitable work must be found. Non-profit collaboration offers a solution for charities seeking to maintain a high level of care at the most efficient cost. By eliminating duplication of services, collaboration creates many benefits for the non-profits and the com-

IN MY OWN WORDS by SCOTT STEPHENS

munities they serve. By meeting together, nonprofit representatives learn each other’s parameters of service, improving inter-agency communication and cooperation and reducing the opportunity of potential system abusers. Relationships are established that improve information-sharing between experts in different fields, providing the community with quality expert service and eliminating the need for another entity to re-create services. Collaboration determines the needed service level for individual clients with fewer calls or emails, better utilizing everyone’s time. And by keeping each other informed, nonprofits can ensure that services discontinued by government agencies will be picked up by an able nonprofit most suited to that mission. As the collaboration process evolves, more and more duplicated services will be eliminated as nonprofits focus on the services their expertise and mission allows. Working together, charities can implement solutions to the problem of system abuse that is taking advantage of their good will. The collaboration process should also include government agencies in an attempt to reduce the costs taxpayers incur for services provided for the needy. Collaboration between all organizations that provide charitable services is vital in these uncertain times. Only through increased communication and sharing of resources will nonprofits effectively continue their mission of mercy in a difficult economic environment. Scott Stephens is a small-business owner and nonprofit executive and serves as the Facilitator of Council for the Children’s Services Council of Pickens County.

IN MY OWN WORDS FEATURES ESSAYS BY RESIDENTS WITH PARTICULAR EXPERTISE WHO WANT TO TELL READERS ABOUT ISSUES IMPORTANT TO THEM. THE JOURNAL ALSO WELCOMES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR (MAXIMUM LENGTH OF 200 WORDS). PLEASE INCLUDE ADDRESS AND DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER. ALL LETTERS WILL BE CONFIRMED BEFORE PUBLICATION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT ALL LETTERS FOR LENGTH. PLEASE CONTACT SUSAN SIMMONS AT SSIMMONS@GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM.

6 GREENVILLE JOURNAL | APRIL 6, 2012


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Jerri Gray doesn’t regret skipping that Family Court hearing in 2009, or fleeing South Carolina with her then 14-year-old son after she found out the state was going to try to take him away from her because he weighed 550 pounds. “I had to fight for my son,” Gray said. “I did it for him and for me.” The case drew national attention and stirred a debate on whether parents of morbidly obese or dangerously overweight children should be charged with criminal child neglect. “The only regret I have is they caught me,” Gray said last week while working on a painting in the art room at the Triune Mercy Center, a missionbased church to the homeless on Rutherford Street in Greenville. Gray sings during some Sunday services there. The criminal charges Gray had faced in connection with the case – unlawful neglect of a child and interfering with a custody order – have been dismissed because she completed the state’s pretrial intervention program, according to the 13th  Circuit Solicitor’s Office. Gray said the charges would disappear from her record as soon as she’s able to pay the fee to expunge them. Gray’s sister has custody of the boy until his 18th birthday next year. He has lost about 300 pounds thanks to a special diet and exercise, Gray said. “He wants to become a vegetarian,” said Gray, who said her son lives with her on weekends. “He’ll help me shop for groceries and he tells me to buy salad, what kind of salad dressing to buy.” Dr. Phil McGraw, the television talk show host, pays for a weekly box of meals from

Jerri Gray with her painting entitled “Use me as you will” in the art room of the Triune Mercy Center.

BistroMD for her son and for her. Dr. Phil is also paying for a gym membership and a personal trainer for the boy, as well as his first year at Oakwood College, a small Christian school in Huntsville, AL. Her son plays basketball and got an A in gym class. Gray has lost 60 pounds herself. “Good has come out of this as far as him losing weight, but if they would have helped me like I asked, we’d be doing this together,” she said. “I was doing everything as a parent I could. I didn’t do this on purpose. I tried my best. I really did.” She said she was going to college full-time and working full-time, always on the second or third shift. “I’d prepare his meals. We’d go a month, a couple of weeks where I’d steam the vegetables and bake the chicken,” she said. Then, they’d revert back to fast food and unhealthier meals. Her son saw his friends doing things with their dads and he didn’t have one in his life. She said after he told her he wanted a dad, she tried to get him a Big Brother. There wasn’t one available, she said. She was just trying to make ends meet. “We knew we were doing

“Once people get to know me, they say I’m not the person they made me out to be. I am a really good mom. I made that one mistake.” Jerri Gray, who faced charges of criminal child neglect in 2009 over her then 14-year-old son’s weight of 550 pounds. The charges were dropped because Gray completed the state’s pre-trial intervention program, and her son has since lost about 300 pounds.

emotional eating,” she said. She said she tried to get her son into a weight-loss program in North Carolina even though she would have had to pay for it herself. Once she rented a car and got to the facility, she found out it was only for wealthy adults. She also said after her release from jail, the television station TLC offered to pay for her and her son to attend a weight loss program in Texas, but the court would not allow it. Since her son was taken

away from her, Gray has found solace at Triune. On Easter Sunday, she’ll sing during church services. A film crew from TLC will be there to document her story, she said. Later in the month, Gray will participate in a fundraising concert at the church that will feature Greenville native and international opera singer Myra Cordell. Gray said she doesn’t want people to know her as the single mother in handcuffs and an orange jumpsuit, an image many people saw when television cameras filmed her return to Greenville from Baltimore. “I’m not going to let my story die,” she said. “I am going to fight this using my talents. People think they know me from what they heard. They say I should have been arrested, and if I saw the information that they put out, I’d probably feel the same way. “But once people get to know me, they say I’m not the person they made me out to be. I am a really good mom. I made that one mistake. I let his weight get out of control,” she said. “God has forgiven me, but man has to hurt each other.” Contact Cindy Landrum at 679-1237 or clandrum@ greenvillejournal.com.


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Warmest March on record at GSP New law makes dent Active tornado season expected to be the result By CHARLES SOWELL | staff

Last month was the warmest March on record at Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport, with an average high of 62.5 degrees. Likewise, Asheville had a record month with 56.4 degrees reported as the average. More than 7,700 daily record high temperatures were set across the eastern half of the nation, compared to 287 record lows. In several instances in the Great Lakes and Upper Midwest, morning lows bested record highs and high temperatures soared above mid-summer norms. The high temperature outbreak stretched across at least 26 states, from the central High Plains to the East Coast. According to the National Weather Service’s long-term predictions, April, May and June should also see above-normal temperatures. The unseasonal warmth has contributed to a spike in tornadoes. More tornadoes have been reported so far this year than even in the extremely active 2011 season, which saw hundreds killed in

April 6

outbreaks across the South and Midwest. Information from the National Storm Predictions Center showed 379 preliminary tornado reports through March 25 – a very busy start to the severe weather and tornado season. A total of 154 tornadoes were reported from January through March of 2011. The three-year average number of tornadoes in January, February and March is 124. The only recent year where the number of tornadoes surpassed this year was 2008, when 491 tornadoes touched down through March 25. So far this year, the March 2 tornado outbreak was the biggest, with 132 tornado reports and at least 61 confirmed tornadoes so far. At least 39 people have died due to tornadoes that leveled Marysville and Henryville, Ind. Earlier this week, tornadoes tore through the Dallas area, ripping roofs off homes, sending tractor-trailers flying into the air and leaving thousands without power. According to the electric provider ONCOR, approximately 10,600 customers were without power across North Texas as of early Wednesday morning from the outbreak of twisters. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@greenvillejournal.com.

in copper thefts By CHARLES SOWELL | staff

Deputies say copper thefts are down 15 percent in Spartanburg County in the wake of last year’s new rules requiring those who sell scrap metal to obtain a permit. In Greenville, the reported level of copper thefts has been cut in half. The Spartanburg Sheriff ’s Office said 13,569 scrap metal permits were sold between Aug. 16 of last year and March 19 of this year. Back in 2010, $2.3 million in metals were stolen and $1.7 million in property damage was reported due to the thefts. Most copper thefts are essentially drug crimes, Greenville County investigators said, with addicts heisting copper and other non-ferrous metals to pay for their drug habits. Under the terms of the new state law, scrap metal buyers who purchase items like copper must get a $200 permit which is valid for two years. They must pay for copper, catalytic converters and beer kegs with checks instead of cash, creating a paper trail back to the individuals who bring in the scrap metal. Seller permits are free and local governments issue two kinds: one that is valid for 48 hours from the time of issue and the other one effective for a year. Both are only good for the county in which they are issued. Sellers may apply for 48-hour permits twice a year. Those who want to sell metal more often must get the yearly permit and show state-issued photo identification, as well as the vehicle registration and license plate number of the vehicle used to transport metals.

PH YSICIAN UPDATE

GHS welcomes these new physicians! Geriatrics Neerja Arya, M.D. Laurie Theriot Roley, M.D. Center for Success in Aging 255 Enterprise Drive, Ste.101 Greenville, 454-8120

Infectious Diseases Rhett M. Shirley, M.D. UMG Infectious Diseases 890 W. Faris Rd., Ste. 520 Greenville, 455-9033

Internal Medicine Diane Eugenio, M.D. Daniel Smith, M.D. Cypress IM–Greer 325 Medical Pkwy., Ste. 200 Greer, 797-9550

S. Meg Carter, M.D. Cypress IM–Maxwell Pointe 3907 S. Highway 14 Greenville, 675-1491

Jane Gwinn, M.D. Pediatric Pulmonology 200 Patewood Dr., Ste. A300 Greenville, 454-5530

Neurology

Manisha Patel, M.D. Pediatric Cardiology 200 Patewood Dr., Ste. A200 Greenville, 454-5120

Kathleen McConnell, M.D. Neuroscience Associates 200 Patewood Dr., Ste. B350 Greenville, 454-4500

Pain Management Leland Berkwits, M.D. Upstate Medical Rehabilitation 111 Doctors Drive Greenville, 797-7100

Pediatrics Beverly Ellington, M.D. Pediatric Associates–Easley 800 N. A St. Easley, 855-0001

Surgery Anita Patt, M.D. UMG Breast Health Center 200 Patewood Dr., Ste. A14 Greenville, 454-2224

Urology Kelly Maloney, M.D. Charles Marguet, M.D. UMG Regional Urology– Cross Creek 11 Park Creek Dr. Greenville, 797-7450 Note: This new office combines the Memorial Court and Medical Ridge practices, which are now closed; the Easley and Parkway offices remain open.

ghs.org

John Siddens, D.O. UMG Plastic Surgery & Aesthetics 200 Patewood Dr., Ste. B480 Greenville, 454-4570

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APRIL 6, 2012 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL 9


journal community

Greenville Journal adds two new writers to editorial team

Old Cars Great Music Join Us for the Largest Cruise-In in the Upstate and RYDELL, JIMMY CLANTON CLANTON, music featuring BOBBY RYDELL Jim Quick & Coastline…

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Friday, May 11 6 pm-10:30 pm Adults $20 • Children $10

(Discounted tickets purchased in advance: Adults $15 • Children $8)

Come in a classic car (1979 or older) and $25 admits a carload of four! Line-up begins at noon. Gates open at 2 pm for classic cars. Dash plaques are available for the first 400 cars. Takes place at Blue Ridge Electric Co-op, 734 W. Main St., Pickens, SC. 1-800-240-3400 • blueridgefest.com

Proceeds benefit select Upstate charitable organizations.

10 Greenville Journal | APRIL 6, 2012

The Greenville Journal is pleased to announce the addition of two new writers, Jerry Salley and April A. Morris, to the Community Journals editorial staff. Salley selected for assistant editor post By April a. morris | staff

As assistant editor, Jerry Salley will contribute articles, edit stories and assist in production. He has degrees in English and creative writing, with nearly two decades of writing and editing experience. An Asheville native, Salley established his Upstate ties as a student at Furman University. Upstate residents may have seen him performing sketches and improv comedy in town with Idiom Savant, a troupe he founded in the late 1980s. After working in North Carolina as a copywriter, senior editor, senior content producer and reporter for corporations such as IBM, Smart Online and Citysearch.com, Salley returned to the Upstate two years ago. As a freelance writer, Salley has tackled a variety of

Morris brings Upstate roots, love of writing to Journal By JERRY SALLEY | staff

April Morris, an award-winning journalist who joins the Journal as a staff writer, returned to the Upstate from North Carolina five years ago to find “a very different” Greenville from the hometown she knew as a child. “I love the downtown renewal, especially the Falls Park area,” she said. Morris’s work at the Journal will be a continued growth of her deep roots in Upstate publications. After graduating from Lander University in Greenwood, she started at the Pickens Sentinel as a general assignment reporter who “covered everything” from government and education to crime and local interest features. Her work at the Sentinel earned her a 1998 South Carolina Press Association award. After three years at the Chatham (NC)

topics from medical coding for trade newsletters to literature and visual arts. He has recently served as executive editor at Eli Research and contributed stories to the Green- Jerry Salley, ville Journal and assistant editor, Greenville Busi- Community ness Magazine. Journals When he’s not searching for interesting stories or composing at the keyboard, Salley can be found reading, enjoying music, completing New York Times crossword puzzles, and restoring his 116year-old-home. As Salley joins the Journal staff, he says, “I’m looking forward to learning more about Greenville and telling stories about the area.” News and Record (where her writing won two more awards), Morris returned to South Carolina in 2003 to work as an assistant editor at G – The Magazine of Greenville, from its launch April Morris, in 2008 to its folding staff writer, in 2010. Morris has Community been a frequent con- Journals tributor to TOWN Magazine as a freelance writer. She’s excited to now be joining the Journal staff. “The Journal is unique in its niche,” she said. “Its format and community focus gives us the opportunity to delve deeper into stories and issues.” Morris’ devotion to writing is proven by an unusual hobby: a collection of fountain pens. Her friends and family often receive letters written in longhand. “It’s a pleasure to write,” she said, “if you have a fine writing instrument.”


Teacher of the Year finalists named Ten teachers vie for district’s top award By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

Ten teachers – from a fifth-grade teacher with four years’ experience to a science teacher who has been in the classroom for 25 years – have been named finalists for the 2012-13 Greenville County Teacher of the Year. The finalists were chosen from among the Teachers of the Year at each of the school district’s schools and centers. Top teachers at each school were chosen by their peers. The finalists are: Abigail Cook, a chemistry teacher with six years of teaching experience, all at Wade Hampton High. She earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees at Clemson. Matt Critell, a kindergarten teacher at Fork Shoals School, who has been in education for four and a half years. Critell, a Youngstown State University graduate, has been at Fork Shoals for three years. Jillian Grimsley, a fifth-grade teacher at

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Stone Academy of Communication Arts, with four years of teaching experience. She has degrees from Furman University and Converse College. Jessica Jackson, a special education teacher at West Greenville School. She has 14 years of teaching experience, six of which have been at West Greenville. Brian Morgan, an art teacher at Duncan Chapel Elementary. He has been at Duncan Chapel for six years and has nine years teaching experience. He earned his master’s degree from Furman. Sara Newell, a fifth-grade teacher at Sterling School. She has 13 years of teach-

ing experience and holds degrees from the University of South Carolina- Spartanburg and Converse College. Will Ragland, a drama teacher at Woodmont High. Four of Ragland’s nine years in teaching have been spent at Woodmont. His bachelor’s degree is from Davidson College. Rex Smith, a sixth-grade science teacher at League Academy. He has spent 25 years teaching, the past three at League. His bachelor’s degree is from Western Carolina University. Jennifer Valenti, eighth-grade Spanish teacher at Northwood Middle School. She

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has 15 years of teaching experience, 10 at Northwood. She earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Columbia College. Sherryan Yarbrough, kindergarten teacher at Blythe Academy of Languages. She has six years teaching experience. Her degrees are from Lenoir-Rhyne College and Southeastern Theological Seminary. Five judges reviewed all the applications, which included educational history and professional development, a professional biography, community involvement, philosophy of teaching, education issues and trends and a personal message to educators and the general public. The judges will observe the finalists in the classroom and interview them individually before the end of the school year. The winner of the district’s Teacher of the Year Award will be named in August and compete for the state Teacher of the Year Award. This year’s Greenville County Teacher of the Year, Summit Drive fifth-grade teacher Taunja Pool, is one of five finalists for the 2011-12 South Carolina Teacher of the Year Award. The winner will be announced May 1. The winner will receive $25,000, a laptop computer and use of a BMW for a year. Contact Cindy Landrum at 679-1237 or clandrum@greenvillejournal.com.

N E W S T H AT Y O U C A N U S E

GHS Centennial History Talks

Head & Neck Cancer Screenings

April 12, 19, 24 • 6:30 p.m. • Hughes Main Library A local historian will discuss the evolution of medicine and share highlights of GHS’ 100-year journey. Part of the story will be enacted by members of the Fountain Inn Repertory Experience. Free; registration required. Call 527-9253.

Fri., April 27 • 1-4 p.m. • Patewood Medical Campus As part of Oral, Head and Neck Cancer Awareness Week, GHS’ Greenville Ear, Nose & Throat is scheduling free head and neck cancer screenings. Call 454-4368.

Heart Walk

March for Babies®

Sat., April 14 • 9 a.m. • Greer City Park Help fight heart disease by taking part in the annual American Heart Association® Heart Walk. To register, visit upstateheartwalk.org.

Sat., April 28 • 9 a.m. • CU-ICAR Help prevent infant mortality, birth defects and premature birth by participating in this March of Dimes® walk. To register, visit marchforbabies.org.

Linking Hands for Life Sat., April 21 • 2 p.m. • Patewood Medical Campus The public is invited to attend a brief ceremony and link hands to raise awareness for more organ, eye and tissue donors. T-shirts available while supplies last. For more information, visit donatelifesc.org.

ghs.org

Tee it Up for Cancer Mon., April 23 • Noon • Greenville Country Club This golf tournament, dinner and silent auction honors colon cancer survivor Tim Bright. Proceeds benefit cancer research at GHS. To register, visit brightlifesc.com/events. 120272

APRIL 6, 2012 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL 11


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12 Greenville Journal | APRIL 6, 2012

Auditor warned about eight ‘areas of concern’ at Disabilities Board Majority of board ignores request to appear before County Council By CHarles Sowell | staff

New details on problems at the Greenville County Disabilities and Special Needs Board show the board’s auditor warned board members in October, 2011, about issues concerning potential conflicts of interest, lack of accounting controls and ethics violations the auditor said could severely damage the board’s credibility. Documents provided to the Journal by a source close to the situation reveal auditor Chris Clark of Clark Eustace Wagner PA, the board’s auditing firm, warned of eight areas of concern in October of 2011. The whole board would have seen the letter, which was attached to the audit report for that fiscal year. However, when former DSN board member Bill Sykes asked that Clark be invited to speak to the board, Sykes was swatted down by board chairwoman Roxie Bill Sykes, Kincannon and former DSN removed from the board member board’s finance committee, Sykes said this week. Sykes and former board members Davis Roeske, Harold Smith and Jack Mesker all resigned their seats on the board in the wake of the firing of former DSN Director Brent Parker. Among the recommendations by Clark to the board: “In auditing the agency’s accounts receivable amounts, it came to our attention that the agency has experienced some difficulty in receiving care and maintenance payments for a consumer whose guardian is also a member of the

board of directors. Because of the public nature of the agency and the high profile that the agency maintains in the community, this situation could potentially be cast in a negative light resulting in damage done to the agency’s image and the public trust.” Referencing another potential area of concern, Clark notes, “The monetary limit on purchases that can be approved by the executive director without also being approved by the board (has been) increased from $15,000 to $75,000, a five-fold increase … The board entered into an expensive consulting agreement with the former board chairperson for services that appear to be duplicative of duties that are currently assigned to agency staff. “During tough budgetary times, it would seem logical to see a tightening of purchasing requirements, not an easing of them. The board should review its procurement requirements to tighten purchasing procedures to assist in reining in costs. This change would also ensure that all major purchases are being scrutinized by the board.” The contract amount given to the former board chairperson was $60,000, Clark’s letter notes, which is close to the new limit on unapproved contracts. Clark also notes the services provided by the former chairperson were not bid out to other potential vendors and there is no mention in the board’s minutes of the contract’s approval. The state Code of Ethics requires that all board members, the executive director and agency personnel maintain a statement on potential conflicts of interest, Clark said in his letter to the board. This has not been done. “Per our own review of completed conflict of interest statements, we identified various known potential conflicts that were not disclosed by board members,” Clark wrote. A request for responses to the Clark letter left on voicemail to interim DSN Director Patrick Haddon was not returned by press time. However, County Council Chairman H.G. “Butch” Kirven said he


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show up (the morning after Parker was fired) so clearly members of the board… had previous conversations that were not handled in an open manner,” State Department of Disabilities and Special Needs Executive Director Beverly Buscemi wrote in a letter to the board on March 13. DSN’s Gibson said it was obvious that some members of the board had spoken with Haddon in advance of his hiring. “He knew to come to work the morning after (Parker was fired),” she told council members. Judith Gibson made it clear to Councilman Joe Dill that the executive session where Parker was fired was conducted in accordance with state Freedom of Information Act provisions. “We may have spoken softly and quickly (in reporting the results of the session), but we did it,” she said. The public works panel, made up of Dill, Meadows, Lottie Gibson, Joe Baldwin and Dan Rawls, voted to ask the entire DSN board to return again at a later date to speak with the entire council about their concerns. No date was set for the meeting. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@greenvillejournal.com.

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spoke to Haddon on Wednesday morning and was assured the interim director was doing his best to work through the financial issues facing the agency. “I think we ought to give him time to do that,” Kirven said. A request from the county’s Public Works and Infrastructure Committee for the board to appear before the committee to provide an explanation of the situation at DSN drew only board Secretary Judith Gibson, who was unable to answer most of the committee’s questions. “If we don’t have anyone to give information, then we need to notify them by demand that they need to come to speak to us,” Councilwoman Lottie Gibson said. “We’re just trying to get blood out of a turnip here (on Tuesday).” Councilman Willis Meadows, who called the committee meeting and asked the entire DSN board and interim director Haddon to appear, called the lack of response “bothersome.” DSN’s Judith Gibson repeatedly told council she could not answer their questions about finances or the hiring of Haddon. “This person (Haddon) knew to

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Girlology: Body Talk

April 10-13 • Times vary • Greenville Memorial Hospital TEDMED brings together 300 adventurous thinkers and doers to explore the future of health care. Watch the conference live via a high-definition simulcast! Visit ghs.org/tedmed for dates and times. Free; no registration required.

Sun., April 22 • 3-4:30 p.m. • Patewood Medical Campus This program for 6th and 7th grade girls helps ease the transition into puberty through open discussion about body image. Fee: $50/mom and daughter. To register, visit the events page at girlology.com.

Minority Health Summit Sat., April 14 • 11 a.m.-2 p.m. • BI-LO Center Learn about health issues that disproportionately affect minorities. Includes a presentation by renowned author Dr. Maya Angelou. Free; registration required. Lunch available for purchase. Parking is $5 in city-designated lots.

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Prepping for Pregnancy

To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, visit ghs.org/360healthed or call 1-877-GHS-INFO (447-4636).

Mon., April 16 • 6:30 p.m. • Greenville Ob Gyn GHS gynecologists from Greenville Ob Gyn will discuss being in the best health possible before pregnancy and ways to reduce complications and prevent birth defects. Free; registration required.

Tues., April 24 • noon-1 p.m. • Spartanburg Marriott Learn who is at risk for blood cancers as well as signs and treatments from Suzanne Fanning, M.D., of Cancer Centers of the Carolinas. Lunch provided. Free; registration required.

Save the Skin You’re In Tues., April 17 • 12:15-1:15 p.m. • Greenville Memorial Hospital Bring lunch and join GHS surgical oncologist Brian McKinley, M.D., for an informal talk on skin cancer. Free; registration required. 120272

APRIL 6, 2012 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL 13


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THE NEWS IN BRIEF

The first new South Carolina electricitygenerating nuclear reactors in a generation won approval from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission last week by a 4-1 vote. The federal panel approved South Carolina Electric and Gas’s application for a combined construction and operating license for two reactor units at the V.C. Summer Nuclear Power Station at Jenkinsville in Fairfield County. SCE&G hopes to have the first of the 1,100-megawatt units in operation in 2016, with the second unit following in 2019. The $10 billion project, announced in March 2008, is expected to employ 3,000 to 5,000 workers at the peak of construction. Currently, about 1,000 workers are preparing the site about 26 miles northwest of Columbia. SCE&G, the primary subsidiary of investor-owned SCANA Corp., is the second power company to receive an NRC nuclear permit since 1978. On Feb. 9, the commission approved Southern Co.’s application for a license to build and operate two units at its Vogtle power plant near Augusta. Friday’s meeting lasted just four minutes as the NRC approved the SCE&G application. SCE&G, which will own 55 percent of the new project, is the licensed operator. Santee Cooper’s share is 45 percent, but it hopes to reduce its stake in the project to about 20 percent. One possible partner for Santee Cooper might be Duke Energy. Jim Rogers, CEO of the Charlotte-based energy provider, said his company is moving forward with talks to buy a 5 to 10 percent ownership stake from Santee Cooper. Nine Upstate professors were honored recently by The Princeton Review in the magazine’s list of the 300 best professors in the country.

Furman University professors making the list were: Charles Brewer, psychology; Timothy Fehler, history; and Margaret Oakes, English. At Clemson, winners were: Paul Christopher Anderson, history; Robert Kosinski, biology; Robin Kowalski, psychology; Karen Pressprich, chemistry; and Stephen Schvaneveld, chemistry. Charlie Bass, a chemistry professor at Wofford, also made the list. The Princeton Review partnered with RateMyProfessors.com to identify more than 42,000 professors who had been rated by students on the website. The publication combined that data with its own surveys to create a list of 1,000 professors before getting more input from schools. Editors at The Princeton Review made the final selections. Furman University has landed a $600,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to fund merit-based scholarships for students studying for sciencerelated degrees over the next five years. Starting in the fall, freshmen students with biology and chemistry majors will be eligible to get financial awards up to $40,000. The foundation’s science, technology, engineering and mathematics program funds the scholarships. The Science Opportunities, Activities and Resources (SOAR) Scholars initiative will provide critical support for students for whom the cost of attendance would be a hardship. Student recipients must demonstrate a financial need. Furman’s program aims to enhance science opportunities for students from South Carolina racial and ethnic groups traditionally underrepresented in science fields. Dr. John Kaup, Furman’s science education coordinator, will direct the SOAR Scholars program. Applicants should contact Kaup at john.kaup@furman.edu or 294-3773.

The Greenville Zoo is extending its hours. The zoo will open an hour earlier – at 9 a.m. – through Sept. 30 to allow patrons to take advantage of the cooler morning temperatures. The zoo will be open until 5 p.m. but entry ticket sales will close at 4:15 p.m. The Greenville Zoo is open every day except Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day. Admission is $7.75 for adults and $4.50 for children ages 3 to 15. More than 270,000 people go to the zoo each year.

South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities social studies department chairman Rusty Godfrey is the Daughters of the American Revolution’s national Outstanding Teacher of American History. He is the first national winner from South Carolina. Godfrey, a Greenville native, joined the Governor’s School faculty in 2002. Prior to that, Godfrey taught at J.L. Mann for 10 years. The DAR award honors a teacher who fosters the spirit of American patriotism, demonstrates the ability to relate his or her subject to modern life and events, and has high academic standards and a rapport with students. Godfrey is a National Board certified teacher. He received the Horace Mann-Abraham Lincoln Fellowship in 2010, has served regularly as an Advance Placement national reader and sponsors frequent history film events.

Godfrey teaches American Studies, AP U.S. History and a Holocaust seminar. “It is a great honor receiving this award,” Godfrey said. “Many people have helped me along the way, and I want to say thanks to all of them. Thanks also to the Govies for keeping me inspired to teach.” Godfrey will receive his national award on June 30 in Washington, D.C. It is not the first award Godfrey has received from the DAR. In 1987, he won a high school essay contest on American history sponsored by the South Carolina DAR. The bunched arrowhead is not a showy plant, but it is one that’s found only in Greenville County and neighboring Hendersonville County, N.C. The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources is offering a $500 reward for information leading to the convic-

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14 GREENVILLE JOURNAL | APRIL 6, 2012

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By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

As Erwin-Penland grew from a small, home-grown marketing company to one of the largest in the South, Greenville advertising executive Joe Erwin began recruiting potential employees from big cites from San Francisco to New York. It was a comment from an art director he was recruiting from San Francisco that led Erwin to found the Food For Thought conference five years ago. The employee said he was impressed with the agency and its work, but then he said, “Greenville, South Carolina. Do you wear shoes down there?” The recruit’s attempt at a joke prompted Erwin to do something to change the perception of Greenville and this region and to showcase how dynamic and beautiful it is. “Our selfish agenda was part of the beginning of Food For Thought, but part of our mission is to help with a lot of other things people are doing,” Erwin said. “It’s about what we can showcase in this region that will benefit everybody.” The 75 to 80 attendees will meet for food and presentations at various locations downtown, including the Wyche Pavilion, Fluor Field and the Peace Center, stay at the Westin Poinsett and navigate the track at the BMW Performance Center.

The speakers are chosen by a committee of 13 people. To qualify, the speaker must be using creativity in some way to change or better the world, and have impressive presentation skills in addition to impressive credentials, Erwin said. Food became an integral part of the festival thanks to Sinclair Lewis, a retired Methodist pastor Erwin knows. In a sermon about the biblical character David, Lewis said it is best to negotiate a truce over a meal because food causes people to drop their defenses and let their creativity through, Erwin recalled. “I call this the un-TED conference,” he said. Potential attendees must submit applications to attend the conference and organizers screen for diversity in experiences as well as race, gender and age, Erwin said. A scholarship program allows 10 people to attend the conference, which carries a $1,575 price tag, at no cost. “We started the scholarship program two years ago and the recipients have been some of the most engaged participants in the conference,” he said. “We want participants who are every bit as interesting and dynamic as the presenters are.” The conference begins on April 24

and concludes with a private concert by singer-songwriters Mary Chapin Carpenter and Shawn Colvin. This year’s presenters include Tina Brown, editor of “The Daily Beast” and “Newsweek” and previous editor at “Vanity Fair” and “The New Yorker,” Denny Strigl, former CEO of Verizon Wireless and author of “Managers, Can You Hear Me Now?,” and Joseph Jaffe, founder of Evol8tion LLC and author of “Life After the 30-Second Spot,” “Join the Conversation” and “Flip the Funnel.” Jaffe is one of the most sought-after consultants on innovation marketing and new and social media through his work with clients such as Anheuser-Busch InBev, Coca-Cola and Kraft Foods. Other speakers include Daymond John, founder of FUBU apparel and star of ABC’s entrepreneurial reality show “Shark Tank;” Adam Lowry and Eric Ryan, co-founder of Method, the world’s largest eco-friendly cleaning brand and one of Inc. 500’s top 10 companies; and DimensionU Learning System founder and CEO Ntiedo Etuk. Contact Cindy Landrum at 679-1237 or clandrum@greenvillejournal.com.

THE NEWS IN BRIEF tion of the person or persons who dug up a two-foot square section of the endangered plants last month from the Bunched Arrowhead Heritage Preserve in northern Greenville County. The Bunched Arrowhead Heritage Preserve has one of the world’s best populations of the plant, a wetland species with simple leaves that remain under shallow water and a small, white flower of three petals. The DNR says the plants were illegally removed sometime between March 20 and March 23. “Because of the bunched arrowhead’s rarity, a theft of any plants is a serious harm to the species and its future survival,” said conservationist Frank Holleman. “Because of the fact that Greenville County is one of only two counties where this globally rare plant exists, a theft of

any plants is a serious injury to the natural heritage of Greenville County.” Whoever took the plants came prepared with tools needed to cut, dig and remove them, the DNR said. The plants can be linked to the preserve by genetic testing. Bunched Arrowhead Heritage Preserve in Travelers Rest was established in 1987 to protect rare Piedmont seepage forests and the bunched arrowhead plants. Anyone with information about the theft may call Operation Game Thief at 800-9225431. Callers can remain anonymous. One number meant the difference between $250,000 and a share of a recordsetting $640 million Mega Millions lottery for somebody who bought a lottery ticket in Simpsonville.

The winning ticket matched the five white ball numbers – 2, 4, 23, 38 and 46 – but did not have the winning Megaball number of 23. The ticket is worth $250,000. The ticket-buyer did not purchase the $1 Megaplier that would have automatically increased the prize to $1 million, according to lottery officials. The ticket was sold at Spinx store No. 134 at 1301 Fairview Road. The ticket holder has 180 days to claim their prize. Nine players in South Carolina matched four white balls and the Megaballl to win $10,000. Of those, two players purchased the Megaplier option to triple their prize to $30,000. Winning tickets for the largest lottery jackpot ever were sold in Kansas, Maryland and Illinois.

Shift the Culture of Your Workplace I heard recently that a raise only makes a difference to an employee for the first 30 days, after that it becomes just their regular salary. It is no longer new and exciting. So, LEE YARBOROUGH how do employers keep employees motivated and excited about growing in their job without tying progress solely to money? A culture shift needs to take place. For a workplace to attract and retain good employees there must be a culture of trust. In study after study, employees prioritize the attributes of a good boss and integrity and ethics is always at the top of the list. An ideal manager is fair and operates the business ethically. They are committed to doing the right thing even when difficult. Instead of calculating your staff according to their return on investment, make an investment in your people instead. Educate your employees, offer them opportunities to grow professionally and personally, and allow them the chance to try something new. People want to be led and developed. Everybody will leave their job someday; do not be fearful that personal growth will make people terminate sooner. Leadership and fear are bad partners. From an HR perspective, this speaks directly to employee relations. If you are counseling or terminating an employee for poor performance or misconduct, be honest. Do not fire someone by saying you are eliminating the position when in actuality, the employee is just not good at the job. Truthfully and nicely, tell the employee why the decision was made. Believe me, this can be a life lesson for that individual and the truth is always better even when it is difficult to say. As business owners and managers, we have an obligation to provide for our employees and nurture a culture of trust.

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APRIL 6, 2012 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL 15


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More tickets added for Lion King run Reconfiguration of concert hall makes room for more seats By Cindy Landrum | staff

To accommodate the animal parade in Disney’s blockbuster musical “The Lion King,” seats will have to be removed from the Peace Center’s Concert Hall. After a record-breaking ticket on-sale event – and an overwhelming demand for tickets – the Peace Center reviewed the seating map with the show’s production team and were able to identify other areas where seats could be placed. The result is that 1,600 additional tickets will be available for the show’s fourweek run from June 12 through July 8. “In an effort to accommodate the community’s tremendous enthusiasm for The Lion King, structural modifications are being implemented to the Peace Center so that additional seat locations can be created,” Peace Center President Megan Riegel said. The Peace Center expects “The Lion King” to be its biggest Broadway show ever. Blockbuster multi-week Broadway shows fill hotel rooms and pack restaurants with out-of-town and out-of-state guests paying accommodations and local sales taxes that support other festivals and arts events. “Wicked,” the last multi-week blockbuster Broadway show to come to the Peace Center, is a good example. “Wicked” had a 24-performance run in Greenville and more than 98 percent of the 48,864 avail-

NEW LOCATION NEW INVENTORY

able tickets were sold, generating more than $4 million in ticket sales alone. More than half those tickets were sold to households outside of Greenville County, with 14 percent going to households with out-of-state addresses. While more than half of those households were from North Carolina, Georgia and Tennessee, tickets were ordered by households with addresses as far away as Washington State. Ticket buyers came from 46 of the 50 states. Because of the high demand for tickets, the Peace Center is warning ticket buyers that the only way to guarantee a ticket’s authenticity is to buy it through its box office and online ticket site at www.peacecenter.org, the only authorized ticket sellers for the show. Although ticket sales have been brisk, there are still good seats left during all four weeks of the show, particularly on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. After “Wicked,” the two most popular Broadway musicals at the Peace Center were “Phantom of the Opera,” which sold nearly 55,000 tickets for $3.7 million during its four-week run in 2003, and “Miss Saigon,” which sold nearly 27,000 tickets for $1.5 million during its two-week run. Contact Cindy Landrum at 679-1237 or clandrum@greenvillejournal.com.

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Arbitration program gives teens second chance

Some teenagers who have their first run-ins with the law will get a second chance to keep their records clean. The 13th Circuit Solicitor’s Office plans to start an arbitration program in Greenville County that will give some juveniles ages 12 to 16 a chance to stay out of court and keep criminal charges off their records. In exchange, they must admit their guilt, face their victims and allow a trained volunteer arbitrator to determine their punishment. The program is designed to reach juveniles who find themselves in legal trouble for the first time for a nonviolent offense – smashing mailboxes, fighting at school, shoplifting – before they get into more serious trouble that can land them in adult court. “They are starting to do the things that lead to other bad things,” said 13th Circuit Solicitor Walt Wilkins. “Instead of having them stay a month at DJJ (Department of Juvenile Justice) where they learn to be a better criminal, we want to educate them, maybe scare them a bit, teach them there are consequences to their actions before they walk down the dangerous path running into a General Sessions charge.” The victim in the case – if there is one – must agree to participate. An arbitration hearing is held with the juvenile, the charged juvenile’s parents, the victim and the police officer. A volunteer arbitrator hears all sides and decides on a sanction: often the writing of an apology letter, restitution of up to $500, reading assignments and research papers, detention facility tours or community service. The arbitrator, who receives 21 hours of training, can also order counseling or refer the juvenile to other services. If the juvenile doesn’t complete the program within 90 days, the case is referred to Family Court for prosecution. The root of the problem is often lack of parental oversight, mixing with the wrong crowd or a traumatic event such as parental divorce or a death in the family, said Leisa Shea, juvenile arbitration coordinator in Greenville.

“They just didn’t think about how their actions affected other people.”

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shooting. When they heard the newscaster mention pipe bombs, one of the children asked if those were the kids who blew up their mailboxes. “When they were told how frightened those little kids were, there wasn’t a dry eye around the table,” Campbell said. “They just didn’t think about how their actions affected other people.” Last year 4,115 juveniles went through juvenile arbitration statewide. Of those, 85 percent did not re-offend within two years of completing the program, according to the DJJ Report Card for 2010-11. In Spartanburg, 80 juveniles were referred to the arbitration program last year, which collected $1,500 in restitution and was responsible for 114 hours of community service. “It’s a great program because it helps resolve court-related conflicts without having to utilize the courtroom,” said 7th Circuit Solicitor’s Office spokesman Murray Glenn. “Court time is valuable and expensive.” The 13th Circuit Solicitor’s Office is seeking volunteer arbitrators. Arbitrators must be at least 21 years of age, have a high school diploma or GED, pass a criminal background check and complete the training. Those interested should contact Deputy Solicitor Andrew Culbreath at 467-8398 or by emailing aculbreath@greenvillecounty. org to learn more about the program. Contact Cindy Landrum at 679-1237 or clandrum@greenvillejournal.com.

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Often, juveniles simply don’t understand the consequences of their actions, said Jennifer Campbell, juvenile arbitration coordinator in Pickens County. Recently, several juveniles were charged with blowing up the mailboxes of seven families. At the hearing, Campbell said the mother told the juveniles that a week after her mailbox was blown up, she and her small children were at the doctor’s office on what happened to be the day of the Columbine school

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APRIL 6, 2012 | Greenville Journal 17


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A Green Valley facelift By Dick Hughes | contributor

Jan Bel Jan, one of the nation’s top golf course designers, has been retained by the Green Valley Country Club to complete a multi-million dollar renovation of the 18-hole championship course. The first phase includes a short-game practice area, a new practice range and reshaping of the fairways and tees of holes one and 10, as well other aesthetic upgrades. A second phase of improvements will begin in late fall. The course will remain open for play while the first phase of work is being completed. Bel Jan’s focus on the design upgrades will be to “make the course more appealing to a broader audience, including women, seniors and junior golfers, while retaining strong appeal for lowhandicap and long-hitting players,” the country club said. “Jan is a tremendous talent and is known throughout international golf circles as one of the best designers in the

industry,” said Michael Kaplan, owner of the Green Valley Country Club. The club also is completing a new fitness center, upgrading the clubhouse, adding an outdoor dining area and planting new landscaping. Bel Jan, a protégée of renowned golf course architect Tom Fazio, was named one of the top 10 most influential women in golf by Sports Illustrated, and is one of only three women with full membership in the American Society of Golf Course Architects. This is the second renovation of the course originally designed in 1958 by George Cobb. Tom Jackson designed an upgrade in 2001. Contact Dick Hughes at dhughes@greenvillejournal.com.

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Who’s your doctor? If you have a physician you like, tell someone you know. If you don’t have a doctor, ask someone you trust for a recommendation. Studies show having a close relationship with a doctor is one of the best ways to stay healthy. So it’s no surprise that upstate residents turn to Greenville Hospital System University Medical Group for dedicated primary care. As part of the region’s most comprehensive community of care, our board certified family practitioners aren’t just capable – they’re committed to making your health a top priority. And when you get to know a doctor while you’re well, it’s easier to monitor your health and get treated quickly when you’re sick. Schedule an introductory appointment with one of our family practice doctors by calling a practice listed here, or visit whosyourdoctor.org to learn more.

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ployed for the first time. “Obviously, it will be hard because I’ll miss my family, but it’s something I signed up for,” he said, after hugging his fiancée of a month, Jaclyn

Thompson. “I’ve dedicated my life to preserving the freedom of America. It’s something that I’m willing to give my life for.” Decker’s dad, Dan, said he is

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Brigadier General Christopher Kemp addresses his troop directly during the Army Reserve 324th Expeditionary Signal Battalion Sendoff at Lockheed Martin Aeronautics-Greenville.

Photos by Greg Beckner / Staff

Deployment is nothing new for Dorian Talley, a member of the U.S. Army Reserve’s 324th Signal Battalion. The 27-year-old has served two tours overseas. But this time is different. “I have a child now,” said Talley of his 3-year-old daughter, Caitlyn. Talley and the other soldiers in the 324th received a big send-off Wednesday afternoon in a hangar at Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Greenville at the South Carolina Technology and Aviation Center. The unit will receive several weeks of final training at Fort Bliss, TX, before they are deployed to Afghanistan for a year to serve in Operation Enduring Freedom. Michael Decker, 21, is being de-

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Soldier Michael Decker of Greenville with the Army Reserve 324th Expeditionary Signal Battalion hugs his fiancee Jaclyn Thompson of Greenville at the end of the battalion’s sendoff at Lockheed Martin Aeronautics-Greenville. Decker was given the honor of singing the national anthem at the event; he is the fifth generation of his family to serve in the military.

proud of his son, who is the fifth generation of his family to serve in the Army. “I’m so proud of him, but as all the parents here, we’re sending our son in harm’s way,” he said. “The Lord will take care of him.” During the half-hour ceremony, the unit was told they were the best the battalion could offer and they were critical to the success of the U.S.’s mission in Afghanistan. “If you fail, the war fight fails and our adversaries win,” said Lt. Col. David Zillic. “If you succeed, we win.” Each of the soldiers left the ceremony with a pocket flag individually folded by a Lockheed Martin employee. The unit will be deployed until May 2013. More than 200 of the soldiers’ family members and friends attended the send-off. Contact Cindy Landrum at 679-1237 or clandrum@greenvillejournal.com.

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The Savannah River Site is moving to finish shutting down two huge tanks that used to be filled with some of the deadliest material on the planet, Department of Energy officials said last week. Tanks 18 and 19 have been deemed the greatest risk of failure out of the 22 tanks located on the F Tank Farm, DOE officials said. The tanks had been filled with liquid radioactive waste left over from the boom years of the Cold War in the 1950s and 1960s. The tanks are some of the largest underground storage tanks ever closed by DOE. They are part of a series of 51 underground tanks at the site’s H and F areas. The waste had to be pumped out of tanks 18 and 19 and hauled to the Defense Waste Processing Facility at the site, where it was “vitrified” into glass logs sealed in steel canisters, rendering them permanently stable. The waste processing plant is the world’s largest radioactive waste vitrification facility. Radioactive operations began in March 1996. About 3,000 canisters have been produced, SRS officials said. Two tanks out of the original 51 were closed in the 1990s. The remaining tanks hold 33 million gallons of highly radioactive waste. Twelve are

leaking, DOE said, and the waste is contained to the area to prevent it from entering the environment. Undersecretary for Nuclear Security Thomas D’Agostino said, “These tank closures will be the first DOE tanks closed nationwide since 2007, the first closed at SRS in 15 years, and some of the largest underground storage tanks closed by the department to date.” The Government Accounting Office has put the cost of cleaning up the tank farms at SRS at about $4.6 billion and estimated the cost will rise significantly over time. The last of the tanks is due to be closed out by 2028. SRS officials said 70 contractors and construction employees are working on the final push to close tanks 18 and 19, a project that should take about five months. Up to six cement trucks an hour will dump more than 3 million gallons of grout to fill the tanks. The work will be ongoing eight hours a day, five days a week. Each tank originally held 1.3 million gallons of waste, enough to fill nearly two Olympic-sized swimming pools.  Officials said 99 percent of the waste has been removed and vitrified. The remaining radioactive film lining the tanks will be immobilized by the grout and should pose little future risk to the environment. South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control officials have signed off on the cleanup plan. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@greenvillejournal.com.

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Emcees Phil Yanov and Deb Sofield greet the TEDx Greenville attendees – both live and online – from the Kroc Center stage.

New ideas, connections shared at TEDx Greenville Conference devoted to “ideas worth spreading” draws hundreds to Kroc Center By jerry salley | staff

“We can’t see any of your faces,” said emcee Phil Yanov to the TEDx Greenville audience, “but we can see all of your iPad screens.” With iPads, laptops and smartphones in hand, more than 400 people crowded into the Kroc Center auditorium last Friday for the third annual TEDx conference. Throughout the day, a dozen speakers shared their ideas – from an exploration of Greenville’s nascent electric vehicle ecosystem to how a (male) artist’s designer tampon cases can provoke dia-

logue about uncomfortable sexual issues. Along with the sold-out Kroc Center crowd – some of whom started hitting Twitter with “#TEDxGVL” posts before the house lights went down at 8:30 a.m. – many more followed the talks live through streaming video at www.tedxgreenville.org. The event, a locally organized version of the renowned TED (Technology, Entertainment and Design) conference in California, is one of over 3,200 TEDx conferences that have convened worldwide as of 2012, all dedicated to the TED mission statement of “ideas worth spreading.” Besides Greenville, a dozen other cities, including New York City,

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rience, said event organizer Marc Bolick. “It kind of flips from your left brain to your right brain to your left brain, and it’s in that process that you start thinking differently,” he said. “Your brain starts to turn into some kind of different machine.” “There’s nothing else like TEDx for Greenville,” said Yanov. “There’s nothing else that brings together this unique cast of characters. There are always unique acts on this stage; people I didn’t know lived in my backyard, doing cool stuff I didn’t know was there.” “I think it’s important for building the soul of Greenville,” said Bolick. “Greenville’s got a lot of people working on the infrastructure and the schools and the roads and all that kind of stuff, and I think TEDx Greenville is a great initiative to help spark conversations and recognize people who have great ideas and give them a platform to talk about those ideas.” How will the TEDx Greenville organizers top 2012? “I don’t know,” laughed Bolick. But clearly the ideas are out there – at www.tedxgreenville.org, nominations have already started coming in for speakers for 2013.

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Seoul and Wroclaw, Poland, were hosting a TEDx event on March 30. The speakers all explored the TEDx Greenville 2012 theme, “Breakthrough.” Upstate Forever’s John Tynan explained the creation of clean water markets; Clemson professor Dr. Juan Gilbert demonstrated his electronic handicapaccessible voting system; and Greenville native Glenis Redmond spoke on the healing impact of poetry. Redmond challenged the audience, “If you don’t have poetry in your life, get you some.” A TEDx crowd is unique, she said. “There’s deep listening. People come to go deep, and they’re willing to follow you. You can feel it in the room. You can go anywhere you want to go with them, and they’re going to go with you.” Musical performances punctuated the talks. Greenville blues legend Mac Arnold performed, as did Christoph Kresse, who combined bagpipe music with electronica. Greenville attorney Josev Brewer, who raps as sintax.the.terrific, included an audience call-and-response in a hiphop song he composed and performed on stage, based on audience suggestions, and had posted for download on his music blog by the end of his talk. Music is a key part of the TEDx expe-

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our schools

activities, awards and accomplishments

Always Best Care Senior Services is sponsoring the Mulligans for Memory Golf Tournament to be held at 9 a.m., Saturday, May 5, at the Gary Player Signature golf course at River Falls Plantation in Duncan. For more information and to register or to become a sponsor contact, Bruce Meyer (864) 527-0464 or bmeyer@abc-seniors.com. River Falls Plantation is located at 100 Player Boulevard, Duncan, SC 29334.

Crossword puzzle: page 54

Sudoku puzzle: page 54

The Friends of the Greenville County Library System Book Sale will be held April 20-22 at Merovan Center, Suite E-2, 1200 Woodruff Road. Proceeds from the sale enable the Friends of the Library, a volunteer non-profit organization, to provide financial support to the library system. Friday, April 20 from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m., is for Friends only – memberships will be available at the door- ($15 for individuals, $25 for families, $5 for students and seniors). Saturday, April 21 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday, April 22 from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., the sale will be open to the public. On Sunday, all items are half price. For additional information, call 527-9291 or visit www.greenvillelibrary.org. The United States Air Force Band, “Airmen of Note,” will perform in concert Monday, April 23 at 7:30 p.m. in McAlister Auditorium. The tour concert is free and open to the public, but tickets are required for admittance. Beginning April 3, concert goers can get up to four free tickets at the Timmons Arena box office.  Tickets can also be delivered by mail by contacting the Timmons box office at 864-294-3097. Greenville County Recreation is hosting a Hershey’s Track and Field Meet at Greenville High School on April 14 at 8:30 a.m. The event, designed to promote fun and physical fitness, is free of charge to boys and girls ages 9-14. Register online by April 11 at http://greenvillerec.com/activities-and-programs/specialevents/. The first 200 athletes to sign up will receive a T-shirt and lunch. For more information, call 676-2142.

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The Carolina Shag Club is having a free Junior Shag Workshop for ages 8 to 20 to learn the South Carolina state dance, the shag. The workshop will take place Saturday, April 14 from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at McKibbons Pub at The Phoenix Inn at 246 N. Pleasantburg Drive. For more information or to pre-register, contact Dede Ward at 238-2960, Jeff Ward at 415-8290 or Kathy Cole at 230-4225 or email dwardgraph@aol.com. The Better Business Bureau Upstate South Carolina will be having their Spring Shred Day on Saturday, April 21, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Better Business Bureau office, 408 N. Church Street. Participants may bring up to 10 small banker boxes per vehicle. Verizon Wireless Hopeline will be collecting used wireless phones, batteries and accessories to provide refurbished phones and cash grants to local shelters and non-profit agencies focusing on the awareness and prevention of domestic violence. Goodwill will accept computers, monitors and printers in any condition to be recycled. Hard drives are wiped by Goodwill Industries following the U.S. Department of Defense standards. For more information, contact the Better Business Bureau Upstate SC at 864.242.5052 or at upstatesc.bbb.org/ shred-day-2012. St. Joseph’s Catholic School will hold their annual Jubilate Knight for the Arts on campus on Saturday, April 21. This family evening features dinner, a talent competition, and a silent auction of student artwork, community arts donations, and faculty desserts. The program will feature dance, vocal, and instrumental performances by students, parents, and staff. Dinner and silent auction begin at 6 p.m., performance seating begins at 6:30 p.m., and performances begin at 7 p.m. For prices and a ticket order form, visit the home page of the school’s website at www.sjcatholicschool.org.

26 Greenville Journal | APRIL 6, 2012


journal community

St. Joseph’s Catholic School will sponsor a free adult computer class on the school’s campus Saturday, April 21, from 10 a.m. to noon. This seminar, sponsored by the school’s National Honor Society members and limited to 20 participants, will help teach adults and senior citizens the basic use of the Internet and computer programs. Contact Karah Viola at 234-9009, ext. 127. The Upcountry History Museum will host the following programs during the month of April. • Transformations: GHS’s 100-Year Story, a lunchtime program on April 11 at noon. Visit upcountryhistory.org for prices. Reservations are suggested, call 467-3100. • Night @ the Museum , a family evene will be held April 13, at 6:30 p.m. Visit upcountryhistory.org for prices. Reservations are strongly encouraged, call 467-3100. • The Underground Railroad Quilting Workshop with Edna Drakeford will be held April 28, from 9 a.m. to noon and 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Visit upcountryhistory.org for prices; Reservations are strongly encouraged. Greer Community Garden held its planting day on March 24. The garden is on West Road, between South Main Street and South Buncombe Road, in Greer. John Mansure, president, Greer Medical Campus of the Greenville Hospital System; Cheryl Moore, Greer Memorial Hospital (the garden’s main organizer); Buddy Waters, CEO of Cunningham-Waters Construction Co., GHS board member and master gardener; and Wryley Bettis, Greer City Council (Mayor Pro Tem), officiated at the planting day ribbon cutting. Fifty plots (10-by-16 feet) have been assigned to members of the community, who will be planting vegetables and flowers. Submit entries to: Greenville Journal, Our Schools, 148 River Street, Ste. 120, Greenville, SC 29601 or e-mail: greenvillecommunity@greenvillejournal.com

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

THE GOOD

EVENTS THAT MAKE OUR COMMUNITY BETTER

The Boys Home of the South will hold its 12th annual Spring Soiree on May 3 at the Embassy Suites on Verdae Boulevard in Greenville. The event hopes to raise $100,000 for the Boys Home, a non-profit group home in southern Greenville County that currently serves 52 boys, ages 6 to 21. The Soiree’s silent auction will begin at 6 p.m. Dinner will be served at 7:30 p.m., with Boys Home alumni serving as guest speakers. During dinner a live auction will take place. Jane Robelot will be mistress of ceremonies. Tickets for a table of 10 are $500 or can be purchased for $50 each. Tickets must be purchased in advance. For more information, contact Susan Spitzer at 864-243-3443 ext. 123. Engenius has awarded two grants to local nonprofits through its annual competitive Engenius Grants program. The 2012 recipients are Greenville Forward and Loaves & Fishes. Engenius grants include a fully developed website, professional logo design, web hosting, marketing consultation and ongoing hosting and support. High Cotton is partnering with Communities in Schools for a special three-course lunch in honor of Administrative Professionals Day, Wednesday, April 25. One hundred percent of the proceeds from the lunch will go towards CIS. CIS works to prevent students from dropping out of school. The lunch is $25 per person (gratuity not included). Lunch reservations are available from 11:30 a.m. until 2 p.m. Reservations are required and can be made by calling 864.335.4200 or www.highcottongreenville.com. On April 28, the Greenville Literacy Association will host A Novel Event at the Hilton Greenville, 45 West Orchard Park Drive. There will be a dinner and dance from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. There will be live and silent auctions with a wide variety of items appropriate for graduation, Mother’s Day and Father’s Day gifts or a personal wish list and the popular wine cellar. Music will be provided by Black Tie Music. Tickets are $75 for a single ticket, $130 for a couple, or $650 for a table of 10. RSVP by April 13 by calling 467-3456 or on www.greenvilleliteracy.org. The Carolina Shag Club Charity Golf Tournament sponsored by the Carolina Shag Club will be held Saturday, May 12 at the Hejaz Shrine Club in Mauldin. There will be a 1:30 p.m. shotgun start. This tournament will be a three-man, Captain’s Choice format. Registration is $65 per player, which includes golf, cart, beverages on the course, a barbecue dinner and door prizes. Cash prizes will be $300 for first place, $200 for second place and $100 for third place. For more information, contact Glenn Cole at 704-995-3491 or Walt Scully at 864-404-9430. All proceeds go to Camp Courage and the Ellen Taylor Foundation for Junior Shaggers. On April 11, 1,200 Special Olympics athletes and over 1,800 volunteers, friends and coaches, will participate in the Special Olympics Greenville Spring Games 2012 at Furman University. The event, organized by the Greenville County Recreation

North Greenville Rotary Club held its annual Easter party for students who attend the pre-school program at Greenview. The event included a visit from the Easter Bunny who presented each child an Easter basket filled with books, school supplies and candy. The goal of the program was to promote literacy by having more books in the homes of at-risk children.

District and Furman University, offers a full day of track and field events for Special Olympics athletes ages 8 and above. The event begins at 9:45 a.m. in Paladin Stadium with the parade of athletes and lighting of the Flame of Hope. The games begin at 10:30 a.m. In addition to the track and field events, athletes will enjoy carnival games and refreshments in Olympic Town. The rain date for this event is April 13. The 28th annual Village Hospital Greer Family Fest will honor veterans during the festival. At 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, May 5, in Greer City Park, all veterans are asked to participate in a “Walk of Honor” through the park leading up to the Nationwide Insurance Garfield Main Stage area. The Blue Ridge High School National Guard program will be escorting the veterans through the park and will end with a presentation of the colors. Veterans who would like to participate are asked to gather by the fountains in City Park at 7 p.m. Send us your announcement. E-mail: greenvillecommunity@greenvillejournal.com

Enabling Dreams. Earning Trust. Exceeding Expectations. Southern First Bank, N.A. southernfirst.com

Austin Goforth, Liz Smith, Lesley Griffeth and Don Kiser

28 GREENVILLE JOURNAL | APRIL 6, 2012

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Sustainable treats on the Swamp Rabbit Trail

Photos by Greg Beckner / Staff

Taking a break at the Swamp Rabbit Trail Cafe And Grocery are, from left, Stacey Owens, his daughter Cailey Owens, his sister Missy Rector, and her daughter Rose Rector. The group were out on a ride along the trail when they decided to stop to get some refreshments.

Swamp Rabbit Café is popular stop for hikers and cyclists By CHarles Sowell | staff

Of the dozens of businesses that have sprouted along the Greenville Hospital System Swamp Rabbit Trail, perhaps none has been more transformative than the Swamp Rabbit Café and Grocery. Plunked down in the heart of Cedar Lane Road between the Parker District Fire Station and a long line of seedy storefronts that used to dominate business in this part of town, the café is an island of sustainable culture and culinary delight that caters to the thousands of bikers, walkers, strollers and runners who find the trail simply irresistible on a weekly basis.

“On the weekends, we see between 200 and 300 customers a day,” said Mary Walsh, 29, who co-owns the business with Jacqueline Oliver, 30; two former Upstate Forever policy wonks gone wild with entrepreneurial joie de vivre. “If it weren’t for the Rabbit, we wouldn’t be here.” Walsh is a civil engineer by training, and Oliver has a degree in biology and a master’s degree in natural resources management from Clemson. Not your typical retail businesswomen, to say the least. They spent their first few years out of college sweating over the details of things like water quality issues and convincing landowners to put their property

into conservation easements. The impact of the Swamp Rabbit Trail is not so easy to discern in Greenville’s booming downtown, where the trail winds up from Cleveland Park, past the Liberty Bridge and through a long run of shops and hotels. Nonetheless, it is there in the bike rental shops and canopied tables. Out on Cedar Lane, things are different. A sweaty former paratrooper out for a run rubs elbows with a society matron in a sun hat and designer glasses. The click of bicycle cleats competes with soft stereo music and the babble of orders for muffins and snacks. “Scott McCrary of TTR Bikes believed in our idea for the café so much that he renovated this building earlier than he’d planned just for us,” said Walsh, sitting on a bench in the blazing sun as patrons trooped in off the trail for a bottle of mineral water or a fruity natural drink. You can’t buy a Diet Coke at the Swamp Rabbit Café and Grocery, or even a Pepsi. No carbonated soft drinks allowed. “People had to get used to that at first,” Walsh said. “A lot of them really wanted that soft drink, but our customers are getting used to it.” The women, with the help of their husbands, opened the doors to their dream in September of last year and are close to turning a profit on the business already. That profit is based on a business model that sees a footpath and bike lane as a major thoroughfare for like-minded people who will shell out a little extra for fair-market products and local meats and vegetables. “Frankly, we were busy as two retail newbies could stand from the first day,” said Oliver, who was forced to take time off just months after the café opened because of the birth of her son Thomas. Now a robust 4-month-old with a winning smile, Thomas has become something of a store mascot.

“Women will take him and watch him when we’re really busy,” Oliver said. “A lot of our business is social. People meet people here that they haven’t seen for years. The Swamp Rabbit draws locals and tourists… people from foreign countries.” The café has become a drive-in business, too, Walsh said. “Word of mouth has been big for us from the start. People would stop in while on the trail and then come back to buy our locally grown meats and vegetables.” In fact, the café’s business has grown so rapidly that the women have, at times, had a hard time keeping their shelves filled with staples like locally grown eggs, Oliver said. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@greenvillejournal.com.

Owners of the Swamp Rabbit Cafe And Grocery Jacqueline Oliver, left and Mary Walsh inside their cafe and grocery.

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JOURNAL BUSINESS

T.B.A.

THE FINE PRINT • IMPROVING ECONOMY BRINGS OUT JOB SEEKERS • BUSINESSES ARE CAUTIOUSLY UPBEAT

Advance America fails to find a richer offer

Watch for a new cigar bar that will be opening at 25 College Street in early May …

Shareholders asked to approve sale to Grupo Elektra By DICK HUGHES | contributor

Over several months, executives of Advance America parried with interested buyer Grupo Elektra of Mexico City before accepting an acquisition price 20 percent higher than Grupo’s initial offer, but with an option to shop around for a better deal from someone else. The 45-day “go-shop” window for entertaining higher offers expired at 12:59 a.m. April 1 without a single rival bid, and Advance America announced it would close on the sale to Grupo Elektra before July 1. ADVANCE continued on PAGE 32

Word is that the popular Moe Joe Coffee Shop of Clemson and Easley fame is heading to South Main in Greenville….

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Look for news in coming weeks concerning Bob Hughes developing a series of clinics and related projects for the Veteran’s Administration around the state. Work continues at the old Winn-Dixie site on Grove Road, reportedly the site of a new VA clinic for Greenville ….

Advance America’s headquarters are to stay in Spartanburg and its top executives are to remain in place, according to the sale agreement.

We don’t.

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You’ve got better things to do than dig through your cash flow statements every day. 864.908.3062 • atlocke.com

APRIL 6, 2012 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL 31


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Improving economy brings out job-seekers

Advance continued from page 31

The company scheduled a special meeting of shareholders for April 20 in Spartanburg, where it is based, to get shareholder approval of the sale. Approval is expected. Grupo Elektra agreed to pay $10.50 per share, or $780 million, for Advance America, the dominant payday lender in the United States. It is the first U.S. venture of the powerful Latin and South American financial services firm. The purchase price represents a 33 percent premium over Advance America’s per share value of $7.91 in trading before the deal with Grupo Elektra was announced Feb. 15. A home-grown company, Advance America’s headquarters are to stay in Spartanburg and its top executives are to remain in place, according to the sale agreement. The company has approximately 225 employees in its downtown headquarters. All told, Advance America has 5,800 employees in nearly 2,600 lending stores in the United States. It also has 56 stores or licensees in Canada and the United Kingdom, which the company says are unprofitable and up for sale. According to a proxy statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, discussions began with a casual conversation in New York in late May 2011 between J. Patrick O’Shaughnessy, chief executive officer of Advance America, and representatives of Grupo Elektra and its financial advisor Stephens Inc. William M. Webster IV of Greenville, chairman of the board and a founder of Advance America with financier George Dean Johnson in 1997, joined James A. Oven-

32 Greenville Journal | APRIL 6, 2012

den, chief financial officer, and O’Shaughnessy in preliminary discussions with Grupo Elektra representatives, including Ricardo B. Salinas, principal owner. In late October, Grupo Elektra made a verbal offer of $8.50 per share, which O’Shaughnessy said Advance America “would not consider.” After Grupo Elektra raised its offer to $9.50, Advance America hired Wells Fargo Securities and K&L Gates as advisors to help determine the value of the company, Grupo Elektra’s offers and other potential alternatives. On Nov. 22, Advance America’s board rejected the $9.50 offer. Grupo Elektra countered with offers of $10.25 and $10.40, which were rejected. On Dec. 14, the Advance America board instructed Webster to tell Salinas that $10.50 “might be acceptable to our board,” and a day later Grupo Elektra verbally agreed to the price but indicated “that this was its final offer.” After multiple exchanges of draft agreements and discussions to resolve outstanding issues, by early February both sides were satisfied with the price and details of the transaction. On February 15, the Advance Board unanimously approved the merger. After more than six months of discussions, the board concluded “that the $10.50 in cash per share was the highest price Grupo Elektra was willing to offer” and that, absent the sale, it “would take a significant period of time before

we would achieve a share price that would be equivalent.” Also of benefit to shareholders, the board said, is that Grupo Elektra is paying cash “that is not subject to a financing condition and is guaranteed by Grupo Elektra.” Another factor in favor of accepting the deal, the board said, was a regulatory environment that presented “significant challenges to further expanding” payday lending, which historically Advance America relied on. The proxy statement given to shareholders and filed with the SEC also provided details on the unsuccessful solicitation to find a better offer for the company than the amount Grupo Elektra agreed to. During that 45-day window, Wells Fargo Securities contacted 80 entities, including some with product lines similar to payday lending in their portfolios, to determine if they were willing to make a superior offer. Of the 80, 12 expressed enough interest to request confidentiality agreements. Three parties signed the agreements and requested and received “confidential information” for initial due diligence, but none made an offer, an apparent sign the deal Advance America made with Grupo Elektra was as good as it was going to get.   Once the deal closes, Advance America will be delisted from NASDAQ as a public company.     Contact Dick Hughes at dhughes@greenvillejournal.com.

Hope stirs renewed efforts by people who had abandoned the hunt By Dick Hughes | contributor

Unemployment in five of the 10 counties of the Upstate rose in February even as the unemployment rate declined slightly across South Carolina. The slight increase in the jobless rate in some counties appeared to be largely the result of people who had previously abandoned the job search feeling encouraged enough about the improving economy to start applying again. The labor force is a combination of employed people plus those actively seeking employment. According to the S.C. Department of Employment and Workforce, only Cherokee and Union counties saw reductions in unemployment from January to February. Both have had persistently high unemployment, the highest in the region. There was no change in Oconee, Abbeville and Greenwood, and unemployment rose slightly in Greenville, Pickens, Spartanburg, Laurens and Anderson. The state jobless rate fell from 9.3 percent to 9.1 percent “with an increase of 9,864 additional employed

Unemployment in the Upstate County                     Feb. 2012 Jan. 2012

Greenville  Pickens Oconee Spartanburg Laurens Anderson Abbeville Greenwood Cherokee Union State

7.2 8.6 9.4 9.5 9.7 9.8 10.6 10.7 12.4 15.0 9.1

7.0 8.5 9.4 9.4 9.3 9.0 10.6 10.7 13.2 15.2 9.3

Feb. 2011

8.5 9.0          10.9 10.8 11.3 10.5          12.6 11.5 13.7 16.8 10.5


Contact Dick Hughes at dhughes@greenvillejournal.com.

JOURNAL BUSINESS

N.C. Bank Acquires Another By DICK HUGHES | contributor

Capital Bank Financial Corp., the company that gained a foothold in South Carolina with acquisition of Spartanburg’s failed First National Bank of the South, has extended its position in North Carolina with the proposed purchase of a Winston-Salem bank. Capital Bank reached an agreement to buy Southern Community Financial Corp. of Winston-Salem for $2.875 a share. At that price, Capital will pay roughly $46 million for Southern Community’s 16.8 million outstanding shares. Southern Community turned a profit in 2011 of $520,000 after losing $25.7 million in 2010 and $65.7 million in 2009. It reported total assets of $1.5 billion at the end of last year. Capital Bank Financial was originally called North American Financial Holding, a Charlotte start-up formed by former Bank of America executives with a $900-million war chest to acquire failed or “underperforming” community banks in the Southeast. It acquired First National Bank in July 2010 in a transaction financially subsidized by the FDIC. First National’s branches in Spartanburg, Greenville and Columbia have been renamed Capital Bank. Through other FDIC-assisted acquisitions and conventional purchases, Capital Bank has total assets of $6.5 billion and 143 branches in the Carolinas, Tennessee, Virginia and southern Florida, excluding what Southern Community will add upon closing. Contact Dick Hughes at dhughes@greenvillejournal.com.

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ment and Workforce said professional and business services (+3,900), health care (+3,200) and leisure and hospitality (+2,700) “had robust gains in employment” in February. Hiring in manufacturing, which has led the state in job growth with 9,500 additional jobs since February 2011, slowed to just 300 new jobs in February. Employment in the retail trade lost 1,700 jobs in a normal seasonal adjustment. Financial services lost 1,000 jobs. In a report on regional employment, economists for TD Bank noted that employment gains in the South Atlantic are lagging behind New England and the Middle Atlantic on a three-month moving average, but Delaware and South Carolina were “the best performers” in this region. “In South Carolina, nearly all the job gains were in the public, education and healthcare sectors,” the TD report states.

© 2012 Elliott Davis LLC © 2012 Elliott Davis PLLC

people driving the decline,” the department said. It was the third largest month-to-month gain in employment since 1976. The national unemployment rate was 8.3 percent. In the Upstate, Greenville’s unemployment rate inched up from 7 percent in January to 7.2 percent in February – still the lowest rate in the state, ahead of Lexington at 7.3 and Charleston at 7.5. Greenville’s job market rose by 3,475 jobs to 225,866, the highest county number in the state. Greenville’s jobless rate statistically inched up because hiring did not keep pace with the rate of people actively resuming job-hunting. In Spartanburg, a similar pattern took place between January and February. That county’s rate rose from 9.4 percent to 9.5 percent as the employed workforce gained, but not enough to absorb an increase in people looking for work. Anderson’s unemployment rate jumped from 9 percent to 9.8 percent. The Department of Employ-

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APRIL 6, 2012 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL 33


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Proaxis Therapy has expanded its physical therapy centers into North Carolina with acquisition of the four clinics of Balanced Physical Therapy of Carrboro, N.C. The acquisition brings Proaxis’ clinics to 32: 13 in the Upstate, 15 in Colorado and four in North Carolina. It has clinics in Spartanburg, Greenville, Greer, Simpsonville, Easley and Piedmont. When the company was founded, it had separate headquarters in South Carolina and Colorado. Management since has been consolidated in Greenville under Chief Executive Officer Sean McEnroe of Spartanburg. Terms of acquisition of the North Carolina clinics were not disclosed.

The Upstate SC Alliance has promoted Jennifer Miller to vice president and has hired recruitment officers for bioscience and energy as well as for automotive. Miller has been with the Alliance for six years, serving as research manager and most recently as marketing director. Erin Ford, who recently was director of development of the Simpsonville Area Chamber of Commerce, was hired to direct recruitment of bioscience and energy industries. Jennifer Miller Aimee Redick, who had been in sales and marketing with The Vice president of Cliffs Communities, was named recruitment officer for the auto- Upstate SC Alliance motive industry.

Bank Gave to Charities

Wells Fargo said it gave $3.1 million to more than 375 nonprofits in South Carolina last year. In addition, the bank said, Wells Fargo employees contributed more than 10,800 volunteer hours to neighborhood and community projects and gave nearly $539,000 to the United Way. Rick Redden, Wells Fargo president for South Carolina, said the company is committed to using its financial and human resources “to improve the quality of life for everyone in the communities we serve.” Wells Fargo, which acquired Wachovia, is the state’s largest bank in terms of deposits.

Coating Plant to Expand

Ionic Technologies, a Dutch maker of heat-resistant coating for metals, will double the size of its Greenville plant, and install “state-of-the-art heat treating and surface engineering” processes, the company announced Tuesday. President Ray Monahan said the $10-million expansion “will allow us to grow in size, service capabilities and profitability while delivering industry-leading coatings capabilities to our customers.” The expanded plant on Fairforest Way will employ 13 to 15 additional workers “at highly competitive pay, based upon experience,” along with full benefits, the company said.

Chef Opens Kitchen and Diningware Store

Liz Minetta Bardsley, who has served as chef or owner of several Greenville restaurants, has opened Village Kitchen Arts & Pottery at McBee Station. “We are an independently owned business dedicated to selling the best quality kitchen and dining wares,” she said. “We offer an eclectic collection of outstanding pottery, arts and gifts, as well as artisan foodstuffs and other items that contribute to the art of the table.” Bardsley moved from Atlanta to Greenville in 1997 to become chef of Seven Oaks Restaurant. In 1999, she opened Restaurant la Boheme (now closed), which she co-owned. From 2004 to 2012, Bardsley was first pastry chef and then chef de cuisine at Northampton Wines and Café.

34 GREENVILLE JOURNAL | APRIL 6, 2012


Businesses cautiously upbeat By Dick Hughes | contributor

Business leaders in the Upstate and Midlands see the economy improving enough to hold employment level or add employees, but remain cautious about consumer demand, according to survey responses by 206 participants from 183 organizations. The survey by Marketplace Staffing across a wide variety of sectors showed that 67.9 percent of the respondents believe the economy regionally and nationally is improving after the lengthy recession and hangover. Of all respondents, 26.6 percent expect to increase staffing by an average of 5 percent, 67.6 percent expect no change and 5.8 percent anticipate reducing employment. An overwhelming 76 percent of the respondents expect revenue to grow “somewhat” this year, 41.6 percent expect revenue to grow by 6 percent or more and 16.6 percent bullishly anticipate growth of at least 11 percent.

In identifying the most significant challenges this year, low customer demand was cited by 45.1 percent, rising healthcare costs by 30.6 percent, increasing salary and benefit costs by 30.1 percent, increasing fuel costs by 24.1 percent and tight credit by 22.6 percent. Asked what factors had “either an extreme impact or significant impact” on the economy in the last 24 months, 94.2 percent identified the housing slowdown. Other factors cited were rising unemployment (87.5 percent), the credit crunch (81.2 percent), national debt (78.2 percent) and high energy costs (76.7 percent). Thirty-two percent said replacing President Obama with a Republican would help recovery. Seventeen percent suggested low interest rates, and only 13 percent called for repeal of the Patient Protection and Affordable Health Care Act (“ObamakXX[hZkYa_[icWa[XWj^j_c[\kd"WdZ care” in the political jargon).

journal business

InnoVision’s Sustainability Forum features energy talks By Dick Hughes | contributor

A panel of speakers from companies heavily committed to energy efficiency from the factory floor to the home kitchen will headline InnoVision’s sustainable energy forum April 19. Duncan Seaman will discuss BMW’s efforts to move Zentrum, its public welcome and assembly center, to a zero-carbon footprint; the goal of eliminating batteries from its fleet of forklifts; and other programs to reduce energy use at its Spartanburg assembly plant. Chris Loveless of Velux America, which makes skylights, water heaters and other energy-efficient products, will discuss Velux’s vision of the 2020 house and efforts in the United States and Europe to be more energy-efficient and energy-independent. Dean Benton of Benton Green Energy will discuss how homebuilders and homeowners can make homes more energy efficient. Benton Green Energy offers energy audits to “find the energy leaks in your home and fix them.” The forum will be held at Immedion, 78 Global A_cX[biWoiWX_]h[Wied\ehYedj_dk_d]]hemj^_i Drive, Greenville, from 3-5 p.m. with networking JhWYoIYejj"b[WZi^emheecYedikbjWdj\ehWbceij from 5-7 p.m. Seating is limited. Contact Kathy *o[Whi$>[hÒhijgk[ij_ed\ehYkijec[hi"m^[j^[h j^[oWh[^ec[emd[hi"YedjhWYjehi"fbkcX[hieh Ham at kham@mcnair.net or at 864-552-9345.

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WhY^_j[Yji"_iÆ>emYWd?^[bfoek5Ç\ebbem[ZXo" Contact Dick Hughes at dhughes@greenvillejournal.com. ÆM^Wj_ioekhXkZ][j5Ç Æ?\?YWda[[fj^[Ykijec[hed#XkZ][j"j^[omWba ekj^WffoWdZj^[_hXk_bZ[h_i^Wffojee"Çi^[ iWoi$J^[ijeh[ijeYaijhWZ_j_edWb"jhWdi_j_edWbWdZ Yedj[cfehWhobeeaiWjWlWh_[joe\fh_Y[fe_dji$

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Journal Sketchbook Furman seniors know how to attract a crowd Art exhibition “Free Food” may have a light name, but the art deals with some heavy topics By Cindy Landrum | staff

Catherine Pate took this photo of Ira Kinard for a photo essay for Furman’s senior art exhibit “Free Food.” Kinard is a regular at Triune Mercy Center in downtown Greenville.

Christina Horn has always immersed herself in the books she was reading. As a child, she rode dragons to faraway places, solved mysteries across time, sang songs of magic and defeated villains against all odds. “Reading was a big part of my childhood and often times, I used reading as an outlet. It was my escape from reality, my stresses, my problems and my hardships,” said Horn, who is from Greenville and graduated from Wade Hampton High School. Now, as one of the 11 Furman University senior art students showing their work in the school’s annual senior student exhibition, she’s again immersing herself in her favorite stories by inserting herself into a scene from each one, carved from the book’s pages. “I cut out the pages of the book to draw the viewer into the author’s world, and into a world I know and Free continued on page 38 love,” Horn said.

WATCH IT TONIGHT

City examining street performer rules Acoustic Café program discontinued after complaints By Cindy Landrum | staff

Crowds have gathered near the entrance to Falls Park on nice spring and summer weekend nights to watch a fire-eater, hula-hoopers and men juggling bowling pins and knives. At the end of the show, audience members filled red buckets with dollar bills, fives and tens. That practice has changed. While street performers can sing, play their instruments and display their tal-

ents in public spaces downtown, they will no longer be able to accept tips because the city has discontinued Acoustic Café, a program run by the city’s special events department when the South Carolina Governor’s School opened on the banks of the Reedy River downtown. Acoustic Café was discontinued this year after the city received an increasing number of complaints over the past two years that some people were using the

program to panhandle for money, said Angie Prosser, the city’s director of public information and events. “Some were literally banging on trash cans and calling it entertainment,” she said. “What started happening was the talent changed to the point where it got edgy.” Under the Acoustic Café program, the city would “book” street performers to provide entertainment at five locations downtown – the Hyatt Plaza, Piazza

Bergamo, Court Street, Falls Park and RiverPlace. Now, people can perform “all day long” in downtown – but they can’t take tips. If they do take tips, they could be charged with operating without a business license, panhandling or violating the city’s noise ordinance if they are too loud. Lynn Holcombe, a music therapist who plays the banjo and sometimes performs

WATCH IT TONIGHT

City continued on page 38

APRIL 6, 2012 | Greenville Journal 37


JOURNAL SKETCHBOOK CITY continued from PAGE 37

downtown with her whole band, said she’s unsure she will continue to do so in the future. “Am I going to break the law and accept tips, or do I tell people all night long not to? They’ll give tips whether there’s a tip jar or not,” she said. “It doesn’t make Greenville look like it appreciates its artists.” The city is reviewing how other cities handle street performers, including looking at Asheville, Nashville and Austin, Texas, Prosser said. Diane Ruggiero, superintendent of cultural arts for Asheville, said that city used to require buskers to get permits, but does not require auditions – even though Asheville gets complaints about the less-talented street performers. “People don’t mind street performers. They don’t like bad street performers,” she said. Asheville officials tell complainers that the less talented people will move on if they are not making any money. “Don’t give them five dollars and tell them to get a lesson. They’re not going to take a lesson,” she said. Some of Asheville’s street performers are professional musicians who charge for performances in other cities, Ruggiero said. “They know that we’re street performer-friendly.” Asheville does have laws regulating its sidewalk entertainment. The performers must provide a minimum of six feet of pedestrian passageway on a sidewalk, they cannot sell records or other products and they cannot perform closer than 40 feet of each other. Neither can they set up within 20 feet of the entrance to a bank or an ATM, any bus stop or an outdoor dining area. If a storeowner doesn’t want a busker to perform in front of his store, the owner can ask them to leave. Tim March, who is also known as the street performer TimTV, gave the Greenville City Council a set of proposed regulations and a brochure to give street performers. March, who has performed internationally, said he wants street performers to be regulated. “We don’t want it to be wide open,” he said. Contact Cindy Landrum at 679-1237 or clandrum@greenvillejournal.com.

These works are on display as part of Furman’s senior art exhibition entitled “Free Food,” which is showing through May 5.

FREE continued from PAGE 37

The exhibition is titled “Free Food” – the seniors know that’s the best way to attract a crowd on a college campus – and will be available for viewing from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays through May 5. Other seniors in the exhibition are Mary Catherine

SO YOU KNOW WHAT: “Free Food” WHO: An exhibition of

work by Furman University senior art students

WHERE: Thompson Gallery in the Roe Art Building on the Furman campus WHEN: Through May 5,

9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday

INFORMATION: 294-2074

south carolina children’s theatre™ TOTALLY PROFESSIONAL. DELIGHTFULLY IMMATURE.

Coppage, Lauren Hein, Mary Susan Henderson, Walker Keith Jernigan, Victor Orozco, Catherine Pate, Sarah Phillips, Patrick Rice, Smedes Scovil and Brooke Seppala. Using mediums from oil, pencil and acrylics to photography and other digital media, the students are showcasing an eclectic range of work. While the title of the exhibition may not be serious, some of the topics are. Catherine Pate, a senior from Greenville, said just passing a stranger on the street can prompt an onslaught of judgments based on a quick review of clothes, skin color, expressions and the surroundings. Take Ira Kinard, the subject of Pate’s photo essay. At first glance, Kinard could be – and has been – dismissed as poor, lazy, scary and deranged as he waits on the street corner at Triune Mercy Center for a hot meal.

But after spending months inching into Kinard’s life, Pate found that “homeless” could not begin to describe him. He’s an art teacher, used to be a high school sports star and is a church activist and mentor. Through photographs that combine the honesty of photojournalism and the introspective, compositional delicacies of fine art intermixed with audio recordings of people who know him, Pate gets viewers to go beyond the first glance to hear Ira’s story. “I visited him two times a week at Triune. But while I was there, I met so many other people. They all have stories, too,” she said. “I feel like this project could go on forever, telling the stories of different people.” For Horn, putting herself in her favorite stories is a sort of a self-portrait. “In each scene, I’m doing something that I know and I love,” she said. “In

some of the books, I act as myself. In others, I replace one of my favorite characters. But in all of them, I reveal some aspect of myself that you may or may not already know.” Among the books Horn has carved are the popular “Harry Potter” and “Lord of the Rings” series and “The Botticelli Secret.” She picked “The Botticelli Secret” because she spent time in Italy. She loves “everything Italian,” she said. In “The Two Towers,” she is rock climbing into the scene – one of her favorite hobbies. Horn said she cuts four pages at a time and each book took her about three weeks to carve. Contact Cindy Landrum at 679-1237 or clandrum@ greenvillejournal.com.

TOTALLY PROFESSIONAL. DELIGHTFULLY IMMATURE.

For tickets call

Apr. 27-May 6, 2012 864-467-3000 scchildrenstheatre.org

38 GREENVILLE JOURNAL | APRIL 6, 2012

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JOURNAL SKETCHBOOK

Concert to benefit Triune Mercy Center Three women who will sing in this year’s benefit concert for the Triune Mercy Center have all made headlines, albeit for far different reasons. Myra Cordell Myra Cordell, a Greenville native Greenville native, and opera soprano has made headlines as an internationally known opera soprano. Elspeth Davis was a voice student at the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Elspeth Davis Arts and Humani- Governor’s school ties summer honors graduate and program before the international singer school moved to its campus on the Reedy River. She, too, has performed internationally. And Jerri Gray, a Greenville resident, made headJerri Gray lines after she Greenville resiwas charged with dent; see related criminal child ne- story on page 8 glect because her

Dawn Ellington

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son weighed 550 pounds. “Songs of Spring” will be held on April 28 at 7 p.m. and April 29 at 3 p.m. Love offerings will be collected at each concert and proceeds will be used for the church’s ministries to the homeless. The concert is being produced and directed by Virginia Uldrick, founding director of Greenville County Schools’ Fine Arts Center and the Governor’s School. In addition to Cordell, Davis and Gray, the concert will feature baritone Bruce Schoonmaker and Triune’s Denise Smith, Andre Simpson and Charles McGee in a program of Broadway, opera and gospel. Pianists Vance Jenkins and Tatiana Milovanova will play.

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JOURNAL SKETCHBOOK

Making sense of the South From okra to opera, it’s more complex than you may think

By NICHOLE LIVENGOOD contributor

Ask 10 Southerners what it means to be Southern, and you’ll get 10 different answers. Many will immediately turn the conversation to food. But Southern culture is more than sweet tea and barbecue – it’s complicated, multi-faceted and deeply unique, however Hollywood script writers may disagree. The South has supplied some of the nation’s most significant cultural exports in the areas of literature, music, food and beyond: Flannery O’Connor, Eudora Welty, jazz and the blues, sweet potato pie, whiskey and Elvis. Colleges and universities (among them, Davidson, the University of Mississippi and the University of South Carolina) have dedicated entire departments to Southern Studies for a reason.

Even “The Encyclopedia of Southern Culture,” written by Charles Reagan Wilson and William Farris, can’t keep up. The already expansive volume has been recently revised, and will be re-released as “The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture.” Topics to be covered include religion, geography, history, myth, manners and memory, language, ethnicity, food, environment, law and politics, literature, agriculture and industry, music and gender – in a series of 24 volumes. “Growing up in a rural area of the deep South, I was very much aware that we were different from other parts of the country,” said former North Carolina poet laureate Kathryn Stripling Byer. “There is a certain rhythm to Southern

life. It has its down and dark side too, but there is a whole sense of belonging. There’s a sense of story that gathers you in and gives you a sense of who you are. In a lot of ways that is still a part of the South. There is more of a sense of pride about that in the South than in other places.” “The complexity of the South is one of its most compelling features,” said Dr. Molly McGehee, assistant professor of English at Presbyterian College. “Unfortunately, the rich heritage is often buried in the media, where Southerners come off as backwards, conservative rednecks. The South has become shorthand for a lot of things wrong with America.” Dr. Anita Rose, associate professor and chair of the

English department at Converse College, calls Southerners “one of the last groups that you can really make fun of with some impunity, but (the mockery) really masks bigger problems. When you look at poverty rates, obesity rates, health problems, you see a lot of those problems are centered in the South.” Despite the region’s continued emphasis on preserving Southern heritage and tradition, the South is changing. Outside influences are transforming the cultural landscape, while small towns are disappearing thanks to the expansion of population and technology. “I think we are very much afraid of becoming one big mass of people who don’t really know who they are any- Kathryn Stripling more,” Byer Byer, former N.C. said. “We cling poet laureate to regional differences because they help us figure out what our place is in the larger realm of things.”

The discussion continues this month at Converse College’s “Okra to Opera” Conference on Southern Culture, April 9-14, 2012. More than 50 scholars, artists and experts from across the Southeast will gather on the Spartanburg campus for an interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary exploration of what it means to be Southern. Don’t expect a typical, snooty, academic conference that looks at Southern culture at arm’s length, said Ross. “That’s really not what we envision. I think it’s a genuine examination of what it means to be Southern, to live in the South and to look at what different kinds of Southern cultures we have here.” McGehee said the conference “will celebrate what the South has contributed to American culture. But I think it will present the South in a balanced way, which we scholars of the South strive to achieve in our research and in our teaching. That is, to see the South as a complicated and – at times – flawed region.” Contact Nichole Livengood at nlivengood@greenvillejournal.com.

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JOURNAL SKETCHBOOK

Centre Stage presents

Wed

Arts Calendar

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Peace Center Downtown Films Norwegian Wood, My Reincarnation & Khodorkovsky Apr. 6-7 ~ 467-3000

Fountain Inn Arts Center Little Women by Artios Academy Apr. 12-14 ~ 409-1050

Greenville Little Theatre Barefoot in the Park Apr. 6-21 ~ 235-6948

Furman University Theatre Beyond Therapy Apr. 12-21 ~ 294-2125

Metro. Arts Council & Centre Stage Works by Cham Little Apr. 6-30 ~ 233-6733

Centre Stage Hairspray Apr. 12-29 ~ 233-6733

Peace Center Johnny Mathis Apr. 7 ~ 467-3000

Greenville County Museum of Art Jasper Johns Through Apr. 15 ~ 271-7570

Furman University Pianist Anne Koscielny Apr. 9 ~ 294-2086

Helen DuPre Moseley Through May 27 ~ 271-7570

Greenville Chautauqua Society Golda Meir, Discussion Apr. 10 ~ 244-1499

Andrew Wyeth: The Greenville Collection Ongoing ~ 271-7570

North Greenville University Brass Ensembles Apr. 10 ~ 977-7085 Piedmont Natural Gas Downtown Alive Heyrocco Apr. 12 ~ 232-2273

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42 GREENVILLE JOURNAL | APRIL 6, 2012


journal sketchbook

scene. here.

DON’T MISS OUT!

the week in the local arts world

The Fountain Inn Center for Visual and Performing Arts will hold a fundraiser called Bubbles, Brews and Barbecue on Saturday April 14, 5:30 – 8 p.m. at the Pavilions at Commerce Park to raise money for the Cultural Arts Foundation. This event will feature the music of INNfusion. Tickets are $25 a person. For more information, visit www.ftinnarts.org.

be a lady - spirit, beauty, character and love. The GCS, an auditioned women’s ensemble, is a musically versatile ensemble that focuses on community service and choral excellence. They are directed by Angela Lemere, who is currently the director of choral activities at Dorman High School and the Spartanburg District 6 choral coordinator.

The South Carolina Children’s Theatre’s summer theatre camp offerings are now available online, along with price listings and dates. Most camps are one-week, part-day or full-day camps divided by rising grade level. Participants who sign up by 5 p.m. on April 24 may deduct $25 per camp. To view these listings go to www.scchildrenstheatre.org/education and select “class listings” and then “summer.”

The Emrys Foundation will host a release party to celebrate the 2012 Emrys Journal at Ford’s Oyster Bar and Cajun Kitchen (631 South Main St.) at 7 p.m. on Thursday, April 12. The evening will include readings by local and regional contributors, an opportunity to buy the Emrys Journal ($10; free for Emrys members) and have copies signed. All are welcome to this free event. The Emrys Journal has been published annually by Greenville’s Emrys Foundation since 1984. For more information, see www.emrys.org.

Registration for the community is underway for evening and weekend art classes at Furman including Still Life in Oils, Beginning Stained Glass, Beginning Digital Photography, Field Photography, Beginning Drawing and more. Visit www. furman.edu/learningforyou or call 294-2153 or 294-3134 for a complete schedule and registration. The Greenville Chamber Singers will present their spring concert, “Song of a Lady”, Thursday, May 10 at 7:00 p.m. at St. Michael Lutheran Church, 2619 Augusta St., Greenville. The concert will feature selections that highlight what it means to

JOHNNY MATHIS The legend will perform hits like “Chances Are” and “Misty.” With special guest comedian and musician Gary Mule Deer.

April 7

Send us your arts announcement. E-mail: greenvillearts@greenvillejournal.com

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April 13

Ask About Our Summer Gift Offer!

CALL LISA YARBER TODAY FOR A FREE BROCHURE!

$

“…the most celebrated new bluegrass act of the last few years.” – The New York Times

Tim Mahon with his mother, Lydie Mahon, who enjoys Available now – Corner lot cottage with bedrooms, 2 baths, residential, independent living at2Martha Franks

COTTAGE & PATIO Tour Now and Receive a FREE COFFEE MUG HOME ENTRY CALL LISA YARBER TODAY FOR A FREE BROCHURE! FEES ARE ON SALE 864-984-4541 or1/2 toll free 1-800-849-3307 OFF through See www.marthafranks.com June 30th!

TICKETS AT STARTING

(864) 675-1155

864.467.3000 The official ticketing site: www.peacecenter.org

See www.marthafranks.com

APRIL 6, 2012 | Greenville Journal 43


JOURNAL SKETCHBOOK

We are...

OUR SCHOOLS

• Fellows of the American Academy of Audiology. • Doctors of Audiology. • Susan Valenti, Courtney Adel & Insook Lim.

ACTIVITIES, AWARDS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Richard W. Riley, chair of the Furman University Board of Trustees, has announced that 10 new members will join the board this summer. The new trustees are Ann Bryan of Atlanta, Ga., Christopher Collins of Manchester, Ma., Larry Estridge of Greenville, Steven Reinemund of Winston-Salem, N.C., Leighan Rinker of Atlantis, Fl., Michael Riordan of Greenville, William Slate II of Reston, Va., A. Alexander Taylor II of Providence, R.I., the Hon. William Traxler, Jr., of Greenville, and Richard Wrenn, Jr., of Asheville, N.C. They will begin their terms July 1. Estridge and Rinker have previously been Furman trustees, and Rinker served as chair of the board.

And WE ARE…

Professional & Personalized Services

454-4368

OPEN HOUSE age 18 months – gr ade 12

April 13 and 27 at 9:00 a.m.

J32

200 Patewood Dr., Bldg. B, Ste. B-400

Southside Christian School student body adviser Rob Brown, and student body officers, Sam McDonald (Chaplin), Melissa Becraft (Treasurer), Taylor Platt (VP) and Evan Ziegenfus (Pres.), deliver three large loads of donations to Piedmont Women’s Center.

Stone Academy (Greenville’s Most Creative School) teachers and students celebrating at the Koger Center in Columbia.

Southside Christian School is hosting three remaining open houses where prospective parents can meet teachers, interact with students and get answers to their questions. The open houses are April 13, April 27 or May 4 at 9 a.m. For more information about the school, go to southsidechristian.org

Carolina International Preparatory School has hired Sandy Miller as Head of School. In this new position, Miller will oversee the school’s dayto-day operations and development of the Upstate’s only technology-integrated Core Knowledge curriculum. Miller comes to Carolina Prep with an extensive background in both public and private school education. In addition, she offers experience in marketing, fundraising and leadership outside of the classroom. Prior to joining Carolina Prep, Miller served as Director of Middle School at an Anderson-area private school. Stone was recognized as one of 4 elementary school finalists in the state for the Palmetto’s Finest Award Tuesday night at the Koger Center in Columbia.

Academic Excellence. Biblical Truth. s o u t h s i d ec h r i s t i a n . o r g

44 GREENVILLE JOURNAL | APRIL 6, 2012

2211 Woodruff Road, Simpsonville • (864) 234-7595

Art educator Rachel Buff at Greenville Senior High Academy in cooperation with Beverly Marion of Spirit Screenz, a division of www.trainyourstudents.com, taught practical business applications of the fine arts to her students. Art students created T-shirts to be sold within the school and plan to continue to practice developing self sustainable fundraising to support the GHS Arts’ Department. Pictured from left to right, wearing their T-shirt creations are Chase Rumens, Carlos Sullivan, Antwone Moore and Manuel Chavez.

Mauldin High Art 2 students Haylei Tucker (on left) and Allison Jackson (on right) add details to the Frankenstein mural in the MHS media center entrance.

Submit entries to: Greenville Journal, Our Schools, 148 River Street, Ste. 120, Greenville, SC 29601 or e-mail: greenvillecommunity@greenvillejournal.com


journal homes F e at u r e d H o m e s & N e i g h b o r h o o d s | O p e n H o u s e s | P r o p e r t y T r a n s f e r s

This Week’s Featured Home

40 Chisolm Trail, Parkins Mill Area, Greenville A beautiful 5 bedroom, 3 full, 1 half bath, brick home located near downtown Greenville and I-85 with Sara Collins Elementary, Beck Academy and JL Mann High School offering the best educational path in the Upstate. The home boasts a rear covered-porch with a wood-burning stone fireplace, patio and private backyard, perfect for entertaining and grilling out. The kitchen, breakfast room and den create a wonderful open, floor plan. The den features a wood-burning fireplace, book shelves and cabinets. The butler’s

pantry separates the kitchen and dining room. The walk-in laundry room is conveniently situated beside the kitchen. The expansive master bedroom offers a walk-in closet and spacious master bath/dressing area. Two other bedrooms have walk-in closets. The fifth bedroom, located downstairs, can easily translate into a rec room or office. This is the perfect family home located in a very family-friendly neighborhood. Be sure and ask about Gower Pool.

Agents on call this weekend

DIANE SHAUIPTE 505-3692 SIMPSONVILLE

Special to the Journal

KAAREN ANDERSON 979-9954 WOODRUFF RD.

BRENDA LEDFORD 879-4239 GREER

REGINA MARY LOU BARNHARDT COULOMB 293-4814 EASLEY/ 420-1362 PLEASANTBURG POWDERSVILLE

Price: $439,900 | MLS#1224920 5 Bedrooms, 3.5 Baths, 3400-3599 SF John Stephenson 864.201.5803 jstephenson@cbcaine.com Coldwell Banker Caine www.cbcaine.com Send us your Featured Home for consideration. homes@greenvillejournal.com

More photos, info and over 1,900 neighborhoods online at

NORM MACDONALD 313-7353 PELHAM RD.

Home Info

MARTHA KENT 616-6523 AUGUSTA RD.

Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at

cdanjoyner.com.

April 6, 2012 | G r e e n v i l l e J o u r n a l 45


I IN M TATE ES

ST JU TED S LI

$439,900 STONEHAVEN

$375,000 MONTEBELLO

H ES T FR AIN P

$249,250 NEELY FARM

$239,000 ASHBY PARK

T EA ! GRRICE P

$219,900 FORRESTER HEIGHTS

AR NE JU B

$199,900 WILDAIRE

Brick Ranch many updates 3 BR, 2.5 BA. Large den/living room with built-ins. Large dining room, nice kitchen with solid counter tops, pass through to living and breakfast area. Large patio, fenced yard, 2 car gar attached with storage, single detached gar with 220 power. Attached shed in back yard. New heating and AC in Feb. 2012. MLS#1238744 Nellie Wagoner 864.232.8342

ST JU TED S LI

$149,000 BENT CREEK PLANTATION

3BR, 2BA home, conveniently located to I-85, airport, Village Hospital, Grocery, Restaurants, Fitness and Shopping. Singlelevel home updated with new paint inside, new Brazilian cherry hdwds, updated kitchen. Beautiful wainscoating in DR, opens to back deck. Master on the main. Pool, tennis, clubhouse in community. MLS#1238375 Tom Marchant 864.449.1658

T N’ DO ISS M

WG NETIN S LI

$82,000 JAMESTOWN II

$499,900 DACUSVILLE

Exceptional quality 4BR, 3.5BA mini estate custom-designed on approx. 2.20 ac w/ lake view. Approx. 3500SF, 9’ ceilings, solid cherry int. doors, heart pine flrs, 2 master suites on main. 4600SF barn could be Mother in Law suite, guest house, or workshop. Adjacent pasture is available to lease for horses. MLS#1237373 Brian Marchant 864.631.5858 or Anne Marchant 864.420.0009

O GI AG L VIL

Quaint authentic 3BR, 2BA Tuscan style one level villa $34,000 Renovation completed in 2011. Added arch openings in great room, new granite island in kitchen, all new closet systems and totally renovated master bath with mirrored TV overlooking jetted tub. MLS#1237148 Nancy McCrory 864.505.8367 or Karen Turpin 864.230.5176

D! CE U D RE

Just Reduced brick ranch patio home w/3 BR, 2 BA. Built 02. 3rd BR/bonus plus storage upstairs. Approx 2000 SF, beautiful hardwoods, nice size galley kitchen with breakfast room on one side and DR/keeping room on other, generous master suite leads to screened in porch, fenced yard & extra large lot. MLS#1236090 Anne Marchant 864.420.0009 or Brian Marchant 864.631.5858

Celebrate Easter

And all the things that bring the family home The value of a home isn’t just found in its price per square foot or its estimated worth in dollars and cents. The value of a home can also be found by multiplying the number of backyard Easter egg hunts by the volume of laughter heard during holidays. Here’s to Easter and all the things that make a house a home. If you are looking for an expert to help you find your dream home, give us a call or start your search online. www.cbcaine.com or 864.250.4601.

ST JU TED LIS

$218,921 ALLISONS MEADOW

AR N NE MA R FU

$189,500 NORTHWOOD HILLS

4BR 2.5BA w/approx. 2600-2799SF. Lots of natural light and arched doorways plus a very open flrpln-conveniently located to I-385, airport, schools, and shopping. Office with french doors, endless ceilings in GR with fpl, spacious kitchen with island, beautifully stained cabinets, oversized bkfst area, formal DR, huge master on main. MLS#1237450 Joan Rapp 864.901.3839

$118,700 PARKINS MILL AREA

2BR, 1.5BA home w/ approx 1200 +/- SF. Nicely finished hardwoods throughout, tile bathrooms. Kitchen has granite counter tops and new cabinets. Electrical wiring and pipes for plumbing have been upgraded and replaced during last 6 years. 8x10 work shed with electricity. 2 car carport with electricity also. MLS#1235859 Gordon Seay 864.444.4359

5 BR 4.5 BA stately home on aprox. 1/3 a. Meticulously maintained, gleaming hardwoods. Kitchen w/ granite counters, ss appl’s. In law suite on main has pvt BA. Spacious MBR on the 2nd level. 3 car gar for add’l storage AND 800 sqft for expansion. Central vac & security sys. Prof. landscaped bkyd w/koi pond & ext lighting. Bring all offers. MLS#1238690 Joye Lanahan 864.404.5372

Meticulously maintained 4BR, 2.5BA ready to move right in and enjoy! Entire interior freshly painted including trim and doors, front door stained, porch painted, garage even painted... including garage floor! Beautiful open floor plan...gorgeous breakfast nook with paladin window and cathederal ceiling overlooks private wooded landscaped backyard. MLS#1235680 Barb Riggs 864.423.2783

Builder warranty good thu 2012. Energy Star Cert. Corner lot, 4BR, 2.5BA. Energy efficient windows, tankless water heater, washer, dryer, & refirgerator, gourmet kitchen with granite island, open floor plan with family and morning rms. Pre-wired throughout for ceiling fans. Lux owners suite. Closets and storage abound. MLS#1238745 Valerie Miller 864.430.6602

Well maintained 3BR, 2BA house in super location. Close to schools, The Fine Arts Center, BJU, downtown and shopping. 1 level home on large corner lot, on cul de sac. Hdwds, tile BAs, and large kitchen, spacious den w/ fpl and built in desk & bookcases, interior wooden shutters. Closets and extra storage areas in the attached carport. MLS#1236459 Mary Praytor 864.593.0366

Nice 2 bedroom 1 1/2 bath in a quiet location, new carpet, new paint, dishwasher and disposal. Lots of storage, maser bedroom with large closets, screened porch with storage room. Approximately 1150 sq.ft. Great Location. Well maintained, complex on the Eastside. MLS#1238405 Nellie Wagoner 864.232.8342

C42R

Weekend Agent on Duty: Mary Praytor 864.593.0366

For more listings, more photos, more details...

www.marchantco.com | 864.467.0085 46 G r e e n v i l l e J o u r n a l | April 6, 2012

Special to the Journal


N e i g h b o r h o o d

over 2,500 Upstate neighborhoods, listings, and area information

HOMEwork

before you buy or sell, do your

Ruskin

p r o f i l e

Square

NG

W NE

I IST

L

Rolling Green Village $84,500 • MLS 1238228 NG

W NE

I IST

L

Pebble Creek $$249,900 • MLS 1238812

Ruskin Square at Hollingsworth Park It’s happening at Verdae. Ruskin Square at Hollingsworth Park features a new style in city living with maintenance-free lawns and homes interset amid shared pocket parks, plazas and pedestrian-friendly streetscapes. It’s an easy stroll to the 20-acre central park and residents enjoy being close to everything. Classic homes are under construction now. Buyers may build the custom home of their dreams or select from a

collection of the pre-approved land/ home packages that are priced from the mid $200s. Premium lot selections are going fast, so plan a visit soon. The community’s Sales Office, located at 18 Shadwell Street, is open daily. For more information, call (864) 3298383 or visit www.verdae.com.

Augusta Road $304,900 • MLS 1235284

Helen Hagood

Selling Greenville for 28 Years! Mobile: 864-419-2889 hhagood@cbcaine.com

Neighborhood Info Land/Home packages from the mid $200s Lot Sizes: 40’x100’ and larger

See these homes and more at cbcaine.com/agents/HelenHagood

C42R

Pelham Road Elementary Beck Academy JL Mann High School

Amenities: Walking/Biking paths, 20-acre Legacy Park, Legacy Square – Neighborhood Professional/ Retail District, The Preserve Golf Course at Verdae, Shopping and Entertainment

Over 1,900 neighborhoods online at Special to the Journal

April 6, 2012 | G r e e n v i l l e J o u r n a l 47


R e a l

E s t a t e March

SUBD. CHANTICLEER MONTEBELLO ABLES RASOR ASHETON LAKES POINSETT CORNERS SCHWIERS AT CLEVELAND HAMPTON’S GRANT CLUB FOREST BOTANY WOODS STONEHAVEN TUXEDO PARK LANFORD’S POINTE SUGAR CREEK FORRESTER HEIGHTS SWANSGATE WOODSTONE COTTAGES SOUTHBROOK WHITEHALL PLANTATION

PRICE $1,200,000 $1,029,091 $950,000 $610,000 $560,000 $524,900 $515,000 $495,000 $447,000 $425,000 $399,000 $370,000 $365,000 $362,450 $328,000 $300,000 $265,000 $265,000 $258,000 $258,000 $250,000 $249,900 $245,000 $239,900 $225,000

THE TOWNES AT RIVERWOOD FARM $222,500 KINGSGATE $220,000 ORCHARD FARMS $220,000 THE TOWNES AT RIVERWOOD FARM $217,000 SUMMER WOOD $215,000 ORCHARD FARMS $215,000 CAMDEN COURT $215,000 PELHAM FALLS $213,000 KELSEY GLEN $211,591 BOTANY WOODS $210,000 SHADOWOOD $205,000 POPLAR RIDGE $204,000 KELSEY GLEN $202,624 SHARON RIDGE $198,000 SUMMERFIELD $196,000 SUMMER WOOD $195,000 WOODSTONE COTTAGES $190,000 RICELAN SPRINGS $187,000 AUGUSTA PLACE $185,800 FOXCROFT $184,000 BLUESTONE COTTAGES $181,385 PARKSIDE @ LISMORE $181,372 SQUIRES CREEK $181,000 FORRESTER WOODS $180,000 TIMBERLAKE $177,000 RIDGECREEK ESTATES $175,000 REMINGTON $172,000 REMINGTON $172,000 DRUID HILLS $171,437 HERITAGE CLUB VILLAS $171,000 NORTHCLIFF $170,500 BLUESTONE COTTAGES $169,900 HAVEN AT RIVER SHOALS $166,465 $165,000 MACEE ESTATES $165,000

Do

T r a n s a c t i o n s 19-23,

SELLER GULLICK ROY M REVOC TRUS REWAL CORP II DE CORP MOTEL 6 OPERATING L P DE SHAW KAREN D BANK OF AMERICIA N A TRU PROPST PATRICK EDWARD DOWNS ROBERT W GARRARD ANDREA BARNES JAMISON BOBBIE A TROTTER LLOYD CURTIS JONES CAMERON JANELLE TOWE WILLIAM V HARDING RICHARD F EADDY REID M GOODMAN FELICIA FIASCHETTI PAUL D MADRAY JOHN RUSSELL STENERSEN LEROY EUGENE HOWARD HAL PIELLUSCH FREDERICK B HESSER KRISTIN L MILES D EARL DRURY JODI F GAGLIARDI ANN MARIE HANDLEY CHAD D

BUYER PEACE CENTER FOUNDATION FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF B SHIVA HOTELS LLC HERNANDEZ JUAN G (JTWROS C & T INFINITY PARTNERS WEST W BROWN SMITH MARYANN C (JTWROS) SPITZER BRIAN C ALLEN TREVOR CHARBEL FORTSON H BRENT JONES CARRICK (JTWROS) JONES MATTHEW RYAN (JTWR WATSON EMILY B (JTWROS) BOYD NANCY G HILLMAN (JT PIECHOWIAK JASON WAYNE ( LIBERTY SAVINGS BANK FSB GARRISON RYAN A (JTWROS) ORIOLE PROPERTIES LLC KIRKLAND DONALD R JR (JT PASCAZIO DANIEL (JTWROS) REALBUTO CAREY J (JTWROS HELGERSON KATHLEEN TROTTER L CURTIS SPRIGGS ARTHUR W (JTWROS EBERT ANDREW (JTWROS)

ADDRESS 101 W BROAD ST PO BOX 8050 1585 MONROE DR 201 E SEVEN OAKS DR 211 N MAIN ST 212 CAPRI CT 46 RIVERSIDE DR 218 ASHETON LAKES WAY 224 S LAURENS ST UNIT #210 7 HARVEST CT 2510 AUGUSTA ST 31 WISETON CT 209 MICHAUX DR 500 BRIDGEWATER DR 104 GLENBRIAR CT 226 TUXEDO LN 31 W TALLULAH DR PO BOX 4068 15 LAKE VISTA CT 202 STONE RIDGE RD 405 RIVANNA LN 136 HUMMINGBIRD RIDGE 203 WINDTISTLE DR 113 SELDEN WAY 105 WATERS REACH LN

ARROWSMITH MICHAEL ARMSTRONG KAY M PORTER ALICIA S WEBER JOEL V STERLING CHAD L KANARAS PANAGIOTA EAST CHELSIE L PALMER JEFFREY S NVR INC BURKHART CARL H MARRAPODI FRANCIS J MCDOWELL MICHELE M NVR INC GLUR GERALD R KO JUNG-TYNN COSGROVE ALISON T ROSEWOOD OF THE PIEDMONT GIBSON JOSEPH H II GARRISON RYAN A CHILDRESS ROBERT CHRISTO MARTIN DONALD EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL MAHONEY ANDREW L HALL DOLORES VAN FOSSEN PAYNE GEOGORY KIRK HOMES BY TAPIO INC DOMBROSKI JEFFREY P CARTUS FINANCIAL CORPORA GAJADHARSINGH IAN BINNEY JAMES D HARRIS JOHN M ROSEWOOD OF THE PIEDMONT NVR INC CHEVES PROPERTIES INC MORONEY CHRISTINA SUZANN

PARRISH TERRELL A STUHL JENNIFER M (JTWROS RAMSEY BRUCE MCDARIS SANDRA D BLAIR CHI MINH (JTWROS) HOWARD RYAN M (JTWROS) FLORA WILLIAM H (JTWROS) COEN RICHARD D (JTWROS) SPEARMAN MICHAEL L STEVENS CHRISTOPHER BROC FLOYD JEAN A (JTWROS) BENNINGER KATIE G (JTWRO LECKRONE KATHERINE L ADKINS CINDY MONDORA JACQUELINE A SNYDER DAVID A DAVIS BRYAN C (JTWROS) HEATON PHILLIP T (SURV) STEWART SAMANTHA N GREIG BRIAN M (JTWROS) FISHER JUDY B LAFFLER ERIC S COX NICHOLAS M FLOYD SUSAN R WELLS FARGO BANK N A WELLBAUM RUSSELL DAVID ( CARTUS FINANCIAL CORPORA TOSELAND JONATHAN ALLEN FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA HAWKINS TERESA G ADDIS JOEL P (JTWROS) RUNION PAULETTE R (JTWRO HARDY DONALD P (JTWROS) FIELDSTONE DEVELOPMENT G LANPHER MEGAN E (JTWROS)

28 REDDINGTON DR 112 LAMBOURN WAY 204 FORTUNA DR 23 BRIGHTMORE DR 812 REID SCHOOL RD #58 31 MOUNTAIN ROSE CT 11 BENTLEY WAY 14 BRIARPARK DR 30 PATEWOOD DR STE 257 13 HIAWATHA DR 308 SHADOW RIDGE CIR 302 POPLAR RIDGE RD 10 REDVALES RD 14 CAPERTON WAY 4 FIRE ISLAND WAY 38 RUSTCRAFT DR 7 LITTEN WAY 111 RAMBLE ROSE CT 307 MCCUEN ST 4 CHIPPENDALE DR 50 DOLERITE DR 614 MILLERVALE RD 304 SQUIRES CREEK RD 203 STONEY CREEK DR 3476 STATEVIEW BLVD 733 PABST ST 40 APPLE RIDGE RD 5 PLAMONDON DR 5250 JONES BRANCH DR 1701 HERITAGE CLUB DR 4 MOUNTAIN FACE CT 9 RUNAMO WAY 500 RIO GRANDE PL 218 MELVILLE AVE 348 BRANNON AVE

2012

SUBD. MILESTONE OFFICE PARK PELHAM ESTATES WAXFORD ESTATES LANSDOWNE AT REMINGTON HALF MILE LAKE FORRESTER WOODS HAMMETT GROVE UNITVERSITY HEIGHTS GARLINGTON PLACE HERITAGE HILL HADLEY PARK TUXEDO PARK

PRICE $165,000 $160,000 $160,000 $159,900 $159,786 $155,000 $154,500 $154,190 $153,000 $153,000 $145,000 $145,000 $145,000

SELLER SCHUESSLER LAUREN MARIE MILESTONE VENTURES LLC HOLMES JUDY D GARRETT KEITH D R HORTON INC PENNINGTON DAVID L VANDEN MEIRACKER ROBERT EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL POLSON LONNIE R HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPOR BUCKLEY EDWARD JOSEPH VAN DEUSEN BEVERLY J FORD ROAD PROPERTIES LLC

BUYER KIRKPATRICK MARY ALICE CEREC TRAINING & CONSULT RASC 2006-EMX6 GRAY RENALDO Q HUGHEY SANDRA COMPTON ANNIE M (JTWROS) LODISE ANTHONY K (JTWROS PERSONS BRIAN J ARENS JAMIE PUTMAN GATELY KATHRYN EILEEN BUCKLEY EDMOND JOSEPH SANDERS KIMBERLY L BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT

HADLEY PARK CANEBRAKE

$144,000 $142,900 $140,500 TOWNES AT PINE GROVE $140,261 WATERFORD PARK $140,000 HALF MILE LAKE $138,000 STONE ESTATES $135,000 LANSDOWNE AT REMINGTON $133,826 FORRESTER CHASE $128,750 $127,000 AUGUSTA HEIGHTS $122,000 $118,500 CHARTWELL ESTATES $113,200 RIVERBEND CONDOS $112,000 $110,000 $109,900 BRYSON HOLLOW $107,950 WEDGEFIELD $105,000 MOUNTAINBROOKE $104,000 WHITE OAKS $103,000 SADDLER’S RIDGE $100,000 SUPER HWY HOMESITES $95,000 FAIR HEIGHTS $93,500 ADAMS MILL ESTATES $93,200 $82,000 RIVERSIDE GLEN $82,000

MARCHBANKS CHARLES W ENGLE JUSTIN EARL (JTWRO FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTG NVR INC BUTLER HARRIETT C ROBINSON VICKY L SIPE RICK B D R HORTON INC MCNEILL DENNIS EPPS JOYCE H GURLEY LAWRENCE T JR BENTLEY PAUL MUNOZ MARIO HOWIE FAMILY TRUST MCLANE ELLA T BLACKWELL JASON R FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTG A REAVIS BRANDIE M WILLSON ADELE K BABER CAROLYN M MASON ELIZABETH J BAKER WILLIAM CHRISTOPHE KENDALL PAMELA L CRANE LAWRENCE W FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTG FAIRCLOTH MARIE A

BRIGHT DAVID L BURGESS GREGORY M KEESE CHERIE F CLEMONS DENISE M DAVIS SUSAN MCCARTHY JAMES ERIC SHELTON AARON W MCALISTER SHERRY DENISE BROOKS BRIAN D MOODY DELORES E MCCALL ROBERT D III ZIMMERMAN AMANDA C BANK OF AMERICA NA HOWIE FAMILY TRUST CHEVES PROPERTIES INC MARTIN SCOTT A (JTWROS) FULLER JENNIFER C HAMMERLE MARCIA A (JTWRO FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTG LAUNDRA CHRISTOPHER FOUNDERS FEDERAL CREDIT GRUBBS CHRISTOPHER M APPELL SHARON L KEATON DIANE S MERRITT ENTERPRISES LLC 111 GLEN WILLOW COURT LA

BEREA FOREST

BOWEN DENNIS R FISHER PATRICIA ANN FOWLER BUDDY E LEMASTER JASON E AHRNDT ORIN E JR WALDEN BEACHER LEE KEESE CHERIE F STOCK LOAN SERVICES LLC FREDRICKS BETTY ANNE (JT GREGORIE COMPANY OF SIMP MYRICK MICHELLE M STEPP WESLEY ALAN HELLAMS NORMA JEAN SHEAD DWIGHT ENSLIN BUILDERS INC WHEELER GARY ODIO LUIS A MCKENZIE CONSUELO FASSETT HEATHER FLEMING BK RESIDENTIAL VENTURES HARMELINK LARRY

GARRETT REALTY INVESTMEN CASSELL KASIE ERIN (JTWR KOWSKI STANLEY T (SURV) UPCHURCH BILLIE HOLLAND WILSON R J BLACK JAMES HEYWARD BRICO JEAN CLAUDE SERRUS REAL ESTATE FUND FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG SIPE RICK B RHODES ANGELA DUCKER HOPE OLIVIA RVM PROPERTIES LLC MSCS HOUSES LLC KUHN DANIELA (JTWROS) SYMONS JOHN H REVOCABLE GORDON JOHN R J & A UPSTATE PROPERTIES GREAT SOUTHERN BANK BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT MOLES ROBERTA M (JTWROS)

$80,000 $79,000 RIVERDALE $77,000 $76,000 RIVERDALE $75,682 LAKEVIEW ACRES $70,000 YORKTOWN CONDOS $69,000 LENHARDT CREEK $67,500 $65,000 BATTERY POINT $64,000 $64,000 PARKTOWNE ESTATES $55,000 P.L. BRUCE $55,000 WHITE HORSE HEIGHTS $55,000 HOLLAND TRACE $55,000 ELLETSON ACRES $52,500 MOUNTAIN CREEK FARMS $52,000 FRESH MEADOW FARMS $50,000 $45,000 SHENANDOAH FARMS $45,000 GLASSY MOUNTAIN $45,000

ADDRESS 500 OVERBROOK RD 301 THE PARKWAY STE B 3476 STATEVIEW BLVD 8 ANSON CT 103 SALTHOUSE RD 1120 HALF MILE WAY 118 OLD HICKORY PT 30 STREAM CROSSING WAY 107 CARMEL ST 4 ANDROMEDA 114 ANDOVER RD 317 ALEXANDRITE LN 1155 HAMMOND PL STE E-5050 1307 ALEXANDRITE LN 109 BUNKER HILL RD 506 SUMMIT DR 344 JUNIPER BEND CIR 801 WEYBOURNE DR 6 PROPST CT 25 DRUID ST 304 MAREFAIR LN 9 SWEETLAND CT 230 LINDSEY LAKE RD 18 WAVERLY CT 105 CANNON AVE 7105 COPORATE DR 6913 SADDLEBURY LN 209 N MAIN ST #204 207 PINE STREET EXT 21 CHELSEABROCK CT 106 BROWN RD 5000 PLANO PKWY 14 AUBURN ST PO BOX 2078 227 MERIDIAN AVE 107 BROOKDALE AVE 3 MILLCREST WAY 960 BERRY SHOALS RD 2123 OLD SPARTANBURG RD STE 18 6210 CALHOUN MEMORIAL HWY 4 SLATER RD 208 KNOLLVIEW DRIVE 550 MOUNTAIN CREEK RD 217 RIVENDELL DR 852 NASH MILL RD 2350 E NORTH ST UNIT 3-J 7 DAVIS KEATS DR 14221 DALLAS PARKWAY STE 100 24 TRANQUIL AVE 3 HOTEL HL 113 SILVER BROOK DR PO BOX 31160 1 MISTLETOE DR 200 TROTTER’S RIDGE LANE 714 SPAULDING FARM RD 127 HOWARD AVE PO BOX 1473 4336 PABLO OAKS CT 1155 HAMMOND DR STE 5050 920 N SAVANNAH DRIVE

rt to

pa your

Electric Lawn Mower Sale March 15 to April 15 Enoree Residential Waste and Recycling Center 243-9672 or lawnmowerexchange@greenvillecounty.org 48 G r e e n v i l l e J o u r n a l | April 6, 2012

Special to the Journal


9 reasons to visit the new mobile cdanjoyner.com 1 Find it fast! The mobile version of the website puts all of the detailed home information you’re looking for in the palm of your hand. 2 Use your smart phone (iPhone, Blackberry Storm, and Droid-based phones) to use the new mobile site. The site will detect if you have a browser that will display the mobile version and give you instructions on where to go get one if you don’t. 3 Quick Search. Use the quick search field to search by street name or address while out driving and looking for homes or to see what other listings are available on that street. Just check out Augusta Road!

4 Advanced Search. Filter search results by MLS#, address, zip, schools, #beds/ baths, square footage, and age. Further filter by home, lot or community features such as “pool” or “club house.” 5 Neighborhood Search. Search by neighborhood name or filter by MLS area, such as Silverleaf (neighborhood) or Eastside 22 (area). The area filter will display all neighborhoods in that area. Don’t forget to use the breadcrumbs at the top of the screen to easily get back to your original search! 6 Favorites. Add listings you find on your phone to your Favorites. Get back to favorites either on your phone or at www.cdanjoyner.com when back at your desktop. If you find a listing while out

and about, mark it as a favorite on your phone then share with the family when you get home. 7 Account. Don’t have an account for Favorites? No problem. You can register for a C Dan Joyner account on your phone, which will also get you to your favorites at www.cdanjoyner.com. 8 Get all of the details scaled to fit your mobile device. The cdanjoyner.com website will automatically detect when you’re surfing from your phone and display the mobile-friendly look. 9 Bookmark it! On the iPhone or iPod touch, add a bookmark to your home screen to easily get back to your home search.

Visit cdanjoyner.com R e a l

E s t a t e March

SUBD. FAIRFIELD ACRES KNIGHTS BRIDGE MILLCREEK ESTATES CARSON’S GLEN

PRICE $41,000 $40,765

$40,500 $40,000 $40,000 WARREN COURT $38,000 $37,500 COURT RIDGE $36,500 PINE HILL VILLAGE $35,000 SYCAMORE RIDGE $35,000 $33,000 HAYNESWORTH POINTE $30,098 COUNTRY WALK $30,000 CHARTWELL ESTATES $30,000 PEGGY J KELLY $30,000 THE CLIFFS AT MOUNTAIN PARK $29,400 $20,000 $20,000 CUTLER RIDGE $19,500 $15,000 SUMMIT VIEW $15,000 BLUE RIDGE HEIGHTS $13,000 DUNEAN MILLS $12,500 $12,000 ISAQUEENA PARK $10,000 THE VILLAGE $8,000 LEE EAST $7,000 VICTOR MONAGHAN $5,000 $4,000 ENGLEWOOD ESTATES $4,000 $3,480 $3,000 DURBIN ESTATES $2,500 $2,500 $2,500 ENGLEWOOD ESTATES $2,000 VALLEY VIEW $2,000 RIVERBREEZE $2,000

SELLER ELLIS EQUITIES LLC MOON-MCMANUS LLC

KELLETT DOUGLAS F LESTER JERRIE M PALMETTO BANK THE DUCKETT THOMAS VOLT ASSET HOLDINGS NPL3 FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTG A BANK OF TRAVELERS REST CHITTICK BRADLEY D BRANNON DAVID W FOOTHILLS LAND INC REEHL ELEANOR N RENAISSANCE AT CHARTWELL FIRST NATIONAL ACCEPTANC LEVERING JILL BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST SMITH GARY J JR RAIGOSA PROPERTIES LLC WATERFRONT HOLDINGS LLC PHILLIPS CAROLYN M EDWARDS FRANK MAURICE MOODY SHEBA DIANA NORRIS D R HORTON INC CENTRAL REALTY CORPORATI ROLLISON MICKEY T THOMPSON LUCILLE W EST MACHIA DOUGLAS JK DEVELOPMENT LLC WHITCOMB DAVID E PERKINS RUBY MAE HAMBY DANIEL MARTIN WEATHERS TRAVIS B SCOLARI KRISTY FLEMING MARTHA V WHITCOMB DAVID ERNEST CAMPBELL BLAKE GROVER MARVIN JR

Special to the Journal

BUYER CAROBA LLC BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT LIDDIE CARROL B (JTWROS) VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND TALMAR ASSOCIATES INC DJJ HOLDINGS LLC BLACKSTREAM PROPERTIES A GALLI JOEL DAVID TM PROPERTIES LLC WELL BROCK DESIGN & BUIL CURRIN ADAM C RAMIREZ ESPERANZA MALDON MANUFACTURED HOUSING CON SK BUILDERS INC ROSE ACCEPTAANCE INC BANK OF AMERICA NATIONAL M&T PROPERTIES INC ROSE LAND AND FINANCE CO DUNCAN CURTIS CABRERA GRACIELA S FLOYD LELA K FRANKLIN DONNA MARIE MOODY SHEBA DIANA NORRIS TO HANG 127 HARRINGTON AVE LAND USA 1ST TO HANG BUSTAMANTE MARIA DOLORES ENRIQUEZ ROBERTO (JTWROS TAYLOR JAMIE NO LIMIT HOLY TEMPLE CHU VAUGHAN DOUG SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND MIDWEST FIRST FINANCIAL TAYLOR JAMIE WEBB INVESTMENT LLC H EDWARD MERCER LLC

T r a n s a c t i o n s 19-23,

ADDRESS PO BOX 8711 1155 HAMMOND PL STE E-5050 422 PEACH GROVE PL PO BOX 9800 131 GLENAGLES RD 14-B E BUTLER RD 231 WOODRUFF RD STE 2100 #325 17 MITCHELL DR 13130 HWY 76 20 ROTHESAY ST 119 BENJAMIN AVE 124 LAKEVIEW DR 2000 CENTER POINT DR STE 2375 52 ST MARKS RD 241 E SAGINAW 7105 CORPORATE DR15-C 3671 CALHOUN MEMORIAL HWY 241 E SAGINAW 39 DANHARDT ST 19 REEDY RIVER WAY 3 CORTEZ ST 8 CAROLE DR 15 WALLACE ST 115 RAMBLE ROSE CT 2123 OLD SPARTANBURG RD STE 18 745 WADE HAMPTON BLVD 115 RAMBLE ROSE CT 1 NORWOOD ST 111 TAMEILIA CT 480 CANEWOOD PL 1225 #4 PENDLETON ST 409 FORRESTER DR 5350 77 CENTER DR STE 200 PO BOX 9800 11904 ARBOR ST STE 200 480 CANEWOOD PL PO BOX 1354 223 E AUGUSTA PL

2012

SUBD. MUSTANG VILLAGE CITY VIEW ANNEX STEEPLECHASE RIVERHILL

PRICE $2,000 $2,000 $1,100 $700 $500 $473 $460 $400

SOUTH FOREST ESTATES $187 $166 $100 WOODSIDE MILLS $10 GLASSY MOUNTAIN $10 THORNBLADE $10 STRATTON PLACE $10 ATHELONE HEIGHTS $10 SWANSGATE $10 $10 $10 DAVENPORT $10 BIRCHWOOD $10 STONEBRIDGE $10 WATERFORD PARK $10 BELL’S CREEK $10 CANNON PARK $10 RIVERDALE $10 $10 $10 FORRESTER WOODS $10 GREENS AT ROCKY CREEK $10 SPRING FOREST EST. $10 BUXTON $10 $10 STONEBRIDGE $10 CANTERBURY $10 W.H. CAMPBELL $10 WEDGEFIELD $5 FAIRWAY ACRES $5

SELLER REDDING NATHAN M CHAPMAN MARY A ROGERS BOBBY TONY NEWMAN JAMES T AIKEN RONALD E MT ZION BAPTIST CHURCH FORFEITED LAND COMMISSIO FORFEITED LAND COMMISSIO

BUYER COOPER JESSIE ASHLEY JOSHUA N LANSING VAUGHAN YORE BRIAN J (IRA) GSAMP TRUST 2004-SEA2 MT ZION BAPTIST CHURCH BUSS ADRIANNE HIGHTOWER CAMERIN M

FORFEITED LAND COMMISSIO FORFEITED LAND COMMISSIO SPROUSE ROBERT B DAVENPORT CAREY O EMERY ARNOLD (JTWROS) GRAY SUSAN Y PIPA JOSEPH A JR SANFORD JACQUELINE GRAWE ROBERT E AUTREY KATHERINE D RJI PROPERTIES LLC JACKSON KIMBERLY A (JTWR RENTZ CRYSTAL D HOLMES TONYA R DAVIS SUSAN NELSON BRENT R LINDSAY E TED FOWLER BUDDY E KILPATRICK ANN KILPATRICK ANN COREY SUZANNE VONGSAVANH THANONGSAK PAYNE JANE T (JTWROS) MCCONKEY MICHAEL C DIXON BEN ANNISS WILLIAM THOMAS II ARNALL JUSTIN BURRELL EUNICE JUANITA SPRINGER SANJA R LOGAN VALERIE (JTWROS)

BUSS ADRIANNE BUSS ADRIANNE HALE FREDDY L DAVENPORT CAREY O NORTH GREENVILLE UNIVERS GRAY JEFFREY H PIPA CAROLYN R PADEN WILLIE MAE GRAWE THELMA F AUTREY BRAD J (JTWROS) BURDETTE LLC JACKSON KIMBERLY A (JTWR ADAMS CRYSTAL D (JTWROS) HOLMES JOHN III (JTWROS) DAVIS SUSAN NELSON ALYSON (JTWROS) LINDSAY SUSAN D FOWLER BUDDY E FREEDOM 1ST LLC FREEDOM 1ST LLC SCHUENEMAN SUZANNE SCOTT SUEN MAY FUN (JTWROS) PAYNE JANE T REVOC INTER MCCONKEY JOSEPHINE H REV DIXON BEN (JTWROS) ANNISS WILLIAM THOMAS II FEBRUARY DELIGHT LLC BURRELL EUNICE JUANITA ( CARL RONALD E (JTWROS) SIMMONS VALAFONTAE

ADDRESS 2729 HWY 86 111 W OAK HILL RD 415 FORRESTER DR PO BOX 4517 104 W MARION RD PO BOX 412 2002 SPRINGWOODS DR 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE STE 600 2002 SPRINGWOODS DR 2002 SPRINGWOOD DR 206 HAMMETT ST 108 BEATTLE ST PO BOX 1892 20 PRISTINE DR 116 BRIDGETON DR 735 CRESTFIELD RD 130 HUMMINGBIRD RIDGE 52 OLD PLANTATION RD 1 MONET DR 400 E WASHINGTON ST UNIT 27 700 ASPEN DR 110 BUCKHEAD LN 801 WEYBOURNE DR 111 BELLS CREEK DR 211 HIGHLAND DR 208 KNOLLVIEW DRIVE 28248 N TATUM BLVD B-1 #236 28248 N TATUM BLVD B-1 #236 219 STONEY CREEK DR 209 WINDSONG DR 119 HARTS LN 114 BEXHILL CT 307 TRAILS END 17 HARTWELL DR 38 FENNER AVE 2250 FEWS CHAPEL RD 15 POPPY MEADOW LN 1513 FORK SHOALS RD

April 6, 2012 | G r e e n v i l l e J o u r n a l 49


journal sketchbook

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA SUMMONS AND NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA IN THE FAMILY COURT COUNTY OF GREENVILLE 2012-DR-23-1466 David Henry Vaughn, Plaintiff, vs. Pamela Gabrel Vaughn, Defendant. TO THE DEFENDANT(S) ABOVE NAMED; You are hereby summoned and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is attached hereto and herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to same upon the subscriber at 100 Williams Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after the service of the same, exclusive of the day of such service. If you fail to answer said within the thirty day period, the Plaintiff(s) will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein and judgment will be taken against you by default. Thomas B. Outlaw Attorney for Plaintiff South Carolina Bar No.: 71952 100 Williams Street Greenville, SC 29601 864-232-0003 Office 864-232-0006 Facsimile Greenville, South Carolina Dated: March 26 , 2012 SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: IFB# 56-04/24/12 Construction of a Pre-Engineered Storage Facility, April 24, 2012, 3:00 P.M. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org or by calling (864) 467-7200.

ORDER REGARDING CHILD SUPPORT NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA IN THE FAMILY COURT THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COUNTY OF GREENVILLE CASE NO.: 2009-DR-23-4550 Jennifer Owens Putman, Plaintiff, vs. Christopher Todd Putman, Defendant This matter appearing before the Court pursuant to an Affidavit for child support to be paid through the court pursuant to a Final Divorce Decree signed by Judge Robert N. Jenkins, Sr. on December 30, 2009. The Affidavit supports that the Defendant in the above referenced matter is not current on his child support payments and payments shall now be directed to the court. Furthermore, Plaintiff is not precluded from bringing a Rule to Show Cause as to any arrearages related to this matter. IT IS THEREFORE ORDERED, ADJUDGED AND DECREED, that Defendant shall make all future child support payments through the Clerk of Court. AND IT IS SO ORDERED. Rochelle Y. Conits Judge of the Family Court Thirteenth Judicial Circuit Greenville, South Carolina This _26th day of __Oct, 2011. SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: One New Extended Day Cab Tractor/Chassis, RFP #5504/23/12 at 3:00 P.M. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org or by calling (864) 467-7200.

50 Greenville Journal | APRIL 6, 2012

PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given that on 4/21/12, at 9:00 a.m. at Woodruff Road Storage, 1868 Woodruff Road, Greenville, SC, the undersigned, Woodruff Road Storage will sell at Public Sale by competitive bidding, the personal property heretofore stored with the undersigned by: 1. Unit: B277 Aundra L. Wilson, 324 Rexford Dr., Moore, SC 29369 Furniture, Boxes/Bags/Misc. 2. Unit: C106 Mark Moon, 1101 Roper Mtn. Rd. # 239, Greenville, SC 29615 Speakers, Wires, Misc. 3. Unit: C113 Pamela R. Kay, 127 Kay Drive, Simpsonville, SC 29681 Bags/ Boxes/Misc., Luggage, Collectible 4. Unit: D03 Jeffrey Clifton, 1409 Roper Mtn. Rd., Apt. 514, Greenville, SC 29615 Furniture, Exercise Equip., Boxes/Misc. 5. Unit: D05 April E. Walker, 1409 Roper Mtn. Rd., Greenville SC 29607 Furniture, Toys/Misc. Denise Adkins Manager, Woodruff Road Storage 864-234-2468

SUMMONS AND NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE FAMILY COURT 2011-DR-23-3803 Daphne Trelia Roach, Plaintiff, vs. Jefferson Todd Bruton, Defendant. TO THE DEFENDANT(S) ABOVE NAMED; You are hereby summoned and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is attached hereto and herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to same upon the subscriber at 100 Williams Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after the service of the same, exclusive of the day of such service. If you fail to answer said within the thirty day period, the Plaintiff(s) will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein and judgment will be taken against you by default. Thomas B. Outlaw Attorney for Plaintiff South Carolina Bar No.: 71952 100 Williams Street Greenville, SC 29601 864-232-0003 Office 864-232-0006 Facsimile Dated: August 17, 2011

SUMMONS AND NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA IN THE FAMILY COURT COUNTY OF GREENVILLE 2011-DR-23-3809 Tammie Rene Witherspoon, Plaintiff, vs. Donyell Lokey Witherspoon, Defendant. TO THE DEFENDANT(S) ABOVE NAMED; You are hereby summoned and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is attached hereto and herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to same upon the subscriber at 100 Williams Street Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after the service of the same, exclusive of the day of such service. If you fail to answer said within the thirty day period, the Plaintiff(s) will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein and judgment will be taken against you by default. Thomas B. Outlaw Attorney for Plaintiff South Carolina Bar No.: 71952 100 Williams Street Greenville, SC 29601 864-232-0003 Office 864-232-0006 Facsimile Greenville, South Carolina Dated: August __, 2011

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: Janitorial Services, on April 24, 2012, 3:00 P.M. A mandatory pre-bid meeting and site tour of selected facilities will be held at 9:00 A.M., EDT, April 17, 2012 at Greenville County Procurement Services Office, County Square, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillevillecounty.org or by calling 864-467-7200.

When you ďŹ nish reading this paper, please recycle it.

LEGAL NOTICES Only $.79 per line ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Only $145 tel 864.679.1205 • fax 864.679.1305 email aharley@communityjournals.com

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that C E Sportz, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1145 Woodruff Road, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than April 8, 2012. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 898-5899

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that C E Gourmet, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1117 A Woodruff Road, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this license/ permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than April 8, 2012. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 898-5899

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that 2 Little Men, LLC / DBA The Cigar Boxx, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of LIQUOR at 25 College Street, Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than April 22, 2012. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 898-5899

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that The Barker Bar, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 226 Main Street, Travelers Rest, SC 29690. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than April 8, 2012. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 898-5899


How it was

The simpson home

JAZZ& WINE

journal sketchbook

Photos available from Greenville County Historical Society - 233-4103 As the commercial district of Main Street crept north in the 1920s, the residential district moved still further out. Dr. William D. Simpson moved from Abbeville to Greenville and joined in partnership with his half-brother, William Henry Belk of Charlotte, in the BelkSimpson Department Store. On the corner of North Main Street and Hillcrest Drive, he and Lucy Simpson built a substantial home in 1926. Spainish architectural styles achieved a degree of popularity in the 1920s under the influence of the Florida construction boom.

FRIDAY, MAY 4

at the Huguenot Mill Designed to soothe the soul and excite the palate – all at the same time. Kick back and enjoy some of the finest regionally and nationally acclaimed musicians as they put their passion on display. Add in delectable foods, amazing wines and a worthy cause, and you have a jazz festival Upstate audiences can really embrace. All proceeds will go to support The Ronald McDonald House here in The Upstate.

Advanced Tickets are $55 per adult (Cost will be $65 at the door)

Proceeds will benefit

$30 per person for students

(21 and older); military; & seniors (60 & over)*

P RES ENTED BY TOWN MAGAZINE • GSA COOP • LARKIN’S ON THE RIVER Acumen IT • Art Eats Bakery • Brights Creek Golf Resort • Carlton Mercedes • Charter Media • Charter Communications • Impact pbs • Marchant Company • Red Hype • Skatell’s Jewelers

www.reedyriverjazzandwinefestival.org www.rmhc-carolinas.org

* ID’s will be checked at the door. Each ticket includes appetizers, food & wine tastings, dessert tasting (from 5:30-8 pm), and live jazz (from 5:30-10 pm). After 8 pm, a cash bar will be open. Tickets go on sale March 30th on Eventbrite.com, buy online at www.reedyriverjazzandwinefestival.org, or from The Ronald McDonald House & Horizon Records

From “Remembering Greenville: Photographs from the Coxe Collection,” by Jeffrey R. Willis

How it is

a private residence

We provide In-Home Support Services that are customized just for you.

CUSTOMIZED COMPANION CARE, INC.

864.679.2601 | www.CustomizedCompanionCare.com

C22R

Greg Beckner / Staff

North Main past Stone Avenue continues to be a residential area. The Simpson home survives today as a private residence.

Compassionate staff (thoroughly screened, bonded and insured) provide services for: Post-Surgical Patients, Expectant Mothers, and The Elderly.

APRIL 6, 2012 | Greenville Journal 51


journal sketchbook

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week

Dr. Margaree Seawright Crosby, the first women to serve of the Greenville Hospital System’s Board of Trustees, 1991 to 1997, arrives at the Upcountry History Museum for the unveiling of the book. People gather in the lobby of the Upcountry History Museum to listen to authors Dave Partridge and Fay Towell talk about their book “Transformation: The Story of Greenville Hospital System University Medical Center” during the celebration for the unveiling of the book.

Ken Johnson, executive director of the Upcountry History Museum, welcomes people attending the celebration of the unveiling of the book “Transformation: The Story of Greenville Hospital System University Medical Center.”

Photos by Greg Beckner / Staff

Authors of the book “Transformation: The Story of Greenville Hospital System University Medical Center,” Dave Partridge and Fay Towell sign copies of their work for people attending the unveiling celebration at the Upcountry History Museum.

for all your special events

Michael Riordan, president and CEO of the Greenville Hospital System University Medical Center, makes a few remarks.

People line up in the lobby of the museum for a chance to get a copy of the book and have it signed by the authors Fay Towell and Dave Partridge.

AQUOS BOARD

It’s not just a display, it’s your business.

Communicate, Collaborate, Disseminate on an affordable, large touch screen LCD whiteboard display to make every presentation unforgettable. SERVING GREENVILLE SINCE 1985

864-282-8600

1922 Augusta St.@ McDaniel Village

52 Greenville Journal | APRIL 6, 2012

864.675.2000 | sharp-sbs.com


journal sketchbook

Cortney Easterling with BI-LO Charities pushes the pinwheels For Prevention sign into the ground in front of the Mauldin Cultural Center. The sign was followed by some 400 pinwheels, the national symbol of child abuse prevention, placed there by BI-LO employees and other volunteers. BI-LO Charities is a sponsor of Greenville County First Steps’ Pinwheels for Prevention Campaign.

Julie Patton with BI-LO Charities puts a pinwheel into place at the Mauldin Cultural Center. 

Claudette Frenette with the Mauldin Garden Club uses a hammer to create holes in the ground in front of the Mauldin Cultural Center. The ground was too hard to push the pinwheels into place without having a hole to start with.

Photos by Greg Beckner / Staff

George Patrick McLeer, executive director of the Mauldin Cultural Center, helps with the pinwheel garden.

Ashley Newton, left, and Lindsey Young, both with BI-LO Charities, add more pinwheels to the pinwheel garden. Nearly 80 other “pinwheel gardens” totaling more than 20,000 pinwheels will spring up across Greenville County through the month of April.

Ashley Downing with BI-LO Charities adds the last of the 400 pinwheels to the pinwheel garden.

APRIL 6, 2012 | Greenville Journal 53


journal sketchbook

TAKE THE FAMILY OUT FOR EASTER DINNER!

figure. this. out. Failing French

By Steven J. St. John

NEED SOME suggestions? Adams Bistro American Grocery Arizona’s Blockhouse Blue Ridge Brewing Company The Bohemian Brick Street Café The Brown Street Club Cafe at Williams Hardware Chophouse ‘47 CityRange Davani’s Devereaux’s Fonda Rosalinda’s Ford’s Oyster House The Galley Restaurant The Green Room Handi Indian Cuisine Hans & Franz Biergarten Harry & Jean’s John Paul Armadillo Oil Company The Lazy Goat Liberty Tap Room & Grill Mary Beth’s The Mellow Mushroom Midtown Deli Nami Asian Bistro Nantucket Seafood Grill Northampton Wine Café Nose Dive On The Border Open Hearth Steak House P. Simpson’s The Plaid Pelican Portofino’s Italian Restaurant Rick Erwin’s West End Grille Ristorante Bergamo Roman’s Macaroni Grill Runway Café Ruth’s Chris Steak House Saffron’s West End Café Sassafras Southern Bistro Smoke on the Water Soby’s New South Cuisine Stax Billy D’s Stax Omega Diner Stella’s Southern Bistro Stellar Restaurant & Wine Bar Thaicoon Ricefire &Sushi Bar The Trappe Door Travinia Italian Kitchen Trio A Brick Oven Café Yia Yia’s

Upstate UpstateFoodie .com Feed Your Inner Food Enthusiast

54 Greenville Journal | APRIL 6, 2012

Across 1 __ finish 6 Latin for “heads” 12 Tease 16 Uncouth one 19 Like hayseeds’ hangouts 20 Issue in May-December romances 21 Straighten out 23 Sense of unity among magnetic devices? 25 Place to dry out, in oaters 26 Goddess with a European capital named for her 27 “Fooled you!” 28 Deceptively realistic painting of The Donald? 30 Dressed 31 Much souvenir shop merchandise 34 Concert wind 35 Egg source 36 Triumphs 37 Horn, in Hastings 39 They may have soft shoulders 44 Point at the dinner table 45 Terrible night’s sleep? 47 “__ Irish Rose” 50 Heyerdahl craft 52 Vacation souvenir 53 Come through 54 “Porgy and Bess” aria 57 Tease 59 Many families begin at them

60 Having a weed-free lawn? 62 Humble reply to a compliment 64 Nurse’s tool 65 Passenger who doesn’t bug the cabbie? 68 Michigan-based financing co. formed in 1919 72 Workbench tool 73 Justification for a dried grape? 75 Early online bookstore 79 QB protectors 82 Admitting, as a lesser charge 83 Restraint 85 Pasture 87 Cholesterol initials 88 Allergy season runners 89 Garden figure taking up arms? 92 Latvian Academy of Sciences home 94 Syrian president 95 Charming, e.g. 96 “Law & Order” panel 97 33 1/3 rpm spinners 100 Country lowland 101 New York town named for its saltmining industry 103 Enjoy a hot tub 104 Ocean trip with a skeleton crew? 110 American __ 111 Saudi neighbor

113 Allergic inflammation 114 Perfume at Garfield’s house? 117 Louis Sachar kids’ book heroine 118 Empty __ 119 Bill who said, “It’s all been satirized for your protection” 120 “Silly me!” 121 Certain tech sch. grad 122 Zen enlightenment 123 Downhill racers Down 1 Take the pulpit 2 Try to catch up 3 Oliver Twist, e.g. 4 Accounted for the container 5 Actress Lena 6 Dishonorable dude 7 Representatives 8 Carlsbad’s river 9 “Makes sense to me” 10 Deck swabber 11 In __: miffed 12 Movie goodies 13 Smitten 14 R.E.M. frontman Michael 15 One way to walk 16 Curved molding 17 Sheryl Crow’s “__ Wanna Do” 18 Dropped 22 Cpl., e.g. 24 “__ It to the Streets”: Doobie Brothers hit

29 Spiral pasta 32 Helium or neon 33 Knuckleballer Wilhelm 36 Became less reckless, say, with “up” 38 Poet Khayyám 39 Pre-closing bell excitement 40 Dead lines?

41 Inventing middle name 42 A hundred bucks, maybe 43 Estonia and Armenia, once: Abbr. 44 Conductor’s beat 45 Green beans 46 Hit from behind

47 Social psychology pioneer Solomon 48 Elevate 49 “It’s not too early to call” 51 Less stuffy 55 Put a new layer in, as a jacket 56 Road race challenge 58 Not neutral 61 Rev.’s address 63 Test 66 Skip over, as ads 67 Future femme 68 Middle Ages rival of Venice 69 Conf. table events 70 Renoir output 71 Conf. table heads 72 Chose 74 Not at all bright 75 Pond organism 76 Hr.’s 60 77 Singer Tori 78 Old Coors product pitched as “Zomething different” 80 Grade school art activity 81 Experienced 84 Dealing with an invitation 86 Fly ball paths 90 Pomaded ‘50s subculturist 91 Idealist’s opposite 93 Citizen of Basra 96 TV image fluctuations 97 Detest 98 “When We Two __”: Byron poem 99 Downhill racers 100 Arrived 102 Mislead 103 Rip off 104 Thin fastener 105 [Gasp!] 106 Near 107 Dallas-to-Memphis dir. 108 Contemptible 109 Long times 112 Benevolent donations 115 Narc’s employer 116 “Do it, __ will!”

Crossword answers: page 26

Sudoku answers: page 26


JOURNAL SKETCHBOOK

WHERE I’VE BEEN

Spay-Neuter

A couple of weeks back, the waxwings flew in to finish off the holly berries on the shrubs along our driveway. They are great little birds, so trim with crested heads and perfect tails. Their colors – the gray, the white, the red and yellow – are distinct and don’t seem to run onto each other. They are tough, high-energy creatures, and can strip the thorniest shrub in minutes. They may be my favorite bird. The funny thing, though, is that the holly is probably my favorite shrub. It stands out in the winter with its leaves getting a deeper green, its berries a brighter red, as skies darken and the weather turns colder. A little snow can really make them stunning. Starting around Christmas, I clip a few of the long stems and bring them in to sit on my dresser in a tall thin bloody mary glass of water. Nice to see them inside and out. The berries are gone with the birds now. But they did their winter duty beautifully, carrying us over into the spring, which is showing itself in a blooming cherry tree across the street and in our budding maples which tell me that the dogwoods are about to break open suddenly. My teenage daughter reminds me that I’m an old English teacher when I say that the scene reminds me of a poem. This time, it is Housman’s “Loveliest of Trees,” which starts: Loveliest of trees the cherry now Is hung with bloom along the bough And stands about the woodland ride Wearing white for Eastertide. The white is a late, light snow that, I guess, notes the stuttering steps from one season to the next. Whatever, the poem’s narrator is reminded of time’s passing, that he won’t be able to watch the beauty forever. He’s already lived twenty of the 70 years he expects for himself. So he tells us: And since to look at things in bloom Fifty springs are little room, About the woodlands I will go To see the cherry hung with snow. Beauty and mortality get rolled together. And that, of course, brings me to still another poem (my child cringes

again) – “Spring and Fall to a Young Girl” by Gerard Manley Hopkins. To my mind, it is a bookend to the Housman poem, as its speaker focuses on one of nature’s marks of changing seasons. In this case, a young girl is sorrowful as she watches the falling leaves of autumn: Margaret are you grieving Over Goldengrove unleaving? She mourns the loss of a lovely fall. But the poet reminds her, and us, that she may see this differently later in her life: Ah! As the heart grows older It will come to such sights colder He goes on to tell us, and the child: It is the blight man was born for, It is Margaret you mourn for. So once again the coming and going of nature, its transient beauty, reminds us of our own mortality. For me, the question in dealing with the irony goes like this: Is nature’s beauty treacherous, as it reveals itself only to withdraw, leaving us with a sad reminder of our mortality? Or is our transience brightened by the beauty we see in the passing? Hopkins knew plenty about our innate selfishness; a Jesuit priest, he’d call it original sin. Margaret mourns for Margaret. Housman, I think, knew as much but was happy to have the loveliness along the path of his threescore and 10. And maybe the two poets put before us a basic question about who we are and how we see our lives – as the sorrow that our time is brief or as the remarkable brightness that is intensified by the shortness of our time. Can I regret that my favorite berries are gone while I’m glad that my favorite birds have been here and are fed? Can I be happy, or at least hopeful, that both will return for the next winter and spring, although their coming and going will chalk off one more of my years? I hope it is OK if I try to have it both ways. Bill Koon lives in Greenville. He can be contacted at badk@clemson.edu.

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J32

BY BILL KOON

Adults $29.95, Seniors (62+) $25.95, Children (6-12) $13.95, Children (5 & Under) Free, 21% Gratuity plus tax

APRIL 6, 2012 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL 55


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April 6, 2012 Greenville Journal