At Home - Winter 2021

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Winter 20212021 Winter

ENDURING ENDURING DESIGN DESIGN

WINTER 2021

WINTER 2021

A COMMUNITY JOURNALS PUBLICATION

A COMMUNITY JOURNALS PUBLICATION

11/19/21 11:46 AM

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Handcrafted Homes | Lifelong Relationships

Named as one of the best design-build firms in the United States, there's no one better equipped to build your family's sanctuary than we are.

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Find yourself at home for the holidays

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Custom In-Town Homes

Dillard-Jones is excited to announce that we have joined the Builder Guild at Hartness. A beautiful 444-acre Traditional Neighborhood Development in Greenville, SC, we are now designing and building Custom In-Town homes for their Estate, Village, and Cottage lots. Contact us today to learn more or schedule a time to meet our team.

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Home for the Holidays

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CONTENTS atHome's doorstep

threshold Value is something we hold onto during winter. The weight of our homes and its contents, including its folk and environs, feel magnified in import as we spend even more time indoors.

21 36 21.

PERISCOPE A Designer's New Home

29. STYLE SPOTTER Local Gifts for Wine Lovers 35. ASKED & ANSWERED  Home Appraisal 36. TAPESTRY  Design Playbook

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P H OTO G R A P H Y BY: E M I LY B O LT, I N S P I R O 8 S T U D I O S ; P R OV I D E D

39. CHRONICLE  An Essay by Matt Lee



CONTENTS Winter 2021

ON OUR COVER: A slice of Provençe in Travelers Rest captured by photographer Kris Decker.

Feature Stories

“WINTER, A LINGERING SEASON, IS A TIME TO GATHER GOLDEN MOMENTS, EMBARK ON A SENTIMENTAL JOURNEY, AND ENJOY EVERY IDLE HOUR.” —John Boswell

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Art & Provenance A home curated around art and built from the ground up is a feat for its builders, consultants and designers indoors and out.

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Home for the Holidays Influencers with a lifestyle brand decorate for joy throughout their family home.

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Generation Zen When you live in two countries, a little bit of home feels just right perched on the side of Paris Mountain.

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY C H E L S E Y A S H F O R D

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CONTENTS Inspired Living

the Collection

Cozy is the word. Pull out your vintage treasures and style with abandon, on tabletops, inside bookshelves and certainly for entertaining because there's never been a better time to get nostalgic.

108 91. ON THE TABLE  Punch Bowl Supper 103. DETOUR  Area Antique Shops 108. TREASURE  Vintage Pipes 112. PANTRY  Mysteries of Green Salt

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P H OTO G R A P H Y BY: E L I WA R R E N , P R OV I D E D A N D F O R E S T C LO N T S

116. FINI  Fireplace Screens


Style and comfort meet with luxury power headrest from Bradington Young

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NOTES FROM HOME

"Laughter is sunshine, it chases winter from the human face."

— Victor Hugo

envelop all the joys of the holidays. Plus embrace a bit of respite from the much warmer days. We can’t think of a better time (or a better way) to buoy spirits than within the pages of this, our winter issue. It’s filled with some terrific gift ideas in Style Spotter; décor and antique shops to visit in Detours; scrumptious food and drink recipes for the season in On the Table and even something fun to collect that Santa would approve of in Treasure. We’re also introducing a new feature called Design Playbook, which will provide interior designer and decorator tips on creating cohesive environments. We’re kicking it off with an open concept living room by Taylor Johnson. As always, we have spectacular homes to show you. One family’s home is fully decorated for the Christmas holiday, and you’d have to be a total humbug not to smile when viewing this family and the pleasure that they exhibit while decorating their home. The other three homes are so unique that it’s

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hard to find the words to describe them. Fortunately, our talented writers and photographers have captured each of them superbly. Of course, there is more and I’m sure you’ll have a grand time enjoying everything in this issue. It makes me think of the unattributed quote, “Christmas: the only time of year you can sit in front of a dead tree and eat candy out of socks.” I wish everyone a festive-filled holiday season and Happy New Year... soon. We’ll see you next year. Enjoy!

Lynn Greenlaw Editor-in-Chief Contact me at lgreenlaw@communityjournals.com or call 864.679.1200 and leave me a message. I always welcome your comments and suggestions.

“Best Plumb

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY PAT R I C K COX

T

IS THE SEASON. Time to cast aside cares and

at Home  |  WINTER 2021

ProSource’s head We have five total bra a

We offer extensiv Whether you visit us entire hous


Thank you for voting us

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www.prosourcesupply.com ProSource’s headquarters in Greenville operates from an 10,000 square-foot location. We have five total branches with other locations in Spartanburg and Anderson South Carolina and in Hendersonville and Asheville North Carolina. We offer extensive product knowledge to assist you with all aspects of your project. Whether you visit us to buy cabinet knobs or select hardware and plumbing fixtures for your entire house, we treat everyone with personalized service and support.


PUBLISHER

Mark B. Johnston GENERAL MANAGER

Susan Schwarzkopf EDITOR IN CHIEF

Lynn Greenlaw

MANAGING EDITOR

Stephanie Burnette ART DIRECTOR

Lina LeGare

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Brendan Blowers | Leigh Savage CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Beth Brown Ables | Johnathon Ammons | Tiffany Anderson Matt Lee | Hali Wyatt CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Chelsey Ashford | Emily Bolt | Robert Bradley Forrest Clonts | Kris Decker | Rebecca Lehde | Eli Warren

VICE PRESIDENT, CONTENT AND DIGITAL

Sherry Jackson

DIGITAL CONTENT MANAGER

John Olsen

DIGITAL CONTENT SPECIALIST

Chris Lee

VICE PRESIDENT, OPERATIONS

Holly Hardin

CLIENT SERVICES MANAGERS

Lizzie Campbell | Sheldon Hubbard | Camden Johnson

Building your Art Collection, together, since 2006.

AD DESIGNERS

Michael Allen | Haley Young ACCOUNTING AND HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER

Kristi Fortner

CIRCULATION COORDINATOR

Marla Lockaby

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER

Donna Johnston

SALES OPERATIONS MANAGER

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ACCOUNT REPRESENTATIVES

Allison Gambone | Sangeeta Hardy | Heather Propp Allen Pruitt | Louise Giusto CHAIRMAN

Douglas J. Greenlaw

Personal and corporate art consultation on-site, in gallery and virtually. More than 40 emerging to established artists at your fingertips.

www.ArtAndLightGallery.com 16 Aiken Street, Greenville | 864-252-5858 @artandlightgallery | art@artandlightgallery.com 18

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ADVERTISING (864) 679-1200 | DISTRIBUTION (864) 679-1240 PUBLISHED BY COMMUNITY JOURNALS LLC- Locally owned & operated since 1999 581 Perry avenue, Greenville, SC 29611 | communityjournals.com atHome Magazine is published four times per year. Information in this publication is carefully compiled to insure accuracy. No recommendation regarding the quality of goods or services is expressed or implied. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without prior written consent of the Publisher. Copyright 2021 by Community Journals, LLC, all rights reserved. Designed and printed in the USA. SUBSCRIPTIONS: atHome Magazine is published Winter, Spring, Summer, and Fall. The cost of a subscription is $30 annually. For subscription information, please contact us at 864-679-1200.


Design and Build the Ultimate Backyard Experience

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For inspiration follow us on instagram @ gencopoolsspas 1217 NE Main Street | Simpsonville, SC 29681 | 864.967.POOL (7665) | gencopools.com |


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Perfect Steam


threshold

PG. 21 Periscope PG. 29 Style Spotter PG. 35 Asked & Answered PG. 36 Design Playbook PG. 39 Chronicle

PERISCOPE

West Meets East San Francisco designer John Stewart builds for harmonious living off Augusta Road.

P H OTO G R A P H Y BY I N S P I R O 8 S T U D I O S

/ by Beth Brown Ables / photography by Inspiro 8 Studios

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T H RESHO L D

Periscope

[Above] Oversized club chairs, a play on an old English design, are Stewart's design, introduced in the mid-70s when he was primarily designing furniture. High set windows punctuate the wall, offering visual interest as blocks of light move across the wooden floors throughout the day. Choosing a custom home builder focused on partnership and communication was vital to the Stewarts. Ryan Gambrel of Truitt Construction was the builder on the project facilitating the construction and the purchase of an adjoining lot, doubling the property.

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T H RESHO L D

Periscope

WH E N RE N OWN E D interior designer John Stewart and his wife Susan considered their next move after decades in the Oakland neighborhood of San Francisco, adventure was top of the list. Eschewing the cold weather of his childhood years in New York while also hoping to avoid year-round heat, Greenville hit the mark. Yet it was the city’s vibrant art scene, burgeoning growth and diversity which tipped the scale and offered the Stewarts the next chapter in their life. Greenville was, as John says with hands outstretched, “the next adventure for us.” That same sense of open-handed welcome and adventure begins as soon as you walk up their driveway to find the front door. “It’s almost like a test,” Stewart laughs, “can you find it the first time you come over?” For the entrance, wide concrete squares stitched together with deep green ground cover reveals itself at the back of the home, there’s no typical all-American front door facing the street here. It’s as if Stewart picked up the entire house and turned it 180 degrees on the property. It’s a clever move, a why-didn’t-I-think-of-that situation. Because the entrance parallels the back fence of a neighboring property, a natural courtyard forms with a corridor flanked with pear and fig trees, lush hosta and sculptural elements creating verdant interest with Eastern appeal. It’s an entryway into a place apart, not a showpiece but a reverential moment. This is no front door, it is a narthex to another world, the storied home of the Stewarts. That sense of movement is obvious in the living area’s intelligent layout. One design element that Stewart wished to forego was the ever-popular open floorplan. So, while yes, the kitchen is open to the main living area, the rest of the home boasts nooks waiting to be discovered. Foyer, dining room, and side porch all invite visitors to find a place to be, to wrap themselves in. It also allows for surprise: the Stewarts’ art collection boasts several sculptures and curiosities, ideal for dramatic around the corner moments. Surprise and delight beckon on every surface, around each turn. A lifetime of travel, art collecting and furniture designing meant that the couple arrived in the Upstate ready to decorate the space as a visual retelling of their lives together. “We know the stories that each piece of art tells,” says John.

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There is no one singular showpiece, not a favorite piece of artwork; instead, the entire space tells of their intertwined lives, each item connects to a particular place or person in time. According to John none of it is overly precious, their first intention was to create a place to be lived in and shared. “We have dinner parties which move from room to room, like a play. Drinks in the living room or the porch, dinner in the formal dining room. We sit by the fire in these chairs with wine and a book and enjoy this place immensely,” he says. The term right-sized home gets bandied about these days, a more polite term for downsizing, yet the Stewarts grew their square footage a bit, making way for a guest room and space for entertaining. A marble table illuminated by a Murano glass chandelier glows warmly in the sunset reflected through a west-facing window. A gift from a dear friend since passed, the fixture holds memory, its undulating hand-blown curves reaching towards the clean lines of the round table below. Lighting matters to Stewart’s design sensibility, whether the placement of the home on the property lining up squarely so the dining room faces the western sunset, and the back porch faces the southern view of the creek and woods, or the way recessed lights warm up the walls. “Lighting gives life to a place, spend your money on lighting every time,” he says. The entire space—doors, ceilings, and trim— is painted in the same warm, creamy beige, Benjamin Moore's Quinoa. “I’ve always treated spaces this way, it makes a clean line, the eye isn’t interrupted with a baseboard or trim in another color. Instead, the furniture and art take the attention, drawing the eye towards the design elements; into the story.” It’s a design choice resulting in a warm, womblike feeling, more than a designer’s sleight of hand or a trick of light, the space feels whole and enveloping as a person moves from room to room. Hung art becomes its own journey; a quartet of drawings by native Californian artist Gabrielle Brill reads airy and delicate from afar, yet as the viewer gets closer, the details and color come alive with hidden words and messages tucked within washes of paint rising to the surface of the paper. Most design elements Stewart uses demand a second or even third look. The porch furniture, arranged to overlook the side yard, mimics

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overstuffed club chairs yet reach out to touch an arm and you’re surprised to find that it’s concrete and fiberglass. Stewart designed these; the chair was named the 'Suzy' in honor of his wife, Susan. Two oversized sculptures the couple refer to as Bob and Sally once resided in their California yard. For years, the two lived in harmony until one day Bob’s head tumbled off, shattering. Sally’s soon followed. Step closer and both have been patched in gold, in tribute to the Japanese art of kitsukuroi: making something broken more beautiful. It feels akin to their cross-country move, hard, adventurous, its own sort of breaking. The thoughtful home, designed by expert hand, brims with new friendships, memories, and tributes to a life well-lived, radiates in the seams, golden and stronger for it.


T H RESHO L D

Periscope

[Opposite Page] John cites both Lichtenfelt Nurseries and consultant Victoria Houston's assistance as part of a greater journey to plant, plot and envision what their property will unfurl in the future. Plans include manicuring the creek-scape with shade friendly greenery and stone. [Left] Much of the home's interior is painted in 'Quinoa' by Benjamin Moore; the downstairs powder room is washed in dark and moody 'Cobalt' also by Benjamin Moore. Sculptural elements found during the Stewart's travels find places of honor, lending organic movement.

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Out with the Old; In with the Old-Looking Most of the renovations that we design at AJH Renovations, LLC are of mature downtown homes that have seen a lot of years and a lot of wear & tear. The rooms need to be expanded, the amenities updated, and everything needs a fresh breath of life. But these are old homes and they have so much character that makes them special – and is usually the reason the new homeowners have bought them in the first place. Most do not want their mature house turned into a modern, plastic, contemporary dwelling. They need more room and better amenities, but without losing the charm of the house itself. In other words, ‘Out with the Old, but in with the Old-Looking.’

This is definitely a design challenge, since most modern materials are definitely ‘new,’ and look it. Modern composites – whether flooring, countertops, or wall finishes – have that manmade look and feel to them that betrays their newness and often overwhelms the mature ambience of the home. Some of this is unavoidable, unless the renovation budget is unlimited (which it never is). Yet there are ways that the character of the home can be retained or enhanced through the modernization of the renovation process, and AJH Renovations, LLC is the expert Design/Build renovation contractor for this task. We are specialists in reclaiming lumber, re-utilizing exterior doors and windows for interior functions or accents, and salvaging the tell-tale features of a mid-century home for use in the next-century remodel. Things like reclaiming wood flooring as wainscot or ceiling accent, re-installing built-in phone nooks or fold-out ironing boards, or just matching the old built-up trim and baseboard are ways that the old can be updated with the old-looking, and the maturity and comfort of the home rescued from the advance of modernity. Give us a call today and let’s begin the conversation about how AJH Renovations, LLC can update and preserve your mature home.

Our Attention to Detail Leads to an Uncommon Renovation Experience.

AJH RENOVATIONS, LLC Design/Build Renovations

Something Uncommon

ajhrenovations.com ♦ 864.901.3021


Building a legacy of trust throughout the Upstate.

1091 Williams Road, Piedmont, South Carolina 29673 (864) 605-7535 truittcon.com


T H RESHO L D

Style Spotter

Gifts for Wine Lovers Local finds for the oenophile in your life. / by Stephanie Burnette / photography by Robert Bradley

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es, you can bring a bottle of wine, but a wine accoutrement shows effort. Technology and craft share real estate on this gift list built for your favorite wine-head. Every item is available locally, so gift away this winter and shop small. It’s time to sip something fermented and these gifts will add to an evening’s ambience. As I write about food and drink in the South, and eat in charming, curated restaurants, bars and boutique hotels, I take note of what’s in the hand of staff and how tabletop style has shifted and leveled up. Items of oenology no longer reside in drawers but have become celebrated items of décor and whimsy.

1  A Chirpy Top may not be needed, but it sure is fun to keep pouring to hear it chirp. Buy it in rose gold at The Cook’s Station, $29.99.

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2  Brümate Winesulator in colorway “Dark Aura” holds a bottle of wine in style, keeping it at a constant temperature for 24 hours. Yes, you’ll put red in it too. Handpicked by the experts at 4Rooms, $36. 3  Soldered glass “cork safes,” replete with paper prompts, one for wine and one for champagne. Find them at Plum Home & Gift Boutique, a local store inside Haywood Mall, $16 and $18.

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Your Dreams Come First

For CorsonSpeer Builders, every detail is important because every home is personal. And that's exactly where you' ll find Steve Carson and James Speer, closely managing the design and build process, personally ensuring that no detail of your handcrafted home is left to chance. Join us as we build a rich legacy together.

CarsonSpeerBuilders.com/dreams I 864.214.6644 A Nationally Recognized Award-Winning Custom Home Builder


T H RESHO L D

Style Spotter

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ut let’s not discount function; a highperformance tool is a gift that keeps on giving. Sustainable home décor is on-trend too and upcycled gifts can feel especially thoughtful. Kitchen stores and bottle shops are great places to find wine gifts, but don’t dismiss stopping by gift stores and décor shops. Many have dedicated areas for high-end beverage items. This season, it’s about an ease of entertainment: the pull of a cork, a bottle well-chilled, and the memories that occur over a toast with friends leaning against a counter, because we all end up standing in the kitchen.

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4  Special bottles get a second life as a bespoke candle. Wine House makes their own with the help of a local artisan. Upcycled, in three signature scents and two sizes, $25 and $45. 5  Bubbles deserve a fabric tote and one that induces a giggle. This one is stocked at 4Rooms for the season, $15. 6  Château Spill Red Wine Stain Remover by The Hates Stains Co. is party proof. No bottle of red should be given without it. Found at The Cook’s Station, $8.99.

P H OTO G R A P H Y P R OV I D E D

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7  Le Creuset makes a stellar wine pull utilizing lever technology with minimal design. This is a gift to give everyone at a price of $20. Stocked at The Cook’s Station’s new giant location.

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Find Your Perfect. at

cdanjoyner.com

The Furrs celebrating their perfect place.

RECOGNIZED—As one of the nation’s most trusted brands TRUSTED—No other Upstate real estate company sells more homes FOCUSED—On your family, dreams, and special places

Your Home’s Best Friend.

©2021 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently owned and operated franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of Columbia Insurance Company, a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate. Equal Housing Opportunity.


Fine Furnishings Tailored to Those with Inspired Taste

C. Taylor Interiors Design Studio & Shoppe Tuesday-Friday 10:00am-5:00pm; Saturday 11:00am-3:00pm

2131 Woodruff Rd. Suite 1000, Greenville, SC 29607 864.254.6395 | www.ctaylorinteriors.com


T H RESHO L D

Asked & Answered

Q. What reasons other than buying a property would I order an appraisal?

Finding Value The current boom of home sales in Greenville and the surrounding areas has led some to wonder whether to schedule a home appraisal before putting their home on the market, refinancing it or selling it. We went to Paul Ryll of OMMA to get some professional answers to common questions about just how much your home may be worth.

A. Appraisals are beneficial for many purposes.

When renovating a home, it could be useful to have an appraisal performed that is subject to the completion of the renovations. Appraisals are also beneficial for pre-listing a home since of late the real estate market has been fluctuating exponentially.

Q. How long should I expect an appraisal to take in today’s environment? A. There are a lot fewer appraisers in the market

due to COVID-19 and the number of transactions has increased dramatically. One way to combat this and exponentially shorten transaction time is to ask if a “desktop” or exterior appraisal can be ordered with the help of a third-party software such as Oscar Mike Mobile Appraisals (OMMA). The process can take the time of the appraisal transaction from 45 days to 3 days.

Q. Is there anything I can do to impact my home’s appraisal? A. Make sure your home is tidy. Realtors recommend turning as many lights on as possible. We think a beneficial preparation is to have an itemized list of any upgrades or recent renovations that have been performed to the house to give to the appraiser.

Q. What is the difference between assessed value, appraised value, market value and sales price? A. Assessed value is determined by a city, county or state assessor to calculate property tax.

Appraised value is set by a licensed or certified appraiser and could vary depending on the type of assignment that is contracted (as-is value, as-repaired value, subject-to completion value, retroactive value).

Z AC G U DA KOV, U N S P L A S H ; P R OV I D E D

Market value is the current value to the market of a property. Sales price is the transaction price agreed upon by a buyer and seller of a property.

Our Expert: PAUL RYLL

Paul, a former Marine, is the founder of OMMA. His focus is on a digital platform to streamline appraisals that will save the homeowner money, time and hassle.

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T H RESHO L D

Tapestry

design playbook

A by: Taylor Johnson Interiors

Living Room

/ photo by Emily Bolt

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" My client's formal living area is a study of continuity throughout the front of the home without being too matchy. " —Taylor Johnson

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1 Because of the large size of the room and the sight lines into the foyer, dining room, kitchen and hallway, we kept the shell of the room, including walls, rug and curtains, neutral.

2 If you look closely through to the foyer, you'll see a lattice vine wallpaper that adds interest but doesn't take your focus away from the rest of the living area.

3 Blue paint highlights pretty architectural details such as the French doors to the office area and the arch that leads to the room from the foyer. The paint, Benjamin Moore Philipsburg Blue, coordinates to a blue grasscloth in the adjacent dining room and was lightened to 50% and used on the client's kitchen island.

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5 To add color and texture, chartreuse velvet pillows and an upholstered orange ottoman were placed. A small dash of pattern was added in the seating area with the accent pillows in a chocolate brown, green, blue and orange pattern, as well as the animal print throw pillows.

4 We incorporated the client's secretary, art and chest of drawers to achieve a collected yet cohesive look.

6 A pair of tuxedo sofas facing each other make for a formal look, but performance fabric on the upholstery and the use of an indoor/outdoor rug makes the space "family proof."

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8 6 4 - 4 5 8 - S O L D ( 7 65 3 )

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EVERYTH I N G WE TOUCH TURNS TO

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T H RESHO L D

Chronicle

A Winter Habit

P H OTO G R A P H Y P R OV I D E D

Writer Matt Lee turns his hand to pasture farming and shares the grainy details, a year later. The day after I bought a tractor, I came home to find three tuxedo kittens gamboling around the house. Gia, my wife, referred to the kitties as “her tractor.” It’s not as if my tractor purchase was impulsive or a midlife-crisisin-the-making, I had plenty of justifications: a family friend offered me 45 acres of sandy sea island pasture to farm, just 23 minutes from our suburban Charleston home; my work writing about food increasingly concerns issues of horticulture and ingredient sourcing and on the heels of my most recent book, why not tackle agriculture? I had a chance to engage even closer to the source material in my work and our food culture. At worst, I would content-farm. At best, I would play with old iron machinery and make a fortune selling certified-organic produce. But I needed to get comfortable with the mechanics of actual farming. The field isn’t foreign to the family, but I had no repository of knowledge; my father is a gastroenterologist, my mother a school administrator and both have been urban dwellers their entire lives. Arthur Lee, my paternal grandfather, was the first in several generations to leave agriculture, taking a job as a bank teller, though he met my grandmother, Charlotte Martens, an avid gardener, at the Grange Fair. Their suburban life, set in a Sears house he’d built in the Hudson Valley of New York, set their two adult children on a path of

stability that would carry into the 21st century. And yet the Yorktown Museum has a room named for him, furnished with a collection of agricultural artifacts of his father and grandfather’s farm lives that Arthur carefully saved and archived. This gave me hope. To appreciate why someone with an art history degree from Harvard would choose farming after a threegeneration hiatus, you would have to visit the particular swath of Johns Island, South Carolina, that now makes up my farmland, see this forgotten peninsula down a dirt road, where kestrels perch on the wires and alligators wallow in the drainage ditches. Until ten years ago, these pastures were tomato fields, almost 900 acres’ worth at their peak, grown

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T H RESHO L D

Chronicle

Writer Matt Lee is a solitary farmer of 45 acres sea island pasture, but at times the kids are enlisted to help with the endeavor.

conventionally under plastic with heavy irrigation. Today they are more or less idle, host to an ever-increasing supply of pine trees and other settler plants, and sustaining a great multitude of wildlife, including wild turkeys, bald eagles, coyotes, armadillos, roseate spoonbills, water voles, Mississippi kites, black racer snakes, green tree frogs, Gulf fritillaries and white-tailed deer. The Stono and Kiawah Rivers are several hundred yards away, and the Atlantic Ocean about two miles as the osprey flies. It’s a beautiful place to be, just a short drive from home. As I recently rounded the corner of 50 years old, I have taken an interest in greater self-examination and self-challenge, coupled with a judicious amount of YOLO self-indulgence, and this farming twist plays into all of that. A perfect example is my search for which tractor to purchase. An earlier Matt would have been seduced by the low entry point and high aesthetic return of a well-used beast, like a 1955 Minneapolis Moline ZB with a glorious goldenrod and garnet color scheme, and for a week or two I was convinced that was exactly what I needed. But then, realizing the timing constraints my busy life is under—and how difficult it is to get 7,000-pound tractors to the repair shop—I decided to overspend my budget on a John Deere that was near-new, built in Augusta, Georgia in 1998, with only 600 hours on the dial. Meow. The dividend of my wise restraint and over-extension was being able to hit the ground running, and in that first month I learned something about what I was and was not capable of doing in the sand. Working the land in the fall is deceptively easy, as the grasses are naturally drying and waning. Burying the tip of a plow into the dirt and flipping it over, row after row, was soul-satisfying in a way that instantly suited me, as did the solitude, a respite from our three boys and their three boy kittens. My soundtrack was romantictriumphant in sync with the landscape, as the tweedles and plinks of an early music station played through my ear-protectors and tamed the drone of the diesel engine.

My first planting felt like a grand success, and it spurred me to reconsider all my goals for the farm. One Friday morning last fall I used a backyard lawn seeder hitched to the tractor with a coat hanger to spray winter rye seed on three pastures. Just as I was finishing up, the skies opened and drenched the new seed; a few days later the fields erupted in perfect green sprouts. Although I had intended the rye as a cover crop, to plow under in the spring, I began to think that maybe the rye grain itself-- something brewers, bakers and distillers use regularly-- might be a product of the farm, something I should consider growing and harvesting. I called my baker friends and farming contacts. As Glenn Roberts of Anson Mills explained to me, in the subtropical climate you can plant grains like wheat, barley, oats, and rye in the fall and they germinate immediately and live a relatively content winter life, without the extreme weed pressure of summer. With plenty of rain I could avoid the costly and time-consuming interventions of installing a well and irrigation system while I stayed true to my wish to avoid spraying herbicides and other poisons on the land. I could take off the sweltering summer months! This is called “winter habit” grain farming, and it sounded to me like the path of least resistance and the most sensible way forward. So by year’s end, and with some additional consultations with Zach Snipes, my Clemson Extension agent, I crafted a new plan for my farm: no vegetables, no animals. My scheduling demands and learning curve would abide nothing so needy that I needed to be present at any particular time; I would grow only grasses, native and exotic perennials, and cover crops, plants that came with low expectations and had some kind of natural advantage over the vigorous dollar-weed, nut grass and yaupon that would take over these fields if given a chance. Another advantage was self-sufficiency: I could

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T H RESHO L D

Chronicle

—Matt Lee

plant and harvest entirely myself, on my own schedule, with devices towed behind the John Deere. As winter turned to spring and my rye crop began to develop seeds, I discerned that I had under-planted the fields. Dog fennel and other weeds were outcompeting the rye, especially in places where the soil was nutritionally depleted. Still, I held out hope. “Don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good” became a mantra, pounded into my bones at every turn. A lot of time on the farm concerns stuck bolts and balky grease guns. And leverage. Moving masses at the limits of what’s possible for a 145-pound human is an everyday thing now and I have become adept at hitching different half-ton tools to the back of the tractor without calling for help. First-year farming presents many life lessons which I am especially receptive to at 50: would you rather try to tame a large acreage at the limits of your time and ability or be a masterful specialist on a smaller square? Alas, I still don’t know how to answer that one, but I’m getting closer. One of my few farming neighbors on the peninsula, Anthony Natoli, spends his every waking hour creating some of the most beautiful vegetables anywhere, on about two acres of sandy soil. A cornucopia erupts from the Fire Ant Farms market table in every season, but it has taken over five years and everything he and his partner have to make that happen. I am an ardent customer and in awe of their accomplishment, but I recognize I am 25 years too old for that path. For now, I am burning time and diesel, and paying to offset the fossil fuel in the hopes that the plants I grow with the tractor will sequester enough carbon to make a net-positive impact. I had no idea how much forethought, nuance and endurance were required to do this job right. According to my farm diary, on May 20th, 2021, with no hope of harvesting clean grain due to the weeds, I mowed and disced my rye fields. They fulfilled their goal of being a cover crop to some degree, the stalks and leaves supplying nutrients and organic matter to the sand as they decomposed.

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I started again. This time I planted twice as thickly, 100 or more pounds per acre and used a new-to-me 1965 John Deere grain drill to make the planting more effective. One of my few farming accomplishments as I near the one-year mark is my tractor shed. Made of treated lumber painted primer white and clad with aluminum roofing, I built it entirely myself, from drawing and applying for permits to digging twelve post holes four feet down, cutting every board and turning every screw (though I hired a concrete truck to come pour the footings). I’ve never been in better shape. The shed is up and it’s magnificent to me, 14 feet high and 14 wide, 36 feet long. It has hurricane ties and stainless fasteners and other touches that should help ensure it outlasts me, although in the harsh, salty, climate of this hurricane-prone Matt Lee is a sea island, that also may co-author, with his be optimistic. It is set brother, Ted, of slightly under the three cookbooks canopy of a large Live and “Hotbox” Oak tree cluster hung (Henry Holt 2019), with Spanish moss, at a book that explores the lives the south corner of the of chefs in the field that’s often shady. catering industry. If I never harvest a grain of rye, it may be enough to prove that I attempted an agricultural way of life here in South Carolina. Unlike kittens and tractors, it’s the only part of the farm that can’t be re-homed if I decide to change course now.

P H OTO S P R OV I D E D

"As I recently rounded the corner of 50 years old, I have taken an interest in greater self-examination and self-challenge, coupled with a judicious amount of YOLO selfindulgence, and this farming twist plays into all of that."


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F I R E WAT E R P H OTO G R A P H Y

Inspired by unforgettable Summers in Provence and an under-the-radar town on the French Riviera, this Upstate home indulges in a legacy of stunning design style centuries in the past.

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Architectural Warehouse in Atlanta uncovered this vintage French door. Once insulated, upfit, and updated with new glass, it formed the perfect portal to a formal hallway entry of Diana Royal Limestone large format tile.

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Art & Provenance A Provençal estate, centuries in the making, springs to life in Travelers Rest under the craftsmanship of Gabriel Builders. / by Brendan Blowers / photography by Firewater Photography

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custom-built home begins as an idea. It starts with a spark of inspiration or a treasured memory. A feeling occurs at a particular place and time that makes someone wish there was a way to extend it indefinitely. For Stacey Gibson, the seed for this home was planted years ago, when she was pregnant with the first of her four children and watching an Oprah episode where interior designer Nate Berkus said: Your home should tell the story of who you are and be a collection of what you love. “I’ve always thought of that show,” Gibson says. “It’s so true.” While vacationing in Beaulieu-sur-Mer between Nice and Monaco, Gibson walked up a winding road towards a mountain where a friend of a woman she had met at the market owned a stone home built in the middle of an ancient olive grove. “It was one of the most serene places I had ever been in my life,” she says. Gibson even took photos for reference. She thought of the possibilities for a piece of land she and her husband had purchased; 30 acres of densely wooded property with a view of Table Rock at one end and an opposing ridge at the other. Interestingly, the previous owner had resisted selling to logging companies and the property retained its centuries-old feel. Gabriel Builders promised they were up for the challenge of building a French Provençal estate, handling everything from concept to construction through finished interiors, which Gabriel’s LH Design Studio would tackle. Richie Martin, vice president of construction, stepped in as designer and manager for the project. He spent nights looking at homes for sale in southern France. “Our goal was to make this house look like it was several hundred years old,” Martin says. “I wanted to make it as authentic as we could.” From the front motor court, where vehicles pull into a chip and seal driveway under the crunch of pea gravel, a forced perspective makes the home appear even bigger than its 12,000 square feet. It sits on the crest of a hill, like the entrance to a medieval village.

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The long private road to the estate wasn't easy to make, but worth the toil as it opens onto a stately pea gravel chip and seal motor court. Though the home was built all at once, two different types of exterior stone (Doggett Mountain on the sides, Texas limestone center) converge to suggest additions and weathering over time.

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ibson likes Hotel Domestique and thought the home should be built like a boutique hotel. Even the kids’ bedrooms open to the outdoors with easy access to a French-inspired landscape designed by J. Dabney Peeples, and significant installations by Dabney Collins. The exterior blends two types of stone. Texas limestone makes up the main entrance, which is flanked on the left and right by a more rustic stone called Doggett Mountain. Martin views the home as a homestead and carriage house connected by what looks like a section that was added later. Atop it all is a handmade terracotta tile roof by Ludowici. Inside, plaster walls curve artfully towards 12-foot ceilings and most rooms connect via archway. “I brought in the arches to pull the walls down, so you don’t feel like you’re in a big corridor,” Martin says.

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A substantial amount of reclaimed timber was utilized and Martin’s favorite part, what he calls the “eye candy,” are the home’s eighteen gas lamps. The Heirloom Companies crafted many of the interior and exterior fixtures and upfitted others reclaimed from France; several are a couple hundred years old and were rewired for the home. They also fabricated a massive peaked outdoor dining pavilion. It is the centerpiece for Peeples' inspired French country landscape; the terraced stone and handcrafted water features seem as though plucked from Provence, though everything was made to order and placed to maximize the Upcountry’s sight lines. As plaster was applied by hand and the house began to take shape, Gibson began collecting art for the home. She went to Blue Spiral 1 in downtown Asheville to commission several pieces for hallways and a grand living area, and she engaged gallerist and


[Above] Long sightlines are accentuated by arches cut out of the traditional plaster walls. [Left] Commissioning artist Taylor Adams to create a piece for the grand living room ensured the color scheme could complement the natural colors seen from any of the massive beamframed windows. at Home | WINTER 2021

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A cook's domain free of upper cabinetry feels accurate to the traditions of a working French kitchen. From the vintage lighting modified and rewired by The Heirloom Companies to the century-old cast iron fireback over the Wolf range.

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art consultant Bracken Stansbury of Art & Light Gallery in Greenville’s West Village for original pieces for the corridors on the lower level. A large colorful work by Cuban artist Rey Alfonso hangs in the corridor as it opens into a common area. "We needed a rather large piece for the downstairs living space that would bring color and connect with the artwork already placed without competing," says Stansbury, who took Gibson to Alfonso's studio at Oyé in Greenville’s North Main neighborhood to learn about his background and process in person. "For a collector to get that rare experience is special," she says. Just outside a home theater is a collage by George Peterson of Circle Factory made from old skateboards. The Gibson family has a long history of supporting the skate community through a foundation that builds skateparks in underprivileged areas around the world. There’s also a large, commissioned Taylor Adams mixed media and thread abstract over the living room couch. Gibson recalls Adams explaining her process and describing what each string means. She related immediately to a line of thread representing a moment in time, mapping the story of a particular feeling inspired by encountered landscapes. Beyond art, the home’s Provençal design also provided opportunities to incorporate period antiques. The front door is a relic from France, discovered at Architectural Warehouse in Atlanta. Gabriel’s team insulated it and updated the glass. When Gibson returned with a broken stainedglass window from the same source, Martin recommended it go above their bed. Gibson commissioned Jim “Murf” Murphy, a New Yorkbased stained-glass conservator, to fix the piece for the bedroom and create four more to be installed throughout the house, where splashes of color were desired. The estate’s grandeur is felt most wherever windows allow light to spill in. There are also two French cast-iron firebacks: one in the living room fireplace, the other over the kitchen range. “I wanted it to look like a working French kitchen,” Gibson says.

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[Opposite Page] Art in the ensuite bath had to be right-sized. That meant more commissioned work, this time by internationally acclaimed artist, Ruth Ava Lyons. Gallerist Bracken Sansbury intentionally placed three works over the tub to balance a shelf installed on one side as well as to add a touch of the unexpected. (Below) The primary bedroom gets quality light from the 1700's-era Italian stained glass windows above the bed. Stained glass craftsman Jim Murphy from Brooklyn created three more throughout the house and installed them to match.

I like homes to have meaning. —Stacey Gibson

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Designed to appear renovated over time, rather than the new construction it is, the home also embraces modern technology, such as the installation of a Savant automation system. It offers the Gibsons one touch control of light, music, temperature and security at the property. One challenge the Gabriel team encountered during construction was how to achieve adequate water pressure for an estate hundreds of feet above the nearest water line. The solution proved commercial. “We had to put in a massive water pump,” says Martin, “like you would find in a high-rise hotel.” Gibson envisions the home will be generational. After spending much of the pandemic quarantined here, she had plenty of time to daydream about her children one day returning to the property with their spouses for holiday dinners around the long dining table. “I like homes to have meaning,” she says. This one checks all the boxes.

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[Opposite Page] Gabriel Builders designed the layout of the home to have wings that can be closed off for functional use. This hallway leads to a garage, guest quarters, and bike storage area that looks like an old carriage house from outside. [Left] Walker Zanger tile leads bare feet in and out of a steam shower on heated floors. The spa-like bath has everything a modern five-star retreat would want. [Below] neutral bedrooms allow the fine art to shine. A small round door recalls one of France's famed monastery-turned luxury hotels.

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HOME for the

HOLIDAYS THE SEASON HOLDS A SPECIAL PLACE FOR BRANDI AND JON WARD OF CHESTNUT LIVING, WHO PERSONALLY DECK THEIR HOME ROOM BY ROOM. / by Tiffany Anderson / photography by Chelsey Ashford

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The garland, pillows and lanterns on the front porch serve up warm and cozy winter vibes throughout the season. Brandi’s favorite thing is fresh greenery anywhere she can find a home for it.

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pending time with family and friends and decorating through the Christmas season is a priority for the Ward family. For Brandi, the tradition runs deep into her childhood. “My grandmother went all out for every holiday, and I was always in charge of helping. After she passed from breast cancer when I was thirteen, everything sort of stopped.” Instead of embracing the details of large family gatherings that once took place, the traditions slowly fizzled out and left an enormous gap. But after Brandi and Jon married, she took the initiative by letting her family know she would host holidays from there on out, especially Christmas. Her family knows well her knack and love for decorating, but her grandfather specifically encouraged her to seek a degree in interior design. As Greenville natives, Brandi and Jon love watching the Upstate turn into an incredibly diverse city full of character and beauty. They built a business together known as Chestnut Living. With humble beginnings as a side hustle, Brandi took on small decoration jobs while Jon built farmhouse-style tables. When Jon lost his job right after they built their new home, they knew it was time to launch their business full time. “We were freaking out, but we took the leap to full-time entrepreneurship. Best choice we ever made,” says Brandi. The risk paid off; the couple today works on a multitude of projects, including six home renovations and are launching a coffee/market hybrid in the next few months. When moving into their home last year, Brandi opted for new decorations to bring the space all together in their current style. While collecting pieces, Brandi thought about how many of their friends enjoy her design style and started putting together the idea of an open house. “To be honest, I had no idea what I was doing. I just picked out things I loved, and people were pumped. We had a line out the front door.” Hundreds of people spent their holiday season exploring the collection of goodies Brandi put on display in her home. Each year, the Ward family takes a couple of trips to Texas, to which Brandi credits a lot of her inspiration. “I find lots of ideas on the road, especially at antique stores,” she says. “But I do a lot of my own things; I see it in my head most of the time.” Stepping into their home during Christmas is akin to being transported into a unique and atmospheric winter wonderland. With plenty of greenery trimmed from around their home and neutral undertones throughout the space, every room pours out a distinctive decoration story down to the tiny details of miniature trees in the spice cabinet.

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For our readers wanting to decorate their homes in similar styles, Brandi’s top recommendation is figuring out where the tree will go first. “The tree needs to be centralized - I personally love being able to see it from the street. It adds a magical touch.” Once you’ve positioned the tree, don’t be afraid to try something new and out of the box - you never know what you’ll create.


“MY GRANDMOTHER WENT ALL OUT FOR EVERY HOLIDAY, AND I WAS ALWAYS IN CHARGE OF HELPING. AFTER SHE PASSED FROM BREAST CANCER WHEN I WAS THIRTEEN, EVERYTHING SORT OF STOPPED.” —Brandi Ward at Home | WINTER 2021

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Pops of red go a long way. Pairing bright colors with various wood tones gives a cohesive look.

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The Ward family spends most of the holiday season in the front room, so decorating it from top to bottom is high on their list.

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[above] Drawing the eyes upward brings a certain level of imaginative creativity to the home. “You can really use anything in hallways, it makes it feel a little more magical,” says Brandi.

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While the color scheme may change year to year, Brandi repurposes items she already owns or has used in past years. Greenery plays an important role in the home and is a huge favorite of hers. By adding little touches of live greenery on tables, around picture frames, looped through various railings and wrapped around the 100-year-old heart pine beams makes the home feel warm and cozy. Small fairy lights and candles add to an inviting ambiance sprinkled throughout different rooms in the home. One of Brandi’s tips is to hang a few decorations from the ceiling, such as the giant snowflakes she hangs in her hallway leading into the dining room. “It’s nice in hallways to add something whimsical. It’s simple and elegant,” she says. Using items already around the home adds to familiarity and brings a level of comfort, she points out. When she needs new decorations, Brandi relies on wholesalers or retail finds. Since the Wards are constantly on the move and busy all year round, decorating the home occurs in stages spanning a few days. “I’ve gotten better at letting other people help me decorate. I used to micromanage it all,” says Brandi, and that means the kids too. Together, the family puts on their favorite Christmas playlist, turns on a Hallmark movie, and enjoys pitching in to bring Christmas alive. Both daughters can decorate their rooms in whatever fashion they desire and Brandi loves seeing their own style come to life. Even with a multitude of items strategically placed throughout the home, the Wards’ space feels put together without clutter. “I think I achieve the ‘no clutter feel’ by using decor that isn’t over the top and super bright. And the use of greenery and garland adds a special touch to bring continuity and beauty without overpowering the rooms.”


[above] During the holidays, slowing down and taking time to spend with family is most important for the Wards.

[right] Their dining room and kitchen is where they make multiple memories through baking and cooking holiday meals.

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“AS YOU AGE, YOU CAN LOSE THAT MAGICAL ASPECT OF CHRISTMAS AND START SEEING HOW BROKEN THE WORLD IS. BEING MINDFUL OF THE SEASON IS HUGE THIS YEAR; IT'S HARD TO RECLAIM THAT AS YOU GET OLDER.” —Brandi Ward

[above] Neutral colors are employed in the decorations to give the space a familiar, peaceful vibe.

A special Advent Calendar of cards hanging from clothespins consists of verses from the Christmas story that are flipped each day during the holiday season. 72

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By using multiple forms of light, greenery and mixing textures, the Ward's home reads: sophisticated winter wonderland.

Brandi says small pops of red go a long way in Christmas decorations, so she focuses on warmer or muted colors, so their home feels cozy, inviting and peaceful. The number of decorations used in each room depends on how they use the space. They fully decorate the living room top-tobottom, so it feels extra joyful. Adding special touches to the kitchen, where the family spends a decent amount of time, is important for them to feel connected during the season. Baking cookies together is a huge tradition for the family, but they don’t make it a one-day big event. Instead, it’s done on a whim! The girls will invite friends over and they’ll focus a few hours on spending quality time with one another while laughing, decorating and savoring each moment. Other rooms in the home, such as the main bedroom and bath, take advantage of smaller touches of festivity as these rooms are havens for Brandi specifically. “I need quiet in these rooms,” is the way she describes it. A noteworthy addition are presents, specially wrapped with coordinating paper for the room. Brandi favors thin

velvet ribbon and small pieces of greenery tying it together. While they use many of the decorations in the home year after year, there’s a very special unique Advent Calendar hung from clothespins which includes a verse from the Christmas story on each card, flipped day by day during Advent. Ultimately, Brandi and Jon want their daughters to remember that Christmas is not just presents; there’s so much more. “As you age, you can lose that magical aspect of Christmas and start seeing how broken the world is,” says Brandi. As a family, they’re shifting their vision and focusing on leaning into peace and calm. While there are many parties to attend and multiple events all season long, rest means much more this year to each member of the family. “Being mindful of the season is huge this year, it’s hard to reclaim that as you get older.” Spending Christmas in peace without the need to rush from house to house is their number one priority… but their secondary goal is to see as many Christmas lights as possible.

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In the bedrooms and bathrooms, decorations are purely up to personal taste. “Sometimes the girls decorate their entire rooms, but Jon and I go for more minimal touches,” says Brandi.

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ZEN GENERATION

DUO DESIGN STUDIO HEADS UP A TEAM OF EXPERTS TO TR ANSFORM A PARIS MOUNTAIN PROPERTY. / by Brendan Blowers / photography by Mark Harvell

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Before preparing to improve the world, first look around your own home Along the back wall, Chinese floral art from The Rock House Antiques in Greenville hangs above an antique Mandarin altar table. In the sitting area, custom furniture, including two swivel chairs upholstered in waterproof performance fabric, is arranged around natural wood tables that bring in the elements of organic design.

– CHINESE PROVERB

“If someone were to drop you here, between the fountains and the fish and the roof tiles, nobody would believe you were in Greenville,” says John Peery, owner of Peery Homes, the general contractor who renovated the 5024 sq ft home that sits towards the top of Paris Mountain. Purchased by a Chinese businessperson whom the design-build team never met, the complete renovation was conceptualized and largely driven by artist and interior designer Christa Sorauf, co-founder of Duo Design Studio. The owner’s nephew, acting as his representative, found Christa through Houzz and all communication occurred virtually. While it wasn’t the way she’s used to working with clients, she relished the opportunity to design a home leaning on traditional Chinese aesthetics. “It’s really clean, the lines are beautiful. I love the history of the different dynasties and periods,” Christa says. While Duo Design Studio doesn’t specialize in any one style, Christa admires pan-Asian interiors and likes Chinese-inspired decorative elements and its detailed hand-painted patterns. Architect Mark Dullea, of Dullea + Associates, was tapped to update the

home for the new owners. It was a property he knew well. “The house was designed as more of a Japanese style when Ben Rook originally designed it for Francis Hipp and his wife. Later Rook purchased it from the Hipps and used the guest house as his studio office,” he says. It sits beautifully on ten acres, surrounded by nature, water features, a zen garden and an expansive view. “Everywhere you turn, nature is involved,” Christa says. Its new owner wanted the interior to feel more authentically Chinese and a plan was made to upfit the house for balance and flow and incorporate a traditional color palette throughout. A tearoom was also created by eliminating a closet and bathroom. A feature of Chinese design is honoring the preservation of nature and using natural materials in construction, such as the home’s interior bamboo ceiling. Mark had been familiar with the project since the 1980s and was excited to work on its next iteration. “Christa got me involved. I did all of the spatial planning. I was able to find extra roof tiles, and bamboo ceiling panels in the crawl space. We wanted to respect what was there,” he says. “I like to

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think like a contractor and design like an architect. We transformed the interior to be more in keeping with the Chinese style while respecting the Japanese architecture." Duo Design was tasked with custom designing teak furniture, selecting upholstery and cabinets. A stunning natural stone tub by Native Trails, which had to be craned into place, went into the en suite bath. Mandarin Antiques in Atlanta was enlisted to source artwork, furnishing and accents like calligraphy brushes and pairs of foo dogs, also called guardian lions. “We did a lot of research,” Christa says. She and her senior designer, Shelby Askins, created room programs and mood boards, sending everything to the nephew to assure accuracy and approval. “The shopping trips were way fun,” Shelby says. While Duo Design sourced beautifully embroidered red and teal silks for upholstery and arranged the

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furniture to be feng shui, the ancient practice of arranging objects according to their energy to create harmony in a space, John and his youngest son, James, project manager for Peery Homes, set about reconfiguring the rooms. Utilizing Mark’s architectural renderings, the Peery Homes team repainted every room and fully renovated the primary bedroom and bath and guest quarters. Walls were removed and rooms repurposed. They also replaced and upgraded the smart home system. James, who was not familiar with some of the Chinese design choices before this project, really enjoyed the process. “The whole vibe of the house is very peaceful and tranquil like it is supposed to be,” he says. The entire experience wasn’t always zen-like, however. Sets of Shoji rice paper doors were needed to match existing ones. Authentic Shoji sliding doors are intricately constructed,

[right] Duo Design Studio custom-designed the wood frame for a couch made by Century Sofa. Its lattice motif connects the furniture to the architectural woodwork of the ceiling. [below] The only thing the stunning exterior required was a fresh coat of red paint on the custom door and updated hardware. The Asian roofline and approach is unlike any residence typically found in the area. The property was designed and landscaped to maximize serenity, reflection, and the preservation of Eastern culture.


B ambo o A treasured resource, the ancient Chinese referred to bamboo, pine and plum as the "gentlemen in Winter." The bamboo ceiling in this home is not just a sustainable choice, but also a material with spiritual significance. Red accents The color symbolizes luck, joy and happiness. It will often be seen playing a key role in traditional Chinese interiors. S ho ji s creens The Japanese room divider has become common throughout Asian decor. It is handmade from translucent rice paper and latticed wood: cedar, cypress, pine or bamboo. C raf t-made Geometric shapes, fine woodcuts and joinery and woven panels are just a few of the craft elements present in fine Chinese furniture, often finished with floral or nature scenes that can be carved, metal inlay or hand painted.

CHINESE DESIGN VERSUS ORIENTALISM Orientalism is the western interpretation or imitation of perceived Chinese or Asian motifs. It is considered an outsider view, though as early as the 18th century it spawned significant theme and variation including Chinoiserie, which immortalized porcelain pattern in fabrications and other tabletop objects, albeit with French and English influence. Traditional Chinese design is a blend of documented styles going back thousands of years, traced through various Chinese ruling dynasties. Over time, Japanese and other Asian influences became part of the mix but what remains of import is harmony with nature, fine craftsmanship, use of color and space management.

Minimalis m Interiors are clean and open. Unnecessary objects are removed and everything in the room has either a practical use or deeper meaning. There is an intentional attempt to achieve a balance of energy between objects using the tenets of feng shui. Natu re A commitment to natural materials and creating a seamless flow of nature from the outside to the interior reflects the Chinese belief in preserving and honoring nature. Natural fiber mats and stone are utilized throughout the Paris Mountain home.

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[left] Teak vanities by Kohler provide storage. The sinks are called "Wabi" vessels. The principle of Wabi-sabi is a Japanese aesthetic that finds beauty in something that has natural imperfections. [right] A natural stone tub from Native Trails had to be craned in, but was worth the effort. After a relaxing soak, the private walk-out deck provides the ideal place to dry off and enjoy the soothing sounds of nature.

requiring precise cuts and specific material know-how. “You’re building a pocket for a door that doesn’t exist, hoping you can find it,” James says. They planned ahead and set up the flooring to fit the doors. He reached out to Rook who put him in touch with the original door’s craftsman. “He was a seventy-five-year-old carpenter and he had the materials stored away in his shop on the backside of Taylor’s Mill that he doesn’t even use anymore,” James says, “He was my saving grace.” The new doors, which took about three weeks to make, match the

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original doors perfectly, as does the five-inch-wide oak flooring James added to the bedroom and tearoom. “It was one of those jobs where you walk away from it and no one can tell you were there,” John says. Christa agrees. It’s a project that never fails to draw attention on design websites and social media. “It was dream project,” she says, “to work on one of the most unique homes in the Upstate.” John says Christa was the right pick for the job. “She did a great job figuring out what made the owner tick and fitting their needs.”


“The whole vibe of the house is very peaceful and tranquil like it is supposed to be” – JOHN PEERY

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Inspired Living

the Collection _ On the Table: Punch Supper PG. 103 _ Detour: Local Antiques PG. 108 _ Treasure: Vintage Pipes PG. 112 _ Pantry: Green Salt PG. 116 _ Fini: Hand Forged

PG. 91

ON THE TABLE

Making Spirits Bright P H OTO G R A P H Y BY F O R R E S T C LO N T S

A welcome cocktail warms the home.

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The Collection On the Table

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On the Table The Collection

super bowls ’Tis the season for a punch supper.

by S T E P H A N I E B U R N E T T E //photog raphy by F O R R E S T C L O N T S //recipes by CHEF FERNAN DO COPPOL A

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The Collection On the Table

Sail Away gin punch

Steak with chimichurri

Sautéed shrimp with sambal sauce

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Baileigh Wilson and Will Ruwer

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nearth your punchbowl. The magical server that fills cups a plenty is back. If the ladle is long gone, buy an acrylic one for a modern pairing. And enlist any stemless glass into service as a punch cup. A batched drink has replaced the signature cocktail and with a pretty punch bowl tabletop guests can serve themselves. Baileigh Wilson, the AC Hotel’s Beverage Director, says a welcome drink affords a host time to spend with friends rather than shake individual cocktails alone in the kitchen. By its nature, punch will start out stronger and morph as its ice block slowly melts but, if made well, each stage will be delicious and slurpable. “You want well-balanced flavors, something that is versatile, approachable, citrus and fruit forward and not too boozy,” Wilson says. She is the creative force behind the cocktails at Juniper; it’s a bar that stocks more than 40 gins and supports a restaurant that can seat 350. If you’ve visited Juniper, then you’ve felt the warmth of General Manager Will Ruwer's hospitality. His enthusiasm extends throughout the spaces of the rooftop menagerie, and Ruwer says that creating an experience is what’s long remembered, whether it’s for a small gathering or a big one. “We all assume our friends can let themselves in, but don’t fall into the busy trap. Be at the front door and welcome guests into your home. The atmosphere, the drink, the food, the aroma, your energy, it all means something.” He offers a fun tip to add to the dinner party experience: create a collective playlist. “Invite your guests on Spotify or Apple to add some songs before the event and you’ll have everyone’s favorite music. It becomes the party’s playlist.” Plates paired with punch can be numbered, but intentional. Sliced steak with chimichurri, sautéed shrimp and homemade focaccia with spreads is our suggested menu. The spice trade is closely associated with the history of punch, so chef Fernando Coppola selected savory, well-seasoned dishes and sized the recipes just for our winter dinner party.

Punch Know-How

One of sour, two of sweet, three of strong and four of weak. Brits working for the East India Company in the 1600s first reference “punch” as a batched cocktail served in homes. Though the origin of the word is uncertain, most believe the name is a riff from a 500-liter cask called a puncheon. The spice route was analogous with the rise of punch and sailors moved the libation around the world with them. Once Europeans found their way to islands with the means to produce sugar, rum became the basis of punch. For sailors, punch consisted of little more than rum, lime, sugar and a dash of a grated spice, like nutmeg. English society went mad for more composed rum punch, after years of struggling to acquire enough brandy from France. Today, a savvy bartender can recite the recipe for punch, in the form of the island rhyme: One of sour, two of sweet, three of strong and four of weak. The jingle is accurate enough; one part citrus juice, two parts sugar, three parts spirit and four parts water make a balanced batched punch.

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On the Table The Collection

Sautéed shrimp with sambal sauce 2

lbs shrimp

Sambal sauce 2 Tbsp sambal olek 2 Tbsp honey ½ cup Tamari or soy sauce 1 pinch of thickener of your choice 2 Tbsp granulated sugar 1 small garlic clove, whole 1 small piece of ginger, peeled and whole MIX all the sauce ingredients in a pot and cook over low heat until it is thick and has formed a glaze. Remove the ginger and garlic clove and allow it to cool. PEEL and clean the shrimp. Pat dry and

season with salt and pepper generously. In a hot sauté pan, add vegetable oil and cook the shrimp on both sides. It will take about 5 minutes. Toss the shrimp in the sambal glaze.

Steak with chimichurri Focaccia with walnut fig spread 1 lb “00” Italian pizza flour (or any high protein flour) 1 oz fresh yeast 1 1/2 cups lukewarm water 1 tsp sugar 2 tsp salt 1 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil Fresh rosemary Maldon salt Extra virgin olive oil, as needed Walnut-fig spread 1 cup walnuts 12 dried Turkish figs 1 cup butter Pinch of sea salt Pinch of Moscovado sugar PLACE fresh yeast it in a bowl and hydrate

it with water. Mix in the sugar and 1/3 of the flour. Mix well and let it rest in a warm place until the “starter” starts bubbling. USING a dough whisk, mix the dry ingredients. Note: make sure the bowl is big enough to contain two pounds of dough. Add the yeast mixture and oil, and whisk until a dough forms. Move the

dough to a countertop. Knead the dough for about 10 minutes using folding motions. Dough may be a bit sticky but should look smooth and shiny. LIGHTLY oil the dough ball and place in

the bowl. Cover and let it rest in a warm place for about an hour. Move the dough into an oiled square mold (12”x12”x3”) and using the tip of the fingers shape it to cover all of the surface. Cover again and let it rest for about 30 minutes.

TOP the dough with the rosemary leaves and the Maldon salt. Drizzle a bit of olive oil on top and place in a 400F oven. Cook until the top is golden brown, about 15-20 minutes. Once ready, remove from the mold immediately and place the focaccia to rest on a wire rack.

For the Walnut-fig spread: USING a food processor, process the figs until they become a paste. Add the butter, salt and sugar and mix well. Reserve. Using the same food processor, break down the walnuts to nearly a powder and mix into the figs blend.

2-3 lbs strip loin Rosemary 1 Tbsp butter 1 garlic clove Salt and pepper, to taste Chimichurri sauce 1/2 bunch cilantro 1/2 bunch parsley 1/4 cup dried oregano 1-2 Tbsp crushed red pepper 2-3 garlic cloves 3/4 cup white vinegar 2 cups olive oil Salt and pepper, to taste RUN cilantro, parsley and garlic with the vinegar in a blender until smooth. Add the dried oregano and crushed pepper. Add salt and pepper and olive oil and mix well. Season the steak and cook in a hot cast iron skillet, slightly sprinkled with oil. Immediately lower the temperature. Cook until an instant read thermometer registers rare. Add garlic, rosemary and butter and baste until medium-rare is reached. Allow it to rest before slicing and top with sauce.

Ch

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On the Table The Collection

A punch is something to add to your entertaining arsenal and a splash of something sparkling at the end is a modern take for the “four parts water.” Even club soda can add sparkle to punch or use prosecco if you’re feeling fancy. A garnish is a hallmark for punch, so pull out your mandoline slicer and get a thin cut so a garnish, such as orange, will float. Baileigh Wilson says there’s a punch for every month this winter. Each will serve to 6-10 guests. Her background in pastry serves her well in her role as Beverage Director for the new AC downtown. “Winter cocktails often tie back to memories of gingerbread and mint or warm, spiced flavors,” she says. “I like making simple syrups, a cordial or a shrub to add to winter cocktails.” Wilson suggests fashioning an ice mold, so use any plastic container that will create a large cube. Slide it into your punch bowl slowly. Garnish is added last so it can float on top.

Our experts say to plan for a guest at a special gathering to have 2.5 drinks an hour, may it be a cocktail, wine, beer or a non-alcoholic one, so infused water or a warm cider are nice to have on hand.

The day before your event, fill a balloon with grapefruit juice, tie and set in a bowl and place into the freezer until set.

December

Sail Away 12 oz Martin Miller Gin 10 oz grapefruit liquor 6 oz Aperol 6 oz lemon juice 5 oz Demerara sugar 20 oz tonic Frozen grapefruit balloon cube

January

Lady Peppermint 12 oz Buffalo Trace bourbon 12 oz Godiva chocolate liqueur 12 oz Mountain Peak espresso liqueur 6 oz peppermint syrup Peppermint syrup: 1 cup sugar 1 cup water 1 teaspoon peppermint extract

February

I’m With Cupid 5 cups gin, preferable Glendalough rose 3 cups rose water 1½ cups lemon juice ½ cup agave syrup Top with prosecco

S

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Detours The Collection

On the Hunt

Greenville County is a shopping trove for the vintage, antique and collectible. / by Stephanie Burnette and Hali Wyatt / photographs by Eli Warren

UPCOMING EVENTS UPCOMING UPCOMINGEVENTS EVENTS Aug 24 - Sept 25, “Renewal”, A Juried Art Show Aug ArtArt Show Aug 24 24--Sept Sept25, 25,“Renewal”, “Renewal”,A AJuried Juried Show Oct 5 - Oct 23, Abstract Art Exhibit, Oct 23, Art Exhibit, ANTIQUES are the brass ring. Exquisite homes in Greenville are featuring Briana Danyelle &Art Jamie Dawson Oct5SOUTHERN 5--Oct Oct 23,Abstract Abstract Exhibit, designed around such family heirlooms or they are collected from excellent featuring Briana Danyelle & Jamie Dawson featuring Briana Danyelle & Jamie Dawson resellers in our area. Nov 2- Dec 22,AsHoliday Exhibition, featuring Ornaments, of today, items made in the Deco and Art Nouveau movements are considered antique. If they haven’t quite made the century mark, then they are Nov 2- Dec 22, Holiday Exhibition, featuring Ornaments, Decor, Notecards, Giftable Art, & more Nov 2- Holiday Dec 22,within Holiday Exhibition, Ornaments, striking distance. And if you featuring can believe it, Depression-era Holiday Decor, Notecards, Giftable Art, & more wares are not far behind. Holiday Decor, Notecards, Giftable Art, & more The term vintage is a moving target. Nothing younger than two decades should be labeled vintage, ever. The idea comes from viniculture and speaks of the grape harvest season. In essence, “vintage” is an object that represents its epoch. You should be able to look at it and know its era.

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Detours The Collection

Deeming something collectible needs no timestamp. I think designers’ capsule collections have taught us this. But collectibles tend to work best in groups, displayed smartly for impact. At times commercial fixtures and signage can fall into this category or items not meant for the home that now have design appeal, like vintage luggage. We’re lucky to live in a region teeming with dealers. You could fill a weekend visiting shops in the Greenville area and never get to them all. The list crafted below is a survey of some of the talented folks picking desirable objects for resell; it includes traditional antique stores, antique malls, pop-ups, specialty dealers, salvage purveyors and thrifters. Can you still negotiate price in the post-covid environment? Of course, you can. Serious buyers will offer 85% of the tagged price for larger items and closer to asking price for items under $100. It’s considered in poor taste to haggle for something marked less than $25 unless you’re hoping to buy a significant group of items. The best introductory phrase remains, “Would you consider…” and don’t forget to ask about approval buying. Leave a credit card on file and run an item home to avoid buyer’s remorse.

Buncombe Antiques Mall 5000 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors, SC 29687 | 864-268-4498 buncombeantiquesmall.com HUNT FOR:

Vintage kitchenware Coins and books Collectibles Americana Textiles and holiday

Cottage Grove Vintage Market 1607 Laurens Rd., Greenville, SC 29607 864-423-9661 | cottagegrovevintage .com | @cottagegrovevintage

Artifacts Greenville 3209 Old Buncombe Rd., Greenville, SC 29609 | 864-569-2313 | artifactsgreenville .com | @artifactsgreenville HUNT FOR:

Haute furnishings European tabletop and religious objects Garden and outdoor vintage Art studios of Annie Koelle, Libby Baxter, Lee Macintosh and Summer Bennett

Bennett & Sons Antiques 10017 Pelham Rd E., Simpsonville, SC 29681 864-757-8009 | bennettandsonsantiques .com | @bennettsonsantiques HUNT FOR:

Post-war furniture American collectibles Jewelry Tableware Vintage prints and lithographs

HUNT FOR:

Glassware, brass and tabletop Accent rugs Custom pillows with designer fabrics Painted furniture done right Vintage and mid-century goods

Dodson Dig Co. Nostalgic Finds & Auction House 427 Wade Hampton Blvd., Greenville, SC 29609 | 864-626-3299 | @dodsondigco HUNT FOR:

Vintage signs of all types, including electrified Signed pottery Southern collectibles Americana Commercial fixtures and displays

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The Collection Detours

Greystone Antiques 1500 Augusta St., Greenville, SC 29605 864-233-3424 | greystonenantiques.net @greystone_antiques HUNT FOR:

Fine wood furnishings Antique dining room tables and chairs Plaster and gilt frames Caned furniture Furniture repair and restoration

Olde Faithful’s Antique Mall 3606 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors, SC 20609 | 864-244-5070 | @oldefaithfuls HUNT FOR:

Vintage kitchenware Pristine dresses, accessories and costume jewelry Period toys Books Tabletop and vintage holiday

Red Ribbon Resale (Thrift Store)

1215 Poinsett Hwy., Greenville, SC 29609 864-546-0394 | route-276-cool-crap. business.site | @route276coolcrap HUNT FOR:

Vintage and antique hardware Doors, shutters and windows, including stained glass Enamel sinks Outdoor iron and furniture 20th century luggage

Shindig Furnishings (MidCentury) 1825 Wade Hampton Blvd., Greenville, SC 29609 | 864-915-9705 call to set appointment | gvlmod.com @shindigfurnishings HUNT FOR:

Dining sets Lamps with period shades Dressers and coffee tables Designer marked accent pieces Bedroom suites

803 Pendleton St., Greenville, SC 29601 864-235-0607 | redribbonresale.com

Southern Housepitality (Consignment)

HUNT FOR:

110 Mauldin Rd., Greenville, SC 29605 864-299-0045 | sohogreenville.com/ @soho_greenville

Estate sale finds Textiles Collectibles Side Chairs Bar glasses

Rock House Antiques 415 Mauldin Rd., Greenville, SC 29605 864-299-8981 | therockhouseantiques .com | @therockhouseantiques HUNT FOR:

European antiques Chests and sideboards Porcelain and sterling objects Framed original art Chandeliers, lamp repair and shades

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HUNT FOR:

Designer brand sofas Leather furniture Dressers and end tables Light fixtures and decorator lamps Larger rugs

The Vintage at Main 1108 S Main St., Greenville, SC 29601 864-569-8237 | thevintageatmain.com @thevintageatmain HUNT FOR:

Juice glasses in sets Cocktail culture Baskets Pairs of chairs Vintage designer items

Vintage Market of Greenville 5500 Augusta Rd., Greenville, SC 29605 864-451-7042 | @vintagemarketofgreenville HUNT FOR:

Vintage signs and appliances Architectural and agriculture salvage Lighting, including parts and pieces Southern antiques Well-organized vinyl records

Wilson Girls (Pop-up) 59 E Main St., Greenville, SC 29611 @wilsongirlsllc HUNT FOR:

Tabletop vintage, including holiday and miniatures Southern collectibles Unique side tables Ironstone and blue and white china Local art


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The Collection Treasure

Pipe Dreams Vintage pipes embrace a growing trend for Americana. / by Beth Brown Ables / photography by Eli Warren

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Treasure The Collection

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rowing up, I wished our house smelled like our neighbor’s. It wasn’t until I was an adult and smelled the rich musky scent of pipe smoke that I made the connection to Mr. Anderson’s nightly ritual. Now, whenever I see a pipe, I’m transported to my childhood’s sweet suburban simplicity. Small things can do that, they seem to possess the power of time travel, which is exactly where collections originate. We collect to connect, trinkets transform into talismans, drawing us into our past and with that closer to people and places long gone. Carved from bone, chiseled out of clay, corncob or hardwood; passed down or purchased on a whim, a pipe becomes a personal article from an ancient ritual. Spending time wandering through the treasure hunt that is the Dodson Dig Co. reveals an array of pipes ready to collect. “During 2020, pipes became increasingly popular,” Nathan Dodson reflects, “whether for personal use or just sheer nostalgia.” Dodson, a lifelong collector, grew up going to auctions with his parents and honed an eye for what he calls sentimental collectibles. “A person sees something in the store, and they connect with it. It’s such a simple thing, but really meaningful to have a collection that has that certain personal spark,” he says. Because pipe styles vary, choosing which to collect is simply a case of personal preference. With literally hundreds of pipe makers worldwide, a pipe’s value ranges from $25 into the thousands. Look for good condition with no cracks or wear, alongside handmade characteristics like carvings and inlay. Most manufactured pipes are marked, but a handmade clay pipe is considered incredibly valuable. Your grandfather’s pipe collection deserves a place of distinction in your home and might be worth more than sentimentality. “An advantage to collecting is that pieces will increase in value under your care. So, while it may be something valuable to you for sentimental reasons,” says Dodson, “it’s often something worth keeping around for financial benefit as well.” As winter draws us inside, pipes can become decor. A glass dome can hold a handful of pipe bowls, each a different color and texture, making for instant interest on a bookshelf or coffee table. Or arrange a few amongst greenery or even wired into a wreath… because didn’t good ol' St. Nick himself smoke a pipe? A small collection nestled in a bowl creates casual elegance, and more valuable pipes look stately tucked into a formal shadow box. Small tokens and collectibles breathe the heady air of nostalgia into the room, telling a story and connecting us to our past. History wafts through your home, leaving behind it the sweet scent of memory and connection.

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CREATIVE

by DESIGN

PelhamArchitects.com


Stressless® Mayfair shown in Paloma Vanilla Stressless® Mary shown in Paloma Funghi

GIVE AND RECEIVE. Donate $50 or more to charity and get hundreds off.*

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BOGARI Ivet Ivanova

European Contemporary Furniture

Interior Designer

66 Carolina Point Parkway, Greenville SC 29607 I 864.254.0770 www.bogarifurniture.com


The Collection Pantry

Green Machine

Sea asparagus is dried, ground and ready to brighten cold weather meals with balanced salinity. / by Jonathan Ammons / photography by Forrest Clonts

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Pantry The Collection

Swamp Ramen

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reen Salt is a startup from Baja California that produces a salt alternative made from dehydrated Salicornia, also known as the sea asparagus. Often used as a flex garnish from high end chefs, Salicornia is an absolute umami bomb, naturally salty and rich in flavor, a little bit goes a long way. And with 50% less sodium than salt, it makes for a fun swap for seasoning foods. I’ve certainly found it to be best applied as a finishing salt. Once you’ve cooked that perfect piece of fish or roasted that squash, instead of reaching for the salt grinder, dash a little Green Salt on there to both cut down on the sodium while still maintaining the flavor. It amps up the umami elements of a dish quite nicely. It’s a fun-colored topper for anything from popcorn to avocado toast, or even to add depth to a salad dressing. But I’ve found it plays best with Far East cuisine. Green Salt makes it easy to cut down on the amount of soy sauce required in Chinese, Japanese and Korean dishes without losing the body and flavor that soy sauce provides. But be aware that unlike salt, Green Salt doesn’t completely dissolve into a liquid the way regular salt does. So be prepared for a dustier coating on your foods. It is also suggested to use double the amount than you would if the goal is to maintain the same flavor. My favorite dish that I came up with is what I call Swamp Ramen. Using a scratch made, unseasoned chicken stock, I applied the Green Salt and cut down on soy sauce. The sea-weediness of the green salt plays really well with the garlic and ginger, and the vegetal nature of the flavor perfectly complements the nori as well. Green Salt imparts an amusingly swampy green color to the broth that clings brilliantly to the noodles. Like any substitute, it would be hard to completely replace salt. Because it doesn’t dissolve, it won’t tenderize or fully infuse into meat or poultry, so you will still need to use salt for a roasted chicken or perfectly grilled steak. But it can be a great way to reduce the amount of sodium in a finished dish, particularly if your doctor is mentioning, like millions of other Americans, to eat less salt.

2 cups scratch made, unseasoned chicken or veggie stock 2 servings of ramen noodles 2 whole eggs ½ onion sliced ¼ cup broccoli chopped 2-4 baby bella mushrooms, sliced ¼ cup green onions, sliced on a bias 2-3 pieces of nori 2 cloves garlic, smashed and chopped 1 tsp grated ginger ½ Tbsp Green Salt Dash of soy sauce

To make the stock: Take the bones or carcass of a chicken and cover in water in a stock pot. Bring to a simmer, allowing it to simmer for up to 3-4 hours. Alternatively, use an instant pot, covering the bones and carcass with water, sealing and setting the pressure cooker to manual at 40 minutes. Strain and jar and refrigerate. Do not salt or season. To make the ramen: Add several cups of stock to the pot along with the whole eggs in the shell and bring to a simmer for 5 minutes. Remove eggs from pot and run cold water over them until they are cool to the touch. Dash in the smallest dash of soy sauce and add the green salt. Add broccoli, mushrooms, onion, garlic, ginger, and noodles and cook for as long as the package suggests cooking the noodles. The rest of the veg will be done by then. While that cooks, peel the eggs, placing one in each of the bowls in which you intend to serve. Using chopsticks or tongs, separate the noodle and veg portions into each bowl, topping with the stock. Be sure to taste the stock to make sure it is properly seasoned. Garnish with green onions, nori, and togarashi if you like it spicy.

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“Everything looks great and you guys were great to work with. That’s what I expected from your reputation and that’s what I got.”

864-304-4249 www.stargraniteinteriors.com jeremy@stargraniteinteriors.com

GRANITE • CAMBRIA • TRAVERTINE • MARBLE • ONYX • SLATE • SOAPSTONE


J

Y

LUMBER COM AN PA D N OR SINCE 1934

Jordan Lumber Company, Inc. is a wood flooring specialty company in business since 1934 providing the highest level of quality and services. Family owned and operated for over 85 years, we offer a vast array of wood flooring options that will please even the most discriminating taste.

www.JORDANLUMBERCOMPANY.com 104 Rutherford Road, Greenville, SC 29609 | 864-232-9686

APPROACHING A CENTURY OF SUPPLYING HARDWOOD FLOORING TO THE UPSTATE

T H R E E G E N E R AT I O N S O F WO O D F LO O R I N G E XC E L L E N C E


The Collection Fini

Hearth of the Home Fireplace screens don’t have to be boring or conventional if imagination is part of the design.

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e’ll soon be cozying up to the fireplace as the temperatures dip. Add on the need to create some calm moments in our lives throughout the winter season. There are plenty of fireplace screens available through retail resources, but who wouldn’t want to grace that need with a charming fireplace screen that is custom designed? The special screen pictured in front of the gorgeous stone fireplace is one of a kind, created by James Moseley of The Heirloom Companies. Moseley tells us that most of their custom jobs start with the “napkin” approach, that has ideas being sketched until something grabs the client

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and a “that’s it” falls into place. This screen came to fruition while talking with his client about a love for gardening and the outdoors. “I suggested a walk through the garden and two hours later I had lots of ideas to be incorporated,” he says. The design and craftsmanship created a truly unique work of metal art. Resting on the mantel is another stunning work that features gifts from Mother Nature. Hand-woven baskets and twigs form an appropriate display that works in tandem with the screen, the reclaimed wooden mantel and the stone fireplace. It can be attributed to the talents of Asheville artist Matt Tommey.

P H OTO G R A P H Y P R OV I D E D BY T H E H E I R LO O M CO M PA N I E S

/ by Lynn Greenlaw


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