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C O M M E R C I A L R E A L ES TAT E E D I T I O N

AUGUST 16, 2019 | VOL. 8 | ISSUE 16

MILL REVITALIZATION

UPDATE SEE PAGES 6-9 FOR STATUS UPDATES

DEALMAKERS: COMMERCIAL August 16, 2019 NOTABLE | upstatebusinessjournal.com 1 REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS | PAGE 15


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NEED TO KNOW

| NEWS

THE OPENING BELL 6 ABOUT THE COVER: 14 Our cover photo is a combination of two of the area mills currently undergoing revitalization. The window portion of the cover illustration is from the Taylors Mill (commonly known as the Southerrn Bleachery) and the water tower and smokestack portion of the illustration are from the Greer Mill. The photos were combined in an effort to represent the revitalization efforts currently underway with some of our area mill properties.

Within the lake region, which includes The Cliffs at Keowee Springs, The Cliffs at Keowee Falls, and The Cliffs at Keowee Vineyards, a total of 14 properties have been closed on, reaching a sales volume of $11,292,500 within the short period of April 1-June 30.

For more information on these two projects as well as several other revitalization projects please see the story on pages 6-9. Both photos by WILL CROOKS.

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See the Notable Commercial Real Estate Transactions that occured between June 2019 and August 2019.

QUOTED

11

“We’re one of the few textile survivors in this area. We’re very proud of our roots.” – Paul Tantillo, president KM Fabrics

33

“A big part of our mission includes supporting the efforts of non-profit organizations based in the Upstate who are working hard to make a real difference...” – Warren Griffith, Fuel’s president and CEO

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August 16, 2019 | upstatebusinessjournal.com

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NEWS |

NEED TO KNOW

REAL ESTATE

The Cook’s Station owners partner with Spinks family for new facility n story by ARIEL TURNER | rendering by TARA HILE OF SHLTR ARCHITECTS

Two longtime Greenville families and supporters are joining forces to bring a new development to the Buncombe Corridor, one of the key areas of need highlighted by the recently updated City of Greenville Master Plan. At the corner of Butler Avenue and Buncombe Street, construction has already begun on the 11,000-square-foot future home of The Cook’s Station with a target completion in Spring 2020. This new location, across from the Heritage Green urban arts and cultural center, is a joint effort between The Cook’s Station owner Kelly Ballentine Colacioppo, her husband, John, and Dana and Whitney Spinks. Whitney Spinks is the son of Spinx founder Stewart Spinks. The relocation will result in a consolidation of the two current Cook’s Station facilities, which are separated by a city block in the West End of Greenville. The first floor of the new facility will be retail store and a new fresh food component. The second floor will house appliances, a live education kitchen, Le Creuset, and Wusthof knives. The new, expanded appliance showroom is expected to open in the spring, while the current retail location at 659 S. Main St. will likely remain open through the end of 2020. Realizing that the market is right to expand and elevate their current culinary operation, the Colacioppos found common ground in their love for food and passion for downtown Greenville with the Spinks. The two couples developed a partnership that will combine high-end retail, state-of-the-art appliances, gourmet food and gifts, culinary education, freshly prepared graband-go food, and a community gathering spot with plenty of on-site parking. “We have long sought ways to continue to satisfy and enrich your culinary curiosity while consolidating our entire offerings in one location,” said Kelly Colacioppo. “Partnering with the Spinks family is a dream come true for John and me and it creates a natural synergy of two locally owned retailers who can truly bring a new and exciting experience in retail and convenience to Greenville.” The two families have much in common, including their long-term loyalty to downtown Greenville, owning successful businesses in Greenville for decades, and being founding members of the West End Retailers Association.

4 UBJ | August 16, 2019

11,000 sf space Target completion Spring 2020 Chef Teryi Youngblood Musolf named culinary director Relocation will result in a consolidation of the two Cook’s Station facilities

Partnering with the Spinks family is a dream come true ... it creates a natural synergy of two locally owned retailers who can truly bring a new and exciting experience in retail and convenience to Greenville.” - Kelly Colacioppo, Cook’s Station owner The Cook’s Station originally opened as a residential component to Kelly Colacioppo’s family’s business, Ballentine Equipment. In 1999, The Cook’s Station became a standalone business where it opened alongside Kudzu, a home décor store, owned and operated by Allison Spinks, wife of Whitney’s brother, Steven Spinks, becoming some of the first businesses to bring major retail to the West End of Greenville. Steven Spinks was also involved in creating the new partnership. With the Spinks family having owned and operated Spinx Convenience Stores in South Carolina for almost 50 years, adding a high-end convenience store component to the new operation was a natural fit. Whitney Spinks, who will act as The Cook’s Station CEO, has always had passion for food and cooking, even working as managing partner for the former fine dining restaurant Devereaux’s from 2008-2011. He was responsible for establishing the Spinx Commissary and Fresh on the Go food program in 2011, which provides fresh fruit, cheeses, and sandwiches to the Spinx stores.

“My enthusiasm of partnering with The Cook’s Station is through the roof,” he says. “I foresee our partnership not only exceeding the expectations of current culinary enthusiasts but also attracting a whole new audience to The Cook’s Station.” Dana Spinks, who has been in the insurance and financial services industry for the past 13 years, brings her project management skills, client satisfaction, and attention to detail in her previous career to the partnership with the Colacioppos. “We are humbled and excited to learn from them while bringing new ideas to help take well-established and loved business to the next generation,” she says. The Cook’s Station will also be adding a new commercial kitchen space to offer homemade prepared food, made to order artisan sandwiches and gourmet salads as well as fresh grab and go items. Chef Teryi Youngblood Musolf has been named the new culinary director to help define and execute the menu as well as to create a new culinary curriculum. Musolf says the state-of-the-art teaching kitchen will allow for an expansion of classes that range from basic to high tech. For food offerings, she is thinking outside the to-go box, she says, to make quick easy dining with flair and flavor. “This is not your average sandwich joint,” she says. “We all need balance, and we plan to bring that to your day with thoughtful food that is freshly prepared with as much home field gusto as possible.”


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MILL REVITALIZATION

UPDATE CONESTEE

STATUS:

Permitting Stage

ELEMENTS WEST

STATUS:

Leasing begins next month

Story by Ariel Turner | Rendering by Seamon Whiteside

Story by John Jeter | Rendering by Base 360

1876:

2017:

Not the First:

1933-1962:

60 Units:

First:

Originally built with final construction in the 1950’s

The revitalization project was announced

Conestee MIlls is the second mill on this property - the first, was known as McBee’s Factory and was built in the 1830’s.

Housed a cotton-merchants company and brokerage

30 one bedroom, 20 two bedroom and 10 one bedroom loft-style apartments are priced from $950 a month.

Greenville’s first solar-powered apartment building

tion, Hardaway says. The developer plans to convert the property into a gathering place similar to Hampton Station. The scope of the project includes 27,500 square feet of leasable commercial space, new-construction modern townhomes and multifamily lofts in the 60,000-square-foot mill building, and an amphitheater. The five buildings with space available for lease range from about 1,200-13,500 square feet. Mills Armstrong of WCM says this project fills a void in the Mauldin submarket because there are no other historic buildings in the area that could serve this purpose. Current tenants with either verbal agreements or, in one case, a signed lease, include a restaurant, brewery, and office user. Rob Howell, senior vice president of Avison Young, is handling leasing efforts on behalf of the landlord.

Leasing begins next month at 2 Waco St. on 60 units in Elements West in the former E.W. Montgomery Cotton Warehouse. Nick Gilley’s Base 360 general contracting company plans completion in November. His father, Jerry, is president of Three Rivers Valle, the developer of the $12 million project said to be Greenville’s first solar-powered apartment building. “This was always the wrong side of the tracks, even to the effect that we couldn’t get financing because the good ol’ local boys who’d known Greenville their entire lives said, ‘No way we’re going to sign off on a project on Green Avenue,’” Nick says. The 2.4-acre property was converted to Section 8 housing in the late ‘60s before the gunshot-addled building sat vacant for nearly 20 years. Seven years ago, the Gilleys saw opportunity in the 63,000-squarefoot warehouse that housed a cot-

The adaptive reuse project announced in 2017 for existing buildings at Conestee Mill, 1 Spanco Drive between Mauldin and Greenville, is now in the permitting stage with leases for retail and office tenants in the queue, says Todd Hardaway of WCM Global Wealth. WCM Global Wealth, a Greenville-based financial services company, manages a real estate fund that acquired the site in March 2017 and is developing the property with various partnerships. The former mill was built in the early 1800s to create South Carolina’s first mill village and closed in 1973, according to a master plan for the Conestee area drawn up by Greenville County. The mill is adjacent to the 500acre Lake Conestee Nature Park and the oldest South Carolina dam, built in 1892. The dam is under review and likely would be rebuilt in the near future if and when funding is secured by the Conestee Founda-

6 UBJ | August 16, 2019

ton-merchants company and brokerage from 1933 to 1962. Saw-tooth skylights facing due north — among old architectural elements that remain — provided ideal lighting for classification. Ticker-tape quotes sent to the Chicago Mercantile Exchange determined futures prices for the cotton that earned Greenville its living — and the building its listing two years ago on the National Register of Historic Places. The Elements West complex will include a pool and cabana, among other amenities. In the green construction, 30 one-bedroom, 20 two-bedroom, and 10 one-bedroom loft-style apartments are priced from $950 a month. “There’s a great need for apartments in Greenville,” Nick says. “It’s getting satisfied obviously, but at our price point, for downtown, that price point truly is affordable housing. We’re providing a niche that’s not fulfilled.”


feature | from the cover

Greenville was once known as the “Textile Center of the South”

DRAYTON

STATUS:

STATUS:

GREER

Revitalization Completed

Story by Neil Cotiaux | Photo by Will Crooks

Moving through rezoning

Story by Ariel Turner | Photo by Will Crooks

1902-1994:

289:

14:

1908:

$1.4 Million:

120:

First of 2020:

Mill was in operation for over 90 years

Luxury loft apartment units located on the grounds of the historic mill

Businesses that operate at the Drayton project

Greer Cotton Mill was originally constructed

Sold last year to the Walker and Black families

Approximate number of apartments once completed

Goal for groundbreaking on the renovations

“Events at Drayton Mills” is now “Eighteen Hundred Drayton Catering & Events.” The former wedding and catering venue at Drayton Mills, a “live-workplay” campus created on the site of a defunct textile mill at 1800 Drayton Road in Spartanburg, is being reworked. Bob Munnich, former chief operating officer of Larkin’s Restaurants, has leased the facility and will now recast the 35,000-square-foot indoor and outdoor space into a “robust” catering business, he said. Munnich’s initial focus is on building out a state-of-the-art kitchen, setting the table for a venue capable of hosting private dinners for 20 to 300 and receptions accommodating 500. A public grand opening is scheduled for Sept. 6, the same day as Drayton Mills’ final installment of its 2019 summer concert series. Munnich is owner, manager, and master chef of the new enterprise. “My intention is to make this the

backbone of my catering business. … This is my sole focus right now,” Munnich said. Established by TMS Development in November 2018, the former Events at Drayton Mills was conceived as part of a larger retail-and-commercial complex within walking distance of 289 apartment units on the grounds of the historic mill. Eighteen Hundred Drayton Catering & Events is one of 14 businesses now operating in the marketplace. “From our luxury loft apartments to the businesses in our marketplace, Drayton is bustling with activity,” a news release quoted Tara Sherbert, managing principal of TMS Development and owner of the property, as saying. “The event venue draws thousands of visitors to Drayton each month, and under Bob’s leadership, we expect that activity to continue to blossom as the community embraces Eighteen Hundred Drayton,” she said.

The 286,000-square-foot historic former cotton mill built in 1908 sitting on 8.37 acres at 300 Connecticut Ave. sold last year for $1.4 million. The owners, the Walker and Black families, who also own the Southern Bleachery property at Taylors Mill, plan to renovate the building into up to 120 apartments consisting of studio, one, two, and three-bedroom units. Amenities will include pool, gym, coffee shop and cafe, and resident lounge. The proposed development also includes office and retail space and 1.4 acres of common space with pedestrian promenade and outdoor seating. If the development proceeds as expected, the build out will be completed in 24 months, Lawrence Black says. Currently, the project is moving through rezoning, architectural drawings are 99 percent completed with Tara Hile of SHLTR Architects

as lead, and construction bids are out, Black says. “We’re looking at turning dirt the first of the year,” he says. Unlike the “imaginarium” of Southern Bleachery, as Black calls it, Greer Mill will be a much more traditional adaptive reuse project, like Brandon Mill in the Village of West Greenville or Drayton Mills in Spartanburg. Paige Pollard with Commonwealth Preservation Group is serving as historical consultant to ensure the project follows the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties. Sitting within an Opportunity Zone (OZ) as defined by the Investing in Opportunity Act, the project has garnered interest from OZ investment funds. Black says the project will benefit from a combination of OZ funds, state and federal historical tax credits, state textile credits, and potentially the new market tax credit program.

August 16, 2019 | upstatebusinessjournal.com

7


MILL REVITALIZATION

UPDATE JUDSON

STATUS:

Construction in Progress

Story by Melody Cuenca | Rendering by McMillan Pazdan Smith

3-5 years:

36 Acres:

Loft-style apartment units, ready 4th quarter of 2020

Estimated completion of revitalization. Site work to be completed all at one time.

One of Greenville’s largest mills, and was the former Milliken facility

8 UBJ | August 16, 2019

STATUS:

Project just unveiled

Story by John Jeter | Rendering by SHLTR Architects

204:

Nearly two years after the historic Judson Mill was purchased, construction has begun on the 36acre mixed-use property. As one of Greenville’s largest mills, the former Milliken facility will soon breathe life into the community again. Judson District is being redeveloped through the partnership of Belmont Sayre and Three Corners Development to include residential, retail, and office spaces. The residential section, which is the centerpiece of Judson, is under construction, according to CBRE senior associate Nick Hollstegge. The developers want to see a vibrant, active community. “There’s nothing better to do that than 204 apartment units,” says Hollstegge, the commercial leasing agent representative. “They’re building loft-style apartment units that will deliver fourth quarter of next year.” The developers aim to attract young professionals, teachers, fire-

POE MILL / CHAPEL

fighters, police officers, and others who are being priced out of Greenville’s central business district. “We do have three commercial tenants secured, and we’re actively marketing the office space,” he says. The commercial tenants will be revealed in the coming weeks. With around 350,000 square feet in buildings over 100 years old, the office space features big windows, wood beams, masonry, and decking. “Our goal is to offer something unique to market,” says Hollstegge. The over 1,700 planned parking spaces are a key feature of the Judson development, and that number may increase as progress is made, Hollstegge says. The site work will be completed at one time in order to avoid ongoing construction for tenants.  “We’re looking at probably a three- to five-year window to have everything completed,” he says. “We’ll have some commercial space delivered first part of next year.”

1897: Built 1977: Closed 2003: Burned

$6 Million:

2020:

Cost of the development. Current plans for Chapel include offices, an event space, a restaurant, and green space.

Expected opening of “Chapel”

Matt McPheely is unveiling a project designed to weave into the very fabric of the old textile village. “It’s not just a run-of-the-mill office space and a co-working space and a random restaurant,” McPheely says of Chapel, a $6 million development at 1505 Buncombe Road. “I want to work closely with the community, with the people who work here, live here — that this is something they feel ownership over, that they have a say here.” The developer/entrepreneur has already talked with a couple of Poe Mill leaders, including Jerry Blassingame, executive director of Soteria Community Development Corp., three blocks away on Shaw Street. “This community was built by the mill, where people lived, worked, and played,” he says. “That’s a great structure, and downtown’s got it, but we need something for low- to moderate-income people that feel

like they belong.” McPheely expects Chapel to open in 2020 in what’s been designated an Opportunity Zone. Part of the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, these zones offer tax incentives for development in under-resourced neighborhoods. Says Blassingame, “If it works and he can get buy-in from the community and it doesn’t gentrify, it would be great.” Current plans for Chapel include offices, an event space, a restaurant, and green space. “This would be a great place where people who live in this community can say, ‘Hey, this was thought about. We were actually interviewed and some of our ideas were really placed into this project,’” Blassingame says, adding that if neighbors have ownership, equity, and jobs, “I think it’ll work.”


feature | from the cover

By 1910, South Carolina was the second-largest textile producing state in the nation.

STATUS:

TAYLORS

Revitalization ongoing

Story by Ariel Turner | Photo by Will Crooks

STATUS:

WOODSIDE

Construction begins this month

Story by John Jeter | Rendering by JDavis Architects

1924-1965:

Around 827,000:

Historic Name:

1902-1912:

1984:

2021:

25 Percent:

Built by Greenville’s J.E. Sirrine Company and was in operation

The approximate square feet of the interior space

Taylors is the location, but Southern Bleachery is the historic mill’s name.

It took a decade to build the five-story mill

Woodside Mill ceased operations.

The projected completion of the $62 million project

Larger than its closest competitors, Brandon and Poe mills.

The nearly 13 acres at the front of what is commonly referred to as Taylors Mill is mid-transformation from forgotten mill property to public gathering space. “Community engagement has driven the whole design of the place,” says co-owner and developer Lawrence Black. This particular collection of freestanding buildings and grounds on the mill property at 226 Mill St., separate from the monstrous mill building, has been named Southern Bleachery, which is the original name of the mill that cost $1 million to build in the early 1920s. Since the announcement of the revitalization project in May 2018, plans have shifted to focus on events and programming, seeking retail and restaurant tenants who can adapt to year-round gatherings in their spaces.  The 6,100-square-foot makers market was completed last September, and with a state-of-the-art commercial kitchen designed by Bacon

Bros. Public House chef Anthony Gray and COO Jason Callaway in the fourth bay, it will house a TBD restaurant. Black says he plans to make the decision shark-tank-style, with interested users proving they can handle the space as restaurant and event venue. The 8,800-square-foot Boiler Room building is the future home of Junto Coffee, currently operating out of the makers market. A distillery, brewery, boutique hotel, and co-working use have been discussed for the remainder of the space. Landscaping is underway on the extensive grounds and includes a treehouse and former railroad bed converted into a trail. In the metal cotton warehouse called the Butler Building, rather than the previously promoted barbecue joint, Black hopes to land a raw-bar seafood restaurant for 3,500 square feet, and about 20 restrooms will be built in the remaining space to accommodate the outdoor crowds.

Woodside Mill’s magnitude matches its outsized history, from its construction between 1902 and 1912 to its series of mega-development proposals, which, like the five-story colossus itself, have seen more than their share of ups, downs, starts, and restarts. Most recently, Crossgate Partners purchased the mill and plans to begin construction this month on 307 residential lofts in a project totaling $62 million, says Randy Moore, managing partner of the Suwanee, Georgia-based real estate company. The mill, once the largest textile operation under one roof in the U.S., has plenty to work with — often, perhaps, foiling previous redevelopment attempts. Such is the story of the mill itself, whose founding visionary, John T. Woodside. Woodside, who along with his three brothers built Greenville’s Textile Crescent empire, went bust in the Great Depression. Ultimately, so did the area’s largest mill

village, many of whose 600-plus houses fell into poverty. In 1987, the Woodside Cotton Mill Village Historic District landed on the National Register of Historic Places. Now, Crossgate Properties envisions a new generation of residents in a mill that Moore expects will come back to life in late 2021. Amenities will include a resort-style pool, outdoor entertaining areas, fitness and yoga facilities, a conference space, and event center. Architectural firm JDavis, with offices in Raleigh, North Carolina, and Philadelphia, says the “adaptive reuse of the cotton mill and ancillary structures” on the 14.3-acre site will feature LEED Gold Certification, “planned around sustainable building and lifestyle features,” its website says. “Our design,” Moore’s email says, “allows us to preserve a great deal of the original Woodside Mill and create a place for many to enjoy for another 100 years.”

August 16, 2019 | upstatebusinessjournal.com

9


NEWS |

NEED TO KNOW

REAL ESTATE

New multi-family development proposed along the Swamp Rabbit Trail n story by ARIEL TURNER | Renderings HOUSING STUDIO

A four-story, 200-unit multifamily development proposed for the water tower district is contingent on County Council’s approval of a second reading Aug. 20 to rezone the property’s current industrial designation to a flexible review district. The 8.29-acre site near Swamp Rabbit Cafe and Grocery at 1430 Hampton Ave. Ext. is bordered by the Reedy River and is currently owned by Mt. Calvary Baptist Church. Woodfield Investments will purchase the tract from the church once rezoning is approved and develop the property, says Brian Schick, Woodfield partner. The development has been named Riverside because it will sit on the bank of the river along the Swamp Rabbit Trail. Only five of the eight acres are buildable because of the floodway, Schick says. The remainder will be converted into common areas for residents. The three buildings will be elevator-served, have climate-controlled corridors, and include studios, one- and two-bedroom units, and seven three-bedroom units at an average of 938 square feet. Construction is expected to begin by the end of this year with the first available units ready by November 2020, Schick says. The Charlotte, North Carolina-based developer’s other projects in the Greenville area include The Greene mixed-use development near Fluor Field that was completed in 2018 and .408 Jackson, the proposed mixed use development on the site of the Shoeless Joe Jackson museum. Riverside will be considered Class A, institutional grade, with standard amenities, sim-

ilar to The Greene amenities without the roof deck. Schick says rental rates will be lower than downtown’s at $1.57 per square foot, averaging from $1,100 for a studio to $2,100 for a three bedroom. Shick says he believes the location will be very attractive to those who want the convenience of living in the CBD but still 1.5 miles away with access to the trail. He says it’s likely to attract both young professionals and other folks who are active and want to take advantage of the trail. “I expect a mix of demographics,” he says.

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NEED TO KNOW

| NEWS

INSIDE

KM Fabrics: Mill still looms over Greenville’s textile history after 40 years n story by JOHN JETER | photos WILL CROOKS

Your ticket to a Peace Center show buys you a front-row seat to Greenville’s textile history. At L.A.’s Dolby Theatre, the Academy would like to thank the Upstate for its Oscar-worthy curtains. And if you caught Meghan and Harry’s wedding, those velvet ropes you see? Those came from here, too—all from a mill whose looms keep humming. “When we first started, a lot of people called it the miracle mill, just for us to stay in existence,” says Richard Heusel, who co-founded KM Fabrics, one of Greenville’s last surviving mills and one of the largest in the world producing pile fabrics. Last March marked the 40th anniversary of the company, which Heusel ran for 32 years as one of only three presidents; the other was Bob Lewis. Today, Paul Tantillo helms the textile plant, which during World War II manufactured duck cloth, a heavy woven cotton canvas. The 1940s-era building stands in the shadow of Brandon Mill, now apartments, and steps away from the textile-leagues ballpark where “Shoeless” Joe Jackson played. “We’re one of the few textile survivors in this area,” says Tantillo, 53, a native New Yorker who joined the company from Milliken five years ago. “We’re very proud of our roots.” Heusel, the son of German immigrants, started his career in textiles in 1957 in Louisville, Ky. In 1972, he became president of Piedmont Plush Mills, now a co-working space across from St. Francis Hospital. He and Smith Hendricks, another Piedmont Plush exec, launched KM Fabrics in 1979 with $150,000 in startup capital. The name honors Heusel’s parents’ German hometown, Kirchentellinsfurt, and Hendricks’ in the Montague community near Furman University. In 1983, the company paid off its $500,000 loan on the building. “We had some tough years, but through the years we persisted. My motto has always been, ‘Perseverance predominates,’ and it has through hard times, and fortunately, the last 25 or 30 years have been pretty good. ” Today, nearly 100 employees and 41 looms, including four new $400,000 Belgian machines and a $1 million “finishing range” purchased in a recent multimillion-dollar reinvest-

March 2019:

40th Anniversary of the company

1979:

KM Fabrics Launched with $150,000 in startup capital

Nearly 100:

Number of current employees

41:

Number of Looms

We had some tough years, but through the years we persisted. My motto has always been, ‘Perseverance predominates’...” - Richard Heusel, co-founder of KM Fabrics ment, churn out “a couple million yards” a year of velvet in the 150,000-square-foot facility. Eighty percent of its business comes from theatrical curtaining, such as Cirque de Soleil, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland and Carnegie Hall, to name a few. KM also makes velvety-soft material to shine shoes and buff floors, as well as for ropes at banks—or the purple ones at a certain royal wedding. In 2018, the Peace Center’s $2.4 million capital project included reupholstering its 2,111 seats, turning again to KM Fabrics, which donated 10,000 yards when the venue opened in 1990. “Velvet is special,” Heusel says. “I did not want to be associated with the company that did sheets and pillowcases. I mean, that’s pretty generic and not identifiable, but velvet has been

80% of Business:

Theatrical curtaining (including the Peace Center) around for centuries, and sometimes it’s still l in good shape over after over a hundred years.” While Heusel has since retired with his wife, Gwendolyn, to the South Carolina Lowcountry and has sold his shares in the privately owned company, he and Tantillo continue looking ahead. “I need to keep this thing going and growing in the right way,” Tantillo says. “It’s very humbling to walk in the footsteps of Richard Heusel.”

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11


NEWS |

NEED TO KNOW

TECHNOLOGY

Why IT can’t talk to your employees By LAURA HAIGHT president, portfoliosc.com

A subject line in my email recently caught my eye: “How to Explain IT to End Users.” That strikes me as a false premise. In reality, IT doesn’t need to teach users more about technology, but more likely it needs to learn more about users and their company’s business. As a VP of IT, my staff knew I would be ballistic if I heard anyone manning the help desk tell a user, “It works for me.” Who cares? It must work for them. And it doesn’t matter if they don’t understand the basics of internet addressing or troubleshooting. That is not their job. Their job is accounting, sales, product development, marketing. What technical programs routinely get wrong is not training on business communication. And it’s businesses that are left at risk when these skills are neglected. The purpose of this column since its inception has been to help articulate technology concepts, information, and developments to a non-technical audience of business executives. I am better equipped to do that because I am not a trained technologist. I was a very good user and communicator with executive experience outside IT. In fact, one of my roles as a senior manager at the corporate headquarters of a Fortune 500 company was to run our IT Executive Development pro-

12 UBJ | August 16, 2019

gram. Essentially teaching technologists how to relate to their executive colleagues and manage a business full of non-techies. This is not to say that employees at a marketing firm or manufacturing company don’t need to understand technology. That’s an imperative for all of us. But they don’t need to understand the how and why in order to grasp the what. What are the risks? What do I need to do to mitigate them? What do I need to know to make this tech work for me?


NEED TO KNOW

| NEWS

What’s a tech staffer to do?

• Get out of the data center. “Management by walking around” has been a thing for decades, but it’s not exactly in the mainstream for a lot of tech staff. You will be surprised what you can learn by talking to your users and seeing how they do things. • Stop doing what users ask for. And start asking them what they are trying to accomplish. Step One needs to be finding out what they need to do, then to deploy the right tool, system, or program. In addition, you will gain important information and a chance to work with another department. • Recognize that technology is a central gear in any business. While CIOs and VPs are routinely part of the management team, information about plans, programs, and changes in other departments may not always trickle down. Execs may feel that staff aren’t really interested. But that is selling them short and cutting off a professional growth lane for them. • Become a liaison to different departments. Attending staff and project meetings of other departments can have multiple advantages: IT becomes a partner, assigned staffers get a sense of ownership and responsibility for projects, and technologists learn about the business and, most importantly, how to communicate business issues to IT and IT issues to the business.

As a function integral to the success of almost every business, leaders have an obligation to help tech staff to see the bigger picture, to develop a deeper understanding of how their technologies are used, and to learn business and communication skills that will help those with aspirations get ahead as business leaders, not just higher-level techies.

REAL ESTATE

Duncan’s Apple Valley Industrial Park fully leased n story by ARIEL TURNER photos PROVIDED

Phase 1 of the Apple Valley Industrial Park in Duncan is now 100 percent leased, with the recent commitment of more than 75,000 square feet by an automotive supplier. The tenant leased space in the same industrial park two years ago. CBRE’s Marcus Cornelius and Broadstreet Partners’ Ryan Koop represented Panattoni in the lease transaction. Panattoni Development has also broken ground on Phase 4 of the industrial park, with construction expected to be completed by the first quarter of 2020. Phase 4 includes two speculative buildings – approximately 195,000 square feet and 327,670 square feet. The completion of Phase 4 will bring the Apple Valley Industrial Park to a total of six buildings with more than 1.4 million square feet.

“Purveyors of Classic American Style” 864.232.2761 | rushwilson.com 23 West North St., Downtown Greenville August 16, 2019 | upstatebusinessjournal.com

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NEWS |

NEED TO KNOW

REAL ESTATE

Real estate sales by Cliffs Realty and Walnut Cove Realty sustains major growth n story by CAMIELL FOULGER | photos PROVIDED

Real estate sales by Cliffs Realty and Walnut Cove Realty, a luxury home real estate team, are continuing to grow, totaling $58,775,751 in sales in the first half of 2019. Since the beginning of the year, Cliffs Realty and Walnut Cove Realty have closed on 80 luxury mountain and lake community sales. At Cliffs Valley, The Cliffs at Mountain Park, and The Cliffs at Glassy, a total of 31 properties have been closed on, reaching a sales volume of $16,912,450 within the first half of the year. And within the lake region, which includes The Cliffs at Keowee Springs, The Cliffs at Keowee Falls, and The Cliffs at Keowee Vineyards, a total of 14 properties have been closed on, reaching a sales volume of $11,292,500 within the short period of April 1-June 30. Walnut Cove Realty in Asheville has closed on 25 properties, totaling $25,191,301 in sales. “By closing the first half of the year with $59 million in sales, The Cliffs is positioned to celebrate its stron-

By closing the first half of the year with $59 million in sales, The Cliffs is positioned to celebrate its strongest year in more than a decade.”

REAL ESTATE

Hookah lounge from Charlotte signs lease in the Village of West Greenville n story by ARIEL TURNER | photo WILL CROOKS

The vacant restaurant space at 1237 Pendleton St. in the Village of West Greenville has a new tenant that will bring a chill hangout vibe with vintage chairs, bookshelves, regionally inspired cuisine and bar, weekly entertainment, and flavored hookah. Named Red Culture, the new lounge is an offshoot of the popular Charlotte concept Red@28th owned by Darren “Jaz” Vincent. This will be his third location, and he plans to have it open before year end. The 4,500-square-foot turn-key space was most recently occupied by Tipsy Music Pub, a short-lived concept from the owners of Tipsy Taco that closed in February 2018. They renovated the former Dr. Mac Arnold’s Blues Restaurant to include a full kitchen, bar, and stage. “I feel like I can convert that to a nice vintage space. I don’t feel like I have to upgrade it that much,” Vincent says. “And then I love the fact that

14 UBJ | August 16, 2019

Rob Duckett, president of The Cliffs

gest year in more than a decade,” Rob Duckett, president of The Cliffs, said. “With this upward momentum as well as significant plans in the works for new club amenities, we expect to see continued growth through the end of the year.” For more information about The Cliffs, visit their website at cliffsliving.com.

And then I love the fact that where it’s at. It reminds me of when we started in NoDa, Charlotte. So I see the same growth over there. So hoping that it expands and we grow with it.”

where it’s at. It reminds - Darren “Jaz” Vincent, me of when Red Culture Owner we started in NoDa, Charlotte. So I see the same growth over there. So hoping that it expands and we grow with it.” NoDa stands for North Davidson and is the city’s arts and entertainment district, much like the Village of West Greenville. “We’ve been studying this area for the last couple years,” Vincent says. “We’re gonna have fun with it.” For the food component, Vincent says they will take the best from each notable geographic region of the country — red beans and rice from New Orleans, hot dogs from Chicago, pizza to represent New York, for example.

Entertainment will be a mix of regional musicians, DJs, spoken word performance, comedy, and whoever else fits the bill, he says. Hours of operation will be seven days a week, noon-2 a.m. Rakan Draz of Avison Young represented the landlord in the lease transaction. The property is owned by Wingspan Properties LLC, registered to Michael Watts, who owns several properties in the Village of West Greenville, including the buildings that house Sixpence Salon and Golden Brown & Delicious a few doors down. Watts’ brother, Kemp Watts, is also part owner.


dealMAKERS Notable Commercial Real Estate Transactions | June - August 2019 Berkshire Hathaway Homeservices C. Dan Joyner, Realtors, Commercial Division:

Matt Carter represented the landlord, Northside Traders LLC, and tenant, Tollison Law Firm, in the lease of ±3,500 SF of office space at 18 Markley St., Greenville.

Bryon Culbertson represented the seller in investment rentals at 313 Perry Ave., Greenville.

Matt Carter and Steve Greer represented the landlord, Clemson Downtown Properties, in the lease of restaurant space at 391 Clemson Ave., Suite 105, Clemson.

Nelson Garrison and Steve Greer represented the landlord and tenant in a lease of ±3,200 SF of flex space at 6 Boland Court, Greenville.

Hope Tz Schmalzl represented the landlord in the lease of a ±1,500 SF restaurant space at 1340 N. Pleasantburg Drive, Greenville.

Steve Greer represented the landlord, SL Development, in leasing a 1,200 SF office space at 205 Bryce Circle, Greenville. Hope Tz Schmalzl represented the landlord leasing a ±1,982 SF retail space at 107 Mills Ave., Greenville, to the tenant, Matrix Chiropractic.

dealMAKERS Company Index:

Boiling Springs Road. John Scott represented the landlord in leasing 30,000 SF at 1370 Shiloh Church Road. Charles Gouch, Blaine Hart, and Shelby Dodson represented the landlord in leasing a 23,231 SF office at Patewood Business Center, Building 4, 1 Marcus Drive, Greenville.

CBRE:

Brian Scurlock and Tommy Molin represented the seller in the sale of ±20,140 SF on Main Street, Laurens.

Trey Pennington represented the tenant in a lease renewal for a 226,140 SF industrial property at 950 Brisack Road, Spartanburg.

Blaine Hart and Marcus Cornelius represented the seller in the sale of a ±15,000 SF medical office building.

Trey Pennington represented the landlord in leasing a 177,060 SF industrial space at Spartan Ridge.

Marcus Cornelius represented the tenant in leasing a 15,000 SF industrial space at 202 Industrial Drive.

BIG

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, C. Dan Joyner, Realtors® – Commercial Division........ 15 CBRE.............................................................. 15 Coldwell Banker Commercial Caine’s Greenville & Spartanburg Offices.................... 18 Colliers International....................................... 20 Cushman & Wakefield | Thalhimer................. 22 Flagship Properties......................................... 22 KDS Commercial Properties............................ 23 Langston Black............................................... 23 Lee & Associates............................................ 24 NAI Earle Furman............................................ 26 Pintail Properties............................................ 27 Spencer Hines Properties................................ 27 The Burgess Co., LLC...................................... 30

Nelson Charles Gouch represented the tenant in Trey Pennington represented the A DEAL Garrison tenant in leasing a 100,000 SF indus- leasing a ±14,780 SF office located at ONE, Nelson Garrison represented the represent2 W. Washington St., Greenville. trial property at 830 Hunter Industrial seller, Bo Hunter LLC, in the sale ed the Park Road, Laurens. of a concrete plant and land at Charles Gouch and Shelby Dodson reprelandlord, 106 Industrial Blvd., Fountain Inn. sented the landlord in a lease renewal for Marcus Cornelius represented the DWB Pleas12,800 SF at 101 N. Main St. Blaine Hart landlord in leasing a 75,320 SF antburg represented the tenant. industrial property at Apple Valley Industrial LLC, in an ATM lease at 1332 S. PleasantPark – Phase I. burg Drive, Greenville, to the tenant, Bank of Charles Gouch and Blaine Hart represented America. the landlord in leasing an 11,780 SF office at Tripp Sellers and David Redmond representOne Liberty Square, Greenville. ed the seller in the sale of a 56,050 SF office Matt Carter and Steve Greer represented investment at 123 Kiowa Lane, the landlord, 68 Pointe Circle LLC, in leasing A DEAL Brittany Farrar Piedmont. a ±13,000 SF office at 68 Pointe Circle, Tripp Sellers and David Redmond represented Greenville, to the tenant, SL & Associates represented the seller in the sale the landlord Blaine Hart represented the buyer Corp. of a 56,050 SF office investment in leasing an in the purchase of a ±45,234 SF at 123 Kiowa Lane, Piedmont. 11,600 SF medical office building. Michael Joseph represented the seller in the office located sale of an automotive building at 4913 White Justin Hirsch represented the buyer at 121 Interstate Blvd., Greenville. Horse Road, Greenville. in the sale of ±44,229 SF of land tracts in Charles Gouch, Blaine Hart, and Shelby the Pinehaven subdivision. Nelson Garrison represented the seller, Bo Dodson represented the landlord in a lease Hunter LLC, in the sale of a concrete plant and Tommy Molin represented the seller in the renewal for 10,850 SF at the Patewood land at 106 Industrial Blvd., Fountain Inn. sale of a ±36,154 SF retail investment on Business Center, Greenville.

BIG

Ryan Clark represented the tenant in leasing 10,481 SF at 22 S Main St. Charles Gouch and Doug Webster represented the landlord in leasing a 10,372 SF office at Camperdown in Greenville. Blaine Hart represented the tenant. Charles Gouch, Blaine Hart, and Shelby Dodson represented the landlord in leasing a 10,325 SF office at Park 37. Tripp Sellers, David Redmond, and Tommy Molin represented the seller in leasing 8,300 SF at 24 Park Woodruff Drive, Greenville. Tommy Molin represented the landlord leasing ±8,000 SF at 305 Pelham Road, Greenville. Blaine Hart represented the landlord in leasing a 7,983 SF space at Two Liberty Square, Greenville. Charles Gouch represented the tenant. Charles Gouch, Blaine Hart, and Shelby Dodson represented the landlord leasing a 7,728 SF space at Harbinger.

August 16, 2019 | upstatebusinessjournal.com

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dealMAKERS NOTABLE COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS Brian Scurlock represented the tenant in leasing ±7,500 SF on Wade Hampton Blvd. Blaine Hart represented the tenant in leasing a 7,090 SF retail space located at 10 Falcon Crest Drive, Greenville.

Charles Gouch, Blaine Hart, and Shelby Dodson represented the landlord in leasing 3,515 SF at 1 Marcus Drive, Greenville. Charles Gouch represented the landlord in leasing a 2,800 SF space at 630 E. Washington St., Greenville.

Blaine A DEAL Hart and Charles Gouch, Blaine Hart, and ShelTrey Pennington represented the Marcus by Dodson represented the landlord in buyer in purchasing 51 acres at Cornelius leasing 2,518 SF at Harbinger. Lister Road and J. Verne Smith representDoug Webster represented the tenant Parkway, Greer. ed the in a lease expansion for ±2,335 SF at tenant in 124 Verdae Blvd., Greenville. leasing a 6,611 SF space at 10 Enterprise Blvd., Greenville. Brittany Farrar represented the tenant in leasing a 2,100 SF space at 430 Haywood Tommy Molin represented the seller in the Road, Greenville. sale of ±6,336 SF on 525 Bypass 123.

BIG

Charles Gouch and Blaine Hart represented the landlord in a lease renewal of a 5,918 SF office at 84 Villa Road, Greenville.

Blaine Hart represented the landlord in leasing a 2,010 SF office space at Claussen, 400 Augusta St., Greenville.

Brian Scurlock and Tommy Molin represented the landlord in leasing a ±4,943 SF retail space in Verdae Village.

Tommy Molin and Brian Scurlock represented the landlord in leasing ±1,948 SF at 810 E. Main St., Laurens.

Ryan Clark and Brittany Farrar represented the tenant in a lease renewal for a 4,800 SF office at 481 Garlington Road, Greenville. Doug Webster represented the tenant in leasing ±4,359 SF at 124 Verdae Blvd., Greenville. Charles Gouch and Shelby Dodson represented the landlord in leasing a 4,000 SF office at Riverview Business Park, 4324 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors. Charles Gouch, Blaine Hart, and Shelby Dodson represented the landlord in leasing a 3,898 SF office at Park 37. Brittany Farrar and Ryan Clark represented the buyer in the purchase of a 3,600 SF office building at 115 Whitsett St., Greenville.

16 UBJ | August 16, 2019

the landlord in leasing ±1,724 SF at 1106 Woodruff Road, Greenville. Tommy Molin and Brian Scurlock represented the landlord in leasing ±1,200 SF at Verdae Village. Tommy Molin and Brian Scurlock represented the landlord in leasing ±1,200 SF at 301 Haywood Road, Greenville. Tommy Molin and Brian Scurlock represented the landlord in leasing ±1,200 SF at Verdae Village. Tommy Molin and Brian Scurlock represented the landlord in leasing ±1,200 SF at Verdae Village. Shelby Dodson and Justin Hirsch represented the buyer in the purchase of a 1,180 SF office building.

Dr. Trey Pennington represented the buyer in the purchase of 33 acres at Lister Road and J. Verne Smith Parkway, Greer. Marcus Cornelius represented the buyer in the purchase of 61 acres at Apple Valley Industrial Park – Phase IV. Marcus Cornelius represented the buyer in the purchase of 77 acres at Apple Valley Industrial Park – Phase IV. Trey Pennington represented the buyer in the purchase of 36 acres at Lister Road and J. Verne Smith Parkway, Greer. Marcus Cornelius represented the buyer in purchasing 62 acres at Apple Valley Industrial Park – Phase IV.

Charles Gouch, Blaine Hart, and Shelby Dodson represented the landlord in leasing 1,007 SF at Park 37.

Trey Pennington represented the landlord and Marcus Cornelius represented the tenant in a lease renewal of 316,491 SF at 525 Dunnett Court, Spartanburg.

Brian Scurlock represented the tenant in leasing ±1,935 SF on S. Main St.

Blaine Hart represented the landlord in leasing 864 SF at Landmark, 301 N. Main St., Greenville.

Charles Gouch represented the landlord in leasing a 21,846 SF office space at 211 Bi Lo Blvd., Greenville.

Charles Gouch and Blaine Hart represented the landlord in leasing 1,847 SF at Harbinger. Shelby Dodson represented the tenant.

Brittany Farrar represented the landlord in leasing 366 SF at 115 Whitsett St., Greenville.

Brittany Farrar represented the tenant in leasing 1,832 SF at Green Gate Office Park.

Trey Pennington represented the buyer in purchasing 51 acres at Lister Road and J. Verne Smith Parkway, Greer.

Charles Gouch represented the tenant in leasing 1,800 SF at 61 Beattie Place, Greenville. Blaine Hart represented the tenant in leasing 1,749 SF at 330 B Pelham Road, Greenville. Brittany Farrar represented the tenant in leasing 1,726 SF at 783 E Butler Road, Mauldin. Tommy Molin and Brian Scurlock represented

A BIG

Charles Gouch, Blaine Hart, and Shelby Dodson represented the landlord in leasing a 5,733 SF office space at 1 Marcus Drive, Greenville. DEAL

Brian Scurlock and Tommy Molin represented the seller in the sale of ±20,140 SF on Main Street, Laurens.

Marcus Cornelius represented the buyer in purchasing 83 acres at Apple Valley Industrial Park – Phase III. Trey Pennington represented the buyer in purchasing 63 acres at Lister Road and J. Verne Smith Parkway, Greer.

Justin Hirsch represented the seller in the sale of ±12.6 acres at Keys Dr. and Marcus

Tommy Molin and Brian Scurlock represented the landlord in leasing 3,820 SF at 301 Haywood Road, Greenville. Tommy Molin and Brian Scurlock represented the landlord in leasing 2,900 SF at 1106 Woodruff Road, Greenville. Brittany Farrar represented the tenant in a lease renewal of 2,100 SF at 730 S. Pleas-


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dealMAKERS NOTABLE COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS antburg Drive, Greenville. Brittany Farrar represented the landlord in leasing 5 SF at 115 Whitsett St., Greenville. Trey Pennington represented the seller in the sale of 71 acres at 1061 Duncan Reidville Road, Duncan. Trey Pennington represented the buyer in purchasing 2 acres on Duncan Reidville Road, Duncan.

Coldwell Banker Commercial Caine’s Greenville & Spartanburg Offices:

Pete Brett and Sammy DuBose represented the sellers, Central Realty Holdings LLC and WWG LLC, in the sale of +12.98 acres at Haywood Road and Transit Drive, Greenville, to the buyer, CPC Real Estate Acquisitions LLC. Tim Satterfield represented the seller, Universal Development Corp., in the sale of an +8,250 SF office building on +0.51 acre at 791 E. Main St., Spartanburg, to the buyer, ECC Holdings LLC. Pete Brett, David Sigmon, and Matt Vanvick represented the seller, 10 Toy Street LLC, in the sale of a +20,277 SF office building on +1.61 acres at 10 Toy St., Greenville, to the buyer, Volition LLC.

Pete Brett, David Sigmon, and Matt Vanvick represented the seller, Southern WilliamsPete Brett, David Sigmon, and Matt Vanvick burg Title LLC, in the sale of a +1,300 SF repreoffice condominium at 700 E. North A DEAL sented St., Unit 4, Greenville, to the buyer, Pete Brett, David Sigmon, and the seller, United Home Loan Services Inc. Matt Vanvick represented the 522 North seller, HCP Ventures IX LLC, in Church Pete Brett, David Sigmon, and Matt the sale of a +7,772 SF medical Street Vanvick represented the seller, HCP office building on +0.648 acre at LLC, in the Ventures IX LLC, in the sale of a 9 Mills Ave., Greenville, to the sale of a +7,772 SF medical office building on buyer, NV LLC. +5,500 +0.648 acre at 9 Mills Ave., GreenSF office ville, to the buyer, NV LLC.

BIG

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building on +0.79 acre at 522 N. Church St., Greenville, to the buyer, SP3 Investments LLC, represented by Charles Humphreys.

Pete Brett, David Sigmon, and Matt Vanvick represented the buyer, TR Hospitality Group LLC, in the purchase of +5 acres at 751 Old Buncombe Road, Travelers Rest, from the seller, TR Investments LLC.

Pete Brett, David Sigmon, and Matt Vanvick represented the buyer, Flatiron Partners LLC, in the purchase of +0.97 George ZimmerA DEAL acre at 256 S. Pleasantburg man represented George Zimmerman represented Drive, Greenville, from the seller, the seller, Conthe seller, Connector Plus LLC, Appian-Pleasantburg LLC. nector Plus LLC, in the sale of +24.15 acres at in the sale of Sagittarius Way and Stable Road, Pete Brett, David Sigmon, and +24.15 acres Piedmont, to the buyer, Vulcan Matt Vanvick represented the at Sagittarius Lands Inc. buyer, AMCO Properties LLC, Way and Stable in the purchase of a +2,100 Road, Piedmont, SF retail building at 3703 White to the buyer, Vulcan Lands Inc. Horse Road, Greenville, from the sellers, Paul D. Carter, Floride G. Carter, and R.L. Carter. Pete Brett, David Sigmon, and Matt Vanvick represented the buyers, 225 East Wood Pete Brett, David Sigmon, and Matt Vanvick Street LLC, NewOpps LLC, and PPTM represented the buyer, James F. Brehm, in Properties LLC in the purchase of a +8,714 the purchase of a +1,386 SF office building SF medical office building at 225 E. Wood on +0.27 acre at 308 W. Stone Ave., Green- St., Spartanburg, from the seller, Wood Street ville, from the seller, 308 West Stone LLC. Property LLC. Graham Howle represented the buyer, EnTim Satterfield represented the seller, deavour Enterprises LLC, in the purchase of Henderson Properties of Spartanburg LLC, a +7,000 SF retail building on +0.6 acre at in the sale of a +4,400 SF retail/residential 4913 White Horse Road, Greenville, from the building on +0.04 acre at 151 W. Main St., seller, The Estate of Lloyd R. Cato Sr. Spartanburg, to the buyer, 151 West Main

EXPLORE THOUSANDS OF ACRES OF INDUSTRIAL LAND THROUGHOUT SOUTH CAROLINA & GEORGIA

BIG

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18 UBJ | August 16, 2019


dealMAKERS NOTABLE COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS

GOODWILL RETAIL STORE 19,500 SF retail store completed July 2019.

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dealMAKERS NOTABLE COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS LLC.

the leasing of a +7,020 SF office space at 201 E. North St., first floor, Greenville, to the tenant, Brasfield & Gorrie LLC.

Pete Brett, David Sigmon, and Matt Vanvick represented the tenant, H&S Style Group LLC, in the Tim Satterfield represented the A DEAL leasing of a landlord, M.T. Enterprises LLC, in the Tim Satterfield represented the +1,100 SF leasing of a +1,500 SF office space seller, Universal Development retail space at 360 E. Main St., Suite 2, SparCorp., in the sale of an +8,250 SF tanburg, to the tenant, Henderson at 4 Market office building on +0.51 acre at Point Drive, Sales Inc. 791 E. Main St., Spartanburg, to Greenville, Brad Halter represented the seller, the buyer, ECC Holdings LLC. from the McDaniel Associates LLC, in the landlord, H & sale of six multifamily duplexes N Properties LLC. on +1.657 acres at 230 E. Broad St., Pete Brett, David Sigmon, and Matt Vanvick Greenville, to the buyer, Crest Communities represented the tenant, Summit 24 LLC, Group LLC. dba Tropical Smoothie, in the leasing of Pete Brett, David Sigmon, and Matt Vanvick a +1,800 SF retail space at 3558 S.C. represented the buyer, AMCO Properties Highway 153, Greenville, from the landlord, LLC, in the purchase of a +2,100 SF retail Friddle & Friddle LLC. building on +0.34 acre at 3703 White Horse Pete Brett, David Sigmon, and Matt Vanvick Road, Greenville, from the sellers, Paul D. represented the landlord, Mountain City Land Carter, Floride G. Carter, and R.L. Carter. & Improvement Co. LLC, in the leasing of a Pete Brett, David Sigmon, and Matt Vanvick +6,158 SF office space at Innovate, 148 River St., Suite 100, Greenville, to the tenant, represented the buyer, Little Italy Restaurant LLC, in the purchase of a +1,800 SF retail Visit Greenville SC. building on +0.98 acre at 2900 Pelzer HighDavid Sigmon and Sammy DuBose repreway, Easley, from the seller, Zenny C. McCall. sented the landlord, Wilson Farms Co., in

BIG

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George Zimmerman represented the seller, Connector Plus LLC, in the sale of +1.458 acres on Piedmont Highway, Piedmont, to the buyer, Sonoma Management LLC. Rick Cauthen represented the landlord, Renaissance Exchange LLC, in the leasing of a +1,800 SF office building at 104 Renaissance Circle, Greenville, to the tenant, Palmetto Family Works LLC. David Sigmon and Nicholas Sardone represented the landlord, 200 East Broad LLC, in the leasing of a +3,560 SF office space at 200 E. Broad St., Suite 220, Greenville, to the tenant, Graycliff Capital Management LLC.

Colliers International: Richard Barrett and Brannan Hudson represented the landlord, MTB Properties LLC, in leasing 3,000 SF at 200 Augusta Arbor Way, Greenville, to the tenant, McLaughlin Group.

A BIG DEAL

Second Half Properties LLC, in leasing 8,620 SF at 603 High Tech Court, Greer, to the tenant, National AME Inc. Brantley Anderson and Taylor Allen represented the landlord, Pinnacle Financial Partners, in leasing 1,200 SF at 6602 Calhoun Memorial Highway, Easley, to the tenant, Avtex Commercial Properties. Brantley Anderson and Taylor Allen represented the tenant, the Greater Greenville Chamber of Commerce, in leasing 9,119 SF at RiverPlace from the landlord, RiverPlace Office LLC. Frank Hammond represented the landlord in the lease of the former 8,000 SF Montessori School of Greenville at 305 Pelham Road, Greenville, to the tenant, Learning and Growing Upstate Inc.

Brantley Anderson and Taylor Allen represented the seller, The Greater Greenville Chamber of Commerce, in the sale of 23,479 SF of office space in Greenville to the buyer, 401 Pettigru Group LLC.

Richard Barrett and Brannan Hudson represented the landlord,

Frank Hammond represented the seller in the sale of 1419 Poinsett Highway, Greenville, to the buyer, Expressions Unlimited Inc.

Frank Hammond represented the seller in the sale of the former

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20 UBJ | August 16, 2019


dealMAKERS NOTABLE COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS

3,200 SF JL Toppers restaurant at 1628 Woodruff Road, Greenville, to the buyer, Vega Holding Company LLC. Frank Hammond represented the seller in the sale of the former bank branch at 1620 Woodruff Road, Greenville, to the buyer, Self-Help Credit Union.

A BIG DEAL

ton Hall represented the seller, Pelzer Pointe Inc., in the sale of 28 acres in Pelzer to the buyer, Rooker Properties.

Ralph Settle represented the buyer, 1640 John B. White Sr. Blvd. LLC, in the purchase of 64 acres from the seller, Sampaguita Investments LLC.

Garrett Scott, John Montgomery, and Brockton Hall represented the seller, Rural Renaissance LLC, in the sale of 18+ acres in Greenville to the buyer, Greystone Acres LLC. Garrett Scott, John Montgomery, and Brockton Hall represented the landlord, Reger Holdings, in leasing 100,000 SF of industrial space in Greenville to the tenant, Chempak International Inc. Garrett Scott, John Montgomery, and Brockton Hall represented the buyer in the purchase of 3,250 SF at 151 West Main St., Spartanburg, from the seller, Henderson Properties of Spartanburg LLC. Garrett Scott, John Montgomery, and Brock-

Scott Burgess, Lance Byars, and Hector Mendoza represented the landlord, Bourne Highway 81 LLC, in the lease renewal for 2,800 SF in Anderson to the tenant, Sakura Japanese Restaurant.

Scott Burgess, Lance Byars, and Hector Mendoza represented the landlord, ARC ASAANDSC001 LLC, in leasing 1,200 SF at 108 Station Drive, Anderson, to the tenant, Eclipse Boutique. Scott Burgess, Lance Byars, and Hector Mendoza represented Pruitt Corp. of Anderson in the lease renewal for Model Barber Shop at 2900 N. Main St., Anderson. Scott Burgess, Lance Byars, and Hector Mendoza represented the landlord, Gresham LLC, in leasing 1,475 SF at 926 N.E. Main St., Simpsonville, to the tenant, Phearum Ven.

Scott Burgess, Lance Byars, and Hector Mendoza represented the landlord, New Market Fairview LLC, in leasing 3,476 SF at 655 Fairview Road, Simpsonville, to the tenant, Harvard’s Liquor. Scott Burgess, Lance Byars, and Hector Mendoza represented the landlord, New Market Anderson LLC, in the lease of 3,200 SF at 651 Highway 28 Bypass, Anderson, to the tenant, EZ Cash Loans of SC Inc. Scott Burgess and Lance Byars represented the seller in the sale of land on Floyd Baker Boulevard in Gaffney to the buyer, Empress Wash Holdings LLC. Lyn Tyner represented the tenant, CBIZ National Tax Office LLC, in leasing 2,878 SF at 530 Howell Road, Greenville.

E. Woodside & Co. LLC, in the sale of 38 acres on Ashmore Bridge Road in Mauldin to the buyer, Carolina Foothills Federal Credit Union. Frank Hammond represented the seller, South State Bank, in the sale of a 3,797 SF former bank building at 1620 Woodruff Road, Greenville, to the buyer, Self-Help Credit Union. Scott Burgess, Lance Byars, and Hector Mendoza represented CAPROCQ GREENVILLE LLC in the lease renewal of 2,421 SF for Ivy Salon in the Wells Fargo Building at 15 S. Main St., Greenville. Scott Burgess, Lance Byars, and Hector Mendoza represented the tenant, GOLFTEC Enterprises LLC, in the lease of 2,253 SF at 4100 Pelham Road, Greenville from the landlord, 4100 Pelham LLC.

Brantley Anderson and Taylor Allen represented the seller, The Greater Greenville Chamber of Commerce, A DEAL in the sale of 23,479 SF Garrett Scott, John Montgomery, of office space in Greenand Brockton Hall represented the ville to the buyer, 401 seller, Rural Renaissance LLC, in Pettigru Group LLC. the sale of 18+ acres in Greenville Frank Hammond repreto the buyer, Greystone Acres LLC. sented the seller, James

BIG

Scott Burgess, Lance Byars, and Hector Mendoza represented the landlord, Anderson Retail Management LLC, in the lease of 1,866 SF at 3433 Clemson Blvd., Clemson, to the tenant,

FOR LEASE F S 3 0 7 ABLE

Hwy 101 at Reidville Road (Hwy 296) | Greer, SC 29651 Grice Hunt, SIOR 864.678.5935 grice@naief.com

Clay Williams

864.678.5938 clay@naief.com

, BDIVID 6 9 3 SU

210

,820

SUBD

IVID

ABLE

SF

Ford Borders, SIOR 864.678.5943 fborders@naief.com

Developed By:

MANUFACTURING | WAREHOUSE | DISTRIBUTION August 16, 2019 | upstatebusinessjournal.com

21


dealMAKERS NOTABLE COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS

Southern Specialty Finance Inc. Scott Burgess, Lance Byars, JP Scurry, and Scottie Smith represented the landlord in the sale of the former Wild Wings location at 15 West Washington St., Greenville, to the buyer, Perry Hospitality Group LLC. Richard Barrett and Brannan Hudson represented the landlord, Ziff Properties, in leasing 1,400 SF at 319 Garlington Road, Greenville, to the tenant, Wentzell LLC. Brantley Anderson, Taylor Allen, and Bailey Tollison represented the landlord, LCP Liberty Square, in leasing 5,122 SF at 55 Beattie Place, Greeville, to the tenant, Treatment Centers Holdco LLC.

Client-Centric Commercial Real Estate www. pintailcapitalpartners .com 864.729.4500

Brantley Anderson, Taylor Allen, and Bailey Tollison represented the landlord, SC Telco Federal Credit Union, in leasing 2,039 SF at 420 E. Park Ave., Greenville, to the tenant, BDO USA LLP.

A BIG DEAL

Frank Hammond represented the seller in the sale of the former bank branch at 1620 Woodruff Road, Greenville, to the buyer, Self-Help Credit Union.

M a s h b u r n C o n st r u ct i o n Building with Integrity

Brantley Anderson, Taylor Allen, and Bailey Tollison represented the tenant, ECPI University, in leasing 30,769 SF at 1001 Keys Drive, Greenville, from the landlord, ROIB 385 Greenville LLC.

C O N TAC T JA M E S H U D S O N 8 6 4 . 6 6 0 . 8 5 2 8 : : j h u d s o n @ m a s h b u r n c o n st r u c t i o n . c o m w w w. m a s h b u r n c o n st r u c t i o n . c o m

22 UBJ | August 16, 2019

Scott Burgess, Lance Byars, and Hector Mendoza represented the tenant, Red Wing Shoes, in leasing 2,526 SF at Dorman Crossroads in Spartanburg from the landlord, Smart Growth Spartanburg LLC.

Cushman & Wakefield | Thalhimer: Kyle Berdugo and Laura Harmon facilitated the lease of 4,483 SF located ate 6000 Pelham Rd., Greenville, to American Funeral Financial, LLC.

A BIG DEAL

Kyle Berdugo and Laura Harmon facilitated the lease of 4,483 SF located ate 6000 Pelham Rd., Greenville, to American Funeral Financial, LLC.

Kyle Berdugo and Laura Harmon facilitated the lease renewal of 1,798 SF located at 37 Villa Rd., Greenville, for the tenant, Prometric. Kyle Berdugo and Laura Harmon facilitated the lease of 1,776 SF located at 5 Creekside Park Ct., Ste. G, Greenville, to Perceptive Recruiting.

Flagship Properties:

Brantley Anderson, Taylor Allen, and Bailey Tollison represented the landlord, Intercontinental, in leasing 14,930 SF at 1 Independence Point, Greenville, to the tenant, Centerplate.

Josh Tew represented the sublandlord in subleasing ±5,684 SF of office space located at 400 Executive Center Dr., Greenville. Jim Brown represented the subtenant, Ameris Bank.

Ralph Settle represented the buyer, 1640 John B. White Sr. Blvd. LLC, in the purchase of 64 acres from the seller, Sampaguita Investments LLC.

Josh Tew represented the tenant, Benchmark Mortgage, in the leasing ±2,500 SF of office space located at 420 The Parkway, Ste. E, Greer.

Scott Burgess and Lance Byars represented the tenant, Lee Spa Nails, in the lease of 2,855 SF at 401 E. Stone Ave., Greenville, from the landlord, Greenville-Northpointe Associates LLC.

RETAIL : INDUSTRIAL : HEALTHCARE : OFFICE : INSTITUTIONAL : HISTORIC

for 2,357 SF at 1143 Woodruff Road, Greenville, to the tenant, Restore Hyper Wellness + Cryotherapy.

Scott Burgess, Lance Byars, and Hector Mendoza represented the landlord, Fairview Market LLC, in the lease renewal of 1,400 SF at 655 Fairview Road, Simpsonville, to the tenant, Hibachi Grill. Scott Burgess, Lance Byars, and Hector Mendoza represented the landlord in a lease

A BIG DEAL

Jim Brown represented the buyer, Moss Real Properties LLC in the purchase of a ±3,500 SF office building located at 125 Pelham Commons Blvd., Greenville. Josh Tew represented the landlord, in leasing ±2,290 SF of retail space located at 1559 & 1561 Laurens Rd., Greenville, to the tenant, FitPast50. Jim Brown represented the buyer, Caro-


dealMAKERS NOTABLE COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS

lina Foothills Federal Credit Union in the Josh Tew represented the landlord in leasing purchase of a ±2,000 SF retail space located A DEAL ±2.38 acres at 100 W. North St., Greenville, to Benji Smith represented the buyer, the tenant, Private Label Carolinas on Ashmore Insight Financial Staffing in the Bridge Rd., LLC. purchase of a ±1,925 SF office Mauldin. Josh Tew represented the landlord building located at 48 Parkway Benji Smith in leasing a ±2,044 SF office Commons, Greer. represented space located at 111 Pelham Comthe buyer, mons, Greenville, to the tenant, Insight Financial Staffing in the purchase of Southern Homecare Services LLC. a ±1,925 SF office building located at 48 KDS Commercial Parkway Commons, Greer.

BIG

Jim Brown represented the buyer, Moss Real Properties LLC in the purchase of a ±3,500 SF office building located at 125 Pelham Commons Blvd., Greenville. Jim Brown represented the tenant, Circadian Funding LLC, in leasing a ±1,200 SF office space located at 205 Bryce Cir., Simpsonville. Jim Brown represented the tenant, Prosperity Group LLC, in leasing ±1,850 SF of office space located at 3515 Pelham Rd., Ste. 101, Greenville.

Properties:

Bobby Miller and Chris Butler facilitated the sale of a 8,500 SF warehouse located at 1140 White Horse Rd., Greenville.

A BIG DEAL

Brad Doyle and Mark Ratchford represented the seller, Swamp Rabbit Properties, LLC of a 55,000 SF light industrial building and associated 56 acres located at 1004 Greer Hwy., Travelers Rest.

Bobby Miller facilitated the sale of 25 acres located on Main St. in Belton.

Mike Kiriakides represented the tenant, Pronk Studios in the lease of their new video production facility located in the Highland Business Park, 355 Woodruff

Rd., Greenville. Brad Doyle and Mark Ratchford represented the seller, Swamp Rabbit Properties, LLC of a 55,000 SF light industrial building and associated 56 acres located at 1004 Greer Hwy., Travelers Rest.

the seller in the sale of 800 Squires Point, Duncan to the purchaser, Falcon Real Estate Development. Brad Doyle represented the buyer, 25 Mills, LLC, in the purchase of a 5,314 SF building on Mills Ave. in Greenville.

Chris Butler represented South Atlantic Healthcare in the lease of Class A office space located at the Harbinger Building, 777 Lowndes Hill Rd., Greenville.

Brad Doyle and Mark Ratchford facilitated the lease of a 4,500 SF office building located at 610 N. Main St., Greenville to the tenant, Mussman Architects.

Mike Kiriakides facilitated the lease of American Eagle Builders’ new corporate office located at 23 N. Main St., Travelers Rest.

Langston Black:

Chris Butler facilitated the sale of a free-standing, professional office space at 308 W. Stone Ave., Greenville. Gary Kirby represented the seller of a free-standing office building located at 3703 White Horse Rd., Greenville. Mark Ratchford represented the buyer of a 71-acre commercial site located on State Park Rd. in Travelers Rest. Gary Kirby represented

Bob Ashworth represented the landlord in a three-year lease of 108-B Trade St., Greer, to the tenant, David Harley, an attorney from Charleston.

Rick Hammett brokered the sale of 31 acres at Brockman A DEAL McClimon and Rick Hammett brokered the sale Abner Creek roads in of 31 acres at Brockman McCliGreer. This land will mon and Abner Creek roads in be developed into a Greer. This land will be developed new mixed-use resinto a new mixed-use residential idential community community of 50 townhomes and of 50 townhomes 80 single-family lots. and 80 single-family lots.

BIG

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August 16, 2019 | upstatebusinessjournal.com

23


dealMAKERS NOTABLE COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS

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OVER 30 YEARS OF DEDICATED EXPERIENCE IN ALL ASPECTS OF COMMERCIAL BROKERAGE AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT The mission of Austin Nelson Property Solutions, LLC is to seek excellence by providing the finest professional real estate services to selected markets and clients, maintaining consistent profitability, and preserving long-term asset value. We offer you a full range of commercial real estate services, the benefit of our experience and our knowledge of the local market. John E. Austin, III Broker-in-Charge 864-444-1457

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Call us at 864-735-7091 to learn more about our wide range of commercial real estate services and to find out how we can help you.

www.austinnelsonpropertysolutions.com 530 Howell Rd Suite 200, Greenville, SC 29615

24 UBJ | August 16, 2019

Rick Hammett represented the buyer, L&L tenant, Southwest Funding. Enterprises Bob Ashworth and Chuck Langston A DEAL Inc., in the facilitated the sale of 77 acres Bob Ashworth represented the purchase of on Crescent Greenpond Road in seller, 1840 S Highway 14 LLC, ±4 acres Woodruff. with the sale of a 100,000 SF at 150 warehouse at 1840 S. Highway 14, Roger Barnes represented the seller Ebenezer Greer, to the buyer, Muran Property in the sale of two income-producing Road, Greer. Group. properties on South Buncombe Road Tim Allender in Greer. represented the landlord, Bentley Properties LLC, in a Chuck Langston represented the buyer, three-year lease of a 1,200 SF space at 3 Expressions Unlimited Inc., with the purTown Center Drive, Greer, to the tenant, Titan chase of a 1,900 SF space at 1419 Poinsett Fitness. Highway, Greenville.

BIG

Bob Ashworth represented the seller, 1840 S Highway 14 LLC, with the sale of a 100,000 SF warehouse at 1840 S. Highway 14, Greer, to the buyer, Muran Property Group.

A BIG DEAL

Chuck Langston represented the seller, Wilene Mason, in the sale of a 142-acre parcel on Lister Road in Greer. Chuck Langston represented the buyer, Lily Doan, with the purchase of 24 acres on Chandler Road in Greer. Brad Toy represented the seller, Foxfield Inc. Chuck Langston and Brad Toy represented the seller in the sale of the 9,108 SF office building at 333 Wade Hampton Blvd., Greenville. Chuck Langston represented the seller, Wilene Mason, in the sale of a 142-acre parcel on Lister Road in Greer. Chuck Langston represented the buyer in the purchase of 14 acres on Highway 290 in Greer. Chuck Langston and Roger Barnes facilitated the sale of 6 acres on Farmers Circle in Greer. Rick Hammett leased 4200 E. North St., Suite 5, Greenville, for a 12-month period to the tenant, Foothills ENT. Tim Allender represented the landlord, Chris Ehlich, in securing a three-year lease of office space at 606-B W. Poinsett St., Greer, to the tenant, Paraprofessionals Inc. Jim Griffin facilitated the lease of a 2,185 SF office space at 68 St. Mark Road, Taylors, to the

Lee & Associates: Randall Bentley, Kevin Bentley, Chad Stepp and Andrew Harrill represented the buyer, Habitat for Humanity of Greenville County S.C., Inc., in the purchase of 9,360 SF buyer located at 46-50 Grand Ave., Greenville, from the seller, Hagins Group, LLC. Randall Bentley, Kevin Bentley, Chad Stepp and Andrew Harrill represented the tenant, Smart Courier, Inc., in leasing 5,962 SF located at 171 Johns Rd., Ste. C, Greenville, from the landlord, Greenville Business Center, LLC. Randall Bentley, Kevin Bentley, Chad Stepp and Andrew Harrill represented the tenant, Visit Greenville, SC, in leasing 6,158 SF located at 148 River St., Ste. 100, Greenville, from the landlord, Mountain City Land & Improvement Company, LLC. Randall Bentley, Kevin Bentley, Chad Stepp and Andrew Harrill represented the tenant, Super Sonic of Florida, in leasing 147,500 SF located at 1102 Old Stage Rd., Simpsonville, from the landlord, Garrett Maple Street Warehouses, LLC. Randall Bentley, Kevin Bentley, Chad Stepp and Andrew Harrill represented the buyer, Business Park Properties, LLC, in the purchase of 5 acres located on Fork Shoals Rd. in Greenville, from the seller, SJJ Property Development, LLC.

Randall Bentley, Kevin Bentley, Chad Stepp and A DEAL Andrew Harrill Randall Bentley, Kevin Bentley, represented the Chad Stepp and Andrew Harrill landlord, Bentrepresented the buyer, Sikes Propley Descendants erties, LLC, in buying 30,000 SF Trust, in the located at 100 Fortis Dr., Duncan, lease renewal from the seller, ROIF Fortis Drive, of 3,527 SF LLC. located at

BIG


dealMAKERS NOTABLE COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS

160 Congress Blvd., Ste. A, Duncan, from the tenant, Universal Protection Security Systems.

Ashley Trantham represented the landlord, William Dodd Mccall, in leasing 13,650 SF located at 1451 Donaldson Rd., Greenville. The tenant is McCarthy

and Andrew Harrill represented the seller, SEPA Enterprises, LLC, in the sale of 5 acres located at Freeman Farm Rd. in Greer.

Randall Bentley, Kevin Bentley, Chad Stepp and Andrew Harrill represented the buyer, Carolina Chem Strip of South Carolina, Inc., in the purchase of 58 acres located at 106 Industrial Blvd., Fountain Inn.

Randall Bentley, Kevin Bentley, Chad Stepp and Andrew Harrill represented the tenant, Sachas Cafe, LLC, in leasing 3,709 SF located at 598 Pendleton St., Greenville.

A BIG DEAL

Darath Mackie represented the seller, H2MP, LLC, in the sale of 11,000 SF located at 217 Donaldson Rd., Greenville. The buyers were James and Patricia Revels.

James McKay represented the seller, Angela Vandermark, in the sale of 1,800 SF located at 2315 Old Buncombe Rd., Greenville, from the buyer, 2315 Old Buncombe, LLC.

Randall Bentley, Kevin Bentley, Chad Stepp and Andrew Harrill represented the buyer, Sikes Properties, LLC, in buying 30,000 SF located at 100 Fortis Dr., Duncan, from the seller, ROIF Fortis Drive, LLC. Randall Bentley, Kevin Bentley, Chad Stepp and Andrew Harrill represented the landlord, Mosley Real Estate & Development, Inc., in leasing 4 acres located at 910 Frontage Rd., Greenville.

A BIG DEAL

Randall Bentley, Kevin Bentley, Chad Stepp and Andrew Harrill represented the buyer, Carolina Chem Strip of South Carolina, Inc., in the purchase of 58 acres located at 106 Industrial Blvd., Fountain Inn.

Improvement Company.

Randall Bentley, Kevin Bentley, Chad Stepp and Andrew Harrill represented the seller, Estate of Trudy Hughes Williams, in the sale of 10 acres located at 301 Ben Hamby Dr., Greenville. The buyer is On.Site Development Services, LLC. Randall Bentley, Kevin Bentley, Chad Stepp and Andrew Harrill represented the buyer, Augusta Arbor Way, LLC, in the purchase of 10 acres located on Augusta Arbor Way in Greenville. Randall Bentley, Kevin Bentley, Chad Stepp

Randall Bentley, Kevin Bentley, Chad Stepp and Andrew Harrill represented the landlord, Junkyard Dawg Properties, LLC, in leasing 4 acres located at 2503 New Easley Hwy., Greenville. The tenant is Geo. Schofield Co. Inc.

SF located at 51 Pointe Cir., Greenville. The tenant is Janney Montgomery Scott, LLC. Randall Bentley, Kevin Bentley, Chad Stepp and Andrew Harrill represented the landlord, 385 Business Park, LLC, in leasing 100,464 SF located at 130 Monroe Dr., Simpsonville. Randall Bentley and James McKay represented the landlord, Armaly Properties, LLC, in the lease renewal of 5,333 SF located at 8595 Pelham Rd., Ste. 100-300, Greenville. The tenant is Rick Erwin Dining Group, LLC.

Randall Bentley and James McKay represented both the buyer and seller in the sale Randall Bentley, Kevin Bentley, Chad Stepp of 66 acres on Brookfield Oaks Dr. in Greenand Andrew Harrill represented the ville. The A DEAL landlord, Cobba Properties, LLC, buyer was James McKay represented the sell- Hughes leasing 6,000 SF located at 2003 er, Angela Vandermark, in the sale Perimeter Rd., Greenville, from the Commercial of 1,800 SF located at 2315 Old tenant, Screenwizards, Inc. Properties, Buncombe Rd., Greenville, from the Inc. Darath Mackie represented the buyer, 2315 Old Buncombe, LLC. landlord, KAMAL SE, LLC, in leasing Randall 1,132 SF located at 419 S.E. Main Bentley, St., Ste. 203B, Simpsonville. The tenant is Kevin Bentley, Chad Stepp and Andrew Narcity Media, Inc. Harrill represented both the buyer and seller in the sale of 66 acres on Brookfield Oaks Darath Mackie represented the landlord, Dr. in Greenville. The buyer was Hughes Pointe Integrity Properties II, in leasing 3,056 Commercial Properties, Inc.

BIG

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cbre.us/greenville August 16, 2019 | upstatebusinessjournal.com

25


864.334.4145 656 S Main Street, Suite 200 Greenville, South Carolina 29601

Commercial Real Estate Services At Avison Young, our commercial brokers deliver integrated real estate services to occupiers and investors throughout South Carolina. We provide solutions via tools, technology and expertise to support our clients however complex their challenges. It starts with the Avison Young team’s understanding of your business priorities, not with real estate transactions. For our clients, this means we produce customized, cost-effective solutions with speed, creativity, and confidence. Learn more about how our approach might help you at

avisonyoung.com

dealMAKERS NOTABLE COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS

A BIG DEAL

LLC.

John Powell represented the seller, Kin Properties Inc., in the sale of a 47,178 SF retail property at 3233 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Anderson. Randall Bentley, Kevin Bentley, Chad Stepp and Andrew Harrill represented the seller in the sale of 74 acre on Pelham Rd. in Greenville. The buyer was Pelham 123, LLC. Randall Bentley and Darath Mackie represented the landlord, Bentley Descendants Trust, in the lease renewal of 5,473 SF located at 160 Congress Blvd., Ste. B, Duncan. The tenant is The Butcher, The Baker, Inc.

Partnership. Performance.

Rhett Craig, MBA

Rakan Draz

Christopher B. Fraser, CCIM

Senior Associate Office & Investment Services rhett.craig@avisonyoung.com 864.616.4676

Senior Associate Retail & Investment Services rakan.draz@avisonyoung.com 864.905.7635

Managing Director and Principal Office & Investment Services chris.fraser@avisonyoung.com 843.452.9425

Randall Bentley, Kevin Bentley, Chad Stepp and Andrew Harrill represented the landlord, Meyer Tool, Inc., in the lease of 7,117 SF located at 7660 Pelham Rd., Ste. A, Greenville. The tenant was Industrial Project Innovation, LLC. James McKay represented the tenant, Bossy Bakery Co. LLC, in the lease of 1,625 SF located at 1540 Wade Hampton Blvd., Ste. G, Taylors. The landlord is Shaw Resources.

Rob Howell, MBA

Gary Lyons, CCIM, SIOR

Senior Vice President Industrial & Investment Services rob.howell@avisonyoung.com 404.493.3904

Senior Vice President Capital Markets/Investment Sales gary.lyons@avisonyoung.com 919.323.0118

John Odom Senior Associate Retail & Investment Services john.odom@avisonyoung.com 864.979.2183

Darath Mackie represented the seller, H2MP, LLC, in the sale of 11,000 SF located at 217 Donaldson Rd., Greenville. The buyers were James and Patricia Revels.

BIG

Chris Prince, MBA

Ned Reynolds Associate Office & Investment Services ned.reynolds@avisonyoung.com 336.260.3148

Beverly Barnes Property Manager beverly.barnes@avisonyoung.com 864.354.3393

Madison Mast

Rionni Ward

Jessica Putallaz

Client Services Coordinator madison.mast@avisonyoung.com

Marketing Coordinator rionni.ward@avisonyoung.com

Marketing Coordinator jessica.putallaz@avisonyoung.com

The Avison Young difference translates into intelligent solutions that deliver a better client experience - and better results.

Call our team today to let us assist with your real estate needs! South Carolina, USA, Avison Young Offices are Owned & Operated by Avison Young - South Carolina, Inc.

26 UBJ | August 16, 2019

Hunter Garrett, John Staunton and Keith Jones represented the landlord Dart, LLC, in leasing a 3,500 SF office space located at 665 N. Academy St., Greenville, to the tenant, Northbridge Wealth Management. Bill Sims represented the seller, Browning Williamston, LLC, in the sale of a 3,080 SF Dollar Tree located at 1 Greenville Dr., Williamston, to the buyer, Shree Neelkanth Group, LLC. John Powell represented the seller, Kin Properties, Inc., in the sale of a 47,178 SF retail property located at 3233 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Anderson. Alex Campbell represented the seller, James Dodenhoff Jr., in the sale of 69 acres located at East Poinsett St. Extension, in Greer, to the buyer AHOP143, LLC. Jimmy Wright represented the landlord, Shops by the Mall, LLC, in leasing a 13,800 SF retail space located at 1175 Woods Crossing Rd., Ste. 7A, Greenville, to the tenant, Classic Carolina Home.

Keith Jones and McNeil Epps represented the landlord, Orion Holdings, LLC, in leasing a 2,800 SF industrial property located at 10 Alex Campbell represented the landlord, Airport Rd., GreenGreenville Business CenA DEAL ville, to the tenant, ter, in leasing 5,962 SF of Alex Campbell represented the International Cleaning industrial space located seller, James Dodenhoff Jr., in the & Maintenance, LLC. at 171 Johns Rd., Ste. C, sale of 69 acres at East Poinsett St. Greer, to the tenant, Smart Ted Lyerly repreExt. in Greer, to the buyer, Courier, Inc. sented the tenant, AHOP143 LLC. Mavis Discount Tire, Hunter Garrett and John in leasing an 8,636 Staunton represented SF retail space located at 1534 E. Main St., the landlord, Garrett Street Maple Ware, in leasing a 40,000 SF industrial space located Spartanburg, from the landlord, Associated Realty Partners East Main, LLC. at 1102 Old Stage Rd., Simpsonville, to the tenant, Super Sonic of Florida. Keith Jones and McNeil Epps represented the landlord, PE Properties, LLC, in leasing John Gray, Jr., Drew Stamm and Michael a 2,615 SF office space located at 600 E. Roth represented the landlord, Chris Pott, North St., Ste. 103, Greenville, to in leasing A DEAL the tenant, Jordan Construction a 3,458 SF Jake Van Gieson, Graham Company. retail space Mullikin, and Gaston Albergotti located at represented the seller, GVC Realty Keith Jones and McNeil Epps 787 E. Butler Ltd., in the sale of a 27,000 SF represented the tenant, Compass Rd., Ste. D, retail property at 341-347 North Pain Care, LLC, in leasing a 5,673 Mauldin, to Main St., Woodruff, to the buyer, SF medical office space located at the tenant, Luigi Cerullo. 52 Bear Dr., Greenville, from the One Shot,

NAI Earle Furman:

Associate Office & Investment Services chris.prince@avisonyoung.com 864.430.4957

Keith Jones and McNeil Epps represented the landlord, Gower Corporation, in leasing a 3,250 SF office space located at 355 Woodruff Rd., Stes. 204 & 205, Greenville, to the tenant, Lincare, Inc.

BIG


dealMAKERS NOTABLE NOTABLE COMMERCIAL COMMERCIAL REAL REAL ESTATE ESTATE TRANSACTIONS TRANSACTIONS

landlord, A & M Holdings, LLC.

lease of ±8,714 SF at 225 E. Wood St., Spartanburg, to the tenant, Bon Secours.

Shannon Caldwell represented the tenant, Southern Way Catering, in leasing a 3,820 SF retail space located at 301 Haywood Rd., Ste. 2, Greenville, from the landlord, DHM301 Haywood Road, LLC.

Tyson Smoak represented the buyer, Bannister, Wyatt & Stalvey LLC, in the purchase of a 23,000 SF office building at 24 Cleveland St., Greenville, from the seller, the Greenville Chamber of Commerce.

Andrew Hewitt and Shane Knight represented the buyer, Burg Ventures, LLC, in the sale of a 6,800 SF retail property located at 146 E. Main St., Spartanburg, from the seller, Long Shot, LLC.

A BIG DEAL

Ross Kester and Jeff Day represented the seller, Wood Street Properties LLC, in the sale of an 8,714 SF medical office building at 225 E. Wood St., Spartanburg.

Jake Van Gieson, Graham Mullikin and Gaston Albergotti represented the seller, GVC Realty Ltd., in the sale of a 27,000 SF retail property located at 341-347 North Main St., Woodruff, to the buyer, Luigi Cerullo.

Lakin Parr represented the buyer, Stone Properties, in the purchase of a 2,500 SF building at 805 Augusta St., Greenville.

Scott Jones and John Stathakis, II represented the seller, Lower Waverly, LLC, in the Lakin Parr represented the landlord, Carolina sale of a 2,800 SF office property located at Oaks Prop142 Milestone Way, Greenville. Earle A DEAL erties LLC, Furman represented the buyer, Garry in the lease Tyson Smoak represented the Green. of 1,798 SF buyer, Bannister, Wyatt & Stalvey located at LLC, in the purchase of a 23,000 Pintail Capital Partners: 23 S. Main SF office building at 24 Cleveland Ross Kester represented the landlord, St., TravelSt., Greenville, from the seller, the Wood Street Properties LLC, in the ers Rest, to Greenville Chamber of Commerce

BIG

DEMOLITION

|

DIRT

|

the tenant, American Eagle Builders. Ross Kester and Jeff Day represented the seller, Wood Street Properties LLC, in the sale of an 8,714 SF medical office building at 225 E. Wood St., Spartanburg. Ross Kester represented the seller, Wells Fargo Advisors Trust, in the sale of a 3,400 SF Arby’s restaurant located at 1004 E. Butler Road, Greenville. Tyson Smoak represented the tenant, Northbridge Wealth Management, in the lease of ±3,500 SF of office space located at 665 N. Academy St., Greenville, from the landlord, DART LLC. Jeff Day represented the buyer, Squires Point Venture LLC, in the purchase of ±3.5 acres at 500 Squires Point, Spartanburg. Tyson Smoak represented the tenant, Six and Twenty Distillery, in the lease of about 5,380 SF at 556 Perry Ave., Greenville, from the landlord, Perry Avenue Investors LLC.

Spencer Hines: Dale Seay, Andy Hayes, and Ben Hines facilitated the sale of 84 acres on Valley Falls Road in Spartanburg, between the buyer,

Higher Learning Housing, and the seller, Roy Hall Living Trust. Robbie Romeiser facilitated the sale of a 300 SF industrial property at 680 Buffington Road, Spartanburg, between the buyer, Blue Lotus Properties, and the seller, J Burke Investments.

A BIG DEAL

Dale Seay, Andy Hayes, and Ben Hines facilitated the sale of 84 acres on Valley Falls Road in Spartanburg, between the buyer, Higher Learning Housing, and the seller, Roy Hall Living Trust. Guy Harris and Guy Harris Jr. facilitated the sale of 76 acres at 204 Knollwood Drive, Spartanburg, between the buyer, Claybrook Holdings LLC, and the seller, Ten Plus LLC. Guy Harris and Guy Harris Jr. facilitated the sale of 76 acres at 1623 John B. White Sr. Blvd., Spartanburg, between the buyer, Claybrook Holdings LLC, and the seller, Ten Plus LLC. Craig Jacobs facilitated the sale of a 2,100 SF office at 349 E. St. John St., Spartanburg,

ROLL-OFFS

DEMOLITION

|

DIRT

|

ROLL-OFFS

We will find a way, or we will make one! We will find a way, or we will make one!

COMMERCIAL | INDUSTRIAL | RESIDENTIAL

864.580.2099 | info@demtekllc.com | www.demtekllc.com August 16, 2019 | upstatebusinessjournal.com

27


dealMAKERS NOTABLE COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS between the buyer, Locus LLC, and the seller, Alconon Inc.

seller, Harlean LLP.

Neal Boyett, Andy Hayes, and Ben Hines facilitated the sale of A DEAL 65 acres at Highway Guy Harris and Guy Harris Jr. 9 and Seay Road in facilitated the sale of 76 acres Inman between the at 1623 John B. White Sr. Blvd., buyer, Elev8+ Prop., Spartanburg, between the buyer, and the seller, Cly Claybrook Holdings LLC, and the Gilbert. seller, Ten Plus LLC. Robbie Romeiser Lynn Spencer facilitated facilitated the lease the sale of 19 acres at Cannons Campground renewal of 1,400 SF of retail space at 150 Road, Spartanburg, between the buyer, Blackstock Road, Spartanburg, between Regional Utility Service, and the seller, Jack the tenant, Upstate Nails, and the landlord, Nodine. Blackstock Westside Associates. Andy Hayes and Ben Hines facilitated the sale of an 8,850 SF retail space at 346 Union St., Spartanburg, between the buyer, Borod Inc., and the seller, Estate of Larry Donald Morris.

BIG

Neal Boyett facilitated the sale of 58 acres located on Reidville Rd. in Greer, between the buyer, Pellegrino Holdings LLP and the seller, Doris Smith. Neal Boyett facilitated the sale of 94 acres at 1491 Kist Road, Greer, between the buyer, Pellegrino Holdings LLP, and the seller, John Porter/Doris Porter/Trustee. Neal Boyett facilitated the sale of a 9,000 SF office at 121 Galbraith St., Spartanburg, between the buyer, Iron Gate LLC, and the

Greyson Furnas, Dylan Abernathy, Andy Hayes, and Ben Hines facilitated the lease of a 1,466 SF retail space at 1802 Drayton Road No. 124-D, Spartanburg, between the tenant, Lauren Ashton Salon, and the landlord, The Sherbert Group. Guy Harris, Guy Harris Jr., and Zach Hines facilitated the lease of a 2,520 SF retail space at 430 Heywood Road, Greenville, between the tenant, Telecell NC, and the landlord, KRKS Investments.

Andy Hayes, Ben Hines, and Neal Boyett facilitated the lease of a 1,000 SF office at 1400 Boiling Springs Road, Spartanburg, between the tenant, Access Therapies, and the landlord, DL Properties of the Upstate.

SF industrial property located at 121 Venture Blvd., Spartanburg, between the tenant, SXTH Element Engineering and the landlord, Venture Blvd. LLC.

Andy Hayes and Ben Hines facilitated the Andy Hayes and Ben Hines facilitated the lease of a 7,200 SF industrial property located lease of a 1,800 SF office space at 324 N. at 2994 Fairforest Clevedale No. 10, SpartanPine St., Spartanburg, between the tenant, burg, between the tenant, Kusters Zima, and USC Upstate, and the the landlord, Fairforest A DEAL landlord, CRF Inc. Southern. Robbie Romeiser facilitated the Dale Seay and Lynn Craig Jacobs facilitated sale of a 12,000 SF industrial Spencer facilitated the the lease of a retail property at 49-51 Concourse lease of an office at 128 space at 227 Cedar Way, Greer, between the buyer, E. Main St., Duncan, Springs Road, SparVASS LLC, and the seller, Bell between the tenant, Tori tanburg, between the Garrett LLC. Sky, and the landlord, tenant, Total Family Care, Brian Armstrong. and the landlord, North Greenville University. Craig Jacobs and Lynn Spencer facilitated the lease of a 6,000 SF industrial space at 101 Craig Jacobs facilitated the lease of a 1,200 Southwest Park Drive, Spartanburg, between SF retail space at 2500 Winchester Place, the tenant, JM Spartanburg, between the A DEAL Smith Corp., and tenant, Food It Is, and the Neal Boyett facilitated the sale of the landlord, RLLR landlord, 2500 Winchester 58 acres located on Reidville Rd. in Holdings. Group LLC. Greer, between the buyer, Pellegrino Andy Hayes and Ben Andy Hayes and Ben Hines Holdings LLP and the seller, Doris Hines facilitated facilitated the sale of a 2,552 Smith. the lease of a 4,000 SF retail space at 14 Roper

BIG

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28 UBJ | August 16, 2019


THURSDAY | OCTOBER 3RD 5:30 PM Networking & Cocktail Reception | 6:30 PM Program HYATT REGENCY, GREENVILLE

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Proceeds from this event will provide unrestricted funds in support of Greenville Technical College and our students.

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dealMAKERS NOTABLE COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS Mountain Road, Greenville, between the buyer, Budnar Properties, and the seller, Coleman Young.

course Way, Greer, between the buyer, VASS LLC, and the seller, Bell Garrett LLC.

Chicken Salad Chick, and the landlord, UCB Bank.

Guy Harris and Guy Harris Jr. facilitated the Andy Hayes and Ben Hines facilitated the Guy Harris and Guy Harris Jr. facilitated the sale of 64 acres at 1640 John B. White Sr. lease of a 3,960 SF office space at 115 C&D sale of a Blvd., Spartanburg, between the buyer, Southport Road, Spartanburg, between the A DEAL 2,456 SF Spartanburg RE Investment, and the tenant, The Emory Group, and the landlord, Lynn Spencer facilitated the sale office space seller, Sampaguita Investments. Hammond Group. of 19 acres at Cannons Campat 300 W. ground Road, Spartanburg, between Dale Seay and Lynn Spencer facilitated Craig Jacobs facilitated the monthly lease of Pitts St., the lease of a 1,250 SF retail space at a 5,500 SF retail property at 522 Avon St., the buyer, Regional Utility Service, Clinton, 1791 E. Blackstock Road, Moore, beSpartanburg, between the tenant, Blessed Lil and the seller, Jack Nodine. between the tween the tenant, Brandon Robertson, Ones, and the landlord, Larry Richardson. buyer, City and the landlord, Echo 31 LLC. of Clinton, Andy Hayes and Ben Hines facilitated the and the seller, Founders Federal Credit Union. Craig Jacobs facilitated the monthly lease A DEAL lease of a 1,200 SF retail of 2225 E. Main Jason Klue and Bobby Hines Guy Harris, Guy Harris Jr., Mike Tan, Ben space at 1660 E. Main St., St., Spartanburg, leased 50,000 SF of industrial Hines, and Andy Hines facilitated the sale Duncan, between the tenant, between the tenant, space at 199 Blackhawk Road to of 3 acres at 2285 Hayne St., Spartanburg, Startin’ Point Tattoo, and the Viking Village, and Sunland Logistics. between the buyer, Tindall Corp., and the landlord, Heard-Appian LLC. the landlord, New seller, Patricia Piekarski. China. Lynn Spencer and Craig Guy Harris and Guy Harris Jr. facilitated the Jacobs facilitated the lease of a 6,700 SF Jason Klue and Bobby Hines leased 50,000 SF sale of a 10,640 SF investment property retail space at 7092 Howard St., Spartanburg, of industrial space at 199 Blackhawk Road to at 6140 Dobbins Bridge Road, Anderson, between the tenant, Avalon Sales, and the Sunland Logistics. between the buyer, Sampaguita Investments, landlord, Hearon Center. and the seller, Patton Development. Jason Klue and Bobby Hines leased ±25,000 Guy Harris and Guy Harris Jr. facilitated the SF of industrial space at 199 Blackhawk Road Robbie Romeiser facilitated the sale of a lease of a 3,813 SF retail space at 449 E. to KL Kempak. 12,000 SF industrial property at 49-51 ConMain St., Spartanburg, between the tenant, Jason Klue and Bobby Hines leased ±25,000 SF of industrial space at 199 Blackhawk Road to Supersonic of Florida.

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Zach Hines and Bobby Hines leased ±4,900 SF to Steinway Pianos in the former Skatell Center on Congaree Road, Greenville. Bobby Hines leased ±1,200 SF of retail space to Coiffed & Collared at Woods Crossing Road, Greenville. Bobby Hines leased 5536 Calhoun Memorial Highway, Easley, to Bolts Auto Sales. Zach Hines and Bobby Hines represented the tenant, the Wedding Center, in a lease renewal with the Skatell Center. Bobby Hines assisted in the renewal of MMS Properties in the leasing of 3 Sunbelt Business Park for CBS Distribution Inc Bobby Hines leased ±3,000 SF of restaurant space for Eggs Up Grill in Powdersville from Ingles Market Bobby Hines assisted Site Designs in the leasing of office space at 1060 Boiling Springs Road, Spartanburg.

GreenvilleOneCenter.com

info@greenvilleonecenter.com | 864-625-0504 2 West Washington St, Suite 200 | Greenville

30 UBJ | August 16, 2019

Zach Hines and Bobby Hines leased ±1,600 SF of office space to Uncommon Marketing Partners LLC at 105 E. North St., Greenville.

Bobby Hines represented the seller in the sale of a residential lot on Herta Street in Easley. Bobby Hines represented the owner, Merritt Enterprises LLC, in the leasing of ±17,600 SF of warehouse space at 960 Berry Shoals Road, Duncan, to the tenant, Facilicon Inc. Zach Hines and Bobby Hines represented the owner, Pain Alley LLC, in the leasing of 7,300 SF of restaurant space at 25 Delano Drive, Greenville, to the tenant, El Thrifty LLC. Zach Hines and Bobby Hines leased ±3,500 SF at 500 E. North St., Greenville, to the tenant, Cemetary Equity Solutions LLC.

The Burgess Co, LLC: Grayson Burgess facilitated the lease of 2,253 SF located at 4100 Pelham Rd., Greenville, by 4100 Pelham, LLC. Grayson Burgess facilitated the lease of a 3,744 SF office space located at 440 Roper Mountain Rd., Greenville, between the landlord, RMBC TIC Rollup, LLC and the tenant, the United States Marshals Service.

A BIG DEAL

Grayson Burgess facilitated the sale of 4,500 SF at 411 and 413 Main St., Taylors, between the seller, Kirk S. Chapman, and the buyers, Joe David and Vicki Louise Morris. Grayson Burgess facilitated the sale of 4,500 SF located at 411 and 413 Main St., Taylors, between the seller, Kirk S. Chapman and the buyers, Joe David and Vicki Louise Morris. Grayson Burgess facilitated the lease of a 1,815 SF office space located at 37 Villa Rd., Greenville, between the landlord, Piedmont Center Owner, LLC and the tenant, Robbins Media Group. Grayson Burgess facilitated the lease of a 1,166 SF office space located at 37 Villa Rd., Greenville, between the landlord, Piedmont Center LLC and the tenant, THS National, LLC. Grayson Burgess facilitated the lease of a 5,665 SF office space located at 440J Roper Mountain Rd., Greenville, from the landlord, RMBC TIC Rollup, LLC to the tenant, GNC. Grayson Burgess facilitated the lease of 1,000 SF of retail space located at Park Place, 12019 N. Radio Station Rd., Seneca, from the landlord, Park Place Holdings, LLC to the tenant, Oconee Neighborhood Pharmacy, LLC


SPONSORED

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Double-edged sword If we can grab a medication right off of the shelf while grocery shopping, that means the product is safe, right? Dr. Jim Burford, a physician at PartnerMD, says that’s a popular misconception that he hears from patients. “It used to be that anything you could get over the counter was harmless,” he says. “The opposite is true now. You can buy a lot of medications over the counter that are potent, powerful and perilous.” He suggests a conversation with a physician who has the time and motivation to discuss any over-thecounter medications, the dangers they pose - and if there is a better way to treat what ails you.

and reduce consumption of fast foods report a reduction or disappearance of heartburn and indigestion. If the problem persists, he says less potent medications like Pepcid and Zantac have fewer long-term side effects.

It used to be that anything you could get over the counter was harmless. The opposite is true now.” Dr. Jim Burford Partner MD physician

ASPIRIN:

Many people take a daily dose of

Keeping your aspirin in an effort to prevent heart PRILOSEC ANDKeeping NEXIUM: your attacks and strokes, and studies leadership Burford points out that these show that in certain populations, it leadership proton pump inhibitors - strong acid does have a positive effect. However, at the leading surppressors - at were once prescripBurford says daily aspirin can also the leading edge of health. tion-only. In 2003, they became increase internal bleeding. edge of people health.“When those complications are over-the-counter, which some questioned due to possible hazards considered, the net benefit for the of long-term use. average healthy person is negligi“They are extremely popular for ble,” he says. Patients should talk to the relief of heartburn and acid indi- their doctor about whether their gestion,” he says. However, the drugs individual case warrants the risks also prevent the digestive system of the aspirin regimen. You know healthy leadership from absorbing iron, calcium and is essential to business success. So do we. We’re PartnerMD, Greenville’s concierge care practice vitamin B-12, whichhealthy can lead to ad- isleading SLEEP AIDS: You know leadership essential to business success. specializing So do we. in executive physicals and primary care to equip progressive businesses ditional health TheyGreenville’s also make leadingBurford says issuespecializing primarily We’reissues. PartnerMD, concierge carethis practice yours with theto latest inolder medicine and holistic wellness people more susceptible severe affects people, whobusinesses are more inlike executive physicals andadvancements primary care to equip progressive for you and your leadership. We tailor our programs to your exacting digestive infections likethe C. diff. likely to disrupted sleep. “People like yours with latest advancements in have medicine and holistic wellness needs, providing customized that enables executives He suggests starting with an ex- control take higher doses ofperform sleep for you and your leadership. Wewho tailor our programs to yourtoexacting at the peak of health and excel every day through care so personal, aminationneeds, of what you eat. Many control medications have an increased risk providing customized that enables executives to perform it’sthe like having a healthier doctor the of family. patients who begin toofeat fallsday during thecare night, fractured at peak health and in excel every through so personal, it’s like having a doctor in the family.

It’s your health. What are you waiting for?

Some over-the-counter medications are “potent, powerful and perilous”

bones and other problems. Some even take additional doses of medications without remembering it.” While sleep medications are sometimes necessary, he recommends starting with a sleep hygiene plan that includes avoiding stimulants like coffee and exercise too close to bedtime, avoiding screens at night, and having a consistent wake time.

ANTICHOLINERGICS: (found in some allergy, mood and sleep medications) Researchers have only recently discovered that many drugs that fall into the category of “anticholinergic” are associated with increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease. An anticholinergic is a substance that blocks the action of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. “These can include antihistamines, medications that control overactive bladder, and some that are given for anxiety and depression,” Burford says. He suggests patients ask their doctor if medications with a minimal anticholinergic effect will still address their health problems. “This issue applies to chronic use, not just a few weeks,” he says. “It affects people who are on these meds for months and years.”

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partnerMD.com 12 Maple Tree Ct., Ste 103 Greenville, SC 29615 August 16, 2019 | upstatebusinessjournal.com

31


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BUSINESS

Creating Culture: Be More than Just a Job You’ve likely heard about “culture,” but do Communication is Essential: No business can operate effectively without you really know what it means and how to communicating with their employees (listening more than talking). CEO/Founder create the right culture for your business and your employees? Work Hard, Play Hard: Recognize and reward your team for their work Today, the hiring process is more in-depth than simply providing a ethic, especially when it requires longer hours or extra measures to get job description, salary and benefits. If you don’t have the right culture, the job done. When they know their sacrifice will be acknowledged, you you’re likely not bringing on board the right people. Hiring the right create a culture of appreciation and they’re more likely to go that extra people is one of the key components needed to build a thriving team. mile. You need to have the right people on board to accomplish the goals you have set and keep that bottom line growing. Promote Interaction: Create the physical space to allow your employees Steve Jobs said, “The key to leading a successful organization is dean opportunity to interact among veloping a team each other, especially within difthat enables ferent departments. Personal inmembers to conteraction leads to engagement and tribute to the a sense of “belonging” to a bigger best of their purpose. They’re now an active ability. By surteam player, not just someone rounding yourriding the bench, being complaself with smart cent. and driven folks, who are able to Are you creating a culture where be just that your people can thrive? Is engagesmart and driven ment a top priority? If not, it needs - you will to be. As former Campbell’s Soup develop a culture CEO, Doug Conant, once said, “To PRODUCTIVITY that yields a win in the marketplace you must great deal of first win in the workplace.” success.” Now is the time to take action. of employees say their business Now that you At E3, our mission is to create a is not doing enough to create a have the right game-plan for businesses to thrive positive culture at work. people, it’s time by improving employee engageto keep them ment and experience. We focus on engaged and the input of the employees, they committed to matter! We take time to interview their goals. AlSALES each employee, listen to their sugCREATIVITY lowing them to gestions/ideas/concerns and do what they do format strategies that can generate best, ultimately engagement almost immediately. affects your We realize there isn’t a “one-sizecompany and fits-all” answer. We handle each what you do company individually to assess the best. Develop needs and best ways we can help those right you reach your goals. people into being your compliment, not your likeness. All great companies should operate like a bicycle chain. Every link looks exactly the same and is as E3: Employee Engagement important as the next one. But if any one link is disengaged the bicycle and Experience cannot go forward. Disengaged employees can have the same effect on your business; breaking down communication, performance, producJillian Wells, CEO/Founder tivity and profitability. e3jillian@gmail.com 864-918-7274 By engaging your team, you improve culture and the overall experience www.employeeengagementexperience.com within the workplace. You know you want it, so how do you get it? JILLIAN WELLS

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NEED TO KNOW

| NEWS

UPSTATE BUSINESS NEWS AND NOTES BB&T Lighthouse Project helps boys at Generations Generations Group Home in Fountain Inn received $5,000 in funding as a BB&T Lighthouse Project Spirit Award recipient. The funds will help install three muchneeded sidewalks. Associates from BB&T’s Upstate Corporate Center in Mauldin recently volunteered their time to help complete landscaping on the almost 30-acre property which included spreading mulch, weeding, cutting grass. BB&T associates also sponsored a party at Generations that included a catered dinner, games and fellowship. Brian Clark, Executive Director of Generation’s said, “The generosity of BB&T is overwhelming. We can’t express how much we appreciate their partnership and support of the boy’s here at Generations!”

Villanova’s Jason Donnelly named athletics director at Furman Jason Donnelly started as Furman University’s athletic director on Aug. 12. Donnely was the senior associate athletics director and executive director of athletics development at Villanova. He was responsible for leading the Villanova Athletics Fund, managing fundraising and external support for all 24 varsity sports. During the past four years, Donnelly has helped raise more than $120 million for Villanova Athletics, including three consecutive record-breaking fundraising years representing a 330% increase in dollars raised. “He [Donnelly] has been a highly successful administrator and fundraiser at Villanova, demonstrating a key understanding of the important role that athletics plays in higher education,” said Furman president Elizabeth Davis.

SWITCH honors FUEL with Champion Award for 2019 SWITCH, a nonprofit with a mission to end human trafficking and sexual exploitation in the Upstate of South Carolina, awarded FUEL, a marketing agency in downtown Greenville, SC, the Champion Award for second quarter of 2019. The Champion Award is presented to one individual and one business per quarter for being an impactful partner to SWITCH in furthering their mission. “A big part of our mission includes supporting the efforts of nonprofit organizations based in the Upstate who are working hard to make a real difference, providing them with a strategic partnership and marketing resources,” said Warren Griffith, Fuel’s president and CEO. “SWITCH’s mission is a noble one that we are proud to support.”

READ MORE ONLINE UPSTATEBUSINESSJOURNAL.com

How Much Is Your Online Identity Worth? THE DARK WEB IS A SHOPPER’S PARADISE FOR HACKERS. Harvested information including credit cards, social security number, your billing address, and the names of your children can be purchased for exactly $1,170.00, according to a new study by Privacy Central. Want to learn more about the Dark Web and how we can help you monitor and protect your online identity? Our professional services include: • Managed / Flat Fee IT Service • Backup & Disaster Recovery • Network Security • CIO Consulting Let us work with you to develop a customized solution to meet your specific needs. Whether your strategy is on the shelf awaiting execution, or you need to begin developing a long-term technology plan for success, we can help you get there.

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SUBMIT YOUR PRESS RELEASE AT: www.UpstateBusinessJournal.com/submit August 16, 2019 | upstatebusinessjournal.com

33


NEWS |

NEED TO KNOW

NETWORKING

Business Events Planner AUG

AUG

20

19

Five Forks Chapter – Monthly Meeting 12:00 - 1:00 pm | Crave Coffee

The Executive Roundtable 9:00 am | The Office Center @ The Point | 33 Market Point Drive, Greenville A peer group of executives and entrepreneurs who meet each Monday morning to discuss career transition issues. This week’s topic is “Collective Genius-Selected Topics.” Free to attend. Contact Golden Career Strategies at (864) 527-0425 or steve@goldencareerstrategies.com

AUG

21

21

Open only to Simpsonville Chamber members. Contact Simpsonville Chamber at (864) 963-3781 or info@simpsonvillechamber.com.

AUG

21

Business Before Hours

Links Group No. 4

Leads Group

8:00 - 8:30 am | The Tutoring Center, Simpsonville Join Chamber staff and members as we get our gears turning at a Business Before Hours networking event hosted by The Tutoring Center Simpsonville.

11:30 am - 1:00 pm | Greenville Chamber

Noon - 1:00pm | Mauldin Cultural Center

This non-compete group offers business networking and referral marketing.

For anyone looking for business leads

Free to Simpsonville Chamber members. Contact Simpsonville Chamber at (864) 963-3781 or info@simpsonvillechamber.com.

AUG

22

Business After Hours 5:00 - 7:00 pm | Cotton Mill Apartments Bring business cards and a desire to meet new folks. Free to Simpsonville Chamber members. Contact Simpsonville Chamber at (864)-963-3781 or info@simpsonvillechamber.com.

34 UBJ | August 16, 2019

AUG

Simpsonville Chamber’s Five Forks Chapter’s monthly meeting to discuss issues of importance, events/projects, and common challenges/opportunities.

Ebony Austin at (864) 239-3745 or eaustin@ greenvillechamber.org.

Mauldin Chamber at 864-297-1323 or info@ mauldinchamber.org

AUG

28

Education and Workforce Summit

8:30 am - 1:00 pm | Hyatt Place Downtown | 128 E. Broad Street, Greenville Superintendent of Education Molly Spearman and Fifth Third Bank’s chief investment strategist Jeff Korzenik talk about education reform, overcoming childcare barriers, expungement, second chance hiring, and more. $35 for Chamber members / $60 for non-members. Contact Madison Hall at (864) 239-3748 or mhall@greenvillechamber.org.


NEED TO KNOW

| NEWS

BUSINESS

5 ways to get project teams working together for better outcomes Team members who are invested in a projCEO, Designli ect disagree. It’s human nature. There are ways to get dedicated project teams on the same page, however. Let’s look at how to get project teams working together for better outcomes.

need in order to do their best work. This meeting will make everyone’s needs clear, will prepare people for what’s to come, and will help inform timelines, deadlines, and processes. It will also serve another important purpose: team building. If a misunderstanding arises at some point, team members are more likely to work together to move forward.

1. Make Sure Everyone Shares the Same Vision

3. Create a Common Language

KEITH SHIELDS

Disagreements often originate from differences in vision. To solve this issue, first define the project’s scope. Then communicate precisely the goals of the project, what problems the deliverables should address, who the deliverables are designed for, and how the deliverables will be used. Staying focused on an outcome is easier when the team shares a vision.

2. Help Your Team Understand Each Other’s Needs

Team members get frustrated with each other over differing needs. You can avoid this frustration if you gather everyone together at the outset and allow each team member to share what they

Every industry, every department, every job specialty has its own language. Miscommunication is inevitable if not everyone understands what the others are talking about. Prevent miscommunication by creating a set of standard terms and definitions that team members can reference at any time during the project.

4. Make Communication Easy

You can make communication easy by creating a communication plan for your project. Your plan should include instructions on the tools team members should use for communication — such as your project management software, Slack, or a

CRM. It should also outline who to ask for what information.

5. Don’t Forget to Have Fun

Team building activities help your people view one another not just as coworkers, but as human beings. This will result in better communication, which will mean a better project. While these tips are simple, they make a big impact when implemented. Building relationships and communicating effectively are the foundation of efficient work that results in a project everyone can be proud of.

Ten counties. Eight cities. More than 170 investor companies. The Upstate SC Alliance brings all of these together to spur innovation and investment in the region. Using our collective resources, #TeamUpstate fuels our rise. Join Us.

upstateSCalliance.com

#

Team U pstate

... Because TOGETHER, WE accelerate our dreams.

An impressive 38% of the 400 aviation and aerospacerelated companies in South Carolina chose to land in the Upstate region. A specially trained workforce and a strong base in research, manufacturing and engineering attract key industry players to place their operations here. Working together as a team, Upstate leaders and businesses create a culture for success.

UpstateSCAlliance Because TOGETHER, WE Can.

August 16, 2019 | upstatebusinessjournal.com

35


NEWS |

NEED TO KNOW

BUSINESS HAPPENINGS

New to the Street

Recently opened businesses in the Upstate

Homewood Suites by Hilton Downtown

Sweetberry Bowls

Homewood Suites recently opened a downtown Greenville location.

Afranchise dedicated to fast and healthy food like bowls, salads, smoothies, and more, recently opened a Greenville location – it’s first in the state. Where: 233 N. Main Street, Greenville

Where: 950 S. Main Street, Greenville Amenities: Every stay includes a free hot breakfast, free WiFi, an evening social, and access to the outdoor pool and fitness center.

Hours: 8 a.m. – 8 p.m. Mon. to Sat.and 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.on Sun.

Find out more: www.hilton.com or call 864-900-2380

Find out more: www.sweetberrybowls.com or call (864) 438-1288.

Interesting Note: Homewood Suites says they are so close to Fluor Field, they are practically home plate.

Interesting Note: Every bowl is handcrafted in the store and made to your personal preferences.

Earning your trust, protecting your assets and providing sound §1031 Exchange advice

When it’s time to sell investment property Let the experts at Banker Exchange show you how a §1031 tax-deferred exchange could be the solution you or your clients are looking for.

864.271.1449 www.bankers1031.com 36 UBJ | August 16, 2019


NEED TO KNOW

| NEWS

BUSINESS HAPPENINGS

On the Move

Some of the Upstate’s most recent hires, promotions, awards, and appointments HIRED

PROMOTED

Garrett Catalano recently joined Jackson Marketing,

Michael D. Downing was recently promoted to chief

PROMOTED

EARNED

Kyle Juell recently promoted to junior content strategist with

Katherine Sosebee business developer at Turner Insurance

HIRED

NAMED

Elizabeth “Betsy” Pusateri recently joined the FinTrust

Rebecca Clark has been named director of the Honors

Motorsports & Events as dealer and product portfolio manager serving the company’s motorsports clients. Catalano’s responsibilities will include managing and growing Jackson’s product sales and service offerings, including those geared toward the off-road enthusiast consumer market.

Crawford Strategy. Juell supports the agency with digital and social campaigns as a junior content strategist. In his role, he develops and edits content across multi-media platforms in addition to supporting with the concepting of creative campaigns.

team as operations administrator. With over 12 years of experience in the industry, she will monitor daily operations and work with branch offices to service client accounts and back office support.

Katherine Ericson Health Information Technology Recruiter 14 years experience

operating officer at Southern First Bank. He will continue to serve as Chief Financial Officer of the company. Dowling has been an executive vice president and chief financial officer of the company for the past eight years.

Agency of Greenville, has successfully earned the Certified Insurance Counselors (CIC) designation. To achieve the designation of CIC, Sosebee completed five courses and passed five comprehensive examinations covering all major areas of the insurance field.

Program at Greenville Technical College. A member of the college’s English faculty since 2016, she has also taught composition, rhetoric, and literature at other colleges across the Upstate.

We’ve already met your next employee.

Godshall Professional Recruiting and Staffing specializes in executive recruiting, career placement, and consulting for businesses and job seekers in South Carolina. Our healthcare services team has more than 20 years of combined experience in placing qualified candidates in administration, clinical, dental, science, and information technology roles. Let us find the perfect fit for your employment needs.

Professional • Finance • Technical • Healthcare godshall.com • 864-242-3491

GODSHALL Professional Recruiting Staffing Consulting

August 16, 2019 | upstatebusinessjournal.com

37


NEWS |

NEED TO KNOW

How to Get Back to Your Passion

UP NEXT GOT ANY THOUGHTS?

by Lee Yarborough, President | Propel HR Your business began with a dream. You wanted to start something from scratch and build a legacy. You wanted the freedom and the ability to be your own boss. You wanted to inspire others and share your passion with the world. You have remained persistent and continue to be proud of your creation. However, some days, you get discouraged. It feels that your time is not spent on your dream but dominated by paperwork and management. You wanted to inspire those around you, but most of your time now goes to supervising behaviors and processes. There is not enough time to keep up with new and changing government regulations and still be the visionary leader of your small business.

How can you get back to doing what you love? For the rest of Lee's story, visit www.MyPropelPro.com/LEE

PUBLISHER Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@communityjournals.com

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

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Susan Schwartzkopf

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MARKETING & ADVERTISING DIRECTOR OF SALES Emily Yepes

MANAGER OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Donna Johnston

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MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Heather Propp | Jessica Schwartz | Liz Tew

1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

UBJ milestone

UBJ milestone jackson Marketing Group’s 25 Years 1988 Jackson Dawson opens in Greenville at Downtown Airport

RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

1988

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Meredith Rice Chairman larry Jackson, Jackson marketing Group. Photos by Greg Beckner / Staff

ACCOUNT MANAGER Callie Michalak

1997 Jackson Dawson launches motorsports Division 1993

1990 Jackson Dawson acquires therapon marketing Group and moves to Piedmont office Center on Villa.

Jackson Marketing Group celebrates 25 years By sherry Jackson | staff | sjackson@communityjournals.com

Solve. Serve. Grow. Those three words summarize Jackson Marketing Group’s guiding principles, and according to owner Larry Jackson, form the motivation that has kept the firm thriving for the past 25 years.

Jackson graduated from Bob Jones University with a degree in video and film production and started his 41-year career in the communications industry with the U.S. Army’s Public Information Office. He served during

Vietnam, where he said he was “luckily” stationed in the middle of Texas at Fort Hood. He left the service and went to work in public affairs and motorsports at Ford Motor Company in Detroit. After a stint at Bell and Howell, where he was responsible for managing Ford’s dealer marketing and training, the entrepreneurial bug hit and he co-founded Jackson-Dawson Marketing Communications, a company specializing in dealer training and product launches for the auto industry in 1980. In 1987, Jackson wanted to move back south and thought Greenville would be a good fit. An avid pilot, he

learned of an opportunity to purchase Cornerstone Aviation, a fixed base operation (FBO) that served as a service station for the Greenville Downtown Airport, providing fuel, maintenance and storage. In fact, when he started the Greenville office of what is now Jackson Marketing Group (JMG) in 1988, the offices were housed on the second floor in an airport hangar. “Clients would get distracted by the airplanes in the hangars and we’d have to corral them to get back upstairs to the meeting,” Jackson said. Jackson sold the FBO in 1993, but says it was a great way to get to know Greenville’s fathers and leaders

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with a majority of them utilizing the general aviation airport as a “corporate gateway to the city.” In 1997, Jackson and his son, Darrell, launched Jackson Motorsports Group. The new division was designed to sell race tires and go to racetracks to sell and mount the tires. Darrell Jackson now serves as president of the motorsports group and Larry Jackson has two other children and a son-in-law who work there. Jackson said all his children started at the bottom and “earned their way up.” Jackson kept the Jackson-Dawson branches in Detroit and others in Los Angeles and New York until he sold his portion of that partnership in 2009 as part of his estate planning. The company now operates a small office in Charlotte, but its main headquarters are in Greenville in a large office space off Woodruff Road, complete with a vision gallery that displays local artwork and an auditorium Jackson makes available for non-profit use. The Motorsports Group is housed in an additional 26,000 square feet building just down the street, and the agency is currently looking for another 20,000 square feet. Jackson said JMG has expanded into other verticals such as financial, healthcare, manufacturing and pro-bono work, but still has a strong focus on the auto industry and transportation. It’s

2003 motorsports Division acquires an additional 26,000 sq. ft. of warehouse space

1998 1998 Jackson Dawson moves to task industrial Court

also one of the few marketing companies in South Carolina to handle all aspects of a project in-house, with four suites handling video production, copywriting, media and research and web design. Clients include heavyweights such as BMW, Bob Jones University, the Peace Center, Michelin and Sage Automotive. Recent projects have included an interactive mobile application for Milliken’s arboretum and 600-acre Spartanburg campus and a marketing campaign for the 2013 Big League World Series. “In my opinion, our greatest single achievement is the longevity of our client relationships,” said Darrell Jackson. “Our first client from back in 1988 is still a client today. I can count on one hand the number of clients who have gone elsewhere in the past decade.” Larry Jackson says his Christian faith and belief in service to others, coupled with business values rooted in solving clients’ problems, have kept

2009 Jackson Dawson changes name to Jackson marketing Group when larry sells his partnership in Detroit and lA 2003

2009-2012 Jackson marketing Group named a top BtoB agency by BtoB magazine 4 years running

him going and growing his business over the years. He is passionate about giving back and outreach to non-profits. The company was recently awarded the Community Foundation Spirit Award. The company reaffirmed its commitment to serving the community last week by celebrating its 25th anniversary with a birthday party and a 25-hour Serve-A-Thon partnership with Hands on Greenville and Habitat for Humanity. JMG’s 103 full-time employees worked in shifts around the clock on October 22 and 23 to help construct a house for a deserving family. As Jackson inches towards retirement, he says he hasn’t quite figured out his succession plan yet, but sees the companies staying under the same umbrella. He wants to continue to strategically grow the business. “From the beginning, my father has taught me that this business is all about our people – both our clients and our associates,” said his son, Darrell. “We have created a focus and a culture that strives to solve problems, serve people and grow careers.” Darrell Jackson said he wants to “continue helping lead a culture where we solve, serve and grow. If we are successful, we will continue to grow towards our ultimate goal of becoming the leading integrated marketing communications brand in the Southeast.”

2011 Jackson marketing Group/Jackson motorsports Group employee base reaches 100 people

2008 2012 Jackson marketing Group recognized by Community Foundation with Creative spirit Award

pro-bono/non-proFit Clients American Red Cross of Western Carolinas Metropolitan Arts Council Artisphere Big League World Series The Wilds Advance SC South Carolina Charities, Inc. Aloft Hidden Treasure Christian School

CoMMUnitY inVolVeMent & boarD positions lArry JACkson (ChAirmAn): Bob Jones University Board chairman, The Wilds Christian Camp and Conference Center board member, Gospel Fellowship Association board member, Past Greenville Area Development Corporation board member, Past Chamber of Commerce Headquarters Recruiting Committee member, Past Greenville Tech Foundation board member David Jones (Vice President Client services, Chief marketing officer): Hands on Greenville board chairman mike Zeller (Vice President, Brand marketing): Artisphere Board, Metropolitan Arts Council Board, American Red Cross Board, Greenville Tech Foundation Board, South Carolina Chamber Board eric Jackson (Jackson motorsports Group sales specialist): Salvation Army Boys & Girls Club Advisory Board

November 1, 2013 Upstate bUsiness joUrnal 21

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August 16, 2019 Upstate Business Journal  

Published biweekly by Community Journals in Greenville, South Carolina. For more information, call 864-679-1200 or visit us online at Upstat...

August 16, 2019 Upstate Business Journal  

Published biweekly by Community Journals in Greenville, South Carolina. For more information, call 864-679-1200 or visit us online at Upstat...

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