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IN THIS ISSUE

NEW TRAFFIC-CALMING PLANS / STUDENTS GET BACK ONTRACK THIS SUMMER / KNOX WHITE IN TIME MAGAZINE

GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, August 3, 2018 • Vol.20, No.31

FOR HOME DELIVERY CALL 864.679.1200 READ ONLINE AT GREENVILLE JOURNAL.COM

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NEARLY 1,100 STUDENTS IN GREENVILLE COUNTY SCHOOLS WERE HOMELESS LAST YEAR The Second Chance pilot program hopes to lower that number page 8

After a period of homelessness, Torrey Hill and her two teenage sons now live in an affordable rental home owned by Homes of Hope. Will Crooks/Greenville Journal


2 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 08.03.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1999 PUBLISHER | Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@communityjournals.com MANAGING EDITOR | Emily Pietras epietras@communityjournals.com STAFF WRITERS Ariel Gilreath | agilreath@communityjournals.com Cindy Landrum | clandrum@communityjournals.com Andrew Moore | amoore@communityjournals.com Sara Pearce | spearce@communityjournals.com Ariel Turner | aturner@communityjournals.com COPY EDITOR Rebecca Strelow ARTS & CULTURE WRITER Vince Harris | vharris@communityjournals.com EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Susan Schwartzkopf VICE PRESIDENT OPERATIONS Holly Hardin CLIENT SER VICES MANAGERS Anita Harley | Rosie Peck BILLING INQUIRIES Shannon Rochester DIRECTOR OF SALES Emily Yepes MANAGER OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Donna Johnston MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Ed Ibarra | Heather Propp | Meredith Rice Caroline Spivey | Liz Tew VISUAL DIRECTOR Will Crooks

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Above & Beyond Expectations

THEY SAID IT

“We really do want to reach students that are really serious about art. It’s not merely recreational art classes.”

Stan Stone

Funeral Director/Manager Mackey Funerals & Cremations at Woodlawn Memorial Park

Michelle Radford, co-founder of the Leaf Institute of Art & Vocation in the Village of West Greenville, on the institute’s mission to provide a space for young or aspiring local artists – P. 30

“Instead of doing a big record every three years, we just decided to put out the songs we were writing as often as possible. This seemed like the best way to do it.” Ryan Newell, lead guitarist for Sister Hazel, on the band’s plans to release four EPs back-to-back. – P. 32

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or Stan Stone, funeral service is more than a business, but a ministry. He is honored to have the opportunity to help families work through their grief and find meaningful ways to celebrate the life of their loved one. A manager who received his license in 2003, Stan is a graduate of Anderson University and a member of Fountain Inn Presbyterian Church. Married and the father of three girls, Stan understands what families need, and goes above and beyond expectations to ease the burden, making extra phone calls and appointments and adding special touches with pictures, music and much more. A recent letter of gratitude summed up Stan’s service focus: “To you, you were doing your job, but to me and my family, it was so much more.”

“It’s like a victory lap, not just for us, but for everyone who was there when we started.” Kristian Bush, of the country-music duo Sugarland, on returning to Greenville to play at the Bon Secours Wellness Arena after playing shows at The Handlebar in the early 2000s. – P. 34

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OPINION Views from your community

Summer It’s time for bilingual education Container Refresh! by Martin Garden Center

It’s summer. You’ve been babying your precious porch containers or door baskets through the Upstate heat all season. Chances are you have gone on vacation and left someone else in charge of watering or just “chanced” it and return home to dead, wilted, and dying plants. Have no fear, we’ll walk you through the refresh process.

1 2 3

Evaluate. Overwatered? Underwatered? Which plants are totally gone and which ones could just use a strong deadheading? Also look at the leaves for insect damage. Prune. Cut back plants that are looking withered or leggy. Prune back stems to the point of green growth or healthy looking material. This encourages bushier growth the rest of the season. Replace. Let’s face it, sometimes these plants need a total re-do. Carefully remove plant(s) leaving the remaining healthy plants in tact. Would a new color give the container a fresh striking look? Pop in the new plant(s) and Voilà! - instant beauty! You’re happier and your containers are happier! Water immediately.

Remember to use our thriller, filler, spiller recipe for the perfect container. If you’re not sure what that is, come in and ask. We don’t keep secrets! Happy Planting!

Adding a new color to your container can transform it to look like a whole new creation!

Martin Garden Center

Tips & Tricks

• Introduce fresh potting soil in any

gaps that you find within your container. This gives your plants a new medium to extend their roots. • Add some slow release fertilizer (we recommend Garden Cote by Fertilome) to feed your plants the necessary nutrients to finish the summer strong. • Plants planted in the heat of summer tend to stress a bit more, so stay on your watering and keep a close eye on newly planted containers.

198 Martin Road, Greenville • 864-277-1818 www.martinnursery.com

By Juliana Meade

This year, more than 11,000 Hispanic youth were enrolled in Greenville public schools. Forty-eight percent come from homes that speak English “very well”; however, for a majority of our Hispanic students, Spanish remains the primary language spoken at home. Professor Patricia Gándara of the University of California Los Angeles, an expert in Latinos in education and Englishlanguage learners, explained that if a child can improve his native tongue, it will be easier for that child to improve his second language. To be clearer, only 34.4 percent of Hispanics are immigrants, so U.S.-born Hispanics and immigrant Spanish-speakers need to work on different issues such as proficiency. Intuitively, we can say that English-language proficiency is vital to be successful within our community and our nation. That is why access to English as a Second Language instruction and bilingual programs and teachers is essential for nurturing the lives and career skills of the Spanish-dominant students who call Greenville home. Looking at a bilingual education more broadly, if more programs were created in Greenville County Schools, we could also expose the 64,000 other students to a multicultural education. Bilingual teachers can better address classroom expectations and academic material. They can also benefit students’ parents and guardians by explaining in their native tongue how their children are doing in school and what they need to work on. The lack of bilingual teachers across our school system presents a barrier that negatively affects our Hispanic students’ chances of being successful both inside and outside the classroom. Author Geoffrey Willans said, “You can never understand one language until you understand at least two.” Bilingualism has been shown in studies to improve cognitive skills and increase social awareness, as well as drive greater career success and higher salaries. Our students here in Greenville deserve every opportunity for success in a future that is more and more competitive and diverse, both locally and in the rest of the world. It is time for the public to realize and demand the benefits of bilingual education for our children. According to the website for Greenville’s Blythe Academy, the school is “currently recognized as the only elementary school in the state that offers daily foreign language instruction to all of its students.” This is a bilingual magnet school

where children will have science and math taught in Spanish or French and social studies and language arts taught in English. Students who want to learn or improve their Spanish or English skills can learn from other students. Blythe Academy is a role model for what more schools in Greenville could offer. One suggestion is to provide summer ESL classes for Spanish-dominant youth. This would ensure that they do not regress in their English-language capabilities.

“You can never understand one language until you understand at least two.” ­— Geoffrey Willans

By 2060, the Hispanic population in the United States is predicted to increase by 115 percent. Investment in bilingual educators and resources is essential not only for the growing Hispanic population but also for every child growing up in this new diverse world. The United States is known for being the land of opportunities. By providing more bilingual teachers and programs, we can give all of our youth the opportunities for a successful and prosperous life. Juliana Meade is a rising sophomore at Furman University studying communications. You can reach her at juliana.meade@furman.edu.

Speak your mind

The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, fact-based arguments. All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Managing Editor Emily Pietras at epietras@communityjournals.com.


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8 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 08.03.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

A PLACE TO CALL HOME As the number of homeless students in Greenville County soars, a new program is helping families find more stable housing WORDS BY CINDY LANDRUM | PHOTO BY WILL CROOKS

Torrey Hill and her two teenage sons recently moved into an affordable rental house owned by Homes of Hope after living in transitional housing.

A

local group is working to address a problem many people might not know exists — homelessness among students. Last year, nearly 1,089 students in Greenville County Schools had no place to call home. Nine of them lived in places not meant for human habitation such as cars, parks, or abandoned buildings. Ninety lived in emergency shelters for the homeless. Eight hundred twenty-two lived with friends or relatives because their families couldn’t afford a place of their own, and 168 stayed in hotels or motels, a number that has doubled since 2012. The number of students categorized as homeless in the school district has increased 113 percent since 2012, and they attend 84 different schools. Under the federal McKinney-Vento Home-

less Assistance Act, homeless students are defined as students who lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence. Some partners in the Greenville Homeless Alliance are working on a pilot program that will target 10 families of students who are living in motels and have an eviction on their record, something that often stops them from getting into stable housing, said Susan McLarty, Greenville Homeless Alliance coordinator. The Second Chance program includes the Greenville Housing Authority, United Housing Connection, SHARE (Sunbelt Human Advancement Resources), the Greenville County Human Relations Commission, and United Ministries. Families identified by the school district’s coordinator for the McKinney-Vento Education Program, named for the federal law that defines which students are

classified as homeless and mandates that public schools accommodate them, will go through an education program that teaches them how to be good tenants. They’ll get a certification, something organizers of the program hope will convince landlords to give them a second chance. “These are people who are paying $225 to $450 dollars a week for a motel room,” said Davina Kavanaugh, a mental health counselor and volunteer with the Greenville Homeless Alliance. Many got there because of life circumstances, she said. “It’s not people who are just lazy or drug addicts or the stereotypical homeless person,” Kavanaugh said. “It’s people who don’t know how to budget, go through a divorce, have a health issue, are escaping domestic violence, or are living paycheck

to paycheck and have an unexpected expense such as a car breaking down.” Never expected to be homeless Torey Hill never expected to be homeless. She had a college degree and a full-time job. Then her husband left after they separated last April. It took three months for her to fall behind on the rent on the apartment in which she and her three children lived. They were evicted. She was able to get another apartment, but within two months, the landlord started the eviction process again. “When the second eviction was going on, my oldest son was really angry and frustrated. He wondered how it could happen to us when I worked. He thought nobody cared about our situation and wondered how we were going to get out of it,” Hill said. “Frankly, I was asking the same questions.”


08.03.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 9

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM Hill sought help from United Ministries in October, and she and her two teenage sons spent two weeks staying in churches in the county before getting a place in a transitional home, and an assigned social worker and financial adviser. In June, she and her sons moved into an affordable rental house owned by Homes of Hope. Her oldest daughter had moved out of state. “The most frustrating part of the whole thing was that it happened in the first place,” Hill said. “But now, we’re in a good situation. Everybody is calmer. Everybody is at peace. I can tell they [her sons] feel more stable. Even when we were in transitional housing, there was always the wonder in the back of their minds when are they going to tell us we can’t live here anymore.” Katie Preuss knows of a single mother and her three daughters who "lived" in a 24-hour McDonald's. Preuss, associate director of the Interfaith Hospitality Network at United Ministries, the church program Hill and her sons utilized, said the woman now has a fulltime job, child care, and her own apartment. Widespread problem Nationwide, 1.3 million students experienced homelessness during the 20152016 school year, according to the  Na-

Homeless students in South Carolina

School year................. Number

Where do Greenville County’s homeless students spend the night? Unsheltered (9)

2013........................... 11,436 2014........................... 12,809 2015........................... 13,353 2016........................... 14,360 2017........................... 12,018 (Source: South Carolina Department of Education)

tional Center for Education Statistics. Larger numbers of homeless students were enrolled in early elementary grades than in later grades. In South Carolina, the numbers increased steadily from 2012-2013 to 20152016. But the number decreased in 2017, falling from 14,360 in 2016 to 12,018, or 1.9 percent of enrolled students.

Doubled up (822)

Matt Orr, public information officer with the South Carolina Department of Education, said those numbers are lower than what is predicted by the level of poverty in the state. He said the rule of thumb is that 10 percent of people living in poverty will experience homelessness at some point during the year. According to U.S. Census data, 18.5 percent of S.C. resi-

Hotel/ Motel (168) Shelter (90) (Source: Greenville County Schools and Second Chance program)

dents under 18 years old live in poverty. In Greenville County, homeless students attend school all over the county, including in some of its wealthiest areas such as Bell's Crossing Elementary, Oakview Elementary, and Riverside High. That shows the importance of increasing available affordable housing in both the city and the county, McLarty said.

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ONE-WAYS AND STREET CLOSURES WOULD NO LONGER BE TRAFFIC-CALMING OPTIONS UNDER NEW RULES CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Closing a street or making it one way would no longer be an option for Greenville residents who want to slow traffic on the streets in their neighborhoods under a new traffic-calming process being discussed by Greenville City Council. The changes come on the heels of a contentious battle over whether a barricade that turned one block of McPherson Lane into a one-way street should be made permanent. The City Council ultimately decided to keep the barricade that prevents motorists from using McPherson, a small residential street, to escape from or avoid the traffic gridlock on Augusta Street. The city’s traffic-calming process has been in place since 1999, and dozens of neighborhoods have voted in favor of installing items such as speed humps, curb extensions, and chicanes. None was as controversial as McPherson, City Councilwoman Amy Ryberg Doyle said.

A barricade on McPherson Lane has forced some neighborhood residents to navigate the busy intersection of Augusta Street and Faris Road. Will Crooks/Greenville Journal

Residents of McPherson and four other their streets were being adversely affected nearby streets — Warner Street, McDan- by increased traffic. iel Court, Camille Avenue, and Cothran More than 70 percent of residents on Street — said they were promised the McPherson and the four other streets votbarricade as an answer to their concerns ed in favor of making the barricade perover increased traffic because of the rede- manent and installing three speed bumps. veloped shopping center at the corner of Greenville Public Works Director Mike Augusta and Faris Road. But residents of Murphy told the City Council Commitother streets in the neighborhood object- tee on Planning and Neighborhoods that ed to the one-way, saying they weren’t no-T:9.75”possible changes could include removtified the barricade would be erected and ing an option that modifies or restricts

access or circulation, increasing the wait time for neighborhoods to initiate the traffic-calming purpose from three years to five, and including a process for removal of a device that has been previously voted in by residents. Murphy told City Council they should consider having the planning commission approve the study area and engineering assessments. Currently, a neighborhood must submit a petition with 50 percent of the households in a study area determined by the city’s traffic engineering department. A neighborhood study team is formed and traffic engineering researches traffic patterns. Together, they develop a traffic-calming plan. The plan can include multiple items. Seventy percent of households in the study area must vote yes for the items to pass. Diverters, textured pavements, chicanes, lane reductions, and street closures require City Council approval. Councilmembers are expected to consider the new rules around the end of August.

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GREER CHILDREN'S THEATRE Production of

Music by STEPHEN FLAHERTY

Lyrics by LYNN AHRENS Book by LYNN AHRENS & STEPHEN FLAHERTY

Co-Conceived by Lynn Ahrens , Stephen Flaherty and Eric Idle Based on the works of Dr. Seuss Music Supervised, Adapted and Produced by Bryan Louiselle

! E FRE

ion s s i m ad

is

Friday & Saturday August 10-11 & 17-18 7:00pm Sunday August 12 & 19 2:00pm THE CANNON CENTRE 204 Cannon Street Greer, SC 29651 Free Admission seating is first come, first served. Arrive early for best seats!

GreerCulturalArts.com SPONSORED BY

Seussical JR. is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI). All authorized performance materials are also supplied by MTI.  www.MTIShows.com

The city purchased a piece of property along the banks of the Reedy River after a developer proposed an office building at the site. A concept plan has been introduced for preliminary landscaping for the area. File photo

WHAT DOES THE CITY HAVE PLANNED AT 55 CAMPERDOWN? THIS COULD BE IT CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

After a developer proposed an office building on a piece of property along the banks of the Reedy River at the edge of Falls Park, the city bought the property so it would not be developed at all. Now, there’s a preliminary landscaping concept plan for the property, which is designed to improve connectivity between South Main Street and the river. The concept plan, done by Beau Welling Design, covers the river’s east bank — defined as Japanese Dogwood Lane, the road that borders Camperdown, Centennial American Properties’ redevelopment of the block of South Main Street across from the Peace Center, down to the Bowater building. The plan covers 0.6 acres and is estimated to cost approximately $600,000, said Edward Kinney, the city’s senior landscape architect. The city bought the parcel at 55 Camperdown Way for $4 million. The Carolina Foothills Garden Club donated $900,000 through its Falls Park Endowment to help defray the cost of purchasing the land in exchange for a conservation easement being permanently placed on the land. Upstate Forever was named the grantee of the conservation easement. Under the easement, the city cannot remove trees and future plantings must be native, Kinney said. The easement also contains a cap of 30 percent impervious surfaces, he said. A letter of intent approved by the City Council last year calls for Centennial to construct the public improvements on the 55 Camperdown plaza. Through a synthetic tax increment financing district, the city will reimburse the company for the cost of those improvements over 25 years with payments based on the increased property taxes generated by the $200 million Camperdown development. Friends of the Red Cross also pledged $250,000 to help the city pay for the land purchase. The concept plan includes a spot for a sculpture

Landscape plan for Reedy River’s east bank. Plans by Beau Welling Designs

commemorating the Red Cross’ centennial and service to Greenville. Kinney said a sculpture honoring former South Carolina Gov. and U.S. Education Secretary Dick Riley could also be located in the river’s east bank area. Kinney said work on the landscape plan likely will be done in conjunction with the rest of the Camperdown streetscape work.


t GIVE RIDE to G led Reschedu

r! e h t a e w f ecause o

b

LLaurens Electric Cooperative’s 2018 Annual Charity Event benefitting our community NEW DATE:

Saturday, August 11, 2018

•• Best Hand $2000 • Worst Hand $250 • Door Prize Drawings Registration 8 A.M. First Bike out 9 A.M. Last Bike out 10 A.M.

Dual Starting Locations: Laurens Electric Cooperative, 2254 Hwy. 14, Laurens, SC or Harley-Davidson of Greenville, 30 Chrome Drive, Greenville, SC Ride Will End At: Harley-Davidson of Greenville

Registration fee $25

(includes a FREE t-shirt)

Ride with us August 11

FOOD WILL BE AVAILABLE from Quaker Steak & Lube

Contact: David Hammond at 864-683-1667 PO Box 700

Laurens, SC 29360

LaurensElectric.com


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08.03.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 15

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

NEW PLAN ADDRESSES FUTURE MOTEL CLOSINGS CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

The next time a motel is condemned in Greenville, local government and nonprofit organizations have a plan to help residents who abruptly find themselves without a place to live. When the Economy Inn off Augusta Road in Greenville County was condemned in January, more than 100 people were left scrambling to find a place to go. Some ended up sleeping on cots at a local church for as long as three weeks. Prevention of condemnations is the first goal, according to the “motel displacement response plan” developed by representatives of nonprofits, governments, and churches. The effort was led by the Greenville Housing Alliance. The plan calls for local governments to support motel owners and property managers in making repairs to keep their properties from being condemned, including providing time for them to make repairs and de-

termining whether financial resources are available to support repairs. The plan said local nonprofit organizations will work “to help people living in precarious housing find sustainable permanent housing." When a closure is expected to occur, local churches and shelters will work to find temporary beds for displaced residents, and organizations will provide services such as transportation, job training and placement, and a link to more-permanent housing, the plan said. The organizations expect to provide assistance for up to two weeks but said a few families may need additional assistance. Greenville Homeless Alliance Coordinator Susan McLarty said 12 motels in the Pleasantburg Drive, Mauldin Road, and Augusta Road areas are being used as long-term housing by low-income individuals and families. Greenville County has an estimated 170,000 people living in or teetering on the edge of poverty, according to the plan.

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16 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 08.03.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

EVADING THE SUMMER SLIDE OnTrack program helps Greenville students succeed

Seventh-graders Claudrez Thompson, Cammiekay Fitzsimmons, and Tony Mack built bikes at Berea Middle School’s OnTrack summer program. Will Crooks/Greenville Journal

ARIEL GILREATH | STAFF

agilreath@communityjournals.com

A local nonprofit is working to address a problem educators across the globe are familiar with when they start the school year — the summer slide. Most school districts have summer programs for students who have failed or come close to failing a class during the year, but the United Way of Greenville County’s OnTrack program is working to take it one step further. During the summer, the last thing on students’ mind is school, and by the start of school, it reflects in their academics. Rather than picking up in the fall where they left off in the spring, teachers have found that students often decline in academic performance during the summer. Educators have termed this fallback the “summer slide.” OnTrack began in Greenville schools

in 2015 in partnership with Building Educated Leaders for Life, a national program and curriculum with the goal of improving student attendance and academic performance. Its free summer program takes middle school students at risk of falling behind academically and attempts to catch them up in the span of six weeks during the summer. Studies show that high-performing students and students from affluent families don’t feel the effects of the summer slide as much as students from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. Students whose families can afford to send them to camp and keep them engaged over the summer, for example, experience the slide less than those who stay at home. A 2011 report from RAND Corp. titled “Making Summer Count” said that on average, students lose one month of learning during the summer. However, students can lose more or even make gains

during the summer, depending on their backgrounds. Tobi Kinsell, director of OnTrack Greenville, said the program identifies middle school students who can benefit from the summer camp based on three early warning signs — chronic absenteeism, behavior problems, and low academic achievement. “The reason those are the indicators is that research has proven that if you are chronically absent, have a high number of behavior referrals, or are failing math and English in middle school, you only have a 20 percent chance of graduating,” Kinsell said. For students who show more than one warning sign, the odds of graduating high school are lower. “OnTrack teams talk about the data and the students to determine why they’re off track and determine the root cause, and then we wrap interventions around students to help support them getting back

on track,” Kinsell said. According to BELL’s 2017 report, students in the summer program gained two months in math and two months in literacy proficiency rather than sliding back. On top of the academic gains, students have said they look forward to coming to the summer program to see their new friends. Steven Sokohl is assistant principal at Berea Middle School — one of the three middle schools in the Greenville County School District to have the OnTrack/BELL summer program. Students at Tanglewood and Lakeview middle schools are also participating in the summer camp. Sokohl said that for the first half of the day, students complete their BELL curriculum. The second half of the day is devoted to activities, from attending Greenville Drive games to learning about robotics. “I had one kid that was getting in trouble here at BELL, and he had never been


08.03.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 17

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM to a Greenville Drive game. So he came to us at my office and basically said, ‘I’m staying out of trouble because I want to be able to go to a Drive game,’” Sokohl said. Sharif Abdulbarr had never successfully ridden a bike before this summer. The soon-to-be seventh-grader tried when she was younger but stopped when

“There was a woman and she was here to help me ride it, and then I caught on by myself,” Sharif said. This is Sharif’s second year coming to the camp, which she said made her feel more at home when she was a rising sixthgrader. Berea Middle School Principal Corey Collington said the program relieves some stress off not only rising middle school students but also their parents. “Sixth grade is that transition year, and you always worry about sixth grade and ninth grade,” Collington said. “But having them here, –Corey Collington, Berea Middle School principal it helps with the comfort level with our parents and our students.” Maddie Fields, who is also each attempt ended in a fall. a rising seventh-grader, said the summer This summer, Sharif not only learned to camp helped her a lot last year when she ride a bike on the Greenville Health Sys- was nervous about starting middle school, tem Swamp Rabbit Trail, she also built and it reflected on her report card. her own mountain bike with other Berea “I had all A’s and B’s every quarter and Middle students. got on the A/B honor roll at the end of the OnTrack partnered with Village Wrench year,” Maddie said. “As long as you know to provide the parts and instruction so each the teachers and you’re on their good side, student could build a bike to take home. you’re going to be better and get used to it.”

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18 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 08.03.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

TIME NAMES GREENVILLE MAYOR KNOX WHITE ONE OF 31 PEOPLE CHANGING THE SOUTH

Crossword puzzle: page 42

Sudoku puzzle: page 42

Time magazine has named Greenville Mayor Knox White one of 31 people who is changing the South. White, who has served as mayor for 23 years, was honored for playing a role in the revitalization of downtown Greenville. The article pointed out the city’s connections to textiles and said the city was saved by a far-sighted decision to diversify its industrial base, landing GE, Michelin, and BMW. “When White was elected mayor in 1995, the city had the money and planning acumen to build an urban center where people actually live, complete with retail, restaurants, and trails beside a reclaimed Reedy,” the article said. The article concluded with the city’s plans for Unity Park, a 60-acre park that is being built on land west of downtown that had once held two separate, segregated parks. Others making Time’s list include Demario Davis, a linebacker for the New Orleans Saints; Danica Roem, the first openly transgender person ever to serve in a state legislature; Paula Wallace, president and cofounder of Savannah College of Art and Design; Meherwan Irani, a chef with restaurants in North Carolina and Georgia; and Christy Coleman, CEO of the American Civil War Museum. –Cindy Landrum Knox White has been Greenville's mayor for 23 years. Will Crooks/Greenville Journal


08.03.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 19

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

Greenville school district implements clear-bag policy at athletic events

We always let you know who will be there when you open the door!

4

Spectators won’t be allowed in any Greenville County School District athletic events with a bag in tow unless it’s transparent, the district announced Thursday morning. The banned bags include camera cases, briefcases, backpacks, cinch bags, and large purses. The only opaque bags allowed will be small clutch purses, according to the announcement. Any items brought into an athletic event that need to be carried in a bag must be in a 1-gallon-sized zip-close bag, or a 12-inch by 6-inch by 12-inch clear bag. The district said spectators will be allowed to carry items in, such as blankets and folding chairs, but they will be subject to a search. The ban comes after tightened security at school districts across the country as parents and students have increasingly publicly questioned school safety in the wake of a mass shooting at a high school in Parkland, Fla. But the announcement said the ban wasn’t a direct result of a specific event. “The policy is similar to those already in place at university stadiums and local arenas. The policy is not a response to any specific event or concern,” the announcement said. “We are continually evaluating security measures in our school buildings and taking steps to 4 ensure public safety at our after-school events.” –Ariel Gilreath

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OBITUARIES & MEMORIALS

Submit to: obits@communityjournals.com

Dollie Isgett Younts

Hayden Hays

1930 - 2018

Dollie I. Younts, of Fountain Inn, wife of Melvin K. Younts for 67 years, known as “Miss Dollie”, passed away on Friday, July 20, 2018 at the age of 88. Her family was by her side. “Miss Dollie” was a native of Cheraw, SC and was a daughter of the late Joseph Bert and Fay Laney Isgett. In addition to her beloved husband, Melvin, she is survived by four sons, Kemp Younts and his wife, Tammie, Joe Younts, David Younts and his wife, Frieda, and Laney Younts and his wife, Dana; and her son-in-law James Culp and his wife, Corie. Mrs. Younts was preceded in death in 1996 by their daughter, Kerry Ann Y. Culp. Known by them as “Meme” she is also survived by the loves of her life her grandchildren, Trent, Colin, and Drew Culp, Jenna Younts Chandler, Jonas, Cassie, and Will Younts, Katie Younts Kinley, Wesley, Dalton, Luke, Savannah, Kerry, and Grayson Younts; great-grandchildren, Jaxon & Mason Chandler, Lottie & Mattson Culp, Noah & Asher Kinley, and David Younts III; one sister, Tate Isgett Allen; and many nieces and nephews. Dollie was a graduate of Columbia College with a BS Degree in Science. She taught eighth grade at Sans Souci Jr. High for four years. She was president of the Fountain Inn Garden Club and won many blue ribbons for her flower arrangements in many Greenville County Flower shows. Dollie thoroughly enjoyed playing golf and was president of the Fox Run CC Ladies Association for two years. Playing bridge and working in her flower garden were among her favorite pastimes. Dollie and her husband, Melvin,

August 11, 1942 – July 18, 2018 co n t r i b u te d much to charities throughout Greenville County and the Upstate of SC including The Younts Center at Furman University, the North Greenville University football stadium, the Columbia College soccer complex, the Marie Younts Girls Home of Connie Maxwell in Mauldin, SC, the Younts Cultural Arts Center in Fountain Inn, and the Younts South Club area in Memorial Stadium at Clemson University. The family received friends on Tuesday, July 24, 2018 at Fountain Inn First Baptist Church, 206 N. Weston St, Fountain Inn, SC 29644. The Funeral Service was held on Wednesday, July 25, 2018 at 3:00 PM at Fountain Inn FBC. Entombment followed in the Cannon Memorial Park Chapel Mausoleum. Her nine grandsons, Trent, Colin & Drew Culp, Will, Jonas, Wesley, Grayson, Luke & Dalton Younts, served as pallbearers. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that memorials be made payable to any of the following: The Melvin & Dollie Younts Charity Foundation, Furman University, Clemson University, Columbia College, the Cultural Arts Foundation of Fountain Inn, or the Fountain Inn First Baptist Church Foundation. Please mail all memorials to: PO Box 566, Fountain Inn, SC 29644. Cannon Funeral Home, Fountain Inn, is assisting the family. Please visit www.CannonFuneralHomes. com to offer online condolences.

Arthur Hayden Hays, 76, of Greenville,

Mr.

Hays

is

SC, died on Wednesday, July 18, 2018.

preceded

Mr. Hays was born on April 11, 1942 in

death

Atlanta, GA to Robert Bond Hays and

parents and his

Virginia Pritchard Hays. After graduating

brother, Robert

from Hartwell High School, he attended

Bond

Furman

University

on

a

in

by

his

Hays,

football

Jr.. He is survived by his wife, Brenda

scholarship. He earned his BA and MA

Haygood Hays; his children, Melanye

from Furman and was a member of the

Hays Cravey (Rick) of Atlanta, GA and

Kappa Alpha Order.

Justin Hayden Hays (Denise) of Portland,

Mr. Hays was Head Coach at Commerce

OR: and his grandchildren: Samuel Lee

High School. He then returned to Furman

Cravey, Hayden Luke Cravey and Jude

to accept a position as Assistant Coach

Arthur Hays.

under Bob King.

Visitation was held on Monday, July 23,

Mr. Hays worked for more than 40 years

2018 at First Baptist Church Greenville.

at Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance

A memorial service followed. Sign online

Company as a sales representative and

guestbook: www.mackeymortuary.com.

district manager.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made runner,

to First Baptist Church of Greenville,

completing six marathons, including one

Mr.

Hays

was

an

avid

847 Cleveland Street, Greenville, SC

with each of his children, and countless

29601,

Peachtree Road races throughout his life.

or Triune Mercy Center, 222 Rutherford

He was an Eagle Scout, President of the

Street, Greenville, SC 29609, www.

Paladin Club, President of the Poinsett

triunemercy.org.

Club, Chair of the Board of Deacons

Mackey Funerals and Cremations at

at First Baptist Church Greenville and

Century Dr., 864-232-6706.

www.firstbaptistgreenville.com;

Arrangements

by

a member of the Furman University Advisory Board.

A Lasting Legacy | Submit to: obits@communityjournals.com The Greenville Journal is pleased to announce the addition of obituaries to our weekly print publication. Online obituaries and memorials will be shared on our website via a Legacy.com affiliation. Obituaries can be placed in person at our office located at 581 Perry Ave., Greenville; via email at obits@communityjournals.com; or our website, GreenvilleJournal.com. Feel free to email or visit for more information about deadlines, space restraints, and editorial requirements.


08.03.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 21

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

SENIOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

Brothers who hadn’t seen each other in seven years were reunited on the baseball diamond during the Senior League Baseball World Series that recently concluded at the J.B. “Red” Owens Baseball Complex in Easley. During a team practice, Saipan’s Justin Celis realized he was throwing pitches to an unknown catcher. The mystery player turned out to be Justin’s older brother Ton, who hadn’t seen Justin in the seven years since he moved to Washington state. When he learned that Justin would be among the players making the 54-hour journey to the SLBWS, Ton began making plans for the surprise reunion. Photos provided by Holly Hardin

Our Community

Justin’s Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands team also featured the first female to play in the SLBWS. Photo by Leland Outz

Community news, events, and happenings

SERVICES

Renovations to begin for Greer Branch Library Renovations will begin in late August on The Jean M. Smith Branch of the Greenville County Library System at 505 Pennsylvania Ave., Greer. The library is adding 5,500 square feet and updating the building. When finished, the branch will include an expanded children’s area (double the current size), a dedicated space for teenagers, an enlarged community meeting room that seats 120, two new four-person conference rooms, enclosed quiet space for reading and studying, interior updates, drive-up materials returns, a family restroom, a nursing room, and additional parking. The project budget is almost $5 million, which is funded by the library system’s accumulated capital fund reserves with no bond issue necessary. There will also be engraved pavers available for purchase to further support the project. The branch closed Monday, July 30, and will reopen in fall 2019. During the closure, the public is invited to use the Burdette Branch at 316 W. Main St. in Taylors or any of the 10 other Greenville County Library System locations. Also, beginning Aug. 13, the Bookmobile will be available from 1:45-4:30 p.m. every other Monday in the parking lot of the Greer First Baptist Church, 201 W. Poinsett St. Materials borrowed from the Jean M. Smith Branch in Greer may be returned to the Bookmobile or any Greenville County Library System location. Submit community news items to www.greenvillejournal.com/submit.

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This Week

Beds for the Modern Dog South Carolina furniture maker believes in good design for all words by Anne Wolfe Postic Josh Cox opens the door of his workshop with the wideopen smile of a man who loves what he does. His workshop, home to Bricker & Bark (and its sister company Bricker & Beam), is located in the growing community of artists, restaurateurs, and eclectic businesses of West Columbia. The large shop is filled with works in progress, experiments with new materials and the delicious smell of fresh wood. Cox makes heirloom-quality furniture, defined by expert craftsmanship, a clean aesthetic and the warmth of natural materials. In one corner, a stack of dog beds handcrafted from sustainably sourced local hardwood await delivery to homes where beloved dogs enjoy the same luxuries as their human families. Cox learned woodworking techniques as a child, working alongside his grandfather on his Ohio farm, where he visited several times a year. “As we neared the farm, we passed what we came to call ‘Bricker Hill,’ the last hill before we arrived and the point at which our excitement for adventure started. It’s that anticipation and excitement to explore and create that inspired our name,” Cox says. That taste for adventure still drives Cox to conceive and design new pieces for humans and canines alike. As he grew older, furniture making became a convenient hobby, a way for Cox to have the high-quality, modern furniture he preferred. When he and his wife were in search of a coffee table, he realized he could simply make it himself; so he did. That coffee table garnered interest from

Josh Cox

For more, visit www.brickerandbeam.com.

friends and Cox found himself cutting out earlier and earlier from his bartending job to finish custom projects. “The business kept snowballing and I realized it was time to make furniture full-time,” he said. Bricker & Beam was born. When a lovable labradoodle named Coltrane joined the family, dog beds to suit a modern aesthetic were in short supply — nonexistent, really. Cox felt that familiar excitement and went to the workshop to build something beautiful. “My goal is to create furniture that blends contemporary, clean lines with the warmth of natural materials,” Cox says. And, furniture for dogs should be no exception, he said: After all, canine companions can’t articulate their own style, so they need guidance. Bricker & Bark beds are built for dogs whose homes reflect their owners’ tastes. They come in two styles: the Winston, a platform style, rests on hand-turned mid-century legs; the Frye has raised edges on three sides. Both beds come with foam cushions, covered in removable, waterproof canvas or premium faux leather. Where overstuffed, garishly colored dog beds are a jarring interruption in the home, Bricker & Bark beds add warmth and style to any room. “Building furniture isn’t just a business for us, but a passion,” Cox says. His passion for design, heirloom-quality work and natural materials shows in every piece.


24 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 08.03.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

do it on your Lawn for a #cleanreedy Washing your car on grass or gravel helps stop pollution from flowing into our waterways. Most soap contains chemicals that harm fish and water quality. These chemicals, together with the dirt and oil washed from your car, can flow into nearby ditches or storm drains that run directly into rivers, lakes, or streams. Why water your driveway when you can water your lawn? Save money and protect the environment! To learn more, visit:

www.cleanreedy.org

...keep it clean!

LONG-TABLE DINNERS The art of unmatched entertaining

words by Stephanie Burnette | photography by Blenco & Co. Dining in the garden has never been more inspiring. Invite a crowd, small or large, over for a long-table supper in the waning light of summer evenings. A family-style meal is the way to accomplish a gathering where you can enjoy the al fresco experience as much as guests. We tapped the expertise of Milton’s Cuisine and Cocktails, whose garden suppers are feted events at their 155-year-old farmhouse and biodynamic micro-farm called Milton’s Acre, in northeast Georgia. Chef Derek Dollar and his team — including farm manager Peter Kohm — grow 90 varieties of heirloom vegetables, fruits, and herbs to supply the restaurant’s menus and cocktails, garden suppers, and private events. Start with an appetizer that can be picked up and carried around as well as a batched cocktail. Milton’s Acre suggests a duo of cucumber, quite the clever pairing: chilled tomato cucumber gazpacho matched with a cucumber basil sparkler made with Effen cucumber vodka. A batched cocktail is a smart starter, sitting ready by the pitcher-full with glasses aplenty. Gazpacho can be pre-ladled into lidded jars with self-serve spoons. Set the table for face-to-face seating with low, spaced-out arrangements, keeping room for communal dishes. Consider common vessels for twinkling votive candles. They can hold a candle alone or be nestled with organic ingredients like grits, dried beans, seashells or pebble. The trick to the long-table-dinner look is to use the same size rectangular folding tables butted end to end. These tables are narrow and uniform and look apt with simple white tablecloths and a runner of herbs or garden greenery, possible sprinkled with battery-powered fairy lights. Chairs can be a menagerie of what you have or can borrow. It works well if all the chairs are armless and nearly the same seat height. Avoid placing chairs at the

FIND OUT MORE To learn more about Miltons Cusine & Cocktails, visit www. miltonscuisine.com. For recipes, visit www.greenvillejournal.com.

ends of your table since these banquetstyle tables tend to be narrower than a traditional dining setup. Plates and flatware can vary immensely, though consider odd sets of twos or threes alternating by seat. Matching napkins, whether cloth or paper, can be uniform and

simple. The show-stopper of the evening is the natural beauty of eating in a garden as well as the dishes served on the plate. Opt for a simple, beautiful protein served with two sides, one warm and one cold. This time of year Dollar likes the airline cut of chicken (it’s the breast with the wing drumette still attached) alongside tomato corn basil spoonbread and a shaved vegetable salad dressed with white balsamic vinaigrette. For dessert, think cobbler self-scooped into bowls. Crème fresh or whipped cream is more easily passed than ice cream and don’t forget to keep pitchers of still water on the table, too. If you plan to set up your dinner around raised beds or garden boxes, think about purchasing low-cost solar lights to pepper into these spaces. As the sun drops below the horizon their ambient lights will add to the festivities. And, if you don’t want to spray this area of your yard for mosquitos, employ torches filled with citronella oil to keep everyone bite free.


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Featured Property

Two Creeks Farm

1120 Bucklevel Rd., Greenwood, SC 29649

Home Info Price: $495,000 Bedrooms: 3 Baths: 2 Lot Size: 57 Acres

MLS#: 1371237 Sq. Ft.: 1400 Year Built: 2005

Schools: Pinecrest Elementary, Brewer Middle, and Greenwood High Agent: Jenks Patrick | 864-631-2770 jenks@jenksincrealty.com Jenks Inc. Realty

Duck Impoundment, Recreational Tract, or Gentleman’s Farm. Just in time for the fall! This turn-key hunt club comes with everything you need to start enjoying the outdoors including a cabin, duck ponds, fishing hole, barn, and equipment. The highlight of the property is the outdoor space. There are three micro-leveled duck impoundments along Coronaca Creek. Each has an agridrain system and ground blinds. Additional hardwood acreage is great for deer or turkey hunting. There is even open space for a dove field. Entertain family and friends in the three bedroom/two bath, Southland log home with a relaxing front porch. The porch

overlooks a small fishing pond loaded with bass and bream. In the back there is a smoking shed where bqq is made and lies are told. Behind the house is a three bay barn to store the included tractor, plows, pumps, bush hogs, decoys, and tools. Everything you need to plant this fall is already on site and included in the sale. All this is located an hour from Greenville and very close to Lake Greenwood. If you have an interest in picking up a tract of land as a hobby farm or primary residence....this is the most efficient way to do it. Buy today and start enjoying it immediately. Showings by appointment only. For more information about this property go to www.JenksIncRealty.com.

Real Estate News

Vicki Galloway Roark named broker-in-charge of C. Dan Joyner, Realtors Pelham Road office Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, Realtors recently announced that Vicki Galloway Roark has been named broker-in-charge of the company’s Pelham Road office. She had most recently served as a residential and commercial broker at Roark the company’s Augusta Road office.   Galloway Roark began her real estate career in 1984 at her mother’s real estate firm, the Faye Galloway Company Realtors and joined C. Dan Joyner, Realtors in 2007. Inspired by her mother’s work ethic and her expertise in resi-

dential and commercial real estate, Galloway Roark continues her mother’s legacy of excellence and achievement. “She was an amazing and respected business woman in the community,” Galloway Roark said of her mother and mentor. Very active in the local real estate community, Galloway Roark served on the Board of Directors for the Greater Greenville Association of Realtors from 2004-2009. In 2008, she was elected president of GGAR. Being actively involved in the association gives her access to information as soon as it becomes available to members, as well as a well-rounded perspective on the local and national markets. “We are honored to appoint Vicki to our leadership team,” said Danny Joyner, president and CEO. “She has been a high-performing agent within our company

for many years, and this is a well-earned progression in her real estate career.”

Coldwell Banker Caine names June Circle of Excellence recipients Coldwell Banker Caine recently recognized its topproducing agents in property sales and listings from June through the Circle of Excellence program. The Circle of Excellence distinction is awarded to agents within the company’s four offices – Easley, Greenville, Seneca, and Spartanburg – and celebrates $1 million in listing or closing volume, or four units listed or closed. The distinction also celebrates Coldwell Bankcontinued on PAGE 27


26 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 08.03.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

On the market Chatelaine • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

North Main • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Acadia • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Estates @ Governor’s Lake • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

52 Castellan Drive · $475,000 · MLS# 1372120

1820 N Main Street · $439,000 · MLS# 1370168

114 Fathers Drive · $399,000 · MLS# 1368093

39 Governor’s Lake Way · $355,000 · MLS# 1371989

4BR/3BA Wonderful home in great location with all the upgrades & amazing views! You don’t want to miss this one! Old Boiling Springs Rd to Left on Castellan

3BR/2BA Completely updated 3 bedroom, 2 bath in North Main community. Updated kitchen. Master suite with two large walk in closets. Stone Ave to N Main Street. Right on N Main.

5BR/4BA Immaculate home with 4,200+sf on a 1/3 acre lot with water view! 5 bedrooms plus and office, loft, and more! Harrison Bridge to Neely Ferry. LEFT into Governor’s Lake.

Contact: Tim Keagy 905-3304 BHHS C Dan Joyner

Contact: Nick Carlson 386-7704 Wilson Associates

3BR/2.5BA Meticulously maintained townhouse in desirable Acadia community-10 minutes from downtown Greenville! Open-floor plan townhouse with numerous upgrades! I-85 S-exit 42-Exit 12. Right then left into Acadia.

Sutton Park • Open Sat. 11 a.m.-2 p.m.

Sutton Park • Open Sat. 11 a.m.-2 p.m.

Autumn Trace • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Contact: Maggie Aiken 616-4280 BHHS C Dan Joyner Real Estate

Contact: Libby Wampole 313-3673 RE/MAX Moves

Cleveland Forest

25 Center Street · $317,900 · MLS# 1368558

27 Center Street · $317,900 · MLS# 1368561

603 Kingsmoor Drive · $249,900 · MLS# 1371976

4 Trails End · $575,000 · MLS# 1372807

3BR/2.5BA Fabulous location, just steps from the Swamp Rabbit Trail and downtown Travelers Rest, new construction, low maintenance AND a garage! From Greenville-US-276 N/Rutherford St. Turn right onto Center Street.

3BR/2.5BA Fabulous location, just steps from the Swamp Rabbit Trail and downtown Travelers Rest, new construction, low maintenance AND a garage! From Greenville-US-276 N/Rutherford St. Turn right onto Center Street.

4BR/2.5BA One-owner home- just over 3,000 square feet! Priced to move - below average price per square foot for neighborhood. Hwy 14 South towards Simpsonville. Autumn Trace. Left on Kingsmoor.

3BR/2BA 3BR/2BA w/basement in heart of Cleveland Forest. Walking distance to Cleveland Park/Greenville Zoo/tennis courts. Kitchen updated w/gas stove, granite counters, stainless steel appliances. Full finished basement w/bonus & flex space.

Contact: Blair Miller 430-7708 Wilson Associates

Contact: Blair Miller 430-7708 Wilson Associates

Contact: Ashley Steigerwald 907-0601 Wilson Associates

Contact: Maggie Aiken 616-4280 BHHS C Dan Joyner Real Estate

EXCEPTIONAL PROPERTIES

CHATSWORTH – 7000+ sf! 6 BR, 5.5 BA brick on +/-1.6 acre cul-de-sac lot. Heated gunite pool w/saltwater filtration system, 2 bonus rms, media rm, office, Flex Rm & finished terrace level. Gourmet kitchen & main level master suite. 3 car garage. A1353370 $1,150,000

CHELSEA WOODS – Custom built 5 BR, 5.5 BA, saltwater pool, pool house, huge bonus rm & 2 home offices! Extensive hrdwds, 2 gas log FPs. Gourmet kitchen w/Viking Range & SubZero fridge. Main level master suite. Main level guest suite. 3 car garage. 1367773 $849,900

MAHAFFEY PLANTATION – 5 BR, 3.5 BA. Extensive hrdwds, coffered ceilings, office, gourmet kitchen, luxury mstr ste, bonus rm, scrnd porch, deck, fncd BY w/waterfall feature & fire pit. 3 car gar & a detached 2 car gar w/ heated & cooled rm! 1362704 $599,900

MAHAFFEY PLANTATION - 4 BR, 3.5 BA, +/-.51 acre lot. 2 story foyer & great rm. Extensive hrdwds & architectural columns. Custom built-ins & gas log FP in Great rm. Huge kitchen w/ furniture qual cabinetry. Luxury main level mstr ste! 1370367 $545,900

Hundreds of styles, thousands of colors

864.438.0811

www.allaboutflooringofsc.com 2111 K North Pleasantburg Dr. Greenville, SC

864-448-1234 • team@carolinamoves.com


08.03.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 27

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Featured Home

River Walk

202 Walnut Trace Court, Simpsonville, SC 29681

Home Info Price: $520,000 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 3.5 Lot Size: 0.42 Acres

MLS#: 1372309 Sq. Ft: 4086

Schools: Monarch Elementary, Mauldin Middle, and Mauldin High Agent: Pam McCartney | 864-630-7844 pmccartney@cdanjoyner.com

This exquisite 4 BR, 3 1/2 bath custom home built by Billy Dunn backs to the coveted 4 mile walking trail and river. The master BR as well as two additional BR’s are on the main floor! Custom features throughout. The large great room is perfect for entertaining and leads into a stunning kitchen. The kitchen has ss appliances, gas range, granite countertops and center isle, tumbled stone backsplash, under cabinet lighting, two pantries, and wine refrigerator. You will love the screened porch and deck. You can sit and listen to the birds and river while feeling like you are living in the mountains. The master BR has a triple trey ceiling

and two closets. Two huge walk-in closets are in the bathroom as well as a double vanity, tile floors, jetted tub and separate shower. The W/O finished basement has a large bonus room with wet bar and a 4th BR and full bath. There is an abundance of storage in the basement and in the unfinished walk up attic space. River Walk is known for its amazing amenities including the 4 mile walking trail, lighted tennis courts, club house with work out room, swimming pool and swim team. Highly social neighborhood in a great Five Forks location. Award winning schools- Monarch Elementary, Mauldin Middle and Mauldin High.

Real Estate News cont. er Caine’s Team efforts listed below.
 Circle of Excellence agents achieving $1 million in listing/closing volume or four listed/closed units include David Seaver, Donna Morrow, Francie Little, Greg Norris, Heather Durbin, Heidi Putnam, Helen Hagood, Jacob Mann, Jake Dickens, Jeannette Schell, Jennifer Wilson, Jon Ferguson, Kathy Harris, Kiersten Bell, Kim Lyon, Kim Johnson, Kristi Matthews, Linda Wood, Lori Thompson, Marshall Jordan, Mary Jo Ochylski, Misty Hardaway, Nicole Tucker, Pat Loftis and Brett Smagala, Rhonda Porter, Shay Felknor, Shelbie Dunn, Susan Gallion, Tracey Cappio, Val Hubber, and Wanda Stewart. Circle of Excellence Groups (two-three agents) achieving $1.5 million in listing/closing volume or six units listed/ closed include the Cheves Mussman Ouzts Group.

Circle of Excellence Teams (four or more agents) achieving $2 million in listing/closing volume or eight units listed/closed include the Lewis & Co. Team.

The Haro Group Keller Williams Historic District The Haro Group Keller Williams Historic District is the top-producing real estate team in the Upstate when it comes to both transactions and volume. That’s according to the REAL Trends America’s Best Real Estate Professionals list. It features nearly 14,000 U.S. real estate professionals from across the country, ranking the top agents and teams in each state in four different categories: individuals by sides; individuals by volume; teams by sides; and teams by volume. This year, The Haro Group had the honor of landing

on two lists. The group took the No. 3 spot on South Carolina’s teams by sides list with just under 472 transactions in 2017. In the South Carolina teams by volume category, The Haro Group ranked sixth, with more than $94.5 million in sales last year. “Being selected for the REAL Trends America’s Best Real Estate Professionals list demonstrates our associates’ commitment to excellence and a high standard of expertise,” CEO and founder Haro Setian said. He went on to highlight the difference the team’s commitment to service makes, saying, “because we hire only full-time agents, clients get the benefit of working with professionals who diligently pursue their expertise in order for the client to thrive in a real escontinued on PAGE 28


28 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 08.03.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

SOLD: Greenville Transactions For the week of July 2 – 6 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

COLLINS CREEK $1,650,000 HAPPY VALLEY FARMS $1,458,000 $1,435,000 JACKSON HOLLOW $1,325,000 ALTA VISTA PLACE $1,250,000 $980,000 $800,000 SUNSET HILLS $760,000 $720,000 LEDGESTONE $650,000 CLAREMONT $610,000 $590,180 CRAFTSMAN COURT $565,000 SOMERLEAF $559,900 TUXEDO PARK $550,000 SPAULDING FARMS $550,000 HIGHGROVE $549,900 SYCAMORE RIDGE $538,500 HIGHCROFT $532,000 NORTHGATE $527,000 RIVER WALK $525,000 VILLAGGIO DI MONTEBELLO $479,500 RIVER WALK $475,900 RIVER WALK $475,900 WOODLAND PARK@CLEVELAND FOREST $475,000 MCDANIEL GREENE TOWNHOUSE $470,000 MEYERS PARK $460,000 SUGAR CREEK $439,000 THE PLANTATION ON PELHAM $436,000 CARILION $430,000 VALLEY OAKS $430,000 SUGAR MILL $430,000 ISAQUEENA PARK $428,000 $425,000 VALLEY VIEW “GOLF COMMUNITY” $418,000 WEATHERSTONE $412,000 KILGORE FARMS $403,750 NORTH HILLS $398,000 LEAFMORE WOODS $389,475 GROVE PARK $382,500 JONES MILL CROSSING $377,165 CARILION $375,000 SUGAR CREEK $374,500 BELHAVEN PARC $372,000 LANFORD’S POINTE $365,000 FIRETHORNE $358,555 BRUSHY MEADOWS $356,000 CYPRESS RUN $350,000 CARILION $350,000 CAROLINA COURT $349,000 KINGS CROSSING $344,267 WEST FARM VILLAGE $342,500 AMBER OAKS FARM $341,014 KILGORE FARMS $340,684 WATERS RUN $338,725 $334,100 RIVER DOWNS $330,000 WOODLAND CHASE $324,000 COPPER CREEK $323,791 $320,000 SUNSET HILLS $317,000

ROBERTSON BARBARA K SCHWEBACH LYNN F PVG PROPERTIES III LLC SPARROW TIMOTHY GEORGE ( ALTA VISTA PLACE LLC MARTIN KENDALL L (JTWROS MCCOY MARK MASSEY EDWARD D ZAWISTOWSKI HEIDI M (JTW ANTONELLI-MCDOWELL LISA STAID MICHAEL (JTWROS) DUCK PROPERTY LLC DAVIS JACLYN T HANSEN CHRISTIAN M MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH OSBORN MARTIN J KNAPPENBERGER RADELLE B CHANDLER ERIN E LS RESIDENTIAL LLC SMITH TAMMY KLASING DEBORAH S HULL R REID CHERYL A GUTIERREZ ALEJANDRO (JTW NEI GLOBAL RELOCATION CO BEATTIE PARK INC TAPPERT TOD N (SURV) HARPER CLYDE VIRGINIA TR STEIN ANNE M (JTWROS) GREER NEDENE TIWARI RYAN D (JTWROS) STEPHENS JEFFREY J VALKO EILEEN M VILLAGE COURT TOWNES LLC HOFFMAN SUSAN A (JTWROS) VASILENKO JANICE S PHILLIPS STEVEN P (JTWRO MERITAGE HOMES OF S C IN OGLESBY JOSEPH PRESTON I MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH MELTZER LAURA L (JTWROS) SABAL HOMES AT JONES MIL CORLEY ELIZABETH C VAUGHAN STEWART H ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC WOWAK PHILIP J (JTWROS) DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL STUBBLEFIELD JULIE H (JT BURDETTE GEORGE ZIEMER JUDITH BROOKS ROBERT A D R HORTON-CROWN LLC HOWARD DRIVE PROPERTIES SK BUILDERS INC MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH NVR INC PONDER JEWEL JANET (L-ES BURWELL JOHN RHYNE MUNGO HOMES INC MUNGO HOMES INC DANIEL JESSE RUTH MATTHEW J

BUYER

ADDRESS

SUBD.

MOODY MARK CHRISTIAN DAN UNCLE JAKE’S LLC 112 SOUTH EVERETT LLC ALSUP WILLIAM SCOTT (JTW NUGENT CHARLES P (JTWROS KINGERY GENA ELIZABETH(J AYER-DENT INC STEIN ANNE M (JTWROS) BLANK BRIAN M (JTWROS) ROSALES JESSICA R (JTWRO HAMILTON HAROLD RAY JR ( ELECTUS DEVELOPMENT GROU BOGART WHITNEY E BUSSOM BRYAN (JTWROS) BARUS DIANE J (JTWROS) BALON DANIEL R (JTWROS) BREDAEL GARY GERARD HUGHES KERRI B (JTWROS) GREER AMY A HUFFLING CASEY P (JTWROS FLOYD ELIZABETH Y (JTWRO MILLER CAROL AURENE TRUS NEI GLOBAL RELOCATION CO AUGHTRY JENNIFER REBECCA DWELLING GROUP LLC BARBARO LEONA A BECK JEFF (JTWROS) DESERIO CATHERINE G (JTW CROCKETT MICHELE M GRANT CHRISTOPHER J (JTW TIWARI RYAN D (JTWROS) GILL JEFFREY A (JTWROS) WALDEN JONATHAN KELLY BURNETTE RICHARD B (JTWR ELLIOTT ANN (JTWROS) CUTTS DANIEL R JR (JTWRO PORTER DONALD BACKER KELLY ELIZABETH BANKS ROBERT L (JTWROS) PARKER KYLE W (JTWROS) FAULKNER JAMES R (JTWROS GODWIN MONICA M CURL JON (JTWROS) STRANGE BRAD J (JTWROS) CIESCO MARC A (JTWROS) MILLIS ELIZABETH SHAVER MUSSON JENNIFER L (JTWRO SMITH BRANDON M (JTWROS) BARROW LYNN H (JTWROS) CENTRE STAGE-SOUTH CAROL RHODES KENNETH (JTWROS) MUNGO HOMES POERSCHMANN ROBERT (JTWR TORRENT SYLVAIN ALBERT JONATHAN (JTWROS) COYOTE’S CALL LLC CLARK BRANDON CHRISTOPHE GRIMES JOSHUA T (JTWROS) BRINKLEY JULIAN L (JTWRO BRUEHL DIMITRY APPLE DANIEL B (JTWROS)

7 PARRISH CT 408 MEADOW HILL WAY 2200 CANADA BLVD 1707 JACKSON HOLLOW TRL 103 CLEVELAND ST UNIT 303 224 HILLSIDE CHURCH RD 201 OLD BOILING SPRINGS RD 15 SUNSET DR 205 E MONTCLAIR AVE 10 BROOKTON CT 209 CHAMBLEE BLVD 16 BUIST AVE 507-B TOWNES ST 10 SOMERLEAF WAY 235 TUXEDO LN 9 BLOCK HOUSE RD 101 HIGHGROVE CT 1 LEGENDS WAY 29 HIGHCROFT CT 101 W AVONDALE DR 102 WALNUT TRACE CT PO BOX 1234 2707 N 118TH ST 207 RIVER WALK CT 204 BELLE OAKS DR 110 MCDANIEL GREEN PO BOX 8457 306 S WINGFIELD RD 101 RIVOLI LN 408 PALLADIO DR 4 MALLARD CT 211 SUGAR MILL RD 119 OXFORD ST 2687 BLACK FOX CT 23 LAURELCREST LN 416 MARSWEN CT 104 FORT DR 10 MCDONALD ST 58 LEAFMORE CT 106 OLD PROVINCE WAY 909 BERWICK DR 2 MAITLAND DR 117 SUGAR CREEK LN 216 ROUND STONE WAY 115 BLUE WATER TRL 205 FIREFLY CT 406 MEADOW LAKE TRL 211 BOUCHILLION DR 202 RIDENOUR AVE PO BOX 8451 1 SHADYWOOD PL 441 WESTERN LN 525 TURNING LEAF LN 24 LAROSE CT 425 FIELDSVIEW LN 5 RAWLINS CT 113 DARTMOOR DR 501 FOREST EDGE CT 159 LEIGH CREEK DR 2 WAKEFIELD ST 33015 BROOKSIDE CT

SUNSET HILLS $317,000 BROOKFIELD WEST $312,000 BELSHIRE $310,650 BOTANY WOODS $302,900 DIXIE HEIGHTS $300,000 BRIDGEWATER $295,000 THE OAKS AT FOWLER $292,000 LAUREL OAKS $291,000 BRIDGEWATER $289,053 MEADOWBROOK FARMS $289,000 BELSHIRE $288,670 THE TOWNES AT FIVE FORKS $285,000 DIXIE HEIGHTS $285,000 MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS $281,225 PLEASANT MEADOWS $278,000 KING’S CROSSING $277,750 MOUNT VERNON ESTATES $275,000 SPRING FOREST $275,000 FOXGLOVE $275,000 HOLLY TREE PLANTATION $270,000 ST JAMES PLACE $270,000 LONGLEAF $269,904 TOWNES SQUARE $269,900 LANDING AT SAVANNAH POINTE $269,000 COLEMAN HEIGHTS $265,000 NEELY FARM - HAWTHORNE RIDGE $264,900 HERITAGE CREEK $262,000 $259,900 CAMERON WOODS $259,000 WHITEHALL PLANTATION $255,000 HERITAGE CREEK $253,500 HERITAGE CREEK $252,500 LONGLEAF $252,435 $250,000 ORCHARD FARMS BAKER’S GARDEN $250,000 MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS $248,740 TREYBERN $247,000 THE ENCLAVE AT LISMORE $244,650 AMBER OAKS FARM $241,170 EDWARDS FOREST $240,000 SWANSGATE $237,500 AUTUMN TRACE $237,000 THE RICHLAND $235,000 WOODLANDS AT WALNUT COVE $235,000 HUNTERS RIDGE $234,000 BRYSON MEADOWS $232,000 CEDAR POINTE $231,000 LAKEVIEW CHASE TOWNES $230,990 FORRESTER WOODS $230,000 TRIPLE CREEK $227,360 WATERTON $225,000 FOWLER CHASE $223,000 KELSEY GLEN $221,000 BRECKENRIDGE $220,850 MAPLESTEAD FARMS $216,985 SHERWOOD FOREST $216,000 ORCHARD FARMS $215,000 FOREST ACRES $215,000 JENKINS ESTATES $214,000 COPPER CREEK $212,000 SPROUSE FARM $210,000

PRICE SELLER RUTH MATTHEW J BURMAN JONATHAN T NVR INC CRONIC ANDREW DANNY (JTW RELIQUE PRIME LLC MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH D R HORTON INC WELLS DEREK A MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH KOBLER AMIE A MARK III PROPERTIES INC SACCO CHRISTINA M (JTWRO HAIR GREGORY H NVR INC MCGEE PROPERTIES OF GREE MESSINA ANDREW J (JTWROS SULLIVAN JOSEPHINE Y RUNYAN CHRISTIE B GILLIS RACHAEL TUCKER ANTHONY ALLEN PAGAN ANGELA B D R HORTON INC HUDSON MELODIE R THOMPSON JEFFREY M HALE KELLY JANSEN TRUST BROWN NIMPHIUS C (JTWROS WEATHERRED MARTHA P (JTW GENDLIN HOMES LLC PRUITT RACHEL CLICK (JTW AIKEN BETTY ROSE B TRUST DIXON CHRISTOPHER J (JTW CHADWELL MARY-KACI N (JT D R HORTON INC BACC INC MURPHY JAIME MELISSA NVR INC LEBLANC ASHLEY ZAFAR KAMRAN (JTWROS) SK BUILDERS INC FUNDERBURK HANNA S GREENLEE HAROLD J KUTZ WILLIAM A III MCBRIDE GWEN B LIVING TR CLARK RYAN K SHEWMAKER BLAKE A REVOCA MUNGO HOMES INC DISTINGUISHED DESIGN LLC DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL GAINES PAUL ANN D R HORTON INC MOORE ROGER C SK BUILDERS INC KIRKINDOLL DONALD R (JTW SK BUILDERS INC NVR INC COTTER MARY E (JTWROS) HEALY FAMILY LIVING TRUS RODRIGUEZ CARLOS A JR ROLFE KALANI N HOLDEN DONNA D MERCER SARA B

BUYER

ADDRESS

GEIST JARED (JTWROS) METRAS KRISTIN A (JTWROS UNNI BEJOY JOSEPH MANAKA OLSON DOUGLAS J (JTWROS) HARTMANN VANESSA MOORE BETHANY FANT (JTWR CROUCH JAMES T THOMPSON THOMAS A SANCHEZ SANTIAGO H ALEXANDER LESLEE J ADAPA RAJESH HANSEN TERESA DYER (JTWR SCHREIBER JEFF HANFORD LIVING TRUST GORE MICHAEL CRISWELL NANCY B CAPPS JAN LEIGH (JTWROS) CROUCH JEFFREY (JTWROS) HALL DEAN (JTWROS) LEWIS BRYAN DAVID GRIGGS CAROLYN C (JTWROS CLOSNER EDWARD I (JTWROS FINCH JUSTIN CHASE (JTWR ROOF ALISHA ANNE (JTWROS COX STEPHEN M KENNY JASON M (JTWROS) MORRIS RUSTIN CRAIG (JTW MCKENZIE TRAVIS (JTWROS) BURNS COLAN NESTER DARWIN R (JTWROS) AGUILERA TANIT (JTWROS) CASSAR DAVID G LECHNER BRIAN K (JTWROS) SCHWEPPE MCCLAIN SHEPHER CHAPMAN STEPHANIE K (JTW GIRALDO CAMILO (JTWROS) ALLEN JAMES C (JTWROS) KASER AUSTIN D (JTWROS) ATKINS JOEL (JTWROS) SCHMITZ JONATHAN L (JTWR CASSELS LINDA M (JTWROS) ARMSTRONG ALICIA R (JTWR BERMAN FRED (JTWROS) RAFFERTY MICHAEL F (JTWR SHOWALTER HARRIET M DA SILVA GENIVALDO FLORE FLUCKER BOBBIE JO (JTWRO SCOTT YVETTE Z DEJONG JOHN WILLIAM II ( JENKINS MAURIAN D ERB DENNIS (JTWROS) GONZALEZ ALEJANDRO NOREN BORKOWSKI KARA M (JTWROS ALEXANDER CHARLES E (JTW PATEL BHARTIBEN MCGILL FRANK H III PFEIFER BENJAMIN J (JTWR MCCANTS BRANDON (JTWROS) KING PAUL H (JTWROS) RICE PATRICIA A (JTWROS) BRINEZ DELBERT (JTWROS)

1030 WINTERBERRY LN 214 GILDERBROOK RD 36 LOVVORN CT 105 KINGSRIDGE DR 201 BRIARCLIFF DR 51 GRAND RIVER LN 12 COMMON OAKS CT 18 OVERCUP CT 344 BLUE DANUBE DR 8 SULLIVAN DR 19 LOVVORN CT 108 VEREEN CT 102 LOWNDES AVE UNIT B 410 SANDUSKY LN 101 PLEASANT MEADOW CT 321 STONELEIGH RD 164 BELLAMY CLOSE 6 LEACROFT DR 9 ANGEL WING CT 102 HONEY HORN DR 803 MEDORA DR 613 TROUTDALE LN 907 TOWNES ST 228 PAQCOLET DR 415 WEST DR 3 WHIFFLETREE DR 200 OPEN RANGE LN 21 CAHU DR 209 W MAGILL CT 300 WINDING RIVER LN 204 OPEN RANGE LN 268 OAK BRANCH DR 615 TROUTDALE LN 6 PARIS MOUNTAIN AVE 108 THURBER WAY 408 SANDUSKY LN 232 HADDINGTON LN 229 WERNINGER CT 523 TURNING LEAF LN 8 ELMWOOD DR 99 HUMMINGBIRD RDG 8 TREBOR CT 1209 E WASHINGTON ST UNIT 204 30 PEBBLEBROOK CT 411 HUNTERS CIR 14 BURGE CT 526 REID SCHOOL RD 5 TIMBER OAK WAY 301 HAMBY DR 308 MILLRIDGE RD 301 WATERTON WAY 10 IVYBERRY RD 9 VELMERE DR 404 SKYWAY PL 613 MAPLESTEAD FARMS CT 31 LADY MARION LN 116 SHELBY CT 105 WOOD HEIGHTS AVE 203 BEAUCLAIR DR 5 BROMLEY WAY 225 CRAIGO CREEK CT

Real Estate News cont. tate transaction, and beyond.” To be included in the REAL Trends America’s Best Real Estate Professionals rankings, teams are required to have closed 75 transaction sides or $30 million in closed sales volume in 2017. A third party independently verifies all production numbers.

Joan Herlong ranked fourth In South Carolina individual sales volume by 2018 REAL Trends Best Real Estate Professionals list Joan Herlong, owner and CEO of Joan Herlong & Associates Sotheby’s International realty, was named one of America’s most-productive sales associates as a part of REAL Trends America’s Best Real Estate Professionals, the newly issued ranking report produced by REAL

Trends and sponsored by Adwerx. Herlong is a member of the “America’s Best Real Estate Professionals for Individuals by Volume,” with nearly $40 million in production for 2017. She is ranked No. 4 in South Carolina for the second year in a row, and No. 1 in Greenville. REAL Trends America’s Best Real Estate Professionals ranks over 13,800 residential real estate professionals solely based on their excellence in real estate sales during the previous calendar year. All production numbers are independently verified by a third party to ensure accuracy and report integrity. “This group of highly successful real estate sales agents represents less than 1 percent of all real estate practitioners in the United States,” says Steve Murray, publisher of REAL Trends America’s Best Real Estate

Agents and president of REAL Trends. To qualify for inclusion, an individual agent must have closed at least 50 transaction sides or $20 million in sales volume in 2017. For real estate agent teams, the minimum is 75 transaction sides or $30 million in closed sales volume. This ensures that only the best of the best are included on the prestigious list. “The average residential real estate agent in the United States closed 8.0 transactions in 2017 and had less than $1.3 million in sales,” Murray said. “To say that Joan Herlong is an exceptional sales professional is an understatement. To attain this level of sales is truly outstanding.” Information on those receiving this recognition can be found online at www.realtrends.com/best-real-estate-agents-south-carolina.


ARTS & CULTURE

TAKE A (NEW) SEAT AT THE PEACE CENTER page 35

TALKING LOCAL MUSIC WITH MARK HARTWELL JONES page 31

SOUTHERN GROWL GROWS page 36

As part of a larger renovation, the Peace Center’s Concert Hall is getting new seats. Will Crooks/Greenville Journal COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

08.03.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 29


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NEW INSTITUTE BLENDS FOUNDATIONAL ART EDUCATION, PRACTICAL CAREER HELP

Founders Michelle Radford (lead instructor), Brannon McAllister (president), and Ian Crook (CFO) combined forces to open a creative and practical art institute for growing artists in Greenville. Will Crooks/Greenville Journal MELODY WRIGHT | CONTRIBUTOR

mwright@communityjournals.com

A new institute in the Village of West Greenville combines art and vocation for a holistic approach to growth for young or aspiring local artists. From foundational art classes and portfolio preparation to career tips and hosted discussions, Leaf Institute of Art & Vocation exists as a flexible space for up-andcoming artists. Co-founder Brannon McAllister, who has years of artistic experience in design, animation, and illustration, says the institute will have seating for about 100 people, a small collapsible stage, and easels. The 501(c)(3) nonprofit art-education pilot program is at 1278 Pendleton St., where Atlas Local Commons serves as the anchor tenant. “I think our main goal now is to create art-education classes that reach high school level,” McAllister says. “There’s a lot of gifted people who are already super interested in either becoming artists or exploring that [who] may not have the art education access they’d like.” Currently, Leaf Institute offers basic painting and drawing instruction, with plans to expand to printmaking and other

classes. “So what we want to do is have very foundational art training combined with very practical career help to get people started as artists,” McAllister says. While the art institute has a Christian faith-based perspective on art, Leaf Institute welcomes everyone in the neighborhood from all backgrounds to enroll for classes and register for events. “We felt like we’d like to have an organization that talked about the intersection of faith and work,” he says. Discussions such as these would include various professionals coming to speak on business, art, and faith. Trained educators and professional local artists will instruct the students, and students will have access to the online education platform Pathwright for assignments, class discussions, and supplemental resources.  The modular course structure allows for students to pay for a single class and reach a specific category of skill. While high-school students are the focus, adults may also enroll. The classes may be used supplementally in partnership with an accredited secondary or vocational school, or to extend education for working professionals.

Co-founder Michelle Radford, who has been teaching art in higher education for 10 years at Bob Jones University, says the classes are developed to equip students with the necessary skills for artistic and professional growth. “We really do want to reach students

that are really serious about art,” Radford says. “It’s not merely recreational art classes. It should be fun, but we want to reach people that are trying to push themselves in their technique.” As for the name of the institute, McAllister and Radford named Leaf Institute for J.R.R. Tolkien’s “Leaf by Niggle.” The short story tells of struggling artist Niggle, whose lifework centers on painting one little leaf. “In the afterlife, he finds out that [the leaf] was actually on a large tree in the middle of a massive forest,” McAllister says. “So, he finds out that this one thing that he was doing that seemed so insignificant was actually part of something much greater.” For McAllister and Radford, the story serves as a metaphor for their “passion projects” or their “creative callings.” “It gives a picture of [how] we are really committed to education in the arts, but also we want to have a really fruitful discussion with the community about creativity,” Radford says. Monthly dinners, rotating gallery shows, and an annual conference will also be hosted by Leaf Institute. Local illustration artist Chris Koelle is the first of several professionals scheduled to hold a show in the space in September.

For more information on upcoming events or to enroll, visit www.leafinstitutegreenville.org.

The modular space allows for classes, meetings, and special events. Will Crooks/Greenville Journal


08.03.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 31

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

MARK HARTWELL JONES’ HOODOO MUSIC PODCAST HIGHLIGHTS LOCAL SCENE VINCENT HARRIS | ARTS & CULTURE WRITER

vharris@communityjournals.com

Like many people in the Upstate, Mark Hartwell Jones has loved music all his life. His mother and grandfather played guitar, and Jones took it up himself, along with the trumpet, when he was in middle school. He formed a band when he was in college, which he remembers as “terrible,” and he grew to love going to small-venue shows around Greenville far better than crowded arenas where he felt lost in a sea of people. “I’d rather go to a small show, in a bar or a basement in someone’s house, than a stadium,” he says. “It’s more intimate; I have more direct contact with the music.” But as time went on and Jones got older, he felt less and less connected to the local music scene and, like many people in Greenville, simply woke up one day and realized he’d lost touch with what was going on in local music. “I looked around and it didn’t seem like there was much of a local scene, and if there was, I didn’t know where it was,” he says. “I’d been out of it for so long at that point.” That might be a bit of an exaggeration because Jones was a skilled recording engineer who’d worked with musicians around town, most notably the remarkably talented acoustic guitarist Jacob Johnson. In fact, it was during a conversation with Johnson in 2016 that he first articulated the idea that would lead to the local-music-centric podcast that Jones hosts, engineers, and produces, called The Hoodoo Music Podcast. “I was at Jacob’s house and we were talking, and I had this idea that I wanted to try to create a project where I would record a band for cheap or for free and then put that out for the sake of exposing people to new music,” he says. “I wanted to find out more about what was out there and offer a way to promote it. I felt that if I didn’t know about it what was going on locally, there must be a lot of people who weren’t as aware as they could be about the music scene.” Johnson’s response was simple: Why not start right now? Johnson offered to be Jones’ first guest, and The Hoodoo Music Podcast was born. Over the past two years, Jones has produced 47 episodes of the podcast, doing

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one roughly every two weeks. A typical episode mixes interviews and performances, and along with Johnson, the series has featured solo artists like Alex Hunnicutt, J.S. Terry, and Thomas Levine and bands like Wasted Wine, Brother Oliver, The Apartment Club, Italo & The Passions, and Horrible Girl & The Hot Mess, whose new album Jones is engineering.

“There are some great bands that have surprised me, and I just want to provide a resource for people to discover new music.” –Mark Hartwell Jones

“It’s not just an avenue to use my skills at recording and mixing, but it’s also a way to offer somebody a way to promote themselves for free,” Jones says. “It seems like when I was younger there were more ways for people to find out about bands; I remember seeing flyers all over the place. Hopefully, with the podcast, people will come looking for one band and find somebody else, and it becomes this cross-promotional effort.” As Jones has progressed through the episodes (he says that initially, he felt like he’d be lucky if he made it to 20 episodes), he’s become more connected to local music again, and he says he sees a newly vibrant music scene around the Upstate, even if that’s just his perception. “It seems like there’s a wave of local music that wasn’t there before,” he says, citing bands like Tom Angst, Daddy’s Beemer, and Apricot Blush as particular favorites. “Maybe it’s just because I’m noticing it now, but it does seem like there’s been a resurgence. There are some great bands that have surprised me, and I just want to provide a resource for people to discover new music.”

The Hoodoo Music Podcast is available through Apple Music, Google Play, and YouTube.

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SISTER HAZEL PLANS TO RELEASE 4 EPS BACK-TO-BACK IN NEW ‘ELEMENTS’ PROJECT VINCENT HARRIS | ARTS & CULTURE WRITER

vharris@communityjournals.com

Doing any job for 25 years is pretty impressive; maintaining a successful band in a fickle music industry for that long is nearmiraculous. But that’s what the Gainesville, Florida, quintet Sister Hazel has managed to do. Long after the appealingly rootsy acoustic-electric rock of its biggest hit single, 1997’s “All for You,” drove its album “… Somewhat More Familiar” to platinum status, Sister Hazel has kept on keepin’ on, touring successfully around the world and holding onto a large fanbase long after its late-’90s contemporaries have faded. The band has even managed to flourish as an independent act without a major label, releasing albums on its own Croakin’ Poets label and making waves on the country charts with its newest EP, “Water,” without significantly changing its sound to fit a format. It’s a rare band that can say it’s just scored a top-10 hit more than two decades into its career, but that’s

Sister Hazel has kept the momentum going ever since their biggest hit single, 1997’s “All For You,” drove its album “... Somewhat More Familiar” to platinum status over two decades ago. Photo provided

what Sister Hazel did when “Water” was released in February. And the band has continued to challenge itself creatively rather than regurgitating the same old hits every night. “Water” is the first

step in an ambitious, conceptual plan. “We’re planning on putting out four EPs back-to-back as a larger project called ‘Elements’,” says Ryan Newell, Sister Hazel’s lead guitarist. “The first one was called ‘Water.’ The next one [which will be released in September] is ‘Wind.’ It’s something we’ve never done before, which is rare when you’ve been in a band for 25 years.” Newell adds that the ambitious EP plan is an outgrowth of the band’s desire to get more music out more often. “Instead of doing a big record every three years, we just decided to put out the songs we were writing as often as possible. This seemed like the best way to do it,” he says. “Water” actually hit the top 10 on the Billboard Country Album charts, which might come as a surprise to Sister Hazel fans who have never considered the band country at all. Newell says that the band has always defied easy genre classification and that the country-radio format has simply moved closer to Sister Hazel’s rootsyrock sound. Of course, if there is a little more twang in the band’s sound lately, its base of operations is in Nashville, Tennessee, now, so that might have helped. “I don’t think we made a conscious shift,” Newell says. “Everything we’ve done still has the Sister Hazel sound. The main difference is that we started writing with writers in Nashville, and we record our albums there, and you can’t help but be influenced. We’re still being true to ourselves, but the format we were lumped into for years has disappeared, and most of our listeners have kind of moved over to the country genre. If

you listen to country music nowadays, it’s what was on rock radio years ago.” Regardless of which chart it’s on, a top10 release is still good news, and Newell says that Sister Hazel, which will perform at the Peace Center’s outdoor TD Stage on Friday, can still command those sales because it’s worked hard over the years to maintain a connection with fans. “When we decided to start doing this on our own, we also decided to be as accessible as possible to our fans,” he says. “We’ve always wanted to do more than put out songs and go out on the road. We wanted the songs to become part of people’s lives. Throughout the years, we’ve done different events like the Hazelnut Hang, where we get together with our fans at the beach and hang out for a long weekend. We’re very involved with our Lyrics for Life charity [which funds cancer research and patient care facilities], which our fans have really gravitated to. And there’s a really big online community that keeps in touch and makes plans to see shows. We try to be the soundtrack to all of these life experiences that they’re going through.”

THE CORONA CONCERT SERIES PRESENTS SISTER HAZEL WHERE TD Stage, 300 S. Main St. WHEN Friday, Aug. 3, 8 p.m. TICKETS $35, $65 INFO 864-467-3000, www.peacecenter.org


ART FOR DUMMIES.

Matthew Rolston |Talking Heads: The Vent Haven Portraits July 18 through September 16 Artist Visit, Sunday, September 9

Comprised of monumental color prints, Matthew Rolston | Talking Heads: The Vent Haven Portraits, features celebrity photographer Matthew Rolston’s eerie documentation of ventriloquist dummies from the Vent Haven Museum of Ventriloquy in Fort Mitchell, Kentucky. Discovered as a student by Andy Warhol, Rolston has photographed the likes of Michael Jackson, Prince, Beyonce, Johnny Depp, and Angelina Jolie, among others. His photographs have been published in Interview, Vogue, Vanity Fair, W, and others, including more than 100 covers for Rolling Stone. Rolston will visit the GCMA Sunday, September 9 for a free, public program. Visit gcma.org to learn more.

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street on Heritage Green 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 5 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm

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MORE THAN A DECADE AFTER PERFORMANCES AT THE HANDLEBAR, SUGARLAND RETURNS TO GREENVILLE AT THE BON SECOURS WELLNESS ARENA VINCENT HARRIS | ARTS & CULTURE WRITER

vharris@communityjournals.com

Most of the time, it doesn’t really mean much to ask a band, especially one that’s sold as many albums as the country-music duo Sugarland, how it feels to be coming back to the Upstate. And that’s because these bands typically don’t really remember where they’ve played before or know where they’re playing next. But we asked guitarist Kristian Bush, who along with singer Jennifer Nettles makes up the group that’s sold 14 million albums, scored five No. 1 singles, and won two Grammys, how it felt to be coming back to Greenville for a special reason. Before the platinum plaques, sellout tours, and awards ceremonies, Bush, Jennifer Nettles, and singer/songwriter Kristen Hall, the original founders of the band, played their first shows right here in

town in the early 2000s, at The Handlebar on Stone Avenue. Before joining forces, the trio (Hall left the band in 2005) were solo singer-songwriters who didn’t seem to have a whole lot in common musically. “I remember people looking at us onstage and maybe recognizing each of us from our solo shows,” Bush says, “but they looked completely confused as to why we were getting onstage together. I remember kind of looking at them like, ‘Hold tight, you’re about to see something cool,’ because it was cool for us, too.” That first night, Bush says, was magic. “It was the strangest thing; I’ve read about it or heard about it with other artists. They say, ‘Oh, the first time the band played together, it really lit the room up,’ and I was always sort of rolling my eyes at those stories, except that I’ve been through it!”

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Jennifer Nettles and Kristian Bush released 2018’s “Bigger” as a duo after the band, formerly a trio, took a multiyear hiatus. Photo provided

So how does it feel for Bush and Nettles to reunite for a tour after a four-year hiatus and head back to their old stomping grounds? “Fantastic,” Bush says. “It’s like a victory lap, not just for us, but for everyone who was there when we started. I’m excited.” There was no acrimony involved in the band’s hiatus; it was simply that, after 10 years and five albums, Nettles had some items to check off her bucket list. “When we took our break, it was focused around the idea of her having a family,” Bush says. “She hadn’t done that yet, and I’d actually had a family the entire time I was in Sugarland. Then she decided to do a solo record [2014’s ‘That Girl’], and that made sense, because she’d been doing solo work before she was in Sugarland. So I think that career-wise, she started exploring things that she couldn’t do in Sugarland. That was fun to watch.” And then one day, out of the blue, Nettles called Bush and asked if he was ready to fire up Sugarland again. There was just one problem: Bush had resumed his own solo career and begun producing other artists. He was swamped. “I said, ‘I’m super busy now. I’m doing like nine things at the same time. But let’s see what happens from a writing perspective. If that’s not working, then maybe we shouldn’t

do anything,’” he says with a laugh. “The first song we wrote together was a song called ‘Still the Same,’ and I was like, ‘Oh, this is good. We need to go do this.’” That’s right: It won’t be just a nostalgia show when Sugarland rolls into Bon Secours Wellness Arena on Saturday, though you’re sure to hear hits like “Baby Girl,” “Something More,” “Want To,” “Stay,” and “Already Gone.” They’ve got a new album in tow, called “Bigger.” “Sugarland has always been about what we made together,” Bush says of the effort to make new music. “Otherwise, it wouldn’t have meant anything. I think our real intention was to just see what we could make, and if it sucks, maybe we ought to not do this. Let the art lead the commerce, not the other way around.”

SUGARLAND WITH FRANKIE BALLARD AND LINDSAY ELL WHERE Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N. Academy St. WHEN Saturday, Aug. 4, 7 p.m. TICKETS $37-$92 INFO 864-241-3800, www.bonsecoursarena.com


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08.03.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 35

Jay STINKS at Tennis.

The new seats are scheduled to be in place before the 2018-2019 season. Will Crooks/Greenville Journal

PEACE CENTER'S CONCERT HALL SEATS REPLACED AFTER 28 YEARS MELODY WRIGHT | CONTRIBUTOR

mwright@communityjournals.com

Renovations are underway to the Peace Center’s Concert Hall, including replacement of the original 2,111 seats that have occupied the venue since 1990. The project is scheduled to be completed in early September. The 28-year-old seats have accommodated patrons throughout thousands of performances. Greenville’s own KM Fabrics made upholstery for the original seats and is doing the same for the new seats. “The Peace Center is here and successful because the people of Greenville have been supportive for so many years,” said  Megan Riegel, Peace Center president and CEO. “We’re always looking for ways to improve the experience of our patrons, and this is the most recent step in that journey.” The $2.4 million capital project entails improvements to the audience chamber and improved accessibility. New carpet, drapes, and fresh paint and stain will also be added. More accessible seats, including transfer seats with raisable armrests, will be scattered around the theater. An additional ramp will be located on the right side of the lobby, allowing full access to both sides of the orchestra level. Also, some updates will be made to the assisted-listening systems. The location of the soundboard is moving to the center of the audience chamber’s back wall to improve the sound experience for patrons. A final element of the project includes future-proofing by updating infrastructure to allow for future sound and lighting upgrades. “With these updates, the Peace Concert Hall will continue to be an exceptional place to host world-class artists and enthusiastic audiences for decades to come,” Riegel said. “We’re excited to welcome the community back into the Peace Concert Hall to see the changes in September.”

But when it comes to lending, Jay crushes it. Jay McDonald works with many top agents in Greenville and he is available seven days a week. Day or night, Jay always answers his phone and is ready to be your dedicated home loan professional. Whether you’re buying, refinancing, or renovating a home-Jay is ready to guide you.

Jay McDonald, Production Manager | NMLS: 659243 864.915.3031 | jmcdonald@primelending.com 142 Milestone Way, Greenville, SC 29615 All loans subject to credit approval. Rates and fees subject to change. ©2018 PrimeLending, a PlainsCapital Company. (NMLS: 13649) Equal Housing Lender. PrimeLending is a wholly owned subsidiary of a state-chartered bank and is an exempt lender in SC. V010918


feast

SUCCESS AND HOPPINESS The Southern Growl is expanding, and their success is no accident WORDS BY ARIEL TURNER | PHOTOS BY WILL CROOKS

The Southern Growl has 60 rotating taps at its current location.

Matt and Anna Bowes are expanding The Southern Growl to include a microbrewery and expanded kitchen and entertainment options.

T

here are enough reasons for the success of The Southern Growl since it opened in April 2014 to make it difficult to pinpoint just one that led to its upcoming expansion. Owners Anna and Matt Bowes have taken the original concept from small taproom at 6 S. Buncombe Road, Greer, to full restaurant in 2016, and now to the future 10,000-square-foot microbrewery and gastropub less than a quarter-mile away at 155 N. Buncombe Road with a planned opening late spring 2019. The square-footage increase alone could cause even a seasoned restaurant owner to break into a cold sweat while trying to justify the necessary profit margins, but the husband-and-wife team who love to interact with their customers as much as, if not more than, their staff, are positive their success will continue in a bigger space with more elbow room for everyone. Their plans on the 4.5-acre site include the 15-barrel microbrewery, expanded kitchen, more entertainment options, on-site garden, and close to an acre of grassy outdoor land that the Bowes believe will draw customers from the nearby neighborhoods and give families a place to create new memories. To name a few things the Bowes have gotten right over the last four and a half years: There’s the 60 rotating taps and the five Certified Cicerones (beer equivalent of

a sommelier) and five Certified Beer Servers on staff to explain all of them. In the new location, about a third of those taps will be brewed on site by bar manager and brewer Jason Azbell. The rotating pub menu is planned by executive chef Joey McCarter, whose Johnson and Wales culinary training is evident even in the sandwiches he creates. Thursday burger night, which recently featured the “Relish Make Ya Jealous” burger with tomato-pepper relish, balsamic mayo, red onion, mozzarella and goat cheeses, and fresh basil on a brioche bun, regularly sells out, even though the kitchen ups its burger prep every week. Every eight weeks, the menu, featuring the freshest local ingredients, changes without exception, and the new, larger kitchen will allow for even more creativity. The Bowes also believe they’ve figured out a thing or two about staff retention, a universal challenge in the service industry for a variety of reasons. “You can’t pay them $2.50 an hour and expect them to care,” says Anna Bowes, referencing the typical hourly base pay for restaurant service staff who receive a gratuity. The Bowes say they pay a “living wage” because they expect a lot of their staff but also want them to enjoy coming to work. And as owners and managers, they work hard to provide intangible benefits for their employees — such as creative license in the kitchen along with coursed, fine-dining beer dinners so chef McCarter and his team don’t get bored. They also regularly take their staff on outings, especially after a big event like their Goat Roast every July. The day after, they shut down the restaurant and take everybody out for a day of fun. “It’s a great industry to be in not only from the community aspect but also, it’s fun,” Matt Bowes says. And fun is exactly why the Bowes got into the beer business in the first place, and it also serves as the motivation behind the plans for the new property. It’s also likely keeping a sense of humor while working long hours and handling the stresses of owning a restaurant have helped. “I always say, ‘It’s a good thing I’m at work right now, ‘cause I could use a beer right now,’” Matt Bowes says.

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small plates FOOD NEWS & EVENTS BY ARIEL TURNER

feast the three for $15 for either lunch or dinner at Cantina 76, and if you’re not into dessert for the third course, you can choose a specialty margarita instead. Cheers to that. Other new participants include Iron Hill Brewery ($30), Encore Gastrolounge ($30), and Hare & Field ($30). Visit restaurantweeksouthcarolina.com to see a complete list of restaurants and their special menus and get planning.

ON SALE NOW! THURSDAY, AUGUST 30

Life needs a Liability Restaurant Week is upon us Pull out the stretchy pants — it’s Restaurant Week, Aug. 9-19. And prepare yourselves for the possibility of 10 straight days of dining out — if the budget allows. The good news on that front is that the prix fixe Restaurant Week menus are offered at a significant discount ranging from three courses for $15-$45 per person, depending on the restaurant. The twice-yearly event has some interesting additions to the list of participating restaurants this goround. The least expensive option is

That’s the slogan for Liability Brewing Co., opening Aug. 3 in the new Westone development at 109 W. Stone Ave. next to the newly opened Moe’s Original Bar B Que. Brewer C.J. Golobish and owner Terry Horner have been working away for months to bring their vision for a brewery to the North Main area. Expect some unique, culinary-inspired brews from this team, and go next door for some Alabama ’cue.

For more of this week's Small Plates, visit www.greenvillejournal.com.

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03 A R T S C A LE N DA R AUG. 3 -9 Main Street Friday Power 2 Party Aug. 3 ~ 232-2273 Peace Center Sister Hazel Aug. 30 ~ 467-3000 Metropolitan Arts Council First Friday Aug. 3 ~ 467-3132 USC School of Medicine Annual Medical Student Art Show Aug. 3 ~ 455-9796 Younts Center for Performing Arts Groovin’ Aug. 3-19 ~ 409-1050 Carolina Music Museum Gabe Smallwood in Concert Aug. 5 ~ 520-8807 GLOW Lyric Theatre End-of-Season Gala Aug. 5 ~ 558-4569 GLOW Lyric Theatre 2018 Summer Festival Through Aug. 5 ~ 558-4569 RIVERWORKS Gallery Jewelry by Katy Cassell Through Aug. 5 ~ 271-0679 Centre Stage Elvis My Way Aug. 6-8 ~ 233-6733 Carolina Music Museum Callisto Quartet Aug. 9 ~ 520-8807 Downtown Alive The Freeway Revival Aug. 9 ~ 232-2273 Greenville Little Theatre A Fantastic Beach Boys Tribute Aug. 9-12 ~ 233-6238 Centre Stage Breaking Up Is Hard to Do Through Aug. 18 ~ 233-6733 Greenville Chamber of Commerce Art of Meg Groat & Marcy Yerkes Through Aug. 24 ~ 242-1050 Metropolitan Arts Council Gvl. Woodworkers Guild Exhibit Through Sep. 7 ~ 467-3132 Metro Arts. Council @ Centre Stage Works by Starr Haney Through Sep. 9 ~ 233-6733 Greenville County Museum of Art Expressionism and the South Through Sep. 16 ~ 271-7570 Main Street Real Estate Gallery Works by Kate Furman Through Sep. 30 ~ 250-2850 Greenville County Museum of Art Bob Jones Museum Highlights Through Dec. 30 ~ 271-7570

Keeping our ARTbeat strong w w w.greenvillearts.com

16 Augusta Street

864. 467.3132

CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

Golf Tournament to help the children of Nepal and Africa

Global Action Coalition Pebble Creek Golf Course 101 Pebble Creek Drive 9 a.m.-1 p.m. | $60 Play Pebble Creek Golf Course backwards for a fun morning with lots of challenges and prizes. Shotgun start at 9 a.m. www.globalactioncoalition.org globalaction@earthlink.net MUSIC

Corona Concert Series

Peace Center | TD Stage | 300 S. Main St. | 8 p.m. The Genevieve’s package includes exclusive access to the balcony overlooking the Reedy River and the TD Stage, a complimentary small-bites spread, a full cash bar, the air-conditioned lounge, Genevieve’s restrooms, and lawn seating. Aug. 3 will feature Sister Hazel. Admission is $35 for lawn seating and $65 for the Genevieve’s package. 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768 www.peacecenter.org CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

Beautiful Music for Beautiful Minds

Gateway | 7-11 p.m. | $75 The Old Cigar Warehouse | 912 S. Main St. Live Music by Steel Toe Stiletto, silent and live auctions, beer, wine, wonderful food, great time. www.gateway-sc.org THRU SAT

04

MUSIC

Lunch, Listen & Learn with Maria Parrini

Carolina Music Museum 516 Buncombe St. noon-1 p.m. | $5 | Wednesdays and Saturdays Only 26 seats. Call 864-520-8807 to make your reservations. You bring your lunch. Maria brings the music and the charm. If you just want to hear Maria, it’s $5 but, if after Maria you wish to stay and tour the incredible museum, we merely add the museum fee (M + M) to your Maria fee–$6 adults, $5 seniors (65 and over)/ military, $4 students, under 6, free. Come to the Green and have lunch with Maria. 864-520-8807 | www.carolinamusicmuseum.org info@carolinamusicmuseum.org SAT

04

COMMUNITY

Festival of Kites Summer Carnival

India Association of Greenville Discovery Island Water Park at Southside Park 417 Baldwin Road, Simpsonville 10 a.m.-7 p.m. | $3 There will be food, music, shopping, custommade Indian kites, rides, games, and a whole lot of fun for the entire family. Come and join us to have a unique kite-flying experience. www.myiag.org FOOD & DRINK

Firehouse Subs’ H2O for Heroes

Firehouse Subs 765 Haywood Rd. Ste. B-3 10:30 a.m.-9 p.m. | FREE Participating Firehouse Subs restaurants will provide one medium sub to each guest who donates an unopened, 24-pack of bottled water, benefiting local fire and police departments, emergency victims, senior, and community centers, and more. www.firehousesubs.com

AUG. 3

Matt Fassas (album release show)

Gottrocks | 200 Eisenhower Drive | 9 p.m. | $10 ($15 with a copy of CD)

Matt Fassas is a skilled songwriter, bandleader, and guitar player whose musical tastes run from country to progressive rock to psychedelia. But on his last album, “Inferno,” he says his wide-ranging stylistic palette may have hurt him more than it helped. “I tried to reach out as far as I could in as many different directions as I could,” he says. “And I think ultimately, while it was a really good exercise for me, I confused people. They really didn’t know what to make of it.” On his new album, “Trip,” largely recorded last year in Athens, Ga., with producer/engineer John Keane (R.E.M., Widespread Panic), Fassas narrowed his focus. He also recruited guests like keyboardist Ike Stubblefield, vocalist Audrey Hamilton, and drummer Jack Ryan (from The Marcus King Band) to augment his rhythm section of Sam Kruer and Troy Jones. “I was very much trying to make it a cohesive album that really worked well as a whole,” he says. “It turned out being a bluesy-rock kind of thing with some Americana and psychedelic influences. It still reaches in different directions, but it’s more direct than anything I’ve done before.” – Vincent Harris

CONCERT

FRI

SUN

05

MUSIC

Gabe Smallwood Concert at the Carolina Music Museum

Carolina Music Museum 516 Buncombe St. (at Heritage Green) 3-4:30 p.m. | $10/adult, $5/student Twenty-year-old Gabriel Smallwood began playing piano at the age 3 and, now, the Columbia native lives in Leipzig, Germany, where he studies under the tutelage of Alexander Meinel at the Hochschule für Musik und Theater “Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy.” Only 50 seats available. 864-520-8807 | www.carolinamusicmuseum.org info@carolinamusicmuseum.org THRU WED

08

FAMILY & EDUCATION

Outshine Summer Reading

Center for Developmental Services 29 N. Academy St. 12:30-2 p.m. | Wednesdays | FREE Join us this summer for Summer Reading at CDS on Wednesdays this summer. All rising firstthrough sixth-graders in the Upstate are welcome. The Greenville County Schools Food and Nutrition Services Summer Meals program will also be there, so we encourage families to arrive at CDS at noon to receive a free lunch for all school-aged children. www.cdservices.org/event/outshine-summer-reading-program-2018/ WED-SUN

08-12

PERFORMING ARTS

Cirque du Soleil’s “Crystal”

Bon Secours Wellness Arena 650 N. Academy St. Cirque du Soleil’s “Crystal” explores the artistic limits of ice for the first time in the company’s 34-year history. This unique production pushes boundaries of performance by combining stunning skating and acrobatic feats that defy the imagination. 800-745-3000 | www.ticketmaster.com THU

09

PERFORMING & VISUAL ARTS

Christopher Clamp Opening Reception

Hampton III Gallery 3110 Wade Hampton Blvd., Suite 10, Taylors 7-9 p.m. | FREE Opening reception for the exhibition of oil paintings by Christopher Clamp of Charlotte. This is Clamp’s first solo exhibition at Hampton III Gallery. www.hamptoniiigallery.com

MUSIC

Jorge Garcia Trio, Wheel Session 49

The Wheel Sessions Greenville Unitarian Universalist Fellowship 1135 State Park Road 7-9:30 p.m. | $15 World-class guitarist Jorge Garcia has performed with Tony Bennett, Richie Cole, Patti Page, Andrea Bocelli, and a host of others. He has appeared on recordings featuring Eddie Gomez, Mitchell Camilo Ignacio Berroa, and Giovani Hidalgo. Now splitting his time between the Upstate and Southern Florida, Garcia is a tremendous addition to the Greenville jazz scene. The Wheel Sessions is excited that he will return with his quartet for session 49. There is a $15 entrance fee, which includes two sets of music. Attendees may BYOB. To reserve a seat, call or text Kevin Korschgen at 312-520-2760, or email him at kmkorschgen@gmail.com. www.wheelsessions.com MUSIC

Callisto Quartet

Carolina Music Museum 516 Buncombe St. (at Heritage Green) 7:30-9 p.m. | $20/adult, $10/student Fresh from winning third place and the $10,000 Laura Brown prize at the Melbourne Australia International Chamber Music Competition, the Callisto Quartet returns to its home, the Carolina Music Museum, for a chamber music concert. With only 80 seats available, we urge everyone to make their reservations early. $20 for adults, $10 for students with IDs. Call 864520-8807 to make your reservations. 864-520-8807 | www.carolinamusicmuseum.org info@carolinamusicmuseum.org THRU FRI

10

SUMMER CAMP

Summer Art Camp

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St., Suite A 9 a.m.-noon | $205/week, $185/member Instructors facilitate immersive experiences in visual art, for children ages 5-8 and 9-12. Sessions are designed to explore diverse materials, mediums, and themes, making each day of Summer Art Camp a new and exciting creative adventure. 864-735-3948 | www.artcentergreenville.org


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COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

Paul Oakenfold w/ Kyle Field, G3X, Waldo, and Chris Tyndell

The Firmament | 5 Market Point Drive | 9 p.m. | $20-$25

CONCERT

AUG. 3

Make no mistake about it, the upcoming Paul Oakenfold show at The Firmament is one of the biggest concert events to hit Greenville in quite a while. Oakenfold is one of the most successful and influential producers and DJs in the history of electronic music, and not just because he’s won three Grammy Awards and created remixes for Madonna, U2, The Rolling Stones, Britney Spears, Massive Attack, The Cure, and over 100 more artists. He’s had a huge role in just about every iteration of dance music that has made a ripple in the world’s musical consciousness in the past three decades, and his status as a pioneer and innovator in the genres of acid house, trance music, big beat techno, and electronic pop is unassailable. And that’s not even including his evocative, darkly beautiful film scores, which have enhanced movies like “The Bourne Conspiracy,” “Collateral,” and “The Matrix Reloaded,” among many others. – Vincent Harris LESSONS & TRAINING

2018 Summer Foreign Language Classes Upstate International | 9 S. Memminger St. $60-$240 Classes meet either once or twice a week. Class size is cozy, three to 15 people, native instructors teach to the interests of the students, and fun is part of the curriculum. All students must be members of Upstate International (memberships start at $50/year.) www.upstateinternational.org/language-classes/ info@upstateinternational.org FRI

10

CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

Casino Night Benefiting SYNNEX Share the Magic

Armada Analytics, Inc. Old Cigar Warehouse | 912 S. Main St. 7-11 p.m. | $110 Greenville Business Networking Casino Night benefiting SYNNEX Share the Magic Children’s Charities. http://fnd.us/a1LCU6?ref=sh_37Cy18 FAMILY & EDUCATION

Call Before You Dig Day

Greer Commission of Public Works 301 McCall St., Greer | 10 a.m.-2 p.m. | FREE Learn more about the importance of calling 8-1-1 before any digging project. There will be a bounce house all day, gift card giveaways, free Sno Hut sno-cones from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and the chance to interact with CPW gas employees, and have your digging questions answered. www.greercpw.com/news modeltrainsstation@gmail.com SAT

11

PERFORMING & VISUAL ARTS

Coffee and Conversation with artist Christopher Clamp

Hampton III Gallery 3110 Wade Hampton Blvd., Suite 10, Taylors 11 a.m.-12 p.m. | FREE Join us as we have an informal conversation with Charlotte, N.C.-based artist Christopher Clamp. www.hamptoniiigallery.com SCIENCE & TECH

ECPI University Career Discovery Day

ECPI University | 1001 Keys Drive 10 a.m.-4 p.m. | FREE ECPI University is hosting Career Discovery Day, an open house at its Greenville campus, located at 1001 Keys Drive on Saturday, Aug. 11, 2018

from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Attendees will have the opportunity to see exciting interactive demonstrations, tour campus, meet faculty and staff, observe the hands-on learning environment, and explore career education for the technology, business, nursing, and medical professions. www.ecpi.edu CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

Superhero 5K and Fun Run

The Salvation Army of Greenville The Salvation Army Ray & Joan Kroc Corps Community Center | 424 Westfield St. 8-10:15 a.m. $35/adult; $25/teen; $15/youth; $10/fun run Help The Salvation Army Boys & Girls Club take local youth to great futures. Race packet includes a T-shirt and other great items. Prizes given for best times and best costumes in adult and youth categories. Each participant receives a medal and free Kilwins ice cream after the run. Parents and guardians are invited to participate with child during Fun Run at no additional cost. https://runsignup.com/Race/SC/Greenville/ BGCSuperhero5K SUN

12

range of topics, with a focus on dating tips, love language, and style advice. www.facebook.com/pg/CourtyardGville/events/ WED

15

COMMUNITY

General Geology of the Upstate

Sierra Club Upstate Greenville Unitarian Universalist Fellowship 1135 State Park Road 7:30-9 p.m. | FREE Have you ever wondered how the rock outcrops and other geologic features that you see while driving or hiking around South Carolina formed, or how old they might be? Our guest speaker, Brian Grothaus, will examine the geology of the Upstate, the basic processes involved, some of the rocks and minerals that are the products of these forces, and how these forces have and continue to shape our state. Grothaus is a retired geologist. He received his B.S. in geology from Morehead State University in Morehead, Ky., and master’s and Ph.D. from the University of South Carolina. www.sierraupstate.org FRI

17

COMMUNITY

Fresh Fridays on the Grand Lawn

Hartness | 3500 S. Highway 14 6-8 p.m. | FREE Fresh Fridays on the Grand Lawn will be recurring the third Friday of each month, where local farmers and artisans will display and sell an assortment of products. Guests can enjoy family-friendly entertainment and activities with

no admission fee. The first 50 guests at the first event will receive a free Hartness tote bag. www.hartnessliving.com/fresh/ THRU SAT

18

PERFORMING ARTS

“Breaking Up Is Hard to Do”

Centre Stage | 501 River St. Thursdays-Sundays | $35, $30, $25 Set at a Catskills resort in 1960, “Breaking Up Is Hard to Do” is the sweetly comic story of Lois and Marge, two friends from Brooklyn in search of good times and romance over one wild Labor Day weekend. www.centrestage.org SAT

18

COMMUNITY

5th Annual Green Avenue Community Cookout Reunion

Lakeside Park | 1500 Piedmont Highway, Piedmont | 2-6 p.m. | $20/person If you live or grew up in the Green Avenue area surrounding communities, please come out and join us for a day of fun, good food, live music, prizes, games, and fellowship. For more information or to RSVP, please contact Alonzo “Mutt” McGreer at 864-2712426 or alonzo.mcgreer@yahoo.com by Aug. 5. WED-NOV

22-14

13

CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

12 Sevier Street Greenville, SC 29605 864-282-8600

Kylie Odetta Summer Benefit Concert For The Salvation Army

CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

Bachelor Nation Nights

Courtyard by Marriott Greenville Downtown | 50 W. Broad St. 7-9 p.m. | Mondays | FREE The Courtyard will play host to a viewing party for ABC’s “The Bachelorette” Mondays. The show will be broadcasted in the renovated lobby and will feature nonprofit organizations with guest bartenders. In addition, we’ll have guest speakers prior to the show to discuss a

Grief Share

Mauldin First Baptist Church 150 S. Main St., Mauldin 6:30-8 p.m. | FREE Support group for individuals who are struggling with the loss of a loved one to death. The 13-week sessions utilize Bible-based videos and group discussions to assist participants with their grief experience. www.fbcmauldin.org

The Rutherford | 520 Rutherford Road 6-9 p.m. | $15/adult, $10/18-23 year old, $5/youth Join Kylie Odetta, a Greenville singer-songwriter and pianist, as she takes the stage acoustic for one night only. Kylie and two specials guests will be sharing personal stories and raw new music in hopes to raise money for the Salvation Army Greenville Chapter. All donations and ticket sales go directly to the Salvation Army Greenville Chapter. www.kylieodetta.com/store THRU MON

RELIGION/SPIRITUALITY

www.embassy-flowers.com


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MUSIC

Brad Jepson Quartet

The Wheel Sessions Greenville Unitarian Universalist Fellowship 1135 State Park Road 7:30-9:30 p.m. | $15 Who better than Brad Jepson to headline Wheel Sessions 50? Brad is a favorite of the Wheel Sessions patrons because of the energy, creativity, and joy he brings to the stage. He can make his trombone sing, scream, or sob, whatever the music requires. Session 50 will be very special, so don’t miss this one! Brad will be joined by Steve Alford on reeds, Troy House on guitar, and drummer Kevin Korschgen. www.wheelsessions.com THRU FRI

24

FAMILY & EDUCATION

SAT Prep Camp

Academic Coach 225 Halton Road, Suite C The upcoming Aug. 25 SAT is just around the corner. Is your child prepared? If their last SAT score didn’t reflect their capabilities, give Academic Coach a call. Our one-on-one tutoring designed for each student will target the weaknesses and build up their strengths. The sooner you sign up, the better the outcome. Don’t look back and wish you should have done more. Give us a call today to join our program. 864-520-0052 www.academictutoringgreenville.com tutoring@academiccoachsuccess.com SAT

25

PERFORMING & VISUAL ARTS

“Shrek: The Musical Jr.” Open Auditions

Mauldin Youth Theatre Mauldin Cultural Center 101 E. Butler Road, Mauldin 9 a.m.-12 p.m. | FREE Mauldin Youth Theatre is holding open auditions for its fall production, “Shrek: The Musical Jr.” open auditions are open for youth in fourth through 12th grades. This production has 35 principal roles and numerous ensemble roles. No prior experience is necessary to audition, and there is no fee to participate in this audition or production. Rehearsal dates TBD. Production dates are Nov. 2-4, 2018 and Nov. 9-11, 2018, (six shows total); actors must be available for ALL shows. Auditions will begin no later than 9 a.m. Auditioners should arrive between 8:30 and 9 a.m. to ensure a smooth schedule. 864-335-4862 www.mauldinculturalcenter.org/auditions/ events@mauldinculturalcenter.org SUN

26

MUSIC

Savannah Baroque Concert

Carolina Music Museum 516 Buncombe St. (at Heritage Green) 3-4:30 p.m. $20/adult, $5/student “Fun, brilliant, and inspiring!” That’s what the critics are saying about Savannah Baroque. A baroque flute, a baroque oboe, a viola da gamba, baroque violin, a harpsichord, and a singer, a baritone, bring “Music for a While,” to this intimate setting. Tickets go on sale Aug. 7 with only 50 seats available. 864-520-8807 www.carolinamusicmuseum.org info@carolinamusicmuseum.org

AUG. 4

T. Hardy Morris w/ Parker Gispert and Jeremy Shiloh

CONCERT

THU

Radio Room, 110 Poinsett Highway Horizon Records, 2-A W. Stone Ave. 8 p.m. (Radio Room), 3 p.m. (Horizon Records) $15 adv., $20 door (Radio Room), Free (Horizon Records)

Those who think that gritty alt-country and atmospheric, near-psychedelic production don’t mix would do well to steer clear of “Dude, the Obscure,” the new album by former Dead Confederate singer/ guitarist T. Hardy Morris. Working with longtime collaborator and producer Adam Landry at Landry’s home studio in Nashville, Tennessee, the duo takes Morris’ forlorn wail and Kiffy Meyer’s weeping pedal steel and bathes them in an eerie, shimmering glow that lends the songs a sense of size and mystery that’s hard to resist. “I felt pretty comfortable in the studio with Adam,” Morris says. “By now, we truly just approach it as making music and steer clear of genre or letting anything happen other than the songs doing what they’re going to do. We just kind of ease into the song and let it take us where it’s going.” Morris says that his band is more than capable of re-creating that atmospheric feel onstage, but it might be a good idea to swing by his in-store show at Horizon Records if you want to catch a more stripped-down approach; that performance will just be Morris and Meyer. “You can kind of present the songs as they were initially written,” he says of the duo lineup. “You can hear what the song was before it was recorded and all the other stuff was laid over the top.” –Vincent Harris PERFORMING & VISUAL ARTS

Greenville Jewish Film Festival Kickoff Event

Greenville ONE Center | 2 W. Washington St. 5-8 p.m. | $25 Greenville Jewish Film Festival invites you to our kickoff event. Israeli food, refreshments, and desserts. Screening of “In Search of Israeli Cuisine,” a film that paints a portrait of Israel told through food. greenvillejewishfilmfestival@gmail.com THU

30

MUSIC

Corona Concert Series

Peace Center TD Stage | 300 S. Main St. | 8 p.m. The Peace Center’s outdoor concert series, now called Corona Concert Series, will bring an exciting lineup to the TD Stage. Available again this year is the Genevieve’s package, which includes a show ticket and offers entry to Genevieve’s Theatre Lounge. The package includes exclusive access to the balcony overlooking the Reedy River and the TD Stage, a complimentary small bites spread, a full cash bar, the airconditioned lounge and Genevieve’s restrooms. The package also gives access to lawn seating. Aug. 30 will feature The Marshall Tucker Band. Admission is $45 for lawn seating and $75 for the Genevieve’s package. 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768 www.peacecenter.org COMMUNITY

Greenville Heroes: Serve and Protect Luncheon

Auro Hotels Hyatt Regency Greenville | 220 N. Main St. noon-1:30 p.m. | $75 This community event supports our city police officers and firefighters. The Hero Among Heroes award will be given to one police officer and one firefighter in recognition of their dedi-

cation and service to the Greenville community. All proceeds go to scholarships for children of our public-safety officers. www.greenvilleheroes.org FRI-SUN

31-02

MUSIC

Ballet Manden West African Drum and Dance Performance and Workshops

Greenville Shrine Club | 19 Beverly Road 7 p.m. It’s the biggest West African Grandmaster ballet in U.S. history. Bolokada Conde has united 15 of the foremost Guinean djembefolas and dancers from the last five decades for an epic performance. In addition to the performance, there will be a two-day workshop with djembe, balafon, kora, flute, and dance classes. https://sewaba.ticketleap.com/sewaba/

SEP SAT

01

MUSIC

Music in the Park

City of Travelers Rest Trailblazer Park 235 Trailblazer Drive, Travelers Rest 6-9 p.m. | FREE Come enjoy free, live music in our open-air amphitheater during the pleasant South Carolina spring and summer seasons. This week features country with the Eric Scott Band. www.TrailblazerPark.com info@TrailblazerPark.com MON

03

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Logos Theatre Labor Day 5k

The Logos Theatre 80 School St., Taylors | 8-10 a.m. Run historic Main Street Taylors and the Taylors Mill. Start your Labor Day morning off on the right foot with our traditional 5K at 8 a.m. and our 1-Mile Family Fun Run/Walk at 9 a.m. fol-

lowed by refreshments and great family-friendly activities. www.raceentry.com/race-reviews/logostheatre-labor-day-5k TUE

04

BOOK SIGNING/READING

Book Your Lunch with Karen White, Beatriz Williams, and Lauren Willig

Fiction Addiction | 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. | $55 Greenville Country Club | 239 Byrd Blvd. New York Times best-selling authors Karen White, Beatriz Williams, and Lauren Willig will discuss the novel that they have written together, “The Glass Ocean.” Each ticket admits one and includes lunch and a book copy, which we will have at the event for you since it releases that day. You will have the choice of an Asian wrap sandwich, Carolina blend salad with grilled chicken, or a Brooklyn Style Deli Sandwich. Please specify your entree choice in the comments box during checkout.Ticket sales end Aug. 29. 864-675-0540 | www.fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com FRI-JUN

07-19

PERFORMING ARTS

Greenville Little Theatre’s 2018-2019 Season

Greenville Little Theatre | 444 College St. Greenville Little Theatre’s 2018-2019 season will feature six MainStage productions, two shows in the concert series, and two shows in the Theatre for Young Audiences. MainStage productions are “Joseph And The Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat,” “Wait Until Dark,” “It’s A Wonderful Life,” “Oliver!,” “Leaving Iowa,” and “Catch Me If You Can: The Musical.” The concert series includes The Sounds Of Summer and Let’s Hang On. The Theatre For Young Audiences shows include “All I Want For Christmas Is My Two Front Teeth,” by Catherine Bush and “Junie B. Jones Is Not A Crook” by Allison Gregory. 864-233-6238 | www.greenvillelittletheatre.org THRU SAT

08

HOBBIES & SPECIAL INTEREST

Summer Model Train Extravaganza

Model Trains Station 250 Mill St., Suite BL1250, Taylors 11 a.m.-5 p.m. | Wed.-Sat. 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; open Fri. til 8 p.m. | $6/adult, $4child Model Trains Station is celebrating our expanded train displays and expanded children’s area. A new multipurpose room is available for birthdays, meetings, and classes with accommodations for up to 45 people. 864-605-7979 | www.modeltrainsstation.com MUSIC SAT

08

Music in the Park

WED

COMMUNITY

City of Travelers Rest Trailblazer Park 235 Trailblazer Drive, Travelers Rest 6-9 p.m. | FREE Come enjoy free, live music in our open-air amphitheater during the pleasant South Carolina spring and summer seasons. This week features pop variety with Randomonium. www.TrailblazerPark.com info@TrailblazerPark.com

12

Navy League Hosts Program on USMC Helicopter Squadron One - Flying POTUS

Navy League, Upper South Carolina Council Poinsett Club | 807 E. Washington St. 6-9 p.m. | $33 The guest speaker will be Major Michael Middleton,


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COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

THU

27

PERFORMING & VISUAL ARTS

Marcel Portilla Band In Celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month

Peace Center TD Stage | 300 S. Main St. 7:30 p.m. | FREE In celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month, the Peace Center presents the Marcel Portilla Band in a free concert for the community. The Marcel Portilla Band plays a fusion of new Latin, tropical, and reggae music. Hailing from Colombia, Ecuador, Puerto Rico, and the United States, they blend sultry Latin rhythms with modern pop tunes, rhythm and blues riffs, and quaking rock arrangements into a must-see high-energy performance. Led by South American singer/ songwriter Marcel Portilla, the band uses music to spread a message of diversity, love, and peace. They perform originals like “Amor Electronico” and “Amarte a Ti” and blend classic dance and club covers from hit artists such as Juanes, Carlos Vives, Oscar de Leon, Marc Anthony, and Ricky Martin. This concert is free but tickets should be reserved. 864-467-3000 | 800-888-7768 www.peacecenter.org

NOV WED

14

PERFORMING & VISUAL ARTS

In Dreams: Roy Orbison - The Hologram Tour

Peace Concert Hall | 300 S. Main St. 7:30 p.m. | $45-$65 Music legend Roy Orbison passed away in 1988, leaving behind a timeless legacy and a collection of beloved songs. Since then, the only access to his otherworldly voice has been through his archive of iconic recordings. That changes with In Dreams: Roy Orbison - The Hologram Tour, an extraordinary event that sees the man himself take the stage via hologram, accompanied by a full live orchestra. Through cutting-edge digital and laser technology and extraordinary theatrical stagecraft, this first of its kind live concert sees Orbison brought to life on stage to perform his classic tracks, as well as newly recorded and never-before-heard arrangements of his originals. Recognized universally as one of the great rock and roll legends, Orbison’s catalogue includes such chart-toppers as “Oh, Pretty Woman,” “You Got It,” “Only the Lonely,” “Crying,” “I Drove All Night,” “It’s Over,” and “In Dreams.” This tour, directed by Eric Schaeffer (Broadway’s “Million Dollar Quartet”), will allow fans the chance to experience one of the most iconic figures in the history of music in a thrilling way, as Orbison and his trademark three-octave range voice comes back to the stage he commanded for decades. 864-467-3000 | 800-888-7768 www.peacecenter.org

THU

22

CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

TreesGreenville’s 10 Annual Turkey Day 5k/8k

Inform. Connect. Inspire.

TreesGreenville Downtown Greenville 7:45-10 a.m. begins at $24 The goal of the Turkey Day 8K and 5K is to raise awareness and funds for TreesGreenville’s urban forestry programs. www.turkeyday8k.com

JAN SAT

12

PERFORMING & VISUAL ARTS

Sierra Hull

Peace Center Gunter Theatre 300 S. Main St. 8 p.m. | $35 Sierra Hull has been recognized from the age of 11 as a musical prodigy and virtuoso mandolin player, astonishing audiences and fellow musicians alike. Alison Krauss called her to the Grand Ole Opry stage when Hull was only 11 years old. Two years later, she signed with Rounder Records and soon became known as a remarkable mandolin player, a tone-true vocalist, and a recording artist of high order. She has played at the White House, Carnegie Hall, and the Kennedy Center, and she became the first bluegrass musician to receive a Presidential Scholarship at the Berklee College of Music. Now a seasoned touring musician nearing her mid-20s, Hull has delivered her most inspired, accomplished, and mature recorded work to date. Weighted Mind is a landmark achievement in folk-pop, bluegrass, and acoustic music. With instrumentation comprised largely of mandolin, bass, and vocals, this is genre-transcending music at its best, with production by Béla Fleck and special harmony vocal guests Alison Krauss, Abigail Washburn, and Rhiannon Giddens adding to the luster. 864-467-3000 | 800-888-7768 www.peacecenter.org

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FEB TUE

19

PERFORMING & VISUAL ARTS

I’m With Her: Sara Watkins - Sarah Jarosz - Aoife O’Donovan

Peace Concert Hall | 300 S. Main St. 7:30 p.m. | $35-$45 A band of extraordinary chemistry and exquisite musicianship, I’m With Her features Sara Watkins, Sarah Jarosz, and Aoife O’Donovan. Collectively, the multi-Grammy Award winners have released seven solo efforts, co-founded two seminal bands (Nickel Creek and Crooked Still), and contributed to critically acclaimed albums from a host of esteemed artists. 864-467-3000 | 800-888-7768 www.peacecenter.org

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE? Enter your event information at www.bit.ly/ GreenvilleJournalCalendarOfEvents by Friday two weeks prior to publishing date.

PHOTOS BY MATTHEW MURPHY

USMC (ret), former commanding officer of U.S. Marine Corps Helicopter Squadron One (HMX-1). HMX-1 is responsible for the transportation of the president of the United States, vice president, heads of states, DOD officials, and other VIPs. Major Middleton was raised in Greenville and graduated from Clemson University in 1994. www.facebook.com/NLUSUSC/ | www.bit.ly/ NavyLeagueReservation

“HILARIOUS! NONSTOP PANDEMONIUM.”

OCTOBER 2-7 GROUPS (15+)


42 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 08.03.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

Apt Alphabet Subset ACROSS

1 Inc. article subjs. 4 Pharmacy chain 7 “— fair in love and war” 11 Luau guitar, informally 14 Actress Skye 18 Lure 20 Tournament sit-outs 21 Rebelled 23 * “High gravity” lager brand 25 Questioning intensely 26 Tattered 27 Sasha Obama’s sis 28 * Home to Nashville 29 Place in a row 32 Actor/singer Gordon 34 Prefix with hazard 35 * “The Good Body” playwright 37 * He played Uncle Leo on “Seinfeld” 42 Prefix with hazard 43 Deliberately disregarding 46 “That’s —!” (“Not true!”) 48 Source of some syrup 53 * Tense situations make them rise 57 Kitchen cover-up 58 Not as hard 60 Noble’s crown 61 * Horizontal supporting piece on a ship’s lower mast

64 First-class 65 Leaves off 66 Be nuts over 68 Woman’s office outfit 73 * Actor who played Hercules in 1958 79 At odds with 80 Biology slide specimen 82 Accord 83 * Unease 85 Solidified 88 Asia’s — Sea 89 Think up 91 Part of TMI 92 * Fitted forearm cover 96 * Not even a single time 102 — populi 103 Pluses 106 Strauss one-act opera 107 * Short-pile cotton fabric 112 Instruments of angels 114 Left amazed 115 Push away 116 * The answers to the starred clues are all drawn from a certain set of them 119 Troubadour relative 120 Busy as — 121 Live through 122 Cooped (up) 123 Cen. parts 124 Part of BMI 125 ER staffers

By Frank Longo

126 Census stat DOWN

1 King’s home 2 13th-century German king 3 “Tristram Shandy” novelist Laurence 4 “Silent” prez 5 Outdated TV hookup 6 Pipe part 7 Husband of Héloïse 8 Bit of a song’s words 9 Actor Burton 10 Dir. opposite NNW 11 Push along 12 Corn piece 13 Show plainly 14 Misfortunes 15 Redding of R&B 16 Hawaiian state bird 17 Outer limit 19 Zellweger of films 22 Butter substitutes 24 Identical 28 Wobble 30 Not crooked 31 Omegas’ preceders 33 Actress Woodard 36 Mauna — 38 Denials 39 Relish 40 Kagan of the court 41 Made angry 44 Snaky curves

45 End in — (finish evenly) 98 Bring joy to 110 Waistcoat 47 Punta del —, Uruguay 99 Oath takers 111 Twisting fish 48 Gymnast’s landing pad 100 Come forth 113 Squalid district 49 Fourth mo. 101 Boston ball team 116 U.S. “Uncle” 50 Nuptial lead-in 104 “Come Back, Little —” 117 Outer limit 51 — Alamos 105 Roof overhangs 118 NFL stats 52 — four (little cake) 107 Improvise jazz-style 54 Get points 108 Writer Wiesel 55 One running easily 109 “Perfect Strangers” 56 Unit of work co-star Mark — -Baker Crossword answers: page 18 59 Gallery work 62 Scoundrel 63 Gives off 64 Actress Feldshuh by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan 66 Nuclear trial, in brief 67 Cotillion star 68 Legal aide, for short 69 Golden — (retirees) 70 Like “m” and “n” sounds 71 Duke, e.g. 72 NBC hit since ’75 73 Sammy of baseball 74 Author Welty 75 Suffix with phenyl 76 Actor Diesel 77 Summer, to the French 78 Pink Floyd’s Barrett 80 Like Peru’s peaks 81 Assembles 84 The “S” of RSVP 86 Off-road bike, in brief 87 Some deer 90 Filling dishes 93 Incident 94 Religious adherent 95 Phillips — Academy Sudoku answers: page 18 97 U.S. Open airer Hard

Sudoku

FRIDAY, AUGUST 10 • 5:30-8:00 • MCALISTER SQUARE • 225 S. PLEASANTBURG DR., GREENVILLE, SC

PREVIEW PARTY • $35/PERSON • $60/COUPLE

SATURDAY, AUGUST 11

8:30-4:00

EARLY BIRDS PAY $10 • STARTING AT 7:30

SUNDAY, AUGUST 12

1:00-4:00

BIG BAG OF BOOKS SALE • $10 TO FILL A BAG

G R E E N V I L L E L I T E R A C Y. O R G 8 6 4 . 4 6 7. 3 4 5 6

Greenville Literacy Association’s mission is to enrich our community by increasing the literacy and employability of our citizens.


THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA GREENVILLE COUNTY ZONING AND PLANNING PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE There will be a public hearing before County Council on Monday, August 20, 2018 at 6:00 p.m. in County Council Chambers, County Square, for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the following items: DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2018-46 APPLICANT: David Gerald Hewitt for Upstate Custom Builders CONTACT INFORMATION: upstatecustombuilders@gmail. com or 864-349-6883 PROPERTY LOCATION: 3 Owens Road PIN: P016010200100 EXISTING ZONING: R-20, SingleFamily Residential REQUESTED ZONING: R-7.5, Single-Family Residential ACREAGE: 0.83 COUNTY COUNCIL: 20 – Cates DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2018-50 APPLICANT: Donna Williamson CONTACT INFORMATION: donna. williamson@ameco.com or 864-643-9080 PROPERTY LOCATION: 908 Old Buncombe Road PIN: 0479000101908 EXISTING ZONING: S-1, Services REQUESTED ZONING: R-12, Single-Family Residential ACREAGE: 1 COUNTY COUNCIL: 19 –Meadows DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2018-51 APPLICANT: Wendell L. Hawkins, PA and Gray Engineering Consultants Inc. for Shannon Dobbins Woodward and Kelly Dobbins Morris & etal CONTACT INFORMATION: wlh@ wlhawkinslawfirm.com or 864-848-9370 PROPERTY LOCATION: Furr Road PIN: 0609040100500 EXISTING ZONING: R-S, Residential Suburban REQUESTED ZONING: R-12, Single-Family Residential ACREAGE: 54.50 COUNTY COUNCIL:26 – Ballard DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2018-52 APPLICANT: Timothy Buchanan Jr., CCAD Engineering, LLC and Vision Development LLC for W. Lemuel Dillard and Ann D. Withrow (Trustee) CONTACT INFORMATION: chipB@CCADengineering.com or 864-250-9999 PROPERTY LOCATION: Beeco Road PIN: G006000301300 (portion) EXISTING ZONING: R-S, Residential Suburban REQUESTED ZONING: S-1, Services ACREAGE: 24.69 COUNTY COUNCIL: 18 – Barnes DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2018-53 APPLICANT: Paul D. Gatlin CONTACT INFORMATION: paul@paulgatlin.com or 818-266-7003 PROPERTY LOCATION: 206 Gordon Street and N. Florida Avenue PIN: 0116001400900, 0116001400800 (portion), and 0116001401100 (portion) EXISTING ZONING: R-7.5, Single-Family Residential REQUESTED ZONING: S-1, Services ACREAGE: 0.29 COUNTY COUNCIL: 23 – Norris All persons interested in these proposed amendments to the Greenville County Zoning Ordinance and Map are invited to attend this meeting. At subsequent meetings, Greenville County Council may approve or deny the proposed amendments as requested or approve a different zoning classification than requested.

SERVICE OF NOTICE OF HEARING BY PUBLICATION STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF SPARTANBURG IN THE FAMILY COURT 2017-DR-42-1733 WESLEY J. BARNARD v. VIOLET S. BROWN Defendant. TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANT, VIOLET S. BROWN. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a hearing has been set in the aboveentitled action on September 28, 2018 at 9:00 AM. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED to be present in the Spartanburg Family Court, 180 Magnolia Street, Spartanburg, SC 29306, at that time.

PUBLIC HEARING A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, AUGUST 21, 2018 AT 6:00 p.m. (or at such time thereafter as other public hearings are concluded), IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC 29601, FOR PURPOSES OF RECEIVING COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC CONCERNING AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORIZE THE SALE OF COUNTY OWNED PROPERTY LOCATED AT 114 N. POINSETT HIGHWAY, CONSISTING OF APPROXIMATELY 0.80 ACRES AND BEING SHOWN AND DESIGNATED AS A PORTION OF LOT NUMBER 11 OF LOVE ESTATES, TAX MAP NUMBER: 0490000402202; AND TO AUTHORIZE THE CHAIRMAN OF COUNTY COUNCIL AND THE COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR TO EXECUTE APPROPRIATE DEEDS AND AGREEMENTS RELATED THERETO. BUTCH KIRVEN, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

NOTICE OF PROCEEDING AND SERVICE OF PROCESS BY PUBLICATION STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF CABARRUS IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE DISTRICT COURT DIVISION IN RE: EA 18 JA 79 To: Ashley Adams, mother of the minor juvenile, and Timothy Ashley, father of the minor juvenile, DOB: 05/10/2002. TAKE NOTICE that a pleading seeking relief against you has been filed in the above-entitled action. The nature of the relief being sought is as follows: Petition alleging Neglect You are required to make defense to such pleading not later than 40 days after the first date of publication, and upon your failure to do so the party seeking relief against you will apply to the Court for the relief sought. You are entitled to attend any hearing affecting your rights. You are entitled to have counsel appointed by the Court if you are indigent. If you desire counsel, you must appear in court to request an attorney and submit information for consideration of your request for counsel. This the day of July, 2018. H. Jay White, Sr. / Elizabeth B. Brown Attorney for CABARRUS COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES/CPS NC State Bar No.: 18043 NC State Bar No.: 44196 1303 S. Canon Boulevard Kannapolis, NC 28081 704 920 1400/704 786 5161

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: • Two Used Refuse Tipper Trailers RFP #13-08/21/18, due at 3:00 P.M., E.D.T., August 21, 2018. Solicitations can be found at https://www. greenvillecounty.org/apps/ procurementpdf/projects. aspx?type=RFP or by calling 864-467-7200.

PUBLIC HEARING A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, AUGUST 21, 2018, AT 6:00 p.m. (or at such time as other public hearings are concluded) IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC, 29601, TO CONSIDER THE MILLAGE REQUEST BY THE DUNKLIN FIRE DISTRICT FOR THE 2019 TAX YEAR. THE DUNKLIN BOARD OF FIRE CONTROL, PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF S.C. CODE ANN. SECTION 6-11-275, AS AMENDED, HAS REQUESTED GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL INCREASE THE MILLAGE RATE OF THE DUNKLIN FIRE DISTRICT BY ONE AND TWO-TENTHS (1.2) MILLS FOR A TOTAL OF THIRTYTWO AND THREE-TENTHS (32.3) MILLS FOR OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE. BUTCH KIRVEN, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

PUBLIC HEARING A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, AUGUST 21, 2018, AT 6:00 p.m. (or as soon thereafter as other public hearings are concluded), IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC, 29601, FOR THE PURPOSE OF DETERMINING WHETHER THE BOUNDARIES OF THE GREATER GREENVILLE SANITATION DISTRICT SHOULD BE ENLARGED TO INCLUDE CERTAIN PROPERTIES LOCATED ON CUNNINGHAM ROAD AND PHILLIPS TRAIL FOR THE PURPOSE OF ORDERLY COLLECTING AND DISPOSAL OF REFUSE, GARBAGE AND TRASH WITHIN GREENVILLE COUNTY. THE NEW BOUNDARY LINES TO RESULT FOR THE GREATER GREENVILLE SANITATION DISTRICT WOULD INCLUDE THE REAL PROPERTIES LOCATED AT 6 CUNNINGHAM ROAD (TAX MAP NUMBER 0538010120600) AND 239 PHILLIPS TRAIL (TAX MAP NUMBER 0463000100900). A MAP OF THE NEW BOUNDARIES AND LEGAL DESCRIPTIONS ARE AVAILABLE IN THE COUNTY COUNCIL OFFICE. THE REASON FOR THE PROPOSED ENLARGEMENT IS TO PROVIDE FOR THE ORDERLY COLLECTION AND DISPOSAL OF REFUSE. NO ADDITIONAL BONDS WILL BE ISSUED BY THE DISTRICT, NOR WILL THERE BE ANY CHANGE IN THE COMMISSION OR IN THE PERSONNEL OF THE PRESENT COMMISSION OF THE GREATER GREENVILLE SANITATION DISTRICT. BUTCH KIRVEN, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

AMENDED SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING OF AMENDED COMPLAINT AND AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS (NON-JURY MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE) C/A NO: 2018-CP-23-02892 DEFICIENCY WAIVED CIS Financial Services, Inc., PLAINTIFF, vs. Victoria Boyles Escudero, Individually and as Personal Representative for the Estate of Richard Eugene Boyles Sr.; Richard E. Hunter Boyles; Arlene Boyles; Deanna Lea Boyles; Rosaline Boyles Golden; B. B., a minor; Discover Bank; Pioneer Credit Company, DEFENDANT(S) TO THE DEFENDANTS, ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, or otherwise appear and defend, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscriber at his office, Hutchens Law Firm P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, except as to the United States of America, which shall have sixty (60) days, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, or otherwise appear and defend, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein, and judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity for Greenville County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. TO MINOR(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE, AND/OR TO MINOR(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THE PERSON WITH WHOM THE MINOR(S) RESIDES, AND/OR TO PERSONS UNDER SOME LEGAL DISABILITY: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff immediately and separately and such application will be deemed absolute and total in the absence of your application for such an appointment within thirty (30) days after the service of the Summons and Complaint upon you. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the

Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity in/for this County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. NOTICE OF FILING OF AMENDED SUMMONS AND AMENDED COMPLAINT TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing Summons, along with the Complaint, was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, on May 15, 2018; that the foregoing Amended Summons, along with the Amended Complaint, was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, on May 17, 2018. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT pursuant to the South Carolina Supreme Court Administrative Order 2011-05-02-01, (hereinafter “Order”), you may have a right to Foreclosure Intervention. To be considered for any available Foreclosure Intervention, you may communicate with and otherwise deal with the Plaintiff through its law firm, Hutchens Law Firm, P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202 or call 803726-2700. Hutchens Law Firm, represents the Plaintiff in this action and does not represent you. Under our ethical rules, we are prohibited from giving you any legal advice. You must submit any requests for Foreclosure Intervention consideration within 30 days from the date of this Notice. IF YOU FAIL, REFUSE, OR VOLUNTARILY ELECT NOT TO PARTICIPATE IN FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION, YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY/ AGENT MAY PROCEED WITH A FORECLOSURE ACTION. If you have already pursued loss mitigation with the Plaintiff, this Notice does not guarantee the availability of loss mitigation options or further review of your qualifications. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY.

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, AUGUST 21, 2018 AT 6:00 p.m. (or at such time as other public hearings are concluded), IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC, 29601, TO CONSIDER THE MILLAGE REQUEST BY THE BOILING SPRINGS FIRE DISTRICT FOR THE 2019 TAX YEAR. THE BOILING SPRINGS BOARD OF FIRE CONTROL, PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF S.C. CODE ANN. SECTION 6-11-275, AS AMENDED, HAS REQUESTED THAT GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL INCREASE THE MILLAGE RATE OF THE BOILING SPRINGS FIRE DISTRICT BY ONE AND SEVEN-TENTHS (1.7) MILLS FOR A TOTAL OF TWENTY-SEVEN AND FOURTENTHS (27.4) MILLS FOR OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE. BUTCH KIRVEN, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

LEGAL NOTICE RATES

ABC Notices $165 All others $1.20 per line

864.679.1205

email: aharley@communityjournals.com

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Tomo International Inc. intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 8590 Pelham Road Suite 7, Greenville SC 29615. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than August 12, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Jenny & Lois, LLC / DBA Aoki Sushi intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 1779 Woodruff Road Suite #B, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than August 19, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that El Rancho Grande, Inc. intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 570 N. Highway 25, Travelers Rest, SC 29690-9363. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than August 5, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: • 2019 Comprehensive Plan, RFQ #12-09/17/18, until 3:00 PM EDT, Monday, August 27, 2018; a Pre-Qualification Meeting will be held at 9:00 AM EDT, Wednesday, August 8, 2018 at Greenville County’s Procurement Services Division, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100; Greenville, SC 29601. Solicitations may be found at http://www.greenvillecounty. org/procurement/ or by calling (864) 467-7200.

SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING OF COMPLAINT AND NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS (NON-JURY MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE) C/A NO: 2018-CP-23-01592 DEFICIENCY WAIVED US Bank, National Association, as Trustee for HomeGold Home Equity Loan Trust 19991, PLAINTIFF, vs. James L. Dawkins; Mary A. Dawkins; LVNV Funding, LLC; CACH LLC; Carolina Investors, Inc., DEFENDANT(S) TO THE DEFENDANTS, ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, or otherwise appear and defend, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscriber at his office, Hutchens Law Firm P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, except as to the United States of America, which shall have sixty (60) days, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, or otherwise appear and defend, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein, and judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity for Greenville County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. TO MINOR(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE, AND/OR TO MINOR(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THE PERSON WITH WHOM THE MINOR(S) RESIDES, AND/OR TO PERSONS UNDER SOME LEGAL DISABILITY: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such

appointment will be made by the Plaintiff immediately and separately and such application will be deemed absolute and total in the absence of your application for such an appointment within thirty (30) days after the service of the Summons and Complaint upon you. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity in/for this County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. NOTICE OF FILING OF SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing Summons, along with the Complaint, was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, on March 15, 2018. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT pursuant to the South Carolina Supreme Court Administrative Order 2011-05-02-01, (hereinafter “Order”), you may have a right to Foreclosure Intervention. To be considered for any available Foreclosure Intervention, you may communicate with and otherwise deal with the Plaintiff through its law firm, Hutchens Law Firm, P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202 or call 803726-2700. Hutchens Law Firm, represents the Plaintiff in this action and does not represent you. Under our ethical rules, we are prohibited from giving you any legal advice. You must submit any requests for Foreclosure Intervention consideration within 30 days from the date of this Notice. IF YOU FAIL, REFUSE, OR VOLUNTARILY ELECT NOT TO PARTICIPATE IN FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION, YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY/ AGENT MAY PROCEED WITH A FORECLOSURE ACTION. If you have already pursued loss mitigation with the Plaintiff, this Notice does not guarantee the availability of loss mitigation options or further review of your qualifications. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY.


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3411 Augusta Road | Greenville, SC 29605 | 864-277-5330

August 3, 2018 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

August 3, 2018 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.