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IN THIS ISSUE

BEHIND-THE-SCENES OF SCHOOL CLOSINGS | ST. JOE’S SIXTH-GRADE ACADEMY | MEET YOUR BARTENDER

GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, January 19, 2018 • Vol.20, No.3

Living History 100 years later, the Great War’s impact on Greenville remains evident page 16

Henry Johnson models a United States Military uniform circa 1917. Will Crooks/Greenville Journal

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1999 PUBLISHER | Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@communityjournals.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR | Emily Pietras epietras@communityjournals.com ADMINISTRATIVE EDITOR | Heidi Coryell Williams hwilliams@communityjournals.com

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STAFF WRITERS Cindy Landrum | clandrum@communityjournals.com Andrew Moore | amoore@communityjournals.com Sara Pearce | spearce@communityjournals.com Ariel Turner | aturner@communityjournals.com COPY EDITOR Rebecca Strelow CONTRIBUTING WRITER Vince Harris | vharris@communityjournals.com EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Susan Schwartzkopf VICE PRESIDENT OPERATIONS Holly Hardin CLIENT SER VICES MANAGERS Anita Harley | Rosie Peck | Jane Rogers BILLING INQUIRIES Shannon Rochester SALES MANAGER Emily Yepes MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES John Clark | Donna Johnston | Jonathan Maney Leigh Miller | Heather Propp | Meredith Rice Caroline Spivey | Liz Tew DIGITAL SALES ASSISTANT Amber Knox VISUAL DIRECTOR Will Crooks

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INSIDE // X7 PRODUCTION BEGINS | GASTROPUB ON THE TRAIL | CHARITABLE GIVING IN 2018

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How will tax reform affect the Upstate

THERAPEUTIC

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poet-in-residence For Peace Center poetry is Glenis Redmond, for healing an instrument

Will Crooks / Greenville Journal

Super Bowl: Broaden Goods brings the best of Morocco to your table and more. See the story, “Faraway Home,” page 86.

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EARLY WAKE-UP CALL

4 A.M. The time that Greenville County Schools’ ICE team is out evaluating roads and bridges throughout the county on mornings that school may be closed due to inclement winter weather

Education That Lasts a Lifetime

Making and Keeping Healthy Resolutions

Wednesday, January 3 at Noon or Monday, January 8 at 6:00 p.m. Learn how to make realistic resolutions for a healthy new year.

THEY SAID IT

“YOU CAN TAKE THE WORST WHISKEY ON THE PLANET … AND IT’LL STILL TASTE GOOD IN THAT DRINK.” Zachary Calfee, bartender at Roost and master of mixology for Auro Hotels, on his favorite cocktail to make, called Lion’s Tail (bourbon and lime, allspice dram, some almond or walnut)

“The Beatles, Ed Sheeran, the Black-Eyed Peas, James Brown — there’s really something for everyone.” “GOBSMACKED!” producer Nic Doodson, on the hybrid a cappella-beatboxing show’s music selection

“We want an environment where kids feel they are able to take a risk, learn, and fail a little.” Elizabeth Duncan, a sixth-grade teacher at St. Joseph’s Catholic School, on the school’s decision to open a sixth-grade academy in the fall, which will help students in the transition to middle school

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Bon Secours St. Francis Health System offers a variety of complimentary health classes to help you achieve a healthier life. Call 864-400-3651 to register.

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OPINION

Views from your community

Precinct organization: the essence of our democracy By Kate Franch

In the 2016 election, we all saw the power the individual voter wields. For Democrats, the aftermath has fueled a surge of resistance in the form of demonstrating, phone calling, and postcard writing. Those activities are compelling ways for voters of any persuasion to express their preferences to elected officials at the local, state, and national level. But to really make a difference, we should remember that “all politics are local,” as legendary Speaker of the House Tip O’Neill famously said. That’s what precinct reorganization is all about. Precinct reorganization occurs every two years for each party, with Republicans organizing in the odd years, Democrats in the even years. This year, Greenville County Democrats will come together on Saturday, Jan. 27, to elect new precinct leadership that will help register, inform, and engage voters at the most personal level — their neighborhoods. Although it is the heart of the electoral process, many voters don’t understand how a precinct fits into the democratic process. • There are 151 precincts in Greenville County, and boundaries are the same for both parties. • Each precinct is a geographical district with a prescribed number of registered voters surrounding a polling place and represents the smallest political subdivision in the electoral system. • Each precinct can have a leadership team composed of a president, three vice presidents, a secretary, a treasurer, and an executive committee representative. Officers must be registered voters and residents of the precinct. • Executive committee reps are members of the county party executive committee and bring the issues from their precinct voters to county party leadership. Through this role, each precinct has a voice and vote in county party management and direction. This year, the Greenville County Democratic Party is embarking on a major effort to extend leadership in all precincts, and to improve the support and training of precinct leadership to organize, mobilize, and activate voters. The precinct model is in place throughout the country. In many cities, like Chicago, it represents the grass-roots level of a robust organizing machine. In Greenville County, we aren’t quite there yet, but we are building toward it. We believe that neighborhoods should be the starting point for conversations on issues that can bubble up and become part of the Democratic Party’s platform. Registered voters interested in participating in this process can attend one of the reorganization meetings from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Jan. 27. Because of the number of precincts, we will be spread out over 10 to 15 locations. If you are not sure which precinct you are in, check your voter registration card or go to http://

Speak your mind

The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, factbased arguments.

We believe that neighborhoods should be the starting point for conversations on issues that can bubble up and become part of the Democratic Party’s platform.

www.scvotes.org/. Then find your precinct meeting here: http://www.greenvilledemocrats.com/precinct-activation-2018 In addition to electing officers, each precinct meeting will include an opportunity to present, discuss, and vote on resolutions — issues for consideration at the Greenville County Democratic Party convention to be held on Thursday, March 1. We invite every member of our community to attend the reorganization meeting and participate in the discussions and election of leadership. Candidates for precinct leadership can declare themselves ad hoc and will be elected by the members present. Each candidate will get a few minutes to present his credentials and goals. Precinct organization is the essence of our democracy: Issues bubbling up from neighborhood conversations, voters staying informed, and grass-roots leadership mobilizing to register voters and support candidates. It is about fulfilling our civic responsibilities to be an informed and active electorate. It is this civic involvement that will lead to decisions and outcomes that truly reflect what our community wants.

Kate Franch became chair of the Greenville County Democratic Party in 2016 after serving four years as president of the Democratic Women of Greenville County. Her first introduction to political organizing came as an active precinct member in North Carolina.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Associate Editor Emily Pietras at epietras@communityjournals.com.


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Views from your community

Time to Focus on School Choice in Greenville and Across America By Andrew R. Campanella

Later this month, schools, homeschool groups, organizations, and individuals in South Carolina and across America will work together to raise awareness about the importance of opportunity in K-12 education. National School Choice Week begins Jan. 21 and celebrates all types of schools and education environments for children. Nationwide, 32,240 events and activities – such as open houses, school fairs, and information sessions – are being planned, with an estimated attendance of 6.7 million people. In fact, 607 of those events and activities will be held in South Carolina, and 45 are in Greenville. National School Choice Week has been celebrated every year since 2011. And even with increased awareness, many families still have questions about school choice and how it can benefit them and their communities. The first thing to know is that school choice isn’t partisan or political. It isn’t about a specific set of policy goals either. Rather, it’s about parents making personal decisions for their children. School choice means empowering individual parents with the opportunity to search for, and find, the best education environments for their individual children – regardless of where they live or how much money they make. Finding the right school is important, because every child has unique talents, challenges, and needs. School choice isn’t about finding fault with any of the schooling options available. Instead, it recognizes that while one student might thrive at a neighborhood school, another student might do better somewhere else. Research shows that when parents actively choose schools and education environments for their children, students are more likely to succeed in school. They are also more likely to graduate from high school, get good jobs, and participate in their communities. School choice isn’t just theoretical. Right now, more parents in South Carolina and across America are actively choosing the education environments for their children than at any other time in history. National School Choice Week provides parents with an opportunity to evaluate the education options available for their children. If parents are interested in switching their child to a different school, or considering homeschooling, it helps to start looking into these options in the winter.

Helping Hands When You Need Them

Families in South Carolina can choose from traditional public schools, public charter schools, public magnet schools, private schools, online academies, and homeschooling. Because the state offers a private school choice program, parents who choose private schools for their children may also be eligible for state-supported scholarships or tuition assistance for their children. Searching for a new school, or considering an alternative education environment, doesn’t have to be daunting. Parents can start by talking to their children and other parents, researching schools online, and visiting schools in person. A good place to start is the National School Choice Week website, www.schoolchoiceweek.com, where we provide more information about specific school choice options in the Palmetto State as well as listings of the tens of thousands of local and regional events happening this year. National School Choice Week is a time when the country comes together around the idea that every child can succeed when they find the right school fit. This January, parents have more options and opportunities than ever before to find that right fit. For individual communities and for our country, that is a good thing.

A nationally recognized advocate for children and families, Andrew R. Campanella serves as president of National School Choice Week, the world’s largest annual celebration of opportunity in education. He lives in Northwest Florida.

Held every January, National School Choice Week is an independent public awareness effort designed to shine a positive spotlight on effective education options for children, including traditional public schools, public charter schools, public magnet schools, private schools, online academies, and homeschooling.

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OPERATION: CLEANUP

Donaldson AFB ranks No. 8 out of 61 S.C. military installations with toxic contamination; full remediation not expected until 2031. WORDS BY ANDREW MOORE

Photo by Bradley Bormuth/ Wikimedia Creative Commons

A new report from ProPublica, an independent nonprofit newsroom based in New York, shows that the former Donaldson Air Force Base in Greenville is one of six military bases statewide that pose a serious threat to the environment and human health. The report, which draws data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Department of Defense’s Environmental Restoration Program, lists 61 current or former military installations in South Carolina that have been contaminated with toxins. Fifteen of those installations are listed as a low or medium risk to the environment and human health, while eight haven’t been evaluated. Thirty-two sites have a “response complete” designation, meaning they were fenced off or didn’t require a cleanup. Donaldson ranks No. 8 among South Carolina sites posing the greatest threat to safety, human health, and the environment, according to ProPublica. In fact, the former air force base has more “high-risk” contamination sites (nine) than any of the 11 installations listed in the Upstate. Three of those sites are considered “active,” which means the military is still conducting cleanup efforts.

Since 1986, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has tracked and mitigated pollution at former and current military installations according to the hazards of contaminants and where and how they might affect humans and the environment. The Savannah District of the Army Corps of Engineers oversees the evaluation and cleanup of contaminated sites at military installations across the Southeast, according to Billy Birdwell, senior public affairs specialist for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Donaldson operated as a military installation until it was purchased by the city and county of Greenville in1964. The former air force base has since been transformed into the South Carolina Technology and Aviation Center (SCTAC), a 2,600-acre industrial park that is home to Lockheed Martin, Michelin, IBM, 3M, and various other companies. Birdwell, however, said the contaminated sites at Donaldson have been surveyed numerous times by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers over the last 20 years and pose “zero threat” to nearby residents or workers at SCTAC.


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DIRTY SITES Six installations in South Carolina have been designated as high risk by the federal government, according to ProPublica. Those comprise:

• Beaufort Marine Corps Air Station in Beaufort County • Conway Bomb and Gunnery Range in Horry County • DONALDSON AIR FORCE BASE IN GREENVILLE COUNTY • Fort Jackson in Richland County • Joint Base Charleston Weapons Station in North Charleston • Parris Island Marine Corps Recruit Depot in Beaufort County

The federal government has poured $21.4 million into environmental monitoring and remediation efforts at Donaldson.

“I don’t think they’re doing anything that would cause them to come into contact with the contaminants,” he said. “They aren’t drinking water from the ground or throwing dirt around with heavy machinery. They’re working inside contained facilities.” Birdwell said the contamination at Donaldson stems from “small dump sites” used during World War II. “We didn’t have environmental science back then, so we just threw these materials into the ground and covered them with dirt.” The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has detected trace amounts of hazardous, toxic, and radioactive materials in the groundwater, soil, surface water, and sediment near the contaminated sites at Donaldson, according to ProPublica. That includes chromium, mercury, cadmium, and trichloroethylene, a carcinogenic cleaning agent that may affect the nervous system, liver, respiratory system, kidneys, blood, and more. According to ProPublica, both on-site workers and visitors at the South Carolina Technology and Aviation

Center “are potential receptors of contaminants in site soils.” The report also says residents of the area could be exposed to contaminants if wading in nearby streams or consuming groundwater. SCTAC president and CEO Jody Bryson said the city and county are aware of the contaminated sites, but the “cleanup of the former Donaldson military base continues to be the responsibility of the Army Corps of Engineers.” The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is working with the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental and Control to evaluate and remediate any remaining “areas of concern” at Donaldson, according to Birdwell. The cleanup is expected to be completed by 2031, with longterm monitoring continuing into 2034. According to ProPublica, the federal government has already poured $21.4 million into the environmental monitoring and remediation efforts at Donaldson. The remaining work will cost an additional $13.9 million to complete.


10 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 01.19.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

WEATHER OR NOT?

Last week’s pre-emptive school closure for icy roads that didn’t happen infuriated some parents and brought to the forefront again the question of how the school district decides whether or not to close WORDS BY CINDY LANDRUM

Two days this winter — exactly one month apart — illustrate the challenges Greenville County Schools face when deciding whether to cancel classes, delay the start of school, or send students home early because of weather. Greenville County Schools canceled classes for Monday, Jan. 8, after a winter advisory issued the day before called for rain and warned of “sudden icing” and hazardous road conditions between 5 a.m. and 11 a.m. None of that occurred, prompting a chorus of complaints from parents who had to scramble to find child care or missed a day of work because the kids were home. A month earlier, on Dec. 8, all the weather forecasts indicated rain that day would not turn to sleet and snow until 8 p.m., an hour and a half after the last student bus rider would have arrived home. But temperatures unexpectedly dropped early that afternoon; snow started falling, prompting the school district to dismiss school early. A bus supervisor and district-level administrator had to take one student who lived at the top of a mountain home in a district SUV. A handful of other students were taken to a fire station for their parents to pick up instead of their bus stops due to concerns about buses on those roads. While the winter weather can be unpredictable, the reaction when the school district gets it wrong is not. “Do we regret canceling school for Monday, with the benefit of hindsight, yes. With the information we had at the time and the level of the concern it presented to our staff and students, no,” said Beth Brotherton, spokesperson for Greenville County Schools. “If we could make every decision with the benefit of hindsight, we would never make a bad decision.”

MAKING THE CALL

Brotherton said there were two major reasons the school district decided to call off school for Jan. 8 on Sunday – an overnight or morning drive by the ICE (Inclement Conditions Evaluation) team would not have been helpful because conditions weren’t expected to worsen until after the buses had already started their routes, and to give working parents and single-parent families time to plan. “We did not have a clearer picture in the morning than we did in the evening,” she said. District officials were concerned that treacherous conditions could develop quickly while school buses, employees, and car-riders were on their way to school. “We made the decision to cancel, believing that waiting until the morning would not clarify our concerns.”

DO THEY STAY HOME DO THEY GO TO SCHOOL OR

Here’s what a day in the life of a school cancellation could look like. National Weather Service sends out alert of predicted inclement weather

4 a.m. ICE team swings into action; each member has a temperature gun to check road and bridges. Other team members begin logging in to monitor weather forecasts, temperatures, and power outages. Start making phone calls to meteorologists, local law enforcement, Highway Patrol, utility companies.

By 6 a.m. Information provided to superintendent, who must decide: Cancel, delay, or attend as normal. School is canceled! Information is pushed out via television stations, radio stations, news outlets, text messages, phone, and email.

?

6:15 a.m. Phone rings, parent wakes up, panics 6:20 a.m. - 7 a.m. Turns off kid alarm/emails boss/babysitter/logs onto social media in search of snow day playdates

Afternoon School district ICE TEAM begins reassessing next-day plans Superintendent reviews information to make next-day decision (cancel, delay, or normal schedule). Call goes out to notify parents.

School closings, delays, and early dismissals are also posted on the district’s INFOLine (864-355-3100), Greenville County School’s website, www.greenville.k12.sc.us, and social media. Parents can sign up for text alerts by texting “follow @gcsalerts” to 40404.


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BAD TIMING

The school district did not consider delaying the start of school on Tuesday, Jan. 9, Brotherton said. Temperatures were expected to remain above freezing overnight, and the security guards who patrol schools around the county throughout the night did not report any issues. Neither did the more than 400 bus drivers and bus supervisors who report to work between 4:30 a.m. and 5 a.m. The first alert from the National Weather Service about freezing temperatures and the first accident due to black ice was reported by the state Highway Patrol shortly before 7 a.m. The district had two options, Brotherton said. It could turn buses around and take children back home on icy roads, leaving other bus riders waiting outside for buses that wouldn’t come, or it could continue with drop-offs. District officials, who were in contact with bus drivers over their radios, decided to continue with pickups because the drivers reported no safety issues. Members of the ICE team were also dispatched to check conditions, and they eported no problems, either, Brotherton said. The district did encourage parents to use their best judgment about traveling to school, especially when it involved high-school-aged drivers. “We make decisions for the whole; parents make the best decisions for their own children,” she said.

ICE TEAM

In cases where winter weather is expected to move into Greenville County overnight, the district sends out its ICE team at 4 a.m. to assess conditions throughout the district and at the Georgia line, since most weather systems move in from the west-southwest, Brotherton said. Making the call the second and subsequent days of a winter event can be more difficult because of the size of the district. Spread out over 800 square miles, Greenville County Schools is the state’s most expansive district. Because of that, some weather events affect one area of the county — typically the northern third that includes Blue Ridge and Travelers Rest — more than the rest.

WEATHER-RELATED REASONS GCS HAS CANCELED SCHOOL OR DELAYED ITS START

Snow

Ice

Hurricane

Bitter cold (wind chill in single digits)

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Storm damage

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A snowstorm in 2016 caused the school district to alter its “all or nothing” approach to closing schools. Greenville County residents south of Interstate 85 had snow and light ice that melted away quickly, while those in Travelers Rest, Slater, Marietta, Tigerville, and Blue Ridge were still iced in five days later. The district decided to hold classes but give excused absences to students and teachers who didn’t feel safe traveling to 10 schools in its upper end. Buses did not run on icy roads. Brotherton said new technology available in the district’s bus system allowed it to alter or delay certain routes and inform parents well in advance. Because of the complexity and number of man-hours involved in employing a quadrant system, it is not something the district would employ during a one- or two-day event, she said.

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Clemson University’s online graduate program in education is tops in the nation, according to the latest rankings from U.S. News & World Report, released Jan. 9. Other schools in the top four were Creighton University, the University of Florida, and the University of North Texas. The University of Houston and Utah State University were tied for fifth. Nearly 1,500 distance education programs for bachelor’s degrees as well as graduate programs in engineering, business, computer information technology, criminal justice, education, and nursing were evaluated for the 2018 Best Online Programs. U.S. News ranked online graduate education programs in five general categories: student engagement, student services and technology, admissions selectivity, faculty credentials and training, and peer reputation. Clemson was tied for 10th in last year’s ranking. The University of South Carolina’s on-

line graduate education program tied for 76th with the University of Maine, Southeast Missouri State University, Hofstra University, Eastern Kentucky University, and Boise State University. Winthrop University’s online graduate education program was 219th, tied with Millersville University of Pennsylvania, Kennesaw State University, Keiser University, and Alabama State University. U.S. News & World Report ranked Charleston Southern University’s online bachelor’s degree program 35th along with Ball State University, Fort Hays State University, and Regent University. The University of South Carolina – Aiken was tied with 12 other schools. Anderson University was 143rd, tied with nine other schools. Columbia College tied for 153rd. North Greenville University tied for 184th. Limestone College was 222nd. Coker College tied for 254th. The Medical University of South Carolina ranked third for the best online nursing program, while the University of South Carolina tied for fifth with George Washington University, Johns Hopkins University, and the University of Texas – Tyler.


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SEESEE WHAT’S GOING WHAT’S GOINGON ONAT ATTHE CULTURAL CENTER THE CULTURAL CENTER mauldinculturalcenter.org mauldinculturalcenter.org

Greenville lands TripAdvisor list as a destination on the rise Greenville has made yet another list of best places to visit, TripAdvisor’s Top Travel Destinations on the Rise for 2018. Greenville was named one of the best up-and-coming destinations among 44 other beaches, cities, and outdoor getaways around the world. The list was compiled based on outstanding accommodations, exceptional attractions, and restaurants for all budgets. The list also took into account year-over-year increases in positive TripAdvisor traveler ratings for accommodations, restaurants, and attractions, as well as increases in search and booking interest through TripAdvisor. The 10 cities on the list of U.S. destinations were Kapaa, Hawaii; Waco, Texas; Wilmington, N.C.; Bend, Ore.; Boulder, Colo.; Paso Robles, Calif.; Richmond, Va.; Greenville, S.C.; Omaha,

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Neb.; and Lexington, Ky. The description of Greenville on TripAdvisor was as follows: “The charming Southern city boasts a thriving arts scene, hundreds of restaurants, shops and boutiques, popular annual festivals, numerous historic sites, and museums housing significant collections. Greenville also features a one-of-a-kind ‘floating’ suspension bridge and is set against the scenic Blue Ridge Mountains.” The rankings described each city’s average hotel price (Greenville’s is $144/ night), as well as examples of hotels and airfare to Greenville-Spartanburg Airport. —Sara Pearce

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01.19.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 15

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TCMU introduces Sensory Saturdays program The Children’s Museum of the Upstate (TCMU) will now be offering Sensory Saturdays, an event geared specifically toward children with special sensory needs, sensory processing differences, and other special needs. The event will be held on a Saturday each month, from 9 a.m. to noon. “It’s definitely been a big need and something we have been wanting to do for a while,” said Jessica Hayes, director of programming at TCMU. “We always try to be inclusive no matter what, but having a day to specifically target these sensoryfriendly activities is a huge thing for us.” TCMU creates its exhibits with all children in mind, but is especially looking forward to being able to designate a monthly date for children with special needs. Some of the adjustments that will be made at TCMU include dimmed lights throughout the museum, limited loud sounds in each exhibit, and designated

quiet spaces with symbols denoting their location on each floor. “One of the most important things is to prepare special-needs children ahead of time so that they know what to expect,” Hayes explains. “The children and their parents will be able to go on our website and see the social narrative we created as well as make their own schedule for the day.” TCMU staff has been participating in several training sessions with experts in the areas of special needs and sensorysensitive children, such as experts in adapting toys for all children, autism, hearing- and vision-impaired children, and more. TCMU looks forward to offering these special program days, and Hayes believes that it will fill a need in the community. Though all of TCMU’s exhibits are accessible for all children, Bib’s World, Off the Wall (the art area), and the Spark!Lab will all be undergoing specific adjustments for this particular day. For more information on Sensory Saturdays, visit tcmupstate.org. —Sara Pearce

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16 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 01.19.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Beyond the Battlefield World War I shaped Greenville in countless ways, mobilizing its workforce, launching its transportation systems, and laying the foundation for its modern-day infrastructure. Historians and city officials are now coming together to commemorate Camp Sevier, and its role in that transformation 100 years later. WORDS BY ANDREW MOORE This year marks the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, a conflict that dragged nations from all across globe into four years of unprecedented bloodshed. Between the start of the war on July 28, 1914, and end of the war on Nov. 11, 1918, more than 18 million people were killed and 21 million wounded. The American diplomat George Kennan described the war as “the seminal catastrophe of this century.” However, the war did much more than cause a global massacre. It allowed millions of women to enter the workforce, featured the initial step of the United States as a world power, and helped to transform Greenville into the city it is today.

Building a camp

When the United States declared war on Germany in April 1917, Secretary of War Newton Baker ordered the construction of 32 training camps, according to local historian and documentary filmmaker Don Koonce. “Most of these cantonments or training camps were to be spread across the Southeast where moderate weather would provide more training days and shorter preparation time before sending the men overseas,” he said. Local business leaders sensed an economic opportunity and began lobbying for a camp soon after. They were successful. In July 1917, the U.S. Army appointed Greenville’s J.E. Sirrine & Co. and Gallivan Construction to build a 1,900-acre training camp near the base of Paris Mountain for the newly created 30th Infantry Division, which was composed of National Guard soldiers from South Carolina, North Carolina, and Tennessee. The division was nicknamed the “Old Hickory” division in honor of U.S. president Andrew “Old Hickory” Jackson, who was born near the borders of the three states. Soldiers from the 1st South Carolina infantry arrived in Greenville soon after and began to construct the camp, according to Koonce. About 20,000 additional soldiers arrived in the following weeks, and by Aug. 31 the camp

was considered complete. It was named Camp Sevier in honor of John Sevier, a Revolutionary War hero and Tennessee’s first governor. The camp included divisional headquarters, drill grounds, YMCA facilities, stables, a chapel, a bakery, a post office, a library, more than a dozen warehouses, and at least four medical buildings. It was also equipped with electricity, running water, and telephone and telegraph lines. The camp, however, did not have barracks, according to Koonce. Soldiers instead lived in pyramidal tents, formed in rows along the camp’s dusty roads.

Training for battle

In September 1917, once all units had reported, soldiers began training in common infantry skills, trench digging, gas defense, and the use of the machine gun. Meanwhile, the division’s engineering regiment built rifle ranges and trenches, and demolished roads, bridges, dams, pontoon boats, and railroads to prepare for war. They also laid out artillery ranges not far from Wade Hampton Boulevard. The U.S. Army, however, was “overwhelmed and significantly behind in delivering supplies and equipment to the training camps,” according to Koonce. “A good number of men were without proper uniforms and personal equipment. Actual machine guns and artillery were not delivered to Camp Sevier until three months before they deployed to France. They trained with wooden replacements.” Greenville also experienced brutally cold weather during the months of November, December, and January. “This all but eliminated outdoor training for the three months,” according to Koonce. The soldiers, however, were anything but bored. The P&N Railway ran eight trains a day to downtown Greenville, where the soldiers were wholeheartedly welcomed by locals, according to Dr. Courtney Tollison Hartness, a professor of history at Furman University. In fact, the entire community mobilized to support

the camp and soldiers. Students from the Greenville Woman’s College knit sweaters and mittens to help the soldiers stay warm throughout the winter. Local churches welcomed soldiers to worship and provided reading rooms with stationary for them to write their loved ones. And when rats infested the camp’s warehouses, children gladly donated their cats.

Going to war

In April 1918, the 30th division was ordered to prepare for war. Every man received a physical and was outfitted with new equipment. On May 1, the division departed Camp Sevier for the ports in New Jersey and New York, according to Koonce. The first soldiers from the 30th division left for Europe in May 1918 and arrived in England, where they departed for the western front soon after. On arrival in France, the division, with the exception of one artillery brigade, was assigned to the American Second Corps and attached to the British Second Army at a training area near Calais. In June 1918, the division underwent extensive combat training under the British, and their equipment and firearms were exchanged for British-made weaponry, including the Lewis automatic machine gun. The division was then sent to the front lines in Belgium. By September, the Old Hickory division had served in the Ypres-Lys campaign and Somme offensive. It was one of two American divisions to successfully break through the Hindenburg Line (the German’s formidable defense barrier on the western front) during the Battle of St. Quentin Canal on Sept. 29, 1918 – an action that would eventually lead to the end of World War I. Twelve members of the division were awarded a Medal of Honor, the nation’s highest award for valor in combat. But the success came at a high price. The 30th division had, in three months, from July through October 1918, sustained more than 1,000 officers and men killed in action, with another 7,178 wound-


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Our cover model, Henry Johnson, started collecting WW1 paraphernalia when he was 15. He now owns well over a dozen types of firearms that were used by the U.S. during the war, and the entirety of the gear issued to U.S. soldiers before and during the war including accoutrements, uniforms, munitions, bedding, and more. Part of his collection will be on display later this year at the Upcountry History Museum as the centerpiece for their planned WW1 exhibit. Will Crooks/Greenville Journal

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18 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 01.19.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

To see more photos of Camp Sevier and World War I, visit the new greenvillejournal.com ed or missing in action, Koonce said. In March 1919, the division departed from France, returned home, and mustered out from Camp Jackson in Columbia.

Modernizing a city

Camp Sevier housed and trained over 100,000 men before its closure in April 1919. While the training camp was only in operation for two years, it had a “huge impact” on Greenville’s economy and infrastructure, according to Tollison. Local companies not only received government contracts to build the camp but also provided services to soldiers once they arrived. The housing market also experienced a financial boom throughout the war as the families of soldiers relocated to Greenville. In 1917, the city used the incoming “war dollars” to purchase a new public hospital, formalize its operations, and significantly expand its facilities on Memminger Street and Arlington Avenue, according to Tollison. The city later purchased the local water company and established a public commission to oversee its operations. Greenville’s economy continued to thrive after the war as many non-native soldiers who trained at Camp Sevier returned, according to Tollison. That includes Henry McKoy, a native of Wilmington, N.C. who served with the U.S. Army 105th Engineers in France.

McKoy met his wife in Greenville while training at Camp Sevier and returned after the war to launch Morris & McKoy Construction, which built Furman University’s Sirrine Stadium and numerous other facilities across the Southeast. The geographic diversity introduced by Camp Sevier and its returning soldiers also sparked a renewed sense of patriotism among Greenville residents, according to Tollison. For years after the Civil War, Independence Day was seen in the South as a holiday for Northerners and African-Americans. But South Carolinians once more began in large numbers to celebrate the Fourth of July after World War 1.

Celebrating a legacy

As the 100th anniversary of the end of World War 1 draws near, Koonce has taken it upon himself to make sure that history is preserved and passed on. Koonce is working alongside the City of Greenville and Greenville County to launch a yearlong series of community celebrations to commemorate the historical significance of Camp Sevier and the men who went through basic training there. The series, also known as the Remember the Old Hickory Project, will include a special celebration during the

Greenville Scottish Games on May 26; a public dedication on Sept. 29; and a Veterans Day event on Nov. 11. Koonce and other event organizers plan to announce additional details later this year. “We want everyone to remember the tremendous contribution Greenville and Camp Sevier made to the war effort,” Koonce said. “The 100th anniversary is a great opportunity to raise awareness of that unique moment in history, and what it meant both locally and on the global stage.” Koonce added that the American Legion plans to participate in the celebration and distribute commemorative posters to area businesses. The Greenville Police Department and Greenville County Sheriff’s Office also plan to display “remembrance poppy” pins and vehicle decals throughout the year. The flower has been used since 1915 to commemorate military personnel who have died in war. “I cannot think of a better way to honor the people of the Old Hickory Division who served our country so heroically a hundred years ago,” said Greenville Mayor Knox White. “Even as we continue to look forward, the city is always cognizant of our roots and the amazing contributions that people in this area have made to the world.”


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Answering A Need St. Joseph’s was first opened in an Augusta Road home in 1993. The original door to that home is now located on the school’s growing campus and is the centerpiece of their Red Door Capital Campaign.

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St. Joseph’s Catholic School was established 25 years ago to fill a need for a Catholic high school in Greenville. Now, the school is starting a unique sixth-grade academy CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

School transitions are tough. High schools have long used freshman academies to help ninth graders move successfully from eighth grade — where they were the oldest students in the school and knew their way around — to ninth grade

where classes are tougher, responsibility is greater, and the stakes are higher. Freshman academies segregate freshmen from the rest of the school for most of the day, use a team-teaching approach, and offer more guidance and support. Beginning next fall, St. Joseph’s Catholic School will tackle the transition between elementary and middle school by


01.19.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 21

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A 2017 groundbreaking ceremony kicked off construction of a new, three-story building that connects St. Joseph’s academic buildings with its gymnasium. Construction is expected to be completed by the fall of 2018. Pictured second from left is Dr. Joseph Moon, who donated $1 million for the construction project.

starting a sixth-grade academy. Some of the pressures that originally drove schools to start freshmen academies have moved to younger ages in our culture at large, and the sixth-grade academy is St. Joseph’s response, said Steven Jones, the school’s academic dean. “It’s really driven by our sense that some sixth-grade students are under pretty significant pressure, not just at St. Joe’s but everywhere. Academics are getting harder, and there’s social media as well,” he said. “We wanted to create an environment where our students could be more focused on their schooling, both what happens in the classroom and the general socialization.” Headmaster Keith Kiser said the school has known for a while that it wanted to help students make the transition. But the school did not have a space that could accommodate six sixth-grade classrooms and have common space big enough to hold all students in that grade. That will change with the completion of a building that links the school’s existing

high school and gymnasium. “We want an environment where kids feel they are able to take a risk, learn, and fail a little,” said Elizabeth Duncan, a sixth-grade teacher. “We want to create a place where students feel it’s OK to make a mistake, not get it right.” A Foundations class taught by Duncan helps sixth-graders with the nonacademic part of the transition from elementary school to middle school — how to use a locker, how to organize for a school day so they don’t have to carry all of their books, note-taking, and goal-setting. “They’re learning to be better students,” Duncan said. The sixth-grade academy also will allow teachers to decide to go off the school’s bell schedule if they determine that students are struggling with concepts or to bring in guest speakers, said Jean Crosby, a sixth-grade math teacher. Team building will be an important part of the academy, she said. “The sixth-grade academy is a mag-

nification of all the things we know are working,” Jones said. “St. Joe’s is a highperforming school, but we also provide a high level of support for students to meet those high expectations.” Kiser said St. Joseph’s officials hope the academy will distinguish the school in a crowded marketplace.

RESPONDING TO NEEDS The sixth-grade academy is not the first time St. Joseph’s Catholic School has responded to the educational needs of students in Greenville. When St. Joseph’s opened in 1993, it was the realization of a 40-year dream many in Greenville’s Catholic community thought would never happen. Many credit the late Margaret Ann Moon, one of the nine original lay founders of the school who served as its founding board chair from the year it opened until 2012. In a video made in 2012 before the school started its 20th year of operation, Moon said she knelt at her bedside one night

Meet Ricky Flynn, winner of the 2017 Icy Hot Ironman 70.3 World Championship triathlon in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Ricky, a former Greenville Track Club Elite team member, won the competition in 4 hours, 10 minutes, 45 seconds, completing a 1.2 mile swim in the Tenessee River in 28:11, a 56-mile bike ride over Lookout Mountain and into downtown Chattanooga in 2:24:32, and a 13.1-mile run along the city’s Riverwalk and Riverfront Parkway in 1:11:19. The race featured 4500 f competitors from 48 states and 90 countries! Ricky Flynn can often be found G training in Greenville’s Salvation Army Kroc Center. The dynamic community center is proud to provide a variety of programs for individuals of all ages and from all walks of life, aimed to st strengthen families and enrich the lives of youth, adults and seniors. Just off the Swamp Rabbit Trail, members of the Kroc enjoy access to an artificial turf field, gymnasium, indoor lap pool, hot tub, weight room, KrocFit box, and much more. Athletes of all ages are K seasonally invited to join the Kroc Adult Leagues and KrocStars youth programs. Ricky Flynn is just one of the fantastic members making Kroc Greenville a center of fun, fitness, family, and faith.

NOTABLE ST. JOSEPH’S GRADUATES ALLISON MOON, 1998

ELLEN WILLIS, 2013

TYLER BURGESS, 1998

LAURA GRAGTMANS, 2005

KATRINA KONOPKA, 2015

MORGAN BECK, 2002

Attorney, Moon Law Firm

President, Southeastern Products Inc., Greenville Fifth place in 50-meter freestyle at 2016 Summer Olympic Trials World record-holder for 4x50 meter medley relay

DAVID ESTES, 2012

Long snapper for Clemson Tigers national championship football team

GEORGE PATRICK MCLEER, 2006

Animator for Pixar Studios Actress, singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist in Queens, N.Y. Works in Hollywood with stars such as Neil Patrick Harris

PHILIP WILMETH, 2009

Now known as Brother Augustine, a Benedictine monk and brewmaster for Norcia, Italy, brewery

KATIE SULLIVAN, 2001

Executive director of the South Carolina Arts Alliance

Director of marketing at Corley Plumbing Air Electric, leader of workshops empowering women professionals

JUSTIN MOHR, 2007

FR. ANDREW FRYML, 2008

The guy you see pushing an upright piano around downtown Greenville, plays events for charities

Ordained Catholic priest for the Diocese of Charleston

424 Westfield Street Greenville SC 29601 (864) 527 - 5948 www.krocgreenville.org


22 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 01.19.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Animal Care’s

ST. JOSEPH’S CATHOLIC SCHOOL THROUGH THE YEARS 1993 The nine original

founders of St. Joseph’s Catholic School used part of a single $800 donation for a mail campaign telling people a 40-year dream of starting a Catholic high school in Greenville was becoming a reality. The school opened in August with 13 students in a small house on Augusta Road.

Correspondent

AUGUST 2000 Margaret

Ann Moon and Bishop Robert J. Baker sign an agreement in which the Diocese of Charleston recognized and approved the school. Many consider it the most important event in the school’s history.

FALL 2000 The boys’ and girls’ cross country teams won state championships, the first in school history.

2003 St. Joseph’s opened a middle school with 57 sixth- and seventh-grade students.

JANUARY, 1994

Featuring Ruff Reporter:

Stanley

8,248 Lives Saved There are a LOT of animals in Greenville County. As the only open admissions shelter in the county, Animal Care sees dozens of stray, injured and unwanted animals walk through their doors every single day. Two years ago, they began their mission to build a NO KILL community and the results are astounding. In 2017, more than 8,000 animals found their forever homes. Thanks to spay/neuter programs, 19% fewer animals needed shelter and 9% more lives were saved than in 2016. That was possible because adopters, volunteers, staff and donors stepped up to the plate and took action. This year they’re going to save even more lives, but they need your help! Are you up for the challenge?

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2004 St. Joseph’s is named to the Catholic High School Honor

Outgrowing the little house, the school moved into a 16,000-square-foot building it bought at 800 E. Washington St.

Roll, gaining recognition for the first time as one of the 50 best in the country. It ranked in the Top 20 for academics.

2005 Construction of a new middle school wing, library, and

MAY 1994 Earns accreditation from the South Carolina

media center begins. Ground was broken for the school’s first oncampus gymnasium.

Independent School Association

MAY 1997 The school held

its first commencement with seven graduates.

DECEMBER 1997 The board buys the former site of Amoco/ Phillips Research and Development near the intersection of Laurens Road and Interstate 85. The site had three buildings totaling 125,000 square feet on 36 acres.

SPRING 2000 Baseball legend Tommy Lasorda visits the school and promises to return to assist in raising money for the school’s new baseball field.

when she was 35 years old and asked God what he wanted from her. “A Catholic high school. I heard it in my ear, and I heard it in my heart,” Moon, who died in 2014, said in the video. Moon and the rest of the founders — Louis Beck, Mary Cotter, Janelle Malone, Barbara McGrath, John McGrath, Nancy McGrath, Tom McPartland, and Bradley Van Name — took a portion of a single $800 donation and set out on a massive mailing campaign to let people know that, after years of planning, the school was finally going to open. When the school opened in a modest house leased to the school by St. Michael’s Lutheran Church on Augusta Road, it had 13 students. Even then, school officials knew they needed more space. The next year, Moon signed a $400,000 mortgage and the

2007 St. Joseph’s hires its first football coach. 2009 St. Joseph’s was officially accepted into the South Carolina High School League for athletics.

2010 Varsity football made its debut, finishing the season with a shutout victory.

2011 Construction of projects included in the first phase of the Red Door Capital Campaign were completed.

2012 Margaret Ann Moon, one of the school’s founders, resigned as board chair, a position she held for nearly 20 years.

2014 Second phase of Red Door Capital Campaign construction begins.

school moved into a 16,000-square-foot building on East Washington Street. Seven students graduated in its first commencement in May 1997. Seven months later, the board bought its current campus, the former site of Amoco/Phillips Research and Development, near the intersection of Interstate 85 and Laurens Road. In 2000, Moon and Bishop Robert J. Baker signed an agreement in which the Diocese of Charleston approved the school, considered by many the most important event in the school’s history. Now, the school has 680 students from sixth through 12th grade. Kiser said St. Joseph’s is needed today

as much as ever. About 70 percent of its students are Catholic, and the Catholic population of Greenville and the Upstate is growing, he said. Graduates of the school — the oldest of which are not yet 40 years old — are making big contributions in all walks of life, he said. “It’s all about the graduates. The young men and women coming out of the school are doing amazing things. Margaret Ann Moon’s vision was that our graduates were destined to change the world,” Kiser said. “The work we’re doing is not just college preparatory, but work preparatory and mission preparatory. Our graduates are using their talents to make lives better.”

For parents interested in learning more about the sixth-grade academy, St. Joseph’s Catholic School will hold a kickoff night on Jan. 23 from 7-8 p.m.


32 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.01.2017

WWW.LEGACY.COM/OBITUARIES/GREENVILLEJOURNAL

OBITUARIES & MEMORIALS Louise Fox

Willie Ruth Chastain

HENDERSONVILLE, NC – Sarah

Louise Shores Fox, 98, widow of Vernon Tennyson Fox, passed away January 15, 2018. A native of Spartanburg County, daughter of the late Virgil and Sally Mabry Shores. Mr. and Mrs. Fox founded WCKI Radio. Surviving are a son, Barry Tennyson Fox; two daughters, Rachel Louise

Hays and Bonnie Kimberly Ruff; five grandchildren, Jaime Fox Teet, Jill Fox Raby, Daniel Fox, Teresia Diana McClendon and Sarah Shelle’ Russell and eleven great-grandchildren. Graveside services will be held 2:00 p.m. Wednesday, January 17, 2018 at Wood Memorial Park. Online condolences may be made at www.thewoodmortuary.com

DEATH NOTICES FOR JAN. 8-15 NAME

AGE TOWN

DEATH DATE ARRANGEMENTS

Thomas, Ginger Ann Simpsonville 8-Jan Thomas McAfee Funeral Home Ellis, Marguerite 75 Owasso, OK 10-Jan Gray Mortuary, Pelzer Martin, Irene 99 Toccoa, GA 12-Jan Sandifer Funeral Home Skelton, Doris 74 Clemson 13-Jan Duckett-Robinson Funeral Home Keller, J. W. 99 Greer 13-Jan Woodlawn Funeral Home Whitaker, Wayne 70 Liberty 13-Jan Liberty Mortuary, Inc Grice, Eula Mae 80 Liberty 13-Jan Dillard Funeral Home Sutter, Evelyn S. 96 Simpsonville 13-Jan Fletcher Funeral Home Roach Barnes, Shirley Jean 79 Campobello 14-Jan Seawright Funeral Home and Creamatory Eppes, James Albert 98 Greenville 14-Jan Woodlawn Funeral Home Styles, Margaret 84 Marietta 14-Jan The Howze Mortuary Langley, Betty Jeter 81 Taylors 14-Jan Thomas McAfee Funeral Home, Dwtn Ross, Katherine 99 Pelzer 14-Jan Gray Mortuary King, Mary “Macy” Henderson 82 Simpsonville 14-Jan Thomas McAfee Funeral Home, SE Chastain, Willie Ruth 89 Westminster 15-Jan Sandifer Funeral Home Sims, Ruby B. Greenville 15-Jan Mackey Mortuary Fox, Louise Greenville 15-Jan The Wood Mortuary Greer SC Wood, Dolores D. Greer 15-Jan Mackey Mortuary For a complete listing of obituaries and memorials, please visit us online at legacy.com/obituaries/greenvillejournal.

A Lasting Legacy | Submit to: obits@communityjournals.com The Greenville Journal is pleased to announce the addition of obituaries to our weekly print publication. Online obituaries and memorials will be shared on our website via a Legacy.com affiliation. Obituaries can be placed in person at our office located at 581 Perry Ave., Greenville; via email at obits@communityjournals.com; or our website, GreenvilleJournal.com. Feel free to email or visit for more information about deadlines, space restraints, and editorial requirements.

WESTMINSTER – Willie Ruth Boggs Chastain, 89, went to be with her Lord and Savior on January 15, 2018 at the Cottingham Hospice House. She was a member of First Baptist Church of Westminster. She was preceded in death by her husband, Ben F. Chastain, with whom she was previously co-owner of Chastain Insurance Agency. She is survived by her children: Kay Chastain, Leca Morehead and Brad Chastain (Sharon); grandchildren, Patrick Morehead (Summer), Boggs Morehead, Lindsay Chastain and Jordan Chastain; and three greatgrandchildren. She is also survived by three loving sisters; Edna Stansell, Jean Prince and Joye Snelgrove. In addition to her husband, she is preceded in death by her sister, Mildred Knight and brother, Lecil Boggs. A funeral service will be held at 2:00 pm on Friday, January 19, 2018 at Westminster First Baptist Church. The family will receive friends from 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm Thursday, January 18, 2018 at Sandifer Funeral Home. A private burial service will be held at Oconee Memorial Park following the service. The family is at the home. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the Cottingham Hospice House, Attn: Foundation Office, 298 Memorial Drive, Seneca, SC 29672 or to Gideon’s International, Westminster Camp, PO Box 662, Westminster, SC 29693. Condolences may be expressed online by visiting www.sandiferfuneralhome.com

Laurie E. Farmer

LANDRUM – Laurie Ellen Maines Farmer, 56, passed away on January 15, 2018 at her home. A native of Clark County, KY, daughter of George S. and Sue Miller Maines, she was a former medical billing administrative assistant. Surviving in addition to her parents, are her husband, Marion Arnold Farmer of the home; one son, Justin Farmer (Caroline) of Saint Matthews; one daughter, Mary Ellen Farmer of Landrum; one brother, George M. Maines of Louisville, KY and one

grandson, Marston M. Farmer. Mrs. Farmer was predeceased by a grandson, Walker Riggs Farmer. A memorial service will be held 12 noon Thursday, January 18, 2018 at Mount Lebanon Baptist Church conducted by Rev. Mark Smith. The family is at the home. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Multiple Sclerosis Foundation, 6520 North Andrews Ave., Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309-2132. Online condolences may be made at www.thewoodmortuary.com

Plan for “someday” today.

Thomas McAfee Funeral Homes can help you plan ahead, allowing you to design personalized arrangements that are a reflection of you. Contact us to receive complimentary information about the following: Funeral Planning Guides Cost Estimates & Payment Plans Cremation Services

Downtown Chapel | 232-6733

Northwest Chapel & Cremation Center | 294-6415

ThomasMcAfee.com Southeast Chapel | 688-1600


24 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 01.19.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Our Community

Community news, events, and happenings

PHILANTHROPY

POLITICS

Hubbell Lighting donates $25K to Make-A-Wish

Women’s March Anniversary rally to be held Jan. 20

The charitable section of Greenville-based Hubbell Lighting and Columbia-based Hubbell Power Systems, The Harvey Hubbell Foundation, chose Make-A-Wish South Carolina as a beneficiary. Garth Warner, vice president of human resources at Hubbell Lighting, and Kevin Potts, vice president of finance at Hubbell Power Systems, visited Make-A-Wish South Carolina to present this generous gift. Potts explained, “The magic of Make-A-Wish is though they are granting the wish of a single deserving child, they are impacting so many more, from the bolstered confidence of family and friends to the heartwarming accomplishment felt by the community of volunteers and wish granters. Hundreds of times a year Make-A-Wish South Carolina delivers on a prescription of hope, joy, and inspiration for the children, families, and communities they serve. Hubbell is honored to be able to be a part of that team.” With this donation, Make-A-Wish will be able to grant approximately three and a half additional wishes to children in the state battling life-threatening medical conditions.

Upstate Coalition for Equality will host a Women’s March Anniversary rally on Saturday, Jan. 20, at noon at Falls Park on the Reedy River. This event is in support of the rallies taking place across the country to launch the collective 2018 Women’s March agenda, Power to the Polls. The event will kick off a new voter registration campaign and hopes to harness the community’s “collective energy to advocate for policies and candidates that reflect our values.” Donations of feminine hygiene products in support of the Homeless Period Project will be collected at the event and can be dropped off at receptacles at the Falls Park entrances.

PHILANTHROPY

Muslim men and Methodist men volunteer at the Harvest Hope Food Bank On Jan. 6, a group of Muslim men from Greenville’s Islamic Center teamed up with a group of Methodist men from Travelers Rest United Methodist Church to volunteer at Harvest Hope Food Bank. The combined group of approximately 40 men worked together to package up food boxes that Harvest Hope distributes to families in need throughout the Greenville area. The men explained that this was a great way to start the year off and an incredible way to have two different religious organizations working together in order to benefit the greater good of the community. Harvest Hope Food Bank was founded in 1981 and feeds hungry individuals across 20 counties of South Carolina. Last year, Harvest Hope distributed over 27.5 million meals and fed approximately 48,000 people a week.

Susan McMillen REALTOR® 864-238-5498 Susan.McMillen@allentate.com

CONTEST

Local Dog Wizard hosting Most Unruly Christmas Puppy Contest The Greenville Dog Wizard is running a Most Unruly Christmas Puppy Contest that will accept entries until Jan. 31. The Greenville Dog Wizard knows that many people get puppies as a Christmas gift, and they want to ensure that new dog owners understand that there is more to owning a puppy than just the adorable, sweet puppy. Owning a puppy is actually a lot of work and responsibility, and it is important to train your puppy while it is still young. The winner of the contest will receive a free private puppy program, which includes five individual lessons valued at $500. This contest serves as a great way to encourage families with new puppies to train them and understand the importance of training early. To enter, send an email to info@ greenvilledogwizard.com detailing, in 500 words or less, why your Christmas puppy is the most unruly. The Greenville Dog Wizard of is one of 13 Dog Wizard franchises across the country hosting Unruly Christmas Puppy Contests. One winner will be selected in each market. Submit community news items to news@greenvillejournal.com.

If you are thinking of selling or buying in the New Year...the time to start planning is NOW.

Call me today and let’s get started!

PLANTATION ON PELHAM

COTTAGE HILL

HOLLAND PLACE

GRESHAM PARK

CUSTOM 3BR TOWNHOME, GATED COMMUNITY NEAR DWNTWN GRVL, OFFICE, BONUS RM. #1346534 • $454,900

4BR/3.5BA W/BONUS RM, BRICK, MASTER ON MAIN, LARGE CDS LOT, OFF ROPER MTN! #1353591 • $419,900

4BR/3BA W/MASTER PLUS ONE ON MAIN! BONUS RM! SCRN PORCH! CDS LOCATION NEAR I385! #1355253 • $284,500

3BR/3BA RANCH HOME LOADED W/UPGRADES IN MAINTENANCE FREE COMMUNITY IN FIVE FORKS! #1354827 • $279,900

SUMMERWALK

KNOLLWOOD HEIGHTS

BRAEMOR

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4BR/2.5BA W/BONUS RM IN POPULAR N’BORHOOD! HDWDS UP & DOWN, MANY NEW UPGRADES! #1358850 • $267,900

4BR/2.5BA IN SUPER CONVENIENT LOCATION! BACKS TO NATURE! GREAT SCHOOLS! #1349118 • $239,900

BEAUTIFUL 1.3 AC RESIDENTIAL LOT NEAR EVERYTHING IN GVILLE! BRING CUSTOM BUILDER! #1353892 • $94,900

FIVE BEAUTIFUL ACRES NEAR I385! BRING YOUR PLANS & BUILDER! SUPER CONVENIENT TO S’VILLE! #1355176 • $59,900


01.19.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 25

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

HOME

Featured Neighborhood

Braxton Ridge

Off Hunter Road in Simpsonville, SC

SIMPSONVILLE’S NEWEST CUSTOM HOME COMMUNITY!!! This brand new community boasts third acre lots, wooded views, community green spaces, and the true feel of home. Located only minutes from downtown Simpsonville and Heritage Park, Braxton Ridge is a great place to build your dream home. Located in Simpsonville - on Hunter Road between East Georgia and Jones Mill Roads.

Home Info Price: From the $400s Amenities: Minutes to Downtown Simpsonville and Heritage Park • Minutes to Shopping & Dining • Backs up to Fox Run Country Club • Community Pool and Cabana • Common Areas/Green Space • Walking Trail Schools: Rudolph G Gordon Elementary, Bryson Middle, and Hillcrest High Contact Information: Brianna McCluskey | 803.671.8851 BMcCluskey@arhomes.com

Real Estate News

The Marchant Company Recognizes Agents For Excellent Performance in December 2017 As the Upstate’s “Signature Real Estate Agency,” The Marchant Company is a small boutique business of just 35 agents that is consistently a top performer in Greenville. The Marchant Company is proud to recognize the following REALTORS® for outstanding performance in December 2017: Congratulated by Seabrook Marchant, broker-in-charge, agents honored included:

Faulk Praytor T. Marchant A. Marchant & B. Marcahnt Cone Team Valerie Miller Properties Charlotte Faulk –Top Unit Listing Anne Marchant & Brian Marchant –Top Valerie Miller Properties (Clint Miller, Leader of the Month Unit Listing Team, Top Volume Listing Valerie Miller, Chuck Miller) –Co-Unit Mary Praytor –Top Volume Listing Team, & Top Volume Sales Team of the Sales Team of the Month Leader of the Month Month Agents at The Marchant Company are Tom Marchant –Top Unit Sales Leader The Cone Team (Shannon Cone, Tra- dedicated to providing unsurpassed serof the Month & Top Volume Sales Leader vis Cone, Margaret Martin, Kelly Martin) vice and are committed to meeting clients’ of the Month –Co-Unit Sales Team of the Month continued on PAGE 28


26 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 01.19.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

On the market Augusta Road • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Quail Hill • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Parkins Pointe • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Green Valley • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

7A Meyers Drive · $749,000 · MLS# 1351072

471 E Parkins Mill Rd · $699,900 · MLS# 1348267

10 Parkins Pointe Way · $609,900 · MLS# 1358945

225 Foot Hills Rd · $499,000 · MLS# 1352725

4BR/3f2hBA Beautiful newer construction home in heart of Augusta Road. Kitchen open to den. Luxurious master suite. Covered back porch. Augusta Drive to Wesminster. Right on Waccamaw. Right on Meyers.

5BR/4f2hBA Prestigious house, recently updated, whole house generator, in-law suite, pool, heat/cool basement, 3 car garage all on a large lot. Laurens Road to East Parkins Mill. Home on your left.

4BR/3.5BA Classic newer construction home in Parkins Mill Area. Large open kitchen, master suite on main, large bonus upstairs. 2-car garage. Laurens Rd to E Parkins Mill. Turn into Parkins Pointe.

4BR/3.5BA Live near Travelers Rest and take advantage of restaurants, shops, and Swamp Rabbit Trail. 9’ ceilings and many updates! Turn onto Foot Hills Rd house is on right.

Contact: Blair Miller 430-7708 Wilson Associates

Contact: Kevin Lawton 304-1101 Keller Williams Realty Greenville Upstate

Contact: Blair Miller 430-7708 Wilson Associates

AllWeatherstone About FLOORING Allp.m.About ofWoodwind SC FLOORING SC Brookstonecd cd • Open Sun. 2-4 Cottagescd • Open Sun.of 2-4 p.m. Meadows • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Contact: Heidi Putnam 864-380-6747 Coldwell Banker Caine

East Park Historic • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

105 Ebenway Lane · $449,900 · MLS# 1350996

79 Vinton Drive · $375,000 · MLS# 1357704

109 Grove Park Drive · $339,900 · MLS# 1349214

122 Ebaugh Avenue · $284,950 · MLS# 1356247

4BR/3.5BA Stately brick home on quiet street. Freshly painted DR and 2 bedrooms. Kitchen with open floorplan for entertaining. Must see! Harrison Bridge Rd to Hillstone into subdivision. Right on Ebenway.

4BR/2.5BA Maintenance-free living at it’s best. Located in 5-forks area. 2 BRs on main level. Open floor plan. Tons of upgrades! From 5-Forks to Batesville Rd. Windwood Cottages on Right.

3BR/2BA Gorgeous, traditional brick home. Split floorplan, private master suite, open living room and zen inspired backyard with saltwater pool. I-85 to SC-81S. Right Scotts Bridge. Left on Grove Park.

3BR/1BA Classic updated bungalow with lots of character! Beautiful updated kitchen. Gorgeous hardwoods. Newly painted exterior. Fabulous location. A must see! Laurens Road to Richland Way. Left on Ebaugh.

Contact: Mary Allison Zimmerman 979-5842 Wilson Associates

Contact: Blair Miller 430-7708 Wilson Associates

cd

Contact: Jennifer Wilson 907-5920 All About FLOORING of SCBanker Caine cd Coldwell

Contact: Linda O’Brien 325-0495 Wilson Associates

cd cd

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All All About About FLOORING FLOORING of SC of SC

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• Experienced staff w larger showroom• New larger showroom

• FREE ’s of the latest styles • 100’s of the latest stylesestimates

cd

Holland Place • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

• Experienced staff • FREE estimates 604 Chaulk Hill Court · $284,500 · MLS# 1355253

• New larger showroom

• Experienced staff

• 100’s of the latest styles

• FREE estimates

• 1000’s of beautiful colors

• Financing available

3BR/3BA Beautiful Upscale Ranch In Five Forks Area! Two Bedrooms(Master)/Two Baths On Main Level! Sunroom, Screened Porch Plus Patio! Everything Here! I385s, L@ Woodruff, R@Gresham Road, R@Aldershot Way, R@Jillian Lee

Contact: Melissa Tomberg 252-6621 Allen Tate

Contact: Tina Arroyave 420-9357 Allen Tate

• FREE estimates

• 1000’s of beautiful colors

• Financing available

• 100’s • 100’s of the oflatest the latest styles styles • 1000’s • 1000’s of beautiful of beautiful colors colors

LOCATION Pleasantburg Dr le, SC 29609 241-3636

Knollwood Heights/040 • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

••Experienced staffstaffstaff Experienced • Experienced

• 100’s of the latest styles

• FREE • FREE estimates estimates

NEW LOCATION TAYLORS LOCATION TAYLORS LOCATION TRAVELERS REST LOCATION TRAVELERS REST LOCATION NEW LOCATION TAYLORS LOCATION TRAVELERS LOCATION 2111k North Pleasantburg 3245C Wade Hampton Dr Blvd 3245C Wade11Hampton Blvd 3598 Hwy (just offREST Hwy 25) 3598 Hwy 11 (just off Hwy 25) Gail Drive · $239,900 · MLS# 1349118 2111k North Pleasantburg Dr Wade Hampton Blvd 3598 Hwy 11 (just off Hwy 25) Greenville, Taylors,SC SC29609 29687 3245C Taylors, SC 29687 Travelers Rest, SC 29690 Travelers 119 Rest, SC 29690 Greenville, SC 29609 Taylors, SC 29687 Travelers Rest, SC 29690 4BR/2.5BA Awesome Location Into Downtown Greenville! Enjoy Nature From Or Sunroom! Newer Roof & Hvac! Various 864-241-3636 864-292-8207 864-292-8207 (for appointment) (for Decks appointment) 864-241-3636 864-292-8207864-241-3636 864-241-3636 (for appointment) 864-241-3636

• Experienced staff

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Remember

LOCATION TAYLORS LOCATION TRAVELERS REST LOCATION • Financing available • 1000’s 2111k ofNEW beautiful North Pleasantburg Dr colors 3245C Wade HamptonDeserve Blvd 3598 HwyOur 11 (just off Hwy 25) Your Feet Floors

Updates! Fantastic Schools! Hwy275(Laurens Rd)S Towards Mauldin, R@Knollwood Dr, R@Locke Ln, R@Gail Drive

Contact: Susan McMillen 238-5498 Allen Tate

mber Remember Your Feet Deserve Your Feet OurDeserve Floors Our Floors Greenville, SC 29609 864-241-3636

NEW LOCATION NEW LOCATION 2111k North 2111k Pleasantburg North Pleasantburg Dr Dr Greenville, Greenville, SC 29609 SC 29609 864-241-3636 864-241-3636

Taylors, SC 29687 864-292-8207

TAYLORS TAYLORS LOCATION LOCATION 3245C 3245C Wade Hampton Wade Hampton Blvd Blvd Taylors, Taylors, SC 29687 SC 29687 864-292-8207 864-292-8207

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TRAVELERS TRAVELERS REST LOCATION REST LOCATION 3598 Hwy 359811Hwy (just11off(just Hwy off25) Hwy 25) Travelers Travelers Rest, SC Rest, 29690 SC 29690 864-241-3636 864-241-3636 (for appointment) (for appointment)

Remember Your Feet Deserve Our Floors

Advertise your home with us Contact:

• Financing • Financing available available

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21

7 Jillian Lee Court · $279,900 · MLS# 1354827

4BR/3BA Cds Location Near I385! Master On Main Plus One! Bonus Room&Screeened Porch! Private Backyard! Fantastic Home! Come See! I385s To Exit33, L@Bridges, R@Holland, L@ Netherland, R@Chaulk Hill

• Financing 0’s of beautiful colors • 1000’s of beautiful colors available • Financing available

Newlarger larger showroom New • •New larger showroom showroom

Gresham Park/032 • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Caroline Spivey 864-679-1229 cspivey@communityjournals.com


OPEN SUNDAY, JAN. 21 from 2-4PM CHESTNUT POND

SPAULDING FARM

www.upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/T6VQCK/405-Southern-Beech-Court-Simpsonville-SC-1348465

COVENTRY

www.upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/67Z8ZQ/9-Block-House-Road-Greenville-SC-1357730

405 Southern Beech Court • 4BR/4.5BA $675,000 · MLS# 1348465 Cynthia Rehberg · 884-9953 CODE 4473024

PIEDMONT

TRENTWOOD

www.upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/J5LSTL/711-Lockhurst-Drive-Simpsonville-SC-1352565

9 Block House Rd • 4BR/3.5BA

www.upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/5ADU9W/3106-Bethel-Road-%2361-Simpsonville-SC-1355700

711 Lockhurst Dr • 4BR/3BA

$598,000 · MLS# 1357730 Jackie Garcia · 818-397-8618 CODE 4760829

3106 Bethel Rd. #61 • 3BR/2.5BA

$269,500 · MLS# 1352565 Joyce Bennett · 678-699-4043 CODE 4597118

$149,993 · MLS# 1355700 Stina Thoennes · 304-9475 CODE 4703293

Text each property’s unique CODE to 67299 for pictures and details.

www.upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/HGH5GK/7-Sue-Cleveland-School-Road-Piedmont-SC-1357784

7 Sue Cleveland School Rd • 2BR/1BA $77,500 · MLS# 1357784 Sean Keagy · 230-1348 CODE 4761939

Your Home's Best Friend.

ALSO OPEN ASHFORD

www.upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/KF9NKP/820-Knollwood-Drive-Greenville-SC-1356848

820 Knollwood Drive • 4BR/3.5BA

WE HELP  PEOPLE  LIKE  YOU  SELL YOUR  HOUSE  AND  FIND  A  HOME.

$350,000 · MLS# 1356848 CODE 4736926 Debbie Levato · 380-9150

Yes, we're recognized for resources, innovation and agents that go above and beyond ... but what really matters is you.

COTTAGE GROVE

www.upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/AZPWJ7/100-TUPELO-Lane-LOT-25-Easley-SC-1356786

100 Tupelo Lane • 3BR/2.5BA $249,900 · MLS# 1356786 CODE 4735645 Liz Nunnally · 415-7617

WILLIAMSTON

www.upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/38LEUE/104-Bragg-Drive-Williamston-SC-1356308

104 Bragg Dr • 3BR/2BA

$135,000 · MLS# 1356308 CODE 4764645 Annette Warrick · 601-613-5649

A good friend listens.

OPEN NEW COMMUNITIES OAKS AT WOODFIN RIDGE

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/HAPBF2/112-Southern-Oaks-Drive-Inman-SC-240983

Sat. 10 am-4 pm Homes starting @ $247,900 112 Southern Oaks Dr. | CODE 4165177 Don Hazzard 909-0141

KENSINGTON CREEK

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/CNG8RY/630-Cub-Branch-Drive-Spartanburg-SC-241013

Sat. 10 am-4 pm Homes starting @ $233,100 603 Cub Branch Road | CODE 4165183 Don Hazzard 909-0141

Agents on call this weekend

Jean Keenan 380-2331 Garlington Road

Gary Thompson 414-7448 Easley

Tammy Copeland 404-0013 Simpsonville

Ellis Crigler 616-1348 Augusta Road

Joy Steverson 337-0625 N. Pleasantburg Dr.

Stephanie Miller 879-4239 Greer

Elizabeth Pope 484-3322 Main Street

Micha Kelley 630-2589 Pelham Road

Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at cdanjoyner.com


28 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 01.19.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

SOLD: Greenville Transactions For the week of Dec. 18 – 22 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$6,599,610 $3,000,000 $1,975,000 $1,745,000 $1,520,000 $1,514,500 $1,501,578 SUKPER HWY HOMESITES $1,300,000 $1,170,000 $1,000,000 THE CLIFFS AT MOUNTAIN PARK $949,000 $916,040 $900,000 LOST RIVER $852,822 THORNBLADE $850,000 $847,870 COBBLESTONE $810,000 PUTMAN PLACE $795,000 $765,000 COMMERCE CENTER $725,000 $709,900 $687,030 GREEN VALLEY ESTATES $687,030 $685,270 SHANNON TERRACE $684,500 STONEHAVEN $655,000 $650,000 $640,000 CHARTWELL ESTATES $600,000 $586,400 SPAULDING FARMS $580,000 MCRAE PARK $578,000 $569,000 MAHAFFEY PLANTATION $558,000 $555,000 HUNTERS LANDING $549,900 THORNBLADE $532,500 SCHWIERS AT CLEVELAND $525,000 CHANDLER LAKE $524,530 $517,000 $506,000 $505,000 MEYERS PARK $502,000 KENWOOD PLACE $498,700 SADDLEHORN $492,667 LAKE LANIER $488,500 MARES HEAD FARM $480,000 RIDGEWATER $472,204 SADDLEHORN $465,630 SILVER MEADOWS $463,346 121 RHETT STREET $459,000 RIVER WALK $457,000 $454,000 CHARLESTON WALK $445,000 BARRINGTON PARK $434,000 AUGUSTA ROAD RANCHES $425,000 BELHAVEN VILLAGE@HOLLINGSWORTH $423,610 KNIGHTS BRIDGE $415,000 PLANTATION GREENE $415,000 CLIFFS AT GLASSY NORTH $410,000 COACHMAN PLANTATION $407,763 RIVER OAKS $400,250 HUNTINGTON $399,900 BELHAVEN VILLAGE@HOLLINGSWORTH $398,151

COLE CM GREENVILLE SC LL CAP CAMPERDOWN LLC HRFH LLC LEPOW PATRICIA J LAMBERSON GARY & ELENA C S C DEPT OF AGRICULTURE CROWN METRO CHEMICALS IN RESTORATION MINISTRIES I HMVP HOLDINGS LLC CAP RIVER LLC TYLER JOHN D REVOCABLE WESTGATE MHP LLC NEW HARRISON BRDG PARTNE LOST RIVER LLC FIELD ALLYSON D PEDEN PROPERTIES LIMITED HERRON CARLA M TRUSTEE CRANE SARA CASE LAURENS KATHRYN ANNE LIV CAMPBELL WILLIAM M JR FAITH PROPERTIES II LLC FAITH PROPERTIES LLC FAITH PROPERTIES LLC TUCKER THOMAS M CUNNINGHAM TODD FOWLER BRIAN K OLIVE TREE HOLDINGS LLC HARPER STONE C HUFSTETLER ELAINE MULLEN KEVIN A RONCEVICH MAUREEN M RAJARAM SELVY (JTWROS) HARMON BIRDIE P HOLLINS ALTON RAY JR LAWTON WILLIAM JOSEPH ANDERSON HOMES AND CONST RADUKA MARKO (JTWROS) GOODALE CATHERINE CREED MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH JOHNSTON FAMILY TRUST MCKINNEY DANIEL N LIV TR SIMS LANA H IV (JTWROS) BIZZELL CHRISTOPHER V HOWELL TIMOTHY O SADDLE HORN LLC SMITH MARGUERITE N DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL MERITAGE HOMES OF SC INC SADDLE HORN LLC COBBLESTONE HOMES LLC 121 RHETT STREET HOLDING SIMS SAMUEL J DELANEY ELIZABETH BROWN JILL C BEATY ELIZABETH H JAB INVESTMENTS LLC NVR INC STARKS JENNIFER B SEMS MISHELLE G TRUSTEE NATURE CONSERVANCY THE MUNGO HOMES INC SWANSON M JANE TRUST GRIFFITH WILLIAM I SALAS GABRIELLA MARIA CE

Real Estate News cont. needs. With over 350 years of combined real estate experience, The Marchant Company prides itself on their knowledge of the Greenville area real estate markets and their commitment to excellence to give their clients the edge on the Greenville area markets. The Marchant Company services the greater Greenville, SC area including Easley, Fountain Inn, Taylors, Mauldin, Travelers Rest, Greer and Simpsonville. The Marchant Company is dedicated to serving Greenville and Upstate South Carolina with “Decades of Trust. Confidence in the Future.”

BUYER

ADDRESS

SUBD.

SPIRIT MASTER FUNDING VI CITY OF GREENVILLE THE 20 NORTH MAIN STREET LLC BLUE RIDGE FARM LLC PREVOST LIVING LLC HOUSE OF RAEFORD FARMS I ECHELON ACQUISITION LLC GRACE COMMUNITY CHURCH O TIMBERTOP ENTERPRISE CITY OF GREENVILLE THE BARKER GEORGE E GREENLEAF INVESTMENT PAR HMVP HOLDINGS LLC MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH CAPITAL INVESTMENT FUNDI PEDEN WARREN DEAN GREGORY H SWIFT JOHNNY CRAIG (JTWR UTECHT MATTHEW P (JTWROS 135 COMMERCE CENTER DRIV GREENLEAF INVESTMENT PAR GREENLEAF INVESTMENT PAR GREENLEAF INVESTMENT PAR LLEWELLYN JEFFREY DANE SMITH ELIZABETH THORNE HUFFMAN CHAD A (JTWROS) GT3 INVESTMENTS LLC TIMBERLAND CAPITAL INVES THY WILL HOLDING COMPANY BIZZELL CHRISTOPHER (JTW DOTSON JULIA M (JTWROS) MITCHELL DANNAH ROBERTS CAMILLE E CUSUMANO JESSE A (JTWROS BORKOSKY DUSTIN SMITS JAMES P (JTWROS) STONEROCK ANDREA L HARPER STONE C CAMPBELL FRANK E (JTWROS ANDERSON BRANTLEY (JTWRO TEDESCHI BRIAN S (JTWROS 25 WARNER LLC GEFTIC LORI (JTWROS) ALFONSO PATRICIA (JTWROS PACK LOVELL LEE (JTWROS) PYATT DANNY L (JTWROS) ECHEVERRI KRISTI D KENNEDY TYA MELTON JAMES RAY (SURV) CRECENTE CHRISTOPHER JR FOX MARGARET P TRUST THE HEARD JONATHAN D (JTWROS ZEIGER BRYAN PICK NATALIE BROWN STEPHEN L MARK THOENNES BUILDERS L ENRIQUEZ WILFREDO REAUX PATRICIA J (JTWROS TOFIELD DAVID R (JTWROS) RUBIN DEBORAH L BENJAMIN THOMAS JOHN WAL MCGATHA JOHNNY WAYNE (JT MAKKAS DEMETRIOS SALAS GABRIELA MARIA CEC

2727 N HARWOOD ST STE 300 206 S MAIN ST 20 N MAIN ST 236 PLEASANT HILL RD 207 STONEBROOK FARM WAY 1354 RUTHERFORD RD 1400 TIARCO DR 2801 PELHAM RD 1401 QUAIL ST #105 206 S MAIN ST 25 SUTTON PL S UNIT 17L 2700 NORTHEAST EXPY NE STE C10 1401 QUAIL ST #105 PO BOX 1039 1249 S PLEASANTBURG DR PO BOX 16239 101 RAMSFORD LN 63 SWEETGUM RD 505 HUDSON RD 500 HARTNESS DR 2700 NORTHEAST EXPY NE STE C10 2700 NORTHEAST EXPY NE STE C10 2700 NORTHEAST EXPY NE STE C10 135 REDDING RD 104 BROOKVIEW CIR 28 HICKORY CHIP CT 3110 AUGUSTA ST 8 SIRRINE DR 450 BELL CREST DR 955 ALTAMONT RD 10 TRIPLE CROWN CT 67 MCRAE PL 31 CLARENDON AVE 19 RIVERBANKS CT 50 DOCOLENA LN 10 HUNTERS LANDING DR 108 MEILLAND DR 37 HARVEST LN 316 TEA OLIVE PL 6 WARNER ST 606 PACKS MOUNTAIN RIDGE RD 25 WARNER ST 27 FOREST LN 29 PINEHURST DR 55 GALICIAN CT 15 RHONE VALLEY LN 124 RAVEN FALLS LN 124 RIDGEWATER CT 9 GALICIAN CT 104 ENOREE FARM WAY PO BOX 574 1 HIDDEN OAK TER 312 WILTON ST 208 GRANDMONT CT 601 SCARBOROUGH DR 217 E STONE AVE STE 37 317 ALGONQUIN TRL 112 CANDLESTON PL 100 POND BLUFF LN 8309 FARINGTON CT 73 MODESTO LN 234 WOODS RD 103 HUNTINGTON RD 200 VERLIN DR

$398,000 ASHETON SPRINGS $394,000 PEBBLECREEK $392,000 121 RHETT STREET $390,000 $389,000 $385,000 COACHMAN PLANTATION $375,000 WAVERLY HALL $373,500 $362,500 JONES MILL CROSSING $362,428 MARES HEAD FARM $358,951 WEATHERSTONE $358,000 HILLSIDE ACRES $354,872 COACHMAN PLANTATION $353,991 STONEFIELD COTTAGES $352,916 HILLSIDE PLANTATION $352,500 CARILION $350,000 $349,900 EAGLES GLEN AT KIMBRELL $347,838 COPPER CREEK $344,022 COURTYARDS ON W. GEORGIA RD $340,000 BRIAR OAKS $338,435 $337,500 $330,000 BRIAR OAKS $329,570 KILGORE FARMS $325,900 EAGLES GLEN AT KIMBRELL $325,000 HOLLY TRACE $325,000 MAGNOLIA COMMONS $324,900 $320,720 BLUE RIDGE PLANTATION LAKESIDE $320,000 $320,000 SHELLBROOK PLANTATION $318,086 RIVER OAKS $317,500 COTTAGES@HARRISON BRIDGE $316,950 STONEHAVEN $315,000 ASHETON LAKES $312,480 HAMMETT POND $312,000 HIGHCREST TOWNES@HOLLINGSWORTH $311,870 GRAYSTONE III $310,000 GARDENS AT ROSE RESERVE $309,000 ASHETON LAKES $307,005 HIGHCREST TOWNES@HOLLINGSWORTH $306,835 COVENTRY $300,941 HIGHCREST TOWNES@HOLLINGSWORTH $299,765 DRUID HILLS $298,000 HIGHCREST TOWNES@HOLLINGSWORTH $297,370 DWELLING HEIGHTS $297,000 COOPER RIDGE $296,020 BROWNSTONE MEADOWS $295,153 THE VILLAGE AT FOUNTAIN INN $290,110 GOWER ESTATES $290,000 CAMERON CREEK $289,900 OVERLOOK AT BELL’S CREEK $288,515 EAGLES GLEN AT KIMBRELL $284,990 BRYSON MEADOWS $284,906 $282,270 WATERS RUN $280,875 MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS $279,900 $276,900 $276,875 ISAQUEENA PARK $275,000 STONEWYCK $275,000 GARDENS AT ROSE RESERVE $273,000

JOY Real Estate Announces Top Agents For The Month

PRICE SELLER SULLIVAN JOSEPH H PAINTER SARA R (JTWROS) MARK THOENNES BUILDERS L 121 RHETT STREET HOLDING GRAY DEVELOPMENT AND CON VERDAE PROPERTIES INC MUNGO HOMES INC PFISTER EDWARD J (JTWROS BELLEW VIRGINIA L SABAL HOMES AT JONES MIL DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL WALKER ANDREA M SK BUILDERS INC MUNGO HOMES INC ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC KERSCH LINDA MARIE (JTWR GILKINSON LINDA F EMBLEY CURTIS B D R HORTON INC MUNGO HOMES INC ROMANA LLC NVR INC EAGLE SC LLC LEPOW PATRICIA J NVR INC BROAD KELLI A (JTWROS) D R HORTON INC SOLESBEE LYNN A BURNS JOHN R GREGORY CENTER LLC HANZEL STEPHANIE L SAVAGE ENTERPRISES LLC MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH TATE LYNDA F DWELLING GROUP LLC NEI GLOBAL RELOCATION CO ASHETON LAKES COMMONS LL PEARCE LAURA N NVR INC GRATZ GREGORY E (JTWROS) LEWIS TERI P ASHETON LAKES COMMONS LL NVR INC DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL NVR INC MARTIN KERRI-ANNE NVR INC SALLE JUSTIN D R HORTON INC KIRKLEN HOMES LLC NVR INC MAHLSTEDT NICKOLAUS H FOX AMANDA E (JTWROS) EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL D R HORTON INC MUNGO HOMES INC HOPEWELL PROPERTIES INC NVR INC SABELHAUS DARLENE RENAISSANCE CUSTOM HOMES RHINO HOLDINS OF GREENVI SCHEIDLER JAMES M CHITTUM FRANCINE (JTWROS DEBERRY BARBARA A

Sales Units Michael McGreevey Diana Tapp Craig Bailey, Managing Broker of JOY Brenda Ledford Real Estate, proudly announces the top Sales Volume performing agents for the Greenville area Michael McGreevey for the month of December 2017. Diana Tapp Listing Units Brenda Ledford Ashley McConaghy Kimberly Banks The Marchant Company Welcomes Leah McGee Realtor Shauna Repetto Listing Volume Ashley McConaghy The Marchant Company is pleased to Kimberly Banks announce that Shauna Repetto is now a Leah McGee part of the company as a licensed Real-

BUYER

ADDRESS

GILLEY CAROL (JTWROS) WILLIAMSON DANIEL T (JTW GRIGNANI CHARLES MICHAEL BARRY ANNE HILL SMITH JORDAN O CROSSING PAWS LLC NORDHUS CARL THOMAS BETTY G SEVIER CREEK PROPERTIES TYNER CHRISTOPHER A (JTW GREGORY JONATHAN M (JTWR GUARCELLO ANNE (JTWROS) SANDERS AVERY C (JTWROS) CHAPPELL BENJAMIN (JTWRO MOORS JANET R OSHEA KATHRYN J (JTWROS) ROBERTS JEFFREY ALAN (JT STONE CARL EDWARD (JTWRO NGUYEN LAM D (JTWROS) TRAN LINH KIM (JTWROS) BAILEY JOHN MARTIN PFISTER PATRICIA O’REILLY AUTOMOTIVE STOR TATE JESSICA J (JTWROS) CODD SHAWN ROBINSON AIMEE RAE ESPINOZA DEYSI N PRIMERO BEHNKE THOMAS E (JTWROS) CRUZ GABY SARAI GIL (JTW WADDINGTON JACK WASCAVAGE MICHELE R MASON KYLE E WILLIAMS MICAH J (JTWROS HOWELL RACHEL E SABELHAUS DARLENE (JTWRO SCHROEDER DANIEL C GARRISON J DANIEL SHANE JORDAN R (JTWROS) GRANT ALEXIS INFANTI ANTHONY P (SURV) MURRAY ROBERT DANIEL (JT GLASSER JODI HARRIS V CALLAWAY III WRICE JOSHUA B (JTWROS) KORNMAN KATHERINE (JTWRO MAKKAS IOANNIS OEI CHARLES BARBARE TRAVIS A (JTWROS KIDDLE ROBERT (JTWROS) BROWN FRED (JTWROS) PUFPAFF DAVID C PDC-AM LLC CANTU GUILLERMO VALENCIA JACOBS ADRIAN G BOWMAN ALLISON M (JTWROS BROOKEY RICHARD D JR (JT NARP REAL ESTATE LLC SMITH NOEL (JTWROS) INDERMAUR JESSICA (JTWRO WATERS BENJAMIN KYLE MEAD CONSTRUCTION INC RABINOVITCH NEIL KLEMM ROBERT PETER (JTWR HARRIS BROGDON G II (JTW

130 TERRY RD 9 HICKORY TWIG WAY 226 WHITTLIN WAY 121 RHETT ST UNIT 202 107 MCCALL ST 545 VERDAE BLVD STE C 441 WESTERN LN 222 WAVERLY HALL LN 10 VICTORY AVE 907 BERWICK DR 127 MARES HEAD PL 204 WEATHERSTONE LN 6 BRIM LN 111 MODESTO LN 686 PONDEN DR 15 FANCY LN 5 MAITLAND DR 155 GUNTER RD 103 CROWNED EAGLE DR 101 LEIGH CREEK DR 28333 MARCIA AVE 102 FAWN HILL DR 233 S PATTERSON 236 PLEASANT HILL RD 208 LIMBERLOCK WAY 8 ASHBY GROVE DR 206 TALON CT 211 CIRCLE SLOPE DR 516 SPRING POINT CT 430 GREENFIELD DR 5 DOUBLE CREST DR 140 BATESVIEW DR 6 SEASHELL CT 10 STONE VALLEY CT 12 CLOVERFIELD DR 204 ENGLISH OAK RD 19303 SAN SOLOMON SPRINGS CT 137 HAMMETT POND CT 244 ROCKY SLOPE RD 5331 90TH AVENUE CIR E 808 MIRANDY CT 823 ASHETON COMMONS LN 240 ROCKY SLOPE RD 108 LONGFELLOW WAY 234 ROCKY SLOPE RD 43 HINDMAN DR 242 ROCKY SLOPE RD 107 ROSEMONT DR 15 PORTICO PT 405 EDRIC CT 503 TOWNSHIP CT 9031 MAUGHAN TRL 15 HOWDEN PL 9 BIRCHALL LN 217 TALON CT 12 BURGE CT 35 TEDWALL CT 836 SILVERWOOD WAY 5 CHATTAHOOCHEE ST 30 CELAND ST 307 LEDGEWOOD WAY 137 HARRINGTON AVE 6 ALAMOSA CT 512 TINEKE WAY

tor. She is a graduate of Santa Fe Community College and the University of Florida. In 1994 she and her husband opened Horacio’s Restaurant in Cashiers, Repetto North Carolina where they served their marvelous clientele for over 15 years before transitioning to Greenville in 2011. Currently Shauna and her family own and operate Bocca Pure Italian Ristorante on Poinsett Highway continued on PAGE 31


Luxury Service at Every Price Point TO BE BUILT

23 ACRE EQUESTRIAN ESTATE

275 Montgomery Drive, Spartanburg $2,750,000 MLS#1350714 Damian Hall Group 828-808-8305

29 Falling Star Way, Cliffs at Glassy $1,895,000 MLS#1346224 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918

UNDER CONTRACT

30 Tilley Road, Cleveland $749,000 MLS#1355490 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918 Michael Mumma 864-238-2542

119 Snap Dragon Way, Cliffs at Glassy $1,595,500 MLS#1346051 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918

UNDER CONTRACT

5 Autumn View Ridge, Natures Watch $699,000 MLS#1346304 Lonnie Adamson 864-385-4659

16 Cedar Waxing Way, Cliffs at Mountain Park $1,209,000 MLS#1356223 Spencer Ashby 864-344-0333

UNDER CONTRACT

6 Chipping Court, Kellett Park $649,900 MLS#1354930 Debra Owensby 864-404-8295

1551 Highway 56, Spartanburg $599,500 MLS#1347108 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918 Cynthia Cole Jenkins 843-696-7891

329 Harkins Bluff Drive, Dillard Creek Crossing $399,000 MLS#1354586 Annell Bailey 864-346-0598

105 Shefford Court, Silverleaf $298,500 MLS#1356748 Erin Colman 864-940-9709

UNDER CONTRACT

100 Walton Court, North Hills $449,500 MLS#1357705 Holly May 864-640-1959

322 Laguna Lane, Courtyards on West Georgia $415,000 MLS#1357757 Holly May 864-640-1959 Annell Bailey 864-346-0598

SOLD

423 S. Pendernale Drive, Millbrook $259,900 MLS#1353721 Debra Owensby 864-404-8295

202 Donybrook Avenue, Greenville $242,000 MLS#1358819 Kris Cawley 864-516-6580

2 Elletson Drive, Overbrook $219,900 MLS#1354838 Michael Mumma 864-238-2542

BlackStreamInternational.com | 864-920-0303

LOT .85 ACRES

6 Crystal Brook Trail, Cliffs Valley $79,500 MLS#1341551 Lana Smith 864-608-8313


30 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 01.19.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

See You in the Garden

with Kathy Slayter

New Beginnings

It’s time to build raised beds for the spring

The name January comes from the Latin term Januarius. Named after Janus, the god of beginnings, gates, and doorways, January has always symbolized new beginnings. As I walk through my garden each day, I imagine what I want to bring forth in my garden, in my life, in my future this year. In my brief jaunts around the yard with the dog, I am surprised to see the tips of my “blue bonnets” popping up in the front where they sleep with a southern exposure. Tiny grape hyacinth bulbs are testing out the temperatures as well. I want to be better this year at keeping my garden a bit more tidy, but still allowing, even encouraging, the wildness I enjoy. Seed catalogs fill my mailbox, and I enjoy sitting with them like good friends planning my seed orders and what I want to grow. Many gardening conferences and local garden tours are coming up. The Master Gardener’s Symposium held in February is sold out; however, our local SCOOL — South Carolina Organization for Organic Living — is holding their 2018 S.C. Organic Growing Conference, Cultivate, in Charleston on March 24. The group is planning more individual educational classes here in Greenville this year. More information can be found at www.scorganicliving.com. Rebecca McKinney,

executive director of SCOOL, director of the sustainable agriculture program at Greenville Technical College, and sustainability specialist at Bon Secours St. Francis Hospital is involved in this conference.

Square has soil test kits available. Then when your seeds arrive from whatever source you have selected them from, you will be ready.

If you have been dreaming of some raised beds in your yard and fresh homegrown tomatoes, now is the time to built your beds. Don’t wait until spring; there are too many other things to do in the spring. Gather your materials and simply begin. There are many suggestions on how to build these beds online, but my personal experience of 30-plus years gardening with raised beds suggests you make them no wider than 5 feet and no deeper than 1 foot. Once you have the frames built, I suggest you lay a good supply of newspaper or cardboard down on the ground inside the frame. The thick cover of cardboard, grass clippings, and newspaper will smother the grass you are covering with your frames. Now layer in mulched leaves and small sticks, a good spreading of compost, and manure, and then add your topsoil. Fill your boxes to the very top. Your soil will have a chance to settle before you begin to plant. A soil test is advised so you can amend the “new soil” and add amendments before you begin planting. Clemson University Extension Office at Greenville County

January in the garden does have its moments. I love the naked silhouettes of the limbs of the trees as they stretch to the sky. It reminds me of the circulatory system of my own limbs and how important my lifeblood is. In one of my favorite books, “Gardening at the Dragon’s Gate” by Wendy Johnson, there is a story about a magical deity who visited Buddha in the night and asked this question: “The inner tangle and the outer tangle — Who succeeds in untangling this tangle?” Buddha answers, “The one who sits down in the middle of it and looks with attention.” Pay attention to the signs in your garden and inside yourself and you will know when to begin. See you in the garden. Kathy Slayter is a Greenville Realtor and Clemson Certified Master Gardener who is passionate about growing, cooking, and eating her homegrown food. Contact her at kathyslayter@gmail.com.

Not all agents are created equal.

GO BEYOND THE EXPECTED.

Tim Keagy 864-905-3304

Ted Green 864-684-8789

Ray Bergey 757-409-4900

864.295.2846 | www.CTKteam.com

Angela Harmon 864-508-4462

Sean Keagy 864-230-1348


01.19.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 31

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

Featured Neighborhood

Villas at Carriage Hills & West Georgia

11 Heron Way, Simpsonville, SC 29680, Exit 29 West Georgia Road off of I-385

Home Info Price: Starting from $260’s Info: Maintenance-free, all brick patio homes. Private outdoor courtyards. Picturesque streetscapes. Great location near Greenville, I-385, shopping, restaurants & airport. HOA Services Provided: All lawn maintenance, irrigation, mulch applications, weed control, leaf removal, gutter repairs, pressure washing, exterior paint, driveway and sidewalk repair, roof repairs and termite bond Agent: Allison Wallace 704-271-9084 Allison@NewStyleCommunities.com

Live the maintenance-free lifestyle you deserve! So, you’ve been thinking about what life would be like without the hassles of yard work and home maintenance. We understand. If you’re like most of our home buyers, you’ve been thinking about “right-sizing” your next home for a long time. But you don’t want to sacrifice quality and you don’t want to compromise on features. We understand. You need to check out The Villas at Carriage Hills and West Georgia where architecture and natural beauty intersect with a no-maintenance platform where all exterior maintenance is handled by others - giving you the freedom to enjoy your free time.

We’ve designed Carriage Hills and West Georgia with a quaint and intimate streetscape - combined with charming architectural elements and high-quality construction practices. The wellcoordinated community will be one-of-a-kind for the residents of Greenville. You’ll soon discover the benefits of maintenance-free living and the convenience of having all of life’s amenities right outside your front door. You’ll have no need for a lawn mower, edger, hedge trimmer or leaf blower. These services will now be handled by someone else. It’s time for you to enjoy the Maintenance-free Lifestyle.

Real Estate News cont. between Cherrydale and Furman Uni- The Marchant Company Welcomes versity. They believe coming to Green- Realtor Jonathan Anderson ville was the best move they could The Marchant Comhave made! Just as she loves to pair pany is pleased to anher restaurant guests with excellent nounce that Jonathan food and wine, she is eager to listen Anderson is now a part and find the perfect real estate match of the company as a for her clients. With real estate license licensed Realtor. He in hand, Shauna believes she has the dove into the real estate perfect recipe to let her clients know Anderson business in August of they are her number one priority. We 2015 and has enjoyed it are proud to welcome Shauna to The since. Jonathan is originally from FrankMarchant Company. lin, Tennessee but spending a portion of

his childhood overseas left him with an appreciation for travel and different cultures. Skilled in social media marketing, Jonathan is able to get your home the exposure it needs in effective ways. He specializes in helping young professionals, first time home buyers, and those relocating. In his spare time, you can find Jonathan behind the site “ItsGreenville. com” where he writes features on local business owners and entrepreneurs. We are proud to welcome Jonathan to The Marchant Company.

Advertise your home with us Contact:

Caroline Spivey 864-679-1229 cspivey@communityjournals.com


Village of West Greenville 25 Draper St., Greenville 864.735.3948 artcentergreenville.org

VISIT THE

FRIday, FEB. 02

FRIDAY, MAR. 02

EX H I BI T OPE N I NG

EXH I BITS

GREENVILLE CENTER FOR CREATIVE ARTS EACH FIRST FRIDAY OF THE MONTH

Making Our Mark: The Artists of Studio South and Cecelia Feld: Chasing the Unexpected (Feb. 2–Mar. 28, 2018)

FROM 6-9PM FOR FREE ART EVENTS THIS SPRING.

OUR MISSION

To enrich thE cultural fabric of our community through visual arts promotion, education, AND inspiration.

Making Our Mark: The Artists of Studio South and Cecelia Feld: Chasing the Unexpected (through Mar. 28, 2018) COMMUNITY GALLERY Opening of new work by local artists.

A RT SC HO OL

A RT SCH O OL

REGISTER FOR WINTER SESSION II classes starting the week of February 26th.

OPEN HOUSE! Meet the instructors and register for Spring Session & Summer Art Camps.


ARTS & CULTURE AURO HOTELS’ MASTER OF MIXOLOGY page

38

THE (GIRL) POWER OF ROCK ‘N’ ROLL page

34

A BEATBOXINGA CAPPELLA SHOW page

37

Zachary Calfee Will Crooks / Greenville Journal COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

01.19.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 33


34 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 01.19.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

A R T S C A LE N DA R JAN. 19-25 2018

Peace Center

Patrick Davis & His Midnight Choir Jan. 19 ~ 467-3000 Peace Center

New York Polyphony Jan. 20 ~ 467-3000 Greenville County Museum of Art

Works by Craig Crawford Through Jan. 21 ~ 271-7570 Peace Center

Gobsmacked! Jan. 22 ~ 467-3000 Greenville Center for Creative Arts

Exhibition: Structural Probability Through Jan. 24 ~ 735-3948 Greenville Little Theatre

The Return: A Spectacular Beatles Tribute Jan. 25-28 ~ 233-6238 Greenville Chamber of Commerce

Works by Cindy Cater & Jennifer Hagans Through Jan. 27 – 242-1050 Centre Stage

Rockin’ the Keys Through Feb. 10 ~ 233-6733

GIRL POWER

Benefit show aims to help jump-start Upstate chapter of Girls Rock Camp Alliance VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

In early 2017, University of South Carolina graduate student Victoria White landed an internship with Girls Rock Columbia, the local branch of a nonprofit organization called the Girls Rock Camp Alliance. The GRCA is an international coalition of organizations whose shared mission is to empower girls, women, transgender, and gender-nonconforming people through music and arts education to foster community and build power. There are more than 50 Girls Rock camps worldwide, where attendees learn an instrument, form a band, write an original song, and perform a concert at a live music venue. White’s experience with the GRCA has been transformative. “Girls Rock is my dream job,” she says. “The longer I worked with these amazing women, the more confident I became in our ability to bring this sort of environment to Greenville.” But as with all things, to start something from scratch, even a nonprofit, you need money. So White reached out to her friend Amelia Taylor Hall, singer and guitarist for the Greenville punk band Horrible Girl & The Hot Mess, who’s spent the past couple of years building up her band’s following and making friends on the Greenville mu-

Metropolitan Arts Council

Direct Experience: Art and Cancer Through Feb. 23 ~ 467-3132 SC Children’s Theatre

Balloonacy Through Feb. 27 ~ 235-2885 Metro. Arts Council @ Centre Stage

WHEN Saturday, Jan. 20, 8 p.m.

Keeping our ARTbeat strong 864. 467.3132

donated gear, etc. It’s a huge undertaking, and to be entirely honest, it’s terrifying. I’ve never done anything this in-depth before, so I’m still learning as I go. We’d like to launch the camp by summer 2018, though that’s a huge long shot looking at where we are now.” As for the other bands involved, they’re all well aware of how important a Girls Rock camp in Greenville could be. “Doing what we love and supporting these young women as they express themselves is a dream come true,” says Hugger Mugger singer/guitarist Cassie Posey. “I just feel like it’s important to show representation of female-fronted bands in a scene where it’s primarily male-dominated,” says Tom Angst singer/guitarist Danielle McConaghy. “Girls need to know that they can lead a rock band and kick ass at it.” But it’s The Cherry Icees singer and guitar player Shelby Switchblade who perhaps sums up the show, and the potential camp, the best: “We just want to play some rock ‘n’ roll,” she says. “That’s it.” FEATURING HORRIBLE GIRL & THE HOT MESS, HUGGER MUGGER, THE CHERRY ICEES, AND TOM ANGST

Through Mar. 4 ~ 233-6733

16 Augusta Street

Amelia Taylor Hall, singer and guitarist for the Greenville punk band Horrible Girl & The Hot Mess. Will Crooks/Greenville Journal

GIRLS ROCK BENEFIT SHOW

Wet Paint: Works by Glory Day Loflin

w w w.greenvillearts.com

sic scene. White proposed that they begin a Girls Rock Camp in the Upstate and find a way to help fund it. Hall loved the idea and organized a four-band benefit show at the Radio Room this Saturday featuring Horrible Girl, the bubblegum-punk band The Cherry Icees, the dream-rockers Hugger Mugger, and the indie-rock outfit Tom Angst. Proceeds from the show will go toward launching a Girls Rock summer camp in Greenville. “The Greenville population of young girls and gender-variant youth are in dire need of an artistic outlet in a safe place,” White says, “and money tends to make things happen. So, the sooner we have a few dollars in our pockets, the sooner we can have more concrete plans concerning our 2018 summer camp. There are thousands of nonprofits already in South Carolina, and with a limited financial pool, we’re all competing for the same resources. But thanks to Amelia, we have a jump start on gear and connections within the community to hold a show like this one.” For Hall’s part, she says she chose the bands for the benefit for a reason. “We wanted to have a set of local femmefronted bands,” she says. “Girls Rock is all about the empowerment of women and GNC [gender-nonconforming] folks, so we wanted a bill of bands all fronted by women. This isn’t something that can happen overnight, and we’re very much in the early stages, but we’ve had an excellent response from the community so far.” Both Hall and White know, however, that this benefit show is just the beginning. “We still have so much to do,” Hall says. “Recruiting volunteers and a potential board of directors, filing incorporation paperwork with the state and nonprofit applications with the federal government, scouting locations, getting insurance and

WHERE Radio Room, 110 Poinsett Highway TICKETS $10 Hugger Mugger

INFO 864-609-4441, www.radioroomgreenville.com


01.19.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 35

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

PARADE OF HITS Centre Stage’s annual rock ‘n’ roll show will pay homage to some of music’s greatest keyboardists VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

For the past seven years, one of the most popular performances on Centre Stage’s schedule has been its annual “Rock ’N’ Roll” show. Every year, the show gathers together some of the best and most beloved songs in rock and pop music history under different themes (’80s songs, for example), puts together a great band and a cast of incredible singers, and creates a nonstop revue of hits. The shows have become so popular that the theater has had to add shows each year to meet demand. And this year’s version, “Rockin’ the Keys,” which will run Jan. 18 to Feb. 10, is no exception. “I checked the ticket sales recently to see how we were doing,” says “Rockin’ the Keys” director and set designer Rick Connor, “and the shows are already around two-thirds of the way sold.” Perhaps one of the reasons for the presale surge is that “Rockin’ the Keys” will feature a cavalcade of hits from some of the best-selling artists of all time, including Elton John, Billy Joel, Stevie Wonder, and Ray Charles. All legends, and all artists whose music revolved around the keyboards. “This is a rock ’n’ roll concert,” says one of the show’s vocalists, Javy Pagan. “It’s not like another piece of musical theater; it’s not a play. There really isn’t a story-

From L to R: Michael Ciaccia, Rebecca René Kelley, Melissa Murphy, Andrew Poston, Mary Evan Giles, and Javy Pagan. Photo by Escobar Photography

line. It’s just iconic song after iconic song by people who have made their mark on the music industry using keyboards, in addition to their voices and the melodies.” In the director’s eyes, however, “Rockin’ the Keys” does tell a story, using the catalogs of these titans of rock, soul, and pop. “Back in July, I started pulling together as many songs as I could,” Connor says. “I’d drive around for hours listening to music and trying to find songs that would encompass ‘Rockin’ the Keys.’ Not just the piano, but the keys. They’re keyboard-based songs. And it took me a couple of months to figure out what would be a good opener, what would be a good closer, and what sequence of songs would tell a story. There’s an ebb and flow to a good show.” There will be a full rock band onstage behind the singers, with dueling keyboards on both sides of the stage and a three-piece horn section. “The band adds so much energy and

excitement,” Pagan says. “They’re an electrifying band, and all of them are topnotch musicians.” Rick Connor arranged the songs for “Rockin’ the Keys” with musical director Chase McAbee and the onstage band’s bassist, Greg Day, and they’ll have a lot of help this time around. For the first time in the series’ history, some of the vocalists will be playing guitar and keyboards while singing the hits for the majority of the show. “With this one, we really wanted to make sure that the cast could command instruments if they needed to,” Pagan says. “Before, they would have featured moments, whereas from the start of this show we have people playing their own instruments.” It’s a heavier load for the singers to carry, but Connor says they’ve come through in spades. “Luckily, Greenville had a huge talent pool to pull from,” he says. “They’re all talented as instrumentalists; they’re talented across the board. They’re not only phenom-

enal actors, but phenomenal musicians.” Connor says the hardest part of planning out the “Rockin’ the Keys” show has been deciding what to leave out. “Early on in the process, I had three or four lists of songs on my phone,” he says. “I knew I was going to have a three-piece horn section, so I wanted to have songs where I could use that. Or maybe the song might have been the wrong key for the actor, or there were too many slow songs in a row. Even in the last week, there have been a few times where we’ve moved some songs around, and the actors have had to adjust to that. But I think this list we’ve culled is right for the show.”

“ROCKIN’ THE KEYS” WHEN Thursday, Jan. 18-Saturday, Feb. 10; 8 p.m. (Thursday-Saturday), 3 p.m. (Sunday) WHERE Centre Stage, 501 River St., Greenville TICKETS $17-$38.50 INFO 864-233-6733, www.centrestage.org


“A jewel of a museum.” Boston, MA

“Should be on anyone visiting Greenville’s “to do” list” Wakefield, UK

“Open, airy and with a sound sense of the relationship between how art is hung and viewer appreciation. A worthy stop for any art lover.” Charleston, SC

“What a wonderful experience we had!” Knoxville, TN “An unexpected gem.” Los Angeles, CA

“World-class art.” Charlotte, NC

“Addresses thematic issues of race, urbanization, nature, and humanity in a subtle, yet powerful manner.” Houston, TX

“Wonderful place to visit.” Chicago, IL

“An art museum you won’t want to miss!” Birmingham, AL

Why take their word for it ?

COME SEE FOR YOUR SELF! Named one of the Top Three Things to Do in Greenville by U.S. News & World Report Travel, the Greenville County Museum of Art is home to the world’s largest public collection of watercolors by renowned American artist Andrew Wyeth.

When you visit the GCMA, you’ll discover a carefully curated selection of American art, including one of the world’s ten best collections of works by America’s most acclaimed living artist, Jasper Johns. The unrivaled Southern Collection explores the breadth of American art and history through the Southern experience. Among the highlights are a collection of clay vessels created by the enslaved potter David Drake and one of the largest collections of paintings by William H. Johnson outside the Smithsonian. In addition, the GCMA has an outstanding collection of American Impressionism and 20th-century American Modernism as well as an impressive collection of works by African-American artists.

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street on Heritage Green 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 5 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm

Journal Why Take Word.indd 1

admission free

12/22/17 10:01 AM


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PREPARE TO BE GOBSMACKED!

“GOBSMACKED!” showcases the talents of an international cast of vocalists and a world-champion beatboxer. Photo provided

The hybrid a cappellabeatboxing show hopes to both astonish and entertain NEIL SHURLEY | CONTRIBUTOR

In the United Kingdom, if someone says they’re gobsmacked, it means they are utterly astonished. And that’s exactly the promise of “GOBSMACKED!” the a cappella and beatboxing show that plays Monday night at the Peace Center. Featuring an international cast of vocalists along with a world-champion beatboxer, “GOBSMACKED!” highlights the versatility of human voices as they create full sonic landscapes without the use of any accompanying instruments. “GOBSMACKED!” originated three years ago as the brainchild of producer Nic Doodson, a founding member of the a cappella group The Magnets. “I toured the world for 17 years,” he told the Greenville Journal in a recent telephone interview, “and in that time I saw the rise of a cappella from something I had to explain to suddenly

being something I didn’t have to explain.” Indeed, thanks to the television show “Glee” and the “Pitch Perfect” movies, as well as popular groups like Pentatonix and Straight No Chaser (who performed at the Peace Center this past November), the cultural awareness of a cappella has perhaps never been greater. Although he’s spent much of his life in the U.K., from age 10 to 18 Nic Doodson lived in New Jersey, where he developed his voice by singing in high school choir. Around that time he also discovered — and fell in love with — an a cappella group called Rockapella, who had a bit of fame in the early ’90s with their theme for the PBS children’s show “Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego?” “When I went to university in London, I was expecting to join an a cappella group, but they didn’t have one,” Doodson recalls. “I had to start a group. And it’s continued to this day.” He laughs. “Maybe that will be my legacy!” The act of creating the University College London a cappella group ultimately became the key to Doodson’s future. “In my last year at university, we got on a British TV show, and ended up signing a contract with EMI Records,” Doodson says. “I

got my degree in physics and then went touring, much to my parents’ chagrin.” They called their a cappella group The Magnets, and they toured the world, including such far-flung locales as Moscow, Hong Kong, and Mumbai. Today, the group continues to perform, even as Nic Doodson branches out as a producer. “Ultimately, I had the idea to try to create for a cappella what Tap Dogs did for tap dancing and what Stomp did for drumming,” he says. The result was “GOBSMACKED!” which Doodson calls a hybrid of show and concert — a sort of staged concert with seven stylized “characters,” including “The Chap,” “The Diva,” and “The Engineer.” “We held auditions and found the best vocalists in the world, from West End to Broadway,” Doodson says. That talent includes Marcus Collins, who won second place on the British TV talent show “X Factor,” and West End star Monika Sik-Holm. But the real star is BallZee, a world beatbox champion who creates an astonishing range of vocal sounds, from drum beats to bass lines to realistic sound effects. “He’s phenomenal,” Doodson says. “He’s always practicing and working on his craft.

He is truly dedicated to getting better.” The show features songs that range from the ’60s to modern day, Doodson says. “The Beatles, Ed Sheeran, the BlackEyed Peas, James Brown — there’s really something for everyone.” If you enjoyed the “Pitch Perfect” movies, Doodson invites you to “come and see the real thing.” And as for Straight No Chaser, Doodson says the difference between his show and theirs is that “GOBMSACKED!” has seven instead of 13 members, and is really more of a show than a concert. “And,” Doodson adds, “we have a better beatboxer.” But whatever your experience with a cappella acts, Doodson promises that if you see “GOBSMACKED!” you will be both astonished and entertained. “We always send the audience home dancing and singing,” he says.

“GOBSMACKED!” THE AMAZING A CAPPELLA AND BEATBOXING SHOW WHEN Monday, Jan. 22, 7:30 p.m. WHERE The Peace Center, 300 S. Main St TICKETS $35 INFO 864-467-3000, www.peacecenter.org


feast

BARTENDERS YOU SHOULD KNOW ZACHARY CALFEE, ROOST WORDS BY ARIEL TURNER | PHOTO BY WILL CROOKS

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C

hances are, if you order a whiskey cocktail at the Roost bar, bartender Zachary Calfee will convince you to give James E. Pepper whiskey a shot. And he’ll sell it to you in his signature high-energy, rapid-fire manner that will convince you of both its historic importance to the catalog of American whiskey (and therefore, your life) and that there’s absolutely no chance of saying no. While measuring and mixing whatever version of an Old Fashioned you’ve settled on, Calfee will also probably tell you the tragic tale of the flamboyant Col. Pepper’s all-too-early demise after slipping, falling, and hitting his head in 1906 at 56 years old. Just three minutes into that stop for a drink, you’ll realize with Calfee behind the bar that your experience will become equal parts educational and enjoyable, especially if he gets chatting about his precocious 3-year-old daughter, Phoenix. And in Calfee’s mind, that’s mission accomplished. Calfee, at 28 years old, has recently been named the master of mixology for Auro Hotels, formerly part of JHM Hotels. Auro owns the Hyatt downtown where Roost is, the under-construction Spring Hill Suites/ Residence Inn combo at the corner of East Washington

Favorite cocktail to make: Lion’s Tail (bourbon and lime, allspice dram, some almond or walnut)

“You can take the worst whiskey on the planet, I mean, it just tastes disgusting, and it’ll still taste good in that drink. You can use the bottom shelf of the bottom shelf, and it’ll still taste good.”

Craziest cocktail ever made: The Smog at Armada

Calfee created a house-blended whiskey (Buffalo Trace, Applejack brandy, and Rittenhouse Rye), mixed with vermouth, smoked cloves, and brown sugar and cinnamon, served from the smoking jar.

feast and Spring streets, and the future AC Hotel at the Camperdown development at South Main and Broad streets. As the new “MoM,” as he jokingly calls it, Calfee will revamp the Hyatt’s atrium bar along with other Auro Hotel bars in the area and concept for the multiple new beverage programs that will open in new hotels throughout the brand. For the Spring Hill Suites restaurant, Calfee has an Earth-themed cocktail menu planned that he describes as approachable and affordable. “I don’t want you to have to gauge whether the price of that drink is worth the experience,” he says. For the AC Hotel, which will have a rooftop and street-level bar, the drinks will be less complicated because of the high volume of guests, but still “amazing drinks,” he says. And even though he’s relatively young to land in such a formative position, Calfee, who moved to the Upstate in June 2016, has 10 years of experience concocting both regular and adventurous cocktails in small farm-totable restaurants, night clubs, franchise bars, and his own speakeasy. Calfee is originally from Knoxville, Tenn., where he began working in restaurants as a teenager. At age 18, he was working at Wok Hay, a defunct Asian Ruby Tuesday concept, when a bartender called in sick, and he got thrown behind the bar with some champion bartenders. “I’ve always been really good with people, and I was already interested in the bar, but I wasn’t allowed to bartend because I wasn’t 21,” he says. He had a knack for it, and it ended up becoming his regular gig. Once in college at the University of Tennessee, he continued to bartend at a variety of establishments, but he says he was actually afraid to become too dedicated because of the risk of it pulling him away from school. Though, in actuality, he wasn’t happy with how his academic experience was going, bouncing around from anthropology to film to geology majors. “I was all over the place, and all of those things that I was doing, I really disliked the people that I was around. They were kinda like Sheldon — they weren’t very social,” he says, referring to the anti-social but brilliant “The Big Bang Theory” character. “And I liked science. I liked school, but I liked people, and I wanted to get to do that.”

One day, Calfee came home after a particularly rough shift behind the bar and he thought about quitting entirely, but then he read an online article about making his own amaretto. “I thought, ‘That’s stupid. I hate amaretto. It’s sweet and awful. Why would you want to make your own?’” he says. Somehow, the allure of an easy home project lured him in, and he gave it a shot. “It was really good,” he says. His would-be wife was out of town, so he had some time to kill. “When my wife got home from her trip, the refrigerator was full of my house-made gin, and I had spiced rum making in the corner, and I had bottles of green tea liquor, and amaretto,” he says. “And I just couldn’t stop.” Calfee, at age 23, was hooked. “Within six months from that, I had dropped out of school and cashed in my retirement accounts to open my first bar,” he says. That bar, Armada in Knoxville, could hold 200-plus people and would run for three years, becoming profitable, before a construction mishap in the neighboring building damaged his building’s foundation. A competitor hired up Calfee and his entire staff within a week or two, and he was named manager and lead for any new concepts, which landed him with 80-hour workweeks. “I learned a ton,” he says. “I mean, it was awful.” His position at Roost and now with Auro Hotels isn’t quite that intense, but it is busy. Yet Calfee finds a way to tap into his love of reading, even if it’s for work. “I still get to read, but I’m reading cookbooks, and I’m reading online articles about how to make chocolate curds so I can figure out how to infuse those flavors onto tequila,” he says. Fatherhood has also certainly changed his use of free time. “My hobbies are now braiding hair and coloring. We do the trampoline park a lot. Most of my hobbies are now her hobbies,” he says. “I like cinema and art, but I only use that now to get a connection with people over the bar. It’s one of those things — it can help you engage at work.”

RESTAURANTS ANNOUNCED FOR EUPHORIA’S ‘A SOUTHERN REMEDY: COMFORT FOOD, BOOZE & TUNES’ To chase away the winter blues, Euphoria, Greenville’s food, wine, and music festival, will host “A Southern Remedy: Comfort Food, Booze & Tunes” from 7 to 10 p.m. Feb. 22 at Revel, 304 E. Stone Ave. The second annual event will highlight newcomers to the Upstate’s culinary scene, with a strong showing from new Travelers Rest concepts – Hare & Field (newly announced American pub from the Farmhouse Tacos owners), Monkey Wrench Smokehouse (the new barbecue concept from Sidewall Pizza owners), and cocktail bar Rocket Surgery. Greenville’s downtown will be represented by Basil Thai Cuisine, Farm Fresh Fast, Stewart Penick’s Terrace, and Wu’s Cajun Sea Food. “We are excited to host A Southern Remedy and showcase some of the Upstate’s newest and most anxiously awaited restaurants,” says Morgan Allen, Euphoria’s event director of food and beverage. “Last year’s inaugural event was an amazing success and a great way COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

to kick off the Euphoria festival season. We are thrilled to bring it back for a second year.” Liquid Catering will be mixing up specialty cocktails featuring Larceny Bourbon and Tito’s Handmade Vodka and pouring wines from Crazy Beautiful Wines and beer from Stella Artois. Guests will also be invited to make their own gourmet s’mores on the patio, a big hit last year. A musical collaboration between the soulful vocals of Erica Berg and the neo-acoustic funk tunes of guitarist Jacob Johnson will provide the soundtrack for the evening. All-inclusive tickets are $50 and can be purchased at Euphoriagreenville.com. –Ariel Turner

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IN THE SPOTLIGHT

JAN. 19

COMEDY

Sketch Comedy: “The Magical Negro and Other Blackness”

Mark Kendall uses a series of comedy sketches to question and discuss the representation of black men in the media. In his critically claimed show “The Magical Negro and Other Blackness,” Kendall discusses topics such as white flight, “Reading Rainbow,” Dr. Seuss’ “Green Eggs and Ham,” and more. Kendall explores some of the ways that these images and experiences influence our thoughts on race in our day-to-day lives, and will leave you laughing as he does so. –Sara Pearce

WHEN Friday, Jan. 19, 9 p.m. WHERE 1 E. Coffee St. ADMISSION $10 INFO www.alchemycomedy.com/shows/39907705020

JAN. 20

RETAIL

Organic Cat Cafe Grand Opening Organic Cat Cafe is excited to celebrate their grand opening with those who helped throughout the process and show Greenville this new concept. The event will offer several fun activities for all ages, including face painting and Sonic Alchemy for cats, which involves healing for cats through their purring frequencies. Admission will be $10, which includes a drink. You can call ahead and make reservations, and the cat cafe has many resident cats for you to spend time with while you read, study, or just enjoy a beverage. – Sara Pearce

WHEN Saturday, Jan. 20, 11 a.m. WHERE 123 College St. ADMISSION $10 INFO www.bit.ly/2FBI1tK


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IN THE SPOTLIGHT

JAN. 23

MUSIC FOR EVERYONE

CHARITY

Parodies for Charity benefiting Greenville Humane Society

JANUARY 22

Tickets start at $15

AN EVENING OF ORIGINAL MUSIC Parodies for Charity will feature a series of parodies of popular TV shows and Hollywood movies, all revolving around beer. There will be shorts leading up to the feature film, entitled “Gary Gose Gump,” which is a craft-beer-themed parody of “Forrest Gump.” It tells the story of one man’s personal journey that leads him on an adventure across America into a career in the craft-beer industry, which culminates at The Brewery Experience right here in Greenville. There are tons of classic scenes from “Forrest Gump” re-created in our own city, centered on craft beer. There will be food from White Duck Taco and beer from Birds Fly South available for purchase. All proceeds from the event, as well as the raffle, will benefit the Greenville Humane Society directly. – Sara Pearce

WHEN Tuesday, Jan. 23, 7 p.m. WHERE 302 Hampton Ave Ext. ADMISSION $14 INFO www.bit.ly/2B5VGWJ

JAN. 27

WITH MAIA SHARP, RANDY SHARP,

AND DAVID RYAN HARRIS

TICKETS START AT $45

JANUARY 26 LIVE IN CONCERT THE LEGENDA RY

LITERATURE

Book Release with Lina Maslo Lina Maslo will be at M. Judson Booksellers & Storytellers to celebrate the release of her newest book, “Free as a Bird: The Story of Malala.” Maslo is an author and illustrator from Ukraine, which is an influence on her various works. “Free as a Bird” tells the remarkable story of Malala Yousafzai, human rights activist and youngest winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, in a way that is friendly for all ages. Where Malala was born in Pakistan, girls were considered to be bad luck, but her supportive family told her she could do anything she set her mind to. Malala secretly attended school and spoke up for women’s education in Pakistan, even after she was attacked for her activism. Malala continued to travel and advocate for women’s education in the Middle East, and this book tells her inspiring story for the entire family. Maslo will be available for questions as well as book signings. –Sara Pearce

WHEN Saturday, Jan. 27, 6 p.m. WHERE 130 S. Main St. ADMISSION Free INFO www.mjudsonbooks.com/calendar

M AV I S S TA P L E S WITH SPECIAL GUEST THE BROADCAST

FEBRUARY 21

Tickets start at $15!

GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY! peacecenter.org @peacecenter

GROUPS

864.467.3000 864.467.3032


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CONCERT

Patrick Davis + His Midnight Choir

Peace Center | Gunter Theatre | 300 S. Main St. 8 p.m. | $35 South Carolina native and singer-songwriter Patrick Davis returns to the Peace Center. 864-467-3000 | www.peacecenter.org VISUAL ARTS

Miller at Art + Light

Art & Light Gallery | 16 Aiken St. | 6-8 p.m. Miller Gallery, whose home base is in the historic French Quarter of downtown Charleston, will bring 10 of their artists and artisans to the upstate for a pop-up exhibit at Art & Light. www.artandlightgallery.com MUSIC

Kailey Miller on tour

Smiley’s Acoustic Cafe | 111 Augusta St. 6:30-9:30 p.m. | FREE Kailey Miller is bringing Nashville to Greenville. Miller is a Nashville artist who makes her living touring the country. She is great for fans of Norah Jones, Ingrid Michealson, and Noah Gundersen. www.kaileymillermusic.com SAT

JAN 18 - FEB 10 Thursday- Sunday

20

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Buti Yoga

The Pole Academy 637 Congaree Rd Suite G 10-11 a.m. | $10 Join TPA for Buti Yoga with certified instructor Sara Brooks. The class will include an intro session with common poses and alignment and super energetic flow. Class is open to women and men 18+. Register online. 864-520-2834 | thepoleacademy.com COMMUNITY

Community Organizing Training

Phillis Wheatly Center | 40 John McCarroll Way 9 a.m.-3 p.m. The Greenville Young Democrats and the South Carolina Democratic Party are hosting a Community Organizing training to learn from trainers Terri Jowers and Scott Thorpe about community organizing and how you can engage and mobilize your neighborhood, your city, your state, and your country for change. 864-915-7020 MUSIC

New York Polyphony

Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre | 300 S. Main St. 8 p.m. | $45 The two-time Grammy-nominated New York Polyphony is one of the foremost vocal chamber ensembles active today. The four men give vibrant, modern voice to repertoire ranging from Gregorian chant to cutting-edge compositions. 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768 www.peacecenter.org SAT & TUE

20 & 23

BUSINESS

Spinx Job Fair

The Courtyard by Marriott 115 The Parkway Jan. 20, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Jan. 23, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE The company is searching for new, qualified talent in the Upstate for management and other positions that offers substantial growth and advancement opportunities. All attendees will be guaranteed interviews and be entered for a chance to win free gas for a month from SPINX. www.myspinx.com/careers.

JAN. 23

Amber Ikeman

Smiley’s Acoustic Cafe | 111 Augusta St. | 6:30 p.m. | Free

On her first album, 2015’s “Free,” singer/ songwriter Amber Ikeman created a gorgeous, sweeping collection of largely acoustic folk that seemed as vast and atmospheric as the skies in her adopted home of Montana. For her second album, “Rise,” the folk is still there, but there’s also a new, grittier style worked into the mix on songs like “Wild Buffalo.” It’s not quite folk-rock, but she’s written and arranged these songs with more confidence the second time out. “When I did my first album, I hadn’t really done much touring before that,” she says. “With the second one, I really had a chance to get to know the songs better by playing them for people, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YBBBj8_35xo and they sort of evolved each time I played them live, and that helped prepare me better for recording them.” With passages like “Mama, I am sorry / This isn’t what you dreamed / A rebel daughter wandering / No home or family” (from “Wild Buffalo”), it’s a solid bet that Ikeman’s material is largely autobiographical. “A lot of it is at least inspired by real events in my life,” she says. “In that instance, I was thinking of my grandmother, who really wants me to get married and settle down.” —Vincent Harris

CONCERT

FRI

SAT-SUN

20-21

VISUAL ARTS

Figure Drawing Workshops with Suzy Hart

122 Broome Lane, Easley 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. $240 for one workshop or $450 for both Beginning to advanced artists welcome. Hart will demonstrate each with detailed analysis of anatomy for artists. Lunch provided. 845-986-3653 www.suzyhart.com suzyhartfineart@gmail.com TUE-WED

23-07

PERFORMANCE ARTS

“The Christians”

Centre Stage | 501 River St. Tuesdays and Wednesdays | $15, $10 Pastor Paul decides he no longer believes in hell, and today, he’s going to preach a sermon that finally says what he really believes. He thinks all the people in his church are going be happy to hear what he has to say. He’s wrong. 864-233-6733 | www.centrestage.org THRU WED

24

VISUAL ARTS

Structural Probability

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St. Structural Probability brings together the work of artists Abraham Abebe, David Bogus, Lindsay McCulloch, and Laura Mosquera in a multi-disciplinary exhibition of artists working in multiple mediums with a common conceptual undercurrent of rhythm and geometry. www.artcentergreenville.org/maingallery WED

24

COMMUNITY

Outshine Homework Help Program

Center for Developmental Services 29 N. Academy St. 3-4:45 p.m. | Wednesdays FREE Outshine is a free community homework help program offered by the Center for Developmental Services. Volunteers and CDS staff will assist children ages 5-13 with any homework subject through May 9. 864-331-1445 leslie.salazar@cdservices.org

LITERATURE

Alexander Nehamas at Furman

Furman University | Johns Hall 101 3300 Poinsett Hwy. | 5 p.m. | FREE Author and Princeton University professor Alexander Nehamas will speak as part of Furman University’s Tocqueville Series. His talk, “Metaphors in Life: ‘I Love You for Yourself’,’” is the first of the 2018 Tocqueville Series, “Love, Friendship and Politics.” 864-294-3547 | www.bit.ly/2CLpSIl paige.blankenship@furman.edu COMMUNITY

Little Things that Run the World

The Children’s Museum | 300 College St. 7 p.m. | FREE In this lecture we’ll get to know some of the beneficial insects, from bees to butterflies to beetles, a little better, and discuss challenges and strategies for their conservation. Pre-register online. www.Greenvillezoo.com/lecture THU FAMILY

25

Storytime Thursday

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 10:30 a.m. | FREE Fiction Addiction hosts a free children’s storytime each Thursday. This week’s featured book is “The Very Very Very Long Dog” by Julia Patton. 864-675-0540 | www.fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com MUSIC

Tom Wright’s Cat and Mouse Ensemble

The Wheel | 1288 Pendleton St. | 7:30 p.m. 2nd and 4th Thursday of the month | $10 The “Wheel Sessions” is a jazz performance series hosted at the Wheel. The entrance fee includes complimentary beverage and two sets of music; all proceeds go to the artists. Attendees may also BYOB. To reserve a seat, call or text. 312-520-2760 CULINARY

Cooking with Fire

Swamp Rabbit Cafe and Grocery 205 Cedar Lane Road | 6:30 p.m. | $75 Watch SRC&G’s three chefs play with fire while they make you a steak dinner complete with lots


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JAN. 24

Songwriters Series w/ Chris Stalcup & Matt Woods Gottrocks | 200 Eisenhower Drive | 9 p.m. | $5

CONCERT

On his most recent album with his band, The Grange, called “Downhearted Fools,” Georgia’s Chris Stalcup sits comfortably on the line between rock and country. Like the Drive-By Truckers or Son Volt before him, Stalcup can work plenty of honky-tonk twang into a rocker and gritty guitars into a country weeper without breaking a sweat. And part of that is because of the music he was raised on. “I grew up on Southern rock,” he says, “and I can’t say it didn’t have a huge impact on me. As I’ve tried to progress as a songwriter, I find myself trying to become a better storyteller, and that all points back to the country and Southern rock that https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9_PXKEaEdL4 was so poignant and told these great stories.” Perhaps that country influence is why Stalcup isn’t afraid to strip his music down to just a voice and an acoustic guitar, as he’ll be doing at Gottrocks as part of its new Songwriters Series. “I really love the rawness of it,” he says. “That format is great because I’m able to showcase these songs as they were written. As a listener, that always excited me: hearing what the artist intended in its purest form.” —Vincent Harris of delicious sides. Beverage pairings included. www.swamprabbitcafe.com/events media@swamprabbitcafe.com MUSIC

Nigel Potts

Furman University | Daniel Memorial Chapel 3300 Poinsett Hwy. 8 p.m. | $15 for adults, $10 for seniors, and $5 for students/youth. Church Music Conference registrants receive free admission to this recital. The Furman University music department presents Nigel Potts, organist and master of the choristers at Grace Cathedral (Episcopal) in Charleston. Potts will perform a recital on Furman’s magnificent C.B. Fisk organ. Potts’ wife, acclaimed soprano Sarah Rose Taylor, will join the program for a performance of Edward Elgar’s song cycle “Sea Pictures.” 864-294-2086 | www.bit.ly/2B0qv36 furmanmusic@furman.edu MUSIC

Mike Murray Trio

The Wheel | 1288 Pendleton St. 7:30-9:30 p.m. 2nd and 4th Thursday of the month | $10 Mike Murray is one of the very “baddest” piano players in the land. Other adjectives for Mike’s jazz playing: blistering, super creative, monstrous, and Chick-like. If you’ve never attended a “Wheel Session”, this is a great show to make your first. Mike Murray will be joined by Shannon Hoover and Kevin Korschgen. 312-520-2760 THU-FRI

25-26

MUSIC

Furman University Hosts Church Music Conference

Furman University | 3300 Poinsett Hwy. Various venues on campus Registration $95 per person. Registration for full-time students is $40. The Furman music department will host its 2018 Church Music Conference. Registration includes two days of conference sessions, an organ concert Thursday night with Nigel Potts, a conference music packet, and a Friday luncheon. 864-294-2086 | www.bit.ly/2CPE4AQ furmanmusic@furman.edu

FRI

26

MUSIC

An Evening of Original Music with Maia Sharp, Randy Sharp, and David Ryan Harris

Genevieve’s | 300 S. Main St. | 7:30 p.m. | $75 This intimate, listening-room-style concert will be held in Genevieve’s theater lounge, located adjacent to the Peace Concert Hall. 864-467-3000 | www.peacecenter.org COMMUNITY

Trivia Night

Joe’s Place | 2 Williams St. | 7 p.m. Don’t miss out on the fun and competition. 864-558-0828 | info@joesplacellc.com www.joesplacellc.com/events/ FRI-SUN

26-28

FUNDRAISER

Sweet Caroline Open

Sportsclub Greenville 712 Congaree Road The South Carolina Racquetball Players’ Association in cooperation with Sportsclub Fitness and Wellness and OB Hospitalist Group will host the Sweet Caroline Open racquetball tournament for professionals and amateurs. The Sweet Caroline Open will also offer a buy one give one opportunity for local businesses. A business will be able to purchase an AED for their use while giving a second AED back to the community. Lynette Froelich at 864-430-8810 FRI-SUN

26-04

PERFORMING ARTS

“Junie B. Jones Is Not a Crook”

South Carolina Children’s Theatre Peace Center, Gunter Theatre | 300 S. Main St. $18-$27 She’s back. Junie B. Jones is ecstatic about her brand new mittens – until a dirty, rotten thief steals them. So when she finds a fantastic pen on the school floor, she should get to keep it. Right? 864-235-2885 or 864-467-3000 www.scchildrenstheatre.org www.peacecenter.org FRI-SAT

26-10

PERFORMANCE ARTS

A Moon for the Misbegotten

Warehouse Theatre | 37 Augusta St. Reserved $40, General Admission $35 In this O’Neill classic, James Tyrone, Jr., the son from A Long Day’s Journey Into Night visits the

home of his tenant farmer, Phil Hogan. There he encounters Hogan’s magnetic daughter, Josie. During one moonlit night, as the love-struck Josie seems to claim him as her own, the drunken Jamie drowns in a wave of remorse. When dawn comes will both the moon and the man be gone, leaving Josie with a new challenge to her dauntless spirit? Or will love finally bring these two together? 864-235-6948 | www.warehousetheatre.com SAT

27

LITERATURE

Cultivating Writing Resilience with Bryan E. Robinson

Fiction Addiction | 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 10 a.m.-noon | $25 Learn techniques to help turn your writing roadblocks into stepping stones at a two-hour seminar with North Carolina author Bryan E. Robinson. Each ticket admits one and includes a copy of Bryan’s new writing book, “Daily Writing Resilience: 365 Meditations & Inspirations for Writers.” 864-675-0540 | www.fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com CONCERT

Corey Smith Live

The Blind Horse Saloon | 1035 Lowndes Hill Road 7-11:45 p.m. | $18-$20 The way Corey Smith sees it, he owes a debt to his fans. And it’s one he is determined to repay with his 10th album, “While the Gettin’ Is Good.” The result is Smith’s most ambitious record yet, as well as a return on the investment made by the fans who have supported him since his first album in 2003. www.blind-horse.com CONCERT

Jeezy Live Peformance

Greenville Shrine Center | 119 Beverly Road 8-11:30 p.m. | $50 Celeste Davenport Birthday Bash with a live performance from Young Jeezy. www.eventbrite.com/e/jeezy-live-peformance-tickets-40088712418?aff=es2 MUSIC

The Songwriter’s Workshop

Ramsaur Studio | 101 W. Broad St. 10:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. | $150 Part workshop and part master class, this experience is designed to help aspiring songwriters put the finishing touches on their songs. Maia Sharp, Randy Sharp, and David Ryan Harris will review and discuss attendees’ songs, provide feedback, and share tips on the songwriting process. www.peacecenter.org SAT-SUN

27-28

VISUAL ARTS

Water Etch Photopolymer Intaglio Printmaking

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St. | 10 a.m.-4 p.m. | $225 This unique printmaking process uses a positive image that is placed in contact with the plate’s surface and then exposed to the plate using UV light. Participants should bring multiple drawings to the workshop to reference while working on 6x8 inch plates. 864-735-3948 ext. 2 | liz@artcentergreenville.org www.artcentergreenville.org CONCERT

Love Stories

Greenville Symphony Orchestra Peace Concert Hall | 300 S. Main St. Jan. 27 at 8 p.m and Jan. 28 at 3 p.m. | $18 - $75 The drama and ecstasy of love reveals itself through four different stories musically told by

Tchaikovsky and Strauss: the timeless love of Romeo and Juliet, the classic Casanova, Don Juan, the tragic tale of Francesca da Rimini, and the comic, yet bittersweet opera of Der Rosenkavalie. 864-467-3000 | www.peacecenter.org THRU SUN

28

VISUAL ARTS

“The World of Jan Brett”

Upcountry History Museum 540 Buncombe St. Designed for children from birth through 10 years old and their caregivers, the 3-D play and learning environments will provide children with hands-on literacy-based experiences and adults with tools for cultivating literacy through everyday activities. This exhibit will guide visitors to the discovery that it is never too early to begin the love of reading. www.upcountryhistory.org/changing-exhibits/current-exhibits/ MON

29

CULINARY

Chef & Gardener Cathy Cleary

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 2 p.m. | FREE Asheville, N.C., chef, gardener, and restaurateur Cathy Cleary will be discussing her new cookbook, “The Southern Harvest Cookbook,” at a book talk, followed by a Q&A session and a book signing. Ms. Cleary will have samples from her cookbook for attendees to taste. RSVP to Fiction Addiction if you plan to attend. 864-675-0540 | www.fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com THRU MON

29

VISUAL ARTS

Cindy Cater and Jennifer Hagans

TD Bank Gallery at Greenville Chamber of Commerce | 24 Cleveland Street Cindy Cater’s art reflects how complex, yet simple and beautiful, life can be if only looked at through unbiased eyes. Jennifer Hagans’s paintings are of the gorgeous places that she has had the chance to see and experience. www.bit.ly/CaterAndHagans TUE

30

LITERATURE

Emrys’ Winter-Spring 2018 Reading Room Series

Joe’s Place Bookstore | 2 Williams St. | 7 p.m. Readings feature a local/regional writer. Jan. 30 will feature Dr. Angela Esco Elder. She is an assistant professor of history at Converse College and sees great value in learning through hands-on experiences, with pedagogy like reacting to the past. www.emrys.org/reading-room-1/ emrys.info@gmail.com THRU WED

31

VISUAL ARTS

John Acorn Exhibition

SIFT | 400 Augusta St. McMillan Pazdan Smith and Hampton III Gallery invite you to join them at SIFT, a curated gallery at Claussen Bakery, for an exhibition featuring the work of the artist-inresidence John Acorn. WED

31

CULINARY

The Craft of Charcuterie

Swamp Rabbit Cafe & Grocery 6 p.m. | $50 The Swamp Rabbit Cafe & Grocery will host “The Craft of Charcuterie,” a charcuterie, beer, and wine pairing class in their newly renovated event space. Swamp Rabbit’s head butcher, James Bryant, and special guest, butcher and author Meredith Leigh, will educate guests on the significance of ethical


44 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 01.19.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

JAN. 24-28

The Return

LESSONS & TRAINING

Greenville Little Theatre | 444 College St. 8 p.m. (Thurs.-Sat.), 3 p.m. (Sun.) | $35

CONCERT

In some ways, our images of The Beatles playing live are frozen in time, perhaps even more so than their music. After all, the band stopped performing live in 1966, so many of their later classics were never performed onstage. But The Beatles tribute band The Return has managed to combine the best of both worlds. Sure, they can don the matching suits and shake their mop-tops like the early Fab Four on songs like “I Want to Hold Your Hand” and “She Loves You,” but they can also transform into Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band and bang out classics like “With a Little Help From My Friends” and “Hello Goodbye” just as easily. And that’s pretty impressive, because many https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_sNMzKKzI4 of these songs weren’t written to be performed live. The fact that four guys standing onstage can recreate the Technicolor psychedelia, perfectly layered vocal harmonies, and intricate instrumental arrangements of a studio-bound band is quite a feat. —Vincent Harris meat before providing them with the skills necessary to craft their own expert charcuterie boards. www.swamprabbitcafe.com/events WED-SUN

31-11

THEATER

“The Phantom of the Opera”

Peace Center | 101 W. Broad St. starting at $65 Cameron Mackintosh’s spectacular new production of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s “The Phantom of the Opera” will return to Greenville as part of a brand new North American tour. 864-467-3000 | www.peacecenter.org

FEB THU

01

LITERATURE

Bestselling Children’s Authors Sarah Mlynowski & Lauren Myracle

University Center Greenville | McAlister Square 225 S. Pleasantburg Dr. in the open space by the USC Upstate office 4:30 p.m. | FREE Fiction Addiction and the University of South Carolina Upstate are excited to bring New York Times bestselling authors Sarah Mlynowski and Lauren Myracle to Greenville to discuss the new book in their middle-grade “Upside-Down Magic” series, “Upside-Down Magic: Dragon Overnight.” Fiction Addiction will have books for sale at the event, or you can purchase beforehand. 864-675-0540 | www.fiction-addiction.com PERFORMING ARTS

George Washington, Chautauqua History Alive Show

Greenville Chautauqua Headquarters Library, Barrett Room 151 S Church St., Spartanburg 7-8:30 p.m. | FREE Nationally acclaimed Colonial Williamsburg historical interpreter Ron Carnegie creates a compelling portrayal of courage. Hear the bullets whistle as Washington stands exposed to enemy fire. Contemplate certain death if the cause fails. Steer a fledgling country clear of danger, and take perhaps the most courageous historic step of all – return to Mt. Vernon as a private citizen. 864-244-1499 www.greenvillechautauqua.org/spartanburg/ caroline@greenvilleCHAUTAUQUA.org

FAMILY

Storytime Thursday

Fiction Addiction | 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 10:30 a.m. | FREE Fiction Addiction hosts a free children’s storytime each Thursday. This week’s featured book is “Sophie the Skunk Who Sometimes Stunk” by local author Kathryn G. Evans and illustrated by Katilin M. Messich. 864-675-0540 | www.fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com FRI

02

VISUAL ARTS

Twisted Moulin Rouge

Studio Unknown 914 Easley Bridge Road | 6-9 p.m. | FREE Underground Arts invites you to attend the Twisted Moulin Rouge themed art exhibit. The event is about love and romance. Celebrate Valentine’s Day early and in a new way. FAMILY

Parent’s Night Out

The Children’s Museum | 300 College St. 5:30-9:30 p.m. Members: $25 first child / $15 per additional sibling | non-members: $30 first child / $20 per additional sibling Bring your little loves to TCMU so you can enjoy a night on the town. Kids will be invited to play in the museum’s exhibits, eat dinner, create Valentine’s crafts, and decorate cookies. For children ages 4-10. Drop off between 5:30-6:15 p.m. Pick-up between 8:30-9:30 p.m. Bring dinner and a cookie for those with food allergies. Register online. www.tcmupstate.org SAT

SCIENCE & TECH

Carolina FIRST 03 South Tech Challenge Robotics Championship

South Carolina Robotics Education Foundation Gaffney High School 149 Twin Lake Road, Gaffney 9:30 a.m. | FREE The FIRST Tech Challenge robotics season will culminate with the South Carolina Robotics Education Foundation hosting the South Carolina State Championship. Two teams will advance to the South Super-Regional Championship being held March 8-10 in Athens, GA. 864-490-8863 | www.scref.org pedersen@scref.org

Youth Job Program

Mauldin United Mauldin Church 100 E. Butler Road, Mauldin 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. | FREE Kayla Alewine, youth director at Mauldin United Mauldin Church, and Bill Vicary, founder of Life Skills U, have developed a program and are hosting the second annual upcoming community program for youth: “What you need to know to get a job.” 864-621-0224 | bill@vicarymanagementgroup.com mauldinmethodist.com/youthjobprogram CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

Sweetheart Charity Ball

Meals on Wheels Hyatt Regency | 220 N. Main St. 6 p.m. | $150 Join Meals on Wheels of Greenville for a night of dinner, dancing, and live music benefiting the homebound in Greenville County. 864-233-6565 | kmendiola@mowgvl.org www.MealsonWheelsGreenville.org/Sweetheart MON-TUE CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

05-06

All Creatures Great and Small

The Warehouse Theatre | 37 Augusta St. 7 p.m. | $25 Glow Raising Voices Series continues with a celebration of the Upstate’s LGBTQ community in “Love is Love is Love.” GLOW Lyric Theatre’s All Creatures Great and Small is a joint fundraiser between Glow and rescue group Saved by the Heart. All Creatures Great & Small is an evening of song, dance, and spoken word celebrating the love that our pets bring us. 864-235-6948 www.glowlyric.com/event/creatures-great-small/ MON

05

COMMUNITY

Saving South American Giants: Giant Armadillo and Giant Anteater

The Children’s Museum | 300 College St. 7 p.m. | FREE Two formidable giants from another era still roam the lands of South America: the giant armadillo and the giant anteater. Come hear about them in this one hour talk. Our guest speaker is Dr. Arnaud Desbiez, Project Coordinator for Anteaters and Highways. www.greenvillezoo.com/lecture MON

19

COMMUNITY

Greenville Young Democrats Black Panther/STEM event

Greenville Tech Center of Manufacturing Innovation | Hollywood 20 10:30 a.m. | FREE The Greenville Young Democrats Black History Month event will be hosting a Black Panther/ STEM event to inspire Black youth in Greenville to pursue STEM studies and careers. This is open to middle and high school students. Youth will be taken from various community centers in Greenville to the Greenville Tech Center of Manufacturing Innovation for a mini STEM camp. The youth will then be taken to the Hollywood 20 movie theater for a free screening of the film. 864-915-7020 youngdemocrats@greenvilledemocrats.com THRU FRI

23

VISUAL ARTS

Southern Icons, A to Z

Greenville Technical College Art Department | Benson Campus Galleries 2522 Locust Hill Road (Hwy 290), Taylors Southern Icons, A to Z is an exhibition of

photographs each accompanied by a written response. Southern Icons, A to Z was conceived and curated by Rob McDonald, Donna Rosser, and Meryl Truett of SlowExposures. The exhibition presents images from 2017 in the form of the medieval abecedary. MON

26

LITERATURE

Emrys’ Winter-Spring 2018 Reading Room Series

Joe’s Place Bookstore | 2 Williams St. 7 p.m. Readings feature a local/regional writer. Feb. 26 will feature Kimberly Simms. Simms’s literary voice is rooted in the Southern tradition of storytelling, informed by her British and Southern lineage. She is an award-winning poet who entertains and educates with poetry that is both poignant and inspiring. www.emrys.org/reading-room-1/ emrys.info@gmail.com

MAR THU-FRI

01-02

COMMUNITY

2018 Converge Autism Summit

Springbrook Autism Behavioral Health Embassy Suites Greenville Downtown Riverplace 250 Riverplace $95-$195 The Converge Autism Summit is attended by professionals, teachers, parents, and caregivers who get a chance to meet and discuss educational, therapeutic, social, and psychological topics related to Autism Spectrum Disorder. The conference is focused on providing resources and assistance to providers, teachers and parents of those with autism. The speaker lineup is comprised of professionals in the fields of youth psychiatry, occupational therapy, behavioral analysis, special education, advocacy, and family therapy. www.ConvergeAutism.com SAT

03

CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

Peacock STRIDES for Babies 5K

Mauldin Cultural Center 101 East Butler Road 9-10:30 a.m. | $20 This 5K race raises money to support research and treatment options to combat Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). The race begins and ends at the Mauldin Cultural Center. More information can be found on our website. 864-335-4855 jedwins@mauldinrecreation.com www.cityofmauldin.org/rec/special-events SAT

24

SEASONAL & HOLIDAY

Community Easter Egg Drop

Mauldin Recreation Sunset Park 211 Fowler Circle noon-4 p.m. FREE This wildly popular event held before Easter each year at Sunset Park is a sight to see. Thousands of eggs stuffed with goodies for the kids are dropped from a helicopter hundreds of feet in the air, after which children run out on to the field to collect as many eggs as they can. 864-335-4856 mauldinrec@yahoo.com www.cityofmauldin.org/rec/special-events


01.19.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 45

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM TUE

27

LITERATURE

Emrys’ Winter-Spring 2018 Reading Room Series

Joe’s Place Bookstore | 2 Williams St. | 7 p.m. Readings feature a local/regional writer. March 27 will feature Laura Leigh Morris. Morris lives in Greenville where she teaches creative writing and literature at Furman University. She’s previously published short fiction in Appalachian Heritage, Louisville Review, Notre Dame Review, and other journals. www.emrys.org/reading-room-1/ emrys.info@gmail.com

APR SAT

14

CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

Whiskeys for Whiskers

FRI

20

CONCERT

Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit

Peace Center | 300 S. Main St. 8 p.m. | $45-$75 Two-time Grammy Award-winner Jason Isbell and his mighty band, the 400 Unit, have announced Spring 2018 tour dates in support of their highly acclaimed album “The Nashville Sound.” Their stop in Greenville will include special guest Richard Thompson. 864-467-3000 | www.peacecenter.org MON

30

LITERATURE

Emrys’ Winter-Spring 2018 Reading Room Series

Joe’s Place Bookstore | 2 Williams St. 7 p.m. Readings feature a local/regional writer. April 30 will feature Young Voices. The graduating seniors from the Creative Writing programs at the Fine Arts Center and the Governor’s School for the Arts are back. Get ready to hear what the next generation of writers and poets are thinking, writing, and creating. www.emrys.org/reading-room-1/ emrys.info@gmail.com

Southern Bleachery 250 Mill St., Taylors 6-10 p.m. | $45/designated driver, $55/taste tester Tickets go up $10 after April 12 This is a tasting event for eight local distilleries that will benefit five area animal rescue organizations: Carolina Basset Hound Rescue, Carolina Poodle Rescue, k9.5 Rescue, Lucky Pup Rescue, and Paved Paws Animal League. The event has a speakeasy theme and will feature a best-dressed WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE? contest. There will be a bar by Razz Bartending with cocktails featuring liquors donated from Send your event information our participating distilleries as well as beer and and images to calendar@ wine and food catered by CHEF360 Catering. A communityjournals.com by DJ and dance floor, silent auction, and mystery Wednesday at 5 p.m. to be raffle round out the festivities. TOTALLY PROFESSIONAL. DELIGHTFULLY IMMATURE. TOTALLY PROFESSIONAL. DELIGHTFULLY IMMATURE. in the considered for publication www.whiskeyforwhiskers.wixsite.com/rescue whiskeysforwhiskers@gmail.com following week’s Journal.

LOVE STORIES An evening of love stories musically told by Tchaikovsky and Strauss: Romeo & Juliet, Don Juan, Francesca de Rimini and Der Rosenkavalier.

January 27 at 8:00 pm & January 28 at 3:00 pm

The Peace Center Edvard Tchivzhel, Conductor Journal Print 1/4 pg Love Stories.indd 2

greenvillesymphony.org 1/12/18 3:31 PM


46 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 01.19.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

Continuing Ed ACROSS 1 Shred 6 To another country 12 Buster Brown’s dog 16 Mexican article 19 University of Maine’s city 20 News anchor Katie 21 Arduous task 22 Not be idle 23 Discoverer of Uranus ... and “The Office” co-star 26 Spoil 27 “Orinoco Flow” singer 28 Sea, to Luc 29 Buenos — 30 Commanded 31 PCs on planes, often 33 Long-range German gun of WWI ... and “Apollo 13” Oscar nominee 37 Letter #3 38 Bern’s river 39 To the extent that 40 1975 Wimbledon winner ... and “Shape of You” singer 47 German article 48 U.S. architect I.M. 49 Pet treaters 50 Slaughter with a bat 52 Abnormal plant swelling 56 Schindler with a list 58 Deputy of an envoy ... and old CBS variety show host 63 Ballpark gate 64 Explorer Hernando de —

By Frank Longo

65 Rose color 66 Klee output 67 Bistro bills 68 Olay product ... and “My Cup Runneth Over” singer 73 Sheriff Andy Taylor’s tyke 74 Coach Parseghian 75 — polloi 76 “T.N.T.” rock band 77 Game venue 78 Officer played by Phil Silvers ... and 1970s-’80s New York City mayor 84 2006 Sacha Baron Cohen film 85 Nobelist Arafat 86 Celine of song 87 Many a repo 89 Poetic form 90 Holiday drink 92 Left-leaning slant ... and “Lou Grant” star 97 “Hips Don’t Lie” singer 101 — Grey 102 Special span 103 Large, hooded snake ... and “60 Minutes” reporter for 26 years 107 Cited as evidence 111 Ship sailing past sirens 112 “— Less Ordinary” 113 Suffix with 66-Across 114 Liquefy 115 Rolodex no. 116 Money from investments

... and Reagan cabineteer 121 Previous to 122 Jib holder 123 “No clue” 124 Whoop it up 125 Berlin-to-Prague dir. 126 “— girl!” (“All right!”) 127 Unboastful 128 Pastoral verse DOWN 1 Disk at the end of a spur 2 “Three Sisters” sister 3 61-Down producer 4 Open, as a shutter 5 Luau paste 6 Peaks 7 Nobelist Niels 8 Long to undo 9 NHL’s Bobby 10 “— for Alibi” 11 1983 Mr. T comedy 12 “— is human ...” 13 Bays, e.g. 14 Detective, slangily 15 Suffix with priest 16 Hedy of film 17 National park in Maine 18 Italicize, e.g. 24 Electrical current unit 25 Move quickly 30 Soccer star Chastain 32 Body of work 33 “Harrumph!” 34 Rage

St. Mary’s Catholic School Tradition

Virtue

Excellence

35 “Oh wow!” compliment 108 ’Vette, e.g. 36 Off course 96 Fried quickly 109 Atelier tripod 38 Birthplace of St. Francis 97 Glides on ice 110 Reflect (on) 40 Desertion of one’s faith 98 Job opening fillers 113 Rural hotels 41 Highway pull-off 99 He directed “Life of Pi” 116 Thurman of “Prime” 42 Polynesian-themed 100 Most adept 117 Tokyo, once lounges 104 Gaucho rope 118 Fizzling thing 43 Quad bike, e.g. 105 Mali’s cont. 119 Opal finish? 44 Classic car 106 Kin of khaki 120 Hosp. scan 45 Actress Blyth 107 Natty tie Crossword answers: page 15 46 Turndowns 51 “Of course!” 53 1996 role for Madonna by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan 54 Steeping sauce 55 Snacker on termites 57 Capone and Unser 59 Dupe 60 Plus more: Abbr. 61 Reef stuff 62 Guitar pioneer Paul 68 “— wise guy, eh?” 69 Caring 70 Martin Luther opponent Johann 71 Hoopla 72 Actress Mitzi 73 Gold, in Italy 75 Daring 77 On deck, say 79 Tree with fan-shaped leaves 80 Up to, in ads 81 Young male, in hiphop 82 Having five sharps 83 Central point 88 Joined with 91 React to, as a bad pun 93 Moray, e.g. 94 “Norma —” 95 Suffix with Sudoku answers: page 15 Medium

Sudoku

Priority Testing Dates at 9 am:

27 January 2018 24 February 2018

Grades K3-8

Call to schedule your school tour: 864.679.4117 101 Ha mpton Aven u e, Gr eenv ille, S C 2 9 6 0 1

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THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: Trailblazer Park RR/Concession Building, IFB #37-02/15/18, due at 3:00 P.M., E.S.T., February 15, 2018. Pre-Bid meeting with Site visit at 10:00 A.M., E.S.T., January 25, 2018 at Greenville County Procurement Services, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601. Solicitations can be found at http://www.greenvillecounty. org/Procurement/ or by calling 864-467-7200.

SUMMONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE FAMILY COURT 2017-DR-23-4705 KAREN LEIGH, PLAINTIFF, -vsTABITHA LEE CONDREY-FULLER AND JOHN DOE, DEFENDANTS. YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to Answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Reply to said Answer on the subscriber, at his office at 16 Whitsett Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601 within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service and if you fail to Answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, Defendant will apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint. C. Carlyle Steele Attorney for the Plaintiff 16 Whitsett Street Greenville, SC 29601 Telephone: 864-271-4360 SC BAR No.: 005316

WEDDINGS  When you ENGAGEMENTS finish reading  this paper, ANNIVERSARIES

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AMENDED SUMMONS (NON-JURY) STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS 2017-CP-23-07466 Gendlin Homes, LLC, Plaintiff, Vs. Landon Keith Williams, Samantha M. Ingram, Bank of America, The South Carolina Department Of Revenue and all unknown parties who may have some right, title, or interest in the property having Tax Map #0119.00-07-005.00, Defendants YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Amended Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you and to serve a copy of your Answer to this Amended Complaint upon subscriber at 11 Whitsett Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the date of such service. If you shall fail to answer the Amended Complaint within that time, the Plaintiffs shall proceed in default proceedings against you and shall apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Amended Complaint. TO: INFANT(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (AN IMPRISONED PERSON) YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a Guardian ad Litem to represent you in this action within thirty (30) days after the service of this Amended Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. TO: INFANTS(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (INCOMPETENT OR INSANE) AND TO, (GENERAL TESTAMENTARY GUARDIAN) (COMMITTEE) WITH WHOM S(HE) RESIDE(S): YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad Litem to represent said infant(s) under fourteen years of age (said incompetent or insane person) within thirty (30) days after the service of this Amended Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. LIS PENDENS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an action has been commenced in the Court upon amended complaint of Plaintiff against Defendants to quiet title on property located in Greenville County. The subject property is described as follows: ALL that piece, parcel or lot of land lying and being in State of South Carolina, County of Greenville, City of Greenville known as Lot 26 on plat entitled Property of Ladson A. Mills shown in Plat Book H, Page 117 – 118 recorded in the ROD Office for Greenville County. Reference is made to said plat for a more detailed description. LESS however any portion previously conveyed and subject to restrictions of record. TAX MAP #0076.02-02-019.00 C. Richard Stewart Attorney for Plaintiff 11 Whitsett Street Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 235-2019 SC Bar No: 5346

SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING OF COMPLAINT AND NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION (NON-JURY MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE) C/A NO: 2017-CP-23-07602 DEFICIENCY WAIVED STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS Navy Federal Credit Union , PLAINTIFF, vs. Mildred Wiggins; The South Carolina Department of Mental Health, through its agency the Greenville Mental Health; Pinnacle Providence Trust 01-042512, Susan Lueck, Trustee, DEFENDANT(S) TO THE DEFENDANTS, ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, or otherwise appear and defend, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscriber at his office, Hutchens Law Firm P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, except as to the United States of America, which shall have sixty (60) days, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, or otherwise appear and defend, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein, and judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity for Greenville County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. TO MINOR(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE, AND/OR TO MINOR(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THE PERSON WITH WHOM THE MINOR(S) RESIDES, AND/OR TO PERSONS UNDER SOME LEGAL DISABILITY: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff immediately and separately and such application will be deemed absolute and total in the absence of your application for such an appointment within thirty (30) days after the service of the Summons and Complaint upon you. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the

WEDDINGS

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Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity in/for this County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. NOTICE OF FILING OF SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing Summons, along with the Complaint, was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, on November 27, 2017. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT pursuant to the South Carolina Supreme Court Administrative Order 2011-05-02-01, (hereinafter “Order”), you may have a right to Foreclosure Intervention. To be considered for any available Foreclosure Intervention, you may communicate with and otherwise deal with the Plaintiff through its law firm, Hutchens Law Firm, P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202 or call 803726-2700. Hutchens Law Firm, represents the Plaintiff in this action and does not represent you. Under our ethical rules, we are prohibited from giving you any legal advice. You must submit any requests for Foreclosure Intervention consideration within 30 days from the date of this Notice. IF YOU FAIL, REFUSE, OR VOLUNTARILY ELECT NOT TO PARTICIPATE IN FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION, YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY/ AGENT MAY PROCEED WITH A FORECLOSURE ACTION. If you have already pursued loss mitigation with the Plaintiff, this Notice does not guarantee the availability of loss mitigation options or further review of your qualifications. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY.

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NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Parkway Grill LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 103 South Batesville Rd., Greer, SC 29650. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than February 4, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL;P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110 NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Derrick Cannon intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 601 Airport Rd., Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than January 28, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL;P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110


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January 19, 2018 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

January 19, 2018 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.