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Education That Lasts a Lifetime

Johnny Autry

THEY SAID IT

“I love steaks and burgers like everyone else, but my mind naturally gravitates to vegetables when I’m in the kitchen. I actually get more excited about preparing a radish than a country ham.” Justin Burdett, executive chef and owner of Local Provisions in Asheville, N.C., on his culinary wheelhouse.

Nutrition for a Healthy Family Monday, September 11 at 6 p.m. Learn how to keep the family healthy despite busy schedules and picky eaters. Brief cooking demo and tasting included!

Pre-diabetes and Insulin Resistance Tuesday, September 12 at 6 p.m. Find out what these terms mean for your health and learn ways to prevent the onset of diabetes.

“I want to play by the rules less and write with more people, and be less uptight about the process and thinking there’s only one way to do this.” Singer-songwriter Drew Holcomb, of Drew Holcomb and The Neighbors, on his new creative approach to making music.

Nicotine Cessation and Management Monday, September 18 at 5:30 p.m. Get acquainted with our QuitSmart® program which combines several effective methods to produce a potent stop-smoking treatment.

Stress Management

“Anything that affects the fundamental fairness of our taxing system is a concern for that committee.”

Monday, September 25 at 6 p.m. Learn techniques for managing everyday stress and gain a new, healthier perspective.

State Rep. Tommy Pope (R-York), chairman of a legislative committee studying tax reform, on the different tax bills for owner-occupied and rental homes.

POLL

Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., believes immigrant children who grew up in the U.S. and attend school should be allowed to become permanent residents. Do you?

I agree! What would our great country be without immigrants?

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No way. We’re a nation of laws. It’s time to build a wall.

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It’s complicated. The parents broke the law, not the kids.

Vote in our latest poll at greenvillejournal.com.

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4 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.15.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

OPINION

Views from your community

Life Changer

How MedEx made a lasting impact on one first-generation college student By Kelsey Williams

I was just another high school student from Pelzer with a dream of going to college. Like many other students at the time, I was a naive 16-year-old wondering if college was like the movies. But I had additional concerns. Being the first in one’s family to go to college comes with many challenges, and the goal of becoming a physician is another struggle altogether. This is my story of how a program called the Medical Experience Academy, more affectionately known as MedEx, changed my life. It’s also a story of how MedEx champion Craig Brown, best known as the owner of the Greenville Drive, changed my life and the lives of hundreds of other students. Greenville Health System’s MedEx Academy helps identify and encourage high school and college students interested in pursuing a career in health care in jobs ranging from doctors and nurses to human resources specialists, medical coders, administrators, and other allied health workers. For those still in high school, MedEx is an educational explorative health careers program. For those in college, MedEx is a preparatory program providing experienc-

es, resources, and advisors for acceptance into medical school, graduate programs, and employment. My journey with MedEx started in summer 2010 in a meeting room in the Greenville Health System’s Cancer Institute. I was a member of MedEx’s inaugural class and the only student from Southside High School. The 12 of us spent every day together, learning as much as we could in a 40-hour workweek. Both clinical and nonclinical professionals – ranging from doctors and nurses to human resources experts and biomedical research specialists – presented to us the in’s and out’s of their various occupations and helped us understand health care as a vocation. We saw firsthand how health care works. Walking through the neonatal intensive care unit was my favorite experience, and a close second was being able to practice intubation on high-tech mannequins in the Greenville HealthCare Simulation Center. I progressed from a student to a mentor the following summer and helped to nurture some of my fellow colleagues through different areas of the medical field. I also met countless future colleagues and gained invaluable mentors. After five years of working closely with MedEx, which took me from high school through college and now into med school, I decided that I wanted to work toward a future in primary care. I saw firsthand the difference a mentor can make and how empowering it is to have someone have faith in you. The point of sharing all of this is to acknowledge the generosity and empowerment of Craig Brown, a benefactor and long-time supporter of this special program. Mr. Brown received an on-field thank you two weeks ago when community members surprised him with $50,000 in student support for this innovative work pipeline he’s championed for nearly a decade. MedEx helped me realize my dream and purpose — and the generosity of Mr. Brown made that possible. I know my life would not be the same without MedEx. That teenager with a dream is now entering her third year of medical school at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville. I have learned how to become a better leader and public servant and how to be the physician I’ve always dreamed of. The amazing mentorship, generosity, and family of MedEx has helped make this small-town girl’s dream a reality. So, thank you, Mr. Brown. Thank you for believing in MedEx. I am one of many who can say that your generosity has directly affected my future for the better. Kelsey Williams is a third-year medical student at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville. To help support MedEx or learn more about Williams’ story, visit ghsgiving.org/kelseys-story.php.

Speak your mind

The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, factbased arguments.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Editor Chris Haire at chaire@communityjournals.com.


Reading Vision Correction is Here! Advanced Treatment for Dry Eye The inlay is a tiny porous ring placed in the cornea. It works like a camera aperture, returning reading vision to patients.

Dry Eye affects an estimated 25 million Americans and is the most common reason for a visit to an eye specialist. It is a complex disease involving the tear quantity, quality, inflammation, and eyelid oil or Meibomian Gland Dysfunction (MGD). Causes include age, medications, health and environmental conditions, and contact lenses. It is more common in women than men. Dry Eye occurs when there are insufficient tears to provide adequate moisture or when the tear film over the eye is of poor quality. “If left untreated, dry eyes become uncomfortable with symptoms of scratchiness, Frustrated with your readers? There’s a solution. stinging, itching, burning, light sensitivity, fluctuating vision, and tired eyes,” Joes Parisi, Ophthalmologist Clemson Eye issays theDr. first and onlyChief clinic in the Upstateat Clemson Eye. Traditional includes artificial to offer patients readingtreatment vision correction throughtear thedrops TM and lifestyle changes, but there are some advanced therapies. Kamra corneal inlay.

Almost America with ageOver the114 past million 15 years,people researchinhas revealedstruggle that Meibomian related near vision loss (presbyopia). Th e inlay is designed Gland Dysfunction is the leading cause of eye discomfort for over to reduce or eliminate the need for reading glasses 86% of patients with Dry Eye. It occurs when the eyelidin oilpeople glands generally over 40 have good distance butand become blocked duewho to inflammation and thickvision, secretions problems with near vision. can no longer produce normal lipids or oils needed for a sustained healthythe tearKamra film. Then more rapid evaporation of your tears leads With procedure, patients previously dependent to inflammation andthings results up in aclose gradual, progressive losstext of the on readers can see again – menus, Meibomianfood glands. messages, labels, computers, books, magazines – and still have clearEye distance vision. During a Dry exam, the doctor will check to see if the glands arereceived releasingFDA oil during the blinking Lipiview® test It approval in Aprilprocess. 2015. The Since then, more provides an accurate digital image of the Meibomian glands than 1,500 have been implanted in the United States. and Note blinkmore function. the test shows the gland functionworldwide has dropped that thanIf37,000 have been implanted over off and is ‘Evaporative Dry Eye’, then the doctor will the pastthere 10 years. recommend cutting edge treatment either with a LipiFlow® or

“We proudlike to artificial be first in theRestasis, Upstateomega-3 to offersupplements patients other are therapies tears, this procedure. Th e Kamra is a great solution for people in or punctal plugs. their 40s and 50s who are frustrated with blurry near vision.

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The inlay offers presbyopia patients a safe reading vision correction solution and freedom from the hassle of readers,” says Dr. Joseph Parisi, Chief Ophthalmologist and Medical LipiFlow® is the only electronic device cleared by the FDA for Director at Clemson Eye. treatment of MGD with clinical studies of safety and effectiveness. Through advances in the application Vectored Thermal The elective procedure takes aboutof15 minutes and is Pulsation technology, LipiFlow® utilizes awho patented reversible(VTPTM) if the patient chooses. Even patients have algorithm of precise heator applied had previous eye surgery, such as cataract patients, who to the eyelids with directed wear bifocals can be candidates forinner the Kamra. gentle massage to remove Clemson Eye offers free reading vision correction blockages from the Meibomian consultations. To find out ifglands. you’reThis a candidate, treatment iscall designed to restore the natural oil flow to today to book your appointment. the tear film that covers the eye’s Clemson Eye’s new Greenville location is 360 Pelham surface and save the glands.

Road, just off Haywood. Clemson Eye has been a leading

Overall, may make sufferer more providerDry of Eye eyetreatments care in the area fora40 years. comfortable and often improve the quality of vision. Anyone with symptoms of Dry Eye should visit an eye care professional specializing in Dry Eye treatment.

Basic vs. Laser Cataract Surgery New Technology for Cataract Patients

Life expectancy in the United States has been increasing steadily over the past century. Americans who reached 65 in 2011 are projected to live another 21 years to age 86.1

As a result,are many Americans are working longer expected. Cataracts a common eye condition where thethan natural lens Visual health is important to abeing ablevision. to work at any age. becomes clouded, impairing patient’s According to But the as we age, vision becomes more of a challenge for a greater number National Eye Institute, than 20 percent of Americans will of us.cataracts Cataractsbyaretheoften the65, culprit. have age of and the prevalence increases with age. In cataract surgery, natural is about 22 Cataracts, a clouding of the the clouded eye’s natural lens,lens affect removed and replaced with an IOL. million Americans over age 40. By age 80, more than 90% of 2 Leftfreed untreated, Americans will havecataract a cataract. For many patients, surgery them cataracts can lead to blindness. They glasses, are the but leading cause ofreplaced vision loss in the U.S. from prescription sometimes them with readers. A new intraocular lens (IOL) Surgery is the only known treatment for cataracts. that provides a full range of vision for cataract Cataract a 15-minute out-patient procedure, is one of the patients, surgery, even those with astigmatism, is now an safest and most commonly performed surgeries in the U.S.3 People option for many patients. with cataracts can opt for basic or laser cataract surgery. Clemson Eye surgeon Dr. Brian Johnson calls The Basic Cataract Symfony lens a Surgery “game changer.” In September, Basic cataractbecame surgeryone involves the diseased lens and Dr. Johnson of theremoving first surgeons in implanting a monofocal lens. The monofocal intraocular lens Greenville to implant the new lens, which was just clears your vision at a single focal point. This manual, bladed approved by the FDA in July for use in the U.S. surgical procedure is covered by Medicare and most health insurance plans. However, if you wore eye glasses before your basic cataract surgery, you will still need them after the surgery.

Laser Cataract Surgery Carol’s Cataract Story “Laser surgery Laser cataract surgery involves using Carol Bridges opted for laser cataract surgery. Bridges is a younga laser and computer-guided software with the multifocal at-heart American who chose to forgo retirement and continue working part-time. She is a dental hygienist in Pickens, SC, and system to create incisions that are up been in in vision 49 countries for several years, but Until the Symfony, cataract astigmatism very muchhas depends onuse good to perform her work. to 10 times more precise thanpatients manualwith signifi lenscanthas changed The Symfony were limited to patients monofocal lens the FDA approval came after a randomized clinical trial of 148 incisions. Here, have theimplants option that would correct either When she started to notice colors diming and driving myislife.” distance or near butcorrect not both. Symfony the first extended of advanced lensesvision, that can patients. In thatmore trial,difficult, 77 percent of Symfony patients 20/25 becoming she booked an eye exam. had At her exam, depth of focus lens with astigmatism nearsightedness, farsightedness and/orcorrection. vision intermediate 34 percent who herateye doctor, Dr.distances, Joe Parisi,compared confirmedwith she had cataracts. astigmatism. This allows excellent night vision discussing all the options with vision him, Bridges chosewas laser had aAfter traditional mono-focal lens. Near for reading and sharpness of vision (visual cataract surgery with an advanced multifocal lens implant. “Through laser cataract surgery with improved and patients were able to read two levels of smaller acuity) advanced lenses, we can deliver the best at near, intermediate and work at close range allcounterparts. day long. The laser surgery with the lines“Ithan their mono-focal far distances. possible visual outcomes for our cataract multifocal lens has changed my life. It’s made my work so patients,” says Dr. Don Glaser, the eye technology innovations, like “Patients have received have been excited and It’s New muchwho easier. I don’t havethese to bother with very glasses anymore. surgeon at Clemson Eye’s Anderson wonderful,” pleased with howsays theirBridges. lifestyles have improved,” Dr. Johnson the Symfony, continue to improve clinic. “Regardless of their age, Clemson the IOLs and the visual outcomes notes. “Th ese lenses are Seniors ideal for patients who have an active Eye Exams for All Eye patients enjoy excellent restored for patients with a variety of If you think you have a cataract, a dilatedwho eye like examtoisgolf, the only lifestyle. They meet the needs of our patients vision, whereby they are entirely free of 4 way to confirm it. An annual eye exam is recommended conditions. The two most or much less dependent on eye glasses.” use a computer or tablet, shop, use a smartphone, and drive for all seniors to help ensure your visual health, quality of life, signifi cant improvements are vastly at night.” A portion of the cost of laser cataract and ability to continue working, should you so desire. Call – Carol Bridges, improved intermediate vision and surgery and advanced lens implants is Clemson Eye today to book your appointment. an extendedDental range ofHygienist vision acuity covered by Medicare and most health 1. “Retirement now requires those living longer to work longer,” Jill Schlesinger, Eye for patientsand withClemson astigmatism. insurance plans. However, an additional Chicago Tribune, Oct. 16, 2013. 2. The Givan Herbert Eye Institute. University of California, Irvine. Cataract Surgery. payment is required. If you’re a Clemson Cataract Patient http://www.eye.uci.edu/cataract.html. [Accessed March 29, 2013]. Eye patient, you have the option of 3. http://www.aao.org/publications/ eyenet/200609/pearls.cfm 4. Clemson Eye Laser Cataract with Advanced Intraocular Lens Replacement Results, 2015. 24-month, 0% payment plans.


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8 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.15.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

PROPERTY TAX ON A $200K HOME VS. RENTAL PROPERTY

$3,784

$3,764

$3,706

BUMMER RENTALS

$4,078

$3,486 $3,022 $2,801 $2,545

$1,563

Want to rent your house? Well, you’re going to have to pay up

$996

$973

$1,105

$915

$1,030

$971

$816

WORDS BY RUDOLPH BELL EE

ON

D

S ER

AN

Few laws continue to ruffle feathers a decade after they took effect, but that’s the case with South Carolina’s Act 388. The tax-relief measure was adopted in 2006 and took effect in 2007. It was the General Assembly’s answer to complaints that residential property taxes were too high. At the time it was adopted, home values were soaring, especially beachfront property along South Carolina’s coast. The law’s main thrust was to remove the tax burden for public school operations from owner-occupied homes. To make up the revenue lost by that tax break, lawmakers added 1 percent to the state sales tax. Other classes of property — commercial property, industrial prop-

erty, and rental property — did not get the same tax break. One result has been a dramatic widening of the tax differential between owner-occupied homes and rental homes. Even before Act 388, taxes were higher for rental homes than for owner-occupied homes. The assessment ratio for rental homes was 6 percent compared with 4 percent for owner-occupied homes. That meant the tax bill on a rental home was 50 percent higher than the tax bill on an owner-occupied home of the same value in the same tax district. A decade into Act 388, the difference can be 300 percent to 400 percent. In Greenville County, for example, the yearly tax bill for an owner-occupied

Even before Act 388, taxes were higher for rental homes than for owner-occupied homes. The assessment ratio for rental homes was 6 percent compared with 4 percent for owner-occupied homes.

K RO

E

CH

E

EE

GR

E UR

LA

HOME RENTAL PROPERTY

EE

NS

NS

LL

I NV

N CO

E CK

PI

O

G*

R BU

AN RT A SP

N

IO

UN

2016 Property tax rates for county and school districts only.

*Represents averages of school district taxes within the county. Source: Author’s calculations based on South Carolina Property Tax Rates by County, 2016. South Carolina Association of Counties. January 2017. (online: http://www.sccounties.org/ property-tax-rates)

home valued at $200,000 is $915 (not counting municipal or special district taxes). By contrast, the yearly tax bill in Greenville County for a $200,000 rental home is $3,022. Act 388 increased the tax inequity between homeowners and renters “and over 10 years that wedge has gotten bigger and bigger,” said Rebecca Gunnlaugsson, a Columbia-based economist who is advising a special committee of the state House of Representatives studying tax reform. Critics of Act 388 say the different tax burdens for owner-occupied homes and rental homes hurt the poor. While some people choose to rent, they say, others rent because they can’t afford to buy. And while those people’s landlords are responsible for paying the higher taxes, the landlords simply pass the additional cost onto their tenants in the form of higher rents, critics say.

It’s not clear whether the legislative committee studying tax reform will try to address the inequity. The committee, created last year by House Speaker Jay Lucas, a Hartsville Republican, has met several times but so far has not recommended any legislation. Members, however, have kicked around ideas for addressing the inequity during public meetings. Among the questions they have posed: Could smaller rental properties – say those with four units or less – be taxed differently than large apartment complexes with hundreds of units each? The committee’s chairman, Rep. Tommy Pope, a York Republican, said the overall goal is to create a “lower, flatter, fairer” tax system. Asked if the committee is expected to recommend changes to Act 388, Pope said he does expect it to address property tax policy, and any true reform of property tax policy would likely have to take Act 388 into account.


09.15.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 9

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

NEWS A decade into Act 388, the difference

can be 300 percent to 400 percent.

“Does that mean we’re going to start taxing your home? I highly doubt that will be the case,” he said. Pope said he sees the different tax bills for owner-occupied homes and rental homes as a concern. “Anything that affects the fundamental fairness of our taxing system is a concern for that committee,” he said. Pope said the state might be able to improve its property tax policy if it begins generating new revenue by ending the

patchwork of sales tax exemptions. Rep. Chandra Dillard, a Greenville Democrat on the committee, said she believes the higher tax burden on rental homes is decreasing the supply of affordable housing by discouraging investors from renovating and renting out older homes. Still, Dillard said, revising tax policy can be tricky. “You start pulling a string, and other things start unraveling,” she said.

FARM-TO-FORK

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Untitled-16 1

9/12/17 11:44 AM


10 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.15.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

Understanding

Grief

Seminars for the community, educators and professional caregivers featuring Dr. Harold Ivan Smith Assisting Grievers in the Community

A FREE seminar for educators September 26, 2017 3:00pm to 5:00pm

How Long Does ‘Normal’ Grief Last? A FREE seminar for anyone experiencing grief or loss September 26, 2017 6:45pm to 9:00pm

If I Were Grieving ‘Right’ Should I Be Done by Now?

A full day workshop for professional caregivers $35.00 Registration Fee for Professionals seeking CEU Credit

September 27, 2017 8:30am - 4:00pm All seminars are located at the TD Convention Center 1 Exposition Drive Greenville, SC For more information or to make a reservation, call (864) 235-8330 or register online at www.thomasmcafee.com. Presented as a public service by:

BETTER NEIGHBORS

‘Homeless Triangle’ Salvation Army agrees to increase patrols, reduce community lunches to two days per week CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

When the Salvation Army requested a zoning change last year for a half-acre of its nearly 4-acre campus, it ignited opposition that revealed an underlying frustration and resentment among residents toward the nonprofits in Greenville’s “homeless triangle.” The rezoning was ultimately approved, and neighborhood residents and the Salvation Army and other nonprofits serving the homeless agreed to mediation in an effort to resolve the issues that were uncovered. That mediation is complete, and the parties agreed on a list of action items, as well as longer-term ideas to reduce homelessness in Greenville, according to a final report by the Upstate Mediation Center. There are about 1,000 homeless in Greenville County, and three of the main service providers — the Salvation Army, Triune Mercy Center, and the Miracle Hill Rescue Mission — are located in that area of downtown, which is a magnet for people who are homeless, including those who are chronically so. “Pop-up” service providers come into the area to hand out food, distribute supplies, and conduct outdoor church services. Some follow a set schedule, and others are more spontaneous and unpredictable, the report said. Some residents expressed concern that service providers would expand their services resulting in more homeless in the area, as well as with nuisance-type behavior such as thefts and public urination. Some residents worried that crime in the area had risen, although law enforcement later said that wasn’t true. As a result of the mediation, the Salvation Army agreed to increase patrols and trash pickup at its campus on Rutherford Road and its Greenville Family Store, and to limit its community lunch feedings to two days per week. In addition, the Salvation Army agreed to not increase its number of beds beyond the current 143. Service providers also said they would try to include neighbors on their boards and they would participate in neighborhood organizations. The Greenville Homeless Alliance, a coalition of 40 stakeholders including nonprofits, government, churches, and health care providers, agreed to coordinate educational programs and events for neighbors in the area as well as continue to monitor the situation. Long-term solutions to homelessness include permanent sup-

16% of the overall homeless

population is chronically homeless

90% decrease in emergency room visits for residents of Reedy Place, the only permanent supportive housing complex in Greenville

100 years Salvation Army has

been at its current location on Rutherford Avenue

143 beds at Miracle Hill Rescue Mission

portive housing, an intervention that combines non-time-limited affordable housing assistance with support services. Greenville has one such housing complex, Reedy Place, and residents had a 90 percent decrease in emergency room visits, an 87 percent decrease in inpatient behavioral health rehab stays, an 89 percent decrease in EMS transports, and a 92 percent decrease in days and charges for detention centers, the report said. Creating additional similar housing would require public-private partnerships, according to the report. In addition, the city needs more affordable housing options, the report said. A consultant recently found there are 2,500 fewer affordable housing units than needed for families who earn $20,000 or less annually. “Without sufficient quality, affordable housing options, these households are either living in substandard housing or are severely cost-burdened, and in many cases will eventually be homeless,” the report said. The report identified a need for more public bathroom facilities and suggested the city and county could explore publicprivate partnerships with convenience stores. In addition, the report said authorities should consider addressing design issues that enable homelessness, such as walls that make it easy for people to hide and sleep.

There are about 1,000 homeless in Greenville County, and three of the main service providers — the Salvation Army, Triune Mercy Center, and the Miracle Hill Rescue Mission — are located in that area of downtown.


Happy Cow Creamery’s

15TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION! Saturday, October 7 • 9-5PM

Happy Cow Creamery and Trantham’s 12 Aprils Dairy have been especially blessed for the past 15 years. We want to thank you, our very special customers, for your support. May God continue to bless us all as we strive to produce a quality product and serve you. – All of us at the Farm

Anniversary Specials

Events

Come join the music and fun! PROUDLY PRESENTING

DR. MAC ARNOLD “Singing the Blues” 11 :30 - 2:30pm

FREE HORSE RIDES

by Black Horse Run Farm 1 :00 - 4:00pm

Happy Cow Raw Milk Gouda Cheeses $1 off/pkg

Fresh Cut Mountain Cabbage 37¢/lb

South Carolina Sweet Potatoes 37¢/lb

Woods Family

Tastings Delicious samples!

Handmade Brooms Trolley Rides around the Farm

Balloon Twister Painting Pumpkin Painting Glass Art Crafty Sisters Mahan’s Plants

Strawberry Jam

Happy Cow

Original, No Sugar 2 for $5

and Face

AMISH WEDDING 16 oz. $3.99

FARO COFFEE

Grape Jelly 16 oz. $3.99

Preground, Certified Organic 7 varieties $5.79/12 oz. Bag

Apple Butter

Jarred Specials 16 oz. Jars $3.99/ea.

• HC Pickled Okra • HC Peach Salsa • HC Pickled Squash • HC Pepper Pickle Sticks

New Crop Apples 67¢/lb

Forx Farm Locally Made

Pickled Peach Halves 32 oz. $5.29

I00 Year Vintage Blue or Purple Pop Corn 32 oz. 2 for $5

Our Famous All-Beef Hot Dog & a Drink:

Artisan Cheeses Happy Cow

Milk & Cheeses

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“Where Quality Is A Reality”

Bull Hill

Beef

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Sausage Woods Mill

Stone Ground Grits & Corn Meal Webbs

Chicken Sausage Piper Pepper

Himalayan Salt Lamps GREAT PRICES! Many Sizes!

A Healthy Choice 864-243-9699 | 332 McKelvey Rd., Pelzer Mon.-Fri. 9am-7pm, Sat. 9am-5pm, Sun. Closed (Off Hwy. 25, 2 miles south of Ware Place, left on McKelvey Rd. 1 mile)

Hot Sauces Oreno Hellenic

Olive Oil with Great Harvest Rustic Sour Dough Bread


HOURS: 12-7PM

2017 Participating Pop-Up Shops* HOURS: 6-9PM

cocobella boutique

lou lou’s

Barre3

P Squared

Copper Penny

Monkee’s

Black Tulip

Prowse on Main

Denim & Soul

Muse Shoe Studio

Blend Salon

Sew Few

Garrison Opticians

Pink Bee

India Hicks

Sursy

J. Britt Boutique

Twill

Lizard Thicket

Safe Harbor Resale Shop

fashiononthetown fashiononthetown

Maggie Aiken

*FOTT POP UP SHOPS will be located at McMillan Pazdan Smith Architecture 400 Augusta Street, #200 (above Upstate Craft Beer Co)

October 19th & 20th

2017 Participating Stores

ULTIMATE SHOPPING CRAWL

FO


09.15.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 13

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

NEWS GRANTS

Duke Energy awards $75K to the Riley Institute Furman University’s Riley Institute has received a $75,000 grant from Duke Energy to expand ConnectionsSC, a program that aims to advance diversity leadership among education and law enforcement professionals across the state. The program brings educators and law enforcement together over the course of five months to discuss and study ways to Furman University’s Riley Institute lead in their increasingly diverse communities. Participants are grouped together by school district and develop action projects that benefit students and their communities. ConnectionsSC was launched in 2015 after nine people were shot and killed by a white supremacist during a Bible study session at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston. In the wake of the shooting, Duke Energy donated $100,000 to the Riley Institute to promote diversity and civic engagement in South Carolina. “There are no quick solutions for the deep legacies of racism,” said Kodwo GharteyTagoe, Duke Energy’s South Carolina president. “We are continuing to invest in the long-term approach of the Riley Institute’s diversity leadership work because we expect that over time it will help drive systemic change in the state.” The program’s inaugural class graduated last year and launched several successful community initiatives. That includes Project H.O.M.E, which aims to provide housing to North Charleston students who become homeless while still in high school. According to a press release, the new funding will help add 31 additional educators and law enforcement officials in six school districts. This year’s participants began orientation on Aug. 22 in Columbia and will attend five-day long sessions through December. —Andrew Moore

The same local expertise, now with unparalleled global influence.

SERVING THE GREATER GREENVILLE AREA

jha-sothebysrealty.com

EDUCATION

Council OKs old Berea Elementary sale for possible Legacy Early College Greenville County Council approved the sale of the old Berea Elementary School property to the nonprofit Campbell Young Leaders, a move that could allow Legacy Early College to demolish the old school and build a new middle school. The move ends a two-year fight by some residents to keep the building, which was built in 1939 by the Works Progress Administration and is located at the corner of Farrs Bridge and Sulphur Springs roads. Legacy Early College wants to construct a new school with a façade substantially the same as the old elementary school, Legacy founder and board chairman William Brown has said. Brown is the CEO of Campbell Young Leaders, a private foundation William Brown started by the late Bob Campbell, a retired vice president of Vulcan Materials and a former Clemson University trustee. Legacy gets part of its funding from CYL. The sale hit a snag earlier this summer, when the sale didn’t get the required number of yes votes for second reading. Last month, County Council voted to reconsider, and the sale for $400,000 was approved on Sept. 5. The sale was approved 8-2 with council members Xanthene Norris and Rick Roberts voting against. Legacy has more than 1,350 students in kindergarten through the 12th grade. It has two campuses on Greenville’s west side. The school now occupies the former Parker High School and a former elementary school that once housed the Fine Arts Center. Brown has said a second middle school is needed because Legacy is at capacity at that grade level. A group of Berea residents have fought since 2015 to save the old school after a Florida developer proposed rezoning the property and building a commercial development. — Cindy Landrum

Jackson Herlong Broker-in-Charge

GREENVILLE’S HOMETOWN AGENT 864-313-2520 jackson@jha-sothebysrealty.com


14 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.15.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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Furman University has chosen John Milby to lead its campus police force. Milby, who joined the university’s police department in 2015, has served as acting police chief since May. He took over for Tom Saccenti, who stepped down earlier this year after being named police chief at the University of West Georgia. As chief, Milby oversees a department that currently employs 12 sworn officers and 10 administrators. He is ultimately responsible for the safety of about 2,700 students, 240 faculty members, and countless visitors. “John is familiar with the university and he understands the role the department John Milby must play in making Furman’s campus among the safest in the nation,” said Mary Lou Merkt, Furman’s vice president for finance and administration. “He also understands the importance of building relationships with both the students and the surrounding community. We welcome him in this new role.” According to a press release, Milby served 25 years as a member of the Douglas County Sheriff ’s Office in Nevada before coming to Furman. He holds a master’s degree in security studies from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School. Milby also holds a Certificate of Criminal Justice Education from the FBI National Academy and a Class I Law Enforcement Officer Certification from the South Carolina Criminal Justice Academy. —Andrew Moore

Let us help you fall in love with your skin again! When was your last skin check? Dr. John Korman,

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16 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.15.2017

FOR SALE TAPROOM/RESTAURANT

• The Beer Joint, 1818 Augusta Street (Open now) • The Beer Joint, 2603 North Pleasantburg #J (Ready but not open) Two brand new beer taprooms, occupancies 88 and 73, 2500 sq ft+, with $400,000+ build outs, long term leases, professionally designed and outfitted, are FOR SALE or seek a PARTNER(s). Separate LLCs are fully licensed and registered. Originally a franchise, they must become full service restaurant/taprooms. Expanding and equipping the kitchens may cost $100,000. EVERYTHING in these two locations is new, including state-of-the art HVAC, FULL AV systems, 33 taps, walk-in coolers, furniture and bars. The owner would like to limit his involvement in operations or sell outright at a substantial loss.

Email owner at roger.kersch@gmail.com or call 828 735-9711. Or call Cecil, Sunbelt Business Brokers, at 864 934-2225.

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS INFRASTRUCTURE

Council OKs using streetlights to improve wireless service Streetlights could soon be used to improve cellphone service and wireless networks in downtown now that Greenville City Council has given final approval to ExteNet Systems Inc. to deploy up to 23 small cell wireless antennas on streetlights and other existing structures in the public right-of-way in the city. Sixteen of those will be in the central business district. ExteNet would replace existing streetlights that are similar in size and appearance with streetlights that are designed to house and conceal antennas and wireless equipment. Verizon Wireless will use the small cells. According to Eric Lovvorn, ExteNet’s external relations director, once the system is up and running, other wireless companies may be interested in co-locating on those poles. Without the small cells, the system would be overloaded in downtown within a year or two, he said. City officials have said most people will not notice the difference once the new streetlights are installed. The alternative to small-cell wireless antennas would be rooftop cell towers. The antennas are needed because unlimited data plans and the increase in video streaming are straining the networks of wireless companies. Telecommunications equipment and services company Ericsson has predicted that by 2022, monthly mobile data traffic per active smartphone will be 26 gigabytes; 90 percent will come from smartphones. Monthly mobile traffic is currently 6.9 gigabytes. S&P Global Market Intelligence estimated that between 100,000 and 150,000 small cells would be constructed by the end of 2018, and the number is expected to reach 455,000 by 2020 and nearly 800,000 by 2026. Under the nonexclusive franchise agreement, ExteNet will grant the city — at no charge — excess fiber optic capacity in its network that can be used for the city’s security cameras. ExteNet will pay the city rent for city-owned poles it uses. Duke Energy owns most of the streetlights slated for replacement. —Cindy Landrum 6th ANNUAL HENDERSON COUNTY

OPEN STUDIO TOUR One of the biggest free, self-guided driving tours in North Carolina 66 artists and 36 studios

Saturday & Sunday

SEPTEMBER 23 & 24 10:00

AM

- 5:00

PM

Find Tour Map/BookleTs

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HCOST.ORG FREE PREVIEW PARTY

Thursday, September 21, 5-9 PM

Rhythm & Brews, Main Street, Hendersonville NC


09.15.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 17

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

COMMUNITY

STEAM POWERED Upstate companies promote career paths for girls with new event

WORDS BY LEIGH SAVAGE

Hundreds of girls streamed toward the booths, clamoring for the chance to build with Legos, fly drones, and create with chemistry. Others learned about CAD programming and spun in circles as they experienced virtual reality. It’s exactly the scene Denna Mensch had in mind during the planning of Girls’ STEAM Night Out, held for the first time at Mauldin High School on Aug. 31. Mensch, vice president of technology solutions marketing at SYNNEX Corp., said the company’s leadership is dedicated to promoting STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art, and math) and the careers available in those fields. “We started thinking, ‘What can we do to create more awareness for parents, students, and schools?’” Mensch said. In addition to building a diverse and skilled workforce, “We want to invest in girls. We want them to think differently about the career choices they have and make it fun for them.” Fun was the name of the game at the event. One group crowded around a photo booth, taking pictures, and then crowded around a laptop to see the photo manipulated on the screen. Caroline Gantt, a seventh-grader at Mauldin Middle School, was checking out the drones and said she came to see “lots of cool technology.” With an interest in animation, she was drawn to the booths that blended art and technology, such as web design and 3-D printing. The event began to take shape when Cherie McCain, a manager at BMW, spoke with Mensch about STEAM support for girls. The Greenville Health System, Roper Mountain Science Center, and Mauldin High School’s Flash robotics team soon came on board and a committee was formed. With minimal advertising, turnout ex-

pectations were between 100 and 200 participants, but 330 had preregistered by the day of the event. In opening remarks before a packed auditorium, Rowan Brown, a junior at the Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities, told the girls in the crowd how designing and communicating about Lego robotics led to an interest in fiction and poetry, and how the arts and sciences are linked.

Girls’ STEAM Night Out was a collaboration between SYNNEX Corp., BMW, the Greenville Health System, Roper Mountain Science Center, and Mauldin High’s robotics team.

“It is revolutionary for a woman to make a career out of art or science,” she said. “I fully expect each young woman in this room to try their hardest to be this generation’s revolutionaries.” Meghan Walters, a fifth-grader at Green Charter School, said she was inspired by her career options as she waited patiently

Photos provided

Games and activities at the event were intended to spark girls’ interest and curiosity in STEAM subjects.

With minimal advertising, turnout expectations were between 100 and 200 participants, but 330 had preregistered

by the day of the event.

for a chance to build a balloon-powered car using a water bottle. She had just checked out the virtual reality booth and the drones. “Those were really cool,” she said. Her mother, Tammy Walters, said Meghan had brought a flyer home from school and “was super excited to be here,” adding, “It’s nice that there’s a program like this that tells them that it’s okay to be whatever you want to be. The sky’s the limit for girls today.” The female focus fits with the mission of F2F, a community of women in technology careers at SYNNEX and its resellers and partners around the country. F2F — which stands for friend-to-friend, faceto-face, and female-to-female — works to unite women in the IT industry, offering networking, mentoring, philanthropy, and education. “It’s a more male-dominated field, so it’s a way to reach out to associates, vendor partners, and the reseller community and get to know each other,” Mensch said. McCain, a manager in BMW’s engineering department, also has a passion for inspiring young women, having worked with more than 1,500 girls in the past five years promoting automotive careers. “We invite middle school girls to come spend a day with us, tour, and learn,” she said. She was standing with her team at a booth full of cups, pens, candy, and other prizes. Girls clustered around the prize table, but were told they had to ask a question to earn a prize. “We want to get them talking,” McCain said. Several girls stood in silence for several seconds, considering possible questions, when one asked, “How do you make your engines?”


18 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.15.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

COMMUNITY Our Community

Community news, events, and happenings

Our Schools

Activities, awards, and accomplishments

FUNDRAISER

GREENVILLE HIGH SCHOOL

Tickets and sponsorships available for Set Free Alliance Gala

School’s spirit week to benefit SYNNEX Share the Magic

Set Free Alliance (SFA), a nonprofit organization based in Simpsonville that helps rescue children in India from slavery, will hold its third annual Keys to Freedom Gala on Sept. 28 at the TD Convention Center, with special guest speaker Praveen Chakravathy and featuring local artist Jared Emerson. Chakravathy began rescuing children from slavery in his home country of India 11 years ago. Chakravathy has rescued more than 14,000 children who were orphaned, abandoned, or kidnapped. The theme of this year’s gala is REUNITED, which will focus on stories of families who were once torn apart, but have now been reunited through the work of Chakravathy and SFA. Last year, the gala raised more than $500,000. Table sponsorships are still available and individual tickets are $75. For more information, visit setfreealliance.org.

Greenville High School has selected SYNNEX Share the Magic as its 2017 Spirit Week fundraiser beneficiary. Funds raised will help SYNNEX Share the Magic continue its work to help children facing challenges such as life-threatening illnesses, abuse, neglect, or developmental delays. Spirit Week kicked off Sept. 9 and concludes Sept. 15. Greenville High School and J.L. Mann hold a series of fundraising events, competing with each other to raise the most money for their respective charities. A check presentation will take place during halftime of the Greenville High School vs. J.L. Mann football game Sept. 15. Greenville High School students have raised more than $1.3 million since 2008.

E-BOOK

GREENVILLE TECHNICAL COLLEGE

School participates in Hispanic Heritage Month

Connie Cleveland, a leading dog trainer recognized for her work with family dogs and dogs involved in obedience and field trial competitions, as well as dogs exhibiting challenging behavioral problems, has released her first online e-book training product, “Home Study for Your New Puppy: Teaching the Basics.” Cleveland, whose physical facility, the Dog Trainers Workshop, is located in Fountain Inn, is a highly regarded presenter at dog training seminars in both North and South America. The new online e-book includes eight text lessons with 29 training videos featuring Cleveland training puppies of various breeds, demonstrating the topics in each lesson. A free chapter is available for review (no registration is required) at onlineobediencetraining.com/ebooks/lesson-one-sample.

Hispanic Heritage Month runs from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, and there are many events planned to celebrate. Greenville Technical College was scheduled to participate in the Hispanic Heritage Month opening night sponsored by the Hispanic Alliance on Sept. 14 in the Clemson One Building. The event featured a panel conversation focused on the central role of Hispanic youth in the global competitiveness of the Upstate with leaders including Dr. Keith Miller, president of Greenville Technical College. Artwork created by area high school students was sold during the event to raise money for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) student scholarships. Dr. James P. Clements, president of Clemson University, served as keynote speaker. Planned panel participants included W. Carlos Phillips, president and CEO of the Greenville Chamber, and Fernando Fleites, senior vice president of human resources for St. Francis Bon Secours Health System. Anne Marie Stieritz, chief impact officer for Liberty Fellowship, served as panel moderator.

Submit community news items to community@communityjournals.com.

Submit education news items at bit.ly/GJEducation.

Local dog trainer releases e-book

Kick Off Fall Susan McMillen in a New Home REALTOR®

864-238-5498 Susan.McMillen@allentate.com

Allen Tate Upstate Region’s Top Realtor

W NE ING! T S LI

MCRAE PARK

TAYLORS / LAKE ROBINSON AREA

PLANTATION ON PELHAM

CUSTOM 6+BR/6BA, ~1AC LOT, GATED COMMUNITY, 5-FORKS AREA, WALKOUT BSMNT, I/G POOL! #1347595 • $599,900

CUSTOM 6BR/5.5BA, ~6300SF! ~2AC FENCED, WALK-OUT BSMNT, STORAGE, POOL, FRUIT TREES. #1351300 • $599,900

CUSTOM 3BR TOWNHOME, GATED COMMUNITY NEAR DWNTWN GRVL, OFFICE, BONUS RM. #1346534 • $454,900

SUMMERWALK

KNOLLWOOD HEIGHTS

DUFFIE WOODS

4BR/2.5BA W/BONUS RM IN POPULAR N’BORHOOD! HDWDS UP & DOWN, MANY NEW UPGRADES! #1347622 • $267,900

4BR/2.5BA IN SUPER CONVENIENT LOCATION! BACKS TO NATURE! GREAT SCHOOLS! #1349118 • $249,500

4BR/2.5BA IN FANTASTIC CONDITION! AMAZING SCREENED PORCH! A GREAT CHOICE! #1346576 • $239,900


09.15.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 19

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

HOME

Featured Home

420 Longview Terrace, Augusta Road Area 420 Longview Terrace, Greenville, SC 29605

Home Info Price: $463,500 Bedrooms: 3 Baths: 3

MLS: 1351987 Sq. Ft: 1800-1999

Schools: Blythe Elementary, Hughes Middle, and Greenville High Agent: Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 Vmiller@MarchantCo.com

Charming Augusta Road area bungalow, only 10 minutes to Downtown Greenville, and move-in-ready! This renovated home features 3 bedrooms and 3 full baths plus a lower level walk out that is currently being used as a home office/exercise room. This room has multi uses such as an art/music studio or recreation room. You will appreciate the beautiful landscaping and convenience of the automatic gate at the driveway and the garage with automatic door opener. The floorplan is excellent for entertaining with the addition of welcoming outdoor spaces on the large rain deck and screened in porch with access from the dining room and the sunroom. The renovated kitchen features stainless steel appliances and custom built in cabinets.

Two bedrooms and two baths are on the main level. One bedroom with attached full bath can be used as a first floor master. The second floor is the current master suite with lots of closets, and a renovated full bath. Another great feature of this home is the solar power that lowers the energy costs and serves as a back up generator. The deep lot, with alley access, allows for expansion of the home and/or for an additional garage. Updates include: a new architectural roof installed August 2017, upstairs heating and air new as of August 2017, and main floor heating and air replaced in June 2010.

864.430.6602 “Valerie Miller Properties is proud to welcome Realtors Lisa Morris and Chris Drewer to our growing and dynamic team. Valerie Miller Properties began at The Marchant Company 14 years ago and we have just completed our most successful month in June of 2017 with 11 transactions producing over $4 Million in closed sales. We are expecting 2017 to be a record year! It is our team’s privilege and pleasure to be the trusted advisors for our wonderful clients.”

Signature Team of the Year 2016 Volume Sales Team of the Year 2016 Highest Average Sales Price Team of the Year 2016 Unit Sales Team of the Year 2016 Award Winning Agent 2007-2016


20 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.15.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

HOME : On the market Chanticleer • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Augusta Road • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

509 E Seven Oaks Dr. · $839,000 · MLS# 1351609

127 Seminole Drive · $829,000 · MLS# 1350589

5BR/5BA Beautifully updated home on one full acre! Move in ready. Master suit on main with trey ceiling. Don’t miss it! E Faris Road to Michaux. Left on E Seven Oaks.

5BR/4.5BA Custom built! Reclaimed heart of pine flooring, 10 foot ceilings, spacious main living area, private backyard. Master suite on main. W Faris to Left on Osceola. Slight left on Seminole

Contact: Blair Miller 430-7708 Wilson Associates

Contact: Blair Miller 430-7708 Wilson Associates

Augusta Road • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Roper Mtn Rd. Area • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

7A Meyers Drive · $774,900 · MLS# 1351072

2392 Roper Mtn Road · $739,900 · MLS# 1349708

4BR/3f2hBA Newer construction in heart of Augusta Road. Spacious rooms and one of a kind kitchen. Luxurious master suite. Must see! Augusta Drive to Westminster. Right on Waccamaw. Right on Meyers.

5BR/5.5BA 4 private acres on Eastside, only 20 minutes to Downtown Greenville. Luxurious with spacious rooms, attached 2BR/2BA suite, and more! I-85 North, right on Hwy. 14, left on Roper Mountain.

Contact: Blair Miller 430-7708 Wilson Associates

Contact: Valerie Miller 430-6602 The Marchant Company

Foxcroft

Kilgore Farms • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

209 Stonehedge Drive · $325,000 · MLS# 1352034

10 Brookton Court · $345,900 · MLS# 1346833

5BR/3.5BA +bonus(3600+sf). Ready for buyer willing to do full cosmetic renovation. Spacious living area/large eat-in kitchenincluding new cabinets/new stainless steel appliances. Level lot. Home is sold in as-is condition.

5BR/4BA Immuculate & Move In Ready! Is what best describes the 5/4 home! Many upgrades throughtout! painting, hardwood, S/S/ appliances. Woodruff Road to Kilgore Farms rt on Ashby Grove

Contact: Maggie Aiken 616-4280 BHHS C Dan Joyner REALTORS

Contact: Lisa Antonelli-McDowell 421-3072 Allen Tate Realtors

Travelers Rest

to ho

P

il

va ta

no

e abl

Hwy 25/Hwy 276 · $210,000 Mixed use commercial. Positive income stream on this sought after location.

Contact: Joe Vaughn 828-899-4000 JJ Vaughn & Assoc.

Advertise your home with us Contact:

Caroline Spivey 864-679-1229 cspivey@communityjournals.com


OPEN SUNDAY, SEPT. 17 from 2-4PM THORNBLADE

CARISBROOKE

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/JW7EZ9/903-Thornblade-Boulevard-Greer-SC-1346597

STONEHAVEN

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/DMJAHZ/804-Ladykirk-Lane-Greer-SC-1348826

903 Thornblade Blvd • 6BR/4.5BA $799,900 · MLS# 1346597 David Reese · 905-5453 CODE 4417043

804 Ladykirk Lane • 5BR/4.5BA

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/E6XSZC/148-Fort-Drive-Simpsonville-SC-1339958

117 Millstone Way • 4BR/3.5BA

$569,900 · MLS# 1348826 Lillian Lever · 979-7002 CODE 4483487

MIDDLE CREEK

148 Fort Drive • 5BR/4.5BA

$419,900 · MLS# 1349682 Brittney Bolt · 991-7761 CODE 4509681

KILGORE FARMS

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/FGZAJE/109-Shefwood-Drive-Easley-SC-1339126

KILGORE FARMS

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/DRVF8R/117-Millstone-Way-Simpsonville-SC-1349682

$375,000 · MLS# 1339958 Sean Keagy · 230-1348 CODE 4222399

LYMAN/GREER

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/HA6CVY/300-Kilgore-Farms-Circle-Simpsonville-SC-1347083

ALSO OPEN

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/BQKVXT/126-Chatim-Ridge-Court-Lyman-SC-1350175

CHESTNUT POND

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/T6VQCK/405-Southern-Beech-Court-Simpsonville-SC-1348465

405 Southern Beech Ct. • 4BR/4.5BA $665,000 · MLS# 1348465 CODE 4473024 Carole Atkison · 787-1067

COVEY HILL

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/7WG8F5/5-Covey-Hill-Lane-Greenville-SC-1334087

109 Shefwood Drive • 5BR/3.5BA $345,000 · MLS# 1339126 Angela Harmon · 508-4462 CODE 4198633

300 Kilgore Farms Cir • 4BR/2.5BA $339,900 · MLS# 1347083 Melissa Morrell · 918-1734 CODE 4433897

126 Chatim Ridge Ct. • 4BR/2.5BA

5 Covey Hill Lane • 4BR/3.5BA

$269,800 · MLS# 1350175 Robyn Gillis · 915-5723 CODE 4523585

$475,000 · MLS# 1334087 CODE 4028456 Ted Green · 684-8789

OPEN NEW COMMUNITIES

CONNORS CREEK

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/LZXJAD/5-CONNORS-CREEK-Court-Simpsonville-SC-1349225

Alta Vista Place upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/VFMPCU

Oaks at Woodfin Ridge

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/HAPBF2/112-Southern-Oaks-Drive-Inman-SC-240983

Tues.-Sat. 11 am-5pm, Sun. 2-4 pm Units starting @ $949,000 CODE 2931606 AltaVistaPlace.com 622-5253

Sat. 1-6 pm Homes starting @ $247,900 112 Southern Oaks Dr. CODE 4165177 Don Hazzard 909-0141

Kensington Creek

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/CNG8RY/630-Cub-Branch-Drive-Spartanburg-SC-241013

Sat. 1-6 pm Homes starting @ $233,100 603 Cub Branch Road CODE 4165183 Don Hazzard 909-0141

Cureton Place

Open Sun. 2-4 pm Units starting @ $400,000 15 Cureton St. • CODE 3418021 Becky Orders 270-0743 Leigh Irwin 380-7755 curetonplace.com

5 Connors Creek Ct • 5BR/4.5BA $449,000 · MLS# 1349225 CODE 4495607 Liz Nunnally · 415-7617

EASTOVER/NICHOLTOWN

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/NHLK8M/10-Beechwood-Avenue-Greenville-SC-1351017

10 Beechwood Ave • 3BR/2BA

$299,000 · MLS# 1351017 CODE 4549839 Kelsey Bishop · (404) 308-1524

LOCKELAND PARK

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/4FLMM8/217-Sleepy-River-Road-Simpsonville-SC-1351912

217 Sleepy River Rd. • 3BR/2BA $184,900 · MLS# 1351912 CODE 4573856 Sarah Georges · 404-9842

Every home has a story Every to tell.home has a story to tell. A great Realtor knows every chapter by heart. A great Realtor knows

NOW IN THE WEEKEND UPDATE

Text each property’s unique CODE to 67299 for pictures and details.

every

Your story matters to us … contact us today to get started on your next chapter.

chapter by heart.

Your story matters us ... contact us today Every home has a tostory to tell. to get started on your next chapter. A great Realtor knows every chapter by heart.

Agents on call this weekend

Your story matters to us ... contact us today to get started on your next chapter. Mike Atkison 616-9168 N. Pleasantburg Dr.

Vickie Given 879-4239 Greer

Avril Caviness 201-6860 Prop. Mgmt.

David Reece 905-5453 Pelham Road

Kaaren Anderson 979-9954 Garlington Road

Twila Kingsmore 525-6665 Easley

Linda Bobo 982-8322 Simpsonville

Keith Boling 419-6903 Augusta Road

Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at cdanjoyner.com ©2017 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently owned and operated franchisee of BHH Affiliates , LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeService of America, Inc.® Equal Housing Opportunity.


We bring the world to your doorstep. LUXURY LISTING

LUXURY LISTING

LUXURY LISTING

275 Montgomery Drive, Spartanburg $3,250,000 MLS#1350714 Damian Hall Group 828-808-8305

45 Falling Star Way, Cliffs at Glassy $2,999,999 MLS#1346484 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918

8 Moss Falls Lane, Cliffs at Glassy $1,945,000 MLS#1346522 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918

UNDER CONTRACT

HISTORIC

5 Autumn View Ridge, Natures Watch $719,900 MLS#1346304 Lonnie Adamson 864-385-4659

1551 Highway 56, Spartanburg $675,000 MLS#1347108 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918 Cynthia Jenkins 843-696-7891

LUXURY LISTING

136 High Rock Ridge Drive, Cliffs at Glassy $1,100,000 MLS#1345766 Shannon Donahoo 864-329-7345

NEW LISTING

111 Foggy Cut Lane, Cliffs at Glassy $645,500 MLS#1346049 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918

416 Santa Cruz Way, Courtyards on West Georgia $393,928 MLS#1352199 Holly May 864-640-1959

305 Shoally Lane, Shoally Ridge $269,900 MLS#1348201 Joe Gobbett 864-553-1998

408 Gassaway Street, Central $252,000 MLS#1350967 Nancy King 864-414-8701

134 Herd Park Court, Rockwell Plantation $194,600 MLS#20183398 Nancy King 864-414-8701

110 Awendaw Way, Townes at Cardinal Creek $190,000 MLS#1351541 Damian Hall Group 828-808-8305

UNDER CONTRACT

30 Vaughn’s Mill Court, Hamptons Grant $429,900 MLS#1343442 Lana Smith 864-608-8313

UNDER CONTRACT

313 Summit Drive, North Main $210,000 MLS#1351750 Holly May 864-640-1959

1 Shinleaf Drive, Dove Tree $324,500 MLS#1349486 Helen Sherman 864-593-7222

UNDER CONTRACT

25 Brookdale Avenue, Fair Heights $199,900 MLS#1349764 Shannon Donahoo 864-329-7345

BlackStreamInternational.com


09.15.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 23

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HOME Featured Home

Cherokee Valley

11 Silkvine Court, Travelers Rest, SC

Home Info Price: $412,900 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 3 Lot Size: 0.62 Acres

MLS: 1327770 Sq. Ft: 2,800-2,900

Schools: Tigerville Elementary, Blue Ridge Middle, and Boiling Springs High Agent: Stan McAlister 864.292.0400 | stan@builderpeople.com

There’s nothing quite like a two-story family room—the high ceilings create a feeling of spaciousness that nothing else can replicate. So, with the Southport, we decided to start that openness right at the front door: the two-story foyer flows seamlessly into the two-story family room. The kitchen connects to the family room, but a few well-placed walls allow for a degree of privacy (and additional space for cabinets). The formal dining room also connects easily with the kitchen, simplifying large meals. We tucked the

downstairs guest suite into a corner of its own, along with a full bathroom. The master suite occupies nearly an entire wing of the house: with a sitting area, bedroom, dual closets, and a large, well-appointed bathroom. We also angled the entrance to the master suite with a small entry hallway (reducing the line of sight from the family room). Upstairs, you’ll find two bedrooms (each with walk-in closets), a bonus room, loft, and full bathroom. The upstairs loft overlooks the family room and makes a great spot for a wide variety of uses.

Real Estate News

Coldwell Banker Caine Announces New Spartanburg Headquarters Coldwell Banker Caine is proud to announce the location of its future Spartanburg headquarters at 151 South Daniel Morgan Avenue. Renovation construction began on August 15 to the building that once housed Gilbert’s Shoes and most recently, Iron Yard. Renovations to the structure will yield 7,000 square feet of modern office space, equipped with innovative technology, industrial design notes, and

community engagement opportunities. To further partner with the Spartanburg community, the office will feature an art gallery modeled after the highly successful Main Street Gallery in downtown Greenville, where local artists will enjoy quarterly exhibitions and opening events. The outdoor space will include a grill, patio, and bocce court. Coldwell Banker Caine is collaborating with SHLTR Architects, Rescom Construction, and Amy Emery Interior Design to facilitate renovations, which are scheduled for completion at the end of 2017. continued on PAGE 25


24 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.15.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

HOME

SOLD: Greenville Transactions For the week of Aug. 14 – 18, 2017 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

HILLSBOROUGH $8,800,000 $3,187,500 HOLLINGSWORTH WOODRUFF RD & ROCKY $1,490,050 $1,235,000 KINGSBRIDGE $985,000 VERDAE COMMONS $775,000 $710,000 TAMARON PARKE $680,000 $650,000 $600,000 GRIFFITH FARM $564,000 GRIFFITH FARM $564,000 W.B. SIMMONS $556,800 BARRINGTON PARK $545,000 $540,000 MAHAFFEY PLANTATION $525,000 MILLER’S POND $518,600 GOWER ESTATES $510,000 RIVER OAKS $497,000 FIVE FORKS PLANTATION $465,000 VALLEY OAKS $455,000 RIVER OAKS $436,000 KILGORE FARMS $435,000 $430,000 SILVER MEADOWS $430,000 BOTANY WOODS $430,000 WEATHERSTONE $425,999 ARBOR WOODS $425,000 CLEAR SPRINGS $422,500 GREEN VALLEY ESTATES $409,000 WATERS RUN $399,135 $398,000 WATERSTONE COTTAGES $389,900 THE VILLAS @ OAK GROVE $383,800 $380,000 RIDGEWATER $367,000 PLANTATION GREENE $365,500 CARILION $361,754 $360,000 BELSHIRE $351,297 ONEAL VILLAGE $350,965 BENNETTS GROVE $350,000 $345,000 STRATFORD FOREST $338,900 WOODLAND CHASE $333,500 SHELLBROOK PLANTATION $331,857 BENNINGTON $325,000 $325,000 $319,000 TUSCAN WOODS $317,000 BELSHIRE $315,485 HOLLY TRACE $312,000 THE LOFTS AT MILLS MILL $312,000 CARTERS GROVE $310,000 VERDMONT $305,900 SHELLBROOK PLANTATION $304,000 BROWNSTONE MEADOWS $296,220 BRIDGEWATER $292,500 THE TOWNES AT FIVE FORKS $291,480 CARSON’S POND $290,000 GRAYSON PARK $289,440 THE OAKS AT FOWLER $288,000

ACDC HOLDINGS GROUP LLC 313 MAIN STREET PARTNERS VERDAE PROPERTIES LLC DAB STANDARD HOLDINGS LL STEENHAUSEN JOHN J VERDAE PROPERTIES LLC CREDIT SHELTER TRUST ORDERS DAVID K HAEFNER ANN K (JTWROS) SHERMAN JESSE FISHER DENNIS W (JTWROS) NEI GLOBAL RELOCATION CO ECTOR ROBERT C WILLIAMS MARK C DOODLEMOMMA INC REICHHARD CHRISTIAN CASE RODNEY T DICKSON DANIELLE S (JTWR SNEDIGAR JOHN L MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH SUMMERS BARBARA L BOSWELL JAMES E III (JTW VAROLA ANDREA M (JTWROS) FAIREY JAMES HOOVER CUSTOM CONSTRUCTI JONES WILLIAM BURRELL MUNGO HOMES INC MARK III PROPERTIES INC THOMPSON BRIAN F (JTWROS BLACK W DENNIS NVR INC SCHMITT JOHN B HAWKINS RODGER E (JTWROS D R HORTON INC ALKEMA DONALD R MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH SAINZ GUSTAVO A DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL HAUN WILLIAM W NVR INC SABAL HOMES AT ONEAL VIL HUDSON GREGORY L (SURV) PENSKE PROPERTIES LLC HEIN JO ANN O LEINBACH URSULA A (JTWRO MERITAGE HOMES OF S C IN LEWIS JANINE E KOCHER MYRON L AYERS BLAKE A (JTWROS) BOOKER DENISE W NVR INC DOBBINS ROBERT A SCHNEIDER ELIZABETH S JONES REX W DAN RYAN BUILDERS SOUTH STEPHENS EDWARD A KIRKLEN HOMES LLC GROCE KELLIANN (JTWROS) NVR INC ELIASON DIANA L EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL HOWARD ROAD ASSOCIATES L

BUYER

ADDRESS

SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

BUYER

ADDRESS

LIONS GATE CGC LLC LOPATCONG PROPERTIES LLC CHELSEA TOWNHOMES LLC NEST HILLS CAPITAL LLC KENNEMORE KIMBERLY NOWIC CAMPERDOWN PROPERTIES LL 404 GREEN AVENUE LLC GOUGARTY JAMIE M (JTWROS SAM REAL ESTATE GROUP LL HEART OF THE CAROLINA LL NEI GLOBAL RELOCATION CO WILLIAMS MARK C (JTWROS) MP GREENVILLE LLC HOLLEY KAZ L (JTWROS) SIMONS PEGGY E RAST LARRY (JTWROS) CANNON GORDON FRANKLIN J MURRAY RYAN SCOTT (JTWRO MAZERALL DEBORAH A (JTWR YUN JAMES HO JIN (JTWROS MORRIS JASON (JTWROS) SCHAEFER ERIC ALASCIO JEFFREY G (JTWRO MULLINAX JAMES D (JTWROS PAGE KEVIN TODD (JTWROS) MARSHALL ZACHARY T BOOKER DEVIN R (JTWROS) CRESCENT HOMES SC LLC DONRUSSELLO NICHOLE A (J KENDALL KATHERINE J (JTW STRADER DEBORAH S (JTWRO VAN HORN JAMES WHALEY HARRIS DEBRA J SMITH DAVID E (JTWROS) FOSS GREGORY S (JTWROS) JACKSON LERA W SAWYER ROBIN HALPERIN PATRICIA A FUNCK NICHOLAS J MAHMOUD YASSER MILES ANDREW LANE III (J BERISHA EVA (SURV) PROVIDENCE BAPTIST CHURC SMITH SUZANNE VELTRI THOMAS J ANALA NALINIDEVI (JTWROS MILLS CANDACE B (JTWROS) PENKERT ERIC DAVID (JTWR COLE DYLAN BLAKE (JTWROS BENTHALL MICHAEL T (JTWR LLYAS SANA (JTWROS) NEAL ALLISON N (JTWROS) KAISER WILLIAM S (JTWROS RUSSELL MARY J (JTWROS) WONG DAVID STEPHEN (JTWR CHAPMAN DAVID G (JTWROS) MCCAULEY KIMBERYLY S WEBER JAMES A (JTWROS) CARVER BARBARA F (JTWROS MEYER DENISE DRAKULIC LINDSAY (JTWROS D R HORTON INC

888 WOODMERE PL 21 KATIE’S POND RD 124 VERDAE BLVD STE 502 1675 ROLLINS RD UNIT F 200 REGENTS GATE CT 501 HOWELL RD 517 WATTS AVE 2 TAMARON WAY 3031 WHITE HORSE RD 213 E BUTLER RD STE F2 14 REDWING CT 14 REDWING CT 4455 LOWER ROSWELL RD # 680453 4 SOMERSET PL 114 E BUTLER RD 30 GRIFFITH CREEK DR 10 MILLERS POND WAY 202 PIMLICO RD 9 DOESKIN HL 12 OSSABAW LOOP 7 VALLEY OAK DR 208 WILDLIFE TRL 155 FORT DR UNIT 5040 BOX 1051 8 WINDING WALK WAY 104 HEARTHSTONE LN 9 EBENWAY LN 572 SAVANNAH HWY 104 ANGEL FALLS DR 224 FOOT HILLS RD 844 SILVERWOOD WAY 7 LONGVIEW TER 520 FULTON CT 104 OCONELL CT 323 WHITE DR 1 SEDGEWOOD CT 1 SPRING FALLS CT 515 PALLADIO DR 11 ASHLEY AVE 200 BIENVILLE PL 3463 ONEAL CHURCH RD 1 CLEYERA CT 212 HARBIN AVE PO BOX 5666 4 WOODLAND CHASE CT 10 SEASHELL CT 208 WYCLIFFE DR 16 POINSETT AVE 1604 E NORTH ST 101 APPLEWOOD DR 209 CARROLLTON CT 119 CIRCLE SLOPE DR 400 MILLS AVE UNIT 112 101 WESTOVER PL 30 LUCERNE CT 208 OYSTERCATCHER WAY 201 KIRKLEN LN 67 GRAND RIVER LN 201 RAGIN CT 122 POND TERRACE LN 1200 WOODRUFF RD STE H20 8001 ARROWBIRDGE BLVD

STRATTON PLACE WHITEHALL PLANTATION THE TOWNES AT FIVE FORKS TERRA PINES ESTATES COLEMAN SHOALS KNOLLWOOD HEIGHTS STONE ESTATES THE TOWNES AT FIVE FORKS LAKE LANIER SUGAR CREEK LOST RIVER MARES HEAD FARM ASHFORD NEELY FARM - LAUREL BROOK MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS ABBEYHILL PARK COACHMAN PLANTATION CAMELOT COUNTRY MEADOWS MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS FORRESTER WOODS ONEAL VILLAGE NEELY FARM - DEER SPRINGS OAKS AT GILDER CREEK FARM SUMMIT AT PELHAM SPRINGS FORRESTER WOODS HERITAGE POINT GRIFFIN PARK HAWTHORNE RIDGE WILLOW GROVE WILLOW GROVE THE LOFTS AT MILLS MILL KNOLLWOOD HEIGHTS DEVENGER PLACE GRIFFIN PARK WOODRUFF LAKE WOODRUFF LAKE MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS TREYBERN THE EDGE ON NORTH MAIN VICTORIA PARK HALF MILE LAKE RUSTIC ESTATES TANNER’S MILL TOWNES AT BROOKWOOD II SUMMERWALK PEBBLE CREEK VILLAGE BROADMOOR RIVER RIDGE EAST PARK HAWTHORNE RIDGE MORNING MIST FARM MERRIFIELD PARK FAIRVIEW POINTE WILLOW POND RIVERSIDE CHASE

$287,000 $285,000 $282,205 $280,615 $280,000 $279,900 $279,350 $278,125 $276,000 $275,000 $271,912 $270,040 $270,000 $270,000 $270,000 $268,900 $267,265 $264,000 $263,000 $263,000 $262,500 $260,000 $259,905 $259,000 $256,825 $256,500 $250,000 $250,000 $250,000 $250,000 $249,000 $249,000 $245,834 $240,000 $239,400 $239,400 $239,000 $238,400 $236,000 $235,798 $234,900 $234,900 $233,260 $230,000 $230,000 $230,000 $225,000 $225,000 $225,000 $222,000 $221,560 $220,000 $217,000 $217,000 $215,000 $215,000 $214,370 $211,900 $210,000 $210,000 $210,000 $210,000

LADD BENJAMIN K (JTWROS) ROBERTSON MICHAEL T (JTW PETRUS GAIL S (JTWROS) DANTZLER JOHN (JTWROS) BHANDARI BRIJESH S (JTWR CARRUTH MARTIN D JR (SUR JACKSON ANDE M BOONE MICHAEL J MAYNARD DONALD V (JTWROS BOOZER DAVID CRAIG (JTWR FERNANDEZ FELIPE AUGUSTO DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL INMAN JOHANNA TUCKER PATRICIA J LOVE AND FAITH TABERNACL CHAVEZ SADOTH OFELIO III OJO BABATUNDE WATSON MICHAEL L (JTWROS ELLIS JAMES (JTWROS) FOWLER MARLA NOLAN FREDERICK HAMILTON MUELLER JOHN L (JTWROS) PORTER ZACHARY W (JTWROS SHAW JASON L GARDNER JOEL D (JTWROS) JONES DANIEL P (JTWROS) DILL GAIL G (JTWROS) BRENTON CYNTHIA GRIFFIN HANDY JONATHAN F REID HARLEY KEMP TAYLOR ADREAN H ATTARDO DINO C (JTWROS) LANGLOIS JEFFREY TOKSOZ OMER F (JTWROS) D R HORTON INC D R HORTON INC WOODRUFF CHELSI M WATSON DEBBIE (JTWROS) COPPER JAMES R (JTWROS) PARTMAN JAMES E L JR (JT NEI GLOBAL RELOCATION CO AGARWAL ROHIT (JTWROS) PAWLOWSKI MARY LOUISE (J HERRON SHANNON LEE (JTWR JARRETT LEAH C BARTHOLF KEVIN P VISION DEVELOPMENT LLC MORTAZAVI JENNIFER GOEHRING THOMAS J MORT JOSHUA T MAZZARO CATHERINE T SWOFFORD BLAKE S CARROLL THOMAS WALTHER ( CHURCHWELL BENJAMIN M HUFF DANIEL (JTWROS) SPINKS/ADKINS LLC ABERNETHY LINDA T BURD JOHN R (JTWROS) CRAWFORD SEPTEMBER DEMIAN SAMIR H (JTWROS) KENNEDY JAMELLE WHITE ANDREW C

100 COVENTRY RD 112 WATERS REACH LN 205 RAGIN CT 100 DOYLE DR 5 BOXLEAF CT 120 BROCKMAN DR 630 SUMMIT DR 203 RAGIN CT 107 WHITE OAK LN 106 BERRYWOOD CT 10 HEYDON HALL CT 211 CENTURY DR STE 100C 404 CRANDALL DR 17 COVENTRY LN 207 N SANDY BROOK WAY 14 WHITESIDE CT 104 SANDUSKY LN 507 HEATHER GROVE CT 125 SCOTTS BLUFF DR 105 LANCELOT CT 129 OAK WIND CIR 105 COLLINS RD 202 SANDUSKY LN 110 PHEASANT TRL 126 NOBLE ST 304 FARMING CREEK DR 502 GRIMES DR 230 ROCKY TOP DR 220 OVERCREEK RD 111 RICE ST 133 HERITAGE POINT DR 128 AUSTIN BROOK ST 312 LOST LAKE DR 339 SURRYWOOD DR 100 VERDAE BLVD STE 401 100 VERDAE BLVD STE 401 PO BOX 2117 203 EDGEWOOD DR 101 LEEWARD TER 129 AUSTIN BROOK ST 2707 N 118TH ST 27 LAKE VALLEY CT 115 SANDUSKY LN 105 HADDINGTON LN 4A EDGE CT 12 CHADMORE ST PO BOX 304 1108 HALF MILE WAY 106 WATEROAK WAY 124 WHIXLEY LN 769 ELMBROOK DR 400 SUMMERWALK PL 46 MADELINE CIR 202 WOODBURY CIR 6 KINGFISHER DR PO BOX 8624 201 CALAVERA DR 503 TULIP TREE LN 3 MERRIFIELD DR 200 HEATHERMOOR WAY 135 WILLOW POND LN 8 IVY SPRINGS DR

HARRISON AMANDA L (JTWRO MOREHOUSE CHRISTOPHER L NVR INC GENDLIN HOMES LLC LEE JEE-EUN STRANDEMO DIANNE CHANDLE DOWNER JAMES (JTWROS) NVR INC SAUNDERS WILLIAM D BALLENGER JOYCE PARHAM MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH C J N LLC SMITH-MCKINNEY SHIRLEY KOBLER RONALD WORD OF LIFE MINISTRIES JENSEN AARON C (JTWROS) NVR INC BISHOP MICHAEL L HAWKINS SHAY VAUGHN LIVI BOUDREAUX KELLY L (JTWRO ADAMS JAMES MICHAEL (JTW MCCONNELL HOMER E JR NVR INC JOHNSON JOHN A III (JTWR SABAH HOMES AT ONEAL VIL BRADT JEFFREY K SCHMIDT GEORGE KINRIDGE LTD GIBSON SHANNON STANDRIDG BENTHALL MICHAEL T SMITH ANGELA FRIEND (JTW LITTLE BERKELEY H TRUST MERITAGE HOMES OF S C IN SATHYANARAYANARAO NANDAK MARK III PROPERTIES INC MARK III PROPERTIES INC SHUTTERS MARK A BOUKNIGHT STEVEN R (JTWR DOV BER LLC EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL FISHER DANIEL W SR (JTWR NEI GLOBAL RELOCATION CO NVR INC GILLEY JOAN M TOY DAVID ALLAN GREAT SOUTHERN HOMES INC INDEPENDENCE NATIONAL BA NUGENT DAWN MICHELLE (JT JAGER TERI L WOODLIEF REBECCA S (JTWR BROOKWOOD TOWNES LLC VELTRI RENEE (JTWROS) CAMPBELL DAWN J CALLICOAT DONALD A BAUER JEFFREY A WILSON W NEIL MERITAGE HOMES OF S C IN STYSKAL AGNIESZKA CRAWFORD ROONEY M IRREV GERTEN JUERGEN SOUTHSTAR CUSTOM BUILDER CANDU LLC

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Tim Keagy 864-905-3304

Ted Green 864-684-8789

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Angela Harmon 864-508-4462

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HOME Featured Neighborhood

Villas at Carriage Hills & West Georgia 1 Heron Way, Simpsonville, SC 29680

Home Info Price: Starting from $260’s Info: Maintenance-free, all brick patio homes. Private outdoor courtyards. Picturesque streetscapes. Great location near Greenville, I-285, shopping, restaurants & airport. HOA Services Provided: All lawn maintenance, irrigation, mulch applications, weed control, leaf removal, gutter repairs, pressure washing, exterior paint, driveway and sidewalk repair, roof repairs and termite bond Agent: Allison Wallace 704-271-9084 Allison@NewStyleCommunities.com

Live the maintenance-free lifestyle you deserve! So, you’ve been thinking about what life would be like without the hassles of yard work and home maintenance. We understand. If you’re like most of our home buyers, you’ve been thinking about “right-sizing” your next home for a long time. But you don’t want to sacrifice quality and you don’t want to compromise on features. We understand. You need to check out The Villas at Carriage Hills and West Georgia where architecture and natural beauty intersect with a no-maintenance platform where all exterior maintenance is handled by others - giving you the freedom to enjoy your free time.

We’ve designed Carriage Hills and West Georgia with a quaint and intimate streetscape - combined with charming architectural elements and high-quality construction practices. The wellcoordinated community will be one-of-a-kind for the residents of Greenville. You’ll soon discover the benefits of maintenance-free living and the convenience of having all of life’s amenities right outside your front door. You’ll have no need for a lawn mower, edger, hedge trimmer or leaf blower. These services will now be handled by someone else. It’s time for you to enjoy the Maintenance-free Lifestyle.

Real Estate News continued “Since the evolution of our business in 2010, we have built a model of creating experiences in our spaces that reflect the unique, full service approach that makes Caine so unique,” said Stephen Edgerton, President and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “We could not be more proud to bring that vision to Spartanburg through this building. We know it will be a springboard for an incredible work culture for our agents, and even more importantly, connection to the community we call home.”

The Marchant Company Recognizes Agents For Excellent Performance in July 2017 As the Upstate’s “Signature Real Estate Agency,” The Marchant Company is a small boutique business of just 40 agents that is Marchant Riggs Valerie Miller Properties consistently a top performer in Greenville. Slayter The Marchant Company is proud to recogKathy Slayter – Co-Unit Listing Leader Top Volume Sales Leader of the Month nize the following REALTORS for outstand- of the Month Valerie Miller Properties (Clint Miller, ing performance in July 2017. CongratulatTom Marchant –Volume Listing Leader Valerie Miller, Chuck Miller) – Top Unit ed by Seabrook Marchant, broker-in-charge, and Co-Unit Listing Leader of the Month Listing Team, Top Volume Listing Team, agents honored included: Barb Riggs – Top Unit Sales Leader and

continued on PAGE 26


26 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.15.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

All About FLOORING All About of SC FLOORING cd cdof SC HOME cd Real Estate News continued Top Unit Sales Team, and Top Volume Sales Team of the Month

Prowl the Den with the Carolina Panthers and Allen Tate

Andrea Owens-Meadows Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Greenville

What does it take to make a successful NFL team? Hard work and talent, of course, but the logistics and operations that go into supporting the Carolina Panthers and creating the ultimate fan experience are also key components - and extremely interesting. Allen Tate Realtors, an Official Partner of the Carolina Panthers, invites you to Prowl the Den and see for yourself what goes on behind the scenes at Bank of America Stadium. This exclusive tailgate and tour experience - now in its 5th year - offers Panthers fans the opportunity to explore areas not open to the public, including the Panthers’ locker room, training areas, Gridiron Club, PantherVision studio and Bank of America Stadium’s kitchen.  On October 14, 25 lucky winners and their three guests each (friends or family members) will take part in the guided tour of the Panthers’ facilities. The tour will begin with a tailgate party with food, beverages and games. At the end of the tour, one of the 25 tour winners will win a Grand Prize - four suite tickets and four field passes for the  December 24, 2017  home game vs. Tampa, and four replica Carolina Panthers jerseys. Tour winners must be present to win the Grand Prize.  To enter, register at contest.allentate. com or stop by any Allen Tate sales office. No purchase is necessary. Contest is open to North and South Carolina residents age 18 or older at the time of entry, with a valid email address. Winners may bring guests age 5 and older.

Coldwell Banker Caine recently welcomed Andrea OwensMeadows as a residenAll About FLOORING of SC tial sales agent to its Crossword puzzle: page 46 Sudoku puzzle: page 46 Greenville office. Andrea joins Caine with an extensive skillset in Owens-Meadows financial planning. She All About FLOORING of SC has a Bachelor of Science in Accounting with a minor in Financial Management and a Master’s Degree in Professional Accountancy, both from Clemson University. Prior to becoming a REAL• Experienced staff • ExperiencedTOR, staffshe worked in higher education at w larger showroom• New larger showroom Clemson University for over 17 years in • FREE • FREE estimates ’s of the latest styles • 100’s of the latest stylesestimates various leadership roles, including Chief Strategy Officer and Assistant Vice Pres• Financing ident for Finance and Operations. 0’s of beautiful colors • 1000’s of beautiful colors available • Financing available Andrea is looking forward to translat• Experienced staff ing her experience converting data into • New larger showroom responsible financial strategies into her • FREE estimates • 100’s of the latest styles new career, helping her clients achieve • Financing available • 1000’s of beautiful colors their real estate dreams. As a native of the upstate, Andrea is well equipped to ••Experienced staffstaffstaff Newlarger larger showroom Experienced • Experienced • New • •New larger showroom showroom assist clients moving into area or those • FREE estimates • 100’s of the latest styles seeking to make a change. She enjoys • FREE • FREE estimates estimates • 100’s • 100’s of the oflatest the latest styles styles a variety of activities in her free time, • Financing available • 1000’s of beautiful colors including yoga, hiking, running, and • Financing • Financing available available • 1000’s • 1000’s of beautiful of beautiful colors colors weight training. She is also a competitive ball room dancer. LOCATION NEW LOCATION TAYLORS LOCATION TAYLORS LOCATION TRAVELERS REST LOCATION TRAVELERS  “We REST are LOCATION proud to have Andrea join NEW LOCATION TAYLORS LOCATION TRAVELERS LOCATION Pleasantburg Dr 2111k North Pleasantburg 3245C Wade Hampton Dr Blvd 3245C Wade11Hampton Blvd 3598 Hwy (just offREST Hwy 25) 3598 Hwyour 11 Greenville (just off Hwy 25) said Stephen Edgoffice,” 2111k North Pleasantburg Dr 3245C Wade Hampton Blvd • Experienced 3598 Hwy 11 (just off Hwystaff 25) • New larger showroom le, SC 29609 Greenville, SC 29609 Taylors, SC 29687 Taylors, SC 29687 Travelers Rest, SC 29690 Travelers Rest, SC 29690 Greenville, SC 29609 Taylors, SC 29687 Travelers Rest, SC 29690 erton, President and CEO of Coldwell 241-3636 864-241-3636 864-292-8207 864-292-8207 (for appointment) 864-241-3636 864-292-8207864-241-3636 864-241-3636 (for appointment) 864-241-3636 (for appointment) Banker Caine. “Her noteworthy achieve• FREE estimates • 100’s of the latest styles ments and experience across the finance and operations spectrum will be incredNEW LOCATION TAYLORS LOCATION TRAVELERS REST LOCATION • Financing available • 1000’s 2111k of North beautiful Pleasantburg Dr colors 3245C Wade Hampton Blvd 3598 Hwy 11 (just off Hwy 25) ibly valuable to her clients.”

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HOME Featured Neighborhood

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Braxton Ridge

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Home Info

Come explore Braxton Ridge so you too can “Love Where You Live”. Braxton Ridge welcomes you home to Simpsonville, SC. This custom home community encourages the southern hospitality and values that have gotten Simpsonville recognized as one of the 10 Best Towns by Family Circle Magazine and one of the 25 Best Affordable Towns by Money Magazine. Come visit the Arthur Rutenberg Model in the Acadia Community at 220 Saluda Run Trail, Piedmont, SC, to learn more! Now accepting lot reservations!

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American Eagle Builders, Inc., an independent franchise

Real Estate News continued Limit one entry per person. Official rules may be found on the contest registration page. Contest ends at 11:59 p.m. on October 1, 2017. Tour winners will be notified on or before October 6, 2017. “Prowl the Den is an amazing experience. It’s the perfect way to celebrate our 11-year Panthers partnership and share it with some awesome Carolina Panthers fans,” said Pat Riley, president and CEO, Allen Tate Companies.

Andy Turner Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Greenville Coldwell Banker Caine recently welcomed Andy Turner as a residential sales agent to its Greenville office. As a native of Greenville, Andy has strong relationships within the community. He also has immense experience in

industry, working in fine dining and gaining an impeccable knowledge of customer service prior to entering the real estate field. Before joining Caine, Andy was a REALTOR at another upstate firm for six years, where he exceeded his company commission goals for five consecutive years. In his free time, Andy enjoys traveling and spending time with his wife and Turner their two-year-old son. Andy is eager to continue his successful real estate the hospitality career at Caine and to help his clients

make every step of the buying and selling process an enjoyable and comfortable experience. “Adding Andy to the Coldwell Banker Caine family is a true joy,” said Stephen Edgerton, president and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “His passion for his business, love for this community, and incredible sense of true cus-American Eagle B tomer service really are unrivaled. We are excited to watch him continue to flourish.”


EUPHORIA 2017 Biscuits BBQ Chocolate Wine Classes Cycling Brunch & more.

SEPTEMBER 21 - 24


feast: euphoria greenville

THE JOY OF VEGETABLES

Meet the Asheville chef who thinks vegetables are the best part of the meal WORDS BY ANDREW MOORE | PHOTO BY PAUL MEHAFFEY

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sheville, N.C.-based chef Justin Burdett would like you to consider, for a moment, vegetables. Our relationship with veggies remains ambivalent. Sure, we know they’re good for us and that we should eat at least five of them on a daily basis. But many of us still regard veggies as more of a chore than a joy when they appear on our plates. Luckily for our waistlines and cholesterol, Burdett plans to help us appreciate the culinary possibilities of veggies by preparing an organic, plant-based dinner at next week’s Euphoria food festival in downtown Greenville. Burdett, who is executive chef and owner of Local Provisions in Asheville, said the upcoming dinner is a natural fit for his style of cooking. “I was immediately interested when Euphoria contacted me,” he said. “I love steaks and burgers like everyone else, but my mind naturally gravitates to vegetables when I’m in the kitchen. I actually get more excited about preparing a radish than a country ham.” Ironically, Burdett got his first official industry job at 14 years old as a dishwasher at Glen’s BBQ in Snellville, Ga. After graduation, Burdett spent several years working his way up the ranks at various restaurants across the Southeast, including 5&10 in Athens, Ga., and Miller Union in Atlanta. He finally settled down in 2012 and took over Ruka’s Table in Highlands, N.C. Last year, Burdett opened Local Provisions. Burdett said the restaurant’s Southerninspired menu is dominated by a variety of locally sourced veggies. One small entrée, for instance, features pickled asparagus, boiled egg, roasted shallot vinaigrette, and radish spread across a variety of leafy greens. “I think more and more restaurants are putting vegetables on their menus, because there’s a growing demand for healthier food options. But I think too many chefs are still throwing

them on a plate and hoping for the best,” Burdett said. “We’re actually putting the focus on vegetables. Our protein dishes, for instance, are buried in them.” Burdett acknowledged that his veggie obsession is likely a result of Asheville’s rich farming culture. “There are so many farmers here,” he said. “And they grow a wide variety of things. I think they’re one of the biggest reasons I use so many veggies in the kitchen.” Over the years, Burdett has cultivated a hefty list of suppliers, including Common Ground Farm along the South Toe River and Ten Mile Farm in Old Fort, N.C. But one of his most prized purveyors is Evan Chender of The Culinary Gardener in Asheville. “He’s figured out how to grow stuff that’s essentially chef-driven, including sculpit, tetragonia, and other weird bitter greens,” said Burdett. “We actually don’t put the names on the menu. We just say, ‘Evan’s crazy greens.’” Burdett said he would likely incorporate lemon bergamot and other herbs from Chender in his upcoming Euphoria dinner. “I always bring some of his stuff with me when I travel. It’s like my own little bag of tricks, because people usually don’t know what it is.” When Burdett spoke with the Greenville Journal, he hadn’t yet finalized a menu for his plant-based dinner. But he did mention the possibility of serving an ancient grain salad with various root vegetables, including turnips and radishes. “I’ve been brainstorming some things, but the menu is entirely dependent on what my farmers can get me that week,” said Burdett. “They’re always dealing with the weather or some kind of animal that’s gotten into their crops. It’s really just one big waiting game.” The dinner, which will be held at The Loft at Soby’s at 7 p.m. on Sept. 23, will also feature organic wines and cocktails made with organic pressed juice by Xavier Bonnafous of Greenville’s Southern Pressed Juicery. Tickets cost $150.

30 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.15.2017

“I love steaks and burgers like everyone else, but my mind naturally gravitates to vegetables when I’m in the kitchen. I actually get more excited about preparing a radish than a country ham.”

Dig In: An Organic, Plant-Based Dinner with Southern Pressed Juicery Who: Justin Burdett of Local Provisions and Xavier Bonnafous of Southern Pressed Juicery When: Saturday, Sept. 23, at 7 p.m. Where: The Loft at Soby’s, 207 S. Main St. Tickets: $150, bit.ly/2xXt1BH GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM


feast: euphoria greenville

A PERFECT MATCH LaRue Fine Chocolate’s Elizabeth McDaniel wants to help you pair chocolate and liqueur WORDS BY EMILY PIETRAS | PHOTO BY WILL CROOKS

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efore Elizabeth McDaniel decided to follow her passion and open a smallbatch, artisanal chocolate business, she already had a wealth of experience in the food and beverage industry. For a decade, McDaniel worked as a fine wine sales representative and became a certified wine specialist. Originally, McDaniel made chocolates and confections with her niece as a hobby, giving away the treats to friends, family, and partners at various restaurants. When she received positive feedback from chefs and restaurateurs, she took it as a sign to consider pursuing the craft professionally. As a Christmas gift in 2013, McDaniel’s husband presented her with some chocolate courses to take. Her enjoyment of that experience solidified her decision to leave the wine business and strike out on her own. In fall 2014, McDaniel went to Vancouver for a one-week, intensive chocolatier master class. Shortly after, in early 2015, she opened LaRue Fine Chocolate. Today, the confections are sold at loca-

tions throughout Greenville, Easley, and Pickens. Two examples of McDaniel’s creations include The Earl (milk chocolate infused with Earl Grey tea and honey, dipped into dark chocolate and topped with candied lemon peel and lemon salt) and The Scheherazade (milk chocolate infused with orange and cardamom and rolled in pistachio dust). Those two are her personal favorites. McDaniel only uses fair-trade and organic chocolate, which she says was a top priority when beginning her business. “It was important to me, especially with fair-trade, that the farmers get a living wage and that the companies take care of them,” she says. She also uses local ingredients in her chocolates whenever possible, including Bee Well honey (Pickens), Happy Cow Creamery butter (Pelzer), Atlanta Fresh cream (Norcross, Ga.), and Nellie T’s peanut butter (Simpsonville). McDaniel’s background as a wine specialist helped provide a foundation for the creativity needed to come up with her complex, unique varieties of chocolates. “You have to do a lot of flavor profiles and

think about all the different components of wine, so it… just translates naturally to come up with flavors of my chocolates,” she says. That experience also makes McDaniel a perfect fit to lead next weekend’s Euphoria event, Sweet Dreams Are Made of These, an hour-long class on chocolate and liqueur pairings. McDaniel and a representative from Remy Martin, a French firm that produces cognac, plan to offer a white, milk, and dark chocolate to complement three liqueurs: Remy Martin 1738, Cointreau, and Cointreau Noir. Remy Martin 1738 is described as having flavors of “butterscotch and baked spices with hints of dark chocolate.” Cointreau and Cointreau Noir are both orange liqueurs, and the latter is distilled with cognac. When McDaniel spoke with the Greenville Journal, she hadn’t yet finalized which chocolates attendees will sample at the event, but she did say her first instinct was to pair the Cointreau Noir with The Kurtz (dark chocolate ganache enrobed in dark chocolate) or The Doo Yah (dark chocolate with toasted crushed almonds). Sweet dreams, indeed.

Euphoria Classroom: Sweet Dreams Are Made of These When: Saturday, Sept. 23, 3–4 pm. Where: On the Roxx, 74 S. Main St. Tickets: $35 Event is for ages 21+

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feast: euphoria greenville

A LIFELONG LOVE AFFAIR Nashville’s Karl Worley talks about the celebrated Southern art of making biscuits

WORDS BY CINDY LANDRUM PHOTO BY ANDREA BEHRENDS

� Nights. �� Chefs. � Dinners.

Completely unique experiences. THURSDAY & SATURDAY NIGHT

Guest Chef Dinners Save your seat at the table to some of our limited ticket dinners.

Family Roots Dinner at Grits & Groceries

Winner, Winner, Chicken Dinner at the Commerce Club of Greenville

Southern Grown: A Fiery Feast at Quest Brewing

An Upstate Pairing

at Stella’s Southern Brasserie

Dig In: An Organic, Plant-based Dinner at The Loft at Soby’s

Tickets on sale now at

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Greenville Journal 32 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.15.2017

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hef Karl Worley knows a thing or two about biscuits. The Nashville, Tenn.-based chef grew up in rural southern Appalachia, and he remembers his maternal grandmother making biscuits every day — drop biscuits on most days and yeast for special occasions. Worley even wooed his wife, Sarah, with his grandmother’s biscuits while the two were in culinary school in Denver. Today, Worley woos Music City diners at both of his Biscuit Love restaurants. So, what makes a perfect biscuit? That’s a question we asked the chef. For Worley, a perfect biscuit has three components — a good crust, a soft middle, and somebody with which to share it. “The key is love,” he said. “I know that sounds cliché.” Less important to Worley is what type of biscuit it is. “It’s all in what you grew up with. Biscuits are really nostalgic,” he said. “[Southern food and history writer] John Egerton said it best, that food memories are made at the dinner table, not at restaurants.” So, what is Worley’s secret for success? It’s a question common to anybody who has made a hard, horrible biscuit — and that includes most cooks. Worley himself failed when he first tried to make his grandmother’s biscuits. It starts with great ingredients. The flour should be made from soft winter wheat, he said. “If you really love your family,

in South Carolina, use flour from Anson Mills. Hands down, it’s the best flour I’ve ever used,” he said. “They use an old strain of wheat. It’s amazing. It makes a dramatic difference.” Buttermilk should be full fat, Worley said. “If you look at the label and see anything other than milk and culture, don’t buy it. Run.” Then comes technique. For the Family Reserve drop biscuits Worley will make at Euphoria, the key is to use really cold butter. “It gives you pockets of flavor,” he said. And don’t overwork the dough. “It’s one of those muscle memory things,” Worley said. That’s something that new cooks at Biscuit Love often don’t have, the chef said. “If we get a new employee, they overwork it and try to get every little piece of flour worked in. It takes about 10,000 biscuits before they get it right. Of course, they’re making 800 to 1,200 biscuits a night, so it only takes a couple of weeks.” A hot oven and a cast iron skillet help make a really good crust, Worley said. “I am of the school that believes cast iron is the only way to cook biscuits at home,” he said. Now, that you have all of Worley’s tips – and his recipe – it’s time to get flour on your hands and make some biscuits.

Euphoria Classroom: Art of the Biscuit When: Saturday, Sept. 23, 1–2 p.m Where: On the Roxx, 74 S. Main St. Tickets: $35

FAMILY RESERVE BISCUITS Ingredients 2 cups flour, low-protein, all-purpose 3 tbsp. sugar, granulated 2 tsp. baking powder 1 tsp. kosher salt 5 tbsp. butter, very cold 1 cup buttermilk, full fat 2/3 cup heavy cream For shaping 1½ cup flour (low-protein, all-purpose) 4 tbsp. butter, melted Method of Preparation 1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. 2. B  utter the bottom and sides of a 10-inch cast iron skillet. 3. Mix together dry ingredients. 4. Grate the butter into the dry ingredients and cut into dry ingredients. 5. Pour buttermilk and cream into dry ingredients and stir until just combined. It should resemble cottage cheese. 6. Use 4-ounce scoop or spoon to place a dollop of dough into a bowl with the remaining flour. 7. Sprinkle flour on top. Pick up dough ball and gently shake off excess flour. 8. Place into the skillet very close together. 9. Bake for 20 minutes until golden brown and set. 10. Pour butter over biscuits as soon as they are out of the oven. Chef’s note: If using self-rising flour, omit baking powder.

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feast: euphoria greenville

EASY LIVING

Big Easy Bash When: Sept. 23, 7-10 p.m. Where: Trailblazer Park,

Yikes!CALL IKE’S

235 Trailblazer Drive, Travelers Rest Tickets: $85

Get ready to party, NOLA-style, at the Big Easy Bash Tariq Hanna, pastry chef and owner of Sucré in New Orleans, has been recognized in Food + Wine for his delicious éclaires.

WORDS BY ARIEL TURNER

awlins is coming to Euphoria in a big way this year at the inaugural Big Easy Bash on Sept. 23. Held at Trailblazer Park in Travelers Rest, 10 chefs, two food trucks, a dessert cart, NOLA-inspired cocktails, and a traditional New Orleans-style jazz outfit, Soda City Brass Band, will get the good times rolling. Euphoria Associate Director Jennifer Dennis says, in her opinion, this is the must-do event of the entire weekend. For starters, there’ll be a special party guest: a barrel of Spanish cider called a txotx (it’s pronounced “choch,” by the way). When someone yells, “Txotx,” everyone gathers around the barrel and takes turns trying to fill their cup with cider without any hitting the ground. Another draw is the addition of New Orleans pastry chef Tariq Hanna to the Euphoria lineup. Why is this exciting? In 2016, Hanna was honored by Food + Wine, which declared he made “one of the 10 best éclairs in the world.” ’Nuff said. Born and raised in Nigeria and educated in England, Hanna lived in Detroit for 20 years before moving to New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. There he opened Sucré in 2007 with co-partner Joel Dondis. Hanna quickly became a part of the post-Katrina renaissance. At the Big Easy Bash, the pastry chef will be serving his All Things NOLA, a sweet buttery sablé tart with bananas Foster caramel, pecan bread pudding, and whipped meunière ganache. “I feel my dessert is a modern representation of the post-Katrina renaissance of New Orleans by paying homage to some of the most iconic

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flavors that is NOLA,” Hanna says. “This is truly indicative of what my cooking style is, in the sense that I love interpreting classic Americana by making it everything you know but nothing you’ve ever had.” Today, Sucré boasts three storefronts, a Confection Studio, a growing online market, a wholesale business with nationwide distribution, and Salon, Sucré’s first restaurant, tearoom, and cocktail lounge. Salon opened in the French Quarter in spring 2015.

Other chefs joining the Bash include locals Heidi and Joe Trull (Grits & Groceries, Belton), Nick Graves (Restaurant 17, Travelers Rest), and Teryi Youngblood Musolf (formerly of Passerelle Bistro), among other regional notables.

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When someone yells, “Txotx,” everyone gathers around the barrel and takes turns trying to fill their cup with cider without any hitting the ground Hanna says his style of cooking is heavily influenced and inspired by both his Middle Eastern heritage and travels, but he’s also usually influenced by his environment – currently New Orleans – and culinary team. “I moved to New Orleans soon after Hurricane Katrina to open my shop because of the food culture,” he says. “The air in New Orleans itself has a flavor all its own – sometimes a bit funky – so the influence of flavor and local cuisine is every part of what I do.” He adds, “Although I don’t serve traditional New Orleans fare, I can’t help but be inspired by local ingredients, so there is always an underlying tone of local inspiration.”

A craft beer tasting presented by H2E

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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 22 • 6PM TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SIMPSONVILLECHAMBER.COM

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YOUNG GUNS Kid cooks throw down with the help of some of America’s best chefs WORDS BY ARIEL TURNER

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our Greenville County students will get the chance of a lifetime when they cook alongside Michelin-starred chefs in Euphoria’s 2017 Healthy Lunchtime Throwdown. The live cook-off will be held Sept. 24 during the family friendly Sunday Brunch: Fired Up! Michelin-starred chefs Dominique Crenn of Atelier Crenn, Michael Mina of Michael Mina, and Curtis Duffy of Grace will be assisting the young cooks and acting as their sous chefs. The winning recipe will be served in all Greenville County Schools during the 2017-18 school year. The finalists and their dishes are Wyatt

Hampton, 9, East North Street Academy, Cheesy Chicken Broccoli Bake; Jordan Sizemore, 17, Greer High School, Beef Chimichanga; Joshua Davis, 17, Southside High School, Asian Tuna Salad; and Nayha Hussain, 16, Riverside High School, Gobi Manchurian. “The Healthy Lunchtime Throwdown has become an annual event for Euphoria, and a fantastic way for us, as a food festival, to promote healthy eating among children,” says Euphoria festival director, Brianna Shaw, who works closely with partners Greenville County Schools and LiveWell Greenville. The Healthy Lunchtime Throwdown is a cooking competition open to all Greenville County Schools students between the ages of 8 and 17. Entrants were required to submit

healthy, delicious, and economical original recipes that adhere to the USDA’s MyPlate guidelines. MyPlate guidelines, which replaced the food pyramid, suggest proportions for each food group in a single meal, such as filling half of a child’s plate with vegetables and fruits; serving whole grains for at least half of the grains, like oatmeal and brown rice; and substituting fat-free or low-fat milk and water for sugary drinks. Based on these criteria, finalists were selected by a panel of local judges. The Euphoria contest is modeled after former First Lady Michelle Obama’s Healthy Lunchtime Challenge and Kids’ State Dinner, an annual event that promotes healthy eating and healthy lifestyles for children across the United States. “Greenville County Schools is dedicated to providing fresh, healthy meals each day during the school year to the district’s nearly

80,000 students,” says Joe Urban, director of Greenville County Schools Food and Nutrition Services. “Year after year, this competition provides an exciting opportunity to help children across our community understand the importance of balanced nutrition – not to mention the fact that cooking and eating healthy can be fun and rewarding,” Urban adds. Judges for the live cooking competition on the Euphoria Culinary Stage will include Cooking Light’s Hannah Klinger, Urban, LiveWell Greenville’s Sally Wills, and 2016 winner Fiona Baulo.

Sunday Brunch: Fired Up! When: Sunday, Sept. 24, 11 a.m.–2 p.m Where: The West End: Corner of South Main and South Markley streets

Tickets: $55; Free for children ages 4 and under

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ARTS & CULTURE LOGOS THEATRE SHINES THE LIGHT ON A GREAT AMERICAN TRAGEDY IN ‘RADIUM GIRLS’ PAGE

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DAN FORREST SET TO DEBUT NEW COMPOSITION PAGE

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DREW HOLCOMB GETS A LITTLE HELP FROM HIS FRIENDS PAGE

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Mary Beth Smith and Christian Lamas in Logos Theatre's production of "Radium Girls." Photo by Will Crooks

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CULTURE

IN THE DARK Conspiracy, corporate malfeasance, and unheralded heroics drive the hard-hitting drama ‘Radium Girls’ EMILY PIETRAS | ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Nadia Cofer (Nancy Jane Harlan)

epietras@communityjournals.com

Photos by WillIam Crooks

Ben Maciejack (Dr. Flinn)

Nearly a century ago, the American public was fascinated by radium. Touted as a groundbreaking medical remedy, the radioactive element was believed to be a cure-all for ailments ranging from cancer to blindness and arthritis to asthma. The allure and glamour surrounding radium created a marketing frenzy, and the chemical was added in everyday products, such as lipstick and toothpaste. One of the most popular uses of radium was in a revolutionary self-luminescent paint applied to the dials of wristwatches and clocks, some of which were used by the United States military during World War I. In the late 1910s and early 1920s, the U.S. Radium Corporation, located in Orange, N.J., was a major producer of these trendy glow-in-the-dark watches. The company hired teenage girls and young women to paint dials by hand. To ensure accuracy and maximize time, the workers were instructed to “point” the brushes between their lips to keep the bristles sharp as they paint-

Those symptoms gradually became severe — and gruesome. Women lost teeth and sustained painful abscesses that wouldn’t heal. Their bones spontaneously fractured. Some needed their jaws to be removed due to necrosis. ed. The health risks associated with repeatedly ingesting trace amounts of radium were unknown to the workers and, for a time, their employers. As scientists and U.S. Radium Corp. management began to discover the potential dangers of radium, they instituted measures to limit their own exposure. The dial painters, however, weren’t afforded any of these protections. A few years later, they started to complain of minor ailments, like toothaches and sore limbs. Those symptoms gradually became severe — and gruesome. Women lost teeth and sustained painful abscesses that wouldn’t heal. Their bones spontaneously fractured. Some needed their jaws to be removed due to necrosis. Dozens of women died excruciating deaths, and it was all due to the effects of radium poisoning. In an effort to avoid liability for causing this occupational disease, U.S. Radium Corp. continued to lie and dispute findings that pointed to the hazards of radium. In 1927, after a two-year struggle, five of the workers that contracted radium poisoning, led by a woman named Grace Fryer, found a lawyer who was willing to take their case. Although they ended up settling out of court, the reality of radium poisoning could no longer be denied. Grace Fryer is the main character in the fictional historic play “Radium Girls,” which opens at Logos Theatre in Taylors on Friday. The play chronicles Grace’s legal battle against U.S. Radium Corp. and the emotional turmoil it causes for herself as well as her friends and family. “Radium Girls” will be a theater-inthe-round performance, meaning the audience will sit surrounding the stage

in close proximity to the actors. Co-director Nicole Stratton, who is also playing the lead role of Grace, says the staging gives the production an “intimate, cinematic feel” and enhances the “raw and personal” style of acting that the script requires. For Stratton and co-director Zac Johnson — who’s also playing the part of C.B. “Charlie” Lee, the vice president of U.S. Radium Corp. — a main technical challenge that accompanies performing in-the-round is how to handle scene changes. “Radium Girls” frequently changes settings, from an apartment to a factory to the outdoors, so the pair was tasked with figuring out how to change the set quickly and creatively on a smaller stage. In preparing to portray Grace, Stratton says she considered how her own life diverges from her character’s experience. Whereas Stratton is married — her husband, Noah, plays Grace’s boyfriend, Tom — and has a child, Grace is aware that neither of those life milestones is in her future as her illness progresses. Looking at Grace from that empathetic perspective “brings an overwhelming sense of sorrow,” Stratton says. But Grace’s character also conveys an inspiring strength amid adversity. “Even though her life is ending, she’s willing to make a difference for the future. She has a willingness to fight against all the odds,” Stratton says. And while there’s a clear distinction between right and wrong presented in the overarching narrative of “Radium Girls,” Johnson and Stratton stress the importance of presenting all the play’s characters in a nuanced manner. That includes the very people Grace is fighting against, such as Arthur Roeder, the president of U.S. Radium Corp.


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09.15.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 37

LET THERE BE LUX Greenville Chorale begins rehearsing Dan Forrest’s blazingly bright new composition ARIEL TURNER | STAFF

aturner@communityjournals.com

Two visual inspirations for local composer Dan Forrest’s latest composition, “Lux: The Dawn From On High,” came from a summer trip to Europe. One was the Poulnabrone dolmen in western Ireland, a stone tomb that’s more than 5,000 years old. Forrest describes it as “a place of profound beauty and history.” The second was the French cathedral at Reims. “With its incredible use of light and stained glass, right when I was working on a piece about light — it was an utterly transcendent experience to behold it,” he says. “And I’d like to think that some of that feeling worked its way into my piece.” “Lux,” which is the Latin word for light, will premiere Oct. 28 with a performance

by the Greenville Chorale and Greenville Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Bingham Vick Jr. The chorale began rehearsing “Lux” on Sept. 4 with Forrest at the piano. The work was commissioned by longtime Greenville residents Sarah and Gordon Herring. The Greenville Chorale performed Forrest’s first major work, “Requiem for the Living,” in fall 2014. The Bob Jones University-educated Forrest says he was mulling ideas for the piece for more than a year, sketching possibilities for eight to nine months and writing for three to four months. “I’m still orchestrating right now,” he says. “Even after the premiere, there will be continued proofing and editing, and writing smaller chamber ensemble accompaniment versions for publication.” The piece, in standard four to eight vocal parts, consists of five movements. Texts

are drawn from liturgical Latin, ancient chant, Scripture, and modern secular poetry; they’re combined to form a narrative about dawn, specifically the metaphorical aspects of the sunrise and light. Musically, along with standard symphonic orchestration, the work features the vibraphone, a large metal xylophone, which, among other unique aspects, has an electric motor for vibrato. In this piece, it will be played with a stringed double bass bow, Forrest says. Vick says his challenge, now that he has the work in hand, is to recreate what he understands Forrest to be saying in the music. “He and I think much alike when it comes to the interpretation of written music,” Vick says. “Our previous work together has shown that my instincts and understanding as a conductor, and his intentions with the music, are very compatible. He trusts my decisions regarding phrasing, tempo, expression, and that is reassuring to me as the conductor.”

ARTS CALEN DAR SEP T. 15 -21, 2017

Main Street Fridays

Bantum Rooster Sep. 15 ~ 233-2273

SC Children’s Theatre

Pinkalicious the Musical Sep. 16-24 ~ 467-3000 Peace Center

The Bodyguard

Through Sep. 17 ~ 467-3000 Peace Center

Drew Holcomb & the Neighbors Sep. 21 ~ 467-3000 Centre Stage

Four Old Broads

Through Sep. 23 ~ 233-6733 Riverworks Gallery

Works by Paul Yanko

Through Sep. 24 ~ 271-0679 Greenville Center for Creative Arts

Annual Showcase Exhibition Justin Swain (Raymond Berry)

“Even though her life is ending, she’s willing to make a difference for the future. She has a willingness to fight against all the odds.”

Through Sep. 27 ~ 271-0679

Main Street Real Estate Gallery

Works by Kiah Bellows

Through Sep. 30 ~ 250-2850 Greenville Little Theatre

For Johnson, Arthur isn’t simply a cartoon villain. “He’s not caricatured. He’s balanced and three-dimensional. He’s a family man and idealistic,” he says. Despite the overwhelming evidence that points to U.S. Radium Corp.’s culpability, Arthur is in denial that the company is responsible for the women’s illnesses. Although audiences may condemn his willful ignorance, Johnson says Arthur represents a very human tendency: to establish beliefs and continue to hold onto them even if proven wrong. Christian Lamas, who plays Arthur, says that finding some empathy for his character is crucial to delivering a balanced portrayal. “It’s easy to judge, but what would I do if I had all of this to lose?” Lamas says, referring to how Arthur’s future hinges on the success of his company. But while Lamas can admire his character’s drive and business acumen, the

actor acknowledges that Arthur is ultimately “holding onto what he has a little too tightly.” “He has sort of a tunnel vision for success and is willing to hurt other people to get it,” Lamas adds. “He cared about success, but not the people.” Regardless of whether Arthur ultimately comes to regret his choices, his inaction shapes one of the play’s chief lessons. “If something is wrong, and we have a passion and desire to fight it, we’ve got to go out and fight it. No one’s going to fight our battles for us,” Lamas says.

“RADIUM GIRLS” WHEN Sept. 16, 23, and 30 at 2 p.m.; Sept. 15, 22, and 29 at 7 p.m. WHERE 80 School St., Taylors TICKETS $25 INFO theacademyofarts.interticket.com

The Mousetrap

Through Oct. 1 ~ 233-6238 Metro. Arts Council @ Centre Stage

From Her Mind’s Eye: Works by Lin Pulliam

Through Oct. 15 ~ 233-6733 Metropolitan Arts Council

Works by Tom Flowers & Jeanet Dreskin Through Oct. 20 ~ 467-3132

Greenville County Museum of Art

“Victoria Wyeth: My Andy” Through Oct. 22 — 271-7570

Works by Grainger McCoy Through Dec. 31 — 271-7570

Keeping our ARTbeat strong w w w.greenvillearts.com 16 Augusta Street

864. 467.3132


38 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.15.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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“When you sit down to write five or six times in a row and nothing happens, you think, ‘Man, I hope I haven’t lost it.’ There’s certainly a voice in your head that’s like, ‘Oh no, the best is all behind me; I don’t have anything left to say.’”

WRITER’S BLOCK Stuck in a creative rut, Drew Holcomb gets an assist from his band — and crafts a new Tom Pettymeets-Laurel Canyon LP

VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

Let the good times roll. Saturday, September 23

Big Easy Bash N’awlins Jazz, Specialty Cocktails, Signature Food & Guest Chefs — One Good Time. Tickets on sale now at

euphoriagreenville.com Proudly Supported by

Greenville Journal

Success, even in small measures, can be exhilarating and exhausting. Take the Memphis, Tenn., band Drew Holcomb & The Neighbors, for example. Their 2015 album “Medicine” was their 10th release in 10 years, and in many ways their most cohesive. Faced with the departure of his wife, Ellie, from the band (both to raise their children and pursue a solo career), Holcomb dug deeper into songwriting than ever before, mixing a desperately emotional delivery with intricate folk-rock. In response, the band – guitarist Nathan Dugger, bassist Rich Brinsfield, and drummer Jonathan Womble – has an incredibly intuitive feel for Holcomb’s songs, staying in the background when his passionate singing is in the spotlight and surging upward with gritty power when the choruses hit. “Medicine” was a musical high point for Holcomb, and it also turned out to be his biggest commercial success. The independent album very nearly cracked the Top 40 on Billboard’s album charts, hit No. 6 on the Folk Charts, and got good reviews from tastemaking publications like Paste magazine. It also launched one of the longest tours the band had ever done. In the end, Holcomb returned home exhausted. “For the first time in my life, I was creatively spent,” Holcomb says. “I’d poured myself into ‘Medicine’ like never before, and it was a very personal record for me.”

So when Holcomb, who’d always written all The Neighbors’ material, began to write new songs for the all-important follow-up, he found himself coming up dry. “When you sit down to write five or six times in a row and nothing happens, you think, ‘Man, I hope I haven’t lost it,’” Holcomb says. “There’s certainly a voice in your head that’s like, ‘Oh no, the best is all behind me; I don’t have anything left to say.’” What Holcomb needed was an infusion of creativity, and he found it pretty close by. Desperate for inspiration, he invited his lead guitarist and bass player to co-write with him for the first time ever. “I needed to work with other people that I trusted to get me back into a creative headspace,” he says. The result was The Neighbors’ new album, “Souvenir,” which predictably expands the band’s sound further into rock than they’d ever been before, with more intricate arrangements as well. The album, which was largely recorded live in the studio, has a throwback kind of feel that recalls both the more intimate moments of Tom Petty circa “Wildflowers” and the autumnal glow of the Laurel Canyon singer/ songwriter albums of the 1970s. “The record reflects a broader musical backbone that Nathan and Rich brought to the table that I wouldn’t have had on my own,” Holcomb says. “I was certainly hoping it would be that way, and the songs would take on a new life. That’s really the hope with every record — that the songs

will grow and develop. That’s the fun of finding something new; it inspires you.” That joy was short-lived for Holcomb, because during the final stages of recording, he was suddenly struck with a severe case of spinal meningitis that hospitalized him for eight days and left him bedridden for weeks. After leaving the final mixing process to producer Ian Fitchuk and Brinsfield, Holcomb took time off to recover before beginning the tour for “Souvenir,” which will bring the band to the Peace Center’s TD Stage on Thursday. “I think I’ve come out of it being a lot less precious about the music,” Holcomb says. “I want to play by the rules less and write with more people, and be less uptight about the process and thinking there’s only one way to do this. I came out of it more excited about writing, recording, and performing music than I ever have before.”

DREW HOLCOMB & THE NEIGHBORS W/ DEVON GILFILLIAN WHEN Thursday, Sept. 21, 7:30 p.m. WHERE TD Stage, 300 S. Main St. TICKETS $25-$55 INFO 864-467-3000, peacecenter.org


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PIROUETTE AND PIVOT

09.15.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 39

Greenville’s Trusted Provider of In-Home Senior Care

International Ballet takes on Armenian folk, the Rat King, and comedy this season ARIEL TURNER | STAFF

of the ballet world, while also presenting something unfamiliar or completely new – all in hopes that Greenville audiences will International Ballet recently announced fall in love with the art of dance even more its 2017-18 lineup, and it comes with a re- than before,” Kysselova says of the season named fall performance, an old Christmas- offerings. “This season, our audiences will time favorite, and a bit of comedy. The 14th be able to truly enjoy the artistry of our own season offers L’automne, the company’s dearly loved and accomplished local artists, newly renamed signature fall concert; “The as well as incredibly respected and worldNutcracker” in December; renowned guest artists of and the return of the comthe ballet world.” ic full-length ballet “CopThe Cuban ballet duo of pélia” in the spring. Adiarys Almeida and Taras “International Ballet Domitro will guest star in has seen a healthy growth “The Nutcracker” Dec. 2-3 spurt and artistic recogniwith the Greenville Symtion during the last few phony Orchestra and the years,” says executive diPeace Center Concert Hall. rector and founder Lena Executive director and founder International Ballet Forster. “As we are playing Lena Forster and artistic director has chosen the classic an important role in our Vlada Kysselova ballet “Coppélia” to end thriving arts community, we needed to en- its main stage season April 14-15 at the sure our branding showed who we are today Peace Center Gunter Theatre. and our image for the future. Our new brand It’s been two years since the company last is a memorable look that acknowledges our presented a full-length ballet in the spring place in the community we serve.” and seven years since its first presentation “Art itself has the power to hold signifi- of “Coppélia,” a ballet known for its comedic cant meaning in a person’s life,” says artis- moments, cheeky heroine, and lively dancing. tic director Vlada Kysselova. “And we take “International Ballet is growing, and we’re our role as a performing arts organization proud to be able to present a full-length balthat provides these artistic experiences let that will demonstrate both who we are with great intention and respect.” and how we’ve been developing over the The Fall Chamber, now the L’automne, past 14 years,” said director of artistic operwill be held for the first time at the Ware- ations and former company dancer Juliana house Theatre with two performances on Jordan. “This story ballet represents many Nov. 4. The concert will feature excerpts entertaining and artistic aspects of dance, from the exotic ballet “La Bayadere,” theater, comedy, and drama.” with International Ballet Senior Company Tickets for the 2017-18 season go on members Logan Acker, Lydia Acker, and sale Sept. 14. Gabriel Paluszak dancing the featured roles in this tale set in ancient India to the 2017-2018 SEASON music of Ludwig Minkus. International Ballet resident choreograPRODUCTIONS pher Alexander Tressor will also debut an L’AUTOMNE original new work that plays on the four Nov. 4, 2 p.m. & 7 p.m.; The Warehouse seasons and weaves together a mix of culTheatre ($25, $30, $40) tures and musical genres. “THE NUTCRACKER” The 2017 guest artist will be local singer Dec. 2, 7:30 p.m.; Dec. 3, 3 p.m.; Peace and recording artist Mariam Matossian, a Center Concert Hall ($18-55) Canadian of Armenian descent who brings Armenian folk music to life accompanied “COPPÉLIA” April 14, 7:30 p.m., and April 15, 3 p.m.; by cello, percussion, and oud, a traditional Peace Center Gunter Theatre ($35) stringed instrument. “It’s always important to me to include INFO both the beloved and well-known classics internationalballetsc.org or peacecenter.org aturner@communityjournals.com

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40 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.15.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

SEPT. 16

SEPT. 16

FOOD & DRINK

SeptemBrew Fest

MUSIC

2017 Greenville Record Fair Attention all music junkies and collectors: Horizon Records is having a giant record fair on Saturday — and we’re not exaggerating when we say giant. There will be over 40 tables stacked with records and vinyl, 12-inch records, 45s, and CDs. Greenville’s own DJ Tavo will be spinning some tunes while you shop. In addition to the fair, the store will also have an all-day sale. Specials include 20 percent off used vinyl, CDs, books, and DVDs and 10 percent off new vinyl, CDs, books, and DVDs. Sales apply to all genres.

Will Crooks / Staff

Sample over 18 beers from across South Carolina at Swamp Rabbit Brewery’s SeptemBrew fest. In addition to Swamp Rabbit beer available in the taproom, guest breweries will include New Groove Artisan Brewery (Boiling Springs), River Rat Brewery (Columbia), Legal Remedy Brewing Co. (Rock Hill), Revelry Brewing (Charleston), Low Tide Brewing (Johns Island), and Freehouse Brewery (North Charleston). Two food trucks, Ellada Kouzina and Keepin’ It Fresh, will be on site for lunch hours, and another duo, Automatic Taco and Groovy Dawg, will stop by for dinnertime. This event is rain or shine. —Emily Pietras

WHEN Sept. 16, noon–9 p.m. WHERE Swamp Rabbit Brewery, 26 S. Main St., Travelers Rest ADMISSION Free, beer tickets available for purchase INFO facebook.com/swamprabbitbrewery

Will Crooks / Staff

Ten lucky customers will also win $40 gift cards as a thank you from Horizon for community support over the years. They’ll be hidden in the selections of new, used, indie, and import vinyl throughout the store. —Emily Pietras

WHEN Sept. 16, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.; store open 10 a.m.–10 p.m. WHERE Sears Recreation Center at McPherson Park, 100 E. Park Ave. ADMISSION Free INFO facebook.com/horizonrecords

BEETHOVEN THE GREAT Featuring Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony An all-Beethoven concert featuring the mighty “Emperor” Piano Concerto performed by Dmitri Levkovich, as well as one of the most powerful and popular works, Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony.

September 23 at 8:00 p.m. September 24 at 3:00 p.m. Edvard Tchivzhel, Conductor The Peace Center Reserve your seats before it sells out. For tickets call 864-467-3000 or purchase online at greenvillesymphony.org.


09.15.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 41

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

SEPT. 17

CHECK OUT OUR 2017 FALL SEASON

FESTIVAL

Return to the Green

mauldinculturalcenter.org

Back in March, the Return to the Green Irish Cultural Festival had to be postponed due to weather. Nearly six months later, the party is officially back on.

7TH ANNUAL MAULDIN BBQ COOK-OFF

SEPT. 22-23

The festival will include musical performances from the Irish band Dunn Sisters and Celtic band Keltic Kudzu, as well as an Irish dance performance from the Karl Drake School. There will also be plenty of Irish food and drinks. A children’s crafts area will be open from 2–4 p.m.

LIVE MUSIC x CRAFT BEER & WINE x FREE ENTRY

SATURDAY

FRIDAY

11 AM - 3 PM BBQ Cook-off

6 - 9 PM Anything Butt Competition

Another highlight will be the youth and senior hurling exhibition between the Greenville Gaels and the Atlanta Clan na Gael. Hurling is a fast-paced, ball-and-stick contact sport. It is similar to Gaelic football and incorporates various elements of field hockey, rugby, and soccer. —Emily Pietras

LIVE MUSIC BY: Jack Roper and the Weatherman Band Doug Hunt & Burning Daylight

LIVE MUSIC BY: Brooks Dixon Band

LEARN MORE AT MAULDINBBQ.COM

COMEDIAN

WHEN Sept. 17, 1–6 p.m. WHERE Flour Field, 945 S. Main St. ADMISSION Free INFO bit.ly/2xOOAFr

HENRY CHO OCTOBER 7

SEPT. 17 & 18

Doors 7:00 PM Show 7:30 PM

ARTS

TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLINE OR BY PHONE mauldinculturalcenter.org

Indie Craft Parade Makers Collective’s celebration of handcrafted goods and independent artists returns this weekend at the eighth annual Indie Craft Parade. The festival has a dual purpose: to provide makers with a platform to connect with buyers and to increase the community’s support and appreciation for artisans and their creations. Indie Craft Parade will feature more than 80 artists from the across the South selling an assortment of handmade wares, including 2-D art (prints), 3-D art (ceramics, metal, glass, wood), fiber art (felted, woven, crocheted items), wearables (clothing, jewelry, accessories), paper goods (stationery, cards), and other miscellaneous crafts (candles, soaps, food). Will Crooks / Staff

Attendees can also enjoy artisan coffee, temporary tattoos, and a free photo booth throughout the weekend. —Emily Pietras

WHEN Sept. 17, 9 a.m.–6 p.m.; Sept. 18, 11 a.m.–5 p.m. WHERE Huguenot Loft, 101 W. Broad St. ADMISSION $5, children ages 12 and under free INFO makerscollective.org/indiecraftparade

864.335.4862

MAULDIN YOUTH THEATRE PRESENTS

directed by Tim St. Clair II

NOVEMBER

17-18 7:30 PM

NOVEMBER

19

3:00 PM

OPEN AUDITIONS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7 TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLINE OR BY PHONE mauldinculturalcenter.org | 864.335.4862

Mauldin Cultural Center 101 East Butler Road, Mauldin mauldinculturalcenter.org


OCTOBER 13, 14 & 15

Greenville County Museum of Art

Featuring 26 dealers from across the country exhibiting the best antiques, fine and folk art, and design in the Southeast! n Meet lifestyle expert, designer, and author James Farmer! n

n

Presented by

To learn more, visit gcma.org/antiques

GCMA AFAD Journal Ad .indd 2

9/8/17 4:11 PM


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MUSIC

Greenville Heritage Main Street Friday

NOMA Square | 5:30-9:30 p.m. | FREE Kick off the weekend with Main Street Friday. Bring the whole family down for a night of fun. Sept. 15 features Bantum Rooster. gvilleevents.com

SEPT. 16 CONCERT

FRI

hootandhollermusic.bandcamp.com

GARDENING

Small Standard Flower Show

Simpsonville Garden Club Simpsonville Community Center 10 Park St. | FREE The Simpsonville Garden Club will sponsor A Small Standard Flower Show at the South Greenville Fair. simpsonvillegardenclub.com MUSIC

RECREATION

SAT

Kroc Tennis Center | 205 Gibbs St. 5-7 p.m. | Fridays Eligibility requirements: lower limb physical disability, able to independently propel manual and/or power chair. Open to all ages. 864-324-8310 | sarahslc@aol.com

Hagood Mill Historic Site | 138 Hagood Mill Road 11 a.m.-4 p.m. | FREE with $5 parking Some of the best fiddlers in the Southeast will gather to compete for the title of S.C. state champion. visitpickenscounty.com

16

Wheelchair Tennis at the Kroc Center

FRI-SAT

15-16

FESTIVAL

The Enchanted Chalice Renaissance Faire

1135 State Park Road The two-day celebration will include music, comedy, dance, and feats of daring and drama. The theme this year is the “Age of Vikings.” theenchantedchalice.com BUSINESS/PROFESSIONAL

Southeastern Film & Photo Conference Furman University | 3300 Poinsett Highway 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. | Free Friday/$49 ASMP members, $99 others Saturday This event begins with free lectures on Friday and continues Saturday with training and speakers. 803-348-7170 | asmpsc.org brian@dresslerphoto.com COMMUNITY

Trains, Trains & More Trains

Mauldin Cultural Center & Amphitheater 101 E. Butler Road, Mauldin | FREE The Greater Mauldin Chamber of Commerce and the City of Mauldin present the largest push-button operated, interactive layout on the East Coast from the Atlantic Coast S Gaugers. 864-297-1323 | mauldinchamber.org info@mauldinchamber.org FRI-SUN

15-17

MUSIC

Merck Mtn. Fall Jam

Merck Mtn 310 Browning Road, Central | $15 Brother and sister Mark and Sheila Merck host music weekends to benefit Helping Hands of Clemson. It’s a family-friendly event with food, vendors, and free primitive camping. 864-884-2444 | facebook.com/merckmtnevents sheila.merckmtn@gmail.com FRI-OCT

15-29

SEASONAL & HOLIDAY

SCarowinds and the Great Pumpkin Fest

Carowinds | 14523 Carowinds Blvd., Charlotte 7-11:45 p.m. | Cost of Carowinds admission Fear rises when darkness falls and Carowinds is transformed into a “scream park” select nights, 7-11:45 p.m., for SCarowinds. During the day, Carowinds puts the “Wee!” in Halloween with the Great Pumpkin Fest on Saturdays and Sundays, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 704-588-2600 | carowinds.com THRU SAT

16

FAMILY

Story Time & More

Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. | Free with admission This week, kids are following a tiny mouse who

Hoot & Holler w/ Mikey Collins Smiley’s Acoustic Café, 111 Augusta St. 6 p.m. | Free

If it sounds like the Asheville, N.C., duo Hoot & Holler (singer/guitarist Mark Kilianski and singer/fiddle player Amy Alvey) is doing a little more than just playing straight-up old-time acoustic music, it might be because of the strong pedigrees both musicians have. Kilianski and Alvey both have degrees from the Berklee College of Music, Kilianski in jazz composition and Alvey in violin performance. And that, along with some teenage influences, is why you can hear a galaxy of genres and dazzling solos within their music. “It’s a matter of being able to play with different textures,” Alvey says. “Mark’s background is more in rock ‘n’ roll. He was really into Zeppelin, and he was also taking jazz lessons before he got into bluegrass. So he’s got those chops.” Unlike some of the other bands in the old-time genre, the band’s most recent release, “Reasons to Run,” prioritizes having fun with the form over merely recreating it. “There’s two different camps in the traditional music realm,” Alvey says. “You’ve got the party, sloppy tunes side, which is really fun, and then there’s the other side, which is people listening to source recordings and mimicking the original recordings. We like a healthy mix of both.” —Vincent Harris

S.C. State Fiddling Championship

LITERATURE

Fiction Writing Seminar

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 10 a.m.-noon | $25 Led by award-winning novelist and short story writer Ellyn Bache, this seminar touches on key elements fiction writers need to keep in mind. 864-675-0540 | fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com COMMUNITY

Storytelling Workshop

Clemson Area Storytellers TriCounty Technical College, Pendleton | FREE Join Clemson Area StoryTellers for a free workshop with Andy Offutt Irwin. Email names, phone numbers, and emails for all those attending. CASTworkshop2017@gmail.com CONCERT

Fountain Inn Symphony Orchestra’s Season Opener, “New Horizons”

Younts Center for Performing Arts 315 N. Main St., Fountain Inn | 7:30-9:30 p.m. | $20 The Fountain Inn Symphony Orchestra’s 20172018 season kicks off with a program entitled “New Horizons” featuring cellist Yuriy Leonovich performing Schumann’s “Cello Concerto” in A minor. 877-725-8849 info@fountaininnsymphony.org COMMUNITY

Touch a Truck

Greenville County Rec | Westside Park 2700 West Blue Ridge Drive 10 a.m.-2 p.m. | FREE Tow trucks, dump trucks, fire trucks, and more will be on hand for the kids to climb on and explore. 864-467-7055 | GreenvilleRec.com bmihalic@greenvillecounty.org COMMUNITY

names all the colors in his teeny house in the book “Teeny, Tiny Mouse: A Book About Colors” by Laura Leuck. tcmupstate.org

Joe’s Place Grand Opening

LITERATURE

COMMUNITY

Hughes Main Library | 25 Heritage Green Place FREE Meet cookbook authors Alice Randall and Ashley English and explore Southern food traditions. Lead-up programs include History of Barbecue, Sept. 12, and Southern Foods and Film, Sept. 14. 864-527-9293 | greenvillelibrary.org

Growler Haus - Fountain Inn and Unique And Chic Marketplace 206 B New Neely Ferry Road, Mauldin 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Our first annual indoor/outdoor vendor market. Home goods, repurposed, upcycled, jewelry, vintage, food, craft beer, wine and much more.

Southern Author Festival

Joe’s Place Bookstore | 2 Williams St. Zac Attack will perform from 6:30–8:30 p.m. 864-558-0828 | info@joesplacellc.com

First Annual Uniquely Southern Market!

SAT-SUN

16-24

THEATER

“Pinkalicious: The Musical”

South Carolina Children’s Theatre Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre 300 S. Main St. | $18-$27 Pinkalicious loves pink, and after overindulging in pink cupcakes, she wakes up to her dream come true of being pink. 864-467-3000 | scchildrenstheatre.org tickets.peacecenter.org SAT-APR

16-28

RECREATION

Carolina Dance Collaborative

First Baptist Greenville, AYMC Building 10:30-11:30 a.m. | Saturdays thru April 28 $50/month or $15/class Come move with Carolina Dance Collaborative on Saturday mornings as we learn to connect with our bodies, each other, and the concepts of movement. info@CarolinaDanceCollaborative.com SAT-MAY

16-12

FAMILY

Saturday Safaris

Greenville Zoo 150 Cleveland Park Drive | Conservation Station 10 a.m.-noon | Members/$15; nonmembers/$25 Classes are designed to help children (ages 4-6) discover the fascinating world of animals. 864-467-4300 | greenvillezoo.com SUN

17

PERFORMING ARTS

Sundays at 2: Music in the Galleries

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College St. | 2-3 p.m. | FREE Join Greenville Jazz Collective for visual jazz improv inspired by the GCMA galleries. 864-271-7570 | gcma.org | info@gcma.org RECREATION

YMCA Spectrum Sunday

Greenville CAN | Adams Mill Program Center 100 Adams Mill Road, Simpsonville 5-7 p.m. | $5 per family Activities will include swimming, open gym, and arts and crafts. Registration is required. Please sign up to bring a drink or snack to share. Please no snacks containing peanuts. 864-963-3608 signupgenius.com/go/10c0945a9af23a0f94september gmckee@ymcagreenville.org COMMUNITY

Barry Yinger, Plant Explorer

St. John in the Wilderness Parish Hall 1895 Greenville Highway, Flat Rock, N.C. 2 p.m. | FREE The Southeastern chapter of the American Rhododendron Society will present Barry Yinger, well known plant explorer, in a program entitled “Rhododendrons Need Friends, Too.” 828-551-9386 | se-ars.org judychuckvr@gmail.com COMMUNITY

39th Annual Camperdown Reunion

St. Paul’s Church | 304 E. Camperdown Way noon Doors open at noon, and lunch begins at 1 p.m. Attendees are asked to bring vegetables, breads, or desserts. The Camperdown Mills Historical Society’s Museum will be open. 864-242-4598


44 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.15.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CULTURE

SEPT. 17

wvrmgrind.bandcamp.com

WVRM w/ Withered, Tar Hag & All Hell

Radio Room, 110 Poinsett Highway | 9 p.m. | $7

CONCERT

Greenville’s WVRM has been together for four years, regrouping from the ashes of a straight-ahead metal band into something rawer and more punk-rock oriented. Take their most recent release, 2016’s “Heartache,” for example. The album provides all the expected brutal riffs, knotted-up rhythms, and skyscraping vocals, but rather than stretch the songs into the expected seven-minute metal epics, the band gets in, cranks the amps, and gets out with no wasted time. In fact, six of the eight tracks on “Heartache” run less than three minutes. “We started it up to do something less metal than we were going for before, and add in that punk kind of feel,” says singer Ian Nix. “We always loved that old metal, but we were also into grindcore, crust punk, and other faster kind of genres. We wanted heavy, explosive songs but in that punk vein where they’re one or two minutes.” The band is currently recording a split release with another Upstate metal band, Waft, and Nix says they’re proud to be part of the Upstate’s resurgent metal scene. “When I was in high school, the scene was pretty big; there were death metal bands, a lot of hardcore, and thrash. Then it dropped off for a while, but the past few years it’s been coming back really hard.” —Vincent Harris

COMMUNITY

MON

Brewery 85 | 6 Whitlee Court | 1-3 p.m. | $10 Admission gets participants one pint and one hour of pilates. Bring two pilates mats (due to cement floors)or an exercise mat. 864-558-0104 | brewery85.com

Poinsett Club | 807 E. Washington St. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. | $20 Upstate Republican Women are excited to join with the Greenville First Monday Club in wel-

Pilates & Pints

18

COMMUNITY

Upstate Republican Women luncheon

coming Rep. Trey Gowdy. upstaterepublicanwomen@gmail.com THEATER

Ed Asner - “A Man and His Prostate” Centre Stage | 501 River St. 3 and 7 p.m. | $30-$50, $20 meet and greet The show takes you on a journey of pain, anatomy, and laughter – not necessarily in that order. 864-233-6733 | centrestage.org MON-WED

18-20

COMMUNITY

The Pulpit, the Pew & the People’s Conference

Pastors United for Action Daytime: Reedy River Baptist Church 1012 Mauldin Road Evening: Valley Brook Baptist Church 8323 Augusta Road, Pelzer During the day, there will be a worship service being led by Dr. Robert McGowens of Charlotte, N.C., (Sept. 18 at 11 a.m.), Rev. Nelson Rivers III of Charleston (Sept. 19 at 11 a.m.), and a panel discussion (Sept. 20). The evening conference speaker will be Dr. John E. Guns. Nightly service will be held at 7 p.m. 864-283-0639 | UpstatePastors@gmail.com MON-SAT

18-23

FAMILY

Story Time & More: “A Rainbow of My Own”

Children’s Museum of the Upstate | 300 College St. 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. | Free with admission Kids will be reading the book “A Rainbow of My Own” by Don Freeman. tcmupstate.org

TUE

19

FAMILY

Tell Me A Story Theatre presents “Pinkalicious”

South Carolina Children’s Theatre 1200 Pendleton St. 9:30-10 a.m. and 11-11:30 a.m. | $1 A chance for wee ones (Pre-K) to hear a favorite story read and acted out! 864-235-2885 scchildrenstheatre.org COMMUNITY

Drop the Mic: Auditions for TEDxGreenville 2018

Zen | 924 S. Main St. Ten to 12 people will present their idea worth spreading. The audience will vote and the top speaker may be given the opportunity to speak at the main event without having to go through the formal nomination process. tedxgreenville.com COMMUNITY

Monarch Butterflies: Are they the canary in the coal mine?

Upstate Native Plant Society Greenville Technical College J. Vern Smith Auditorium 620 S. Pleasantburg Drive 7 p.m. FREE Dr. Sarah Ross will offer a talk titled Monarch Butterflies, Migration Patterns, and the Importance of Native Plants. scnps.org


09.15.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 45

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

CULTURE CONCERT

SEPT. 21 mygirlmywhiskeyandme.com/#music-section

My Girl, My Whiskey & Me (album release show) Horizon Records, 2 W. Stone Ave. 7 p.m. | Free

Greenville’s My Girl, My Whiskey & Me has a fluid, multifaceted approach to their bluegrass-based sound. On their new album, “In the Ground,” you can hear influences from jazz to progressive rock throughout the 10 rootsyyet-experimental tracks. “We were very much inspired by a lot of different bands, from the Punch Brothers and Trampled by Turtles to Pink Floyd,” says singer and multi-instrumentalist George Beardsworth, who forms the nucleus of the group with singer, percussionist, and guitarist Kelly Colyer. “But I haven’t heard anyone who’s doing exactly what we’re doing. We wanted to take the kind of music we like and expand on it to see if we can make it new and interesting.” The band experiments with their lineup as well, playing shows as a duo, trio, quartet, or quintet, depending on the night. “I think each iteration of the band has something very unique about it,” Beardsworth says. “You can hear us play songs as a duo and then hear those songs in a completely different light when you have these other creative minds coming in.” —Vincent Harris TUE-TUE

19-10

COMMUNITY

Creating Stories from the Write-Side of the Brain

Joe’s Place Bookstore | 2 Williams St. 7-9 p.m. | Tuesdays | Emrys members: $100, Emrys nonembers: $125 An Emrys Writing Room event with Tim Davis. This four-week course requires registration. 864-558-0828 | info@joesplacellc.com emrys.org/creating-stories-workshop WED

20

COMMUNITY

America and the World

EXPAND YOUR PLAYLIST

World Affairs Council Upstate Ogletree Deakins, Conference Center 300 N. Main St. 8:30-10 a.m. | $10/members; $20/nonmembers The World Affairs Council Upstate is pleased to kick-off America and the World, an eight-part monthly lecture series, as part of the Distinguished Speaker Series programming. The first presentation will feature Dr. Akan Malici. The first lecture is titled “Challenges for American Foreign Policy.” 864-631-2188 | upstateinternational.org info@upstateinternational.org WED-SAT

20-30

FAMILY

Random Acts of Science: Ozobot

Children’s Museum of the Upstate | 300 College St. 11:30 a.m. & 3:30 p.m. | Wednesday-Saturday Free with admission Ozobot teaches children about coding by following colorful instructions. tcmupstate.org THU

21

FAMILY

Storytime Thursday

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 10:30 a.m. | FREE This week’s featured story is “The Pout-Pout Fish and the Bully-Bully Shark” by Deborah Diesen and illustrated by Dan Hanna. 864-675-0540 | fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com

SEPTEMBER 21

SWEET PLANTAIN OCT. 12 PEACE CHAMBER CONCERT SERIES

VISUAL ARTS

Third Thursday Tour — “Victoria Wyeth: My Andy”

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College St. 11 a.m.-noon | FREE Join us for a guided tour of “Victoria Wyeth: My Andy,” an intimate look at the Wyeth family story. 864-271-7570 | gcma.org | info@gcma.org COMMUNITY

Wine Class & Tasting

Joe’s Place Bookstore | 2 Williams St. 6:30-8:30 p.m. | Tuesdays | $25 Compare and contrast Old World and New World wines in this first of a series of introductory wine classes. Limited to 10 people. 864-558-0828 | info@joesplacellc.com THU-SAT

21-23

VISUAL ARTS

Breaking the Rules with Gary Bodner

Vino & Van Gogh | 1818 Augusta St., Suite 112 9/21 - 6-9 p.m.-9/22 & 9/23 - 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $450 Join Vino & Van Gogh for a workshop with Gary Bodner to discuss Bodner’s history of painting, points of painting, and theory of color. 864-434-3054 | vinoandvangogh.net

EDDIE PALMIERI

LATIN JAZZ ORCHESTRA

EDDIE AT 80 OCTOBER 19

COMMUNITY

Upstate Republican Women Fall Fundraising Barbecue

Home of Aline and Phillip Kilgore 1504 Parkins Mill Road 5-7:30 p.m. | $25 The Honorable Henry D. and Peggy McMaster will be special guests at this barbecue for a meet and greet with music and fun. 864-787-8100 | bit.ly/2glYvOC

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE? Send your event information and images to calendar@ communityjournals.com by Wednesday at 5 p.m. to be considered for publication in the following week’s Journal.

GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY! peacecenter.org GROUPS

864.467.3000 864.467.3032 @peacecenter


46 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.15.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

Setting out to siege ACROSS 1 Dwelling place: Abbr. 4 Modifying wd. 7 Fail to mention 11 Prez Lincoln 14 Bar checks 18 Artificial fat 20 Relatives of allegories 22 To — (precisely) 23 Mocking remarks from Pluto’s master? 25 Burnett of CNN 26 — Spumante (wine) 27 Schubert’s “The — King” 28 Manet’s forte 29 Actor Claude 30 “No, we’re not going to give the employee a raise”? 37 I, to Franz 40 “Mazel —!” 41 Fed. crash-probing org. 42 Countertenor 43 Very small toll to drive on a road through the Alps? 48 Present from birth 52 To a foreign country 53 Fair-hiring inits. 54 “Der —” (Konrad Adenauer) 56 Ruin totally 57 Fragment 58 Use stitching 60 Quips about a Civil War general?

64 — Boothe Luce 66 Yuletide quaff 68 “— be great if ...” 69 Leeds lav 70 Miser’s reformation into a generous person? 77 Santa — 78 Polly’s “Alice” role 79 — -TURN (street sign) 80 Wafer brand 82 Verbal noun the nitwit uses a lot? 88 Actress Thurman 90 Be inclined 91 British noble 92 “Why Can’t — Friends?” 93 Deutsch article 95 Develop 97 Painting on plaster 99 Concert tour during which a Muppet opens for the “Open Arms” band? 103 Singer Amos 105 Tap-in, e.g. 106 Suffix with north or west 107 Opposite NNW 108 “Stop grazing and return to your barn”? 115 Bedeck 116 Air safety org. 117 Stimpy’s pal 118 Close 122 Certain Slav 123 Very inexpensive part of a ship’s hull?

By Frank Longo

129 Different 130 Maryland suburb of D.C. 131 Motorist’s guide 132 Inuit’s ride 133 1040 org. 134 With 11-Down, “Don’t drop your guard!” 135 Tent stake 136 Gold, to Spaniards DOWN 1 City in Italia 2 Yalies 3 Religious faction 4 Enjoyed food 5 Sahara-like 6 1567-1625 king of Scotland 7 Great riches 8 Some parents 9 Infuriation 10 — Mahal 11 See 134-Across 12 Big — (WWI gun) 13 Kin of -trix 14 Korean martial art 15 Upper heart chambers 16 Living thing 17 Taste, e.g. 19 Power tool brand 21 Trounce 24 Mork’s home planet 29 Env. notation 31 R&B singer — James 32 Frogs’ kin 33 Group values 34 Ad Council ad, for short 35 “Son of,” in Arab names 36 Property transferor 37 Windows ad catchphrase 38 Steel-gray metallic element 39 “Woo-hoo!” 44 — Dame 45 — the scene (having recently arrived) 46 Flower plot 47 Shade tree 49 Totally fine 50 Ascot, e.g. 51 USNA grad. 55 Perfumed powder 59 Make furious 61 Find by chance 62 Archaic verb ending 63 “Benny & —” (Johnny Depp film) 65 & others 67 Become liberated 71 Not given under 112Down 72 Winter woe 73 Logical 74 OPEC ship 75 Gathers bit by bit 76 Tickles a lot 81 Without batting — 82 Furry TV alien 83 Opposite of 118-Across 84 Lofty verse 85 Place to find pearls 86 Peter out 87 Sudden — 89 Squirrel’s bit 94 Put between 96 Ladder step 98 Quarter, e.g. 100 Tach reading 101 “For shame!”

102 Dada artist 104 Less certain 108 Valises, e.g. 109 Novelist Scott 110 Eponymous code creator 111 Balsa boats 112 Witness’ promise 113 Cousin, for one: Abbr. 114 Sooner city 119 Sailors’ saint

Sudoku

Every Wednesday in

SEPTEMBER Located at Falls Park • Movies start at dusk

6 13

Jumanji (1995) Action, Family

north by northwest (1959) Action, Adventure, Crime

WWW.GVILLEEVENTS.COM

20 27

the man who shot liberty valance (1962) Western

PRINCESS BRIDE (1987) Action, Adventure, Comedy

Medium

120 Lab medium 121 Debtor’s woe 123 DOJ agency 124 “Certainly!” 125 May hrs. 126 Harem room 127 — v. Wade 128 Duffel or tote Crossword answers: page 26

by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan

Sudoku answers: page 26


THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that LIDL US Operations, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 1866 Woodruff Road, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than September 17, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110 NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that The Spinx Co. Inc intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 3 Reid School Road, Taylors, SC 29687. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than September 24, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110 NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that The Spinx Co. Inc intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 103 Shaw St., Greenville, SC 29609. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than September 24, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

LEGAL NOTICE RATES ABC Notices $165 Summons, Notices, Foreclosures, etc. $1.20 per line

NOTICE INVITATION TO BID: MILLER PLACE COURT DUPLEX DEVELOPMENT, MAULDIN NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR BIDS for new construction of nine (9) duplex homes for a total of eighteen (18) dwelling units within the City of Mauldin SC. The Greenville County Redevelopment Authority (GCRA) is the developer and federal requirements will apply. Bids are due to GCRA c/o LS3P Associates, Ltd. / 110 West North Street / Greenville, SC 29601 by 5:00PM on November 8, 2017. For information and to request an electronic bid package, contact John Edwards at LS3P Associates, Ltd. 864-272-1228 or johnedwards@LS3P.com. Electronic transmitted bids will be accepted. GCRA is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Local residents, Women & Minority Owned Businesses are encouraged to participate in the bidding process. EOE, EHO.

864.679.1205 | email: aharley@communityjournals.com SUMMONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF OCONEE IN THE FAMILY COURT 2017-DR-37-415 Erica Beth Merchant, Plaintiff, -VS- Kodi Paul Merchant, Defendant. TO THE DEFENDANT ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to Reply to the Complaint of the Plaintiff in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Reply to the Plaintiff upon the undersigned at his office at 1743 Blue Ridge Blvd., Post Office Box 4, Seneca, South Carolina 29679-0004, within THIRTY (30) DAYS after service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to REPLY to the Complaint within that time, Judgement against you will be rendered by default for the relief sought in the Complaint. TO INFANTS UNDER EIGHTEEN YEARS OF AGE, IMPRISONED PERSONS AND INCOMPETENT OR INSANE PERSONS: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED and notified to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad Litem to represent you in this action within THIRTY (30) DAYS after the service of this Summons upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Defendant herein. YOU ARE FURTHER ADVISED of your right to have an attorney represent you in this matter. Should you retain legal counsel, (s)he is directed to advise this Court of such representation, forthwith. Robert K. Whitney Whitney Law Firm P. O. Box 14, Seneca, SC 29679-0014 864-882-1414 fax 885-0675 Attorney for the Plaintiff

PUBLIC SALE NOTICE Notice is hereby given that on 9/23/2017, at 9:00 a.m. at Woodruff Road Storage, 1868 Woodruff Road, Greenville, SC, the undersigned, Woodruff Road Storage will sell at Public Sale by competitive bidding, the personal property heretofore stored with the undersigned by: 1. Unit: A010, Katherine M Flanagan Furniture, Boxes, Misc. 2. Unit: D12, Kory P Johnson Ladders, Tools, Boxes/Misc. 3. Unit B089, Edmund Jacek Golf Clubs, Clothes, Furniture, Misc. 4. Unit: A049, Andrew LaLonde Loveseat, Picture/Mirror, Totes 5. Unit B135, Michael Purser Metal, Clothes/Shoes/Misc. 6. Unit B249, Kristopher A Anderson Toys, Boxes/Misc. 7. Unit C283, Simon Hentschel Boxes/Misc. 8. Unit C157, Alan Matson, Jr. Bags/Boxes/Misc. 9. Unit B154, Deborah Quartey Table, Totes/Boxes/Misc. 10. Unit B154, Lauren Canady Boxes 11. Unit D37, Nora Hussein Cedar Chest, File Cabinets, Boxes, Misc.

SUMMONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS C.A. No: 17-CP-23- 02324 A Kenneth Wheeler and April Wheeler, Plaintiff, vs. Clyde E. Pruitt, Robin K. Pruitt and Washington Mutual Finance, LLC, Defendants. TO THE DEFENDANTS NAMED ABOVE: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to appear and defend by answering the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer on the subscribers at 134 Oakland Avenue, Spartanburg, South Carolina, 29302, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service; and if you fail to do so judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference or that the Court may issue a general Order of Reference of this action to a master/special referee, pursuant to Rule 53, South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure. TALLEY LAW FIRM, P.A. _/s/ Scott F. Talley Scott F. Talley, Esquire (SC Bar 70364) 134 Oakland Avenue Spartanburg, SC 29302 864-595-2966 Attorneys for Plaintiff

Vaccines, spay or neuter, testing & microchip included!

LIS PENDENS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 2017-CP-23Nebraska Alliance Realty Co. Plaintiff, vs. Carolyn H. Jenkins & Bobby C. Jenkins; A. Kevin Hunter II, as Greenville County Tax Collector, And also all other firms and corporations entitled to claim under, by or through the above named Defendants, and all other persons or entities unknown claiming any right, title,) interest, estate in or lien upon the real estate described herein; And also any unknown adults being as a class designated as John Doe; And also any unknown infants or persons under disability being as a class designated as Richard Roe, Defendants TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an action will be commenced in this Court upon the Complaint of the above-named Plaintiff above seeking a Declaratory Judgment to quiet title to the property described herein below in the name of the Plaintiff Property Description: All that certain piece, parcel or lot of land, together with improvements thereon, situate, lying and being on the southern side of Lanewood Drive in te County of Greenville, State of South Carlina, being known and designated as Lot No. 52 and the adjoining one-half of Lot No. 51, on a plat of Pineforest recorded in plat Book QQ at Page 106-107 in the Office of the Register of Deeds Office for Greenville County, South Carolina. Reference is made to said plat for a more detailed description. LESS however and portion previously conveyed and subject to restrictions of record. Derivation: This being the same property conveyed to Carolyn H. Every, n/k/a Carolyn H. Jenkins and Alton Lyon Every by Wooten Corp. recorded in Deed Book 839 at Page 620 in the Register of Deeds for Greenville County on March 14, 1968; thereafter Alton Lyon Avery conveyed his one-half interest to Carolyn H. Jenkins by Deed recorded in Deed Book 958 at Page 253 on October 19, 1972. Carolyn H. Jenkins thereafter conveyed a one-half interest to Bobby C. Jenkins by deed recorded in Deed Book 1029 at Page 566 on December 31, 1975. TMS#009.04-13-004.00 Degenhart & Degenhart Law, LLC 2131 Park Street Columbia, SC 29201 (803) 771-6050 By: Mary Nell Degenhart Attorneys for the Plaintiff

COUNTY OF GREENVILLE, GOVERNMENT, GREENVILLE SOUTH CAROLINA COMMUNITY RELATIONS COORDINATOR DEPARTMENT: SOIL AND WATER SALARY: $39,673.99 Description: Under direction of the Education Program Coordinator, is responsible for assisting with design, development, implementation, and evaluation of educational and promotional programs that meet Greenville County Government's NPDES Storm Water Education requirements. Responsible for generating strong public awareness of the agency through press releases, interaction with the media, marketing messages, public displays, and public speaking appearances. This includes the conceptualization, design, and distribution of materials in a variety of media that reach the intended audiences; oversight of the production of these materials; performing public speaking engagements to various audiences of all ages; and participating in a variety of special educational projects such as demonstrations, festivals, trade shows and training seminars. Responsible for evaluating success of programs through constituent and stakeholder baseline and post-program surveys and analysis. A bachelor's degree in Marketing Business Management, Political Science, Conservation, or related public relations field, with some knowledge and experience in storm water regulations, or any equivalent combination of education, training and experience which provides the required skills, knowledge and abilities (3-5 years of education/advertising/ m a r k e ti n g /c ommuni c a t i on experience or 3 -5 years of creative/design experience; 1-3 years of computer and desktop publishing experience). Video production skills are a plus. Grass-roots campaign development and coordination experience or experience in a non-profit organization is a plus. Ability to work in a team environment; must possess a valid South Carolina Driver's License. Closing Date: September 08, 2017 Apply online at: www.greenvillecounty.org County of Greenville is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, or protected veteran status.

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: SPORTS LIGHTING REMOVAL & REPLACEMENT-MESA, Thursday, October 5, 2017, 3:00 P.M. A pre-proposal meeting and site visit will be held at 9:00 A.M., EDT, Wednesday, September 20, 2017 , at Greenville County Procurement Services Office, County Square, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601. Solicitations can be found at http://www.greenvillecounty. org/Purchasing/ or by calling 864-467-7200.

AMENDED SUMMONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS C.A. No: 17-CP-23-00184 35 Hummingbird Co., LLC, Plaintiff, vs. First Investors Holding, LLC, Central Carolina Bank, Defendants. TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to appear and defend by answering the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer on the subscribers at 134 Oakland Avenue, Spartanburg, South Carolina, 29302, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service; and if you fail to do so judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. TALLEY LAW FIRM, P.A. Scott F. Talley, Esquire (SC Bar 70364) 134 Oakland Avenue Spartanburg, SC 29302 864-595-2966 Attorneys for Plaintiff

SUMMONS (Non-Jury) STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS 2017-CP-23-05126 Gendlin Homes, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. James R. Brockman, Yolanda Miles Brockman, Billy Young, Bernice Barber, Greenville Hospital System, The State of South Carolina, The City of Greenville, and all unknown parties who may have some right, title, or interest in the property having Tax Map #0119.00-07-005.00, Defendants YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you and to serve a copy of your Answer to this Complaint upon subscriber at 11 Whitsett Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the date of such service. If you shall fail to answer the Complaint within that time, the Plaintiffs shall proceed in default proceedings against you and shall apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint. TO: INFANT(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (AN IMPRISONED PERSON) YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a Guardian ad Litem to represent you in this action within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. TO: NFANTS(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (INCOMPETENT OR INSANE) AND TO, (GENERAL TESTAMENTARY GUARDIAN) (COMMITTEE) WITH WHOM S(HE) RESIDE(S): YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad Litem to represent said infant(s) under fourteen years of age (said incompetent or insane person) within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. LIS PENDENS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an action has been commenced in the Court upon complaint of Plaintiff against Defendants to quiet title on property located in Greenville County. The subject property is described as follows: ALL that piece, parcel or lot of land lying and being in State of South Carolina, County of Greenville, designated as Lot 15 Block C on plat of the lands of Melville Land Company shown in plat book A, page 97 recorded in the Register of Deeds Office for Greenville County. References made to said plat for a more detailed description. LESS however any portion previously conveyed and subject to restrictions of record. TAX MAP #0119.00-07-005.00 C. Richard Stewart Attorney for Plaintiff 11 Whitsett Street Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 235-2019 SC Bar No: 5346

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PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE THERE WILL BE A PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE THE GREENVILLE COUNTY PROPERTY MAINTENANCE CODE, HEARING OFFICER ON THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2017 AT 10:00AM, IN CONFERENCE ROOM A, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, FOR THE PURPOSE OF HEARING THOSE PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE CASES PERTAINING TO THE HABITABILITY OF STRUCTURE(S) ON THE PROPERTY. A. CASE NO: 17-2024 PROPERTY OWNER: LARRY DALE PRUITT & CAROL JEAN PROPERTY LOCATION: 123 ODOM CIRCLE TAX MAP NUMBER: 0147.0006-007.00 COUNCIL DISTRICT: 19 B. CASE NO: 16-4240 PROPERTY OWNER: VICKY YVONNE JOHNSON (LIFE ESTATE); MARSHALL BROWN ND CLIFFORD BROWN, JR. AND HELEN HAWTHORNE PROPERTY LOCATION: 508 GOLDSMITH ROAD TAX MAP NUMBER: 0560.0201-029.00 COUNCIL DISTRICT: 27 C. CASE NO: 17-622 PROPERTY OWNER: LORA P. HICE AND LOIS SCRUGGS, LULA MAE PITTMAN PROPERTY LOCATION: 350 N BATES ROAD TAX MAP NUMBER: 0644.0201-009.00 COUNCIL DISTRICT: 17 D. CASE NO: 15-4084 PROPERTY OWNER: AMERICAN IRA, LLC FBO J. MICHAEL BURROUGHS SEP IRA AND ANNIE B CORBETT, PRINCE A BROWN JR., MARTHA B SMITH PROPERTY LOCATION: 82 BRUCE ROAD TAX MAP NUMBER: WG02.0301-013.03 COUNCIL DISTRICT: 25 E. CASE NO: 17-23 PROPERTY OWNER: AUGUST CLEMONS PROPERTY LOCATION: 114 BENNINGTON ROAD TAX MAP NUMBER: 0534.0401-069.00 COUNCIL DISTRICT: 21 F. CASE NO: 15-4211 PROPERTY OWNER: TRAVIS R DOGAN PROPERTY LOCATION: 10 FOXHALL ROAD TAX MAP NUMBER: 0370.0003-005.00 COUNCIL DISTRICT: 25 A complaint has been brought before the Code Enforcement Division of a dangerous, insanitary and unsafe structure located at the following locations: 123 Odom Circle, Greenville County Tax Map Number 0147.00-06-007.00, Greenville County, SC. 508 Goldsmith Road, Greenville County Tax Map Number 0560.02-01-029.00, Greenville County, SC. 350 N Bates Road, Greenville County Tax Map Number 0644.02-01-009.00, Greenville County, SC. 82 Bruce Road, Greenville County Tax Map Number WG02.03-01-013.03, Greenville County, SC. 114 Bennington Road, Greenville County Tax Map Number 0534.04-01-069.00, Greenville County, SC. 10 Foxhall Road, Greenville County Tax Map Number 0370.00-03-005.00, Greenville County, SC. Any persons having interest in these properties, or knowledge of the property owner should contact the Codes Enforcement Office at 864-467-7090 on or before September 28, 2017.


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September 15, 2017 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

September 15, 2017 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.