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MERRY CHRISTMAS

FROM THE COMMUNITY JOURNALS FAMILY TO YOURS

GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, December 25, 2015 • Vol.17, No.52

FOR HOME DELIVERY CALL 864.679.1200 READ ONLINE AT GREENVILLE JOURNAL.COM

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PHOTO BY ANDREW HUANG

A look back at 2015

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2 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.25.2015 | NEWS

GREENVILLEJOURNAL LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1999 PRESIDENT/CEO | Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@communityjournals.com

It’s the most wonderful time of the year.

EXECUTIVE EDITOR | Susan Clary Simmons ssimmons@communityjournals.com MANAGING EDITOR | Jerry Salley jsalley@communityjournals.com DIGITAL TEAM Emily Price | Danielle Car STAFF WRITERS Ashley Boncimino | aboncimino@communityjournals.com Sherry Jackson | sjackson@communityjournals.com Benjamin Jeffers | bjeffers@communityjournals.com Cindy Landrum | clandrum@communityjournals.com April A. Morris | amorris@communityjournals.com

The holiday season can be the best time of year to upgrade your vehicle, or your vehicle loan.

ART DIRECTOR | Kristy M. Adair

Most vehicle manufacturers and dealers drop prices on current inventory

OPERATIONS MANAGER | Holly Hardin

at year-end to make room for next model year’s inventory. A lower price

CLIENT SER VICES MANAGERS Anita Harley | Jane Rogers

tag combined with your credit union’s competitive loan rate gives you

BILLING INQUIRIES | Shannon Rochester MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Nicole Greer | Kristi Jennings | Donna Johnston David Kabrin | Annie Langston | Emily Yepes

the upper hand when shopping for your next car.

DESIGN & LAYOUT Kristy Adair | Whitney Fincannon Tammy Smith

Our members enjoy the same low rate on

ADVERTISING DESIGN | Michael Allen

new, pre-owned and refinanced vehicles

EVENTS & ACCOUNT STRATEGY | Kate Madden

(cars, trucks and SUVs) with less than

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Apply online at www.greenvillefcu.com call 800.336.6309 or visit any branch. publishers of

581 perry ave., greenville, sc 29611 phone: 864-679-1200 delivery inquiries: 864-679-1240 communityjournals.com © 2015 published by community journals llc. all rights reserved. all property rights for the entire contents of this publication shall be the property of community journals. no part of this publication may be reproduced, scanned, stored, distributed or transmitted by any means – whether auditory, graphic, mechanical, or electronic – without written permission from the publisher.

Our community-based charter allows anyone who lives, works, worships or attends school in Greenville County to join.

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*Annual Percentage Rate is based on a 36-month term. Your loan rate and term amount may vary depending on individual credit history and underwriting factors. All credit union rates, fees, terms, and conditions are subject to change at any time without notice. A 36-month loan with 1.99% APR would have monthly payments of $28.64 per thousand borrowed. Rate floor is 1.74%, offer excludes current loans held by Greenville Federal Credit Union. ©2015, Greenville Federal Credit Union. All rights reserved. Member NCUA.

Bringing Family and Friends Together for the Holidays. With low fares, direct flights and convenient parking, GSP Airport takes all the stress out of holiday travel. Search online and compare fares, book flights, hotel rooms and rental cars. We wish you and your family a very happy holiday.

www.gspairport.com


NEWS | 12.25.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 3

THEY SAID IT

page three

“You don’t get inebriated like you do from alcohol, but you do get relaxed.”

Happy Holidays to our Friends and Caregivers

Gabriel Coggins, co-owner of Kava Konnection on Wade Hampton Boulevard, on the effects of drinks made with kava roots, which reportedly have a mild mouth-numbing effect.

“I am On our cover this week, CJ, our newest editorial suspending intern, pores over back issues in search of 2015’s most exciting stories. She came to Community my campaign, Journals from Greenville County Animal care as a heartworm-positive rescue dog. CJ is recovering but never my nicely and is looking forward to helping us sniff commitment out next year’s breaking news. to achieving security “It was a total through strength or surprise.” Julie Horton, city governmental relations the American people.” U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham, announcing his exit from the presidential race.

“Mental illnesses are most frequently diseases of childhood.” Paul Gionfriddo, President and CEO of Mental Health America, speaking at the Mental Health America Greenville County annual meeting.

manager, on learning that U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham had secured $92 million in federal funding for a new Greenville federal courthouse.

NUMBERED

21

Average breakdowns per day for Greenville County Schools buses, according to GCS officials

Independent Living Patio and Apartment Homes Assisted Living • Memory Care • Rehabilitation • Skilled Nursing Contact Ruth Wood at 987-4612 for more information.

www.RollingGreenVillage.com

1 Hoke Smith Blvd., Greenville • 864.987.4612


4 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.25.2015 | NEWS

Miles to go

By the numbers

More school buses required to ensure no student rides longer than 90 minutes

average age of school buses in Greenville County

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Some Greenville County students ride to and from school on buses old enough to have transported their parents as schoolchildren. Others have bus rides home of more than 90 minutes – the time it takes to drive from Greenville to Charlotte. Problems with aging school buses are nothing new in South Carolina. The state – the only one operating a state-owned school bus system – attracted headlines in years past when it bought used school buses from other states, including some from Kentucky that averaged 17 years old. Legislators passed a law in 2007 that mandated the state buy enough new school buses to replace the entire fleet every 15 years. But the recession hit shortly afterward and lawmakers have ignored the law. The state allocates 235 regular school

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buses and 30 spares to Greenville County Schools. The district’s allocation for special needs school buses is 111 with 13 spares. The average age of Greenville’s route buses fleet is 15 years, with 203 of the district’s 346 route buses at least 2001 models or newer. Of the remainder, 101 are 1995 models. Four date back to 1988. Sixteen of the district’s spare buses date back to 1988. Nine are from 1990. GCS officials say the age of the buses results in an average of 21 breakdowns per day. Breakdowns account for 42 percent of the late buses in the district, which has implemented a school messenger system that notifies parents when a bus is delayed 15 minutes or more. Fewer buses are late for school since the bell schedule was changed five years ago, district officials said. Most students have ride times between 30 minutes and an hour, while seven elementary

routes and 29 middle and high school routes have ride times of more than 90 minutes. It’s worse for special education students. Most of those routes have ride times of more than 90 minutes. Four special education routes pick up students before 5:30 a.m. School board chair Lisa Wells said 19 additional buses are needed to reduce every regular school bus route to less than 90 minutes, while an additional 50 buses are needed to cut every special education bus route to less than 90 minutes. The school board will ask state lawmakers in 2016 for enough money to: fully fund the mandated 15-year bus replacement cycle; ensure no student’s ride is more than 90 minutes long; fully fund the statemandated bus driver salary schedule; raise driver salaries to aid with hiring; and provide buses for students who live within a mile and a half from school but must cross dangerous roads to walk to school.

Dollars Make Change

percentage of buses in GCS’ state fleet that are model year 1999 or older

346 21 37,231 6,701,580 number of route buses

average breakdowns per day

miles traveled each day

miles traveled per year

Give hope this year Serving Greenville County since 1904

Direct Social Services | Emergency Homeless Shelters | Food Pantry & Dining Hall CSRC Rehabilitation Program | Family Stores | The Salvation Army Boys & Girls Club The Salvation Army Ray & Joan Kroc Corps Community Center www.salvationarmygreenville.org 864-235-4803 1-800-SAL-ARMY

Please send your tax-deductible gift to the following address: The Salvation Army, P.O. Box 1237, Greenville, SC 29602


NEWS | 12.25.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 5

Federal funding for Greenville courthouse a ‘total surprise’ BENJAMIN JEFFERS | STAFF

bjeffers@communityjournals.com

“Greenville long ago outgrew the small federal building, forcing many agencies to lease space in areas less convenient for the public and making the court’s operations less efficient.”

When Greenville city staff learned that U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham said he secured $92 million in funding for a new Greenville federal courthouse, City Governmental Relations Manager Julie Horton said the news came as a “total surprise.” The city has been trying to get funding to construct the courthouse for more than 10 years, but because several other federal courthouses were before Greenville in line, Horton said the city didn’t expect to get the funding for another few years. Graham, who is a member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, was able to attach the funding to a $1.1 trillion spending bill that passed Congress on Friday. The total cost of the new Greenville federal courthouse is expected to be $103 million. “We appreciate Sen. Graham’s persistence in moving this project forward,” said Mayor Knox White. “He has been a great partner with the City of Greenville.” Congress previously allocated $11 million for preliminary work on the facility, and in 2011 bought the two-acre property across from the Greenville County Courthouse on East North Street, where the courthouse will be built. “Greenville long ago outgrew the small federal building, forcing many agencies to lease space in areas less convenient for the public and making the court’s operations

U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham

less efficient,” Graham said in a statement. The funding will be for site design and construction of the new facility. The building is expected to be 10 stories tall and will be called the Carroll A. Campbell Jr. Federal Courthouse, in honor of the late governor of South Carolina. Horton said the city will work with the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) for a timeline of the project. The current federal courthouse on Washington Street will house the U.S. Bankruptcy Court, Federal Public Defender’s Office and other federal agencies if the new courthouse is constructed, a spokesperson for GSA said. While Graham said that the total he was able to secure was $92 million, the spokesperson said GSA had not yet received a specific amount allocated for the project, but the organization will work with the U.S. Judicial Conference to determine the scope and price of the new courthouse. Gre Cou enville Cou nty rtho use

E. N

Sled Hockey Jan. 9 & 14 • 8-10 a.m./11 a.m.-1 p.m. • Ice on Main Individuals with physical disabilities are invited to learn to play sled hockey with help from GHS’ Roger C. Peace Rehabilitation Hospital. Call 455-2627. Caregiving ABCs Thurs., Jan. 14-Feb. 18 • 6 p.m. • Patewood Medical Campus This six-week education series is for those caring for a loved one with a memory health condition or dementia. Free; registration required. Guyology Sun., Jan. 24 • 3:30-5:30 p.m. • Patewood Medical Campus Boys in sixth and seventh grade and their parents are invited to discuss puberty. Fee: $75 parent/child. Register at girlology.com. Girls on the Run Feb. 17-May 10 • Times and locations vary This program combines training for a 5K with esteem-enhancing workouts for girls ages 8-15. Scholarships and payment plans available. Registration opens Jan. 1 at ghs.org/girlsontherun. To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, please visit ghs.org/healthevents or call 1-877-GHS-INFO (447-4636).

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Resolution Run Sat., Jan. 9 • 9 a.m. • Travelers Rest High School Take part in this 5K or half-marathon. Visit ymcagreenville.org/resolution-run.

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orth

Health Events

ghs.org 16-0068GJ


6 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.25.2015 | NEWS

OPINION VIEWS FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

DRAWN OUT LOUD BY KATE SALLEY PALMER

Small actions, big changes IN MY OWN WORDS

by Deb Richardson-Moore I have already received my favorite Christmas present this season: a bright red baseball cap with sequins and a picture of Our Lady of Guadalupe. Not that I would have known it was Our Lady of Guadalupe, had her name not been scrawled across the hat, right between the sequins and serenely smiling face. When people see me coming – and oh, they will – “Protestant pastor” will not be their first thought. But I cherish the cap because it was a gift from one of my longtime parishioners at Triune Mercy Center. A man who spent the last nine Christmases homeless. When I arrived at Triune in 2005, Lee was among the surliest of my new congregants. He spent every weekend sleeping in our dining hall, his head

cradled on his arms. When spoken to, he grunted. When asked to take out trash, he rolled his eyes. A couple of years in, I asked Lee to help me serve communion one Sunday. To my surprise, he agreed. Together we made our way along the altar rail. “The body of Christ broken for you, Denise, Sippio, Pete, Robert. The blood of Christ shed for you.” I uttered the words and handed over the bread. Lee followed with the tray of communion cups. Three weeks later, he caught me after a service. “Communion is next Sunday,” he mumbled, slouched against a wall. “Do I have to help you again?” “Yes,” I replied. “Yes, you do.” When the next Sunday rolled around, he backed out. But then we started noticing that he was helping out in the dining hall. He set up tables and chairs, took out the trash. He served the tea.

From thel Journa Family

Then he started making the tea. He brewed the coffee. We talked about him at staff meetings. What’s up with Lee? What’s gotten into Lee? Nobody knew. But he was a different person. He wouldn’t sit down and eat until everyone else had been served. One December morning, I was going to visit Fourth Presbyterian Church for an alternative gift fair. I stopped in our kitchen to see if the coffee was ready. It wasn’t. “Don’t worry,” I told Lee. “I’ll get some at Fourth Pres.” Ten minutes later there was a knock on my office door. There stood Lee with a steaming cup of hot coffee. I just stared. “You brought me coffee?” “You were taking so long the men were going to drink it all up,” he replied. Gruffly. Lee still had a drinking problem. He still lived outside – in a tent, during good times. But after that day, he brought me coffee every Sunday morning. He and I were unlikely friends, yet friends nonetheless in this ragtag community we call church. He was the illustration I used when I told proponents of outcome measurement that there is a point to church, to

relationship, even when sobriety and housing and employment don’t happen. There is a way someone can be “with us” in the same way Emmanuel is “God with us.” One day this spring, Lee entered rehab at a Veterans Affairs clinic in Asheville. He got a job. He calls every Sunday to let us know how he’s doing. On the first Sunday of Advent, he rode the bus to Greenville and dashed into the middle of our worship service where I sat on the front row, listening to the offertory. He handed me that blazing, garish, flashy, quite lovely paean to Our Lady of Guadalupe. We Christians will mark this Christmas amid fear of terrorism and cataclysmic climate change and racial strife and domestic shootings. The truth is, most of us aren’t in a position to do much about any of that. What we can do is be with our brothers and sisters. As Emmanuel promised to be with us. Deb Richardson-Moore is the pastor of Triune Mercy Center. You may contact her at deb@triunemercy.org or visit www.triunemercy.org.

Speak your mind The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, fact-based arguments.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Executive Editor Susan Clary Simmons at ssimmons@communityjournals.com.


NEWS | 12.25.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 7

OPINION VIEWS FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

A Constitution in every stocking IN MY OWN WORDS

by Carrie Lukas

After unshakable economic doldrums and a tough year in terms of American prestige worldwide, people are undoubtedly wishing for better news in 2016 – starting, surely, with success in defeating global threats and an economic reawakening that allows Americans at all stages of life to improve their financial fortunes. As a first step to making both a reality, I suggest you consider tucking a copy of our nation’s founding documents into the family stockings this Christmas. (You can purchase an attractive pocket Constitution online at Barnes and Noble for less than $2). The preamble alone is a refreshing reminder of what our government is really supposed to be about: “We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.” America was meant to be a country governed by laws that are fairly enforced. The federal government was meant to fulfill a few vital needs and to do those jobs well. Our legislative branch was given the power to develop those laws, but was meant to exercise its legislative power in a limited manner. The president was to serve as commander in chief and represent the country to foreign nations. The executive branch – which today issues an unimaginable number of rules and regulations with the force of law – is barely mentioned, but clearly intended to have only powers to enforce our laws and facilitate commerce. Our current government has strayed far from this vision. Some of its evolution has been necessary, but much of it hasn’t, and today betrays the vision of our founders and contributes to the problems that will plague our country

in 2016. Government tries to do too much – micromanaging nearly every aspect of society, from business to health care to schools and infrastructure – and does none of it very well. This overreach has become an open door for corruption, as the politically connected are able to carve out special laws and regulatory fiats that help them and hurt others. That’s not how our country was supposed to work. Federal government spending is responsible for about 20 percent of our country’s gross domestic product. States and localities control almost another 20 percent. This means that our private sector is being squeezed, and many are finding the American dream more and more difficult to achieve. Some hold out hope that government can solve their problems. With too few jobs, stagnant pay and rising prices, it’s no wonder they want Uncle Sam to come to their aid. The problem is, Uncle Sam isn’t Santa Claus and can’t just pile goodies in our stockings. As government provides more support – new entitlements, expanded benefit payments, more money for this corporation or that interest group, a bigger bureaucracy – it must take those resources from taxpayers. People are left with less money in their paychecks and less economic opportunity everywhere. Our founders envisioned an effective, fair government that relied on Americans to make our country strong and compassionate. We can restore this vision by encouraging greater entrepreneurship, job creation and economic growth, while maintaining a system that protects our most vulnerable citizens. I hope you reread that pocket Constitution often this year, and use it as a guide as you evaluate our political debates and decisions in 2016. Carrie Lukas is the managing director of the Independent Women’s Forum (iwf.org). She wrote this op-ed for InsideSources.com.

What’s Right in Health Care Physician Gives $1 Million to Children’s Hospital GHS neonatologist Jerry Ferlauto, MD, and wife Natalina gifted GHS Children’s Hospital with $1 million to endow and grow an innovative program to help families better cope with the complex needs of chronically ill children. The program—called the Ferlauto Center for Complex Pediatric Care—uses a coordinated team approach to improve health outcomes, reduce costs and decrease stress on these families. To learn more, visit ghs.org/news. Research Shows Better Way to Clean Wounds, Reduce Infections Research conducted by GHS orthopaedic trauma surgeon Kyle Jeray, MD, and published in The New England Journal of Medicine shows saline is better than soap at cleaning open fracture wounds and reducing infections. This is important news for the 250,000 people a year who sustain open fractures, as well as the military, where over 70 percent of injuries involve orthopaedic care. GHS CEO Named Influential Leader GHS President and CEO Mike Riordan was named one of the top 20 most influential leaders in the Upstate by readers of GSA Business. Riordan and others will be featured in the Dec. 28 edition of GSA Business Newsmakers. Virtual Toy Drive Benefits Children’s Hospital Bring cheer to pediatric patients this holiday season by participating in the GHS Children’s Hospital Virtual Toy Drive presented by WYFF4. Make a donation at virtualtoydrive.org.

ghs.org 16-0068GJ


8 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.25.2015 | NEWS

12 months, 10 top stories Triumph and tragedy, controversy and community were on Greenvillians’ minds in 2015 CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com BENJAMIN JEFFERS | STAFF

bjeffers@communityjournals.com 2015 was a year of profound change in South Carolina and Greenville. Cata-

Greenville Health System shakes up governance

The Upstate’s largest health care system again made news when its board of trustees unveiled a plan to change its governance structure and establish a private, nonprofit board to operate the system. Local legislators cried foul, saying GHS plotted the change in secret, and the plan violates the state law that originally established the hospital system, leases away public assets and governance power and sets a precedent for other public entities. GHS officials maintained the change would not violate the law and would give GHS the flexibility to create regional partnerships. Despite multiple meetings between trustees and legislators, the matter may be decided in the SC Supreme Court if the court decides to issue an opinion case on the legality of the change, as requested in a lawsuit filed by three former GHS trustees. Legislators have also prefiled bills for the 2016 session countering the GHS move.

strophic events, controversy and wins on athletic fields and in governmental chambers marked the past 12 months. 2015 focused the national spotlight on the state, starting with the unthinkable when nine black worshippers in a Bible study at a historic church in Charleston were massacred in a white gunman’s misguided attempt to start a race war. The spotlight intensified when Pal-

Duke scraps transmission line plans

After a groundswell of opposition, Duke Energy scrapped plans for a new substation in Campobello and a controversial 45-mile transmission line that would have cut through the mountains in the Upstate and western North Carolina. Duke had wanted to build a new 650-megawatt power plant near Lake Julian in Asheville, but instead will build smaller gas units at its Asheville plant that negate the need for the substation and transmission line.

metto State residents – black and white, young and old – united in the tragedy’s aftermath and the Confederate flag was removed from the Statehouse grounds. The state’s resolve surfaced again when historic rainfall produced widespread flooding in October, wiping out roads and bridges, but not South Carolinians’ ability to pull together when the going got tough.

The national limelight returned with the success of a team from the Northwood Little League in the Little League World Series and continues with the Clemson Tigers’ pursuit of a football national championship. Here’s a look back at some of the year’s biggest headline-makers in Greenville and South Carolina.

Work underway on I-85/I-385 interchange

Work began this year on a long-anticipated $231 million project to restructure the I-85/I-385 interchange. The job is the second most expensive South Carolina Department of Transportation project (No. 1 is the Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge in Charleston). The contract for the project ends in the summer of 2019. Work includes resurfacing, construction of 11 bridges, redoing exit ramps, rebuilding intersections on Woodruff Road and widening roads.

Orange crushin’ it

The announcement last month was a victory for thousands of Upstate residents who protested the original plan, saying the proposed line would bring irreparable harm to environmentally sensitive areas, tourism and property values.

Is it possible to have an up-and-down undefeated football season? Look to the 2015 Clemson Tigers for that answer. After appearing indomitable in their season-opening cupcake games, Clemson struggled against Louisville, gutted out a win over Notre Dame, exacted revenge on Georgia Tech, got past Boston College, pounded Miami into the turf, avoided potentially embarrassing losses to NC State and Syracuse, knocked off their biggest division rival (Florida St.) and their in-state rival (USC), and beat UNC for the ACC title. Time will tell if they become national champions, but one certainty remains: What was Andy Teasdall thinking trying to run the ball instead of just punting it? Journal sports writer Vincent Harris contributed this story. TOP 10 continued on PAGE 10


NEWS | 12.25.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 9

On-demand grocery delivery coming in January SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com Shipt, an on-demand grocery delivery service, announced that it will expand its service to Greenville beginning on Jan. 7, 2016. Shipt will deliver fresh Publix groceries to Greenville and surrounding areas of Berea, Easley, Greer, Mauldin and Simpsonville. “As we looked ahead to 2016, our team knew that Greenville was one of many cities where we had heard from busy families asking us to bring Shipt to their area,” said Bill Smith, founder and CEO of Shipt. “Our business is hyper-responsive, both in determining where to go next and in taking care of our customers who trust us as their grocery-shopping partner. As we expand our presence to Greenville, our team is excited to simplify many lives through the convenience of grocery delivery.” Customers can select from the full range of items available at local Publix stores using Shipt’s integrated mobile app. The app allows customers to select specific items and provide notes regarding any preferences or substitutions. There is no limit to the quantity of items delivered, and orders can include fresh produce, meat and perishable items. To support its expansion to Greenville, the company will hire hundreds of shoppers to select high-quality produce and communicate closely with the customer to ensure complete, accurate fulfillment of each order. By purchasing a membership, customers receive unlimited grocery deliveries for an annual fee of $99. Prior to the Jan. 7 launch, customers can receive a pre-launch price of $49 for a one-year membership. Members receive unlimited free delivery for orders over $35. Shipt offers sale items including “buy one, get one free” items from the grocery store’s weekly sales. Shipt prices vary from grocery store prices by an average of approximately $5 on a $35 order.

GHS Physician Update GHS welcomes these new doctors & offices! Internal Medicine Katherine Gettys, MD GHS Family & Internal Medicine– Simpsonville Simpsonville, 522-1170

900 W. Faris Rd., 1st Floor Cancer Institute Greenville, 455-5230 (for post-mastectomy patients and those with lymphedema)

Mitchell McClure, MD Pamela Wenger Yanoviak, MD GHS Internal Medicine–Maxwell Pointe Greenville, 522-1300

WELCOME, FAMILY MEDICINE! GHS welcomes Hillcrest Family Practice and its 6 doctors:

Pediatrics Leigh Bragg, MD Pediatric Associates–Easley Easley, 855-0001 TWO NEW PROSTHETICS & ORTHOTICS SITES GHS Prosthetics & Orthotics 1807 E. Main St. Easley, 855-4895 (all ages) (in cooperation with Roger C. Peace Adult & Pediatric Outpatient Therapy at Baptist Easley)

For a full coverage map, visit Shipt. com/Greenville. Shipt’s grocery delivery service spans across the country, including on-demand grocery delivery to Atlanta, Birmingham, Charlotte, Chattanooga, Dallas, Huntsville, Nashville, Phoenix and Savannah, as well as 10 markets in Florida.

Robert Broker, MD Jennifer Ellis, MD Francis Heidt, MD Gretchen Johnson, MD Katherine Lewis, MD David Silkiner, MD 717 S.E. Main St. Simpsonville, 963-1548 GHS PHYSICIAN FINDER Call 1-844-GHS-DOCS (447-3627) weekdays 8 a.m.-8 p.m., and a trained operator will schedule a visit for you.

ghs.org 16-0068GJ


10 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.25.2015 | NEWS TOP 10 continued from PAGE 8

Charleston tragedy focuses attention on Confederate symbol The night of June 17 – when Dylann Roof sat with members of the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston for Bible study then opened fire, killing nine – forever changed South Carolina. An act meant to tear a city and state apart instead united it. At a bond hearing shortly after Roof’s arrest, some of the family members of the nine victims offered him forgiveness. People of all races grieved together and walked with linked arms on the Ravenel Bridge in Charleston. Less than a month later, the Confederate flag came down from the Statehouse grounds, an action most South Carolinians thought they’d never see in their lifetimes.

Party labels return for municipal elections

EMS oversight under debate Concern – primarily from Bon Secours St. Francis – over a potential takeover of Greenville County’s EMS by Greenville Health System (GHS) intensified in 2015 when GHS and county staff presented a mobile integrated health practice (MIHP) proposal in June. The plan proposed that the county contract with GHS to operate EMS and pay GHS $1.5 million yearly in a 10-year agreement. St. Francis leadership protested its exclusion from the planning process and Greenville County Council passed a directive in September encouraging the two health systems to find a way to collaborate.

Following an unprecedented petition drive, the Greenville City Council in April reversed its previous decision to remove party labels from municipal elections. Councilman David Sudduth stunned those in attendance at a special called Council meeting when he changed sides on the nonpartisan issue and voted to repeal the ordinance that stripped party labels from the ballot. It was one of the more divisive political issues in the city’s recent history. Supporters of making city elections nonpartisan said party labels have little to do with local government and discouraged some candidates from running. Greenville is one of a handful of cities in the state with more than 20,000 residents that still uses partisan elections to select council members. Opponents said the move would disenfranchise minority voters.

Historic rainfall leads to “1,000-year flood”

The controversy ended with a whimper in early November when GHS submitted a letter to the county withdrawing its proposal. County officials say the matter still warrants attention because of federal healthcare reforms’ focus on quality rather than fee-for-service patient care, requiring even higher levels of health care expertise.

Tougher domestic violence penalties Domestic violence opponents celebrated the passage of a law this year that restructures penalties for abusers. The most controversial aspect of the bill was a lifetime gun ban for the top-level offenders, followed by a 10-year ban for mid-level and three-year ban for low-level offenders. The law also creates a tiered system of punishments based on severity and the number of domestic violence charges. Sentences range from 20 years in prison to 90 days in jail and could be accompanied by a $1,000-$5,000 fine.

A home-run season for Northwood Little League A team from Northwood Little League became the first from South Carolina to reach the Little League World Series since 1950. The historic trip to Williamsport came after the team’s undefeated run in the Southeast Regional, capped by pitcher Alex Edmondson’s no-hitter and two-home-run game. Edmondson pitched another no-hitter in the team’s first Little League World Series game against Cranston, R.I., for the first South Carolina win ever at the LLWS. But the scrappy, happy team of 11- and 12-year-olds from Taylors lost its next two games to be eliminated from the tournament. In those two losses, a national television audience saw a team that never quit, battled back from adversity and enjoyed the experience.

South Carolina suffered more than $1.2 billion in damage from historic flooding in October. Greenville avoided the heaviest rainfall, but parts of the Midlands and Lowcountry got pounded. The flooding killed 19 people and left many with destroyed homes. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has approved millions of dollars in assistance for thousands of individuals. The flooding also caused more damage to South Carolina’s already crumbling roads system. The state Department of Transportation closed a total of 541 roads across the state.


NEWS | 12.25.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 11

Graham drops out of presidential race BENJAMIN JEFFERS | STAFF

bjeffers@communityjournals.com Sen. Lindsey Graham ended his presidential campaign Monday – the last day that his name could be removed from the South Carolina primary ballot. Graham, who launched his campaign in June, failed to ever gain traction in the race, even in his home state of South Carolina, where Donald Trump dominates the polls. A Real Clear Politics average of the polls had Graham at just half of a percent of support. One of highest profile moments of his campaign came during his feud with Trump, when Trump retaliated by giving out Graham’s private cellphone number at an event. South Carolina GOP Chairman Matt Moore confirmed that Graham’s name will not appear on the Feb. 20 primary ballot. “We are proud of him for being the first South Carolinian in over 60 years to seriously compete for the White House,” Moore said in a statement. “Given Sen. Graham’s huge primary victory in South Carolina just last year, the Graham network could have a major impact on South Carolina’s presidential primary.” Graham’s announcement was first reported by CNN, and he released a video on his campaign website. “I am suspending my campaign but never my commitment to achieving security through strength or the American people,” Graham said in the video. During his campaign he sought to play up his military experience and time on the Senate Armed Services Committee to

show that he was the best candidate to keep the country secure. “I got into this race to put forward a plan to win a war we cannot afford to lose and to turn back the tide of isolationism that was rising in our party,” Graham said. “Here’s what I predict,” he said in an interview with CNN. “I think the nominee of our party is going to adopt my plan when it comes time to articulate how to destroy ISIL. We’ve fallen short here, but the fight continues. To those who are doing the fighting, I want to be your voice.” Graham also had a message for Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton. “Hillary, if you get to be president, I’ll help you where I can,” he said in the interview with CNN. “I hope you’re not. But if you are, I’ll be there to help you win a war we can’t afford to lose.”

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12 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.25.2015 | NEWS

THE NEWS IN BRIEF GHS LAUNCHES MOBILE HEALTH CLINIC Greenville Health System will launch a mobile health clinic housed in a 40-foot custom RV to target areas with high emergency room and EMS usage rates and reach patients who may not have transportation. The clinic will have three exam rooms and be staffed by a nurse practitioner, paramedic, program manager and business office representative. The clinic will launch in February and initially visit five areas within the Parker, Berea, Gantt, Belmont and Greenville city fire districts, said Jennifer Snow, director of GHS Accountable Communities. Rather than the screening services or dental care provided by many mobile units, the GHS clinic will offer primary and acute care for patients on Medicare, Medicaid and who are uninsured, she said. The $467,000 unit was funded through Hollingsworth Funds and F.W. Symmes Foundation.

BOYS HOME SEVERS AGREEMENT WITH TRAIL LIFE USA The Boys Home of the South has terminated an endowed partnership with Trail Life USA, citing mismanagement of funds and facility use inconsistent with the original agreement. The Boys Home partnered with Trail Life USA, a Christian adventure, character and leadership program, in 2014 to use the homes’ 127-acre campus as a national headquarters and camp. Al Squire, Boys Home of the South CEO, wrote in a letter to supporters that Trail Life USA had not met standards outlined in the agreement. Trail Life USA’s “stated values as ‘unapologetically Christian’ do not coincide with their executive team, led by John Stemberger [board chairman], or their business practices and morals. Their love of money is the root for the fame and notoriety they achieve. They are willing to make a profit by exploiting our most vulnerable children,” Squire wrote. The Boys Home of the South board of directors voted to terminate the agreement and rescind the endowment on Dec. 24, according to Squire’s letter. Squire was not available for comment before press time. Trail Life USA offices were closed this week and leadership did not respond for comment. According to Trail Life’s website, it has 600 troops and nearly 25,000 members nationwide. The former residential home for boys in Belton had dissolved as a nonprofit organization in the spring of 2014, following allegations of child-on-child maltreatment at the facility where children were placed by the SC Department of Social Services (DSS). The home provided residential care for boys since 1958, but the numbers of children served there dwindled from 50 residents to fewer than 10 between 2012 and spring 2014, Squire said in 2014. DSS removed residents from the facility in late 2013 and the organization announced a mission change toward an outreach focus.

FURMAN AMONG NCAA’S BEST Furman’s fall sports season, the best in school history, has the school ranked 31st nationally among NCAA Division I schools in the Learfield Sports Directors’ competition. The standings, which reflect completed NCAA competition in men’s and women’s cross country, men’s and women’s soccer and field hockey, have Furman with 113 points. That ranks Furman above Michigan State, Mississippi, West Virginia and South Carolina, among others. The standings next update is scheduled for Dec. 24 and will include volleyball, a

sport in which the Paladins appeared in the NCAA tournament. Furman won the Southern Conference championships in men’s and women’s soccer, men’s and women’s cross-country and in volleyball. Furman became the first SoCon team in league history to win all five fall tournament championships. Four went on to participate in the NCAA tournament.

WELLS RE-ELECTED SCHOOL BOARD CHAIR Lisa Wells will serve another year as chair of the Greenville County School Board. Wells, who is in her second term as the board’s Area 28 representative, was re-elected during the board’s December meeting. Dr. Crystal Ball O’Connor was re-elected vice chair. Debi Bush was re-elected as secretary.

HOLLYWILD HIRES NEW ANIMAL CURATOR Hollywild Animal Park has hired S. Nigel Platt to serve as animal curator and leader of Hollywild’s animal department. The nonprofit park’s board of directors agreed to the new position to facilitate the retiring of founder David Meeks. “Mr. Platt brings a wealth of experience and passion for quality animal care to his leadership position at Hollywild,” said executive director Kim Atchley. “He is a perfect fit for the collective efforts of our board, staff and volunteers as we move forward into a new era for Hollywild.” For the last eight years, Platt has served as executive director at Safe Haven and Educational Adventures in Easley, a nonprofit organization providing permanent refuge for rescued exotic wildlife, which he co-founded. Platt will remain a consultant for Safe Haven as he fulfills his fulltime duties at Hollywild. A native of England, Platt first came to the United States as herpetologist for the Toledo Zoo in 1993. He moved to the Upstate to become general curator of the Greenville Zoo, where he worked for six years. Platt has served as an AZA accreditation inspector and received training in institutional collection planning and other specialty areas of animal care.

CLEMSON TASK FORCE TO ISSUE REPORT BY FEBRUARY The Clemson University task force formed in the wake of a student-led drive to rename certain buildings on campus should be ready to report to the university board of trustees by February. The task force is charged with recommending how Clemson should best go about telling its complete history in both the near and long term. The panel was formed in July on the heels of the Mother Emanuel AME church massacre in Charleston and a student-led drive to remove the name of Benjamin Tillman, a founding trustee of the university and an unapologetic racist, from the signature building on campus. The panel has been collecting public feedback since September. “The care and effort that people put into their thoughts on how best to tell Clemson’s history is impressive, and it has provided the task force with real substance as we move into this next phase,” said David Wilkins, a Greenville resident who chairs the panel and is the past Clemson board president, in a release. The task force and the Clemson administration have been holding meetings and listening sessions in addition to receiving written online and hard copy submissions. “Over the next few weeks, we will be working to consolidate the excellent information and recommendations we’ve received during this stakeholder engagement period into a comprehensive report for the board,” said Clemson President James Clements in a release. The final recommendations will be made public and presented to the board at its February 2016 meeting.


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14 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.25.2015 | COMMUNITY

A new year, a new park Cancer Survivors Park set to open first amenities in early 2016 APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com The Cancer Survivors Park in downtown Greenville has been more than a decade in the making; and in 2016 will open a boardwalk winding from Church Street down to the banks of the Reedy River, along with holding multiple fundraisers and celebrations of survivors.

THE PAST Patients First, a nonprofit formed in 1999 as a patient advocacy group, developed the idea for a park that would provide respite for survivors. The organization defines “survivor” broadly as “those who are kicking cancer right now and also people who have lost someone to cancer and who are surviving and carrying on in their memory,” according to Diane Gluck, co-founder of the organization now known as the Cancer Survivors Park Alliance. Land had been designated for the park in other areas, but plans never moved forward, she said. The opportunity arose to provide a central space for survivors and improve a 6.8-acre area along the Greenville Health System Swamp Rabbit Trail behind the Greenville Chamber of Commerce. The park was

Leap of Faith Perspective

designed to include contemplative spaces, educational areas, sculpture installations and a children’s garden. “The Cancer Survivors Park provides the perfect opportunity to rejuvenate the area and increase its accessibility while working closely with Upstate

Showing Support Roots Smokehouse fundraiser Benefits Lindsey Bates Motley Leap of Faith Overlook at Cancers Survivors Park WHEN: Dec. 31, 7 p.m.-1 a.m. WHERE: Mac Arnold’s Blues Restaurant, 1237 Pendleton St., Greenville COST: $60 INFORMATION: http://bit.ly/1OcT8v2

PHOTO BY MARK KIRBY PHOTO PROVIDED

Lindsey Motley with her daughter, Lilla (left), and husband, Jay (right).

Forever to ensure the native setting is appropriately preserved,” said Gluck.

THE PRESENT Partnerships were forged with the City of Greenville, Greenville County, ReWa and the Nature Conservancy to locate the park along the river. Work began in 2015 on a boardwalk, which is to be fully accessible and is set to open in the early part of 2016, said Cancer Survivors Park Alliance director Kay Roper. In addition, the Lindsey Bates Motley Leap of Faith, an overlook along the new boardwalk, is set to open in 2016. The overlook is named for Motley, who was diagnosed with stage-four colon cancer in 2013 when she was pregnant and has been undergoing treatment. Tom Bates is raising funds to name the overlook after his daughter. Roots Smokehouse is also hosting a fundraiser for the overlook on New Year’s Eve at its new location at Mac Arnold’s Blues Restaurant. Arnold is donating a live performance at the event that will also feature unlimited smoked fare and a cash bar. “I wanted the opening of Roots Smokehouse, whose fundamental philosophy is about getting to the root of what matters – in our case, cooking – to benefit Lindsey and the roots of courage and compassion she is instilling in all who know her story. Our entire Roots Smokehouse team strongly believes in raising awareness about cancer; shedding light on this disease that so personally affects us all is key in fighting it,” said Ivan Mathena, the owner of the Roots Smokehouse and a longtime friend of Motley. 

THE FUTURE Soon the infamous “cheese grater” bridge across the Reedy River will be replaced with one

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COMMUNITY | 12.25.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 15

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safer for cyclists and more appealing to canine companions. “The CSP has hit the tipping point and all this forward momentum has us poised to start phase two of construction in early 2016,” said Gluck. The phase also includes rerouting the trail, grading of a pathway from Cleveland Street to the trail and grading preparation. The foundation continues to raise funds to complete all phases of the park, approximately $7.5 million. Butterfly sculptures by Yuri Tsuzuki have been installed in downtown Greenville

and will also be part of the Cancer Survivors Park. Artist Charles Pate is currently at work on a lion sculpture that will be a central part of the children’s garden. Chop Cancer, a fundraiser held in 2015, will repeat its culinary competition in 2016 and an “Under the Boardwalk” fundraiser is planned for the spring. Gluck added that the new year will also bring a celebration of Cancer Survivors Day and a “Stick It to Cancer” event with the Greenville Swamp Rabbits. BOARDWALK PHOTO PROVIDED

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16 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.25.2015 | COMMUNITY

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Gabriel Coggins recently opened Kava Konnection with his mother, Debbie.

PHOTO BY BENJAMIN JEFFERS

New bar passes on alcohol, serves up naturally mellow drinks BENJAMIN JEFFERS | STAFF

bjeffers@communityjournals.com A new bar has recently opened on Wade Hampton Boulevard, but this bar doesn’t sell alcohol. Instead, it features a drink native to the South Pacific – kava. Gabriel Coggins, a fast-talking 23-yearold, opened Kava Konnection with his mother, Debbie, about three months ago, using funds he had originally saved up for college combined with money from selling their house when they moved in with his grandmother to help take care of her. Coggins’ father was an alcoholic and died from cancer when Coggins was 15. As a way to cope with his father’s and grandfather’s death in the same year, Coggins said he turned to alcohol and partying. By the age of 19, Coggins said he recognized he was on a destructive path and gave up drinking. He also started working

at the natural health foods store Garner’s Natural Life, where he first became acquainted with kava. Kava is popular in the Pacific islands, and the drink is made from the crushed roots of the plant. Kava drinkers typically use it as a way to curb anxiety, Coggins said. The drink has some properties similar to alcohol and a mild mouth-numbing effect, but it isn’t addictive and people still have full function of motor skills, he said. “You don’t get inebriated like you do from alcohol, but you do get relaxed,” Coggins said.

RISKS INVESTIGATED Reports in Europe in the early 2000s said kava was linked to liver problems. However, research reported by Duke University around the same time said the consumption did not pose a risk for people.

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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said in a 2002 advisory that kavalinked liver damage appears to be rare, but the organization was investigating kava supplements.

EMBRACING THE NIGHT SCENE Coggins first visited a kava bar in Asheville about two and a half years ago, and that was when the idea was planted for opening up a similar venue in Greenville. “Greenville is well saturated in the nightlife scene for someone who drinks, but not for someone who doesn’t drink,” he said. Coggins and his mom didn’t plan on opening a brick-and-mortar location at first. They experimented with the idea of a food truck that sold juices and other natural food items, but ultimately decided that a set location was their best venue. Kava bars are a growing trend throughout the U.S., and Coggins said in the time it took him and his mother to open their location, other kava bars they were following on social media had opened multiple locations. When the bar opened, the original hours were 3-11 p.m., but Coggins said the hours soon changed to 5 p.m.-2 a.m. on Tuesday though Saturday to accommodate customer schedules. “We decided to fully embrace the night scene,” he said.

‘A BEAUTIFUL THING’ The décor inside Kava Konnection harkens back to kava’s roots in the South Pacific. Also, a shelf on one of the walls is stacked with dozens of board games for customers to play. A “communal guitar” that anyone is allowed to play sits next to one of the couches. Kava, which has an earthy taste when consumed without additives, is the main drink on the menu. It is served straight in a half coconut shell or used in the place of alcohol for different mixed drinks on the bar’s menu. In addition to kava, the bar also sells herbal teas and finger foods like Debbie Coggins’ kava brownies. Coggins said in the future they want to expand to selling coffee and more food items, but right now he’s happy with the growth of the bar. “For us it’s kind of been a fun and beautiful thing to see,” he said.

Want To Go? KAVA KONNECTION WHERE: 1540 Wade Hampton Blvd., Suite H, Greenville HOURS: Tuesday-Saturday, 5 p.m.-2 a.m.


18 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.25.2015 | COMMUNITY

Carrying on the compassion Dr. Jim Hayes on a lifetime of advocacy APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com Dr. Jim Hayes grew up in Sumter and says he learned compassion for children from his mother, Cleo. His father, George, also offered a caring example, translating sign language for anyone who needed it. With this foundation of giving, Hayes acted on his compassion in a big way: working as a pediatrician, starting an orphanage, launching a free medical clinic and becoming an advocate for mental health.

THE EARLY YEARS Hayes was accepted into medical school in his third year as a Clemson University student. He met his wife, Glenda, while at Clemson and they dated all through her nursing school years and his medical school years at Medical University of South Carolina. The couple married and returned to the Upstate in 1969, where Hayes completed a pediatric internship at then-Greenville General Hospital. He then completed a residency and a fellowship in pediatric hematology and oncology at Texas Children’s Hospital in Houston and a fellowship in bone marrow transplant at Duke University Medical Center. In 1973, he began practice in general pediatrics, hematology and oncology in Greenville. When asked why he pursued medicine, Hayes said, “I was intrigued by the intricacies of the human body, and my mom and dad had instilled in me the idea of always helping people. I felt a real calling in my heart that that was what I was supposed to do.” Hayes admits that he chose to work with children because “I never grew up. I was always childish. Might as well stick with people I know. I would hate to wake up dignified one morning; it would be an awful thing, wouldn’t it?” In 1986, Hayes helped

launch the pediatric hematology and oncology unit at Greenville Memorial Hospital and remained there until 2008. Hayes later became the medical director of research compliance until 2014, he said. “We would oversee the research at the hospital to protect human rights. So I got to see every research study that came through the hospital and that was a lot of fun.”

MEDICAL MISSIONS Hayes and his wife are active at Taylors First Baptist Church, and in 1976 went on a mission trip to Grenada. “While we were there we got the bug for medical missions,” Hayes said. On a trip to Brazil, Hayes discovered another calling. “It was during one of those trips that we were so touched by the homeless children in Brazil, they seemed to be everywhere,” he said. He worked with Betty Brown, a dental hygienist and realtor, to help found an orphanage. When Brown developed a subdivision, all of the profits went to a foundation to establish the Davis Lar Children’s Home just outside Fortaleza, Brazil, in 2000. “Part of the mission is to help heal children and prepare them for life. Most of them have some form of PTSD … unfortunately, Fortaleza is number two in the world as far as child sex trade and child prostitution behind Bankok, Thailand,” he said. Some children grew up in the home and remained to help with programs, including a 26-year-old nurse who now mentors adolescent girls, he said. Hayes works raising funds for the home, which now has 75 children. “We have capacity for 120 if we had the funds,” he said.

FROM INTERNATIONAL AID TO LOCAL MINISTRY While Hayes was serving at a Brazilian free medical clinic in 2001, his friend Russell Ashmore approached him to ask about duplicating the pro-

“I check on it all the time because it’s like one of my babies.” Dr. Jim Hayes on the Taylors Free Medical Clinic he helped launch.

Dr. Jim Hayes with Nayara Da Silva seeing a patient together. Da Silva was one of the first residents of the Davis Lar Children’s Home and now works as a nurse there.

gram in Taylors. Hayes told him there would be too much red tape. “That wasn’t the answer Russell wanted. By March of 2002 we had begun to make plans for a free medical clinic in Taylors,” he said. Hayes helped with the process and the faith-based Taylors Free Medical Clinic opened its doors in 2005. The clinic sees roughly 3,500 patients each year and Hayes worked in the clinic until 2014. Though he doesn’t see patients anymore, “I check on it all the time because it’s like one of my babies,” he said. Hayes said working at the clinic taught him about integrative health. “Let’s take care of the mind and the body and the spirit all at the same time instead of treating them in little silos, because our spiritual being influences our physical and mental to a great degree,” he said. The clinic offers spiritual counseling and partners with National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Greenville for mental health services along with local mental health centers.

ADVOCATING FOR MENTAL HEALTH The clinic counseling dovetails with another of Hayes’ passions: mental health. Hayes has strong family involvement with mental illness and Glenda would take him to as many NAMI meetings as possible beginning in 2007, he said. The couple became Family-to-Family leaders, teaching a 30-hour course for those close to people living with mental illness. To date, the Hayes have led 14 classes. Jim Hayes has also served as chapter board member and state board president, and was elected to the national board in 2014. They were honored by NAMI South Carolina with the Solid Gold Member of the Year in 2015. Jim Hayes talks about mental health

advocacy filtered through his experience as an oncologist. He likens the systemic late diagnosis of mental illness to diagnosing cancer at stage four. Mental illnesses are often diagnosed at around 24 years old, but people don’t receive treatment until their 30s, he said. “We wait until they’re 24 and have been in trouble with the law; that’s stage four. We need to adopt the mindset of early intervention.”

STILL MORE TO ACCOMPLISH His faith is sustaining, Hayes said. “Throughout all this – college, medical school, fellowships, residency and my practice – my faith has kept me going.” At 71, he is now retired, but it is clear he sees more advocacy work to be done. When asked what’s next, Hayes rattles off a few things he would like to help accomplish: replicate the Davis Lar model worldwide, see NAMI Greenville grow, continue teaching and make NAMI a household word.

A Caring Example Jim Hayes’ grandparents lived in Sumter County, where his grandmother taught school and his grandfather was overseer of a large farm. “I loved how my grandmother and granddaddy took care of the people who worked for them,” he said. He recounts that when his mother was young, an African-American couple were living on the farm when both tragically died. “They had a six-year-old little girl … my granddaddy tried for weeks and weeks to find some relatives. And since he couldn’t, they just adopted this little girl and raised her as their own [until she was in high school],” said Hayes. “That was in the days when it wasn’t real cool for a white couple to have a black child, but it didn’t bother them a bit.”


COMMUNITY | 12.25.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 19

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20 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.25.2015 | COMMUNITY

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George and Rich Hincapie along with the Hincapie Sportswear team presented funds to Meals on Wheels of Greenville to provide more than 6,000 meals to the homebound in Greenville County. The donation came from proceeds of the annual Gran Fondo Hincapie, which drew more than 1,600 riders in October. In addition, the Hincapies and Hincapie Sportswear team packaged more than 1,500 meals to be delivered to Meals on Wheels clients. The Greenville Society for Human Resources Management honored Greenville Health System with the Diversity and Inclusion Large Business Award at their December meeting. GHS was recognized for ranking above average in CEO commitment to diversity and inclusion, human capital, corporate and organizational communication, and supplier diversity.

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OUR COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY NEWS, EVENTS AND HAPPENINGS

The South Carolina Theatre Association announced its 2016 board members, including multiple representatives from the Upstate. The association brings together theatre groups – educational, professional, community and high school – to improve and further the cultural growth of theatrical art by mutual aid and encouraging public interest. Local representatives included: immediate past president, Maegan McNerney Azar, Furman University; professional theatre division representative, Anne Tromsness, The Warehouse Theatre; board members Will Ragland, Palmetto High School and Mill Town Players; Allen Evans, USC Upstate and Productions Unlimited; Matt Leckenbusch, Clemson University; and Will Luther, Spartanburg Little Theatre. The new administrative director is Anita Sleeman of zBananas. In 2016 SCTA will celebrate its 50th convention with a kickoff at the annual gala on May 14, 2016.

Submit entries to community@communityjournals.com.


COMMUNITY | 12.25.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 21

GAME ON Vincent Harris covers music and sports for The Greenville Journal.

TALKING POINTS ON SPORTS WITH VINCENT HARRIS

Clemson and Oklahoma: Together again for the first time Didn’t we just do this? I feel like we just finished basking in the afterglow of a 40-6 Tigers win over the Sooners in the Russell Athletic Bowl. Well, regardless, I’m sure with the steady hand of that dreamy Cole Stoudt at QB, we can once again… What’s that? It’s 2015 and DeShaun Watson is our quarterback and this game is to determine who plays for the championship? Man, how long was my nap? Okay, so as it turns out, this Oklahoma team is far better than last year’s 8-5 squad, and they’ve got a quarterback (Baker Mayfield) who garnered some serious Heisman buzz. Of course, Clemson is 13-0 with a QB who finished third in the Heisman balloting. And that is actually a good place to start when it comes to this game, because for every advantage one team would seem to have, the other has an answer.

THE QBS Baker Mayfield was a walk-on. Let that roll around in your head for a sec. This guy has

years of experience under his belt when it comes to the spread offense, and he’s made it count. He’s not always a threat to run, but when he does, he can get you big chunks of yardage, and he’s got seven rushing touchdowns for the season. He’s also sure-handed when holding the football; Mayfield’s got two – count’em, two – fumbles on the season. What is there to say about DeShaun Watson? He can throw the long ball like Marino and rush like vintage Vick. He can scramble like Rothlisberger but he doesn’t often need to because he’s so good at his check-downs. He’s got 11 rushing touchdowns and 30 passing, and his average panic level hovers around “comatose.” Whatever weaknesses the Sooners find in the Tigers, they won’t be in Watson, unless he suffers a relapse of his occasional overthrow-itis.

THE OFFENSE In terms of total offense, Oklahoma is actually ranked higher than Clemson, but not significantly higher: The Sooners are

seventh and Clemson is 12th, which is basically a wash. But Clemson is far better at third-down conversions and completion percentage. People might be expecting a high-flying passing game, and there will probably be some of that, for sure, but the key to a Clemson win, at least on the offensive side of the ball, might be in grinding out some third-and-threes, making some short-gain passes and winning the ground war.

THE DEFENSE Regardless of whether DeShaun Watson throws the long ball or hands off to Wayne Gallman, I think Clemson’s defense is what wins this game. Mayfield is amazing in the pocket, but he’s prone to throwing interceptions, especially when he’s pressured at the line, something Clemson’s D has been amazing at all year. If Shaq Lawson and Ben Boulware

can continue their allout assault up front and Mackensie Alexander can continue to be a thorn in the side of receivers, that’s going to be the difference. Clemson is currently seventh in the country in Total Defense; Oklahoma is 31st. That’s the clearest delineation between the two teams, and it’s where Clemson needs to take advantage. That having been said, the mistakes we saw in the ACC Championship game will have to be cleaned up. The foolish penalties, the occasional lapses in discipline, the fumbles, all of that will have to stop. North Carolina made the Tigers pay hard every time they made a mistake in that game, and the Sooners will have that game film memorized by the time they get to the Orange Bowl. But if they can control the mistakes, and the defense stays true to their strengths, Clemson will win this game.

Seniors Taking Charge – 2016

An informative series of free talks open to the public. St. Francis LifeWise, C. Dan Joyner Senior Services Division, Thrive Assisted Living and Memory Care and Always Best Care Senior Services invite you to attend an informative series of free talks open to the public on topics that are important to all of us as we age. The more informed we are the better we can plan for our future! Each Tuesday session will start promptly at 10:00 am and end at 11:00 am. These sessions are being hosted by Thrive Assisted Living and Memory Care located at 715 S. Buncombe Road, Greer, SC 29650. You are invited to take a personal tour of the community following each session.

Please RSVP

Talk Schedule: Date

Topic

Jan. 12

Financial Matters

Jan. 19

Reverse Mortgages

Jan. 26

Legal Matters

Feb. 2

Home Choices

Feb. 9

Home Transitioning

Feb. 16

Senior Living Communities

Seating is limited so please RSVP to Toni Edge at Toni.Edge@ThriveAtGreer.com or by phone at (864) 469-4335. LifeWise members can register online at www.stfrancishealth.org/events. Come join us for some important free information to help you make plans for 2016 and beyond!


22 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.25.2015 | COMMUNITY

LOOK

Dabo Swinney’s golf club is going “all in” for Clemson football. The Reserve at Lake Keowee’s Great Lawn has a Death Valley look and feel this week after staff at the mountain lake community created a gridiron homage to the Tigers football team. The Reserve’s grounds crew laid out a half-sized football field featuring a Tiger paw painted with guidance from the same stencil employed at Clemson’s Memorial Stadium.


COMMUNITY | 12.25.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 23

Santa Claus paid a visit to the associates of the Gibbs Cancer Center. On Dec. 19, a group representing multiple churches and denominations stopped outside Woodruff Road’s Greenridge shopping center on one of the busiest shopping days before Christmas. Sign wavers encouraged passersby with a positive message about celebrating the season.


24 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.25.2015 | COMMUNITY

OUR SCHOOLS

ACTIVITIES, AWARDS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students decked the halls and made spirits bright at Washington Center. In art, students helped design and decorate wrapping paper for gifts under the school’s tree. Some students used their fingerprints to decorate their paper, while others practiced printmaking with stamps. The project went over so well that it sparked an idea for a line of Washington Center gift-wrap to sell at next year’s craft fair.

event. He talked about SCC students who have been part of the BMW Technical Scholars program, graduated from SCC and went to work for BMW.

Washington Center artist Taneda Brooks holds one of the gifts wrapped by her class using student-made wrapping paper.

Southside Christian School will host open house and campus tours for parents of students from age 12 months through 12th grade on Jan. 8, 15, 22 and 29. The informational session will begin at 8:45 a.m. Visitors will have an opportunity to meet the superintendent and principals and ask questions about the various programs.

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Dr. Kevin Power and Monte Guffey were recently honored by Sherman College of Chiropractic in appreciation of their contributions, time and commitment to the college. An assistant Power Guffy professor of clinical sciences and assistant case doctor at the college’s on-campus Chiropractic Health Center, Power was named Faculty Member of the Year, an honor he also received in 2010. Guffey, the college’s maintenance supervisor, was named Staff Member of the Year. This is Guffey’s second time being named Staff Member of the Year; he was first honored in 2009. More than 230 students participated in Greenville Technical College’s inaugural fall commencement on Dec. 17 at the TD Convention Center. In years past, Greenville Tech has held a May commencement, and students who completed their education throughout the year waited for that event. Caroline France and Amy S. McGee received the President’s Award. The Spartanburg Community College Foundation recognized outstanding students and donors at its annual Scholarship and Donor Brunch. Academic scholarships were awarded to 85 students. Ryan Childers, BMW’s manager for training and talent, was one of two speakers at the

Quinn Reilly and Serene Carmack, students in Sister Maureen Clark’s second-grade class at St. Mary’s School, made salt dough ornaments as Christmas gifts for their families.

Students from Camperdown Academy and The Chandler School met to discuss their upcoming Quiz Bowl competition. Students in grades three through eight from both schools had lunch at Camperdown, the site of the second annual Quiz Bowl in February. The academic team event is organized by the social studies department and will consist of weekly practices leading up to the event.

South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities seniors Heather Finnegan and Trudy Wrona were recognized in the creative non-fiction category in The Quaker High School Creative Writing Contest sponsored by Malone University. Finnegan will receive a cash prize and her work will be published in a special edition of “The Quaker,” a national undergraduate literary journal. Both students will be recognized in festivities at the University in Canton, Ohio. Greenville County School Board member Kenneth Baxter was elected to serve a four-year term as Region 15 director of the South Carolina School Boards Association. He’s one of 22 members of the board.

Tru Lane and Adie Cassidy played Joseph and Mary in St. Mary’s Catholic School’s annual Christmas Pageant. They are holding Grady Upham, who played baby Jesus.

Submit entries to community@communityjournals.com.


COMMUNITY | 12.25.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 25

THE GIST OF IT

‘Act before crises occur’

Details

The president of Mental Health America says early action could have helped his schizophrenic son while the system failed him EVENT: Mental Health America Greenville County Annual Meeting and 60th anniversary celebration. WHO WAS THERE: More than 40 friends, staff and board members of MHAGC. SPEAKER: Paul Gionfriddo, president and CEO of Mental Health America and author of “Losing Tim: How Our Health and Education Systems Failed My Son with Schizophrenia.” TOPIC: “Tomorrow’s Hope in Today’s Failing Mental Health System.” A look at the policy decisions of the 1980s that still affect us today and the positive impact of early intervention on mental health. Mental Health America of Greenville County (MHAGC) has provided 60 years of service to the Greenville community. In celebration of this anniversary, Paul Gionfriddo, president and CEO of Mental Health America (MHA), spoke about the public policy decisions that helped to create the system we have now. He also detailed the role that each of us can play in order to have meaningful change in the area of mental health. Here are some highlights of his speech:

PAST MENTAL HEALTH POLICY MISTAKES Gionfriddo served in the Connecticut General Assembly and discussed the policy mistakes of the 1980s that we are still dealing with today. At that time the goal was to move people out of and close state psychiatric institutions, placing individuals into the community. The belief was that any community-based service would be better than institutionalization. What actually happened was individuals were moved from one locked custodial care facility, the state psychiatric institutions, into another locked custodial

care facility, the prisons. While they knew who was coming out of the prisons, they didn’t look at who was going in. They later found that it was children and teens going into the system.

MENTAL ILLNESS ONSET “Mental illnesses are most frequent diseases of childhood. Half of mental illnesses emerge by the age of 14, yet only one in every 28 children with a serious mental health concern receives special education services to help them succeed academically.” Gionfriddo shared the educational experience of his son, Tim, who has schizophrenia. At five years old, the family began to notice behaviors that were different about his son. The fact that we call this a behavioral health issue often allows people to believe that if the child would just behave better or if they had more discipline, they

would be okay, Gionfriddo says. Discipline is helpful for many children, but not for those with schizophrenia. Policymakers who developed the Americans with Disabilities Act were thinking about physical disabilities, not mental health. Tim had a mental health diagnosis, and it was still three full additional years, to midsixth grade, before he got an educational plan. Many have to wait until they are two years behind grade level to receive services. For kids with a mental health disability who are two years behind grade level, they never catch up and they never graduate, Gionfriddo said.

STAGE 4 - INTERVENTION Currently, the law allows mental health intervention when someone is a danger to himself or others. While we must provide compassionate care for those in crisis, looking at mental health i nte r ve nt i o n only when an individual is in crisis or at

Mental Health America of Greenville County is one of more than 200 nongovernmental and nonprofit affiliates of mental Health America. MHAGC is a United Way partner agency dedicated to Bringing Wellness Home. To learn more, go to mhagc.org. Stage 4 is part of the problem. “Mental illnesses are the only chronic conditions we wait until Stage 4 to treat, and then often only through incarceration,” Gionfriddo said. When we think about cancer, heart disease or diabetes, we don’t wait years to treat them, he said. We start before Stage 4; we begin with prevention. So why don’t we do the same for individuals who are dealing with potentially serious mental illness? Research shows that by ignoring mental health symptoms, we lose 10 years in which we could intervene in order to change people’s lives for the better. During most of these years, most people still have supports that allow them to succeed – home, family, friends, school and work. Intervening effectively during early stages of mental illness can save lives and change the trajectories of people living with mental illness. “We need to act before crises occur, before Stage 4, by treating mental illnesses just as we treat other chronic diseases, with prevention for all, early identification and intervention for those at risk, integrated health, behavioral health and other services for those who need them, and recovery as the goal,” Gionfriddo said.

B4STAGE4 Mental Health America’s screening tools can help. Taken online at bit.ly/ mental-health-tools, the free anonymous screening tool is a private way to learn about your mental health and see if you are showing warning signs of mental illness. A screening is not a diagnosis, but it can be a helpful tool for starting a conversation with your doctor or loved one about your mental health. Mental illnesses are not only common, they are treatable. It’s up to all of us to know the signs and take action so that mental illnesses can be caught early and treated, and we can live up to our full potential. We know that intervening effectively during early stages of mental illness can save lives and change the trajectories of people living with mental illnesses.


32 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.25.2015 | CULTURE

Extra, extra, read all about it Disney’s ‘Newsies the Musical’ comes to Greenville ORIGINAL COMPANY, NORTH AMERICAN TOUR OF DISNEY’S NEWSIES. ©DISNEY. PHOTOS BY DEEN VAN MEER.

around the turn of the last century. When publishing tycoons William Randolph Hearst and Joseph Pulitzer increased Times have changed, especially when it what they charged the boys per hundred comes to how the world gets its news. Long papers, the newsies went on strike. gone are the days when newsboys peddled “Newsies” is based on the real-life papers of publishing tycoons on the “Newsboy Strike of 1899,” when streets of New York City. newsboy Kid Blink led a band of But what hasn’t changed is the orphan and runaway newsies on a love for “Newsies the Musical,” the two-week strike against Pulitzer, stage adaptation of the 1992 box ofHearst and other newspaper pubfice flop turned cult favorite movie. lishers. When New Jersey’s Paper Mill Prior to its adaptation for the Playhouse created “Newsies the stage by Alan Menken and Jack Musical” in 2011, it didn’t have its Feldman, “Newsies” had been the sights on Broadway. But thanks single most requested title of all to an enthusiastic fan base called the Disney musical films not yet Fansies, it got it there. Originally adapted for the stage. It was the intended for a Broadway run of highest-grossing show from the 101 performances, “Newsies” had 2011-12 Broadway season and reother ideas. It ended up with a ceived 23 major theatrical award run of 1,005 performances and nominations. grossed more than $100 million. Keene’s character, newspaThe national tour hits Greenville per reporter Katherine Plumber, on Tuesday for eight performancdidn’t exist in the movie. It was es over six days. created for the musical to give Jack Before she auditioned for the Kelly a love interest. national tour, Morgan Keene, the “Katherine is a strong character. Morgan Keene (left) with Joey Barreiro in “Newsies” show’s female She’s confident lead, had not and spunky,” seen the film Keene said. “She version – it reminds me of came out beme.” fore she was Keene had perborn. She did formed in the see the Broadshow’s ensemble way producand understudtion during its ied the role of first week of Katherine before previews at the getting the role Ne d e rl a nd e r for herself. She Theatre. found out she

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

“I’m a Fansie,” she said. “I was hooked the first time I saw it. It’s such a good story.” “Newsies” is the tale of Jack Kelly, who leads a band of teenage “Newsies,” or newspaper boys, in New York City

7 Newsworthy Facts About “Newsies” 1 – The antique Chandler & Price printing press used in the show was manufactured in the early 1900s and is fully capable of printing 2 – The real-life Newsboy Strike of 1899 came after publishers raised the price for newsies by a dime per hundred papers 3 – “Newsies” has a large group of dedicated fans called Fansies, who helped push the show to Broadway. 4 – 42 sheets of paper are danced on or torn during the riot sequence. They are either recycled or given to audience members during the performance. 5 – The actor with the most costume changes plays seven characters, including a cop, Nunzio the barber, a photographer and Gov. Roosevelt. 6 – The fastest full-body quick change is the character Darcy switching to the Newsies character Jo Jo during “Carrying the Banner” at 56 seconds. 7 – 60 local crewmembers are used for the load-in and 70 for the load-out in each city

won the role during a show in Toronto. “My manager called me twice, and she only calls me twice when I get a role, so I knew I had to pick up the phone. I was backstage and ran out the stage door so nobody could see me,” she said. “When she told me I got the role, I started crying. But the security guard saw everything on the video monitor, and as I walked down the stairs to go back on stage, the security guard handed me a tissue because he saw everything.”


CULTURE | 12.25.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 33

Huangry Sensual and Not-So-Sensual Meals with Andrew Huang

Despite that, something more substantial has to be at work. How else do you explain 45 hits on Yelp for “Chinese takeout” in a city the size of Greenville?

Deep thoughts about Chinese takeout

No, you’re not going to get the most culturally authentic Chinese food, though the Singapore rice noodles I had were certainly passable. You also shouldn’t expect a life-changing culinary experience.

When I first set out to write this column, I was thinking how clever and unexpected it would be to write about Chinese takeout. After all, this time of year is all about homemade feasts of hams, turkeys, and roasts – not takeout containers of fried rice, General Tso’s chicken, and lo mein.

Ultimately, I think the appeal of Chinese takeout can be boiled down to the reason my friend and I ordered from Golden Wok: It was in our neighborhood. That is, Chinese takeout is thoroughly a part of the American food landscape – as much as a neighborhood pizza parlor or diner.

“How edgy I’ll be,” I thought. There was at least some precedent for the timing: “A Christmas Story” has a scene in a Chinese restaurant (though that scene happens to be rather offensive), and Chinese takeout on Christmas has become a pretty standard ritual for American Jews. (See: Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan’s comments during her 2010 confirmation hearing.).

We ordered the Eight Treasure Chicken (with mushrooms, baby corn, onions, celery, water chestnuts, peas, and carrots in a brown sauce, topped with cashews and almonds); Singapore rice noodles (stir-fried with curry powder, shrimp, chicken, and vegetables); cheese fried wontons; and a couple of egg rolls. Contrary to the eye rolls of foodies, our order wasn’t bad. The Eight Treasure Chicken was maybe a little too saucy and too sweet, but all the ingredients had some crunch or bite— enough to elevate it above your bog standard meat-in-a-sauce

ANDREW HUANG

I got together with a friend and grabbed some takeout from Golden Wok, our neighborhood Chinese restaurant. See, Chinese takeout has always been a go-to comfort food. It’s made appearances after traumatic experiences in my life— organic chemistry exams, breakups, car accidents, and “Game of Thrones” season finales—and after a weekend full of holiday parties, my friend and I were both in need of some comfort.

formula. The noodles, on the other hand, had a nice al dente texture and some punch from the curry. The fried bits – the wontons and the egg rolls – were about as you’d expect: crunchy and fried. I thought the egg roll filling could have used a bit more definition (it seemed to be mostly mushy cabbage). All in all, a perfectly adequate takeout experience. As we sat munching, I began thinking how my original angle – Chinese food during the Christmas season! – was really just a shallow gimmick. It played into this cultural milieu that dismisses takeout: It’s usually the punch line for a cultural stereotype, or conversely derided as “inauthentic.”

The unfortunate thing is that, with ethnic food, we’ve come to expect amazingly authentic hole-in-the-walls, or elevated and refined concepts. There’s no recognition or space for food that’s simply dependable and convenient – the fare you eat in between meals at Michelin-starred restaurants. But maybe there should be – especially when we’re all exhausted from planning, preparing, and indulging in these holiday feasts.

GOLDEN WOK 1340 N Pleasantburg Drive, Greenville, 991-8498 Eight Treasure Chicken: $8.50 Singapore Rice Noodles: $8.95 Eggrolls: $1.30 each Wontons: $3.95 for six Andrew Huang is senior editor of TOWN Magazine. Follow his food misadventures on Twitter and at @rooftoptales and #huangry.


34 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.25.2015 | CULTURE

SOUND CHECK

Must-See Movies

And the 2015 Checkies go to…

WITH VINCENT HARRIS

Vince’s picks for the Upstate’s best musical offerings this year 2015 was one of the best years for music that I’ve seen in the Upstate in quite some time. Starting in January when people began talking about whether Greenville was a music town or not, through an incredible year of shows at places like Gottrocks, IPA, Smiley’s, the Radio Room and the Peace Center, into Fall For Greenville and through Horizon Records’ 40th anniversary, it’s been an incredible 12 months. So I figured that it’s time for Second Annual Checkie Awards, my picks for the best musical happenings, albums and artists of 2015. Here we go: Best Album, Local: “Wasted Wine Vs. The Hypnosis Center,” Wasted Wine Not only is this the best album by an Upstate band in 2015, it’s really unlike anything I’ve ever heard. Back in November when I wrote about the band, I described their sound thusly: “Imagine that someone built a creepy old-school funhouse, and then placed it in the bowels of a 19th-century ship crewed by travelling gypsy musicians in the middle of a massive storm.” I’ve always said that the best albums create their own little world that you’re immersed in for a while; Wasted Wine created an unsettling, compelling, infectiously melodic feverdream that I didn’t want to wake up from. Best Album, Regional: “Halfway to Hopkins,” Atlas Road Crew If there was a better straightahead rock & roll album released this year, I haven’t heard it. This Charleston quintet has proudly planted the oldschool Southern-rock flag better than anything since the Crowes’ “Southern Harmony & Musical Companion.” Best Show, Small Venue: Jon Mueller, Cabin Floor Records, 5/1/15 As many good shows as I saw this year, none

of them actually transported me out of my body and into some sort of intense, ecstatic spiritual plane like Mueller’s one-man show at Cabin Floor did. Using only percussion and layered vocals, Mueller’s performance was one of the most intense, hypnotic, life-changing musical experiences I’ve ever had. Best Show, Large Venue: Bill Frisell Trio, Peace Center, 11/22/15 There’s a certain amount of joy in watching a master practicing his craft. Jazz guitarist Bill Frisell is a master, and his craft is less about dazzling solos and more about creating a beautifully melodic tone and gently exploring the hidden corners of a melody, pushing at its edges while still serving the song. His trio show with bassist Tony Scherr and drummer Kenny Wollesen was simply breathtaking. Best Band: The Marcus King Band The rest of the country might not be ready for these guys, but they’re coming. Not only is Marcus a stellar guitarist, bandleader and songwriter, but he’s assembled a group of top-flight musicians behind him: keyboardist Matt Jennings, drummer Jack Ryan, bassist Stephen Campbell and horn player Justin Johnson. This is the hottest ensemble around. Best Surprise: The 2015 Fall For Greenville music lineup As usual, people found plenty to complain about, but I thought the city’s Special Event Coordinator Josh McGee created one of the most balanced schedules I’ve seen. It was a great mix of local, regional, national, new and old. Best Venue: Independent Public Ale House, 110 Poinsett Hwy., Greenville All Wes Gilliam’s done since he took over Independent Public Ale House in October is create one of the most diverse, enjoyable concert schedules in town and started a great buzz about a venue that deserved it. Not too shabby.

By Eric Rogers

Blinded by the ‘new’

How technology affects story structure: Part 2 Last week I mentioned that some films exist today that could not have been made if not for a recent advancement in technology. The 2000 film “O Brother, Where Art Thou?” used a technique of altering the color on a computer that was not possible prior to then. In 2005’s “Sin City,” computer technology was used to make the live action look like images from a graphic novel – a technique the film’s director Robert Rodriguez stated he could not have accomplished without the new technology. “Terminator 2: Judgment Day” could not have been made in 1991 had it not been for a recent advancement in computer animation enabling the T-1000 character to morph into whatever it touched. This was a technique that had first been used in 1989’s “The Abyss,” to create an alien sea creature, but was pushed to greater limits for the “Terminator” sequel. I would say though that by far the films most reliant on developing technologies were the “Star Wars” films. When George Lucas made the first one (Episode Four), he had very little money but pulled together a group of friends who were model builders and comic book artists. They expanded on some old techniques and came up with neverbefore-used methods of their own. Imagine how different the Star Wars series would have looked had they been filmed using the same technology of the Buck Rogers serials that inspired Lucas. But as the technology developed, an odd thing happened. The story eventually became a slave to the technology. Lucas became so intent on pushing the technology that when he made the prequels, he shot practically everything in front of a green screen. It’s difficult for actors to get into character when they aren’t in a natural surrounding. As a result, the acting is stilted and mechanical. There are some really good actors giving really lousy performances in the three prequels. Another example of where the technology got in the way is in “Back to the Future II and III.” The first one had a great storyline, but the second and third, which were made by the same director, aren’t very good. They introduced a new technique called motion capture, which allowed Michael J. Fox to play two characters and to interact with himself, so, for instance, he could hand himself a plate. Robert Zemeckis, the director, seemed to have been far more concerned about breaking new ground in special effects than he was about maintaining a good storyline. And now we have YouTube, which has changed story structure in a different manner, both good and bad, that I’ll discuss next week.

Eric Rogers has been teaching filmmaking at The Greenville Fine Arts Center since 1994.


CULTURE | 12.25.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 35

Page Turners

Road reads

THIS IS HOW 2016 SHOULD SOUND

Audiobooks for eating up the hours and the miles If you’re hitting the road for the holidays, it’s a good bet that hours in the car will pass more easily (and harmoniously) with a good book in your ears. Community Journals’ staff recommends these audiobooks for the long journey or for relaxing at home during the holidays. “THE KID STAYS IN THE PICTURE” by Robert Evans Read by the author | HarperAudio, June 4, 2013 | 6 hours, 22 minutes In his distinctive New Yawk murmur, movie producer and former studio executive Robert Evans takes us through his improbable rise, fall and rebirth in “The Kid Stays in the Picture.” Charting his course from clothing business owner to his career as a hotshot producer and head of Paramount Studios, Evans’ voice lends a hushed, film-noir-style suspense to the most mundane moments. But little about Evans’ life was mundane. Between producing some of the best movies ever made (and several of the worst), battling with virtually every director who worked for him, marrying Ali McGraw, getting busted for cocaine, making and losing a fortune seemingly every two pages, committing himself to a psychiatric hospital (then escaping), Evans’ life story is action-packed. Only someone with his cinematic experience could narrate as skillfully as Evans does, talking tough one minute, whispering softly the next, setting up each scene in his life with a storyteller’s skill and a diva’s love of the spotlight. – Vincent Harris, sports and music writer, Community Journals “PETER AND THE STARCATCHERS” by Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson Read by Jim Dale | Brilliance Audio, September 2004 8 hours, 42 minutes My family chose this audiobook for a long car trip to visit relatives in Pennsylvania, and got so caught up in it we hardly stopped for food. “Peter and the Starcatchers” is a rousing prequel to J. M. Barrie’s classic “Peter Pan” that credibly fills in how Neverland began, but with a great adventure of its own: talking porpoises, biting mermaids, a  scheming pirate named Black Stache and a coveted  trunk full of magical “starstuff”  that bestows happiness, power, intellect, and (gasp) the ability to fly. It’s read by British actor Jim Dale, the voice of the Harry Potter audio series. A total blast. – Susan Simmons, executive editor, Greenville Journal and Upstate Business Journal “THE HITCHHIKER’S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY” by Douglas Adams Read by Stephen Fry | Random House Audio, Jan 14, 2014 | 6 hours The nearly four-inch-thick volume that houses the complete collection of Douglas Adams’ Hitchhikers books sits on my home bookshelf, but for portability, the audio version of “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” can’t be beat. Listening to Stephen Fry’s proper, matter-of-fact British delivery flawlessly complements Adams’ wit and spot-on satire. It was a pleasure to get lost in the story of Arthur Dent and his space adventure, punctuated by practical advice about knowing where your towel is delivered from a book with “‘Don’t panic’ written in large, friendly letters on the cover.” – April A. Morris, staff writer, Greenville Journal and Upstate Business Journal

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

PEACE CENTER | PEACECENTER.ORG | 864.467.3000


NOT ALL STORIES ARE FOUND IN BOOKS. © Andrew Wyeth

Andrew Wyeth (1917-2009) In The Orchard, 1973

Helen DuPre Moseley (1887-1984) untitled, 1964

Lynne Drexler (1928-1999) Gotterdammerung, 1959

Margaret Bowland (born 1953) It Ain’t Necessarily So, 2010

Andrew Moore (born 1957) Zydeco Zinger, 2012

A WORLD OF STORIES AWAITS AT THE GCMA.

NOW ON VIEW: Andy and Helga: This Whole World Helga Testorf posed for Andrew Wyeth for 15 years. Comprised of one major tempera painting and 20 works on paper, some of which have never before been exhibited publicly, Andy and Helga: This Whole World explores the artist’s creative process as he refines and recombines composition and narrative into a compellingly holistic world view. Ooh, Baby, It’s a Wild World Discover a few of the wild animals that lurk at the GCMA. Ranging from breathtaking realism to fantastical imaginary creatures, this exhibition invites you to explore your wild side. Wonderful World of Color Whether bold and brilliant or subtle and subdued, color serves as both a stimulus and a deterrent throughout the natural world. This exhibition welcomes viewers to consider the power of color and their own responses.

Greenville County Museum of Art

Andrew Moore Part of an ongoing project that focuses on the American South, large-format color photographs by Andrew Moore capture architectural elements and urban landscapes as they are slowly reclaimed by nature.

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570

Carolina Zeitgeist Organized largely from the GCMA permanent collection, Carolina Zeitgeist surveys post-World War II paintings and sculpture created by both North and South Carolina artists. A number of Upstate artists are featured in this exhibition.

Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm

GCMA 1562 Journal not all stories new.indd 4

gcma.org

Closed December 24 & 25 Merry Christmas!

Free Admission

12/15/15 4:44 PM


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On The Market • Open Houses • Design • Trends

FEATURED NEIGHBORHOOD

NEIGHBORHOOD INFO Community Size: 52 lots Details: Located in the Five Forks neighborhood at the corner of Brown Road and Maxwell Road. Schools: Monarch Elementary, Mauldin Middle and Mauldin High Schools

Maxwell Farm, Simpsonville, SC - SECTION II NOW OPEN! Simpsonville’s newest community with 52 lots for custom homes. Section I is almost sold out and lots in Section II can now be purchased through an approved builder. Section II consists of lots 9 through 19, some of the most desirable homesites in the neighborhood. Don’t want to go through the building process? There are spec homes currently for sale. Home prices starting in the $600’s. We invite you to contact an approved builder for more information or visit our website at www.maxwellfarmsc.com.

Lots in Section II can now be purchased through one of the four approved builders: J. Francis Builders • 864.288.4001 • rachel@jfrancisbuilders.com

Galloway Custom Homes • 864.289.9994 • homebldr@bellsouth.net

Goodwin Foust Custom Homes • 864.505.0479 • barret@goodwinfoust.com Sadler Company • 864.230.2275 • bobsadler@sadlercompany.com


HOME | 12.25.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 27

CHRISTOPHER RIDGE

ON THE MARKET RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES FOR SALE

www.ConservusRealty.com Hollingsworth Park

12 Shadwell Drive, Greenville, SC $549,000.00

207 KEENELAND WAY . $499,000 . MLS#1307452 4BR/3.5B Level 1.1 acre lot, granite and stainless steel appliances in kitchen, beautiful millwork throughout, large bedrooms and baths. Great location zoned for Oakview, Riverside, J.L. Mann. +Den, Bonus, and Sunroom

• 3 Bed/2 Bath with two 1/2 baths • Luxurious Main Level Master Suite • Custom Carolina Closets Throughout

Contact: Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 The Marchant Company

PEOPL E, AWA RD S, HONOR S

Agent: Debra Owensby 864.608.4608

Kate Dabbs and Marisa Stephens Join Coldwell Banker Caine

Stephens joins the marketing team with an extensive background in social media and digital advertising. In her previous positions as Digital Advertisting Account Manager and Social Media and Digital Coldwell Banker Caine recently Marketing Specialist for Chumney Dabbs welcomed Kate Dabbs as Integrated and Associates, she gained social Marketing Manager and Marisa media, search engine optimization, Stephens as Digital Experience and pay-per-click advertising Coordinator. experience. Stephens received her In her role, Dabbs leads the B.S. in Psychology from Clemson marketing team using skills honed University. In her free time, she through previous positions as enjoys traveling, spending time with Associate Director of Development her family, playing with her puppy, Stephens Communications at Furman and trying new restaurants. University and Communications “Marisa and Kate are talented Director at Greenville Forward. She is additions to the Caine marketing team,” said completing her M.A. in Professional Jane Harrison Fisher, Chief Experience Officer Communications from Clemson University of Coldwell Banker Caine. “Their combined and holds a B.A. in English and Political Science skill sets will enhance our overall branding from Furman. Dabbs serves on the Community initiatives and provide excellent in-house Foundation of Greenville Capacity Building marketing strategies for our agents and brand.” Grant Selection Committee and enjoys outdoor sports, cooking, and traveling with her husband.

BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES C. DAN JOYNER, REALTORS WELCOMES THREE AGENTS TO PELHAM ROAD OFFICE Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS announces the addition of three agents to its Pelham Road office. Arica Foley, Jackie Garcia and Molly Gehrt join the company’s largest office as residential sales associates. Arica Foley commences her real estate career following five years as a contracts assistant for Hewlett Packard in Virginia and nearly two years in beverage sales in Maryland.

Dreams are heartwarming... your dream home search should be too.

That’s why we’re different. INTRODUCING OUR DREAM TEAM: COULD BE OUR

Debra

Kathy

YOU

BE OUR NEXT DREAM HOME SPECIALIST?

COME INSIDE TO LEARN MORE!

* List of Qualifications to Apply

Gehrt

Foley

Donna

Joann

John

Kendall

Tracy

Nancy

Garcia

A native of Washington, DC, Foley attended the College of Southern Maryland. She and her husband, Matthew, currently reside in Greer. Jackie Garcia is the latest addition to The French Connection team. Garcia most recently served as a property representative for a homeowners’ association management company on the West Coast. She earned a bachelor’s degree from Bible Baptist Institute continued on PAGE 29

Lonnie

Conservus Realty provides equal employment opportunities (EEO) to all employees and applicants for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability or genetics. In addition to federal law requirements, [Company Name] complies with applicable state and local laws governing nondiscrimination in employment in every location in which the company has facilities. This policy applies to all terms and conditions of employment, including recruiting, hiring, placement, promotion, termination, layoff, recall, transfer, leaves of absence, compensation and training.


28 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.25.2015 | HOME

Witchery and magic in the winter garden

5

December 21 was the win- Guest columnist 3 1 ter solstice – the shortest day of the year – and we are on the swing back to a lengthening day. You have felt the solstice and the ever-present essence of nature by observing the length of the day, the with Kathy Slayter movement of the sun and the phases of the moon. So does the garden. In the darkness 4 and the cold is a wonderful collection of plants that 6 thrive in this type of weather, and these are the plants I 2 want to talk with you about. A rare magic or witchery is given to those of us who venture out into the garden now. Your spirit will lift as you notice a sweet little flower poking up four-season through the debris of fall. Pansies are garden. Setbloom planted in the late fall and will bloom ting 1. Edgeworthia 2. Edgeworthia Chrysantha 3. Garden greens 4. Mahonia 5. Hellebores or “Lenten Rose” 6. Nandina with berries these throughout the winter with proper care. now, Bright red berries abound. Tiny flower- plants have become highly coveted. Helle- green, and its drooping silver blue ber- thrived this year due to delayed cold and ing bulbs peek up at you; a fragrance you bores are long-blooming, cold-hardy, self- ries. Look for foliage variety and color plastic. Lettuce, kale, parsley, arugula, cican’t identify comes to you from nearby. sowing and low-maintenance – who could when you look for winter plants. Foliage lantro, chard, spinach, endive, radicchio, These things stir our hearts and our ask for more? They come in many colors can be as interesting as the flower. beet tops, turnip greens and scallions are and their leaves vary in shape and design. minds. It is your choice to notice. Another winter blooming tree is Witch abundant. I do have to be vigilant with the The garden at Falls Park in downtown You can buy them now or like me, pinch Hazel (Hamamelis) which, though a slow plastic coverings to be sure the plants are Greenville has many lovely winter seedpods from plants of friends and sow grower to about 15 feet, has striking yel- protected, but it is well worth the effort. blooming shrubs and plants. With cool the seed in the spring. They are interesting low fragrant flowers on bare woods that As we pass into a new year, remember weather being the best time to plant your to watch grow, and prefer partial shade. attract birds and my eyes as they blaze in that nature speaks to us all day and Another shrub that is a favorite of the winter sun. Sweet box (Sarcococca night, through every season of the year, shrubs, you can see many of the winter blooming and berry fruiting shrubs now. mine is Edgeworthia. This plant looks hookeriana) has evergreen leaves and through the passing of the sun through A technique for layering your garden is great in summer but excels in winter. fragrant flowers as its name suggests. the windows of our homes and souls, life to stand inside your home and look out The leaves drop and it is covered on each Always good near the front door, this is a renewing itself, day after day after day. through the windows. Notice where the long stem with fluffy fragrant blooms favorite shrub of master gardeners. See you in the garden. sun has traveled and which areas are that open to a creamy yellow about the Bulbs should have been planted by now, now bare. Just look and think about what size of a cotton ball. The bark is a strik- but you can include many that bloom in Kathy Slayter is a Greenville Realtor and ing reddish-brown and the shrub is a winter in the well-layered garden next you would like to see. third-generation gardener who became Camellias are a wonderful gift for a win- show stealer. It is so fragrant that you year. Snowdrops, grape hyacinth, crocus a Clemson-certified Master Gardener in ter garden, as they are evergreen and bloom can smell it across the garden. and cyclamen are a few to include. Hardy 2007. She is passionate about growing, I also love Mahonia for its spiky thorn ferns like Autumn and Holly ferns love in winter. Hellebores or “Lenten Rose” are cooking and eating her homegrown food. Contact her at kathyslayter@gmail.com. a perennial that is a great contributor to a covered leathery leaves of muted gray the cold weather. My veggie garden has

SEE YOU IN THE GARDEN

Agents on call this weekend

C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS ®

BRYAN DEYOUNG 230-8284 PELHAM ROAD

SHERMAN WILSON 3003-6930 GARLINGTON RD

GARY THOMPSON 414-7448 EASLEY/ POWDERSVILLE

DIANE SHAPUITE 505-3692 SIMPSONVILLE

STACEY BRADSHAW 230-1314 AUGUSTA ROAD

JOY STEVERSON 337-0625 N. PLEASANTBURG DR.

JEFF AND ANNA SHEPHERD 879-4239 GREER

JOANN RUTLEDGE 293-3320 DOWNTOWN

Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at cdanjoyner.com


HOME | 12.25.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 29

PEOPL E, AWA RD S, HONOR S Continued from PAGE 27

& Seminary in Arleta, California. A native of Los Angeles, Garcia lives in Greenville with her husband, Solomon, and they are parents to two children. Molly Gehrt joins the Toates Team at the Pelham Road office. Prior to entering real estate, she served as business coordinator at Carolina Medical Technology in Greenville. A native of Hilton Head Island, Gehrt earned a

bachelor’s degree in modern languages from Clemson University. She currently lives in Greenville and will marry Brian Cornelius in January 2016. “I am happy to welcome Arica, Jackie and Molly to our office,” said Duane Bargar, BrokerIn-Charge of the company’s Pelham Road location. “As we continue to grow to meet the needs of the Upstate, their perspectives and expertise will certainly enhance their clients’ buying and selling experiences.”

Hom e i s... sugar and spice and everything nice

RE /MAX Moves is excited to announce that four new agents have joined their Simpsonville office in Five Forks Megan Moe joins RE/ MAX Moves with 7 years of real estate sales experience, and has a degree in education from Miami University. meganmoe.greenvillemoves. com Chris Emde comes to us Fletcher with more than 25 years of real estate experience ranging from sales to development to new construction. He also holds degrees in both finance and engineering. chrisemde. greenvillemoves.com Len Fletcher is excited to Emde be back with RE/MAX. He has 25 years of real estate experience in the

Patterson

Moe

Greenville area, is a retired Lieutenant Commander in the US Navy, and is the incoming 2016 President of the Greater Greenville Association of Realtors Board of Directors. lenfletcher.greenvillemoves. com Pam Patterson first started in real estate in 2006, and has lived in the Upstate since 1994. She has experience ranging from buying and selling to new construction. pampatterson. greenvillemoves.com

BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY HOMESERVICES C. DAN JOYNER, REALTORS WELCOMES THREE AGENTS TO DOWNTOWN OFFICE Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS announces the addition of three residential sales associates agents to the Downtown office located on Vardry Street. John Greene joins the company following seven years as an account manager for an Upstate apparel manufacturer and distributor. A Greenville native, he earned a Bachelor of Science in business from the University of South Carolina. In his spare time, Greene enjoys playing and coaching soccer and advocating for organ donation. Jason McClain brings over a year of Upstate real estate experience to his role within the company. Prior to real estate, McClain served in purchasing and sales roles in the power distribution and telecommunications industries. He is a native of Piedmont, SC and earned a Bachelor of Arts from Wofford College. Christina Taylor also joins the Downtown office as an experienced agent, having amassed

Taylor

Greene

McClain

over 18 months of real estate experience in the Upstate. Her background also includes nine years in catering sales management in the hospitality industry. A graduate of the College of Charleston, she holds a degree in historic preservation. Taylor originally hails from Lexington, SC and now lives in Greenville. “As our Downtown office continues to expand, I am happy to welcome these new and seasoned agents,” said Teresa Cox, Broker-InCharge of the Vardry Street location. “Their backgrounds, focus and enthusiasm align with our company’s commitment to being the Upstate’s real estate leader.”

Happy Holidays from our family to yours. Proud supporters of the American Dream www.cbcaine.com


30 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.25.2015 | HOME

G R E E N V I L L E T R A N S AC T I O N S

FO R T H E W E E K O F NOV E M B E R 2 3 - 2 7 , 2 0 1 5 TOP TRANSFERS OF THE WEEK

$652,000 769 Hillside Church Road, Greenville

KINGSBRIDGE - $590,000 422 Kingsgate Ct., Simpsonville

NORTH HILLS - $476,000 214 Mcdonald St., Greenville

PARK HILL - $365,000 106 Melville Ave., Greenville

HOLLAND TRACE - $355,000 127 Holland Trace Cir., Simpsonville

THE LOFTS AT MILLS MILL - $350,000 400 Mills Ave Unit 201, Greenville

SILVERLEAF - $331,000 112 Comstock Ct., Greer

ROPER MOUNTAIN ESTATES - $320,000 27 W Cranberry Ln., Greenville

SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$1,500,000 $1,400,000 $1,233,874 $890,000 SPAULDING FARMS $659,900 $652,000 KINGSBRIDGE $590,000 CLIFFS VALLEY $585,000 ACADIA $543,000 NORTH HILLS $476,000 $450,000 PARK PLACE $400,000 PARK HILL $365,000 HOLLAND TRACE $355,000 THE LOFTS AT MILLS MILL $350,000 SILVERLEAF $331,000 ROPER MOUNTAIN ESTATES $320,000 WOODLAND RIDGE $309,702 LINKSIDE $305,000 STONE LAKE HEIGHTS $290,000 GROVE PARK $289,000 BELSHIRE $284,252 WATERSTONE COTTAGES $277,650 $275,000 MERRIFIELD PARK $272,000 TIMBERLAND TRAIL $270,000 ROCKBROOKE NORTH $264,000 CARLYLE POINTE $260,000 $257,000 OAK HOLLOW $255,000 BELSHIRE $252,810 HUDSON PLACE $250,000 COACHMAN PLANTATION $250,000 STONE ESTATES $247,000 DEVENGER PLACE $247,000 BOTANY WOODS $245,000 GRESHAM PARK $237,500 DAVENPORT $230,000 REMINGTON $224,900 TIMBERLAND TRAIL $221,491 POINSETT CORNERS $220,500 WINDSTONE $218,000 THE EDGE ON NORTH MAIN $217,000 WATSON CROSSING $215,000 CREEKWOOD $212,000 KELSEY GLEN $211,260 AUGUSTA CIRCLE $208,000 BROOKFIELD EAST $205,000 AUTUMN WOODS $205,000 HOLLY TREE PLANTATION $200,527 EIGHTEEN BOWERS ROAD $198,000 PALMETTO PLACE $198,000 ONEAL VILLAGE $197,424 HERITAGE CREEK $195,500 PEMBERTON PLACE $195,000 $195,000 FAIRVIEW POINTE $188,500 COVE AT SAVANNAH POINTE $187,036 CEDAR VALE $184,000 HAMMETT GROVE $181,250 $180,000 DEVENGER PLACE $178,000 HERITAGE HILL $175,000 PARKER CREEK $175,000 VICTORIA PARK TOWNHOMES $174,380 CANEBRAKE $174,000

BUYER

RYAN’S FAMILY STEAK HOUS BRASHIER T WALTER REVOC VIP HOSPITALITY LLC QUIKTRIP CORPORATION FAMILY DOLLAR STORES OF NORTH PLAZA PARTNERS LLC CHASTAIN SIMPSONVILLE GR CENTURY BAYTOWN LLC HIGGINS ANNMARIE C NEI GLOBAL RELOCATION CO WASCHKOWSKI MATTHEW W (J RAY THOMAS B ABEL ASHLEY BRYAN NEWMAN RONALEE K (JTWROS NICKLAW GALEN F & EVA D HARTMAN ELROY M JR (JTWR ACADIA TOWNHOMES LLC FREEMAN KELLER CUSHING STAFFORD ASA EVANS ANA M (JTWROS) D & V LLC HUSKY WHITE HORSE LLC PETRATOS NICKIE SAM REAL ESTATE GROUP LL BARNETT CLAIRE F (JTWROS THOMPSON MICHAEL R SNIPES AMANDA R HUDGENS ERIC BEAVERS TROY L GELLER ANDREW L GOODMAN DIANE F (SURV) GILLESPIE ERICA P (JTWRO RIDGEWAY INA C YOUNG CARSON B (JTWROS) D R HORTON INC STELLERN KATHRYN ANN H ( JACKSON BRIAN KING RICHARD W (JTWROS) MARTIN JAMES TIMOTHY (JT RIDGEWAY ALEXANDRA MARIE MAJOR JOHN PERRY II PSB BEVERLY PROPERTIES L NVR INC LAWS ANTHONY TODD (JTWRO ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC SIEFERT JAMES (JTWROS) WACHOVIA BANK N A TRUSTE GREGORY LANE PROPERTIES BOYD ROBERT A JOHNSON ELIZABETH SOMERS D R HORTON INC TANSKI DIANE (JTWROS) OSTRANDER ELMER E CHASTAIN TIMOTHY PAUL LAUGHLIN STEVE C BELTAKIS ERIC STEIFLE CELIA FRANCES GROVES KATHERINE MARIE CAMPBELL BETTINA H DIXON JAMES K NVR INC LACKEY JON C (JTWROS) DOBBS ANDREW J GIBSON JASON C (JTWROS) D R HORTON INC MCQUAIDE KEITH A (JTWROS HOUSE 2 HOUSE LLC KOPELMAN JUSTIN G (JTWRO HEITZ DAVID RICHARD MORRIS APRIL B MULLIKIN ELIZABETH T JTM PROPERTIES LLC HORVAT LINDA BERTLING CECELIA W KENT THABET HOLDINGS LLC WILLIAMS CRIS AND TERESA OGLESBY COURTNEY ANN (JT DRIVER OTIS L SR D R HORTON INC PATTERSON JOANNE (JTWROS CAUBLE CHARLES E DURANT BRENDA PAGAN LEIGH A MOSS CHARLES S (JTWROS) HALFACRE ANGELA C SMITH KIMBERLY D MILLER PAMELA RAE FRYE GREGORY D (SURV) SPRENGER MARCELL MCLEES JAMES A NVR INC SEITH MICHAEL W (JTWROS) LUCAS D LEE JR REVOCABLE GREGORY REBECCA P KAINUMA ERICA T CUSACK CHRISTOPHER M (JT HOOVER HERBERT ANDREW (J DABNEY AARON JOHN (JTWRO GREEN EDWARD G ARLP SECURITIZATION TRUS DISTINGUISHED DESIGN LLC SNOW RACHEL E (JTWROS) FARMER BROOK R AL HAMEEDI ZINAH A DAN RYAN BUILDERS SOUTH DERUBIS CHRISTINA MARIE OBADINA OBAJUWON O PENA CHRISTIAN (JTWROS) WYEN JASON T (JTWROS) SEVERANCE LISA M (JTWROS KAY JO ANN C ALDRICH CRAIG OKEEFE RELIANT SC LLC SWING CLAY A MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH ARENA ELVIRA (JTWROS) JCI GROUP LLC GLENN ROBYN B GIBSON JASON C ABAROTIN JORDAN (JTWROS) MATTHEWS DAVID S BARR MICHELE M SMITH WILLIAM J WOOLLENS DEBORAH L TURNER IRIS K PATRICK RUSSELL W CHURCH CHARLES D HEY DAVID A (JTWROS) MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH SMITH JACOB A (JTWROS) BURNETT LUKE M (JTWROS) HAVRAN MARIE PUTNAM

Congratulations, Andreana! Wilson Associates Real Estate proudly announces that Andreana Horowitz Snyder has earned her Broker License. This step in enhancing her education to better serve her clients is just one example of the diligent work ethic we so admire in her. We look forward to Andreana continuing to exceed her client’s expectations in the Greenville SC Real Estate market. We are so thrilled she is a part of Wilson Associates! Andreana Horowitz Snyder, andreana@wilsonassociates.net, Mobile: (864) 915-4201 See all of our extraordinary properties at wilsonassociates.net

ADDRESS PO BOX 17859 6 GABLES WAY 123 W FRONT ST STE 200 PO BOX 863975 8701 W DODGE RD 769 HILLSIDE CHURCH RD 422 KINGSGATE CT 378 N AVALON ST PO BOX 8580 214 MCDONALD ST 222 W COLEMAN BLVD 15198 DOWNEY AVE 106 MELVILLE AVE 127 HOLLAND TRACE CIR 400 MILLS AVE UNIT 201 112 COMSTOCK CT 27 W CRANBERRY LN 23 WOOD HOLLOW CIR 118 LINKSIDE DR 111 LAKE FOREST DR 102 ANTIGUA WAY 19 DAUPHINE WAY 103D UNIT 2 REGENCY COMMONS DR 1332 N PLEASANTBURG DR 122 MERRIFIELD DR 100 VERDAE BLVD STE 401 109 HUBBARD LN 9 BRADWELL WAY 31 CAMMER AVE 247 CARDINAL DR 18 DAUPHINE WAY 5 CONTINENTAL DR 143 SCOTTS BLUFF DR 16 DRUID ST 108 RICHFIELD TER 2089 WOODRUFF RD 10 KENTON FINCH CT 806 PELTON AVE 14 PHAETON AVE 112 TRAILWOOD DR 224 S LAURENS ST UNIT 207L 105 WINDSTONE DR 6 EDGE CT UNIT A 4 WILD GEESE WAY PO BOX 386 112 CHAPEL HILL LN 213 W FARIS RD 402 HALIFAX DR 101 KINGSDALE CT 8 FIELDWOOD LN 408 BOWERS RD 611 REID SCHOOL RD 101 MERITAGE ST 220 OAK BRANCH DR 204 KAPLAN CT 22 GLENN ST 15 VALLEY BLUFF LN 201 ST LUCIE DR 8 STRADLEY TER 116 STREAM CROSSING WAY 66 RANDALL DR PO BOX 25181 835 BUTLER SPRINGS RD 1210 N PARKER RD 405 KINDLETREE WAY 115 TICONDEROGA DR


HOME | 12.25.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 31

www.MarchantCo.com (864) 467-0085 | AGENT ON DUTY: JeanE Bartlett (864) 506-4093 RENTAL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE • Marchantpm.com (864) 527-4505 la nsu eni res P c e vat 5 a Pri w/ 5

Sig na tur e

cle Cir a t s gu Au

Sig na tur e

! der ee un ust s k $90sal, m rai p Ap

Sig na tur e

100 Woodbine Rd. - Lake Greenwood

12 Highland Dr. - Augusta Road

39 Brooke Ann Ct. - Arrowhead

$1,225,000 • 1304750 • 4BR/4BA/1Hf BA

$789,000 • 1310557 • 4BR/3BA/1Hf BA

$650,000 • 1311242 • 5BR/5BA/1Hf BA

Valerie Miller • (864) 430-6602 • vmiller@marchantco.com

, ial 85 erc off I-1 m m ty Co isibili V t a Gre

Tom Marchant • (864) 449-1658 • tom@tommarchant.com

sly d ou taine l u tic in Me & Ma t l i Bu

Lydia Johnson • (864) 918-9663 • lydia@marchantco.com Mikel-Ann Scott • (864) 630-2474 • mikelann@marchantco.com

SF, us 19 +Bon 6 2 cs, 7A 2 . 1

ks oo erl Rock v O ble Ta

8255 Geer Hwy - Caesars Head $369,000 • 1302748 • 3BR/2BA

Tom Marchant • (864) 449-1658 • tom@tommarchant.com

+! SF 00 6 2

2234 Fork Shoals Rd. - Piedmont

414 Kilgore Farms Cir. - Kilgore Farms

23 Fox Creek Ct. - Heritage Cove

4 Braywood Ct. - Neely Farm

$350,000 • 1309297 • Lot

$349,900 • 1312120 • 4BR/3BA/1Hf BA

$278,000 • 1310839 • 3BR/2BA/1Hf BA

$267,500 • 1309645 • 4BR/2BA/1Hf BA

Bo Matheny • (864) 605-7578 • bo@marchantco.com Joan Rapp • (864) 901-3839 • joan@marchantco.com

ary cs por e .57a m te at ConF, Priv S 0 270

Lydia Johnson • (864) 918-9663 • lydia@marchantco.com Mikel-Ann Scott • (864) 630-2474 • mikelann@marchantco.com

s iew g V tn. n i d M stan sy Out Glas of

Anne Marchant • (864) 420-0009 • anne@marchantco.com Jolene Wimberly • (864) 414-1688 • jolenewim@aol.com

G wtn TIN From D S I L teps W NE etting S S e -Lik Park

Barbara Riggs • (864) 423-2783 • barbriggs@marchantco.com

G TIN from m! S I L ws g R W e n NE ke Vi& Livi La ster Ma

75 Regent Dr. - Edgefield

1821 Highway 11 - Landrum

204 E. Park Ave. #903 - The Park Downtown

2 Wieuca Ct. - Half Mile Lake

$234,900 • 1311977 • 3BR/2BA/1Hf BA

$220,000 • 1309415 • 3BR/2BA

$199,900 • 1308478 • 2BR/1BA

$179,000 • 1313139 • 3BR/2BA/1Hf BA

Anne Marchant • (864) 420-0009 • anne@marchantco.com Jolene Wimberly • (864) 414-1688 • jolenewim@aol.com

Nellie Wagoner • (864) 423-3939 • nellie@marchantco.com

G TIN , lle LIS Build S’vi W n NE New, Dwt A HO No

ace e Sp S’vill e c i n Off ntow w o D

303 Perry Ave. - League Estates $154,747 • 1313117 • 3BR/2BA

Joan Rapp • (864) 901-3839 • joan@marchantco.com

Karen W. Turpin • (864) 230-5176 • karenturpi@aol.com Nancy McCrory • (864) 505-8367 • nmmccrory@aol.com

G TIN 385 LIS 85 & es! W t NE se to pda U o l h C wit

105 Maple St. - Downtown Simpsonville 1903 Spring Wood Dr. - Summerwoods Condos $124,747 • 1303924 • Lot

Joan Rapp • (864) 901-3839 • joan@marchantco.com

$78,000 • 1313035 • 2BR/1BA/1Hf BA

Anne Marchant • (864) 420-0009 • anne@marchantco.com

Barbara Riggs • (864) 423-2783 • barbriggs@marchantco.com

it Un or o l dF un Gro

400 Mills Ave. #204 - Lofts @ Mills Ave. $219,900 • 1306602 • 1BR/1BA

James Akers, Jr. • (865) 325-8413 • jamesakersjr@gmail.com

RESIDENTIAL | COMMERCIAL | NEW HOME COMMUNITIES | PROPERTY MANAGEMENT | VETERAN SERVICES | FORECLOSURES | LAND & ACREAGE | MOUNTAIN PROPERTIES


CULTURE | 12.25.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 37

WHAT’S HAPPENING

Noon Year’s Eve at The Museum! Dec. 31, 9 a.m.–3 p.m The Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College Street, Greenville $9 for children ages 1–15; $10 for adults 233-7755 tcmupstate.org

Come celebrate the new year at noon! Create festive noise makers, crafts and get covered in confetti during the countdown to noon.

Dec. 26

CONCERT

Soul Ripple

CONCERT

Honey & The Hot Rods Smiley’s Acoustic Café FREE Upstate band plays revved-up rockabilly. 282-8988 smileysacousticcafe.com

Blues Boulevard (Greenville) Tickets: $5 (early show), $2 (late show). Plus $10 food/drink minimum Versatile band covers soul, rock, blues and jazz with ease. 242-2583 bluesboulevardjazzgreenville.com

Dec. 27

Dec. 28

CONCERT

FAMILY

Ricky Godfrey

Save with Ingles

Southern Culture FREE

United Community Bank Ice on Main Mondays thru Jan. 18 $8/adults and $6/kids with Ingles Advantage card

Veteran Upstate bluesman. 552-1998 southernculturekitchenandbar.com

Get $2 off skating with your Ingles advantage card. iceonmain.com

Come to TCMU on December 31st to ring in the “noon year” at our annual pajama party! ®

300 College St. TCMUpstate.org

FREE WITH ADMISSION! Please note the museum will close at 3pm on 12/31/15.

«


38 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.25.2015 | CULTURE

« thru Dec. 30 FAMILY

Skating on the Big Ice Bon Secours Wellness Arena 1-5 p.m. $5 for 6 & under; $7 for 7 & older; $3 skate rental (no rental fee if you bring your own skates)

Join the Bon Secours Wellness Arena on Dec. 31 for Noon Year’s Eve as we count down to noon - the party on ice starts at 10 a.m. and ends at 2 p.m. bonsecoursarena.com

CONCERT

Mourning Dove Smiley’s Acoustic Café FREE Ethereal, mesmerizing folk duo. 282-8988 | smileysacousticcafe.com

Jan. 1

Presented by Greenville Water. Enjoy ice skating on the biggest ice in town during your winter break. bonsecoursarena.com

HEALTH/FITNESS

2016 First Day Ranger Run and Loon Lunge Devils Fork State Park | 161 Holcombe Circle 11 a.m.-2 p.m. | $25 donation/registration

FAMILY

thru Dec. 31 ARTS EVENT

Matthew Zedler display Hyatt Regency, Studio 220 220 North Main St. FREE Studio 220 will host the modern- contemporary artist Matthew Zedler’s exhibit until Dec. 31. 828-404-6882 | matthewzedlerfineart.com ARTS EVENT

Holiday Jewelry Show Artists Guild Gallery of Greenville 200 N. Main St. Mondays-Saturday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sundays 1-5 p.m. FREE Twelve local jewelers are collaborating again this holiday season for the AGGG annual holiday celebration show. Local jewelers and other fine artists are making exquisite pieces of handcrafted jewelry from beaded work to hand-blown glass pieces, silversmithing to beautiful gems and wire-wrapped minerals. The perfect gift for loved ones or yourself. 239-3882 | artistsguildgalleryofgreenville.com

Noon Year’s Eve Party Greenville County Library System Pelham Road Branch | 1508 Pelham Road 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. FREE Welcome in 2016 with stories, games, crafts and snacks. Balloon drop at noon. Ages 3-6. Registration required and opens Dec. 7. 288-6688 | greenvillelibrary.org

CONCERT

T.J Lazer & The New Detroits/ Jo Jo Taterhead Revival Gottrocks Tickets: $12 in advance/$15 day of show Ska maniacs plus dance-funk party animals equals great New Year’s Eve show. 235-5519 | gottrocksgreenville.com

CONCERT

New Year’s at Moe Joe’s, featuring Kylie Odetta, the Maggie Valley Band, Joshua Jones & Jacob Johnson Moe Joe Coffee (Greenville) Tickets: $25 Multi-band NYE blowout. 263-3550 | moejoecoffeeandmusic.net

Dec. 31 FAMILY

Soundbox Tavern

Bon Secours Wellness Arena 10 a.m.-2 p.m. $5 for 6 & under; $7 for 7 & older; $3 skate rental (no rental fee if you bring your own skates)

Alias for Now w/ Faces Unturned & Psycho Spoon Upstate power-trio plays going-away show on New Year’s Eve. 228-7763 facebook.com/The-SoundboxTavern-1617676778479745/

thru Jan. 3 FAMILY

Christmas Model Train Display Miniature World of Trains 2801 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors varies-5 p.m. Children over 2 – $3; Adults – $3 The fifth annual Christmas model train display is described as “One of the finest holiday displays in the country.” Due to the delays with the preparation of the new location, the Christmas Model Train Display will be the only display open at this time. Visit miniatureworldoftrains. com/HoursOfOperation.htm for hours and days of operation. miniatureworldoftrains.com

CONCERT

Nihil Ground Zero A little black metal for the first day of 2016. 948-1661 reverbnation.com/venue/groundzero2 CONCERT

Mason Jar Menagerie w/ Andrew Scotchie & The River Rats Independent Public Ale House Fountain Inn combo blends punk energy with classic blues and folk. 552-1265 | ipagreenville.com CONCERT

CONCERT

Noon Year’s Eve Celebration

On New Year’s Day, join us at Devils Fork State Park for the 2016 First Day 5K Ranger Run, guided trail hike and the Loon Lunge. Register for the 5K at www. Go-GreenEvents.com. Guided nature hike is free, as well as the Loon Lunge. The Ranger Run 5K and guided hike will start at 11 AM, with the Loon Lunge to follow. 918-8475 | Go-GreenEvents.com

214-1600 | legacycharterschool.com vburrows@legacycharterschool.com

Airplane Mode, w/ G3X, Comrade Ringo & Owen Ni Radio Room Upstate producer creates haunting EDM. 263-7868 | radioroomgreenville.com

Jan. 1-Feb. 2 EDUCATION

Legacy Charter School K5 Open Enrollment Legacy Charter Elementary School 1613 W. Washington St. 8 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE Open enrollment for Legacy Charter School K5 will be from Jan. 1-Feb. 2 at 4 p.m. Applications available online or by contacting Virgina Burrows, elementary school principal.

Jan. 6 FAMILY

Duke Energy Math + Science Challenge Night United Community Bank Ice on Main 5-8 p.m. $5 skating for K-12 students with report cards showing a B or higher in math or science Kindergarten through 12th grade students who bring a report card showing a B or higher in math or science will skate for just $5 thanks to Duke Energy Foundation. iceonmain.com

Jan. 8 FUNDRAISER

GSP Below Zero with Heroes Night United Community Bank Ice on Main 5-8 p.m. $5 skating for anyone with a military ID Come skate with Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport to honor those who have served our country. $5 skating for anyone with a military ID. A portion of every ticket sold will benefit Honor Flight Upstate. iceonmain.com

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CULTURE | 12.25.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 39

« Jan. 9

Jan. 12

TRAINING

ARTS EVENT

Partner In Command

‘The Yarn’ - True-Life Storytelling

Cabela’s Sporting Good 9:30 AM-12:00 PM

M. Judson Booksellers & Storytellers 130 S. Main Street 7-8:30 p.m. $10 Suggested Donation

free Are you a boater, but not a skipper? Partner in Command, is to teach non-skippers what is needed to handle skipper duties should the need arise. This seminar is one in a series from the United States Power Squadron, and instructed by ladies. It is designed to help you become comfortable using the radio, stop, start and run the engine, rules of the road, and returning the boat to a safe haven. 281-9774 CONCERT

Greenville Symphony Orchestra presents “Get Dreaming!” at Centre Stage Centre Stage South Carolina 501 River Street 7 PM-8 PM (Sat., Jan 9 at 2 pm & 7 pm) $15 The Greenville Symphony Orchestra Principal Musicians present the third and final installment of the 2015-16 Spotlight Series concerts, “Get Dreaming!” featuring five distinct and lively pieces in the intimate venue of Centre Stage Theatre. Visit greenvillesymphony.org for more information. 233-6733 | greenvillesymphony.org

FREE Southerners tell the best stories. In fact, we spin better yarns than anyone in the country. Inspired by The Moth StorySLAM, this night features stories by you. Prepare a 5-minute (true) tale on our theme - “Beginnings” - and see if you get picked to share. Come laugh, cry, or just sit in silent awe with members of our community. Ages 16+. Hosted by Greenville Wordsmiths. greenvillewordsmiths.com FAMILY

‘Skate United’ with the Greenville Swamp Rabbits United Community Bank Ice on Main 6-8 p.m. $5 for everyone to skate

James B. Duke Library, Furman University 3300 Poinsett Hwy. Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE A new exhibit showcasing South Carolina poetry is open at Furman University’s James B. Duke Library, Special Collections and Archives. The exhibit, “Celebrating South Carolina Poetry: An Exhibition to Mark the Acquisition of The Ninety-Six Press Archive” is free and open to the public. Furman English professors William Rogers and Gilbert Allen founded The Ninety-Six Press in 1991 to publish book-length works of poetry by South Carolina authors. 294-2714 | newspress.furman.edu/?p=19301

The South Carolina International Auto Show

United Community Bank Ice on Main 5-8 p.m. $5 skating for K-12 students with report cards showing a B or higher in math or science

Mixed media art by Mollie Oblinger, Associate Professor of Art at Ripon College (Wis.), will be on display at Furman University. A reception with the artist is scheduled for Monday, Feb. 8, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in the Roe Art Building. 294-2074 | newspress.furman.edu

South Carolina Poetry Exhibit

Jan. 13

ARTS EVENT

FREE

ARTS EVENT

Jan. 15-17

Jan. 11-Feb. 12 Furman University Thompson Gallery of Roe Art Bldg. 3300 Poinsett Hwy 9 a.m.-5 p.m. | Monday-Friday

thru Jan. 15

Join players from The Greenville Swamp Rabbits and skate for only $5, thanks to United Community Bank. iceonmain.com

FAMILY

Mixed Media Art by Mollie Oblinger on Display at Furman

covering all school subjects, is for CDS children ages 5-13 and their siblings. Spanish interpreters will be available as well. 331-1445 cdservices.org/event/homework-help-cds/

Duke Energy Math + Science Challenge Night

Kindergarten through 12th grade students who bring a report card showing a B or higher in math or science will skate for just $5 thanks to Duke Energy Foundation. iceonmain.com

Jan. 13–May 11 EDUCATION

CDS Homework Help Program - Outshine Center for Developmental Services (CDS) 29 N. Academy St. Wednesdays, 3-4 p.m. free CDS will host a homework help program, Outshine, every Wednesday from Jan. 13 May 11, 2016. This free tutoring program,

FAMILY

TD Convention Center, One Exposition Avenue Friday, Saturday & Sunday, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. $8 for adults, and $5 for seniors (62 and over) and children age 7-12. Children 6 and under are admitted free. Advanced E-tickets can be purchased online. Purchase an adult ticket online and save $1. On Family Day, Sunday, Jan. 17, children ages 12 and younger will enjoy the day at the auto show for free. New cars, trucks and SUVs will fill the TD Convention Center for the South Carolina International Auto Show Jan. 15-17. Close the loop on your auto show research, plus see high-end exotics and ultra-luxurious models on display all in one location. Showgoers are invited to explore the newest rides, experience the latest in-car technology and even take a test drive right at the show. 233-2562 | southcarolinaautoshow.com

TICKET OFFICE – GOING ON SALE – UNCLE VANYA Jan. 29-Feb. 20; 8 p.m. The Warehouse Theatre Cost: $30 for general admission, $35 for reserved On sale: now To purchase tickets: 235-6948; 37 Augusta Street; warehousetheatre.com Info: Featuring Will Ragland, Shirley Sarlin, Ronn Carroll, Jason D. Johnson and more of your local favorites...The Warehouse Theatre presents Uncle Vanya by Anton Chekhov. Adaptation by Annie Baker. Exploring family dynamics, leaving a legacy, and desire, this timeless classic is being directed by Roy Fluhrer. Submit your Last Minute Ticket Sales for Upstate Events at bit.ly/LastTicketsGville For Upcoming Ticket Sales, enter them at bit.ly/UpcomingTicketsGJ

Jan. 21-Feb. 14 THEATER PRODUCTION

Heart & Soul Rock Show Centre Stage | 501 River St. 8-10 p.m. | Thursdays-Sundays $35, $30, $25 Centre Stage’s annual hit rock show featuring rhythm, blues & Motown hits. “Heart & Soul” captures those great songs that brought us all together mixed with a dose of rock n’ roll. 233-6733 | centrestage.org

thru Jan. 22 ARTS EVENT

#Unseen Greenville Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St. FREE The #Unseen Greenville exhibit is open to the public. The exhibit focuses on the people and places in Greenville County that often go unnoticed, and continues through Jan. 22. Gallery hours are 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. 735-3948 | artcentergreenville.org

Jan. 18 CONCERT

Kim and Reggie Harris concert Standing on the Side of Love Coffee House, Tigg’s Pond Retreat Center, 212 Fiddlehead Lane, Zirconia, N.C. 7-9 p.m. $20

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40 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.25.2015 | CULTURE

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This is a concert with songs and stories to celebrate the forgiveness legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King. (828) 697-0680 brownpapertickets.com/event/2463956

Jan. 23 TRAINING

Forgiveness 101 workshop Tigg’s Pond Retreat Center, 212 Fiddlehead Lane, Zirconia, N.C. 10:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m. $45 includes lunch This is a powerful workshop where you will learn proven strategies for a more positive and joy-filled future. (828) 697-0680 | tiggspondretreatcenter.com

Jan. 23–24 CONCERT

Greenville Symphony Orchestra presents “Poetry and Drama of Life”

thru Jan. 18 FAMILY

United Community Bank Ice on Main Village Green 206 S. Main Street $10 for Adults and $8 for Children United Community Bank Ice on Main, located in the heart of downtown Greenville, is an open-air ice skating rink - the only one of its kind in Upstate South Carolina. Join us from November through January every year, as we celebrate the holiday season with one of America’s favorite winter traditions - ice skating. 467-4355 | iceonmain.com

Jan. 21-22 EDUCATION

Furman University Hosts Church Music Conference Furman University, Herring Music Pavilion, Harper Hall, Daniel Chapel and other locations 3300 Poinsett Hwy. Noon-5:30 p.m. $70 on or prior to Jan. 7, $90 after Jan. 7 Furman University will host its 2016 Church Music Conference on campus Thursday and Friday, Jan. 21 and 22. The conference is open to the public. Drawing church musicians from all over the Southeast, the conference features nationally known clinicians who present lectures and conduct workshops relating to the practice of church music. Guest clinicians for this year’s conference are Dennis Keene and William Bradley Roberts. 294-2086 | newspress.furman.edu

Peace Center Concert Hall, The Peace Center for the Performing Arts 300 S Main Street 8:00 PM-9:30 PM Saturday, Jan 23 at 8:00 p.m.; Sunday, Jan 24 at 3:00 p.m. Tickets range from $17-$60 The Greenville Symphony Orchestra presents the world premiere of “Moonbeams,” an original composition by the late Tommy Wyche, accomplished attorney and beloved, local leader in its Masterworks Series concert, “Poetry and Drama of Life.” The concert also features Grieg’s “Peer Gynt” and Sibelius’ Second Symphony. 467-3000 | greenvillesymphony.org

Jan. 24 EDUCATION

Cannabis Educational Forum Hughes Branch Greenville Library at Heritage Green, The Meeting Space 25 Heritage Green Place 2:30-4:30 p.m. FREE Free event open to public. Health care professionals and caregivers encouraged to attend. Learn how cannabis is used as medicine. cannabisforward.org

Jan. 26-Feb. 10

evening that changes their lives forever. 233-6733 | centrestage.org

Jan. 28 CONCERT

The Tenors Peace Center 7:30 p.m. $25-$55 In 2007, four Canadian voices came together to form a classically inspired vocal quartet with a versatile sound. Those voices belonged to Remigio Pereira, Victor Micallef, Fraser Walters and Clifton Murray, and that quartet is The Tenors. They’ve had albums go double and triple platinum, and they’re Juno Award winners. They’ve been featured on television shows like Oprah and shared the stage with acts like Neil Young, Andrea Bocelli, Elton John, Sting, and Jennifer Hudson. 467-3000 | peacecenter.org

Jan. 29 CONCERT

The Hot Sardines Peace Center 8 p.m. $15-$35 It began with a washboard and a piano. Soon, a tap dancer was added for percussion purposes and The Hot Sardines began to take shape. With a French-inspired 1930s sound and the style to back it up, The Hot Sardines have taken New York City, and much of the world, by storm. Fronted by Paris-born Miz Elizabeth, their original songs blend French and New Orleans jazz with lyrics written in both French and English. 467-3000 | peacecenter.org

THEATER PRODUCTION

Six interconnected black males experience an unexpected phenomenon on the same

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Coffee House Holdings, Inc. intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE, at 1378 West Wade Hampton Blvd, Greer, SC 29651. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than December 27, 2015. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations for the City of Greenville, Greenville County, South Carolina, and Case No. 15-04-4735P. The Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) solicits technical information or comments on proposed flood hazard determinations for the Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM), and where applicable, the Flood Insurance Study (FIS) report for your community. These flood hazard determinations may include the addition or modification of Base Flood Elevations, base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard Area boundaries or zone designations, or the regulatory floodway. The FIRM and, if applicable, the FIS report have been revised to reflect these flood hazard determinations through issuance of a Letter of Map Revision (LOMR), in accordance with Title 44, Part 65 of the Code of Federal Regulations. These determinations are the basis for the floodplain management measures that your community is required to adopt or show evidence of having in effect to qualify or remain qualified for participation in the National Flood Insurance Program. For more information on the proposed flood hazard determinations and information on the statutory 90-day period provided for appeals, please visit FEMA’s website at www.fema.gov/ plan/prevent/fhm/bfe, or call the FEMA Map Information eXchange (FMIX) toll free at 1-877-FEMA MAP (1-877-336-2627).

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE There will be a PUBLIC HEARING before the GREENVILLE COUNTY BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS ON WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 13, 2016 AT 3:00 P.M. in CONFERENCE ROOM –D at GREENVILLE COUNTY SQUARE, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, S.C., for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the petitions listed below. PERSONS HAVING AN INTEREST IN THESE PETITIONS MAY BECOME PARTIES OF RECORD BY FILING WITH THE BOARD, AT LEAST THREE (3) DAYS PRIOR TO THE SCHEDULED DATE SET FOR HEARING, BY WRITING THEIR ADDRESS, A STATEMENT OF THEIR POSITION AND THE REASONS WHY THE RELIEF SOUGHT WITH RESPECT TO SUCH PROPERTY SHOULD OR SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED. CB-16-01 APPLICANT: CLAUDIA GAINES TAX MAP#: 0147.00-11-020.00 LOCATION: 416 Cedar Lane Road, Greenville SC REQUEST: VARIANCE from Rear Setback requirement for storage building on site. CB-16-02 APPLICANT: CITY of SIMPSONVILLE TAX MAP#: 0574.01-01-007.01 LOCATION: Intersection of E. Standing Springs Road & Mosely Road, Simpsonville SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception for Construction and Operation of Fire Department Station #5 on site. CB-16-03 APPLICANT: JENNIFER DRAKE TAX MAP#: 0389.00-07-031.01 LOCATION: 5055 Old Augusta Road, Greenville SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception to allow Expansion of an existing non-conforming Daycare with Placement of a Portable Classroom on site. CB-15-46 APPLICANT: GREENVILLE COUNTY PRT TAX MAP#: 0550.02-01-005.00 LOCATION: 1020 Anderson Ridge Road, Greer SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception for Construction of Parking Lot and Additional Soccer Fields and Support Buildings

LEGAL NOTICES Only $.99 per line

Through The Night Centre Stage, 501 River St. Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 7 p.m. $15

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE? Complete our easy-to-use online form at www.bit.ly/GJCalendar by Monday at 5 p.m. to be considered for publication in that week’s Journal.

ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Only $145 tel 864.679.1205 fax 864.679.1305 email aharley@communityjournals.com


CULTURE | 12.25.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 41

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF CHARLESTON IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THENINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 2013-CP-10–7067 SECOND AMENDED SUMMONS (JURY TRIAL DEMANDED) OAK BLUFF HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Plaintiffs, vs. PORTRAIT HOMES-SOUTH CAROLINA, LLC, PORTRAIT HOMES-OAK BLUFF, LLC, JOHN DOE #1-60, JJA CONSTRUCTION, INC., D/B/A JJA FRAMING, JOSE CASTILLO D/B/A JJA FRAMING, BYRON K. KRIEWALDT D/B/A KRIEWALDT ROOFING, SUPERIOR STRUCTURES, INC., CHRISTO PALLES & ASSOCIATES, LLC D/B/A CHRIS PALLES & ASSOCIATES, ALL AMERICAN ROOFING, INC., HERITAGE CONSTRUCTION CONSULTANTS, INC., ROBERT H. YARNALL D/B/A HERITAGE CONSTRUCTION CONSULTANTS, INC.,UNITED SIDING SPECIALISTS, INC., Z & Z INCORPORATED, SAMUEL GLOVER D/B/A GLOVER’S BRICKWORK, GLOVER’S BRICKWORKS, INC., TOM’S VINYL SIDING, LLC, PNL CONSTRUCTION, LLC, BUILDERS FIRSTSOURCE-SOUTHEAST GROUP, LLC, LUTZEN CONSTRUCTION, INC., DIRIA TAWI PAINTING, INC., MICHAEL TEUTON D/B/A M & J SIDING, CRAIG ELWOOD D/B/A THE FINISH COMPANY, SUPERIOR WALLS OF THE MIDLANDS, INC., AND SCOTT HOLLAND D/B/A H & C CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, PASQUINELLI HOMEBUILDING, LLC, BENJAMIN MORA D/B/A MORA CONSTRUCTION AND BENJAMIN MORA CONSTRUCTION, LLC, VICTOR MANUEL FERNANDEZ JIMINEZ D/B/A MJF ROOFING SPECIALIST, ARTURO TORRES SOLACHE, TRINIDAD OLIVIA GARCIA, LUIS HERNANDEZ D/B/A CNN ROOFING, NORLAN CERRATO, CHARLES BOWSER D/B/A CBW SERVICES, DONALD LEE, GILDO R. DEMELO, GILMAR FERNANDEZ BARCELO, LAERCIO DOS SANTOS, LEANDRO DE PAULO ARAUJO, LUCAS RODRIGUEZ BARCELO, MAURILIO DEMENDONCA, ROBERT M. HUGHES, VINICIUS ARAUJO, OSCAR ISREAL ROSIRO, Defendants. TO: THE DEFENDANTS ABOVENAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and are required to answer the Second Amended Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon your, and to serve a copy of your Answer upon the subscribers, at Segui Law Firm, at 864 Lowcountry Blvd., Suite A, Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina 29464, within thirty (30) days after the service thereof, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint.* * This Complaint was filed in Charleston County on June 4, 2015. SEGUI LAW FIRM PC Phillip W. Segui, Jr., Esquire Amanda M. Blundy, Esquire 864 Lowcountry Blvd., Suite A Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464 843-884-1865 psegui@seguilawfirm.com ablundy@seguilawfirm.com Mount Pleasant, SC Dated: June 2, 2015

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF CHARLESTON IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THENINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 2013-CP-10–7066 SECOND AMENDED SUMMONS (JURY TRIAL DEMANDED) JOHN F. KELLY, on behalf of himself and others similarly situated, Plaintiffs, vs. PORTRAIT HOMES-SOUTH CAROLINA, LLC, PORTRAIT HOMES-OAK BLUFF, LLC, JOHN DOE #1-60, JJA CONSTRUCTION, INC., D/B/A JJA FRAMING, JOSE CASTILLO D/B/A JJA FRAMING, BYRON K. KRIEWALDT D/B/A KRIEWALDT ROOFING, SUPERIOR STRUCTURES, INC., CHRISTO PALLES & ASSOCIATES, LLC D/B/A CHRIS PALLES & ASSOCIATES, ALL AMERICAN ROOFING, INC., HERITAGE CONSTRUCTION CONSULTANTS, INC., ROBERT H. YARNALL D/B/A HERITAGE CONSTRUCTION CONSULTANTS, INC.,UNITED SIDING SPECIALISTS, INC., Z & Z INCORPORATED, SAMUEL GLOVER D/B/A GLOVER’S BRICKWORK, GLOVER’S BRICKWORKS, INC., TOM’S VINYL SIDING, LLC, PNL CONSTRUCTION, LLC, BUILDERS FIRSTSOURCE-SOUTHEAST GROUP, LLC, LUTZEN CONSTRUCTION, INC., DIRIA TAWI PAINTING, INC., MICHAEL TEUTON D/B/A M & J SIDING, CRAIG ELWOOD D/B/A THE FINISH COMPANY, SUPERIOR WALLS OF THE MIDLANDS, INC., AND SCOTT HOLLAND D/B/A H & C CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, PASQUINELLI HOMEBUILDING, LLC, BENJAMIN MORA D/B/A MORA CONSTRUCTION AND BENJAMIN MORA CONSTRUCTION, LLC, VICTOR MANUEL FERNANDEZ JIMINEZ D/B/A MJF ROOFING SPECIALIST, ARTURO TORRES SOLACHE, TRINIDAD OLIVIA GARCIA, LUIS HERNANDEZ D/B/A CNN ROOFING, NORLAN CERRATO, CHARLES BOWSER D/B/A CBW SERVICES, DONALD LEE, GILDO R. DEMELO, GILMAR FERNANDEZ BARCELO, LAERCIO DOS SANTOS, LEANDRO DE PAULO ARAUJO, LUCAS RODRIGUEZ BARCELO, MAURILIO DEMENDONCA, ROBERT M. HUGHES, VINICIUS ARAUJO, OSCAR ISREAL ROSIRO, Defendants. TO: THE DEFENDANTS ABOVENAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and are required to answer the Second Amended Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon your, and to serve a copy of your Answer upon the subscribers, at Segui Law Firm, at 864 Lowcountry Blvd., Suite A, Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina 29464, within thirty (30) days after the service thereof, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint.* * This Complaint was filed in Charleston County on June 4, 2015. SEGUI LAW FIRM PC Phillip W. Segui, Jr., Esquire Amanda M. Blundy, Esquire 864 Lowcountry Blvd., Suite A Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464 843-884-1865 psegui@seguilawfirm.com ablundy@seguilawfirm.com Mount Pleasant, SC Dated: June 2, 2015

THE CHAKERIS LAW FIRM John T. Chakeris, Esquire P.O. Box 397 Charleston, SC 29402 843-853-5678 john@chakerislawfirm.com Attorneys for Plaintiffs

THE CHAKERIS LAW FIRM John T. Chakeris, Esquire P.O. Box 397 Charleston, SC 29402 843-853-5678 john@chakerislawfirm.com Attorneys for Plaintiffs

GREENVILLE COUNTY ZONING AND PLANNING PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE There will be a public hearing before County Council on Monday, January 11, 2016 at 6:00 p.m. in Conference Room D, County Square, for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the following items: DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2016-01 APPLICANT: Lisa Lanni c/o McMillan Pazdan Smith Architecture for Campbell Young Leaders CONTACT INFORMATION: llanni@mcmillanpazdansmith.com or 864-242-2033 PROPERTY LOCATION: 601 E. Bramlett Road PIN: 0137001100100 EXISTING ZONING: I-1, Industrial REQUESTED ZONING: R-7.5, Single-Family Residential ACREAGE: 5.5 COUNTY COUNCIL: 23 – Norris DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2016-02 APPLICANT: Adam R. Fiorenza for Patricia N. Greene CONTACT INFORMATION: adam@newstylecommunities.com or 704-905-9908 PROPERTY LOCATION: 816 McKinney Road PIN: 0548010102503 EXISTING ZONING: R-S, Residential Suburban REQUESTED ZONING: R-12, Single-Family Residential ACREAGE: 12.3 COUNTY COUNCIL: 27 – Kirven DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2016-03 APPLICANT: Gray Engineering Consultants c/o Chris Przirembel for Louise Bell Cooper, Connie L. Tadlock and Peggy Ayers Brown CONTACT INFORMATION: chrisprz@grayengineering.com or 864-297-3027 PROPERTY LOCATION: 300 Block of Michelin Road PIN: 0593030101100, 0593030101101 and 0593030101102 EXISTING ZONING: R-S, Residential Suburban REQUESTED ZONING: R-12, Single-Family Residential ACREAGE: 57 COUNTY COUNCIL: 25 – Gibson DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2016-04 APPLICANT: Johnny Craig Osteen CONTACT INFORMATION: osteencollision@bellsouth.net or 864-444-2260 PROPERTY LOCATION: 3218 New Easley Highway PIN: 0239040101000 EXISTING ZONING: C-2, Commercial REQUESTED ZONING: S-1, Services ACREAGE: 1.13 COUNTY COUNCIL: 23 – Norris DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2016-05 APPLICANT: Eugene Kenneth Iozzino for Carl Vaughan Schmidt, Jr. CONTACT INFORMATION: cmc42@msn.com or 864-303-1022 PROPERTY LOCATION: 100 Block of All Star Way PIN: 0540020103701 EXISTING ZONING: R-20, SingleFamily Residential REQUESTED ZONING: FRD, Flexible Review District ACREAGE: 5 COUNTY COUNCIL: 22 – Taylor DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2016-06 APPLICANT: John Fort for Hillcrest Baptist Church, dba Berea Heights Baptist Church CONTACT INFORMATION: john@fcrsc.com or 864-630-9284 PROPERTY LOCATION: 6914 White Horse Road PIN: B013020100601 EXISTING ZONING: R-12, SingleFamily Residential REQUESTED ZONING: C-3, Commercial (portion only) ACREAGE: 2 COUNTY COUNCIL: 19- Meadows

DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2016-07 APPLICANT: Teodoro Lloyd Silva for M & T. Properties, Inc. CONTACT INFORMATION: Lloyd_silva@yahoo.com or 864-630-9627 PROPERTY LOCATION: 8 White Circle PIN: 0231000303100, 0231000301400 and 0231000301500 EXISTING ZONING: R-10, SingleFamily Residential REQUESTED ZONING: S-1, Services ACREAGE: 0.75 COUNTY COUNCIL: 23 – Norris DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2016-08 APPLICANT: Gray Engineering Consultants c/o Chris Przirembel for Jeffery Scott Collins, Co A LLC, David M. Collins, Dana M. Collins, Douglas N. Collins, Lois C. Rouse and Samuel B. Rouse, etal CONTACT INFORMATION: chrisprz@grayengineering.com or 864-297-3027 PROPERTY LOCATION: 300 Block of Reedy Fork Road PIN: 0583020100700, 0583020100703, 0583020100704, 0593030101000, and 0593030101002 EXISTING ZONING: I-1, Industrial and R-S, Residential Suburban REQUESTED ZONING: R-12, Single-Family Residential ACREAGE: 180 COUNTY COUNCIL: 28 – Payne DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2016-09 APPLICANT: Bryon D. Culbertson for Jennifer L. Brooks CONTACT INFORMATION: bculbertson@lee-associates. com or 864-704-1053 PROPERTY LOCATION: 555 S. Old Piedmont Highway PIN: WG10010300101 and WG10010300200 EXISTING ZONING: I-1, Industrial REQUESTED ZONING: S-1, Services ACREAGE: 10.2 COUNTY COUNCIL: 25 – Gibson DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2016-10 APPLICANT: Central Realty Holdings, LLC. for Archie L. Honbarrier Trust & Cenco, Inc. CONTACT INFORMATION: twallace@crchsc.com or 864-250-9407 PROPERTY LOCATION: 5320 Honbarrier Drive PIN: 0533040100519, 0533040100520, 0533040100528, 0533040100529, 0533040100700 (portion), and 0533040100707 EXISTING ZONING: S-1, Services and R-S, Residential Suburban REQUESTED ZONING: FRD, Flexible Review District ACREAGE: 35.98 COUNTY COUNCIL: 21 – Burns DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2016-11 APPLICANT: Adem Dokmeci for R. L. R. Investments, LLC CONTACT INFORMATION: adokmeci@scgreencharter.org or 864-288-4134 PROPERTY LOCATION: 25 Chrome Drive PIN: 0547020102001 EXISTING ZONING: I-1, Industrial REQUESTED ZONING: S-1, Services ACREAGE: 7.5 COUNTY COUNCIL: 21 – Burns All persons interested in these proposed amendments to the Greenville County Zoning Ordinance and Map are invited to attend this meeting. At subsequent meetings, Greenville County Council may approve or deny the proposed amendments as requested or approve a different zoning classification than requested.

NOTICE OF ELECTIONS — STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, COUNTY OF GREENVILLE A Republican Presidential Preference Primary will be held on Saturday, February 20, 2016. A Democratic Presidential Preference Primary will be held on Saturday, February 27, 2016. These primaries will be conducted in the polling places listed in this notice. Voters may participate in only one party’s presidential preference primary. The deadline to register to vote and be eligible to vote in either Presidential Preference Primary is January 27, 2016. The polling place locations for some precincts may be combined with others for the primaries as allowed by law. The polls will be open from 7:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m. at the polling places designated below. These primaries will be held under the rules for providing Photo ID at the polling place. Voters will be asked to provide one of the following Photo IDs at their polling place. • S.C. Driver's License • ID Card issued by S.C. Department of Motor Vehicles • S.C. Voter Registration Card with Photo • Federal Military ID • U.S. Passport If you have one of these IDs, you are ready to vote. Voters should remember to bring one of these IDs with them to the polling place. Voters without Photo ID can get one free of charge from the Department of Motor Vehicles or their county voter registration and elections office. Voters who encounter an obstacle to getting a Photo ID should bring their paper voter registration card without a photo with them to their polling place. These voters can then sign an affidavit swearing to their identity and to their obstacle to obtaining a Photo ID and vote a provisional ballot. This ballot will count unless the county election board has grounds to believe the affidavit is false. For more information on Photo ID, visit scVOTES.org or contact your county board of voter registration and elections. At 9:00 a.m. on February 20, the county board will begin its examination of the absentee ballot return envelopes from the Republican Presidential Preference Primary at the Greenville County Voter Registration and Election office, Suite 1900, 301 University Ridge, Greenville, SC, 29601. Telephone number for the office is 864-467-7250. At 9:00 a.m. on February 27, the county board will begin its examination of the absentee ballot return envelopes from the Democratic Presidential Preference Primary at the Greenville County Voter Registration and Election office, Suite 1900, 301 University Ridge, Greenville, SC, 29601. Telephone number for the office is 864-467-7250. On Thursday, February 25, at 12 Noon, the County Board of Canvassers will hold a hearing to determine the validity of all provisional ballots cast in the Republican Preference Primary. This hearing will be held in Greenville County Council Chambers, 301 University Ridge, Greenville, SC, 29601. Telephone number for the office is 864-467-7250. On Thursday, March 3, at 12 Noon, the County Board of Canvassers will hold a hearing to determine the validity of all provisional ballots cast in the Democratic Preference Primary. This hearing will be held in Greenville County Council Chambers, 301 University Ridge, Greenville, SC, 29601. Telephone number for the office is 864-467-7250. The following precincts and polling places will be involved in this election: PRECINCT Greenville 01 Greenville 03 Greenville 04 Greenville 05 Greenville 06 Greenville 07 Greenville 08 Greenville 10 Greenville 14 Greenville 16 Greenville 17 Greenville 18 Greenville 19 Greenville 20 Greenville 21 Greenville 22 Greenville 23 Greenville 24 Greenville 25 Greenville 26 Greenville 27 Greenville 28 Greenville 29 Aiken Altamont Forest Asheton Lakes Avon Belle Meade Bells Crossing Belmont Berea Boiling Springs Botany Woods Brook Glenn Canebrake Carolina Chestnut Hills Circle Creek Clear Creek Conestee Darby Ridge Del Norte Devenger Donaldson Dove Tree Dunklin Eastside Ebenezer Edwards Forest Enoree Feaster Fork Shoals Fountain Inn 1 Fountain Inn 2 Furman Gowensville

POLLING SITE League Academy Summit Dr Elementary School Stone Academy Sears Shelter Alexander Elementary School W Greenville Recreation Center West End Community Development Center Springfield Baptist Church Sterling School Augusta Rd Baptist Church St Matthew United Methodist Church Augusta Circle Elementary School Pleasant Valley Connection Center Trinity United Methodist Church Meals on Wheels Sanctuary Church Eastlan Baptist Church Beck Academy McCarter Presbyterian Church E North St Academy Overbrook Baptist Church Francis Asbury United Methodist Church J L Mann High School Alexander Elementary School Redeemer PresbyterianChurch Five Forks Baptist Church Northwood Middle School Disciples Fellowship Baptist Church Bells Crossing Elementary School Belmont Fire Station Berea Elementary School Devenger Rd Presbyterian Church Lutheran Church of Our Saviour Brook Glenn Elementary School Buena Vista Elementary School Carolina Academy Dunean Baptist Church Cross Roads Baptist Church Pleasant View Baptist Church Reedy River Missionary Baptist Church New Velocity Church Brushy Creek Elementary School St Giles Presbyterian Church Donaldson Center Fire Dept Dove Tree Clubhouse Dunklin Fire Station Eastside High School Heritage Elementary School Taylors Elementary School Enoree Career Center Shannon Forest Presbyterian Church Fork Shoals Elementary School Younts Center for Performing Arts Fountain Inn Activities Center Redeemer PresbyterianChurch Gowensville Community Center

ADDRESS 125 Twin Lake Rd 424 Summit Dr 115 Randall St 100 E Park Ave 1601 W Bramlett Rd 8 Rochester St 404 Vardry St 600 E McBee Ave 99 John McCarroll Way 1823 Augusta St 701 Cleveland St 100 Winyah St 510 Old Augusta Rd 2703 Augusta St 15 Oregon St 302 Parkins Mill Rd 625 S Pleasantburg Dr 901 Woodruff Rd 2 Pelham Rd 1720 E North St 1705 E North St 1800 E North St 160 Fairforest Way 1601 W Bramlett Rd 6150 Old Buncombe Rd 112 Batesville Rd 710 Ikes Rd 105 Crestfield Rd 804 Scuffletown Rd 701 Fork Shoals Rd 100 Berea Dr 1200 Devenger Rd 2600 Wade Hampton Blvd 2003 E Lee Rd 310 S Batesville Rd 2725 Anderson Rd 21 Allen St 705 Anderson Ridge Rd 110 Old Rutherford Rd Conestee Rd @ Lakewood Dr – Family Center 1720 Reid School Rd 1344 Brushy Creek Rd 1021 Hudson Rd 2291 Perimeter Rd 2 Sugarberry Dr 11353 Augusta Rd 1300 Brushy Creek Rd 1592 Geer Hwy 809 Reid School Rd 108 Scalybark Rd 830 Garlington Rd 916 McKelvey Rd 315 N Main St 610 Fairview St 6150 Old Buncombe Rd 14186 Hwy 11

PRECINCT Grove Jennings Mill Lakeview Laurel Ridge Leawood Maple Creek Maridell Mauldin 1 Mauldin 2 Mauldin 3 Mauldin 4 Mauldin 5 Mauldin 6 Mauldin 7 Mission Monaview Mountain Creek Mountain View Neely Farms Northwood Oakview Palmetto Paris Mountain Pebble Creek Pelham Falls Piedmont Pineview Poinsett Raintree Reedy Fork River Walk Rock Hill Rocky Creek Rolling Green Royal Oaks Saluda Sandy Flat Sevier Silverleaf Simpsonville 1 Simpsonville 2 Simpsonville 3 Simpsonville 4 Simpsonville 5 Simpsonville 6 Skyland Slater Marietta Southside Spring Forest Stone Valley Stonehaven Suber Mill Sugar Creek Sulphur Springs Sycamore Tanglewood Taylors Thornblade Tigerville Timberlake Trade Tubbs Mountain Wade Hampton Walnut Springs Welcome Wellington Westcliffe Westside Woodmont Woodruff Lakes Mt Pleasant Baker Creek Bridge Fork Castle Rock Fox Chase Frohawk Granite Creek Graze Branch Greenbriar Hillcrest Holly Tree Kilgore Farms Locust Hill Long Creek Moore Creek Oneal Ranch Creek Riverside Sparrows Point Standing Springs Travelers Rest 1 Travelers Rest 2 Tyger River Verdmont Ware Place

POLLING SITE Grove Elementary School Cleveland First Baptist Church Lakeview Middle School St Mark United Methodist Church Hampton Park Baptist Church Southside Baptist Church New Liberty Baptist Church Grace Covenant Presbyterian Church Forrester Woods Clubhouse Mauldin First Baptist Church Mauldin United Methodist Church Mauldin Miller Fire Station #1 Ray Hopkins Senior Center Mauldin Middle School Pelham Rd Elementary School Monaview Elementary School Mountain Creek Baptist Church Mountain View Elementary School Christ Community Church Northwood Middle School Oakview Elementary School Grace Church Piedmont Park Fire Station Pebble Creek Baptist Church Cornerstone Baptist Church Piedmont Community Center-Beattie Hall Canebrake Fire Dept Duncan Chapel Elementary School The Bridge Church Reedy Fork Baptist Church River Walk Clubhouse Mitchell Rd Elementary School Rocky Creek Baptist Church Rolling Green Retirement Center Rock of Ages Baptist Church Berea Fire Station Double Springs Baptist Church Sevier Middle School Heritage Bible Church Simpsonville City Park Center Plain Elementary School Simpsonville United Methodist Church Westside Church Center for Community Services Calvary Baptist Church Skyland Elementary School Slater Marietta Elementary School Southside High School Greenville Nazarene Church Springwell Church Advent United Methodist Church Praise Cathedral Sugar Creek Clubhouse Armstrong Elementary School First Presbyterian Church Tanglewood Middle School Taylors First Baptist Church Oakleaf Village@Thornblade Tigerville Elementary School Aldersgate United Methodist Church Needmore Recreation Center Enoree Baptist Church Faith Baptist Church Clear Spring Baptist Church Welcome Elementary School LifeSong Church Westcliffe Elementary School John Calvin Presbyterian Church Woodmont Middle School Woodruff Rd Christian Church Mt Pleasant Community Center Valley Brook Outreach Baptist Church City Church Washington Baptist Church Northwood Baptist Church Grace United Methodist Church Pleasant Grove Baptist Church Holly Ridge Baptist Church Messiah Lutheran Church Hillcrest Middle School Faith Baptist Church Gilder Creek Farm Clubhouse Fairview Baptist Church Rocky Creek Missionary Baptist Church South Greenville Fire Station #6 Lake Cunningham Fire Station Hdqt Robert E Cashion Elementary School Riverside High School Immanuel Lutheran Church Standing Springs Baptist Church Travelers Rest City Hall Renfrew Baptist Church Chandler Creek Elementary School Hopewell United Methodist Church Ellen Woodside Elementary School

ADDRESS 1220 Old Grove Rd 5 Church Dr 3801 Old Buncombe Rd 901 St Mark Rd 875 State Park Rd 410 S Main St 1798 N Hwy 25 739 N Main St 424 Piney Grove Rd 150 S Main St - Fellowship Hall 100 E Butler Rd 802 Miller Rd Corn Rd @ 699 E Butler Rd 1190 Holland Rd 1115 Pelham100 All Star Way 10 Monaview St 255 W Mountain Creek Church Rd 6350 Mountain View Rd 700 Harrison Bridge Rd 710 Ikes Rd 515 Godfrey Rd 2801 Pelham Rd 2119 State Park Rd 1300 Reid School Rd 8508 Pelham Rd 3 Main St 100 Hillside Church Rd 210 Duncan Chapel Rd 257 Harrison Bridge Rd 3115 Fork Shoals Rd 103 River Walk Blvd 4124 E North St 1801 Woodruff Rd 1 Hoke Smith Blvd 105 Donaldson Rd 7401 White Horse Rd 3800 Locust Hill Rd 1000 Piedmont Park Rd 2005 Old Spartanburg Rd 405 E Curtis St 506 Neely Ferry Rd 215 SE Main St 611 Richardson St 1102 Howard Dr 207 Davenport Rd - Chapel 4221 N Hwy 14 100 Baker Cr 6630 Frontage Rd 1201 Haywood Rd 4369 Wade Hampton Blvd 2258 Woodruff Rd 3390 Brushy Creek Rd 103 Sugar Creek Rd 8601 White Horse Rd 510 E Curtis St 44 Merriwoods Dr 200 W Main St - Ministry Center 1560 Thornblade Blvd 25 Tigerville Elementary School Rd 7 Shannon Dr 202 Canteen Ave 881 Tigerville Rd - Youth Center 500 W Lee Rd 301 Bethany Rd 36 E Welcome Rd 4108 E North St - Fellowship Hall 105 Eastbourne Rd 1801 W Parker Rd 325 N Flat Rock Rd 20 Bell Rd 710 S Fairfield Rd 8323 Augusta Rd 416 Holland Rd 3500 N Hwy 14 888 Ansel School Rd 627 Taylor Rd 1002 S Buncombe Rd 260 Adams Mill Rd 1100 Log Shoals Rd 510 Garrison Rd 906 Highway 14 404 Grimes Dr 1300 Locust Hill Rd 239 Rocky Creek Rd 1800 W Georgia Rd 2802 N McElhaney Rd 1500 Fork Shoals Rd 794 Hammett Bridge Rd 2820 Woodruff Rd 1111 W Georgia Rd 6711 State Park Rd 951 Geer Hwy 301 Chandler Rd 1420 Neely Ferry Rd 9122 Augusta Rd

Respectfully submitted by the Greenville County Voter Registration and Election Office.

SECOND

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Donate at Greenville Heritage Federal Credit Union or give online at

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42 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.25.2015 | CULTURE

FIGURE. THIS. OUT. OPENING AND CLOSING QUARTETS A CR OSS

1 Picasso of art 6 Left dumbstruck 10 Give form to 15 Very top 19 Israeli leader Sharon 20 Give up rights to 21 On-call attachment 22 Sandbox player’s tote 23 Sense that stays with you 26 Wintour of fashion 27 Abundance 28 Crimean resort port 29 Go quickly 30 People’s genus 33 Mil. figure 34 In various places 36 Big concert sites 38 Some gems 40 Middle 41 Jimmy Dean product 43 R&B singer — Marie 45 Hail, e.g. 48 Secret store 49 Stimpy’s canine bud 50 Enterprise empath Deanna 52 “— so sure” 54 IM “ha ha” 55 Tomorrow, to Pedro 58 Fair and equal 61 Abrades 63 Longoria and Cassidy 65 5% of LX 66 Title slave of opera

67 Child’s cognitive growth 72 Thon Buri resident 74 Rival of Sony and LG 75 Island goose 76 Westerns, informally 79 Influence in the choice of a ruler 82 Make insane, old-style 85 Lusterless 86 Lopez of pop 87 Schreiber of “Scream” 89 Made-up tale 90 Acclivity 92 Bus dep. 93 Twine fiber 96 Big name in daredeviltry 99 Tex-Mex dip, for short 100 Globular 101 Consume 102 Contests with knights 107 Simple bed 109 Partner of crafts 110 Actor Lash of 76-Across 111 Officer over a 33-Across, in brief 112 Like some lower vertebrae 114 Jai — 115 VIPs’ purchasing consultants 120 Sit still 121 Jung’s inner self 122 Activist 123 Malia’s little sister 124 “For” votes

By Frank Longo

125 Mission to gather info 126 Basilica part 127 Cineplex — (old theater chain) DOWN

1 Bud 2 Meyers of TV 3 Coal box 4 Femurs, e.g. 5 Bread spread 6 Getting 100 on, as a test 7 Shoved off 8 Antsy 9 Excellent, slangily 10 Fishing tools 11 Best Actress Berry 12 Anxiety 13 It’s done to atone for sin 14 Tiny bit of work 15 Geronimo, e.g. 16 Rapids craft 17 Not serious 18 Give a thrill 24 Baseball Hall of Famer Tony La — 25 Shoe hole 29 Narrow waterway 30 Bug no end 31 Public speaker 32 Delusions of grandeur 34 Gorgon, e.g. 35 Dress up in 37 Trash collectors

Be social.

39 Gave an awful review 42 Catering hall dispenser 43 “Mazel —!” 44 Kiddie-song refrain 45 Asked to a neighbor’s house, say 46 Admitting both sexes 47 Sicily’s erupter

Connect with the City of Greenville.

www.greenvillesc.gov

SUDOKU

by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan

‘Tis the season to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube! Medium

CityofGvilleAd.indd 3

51 Forward, e.g. 53 Symbolized 56 “Ad — per aspera” 57 Get back at 59 Pinch lightly 60 Pop’s Carly 62 Condescend (to) 64 “Hail, Ovid!”

10/31/2011 9:16:08 AM

Sudoku answers: page 16

68 “Oh, no!,” in comics 69 Boxer Ali 70 “Max” actress Sobieski 71 Has a TV dinner, say 72 B’way booth in Times Square 73 Trumpeter Al 77 Most mature 78 Refines, as ore 80 Apply wrongly 81 Not one 83 They’re relatively easy to treat 84 “Oh no!,” in comics 88 Actor Ben 91 Yellow writing tablet 94 Reply to “Are you?” 95 Triangle type 97 Action wds. 98 Racecar fuel 99 Test pilots’ garments 100 Lima resident 102 Santa — 103 “Roots” writer Alex 104 Wipe away 105 Shaped like a doughnut 106 Vodka drink, for short 108 Earth tone, to a Brit 112 Pig’s food 113 Lhasa — 115 So-so, in golf 116 Nabokov title heroine 117 Suffix with Bhutan 118 Fraternity P 119 UCSD part Crossword answers: page 16


CULTURE | 12.25.2015 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 43

COMMUNITY VOICES LIFE LESSONS FROM A DOG TRAINER WITH CONNIE CLEVELAND

Justification and denial Training dogs has made it clear that dog owners move constantly between two poles – denial and justification – about their dog’s behavior. That’s not a whole lot different from people in general. We’d rather explain, psychologize, justify and deny than determine if we want to accept or shape behavior that tramples on our boundaries and values. The two poles of denial and justification are most clearly and frighteningly demonstrated by owners of dogs that are acting aggressively. “Does your dog ever bite?” I’ll ask. The response: “Oh, he’s not aggressive, he’s just expressing his unhappiness.” Or “As a puppy, when he had a bone or food, he would growl when we approached him, so we made a family rule not to go near him when he’s eating.” Likewise, some owners are in denial about how bad a problem may be. When I’m told, “He might try to bite me but he never breaks the skin,” I typically reply, “Only because he has not needed to yet. So far, you behave correctly when he threatens you.” One of the saddest experiences involved a woman who owned six dogs. She called about one who was attacking the other dogs in the pack. I explained that we have two options regarding dog behavior and asked which one appealed to her: Did she want to manage the dog by separating him from the pack, or participate in training the dog to stop attacking the other dogs? Neither! She was emphatic. She did not have time or the space to separate them (justification), she did not offer homes to multiple dogs to have to separate them (justification) and she was not going to spend time or money to train them (justification). Instead, the dogs would have to “work it out” (denial)! Sadly, she called again a few months later to report that the dog in question had, in fact, killed one of the other dogs. In the human-world of marriages, children, jobs, and friendships, all of us have watched people engage in denial or justification, sometimes calmly cycling between each option day to day. Both patterns can occur in far less dramatic ways as well. I had long wanted a swimming pool. Friends and family told me it was too

promotes good decision-making. • Avoid choosing the path of least resistance; the easiest solution to a problem may not be the best decision.

much work and not worth the effort. Finally, I decided to find out for myself. I justified that an above-ground pool was not permanent, and could be resold if I disliked it. I further justified that if I built a deck with a gate, my retrievers would not be able to get in the pool unless I was out in the yard to open it. Wrong! In under 48 hours, my 5-month-old retriever had jumped the wall, enjoyed a swim, climbed out the stairs, and found himself trapped on the deck. To solve that problem, he launched himself over the gate and thankfully hit the ground without major injury. So I built two decks to give them ease of access, abandoned the gate, and now have an above-ground pool for the dogs, who allow me to join them occasionally. The moral of the story: I could have built an in-ground pool for the same price, without all the work at justification. How do we recognize denial and justification in ourselves? By using denial, people avoid having to deal with behavioral problems; the behavior simply isn’t acknowledged. Denial is most appealing to us when the problem is evident but the solution is not. When we live in denial, we miss opportunities to find real solutions. Justification is an excuse for behavior we know we should question; the behavior is acknowledged, but assigned a “condition” to explain away the behavior. We qualify decisions, purchases, and actions with statements like, “It’s not that big a deal,” “I deserve it” and “I’ve always done it this way.” At its most extreme a person may “explain away” abusive behavior from a spouse or child or parent; people can then refuse to deal with the behavior, since the behavior has become a “named illness” or psychological condition. How do we avoid falling into patterns of denial or justification? Some learn to avoid these patterns in

childhood – from that fifth-grade teacher who says, “If you don’t have your homework, say ‘I don’t have my homework’; please do not tell me why,” or from a coach like my dad, who told his players, “Don’t give me the excuse, just the page number,” referring to what he called their commonly used book of excuses. If you missed such early influences, you can still establish some routines that may help: • Avoid impulse decisions, as quick decisions are easy to justify. • Delay gratification, as time generally

• Ask yourself, “If I could see a solution to this behavioral pattern, would I be more able to acknowledge it as a problem?” • Surround yourself with friends and mentors bold enough to cock their heads and look at you with the same gaze your dog does when he’s wondering why you haven’t yet made the decision to take him for a walk! Connie Cleveland, a nationally recognized dog trainer, is the founder of Dog Trainers Workshop, a training and boarding center in Fountain Inn. She has personally owned and trained 10 Obedience Trial Champions, all of them golden or Labrador retrievers. Go to dogtrainersworkshop.com or facebook. com/DogTrainersWorkshop


Bro ws e o u r co lle ctio n s o n lin e at oldc olonyfurniture.c om/holidays

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3411 August a R oad | G r eenvi l l e, SC 29605 | 864-277-5330

December 25, 2015 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

December 25, 2015 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.