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Water’s Edge When When it it comes comes to to development development along along the the Reedy, Reedy,

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4 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.16.2016

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

OPINION Views from your community

The Secret to Our Success

When it comes to planning, Greenville designs for people first IN MY OWN WORDS

By Knox White

There is no better example of the challenges of growth than the recent debate over whether an office building should be allowed on the edge of Falls Park. It speaks to one of the fundamental rules of good urban planning: Design for people first, and then for buildings. Greenville’s consistent observance of this rule is the secret of our success. In the 1970s, our Main Street was narrowed from four lanes to two, sidewalks were widened and the now-magnificent trees were planted. Nearly 30 years later, the Camperdown bridge was removed to re-

Drawn Out Loud

claim the majestic waterfall and the neglected Reedy River. Suddenly, after decades in the shadows, the river and the falls became the centerpiece of the city, and an extraordinary pedestrian suspension bridge became the emblem of our “people first” urban design strategy. These bold actions transformed our downtown, and set the stage for the redevelopment we have today. A pleasant and safe urban environment encouraged the return of residential development, so critical to establishing a downtown that doesn’t shut down after 5 p.m. Well-designed public plazas all along Main Street invite people to meet, talk, rest or gather. Even large-scale private projects, from

by Kate Salley Palmer

the early Hyatt complex to the renovated Westin Poinsett, Riverplace and so many others, were all carefully planned to fit the context of a walkable, human-scale downtown. With so many new apartments, hotels and office buildings springing up so fast, we are constantly tasked to make sure the new growth fits into our unique and successful formula for redevelopment. City Council has responded to this challenge by adopting new architectural guidelines for apartments (that clearly need to be made even more robust!) and has also authorized a sweeping update of the design guidelines for all downtown building facades and public spaces. Our dedicated citizen-led Design Review Board engages developers in a positive and constructive conversation about quality, but it also has not hesitated to send some projects back to the drawing board to get a better result. The new guidelines, after extensive public input, will give them badly needed additional tools and authority to safeguard our urban design standards. All of these tools, however imperfect, reflect our core value to put people first. That means maintaining our welcoming sidewalks by paying special attention to what’s at eye level on the first floor of all new buildings. It means assuring easy pedestrian access and safeguarding open vistas to key attractions. It also means remembering that our downtown is defined by the quality of

Falls Park and our grand trees on Main Street. All development, public and private, should complement these signature features. The new 55 E. Camperdown Way office building as originally proposed would have detracted from our river vista and removed for all time the trees that conspicuously form a natural green connection between people on Main Street and the park. It is the city’s desire to preserve this link by buying the site, enlarging the footprint of Falls Park and (in the words of Harriet Wyche) our “oasis in the heart of the city.” As more change comes to downtown in 2017, we must continue to put a “thumb on the scale” for quality as each new project is presented. But more than that, we must continue in the Greenville tradition of taking bold steps to shape our city in fundamental ways to keep it green and vibrant. The next major project is a new 60-acre park along the river, designed for people of all ages and means. It will improve the quality of the river and dramatically enlarge the open green space in the heart of our downtown. We owe this to the next generation. If we are intentional about how we grow and remain committed to our people-first urban planning strategy, we can continue to be the most beautiful and livable city in America. Knox White is the mayor of Greenville, S.C.

Speak your mind The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, factbased arguments.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Editor Chris Haire at chaire@communityjournals.com.


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6 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.16.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

THE PINNACLE MOUNTAIN FIRE IS ONE OF THE LARGEST IN UPSTATE HISTORY, surpassing a 1978 fire in Oconee County that spread to 2,856 acres, according to the Forestry Commission.

H2O-NO ANDREW MOORE | STAFF

amoore@communityjournals.com

Last week, the S.C. Forestry Commission announced that fire crews have fully contained the Pinnacle Mountain fire, which has burned 10,645 acres and cost $4.8 million across Pickens County. However, the fight is far from over. Containment does not mean the fire is controlled but that 100 percent of the fire’s perimeter will hold under current and foreseeable conditions, said Forestry Commission spokesman Doug Wood. However, that percentage can fluctuate depending on the fire and the fire lines constructed around it. Wood added that the fire would be considered controlled once it has been determined that fire crews are no longer needed at the site. “There are still a number of hot spots throughout the area, but we’re starting the cleanup process,” Wood said. However, there have been no residential structures destroyed or firefighter injuries since the fire started on Nov. 9 due to a campfire. Also, the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control has suspended its air

After Pinnacle Mountain fire, officials monitor county water supply quality reports as conditions have improved. A code yellow air quality alert ended last week in Greenville and Pickens counties. “The rain has helped the air but has caused some concern about erosion,” Wood said.

EYES ON THE WATER

The Forestry Commission’s announcement followed a heavy rain shower that moved through the area last Sunday, which was the fourth day of significant rainfall for the region. Showers continued to pour on the fire through last Wednesday. With more rain in the forecast this month, the Forestry Commission and several other agencies, including the Greenville Water System and the S.C. Department of Natural Resources, have begun addressing erosion control issues in some areas. That includes cleaning out stream crossings to restore the natural flow of water, planting grass seed, repairing grades, installing dips in the ground and installing water bars to direct rainwater. Greenville Water officials are also monitoring water in its Table Rock Reservoir, which is one of the company’s three drinking wa-

ter sources for 500,000 Greenville County residents. On Nov. 18, the water company stopped using water from the reservoir, which provides residents with 2.77 million gallons of drinking water per month. The company is currently distributing water from its North Saluda Reservoir and Lake Keowee. Greenville Water decided to stop using water from the reservoir due to a large-scale burnout operation on Nov. 17 that covered about 2,000 acres, from Back Park to South Saluda roads and north to Table Rock Reservoir, according to Greenville Water Chief Operating Officer Rebecca West. Since the burnout operation, Greenville Water has lab-tested several water samples from the reservoir. The water company has also worked closely with Clemson University, which has provided independent lab testing. “The burnout created piles of soot in the area that could have ended up in the reservoir due to heavy rain showers and erosion,” West said. “Luckily, our samples aren’t showing increased levels of total organic carbon.” Organic carbon comes from organic matter, such as soot and charcoal. If soot gets into sediment and flows into the Table Rock

Reservoir, the company has to use extra treatment methods, said Oliva Vassey, communications manager for Greenville Water. To prevent water contamination from occurring, the water company has constructed silt fencing around the reservoir. Silt fencing can trap up to 90 percent of hill-slope erosion, according to the U.S. Forest Service. Greenville Water currently uses chloramine, which is a combination of chlorine and ammonia, to disinfect its water. The soot risk will gradually disappear as rain continues to fall across the area and leaves start to layer over the fire debris, according to West. “The soot filters through the foliage as erosion occurs,” she said. “We’re just monitoring to be safe.” West said the company is also monitoring the reservoir’s pH levels, as smoke from the fire could have affected the water’s acidity through heavy acidic rainfall. So far, pH levels in the reservoir have remained normal.

A GREEN WATERSHED AHEAD

The Table Rock Reservoir is expected to remain closed until Greenville Water and Clemson University do more lab testing. Once Greenville Water begins using the reservoir again, there could be a slight difference in the taste of the water as decades


COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

12.16.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 7

NEWS TABLE ROCK RESERVOIR

FIRE STARTING POINT

of filtering foliage near the reservoir are now burned up, according to Vassey. So far, the fire has burned more than 7,000 acres in the Greenville Water System Watershed. “While the fire spread throughout more than 70 percent of the watershed, it hasn’t consumed all of the land. Sure, some of the watershed trees and understory brush were burned up, but it really hit in spots,” West said. “We’re expecting to see a green watershed in the spring, because nutrients from the dead trees will act as fertilizer.” In 2014, the company hired The Nature Conservancy, a Greenville-based conservation group, to create a management plan for the watershed. That management plan recommends prescribed fires, which reduce forest fuels that lead to the increased risk of severe wildfires. Greenville Water is con-

The Table Rock Reservoir provides consumers with 2.77 million gallons of drinking water per month. It has been closed since Nov. 18.

10,645 ACRES BURNED sidering the use of prescribed fire to prevent fires from spreading across the area in the future. “Prescribed fire isn’t something to take lightly,” Vassey said. “We haven’t had, and still don’t have, enough people on staff to properly conduct a prescribed fire in the watershed. Prescribed fires require a lot of planning, so we have to balance that out. Plus, we really don’t want to be responsible for the Upstate’s next big wildfire.” She also said that drought has prevented the company from conducting prescribed burns. During drought, the Forestry Commission issues burning bans when “weather conditions present an elevated risk of wildfire.” That ban prohibits outdoor burning, including yard debris burning and burning for forestry purposes. The commission recently lifted a burning ban for the Piedmont region that lasted through much of November. The South Carolina Drought Response Committee updated drought statuses for all 46 counties in October. Upstate counties, including Anderson, Oconee and Pickens, were upgraded to severe drought status. Other Upstate counties, including Greenville, were designated as moderate. The current drought conditions are the worst in the Upstate since 2012. Some counties in the Upstate have received less than 10 percent of normal rainfall throughout the last 60 days, according to state climatologist Hope Mizzell. Last Thursday, the drought response committee released an updated drought status for the state, but the status for Upstate counties remained the same. Rain is expected in the near future, but many weather experts said it wouldn’t be enough to cause a significant change to drought statuses across the state.

Health Events Ice on Main Now-Jan. 16 • Downtown Greenville Bring the family downtown for ice skating! Adults are $12 and children 12 and under are $8. Price includes skate rental. Skate sleds for those with a disability are free of charge thanks to GHS’ Roger C. Peace Hospital. Meet the Midwives Dec. 22 • 6-7 p.m. • Greenville Midwifery Care Learn about GHS’ nurse-midwifery program and how a midwife can enhance the birthing process. Free; registration required. Resolution Run Sat., Jan. 14 • 9 a.m. • Trailblazer Park This half-marathon and 5K event is hosted by the George I. Theisen YMCA. Proceeds benefit the YMCA’s Open Doors Campaign. To register, visit go-greenevents.com. Nutritional Reversal of Cardiovascular Disease Fri., Jan. 27 • Noon-1:15 p.m. • Greenville Memorial Hospital Learn how proper nutrition can reverse heart disease from Caldwell B. Esselstyn Jr., MD, director of the Cardiovascular Prevention and Reversal Program at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute. To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, please visit ghs.org/healthevents or call 1-877-GHS-INFO (447-4636).

ghs.org 17-0137GJ


8 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.16.2016

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

2016 Champions of the Environment grant winners

Next Gen Greenies Northwest Middle School receives grant for recycling, bird conservation efforts ANDREW MOORE | STAFF

amoore@communityjournals.com

Eight South Carolina schools have won grants to support their efforts to educate the next generation of environmental stewards, the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) announced last Monday. One of those schools is Greenville County’s Northwest Middle School. The school will receive $2,000 from DHEC through its Champions of the Environment program, which has rewarded schools statewide for environmental action and awareness since 1993. International Paper, SCE&G, WIS-TV and WCSC-TV sponsor the program with assistance from the Environmental Education Association of South Carolina. “This program provides the opportunity for students to have some hands-on learning with the environment,” said Amanda Ley, DHEC’s coordinator for Champions of the Environment program.

Northwest Middle School is using its grant to reduce waste and enhance natural areas on campus as well as create the Panthers Eco Club. That club will start a recycling program, distributing recycling bins to the cafeteria, commons areas and classrooms to collect paper, plastic bottles and glass. The school plans to make public service announcements about recycling that will be shared through the morning news show to increase awareness about the impact of garbage in natural areas. “We live in a very beautiful part of the county, so we want our students to play a part in that. We really want our students to understand that they can have a real impact on the local environment by improving their own,” said David McDonald, principal at Northwest Middle School. He added that students would participate in bird conservation as well. Special education classes are going to build birdhouses with help of a local builder and the art class-

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Dent Middle School, Richland County

The Gills Creek Watershed Student Organization will partner with local environmental organizations to construct a rain garden on campus designed to mitigate stormwater running off to Carys Lake.

Windwood Farm School, Charleston County

Using a technology toolkit, students will study live biological data servers to research how the ecological health of honeybees is affected by environmental conditions.

Richland Two Institute of Innovation, Richland County

Students will learn about alternative energy by using a “Read and Ride” bicycle to generate power for small-wattage applications while promoting healthy lifestyles.

Leaphart Elementary School, Lexington, Richland counties

A small off-grid solar panel energy system will power the school’s greenhouse and teach students about alternative energy and renewable resources.

Carolina Springs Middle School, Lexington County

Students studying world languages will learn about gardening and environmental concerns in their target language by constructing and maintaining a water-efficient, handicap-accessible raised vegetable garden.

Sneed Middle School, Florence County

The Environmental Action Club will use compost made from cafeteria food waste and vermicomposting to enrich the soil of two pollinator gardens on campus.

Newberry Academy, Newberry County

Newberry Academy will work with community partners to revamp the school’s recycling program and restore the natural environment on campus. es will decorate the birdhouses. Also, eighth-grade students plan to install the birdhouses and distribute more information about the project to various community groups. Science classes will research native bird species and create informational signs, which will be installed with the birdhouses. While some birds build nests on tree branches, porches and gutters, other birds, which are called “cavity nesters,” search for holes in wood to build nests and lay their eggs. Unfortunately, there aren’t e n o u g h holes. But birdhouses, also known as nest boxes, provide those holes, giving a home and nesting spot to many species of birds. Birdhouses can also provide warmth during winter months as well as protect bird eggs and baby birds from hungry predators, including squirrels, raccoons, snakes, cats and house sparrows.

“We had more than 30 entries this year, and some were really creative,” said Ley. “The Northwest Middle School recycling program and bird project really stood out. Their efforts should create a culture of environmental stewardship at the school and in the community.” McDonald said both projects would begin sometime in the spring. In addition to the grant, the school will appear in a commercial detailing the project. That commercial will be featured on WIS-TV in Columbia, the school’s website and YouTube, according to Ley. Northwest Middle School was also recently awarded a $5,000 grant from the nonprofit PalmettoPride to build a Carolina Fence Garden, which houses a native plant for every square inch of the garden.


12.16.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 9

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

NEWS

EMERGENCY POWER

FOR HOME SWEET HOME

Miller: Police chiefs will oppose medical marijuana legalization CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

As president of the state Police Chiefs Association, Greenville Police Chief Ken Miller expects to be at the forefront in the fight over medical marijuana in South Carolina. Sen. Tom Davis, R-Beaufort, plans to file a bill in advance of the 2017 legislative session that would make medical marijuana legal in the state. Twenty-eight states allow medical marijuana, including Arkansas, Florida and North Dakota, where voters last month approved the measure. Two years ago, Davis led the effort to legalize the use of cannabidiol, oil derived from marijuana, for treatment of certain forms of epilepsy. The law specifies that cannabidiol must have no more than 0.9 percent of tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the main mind-altering ingredient in marijuana. Last year, such a bill passed a Senate medical affairs subcommittee but failed to pass the full panel. Davis spent the first five minutes of each day in the latter part of the legislative session telling stories of state residents who could benefit from medical marijuana. But Miller said the Police Chiefs Association would continue to oppose Davis’ efforts. Miller said because marijuana is an illegal drug at the federal level, pharmacies cannot stock or sell it, physicians cannot prescribe it and banks cannot accept money from its sale. “None of that

would change if the South Carolina Legislature passed a law permitting use of medical marijuana,” Miller said. If medical marijuana were to be legalized, Miller said, “Specialty marijuana stores manned by experts in cannabis consumption … will pop up on main streets, malls and shopping centers everywhere.” “People will flock to these marijuana stores with cash, because cash will be virtually the only way to conduct the business, and we will begin to see violent robberies and other victimization begin to occur in places that were stable prior to the inclusion of the marijuana store,” he said. Clinics with long lines of visitors have been documented in national news reports, he said. Without real medical control, the legislation would not offer a prospect of legitimate pain relief but would instead offer more complications and problems for the people of a state that already lacks adequate addiction and mental health services, Miller said. He also said it likely would fuel more crime in a state with a crime rate already too high. Davis told The State newspaper he plans to address concerns of law enforcement that medical marijuana would be diverted for recreational use. He told The State that seed-to-sale tracking programs could prevent that. Davis told The State he plans to look at other states for “tried-and-true measures.”

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NEWS

The Ex-President’s Orders David Shi donates $500K to create sustainability fellowships at Furman ANDREW MOORE | STAFF

amoore@communityjournals.com

Former Furman University President David E. Shi and his wife, Angela Halfacre Shi, have donated $500,000 to the university to create an endowed fund that will support student fellowships through the Shi Center for Sustainability. The Student Sustainability Fellows Program supports Furman University’s undergraduate students who are focused on campus and community-based sustainability projects. The fellowships are open to all students no matter their major, according to Dr. Weston Dripps, executive director of the Shi Center. The fellowship program is a primary focus of the Shi Center, which was established in 2008 to host research projects centered on sustainable food and farming, transportation, energy conservation, water quality and more, he added. To date, the program has supported 236 student fellows from various majors. The new endowed fund will expand the fellowship program. “This timely and important gift will create even more quality experiences for Furman students who are interested in sustainability and who want to make a difference in the communities where they live,” said Furman President Elizabeth Davis. “The Shi Center Fellowships will also support The Furman Advantage, our new vision to transform the student experience and redefine a liberal arts and sciences education. We are grateful to both David and Angela for their extraordinary generosity and their commitment to the university,” she added. Earlier this year, the university unveiled The Furman Advantage, an initiative that allows undergraduate students to work alongside faculty, staff, alumni and community members to address real-world problems across the Upstate. That means increased opportunities for campus and community-based projects and internships related to various programs, such as sustainability. “Angela and I were eager to step up in support of President Davis’ recently announced strategic focus on The Furman Advantage, which ensures that every student has opportunities for engaged learning experiences, and the Shi Center Fellowships do just that,” David Shi said. The increased opportunity for fellowships could also boost the university’s sustainability efforts, which have been widely

The Shi Center Sustainability Fellowships will be named for these individuals: • Carroll Rushing and Billie Cleveland • Judy Cromwell* • Richard Cullen* • David* and Frances Ellison • James Grantham • Francie Heller • Carl* and Lynne Kohrt • J aime* and Mary Anne Lanier* • Erwin Maddrey • Richard Robb • Todd Rupert • Frank* and Susan Shaw • Minor Shaw • Tom Skains • Fred Stanback • Mary Sterling • Peace Sterling • Jim Thompson* *Furman graduates

recognized. Furman is the only liberal arts school in the nation to offer a bachelor’s degree in sustainability science. The university recently received the 2016 Campus Sustainability Achievement Award from the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education. In addition, the Princeton Review listed Furman University among the “Top 50 Green Colleges” in the country. The donation to Furman University was made in honor of specific individuals who “have made extraordinary contributions to Furman and its commitment to sustainability over the years,” Shi said.

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NEWS

‘‘We need to get it right’ How should development happen along the Reedy River? The conversation on both sides continues CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com DAVID DYKES | STAFF

ddykes@communityjournals.com

The Reedy River is Greenville’s centerpiece, playing a critical role in downtown’s rise, fall and resurrection. Two Bostonians opened Camperdown Mill on the east side of the river in the late 1870s. A century later, the river was a stinky cesspool in a forgotten end of downtown that changed colors based on which dye the textile plants were using. Today, the Reedy River is one of the crown jewels of the city’s successful downtown revitalization. In fact, it plays the starring role. And as downtown’s star player, everyone has an opinion about how it should or should not be developed. Recently, the proposed construction of a building near the historic Main Street bridge and Reedy River Falls has once again put the river at the forefront of a discussion of what role it should play in the next phase of downtown’s development. The proposed 55 E. Camperdown Way office building has sparked conversation about how to encourage further development in what is being called downtown’s East Gateway District, while protecting the river that historically has not always been treated kindly.

The past After a massive fire in Boston in 1872, Oscar H. Sampson and George F. Hall journeyed south. They were looking for a mill site and they found one, a grain mill on the south bank of the Reedy. The mill was the same spot Indian trader and settler Richard Pearis established a trading post and gristmill in 1768. Sampson and Hall leased the mill from the descendants of Vardry McBee, commonly known as the father of Greenville. In 1874, Sampson and Hall opened a cotton thread factory, which harnessed the power of the falls. Buoyed by its success, two years later Samson, Hall & Co. opened a second, larger mill on the east side of the river. They called it Camperdown No. 2, although it ultimately came to be the main Camperdown Mill. By 1880, Camperdown was the second-largest mill in South Carolina behind only Graniteville in Aiken. The white-fronted Camperdown Mill, which helped fuel Greenville’s rise as the textile capital of the world, operated until 1956. It was demolished three years later when Church Street was being extended to Augusta Road, cutting through the Camperdown mill village. The concrete Camperdown Bridge opened in 1960 and hid the falls. Falls Park, a 24-acre green oasis within

downtown, had its beginnings in 1967 when the Carolina Foothills Garden Club, partnering with the Greenville Planning Commission and Furman University, deeded six acres to the City of Greenville for the Reedy River Historic Park. In the mid-1980s, an idea of building a performing arts center on the bank of the almostforgotten river and a slumping area of downtown took hold, in large part because of a $10 million pledge from the Peace family — one of Greenville’s most prominent. The Peace Center for the Performing Arts opened in 1990. Soon other efforts to revive the river were underway. Anna Kate Hipp became involved in the garden club’s efforts to remove the old Camperdown Bridge, which ultimately was torn down to open more area for the park. Using the campaign slogan “Free the Falls,” the Carolina Foothills Garden Club gathered enough community support for the removal of the bridge. It came down, the park was expanded and the city’s new and iconic Liberty Bridge was built. About the same time, development across the river from the Peace Center began. Now, developers are working on projects near the river on the other side of Main Street. Centennial American Properties is redeveloping the block of South Main Street where the Greenville News has made its home since 1969. The newspaper will relocate to a build-

ing currently under construction on a corner of the property, while the rest will be redeveloped into multifamily housing, a hotel and office and retail space. The project is called Camperdown, a nod to the mill and village that once surrounded it, an area where the grandmother of Centennial President Brody Glenn grew up.

The present Centennial proposed building a four-story brick and glass office building mere steps from the historic Main Street bridge. On Nov. 3 of this year, the plan received a certificate of appropriateness from the city’s Design Review Board on the condition the project meets the city’s stormwater regulations and an easement is provided that allows public access. The DRB would still need to approve final landscaping and site design. The small piece of wooded land sits between the river, the Bowater parking garage and Japanese Dogwood Lane/Murphy Street, which leads under the bridge to the amphitheater behind the Peace Center. Shortly after the proposed 55 E. Camperdown Way project was introduced in September, it came under fire. Members of the Carolina Foothills Garden Club argued that the office building would be directly in the view line of

«


12.16.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 13

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

NEWS “We’re so lucky to have the park that we have. We also have a good bit of land in that area that can be redeveloped and help our city grow and become more vibrant.” Brody Glenn

«

those on the Liberty Bridge. “While the developer has met ‘legal regulations’ for construction under current code, the building will block the gateway arch underneath the historic Main Street Bridge and become the view from the Liberty Bridge,” Hipp and other others wrote in a recent Greenville Journal guest column. “Now, imagine standing on the Liberty Bridge at sunset in the near future,” the garden club members wrote. “The existing trees on the far bank of the river have disappeared, replaced by a four-story building with the afternoon sun reflecting off the exterior of its façade. Gone is the tranquility and cool serenity formally encompassing our widely admired ‘view from the bridge.’” The 55 E. Camperdown Way building wasn’t

the first proposal for the Bowater property. According to Greenville Mayor Knox White, two hotels have been considered over the years, including one less than a year ago. White said they were “summarily rejected” because of a pedestrian easement to the river. The mayor also noted that the 55 E. Camperdown Way proposal was somewhat of a shock to the city because of those past rejections. “The building was a surprise. They found a way to get around the pedestrian easement,” he said. In order for the office building to be built where Centennial proposed, the developer has asked for an exception to the city’s minimum 50-foot buffer from the river. The exception would allow the developer to use a buffer average, meaning part of the development could be inside the buffer zone but other parts would be outside it. The city has applied buffer averages to other developments in the past, including RiverPlace, a development on the other side of the river. Glenn said at a recent DRB meeting his intent has been “to create some energy” on the side of the Reedy River that includes the parking deck next to the former Bowater Inc. building. “We’re so lucky to have the park that we have,” he said. “We also have a good bit of land in that area that can be redeveloped and help our city grow and become more vibrant.” The city’s latest downtown master plan, completed in 2008, called for developing the Broad Street (one of the streets bordering the Greenville News site) and River Street area, what is now being called, at least informally, the East Gateway District. The development of the East Gateway District would not hinge on

where or whether 55 E. Camperdown is built. The city has identified the area for growth, saying that it, along with Heritage Green County Square and two other locations, is one of five “corners” of downtown. Each “corner” has its own character and competitive advantage, the downtown plan said. Before the DRB held its Nov. 3 meeting, members of City Council walked the site as part of one of its work sessions. “It’s one thing to look at pictures. It’s another to walk the site. That was a game-changer,” the mayor said. “The reaction to a person was that it seemed forced.” After the DRB approval, some residents started a petition drive to express their opposition. The petition to White, City Manager John Castile and the Greenville City Council said the city “owes its downtown and regional renaissance to the existence of the Reedy River and the falls. Exploitation of the river in this manner, rather than its protection, is unacceptable.” Calling the proposed site “sacred ground,” White said the city is trying to buy the corner where the building was proposed. “The building will not go there,” the mayor said.

The future White said if a building goes on the site, the city wants it to be closer to the former Bowater building. “It’s more likely than not there will be a building on the site, but not at the proposed site because that spot is too much a part of Falls Park. We will still have setback issues, but if it’s done right, you’ve got an opportunity to create

original location

newly proposed location

a NOMA Square or ONE Plaza. It could be a draw, a magnet,” White said. Looking at both sites, there are positives and negatives. If the 55 E. Camperdown building were built where Centennial proposes, the Bowater plaza would provide 50 percent more public space than the alternative plan. Restaurants and retail could go on its fringes, activating the area and encouraging people to gather. It could also help funnel people from that side of Main and the city’s burgeoning east side to the river. If 55 E. Camperdown Way is built closer to the former Bowater building — where some have proposed it be located — the area closer to the bridge would remain empty; however, the building would take up the current green space between the Bowater building and the parking garage. Moreover, a bigger building could be built in the space closer to the former Bowater building than the area closer to the bridge. The question remains: If construction of a new building is a given along this section of the Reedy River, which configuration will ultimately be more advantageous to the public, the city, business and the environment? Is it the property that eliminates green space by the Main Street bridge or one that eliminates green space closer to the Bowater building? Hipp, who is past president of the Carolina Foothills Garden Club, is uncertain of what will happen to the proposed development on the banks of the Reedy. “Where are we? I’m not sure,” she says. She said media reports showing an alternaREEDY continued on PAGE 14


14 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.16.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS REEDY continued from PAGE 13

“Not building anywhere would be great for me.” Anna Kate Hipp

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tive site for the proposed building don’t seem to reflect “a good compromise.” “Not building anywhere would be great for me,” Hipp said. There are other options for the site, according to Hipp and other Carolina Garden Club members in their Greenville Journal op-ed, although none of them explicitly take into account moving 55 E. Camperdown Way closer to Bowater. One option, they said, would be to deed the small parcel of 55 E. Camperdown Way property to the city or a nonprofit organization and put it into a perpetually safe designation. The property values would be a contribution resulting in a tax credit to the donor. Secondly, the present owner could sell the parcel to an interested party with the agreement that it would become a safe buffer to the river and never be developed, the club members said. The buyer would donate the property to the Falls Park Foundation and receive a tax credit. Thirdly, the city could purchase the property, preserving and protecting the banks of the Reedy River in the park, they said. The garden club has a $3 million endowment, some of which could be used to buy land to help preserve green space in the park, Hipp said. “We’re willing to do that,” she said. “We haven’t really had any concrete opportunities or proposals.” Her vision for the park is “just to preserve what is around the area that is in question, and then I think the park will be finished.” “We need to look to the future,” she said. “But we don’t need to lose the magic that got us where we are.” A new boutique hotel at the current site of the Wyche P.A. law firm hopes to capture some of that magic. The Grand Bohemian Greenville is a further sign that properties along the eastern side banks of the Reedy and along Falls and Broad streets are about to potentially experience a transformation about as significant as the one that gave birth to RiverPlace. Grand Bohemian developer Richard Kessler, chairman and CEO of The Kessler Enterprise Inc., said in a recent interview he chose the Reedy River location for the boutique hotel because of the city’s vibrancy — and promise. “There are a lot of cities Greenville-size and larger we could choose,” Kessler said during an interview in Savannah, where he is working on redeveloping the historic Georgia Power Plant Building into a waterfront mixed-use entertainment complex with hotel, food and beverage, retail and entertainment components. But people who have gone through Greenville, done business or have friends here

“would literally talk to me every month and say ‘Richard, you need to have a hotel in Greenville, South Carolina.’” After about three or four years of hearing that, Kessler decided to investigate. “I liked what I saw,” he said. He gained insight into Greenville, including its development projects and its politics – “all positive things,” Kessler said. “That further interested me,” he said. “The other thing I liked is I liked the looks of it. It looked like it was healthy. It was clean. It was well organized. I heard good reviews about the political structure.” He also cited large industries in the area, including BMW. The Wyche P.A. law firm’s site at 44 E. Camperdown Way “really caught my eye,” he said. “When I saw it, I said, ‘Oh my gosh. This really encourages me to do it, because I think we can do something extremely special and create an iconic location here.’” “Where else can you go, have waterfalls in the center of the city and have a location spread out facing the waterfalls?” Kessler said. “And you think of all the social things, the travelers and the weekend romances that could happen right there on the waterfalls. It can be incredible.”

“Greenville residents are really attuned to the whole issue of growth ... We never want to be in a position of being anti-growth. We need to get it right.” Knox White He plans an outdoor bar at the hotel that overlooks the falls. “Where else in the Southeast can you go enjoy that?” Kessler said. “I don’t know of a single place. It’s so unique.” In the end, everyone seems to agree that they want the Reedy, and Greenville, to remain unique. At the DRB meeting, Glenn said it’s important to establish a “bigger, more active Falls Park” by connecting buildings and public space, while White said the city must keep its sights on its downtown urban plan. (Editor’s note: Please see Mayor White’s op-ed on page 4.) “Greenville residents are really attuned to the whole issue of growth and wanting us to make sure we get it right, and that plays out on a lot of issues, not just this one,” White said. “We never want to be in a position of being anti-growth. We need to get it right.”


New iStent Treats Glaucoma Glaucoma has been called “the silent thief of sight” because it doesn’t have any overt symptoms until damage is done and vision is lost. It is the second leading cause of blindness in the United States, after cataracts. The only way to detect glaucoma is through an eye exam. Now, a tiny implant is giving glaucoma patients new hope. It is called the iStent – the smallest implant ever approved by the FDA. Clemson Eye, a leader in eye care innovation, was among the first practices in the area to offer this solution to its patients. The L-shaped iStent opens up a channel that drains fluid from the eye and reduces pressure. Glaucoma is caused when the network of tissue that drains fluid out of the space between the iris and cornea becomes blocked or drains too slowly. The resulting pressure can damage the optic nerve and cause vision loss or blindness. “Glaucoma has no cure,” says Dr. Joseph Parisi, Medical

Director and Chief Ophthalmologist at Clemson Eye. “Lowering the pressure in the eye is the only way to treat it. If we can reduce the pressure, then we can stop the disease’s progress.”

ADVERTORIAL

The minimally invasive iStent helps improve the compliance rate by reducing or eliminating the glaucoma patient’s need for eye drops. It is covered by Medicare and many health plans. Currently, the iStent can only be inserted during cataract surgery. Roughly 20 percent of cataract patients also have glaucoma, says Dr. Parisi. The size of the tiny stent requires complex microscopes and mirrors to make sure the device is placed correctly, which adds roughly 15 minutes to cataract surgery.

A regime of eye drops is generally used to reduce The tiny L-shaped iStent measures just 1 x 1/3 mm. “So far, Clemson Eye cataract patients who received the eye pressure. the stent have maintained a reduction in eye pressure and Unfortunately, multiple eye drops and an inefficient drug seen the number of their eye drop medications cut in half,”1 delivery system (i.e., the drops often do not make it fully says Dr. Parisi. He adds that an eye exam is the best way to into the eye) are a challenge for glaucoma patients to be detect glaucoma and protect your vision. compliant in administering their medications. “Glaucoma 1. Clemson Eye iStent and cataract patient clinical results, 2015. drops are costly (about $1,200/year) and many patients struggle to administer them as prescribed,” says Dr. Parisi.

Cataract Patients Now Seeing Near To Far Cataracts, a clouding of the eye’s natural lens, affect about 22 million Americans over age 40. Left untreated, cataracts can lead to blindness. They are the leading cause of vision loss in the United States. Surgery is the only known treatment for cataracts. Two things happen during the surgery: Your clouded lens is removed and an artificial intraocular lens is implanted. The lens requires no care and simply becomes a permanent part of your eye. You don’t see or feel the lens implant. Cataract surgery is one of the safest and most commonly performed surgeries in the U.S.1 It is a 15-minute out-patient procedure. People with cataracts can opt for basic or laser cataract surgery.

It cannot correct astigmatism or poor reading vision. This manual, bladed surgical procedure is covered by Medicare and most health insurance plans. It is a safe, excellent option. However, if you wore eye glasses before your basic cataract surgery, you will most likely need them after it. Laser Surgery Laser cataract surgery involves using a laser and computer-guided software system to create incisions that are up to 10 times more precise than manual incisions. Here, patients have the option of advanced lenses that can correct astigmatism and provide a range of vision from near-to-far.

“Through laser cataract surgery with Vicky and Doug Kingsmore, advanced lenses, we can deliver the best Clemson Eye Cataract Patients. possible visual outcomes for our cataract patients, regardless of their age” says Dr. Joseph Parisi, Medical Director and Chief Ophthalmologist at Clemson Basic Surgery Eye. “Our laser cataract patients enjoy excellent restored Basic cataract surgery involves removing the diseased vision, whereby they are entirely free of or much less lens and implanting a monofocal lens. The monofocal dependent on eye glasses.”2 intraocular lens clears your vision at a single focal point.

A portion of the cost of laser cataract surgery and advanced lens implants is covered by Medicare and most health insurance plans. However, an additional payment is required. Clemson Eye patients have the option of 24-month, 0% payment plans. When they developed cataracts, Clemson University benefactors Vicky and Doug Kingsmore opted for laser cataract surgery at Clemson Eye. Mr. Kingsmore had an advanced multifocal lens implanted during his laser cataract surgery. “After my surgery, I could read the telephone book and newspaper. It helped me tremendously. But more than anything else, it improved my golf game! It has been the most wonderful thing to happen to me in my adult life,” he says. Mrs. Kingsmore had her laser cataract surgery a couple years after Doug’s, and she too opted for a multifocal lens. “It’s a different world,” she says. “It’s a much brighter world. And I don’t need to look for my glasses anymore, because I can read just about anything without them.” 1. http://www.aao.org/publications/eyenet/200609/pearls.cfm 2. Clemson Eye Laser Cataract with Advanced Intraocular Lens Replacement Results, 2015.


16 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.16.2016

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

Downtown’s Five Districts CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Crafted nearly 10 years ago, a Greenville master plan called the area of Broad and River streets the premier redevelopment site in downtown. Developments along the informally named East Gateway District seem to indicate that sentiment holds true today. “While the Greenville News commands the frontage on Main Street today, Broad Street could become a major new address for the area, with strong connections to Butler Avenue on the west. Falls Street provides a north-south route through the district, and its improvement would further open up access to the riverfront,” said a section of Greenville’s 2008 downtown master plan completed by Sasaki Associates Inc. Today, the Greenville News site, which was sold by Gannett last year, is undergoing transformative changes. A new office building being built at the corner of Broad and Falls streets as part of the multimillion-dollar Camperdown project will become the new home of the News. The Greenville News building will be demolished to make way for a hotel, an apartment complex, offices, condos and a plaza. Two other small buildings not owned by Gannett also became part of the project and were demolished. Nearby, the Wyche law firm has announced plans to sell its offices on East Camperdown Way and a new hotel, the Grand Bohemian Greenville, will take its place. The downtown master plan called for expanding to what

was called the five corners of downtown — Heritage Green, where the library and museums are located; Gateway District, which includes Interstate 385 and the Bon Secours

Wellness Arena; Broad & River; County Square, the county’s headquarters on University Ridge; and the Warehouse District, which includes the West End, the area near the Kroc Center and the baseball field. “Rather than dilute the strong identity of Main Street Greenville by extending its length, another approach is to create new districts, each one with a strong identity developed out of its own geography and history. In looking at the opportunities for growth in Greenville, five distinct areas stand out in each of the corners of downtown,” the study said. Each of the corners lies at a critical gateway into downtown and “stand to influence many people’s first time impression of downtown Greenville,” the study said. Each has its unique historic development, urban character and competitive advantage for new development, the plan said. The study said Heritage Green has iconic architecture and is a civic anchor to downtown. County Square historically was the site of Furman University and now serves as a county government employment center. The Warehouse district has struggled to find an identity, but the plan said with the success of the baseball stadium and successful infill, it could become a center for start-up businesses and entrepreneurs. The Gateway District is the main entry into downtown for most. Broad & River has the greatest potential for redevelopment into new headquarters offices and research firms due to large parcel size visibility of the area.


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18 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.16.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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clandrum@communityjournals.com

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Greenville’s new downtown design guidelines should provide members of the city’s Design Review Board more direction when they are making decisions on whether to approve proposed developments in downtown and the West End. “One thing the DRB has asked for is more specific guidelines,” said Mary Douglas Hirsch, downtown manager in the city’s economic development department. “It’s not that our design guidelines are bad. They just needed to be tweaked to show how we are changing and where we’re going as a city.” The DRB last month approved a certificate of appropriateness for a proposed office building along the banks of the Reedy River at the edge of Falls Park that has fueled intense opposition from environmental groups that say the project is too close to the river, garden club members who say the building would hurt the park’s tranquility and citizens who don’t want construction that close to the Main Street bridge. The city and Centennial American Properties, the developer who is also handling the redevelopment of the nearby Greenville News site, are now in negotiations for a possible deal for the land where the building was proposed. Mayor Knox White said the new guidelines, which the city was working to revise before the controversial building on the river was proposed, should make it clear that protection of public space is within the DRB’s jurisdiction, not just architecture. “They have to be the guardians of the downtown urban plan,” White said. The city’s guidelines were written in 2000. Since they were written, Greenville’s downtown has grown with development in the West End shifting the center of downtown west, and there are new trends and aesthetics. The city hired Design Workshop, an Austin, Texas-

HOW DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE IS PERCEIVED: • More refined than rustic • More historic than contemporary • Slightly more informal than formal • Slightly more urban than natural • Equally balanced between mature and youthful • Slightly more quiet than loud • Slightly more rooted than independent • Slightly more classic than modern • Equally balanced between iconic simple • More predictable than mysterious • More casual than proper • More outgoing than reserved • Equally balanced between fast and slow (Source: City of Greenville from October survey)

based landscape architecture, planning and urban design firm, to rewrite the guidelines. The company is writing the guidelines now. A draft of the new guidelines should be available for residents, architects and developers to see in February, said Hirsch. The guidelines, which include such items as building mass and scale, building materials and architectural character, streetscape design, parking and signage, likely will emphasize protection and enhancement of downtown Greenville’s natural assets and providing a pleasant and diverse pedestrian experience, the top two priorities downtown residents, workers and visitors identified in an October survey. As a part of the project, the consultants will create a virtual 3-D model to allow the city and the public to visualize the impact of projects and recommendations

DOWNTOWN DESIGN GUIDELINE TIMELINE NOW – Guidelines are being written by consultants JANUARY – City staff and steering committee review draft guidelines FEB. 21 – P ublic meetings (at Aloft Hotel) Architects – 10–11:30 a.m. Developers –2–3:30 p.m. Public – 5:30–7:30 p.m. MARCH – Survey APRIL OR MAY – City Council to consider new guidelines SUMMER/FALL – DRB will use new guidelines when reviewing projects


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20 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.16.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

COMMUNITY

Plant Trees, Save Energy Trees Greenville, Duke Energy partner to give away 750 energy saving trees ANDREW MOORE | STAFF

amoore@communityjournals.com

Green thumbs, rejoice: You can now plant a tree and save some energy. Trees Greenville has been awarded a $36,144 grant from Duke Energy to provide 750 free trees to Greenville neighborhoods through the Energy Saving Tree program, which is an Arbor Day Foundation program that helps residents conserve energy and reduce energy bills through strategic tree planting. The program is only available to Greenville County Duke Energy customers. Interested customers must pre-register and reserve their free trees at treesgreenville. org/giveaway. Participating customers can reserve up to two shade trees or understory trees, which range from White Oak to Tulip Polar. Trees Greenville is holding five special pick-up events in January and February. The first event is happening on Jan. 27, 2017, at Lake Conestee Nature Park. Each of the reserved trees will range from 4.5 feet to 6 feet tall and will be placed in seven-gallon containers for pick-up, according to a press release. The trees could provide several environmental benefits. “Trees are a last-minute thought for a lot of people, but this new program is going to help us educate residents about strategic tree planting,” said Joelle Teachey, execu-

tive director of Trees Greenville. “Strategically planting trees to create shade improves air quality, energy conservation and quality of life.” That could greatly benefit Greenville County, which has made an effort to reduce its air pollution since falling out of compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency’s Clean Air Act earlier this year. Greenville’s ground-level ozone fell out of EPA compliance twice in April. The county’s ozone levels on April 18 and April 20 resulted in orange alerts, meaning the air quality on those days was unhealthy for sensitive people, like asthmatics. When ozone levels rise, which is a risk especially in summer months, people with breathing issues, such as asthma, should take precautions. Air pollution is made of chemicals, ozone and particles. The most common types are ground-level ozone and particle pollutants. Ground-level ozone occurs when volatile organic compounds (VOCs) react with nitrogen oxides and UV radiation under hot and sunny weather conditions. These compounds come from industry, cars, trucks, lawn equipment and other sources. The region’s and state’s overall air quality has been improving over the past decade, thanks in part to a combination of industrial and residential changes, according to Andy Hollis, environmental health manager for the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC). Those changes include reduced factory emissions, cars with reduced emissions and better fuel efficiency. But one of the simplest ways people can improve air quality is by planting a tree. Trees Greenville planted 369 trees last year, which, over the next 25 years, will

Trees Greenville planted 369 trees in 2015, which will reduce carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by 934,203 pounds in the next 25 years.

reduce carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by an estimated 934,203 pounds, Teachey says. The Greenville-based nonprofit has planted more than 4,000 trees in the last five years through partnerships with several Greenville County schools, Furman University, communities and more. “Trees keep temperatures cooler and reduce the heat island effect,” Teachey said. They also reduce ground-level ozone by cleaning the air of dust, ash, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide, she adds. “Energy saving trees” can also provide economic benefits. Participating customers can use an online calculator to estimate the annual energy savings from their trees. Trees properly placed around a home can reduce air conditioning needs by 30 percent and save up to 50 percent in heating costs, according to the U.S. Forest Service. That could translate up to $250 in savings. The Forest Service also says mature trees add an average of 10 percent to home values. While understory trees typically die within 10 years, large shade trees could last between 80 and 100 years if planted correctly, according to Teachey. “Too many people plant trees too deeply and then mulch them improperly,” she said. “We’ll be holding demonstrations at the pickup sites next year.”

MONEY TREES

Trees Greenville planted more than 300 trees last year. So how will those trees benefit Greenville County residents over the next 25 years? •$  103,626 of stormwater runoff savings • 6,233,422 gallons of rainfall intercepted •$  11,180 of air quality and carbon dioxide savings •9  34,203 pounds of carbon dioxide reduction Source: Trees Greenville

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COMMUNITY Our Community

Limited Special Offer

Community news, events and happenings

COMPETITION

Sixth Annual Lights on Augusta decorating competition held through Dec. 31

Men’s and Women’s

The Augusta Road Business Association (ARBA) presents the Sixth Annual Lights on Augusta, a Christmas decoration contest on historic Augusta Road through Dec. 31. Members of ARBA get in the spirit of the season with this light-hearted competition by decorating their business or storefront for the month of December. The winner will be decided by online vote.

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Lights on Augusta is designed to be a friendly competition that encourages community participation and camaraderie between businesses. Voting is taking place online at onlyonaugusta.com through Dec. 31.

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Our Lady of The Rosary Catholic Church dedicates new building, invites public to January events Our Lady of The Rosary Catholic Church recently celebrated Holy Mass with the Rite of Dedication in its new 15,788-square-foot church building at the junction of I-85 and Augusta Road. More than 400 parishioners gathered with the Bishop of the Diocese of Charleston, Robert Guglielmone, to dedicate the church.

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“This church has been nearly 60 years in the making for our parishioners,” said Father Dwight Longenecker of Our Lady of the Rosary. “It was an amazing night to celebrate our new church with Bishop Guglielmone and several fellow priests of the Charleston dioceses. As Greenville continues to grow and prosper, we’re hopeful that this church will help spur a revival in the south Augusta Road corridor.”

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installed by Wicks Organ Company from Highland, Ill. In addition to the reclaimed items, the church has several new and unique art features, including painting in the dome of the Baldachino that portrays the night sky over the Bay of Lepanto on Oct 7, 1571, the historic date when the armies of Christendom repelled the invasion by the Ottoman Turks at the Battle of Lepanto; an antique hand-painted 19th-century crucifix in the style of 13c. Italian master Duccio; ceramic carvings over entrance doors by local artist Jim Craft; and original painting and church design by Anja Zunkeler Longenecker of Zinclair Studios.

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Our Lady of The Rosary will welcome visitors interested in touring the new church at two upcoming events: Jan. 15 – guided tours of the new church at 2 p.m. followed by the dedication of the Madonna Organ and at 3 p.m. a one-hour recital on the organ by Kevin Clarke; Jan. 22 – open house and tours of the new church at 3 p.m.

CLASS

Upstate International offers language classes beginning in January Upstate International offers various language classes beginning Jan. 9 that are appropriate for different skill levels, whether beginner, advanced or somewhere in-between. At UI, the curricula are structured according to class needs. Languages offered this winter include Chinese, English, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Russian and Spanish. Winter regular classes start the week of Jan. 9 and run through March 16. Classes meet once a week for 60 minutes per lesson for 10 weeks. Cost is $75 for members.

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Winter intensive classes also start the week of Jan. 9 and meet twice a week for 90 minutes per lesson for 10 weeks. Cost is $300 for members. Language classes run with a minimum of three students per class and a maximum of 15. All students must be members of Upstate International (starting at $50 per year). Register early to guarantee a spot. Registration is nonrefundable. Check the start and end dates for particular classes, as not all classes follow the same schedule. Visit conta.cc/2gfWzkV to register or email info@upstateinternational.org for more information.

Submit community news items to community@communityjournals.com.

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

COMMUNITY The Good

Events that make our community better

PARTNERSHIP

NONPROFIT

Greenville City Fire Department Partners With Corley Plumbing Air Electric

Macy’s and Make-A-Wish grant wish to Upstate teen Macy’s and Make-A-Wish celebrated the eighth annual National Believe Day on Dec. 9. In Greenville, 18-year-old Jonathan’s wish for a camper was granted at the Haywood Mall Macy’s, where he was surprised by associates hosting a cookout in front of his new camper. Jonathan, who has chronic kidney disease, was joined by his family for what he thought was just a normal trip to the mall. He will use the camper for all of his favorite outdoor activities.

The Greenville City Fire Department (GCFD) is partnering with Corley Plumbing Air Electric, which will be the new title sponsor of GCFD’s Smoke Alarm and Fire Education (S.A.F.E.) initiative. Corley provided $6,000 to the program, which combines door-todoor installation of smoke alarms with educational information and personalized fire-safety checks.

CONTEST

2016 Festival of Trees winners announced The winners of the St. Francis Foundation’s 31st annual Festival of Trees have been announced. A downtown Greenville holiday tradition, specially decorated trees line the entranceways of The Hyatt Regency, Courtyard Downtown Greenville and Hampton Inn & Suites RiverPlace through Dec. 31. The St. Francis Foundation congratulates the following designers: School Decorator Category: First place: Christ Church Middle School, sponsored by Pepsi-Cola of Greenville Second place: Bob Jones Academy Elementary School, sponsored by BMW Manufacturing Corporation Third place: Tails on the Trail Children’s Book & Hollis Academy, sponsored by Community Journals

According to Will Broscious, GCFD’s community risk reduction & education coordinator, the goal is to increase the number of residences with working smoke alarms in order to mitigate fire injuries and property loss. The program also provides a unique opportunity for GCFD firefighters to teach residents about fire safety in their own homes. To date, GCFD has installed more than 1,900 smoke alarms throughout the city of Greenville through the S.A.F.E. initiative.

Professional Decorator Category: First place: Brian Hollifield, sponsored by Hampton Inn & Suites – Riverplace Second place: A Touch of Class Florist, sponsored by Trehel Corporation Third place: Heaven’s Touch Designs, sponsored by Hyatt Business and Organization Category: First place: Young Office, sponsored by Young Office

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12.16.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 23

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

COMMUNITY Our Schools

Activities, awards and accomplishments

CLEMSON UNIVERSITY

Clemson Online has been ranked among the top online colleges

It’s all the buzz! Add a little spirit to your holidays!

The Community for Accredited Online Schools selected Clemson to its 2016 list for best online colleges. The scoring methodology included cost, financial aid, number of programs, student-teacher ratio, graduation rate and other factors. “Clemson University employs highly trained faculty members who are aware of the special circumstances that many online students are working around and are prepared to help all student reach their goals,” according to the website. “Students will be able to interact with their teachers and peers through message board communication and video-chatting, helping to build a productive virtual community.” The Community for Accredited Online Schools also noted Clemson’s placement and counseling services for online students as additional benefits to the program.

GREENVILLE TECH CHARTER HIGH SCHOOL

Dr. Anita Tam, Jill Littlejohn, Dr. Keith Miller, Sophie Finnell, Brittany Williams , Rachel Bereskin and Graham Lawrence

Students inducted into college honor society Five GTCHS students were inducted into the Greenville Technical College chapter of Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society at a ceremony on Dec. 2. Honored students were Sophie Finnell, Brittany Williams, Rachel Bereskin, Akim Koutsioukis, Jack Markowitz and Graham Lawrence.

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Students participate in Samaritan’s Purse Operation Christmas Child Students filled 548 boxes for Samaritan’s Purse Operation Christmas Child. The GMC service learning class traveled to Charlotte on Dec. 1 to deliver the boxes and volunteer in the processing center. Shelly Bishop, service learning teacher, said, “I am so proud of our students for their tremendous effort. With just 440 students at GMC, we packed more than one box per student! At GMC, we love to serve others. We are thankful for the opportunity to impact the lives of children around the world.”

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Second place: Golden Years Moving Third place: Mavin Construction, sponsored by Mavin Construction

FUNDRAISER

Pigs on the Gridiron to benefit Spartanburg Soup Kitchen Pigs on the Gridiron, a beer and barbecue event to support the Spartanburg Soup Kitchen, will be held Dec. 17 at RJ Rockers Brewing Company in downtown Spartanburg. The brewery opens at noon and the event officially begins at 3 p.m., with food being served at 4 p.m. A $25 ticket includes plenty of pulled pork, wings and other eats as well as two beer tickets and a souvenir pint glass. A portion of additional beers sold throughout the event will also go to the Soup Kitchen. There will be plenty of football to watch, as well as three musical acts throughout the day. Music will be provided by Zach Parks, Three Legged Mule and Smokey Oak and the Brisket Boys. Submit good news items to community@communityjournals.com

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24 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.16.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

LOOK

Photos by Demorris Giovonni Dodd

The Travelers Rest Farmers Market hosted its third annual Very Merry Local Christmas Market last Saturday. Vendors sold a variety of baked goods and crafts, and there were also Santa visits and food trucks.

From Dec. 1–12, Makers Collective hosted a retail pop up shop at the Methodical Coffee roasting facility. Fifty-five makers from the Upstate, Carolinas and Southeast sold home goods, art and jewelry. Local vendors included Billiam Jeans, Dapper Ink and Lily Pottery, among others.

Photos by Demorris Giovonni Dodd

Downtown Holiday Happening, held last weekend, transformed Main Street into a festive, family-friendly hotspot. There were live music performances, Santa visits for kids and a variety of special events held by various businesses.

Photos by Jivan Dave


feast IT’S PEAK OYSTER ROAST SEASON. The nights are cold (less sweating while standing around the roasting pit). It’s an R-month (more on that quasi-controversy later). Coldwater oysters taste the best (don’t even try to say otherwise). And if you need more concrete proof that the demand for bivalves is high, check in with local oyster suppliers Gusto Seafood, Key West Connection or Blockhouse Restaurant and Oyster Bar — it’s nonstop. Blockhouse owner Charlie McMullen says the 40-pound, 100-count boxes of raw Chesapeake oysters he sells to consumers are flying out the door on a daily basis, with several pickups every day from November through the holidays. “I can go through 100 boxes in one week from Thanksgiving to Christmas,” McMullen says. The Augusta Road restaurant owner knows his customers well and says most everyone buying those boxes, which range from $67– $100, are hosting outdoor oyster roasts for friends and family.

WHAT’S THE BIG DEAL?

If it’s a month with an ‘R,’ it’s time for oysters

BIVALVE BONANZA SO YOU WANT TO THROW AN OYSTER ROAST IN THE UPSTATE… ARIEL TURNER | STAFF

en’s m o W

Health Iss u

es

Specialize We in

aturner@communityjournals.com

If you’re not an oyster fan — or don’t yet know if you are — you may wonder what all the fuss is about oyster roasts. Hint: It’s not just about the seafood. Longtime Blockhouse customer William Jackson hosted Instel Power Products’ holiday party last week in his backyard in Chanticleer. “We’ve done the Greenville Country Club and the Commerce Club, but I thought an oyster roast would be a lot more fun and more interactive,” Jackson says. “I wanted everyone to be able to come casually, in jeans.” Jackson hired McMullen and his staff to handle the actual oyster roasting, or steaming, the more typical cooking method. He says the atmosphere outdoors, this time with live music, strings of white lights and drinks flowing, is what makes for a great party. For Jackson, the holiday oyster roast isn’t just a one-time thing. He enjoys throwing them a few times a year for friends and family. Although many of his guests might not partake in the steamed half-shells, everyone still has a good time.

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this week Things to do

eries ✓ Get Groc ing e Dry Clean ✓ Pick up th aundry ✓ Do the L dog and cat ✓ Feed the 2 to 5pm Cable guy ✓ Wait on om e Baby’s ro ✓ Reorganiz car ✓ Clean the r vacation sesitter fo u o H a d in F ✓ d tter notarize ✓ Get the le

He also says there’s a major benefit to hiring McMullen to steam the oysters. “I tell him to bring as many as he feels like is enough,” Jackson says.

THE NITTY-GRITTY Setting aside the party hype, oysters can actually be intimidating for some newbies; there are a lot of oyster-specific terms thrown around by connoisseurs. For instance, that R-month controversy referenced above. It’s a controversy now only because it used to be the hard and fast rule: You did not dare eat raw wild-caught oyster during months lacking an “R”— May through August — because those are the months oysters spawn and when the water is warmest, allowing for much more bacteria to grow in the little guys. Contracting a foodborne illness is never fun, especially at a party and especially from seafood. Today, oyster-growing practices are such that the risk has been minimized. Cooking them eliminates most of the worry; however, brandnew oysters won’t taste as meaty as they will after a few months of growth. The experts agree it’s still best to wait, though not necessary. Which brings us back to cold-water oysters. Again, they simply taste better. There’s no argument. And since that’s the whole point of eating them, why bother with anything else? The cold-water seasons vary according to climate, but as a general rule, by December, even Southern-harvested oysters are cold-water. Oysters come from 30 regions of the world, and each has specific shell features and distinct flavor. Local suppliers Gusto, Key West and Blockhouse can order oysters from any of those regions with enough notice. McMullen says he is normally stocking Chesapeake Bay singles and occasionally Bluepoint or Canadian oysters if a customer orders them specifically, while Key West brings in Gulf single selects along with North Carolina oysters. Gusto, who supplies mostly restaurants, has also been discovered by a few local residents. They all sell the 40-pound boxes at similar price points.

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feast NOT YOUR TYPICAL COOKOUT

Shuck ‘em if you got’em

What you need:

Throwing an oyster roast without an experienced caterer is a bit more involved than the typical cookout, but it’s still worth it. McMullen says he often hears from small groups of people who want do an outdoor roast, and with a small amount of research, they realize it’s a more complicated process than originally expected. “It requires so much time and effort, but it costs a lot to move from the restaurant to their house,” he says, explaining the sticker shock many experience when they price out having Blockhouse do a roast on-site. McMullen says it’s ultimately better if people wanting to throw an oyster roast for a small group learn how to do it themselves. And he’s game to give as much advice as they need about the proper cooking apparatus (a gas burner or fire pit), pot size or type (at least 30-quart with a removable steam basket) and how many oysters per person to plan for. “I always say 12 per person,” McMullen says. “Some don’t eat any, and some eat a bunch.”

Source: Amazon

Steamer pot:

A stainless steel pot — try the Bayou Classic line — with a perforated insert ideal for boiling, steaming or frying. The bigger, the better. Around $100. Gloves:

A pair of stainless steel, chainmail, injury-proof gloves can run you $40–$100. Cut-resistant woven work gloves run less than $15. Knife:

A decent shucking knife doesn’t have to break the bank. $6–20. Shucking surface:

A table or a sheet of wood with a hole cut in the center propped on a pair of sawhorses. Place a trashcan below for discarded shells.

WHERE TO BUY: BLOCKHOUSE RESTAURANT AND OYSTER BAR 1619 Augusta St., 864-232-4280

GUSTO SEAFOOD 208 Pennsylvania Ave., Greer, 864-879-7747

KEY WEST CONNECTION 540 Wade Hampton Blvd. 864-458-9603

BRIEFS

Johnny F’s Chicago Style opens in Greer Chicago native John Fetchko opened his new sandwich shop, Johnny F’s Chicago Style, on Dec. 3 at Hudson Corners, 2113 Old Spartanburg Road in Greer. “My venue will resemble iconic Chicago-style hot dog and beef stands found in nearly every neighborhood,” says Fetchko, aka “Johnny F.” Fetchko moved to the Upstate five years ago due to a corporate relocation. After a few years, he decided it was time for a change. He says he looked into some franchise opportunities, which led to starting his own business. “This town needs a really good hot dog — ‘dragged thru the garden,’ as we say in Chicago,” he says. Signature items are vienna beef hot dogs and Polish sausage; Italian beef and sausage sandwiches; loaded gyros; chargrilled chicken and burgers; homemade chili; tamales (combine them for a “chili tamale boat” – a beef tamale smothered with chili and topped with fresh shredded cheese, chopped onion, jalapeños, oyster crackers and hot sauce); and fresh hand-cut fries. Hours are Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m.–10 p.m., and Sunday, noon–6 p.m. Call 864-520-1699, or visit HotDogJohnnyFs.com. —Ariel Turner

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feast BRIEFS

Charleston pizzeria D’Allesandro’s opening on Mohawk Founded back in 2006 by bicycle-lovin’ Philly natives Ben and Nick D’Allesandro in what was then the ramshackle neighborhood of Elliotborough, D’Allesandro’s Pizza quickly became one of peninsular Charleston’s most popular pizza parlors thanks to its offbeat pies. Like the Get Gnarly (olive oil, garlic, spinach, balsamic chicken, mozzarella, blue cheese crumbles), the Beetnick (olive oil and garlic base, mozzarella, goat cheese, bacon, golden beets, rosemary), Buffalo Chicken (olive oil, garlic, mozzarella, buffalo chicken, blue cheese crumbles) and the Chauncinator (a margherita plus double pepperoni, minus tomatoes). Now, the D’Allesandro brothers have partnered with John Petrich and his son Chad to open a second D’Allesandro’s Pizza at 19 Mohawk Drive in the new northpointe standard strip mall. The redevelopment is the former home of Shinola. Rallis Holdings is behind northpointe standard. According to project developer Paula Rallis, D’Al’s will occupy a 1,500-square-foot unit on the far left side of redevelopment. It is scheduled to open in the spring. Paula says D’Al’s will be a neighborhood center, a possibility given the limited number of restaurants and retail in the immediate area. “We are kinda going for an industrial feel. It won’t feel like new construction. We want it to feel like it has been there a while,” she says. “It will have the same bicycle theme but with a little more family feel.” —Chris Haire

The Anchorage to host soft opening before Christmas The long-anticipated opening of chef Greg McPhee’s The Anchorage restaurant in the Village of West Greenville is almost here, just in time for Christmas. In a cloud of sawdust, with compressors drowning out most conversation, the former Restaurant 17 and High Cotton Greenville chef stood upstairs in the building that in just a few days will open for dinner service. McPhee, who worked alongside Sean Brock at Husk in Charleston, says by Dec. 21 they’ll be ready to host a soft opening for friends and family to work out all the kinks over a few days. As long as inspections go as planned, The Anchorage, 586 Perry Ave., will officially open around New Year’s Day to the public, Tuesday– Saturday, 5-10 p.m. “We’ll start brunch as soon as we get our sea legs,” McPhee says. The star of The Anchorage menu will be local vegetables. McPhee told the Greenville Journal in August: “Back when people couldn’t afford to eat meat, they certainly were a whole lot healthier, because they were forced to make

vegetables the center of the plate. In Greenville, we have a really great farming community that can support that.” But it certainly won’t be a vegetarian restaurant. “Pork is really integral in just about any culture’s cuisine just because it’s so versatile, so we’re definitely going to have pork options,” he said. The Anchorage will feature some seafood — courtesy of the Lowcountry’s much-heralded Abundant Seafood — and freshwater fish. —Ariel Turner

Monster Subs to open in downtown Pete Gambino, the restaurateur who brought his family-owned Monster Subs concept down when he moved from New Jersey a few years ago, said he has signed a lease on 1,350 square feet at 206 Coffee St., a space once occupied by Downtown Dogs. Gambino said he hopes to open the eatery in March. It will operate Tuesday through Saturday and feature a range of hot and cold subs, sandwiches and paninis piled high with fresh, quality ingredients at an affordable price. “We’re very excited about it,” Gambino said. “When we started this, I said I’d give it three years to see if we’d be at the point where we could open a second one. And here we are.” Gambino opened the Spartanburg location in June 2013 in the 2,500-square-foot former Sub Station II space at 115 E. Blackstock Road near Dorman Centre. His wife, Robbin, and their sons, Peter “PeeJay” and Jordan “Grizzly” Gambino, and daughter-in-law, Amanda Gambino, are all a part of the business. Monster Subs’ menu includes several signature subs, such as the Godfather, the Good Fella and the Knuckle Sandwich. One of the restaurant’s best-sellers, the Kraken, includes a hefty portion of freshly sliced turkey, roast beef and pepperoni with jalapeño bacon, lettuce, tomato, onion, hot peppers and spices priced a $7.45 for the regular 6-inch size and $12.45 for the “Monster” version. Gambino said he will keep most of the signature subs on the menu for the Greenville store, but could adapt other parts of it to give the restaurant a more Greenville feel. Monster Subs has several salads and sides and desserts, including cheesecake, cannolis, tiramisu and authentic Italian ice. The Spartanburg store sells several domestic and import beers. The owners said the Greenville store most likely will sell beer in the future. “They key for us is freshness; everything is made to order,” Gambino said. “For the Greenville store we’ll probably take a few things off the menu and add a couple of new things. But you know what they say: ‘If it ain’t broke…’” —Trevor Anderson

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Not all stories are fouNd iN books. Syd Solomon (1917-2004) Beck and Call,

Alfred Hutty (1877-1954) In a Southern City, 1922

Grainger McKoy, born 1947 American Kestrel (detail), 1998

Jamie Wyeth, born 1946 Sister Parrish and Mr. Universe, 2011

A world of stories AwAits At the GCMA.

NOW ON vieW: Syd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed Awarded five Bronze Stars for his service in World War II, Pennsylvania native Syd Solomon (1917-2004) served as a camoufleur, creating instruction manuals and camouflaging techniques that assisted in the lead up to the Normandy Invasion. By combining cutting edge materials with his camouflage experience Solomon realized his signature style. The Poetry of Place The Poetry of Place offers a respite and reminder that our country, and particularly the South, is home. From the colorful streets of New Orleans to the misty bayou of Louisiana to the undulant Smoky Mountains, The Poetry of Place invites you to re-discover America. Grainger McKoy South Carolina carver and artist Grainger McKoy (born 1947) grew up in Sumter, and attended Clemson University, earning a degree in zoology, while also studying architecture. Under his masterful hand, McKoy’s intricately carved birds are transformed into gravity-defying sculptures. Wyeth Dynasty In celebration of the centennial of Andrew Wyeth’s birth in 1917, the Museum presents Wyeth Dynasty. More than 70 works are featured in this important look at the first family of American painting.

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12.16.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 29

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Shopping for Caskets How an online search led BJU Museum & Gallery to their latest acquisition CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

When Erin Jones goes shopping, she turns to the internet. Jones is not shopping for the standard piece of living room art or furniture, however. As the executive director of the Museum & Gallery of Bob Jones University, she’s shopping for the school’s collection, widely recognized as one of the finest collections of religious art in the Southeast and perhaps the nation. On a search last year, Jones was browsing the website of art dealer Blumka Gallery when she came across a medieval Flemish bone casket, one of several pieces Jones thought would make good additions to the BJU collection. The casket, a box made to hold special valuables or keepsakes of its wealthy owner, is now on permanent display at the museum on campus. It is made of bovine bone mounted on a

BJU’s casket features pictures of Christ, the apostles and saints such as St. Catherine, identified by her wheel. Worn and repaired green fabric lines the interior. “The casket probably held a religious script or text,” she said. “The casket once held something of great value. Now, it is of great value.” Jones declined to disclose the purchase price or value of the piece, saying only it would be several thousand dollars. “We were also looking at an ilThe 15th-century casket, made of bovine bone and featuring pictures of Christ, the apostles and saints, was used to hold valuables or keepsakes of its wealthy owner. luminated manuscript, but it was out of our [price] range,” she said. niture to flush out the collection. seum sold pieces in its collection to finance Bob Jones Jr. began building BJU’s art colJones said the casket was purchased with acquisitions. The museum may do that again lection in 1948 after Carl Hamilton, an art funds from the Audrey Love Charitable in the future but has no plans to do so now, expert and friend, suggested a collection of Foundation. She said in the past the mu- Jones said. sacred art would complement BJU’s schools of fine art and religion. It was decided the

Erin Jones, executive director of the Museum & Gallery of Bob Jones University

wood structure. The bottom of the box is a checkerboard pattern of wood and bone, and the sides and tops are carved in low relief, which still has some gilding and color. Many of the 15th-century caskets focus on romance — decorated with scenes from literature, including Homer’s epics and the story of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table — indicating that they may have been given as bridal gifts or gifts to the wealthy or noble, Jones said.

university’s collection would be limited to European Old Master paintings. At the time, Baroque art (1600-1700) was unpopular with museums and collectors. What began as fewer than 30 paintings in two rooms has grown over time to a collection of nearly 5,000 pieces and two museums, Jones said. Since the paintings of the Old Masters are no longer in the museum’s financial reach, Jones now focuses on other artwork and fur-


30 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.16.2016

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The Big Dance Tajh Boyd goes from passing plays to pas de deux in CBT’s ‘Nutcracker’ ARIEL TURNER | STAFF

aturner@communityjournals.com

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The “big dance” means something entirely different for former Clemson quarterback Tajh Boyd this week. And it requires a completely different uniform than he’s used to. Boyd will don a tux and dance his way onstage for three minutes during the party scene of Carolina Ballet Theatre’s “The Nutcracker: Once Upon a Time in Greenville,” Dec. 22–23, at the Peace Center Concert Hall. “It’s too long — it should be a 30-second role,” he says, laughing. “I might be a little clumsy. I gotta get a haircut first.” Boyd is one of four special guests — two from Greenville, one from New York City and one from Miami — featured in the year’s production. Leslie Haas, local socialite and barre-exercise enthusiast, will be Boyd’s partner on stage. Principal dancer Daniel Ulbricht from New York City Ballet and principal dancer Jeanette Delgado from Miami City Ballet will be performing on opening night as the Cavalier and adult Clara, respectively. Herman Justo, CBT artistic director and creator of this version, says it is different in two ways from the original choreography and libretto by Marius Petipa. First, the story happens in Greenville, as is evident in the sets: The snow scene happens in Falls Park on the Reedy, and the Land Herman Justo of the Sweets also takes place downtown. Secondly, Herr Drosselmeyer, rather than Clara, has the dream that is the catalyst for the fanciful scenes that follow. Justo says that second change affects the two principals, because the famous Sugar Plum Fairy doesn’t exist in Drosselmeyer’s dream, so the grand pas de deux between the Cavalier and her becomes part of Clara’s wedding. “Everything else is as traditional as can be,” Justo says. “We just change the way to narrate the story, but [it] is choreographed based in the original version.” The ballet also includes recognizable Greenville characters from “Mice on Main”

Leslie Haas and Tajh Boyd

by Linda Kelly, Zan Wells and Jim Ryan and “Tails on the Trail” by author Stephanie Morgan and illustrator Laura Lynn Luce. Ulbricht, who says he has performed hundreds of “Nutcrackers,” is excited to dance with CBT for the first time and share the dance with the Greenville community. “I usually don’t dance the Cavalier role in New York, so I am always

excited to perform it wherever it may be,” he says. “In the end, it is not the holiday season without the ‘Nutcracker.’”

“The Nutcracker: Once Upon a Time in Greenville” When: Dec. 22, 7 p.m., featuring guest principals Dec. 23, 1 p.m. and 7 p.m., featuring CBT principals Where: The Peace Center Concert Hall Tickets: $18-55, carolinaballet.org

Jeanette Delgado


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The opening track on the Greenville quartet REdEFIND’s new EP “Raw,” “Nowhere to Run,” has all the earmarks of numetal. Over a relentless beat and a brutal wall of guitars, singer Branden Knapp spits rhymes as much as he sings, and the song locks into a rhythm that draws just as much from hip-hop as it does from rock. But as the song continues, “Nowhere to Run” begins to twist and turn like a roller coaster, throwing some seriously intense prog-metal kinks into the track. It’s just a taste of the genre bending the band does throughout the EP. “I don’t really like to pigeonhole our sound,” says bassist Drew Porter. “I know we get the ‘nu-metal’ tag a lot because we play heavy music with a hip-hop influence and we have some rap vocals, but we really try to expand on that. We’re not just a onetrick pony; we pull in thrash, progressive and even some pop. Our sound is kind of a combination of everything.” Porter says the biggest challenge in recording the EP at Greenville’s Sit N Spin studio earlier this year was to simulate the level of energy the band puts out onstage. “That’s one of the hardest things for us, because a lot of what works for us

is our high-energy live show,” he says. “So in the studio we got all hyped up like we would be doing a show and record from the ground up. We wanted to create that same kind of feel. We tried to get everything down with that show feel, then go back and put the polish on afterwards. And then [engineer] Ben Scott at Sit N Spin Studios did a great job mixing and matching things.” The band’s current lineup has been in place less than a year, but Porter says that he’s never been as comfortable in any other iteration of the group, or any other he’s

“We’re not just a one-trick pony; we pull in thrash, progressive and even some pop. Our sound is kind of a combination of everything.” Drew Porter

been a part of. “I feel like this lineup is probably the most family feeling that I’ve had with any band I’ve played in,” he says. “Everybody’s on the same page. We’ve only been jamming with our guitar player since January, but when he came in,

«


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Pure Mountain Honey An evening with Asheville’s Honeycutters and Town Mountain brings bluegrass into the honky-tonk VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

On the surface, a joint tour between the bluegrass combo Town Mountain and the alt-country band The Honeycutters might seem like an odd fit. Town Mountain’s dizzying all-acoustic instrumental skills and tight vocal harmonies recall the great early bluegrass groups like The Stanley Brothers or Bill Monroe’s Bluegrass Boys, while The Honeycutters’ rougher brand of twangy heartbreak is perfect for the honky-tonk. But Honeycutters singer Amanda Anne Platt sees a lot of common ground between the two groups, starting with where they come from. “I’m not even sure we’ve ever played together before this,” Platt says. “We just go back a long way in the Asheville music scene; we’re friends in that way. And I think that we’re both bands with roots in more traditional forms of music. We can be put into genres, but at the same time, ‘Americana’ describes what both of us do. Obviously, Town Mountain plays bluegrass and The Honeycutters have origins in classic country, but we’re both very song-oriented. Town Mountain has three great songwriters that share the songwriting duties, and in The Honeycutters I’m all about the song.” The two bands will play Gottrocks on Saturday as part of brief tour called the Asheville Holiday Hang. The Holiday Hang began five years ago as a one-show benefit for the MANNA Foodbank but expanded to multiple dates for the first time this year. “I wish I could take more credit for it,” Platt says, “but Town Mountain called us up back in May and asked if we wanted to be part of the Asheville show at Grey Eagle. We knew the show and we knew it

always benefitted the MANNA Foodbank, and we said, ‘Yeah, of course.’ We always love to play shows with our friends. And when we noticed that we didn’t have any dates around that show, we figured why not prolong it and make one show into four?” Platt doesn’t mention it, but another thing the two groups have in common is that they’re both experiencing new highs in their respective careers. Town Mountain recently played some shows with bluegrass titan Peter Rowan, and their latest album, “Southern Crescent” was produced by four-time Grammy winner Dirk Powell. And The Honeycutters’ fourth album, “On the Ropes,” spent 19 weeks on the Americana Radio Chart, remaining in the Top 20 for 11 weeks. Platt’s sleepily sensual voice and incisive lyrical perspective have garnered comparisons to Lucinda Williams, but her words can be a double-edged sword when she writes songs about heartbreak; Platt says people often think she’s writing about her own life. “But it’s funny,” she says, “Because I do it, too! I’ve caught myself listening to a new song that seemed like a troubled love song, and I thought, ‘Oh no, I hope their marriage is OK!’ And I do write about myself to an extent; I use my own experiences past or present to drive any song I write. But often the story is something that I got from somebody else, or just made it in my imagination.” “On the Ropes” is the second album Platt has recorded with the same band lineup (mandolin player Tal Taylor, guitarist Matt Smith, bassist Rick Cooper and drummer Josh Milligan), and she says that time together has built up a level of trust between the players. “These guys know

Honeycutters

me,” she says. “They know my aesthetic. They know my songs, and they have their own ideas that they bring to the table. It makes the music more interesting and better and stronger. I’ve been learning a lot more about collaboration and being open. That’s what so cool about letting go of the reins a little bit.”

The Honeycutters & Town Mountain When: Saturday, Dec. 17, 8 p.m. Where: Gottrocks, 200 Eisenhower Drive Tickets: $12 (general)/$20 (VIP sections) Info: 235-5519; gottrocksgreenville.com

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we felt like we’d been playing with him for years. It was an instant click. We started writing immediately and collaborated really well.” REdEFIND will be playing an EP-release show at the Radio Room in Greenville on Saturday, and they’re bringing along an equally heavy band called Amnesis to help them out. “They’re good friends of ours from Asheville,” Porter says. “We swap shows a lot. We’re actually playing a warm-up show with them the night before our show here in Asheville. The sound’s a little different, but I think fans of ours could be fans of theirs, as well.”

And the bands will be helping out a good cause, as well. “We’ll be working with Toys for Tots,” he says, “which I’m really looking forward to. We’re hoping a lot of folks will come and bring in toys for the Salvation Army to come pick up.”

REdEFIND, w/ Amnesis & Tone When: Saturday, Dec. 17, 9 p.m. Where: Radio Room, 2845 N. Pleasantburg Drive Tickets: $5 (over 21)/$7 (under) Info: 263-7868, radioroomgreenville.com

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34 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.16.2016

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CULTURE Ticket Alerts EARTH, WIND & FIRE Peace Center, March 25, 8 p.m. Tickets on sale Dec. 16, 10 a.m. Earth, Wind & Fire, America’s seventh top-selling musical group of all time, was born in Chicago in 1969. They have released a total of 23 albums and have recorded eight No. 1 R&B singles and eight double platinum Top 10 Pop Albums.

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Tickets for the March 25 performance are $65– $95 and may be purchased by calling 864-4673000 or 800-888-7768, in person at the Peace Center Box Office or online at peacecenter.org. VIP ticket packages are also available. Handling fees will apply to phone and online sales.

CHICAGO Peace Center, March 19, 7:30 p.m. Tickets on sale Dec. 16, 10 a.m. Chicago is the first American rock band to chart Top 40 albums across six decades. The band has toured every year since the beginning, with 2017 marking the band’s 50th consecutive year of touring, all without missing a single concert date. The lineup includes original members Robert

Lamm on keyboards and vocals, Lee Loughnane on trumpet and vocals, James Pankow on trombone and Walt Parazaider on woodwinds. Tickets for the performance are $65–$95 and may be purchased by calling 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768, in person at the Peace Center Box Office or online at peacecenter.org. VIP ticket packages are also available. Handling fees will apply to phone and online sales.

STEVE WINWOOD Peace Center, May 9, 7:30 p.m. Tickets on sale now For more than five decades, Steve Winwood has remained a primary figure in rock ’n’ roll, a respected innovator who has helped to create some of the genre’s most celebrated achievements. Inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2004 and listed among Rolling Stone’s “100 Greatest Singers of All Time,” Winwood remains one of the most important and influential artists in all of popular music. Tickets for the May 9 performance are $45–$75 and may be purchased by calling 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768, in person at the Peace Center Box Office or online at peacecenter.org. Handling fees will apply to phone and online sales.

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This is an opportunity to live in a first time offered custom home with complete privacy in Simpsonville’s prestigious Harrison Hills! Each home in the community sits on a minimum of 5 acres. Upon entering the large foyer, you will be awed when you experience the dramatic great room with a vaulted wood ceiling and large welcoming fireplace. Owners have recently renovated all bathrooms and remodeled the fabulous kitchen, with all the bells and whistles! Off of the kitchen is a wonderful screened in porch that overlooks beautifully landscaped grounds, the grilling deck, and fire pit.

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Home Info Price: From the high $200s to the high $400s Info: Enjoy the benefits of maintenance-free living on one level with a selection of award-winning floor plans HOA Services Provided: All lawn maintenance, irrigation, mulch applications, weed control, leaf removal, gutter repairs, pressure washing, exterior paint, driveway and sidewalk repair, roof repairs and termite bond Agent: Levi Weisser 864-207-8094 | Levi@NewStyleCommunities.com

ASK ABOUT YEAR-END SPECIALS ON MARKET HOMES So, you’ve been thinking about what life would be like without the hassles of yard work and home maintenance. We understand. If you’re like most of our home buyers, you’ve been thinking about “right-sizing” your next home for a long time. But you don’t want to sacrifice quality and you don’t want to compromise on features. We understand. You need to check out The Villas at Carriage Hills and West Georgia where architecture and natural beauty intersect with a no-maintenance platform where all exterior maintenance is handled by others – giving you the freedom to enjoy your free time.

We’ve designed Carriage Hills and West Georgia with a quaint and intimate streetscape – combined with charming architectural elements and high-quality construction practices. The well-coordinated community will be one-of-a-kind for the residents of Greenville. You’ll soon discover the benefits of maintenance-free living and the convenience of having all of life’s amenities right outside your front door. You’ll have no need for a lawn mower, edger, hedge trimmer or leaf blower. These services will now be handled by someone else. It’s time for you to enjoy the Maintenance-free Lifestyle.

Dreaming of living in downtown Greenville? As a downtown resident, I can help to make your dream come true!

“It’s not about the transaction, it’s about the relationship.”

Cynthia Serra, REALTOR | 864-304-3372 | cserra@cbcaine.com


38 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.16.2016

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HOME Put Your Apron On

with Emily Yepes

‘Tis the Bourbon Season Any self-respecting Southerner knows that every season is bourbon season. From summery mint juleps to holiday eggnog, there is always a seasonally appropriate cocktail for consuming our liquor of choice. But the holidays are when the bourbon-drinking tradition becomes a nightly affair for me. It started during my first Christmas as a married woman — we married early in November, and after the honeymoon I sat down by the tree, bourbon-spiked eggnog in hand, and wrote thank-you cards for our wedding gifts. I wrote a few per night with the goal of finishing before the New Year. This is when I realized that a winter bourbon cocktail is even more pleasurable to drink when surrounded by the twinkle of Christmas lights, the smell of the tree and the warming comfort that comes with the anticipation and execution of a holiday ritual. I know I’m not alone in savoring the entire routine, from the opening of the bourbon bottle to taking that very last sip. An excerpt from Roy Blount Jr.’s “Ode to Bourbon” essay in Garden & Gun is worth sharing: “A cork is a great thing in a whiskey bottle for the pleasure of pulling it out. Let’s see if I can spell the sound: f-toong. That’s if you pull it straight out. If you give it a little twist as you pull it, there’s a squeak — no, a chirp, a tweet even — that drowns out the f and even the t.... Sort of squeeoong.” These are the sounds that make the holidays just a little bit more magical. The sounds that herald a soul-hugging cocktail in the making. The recipe here is for a bourbon cider cocktail. Beyond being a regular

in the nightly drink rotation, it’s also my signature cocktail for all holiday entertaining, from Thanksgiving through New Year’s. Just three ingredients blend beautifully into smooth, festive flavor: apple cider, lemon juice and bourbon. I am loyal to R.W. Knudsen’s Cider and Spice (available at most grocery stores) because there’s no added sugar, just the sweetness from the apples, brewed with cinnamon, allspice, cloves and orange in perfect proportion. It’s just the right amount of sweetness and spice to balance the lemon juice and bourbon. Before this year, I would have insisted upon squeezing real lemons for the juice. In fact, this recipe in my family cookbook says, “Do not use bottled lemon juice. It will ruin your drink!” That’s true of the yellow, lemon-shaped plastic squeeze bottles, but I was forced to find a great bottled lemon juice this holiday season because making a cocktail while holding an infant is that much harder when juicing lemons is involved. It turns out that Santa Cruz Organics makes a quality bottle of 100 percent lemon juice (not from concentrate), which is welcome news for anyone wishing to scale up the recipe for entertaining. Cheers! Emily Yepes is an advertising representative at Community Journals and a fitness instructor at Barre Evolution and RevUp Indoor Cycling. She is “just” a home cook whose favorite hobby is to test and perfect recipes for her annual family cookbook.

Bourbon Cider Cocktail (by Martha Stewart)

• ¾ cup apple cider (recommend R. W. Knudsen’s Cider & Spice) • 1/3 cup bourbon • 2 tablespoons lemon juice (fresh-squeezed, or Santa Cruz Organic’s bottled lemon juice) Instructions Shake with ice, then serve over ice. Garnish with lemon rind, a shaving of fresh ginger or a sprig of rosemary if you’re feeling fancy.


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HOME Featured Neighborhood

Coventry Simpsonville, SC

Home Info Price: $209,900-$300,000’s Amenities: Swimming Pool, Craftsman Style Homes Schools: Simpsonville Elementary, Hillcrest Middle, and Hillcrest High Contact Information: Stan McAlister | 864.292.0400 stan@builderpeople.com

SK Builder’s welcomes you to Coventry – our newest community in the Simpsonville area comes complete with a community swimming pool and ample common area. Choose from over 20 home sites to build your perfect SK home. Standard upgrades Included in this community: 9 foot ceilings, 12x12 patio, double sinks in master bedroom, cultured marble vanities, hardwoods in entry, fireplace with gas logs, fiber cement siding, upgraded paint package, granite countertops, and many more features that distinguish an SK Builder’s home.

Choose to build your home with the largest local builder in the Upstate. SK Builders and McAlister Realty are focused on your complete home-building experience. Family owned and operated for over 25 years, we understand residential construction which enables us to anticipate your concerns during the build. From the homes and locations offered, the quality of materials and workmanship, and the customer service you get along the way – we make home construction an enjoyable process.. We’re not just building homes – We’re Building a Way of Life.

Real Estate News

Allen Tate Announces December Winner’s Edge Graduates – Upstate Allen Tate Realtors, the Carolinas’ leading real estate company, has announced that the following individuals have graduated from the company’s Winner’s Edge training in the Upstate region: Tim Dunham, Jessica Lee, Ivonne Wilson – Greenville-Woodruff Road Brett Shone – Greer Melissa Johnson, Rosalyn Western – Simpsonville Exclusively for  Allen Tate  Realtors,  Winner’s Edge  is a required, comprehensive real estate training program. The curriculum includes the latest in national real estate trends, technology, license law, sales and marketing techniques, integrated with detailed information about the local real estate market. As a result of this intensive course of study, Realtors are equipped with the latest tools in the industry in order to serve their clients in a knowledgeable, caring and professional manner.  Since 1957,  Allen Tate  Realtors has focused on the needs of consumers by providing

one-stop shopping with choices in branches located in communities throughout the Carolinas.

Wilson Associates Real Estate proudly announces the addition of Mary Allison Zimmerman, Realtor Associate

We are excited about our continued growth and excellence is our standard. Passionate, personable, and incredibly business savvy, Mary Allison Zimmerman is driven for success and client satisfaction at every level. Her strong business acumen and expansive network are the product of her background as a marketing consultant and business owner. A seventh generation Greenvillian, Mary Allison enjoys strong ties to the Upstate commercial and residential real estate markets, and is a fantas- Zimmerman tic resource and advocate for buyers and sellers alike.


40 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.16.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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SOLD: Greenville Transactions For the week of November 14 – 18, 2016 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$38,500,000 $22,150,000 $3,500,000 $2,858,525 $2,200,000 $1,500,000 ROCKWOOD $1,344,150 THE ENCLAVE AT THORNBLADE $1,000,000 COLLINS CREEK $910,000 CLIFFS VALLEY $895,000 COBBLESTONE $850,000 IVEY SQUARE HORIZONTAL PROP REGIME $800,000 $780,000 $720,000 DEERLAND PLANTATION $657,500 CLAREMONT $655,000 KILGORE PLANTATION $619,900 $601,884 BRAYDON@HOLLINGSWORTH PARK $598,000 $590,391 $553,734 GARRENTERRA $530,000 TUXEDO PARK $511,652 MONTEBELLO $510,000 $474,500 THE RICHLAND $458,000 FIVE FORKS PLANTATION $457,000 ROCKWOOD $431,340 ASHETON LAKES $420,000 FIVE FORKS PLANTATION $407,370 $399,760 BELHAVEN VILLAGE@HOLLINGSWORTH $394,165 STONEHAVEN $393,000 LANNEAU DRIVE HIGHLANDS $382,500 BOTANY WOODS $382,000 BELHAVEN VILLAGE@HOLLINGSWORTH $380,247 COACHMAN PLANTATION $375,751 STONEHAVEN $369,000 STONEFIELD COTTAGES $352,786 COURTYARDS ON W GEORGIA RD $352,000 MOORCROFT $350,000 $349,900 $345,000 MOUNT VERNON ESTATES $345,000 COOPER RIDGE $335,536 HILLSIDE PLANTATION $335,000 VALLEY AT TANNER ESTATES $334,000 KILGORE FARMS $330,077 CURETON CORNERS $327,500 FOX HOLLOW FARMS $325,000 SILVER MEADOWS $323,020 COACHMAN PLANTATION $317,000 LOST RIVER $316,514 MCBEE STATION RESIDENTIAL $315,000 COPPER CREEK $312,144 GOWER ESTATES $310,000 THE EDGE ON NORTH MAIN $307,000 TIMBERLAKE $299,777 CASTLE ROCK $299,000 $290,000 WALNUT RIDGE $287,000 SHENANDOAH FARMS $285,000 CHANTICLEER $285,000 FORRESTER HEIGHTS $285,000 $283,000 THE TOWNES AT HIGHGROVE $282,500 COLLINS CREEK $282,500 WHITEHALL PLANTATION $280,000 SADDLEHORN $275,000 SHENANDOAH FARMS $273,000 $272,038 CREEKWOOD $263,900 KELSEY GLEN $262,484 HUNTERS RIDGE $261,886 AMBER OAKS FARM $261,339 CAMERON CREEK $261,000 STONELEDGES $259,000 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $258,358 STONEWYCK $258,000 WINDSTONE $253,000 NEELY FARM - DEER SPRINGS $252,000 ROPER MEADOW $250,000 GREEN AVE REVITALIZATION $250,000 SHERWOOD FOREST $247,500 THE ENCLAVE AT LISMORE $245,368 DEVENGER PLACE $245,000 AUGUSTA RD HILLS $245,000

TERRA PARKGREEN LLC ENCLAVE GRANDVIEW LLC GEORGIA CAPITAL LLC GARRETT MARY FRANCES E PASSCO GREER PIEDMONT LL GVILLE CO SCHOOL BARNETT DOTSIE S REVOC T MCCALL JAMES D MACKIE COLLIN D AMES MARSHALL A JR REVOC HARMS SAMUEL D III TRUST REEVES JUDY P QTIP TRUST BOB JONES UNIVERSITY INC GREENE MARTIN A ELLENBURG VICKIE BENSON KING ALAN C (JTWROS) SCHMOTZER PAMELA A ARBORS AT FAIRVIEW APART SULLIVAN LISA JANE ARBORS AT FAIRVIEW APART ARBORS AT FAIRVIEW APART SMITHYMAN JOSEPHINE B MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH SHERARD THOMAS A EVANS KATHRYN G (JTWROS) GROOMS LINDSEY BROOKS AARON M (JTWROS) MAXWELL JAMES ALBERT JR HARDY KELLY C NVR INC SOU REG IND REA INC THE NVR INC FAITH KENNETH W II HILL DARRELL T MAGUIRE DAWN L REVOCABLE NVR INC MUNGO HOMES INC PIECHOWIAK JASON WAYNE ( ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC VIRANI LLC VALENTE KELLY ASHFORD JOHN P KLASING JOHN C (JTWROS) PEEK DEBORAH S (JTWROS) D R HORTON INC MARTINS JOHN (JTWROS) GAMBONE ALLISON B (JTWRO MERITAGE HOMES OF S C IN FIEVET CHARLES J (JTWROS BURCHETT LINDY J COBBLESTONE HOMES LLC D R HORTON INC MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH MOXIE LINDSAY D MUNGO HOMES INC LACY WILLIAM R JACKSON PHILIP G (SURV) GENDLIN HOMES LLC KERSKI MICHAEL BOYER CHRISTOPHER LEE (J ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC BRADHAM MARK A NEWSOM CAROL C REVOCABLE YU MINGYE COOPER CHARLES ROBERT REINERT PETER E CAMPBELL RAYMOND N PEDERSEN JOSHUA D TAGUE TERRI S REHBERGER STEPHEN A ARBORS AT FAIRVIEW APART GILREATH MATTHEW J NVR INC SK BUILDERS INC SK BUILDERS INC D R HORTON - CROWN LLC SMITH DAVID A ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC MATHEWES DANA COX WAYNE HOUSTON SICKLER ROBERT L SANDERS PHILIP W PRINDLE DANIEL JAMES (JT ALLSTON LACEY M (JTWROS) EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL CUNNINGHAM LEE N (JTWROS WHELCHEL JANETTE LEE

BUYER

ADDRESS

SUBD.

TWO GREENVILLE PARK LP 6520 DORCHESTER ROAD LLC BON SECOURS ST FRANCIS H BRAXTON RIDGE LLC HALPERN ENTERPRISES INC TINDAL HOLDINGS LLC GODFREY RIDGE LLC VREELAND HOLLY M MIMS GREG F WIELICKI BARBARA S (SURV BADINSKI MOUHAMAD (JTWRO LANSPRING LP 5 X HOLDINGS LLC BEE SAFE SUBER ROAD LLC STANHOPE ANGELA M (JTWRO OSISEK DIANE G (JTWROS) PEARSE SUZANNE V (JTWROS ARBORS AT FAIRVIEW APART FUNK ALLEN M (JTWROS) ARBORS AT FAIRVIEW APART ARBORS AT FAIRVIEW APART SMITH CYNTHIA J (JTWROS) STOVALL JUSTIN (JTWROS) WILLIAMS EDWARD M NOCITO RACHEL M BINGHAM DOUGLAS M FURMANEK DOUGLAS (JTWROS GODFREY RIDGE LLC YANG XUEZHONG VELAETIS LOUIS WASTE INDUSTRIES LLC MOSS DANIEL (JTWROS) TAYLOR CRYSTAL D (JTWROS MEANS ALEXANDER M (JTWRO SARLES KELSEY C (JTWROS) WISNER MARY ANNE (JTWROS LUNA LAURA HOY ADAM J (JTWROS) NORMINGTON DALE A GREENE HEIDI L (JTWROS) TESTERMAN TROY GUERRA BRAND H REYNOLDS CAMERON COLCOLO TEAGUE JEAN ANN (JTWROS) GUILLEN VLADIMIR (JTWROS FERGUSON REBECCAR (JTWRO REMI ANNETTE J (JTWROS) ORUBO DIEPRIYE STEPHEN ( LAMOUREUX DEBRA LEAPARD RONNIE L ROBERTSON JONATHAN E (JT DAVIS ANDREW A (JTWROS) VICKS ADRIENNE (JTWROS) SCHULTZ MICHELE (JTWROS) GILLEN PATRICK PENNY KATHERINE LEE (JTW SMITH STEPHANIE A VOGT JAMES J MUELLER GEORGIA W (JTWRO DANNIBALE JOHN (JTWROS) HYJEK ANNA (JTWROS) GUADARRAMA ANNE E (JTWRO ERWIN RICHARD BROOKS CATRON DAVID E CARNELL WILLIAM F JR KEITH ROBIN R CAMPBELL RAYMOND N ADKISON CHRISTINA M (JTW TUCKER LINDSAY BOOTH DESIREE ANGELIQUE ARBORS AT FAIRVIEW APART STAFFORD ADAM MARTENS ROBERT W (JTWROS CONNELL JAMES E (JTWROS) SHARPLESS JAMES M (JTWRO NICHOLS ERICA L (JTWROS) PINELL BELINDA S (JTWROS SANFORD DARLEEN L (JTWRO BOBBY VINEETHA HULTSTRAND KATHERINE ROBERTSON AMY JO (JTWROS NACRELLI DAVID M FIEDLER ALEX D HOPPE JOHN G VARANASI SRIKANTH (JTWRO DEAMICIS GENE E (JTWROS) BARRIC HOMES LLC

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PEBBLE VALLEY $244,900 RUNION ESTATES $243,813 MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS $243,401 FOREST HILLS $240,000 ANSLEY CROSSING $236,900 POINSETT CORNERS $236,500 NEELY FARM - DEER SPRINGS $231,000 OAKFERN $228,500 SILVERLEAF $226,512 HOLLYVALE $225,000 BRENTMOOR $224,750 PINEWOOD ESTATES $223,000 RIVERSIDE COMMONS $220,890 HAMPSHIRE HILLS $210,000 FAIRWAY VIEW $210,000 FOX TRACE $210,000 PEBBLECREEK $209,900 DEVENGER POINTE $209,000 SUMMER WOOD $207,000 FAIRVIEW POINTE $203,000 THE HEIGHTS $202,400 VALLEY HAVEN ACRES $201,900 $200,000 WAGON CREEK $199,900 COACH HILLS $199,000 $199,000 PEBBLE CREEK VILLAGE $198,610 FORRESTER WOODS $197,607 $197,500 ROSEMONT $197,500 HAMPTON FARMS $196,051 THE TOWNES AT FIVE FORKS $194,700 GREENS AT ROCKY CREEK $192,500 IVYBROOKE $192,000 EASTRIDGE $192,000 SHADOW CREEK $190,000 BRENTMOOR $188,000 HUDDERS CREEK $187,900 WATERMILL $185,209 GRAY FOX RUN $185,000 CANEBRAKE $185,000 MEADOWBROOKE $185,000 WEBSTER ESTATES $180,000 SPARROWS POINT $180,000 KNOLLWOOD HEIGHTS $179,900 WEXFORD $179,900 WYNDHAM PLACE $179,900 WHISPERING OAKS $176,999 WHISPERING OAKS $175,739 GARDENS@BRIDGES CROSSING $175,000 PIEDMONT PARK $174,900 GRIFFIN PARK $174,745 THE LANDING @ HARTS LANE $173,500 STEEPLECHASE $170,000 THE FARM AT SANDY SPRINGS $167,555 ENCLAVES@BRIDGES CROSSING $167,000 MOUNTAINBROOKE $167,000 $166,900 $165,000 BROOKSIDE $165,000 TWIN CREEKS $163,000 GLASTONBURY VILLAGE $163,000 THE GROVE $162,500 RIVERSIDE CHASE $161,900 LAUREN WOODS $160,000 REVIS FALLS $159,988 BROOKSIDE $159,000 $159,000 WATERMILL $157,758 CANEBRAKE $155,000 CRESCENT CREEK $155,000 DEL NORTE $155,000 WESTWOOD $154,500 $153,900 $151,500 $150,000 WALKER ESTATES $150,000 $150,000 WATERFORD PARK $149,600 FAIR HEIGHTS $145,000 VALLEY HAVEN ACRES $145,000 $145,000 FOXDALE $145,000 GREEN FOREST $145,000 ROLLING HILLS $144,000 WATERFORD PARK $143,000 RICHMOND HILLS $143,000

PRICE SELLER BREIL MEGHAN RAHCAEL (JT DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL NVR INC SERRUS REAL ESTATE FUND LARUE PAUL E (JTWROS) BROOKS CLARK A KELLY ANGELA BURNETT WEAVER BRENDA M SC UPSTATE HOUSING LLC HILL EUNICE M JONES JOANNE R (JTWROS) GIORDANO FAMILY IRREVOC NVR INC CARTER CHRISTIAN A (JTWR MORGAN STANLEY MORTGAGE MILLER CHARLES D (JTWROS CRAFT JESSICA ELAINE BAR GARRETT WESLEY G PURDY MYRN H JOHNSON DEKOVEN RONERIC ARGO CHADWICK A MARK THOENNES BUILDERS L BLUE BLOCK ENTERPRISES L KEY PROPERTY HOLDINGS LL PRESLEY ALISSA B RIVER FALLS LODGE LLC AMBRIA PROPERTIES LLC MAXWELL NICHOLE M (JTWRO WEST WILLIAM EARL OAKLEY JOY D SK BUILDERS INC MARK III PROPERTIES INC MICHAUD KRISTEN (JTWROS) FRITZ JAMES P HUNT GERALD P PADGETT NORMAN GREG SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND DOPPELHEUER CHRISTOPHER EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL LOOK-UP HOLDINGS LLC HAGA HOLLY A (JTWROS) SEJMAN MARILYN S ROGERS KESHA ADKISON CHRISTINA M LESIAK SCOTT M LEPPARD BRYAN BELL CYNTHIA G LIVING TR GREAT SOUTHERN HOMES INC GREAT SOUTHERN HOMES INC BISHOP ANGELA L (JTWROS) DISTINGUISHED DESIGN LLC EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL WALKER JARON D (JTWROS) HART SALLY C SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND DARCY JANE M VILCHECK ARGIE AGUILAR SAMUEL E BANK OF TRAVELERS REST BARRETT CAROLYN W (L-EST NIGHTINGALE RYAN W MMO PROPERTIES LLC DIXON LLOYD C JR (JTWROS HOLDEN-JACKSON TAMMY LAUREN WOODS CIRCLE LLC THOMAS VALERIE TRIBEC CORP BLISSFULL HOMES LLC EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL ELBAYOUMI MOHSEN A COLEMAN SHAWN YANICK JOSEPH S REVOCABL ALEXANDER SUSIE VOYLES GLORIA A THOMPSON STEPHEN HOWARD M KENNETH JR PENNINGTON CHRISTOPHER R BAKER JOHN L DAVIS SUSAN OWENS ELIZABETH B JOYAL FRANCES TANT JONATHAN COREY BROCKMAN SHANNON M ENGROOS CHRISTY (JTWROS) PRUITT RACHEL CLICK (JTW PRYOR MELISSA H BENNETT ROBERT E JR

BUYER

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COMBS BRANDON RICHARD JONES DOROTHY B REVOC TR SCHWAB MEGAN (JTWROS) BEATTIE WILLIAM F GALICIA NORMA E TARPY KATHLEEN E EMMERSON MAUREEN BURNESS CRAIG M (SURV) FIASCHETTI PAUL SHIMARY TATYANA HANEY JANICE F BERZINS DEVIN A (JTWROS) DOZIER KALISHA L (JTWROS CARSON KEITH J (JTWROS) COLEMAN ADRIENNE CARFANG DENNIS R (JTWROS VARGA ELIZABETH T (JTWRO WRIGHT ANDY WISE CARNEGIE E (JTWROS) MARTIN COREY T (JTWROS) BRICE ROCHELLE L BROWN KEVIN L GRANDSOUTH BANK SNEED COURTNEY MOORE DANA N MIDDLE SALUDA LLC LATTIN CHARLES T JR (JTW SNYDER HOLLY THEODORE (J WALTERS CHARLES W JR (JT COX JADE S GAFFNEY KATHERINE S (JTW NVR INC TRONCONE KAREN (JTWROS) STOLLER SCOTT H COCCIOLONE JANE L (SURV) KIRK GENCY ELIZABETH FURINO CHRISTINE MARIE SMITH DORIS J BARNES DAWN A (JTWROS) SHROPSHIRE ANN ZOHA CHRISTINA M PATRICK JULIE (JTWROS) JONES LAUREN BORKOWSKI JAMES E LEWIS ANGELA M HILL JONATHAN R (JTWROS) WEAVER BRENDA M WEAVER NANCY D VICKERY MARY C ALEXANDER HAROLD LUMPKIN TERRANCE BOYD JAMARO C PALMICASA CREEK LLC GAULT NIYA (JTWROS) BROWN JONATHAN R HOLMES JAMES K JR CARTER MERRILL W (JTWROS REED REGINALD A L KRISHNA INVESTMENT LLC GALLOWAY DANIEL W STEALI LAND LLC HARDING DWIGHT K ARAMBULO FRANCISCO A APPLEBY CHERYLANN M STEALI LAND LLC GARLIN JAMES R (JTWROS) PELLICCIO MARY STRIBLING KELLY CHRISTIAN (JTWROS) LOWE JAMES III MUMM SHAWN A BANK OF AMERICA NATIONAL GALLAGHER BRANDON (JTWRO ALLEN DARRELL ANDRE BAILEY JOHN WARREN WHITMIRE JOHN M WASH WORLD CAR WASH LLC TRASP AMBER (JTWROS) THOMAS MARK J (JTWROS) SACCHERE DOLORES GRAVES LOREN A PARKS CARLA J WHARTON TRAVIS S WEST GEORGIA ROAD HOLDIN ALBERT A JEANNINE ODELL VICTORIA DANIELLE BONNOITT HUGH E JR (JTWR SPEARMAN ANGELINA YVONNE

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HOME Featured Home

Stonehaven

6 Linfield Court, Simpsonville, SC 29681

Home Info Price: $465.000 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 3.5 Lot Size: 0.70 Acres

MLS#: 1321704 Sq. Ft: 3600-3799 Built: 1997

Schools: Monarch Elementary, Mauldin Middle, and Mauldin High Agent: Virginia Abrams | 864.270.3329 vabrams@cbcaine.com

Stately brick built in 1997 by a great local builder features double leaded front doors, arched windows and a widows walk. All hardwood floors on the first level and NEW carpet upstairs. The handsome study has French doors, built-in bookcases and computer space. This room would also be perfect for a music room with space for a grand piano. A formal dining is large enough for all of your holiday meals. The kitchen has cabinets galore, double ovens, granite counters and a built- in wine cabinet.

From the family room you have a very nice screen porch and large deck. The back yard is fenced and is a shady retreat during our warm summers. Storage is everywhere, even a walk-in cedar closet in the attic. Check out the size of the bonus room closet – room for kids to play or to store all of your Christmas directions. The four bedrooms are all large and have walk-in closets. This wonderful home located in the end of a cul-de-sac is waiting on your family. Stonehaven is a neighborhood with amenities and activities for everyone and it is in a superb school district.

SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

BUYER

ADDRESS

SUBD.

DUNWOODY OAKS VILLAGE COURT ORCHARD ACRES OAK KNOLL BONAIRE ACRES ROLLING MEADOWS ESTATES W.O. LEE HOLLY ACRES LAKEWOOD ON THE SALUDA SUPER HWY HOMESITES PONDER ROSA VILLAGE MONTEBELLO KNOLLWOOD HEIGHTS NORTH HILLS LEAGUE ESTATES NORTH PARK WESTWOOD KIRKWOOD HEIGHTS COMMONS AT BUTLER BELLE MEADE

$140,000 $140,000 $139,900 $135,000 $134,900 $134,000 $134,000 $133,000 $132,000 $132,000 $130,000 $130,000 $130,000 $126,200 $125,000 $123,000 $120,000 $120,000 $117,860 $117,500 $115,000 $115,000 $114,000

MOUNTAIN LAKE HOLDINGS L EVANS BETH E KEITH QUENTIN O BROOKS NORMA P ZAMBRANO JUAN OSVALDO PO EVANS JASON R (JTWROS) VIOLET P RHOADES TRUST OROZCO DUVAN A TORRES SPELLS CLIFTON L GETTY GEOFFREY G GFELLER CAMDEN W SIMMONS CATHY S (JTWROS) GOLIGHTLY KIMBERLY C (JT FLESHMAN MELONIE (JTWROS NORVELL FAMILY TRUST GEDIKOGLU YAMAN NORMAN F BRIAN BELL CYNTHIA G LIVING TR COUNDOUSSIAS GEORGIA HANEL CODY M DEWITT JOHN G (JTWROS) STEWART LESLIE ELIZABETH SOLOMON-WATT KYLE (JTWRO

107 HICKORY HILL LN 3 LANDFALL CT 126 VILLAGE CT 303 WATSON RD 101 KETCHITAN CT 106 WILSON RD 103 PINK DILL MILL RD 300 BUNCOMBE ST 500 DREW ST 37 SHORE DR 201 MERIDIAN AVE 124 WILLIAM RD 217 PONDER RD 520 MAHAFFEY RD 19 DONATELLO CT 101 ALBERMARLE DR 846 CLEVELAND ST PO BOX 33 1209 N MAIN ST 707 DAVENPORT RD 105 BIRCHWOOD DR 419 E BUTLER RD UNIT 25 845 PINE CREEK DR

NORWOOD HEIGHTS $113,291 VALLEY CREEK $108,900 SUNLIGHT HEIGHTS $108,500 ABIGAIL SPRINGS $108,000 $107,500 COACHMAN ESTATES $107,000 CAROLETON COVE $104,000 BRIARCREEK $103,000 PINEHURST $103,000 RICHMOND HILLS $100,000 NORTH HILLS $100,000 $100,000 HERITAGE COURT $99,900 AUGUSTA ACRES $98,000 TOWNES AT FOWLER $97,000 ROLLING GREEN $96,500 STANDING SPRINGS ESTATES $95,733 $94,500 BELHAVEN VILLAGE@HOLLINGSWORTH $89,440 $88,450 SPRINGVIEW $87,000 CATALINA ESTATES $85,000 MORNINGSIDE ROLLING GREEN $83,000

KRAMER ELMER R JR MCKAIG ROYSTON VILLAGE COURT TOWNES LLC SEXTON MICHAEL E GONZALEZ GUSTAVO PINZON VEHORN DORIS H (L-EST) CRUMP CAMERON APEX DEVELOPMENT SC LLC GARDNER KRYSTAL SEXTON CHRISTINE L KEARNEY JOHN J KNIGHT DREW W MUNOZ LILIANA KERR CHRISTINA B BLOOMER DANNELLE (JTWROS BATESON NORMAN E CALDWELL ABBIE G MCCULLEY BARBARA A COUNDOUSSIAS GEORGIA COX JACK L GRIZZLE INVESTMENT GROUP CASMAN ELIZABETH CARTEE TUTT ANTHONY W

PRICE SELLER S & S COLEMAN TRUSTEE WALKER HEATHER A (JTWROS KELLY CHRISTIAN (JTWROS) HABITAT FOR HUMANITY GVI GRIFFITH JEREMY L GREGG BILLY M NEWLANDS ASSET HOLDING T BUDDIN JASON (JTWROS) SWARTZ JAMES A DOCKERY JESSE WILLIAM (J RALLIS HOLDINGS LLC JEFFERSON STEPHEN E MARTIN JOAN ALTHEA (JTWR VALBUENA LILIANA DAVENPORT GEORGIA LOUCKS ROBERT L TRUSTEE JPMORGAN CHASE BANK N A BOIES DEBORAH L SHF VERDAE LLC LYNN SARAH ELLEN WHAM SHARON FOUSHEE STEPHEN KENT (JT MOSLEY AMY W

BUYER

ADDRESS

BANK OF AMERICA NATIONAL MUNOZ OMAR A AUSTILL HAROLD WAYNE OWENS GENELLE FULLER NAOMI R NEUGENT RICHARD C HUNTER LINDA (JTWROS) SMITH SARAH ELIZABETH ALLEN WILLENE GUILD MORTGAGE COMPANY HUGHES KATHRYN T (JTWROS ALEXANDER AUDREY MESHELL BOESCH BETTY E LANEY JAMES R JR DILLONS CONSTRUCTION CO MORSE EVELYN R (JTWROS) WARREN BIRAN LANIER JACQUELYN J NVR INC FOWLER DOUGLAS MICHAEL ( JONES BOBBY JOE II KNABLE CHRISTINE (SURV) PACE MARGARET (JTWROS)

55 BEATTIE PL STE 110 127 GOLF ST 79 EDITH DR PO BOX 1206 449 OSTEEN RD 5 CARRIAGE CT 35 N HENDERSON RD 51 BRIARRUN PL UNIT 8-B 6 STONECUTTER LN PO BOX 85304 105 NEAL ST 102 MCDONALD RD 3B HERITAGE CT 16 CHATHAM DR PO BOX 1331 408 LAKESIDE CIR 5115 MEADOWLAKE DR 113 PELHAM COMMONS BLVD 11 BRENDAN WAY STE 140 209 SNOW ST 11 FARLEY AVE 1 THORNCLIFF CT 5 WOODTRACE CIR


42 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.16.2016

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CALENDAR Furman University | 3300 Poinsett Highway $1,350 The Women’s Leadership Institute of Furman University is now accepting applications for the 2017 class. The series for 2017, themed “Reflection, Transformation and Self,” includes four half-day sessions and a graduation ceremony, all of which take place on the Furman University campus. Scholarships are available. Sessions are scheduled for 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Jan. 24, Feb. 22, March 23 and April 19. Graduation takes place May 4, 6-8 p.m. 294-3136 | bit.ly/2fkzdMq brad.bechtold@furman.edu

CONCERT

Greenville Concert Band presents “Sounds for the Season” Dec. 4 at 6 p.m. at Powdersville First Baptist Church Dec. 11 at 6 p.m. at White Oak Baptist Dec. 16 at 7:15 p.m. at Fellowship Greenville FREE These concerts feature a wide selection of music for the Christmas season. greenvilleconcertband.org

FRI

16

CONCERT

Angela Easterling Southern Culture 2537 N. Pleasantburg Drive

7:30 p.m. | FREE Angela Easterling plays a sunny brand of folk-rock with catchy pop choruses, and on her most recent album, “Common Law Wife,” she used that skill to document her transition from hard-touring musician to new mother. 552-1998 southernculturekitchenandbar.com

DEC. 16 The Cole Swindell Band Blind Horse Saloon 1035 Lowndes Hill Road 8 p.m. $15 in advance/$18 at the door The Blind Horse continues its streak of white-hot country shows with Cole Swindell, who started out writing hits for Luke Bryan and Craig Campbell and eventually became a performer, landing six consecutive Top 5 singles on the country charts. 228-7763 blind-horse.com

CONCERT

Silvermane with The Apartment Club & Total Astronaut Soundbox Tavern | 507 W. Georgia Road 9 p.m. Greenville’s Silvermane specializes moody, elliptical songs sprinkled with clever and cathartic lyrics focused on friendship, mortality and self-doubt. 228-7763

FRI-SUN

16-18

CONCERT

The Greenville Symphony Orchestra presents “Holiday at Peace” sponsored by United Community Bank Peace Concert Hall 300 S. Main St. Dec. 16 & 17 at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 18 at 3 p.m. $18-$39 Music and merriment abound with the Upstate’s favorite holiday-themed pops concert with Maestro Edvard Tchivzhel as conductor.

FRI-JAN

16-10

THEATER

“Prince Caspian”

The Academy of Arts Ministries | The LOGOS Theatre 80 Schools St., Taylors Dec. 16, 7-10 p.m.; Dec. 17, 2-5 p.m.; Jan. 5, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; Jan. 7, 2-5 p.m.; and Jan. 10, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. | $35-$45 If you enjoyed “The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe,” then you will not want to miss the featured production of our 2016-2017 season, “Prince Caspian.” This epic production will be making its first appearance worldwide on a professional level on the Logos Theatre stage and will bring you to the world of Narnia in a new and unforgettable way. 268-9342 | theAcademyOfArts.org information@theAcademyOfArts.org

DEC. 16-18

DEC. 16-18 THEATER

Furman Women’s Leadership Institute Accepting Applications

Celebrate the season with the GSO, International Ballet, Santa and Mrs. Claus and special guest star, acclaimed Broadway actress and singer Rachel York. 467-3000 | greenvillesymphony.org

THEATER

16

COMMUNITY

CONCERT

NOW THRU

“Miracle on 34th Street” Greenville Little Theatre Dec. 16-17 at 8 p.m. and Dec. 18 at 3 p.m. $25-35

The beloved holiday tale by Valentine Davies, made famous by the classic movie, is brought to life on the stage by the uplifting music of the Music Man himself, Meredith Willson. Rediscover your childhood and restore your faith in miracles in this funfilled musical classic for the whole family. The theater is collecting new, unopened presents during the run of “Miracle on 34th Street” for Toys for Tots. Donation boxes are in the lobby. greenvillelittletheatre.org 233-6238

“In the Next Room” (or the vibrator play)

The Warehouse Theatre 37 Augusta St. Dec. 16-17 at 8 p.m. Dec. 18 at 3 p.m. $30/$35 A finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, Sarah Ruhl’s comedy about marriage, motherhood and communication is set in the 1880s at the dawn of electricity where an innocent and gentlemanly scientist named Dr. Givings invents a new device to treat hysteria in women and men. It’s called a vibrator. When his latest patient brings her own complicated marriage and sufferings to the Givings’ home, Dr. and Mrs. Givings confront the fragility of their own union and discover the true depths of real love. 235-6948 | warehousetheatre.com

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CALENDAR

THEATER

NOW THRU

17

SAT

17

“Let Nothing You Dismay” Centre Stage | 501 River St.

SPORTS & REC

Boating Seminar: Mastering the Rules of the Road

Thurs.-Sat., 8 p.m. and Sun., 3 p.m. | $15-$30

Cabela’s | 1025 Woodruff Road

It’s Christmas in Ohio, and Kevin and Allie are a young couple about to become parents to an adopted child — they’re just waiting for a phone call. Although they’ve asked their families to keep their distance until they bring the baby home, their funny and fearsome relatives have vastly different plans in mind. This comedy is rated PG-13. centrestage.org

The seminar provides an explanation with examples of the 37 Rules of the Road for both the U.S. Inland Rules and the International Rules (COLREGS). It simplifies the sometimes complex law relating to boat operation for the recreational boater. It is a starting point for study preparation for the USCG License examination. upstateboatingcourse.org/seminars

9:30 a.m.12 p.m. | $10

CONCERT

DANCE

“The Nutcracker” by Greenville Ballet

Broken Testimony, Enthean, Rapheumet’s Well & Crow Hollar

Greenville Ballet Furman University, McAlister Auditorium 3300 Poinsett Highway

Ground Zero 3052 Howard St., Spartanburg 8 p.m.

3 p.m. | $26, $24, $22

After a long series of out-of-town metal shows, Ground Zero goes local, bringing in four ultraheavy doom metal bands from Easley, Greenville, Hickory and Morganton. 948-1661 reverbnation.com/venue/groundzero2

The Upstate’s oldest classical rendition of the holiday favorite “The Nutcracker” features Andrew Kuharsky’s award-winning choreography. 800-745-3000 | bit.ly/2fCsDQw

SAT-SUN

17-18

HOLIDAY

Storytime in Holiday Traditions

The Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. Saturdays, 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.; Sundays, 2 p.m. FREE with admission Stop by Holiday Traditions this weekend for a special storytime about holidays from around the world. tcmupstate.org

NOW THRU

18

THEATER

“Christmas in Dixie” Pelzer Auditorium 214 Lebby St., Pelzer

7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday; 3 p.m. on Sunday $10 general, $8 for seniors (age 65+), $8 for military, $7 for students (18 and under) Milltown Players presents this holiday show that includes 10 performers and a full band on stage. Tickets can be purchased online at the box office one hour before the show starts. Online sales close two hours before the show starts. Tickets will still be available at the box office. Doors to the auditorium open 30 minutes before the show starts. milltownplayers.org

FAMILY

Free Santa Photos at Cabela’s Cabela’s | 1025 Woodruff Road, Ste. H101 Noon-3 p.m. | Saturdays and Sundays FREE Santa is making a special stop at Cabela’s this year. Visit the store for free pictures with Santa. 516-8100

WED

21

FAMILY

Pickleball

Sterling Community Center 113 Minus St. 6-8 p.m. | Wednesdays thru Dec. 28 | $3 Pickleball is the fastest growing sport in America. The game combines elements of tennis, ping-pong and badminton. It is easy for beginners to learn and is a challenging, fast-paced, competitive game for more experienced players. There are hundreds of Pickleball players in the Upstate. New players are always welcome. Games go on every Wednesday night at Sterling Community Center (113 Minus St., Greenville, SC 29601) starting at 6 p.m. No paddle, no problem. Loaner paddles are available. Cost is $3 with the money going to Sterling. 603-3558 | Upstatepickleball.com

Mattie’s Second Chance

The heartwarming story of a dog who never gave up hope

«

Animal Care’s

Correspondent

I never knew life could be like this. For the first time I have a warm bed, plenty of food and more friends than I knew possible. It’s hard to believe that just a few months ago, my future seemed hopeless. My brother and I had spent most of our lives on a chain. One day our people stopped coming and so did the food. We were alone, hungry and scared. Four months went by before we were found. My brother had passed and there was nothing I could do to save him. I had to keep fighting. When they found me, I was barely breathing. I could tell by the look on my rescuers’ faces that my situation was dire. They said I was “abandoned” and “emaciated”. All I remember is that I was really hungry and really sick. But I immediately knew I was in good hands.

Mattie Before

Mattie Today

When I was brought to Animal Care, I could tell that my life was about to change forever. I’d always loved people but did not know they would love me back. I was fed, given medical attention and around-the-clock care. Instead of putting the chain back on, they gave me love, affection and my very own bed.

The next day, my new friends took me to get some tests. They said I had heartworm disease and a tumor. I overheard them saying that many places that take dogs like me in can’t afford the treatment for problems like these. Thankfully, they said that here at Animal Care, kind people like you donate money to help with that. I had the life-saving surgery I needed and my heartworms are being treated. Once I’m better I’ll be ready to find my forever family, and they’ll keep me healthy for life with heartworm prevention and regular visits to the vet. Because of the Animal Care staff, volunteers and friends like you, I will never know hardship again. I look and feel like a new dog! Life is looking good and I can’t wait to see who my new family will be. Maybe it will be you! Love and Doggy Kisses,

Donate to help build a no kill community in Greenville County.

Visit GreenvillePets.org


re-ignite the spark

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CALENDAR

DEC. 22-23 DANCE

44 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.16.2016

Carolina Ballet Theatre | Peace Concert Hall | 300 S. Main St. 7 p.m. Thursday1 p.m. and 7 p.m. Friday | $18-55 This Greenville-inspired version of “The Nutracker” has become a holiday tradition in the Upstate. Thursday night’s show will feature guest principals from Miami and New York City. The Friday performances will feature CBT principals. carolinaballet.org

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Locally Owned

864-520-1143 Shop online at

adamevegreenvillesc.com 1659 Woodruff Road, Suite D Greenville SC 29607

CBT’s “The Nutcracker: Once Upon a Time in Greenville”

THU

22

FAMILY

Storytime Thursday Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5

10:30 a.m. | FREE Celebrate Christmas by bringing your preschool children to Fiction Addiction for a storytime reading of the picture book “Santa’s Underwear” by Marty Rhodes Figley and illustrated by Marty Kelley. 675-0540 | fiction-addiction.com

CONCERT

Black River Rebels with Noveil and Silver Tongued Devils Radio Room | 2845 N. Pleasantburg Drive

LINGERIE • BACHELOR AND BACHELORETTE GIFTS • KNOWLEDGEABLE STAFF • GAMES

9 p.m. | $5 (over 21), $7 (under) The Rebels’ sound is a rough-and-ready brand of

rock that calls to mind late-period Social Distortion; the guitars are sharp, the rhythms are tight and the vocals are raw and guttural. 263-7868 | radioroomgreenville.com

THU-FRI

22-23

CONCERT

The Marcus King Band

Gottrocks | 200 Eisenhower Drive 9 p.m. | $12 The blues guitar phenom is barely old enough to buy a drink in the venues he typically plays in, but he’s been playing truly dazzling solos for more than a decade now. Fresh off a new Warren Haynes-produced album and a white-hot Fall For Greenville performance, King and his band are set for a two-night stand at Gottrocks. 235-5519 | gottrocksgreenville.com

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Crossword puzzle: page 50

Sudoku puzzle: page 50


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CALENDAR « CULINARY SUN

23

Southern Culinary Instructor and Author Marilyn Markel Book Signing & Tasting

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5 noon-2 p.m. FREE Southern culinary instructor Marilyn Markel and Southern history author Chris Holaday have combined their talents for their new book, “Southern Breads: Recipes, Stories and Traditions” (The History Press, paperback, $24.99). Meet Marilyn and taste samples of some of these historic Southern breads. 675-0540 | fiction-addiction.com

CONCERT

DJ Yuki’s Birthday Celebration Independent Public Ale House 110 Poinsett Highway 9 p.m. | $5 donation or a non-perishable food item or toy After a spectacular year of techno and electronica shows, IPA celebrates the season of giving with a nine-act blowout headed by rising deep-house DJ Yuki. 552-1265 ipagreenville.com

CONCERT

Darby Wilcox

CONCERT

DEC. 23

Ron Westray

CONCERT

Soul Sistas Aloft Downtown W XYZ Lounge 5 N. Laurens St. 8 p.m. | FREE An interesting clash of styles here: The Soul Sistas are Jamie Wright (leader of the Jamie Wright Band) and Whitney Walters (of Groove Planet). Wright sings in a particularly skillful R&B/soul-diva style, while Walters is more jazz and pop oriented. Should be fun to see them set off vocal fireworks and find musical common ground. 297-6100 | aloftgreenvilledowntown.com

SAT

24

FAMILY

Light of the World

Christmas Eve services at Springwell Church feature Christmas music and a message of hope and joy as parishioners and guests worship the One who still lights up the darkness. 268-2299 | springwell.org/ChristmasEve

VISUAL

10 x 10 = 100 - Small Works Exhibit of 100 Artists

Center for Creative Arts Village of West Greenville 25 Draper St. 9-5 p.m., Monday-Friday and 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Saturdays

Quest Brewing | 55 Airview Drive 6 p.m. | FREE

Working with bassist Samuel Kruer, singer/songwriter/guitarist Darby Wilcox has evolved over the past two years from a somewhat shy folk-singer to a confident, provocative performer who mixes deeply intimate material with a jazzier, more flexible delivery. 272-6232 | questbrewing.com

Blues Boulevard (Greenville) 300 River St., Ste. 203 8 p.m. $8 (plus $10 food/drink minimum)

Trombonist Ron Westray has had two remarkable parallel careers, one as a performing musician and another as an educator. As a player, he’s worked with the Mingus Big Band and the Wynton Marsalis septet, all while holding the Oscar Peterson Chair in jazz performance at York University in Toronto. 242-2583 bluesboulevardjazzgreenville.com

Steve Garner

During the holiday season approximately 100 local artists have created artworks measuring 10 by 10 feet for a special exhibit of original works that will be priced at $100 or less. These works are on display in the gallery at the Greenville Center for Creative Arts beginning Dec. 2. Many well-known local artists as well as emerging artists have generously provided works at a price sure to appeal to collectors and art lovers. 735-3948 artcentergreenville.org

VISA Gift Cards Christmas Club Savings Accounts Call 467.4160 or visit www.greenvilleheritage.com for more information on how to join.

3 & 5 p.m. | FREE

25

Skip-A-Pay

NOT A MEMBER? YOU CAN JOIN!

Springwell Church 4369 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors

NOW THRU

Christmas Loans

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75 Years


46 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.16.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CALENDAR « FAMILY THU

29

Storytime Thursday Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5

10:30 a.m. FREE Bring your preschool children to Fiction Addiction for a storytime reading of the picture book “What Color Is a Kiss?” by Rocio Bonilla. 675-0540 fiction-addiction.com

NOW THRU

31

VISUAL ART

Charlie Pate exhibit

Coldwell Banker Caine’s Main Street Real Estate Gallery 28 S. Main St. FREE Charlie Pate is a renowned Upstate painter and

Happy Holidays to Family and Friends

Independent Living Patio and Apartment Homes Assisted Living • Memory Care • Rehabilitation • Skilled Nursing Contact Ruth Wood at 987-4612 for more information.

www.RollingGreenVillage.com

1 Hoke Smith Blvd., Greenville • 864.987.4612

sculptor specializing in classical realism, preferring to paint landscapes or people and common objects in still life. Pate’s artwork will be available for purchase throughout its exhibition. 250-4676 cbcaine.com

VISUAL ARTS

“Recent Works: Sunsets and Fish” Hampton III Gallery Ltd. 3110 Wade Hampton Blvd.

Ste. 10, Taylors Tuesday-Friday 1 p.m. Saturday at 10 a.m.5 p.m. FREE Artist John Acorn’s recent mixed media work uses trailer nails, chrome, tape, paint and various other materials to create scenes from nature. 268-2771 hamptoniiigallery.com sandy@hamptoniiigallery.com

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CALENDAR

JAN

THU

05

LITERARY

“Lucky Lazlo” storytime

JAN. 23-MAR. 17 FAMILY

«

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5 10:30 a.m. FREE Bring your preschool children for a storytime reading of the picture book “Lucky Lazlo” by Steve Light. 675-0540 fiction-addiction.com

SAT

07

CONCERT

Biltmore | 1 North Pack Square, Asheville

Parmalee plays after Swamp Rabbit Game

In the early months of the year, Biltmore offers a peaceful retreat following the hectic pace of the holidays. Discover the great indoors in Biltmore House, America’s largest home. Explore the conservatory with complimentary guided tours of Biltmore’s extensive orchid collection, offered weekdays. Winter specials include lowest admission of the year. Tickets include a free audio guide of Biltmore House for a limited time. 800-411-3812 | biltmore.com

Bon Secours Wellness Arena 650 N. Academy St. Game begins at 5 p.m. $15-125 2016 Academy of Country Music nominee Parmalee will perform following the Greenville Swamp Rabbits hockey game. Special VIP ticket packages are available to purchase. VIP packages enable fans to have the opportunity to meet the band, take pictures and receive autographs during the first intermission. swamprabbits.com

NOW THRU

09

VISUAL ART

Roberto Cortez exhibit Centre Stage lobby 501 River St.

Tuesday-Friday, 2-6 p.m. FREE Cortez’s vibrant, colorful works will be on display through January.

THU

12

LITERARY

“I’m Going to Give You a Bear Hug!” storytime

Fiction Addiction | 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5 10:30 a.m. | FREE

You a Bear Hug!” by Caroline B. Cooney and illustrated by Tim Warnes. 675-0540 fiction-addiction.com

THU

19

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5

Dr. Mac Arnold’s Blues National Concert Series

10:30 a.m. FREE

Dr. Mac Arnold’s Blues 1237 Pendleton Street

Bring your preschool children for a storytime reading of the picture book “How Do Dinosaurs Choose Their Pets?” by Jane Yolen and illustrated by Mark Teague. 675-0540 fiction-addiction.com

8-11 p.m. $10 On Thursday, Jan. 12, from 8–11 p.m., national touring artist The Reverend Billy C. Wirtz will grace the stage of Mac Arnold’s Blues in Greenville. Reverend Billy C. Wirtz is a comic genius, gifted pianist and American musicologist who defies easy classification. “I like to think of myself as the Victor Borge of the blues,” states the Reverend, but Billy goes way beyond Borge both in scope of subject matter (from politics to social commentary) and, of course, in taste. In fact, no theme is too extreme, taboo or undignified for the Reverend, so long as it garners a good laugh. 558-0747 drmacarnoldsbluesrestaurant.com

13

THEATER

Eleanor Roosevelt, Chautauqua Talk led by Judith Prince Greenville Chautauqua Hughes Main Library 25 Heritage Green Place 7-8:30 p.m. FREE Kickoff event for Chautauqua’s Season “The

LITERARY

“How Do Dinosaurs Choose Their Pets?” storytime

CONCERT

FRI

Bring your preschool children for a storytime reading of the picture book “I’m Going to Give

Photo courtesy of The Biltmore Company

Winter at Biltmore

SUN

22

CONCERT

9 String Theory

Temple of Israel, sanctuary 400 Spring Forest Road 3-5 p.m. Power of Words.” Join an audience that loves to talk back to history led by Dr. Judith Prince whose life’s work has been inspired by Eleanor Roosevelt. Former vice chancellor and chief academic officer and professor at University of South Carolina Upstate, Dr. Prince’s Eleanor Roosevelt-inspired life work has been honored with the Leadership Greenville Distinguished Alumnae Award, YWCA Women of Achievement in Education Award, Rotary Club of Greenville Career Award, Calder D. Ehrmann Outstanding Individual Award for Diversity from the Riley Institute at Furman University, Women Making History Award and The Urban League Whitney M. Young Jr. Humanitarian Award. 244-1499 greenvilleCHAUTAUQUA.org

$20 adults/$5 children This unique collaboration of domra and guitar is a dazzling display of string virtuosity featuring Angelina Galashenkova, domra, and John Huston, guitar, in a varied program featuring Latin American rhythms, Russian Gypsy fire, Spanish flamenco and songs from America. This program will delight every musical taste, and the virtuosity of these artists is amazing. Free wine and cheese reception to meet the artists follows the performance. 292-1782 templeofisrael.org office@templeofisrael.org

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CALENDAR « LITERARY THU

26

“Pablo in the Snow” storytime Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

THU-FRI

26-27

EDUCATION

Register Now: Church Music Conference

SAT

28

FAMILY

SC Bar YLD host Family Fair in Greenville

Upstate Church 679 N. Harrison Bridge Road, Simpsonville

10:30 a.m.

Furman University 3300 Poinsett Highway

FREE

$40-95

FREE

Furman University Music Department will host its 2017 Church Music Conference on campus and other venues Jan. 26-27. Registration includes two days of conference sessions, a conference music packet and a Friday luncheon. Hosted by Furman music faculty members, the conference features two legends of American church music, André Thomas of Florida State University and John Ferguson, the now-retired professor of organ and church music at St. Olaf College. Together they will team up to provide two days of education sessions and musicmaking. A highlight of this year’s conference is Thursday evening’s Hymn Festival, which will be held in the sanctuary of Greenville’s historic First Baptist Church. Registration for the event is $75 on or before Jan. 6, and $95 after that date as space remains. Registration for full-time students is $40. 294-2086 bit.ly/2gxxKCv

(843) 284-9500 janthony@anthonyandmoore.com

Bring your preschool children for a storytime reading of the picture book “Pablo in the Snow” by Teri Sloat and illustrated by Rosalinde Bonnet. 675-0540 | fiction-addiction.com

10 a.m.-1:30 p.m.

FEB FRI

03

World any question your heart desires. And Eleanor will answer them. On Friday, Feb. 3, there will be a spectacular dessert reception and private showing of the Eleanor Roosevelt Show (portrayed by nationally acclaimed historical interpreter Susan Marie Frontczak). This oncea-year fundraising event supports Chautauqua’s year-round, free community shows. This is a limited seating event that has sold out every year. Reserve your tickets today. 244-1499 greenvilleCHAUTAUQUA.org

SAT-SUN

04-05

THEATER

An Evening with Eleanor Roosevelt, Opening Night Benefit Show Greenville Chautauqua Fine Arts Center on WHHS campus 102 Pine Knoll Drive

Eleanor Roosevelt, a Free Chautauqua History Alive show Greenville Chautauqua | Wade Hampton High School Auditorium 102 Pine Knoll Drive 2-3:30 p.m. FREE

7:309 p.m. $30 Picture this: You and Eleanor Roosevelt at an intimate party enjoying fabulous homemade desserts with a small group of avid Chautauqua fans. And being able to ask the First Lady of the

Get ready to laugh, cry and flat-out have a great time as you meet one of the most influential women in world history, Eleanor Roosevelt. Nationally acclaimed historical interpreter Susan Marie Frontczak creates a compelling portrayal that reveals Eleanor Roosevelt not only as a relentless voice for the powerless,

Get Carded for the Holidays With a donation of $50+ to the Metropolitan Arts Council you will receive an ArtCard entitling you to buy-one-get-one-free tickets to one performance at each of the following venues for one full year!

. Centre Stage . Greenville Chorale . Greenville Little Theatre . Greenville Symphony Orchestra . The Peace Center (select shows only) . South Carolina Children’s Theatre . The Warehouse Theatre

You can gift this amazing deal to your family members or friends this holiday season. The ArtCard pays for itself in just two uses making it a gift that keeps on giving.

.

.

.

16 Augusta Street Downtown Greenville (864) 467-3132 mac@greenvilleARTS.com Background photo from the Greenville Little Theatre’s production of All Shook Up.

THEATER

.

www.greenvilleARTS.com

«


12.16.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 49

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

CALENDAR

MAR

with fellow writers and best friends Cynthia Weil and Barry Mann to becoming one of the most successful solo acts in popular music history. Along the way, she made more than beautiful music; she wrote the soundtrack to a generation.

but also

SAT

04

467-3000 | 800-888-7768 peacecenter.org

CONCERT

FEB. 19 «

FRI-JUL

10-04

6-10 p.m. | $75 Please join us for the inaugural Plant A Dream: A Pajama Black Tie Soiree benefiting and hosted by the Barbara Stone Foundation. WYFF’s Geoff Hart will be the event’s emcee with The Erica Berg Collective spinning tracks, special performance by Centre Stage performers Taylor and Daniel Marlatt and GoodLife Catering serving up a menu set to impress. Help make dreams come true for our friends and neighbors with special needs and disabilities by wearing your finest pajamas on the red carpet. plantadream.info

Peace Center 7:30 p.m. | $65-$85

Book Club. He is also the author of “The Essential Lincoln, Speeches and Correspondence” as well as eight other books on Southern history. 244-1499 greenvilleCHAUTAUQUA.org

FAMILY

Designed for Drama: Fashion from the Classics

Plant A Dream: A Pajama Black Tie Soiree

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St.

ZZ Top’s Tonnage Tour

as a mass communications genius. Hear her speak for herself as she transforms the role of First Lady to become one of the most revered women of her generation. You’ll have lots of questions. And Eleanor Roosevelt will answer them because at Chautauqua, the audience is part of the show. Bring your stories. Share your experiences. Get inspired. Because it’s not just history — it’s personal. Sunday, Feb. 5, show will be sign interpreted. 244-1499 | greenvilleCHAUTAUQUA.org

FUNDRAISER

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE? Send your event information and images to calendar@ communityjournals.com by Wednesday at 5 p.m. to be considered for publication in the following week’s Journal.

Biltmore | 1 North Pack Square, Asheville The artistry of great literary works, costume design and movie making comes together in “Designed for Drama: Fashion from the Classics,” Biltmore’s new exhibition in Biltmore House. Inspired by George Vanderbilt’s love of literature, “Designed for Drama” showcases more than 40 award-winning movie costumes from films based on favorite books in his collection. 800-411-3812 | biltmore.com

TUE-SUN

21-26

THEATER

“Beautiful: The Carole King Musical”

Peace Center | 101 W. Broad St. | $35–$95

More than four and a half decades after their formation in the Houston area, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees ZZ Top are set to begin a new tour in 2017. 467-3000 or 800-888-7768 peacecenter.org

LEGAL NOTICE RATES ABC Notices

TUE

28

THEATER

Abraham Lincoln, Chautauqua Talk led by Dr. Vernon Burton Greenville Chautauqua Hughes Main Library 25 Heritage Green Place 7-8:30 p.m. FREE

“Beautiful: The Carole King Musical” tells the inspiring true story of King’s remarkable rise to stardom, from being part of a hit songwriting team with her husband, Gerry Goffin, to her relationship

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

Discuss the words of Abraham Lincoln with the author of “The Age of Lincoln.” Dr. Vernon Burton is a prolific author, an eminent Lincoln scholar — and, like Lincoln, tells a great story. For Dr. Burton, Southern history is personal. He grew up in Ninety-Six and graduated from Furman University. He is Clemson University creativity professor of humanities; professor of history, sociology and computer science; and director of the Clemson CyberInstitute. Dr. Burton’s “The Age of Lincoln” (2007) won the Chicago Tribune Heartland Literary Award for nonfiction and was selected for Book of the Month Club, History Book Club and Military

$165

All others

$1.20 per line 864.679.1205 • 864.679.1305 email: aharley@communityjournals.com

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that BANA Liquor Store and Party Shop LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1733 Piedmont Highway Suite A and B, Piedmont, SC 29673. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than December 18, 2016. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Vaccines, spay or neuter, testing & microchip included!


50 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.16.2016

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

Bed of Fish ACROSS

1 Santa — (desert winds) 5 Heroic tales 10 “iZombie” network 15 Marathoner’s statistic 19 Promote 20 Horror, e.g. 21 Prefix with gram or liter 22 Strong — ox 23 Start of a riddle 25 “That is to say ...” 26 Piper’s garb 27 AWOL part 28 Pat lightly 30 Short literary sketch 32 Riddle, part 2 38 Jailbird 39 Poet’s “always” 40 German’s “one” 41 Suffix with sucr- or lact42 Riddle, part 3 51 Starting point 52 Ike’s inits. 53 Cell stuff 54 Government loan agcy. 55 Runway user 56 Clumsy sort 58 Dollar pts. 60 He beat Romney 64 Riddle, part 4 70 “Look, I did it!” 74 Ostrich kin 75 Bohea, e.g. 76 That, in Chile

77 Oil gp. 78 Riddle, part 5 83 ’90s-’00s boy band 84 Thrice-spun-off TV show 85 Wimbledon unit 86 Swimming (in) 91 Sue Grafton’s “— for Evidence” 93 Mind-reading ability 95 Lilted syllable 97 “Hägar the Horrible” creator Dik 98 Riddle, part 6 104 Pitching whiz 105 Ballpark fig. 106 Prefix meaning “equal” 107 Syllable after “Mao” 108 End of the riddle 118 Merit the best score, maybe 119 Half of hexa120 See 45-Down 121 Lacking width and depth, for short 122 Els of golf 125 Riddle’s answer 129 Baseball team count 130 Actress Tierney 131 Plants used in first aid 132 Borscht vegetable 133 Anti-DUI org. 134 More sneaky 135 Flirty laugh 136 Probability

By Frank Longo DOWN

1 Slanting 2 Like free banking 3 Acoustic 4 Rock’s Perry 5 “I” problem 6 Chapel seat 7 Hotel’s kin 8 Set of beliefs 9 Roomy car 10 “No need to share all that,” in texts 11 That bloke 12 School pupil, in France 13 Actresses Bloom and Danes 14 Fancy shoes 15 George of “Star Trek” 16 “... true statement, correct?” 17 Dog or cat breed 18 Went inside 24 Ida. borderer 29 British TV network, with “the” 31 Tiny self-propelled machine 33 Clicked-on graphic 34 Bart Simpson, to Marge 35 With a sharp image, briefly 36 — -do-well 37 Long ditch 42 Marge Simpson, to Bart 43 — -Magnon

Hey Greenville,

THANK YOU

for making our 2016 Downtown Event Series a success!

events.greenvillesc.gov #whatsgoingongvl

44 Prefix with day or week 100 Soho locale 115 “— a drink!” 45 With 120-Across, 65 and 101 Left-leaning 116 Looked at provocatively older, e.g. 102 Ring around a castle 117 Swift homes 46 Sledding site 103 Pa. hours 123 Wrath 47 Work like — 109 Surrendered 124 Acoustic organ 48 Cherished by 110 Listless feeling 126 “So fancy!” 49 Ramble on 111 Yummy morsel 127 Peace gesture 50 Verboten act 112 Edge shyly 128 Nationality suffix 57 Feudal lands 113 Abbr. at LAX 59 Cubs hero Sammy 114 1990s fitness fad Crossword answers: page 44 61 Galaxy buy 62 Pal of Larry and Curly 63 Jets’ gp. by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan 65 Conifer with toxic seeds 66 Apple choice 67 Sipped on 68 Sex cell 69 Down vote 70 Earthy color 71 Muscles below pecs 72 Handyman’s initialism 73 Nixon’s veep 79 Actress Annabella 80 Not make the event in time, say 81 Other, in Chile 82 Delhi wear 87 Concave pan 88 Stupefy 89 NBC skit show since ’75 90 Kin of “Psst!” 92 Secondary details 94 Elegant 96 Voting 69-Down 97 Cordon — (chicken dish) 98 Particles composed of quarks Sudoku answers: page 44 99 South Pacific region Medium

Sudoku


12.16.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 51

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

BACK PAGE Community Voices

Past and Present with Courtney L. Tollison Hartness Ph.D.

THE PERFECT GIFT

Charlie Daniel marched for change On June 5, 1917, a young man from Anderson became one of the 24 million men who registered for the draft during World War I. Months later, Charles Ezra Daniel, more commonly known as Charlie, left The Citadel, where he had been enrolled on scholarship since 1916, and joined the U.S. Army.

historian Marcia Synnott has written that Daniel argued that “the state would benefit economically by fulfilling its ‘obligation to increase the productivity of our Negro citizens, to provide them with good jobs at good wages, and to continue to assure them of fair treatment.’” Historian Walter

Daniel was placed with Company B of the 51st Infantry of the 6th Division, which sailed for France from New York in July 1918. 2nd Lt. Daniel’s division was assigned to the Vosges sector, a mountainous area in eastern France near the border with Germany where French and German troops had been stalemated. They suffered neardaily German artillery attacks. In summer of 1919, Daniel returned to Anderson and took a position with Townshend Lumber. In 1924, he married Homozel “Mickey” Mickel. In 1934-5, Daniel founded a construction company based in Anderson. Daniel Construction, which moved to Greenville in 1941, won the government contract to build the Greenville Army Air Base (now known as Donaldson Air Field at the S.C. Technology and Aviation Center). In the years after the war, he and his wife established The Daniel Foundation as a means of giving to local hospitals, colleges and universities and churches. In the mid-1950s, Daniel was appointed to fill one of the state’s seats in the U.S. Senate. He served for four months in 1954, resigning in December of that year. In the late 1950s, he helped oversee the construction of a new Furman campus north of downtown Greenville, and he and his wife built White Oaks, a majestic home near the Furman campus. Other colleges and universities, such as Clemson, Converse and The Citadel, and more importantly the students who attend them, have also been recipients of Daniel philanthropy. Many of the structures he built and the scholarships and professorships they endowed bear his and his wife’s names. During that time, the American South was wrought with strife over social changes prompted by the civil rights movement. Many influential white men stood forcefully against change; few publicly endorsed acquiescence, and those who did typically did so only when faced with unacceptable alternatives. At the Hampton Watermelon Festival in July 1961, however, Daniel offered remarks that are now known among historians as the “Watermelon Speech.” Given years before passage of the Civil Rights Act, Daniel confronted desegregation head on, and in keeping with his strong commitment to South Carolina’s economic development, deemed that the issue “cannot continue to be hidden behind the door.” University of South Carolina

Courtesy of Special Collections and Archives, Furman University

Edgar has written that his remarks were “the first public indication that men in positions of power were willing to abandon segregation.” Daniel’s forthright remarks encouraged and emboldened other white civic and business leaders to follow his practical, realistic approach of acceptance instead of opposition. Charlie Daniel died in 1964 at 68 and is buried in the Daniel Mausoleum in Springwood Cemetery. His wife lived in White Oaks and continued their philanthropy until her death in 1992, whereupon the home was bequeathed to Furman and is used as the president’s residence. Daniel’s legacy is evidenced by the thousands of young people whose lives are improved by the scholarships and educational opportunities provided by the Daniel-Mickel Foundation. Charlie Daniel may not have graduated from college, but he and his family have helped thousands of young people do so. Our community has also been greatly enhanced by the Daniels; to date, the Foundation has given more than $46 million in support of local organizations. Charles Daniel was a veteran, a leader who advocated for what was right, a visionary and a generous philanthropist. In this season of giving and thanksgiving, let us be mindful of those like Charles Daniel who have done so much for our country and our community. Dr. Courtney L. Tollison Hartness teaches history at Furman University. She can be reached at courtney.tollison@ furman.edu.

GIVE THE GIFT OF

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Dec. 16, 2016 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

Dec. 16, 2016 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.