Page 1

GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, December 13, 2013 • Vol.15, No.50

Page 4

USC shooting victim will be home for holidays Page 7

DEADLY RELATIONSHIPS

State’s No. 1 ranking in women killed by men prompts push to toughen penalties for domestic violence SEE PAGE 8

Shakeup in county GOP Page 10

MEGACHURCHES ARE MEGABUSINESS IN THE UPSTATE FOR HOME DELIVERY CALL 864.679.1200 READ ONLINE AT GREENVILLE JOURNAL.COM

$1.00

it easier for you to focus on k-inMaking faster.

nk GSP first. Rental Cars.

Days may be numbered for historic Augusta Street house

what the holidays are all about. www.GSPAirport.com


JOURNAL NEWS

GREENVILLE JOURNAL LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1999 FOR DELIVERY REQUESTS, CALL 679-1240

It’s the most wonderful time of the year.

PUBLISHER

Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@communityjournals.com EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Susan Clary Simmons ssimmons@communityjournals.com MANAGING EDITOR

Jerry Salley jsalley@communityjournals.com

The holiday season can be the best time of year to upgrade your vehicle, or your vehicle loan.

STAFF WRITERS

Cindy Landrum clandrum@communityjournals.com Sherry Jackson sjackson@communityjournals.com April A. Morris amorris@communityjournals.com

Most vehicle manufacturers and dealers drop prices on current inventory at year-end to make room for next model year’s inventory. A lower price

PHOTOGRAPHER

Greg Beckner gbeckner@communityjournals.com

tag combined with your credit union’s competitive loan rate gives you

NEWS LAYOUT

Kristy Adair Tammy Smith

the upper hand when shopping for your next car.

OPERATIONS MANAGER

Holly Hardin

Members enjoy the same low rate on new,

CLIENT SERVICES MANAGERS

Anita Harley Jane Rogers

pre-owned and refinanced vehicles (cars,

BILLING INQUIRIES

trucks and SUVs) with less than 30,000

Shannon Rochester CONTROLLER

miles and less than two years old.

Kim Mason

Vehicle loans as low as

2.49

%

APR*

LIMITED TIME OFFER

MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES

Lori Burney Kristi Jennings Donna Johnston Annie Langston Pam Putman

Apply online at www.greenvillefcu.com call 800.336.6309 or visit any branch.

COMMUNITY SPONSORSHIPS AND EVENT MARKETING

Kate Banner PO BOX 2266 GREENVILLE, SC 29602 PHONE: 864-679-1200 FAX: 864-467-9809 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Your savings federally insured to at least $250,000 and backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Government

NCUA

National Credit Union Administration, a U.S. Government Agency

*Annual Percentage Rate is based on a 36-month term. Your loan rate and term amount may vary depending on individual credit history and underwriting factors. A 36-month loan with 2.49% APR would have monthly payments of $28.86 per thousand borrowed. All credit union rates, fees, terms, and conditions are subject to change at any time without notice. This offer is for members in good standing who are eligible and qualify for loan services. © 2013, Greenville Federal Credit Union, all rights reserved. Member NCUA.

Happy Holidays from our family to yours.

2 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013

d d wnt wn

E S T. 2 01 2

THE

G R E E N V I L L E

WINTER 2013–2014

© The Greenville Journal is published by Community Journals LLC. All rights reserved. All property rights for the entire contents of this publication shall be the property of Community Journals, no part therefore may be reproduced without prior written consent.

LO O K BO O

••

e Insurance coverag gap feared for nearly4 PG 200,000 in state

INSIDE THE UBJ:

r’s The Greenville Chambe lessons from the road

rs GOP chair: Protesto “have taken politics too far” PG 17

GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOU RNAL.COM

• Friday, November 15,

2013 • Vol.15, No.46

Meet the

NO

Road Show

The journey that led Jim Clements to the Clemson president’s office began 20 years ago

FOOD TRUCK S HIT THE STREET S FOR HUNG RY APPETITES

House Drinks

NEW BOSS CINDY LANDRUM

| STAFF

.com clandrum@communityjournals University In a sense, new Clemson has been Clements President Jim the top job in Tiger auditioning for two decades. Town for the past ago that Clements It was 20 years first started talking and his wife, Beth, could take to he path about a career Clemson, a school eventually land at family ties through to which he had had been following his in-laws and team won the since the 1981 football ip. national championsh even consulted At times, Clements will succeed as the with the man he James F. Barker, school’s president, in April that he who announced from the presidency would step down return to teaching. after 14 years and 8 CONTINUED ON PAGE FOR HOME DELIVERY CALL 864.679.1200 READ ONLINE GREENVILLE JOURNAL.COM

AT

$1.00

PHOTO BY CRAIG

MAHAFFEY / CLEMSON

UNIVERSITY

If Your Bank is Not

Journal ad ad.indd

1

You Expect,

We Need to Talk!

550 E. McBee Avenue

MEMBER FDIC 3653 Greenville

Than Delivering MORE | Greenville, SC 29601

| Ph: 864.250.980

0

COCK TAILS COME HOME WITH THE RETUR OF BAR CARTS N

bncbanksc.com AM 11/13/13 11:57

TOWN_DEC_

COVER.indd

1

VE M

BE R

15 ,

K

20 13

Good as Gold

CHOCOLATE TAKES ON EPIC PROP ORTIO IN THE HAND NS S OF REGIONAL CHOCOLATI ERS

LOOKBook_

layout 2013.indd

1

Vol.2 4/8/13 8:45 PM

INTER DECEM BER 20 TOWNC 13 AROLIN A.COM

11/18/13 6:06 PM

As a

deleg

-CITYTHE ART OF TH VISIT E

ation of two vast Upstat e ly di ffere busines nt cit sp ies ca eople n teac discov h ea ered on ch ot her sua recent rpris trip to ing les Pitts sons burg h,


JOURNAL NEWS

WORTH REPEATING

Wreaths and Garlands 20% Off!

THEY SAID IT QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“I can’t wait to get back to my life and live as normally as possible.” USC freshman Martha Childress, on finishing her rehabilitation after being paralyzed by a stray bullet fired in Columbia’s Five Points in October.

“They kind of fight in the off-season and come together for elections.”

12 Sevier Street, Greenville 864.282.8600 www.embassy-flowers.com

David Woodard, political science professor with Clemson University, on the Greenville County Republican Party.

“You won’t find me wearing a tie on the last day of the year.” Brad Majors of Goodwill Industries of the Upstate/Midlands, on dressing down to help unload the 750 to 1,000 donations that typically pour in Dec. 30-31.

Just off Augusta!

ion! cat t o l ew ree urch; ur n sta St aptist Ch o in u s B t us 1 Augst Height Muffin) i s i V 302 ugu ug & A oss

(acr

from ext to N

M

“To shove the sweater into the bottom of your drawer and forget about it denies someone else the chance to stay warm.” Bruce Weinstein, aka “The Ethics Guy” for Bloomberg Businessweek, on the value of regifting.

“If a stranger assaults you, it’s cut and dry. People help. You prosecute. But domestic violence is a different phenomenon.” Becky Callahan, executive director of Safe Harbor, a nonprofit organization that provides shelter, counseling and legal services for abused women.

Custom Designed Lamps & Lighting Shades | Unique Chandeliers & Sconces Gas & Electric Lanterns | Design, Construct, Repair & Restore

Beautiful Lighting,Distinguished Service, Creating Brilliance harrisonlighting.com | 3021 Augusta Street, Greenville | 864.271.3922 |

Custom Build – Renovations – Design

TURNING DREAMS I N T O R E A L I T Y

C111R

highlandhomessc.com – 864.233.4175

DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 3


JOURNAL NEWS

Historic house may be dismantled Wilkins house may make way for proposed assisted living center on Augusta SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com If a proposed zoning change is approved, a landmark home on Augusta Street could be moved or dismantled to make room for an assisted living and memory care facility. Spartanburg merchant William T. Wilkins built the house, located at 1004 Augusta St., in 1876. The property currently has 10 owners and is used as an event venue and dance studio. A request was filed with the city Planning Commission to change the zoning on the property from C-2 (local commercial) to OD (office and institutional). The proposed development would actually be a less intensive use than those typically allowed under C-2 zoning laws – among them, restaurants, banks, grocery stores or health clubs, said Dan Simmons, an owner of The Balance Group, the company that would ultimately own and operate the facility, and representative of TXG LLC, which is purchasing the property. The location was chosen after conducting market studies that identified a need for assisted living on the west side of town, Simmons said. The proximity to downtown with access to shopping and the ball field are all “positives to the lifestyle and quality of life for seniors and their families,” he said. Simmons said financial and licensing costs involved

Plans for an assisted living center, which would be built where the historic Wilkins house now stands on Augusta Street.

TMG

9 Setting sun Lane $274,690 | 3BR, 2.5BA | Ready NOW! MLS1261752

Custom Homes... Creating your New Home Place In Travelers Rest

The Ridge at s unset

Just off Old White Horse Road, In Travelers Rest

46 Setting sun Lane $349,605 | 4BR 3 1/2BA almost 4000 sq. ft., fully finished basement READY TO CLOSE IN 30 DAYS! MLS 1263818 (Photo dated November 16)

AugustaRoad.com Realty LLC Joan Herlong, Listing Agent · 864-325-2112

4 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013

For the child in all of us… Five Forks Promenade 2531 Woodruff Road Simpsonville, SC 29681 Monday - Saturday 10am - 6pm Now open Sundays 1 - 4pm

10 OFF

$

Your purchase of $50 or more

*With this coupon. Expires 12/24/13. Not to be combined with other offers. One use per customer. Not valid on hold or layaway items.

Free Christmas Gift Wrapping! 864-509-1883

www.hollipopstoys.com


GREG BECKNER / STAFF

make it impractical to incorporate the existing house into the proposed 103-bed, 88,000-square-foot assisted living facility, though he hasn’t completely ruled it out. “The last thing we want to do is a wholesale demolition of the existing house,” he said. Simmons said that the home has been added on to over the years and he is meeting with the Palmetto Trust for Preservation this week to discuss what can be worked out regarding the disposition of the home. He also said he would entertain offers from anyone who may want to relocate the house and keep it intact. He is meeting with Jerry Blassingame According to “Remembering Greenville: at Soteria Community Development Photographs from the Coxe Collection” by Jeffrey Corporation, a ministry service that R. Willis of the Greenville Historical Society, the takes down buildings piece by piece to house at 1004 Augusta St. was built by William and Harriet Cleveland Wilkins in 1868-1869. The reclaim and recycle the building matehouse was designed in the Second Empire style, rials. a popular Victorian designed borrowed from “That could be another option,” he the French during the reign of Napoleon III. The said. historic home could be demolished to make way A neighborhood meeting was held for a new assisted-living facility. Monday evening with nearby Greater Sullivan residents. Simmons said there home,” he said. Initial city staff analysis on the zonwere some concerns about traffic and parking but said most residents don’t ing change concluded “the request to bring vehicles and he hopes that staff rezone the property from C-2 to OD is could use public transportation since consistent with the standards.” The proposal will go before the Planit is easily accessible. o the fIrst and only InvIsIble 24/7I* hope hearIng ning Commission on Thursday, Dec. “Somewhere in all of this we aId. can find a solution for the existing 12, at 4 p.m. at City Hall.

JOURNAL NEWS

You found the perfect tree... Now find the perfect gifts to put under it. Alligator belts with engravable buckles

T IT’S INVISIBLE MAY BE THE UTIONARY THING ABOUT IT.

eye-bobs® Reading Glasses

ARING

YOU NEED YOUR HEARING CHECKED

qUALITY

Call Today For Your 14 DAY Risk Free Trial With Hearing Aid Technology Recommended For YOUR Hearing Loss, YOUR Life, YOUR Budget.

Better Hearing Month.

E LYRIC HEARING FOR YOURSELF!

ial† • Complimentary Lyric Screening Offers expire May 31, 2013

Au.D.

Doctor of Audiology c Hearing Professional

Barbour for all!

The Art of Shaving

Kristin Davis, Au.D.

Doctor of Audiology Premier Lyric Hearing Professional

oinsett Street, SC Improving 29650 Patient Satisfaction With Their Hearing HealthCare 17 yearsGreer, Experience

703 W. Poinsett Street, Greer, SC 29650 • www.greeraudiology.com 4-655-8300 Today!

CALL 864-655-8300 TODAY FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT! ww.greeraudiology.com

“After two negative hearing aid experiences, I was referred to Greer Audiology by my physician. I found Kristin Davis to be a very professional and unassuming practitioner, with no sales pressure or gimmicks. She immediately instills confidence and trust. I would, without hesitation, highly recommend her for those experiencing hearing difficulties and becoming like me, a very grateful and satisfied patient.” – Philip Gauthier, Simpsonville, SC

ttery life varies by patient and is subject to individual ear conditions.**Lyric is water resistant, not waterproof, and essional fees may apply. Annual subscription begins the first day of trial. Lyric is not appropriate for all patients. See , Distributed by Phonak, LLC ©2013. All rights reserved. MS025831 NEW904

23 West North Street, Greenville, SC 29601 | 864.232.2761 | www.rushwilson.com Open Mon.–Sat. 9:30am–5:30pm, Wed. 9:30am–1:00pm

DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 5


JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

Bill will stifle competition

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

Hang up and drive Greenville would advance public safety by banning handheld devices behind the wheel. Greenville City Council would raise the bar statewide and challenge a feckless Legislature if its members adopt a proposed ban on not just texting, but the use of any handheld device while driving a motor vehicle within city limits. The chief value of a law is to change behavior – and few behaviors threaten public safety more than the “epidemic of distracted driving” Mayor Pro Tem David Sudduth denounced in a recent council work session on a proposed texting ban for drivers. Sudduth heads a council task force charged several months ago with evaluating the potential for a municipal ban on sending electronic text messages while driving a vehicle. But the subcommittee quickly realized other cellphone uses were just as distracting and dangerous behind the wheel, he said. The city needs to create an environment and a mechanism that will encourage people “to have two hands on the steering wheel and two eyes on the road,” Sudduth told his colleagues. To that end, the task force is proposing a blanket ban on the use of hand-held devices while driving. No talking. No texting. No fiddling with the GPS or iTunes playlist. If opposition runs true to form, it will sort into two camps: nanny government foes who resist policy limits on personal choice, and quibblers who oppose texting bans until all possible distractions (eating, reading, applying makeup) are banned while driving as well. Both are pure stonewalling. Cellphone use is a unique threat to highway safety, provoking well-documented lane swerves, delayed reaction times and other potentially fatal lapses. Federal studies show motorists talking on a phone are 30 percent more likely to crash. University of Utah researchers certify cellphone use behind the wheel to be equal to driving drunk. However, texting stands unrivaled because it involves all three types of distraction: visual (taking your eyes off the road), manual (taking your hands off the wheel) and cognitive (taking your mind off what you are doing). One federal study by the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute concluded texting makes a driver 20 times more likely to cause an accident. Not 20 percent – 20 times. No other distraction comes close to the perils of typing on a tiny screen while piloting 4,000 pounds of aluminum, glass and steel. That reality exposes the reckless disregard of our state Legislature’s perennial refusal to make texting while driving illegal. Only one other state – Montana – has no distracted-driving law of any form. In typical Palmetto State fashion, the legislative debate so far has focused more on limiting the reach of the laws proposed than on protecting the motoring public from texters. So municipal governments are stepping into the breach – 13 to date, with Charleston being the latest, as of October. All ban texting while driving; Greenville would be the first to ban handheld devices altogether. As police Chief Terri Wilfong noted, “nothing in your hand” is easy to enforce. If “hands on the wheel, eyes on the road” is the goal, City Council now knows the way forward.

SPEAK YOUR MIND The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters

6 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013

should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short

Last year, the South Carolina House of Representatives passed a bill that many representatives thought pertained only to Horry County. That bill, H.3290, may be up for a vote in the Senate as early as the first day of the legislative session in January. Cleverly named the “Business Freedom to Choose Act,” the bill has nothing to do with small businesses or the right to choose. In fact, passage of the bill will result in less competition and higher costs for the residents of Greenville County by taking away the county’s ability to provide low-cost solid waste disposal, a core function of county government. The two main supporters of H.3290 are Waste Management, based in Houston, and Republic Services, based in Phoenix. These two companies own seven of the eight private landfills in the state. They argue that failing to pass H.3290 will create a government monopoly on waste disposal – that keeping things the same disadvantages these waste companies. Private companies already control 75 percent of all waste disposed of in South Carolina and bring in 95 percent of the out-of-state waste that is dumped in South Carolina each year. How is this government monopoly? A tipping fee is the cost per ton to dump solid waste into a landfill. According to annual reports submitted to DHEC, Greenville’s Twin Chimneys landfill charges a tipping fee of $22.35, the lowest in South Carolina and 40 percent lower than the South Carolina average. Passage of this bill could harm public landfills by invalidating franchise agreements with local waste haulers, forcing the county to cover the costs with higher taxes or sell to a private company. If a private waste company purchased the landfill, do you think they would continue to charge these low prices to the residents of Greenville County? I don’t think so. Private waste companies are in business for

bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, fact-based arguments.

IN MY OWN WORDS by JOE DILL

the profit. At current rates of disposal, the Twin Chimneys landfill will be able to provide this cost-effective service to Greenville County residents for 125 years. If H.3290 passes and Greenville County is forced to sell the landfill to a private mega waste company, they would be allowed to fill the site with out-of-state waste for 57 years. Do you think a private company would save the landfill capacity for future generations of Greenville County residents? I don’t think so. New York pays over $100 per ton to send its waste to South Carolina. Private waste companies will fill Twin Chimneys with out-of-state waste and make a hefty profit. Waste Management and Republic Services are spending hundreds of thousands of dollars in support of H.3290. Why would these two companies be spending so much money? They want this bill to pass because it is going to make them money – lots of money – by eliminating competition. Where are they going to get that money? From the citizens of Greenville County, in the form of increased disposal costs and from the disposal of out-of state waste. The so-called “Business Freedom to Choose Act” is bad for business and bad for the residents of Greenville County. Urge your legislators to vote “No” on H.3290 – we owe it to ourselves and the future generations of Upstate residents.

Joe Dill represents District 17 on Greenville County Council.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of

organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Executive Editor Susan Clary Simmons at ssimmons@ communityjournals.com.


Childress expected home before Christmas USC freshman was paralyzed by a stray bullet

JOURNAL NEWS

If the

power

goes out,

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Martha Childress, the University of South Carolina freshman from Greenville who was paralyzed by a stray bullet in October, is expected to be home before Christmas. Childress Childress has been at the Shepherd Center in Atlanta since Oct. 21 undergoing rehabilitation. She plans to take online classes in January and return to USC next fall. “I’m beyond thankful to be alive,” Childress said in a press release from the Shepherd Center. “I cannot believe the outpouring of support and prayers from those not only in South Carolina, but around the country as well.” Childress expressed thanks to her treatment team at the Shepherd Center as well as those who have kept her in their thoughts since the shooting. “I can’t wait to get back to my life and live as normally as possible,” she said. Childress was waiting with a friend for a taxi in Columbia’s popular Five Points area Oct. 13 when a bullet struck her and severed her spine. Childress wasn’t the intended target. A convicted felon fired at another man during a dispute nearby. The shooting prompted local law-

Martha Childress works on her physical rehabilitation at the Shepherd Center in Atlanta.

makers and law enforcement officers to push for stronger laws they say could help prevent future innocents from being victimized in similar circumstances. During Childress’ stay at the Shepherd Center, she has participated in a comprehensive rehabilitation program with a full team of medical and rehabilitation specialists. Her treatment team is led by Dr. Anna Elmers and includes nurses, an occupational therapist, physical therapist, case manager, peer support specialist, nutritionist and psychologist. “We are thrilled with not only the progress Martha has made since she has been with us, but also with how she has adjusted to this devastating injury,” Elmers said. “She always has a smile when I see her, even when she is in pain. It has been such a pleasure to take care of her.” Elmers said she expects Childress to do well in the future. “Given her great attitude, I have no doubt Martha will be very successful in whatever career she chooses to pursue.” Pam Childress, Martha’s mother, thanked everyone for their prayers, thoughts and support. “As a parent, one can never prepare themselves for anything like this, and I wish this experience on no one,” she said. “Martha is a strong, courageous and brave young woman, who I know will thrive as she makes her way through life. She will make a difference.”

will you be ready?

Rated “BEST BUY” by Consumer Reports (in both Portable and Standby Generators categories)

A subsidiary of Blue Ridge Electric Co-op

Stand up to unpredictable weather or unforeseen outages. If the power goes out the generator goes on. It’s that simple. It doesn’t sleep. It doesn’t call in sick or make excuses. It’s made by the company that has been building generators for over 50 years and it’s at the top of its class. Call today for more information on an affordable power solution.

1-888-407-7233 • www.blueridgegenerators.com

DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 7


JOURNAL NEWS

Cracking down on domestic violence Advocates look for tougher penalties for CDV offenders

abuse will never happen again. “Whenever you’re dealing with the family unit, there’s a unique dynamic with which prosecutors must deal,” Wilkins said. “The victims have a conflict of interest. They are victims of a crime, but they also have ties to the defendant.”

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com In a caption above a photo posted on Facebook of Bryan Eugene Sweatt holding his baby daughter, Sweatt wrote that the little girl would always be his No. 1 baby. “Ava is so beautiful and Daddy loves you with all his heart and soul,” said the caption under the picture, which included Sweatt’s estranged girlfriend – the mother of the little girl – sitting in a chair by his side. The next day, Sweatt broke into his former girlfriend’s parents’ house in Greenwood, and waited for them and his daughter’s mother to come home. When they arrived, police said he bound them with duct tape and executed the girlfriend, both parents and his girlfriend’s two nephews before he killed himself. He allowed four other children – including the baby girl – to leave the home. Although the number of victims in this case was unusual, the cause is not. South Carolina ranks No. 1 in the nation in the rate of women killed by men. More than 36,000 cases of domestic violence – a crime that many times goes unreported – are investigated by S.C. law enforcement agencies each year. South Carolina’s rate of women killed by men was 2.54 per 100,000 – more than double the national average, according to an analysis of 2011 homicide data by the Washington, D.C.-based Violence Policy Council. The state has a much higher rate than other states in the South with the exception of Tennessee. South Carolina has ranked in the top 10 in the rankings in each of the past 10 years. The rankings are based on the most recent crime reports collected by the FBI.

TOUGHER PENALTIES Domestic violence prevention advocates say South Carolina needs tougher domestic violence laws. State Rep. Bakari Sellers has prefiled a bill that would stiffen the penalty for first-time domestic violence offenders – increasing the maximum jail sentence from 30 days to 180 – and require them to attend and pay for a criminal domestic violence intervention program. The bill would also prohibit those with

8 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013

VICTIMS

Photo Provided

criminal domestic violence convictions as well as those who are subject to a court protection order from possessing firearms or ammunition. Finally, the bill would remove a $5,000 cap now placed on first-offense CDV charges. “It’s a great start,” said Becky Callaham, executive director of Safe Harbor, a nonprofit organization that provides shelter, counseling and legal services for abused women. “Stronger penalties for domestic violence are absolutely necessary. But this is not the end-all be-all. There are layers of changes that need to happen in this state to decrease domestic violence.” Callaham said increased penalties could help make offenders realize the seriousness of the crime, but only if those increased penalties are used consistently and cases are not pleaded down to lesser charge. “Perpetrators need to be held accountable,” Callaham said. “If the bill passes and the increased penalties are used consistently, then I think it can send that message. But more importantly, it can send a message to victims that the crime is being taken seriously as well. “I think the end product could be that

more victims are going to report it,” she said. “At first, I think we could see the number of reports increase … but in the long run, I think we’d have people asking for help earlier and before it escalates to murder.” Callaham said that the people involved in three domestic-related murder-suicides in Oconee County in late 2012 and early 2013 were unknown to law enforcement authorities but were in relationships marked by domestic violence.

UNIQUE CRIME Thirteenth Circuit Solicitor Walt Wilkins says more than 60 percent of the first-offense criminal domestic violence cases his office receives are accompanied by an affidavit from the victim who says she doesn’t want to prosecute. The reasons vary. In some cases, they are financial – the victim has no means to support herself and her children if she leaves and believes it is in her best interest to try to “keep the peace,” Wilkins said. In other cases, the defendant has threatened to take the children away. Still others believe their spouse or “significant other” when he says he is sorry and the

Accompanied by her daughter, Rebecca Redding went to her estranged husband’s home on April 25 to retrieve some belongings. She was shot and killed by her husband. While law enforcement arrived on the scene, Donnie Redding shot and killed himself. Dale Wetzelberger shot and killed his wife, Michele Wetzelberger, at their home on Dec. 3, 2012. He took their four-yearold son to day care the next morning, returned home and shot and killed himself. Police were called after nobody picked up the boy from day care. But it’s not always men killing women. In 2012, Eugene Blyther was stabbed in the stomach by his wife. He died and she was charged with murder. The year before, Juan Tafoya-Gonzalez was shot by his live-in girlfriend, Elvira Seay. She asked a friend to help her dispose of the body. She was arrested in New Orleans six months after the murder and is still awaiting trial. “Sometimes I wonder which CDV first is going to end up being a murder,” Wilkins said. That’s why Wilkins developed a policy that he would prosecute any criminal domestic violence case where he believes he can win a conviction – even if the victim doesn’t testify.

PILOT PROGRAM Wilkins also piloted a program over the past year in which all initial court appearances in first-offense CDV cases in Magistrate Dean Ford’s j u r i s d i c t i o n were held on the same day each month. During those appearances, victims were shown a video on CDV developed by Wilkins about 18 months ago. Victim advocates were available to answer questions, as were lawyers from the solicitor’s office. Prosecutors meet with defendants and their lawyers to see if the case could come to a quick resolution. Those resolutions were often a guilty plea in exchange for the solicitor’s office recommending a minimum fine and counseling. The defendants were immediately signed up for a counseling program. The program will go countywide


JOURNAL NEWS next month. One day a month, Ford will hear all first appearances in first-offense CDV cases. The initial appearances are held within 30 to 40 days of arrest. “We’ve had more cooperation from victims and more successful prosecutions,” Wilkins said. Wilkins said he supports a longer sentence for first offense CDV. “With CDV first, counseling is the most important thing you can do. The goal is to change behavior and that really requires more than 30 days.”

MEN KILLING WOMEN

The 10 states with the highest rates of women murdered by men based on 2011 crime data.

1. South Carolina 2. Alaska 3. Oklahoma 4. Delaware 5. Arizona 6. Tennessee 7. Idaho 8. West Virginia 9. Louisiana 10. New Mexico

61 7 38 9 60 59 14 16 39 17

2.54 2.01 1.99 1.92 1.84 1.80 1.77 1.70 1.67 1.62

OTHER SOUTHERN STATES The 2011 U.S. total was 1,707 homicide victims (at a rate of 1.17 per 100,000 women).

MORE NEEDS TO BE DONE Callaham said in addition to increased penalties, training for law enforcement officers, judges and “helpers” is needed. “The phenomenon of domestic violence is different from other crimes. It doesn’t seem logical,” she said. “If a stranger assaults you, it’s cut and dry.

STATE

NO. OF RATE WOMEN PER HOMICIDE 100,000 VICTIMS WOMEN

12. Georgia 79 13. Mississippi 24 17. Arkansas 20 19. Texas 171 22. North Carolina 61 26. Kentucky 25 33. Virginia 40

1.58 1.24 1.34 1.32 1.23 1.13 0.97

**No data available for Alabama or Florida (Source: Violence Policy Center, Washington, D.C.)

People help. You prosecute. But domestic violence is a different phenomenon. In domestic violence cases generally the victim asks for help in the moment, but they back down after a cooling-off period.” Education is key, too, she said. “We

need to teach our middle schoolers and high schoolers what healthy relationships are. Many don’t know how to have healthy relationships because they’ve not seen healthy relationships at home. Even if kids come from homes with parents with healthy relationships, they need to

LD R O W US O M FA akes! C b a r C Live Music Every Thursday with Marcus King Band

hear it, too.” Callaham said men need to get involved in order to stop domestic violence. “Typically, you see women get involved in the issue of domestic violence,” she said. “But it would really help if men would step up and say, ‘This is not O.K.’”

Down2t Location s (at Foawn Greenv:i & Ma lls Par lle in St. k) Mauldi n

Downtown location to Open Christmas Night at 7pm!

SPECIALTIES:

BEST Burgers, Crab Cakes, Nachos, & Tacos IN TOWN! 116 North Main · Mauldin · 864.991.8863 Hours: Sunday Brunch 11 am till 2 pm ; Monday - Saturday 11:30 am till late

608B South Main Street · Downtown Greenville · 864.232.4100 Hours: Tuesday - Sunday 11:30 am till late; Closed on Monday

www.ChicoraAlley.com | Find us on Facebook! DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 9


JOURNAL NEWS

3 Greenville County GOP committee members resign APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

e nitur r u F rt s Impo cessorie c &A

amorris@communityjournals.com

WHERE:

www.TradeRouteImport.com

Trade Route Import Furniture & Accessories (located behind Haywood Mall) 1175 Woods Crossing Road Greenville, SC | 864-234.1514

WHAT:

You’ll find a large selection of centuries-old Asian furniture and accessories beautifully mixed with one of a kind contemporary Asian home furnishings, all expertly hand crafted, painted and selected from China, Thailand, Mongolia and Tibet.

WHO:

Living and traveling in Asia for more than 15 years has instilled in owners Sherry and Fred Smid a true passion for all things Asian. Their greatest enjoyment is being able to share the beauty of Asian style and culture with their customers.

NEWEST ARRIVAL:

Be on the lookout for the arrival of two new containers full of treasures from China and Thailand this fall at Trade Route!

Tickets: $20 in advance; $5 students; children under 5 free Timmons Arena Box Office Ticketmaster outlets or ticketmaster.com

Presented by the Year of Altruism and Furman University

10 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013

Controversy within the county Republican Party flared again last week after three executive committee members tendered their resignations to newly elected Greenville County Republican Party chairman Chad Groover. Linda Weeks, Harry Kibler and Magda Aguila resigned from the local party’s executive committee. Weeks had served as second vice-chair for two years and said she spent much of that time “fighting with other people in the GOP who refuse to support the party platform and look at the tea party and conservatives as the enemy.” Kibler, who had served as first vice chairman for two years, said that officers are not upholding their promise to seek unity and reach out to conservatives. Kibler was among the group that picketed Bob Jones University, the former employer of Greenville County Council chairman Bob Taylor, in November to pressure Taylor to vote against a proposed county referendum on a possible sales tax increase to fund road repairs. After the protest, Groover issued a call for unity and an end to the targeting of Taylor, saying some “have taken politics too far in an effort to smear a good man.” In her letter, Aguila cited a hostile environment after former GOP chairman Betty Poe resigned this summer, adding that hostilities escalated after Groover’s election. Aguila said those who disagreed with her beliefs and principles had anonymously attacked her and her business on social media. She said in the letter that she has been publicly attacked for exercising freedom of speech during the “sign wave” outside Bob Jones University. As of press time, efforts to contact those who resigned for further comment were unsuccessful. Political analysts say the resignations may be a sign of a further rift in the county GOP following the resignation of Poe and a heated and close race for the chairmanship between Groover and Samuel Harms. “The Greenville GOP has always been outspoken and informed. It’s always been contentious in Greenville,” said David Woodard, a po-

litical science professor at Clemson University. However, Groover says the resignations are not indicators of a schism in the local party, but a sign “that three disgruntled people weren’t willing to work with the party.” “Their decision has no bearing on the overwhelming majority of people in the organized GCGOP and in the Greenville community who proudly call themselves Republicans and vote for Republican candidates,” Groover said. “Based on their letters, I would say they are upset that I openly criticized their picketing outside of religious institutions. It certainly isn’t based on policy disagreements, since I supported their position on the proposed tax referendum.” Woodard predicts the party will most likely forgo the infighting and come together in 2014 when midterm elections heat up. “They kind of fight in the off-season and come together for elections, especially for presidential elections,” he said. However, a rift may yet surface between those supporting and opposing U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham’s reelection bid, he said. There is often a debate in the Upstate over whether a candidate is conservative enough, he said, citing the 1996 presidential race when Upstate Republicans were divided over whether Bob Dole was too liberal. “Greenville is a bellwether county” because Greenville “has a lot of Republicans and a lot of money for candidates,” Woodard said. The tone of debate has changed over the years, he said. “Social issues like abortion, same-sex marriage and stem cell research have really raised emotions.” As for the future of the Greenville County GOP leadership, Groover said, “I don’t know if we will see any more resignations, but I can’t imagine it would be more than one or two people. … We will keep our focus on multiplying and not dividing the party.” Since the resignations, Groover said the local party has had “a wellrun and informative executive meeting, an overwhelmingly successful social media training seminar and have raised more money than we did in the previous several months of bickering.”


JOURNAL NEWS

Ingles helps me And with an Ingles Advantage Card, they can help you too!

INGLES PREMIUM CERTIFIED USDA CHOICE BEEF BONELESS SIRLOIN STEAK All Sizes Save up to $2.50 Lb.

4

$ 98 Lb.

4

2/ for $

JUMBO CANTALOUPES Save $3.96 on 2

and more...PER GAL ANY GRADE Save 5¢/gal per 100 Points Earned. Redeem on One 20 gal Fill-up. See Store Associate for Details*

EARN UNLIMITED GAS SAVINGS!

$1 in Groceries* = 1 Point WHEN YOU EARN 100 pts 200 pts 300 pts

YOU SAVE PER GAL 5¢ 10¢ 15¢

"Time is precious, so rather than spending it shopping the sale papers, I spend time with Sarah. I let Ingles shop for me with AdvantageMail. They send me an e-mail every Sunday letting me know what items I regularly buy are on sale. I save time and money. Thanks, Ingles."

Sign up for AdvantageMail™ 1. Get your Ingles Advantage card & save

2. Go to www.ingles-markets.com/amail & follow the instructions

FRIENDLY’S ICE CREAM 48 Oz., Selected Varieties Save $2.96 on 2

5

2/ for $

Hurry – sale ends Saturday!

A M E R I C A N O W N E D & O P E R AT E D – GOD BLESS AMERICA!

www.ingles-markets.com/amail 3. Ingles will let you know, weekly, what items you buy are on sale

PLUS enjoy exclusive

AdvantageMail savings. DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 11


JOURNAL NEWS

More Greenville County students graduating on time CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com The good news is more students in Greenville County Schools are graduating on time. The bad news is a little more than one in four students won’t graduate on time, will drop out or not earn a diploma. Greenville County Schools’ on-time graduation rate – defined as earning a high school diploma in four years – increased from 72.4 percent in 2012 to 76.9 percent in 2013. That’s lower than the state graduation rate – 77.5 percent. The state rate is up from 73.6 percent in 2011 and is the largest two-year increase ever. It is just below the 78.0 percent achieved in 2003, the highest rate during the past dozen years. Graduation rates in Greenville County improved for African-American students, Hispanic students and students who receive subsidized or free school meals because of their families’ incomes. Those groups have historically had lower graduation rates than white students. Statewide, all of those groups showed improvement. Disabled students graduated at a higher rate statewide as well. But that category saw a decrease in Greenville County, something district officials attributed to fewer students being identified as disabled, giving the district a higher concentration of lowerfunctioning students. The graduation rate is calculated by dividing the

number of students who graduated with a regular South Carolina diploma within four years of entering high school by the number of first-time ninth-graders, adding any students who transfer in and subtracting any who transferred to another diploma-granting school, emigrated or died. Students who take longer than four years to earn a diploma, earn an occupational diploma, earn a local or state certificate, earn a GED and students who leave school and whose status is not known or cannot be documented, or who are incarcerated but do not enroll in a diplomagranting program, are counted as non-graduates. Among Greenville County Schools, six had graduation rates below the state average. Unlike previous years, none had rates below 60 percent. If students are given an extra year to earn their diplomas, schools’ graduation rates improved as expected. District officials say existing programs to help improve the graduation rate have been refined and new ones added. There are academic specialists to give additional support to schools. At the preschool level, two new pre-K classrooms were added to serve students at risk of being unsuccessful in school. Summer programs were started for at-risk students and there is a proposed summer enrichment reading program. In elementary schools, the district is monitoring academic progress of students, using a balanced literacy program and increasing utilization of personal

devices such as iPads in the classroom. In middle schools, there’s increased utilization of personal devices and one-to-one technology and special emphasis schools in the fields of science, technology, engineering, the arts and math. At the high school level, satellite diploma programs have been started. The district’s teen parent program has been restructured to serve students in their home schools.

ON-TIME GRADUATION RATES SCHOOL............................ 2010....... 2011....... 2012........ 2013 Mauldin High........................83.6......... 83.7......... 83.7.......... 89.1 Wade Hampton High..............86.4......... 84.1......... 86.8.......... 86.5 Blue Ridge High....................73.3......... 80.0......... 75.0.......... 82.7 Eastside High........................76.0......... 75.4......... 80.2.......... 82.6 Riverside High......................83.0......... 85.7......... 82.0.......... 82.3 Greenville High.....................70.8......... 70.0......... 69.8.......... 81.5 J.L. Mann High......................72.8......... 70.3......... 75.7.......... 80.0 Hillcrest High........................73.0......... 71.3......... 73.9.......... 79.4 Berea High............................63.5......... 63.1......... 64.5.......... 71.4 Southside High.....................64.6......... 65.4......... 57.4.......... 69.3 Greer High............................71.0......... 72.3......... 65.5.......... 67.8 Travelers Rest High...............61.6......... 72.6......... 65.5.......... 67.8 Woodmont High...................61.7......... 61.5......... 64.7.......... 65.3 Carolina Academy.................48.8......... 55.8......... 58.7.......... 62.4 South Carolina................. 72.0........ 73.6........ 74.9......... 77.5 Greenville County Schools.. 72.1........ 72.2........ 72.4......... 76.9 (Source: Greenville County Schools)

Jump for Joy!

Our Holiday Sale is Here!

$100 off

a complete pair of Rx glasses

50% OFF

$125 off

HOLIDAY WREATH

each additional complete pair of Rx glasses

While supplies last.Feeder and Snowman sold separately.

sunglasses, readers and accessories

15% off

WITH A $50 PURCHASE

Offer applies to stock on hand. No other discounts apply.

LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

GARRISON OPTICIANS

Open Mon. - Fri. 9:30-5:30 • Sat. 9-5

12 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013

J112

BIRDFOOD • FEEDERS • HOUSES • HARDWARE • BATHS • GIFTS

1922 Augusta Street, Suite 109 | McDaniel Village | 271-1812 M-F 9:30-5:30 & by appt. | www.garrisonopticians.com

M123A

Locally Owned and Operated Since 1974

626 Congaree Road • 864-234-2150 www.wbu.com/greenville


JOURNAL NEWS

HANCOCK & MOORE LEATHER RECLINER SALE

WOODBRIDGE Retail: $4,245 SALE: $1,595

3411 Augusta Road, Greenville • 864-277-5330 • www.oldcolonyfurniture.com

M13A

SOLID MAPLE FRAME • MADE IN USA • 4 LEATHERS AT THIS PRICE!

DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 13


JOURNAL NEWS

THE BLOTTER The State Law Enforcement Division is investigating an officer-involved shooting in Greenville. Two Greenville Police Department vice and narcotics officers responded to the Comfort Inn on Laurens Road shortly after 10 p.m. on Saturday. As they investigated a narcotics complaint, a vehicle almost hit two pedestrians, jumped a curb and started to accelerate in the direction of the officers. Staggs One of the officers shot at the vehicle, which left the scene. Greenville County deputies spotted the car in the Taylors area around 4 a.m. Sunday. Carlton Emanuel Staggs, 22, who was treated at the hospital for a gunshot wound, was charged with attempted murder and was being held at the Greenville County Detention Center. Greenville businessman Eric Robinson wants to be tried separately from a former South Carolina State University board chairman. Robinson and Jonathan Pinson were arrested in January as part of what federal prosecutors say was a kickback scheme involving the university. In court papers, prosecutors allege Robinson conspired to get kickbacks for Pinson in exchange for Robinson’s entertainment Pinson company being used to promote a homecoming concert. Additional charges were filed against both men last month. In his motion for a separate trial, Robinson said being tried with Pinson would “unfairly and irreparably prejudice” his case and deprive him of his right to due process.

Happy Holidays!

M cAbee’s Custom Carpet, Inc. CARPET AND RUGS • REPAIR • RUG CLEANING

R

12 N. Kings Road • Greenville 864.277.0470 | www.mcabeescarpet.com 14 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013

C103R

Located off Mauldin Road next to I-85 and Exit 46


JOURNAL NEWS

THE BLOTTER Prosecutors claimed Robinson’s argument for a separate trial wasn’t strong enough and that separating the trials would force the government to try the same case twice. “Such an action would not benefit the defendant, and yet would be a disservice to the interests of judicial economy,” prosecutors wrote in their motion arguing against separate trials. A reversal of a man’s conviction for armed robbery and possession of a weapon during the commission of a violent crime has also been reversed. Robert Watkins was first convicted in Greenville County Court of Common Pleas in 2002. After the South Carolina Court of Appeals dismissed his direct appeal, Watkins filed a petition for post-conviction relief. The appeals court determined Watkins’ trial counsel was ineffective in failing to preserve Watkins’ right to an alibi charge and remanded the case for retrial. The case came before Judge Larry Patterson on a motion that the public defender’s office be relieved of representing Watkins. Patterson granted the motion, telling Watkins he’d appoint counsel if he made a timely request before the trial scheduled for July 2008. A month later, the state announced Watkins wanted a bench trial and requested it be held in June before Patterson. Watkins requested Patterson recuse himself for the retrial because he had presided at his PCR hearing. The request was denied. Watkins was convicted, sentenced and appealed. The Court of Appeals ruled it was a reversible error for Patterson to deny the request to recuse himself. The Supreme Court reversed that, saying a criminal defendant may ask the judge who heard his PCR to recuse himself from the retrial of the matter for any of the reasons for which recusal may be sought. The justices ruled there was no evidence of judicial bias in the case.

DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 15


JOURNAL NEWS

Bill to increase penalties for gang violence Henderson prefiles legislation in response to Five Points shooting CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com State Rep. Phyllis Henderson has prefiled a bill that would toughen laws dealing with gangs and repeat violent

16 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013

offenders. The shooting of University of South Carolina freshman Martha Childress in Columbia’s popular Five Points area prompted the legislation. Childress, a graduate of J.L. Mann High in Greenville, was paralyzed when she was struck by a stray bullet fired by a convicted felon who was arguing with at least one other man nearby. The accused shooter, Michael Juan Smith, is classified as a violent offender

and had avoided long prison sentences on two burglary convictions. He faces several charges in state court and has been indicted in federal court on a weapon charge in connection with the Childress shooting. When a person is convicted of a crime and the court finds that the offense was committed to benefit, promote or further the interests of a criminal gang, the bill calls for up to five years to be added to the maximum sentence.

The bill says that if a court finds that a criminal gang member charged with a felony may be released on bail, the bond must be at least $50,000 cash or surety unless the court determines the defendant is not likely to reoffend and the defendant agrees to comply with intensive pretrial supervision. It is against the law now for gang members to coerce someone into joining a gang by using or threatening physical violence.


JOURNAL NEWS

Joyner joins Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com Upstate real estate firm C. Dan Joyner Co. Realtors announced earlier this week it would become a Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices affiliate in 2014. The announcement came as part of a signing of 12 new affiliates, bringing the total of Berkshire Hathaway affiliates to 502 offices that have transitioned to or signed with the brand since July, for a total of nearly 19,000 agents in 24 states. The bill would change that to make it illegal for a gang member to cause, encourage, solicit, recruit or coerce another person to actively participate in criminal gang activity or to prevent a gang member from withdrawing or leaving a gang. Gang members who recruit others could be fined up to $1,000 or imprisoned for up to two years. Gang members convicted for a second or sub-

CARPET | HARDWOOD LAMINATE | VINYL | TILE CELEBRATING 25 YEARS IN THE UPSTATE

Many more signings are on the way, said Earl Lee, CEO of HSF Affiliates LLC. “Momentum continues building for Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices. Affiliates realize the strength of this new brand … and the depth of its real estate tools, technology and services. They want to capitalize on our brand and all it has to offer.” Danny Joyner, broker/owner at Prudential C. Dan Joyner, said the brand brings strong values and fresh perspectives to a recovering JOYNER continued on PAGE 19

sequent offense would be guilty of a felony and could be find up to $5,000 or imprisoned up to five years. A gang member who uses a weapon or physical violence to cause, encourage, solicit, recruit or coerce another into gang activity could be fined $10,000 and imprisoned for 10 years. If the recruit is under the age of 18, an additional prison sentence of three years may be imposed.

A fresh new look, the same traditions

Being the first funeral home in Greenville, we have had the privilege to serve

More than just carpet. Visit us soon & beat the holiday rush!

this community for over 140 years. We have recently renovated our family and visiting areas, and have added a Community Room where families may gather for receptions or a catered meal. All of this is to better provide you and your family with a comfortable and calming atmosphere in your time of need. The look is new, but our foundation is still providing the Upstate with affordable, compassionate care.

CarpetOneGreenville.com Offering affordable, compassionate care to the Upstate since 1872. 864-232-6706 | 311 Century Drive, 291 Bypass at I-385, Greenville, SC 29607

226 Pelham Davis Cir., Greenville | 864.281.0006 Showroom Hours: Monday-Friday 8am-5:30pm, Saturday 10am-2pm

MackeyMortuary.com DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 17


JOURNAL NEWS

Parker District commissioners accused of ethics violations APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com Four of the five commissioners on the Parker Sewer and Fire District have been accused of ethics violations, according to documents served by the South Carolina Ethics Commission last week. The complaints were filed in early August. According to the complaints, chairman James Gillespie, vice

chairman Robert Jones, secretary/ treasurer Patrick Haddon and Raymond Arceneaux used their positions to have maintenance performed on their personal vehicles by the district’s on-duty maintenance employees. The actions are listed as “use of official office for gain,” a violation of Section 8-13-700 (A) of the state code of laws, which stipulates that a public official cannot knowingly

use his official office to obtain an economic interest for themselves, a family member, an associate or business. The section says, “This prohibition does not extend to the incidental use of public materials, personnel or equipment, subject to or available for a public official’s, public member’s or public employee’s use which does not result in additional public expense.”

70+ combined years experience in gynecology

Same day appointments available for acute problems

Each physician is board certified in OB-GYN

Accept most insurance plans including Medicare

Welcoming new patients

Commonwealth Women’s Care 135 Commonwealth Drive, Suite 230 Greenville, SC 29615

18 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013

Ethics Commission officials would not comment on whether the Parker Sewer and Fire commissioners had incurred additional public expense. Haddon faces four counts of having on-duty district mechanics work on his personal vehicle between 2011 and 2012 in the district garage with district equipment. Arceneaux faces two counts of having his vehicle worked on by an onduty maintenance employee, one

phone: 864.365.0250 fax: 864.365.0251 CommonwealthWomensCare.com


JOURNAL NEWS real estate market. “The timing is right to align with the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices brand and bring exceptional value to our brokers, agents and customers through new tools and resources,” he said. “Our affiliation will change the real estate market in upstate South Carolina, and we can’t wait.” HSF Affiliates operates Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, Prudential Real Estate and Real Living Real Estate franchise networks and is based in Irvine, Calif. The company is a joint venture of HomeServices of America Inc., the nation’s second-largest full-service residential brokerage firm, and is a majority owner. HomeServices of America is an affiliate of worldrenowned Berkshire Hathaway Inc. in 2011 and one in 2013. Jones faces one count of having an employee work on his personal vehicle in 2013, along with one count of failure to disclose income in 2011 on a Statement of Economic Interests form. Gillespie faces six counts between 2010 and 2013. Work performed on

The joint venture is “a brand-new real estate brokerage network built for a new era in residential real estate,” according to its company slogan. Joyner said that the transition has already begun and while there won’t be any physical changes to the offices, the company is “in the process of ordering all new materials as it relates to our business (building signs, yard signs, collateral material, etc.).” He also said that while not every Prudential affiliate around the country will be invited to join the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices brand, “all of our offices in the Upstate will make the conversion.” The actual conversion date for the Upstate offices is the week of Feb. 17, at which time Joyner says “over 1,400 new yard signs will hit the Upstate market.” commissioners’ personal vehicles range from an oil change to installation of a lift. One count outlines that a district employee was asked to work on Jones’ lawnmower at his home. A formal hearing is scheduled for May 21 in Columbia.

Fine home furnishings. Exceptional prices. 875 NE Main Street, Simpsonville | Mon-Fri 9-5 & Sat 9-3 864.228.1619 | www.CarolinaConsignmentLLC.com

K102S

JOYNER continued from PAGE 17

DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 19


JOURNAL NEWS LOWEST PRICES • INCREDIBLE SELECTION • GREAT SERVICE

3

Prices good thru 1/5/2014.

TIME

WINNER

National Retailer of the Year Award

Get in the Spirits!

WINE & B

ER OPEN SUNDEAY S 9AM-8PM

Over 3,000 Spirits at Unbelievably Low Prices

Smirnoff,

$16.99

Captain Morgan’s Spiced Rum,

Jack Daniel’s Black,

$19.99

$33.99

1.75L

1.75L

1.75L

Tanqueray,

Kahlua,

$35.99

$14.99

1.75L

750ml

GREENVILLE

www.totalwine.com

TotalWineAndMore

20 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013

TotalWine

HOURS: Wine & Beer – Mon-Thurs 9am-9pm, Fri & Sat 9am-10 pm, Sun 9am-8pm Liquor – Mon-Sat 9am-7pm • No liquor sales on Sundays VISIT US ONLINE FOR OUR HOLIDAY HOURS. Enjoy the Total Wine & More Experience in 15 States. Find them att www.totalwine.com

GVL-13-1209-TAB

Prices good thru 1/5/2014. Not responsible for typographical errors, human error or supplier price increases. Same Price Cash or Credit. Products while supplies last. We reserve the right to limit quantities. Total Wine & More is a registered trademark of Retail Services & Systems, Inc. © 2013 Retail Services & Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Please drink responsibly. Use a designated driver.

The Shops at Greenridge 1125 Woodruff Rd., Greenville, SC 29607 (864) 288-4575 Next to Lowe’s.


JOURNAL COMMUNITY Moving on, MOVING MORE

April Morris lies still for the body composition scan, which takes about 6 to 7 minutes.

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

GHS and USC Human Performance Lab to measure benefits of exercise for cancer survivors APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com Among other things, debilitating fatigue is one of the side effects of treatment for many cancer patients. In January, research at a human performance lab run by Greenville Health System and USC School of Medicine-Greenville will investigate how exercise can help make cancer survivors healthier. Typically used by athletes to measure and improve their performance, researchers will use the new lab to track changes in post-treatment cancer survivors. Dr. Larry Gluck, medical director of the

GHS Cancer Institute, said that cancer survivors experience fatigue after treatment is over, fatigue that cannot be corrected by rest. Many survivors report that the condition affects their daily function to the point of forcing them to stop while doing something as simple as brushing their teeth, he said. Physicians and researchers are working to reduce and potentially prevent fatigue brought on by chemotherapy or radiation treatment, along with reducing the risk of recurring cancer and other conditions. Gluck tells the story of a young nurse who was treated with chemotherapy and later exhibited all the signs of aerobic de-

Buy tickets online! www.GreenvilleCamelot.com

C I N E M A S

E. Antrim Dr., McAlister Square • 864.235.6700 $7.00 BARGAIN SHOWS BEFORE 6PM

(PG13) DIGITAL PRESENTATION NO PASSES ALLOWED

1:00 | 4:15 | 7:30 In Digital

conditioning, or loss of strength and aerobic fitness, said Gluck. When she went through 12 weeks of an exercise regimen, her deconditioning was corrected. By measuring a patient’s cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength, metabolic fitness and body composition right after treatment, researchers can establish a baseline and will test the patient again

PERFORMANCE LAB continued on PAGE 22

We offer...

Professional & Personalized Services

200 Patewood Dr., Bldg B, Suite B-400 • 454-4368 M113A

THE HOBBIT:

THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG

PRESENTED IN DIGITAL PROJECTION / STADIUM SEATING: THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG IN 3D (PG13) 2:30 | 6:00 TYLER PERRY’S A MADEA CHRISTMAS (PG13) 12:30 | 2:45 | 5:00 | 6:30 | 7:20 | 9:00 | 9:40 THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG-13) 1:00 | 4:00 | 7:00 | 9:45 THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG (PG13) 1:45 | 5:00 | 8:15 | 9:10 FROZEN (PG) 12:30 | 2:45 | 5:00 | 7:15 | 9:20

Dr. Larry Gluck

after 90 days of exercise. Inside the lab there is a treadmill, stands for bicycles, a stationary bicycle and a machine to measure muscle strength. Patients also get a full-body composition scan in a machine that typically performs bone density scans. This scan also shows where fat is located in the body, including around the organs, which is recognized as a disease risk factor for cancer and cardiovascular disease. Patients who have come through cancer therapy are still below the level of functioning that they want to be, said Gluck.

• Latest in Digital Technology • Streaming to Phone and TV • Multiple Major Manufacturers

NOW SHOWING: FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13 - THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19 IN BIG THEATER

“Mental clarity parallels cardiopulmonary fitness and encourages these patients.”

Doctors of Audiology: Angie Zuendt, Courtney Russo, Susan Valenti & Lisa Ramos

DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 21


JOURNAL COMMUNITY In Addition FINDING THE FAT Full-body scan helps researchers locate the weight.

SEE PAGE 23

Gina Franco, manager of the GHS Cancer Institute Center for Integrative Survivorship and Oncology, and Dr. Larry Gluck, medical director at the GHS Cancer Institute, in the new Human Performance Laboratory. PERFORMANCE LAB continued from PAGE 21

“They have feelings of confusion, frustration and guilt.” The fatigue can contribute to sedentary behavior and patients gain weight, creating a cascade of events, said Regina Fran-

22 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013

co, manager of the Center for Integrative Oncology and Survivorship. “Exercise is the very thing that cancer survivors need to do to decrease their chances of recurrence or second cancers independent of the first,” added Jennifer Trilk, Ph.D., lab director and clinical as-

ABOVE: Judy Deaver with Greenville Radiology looks over the results of a body scan. AT RIGHT: Image 1 is a full-body scan of a normal-weight person. Image 2 is a full-body scan of an overweight person.

PHOTOS BY GREG BECKNER / STAFF

1

2

sistant professor at the USC School of Medicine Greenville. Researchers suspect that treatment fatigue is related to damage to the cell’s mitochondria, which converts food into power, said Gluck. They also suspect that this could be the cause of diminished mental function, often called “chemo brain.” Studying how exercise can benefit cancer survivors could lead to health care providers eliminating the debilitating fatigue, he said. The research will determine “have we actually reset the mitochondria so that they are now healthy … then is there something Color Mapping (%Fat) that could be done to proLow Medium High tect the mitochondria?” 25% 60% Trilk will study muscle health and function on the cellular level to track the mitochondrial Several patients and Gluck have underfunction in patients. Gluck likens this to gone testing in the human performance giving patients anti-nausea medication be- lab, he said, and researchers hope to folfore chemotherapy treatment. low more than 100 in the first year. It’s the “If we can pinpoint mitochondria and first such lab embedded in a cancer cenpinpoint how that disruption occurs ter, according to GHS. … when the patient of tomorrow goes Once patients begin to exercise, Gluck through chemotherapy, we can prevent has consistently noticed that after about nausea and vomiting and we can prevent two weeks they notice some improvement. this devastating fatigue,” he said. “When they start to notice that they’re The research could not only lead to us- feeling a little better, that’s a positive feeding the lab for other conditions such as back loop,” he said. “Mental clarity parallels Parkinson’s disease, but for an evidence- cardiopulmonary fitness and encourages based standard for cancer survivor care, these patients.” In addition, exercise can rehe said. duce depression and improve sleep, he said.


JOURNAL COMMUNITY I N

A D D I T I O N

Finding the fat Full-body scan helps researchers locate the weight APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

old patients also do well staying still for the scan. Freed from the stays, I watched Deaver As part of the human performance as she pulled up a black-and-white imlaboratory that will study exercise in can- age of my skeleton (pigeon-toed because cer survivors, patients will soon be taking of the straps) on the screen. With a few part in a body composition test to mea- expert clicks, she aligned digital markers sure the percentage of fat in their bodies around certain body parts like hips and and where it is located. waist, making sure defaults corresponded rnamental ironwork in the deep South Patients then return after 90 days to to the actual image. check how their body mass index (BMI) The body composition scan is generreflected the influence of blacksmiths, through time, and fat distribution responded to diet and ated by the same machine that does a exercise, said Scott Looper, clinical direc- bone density scan, but running different forging folk art into gates, balconies, and grills. tor of outpatient radiology at Greenville software, explained Deaver. In addition The pieces in this Collection are Radiology. to a BMI reading, the results include a I had the opportunity to try out the full- breakdown of percentages of fat and lean reminiscent of that ironwork. body scan, which is a dual X-ray absorp- for seven parts of the body. tiometry full-body scan by a machine also There’s also an estimation of visceral used for bone density scans. adipose tissue (VAT), which surrounds The intricate scroll designs are a tribute At Greenville Radiology, the GE iDXA the organs and is of increasing interest bemachine looked like a single bed with an cause it has been linked to a patient’s risk to the skill of artisans in the past who wrought arm arching over it. I was glad to see that of obesity, Type 2 diabetes and metabolic beauty from the iron in their forges. These clean, the device didn’t match the horror stories syndrome. Scientists are studying where I had heard about cramped and claustro- fat is stored in the body, including in the distinct lines show as well in jewelry as they did phobia-inducing closed MRI machines. organs, as a link to how it contributes to in the decorative ironwork of the South According to GE, it ofdisease, said Deaver. This fers research-grade analalso relates to whether a in the 18th and 19th centuries. BMI info ysis – which in this case person has an “apple” or will be used for research One indicator of health is BMI, “pear” body shape. by GHS and USC School but scientists are discovering that And with another click, of Medicine-Greenville. Deaver pulled up a color where fat is stored is also a factor. Precision cut diamonds Judy Deaver, bone graph, which showed the 18.5-24.9 – HEALTHY densitometry technoloconcentration of fat in my mounted in a state of gist, recorded my height 25-30 – OVERWEIGHT body. There was green for and weight and entered (increased risk of heart and blood constant motion. less than 25 percent, yelvessel disease) the info. She had me low for 25 to 60 percent Available in sterling silver and 14 karat white gold. lie face-up, aligning my 30 OR HIGHER – OBESE and red for more than 60 (higher risk of cardiovascular disease) back along a white line percent. The red and yelthat ran down the center 40 OR HIGHER low areas are also predic– EXTREME OBESITY of the mat. I wasn’t too tors for where weight may nervous until Deaver said Source: National Center for Health Statistics be gained. The five-page DIAMOND COLLECTION I would have to hold perresults also broke down fectly still for seven minthe VAT percentage, anutes while I was scanned head to toe. droid (abdomen) and gynoid (hips and As I put my palms against my legs, she thighs) fat percentage and percentages of gently wrapped two Velcro straps around fat and lean mass for seven areas. my legs to keep them together and still, Dr. Larry Gluck, medical director of the she said. The yoga classes I enjoy so much GHS cancer center, took a look at my re- This collection is available in paid off as I worked hard to remain mo- sults during our interview, proclaiming I sterling silver, 14 karat gold or a tionless – an effort not made any easier by had good bone density and noting that I combination of both. our photographer, Greg Beckner, busily fell within a normal BMI. snapping photos and cracking jokes. With a scan of your body covered in The arm whirred its way across the green, yellow and red areas, the visual length of my body, looking very much like presentation was quite clear and will no a scanner taking an image of a document. doubt be a motivator for some patients to 288-9068 • 579 Haywood Rd. I did okay, said Deaver, but then burst become active. Now, excuse me while I go 288-9068•301 Haywood Rd. (Near David’s Bridal) my bubble when she added that 5-year- for a quick run around the block.

amorris@communityjournals.com

This Holiday Season This a Holiday give her giftSeason that give her a gift that

SPARKLES SPARKLES Precision cut diamonds mounted in a state of constant motion.

DIAMOND COLLEC

Julie’s Jewels & Gifts

DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 23 JuliesJewels 1119.indd 1

11/8/10 12:26:56 PM


Let Swarovski Crystal be the star of your Chamilia (or Pandora) bracelet with Chamilia’s new Starburst Lock

JOURNAL COMMUNITY

A present conundrum To regift or not to regift?

Stop in for free slide offer!

Trunk show specials!

New Pineapple Collection!

Your holiday attire will be refreshed and party ready after a visit to…

Lafayette SCIENTIFIC CLEANERS

Personalized Cleaning & Hand Finishing 1707 AUGUSTA STREET | GREENVILLE | 864.242.5606 24 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013

Chamilia · Southern Gates · Lampe Berger · Troll Beads · Rainbow Loom

John Wind · Poo-Pouri · Christmas Decor Bon Bons · Collegiate · Waterglobes

1276 Woodruff Rd., Greenville | 864.675.9977 |

APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com Holiday gift exchanges can bring on joyous receptions of the perfect present, but can also create a glut of stuff. If you’re stuck with something you didn’t really want, is it okay to pass it along to someone who could appreciate it?

Regift carefully

Though it may seem like a good idea to hand off the hideous sweater or manicure kit that you got over the holidays, Emily Post advises that regifting is not really okay. If you decide to regift anyway, she says, it must be done with caution to avoid hurt feelings. If you opt to regift, be certain that you know (1) the recipient would want the gift, (2) it is brand-new and (3) it isn’t one that “the original giver took great care to select or make,” warns Post. It is appropriate to regift if you receive a duplicate and someone you know needs that item, says Post. For example, you receive a coffeemaker exactly like your own and your sister needs one. She has commented that she likes yours – wrap it and pass it along. Another way to pass along duplicates is to give them as a surprise, unwrapped gift rather than for an official occasion. Taking the opposite view, however, is Bruce Weinstein, aka “The Ethics Guy,” who said in a Bloomberg Businessweek column that we have an “ethical obligation” to regift because there are so many in need. “You may not have a need for another wool sweater, but there are many people who do. To shove the sweater into the bottom of your drawer and forget about it denies someone else the chance to stay warm,” Weinstein wrote. “As the gap between the haves and the have-nots grows wider, we have an ever stronger obligation to ensure that others benefit from our blessings.” Weinstein said we have an obligation to thank the people who have

by the

NUMBERS 50% 5% jump in donations to Goodwill in December

percentage of generation X (1965-1979) and generation Ys (1980-2000) who sold an unwanted gift on ebay, according to a Tada.com survey

helped us throughout the year, and passing along an item we know they would love justifies regifting. Unfortunately, if a person who presents you with an awful gift expects to see you wearing or using it, you may have to hold on to it, he warned.

The charity route

With the inflow of new items, many people take the chance over the holidays to clean out and tidy up. Local charities are grateful for this pre-New Year cleansing. Donating items to charity also offers the benefit of tax deductions before year’s end. In the Upstate, Goodwill donation centers experience up to a 50 percent increase in donations in the month of December. And on the last two days of the year, administrative staff don’t head to the office, but instead don their jeans and sweatshirts to help unload donors’ vehicles at donation centers, said Brad Majors, vice president of marketing and development with Goodwill Industries of Upstate/Midlands SC. “You won’t find me wearing a tie on the last day of the year,” said Majors. At a busy location like Woodruff Road in Greenville or in Columbia, 750 to 1,000 donations will pour in over Dec. 30-31, he said. On an average day, the same stores usually attract 125-200 donations. And the cars don’t just have one or two bags, said Majors: “They are SUVs pulling trailers.”

SO YOU KNOW • Regift: popularized on the “Seinfeld” TV show’s 1995 episode, “The Label Maker,” which featured a “Label Baby Jr.”-brand label maker given to Jerry after Elaine had given it to dentist Dr. Tim Whatley for Christmas. • Dec. 19 – National Regifting Day, a tongue-in-cheek celebration established in honor of holiday office parties, which often feature regifts. • According to Money Management International, 41 percent of regifters target coworkers as recipients. Read and post regifting stories at regiftable.com.


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

North Pole Christmas Adventure opens The North Pole Christmas Adventure opened for its first year at 810 Pendleton St. in Greenville. It is presented by the same team who featured Hawk and Tom’s New Nightmare on Pendleton Street at the same location. The attraction features Mrs. Claus’s Sweet Shop, where Mrs. Claus reads a story to the children and gives each child a cookie; an elf room where children make ornaments; a Whoville-themed room with small buildings for The Elves' Workshop at the North Pole Christmas Adventure. indoor miniature golf; a ball pit; a Letter to Santa Post Office; an inflatable jump house; pictures with Frosty; a monster truck play area; a petting zoo; and a picture with Santa. All activities are included in admission, which is $12 for children aged 2-12, and $6 for adults aged 13 and older and children under 2 who want to make an ornament and feed the animals. For more information, visit facebook.com/ north-pole-christmas-adventure or call 864-245-5640.

Your pets will thank you! Posh Paws is a professional, full service grooming salon and upscale spa located in downtown Greenville. We provide the following specialized services to your furry family member: . Mud baths, sugar or salt scrubs · Premium grooming products · Luxurious and pristine facility · Aromatherapy and soothing music

234 Westfield St. | Greenville | 864.271.4377 | poshpawsgreenville.com

J123

· Canine and feline grooming · Canine massage · One-on-one appointments · Stress-free grooming environment · Skin and coat evaluations

1818 Augusta Street Greenville, SC

Your destination for

Holiday Shopping

LeGrand Bakery 864.242.0316 www.augustagrill.com

864.434.3054 www.vinoandvangogh.com

864.991.8592 www.legrandbakery.com

Gifts for the men, women, and children in your life, all at Augusta Village!

a paperie and gift shop

864.242.1466 www.paisleyandpaper.com

864.241.4001 www.bellabridesmaid.com

864.451.7553 Facebook: Vestiti

864.331.3333 www.wisteriasalonspa.com

DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 25


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Critter sitters

JEANNE PUTNAM | CONTRIBUTOR

jputnam@communityjournals.com With the holidays upon us, many people are planning trips, whether to visit family or just get out of town. However, pet owners can’t forget their furry family members in the holiday travel season. When traveling, most people look at boarding their pets at a veterinarian’s office or boarding kennels such as the Pet Hotel at PetSmart. If you decide to board a pet, owners should visit first and tour the facility they are considering, said Jessica Brush, president of Wood“RUFF” Pet Resort & Spa, Inc. “If the facility does not allow tours, that should be a signal not to use it,” she said. “This is your pet you are talking about, and you want to make sure they are kept in a nice, clean, safe facility.” Brush suggests that owners show up “for

owner of BringFido.com, information on the site about the pet-friendly attractions is content the couple has accumulated over time through personal experiences and customer comments. The website allows people to book vacations online or contact the call center to discuss pet-friendly travel options at no charge. “We don’t charge a booking fee over and above what you would see on the website,” said Halliburton. “There is no charge to use our service. Anyone can call and ask questions and our customer service support will help those people find the right places to go or hotel for their pets.” Halliburton recommends that people traveling with pets visit Bringfido. com’s 10 Tips for Flying with Fido list and look it over because it can apply to traveling with a pet beyond flying the friendly skies. Halliburton said the primary benefit of traveling with your pets is having them with you because it is “a greater comfort level for the pet than being at home.” JEANNE PUTNAM / CONTRIBUTING

For many, holiday travel means planning ahead for their furry friends

a tour unexpectedly during office hours” so they can see how the facility is normally kept. In addition, she recommends that the owner examine where the pet will be staying as far as a run or cage area. “Check to see if the dogs can see other dogs while they are in their suite or run. Check the suites or runs for any sharp edges. You’ll want to find out how often or how many times dogs are let outside for potty breaks,” she said. “Also find out if your dog is going on a walk or just let out on a patio to use the restroom. It is important to understand the policies of the facility and what is required as far as vaccines for your dog. If your dog has special needs, bring this to the facility’s attention and see if they are able to accommodate that need,” added Brush. In addition to boarding, pet owners have the option of hiring pet sitters, which offer the advantage of keeping the pet in familiar surroundings while you’re away. “Most of my clients don’t want to leave their pets in boarding facilities. There’s no place like home. Many animals stress in strange environments, anyway,” said Keila Adams of Hooves and Paws Animal Rescue, which also offers pet sitting. Adams recommends that the owner be very comfortable with the person who is coming into the house and caring for pets. “Peace of mind is everything,” she

said. “They should have a contract specifying certain things, like who will be providing the care, what will happen if your pet needs medical attention in your absence, etc. A caregiver should come out to meet your pets prior to any scheduling. They should connect.” And if you want your furry companion to come along on vacation, BringFido.com helps to find pet-friendly vacation spots and hotels. The Greenville-based business was started by Melissa Halliburton in 2005 and launched its website in the spring of 2006. According to Jason Halliburton, co-

Be social.

Connect with the City of Greenville.

events.greenvillesc.gov 26 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013

‘Tis the season to follow us on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube!


JOURNAL COMMUNITY Loren Hope Necklace, MUSE Shoe Studio Kitchen & Home built by Highland Homes; Home Design byKatie Skoloff, In-Site Designs Apron, Charleston Cooks!

Pink Lace Party Dress, Pink Bee

Spices & Rack, Postcard From Paris Home | Linda McDougald Design

Amaryllis Potted Arrangement, Roots

Miss Pitty Pat’s Collar, Paws & Claws

Untensil Canister, Mast General Store Maverick Wine, Charleston Cooks!

Cupcakes, The Chocolate Moose

Olive Oil Set, Palmetto Olive Oil Co.

Mixing Bowl, Mast General Store

Nesting Bowls, Mast General Store

D

Owl Pitcher, Mast General Store

uring this Holiday Season, we encourage you to

Fiestaware Covered Butter Dish, Mast General Store

Juliska Place Setting, Foxfire Gallery & Kitchen Shop

. As a locally owned and Greenville based

Publishing Group, this cause is near and dear to our heart. Lindsay and Church Powers are well known

faces with many of our advertisers. Virtually everything in their home was purchased from local retailers.

As Lindsay said, “It’s great to go in a store and have them know your name and your taste! It’s so personal and you can shop with a lot less guilt when you know you’re helping support the local economy.”

This Holiday Season Photography: Cox Photography; Hair & Makeup: Capello Salon; Wardrobe Styling: Melissa Stroud

DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 27


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Festive feet on the street The Christmas season officially kicked off downtown last Saturday evening with the annual Greenville Poinsettia Christmas Parade down Main Street. More than 90 floats and marching units took part. Outgoing Clemson University President Jim Barker served as grand marshal, with a certain well-known visitor from the North Pole bringing up the rear.

PHOTOS BY GREG BECKNER / STAFF

J.L. Mann color guard member Bre Cunningham warms up prior to the start.

Dani Carver, 10, left, and Madison Anders, 10, with the Spotlight Dance Company, practice their routine at the parade staging point at County Square.

Leilani Alat, 6, tries to keep warm while waiting for the start of the Poinsettia Christmas Parade. Steve Prout helps his wife, Angie, with her shoes. Angie was part of the AVX Corporation float for the parade.

SPAULDING FARM

2 BUCKLAND WAY • $799,900 5BR/6BA • MLS#1256669

The Pink Ladies wave to the crowd from their float.

STONEBROOK FARM

305 STONEBROOK FARM WAY • $679,900 4BR/5BA • MLS#1268662

Janet Sandifer

864.346.9943

864.979.6713

charlottes@carolpyfrom.com

28 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013

109 WOODBRIDGE WAY • $410,000 4BR/3BA • MLS#1266303

Charlotte Sarvis REALTOR, ABR

Flat Fee Listing

BRADLEY OAKS

REALTOR, ABR

janets@carolpyfrom.com

864.250.2112 www.CarolPyfrom.com

SHADOWOOD

405 SHADOW RIDGE CIRCLE • $568,000 4BR/2.5BA • MLS#1256706


JOURNAL COMMUNITY Our gift to you...visit

OIL & VINEGAR

Receive 15% off all on-tap oils and vinegars with this coupon Coupon valid through 12/24/13

NOMA Square Members of the Furman University marching band head down South Main Street at the start of the parade.

Carl Gibson with the the Hejaz Shriners Band plays the drums.

Easy Recipes

864.241.6689 greenvillesc.oilandvinegarusa.com : OandVGreenville

Lilah, a European Great Dane, part of the Paws To Care contingent, waits at the parade staging point.

Gifts

220 N. Main St, Greenville

Gourmet Entertaining

You want the BEST for your Mom.

A FREE Care Consultation is the First Step. Greenville Rugby members played catch with the crowd during the parade.

Members of the Movement Dance Company wave to the parade crowd.

The first step in our process includes a free personal consultation with a Transitional Care Coordinator. In our meeting, we will: • Thoroughly discuss your care needs • Create a written, detailed and highly personal Care Plan • Work with you or your loved one to determine how best to meet your requirements • Coordinate billing with insurance providers Your individual Care Plan is constantly assessed and updated to meet physical, social, emotional and intellectual needs.

Types of Services Available Bathing and Toilet Assistance, Dressing, Cooking Light Housekeeping, Transportation, Companionship To schedule, contact us today:

Always Best Care Senior Services

Non-medical in-home care • Assisted living finder and referral services Dedicated to exceeding your expectations ... always

(864) 527-0464 or (864) 580-3470 Members of the Woodmont High School marching band perform.

Independently owned and operated offices throughout the United States Santa Claus brings up the rear of the 2013 Greenville Poinsettia Christmas Parade.

AlwaysBestCare-GSP.com DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 29


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

AugustaRoad.com Realty LLC

Simpsonville’s Hillcrest Rams boys and girls basketball teams played host to the Mauldin Mavericks in a crosstown high school rivalry game. The Hillcrest boys team defeated the Mavericks 90-55; the Hillcrest girls team won its game 47-34. PHOTOS BY GWINN DAVIS / CONTRIBUTING

CONDOS/TOWNHOMES Lewis Village - Unit 14 A - $84,605 111 Hunters Way - Hunters Ridge - $239,617 The Edge - Unit 16B - $299,609 UNDER CONTRACT - 6 Cureton Corners - $339,605 160 Ridgeland - Unit 100 - $889,601 HOMES 200 Clarendon Dr - Hampton Downs - Easley - $185,642 9 Setting Sun Lane in The Ridge at Sunset - $274,690 NEW LISTING - 100 Cammer Avenue - Augusta Road Area - $319,605 OPEN SUN. 3-5PM - 28 Frontus Street - Augusta Rd Area - $349,605 46 Setting Sun Lane in The Ridge at Sunset - $349,690 213 Oregon Street - Augusta Road Area - $389,605 3 Crabapple Court - Augusta Road Area - $389,605 3 Club Drive - GCC Area - $399,605 790 Roe Ford Road on 11.5 acres - $399,617 120 E Augusta Place - Augusta Road Area - $449,605 35 E Tallulah - Augusta Road - $499,605 408 Altamont - Paris Mtn - $483,609 48 Forest Lane - Augusta Road Area - $509,605 4 Southbourne Ct. - Parkins Mill Area - $599,607 16 Keowee Ave - Augusta Circle Area- BRAND NEW - $624,605 25 Fontaine - Parkins Mill Area - $624,607 SOLD - 1 Rockingham Rd - Parkins Mill Area - $674,607 611 McDaniel Avenue - $764,605 8 Stonehaven Drive - Parkins Mill Area - $765,607 101 Country Club Drive - GCC Area - $769,605 121 Stonehaven Drive - Parkins Mill Area - $948,607 702 Crescent Ave. - Alta Vista - $959,601 102 Bruce Farm Road - On 7 acres in Simpsonville - $989,681 18 E Earle Street - Historic Preservation District - $1,049,609 UNDER CONTRACT - 28 Lawson Way - Chanticleer - $1,275,605 112 Riverside Drive - Greenville Country Club Area - $1,750,605 LOTS OF LOTS! 731 Brookdale - Greer - $49,651 Lot 91 - Limestone Trail - 6 acres - Cliffs of Glassy - $99,356 Lot 31- Hidden Hills Ct - Chanticleer Towns - $149,605 Lot 67 - Club Forest Lane - Chanticleer - $160,605 UNDER CONTRACT - Lot 36A - Hope St - DOWNTOWN - $189,601 Lot 311 Lawson Way - Chanticleer - $374,605 Lot 292 Lawson Way - Chanticleer - $394,605

Hillcrest wins in hoops rivalry

Hillcrest’s Randall Shaw (3) is fouled by Mauldin’s Dorrell Dunbar (24). Mauldin’s Frankie Thomas (23) is fouled by Hillcrest’s R J Cain (40).

Hillcrest’s Yazmeen Young (23) defends against Mauldin’s La’Daisha Mauldin’s Caitland Considine (11) pushes the Johnson break as Hillcrest’s Julia Mayes (5) gives chase. (10).

Give the Gift of Health!

We Wish You a Wonderful Thanksgiving, Wrapped in the Warmth of Family & Friends! Visit www.AugustaRoad.com today! Joan Herlong Owner/BIC

864-325-2112

30 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013

27 S. Pleasantburg Dr. Suite 20 • Greenville, SC 864-242-4856 • Mon-Sat 9-9; Sun 11-7 www.garnersnaturallife.com


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Journey to the Manger presents sights, sounds of Jesus’ birth Every December, Simpsonville United Methodist Church presents Journey to the Manger Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights. The church shares the message of Jesus’ birth. The live, drive-through production is the church’s way of reaching out to the community and sharing in the celebration of the season. Visitors to the event enjoy authentic costumes, architectural displays, live animals and a glimpse of historic sights and sounds from biblical Bethlehem. Journey To The Manger requires a minimum of 200 plus cast members and volunteers each night.

BJA Forensics places The Bob Jones Academy Forensic Team won the fourth place sweepstakes trophy in the recent Cougar Classic Invitational at Asheville High School in Asheville, N.C. They competed against schools from South Carolina, North Carolina and Tennessee.

From left: Lauren Jacquette of Taylors, eighth place in oral interpretation, and Helena Sullivan of Easley, sixth place in oral interpretation.

From left: Jennie Hudson of Greenville, fourth place in novice reading, and Carter Henderson of Taylors, third place in novice reading.

Happier, healthier, and at home. Comfort Keepers provides the kind of trusted, in-home care that helps people maintain full and independent lives, right in the comfort of their own home. We would be happy to arrange a free in-home visit to help you learn more.

SERVICES:

®

268-8993 www.comfortkeepers.com Over 550 independently owned and operated offices worldwide Caregivers are carefully screened, bonded and insured

• • • •

Companionship Cooking, Light Housekeeping Laundry Incidental Transportation (shopping, appointments) • Grooming & Dressing Guidance • Medication Reminders • Personal Care Services - Transfer & Positioning - Bathing, Hygiene - Incontinence Care - Feeding

DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 31


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Burning bright Light the night, but save some holiday cheer for your wallet APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com Whether festooning the eaves with twinkling icicles or peppering the front lawn with glowing wise men and reindeer, consumers adore celebrating the holidays with light. During a season when there’s a lot of gift giving, too, an escalating power bill may not make the season bright, however. Enter Duke Energy’s holiday lighting energy calculator, which the company describes as a way to help holiday decorators light the night on a budget. Lighting aficionados can enter the type of lights they own, size, number of strands, and how long they burn each day to determine the cost per day and per month. Options range from incandescent to light-emitting diode (LED), which Duke recommends for safety and efficiency. The LED bulbs use less energy and generate little heat. Burning 300 two-inch LED bulbs for six hours daily would cost $0.18 per day, or $5.40 per month. The same number and size incandescent bulbs would cost about $1.26 per day and $37.80 per month, according to the calculator. Six 100-bulb sets of large, incandescent bulbs plugged in six hours every evening can add up to $80 to a monthly power bill, according to Duke. Six 100-bulb sets of similar LED bulbs would increase a monthly power bill by about $7. Using six 100-bulb sets of mini-LED bulbs would increase a monthly power bill by about $1. The calculator is very popular, said Ryan Mosier, Duke spokesman, and has been offered for several years.

$2,600 • cost of electric bill reported by Tommy Sosebee, who decorates his Butler Station home in Mauldin with more than 250,000 lights each year

Mosier said paying attention to the small things like switching to LED holiday lights, cooking efficiently and home heating can make a real difference for homeowners. “They can free up expenditures over the season.” M O R E W AY S T O S AV E ENERGY THIS SEASON FROM DUKE ENERGY

COOKING • Open the oven door as little as possible. An oven loses 25 to 50 degrees Fahrenheit each time the door is opened. • Preheat ovens only when necessary. • Cover pans to reduce the cooking time and amount of heat needed. • Use smaller appliances, such as crock pots, toaster ovens and electric skillets. • Operate the dishwasher with a full load and select an energy-saving cycle. Use the “air dry” or “overnight dry” setting. • Don’t use the dishwasher’s “rinse hold” – it uses three to seven gallons of water each time. HEATING • Change air filters regularly. • Select the lowest comfortable thermostat setting when home, and bump the thermostat down a degree or two when leaving home. • Regular service calls from a licensed technician will help to properly maintain your heating and cooling system. • Set ceiling fans to operate in a clockwise direction to push warm air back down. • On sunny days, leave drapes or blinds open.

PLUG IT IN...

Estimate your holiday lighting costs at duke-energy.com/lightscalculator.

Sosebee light show open 7 days An item in the Dec. 6 Greenville Journal omitted some weekend operating hours for the Sosebee Light Show in Mauldin. The event’s complete information is listed here. • 106 Shearbrook Drive, Mauldin (inside the Butler Station development) • Attractions: Nearly 300,000 lights with a 21-foot mega-tree operated by a 16-channel computerized controller; a light tunnel, a nativity; nearly 70 inflatables; Santa hot chocolate and popcorn. • Open: Through Jan. 1, Sunday-Thursday, 6-10 p.m.; Friday-Saturday 6-11 p.m. • The display is only closed during heavy rain. • Cost: Free, but donations are accepted.

32 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Have You?

Look Who’s aLready been nominated*...

knoW someone not on this List? there are just a feW days Left to get them on here!

hurry! go To upstatebusinessjournal.com/wHos-wH0 To NomiNaTe By Dec. 16 James akers

JasoN fleTcher

marioN maNN

Zach spruNger

DaviD aNNa

moNroe free

Dr. sara maNsBach

aflreD squire

Tom BaTes

J. earle furmaN, Jr.

chaD mcgaha

russell sTall

Dr. JohN BeckforD

meric gamBel

meghaN meier

ToBy sTaNsell

Brook BrisTow

paula gaNTT

NeD miller

JeNNifer sTilwell

Jeff Bullock

Trevor gorDoN

Tami miller

chris sToNe

Jim BurNs

Neil graysoN

Tammy moore

Dr. speNce Taylor

roBiN ByleNga

ZeNo hawkiNs

carlToN oweN

Jim Terry

sTephaNie calloway

william hayNes

freD payNe

aNNe TromsNess

valerie chapmaN

Ty houck

mike peNNiNgToN

larry weBB

DeBra clemeNTs

BoB howarD

scoTT powell

kNox whiTe

howell clyBorNe, Jr.

BoB hughes

JasoN premo

Nika whiTe

mark coThraN

phil hughes

aNgela priDe

DaviD wilkiNs

liNDa craig

larry JacksoN

Dr. larry puls

DaviD wyaTT

Tom crofT

curTis JohNsoN

Tim reeD

gilliaN ZeTTler

leighToN cuBBage

Tammy JohNsoN

maTT reeves

rick Davis

michael kerski

BarBara repik

walTer Davis

charlie kilBy

DeB richarDsoN-moore

J. russ Davis, Jr.

Doug kim

aNNe shafer

DoroThy Dowe

mike kiriakiDes

chuck simmoNs

roseaNNe Dufala

JeNNa kocheNauer

heaTher simmoNs JoNes

marie DuNN-Blough

reiD lehmaN

alaN smiTh

sam erwiN

marie maJarais smiTh

garry smiTh

kyle felker

chris maNley

DaNa souZa

*Nominee list current as of December 8, 2013

DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 33


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Buncombe Street United Methodist Church

In Downtown Greenville www.bsumc.com | 864.232.7341

Wednesday Advent “Message & Music” Series 12:00 Noon (Memorial Chapel with $5 lunch following service)

December 18 - Rev. Debra Griffis-Woodberry Pastor Disciples UMC

Christmas Eve Services with Communion 12:00 Noon (Traditional - Memorial Chapel) 3:45 PM (Non-Traditional - Sisk Hall) 5:30 PM (Traditional - Sanctuary) 10:00 PM (Traditional - Sanctuary) Nursery available for the 5:30 PM service

OUR SCHOOLS

ACTIVITIES, AWARDS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

The Riverside High School Choral Department will present their Winter Choral Concert on Dec. 19, 7 p.m., in the school auditorium. All tickets are $5 at the door, general seating. Concertgoers are asked to bring a canned good or nonperishable food donation item for Harvest Hope Food Bank. Riverside High School students Treavonnie Kyeasta Coleman-Blakely and Jaquisha Johnson were recently awarded “I Am an Achiever” awards. Principal Andrew Crowley presented a Certificate of Special Congressional Recognition from U.S. Rep. Trey Gowdy. The award is given to students who are role models and inspirations to others and have overcome difficult Coleman-Blakely challenges.

Johnson

Students in Amy Gosnell’s room at Washington Center are learning to use alternate modes of mobility. A variety of positioning is crucial for the health and development of children. Adapted equipment for positioning also allows students to participate more fully in classroom activities. Students are learning to use wheelchairs manually, operate motorized wheelchairs, ride adapted bicycles and even find their way around school in a standing position. Washington Center student Quindariss Spurgeon is learning to explore the school in his mobile Rifton Stander.

Journal_12.13.13

Members of the St. Anthony of Padua School Student Council and Jr. Beta Club recently sponsored a school-wide food drive. They collected and sorted more than 320 cans and non-perishable food items and delivered them to the St. Anthony’s Food Pantry, which benefits the local community.

Christmas Gifts starting at

U.S. Sen. Tim Scott recently spoke to an overflow crowd of nearly 500 Bob Jones Academy sevenththrough 12th-grade students. Much of Scott’s talk centered on some of the wrong choices he made throughout his life and how God used circumstances and people to point him back to Christ.

$2.99

Holiday Hours: Thursdays 9-5 Fridays 9-3 • Saturdays 9-3 Near Mall Connector Road, behind Nationwide Insurance

True Warehouse Prices!

2 Days A Week! 2 Good To Be True!

700 Woodruff Road, Greenville • 864-234-7009 www.realdeals.net/greenville 34 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013

Students from Mauldin Middle School recently participated in the South Carolina YMCA Youth in Government Program’s ninth annual Middle School Model Legislature. More than 300 students from public and private schools across the state participated in the program, including six students from Mauldin Middle School. Student legislators took over the Statehouse, debating bills in the House and Senate chambers. Students from Mauldin Middle School wrote bills that included homeless benefits for veterans, bars requiring breathalyzer tests for their customers and schools providing e-readers for all students in lieu of textbooks. Students were recognized with the following awards: Madison Ragland and Kate Windey received awards for Outstanding Bills and Mauldin Middle School received the award of Premier Delegation.


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OUR SCHOOLS

ACTIVITIES, AWARDS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS Westcliffe Elementary recently teamed up with Palmetto Pride to gather recyclable items to create the “Go Green” Christmas tree. The tree is displayed at the Festival of Trees, downtown at the Hyatt. Both the school and Palmetto Pride promote recycling and wanted to show this support by creating this recyclable tree.

Ellen Woodside Elementary fifth-grade students recently participated in an Ellis Island simulation to learn about immigration. Students took on the identity of an immigrant after researching what life was like at the time. They dressed as the identity and traveled to America where they participated in a simulation that took them through what the immigration process would have been like. Prince of Peace Catholic School students recently came together for the Annual Pow Wow which reenacts the first Thanksgiving through the eyes of the children. Fourth-graders portrayed the pilgrims and the first-graders as well-decorated Native Americans. The annual Thanksgiving program allows students who play Native Americans as first-graders to come back as fourth-graders. Students are from Kathy Moore and Jay Martinez’s first-grade classes, and Martha Smith and Suzette Campbell’s fourth-grade classes. Pictured with the students are Smith and Moore.

Brashier Middle College participates in a system of evaluation and professional development called the System for Teacher and Student Improvement, created and implemented by the National Institute for Excellence in Teaching. Brashier received the highest rating for this past academic year and was one of two high schools in the state to achieve the rating. The system involves evaluating teacher performance, weekly professional development and leadership team development sessions for the adults in the school. The system also evaluates student performance both annually and over a four-year period. Beth Sawicki’s fourth-grade class at St. Mary’s School recently celebrated Patriots Day, the culmination of a six-week interdisciplinary study called “Why America Is Free.”

Greenville Middle Academy students are researching, scripting and recording a weekly radio show broadcast on the Internet. RAM Radio podcasts contain world, local, school and sport news, as well as special-interest segments including humor, fashion, advice, movie and book reviews, and celebrity news. Listeners can tune in to the weekly program at RamRadio.podOmatic.com and download the free app.

Submit entries to community@communityjournals.com.

The holidays are just around the corner

Yikes! Call Ike’s!

Living Sands

Ike’s Carpet, Rug and Upholstery Cleaning has more than 39 years of experience in the carpet and upholstery cleaning industry. We have been satisfying our clients by providing individual attention and excellent customer service. Let us help you get your rugs and upholstery ready for the holidays! Our services include:

Never Dries Out All Natural Ingredients 100% Non-Toxic Anti-Bacterial

• In-Plant Cleaning of Orientals, Dhurries, Silks and Upholstery • On Location Cleaning Services

Watch it come to life in your hands!

• Hot-Water Extraction • Odor Control • Carpet Inspections, Corrections and Repairs • Solvent Dry Cleaning (In-Plant Only) • Water Damage Restoration and Structure Drying

LIKE US ON

We’d like to add you to our long list of satisfied customers. Call us today at 864-232-9015 for a free estimate. We look forward to serving you!

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL

Augusta Commons • 2222 Augusta St, Greenville 864.232.4731 • www.elephantstrunktoys.com

CARPET, RUG & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING, INC. IKE’S 128 Poinsett Hwy., Greenville, SC • 864-232-9015 • www.ikescarpet.com

DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 35


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OUR COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY NEWS, EVENTS AND HAPPENINGS

Sugar Creek presents its sixth annual Jingle Bell Jog on Dec. 14 at the Sugar Creek III Clubhouse, 119 Stonecrest Road, in Greer. The ¾-mile Elf Run starts at 2:15 p.m. and the Jingle Bell Jog 5K starts at 3 p.m. The public is invited to participate and Publix will provide post-race food. Register at sugarcreekfunruns.com or go-greenevents.com/SugarCreekJBJ2013. South Carolina author William Woodson will be signing copies of his debut novel, “Waccamaw Gold,” at Fiction Addiction on Dec. 18, 4:30-7 p.m. The novel focuses on the events after the death of Molly Commander, reaching from Lowcountry South Carolina to the private clubs of New York City. The event is free and open to the public. Wine and cheese will be served. If you cannot make the signing, reserve a personalized copy of the book by contacting Fiction Addiction in advance at 864-675-0540 or at info@fiction-addiction.com. Bon Secours St. Francis presents live holiday music in its various locations: In the Eastside, Outpatient Lobby on Dec. 17 at 2:30 p.m. will be Rita Dunn on harp and Susan Dunn on Pennywhistle and on Dec. 18 at 11 a.m. will be Lucy Allen and Marshall Goers with Celtic music. In the Downtown Main Lobby on Dec. 17 at 11:30 a.m. will be the St. Anthony of Padua Children’s Choir; Dec. 18 at 1 p.m., Angela Jackson on harp. On Dec. 19 at noon will be the White Horse Academy Carolers followed by Aubrey Elliott on harp and Ardis Chetta on violin at 2:30 p.m. For more information, visit stfrancishealth.org. When torrential summer rains fell this summer, the South Carolina Botanical Garden in Clemson was one the most devastated victims. Flooding forced the garden to close for a time, and some of the damage lingers. On Dec. 15, 3 p.m., Lea Kibler, a flute professor in the Clemson University performing arts department, will be joined by harpist Lelia Lattimore and speaker Phil Sageser in a benefit con-

The Latest Designer Finds Make Great Gifts

20% OFF

cert for one of Clemson’s most scenic destinations. The concert, “A Child’s Christmas in Wales,” is themed around Welsh writer Dylan Thomas’ work of the same name. Proceeds will help with garden flood damage. Audience members will receive a 25 percent discount in the garden gift shop that afternoon (Garden Friends receive an extra 10 percent). The concert will in the Fuller Gallery at the garden. Tickets are $20 and can be purchased at the door or through clemson.edu/scbg. Seating is limited. The South Carolina Department of Corrections program Operation Get Smart will visit Mauldin on Dec. 16 at 6 p.m. at the Mauldin Cultural Center. The program uses testimonials from a panel of current inmates, all of whom have been extensively screened by the SC DOC, to encourage audiences, especially youth, to make good decisions and avoid criminal behavior later in life. Presented by The Mentoring And Leadership Development Institute (TMALDI) and the City of Mauldin, the event is free and open to the public. Parents and children of all ages are encouraged to attend this powerful event. Light refreshments will also be provided. For more information, visit mauldinculturalcenter.org. The Mauldin Cultural Center is located at 101 East Butler Road in Mauldin Just in time for the holiday season, Clemson University carillonneur Linda Dzuris has released “Carillon for Christmas,” a limited-edition CD that is the first professional recording of music from the Clemson University Memorial Carillon. The CD is available at clemson.edu or in the main office (room 221) of the Brooks Center for the Performing Arts. Greenville Health System’s Greenville Memorial Hospital recently received the Outstanding Partner Award from the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control during its annual HIV/STD Conference.

Fresh Wreaths and Garlands are here!

$10 OFF

Any One Regularly Priced Item

Any Purchase of $50 or More Valid through December 16, 2013.

Expires 12/16/13. Valid on in-stock items only. Can not be combined with any other offers. Not valid with groupon voucher.

Not valid with any other discounts or Groupon vouchers.

We appreciate our customers who shop local with us! GIFTS • HOME DECOR • OCCASIONAL PIECES • ACCENTS 864-241-0100 2222 augusta street, unit 7 4roomsgreenville.com mon-sat 10am-6pm; sun 1-5pm

36 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013

2249 Augusta Street, Greenville (Across the street from Foxfire) www.RootsofGreenville.com | 864-241-0100 Open Sundays from 1-5pm


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OUR COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY NEWS, EVENTS AND HAPPENINGS

The hospital was commended as a service provider, community partner and leader in an effort to improve the health of South Carolinians. For the past five years, the hospital’s laboratory services and emergency department have worked collaboratively under a grant to offer free HIV screenings.

YOU E V HA

SEEN THE LIG H

TS

?

TEDxGreenville will host its December 2013 salon, “Encore!,” on Dec. 17, 6-7:30 p.m., at Zen in downtown Greenville. The event is free and will feature Mayor Knox White and educator Thomas Riddle. For more information, contact salons@tedxgreenville.com. ROTARY CLUB OF GREENVILLE

The Admissions and Registration Center at Greenville Technical College will be open during the holidays to serve people seeking to enroll in classes. Admissions, financial aid, testing, advising and registration, students records and veterans services will be available on Dec. 23, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Dec. 27, 8 a.m.-1 p.m.; Dec. 30, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Jan. 2, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; and on Jan. 3, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Information on enrollment at Greenville Tech is available at gvltec.edu/enrollment_steps. The Pavilion is offering new sessions of classes and activities including: Learn to Skate and Learn to Play Hockey – new sessions on Jan. 6; Adult Ice Hockey, which begins Jan. 12 with a registration deadline on Dec. 29; Indoor Soccer, which begins on Jan. 6 with a registration deadline on Dec. 30; and Volleyball, which begins on Jan. 16 with a registration deadline on Jan. 12. In addition, Westside Aquatic Complex is offering a no-joining-fee special during January for both monthly and yearly memberships. Members have access to both pools, all water aerobics classes, Zumba classes, the fitness center, the weight area and the Fun Zone. Passes are available for households, children, adults and seniors. For more information, visit greenvillerec.com. Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey will present “LEGENDS!,” the world premiere of a new show, Jan. 29–Feb. 2, 2014 at the Bon Secours Wellness Arena. Tickets are $15, $20, $25, $45, and $60. All seats are reserved, and tickets are available through Ticketmaster and the BSW Arena Box Office. For group rates and information, call 864-241-3800. Visit bonsecoursarena.com for more information. The Greenville Dirt Series, a collection of six trail races over 11 months at two different parks crowning one champion, begins with the Ice Breaker 8K on Jan. 25. The series continues with the Easter Bunny Trail Hop 5K on April 19 and the Get Out Greenville 10K on Oct. 4 at Lake Conestee Nature Park. In addition, the Paris Mountain 12K will be on May 31, the Paris Mountain 7K will be Aug. 9, and the Paris Mountain 16K will be Nov. 1 at Paris Mountain State Park. For more information, visit greenvillerec.com/trailraces. Lake Hartwell Sail and Power Squadron will offer the America’s Boating Course on Feb. 22, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at Messiah Lutheran Church, 1100 Log Shoals Road, Mauldin. The eight-hour course covers boat handling, anchoring, finding directions, adverse conditions and using the marine radio. Cost is $40 including text for the family. For more information and to register, email education@lake-hartwell.org. Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America – South Carolina Chapter will host a memorial event, “No More Silence,” on Dec. 14, 10 a.m., at St. Anthony of Padua Catholic Church in honor of the 20 children and six adults murdered one year ago at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, CT. Moms in the Upstate will honor the Newtown victims and all victims of gun violence through bell ringing in lieu of a moment of silence. The event is sponsored by Mayors Against Illegal Guns, St. Anthony of Padua Catholic Church, Think Twice and Organizing for Action. There will be “No More Silence” events in 35 states. A full list of events is at momsdemandaction.org/ no-more-silence.

Submit entries to community@communityjournals.com.

Now through December 30th Open Nightly from 6:00 pm–10:00 pm Before you enjoy the 1.5 mile drive through the lights, be sure to visit

Winter Wonderland (Open until 9:00 pm)

n Santa (through Dec. 24) n A Gift Shop n Balloon art from the Balloon Elf n Face Painters n Concession Stands— drinks, snacks, and S’more Roasting Kits to make over a fire pit right there in Winter Wonderland n NEW THIS YEAR! Santa’s Living Room where you may purchase family photos taken by a professional photographer n 22 Giant Holiday Cards created by students from local Greenville County Schools

Stay connected through Facebook and our website, RoperMountainHolidayLights.com.

ADMISSION PER VEHICLE:

Car, Minivan or SUV: $10 Mon–Thurs; $15 Fri–Sun Activity Vans: $25 | Buses: $50 Multi Car Pass: $25. Good for three (3) visits. Saves $5–$20! Purchase at Gate. Cash and Checks Only.

Upcoming Events in Winter Wonderland SUNDAY, DEC. 15 THE CASHION CHORUS, ROBERT E. CASHION ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, 6:30PM IN THE OUTDOOR AMPHITHEATRE MONDAY, DEC. 16 LEAGUE ACADEMY ADVANCED CHOIR, 6:457:15PM IN THE OUTDOOR AMPHITHEATRE & DOG NIGHT THURSDAY, DEC. 19 MEET THE CLEMSON TIGER, 78:15PM THURSDAY, DEC. 26 THROUGH MONDAY, DEC. 30 DON’T MISS THE HOLIDAY BEAR!, 69PM

ROPER MOUNTAIN HOLIDAY LIGHTS 402 ROPER MOUNTAIN ROAD, GREENVILLE DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 37


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

THE GOOD

EVENTS THAT MAKE OUR COMMUNITY BETTER The Boy Scouts of America Blue Ridge Council will hold an open house and dedication of the new Three Forks Lodge at Camp Old Indian on Dec. 15, 3-5 p.m. Light food and refreshments will be served. Three Forks Lodge will serve as the headquarters for a year-round Camp Master program, conservation programs and as the summer camp directors’ residence. For more information, visit blueridgecouncil.org. Bike Street USA is making the holidays and the New Year a little better for youth in the Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Upstate program by donating 150 bicycles. Bikes will be distributed throughout the Upstate in the BBBS six-county service region of Anderson, Greenville, Laurens, Pickens, Oconee and Spartanburg County in the upcoming weeks. Fifty bicycles were distributed at the BBBS Annual Christmas Party in Spartanburg.

George and Rich Hincapie of Hincapie Sportswear recently presented $15,000 to Meals on Wheels of Greenville to help the organization provide meals to homebound individuals throughout the holidays. The donation comes from proceeds generated by Hincapie’s yearly ride, the Gran Fondo Hincapie. More than 1,200 cyclists from around the globe participated in the October ride.

Former “The Voice” contestant Delvin Choice will perform at a benefit concert called “Soulful Christmas” on Dec. 18 at 8 p.m. at The Handlebar, 304 E. Stone Ave., Greenville. The concert will benefit the South Carolina Youth Advocate Program and supply toys to children for the holiday season. The show will also feature vocalists Whitney Walters, Jamie Wright and Trey Frances along with Big Ted Sherard on drums, saxophonist Tom Wright and Dyrall Searles on keys. Donations of toys, clothing and other gifts will be accepted at the door. Tickets are available at The Handlebar in advance and at the door. Visit handlebar-online.com for more information.

Please Don’t Forget

Giving Changes Lives -

United Ministries has received a $25,000 matching gift challenge from Alvin and Wanda McCall Charities for any monetary gift given during the month of December. All donations through Dec. 31 will count toward this matching gift challenge. Funds raised from the matching gift challenge will benefit all United Ministries’ programs and services, including financial stabilization of participants. For more information, visit united-ministries.org or contact Teresa Skinner, director of development, at tskinner@united-ministries.org or 864-335-2614. The first-ever Southern Skyline Grand Ball will be held at the Hyatt Regency Hotel on Dec. 31, beginning at 9 p.m. The event benefits the Shriners Hospitals for Children. A black-tie-optional event, participants are invited to enjoy heavy hors d’oeuvres and a full-service bar. Celebration highlights kick off with the David Higgins Band. The cost of the event is $125 per person or $200 per person for VIP. Tickets are now on sale and available at southern-skyline.com. For more information, visit the website or Facebook event page at facebook.com/southernskyline. Members of The Greenville Woodworkers Guild made more than 700 Christmas toys this year that will be donated to children at over 15 local charities this holiday season. The guild’s more than 675 members craft toys each year, including trucks, trains, airplanes, doll beds, spaceships and pull toys. Throughout the year, the guild creates everything from special bookshelves and other custom projects for more than 35 facilities like the Meyer Center for Special Children, Miracle Hill, Safe Harbor. Visit greenvillewoodworkers. com for more information.

Serving Greenville County since 1904

Direct Social Services | Emergency Homeless Shelters Food Pantry & Dining Hall | CSRC Rehabilitation Program www.salvationarmygreenville.org 864-235-4803 1-800-SAL-ARMY Please send your tax-deductible gift to the following address: The Salvation Army, P.O. Box 1237, Greenville, SC 29602

38 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013

Send announcements to community@communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL CULTURE

Take a hike

Book highlights some of Upstate’s best hiking trails CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com When Sherry Jackson moved from Texas to the Upstate, she traded a landscape that was flat and brown for a varied countryside that offered a plethora of hiking opportunities. Jackson, who grew up hiking the deserts, forests and mountains of Arizona with her family, began exploring the Upstate’s extensive trail system, discovering iconic places such as Table Rock and Jones Gap state parks and lesser-known places such as the Cottonwood Trail in the Edwin M.

Griffin Nature Preserve in Spartanburg and the Heron Trail in Lake Conestee Nature Park. Jackson, a staff writer for the Greenville Journal and Upstate Business Journal and a travel writer, discovered that there was no one place for people to go to find out about all of the trails in Greenville, Spartanburg, Pickens, Anderson, Oconee and Cherokee counties. “There were hiking guides for North and South Carolina. There were guides to waterfalls. But there was no one hiking guide for the Upstate,” Jackson said. HIKING continued on PAGE 40

We carry only the best shoes, equipment, and apparel available.

PLAY BALL!

Ove

m Co

2520 Wade Hampton Blvd., Greenville 864.268.6227 | FirstTeamSC.com Mon.-Fri. 9am-6pm; Sat. 9am-3pm

PHOTOS BY SHERRY JACKSON

es

fo ee

t b es

gift

m s co

of local vendors! uare feet q s 0 0 o Home and Garden! r 50,0 t Palmett

tic sele antas our f m o e fr

ction a

en h w s w He Kno local! p you sho

he lf. T rse u o ry

So shop with us for goodness sake! www.PalmettoHG.com • 2422 Laurens Rd • 864.234.4960 DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 39


JOURNAL CULTURE

HIKING continued from PAGE 39

She decided to write one. “Five-Star Trails: South Carolina Upstate” features descriptions of 30 trails in the Upstate, directions to the trailheads and information about nearby attractions. “As a travel writer, I frequently explore the South and beyond,” Jackson said, “but I am so amazed every day by the Upstate’s beauty and natural resources that it was really hard to narrow the list of hikes to 30. I decided to focus on variety.” The book features short, leisurely

walks such as the Lake Hartwell Dam walking trail and Greenville’s popular Swamp Rabbit Trail to strenuous Rainbow Falls trail in Jones Gap State Park and the hike to the top of Table Rock. Jackson rates each hike for scenery, trail condition, how suitable it is for children, difficulty and for solitude. Each of the trails in the book received five stars in at least one of the categories. One unfamiliar trail – Chau Ram County Park in Westminster – won five stars for scenery. “I had never heard about it before I PHOTOS BY SHERRY JACKSON

GIFTS CLASSES SUPPLIES Beads • Gemstones • Jewelry & Gifts • Free Design Services Custom Work • Repairs & Recycles • Classes & Parties by Reservation

864.235.2323 (BEAD) • www.beadedfrog.com 233 North Main Street, Downtown Greenville (across from the Hyatt) Hours: Tues.-Sat. 11-5:30; Thurs. 11-8; Sun. 1-5

40 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013

started researching the book,” Jackson said. “Even some of the locals don’t know the park exists.” But those who do find it will be rewarded with a nice hike, waterfalls, sandy beaches with water access for swimming and four major sets of rapids for kayaking, canoeing and tubing. “It is a gorgeous park,” Jackson said. Jackson said another trail that may be unfamiliar to some Upstate residents is the Cottonwood Trail in Edwin M. Griffin Nature Preserve, just minutes from downtown Spartanburg. The preserve was the Spartanburg Area Conservancy’s first project. The 11-acre urban preserve follows Lawson’s Fork Creek. Jackson’s favorite trail was Rainbow Falls, a challenging hike with a steep elevation change that will have trekkers working up a sweat. But even crawling over boulders is worth it when they see the 140-foot waterfall, Jackson said. “You come around the corner and there it is. It’s beautiful,” she said. “I think it’s the best waterfall hike in South Carolina.” Jackson left the National Recreation Trail at Table Rock State Park for last. She says the 8.6-mile, out-and-back hike to the top of Table Rock should be on the bucket list of every hiker who

“I am so amazed every day by the Upstate’s beauty and natural resources that it was really hard to narrow the list of hikes to 30. I decided to focus on variety.” Sherry Jackson

lives or visits the Upstate. But it’s not for the faint of heart. “Even the most serious hiker will find the hike challenging,” Jackson says – but the effort is worth it. From the top of the large granite rock, hikers are rewarded with views of the surrounding mountains, a watershed and, on clear days, the city of Greenville. “Five-Star Trails: South Carolina Upstate” also includes information about weather, clothing and essential gear, what should be packed in a first-aid kit, general safety tips and trail etiquette. The book is available from the Menasha Ridge Press website (menasharidge. com), online booksellers and at REI in Greenville.


JOURNAL CULTURE

GLT puts on first-ever children’s Christmas show Story of “Rudolph” will appeal to all ages CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Greenville Little Theatre has a special gift for kids this year – the theater is presenting its first-ever children’s Christmas show. The best news is that “Rudolph” will appeal to adults, too, said Allan McCalla, the theater’s artistic director. Playwright Catherine Bush expanded the familiar song “Rudolph the RedNosed Reindeer” into a play that was produced for the first time by the Barter Theatre in Abingdon, Va., in 2011. Mandy Williams wrote the music. “It is a terrific script,” McCalla said. “Adults will find humor in it and kids will love it. The best children’s pieces appeal to adults as well and this one does.” The play opens with one week to go until Christmas. The reindeer not on the Air Team are working hard to com-

plete their tasks while dreaming about one day flying with Santa. After a test flight results in disaster, Santa must replace the whole Air Team immediately. Dasher, Prancer, Comet and Blitzen are determined to qualify for the new Air Team. They are equally determined to keep Rudolph off the team; his shiny red nose makes him different – and they think different is bad. But Rudolph doesn’t give up and when Christmas Eve turns out to be foggy, he saves the day. “We find out different is not a bad thing,” McCalla said. For the last decade, a small troupe of actors from GLT has conducted a

program where they perform in schools. Typically, the troupe does a public performance in the spring, McCalla said. This year, the actors suggested the public performance be done at Christmas. McCalla’s son, Sam, had worked at the Barter Theatre when it produced “Rudolph.” The play also fits on the set of “It’s a Wonderful Life,” one of GLT’s main stage productions. Sam McCalla plays Dasher in the GLT production. Audrey Layne Crocker is Rudolph, Katie King is Prancer, Cory Granner is Comet and Laura Skyes is Blitzen. Tim St. Clair II plays Santa Claus. The play will last about an hour.

“Rudolph” is in town for one weekend only. It opens Friday, Dec. 13, at 10:30 a.m. On Saturday, there are two shows – at 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. A 7 p.m. show on Sunday night wraps it up. Tickets are $10 each. GLT is teaming up with the Children’s Museum of the Upstate for a “double play” promotion, which for $15 includes a ticket to “Rudolph” and an admission to the Children’s Museum during the month of December. McCalla said if “Rudolph” is successful, GLT might incorporate a children’s Christmas show into its schedule in future years.

SO YOU KNOW WHAT: “Rudolph” WHERE: Greenville Little Theatre WHEN: Dec. 13, 10:30 a.m. Dec. 14, 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. Dec. 15, 7 p.m. TICKETS: $10 INFORMATION: greenvillelittletheatre. org or 864-233-6238

DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 41


JOURNAL CULTURE Martha Franks Baptist Retirement Community Laurens, South Carolina

"I'mModern Glad My Mom The Seniors: Still young and Isfeel Secure!" “on-the-go”!

Retirement Community living provides services, security and freedom.

A R T S CALENDAR DECEMBER 13-19

Greenville Chorale Christmas with the Chorale Dec. 13 ~ 467-3000 Greenville Little Theatre Rudolph Dec. 13-15 ~ 233-6238 International Ballet The Nutcracker Dec. 13-15 ~ 467-3000

Tim Mahon with his mother, Lydie Mahon, who enjoys residential, independent living at Martha Franks

* Cottages * Patio Homes * Apartments * Residential and Assisted Living Ed and Betty Corley recently joined * Rehab * Skilled Nursing Care Martha Franks Community and enjoy a beautiful cottage with no maintenance! Ask About Our Summer Gift Offer!

• Tour OneNow remodeled and Receive aand FREEdiscounted COFFEE MUG Patio Home available CALL LISA YARBER TODAY FOR A FREE BROCHURE! • One larger garden apartment available

864-984-4541 or toll free 1-800-849-3307

864-984-4541

Younts Center for Performing Arts A Christmas Carol Through Dec. 15 ~ 409-1050

Greenville County Museum of Art Wizards of Pop Through Dec. 29 ~ 271-7570

Greenville Light Opera Works Amahl & the Night Visitors Dec. 16-18 ~ 409-1050

Main Street Real Estate Gallery Photography by George Lee Through Dec. 31 ~ 250-2850

Centre Stage Irena’s Vow Dec. 17 ~ 233-6733

Foothills Philharmonic Annual Christmas Concert Dec. 14 ~ 268-8743

Peace Center Celtic Woman Dec. 17 ~ 467-3000

Centre Stage A Christmas Carol Through Dec. 14 ~ 233-6733

Younts Center for Performing Arts Old-Time Radio Xmas Review Dec. 19 ~ 409-1050

Greenville Little Theatre It’s a Wonderful Life Through Dec. 15 ~ 233-6238

The Warehouse Theatre Avenue Q Through Dec. 21 ~ 235-6948

SC Children’s Theatre Jingle Arrgh the Way Through Dec. 15 ~ 467-3000

Younts Center for Performing Arts Spirit of Christmas Past Festival Through Dec. 22 ~ 409-1050

Greenville Chamber of Commerce Mon. Night Painters Batik Show Through Jan. 10 ~ 242-1050 Metro. Arts Council at Centre Stage Works by Marquin Campbell Through Jan. 13 ~ 233-6733

See www.marthafranks.com

See www.marthafranks.com Cottages • Patio Homes • Apartments Residential Living • Assisted Living Skilled Nursing • Short-Term Rehab

SC Gift Items!

3219 Augusta St., Greenville • M-F 9-6; Sat. 9-3 • 864-277-4180 • ThePickwick.net 42 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013


JOURNAL CULTURE

‘I Know Santa Very Well’ Successful Kickstarter campaign turns poem into Christmas book CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Author Kate Salley Palmer didn’t set out to write a children’s book when she wrote, “I Know Santa Very Well,” a few years ago. She was just writing a poem. “I write stupid little poems. I wouldn’t say I write poetry,” she said. But her daughter, Salley, liked the poem and suggested that Warbranch Press, the family-owned publishing company started 15 years ago by Palmer and her husband, Jim, publish the book. Palmer could use Kickstarter – a crowd-funding website – to raise the money to pay for the printing, her daughter said. Palmer said she used to hide from Santa as a kid because she thought he knew she had been bad. Now, when she hears parents tell their children “Santa’s watching – you better be good,” she thinks of it “as a

metaphor for a parent’s unconditional love. I think it’s a good message for Christmas, for kids to be reminded they are loved by somebody and Santa is not scary.” Palmer, who worked for the Greenville News as an editorial cartoonist from 1978 to 1984 and was a nationally syndicated political cartoonist, did the illustrations for “I Know Santa Very Well” while the Kickstarter campaign was ongoing. The book is the first in a new line of small poetry picture books called “Little Tales.” It is Palmer’s first rhyming book. “Big publishers don’t like you to rhyme in books,” she said. “Not everybody is Dr. Seuss.” She has also written a poem, “Couldn’t Do My Homework,” which is based on one of the excuses she heard her niece used for not doing her homework. “She tried to say she couldn’t do her homework because her toes stuck together,” she said. That excuse didn’t work. “I Know Santa Very Well” can be purchased on the Warbranch Press website (warbranchpress.com) or from online booksellers.

Holiday Party for Children Saturday, December 14, 2013 2 pm until 4 pm Enjoy hands-on art activities, light refreshments, and a visit with Santa Claus!

Admission is free. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Greenville County Museum of Art

southern skyline presents

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org

NEW YEAR’S 2014

GCMA-1417 Holiday Party Journal.indd 1

12/10/13 4:07 PM

presents tsouthern u e s d a y,skyline decem b e r 3 1 | H ya t t r e g e n c y g r e e n v i l l e

1 9PM 1 9PM

NEW YEAR’SE 2014 NJOY s h r i n e r s annual ben eF it ing

st

t u e s d a y, d e c eGmRb A e rN 3d1 hospitals B A l l

For cHildren ben eF it ing

st

livemusic & BAR

| H ya t t r e g e n c y g r e e n v i oPen lle

+ heavy hors d’oeuvres

ENJOY

swww.southern-skyline.com h r i n e r s annual | facebook.com/southernskyline hospitals

For cHildren

GRANd

B A l l

oPen & live music BAR + heavy hors d’oeuvres

www.southern-skyline.com | facebook.com/southernskyline

JM Smith Foundation, the philanthropic agency for JM Smith Corporation of Spartanburg, was recognized as Chapman Cultural Center’s Corporate Cultural Champion for 2013. The foundation was honored at an event attended by more than 100 leaders in businesses that have a commitment to the advancement of the arts in Spartanburg through the United Arts Campaign. The Corporate Cultural Champion award is given annually to a business partner in recognition of its support of the United Arts Campaign.

DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 43


JOURNAL CULTURE

LISTEN UP

BEST BETS FOR LOCAL LIVE MUSIC 1 2 / 1 3 , B L U E S B O U L E VA R D (GREENVILLE)

Saffron’s Catering For Life’s Simple Pleasures 864.241.0401 | saffronscafe@yahoo.com

Melodious Earth Cool jazz/swing sextet. Tickets: $5. Call 864-242-2583 or visit bluesboulevardjazz.com.

12/14, GOTTROCKS

BEiTHEMEANS Swaggering heavy rock. Call 864-235-5519 or visit reverbnation.com/venue/255976. 12/17, PEACE CENTER

12/13, GOTTROCKS

BIG Something Diverse rock sextet. Call 864-235-5519 or visit reverbnation.com/venue/255976. 12/13, THE HANDLEBAR

Southern Culture on the Skids Everyone’s favorite Southern-fried trash-rock trio returns. Tickets: $15. Call 864-233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com.

Celtic Woman “Home For Christmas” symphony tour. Tickets: $65-$95. Call 864-467-3000 or visit peacecenter.org. 1 2 / 1 8 , B L U E S B O U L E VA R D (GREENVILLE)

Hans Wenzel Former Noxious frontman blends rock and soul solo. Call 864-242-2583 or visit bluesboulevardjazz.com.

12/13, RADIO ROOM

Islander Raging thrash. Call 864-263-7868 or visit wpbrradioroom.com.

12/18, GROUND ZERO

Razorz Edge Edgy electronic noise. Call 864-948-1661 or visit reverbnation.com/venue/groundzero2.

12/13, SMILEY’S ACOUSTIC CAFÉ

The Acoustic Bad Popes Greenville supergroup strips down. Call 864-282-8988 or visit smileysacousticcafe.com. 1 2 / 1 4 , B L U E S B O U L E VA R D (GREENVILLE)

Wade Baker Jazz Group Eclectic fusion of jazz, hip-hop and funk. Tickets: $5. Call 864-242-2583 or visit bluesboulevardjazz.com. 12/14, THE HANDLEBAR

Mayhem & Rell The Soundbender Drum ’n’ bass, dubstep rising stars. Tickets: $15. Call 864-233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com. 12/14, RADIO ROOM

Joie Eerily atmospheric group celebrates album release. Call 864-263-7868 or visit wpbrradioroom.com. 12/14, SMILEY’S ACOUSTIC CAFÉ

Kenny George Band Laid-back, soulful rock. Call 864-282-8988 or visit smileysacousticcafe.com.

44 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013

12/18, INDEPENDENT PUBLIC ALE HOUSE

Stereo Reform Electro rock-dance duo. Call 864-552-1265 or visit reverbnation.com/venue/ independentpublicalehouse. 12/18, RADIO ROOM

Brigades Anthemic emo-rock quintet. Call 864-263-7868 or visit wpbrradioroom.com. 1 2 / 1 9 , B L U E S B O U L E VA R D (GREENVILLE)

Tameka Diaz & The Sweet Addiction Project Sultry R&B/jazz diva. Call 864-242-2583 or visit bluesboulevardjazz.com. 12/19, INDEPENDENT PUBLIC ALE HOUSE

Tonight’s Noise Electric-acoustic jam trio. Call 864-552-1265 or visit reverbnation.com/venue/ independentpublicalehouse.


JOURNAL CULTURE

SOUND CHECK

WITH VINCENT HARRIS

‘Dig This’ SCOTS brings its kitschy Southern surf-rock to town Sometimes, the things you’d rather not do turn out to be the most rewarding. Rick Miller, singer, guitarist and songwriter for Southern Culture On The Skids, has had just that experience. Southern Culture (or SCOTS, if you’re into the whole brevity thing) has been slinging the band’s one-of-a-kind brand of sleazy, greasy Southern surf-rock for more than 30 years. Miller’s choppedand-channeled, jagged-edge guitar, Mary Huff’s rock-solid bass and Dave Hartman’s heartbeat drumming have powered kitschy-but-catchy favorites like “Camel Walk,” “Mojo Box” and the immortal “Liquored Up and Lacquered Down.” They’ve recently released “Dig This,” a track-bytrack re-recording of their hard-to-find 1994 album, “Ditch Diggin’.” When I spoke to Miller, who is bringing SCOTS to Greenville this Friday, Dec. 13, he talked about both the fun and the practical reality of revisiting the band’s previous work. WHO: Southern Culture on the Skids What was behind the re-recording of the “Ditch Diggin’” songs for “Dig This?” WHEN: Friday, Dec. 13 We were getting our publishing in order, and WHERE: 4: 30 p.m.: Horizon Records, before we could put those songs into our cata2 W. Stone Ave., Greenville log, we needed to own them. I own the songs (864-235-7922 or because I wrote them, but the versions on the blog.horizonrecords.net) original album, “Ditch Diggin’,” are owned by 9 p.m.: The Handlebar, our old record label – and ownership is a big 304 E. Stone Ave., Greenville deal. If you own the publishing AND perform(864-233-6173 or ing rights, you get all the money. handlebar-online.com) So we decided we would re-record the album. I don’t have the discipline to listen to our songs and re-record them note-for-note, so we came up with new versions. Everything’s a little bit different, and some things are a lot different. When we got done with it, we weren’t thinking we were going to release it or anything. But it turned out so well that we thought we should put it out. So we thought we’d make it a nice package and put it out. When you’re doing something like that for financial reasons, is it a challenge to be enthusiastic about the project? Once I decided I didn’t want to do versions just like the old ones, it got a lot more fun (laughs). Because you have moments where you think, “Wow, I wish I would’ve done this or that on that song, or this approach would’ve been really neat.” Hindsight is 20/20. So it’s fun, especially if you’ve been a band as long as we have, to go back 20 years in your catalogue and re-do something but update it. It’s not a revival but a revision. I felt like we could play it so much better now. Were there songs on the album that surprised you when you went back to them? Oh yeah. There were some great songs on that album that never really got a fair shake. I thought that “My House Has Wheels” and “Too Much Pork” and “Put Your Teeth on the Windowsill” and some of the instrumentals were good songs. The songs are 20 years old, but “Dig This” is like a brand-new record to me. How have you managed to keep SCOTS together? It’s been over 25 years, right? Thirty years. I started the band in ’83, and Mary and Dave joined in 1987. I just think we’ve always made our own decisions, good or bad. I think what tears bands apart a lot of times is when decisions are made for them by people who are supposed to be looking out for them. We’ve always been very independent. And now, I have a studio. We have our own production facilities. We do all of our records on our own label now. It’s about making your own choices. You make a bad choice; you shrug it off and move on. You don’t hold grudges or get mad. But also, we have fun. We play music that’s fun to listen to and we have a show that people enjoy. We’re lucky. VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 45


JOURNAL CULTURE

SCENE. HERE.

THE WEEK IN THE LOCAL ARTS WORLD

The Art Haven at the Younts Center presents “Kids ‘n’ Canvas” on Dec. 14, 10 a.m.-noon. Children ages 4 and older are invited to paint a snowman in acrylics. Cost is $25 per child and refreshments will be provided. Call 864-409-1050 to register. Bob Jones University will present the Bob Jones Academy Elementary Choir on Dec. 13 at 12:15 p.m. at the Student Center Mall. On Dec. 14, the BJU Symphony Orchestra and combined choirs will perform in Rodeheaver Auditorium at 7 and 8:30 p.m. in a show called “Joy Has Dawned.” The trombone choir will perform Dec. 17 at noon at the Woodlands at Furman. The Advent Organ recital will be Dec. 18 in the War Memorial Chapel at 12:10 p.m. For more information, visit bju.edu. The Upstate South Carolina Tuba Christmas concert will be on Dec. 14 at 11:30 a.m. at the UBS Ice on Main (adjacent to the Courtyard Marriott) in downtown Greenville. The concert is free. For more information, visit tubachristmas.com. The Warehouse Theatre will host additional performances of “Avenue Q” on Dec. 18 and 21. Tickets are $35 and can be purchased at warehousetheatre.com. The Fine Arts Center is hosting the Metals Students Holiday Sale now through Dec. 18. Fifty percent of sales price is paid to the student artist and the other 50 percent supports the school’s metals department. Sale times are before and after morning and afternoon classes (9-9:15 a.m., 11:05-11:20

46 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013

a.m., 1:10-1:30 p.m., 3:20-4 p.m.), before every evening performance, and by appointment by calling 864-355-2671 or email kcassell@greenville.k12.sc.us. The Carolina Bronze handbell ensemble will present a free concert on Dec. 21 at 11 a.m. at Ice on Main, 208 S. Main St., in Greenville. For more information, visit carolinabronze. net or call 864-238-4639. Flat Rock Playhouse presents “A Christmas Story” now through Dec. 22 at the Flat Rock Playhouse Mainstage. Performances will be Wednesday through Saturday at 8 p.m.; matinees Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. All tickets are $35 and can be purchased by calling 828693-0731, 866-732-8008 or online at flatrockplayhouse.org. Discounts are available for seniors, AAA members, military personnel, students and groups. Playhouse Mainstage is located at 2661 Greenville Highway in Flat Rock, N.C. The Pride of Greenville Men’s Chorus will present their third annual holiday concert, “Don We Now Our Straight Apparel,” on Dec. 21 at 8 p.m. at the Greenville Little Theatre, 444 College St., Greenville. The chorus will again be joined by Cantaria: The Gay Men’s Chorus of Asheville, the Pride of Greenville Community Chorus and the Pride of Greenville Orchestra. The cost is $15-$25. Visit pogmc.buylocalsimpsonville.com for more information.

Send announcements to arts@communityjournals.com.

The holiday classic “A Christmas Carol” will be performed on Dec. 13 and 14 at 7:30 p.m. and Dec. 15 at 3 p.m. at the Younts Center for Performing Arts, 315 N. Main St., in Fountain Inn. Tickets are $18, $15 and $10. For more information, call 864-409-1050 or visit yountscenter.org.


JOURNAL HOMES

REPRESENTATIVE FINISHES

Featured Homes & Neighborhoods | Open Houses | Property Transfers

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED HOME

HOME INFO 120 E. Augusta Place, Greenville Oasis Custom Homes, another brand new home TO BE BUILT in the heart of established Augusta Road Area, on 1/3 acre “walk out basement lot” on E Augusta Place. Three bedrooms, two and a half baths about 2800 square feet, plus 2 car attached garage/ this home will feature all the same fine finishes that Oasis Custom Homes always includes, such as site finished hardwood floors, 9 ft ceilings, granite counters in the kitchen AND baths, true Jack’n’Jill bathroom for the kids’

G

Joan Herlong, Owner, Broker in Charge AugustaRoad.com Realty, LLC | 864.325.2112 To submit your Featured Home: homes@greenvillejournal.com

ILDING ... with your family

ASIS CUSTOM HOMES

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

in mind.

C23R

BU UILD

O

bathrooms, and a truly luxurious master bath with dual sinks, separate glass/ceramic tile shower and tub, separate water closet and walk in closet with custom organizers. Oasis kitchens ALWAYS feature custom cabinetry by local cabinet maker, and top of the line stainless steel appliances, ceramic tile backsplash and DESIGNER LIGHTING THROUGHOUT.   Oasis is ready to customize this for you, or will cost out your own plans for this lot.  Contact listing agent Joan Herlong.

Price: $449,605 | Square Footage: 2800 Bedrooms: 3 Baths: 2 full, 1 half | Garage: 2-car attached Schools: Blythe Elementary | Hughes Middle Greenville High

· oasiscustomhomes.com · 864-292-5901

Marketed exclusively by Joan Herlong, BIC 864-325-2112 AugustaRoad.com

DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 47


JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND WOODBRIDGE

O P E N S U N D AY, D E C. 15 F R O M 2 – 4 P M 719 BROOKDALE DR . $329,900 . MLS#1270812 4BR/3.5BA FULL BRICK EXTERIOR, +/-.59 ACRE, LARGE BACKYARD Wade Hampton Blvd toward Greer, Left on Hwy 290, Right on N. Hwy 101, Left into SD on Brookdale Dr Contact: Chet Smith 458-SOLD(7653) Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

MLS #1267511 EASLEY

3 Beds/2 Baths | 2400-2599 Sqft

ALTAMONT TERRACE

7 ALTAMONT TERRACE . $295,900 . MLS#1269653 4BR/2.5BA Home is in terrific shape & move-in ready! Dream home. Hwy 25, Right on Roe Ford Rd, Left on Old Buncombe Rd, Right on Altamont, Left on Altamont Terrace Ln Contact: Doug Banner 640-6800 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

MLS #1268952

POPLAR FOREST

GREER

4 Beds/ 2.5 Baths | 2800-2999 Sqft

5 CREVASSE LANE . $192,500 . MLS#1267531 3BR/2BA Elegant stone fascia. Picture perfect lovely home with bonus room From Cherrydale pass Furman, Left on New Roe Ford Rd, Right on Hwy 25 Bypass, Left on Foothills Contact: Elvin Rivera 921-4733 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

HARTS LANE

MLS #1270650

110 SHEA CT . $184,999 . MLS#1265949 3BR/2.5BA Fantastic home on Cuk-de-sac lot. Woodruff Rd to Right on Hwy 14, Left on Harts Ln, Left into SD on Paranor Dr, Right on Shea

SIMPSONVILLE

4 Beds/4 Baths | 3600-3799 Sqft

Contact: Barry Ledford 399-2254 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

NORTH MAIN AREA MLS #1270855 SPARTANBURG 4 Beds/2.5 Baths | 2000-2199 Sqft

kw ®

KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY

®

Each Keller Williams Realty Office is Independently Owned and Operated

48 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013

200 W. HILLCREST DR . $164,000 . MLS#1270486 2BR/1BA Charming home in the highly desirable North Main neighborhood. Stone Ave to Right on N. Main, Left on Hillcrest, Cross Townes & continue on West Hillcrest. Contact: Kim Redden 608-0253 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


JOURNAL HOMES

F E AT U R E D N E I G H B OR H O OD CT RA NT YS! O RC A DE 5 D N U IN

WILLIAMSTON 3 Beds/2 Baths | 1200-1399 Sqft

CT RA NT YS! O RC A DE 7 D UN IN 1

TRAVELERS REST 3 Beds/2.5 Baths | 2000–2199 Sqft

Coachman Plantation and the Estates at Coachman Plantation

NEIGHBORHOOD INFO Directions: From Greenville: Take I-385 South to Woodruff Road (Exit 35. Travel East on Woodruff Road for 7.4 miles. Turn right on East Georgia Road and drive 1.7 miles. Turn left on Coachman Drive for 1.2 miles and the entrance to Coachman Plantation is on the left. Model address is 5 Scotts Bluff Drive, Simpsonville, SC 29681. Schools: Rudolph D. Gordon Elementary Bryson Middle | Hillcrest High Contact: Edward Wingate, your D.R. Horton Sales Professional, at Coachman Plantation 615.414.7653

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

For years, Coachman Plantation has attracted homeowners who relish in the beauty and serenity of rolling country meadows, while being close to shopping, dining and great schools in Simpsonville. Today, Coachman Plantation and The Estates at Coachman Plantation offer gorgeous homes from the $200’s* built by the Nation’s Number One Builder**, D.R. Horton, on large homesites in a peaceful and tranquil country setting. D.R. Horton brings 35 years of national building expertise to Coachman Plantation. The ranch and two story homes include features such as signature trim package, generous hardwoods, granite countertops and backsplash and MUCH more…plus too many options to list! The beautiful swimming pool and cabana at Coachman Plantation are ready for your Spring enjoyment. With fantastic Grand Opening Incentives, now is the time to invest in your future with the beauty, privacy and quality of your own D.R. Horton Home in Coachman Plantation and the exclusive Estates at Coachman Plantation. Five homes are available now for Quick Move-In! *Home and community information including pricing, included features, terms, availability, and amenities are subject to change and prior sale at any time without notice or obligation. Pictures, photographs, colors, features and sizes are more illustration purposes only and will vary from the homes as built. **According to Builder Magazine.

T AC TR S! N O Y R C DA DE 38 N U IN

PIEDMONT 3 Beds/2 Baths | 1400-1599 Sqft

T AC TR S! N CO AY ER 4 D D UN IN 3

FOUNTAIN INN 3 Beds/2 Baths | 1400-1599 Sqft

864-527-7685 DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 49


JOURNAL HOMES re atu ICE n Sig W PR NE

re atu n g Si

re atu n g Si

re atu n g Si

116 Ridge Glen - Harrison Hills

102 Veronese Dr. - Montebello

119 Sherwood St. #101 - Ridgeland at the Park

4 Phillips Ln. - Augusta Rd.

$799,900 • 1252670 • 4 BR/3.5 BA

$749,000 • 1261495 • 5 BR/ 4.5 BA

$649,000 • 1267735 • 2 BR/2.5 BA

$594,000 • 1265590 • 4 BR/3.5 BA+ Bonus

Under appraised value! ≈ 8 acre country estate, 5C gar. w/2 BR, 1.5 BA apt, 2 story barn, salt water pool and more

Details!! L’scape yard, gourmet kitchen, fresh paint, new carpet, refinished hardwood floors and much more, plus amenitites.

Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 Chuck Miller 864.293.4778

Nancy McCrory 864.505.8367 Karen Turpin 864.230.5176

of l. rs inc 2 y fees do con

Premier location in the Alta Vista neighorhood. 2011 construction offering upscale luxury, extra storage, 1C garage. Walking distance to downtown.

New Construction. ≈ 4000 SF, 10’ ceiling down & 9’ ceiling up, beautiful finishes and 2C garage. Tom Marchant 864.449.1658

Tom Marchant 864.449.1658

ind e F des u iq ra Un upg w/

y es erg at En t Upd n cie Effi

lan rp o o at fl Gre

506 Summergreen Way - Warrenton

701 Montebello Dr. Unit 104 - Montebello

26 Crowsnest - Neely Farm

3 Dillworth Ct. - Highgrove Estate

$450,000 • 1252477 • 3 BR/3.5 BA

$299,000 • 1268051 • 4 BR/3.5 BA

$288,000 • 1267198 • 4 BR/2.5 BA

$259,900 • 1269319 • 4 BR/3.5 BA + Bonus

1 level, open corner unit condo. ≈ 3000 SF, offers guest wing, covered terrace, balcony, gourmet kitchen and amenities.

Fabulous home, end of quiet cul-de-sac location w/many upgrades. MBR on main level. Granite, hardwood flrs, dbl-sided flp, pvt wooded bkyd.

3000+ SF brick townhouse offering: granite, main floor MBR, dining room, laundry rm, and a screened-in porch. Immaculate condition!

3000+ SF home, great community & schools, mins to I-385 and GSP. Hdwds, fml DR, open GR w/ fpl, great kitchen storage, and fully fenced bkyard.

Nancy McCrory 864.505.8367 Karen Turpin 864.230.5176

Barb Riggs 864.423.2783

Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 Chuck Miller 864.293.4778

Jonathan Mullikin 864.449.4132

w Ne

t rpe Ca

m sto Cu

res atu e F

w Ne

n tio uc d Re ce Pri

g tin Lis

1 Mallard Ridge Pl. - Neely Farm

1 Matteson Brook Ln. - Matteson Brook

104 Forest Lake Dr. - Forest Lake

$259,000 • 1268285 • 4 BR/2.5 BA

$247,900 • 1268724 • 4 BR/2.5 BA

$214,921 • 1270671 • 3 BR/3 BA

Wonderful family home on quiet cul-de-sac w/ pvt wooded backyard. Custom scr-porch, lrg MBR suite, flexroom, upgrades & New carpet!

2600+ SF custom home featuring lrg BRs, Master on main lvl & unique sq. windows. Upds: Stainless appl. carpet, facets/lighting. Irr.. & Fenced yd.

Barb Riggs 864.423.2783

Barb Riggs 864.423.2783

Located in a gated community w/a lake. MBR on main or 2nd. Endless ceilings, tons of natural light, hardwoods, wet bar, sunroom, 2C garage, fenced yd & pvt patio.

ar n Ne ntow w Do

32 Bradley Blvd. - University Park

209 Marefair Ln. - Remington

308 Hyde Park Ln. - Butler Station

$179,921 • 1270302 • 3 BR/3 BA

$184,900 • 1266946 • 4 BR/2.5 BA

$159,900 • 1269121 • 3 BR/2.5 BA+ Bonus

Joan Rapp 864.901.3839

Mary Praytor 864.593.0366

ny es Ma pdat u W NE

3385 Knighton Chapel Rd. - Fountain Inn Log cabin on ≈2 acs. Master BR on the main lvl, gorgeous kitchen, sunroom, workshop, in-ground pool, fenced bkyd, and several outbuildings

$199,900 • 1268843 • 3 BR/1.5 BA

Great house, close to downtown, recently renovated, hardwood floors, rocking chair front porch and basement!

Joan Rapp 864.901.3839

le ab y sir nit De mmu Co

bin Ca g o L

1511 E. North St. - Overbrook

$119,000 • 1266748 • 3 BR/2 BA

Highly sought after Remington SD, with amazing curb appeal and second floor deck. Open flr plan, great for entertaining. Won’t Last!

Lovely home situationed on a .24 ac lot w/mature trees & fenced yd. Hdwds d’stairs, stainless appliances, 2C garage & many updates! Must see!

Adorable 1300+/- SF bungalow, near downtown. Fenced bkyd, open DR/LR. Updates: hdwds, new stainless appliances & paint.

James Akers 864.325.8413

Anne Marchant 864.420.0009 Jolene Wimberly 864.414.1688

Anne Marchant 864.420.0009 Jolene Wimberly 864.414.1688

RENTAL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE • Marchantpm.com

www.marchantco.com

50 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013

|

864.467.0085 | AGENT ON DUTY: Jolene Wimberly 864.414.1688

J53

Decades of Trust. Confidence in the Future. SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


JOURNAL HOMES

Legendary Communities Design Center

Legendary Communities announced the Grand Opening of the IDEA STUDIO. A unique way to define your home.

When building a home with Legendary Communities, the options are endless! With exterior and interior selections, and distinct details that truly define your home, all is accomplished within the IDEA Studio. Our homes are designed with Creative Coordinators that understand the complexities of the buying process and the decisions that need to be made to design your home with your personal style. 1200 Woodruff Road • Suite C-2 • Greenville • South Carolina • 29607

Visit any Legendary Community today or come tour the IDEA Studio to learn more about how we can turn your home buying experience from the purchase of a home to defining your IDENTITY!

AN EYE FOR

COLOR

www.LEGENDARYCOM .com

Agents on call this weekend

DANA MATHEWS 270-4722 PELHAM ROAD

MICHELLE RAFFERTY WANDA REED 607-8290 270-4078 GARLINGTON ROAD EASLEY/POWDERSVILLE

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

ROBIN ADEL 990-7406 SIMPSONVILLE

STACEY BRADSHAW CURRAN MORGAN 351-9706 230-1314 AUGUSTA ROAD N. PLEASANTBURG DR.

Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at cdanjoyner.com.

JULIA DICKEY 879-4239 GREER

DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 51


JOURNAL HOMES

G R E E N V I L L E T R A N S AC T ION S N O V E M B E R 18 - 2 2 , 2 013

SUBD.

MATRIX COLLINS CREEK PLANTATION ON PELHAM CLAREMONT

ABINGTON PARK MCRAE PARK RESERVE@GREEN VALLEY HUNTINGTON WEATHERSTONE WEATHERSTONE ESTATES@RIVERWOOD FARM

LEAFMORE WOODS ASHETON LAKES SILVER MEADOWS MCRAE PARK VILLAS@THORNBLADE CARISBROOKE PLEASANT VALLEY COUNTRY CHASE WOODLAND CREEK WOODLAND CREEK HAMMOND’S POINTE WEST FARM TERRA PINES ESTATES GREYSTONE COTTAGES GREYSTONE@NEELY FARMS NEELY FARM - IVEY CREEK BRIDGEWATER WOODLAND CREEK WHITEHALL PLANTATION MILL POND@RIVER SHOALS

PRICE

SELLER

BUYER

$6,100,000 $5,670,000 $1,900,000 $780,000 $770,000 $750,000 $724,000 $550,000 $540,000 $530,000 $477,975 $461,111 $450,630 $435,000 $430,000 $424,900 $424,900 $410,000 $405,000 $400,000 $399,953 $375,000 $370,000 $369,095 $340,000 $338,000 $333,001 $308,000 $304,139 $300,530 $300,000 $292,824 $290,000 $285,431 $285,000 $278,236 $270,000 $270,000 $267,500 $257,000 $255,000 $252,920

TRITEX REAL ESTATE ADVIS VTT GREENVILLE LLC 100 CONCORD ST 3RD FL PLAZA ON PELHAM LLC INDIAN LAND INVESTORS LL PO BOX 16053 WELLS FARGO BANK N A TODAH REALTY 500 MATRIX WEST STE100 RALLIS RONALD D JR JASMINE COVE APARTMENTS 32 S MAIN ST CUNNINGHAM RAYMOND C REV SOBRAY ALICE B (JTWROS) 126 BABBS HOLLOW RD PEOPLES BANK THE REDEMPTION WORLD OUTREAC 635 HAYWOOD RD GALLOWAY CUSTOM HOMES LL CLAY ALEX J (JTWROS) 420 CHAMBLEE BLVD HENDRIX WILLIAM H RALLIS RONALD D JR 209 N MAIN ST APT 204 BELL GEORGE C BENEDICT JUDITH L (JTWRO 402 HAMPTON AVE RISTORANTE BERGAMO INC JASMINE COVE APARTMENTS 32 S MAIN ST BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT ORR STACEY F PO BOX 1039 BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT MCCRARY KASEY (JTWROS) 108 MCRAE PL BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT RICHARDSON DAVID B (JTWR 34 WOOD LEAF TRL PARKER WILLIE E SPILKER ALAN J REVOCABLE 534 JAMESON RD BREEN AMY LEE HOLLY P (JTWROS) 328 S HARRISON BRIDGE RD MCMILLAN DENNON K (JTWRO AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL R 6 OAKLYNN CT AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL R COUTCH CHRYSTAL 6 OAKLYNN CT HIGGINBOTHAM ANNE M AHMED ABRAN (JTWROS) 201 TRAYMORE WAY HALL RUSSELL PHELPS CAREY K (JTWROS) 18 PINCKNEY ST KELLETT KATHY DIANE PRESBYTERIAN FELLOWSHIP PO BOX 429 BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT NELSON DENNIS L (JTWROS) 9 LEAFMORE CT MOORE JOHN J SHARONVIEW FEDERAL CREDI PO BOX 2070 WALTER CHRIS A DINUNZIO DOMINICK (JTWRO 109 BROCKTON CT BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT STEWART CHRISTINE M (JTW 224 PLEASANT ISLE LN ESTRIDGE DIANE M BUTLER SCOTT DAVID (JTWR 1400 THORNBLADE BLVD UNIT 7 DEL TORO WILFRED J HOPSON DOUGLAS ALAN (JTW 304 ROSEBUD LN FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA TESNER DONALD R 53 PLEASANT VALLEY TRL BANK OF AMERICA N A JAMES & COMPANY BUILDERS 1120 OWENS RD NVR INC TRULL JEANNETTE 6 LAUREL SPRINGS DR NVR INC SHAW JOSHUA D (JTWROS) 5 LAUREL SPRINGS DR TACKETT JAMES J FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA 1410 SPRING HILL RD MAILSTOP 7 MUNGO HOMES INC BERNSTEIN ARLENE 441 WESTERN LN HALL GREGORY W REVOCABLE CORLEY CHRISTOPHER TROY 220 TERRAMONT DR ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC CORNELISON MELINDA M (JT 814 SHANDWICK DR MILLER J GRADY JR TRUSTE GREEN ISABEL C (JTWROS) 127 LAKE CIRCLE DR FOX ALLISON CHRISTINA FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG 1001 SEMMES AVE 2ND FL ZIMMERMAN JEFFREY C CRAWFORD HEIDI W (JTWROS 1004 FARMING CREEK DR GRAHAM JOSEPH E PRUITT DENNIS A JR (JTWR 14 OAKLEAF RD BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT SHERIDAN ELIZABETH L (JT 338 BRIDGE CROSSING DR WAIN ELEANOR HERRINGTON DONNA (JTWROS 220 WOODLAND CREEK WAY REIFSCHNEIDER MELISSA L DAVIS KATHRYN H 37 WATERS REACH LN NVR INC BARRETT PATRICIA P (JTWR 19 CHATTAHOOCHEE ST

Meet

ADDRESS

CONVERGENT PROPERTY GROUP.

SUBD.

PRICE

CARRINGTON GREEN $250,000 STATES@GOVERNOR’S LAKE $250,000 GRANITE WOODS SOUTH $244,097 VERDMONT $238,000 CEDAR COVE $235,000 $235,000 100 COURT ST CONDO $235,000 SHENANDOAH FARMS $234,900 CAMERON CREEK $234,767 WILDAIRE ESTATES $230,875 MILL POND@RIVER SHOALS $230,100 WOODLAND CREEK $224,885 BRENTMOOR $222,609 FOX TRACE $219,279 TWIN CREEKS $216,665 WETHERILL PARK $216,017 HEARTHSTONE@RIVER SHOALS $214,975 KELSEY GLEN $214,180 CAMERON CREEK $212,736 MERRIFIELD PARK $210,000 WOODLAND CREEK $209,000 PARKINS GROVE $204,900 PARKINS GROVE $204,900 WELLINGTON GREEN $204,000 REMINGTON $199,184 SUMMIT@PELHAM SPRINGS $198,407 $190,000 AUGUSTA RD HILLS $189,500 $189,000 LONG CREEK PLANTATION $188,750 PELHAM SPRINGS $187,000 LONG CREEK PLANTATION $185,000 RIVER DOWNS $185,000 HAMMETT CROSSING $182,000 GOWER ESTATES $182,000 TWIN CREEKS $182,000 $182,000 HAMPSHIRE HILLS $178,000 CASTLE ROCK $177,000 LONG CREEK PLANTATION $175,000 THE HEIGHTS $173,955 REID VALLEY $173,125

SELLER

BUYER

ADDRESS

MCMILLIAN JOHN W (JTWROS 205 CLEVINGTON WAY STEVENS JANET L DAVIS NATHAN S FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA 1410 SPRING HILL RD MAILSTOP 7 LYNCH VENITA A FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG PO BOX 650043 VIKING MASTER BUILDERS I CAIN CAROL E (JTWROS) 224 FREMONT DR GORDON MELANIE C KELLETT KATHY DIANE 106 BANBURY CIR SCOTT FORD THACKSTON AUSTIN AND TUTTON LLC-SE 243 SIGNAL MOUNTAIN RD STE A LANE THOMAS P JR RICHARDS REED E 100 W COURT ST APT 3N DAVIS MARK A (JTWROS) JONES JEFFREY C 352 STRASBURG DR SC PILLON HOMES INC ECHEVERRI ALEJANDRO 113 CAMERON CREEK LN GIAGTZOGLOU CHRISTOS HERNANDEZ ALBERTO (JTWRO 7 WONDERWOOD DR MCGATHA SHAWN W CARPENTER JOHN T (JTWROS 401 HEATHER FALLS LN NVR INC JOHNSON DAVID A (JTWROS) 15 LAUREL SPRINGS DR D R HORTON INC HENSON LANA S (JTWROS) 205 IVERNESS CT S C PILLON HOMES INC FINKBEINER KYLE H (JTWRO 62 DANDIE DR NVR INC TROISO KAREN 115 YOUNG HARRIS DR S C PILLON HOMES INC ECHEVERRIA PAUL 133 RIVER VALLEY LN NVR INC ABRAMS JEREMY J 6 SANTEE CT NVR INC HIGGINS CHRISTOPHER L (J 11 VELMERE DR SC PILLON HOMES INC KEY JAMES ALEX (JTWROS) 2 HOWDEN PL NICKERSON LLOYD E NICKERSON DANIEL (JTWROS 19 HILLSBOROUGH DR SERRUS REAL ESTATE FUND STONE DENIS N/O/D VAN DYCK WILLIAM R AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL R 6 PENN CTR W 2ND FL AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL R PETERSON SHANNON RAE 103 BEECHRIDGE WAY CAIN RALPH R (JTWROS) JENKINS ROBERT THOMAS II 110 MELBOURNE LN D R HORTON INC MURPHY LORI (JTWROS) 109 LANDAU PL BANK OF AMERICA N A MARSHALL JAMES E IV 342 ROCKY TOP DR TURNER DON L LOG SHOALS DEVELOPMENT L 134 HIGHWAY 417 GRANDE KIMBERLY D GAUGHF KATHY DILLON REVO 207 LONG HILL ST PAGE FRANKLIN STUART MCMAKIN ELSA H (JTWROS) 17 LUCILLE SMITH RD BEZEK ANDREW HARBUCK BRYAN F (JTWROS) 104 TWINLEAF WAY COCHRANE JO-ANNE C CALDAS ROMMEL 125 PELHAM SPRINGS PL GOODWIN KATHERINE BRASHIER JASON L (JTWROS 205 COLTSFOOT CT CHEARS NELSON P WOODBURY BILLY P (JTWROS 207 SHETLAND WAY TAYLOR JANE VAIGNEUR PARSONS DUSTIN M (JTWROS 4 AMBROSE TRL NEWLAND MARY D (JTWROS) REESE ASHLEY (JTWROS) 610 DON DR HOOGEVEEN ANNELIESE JOHNSON ANN MARIE 7 MONTREAT LN KENDALL KERRY N DUPRE CHRISTOPHER 28 IDLEWOOD DR SNIPES STEPHEN P LEO CASSONDRA COLLINS (J 204 LACONIA DR NIEMITALO INC CULBERTSON PAUL M (JTWRO 9 JADEN CT CULP BARRETT E BALLENGER HUNTER (SURV) 403 WALKINGSTICK WAY NVR INC DILLARD MENDY D 32 GRANITE LN TYRIS NICKOLAS M SANDY DANIEL J (JTWROS) 23 ECHO VALLEY DR

Residential Property Management | Residential + Commercial Real Estate Brokerage | Investment Analysis + Advising

Greenville’s Partner for Property Management

Our dynamic team of property management and real estate professionals specializes in converging properties for lease or sale with qualified tenants and buyers. Voted Best of the Upstate 2013, we help you capitalize on the value of your real estate with income-producing solutions backed by our 10-Point Promise. Contact us today for a free consultation! (864) 751-1000 | www.convergentpg.com James McKissick, MBA Broker-in-charge james@convergentpg.com

Katie Braeunig Walsh Property Manager / REALTOR® Katie@convergentpg.com

From left to right: Wade Zebro, Dan Lemanski, Trey Varn, Barb Turner, James McKissick, Katie B. Walsh

728 N. Pleasantburg Drive Greenville, South Carolina 29607 Where Relationships Meet Results 52 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013

/ConvergentPropertyGroup /ConvergentPG www.Convergentpg.com SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


JOURNAL HOMES

ON THE MARKET

REAL ESTATE NEWS RIVER WALK

208 WALNUT TRACE COURT . $575,000 . MLS#1270955 5BR/4.5BA PERFECT floor plan!Almost 5000 Sf, finished w/o basement w kitchenette. MBR and 2 more BRs on main. Bonus room, Gourmet kitchen w SS appliances, granite, On Gilder Creek and trail. Contact: Pam McCartney 864-630-7844 Prudential Spaulding Group

PE OPL E , AWA R D S , H ON OR S The Marchant Company Recognizes Agents for Excellent Performance in October 2013

Marchant

Riggs

Slayter

The Marchant Company, the Upstate’s local “Signature Agency” in Real Estate, representing buyers and sellers of residential, land, and commercial properties, is proud to recognize select realtors for outstanding performance through October 2013. Congratulated by Seabrook March to SOLD Marchant, broker-in-charge, agents honored included: • Tom Marchant for Volume Listing & Volume Sales Agent of the month; • Barb Riggs Unit Listing Agent of the month; • Kathy Slayter for Unit Sales Agent of the month; • “March to SOLD” Anne Marchant, Jolene Wimberly & Brian Marchant for Sales Team of the month.

Allen Tate Company Names Erika DeRoberts Branch Leader of Greer Office Allen Tate Company (www.allentate.com), the Carolinas’ leading real estate company, has named Erika DeRoberts as branch leader of the company’s Greer office at 1380 West Wade Hampton Boulevard in Greer. In her new role, DeRoberts will oversee branch operations, management and training of more than 15 Allen Tate agents and staff. DeRoberts is an award-winning career professional with eight years of

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

real estate experience, including positions in new home sales and residential brokerage. Additionally, DeRoberts has worked in sales and marketing for a global logistics firm, business equipment solutions supplier, Homefinder.com, and most recently, The Greenville News. An engaged community citizen, DeRoberts volunteers at the Metropolitan Arts Council and is an active member of Mauldin United Methodist Church. DeRoberts A native of Michigan, DeRoberts has lived in the Greenville area since 1998. She and her husband, Brian, reside in Fountain Inn. They have three daughters, Emmaleine, Sophia and Lucille. She enjoys competing in 5K races and sprint triathalons and is an accomplished artist.

C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS Partners with Thomason PR for Launch of New Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Brand Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS has hired Beth Thomason, APR, of Thomason PR to manage public relations and marketing during the company’s transition from the Prudential brand to the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices brand in early 2014.   Thomason will be a valued partner in the transition efforts, working as the company’s inhouse resource for all transition communications, including internal and external announcements, Thomason advertising, social media, collateral materials, website, and signage, as well as overseeing the planning and management for the launch celebration event.  “We’re excited to partner with Beth during this exciting time in our company’s history,” says Danny Joyner, President of Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS. “As we re-brand our 50-year company under the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices name, Beth will play a critical role in the planning and execution of a successful and seamless transition process for our agents, consumers and the Upstate community.”

The Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® Community Service Committee Presents Checks To Local Charities

The Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® Community Service Committee presented two local charities with donations of $7,500.00 each at a Mix and Mingle event December 3rd at City Range in Greenville. The Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® Community Service Committee is comprised of REALTOR® and Affiliate members of the Association along with GGAR staff liaisons. The primary focus of this committee is giving back to the community. This is done through the committee hosting Lobs, Links and Lanes and “Mix and Mingle” events. The Lobs, Links and Lanes event, which is now in its 16th year, consists of a Golf Tournament, Tennis Round Robin, Bowling Tournament, and BBQ Dinner/Party. The success of this event is due to the generosity of Sponsors, event participants, and the dedication of the Community Service Committee. The “Mix and Mingle” events have been sponsored by Affiliate members of the Association and held at local restaurants. Association members and guests bring monetary donations or items from the wish list for the two charities supported and enjoy appetizers provided by the sponsors. Proceeds from the Lobs, Links & Lanes and Mix and Mingle events, benefit two local charities: The Frazee Dream Center and ReWiGo Ministries. ReWiGo Ministries creates safe, healthy, sustainable home environments for elderly, disabled, and impoverished people. Serving in Anderson, Greenville, Oconee, and Pickens Counties of Upstate South Carolina, our target populations include children, families, and seniors. The Frazee Dream Center is a free preschool, after school & summer program for under resourced children in the downtown Greenville area. The program offers assistance and guidance to children ages 3-16 in the areas of academics, character development, sportsmanship and emotional wellness. GGAR Community Service Committee: Tim Lee (2013 Chair), Bankline Mortgage Corp.; Ginger Griffin (2014 Chair), The Gajda & Gutbrod RE Corner; Lisa Alexander, Del-Co Realty Group, Inc.; Becky Coley, Certus Bank; Pamela Fulmer, Legendary Realty & Marketing; Greg Hammond, The Palmetto Bank; Jennifer Hocker, Prudential/C. Dan Joyner-Pelham Road; Amanda Jones, Coldwell Banker Caine Co.; Judy Kirby-Link, Piedmont Natural Gas Co.; Matthew McCord, McCord Law Firm; Carol Simpson, Carol Simpson Law Offices; Kendyl Urgo, First American Home Buyers. Staff Liaisons: Connie Winslow, Leah Duke and Chris Bailey. Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® represents over 1,700 members in all aspects of the real estate industry. Please visit the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® web site at www.ggar.com for real estate and consumer information. “Every market is different, call a REALTOR® today.”

DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 53


JOURNAL HOMES

OUTSTANDING HOMES. EXCELLENT BUILDERS. GREAT LOCATION. www.RiverReserveSC.com

THE RIVER RESERVE Greenville’s best kept secret.

Eleven minutes to “Downtown Greenville” • Eight minutes to Greenville Memorial Hospital .7 to 2.4 acre estate lots starting at $99,000 Our Building Partners

BUILDERS

Exclusively Marketed By:

Joey Beeson 864.660.9689 • Tom Marchant 864.449.1658 Call us today to schedule and appointment 54 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


JOURNAL CULTURE

D O W ND TO DW OW NT NG OTR W OEW NEN N G VR GIE R LEE LN EV N IVLILLEL

Holiday Holiday Holiday Happening Happening Happenin

VILLE

ning

3

Specials you won’t want to miss – only offered Dec. 13-22 with your passport

Extended Hours 10 AM-8 PM Dec. 13, 14, 20, 21 with Most Businesses

TM

D DO OW WN NTTO OW WN N G GR RE EE EN NV VIILLLLE E TM

Holiday Happening

com

TM

Catch the trolley on Main Street to visit all 3 zones of downtown!

DECEMBER 13-22, 2013 DECEMBER 13-22, 2013 DECEMBER 13-22, 2013

TM

TM

Special Specia you youwon’t won’tww miss miss– –only onlyo Dec. Dec.13-22 13-2 your yourpassp pas

Extended Extended Hours Hours 10 10AM-8 AM-8PM PM Your Passport for 10 Days of Downtown Holiday Shopping Specials, Dec. 13, Dec. 13,14, 14,20, 20,21 21 Your Passport for ofofDowntown Your Passport for10 10Days Days Downtown Restaurant Specials, Giveaways, Santa, Elf Sightings and much more! with withMost Most Holiday HolidayShopping ShoppingSpecials, Specials,Restaurant Restaurant Businesses Volunteer Ambassadors will be stationed on Main Street to provide hospitality, passports and Businesses

DEC

Specials, Santa, Elf Specials, Giveaways, Santa, ElfSightings Sightings directions. As you shop andGiveaways, dine, have your passport stamped at participating businesses to and more. andso somuch muchgift more. be entered into drawings for great baskets filled with local business items!

Catch Catch Your Passport DECEMBER DECEMBER DECEMBER 13-22,13-22, 2013 13-22, 2013 201 the thetrolle troll Spec downtownholidayhappening.com on downtownholidayhappening.com onMain MainStS downtownholidayhappening.com totovisit visitallall33z

Your Passport for 10 Your Days Passport Your of Passport Downtown for 10for Days Holiday 10 Days of Downtown Shopping of Downtown Specials, Holiday Holiday Shopping Restaurant Shopping Specials, Specials, Restaurant Restau Specials, Giveaways, Specials, Santa, Specials, Elf Giveaways, Sightings Giveaways, Santa, andSanta, so Elfmuch Sightings Elf more. Sightings and so and much so much more.more.

downto downtownholidayhappening.com downtownholidayhappening.com downtownholidayhappening.com ofofdowntow DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 55


JOURNAL CULTURE

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Never On Sunday, Inc., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINEat 210 East Coffee Street, Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than December 15, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that MB Social Club, Inc. / DBA The Swaggs Sports Bar, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1418 White Horse Road Greenville, SC 29605. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than December 22, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that A & H Food Group Inc./ DBA Cheers Sports & Spirits, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 3505 W. Blue Ridge Drive, Greenville, SC 29611. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than December 22, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Greenville Universal Restaurant Group Inc., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 300 E Stone Avenue, Greenville, SC 29609. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than December 22, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

2014 Regular Meeting Dates for Greenville County Council Meetings begin at 6:00 p.m. Council Chambers at County Square 301 University Ridge, Greenville, SC 29601 January 7 & 21 February 4 & 18 March 4 & 18 April 1 & 15 May 6 & 20 June 3 & 17 July 8 August 19 September 2 & 16 October 7 & 21 November 4 & 18 December 2

2014 Tentative Meeting Dates for the Greenville County Council Committee of the Whole Committee of the Whole meetings are held in Conference Room D at County Square Times to be determined. January 7 & 21 February 4 & 18 March 4 & 18 April 1 & 15 May 6 & 20 June 3 & 17 July 8 August 19 September 2 & 16 October 7 & 21 November 4 & 18 December 2 ** the Committee of the Whole meets on an “as-needed basis”

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP#25-01/06/14 – Water Park Pump and Motor Evaluation and Servicing, January 6, 2014, 3:00 P.M. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org or by calling (864) 467-7200.

LEGAL NOTICES Only $.99 per line ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Only $145 tel 864.679.1205 fax 864.679.1305 email aharley@ communityjournals.com

56 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013


JOURNAL CULTURE

THE WEEK IN PHOTOS

LOOK WHO’S IN THE JOURNAL THIS WEEK

Sue Mitchell, a key figure in the best-selling book “The Blind Side” and the Oscarnominated movie it inspired, speaks to the crowd gathered for A Child’s Haven 15th Annual Holiday Benefit Breakfast at Embassy Suites in Greenville.

U.S. NAVY PHOTO BY MASS COMMUNICATION SPECIALIST 2ND CLASS ADAM BROCK

DAVID POLESKI / CONTRIBUTING

DAVID POLESKI / CONTRIBUTING

From left, Joe Pazdan, Erik Whaley and Mack Pazdan mingle at Bon Secours St. Francis Foundation’s Martinis and Mistletoe, the official kickoff party for the Saint Francis Festival of Trees. Cocktails and heavy hors d’oeuvres were served, live music was provided by a jazz band, and a silent auction was held.

Lance Cpl. Robert McKelvey, of Greenville, assigned to the “Checkerboards” of Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 312, performs corrosion prevention maintenance on an F/A-18C Hornet in the hangar bay of the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). Harry S. Truman, flagship for the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group, is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, supporting theater security cooperation efforts and supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.

Tracy Ackerman, Claudia Glover and Michael Ackerman were at the Hyatt Regency for the Bon Secours St. Francis Foundation Martinis and Mistletoe.

Crossword puzzle: page 58

Rolling Green Village Offers:

Sudoku puzzle: page 58

1 Hoke Smith Blvd., Greenville • 864.987.4612 • www.RollingGreenVillage.com

J52

Independent Living Patio Homes • Independent Apartment Homes Assisted Living • Memory Care • Rehabilitation • Skilled Nursing

DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 57


JOURNAL CULTURE

FIGURE. THIS. OUT. AND 100 MORE!

ACROSS 1 Brief regrets, maybe 6 Agitated state 10 Order from on high 14 DJIA stock 17 Nobelist Root 18 Source of heat 19 It’s for the dogs 20 Campus center 22 Big tips on cruises? 24 Chicken __ 25 Many a jazz combo

26 Willing to listen 27 Peace Nobelist Wiesel 28 One good at stretching? 29 Tubular carb source 30 Green sage of films 32 Beginning piano student’s first scale? 36 Stars and Stripes squad 39 They’re noted for their neutrality 40 Civil offenses 41 LAX listing

58 THE JOURNAL | DECEMBER 13, 2013

By Jeff Chen

42 Sassy 44 Fútbol cheer 45 Panther’s color? 46 Nigerian people 49 Shockproof battery? 52 Stumblebums 53 Multiple millennia 54 Latin 101 verb 55 Code breakers’ cries 56 Sugar bowl fans 57 Capital of Belarus 58 __ Aires

61 Twosome in the news, or the news itself 62 Appear eventually 63 Channel for channel surfers? 67 Sitcom lover of Chachi 68 Give up 69 Start of a balcony delivery 70 Queen __ lace 71 Via, informally 72 Locking horns 73 City on the Arno

77 Manufactured locks 78 Startled cries 79 Food problem at the front? 82 One of several H.S. subjects 83 Black Friday event 84 Owing 85 Rough patch? 86 Slick, perhaps 87 Hugo title word 89 Deliveries at Lincoln Center 91 “CHiPs” co-star 93 Tech news site’s nefarious plan? 97 Sorority letters 98 Nonspecific checkbox 99 “Born Free” lioness 100 Skye of film 102 Classic muscle cars 105 URI’s hoops conference 106 “Sometimes you feel like __ …” 107 Painfully out-of-tune note? 110 Hamburger man 111 Miller __ 112 John Paul’s Supreme Court successor 113 Out-and-out 114 Playa del __: L.A. coastal region 115 Pic to click 116 Binds 117 Arnold’s art

DOWN 1 HR dept. concern 2 Err 3 Oenophile’s vacation destinations 4 Promising whiz 5 California’s Big __ 6 Vulcan in demeanor 7 Tribal emblems 8 Holiday preceder 9 Director Craven 10 Muslim ascetics 11 Homer classic 12 Appetite stimulants 13 “Mazel __!” 14 Measure of brightness 15 Color in the original “Crayola 48” 16 It was admitted as a free state as part of the Missouri Compromise 18 NBC staple 21 Shaker, so to speak 23 Quit

28 Get shellacked, say 29 Part of PRNDL 31 Pigeon 33 Delinquents of a sort, briefly 34 Memorable climber 35 George Foreman’s five Georges 36 Record, in a way 37 Historical periods 38 Things known to a select few 43 Knickknack 45 He played Arnold on “Happy Days” 47 Short deck hand? 48 Doing mil. drudge work 50 Fillets 51 Hunters’ holidays 52 A smidgen 53 Preps for a snack, as corn 56 Long-distance letters 57 Ponder 59 “Exodus” novelist 60 Hot time in Quebec 61 Like Beethoven’s Sonata Op. 109 62 Airer of vintage films 63 NBAer until 2008 64 Motto on an inspirational cat poster 65 URL tag 66 Observe 67 Steel-toothed Bond villain 71 Like some anchors

Medium

72 Early Indo-European 74 Big 12 wrestling powerhouse 75 Went after 76 “__ boy!” 78 Make 79 In 80 Without a buyer lined up 81 Belg. neighbor 83 The cooler 84 Span. miss 88 Writer with an award named for him 89 “Pride and Prejudice” novelist 90 Grabbed 92 “You betcha!” 93 Father of Shem, Ham and Japheth 94 Aquatic frolicker 95 Belushi’s “Animal House” role 96 Cel mates? 101 Org. that sticks to its guns 103 Metal refinery input 104 Nimble 106 Frazier’s Fight of the Century foe 107 Clicker button 108 Microbrew selection 109 Slangy “How’s things?”

Crossword answers: page 57

Sudoku answers: page 57


JOURNAL CULTURE

WHERE I’VE BEEN WITH BILL KOON

Say ‘Uncle’ Looking over my Christmas card list reminds me that I have a mob of nieces and nephews. They are all good young people who have behaved and done well, as far as I know. But they are unfortunate in one regard: They have only one uncle, and that happens to be yours truly. I am my brother’s only sibling, and his wife is an only child. Nothing but sad. I had a plethora (the word sounds like a disease) of uncles. My parents both had a number of brothers, and a generation further back there was a crowd of great-uncles from the days of large families. All of these guys were fascinating characters in my eyes. My Uncle Hal lived in the Upstate but visited us in Columbia when he was rambling around as a traveling salesman. He was a jovial, chubby guy who had an Oldsmobile Rocket 88 that he drove, astonishingly, at 60 miles per hour. He’d stop on his way to go fishing at Santee Cooper, and he’d stop on returning, typically with two or three big rock bass in his cooler. I begged to go with him on one of these trips, and finally he took me, when I was “old enough.” We stayed in a little cabin at a fish camp, and I remember waking up in the night to find that Uncle Hal was no longer abed – and to realize that these trips were about more than fishing – and maybe that, really, I wasn’t quite “old enough” yet. My Uncle Bob worked at the Charleston airport. He promised to arrange for me to go up in a Piper Cub, and he delivered. Up I went on my first flight, with a stranger at the stick, over the winding old Cooper River Bridge and the Atlantic Ocean with a few loops and twists and turns, whereupon I learned my fear of flying – which lingers with me now. I should have noticed that Uncle Bob stayed on the ground during this episode. My Great-Uncle Miles was a squirrel hunter, and he’d take me along now and then to tramp the woods on the old family farm. He gave me his ancient single-shot 12-gauge shot-

gun when he figured he’d had enough squirrel stew. He smoked three stubby Camel cigarettes each day and would lay them out on the mantel before he went to bed. The next day he’d have a smoke after each of his meals, much undisturbed in his easy chair. My Great-Uncle Jeff refused to drive a car and was seen about town with my great-aunt at the wheel. In those days, letting a woman drive you around was considered wimpy. I mowed his grass; he liked it double cut, up and down and back and forth, with his push mower. He’d pay me a dime except when his pecan trees were plentiful – then he’d pay me with a bag of pecans that I picked up. Uncle Jim survived the Battle of the Bulge but with some frostbite. He played the violin and came home from the war with a lovely, dark Italian instrument. He could play a jig, but mainly he did sweet old hymns at church and at night on his screened porch. He never talked about the war. His brother, Uncle Jack, lived across the street from the Lutheran church. Since he never left town, he was in charge of the church bell. He’d ring the congregation in, go home and sit on his porch and then go back to ring them out. He never went to the services, but was faithful about his bell-ringing. He let me pull the heavy, knotted rope once, and it lifted me right off the floor. Two of my favorite uncles probably did not exist. My mother, a lady who believed in every virtue of the old South while denying Appomattox, claimed that she had two uncles; one named “North,” the other named “South.” I took it as a metaphor for families split by the Civil War, but she was sure the boys were real. Only she could imagine parents who gave infants such names long before there was a war. Which leads me to this conclusion: If my mother could invent uncles, maybe my nieces and nephews could do the same. They deserve more than one. Bill Koon lives in Greenville. He can be contacted at badk@clemson.edu.

DECEMBER 13, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 59


B: 10.25 X 11.25 T: 10 X 11 GREENVILLE JOURNAL

Dream bigger. From gourmet kitchens to second homes and family vacations, we can help turn your dreams into reality. Visit your local branch to learn more.

CertusBank.com CertusBank, N.A. Member FDIC.

CB 13-0339 Journal_WinterVacay v1.indd 1

usBank.com

Equal Housing Lender Š 2013 CertusHoldings, Inc. All rights reserved. CertusBank, N.A. is a trademark of CertusHoldings, Inc.

12/6/13 9:29 AM

Dec. 13, 2013 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.