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GREENVILLEJOURNAL LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1999 PUBLISHER | Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@communityjournals.com EDITOR | Chris Haire chaire@communityjournals.com MANAGING EDITOR | Jerry Salley jsalley@communityjournals.com DIGITAL OPERATIONS MANAGER Danielle Car ASSOCIATE EDITOR Emily Pietras | epietras@communityjournals.com STAFF WRITERS David Dykes | ddykes@communityjournals.com Cindy Landrum | clandrum@communityjournals.com Andrew Moore | amoore@communityjournals.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Vince Harris | vharris@communityjournals.com Ariel Turner | aturner@communityjournals.com Melinda Young | myoung@communityjournals.com OPERATIONS MANAGER | Holly Hardin CLIENT SER VICES MANAGERS Anita Harley | Jane Rogers BILLING INQUIRIES | Shannon Rochester MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Nicole Greer | Donna Johnston Annie Langston | Emily Yepes

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4 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.02.2016

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OPINION Views from your community

Agents of Change

Obama’s overtime changes are on hold, but we should still talk about the value of nonprofit work IN MY OWN WORDS

By Debbie Nelson

The season of giving is upon us, and most nonprofit organizations are in the midst of making their year-end appeals. I hope you are getting out your checkbooks and considering how you will generously allocate your charitable dollars. Will you be donating to neighborhood-based organizations, human service agencies, health care providers or cultural institutions? The opportunities to make a difference are endless. I personally have a ritual on New Year’s Eve, when I reflect on those organizations that I believe are having the most impact on our community. Then I go online and make my contributions before midnight. Others donate in honor of friends and family in place of greeting cards and expensive holiday gifts. And I love the story from Advent UMC where the congregation donated more than $260,000 on Christmas Eve to provide housing for homeless families. This year as we support our favorite non-

Drawn Out Loud

profits, take a moment to consider a significant governmental change that impacts many, if not most, of our local organizations. On Dec. 1, the Department of Labor was set to raise the salary threshold that establishes whether certain “white collar” workers are exempt from overtime pay. Although a judge has placed an injunction on the new rules, the proposed changes would raise the gross salary level from $455/week ($23,660/year) to $913/week ($47,476/ year). Salaried employees paid below the new threshold will generally be eligible for overtime pay, which most did not receive in the past. Most employees paid at or above this threshold will be exempt from receiving overtime. If the new rules are ultimately put in place, the effect of this change could be a game-changer for nonprofits, and yet it is difficult to argue against revising an economic threshold that has only been adjusted once for inflation over the past 40 years. What does this proposed change mean

by Kate Salley Palmer

for your favorite organizations? Over the past months, nonprofit leaders have diligently studied their operating budgets and evaluated their staffing requirements. They have consulted with labor attorneys and human resources experts to figure out how they can do more with less. The bottom line is they really have only a few options: � Continue current salaries below the new threshold of $47,476 and limit employee hours to 40 hours or fewer per week. To ensure that non-exempt employees do not exceed 40 hours/week, employers must realign hours, workloads and staffing levels. This approach may also require hiring additional staff. � Continue current salaries below the new threshold of $47,476 and pay employees overtime when necessary. These new overtime-eligible employees must be paid overtime whenever they work more than 40 hours/week. This approach may be advised for employees who typically work 40 hours/ week and occasionally require overtime. If this is the case, the nonprofit employer should plan and budget for the anticipated overtime. � Raise salaries of employees who are close to the new threshold to $47,476. If these employees meet the duties test, which establishes their responsibilities as truly those of an executive, administrative or professional employee, they will maintain their exempt status and will not be eligible for overtime. Now let’s consider the people behind the payroll projections, the individuals who work tirelessly to serve others in our communities. Our nonprofit friends are a dedicated and passionate lot, sometimes to a fault. They work long hours, meeting with clients, answering late-night calls and staffing fundraising events. Empowering others to succeed is not something that only happens from 9 to 5 Monday through Friday. Those of us on the cycle of success realize

it is a 24/7 commitment. Can we truly ask nonprofit employees to “turn off ” after 40 hours? While the overtime adjustment may seem simple on the surface, it comes with considerable implementation challenges. In summary I ask the following questions: 1) Are nonprofit salaries aligned with the value of the work? 2) What would our communities be like if we did not have these folks with their passion and dedication to serving others? While I understand precarious budgets and uncertain funding streams, I also recognize that we must pay folks fairly for their work. Let’s get away from misperceptions, like the overhead myth and the belief that nonprofit employees should be paid less because they are doing what they love — working for nonprofits. Let’s support paying our nonprofit friends fairly and recognize the value of what they do. Regardless of whether the new salary threshold becomes the rule or not, it should be a conversation-starter about the value of nonprofit work. It gives us the opportunity to increase our support of these brave agents of change who are tackling the challenges in our communities. In the wise words of my friend Darrin Goss, president and CEO of the Coastal Community Foundation, “Rather than focusing on how we can do more with less, let’s consider the possibilities. How can we do more with more?” Please think big when you open your wallets this December. Consider the folks working behind the scenes of your favorite nonprofits and what we would do without them. Debbie Nelson is the president of DNA Creative Communications, an inspirational public relations and marketing firm for nonprofit organizations. She is also the founder of Shine the Light Nonprofit Forums.

Speak your mind The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, factbased arguments.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Editor Chris Haire at chaire@communityjournals.com.


CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

New development planned on Camperdown Way

SAVE FALLS PARK A DVERTISEM EN T

#2-C. The City built Falls Park as we now see it, according to the landscape designer’s diagrams and written descriptions. These same plans were presented to taxpayers and private donors. The City Council approved $13.5 Million for the “Falls Park Extension Project” and built the park partly on this “private land.” What was the dollar value of that portion of Falls Park that was built on the private land? (Local citizens contributed additional funds and resources, including one family’s $500,000 contribution to build The Liberty Bridge directly connecting thethe“private land, ” adding even more Glass facadeto faces Reedy River and Falls Park value to the private land.)The Public wants to know. #2-D. What easement(s), if any, did The City record at that Freedom of Information Act (F.O.I.A.) Request time to protect the millions of dollars of public and private Bowater Building Date: December 2, 2016 investments that went into the City’s extensive Falls Park improvements on this “private land?” Did the City record To: Mayor Knox White, Members of the Greenville City ANY EASEMENTS OR ANY PROTECTIONS AT ALL FOR Council, Members of the Planning Commission, Members of FALLS PARK? It appears not. The Public wants to know. the Design Review Board – Urban and Neighborhood Panels, Falls Park and F.O.I.A. Manager Category 3: The Public wants to know who is benefiting from this approval. Ladies and Gentlemen, #3-A. Have any political contributions been made that might be We need to Save Falls Park. Much is at stake. Failure to deal construed toView be related toStreet the history and plans for this property from Main properly with the City’s approval of a developer’s “glass tower” that came from owners of this “private property” over the years in Falls Park could negatively impact the Public’s A support for new office and retail development is ThGa., project on the Greenville News site on Main Street. architect for the project, has applied for a cerCity. Why was this not done? e City appears to have skipped before and since the City gave the parking garage, in effect, the the park’s expansions in the future. Public support foratthe planned the edge of Falls Park at 55 E. Camperdown of appropriateness from the city's Design Greenville Mayor Knox White said the project will this common sense part of its tificate own Planning Ordinance. The park and ThebeLiberty Bridge, to them? TheCamperdown Public wants to know. Way, side property planned future expansion of Falls Park on the west of that includes the Bowater parking Review Board. The board will consider the project a boost to the underdeveloped Way Public wants to know. and the former Bowater building that now and Riverof Street at its Oct. 6 meeting. River Street may disappear depending on how garage you handle #3-B. The owners the area. Bowater property have enjoyed a houses the Nexsen Pruet law firm, Colliers these Centennial American Properties "It demonstrates the positive impact Falls Park #1-C. The MGC CityLaw, permitted developers to take theiris the developer. this. The Public wants to know that you will not International permit this real estate meteoric increase in the value of their property directly as firm and others. Centennial is also–developing the Camperdown has had on downtown development," he said. proposal directly to the Design Review Board Urban Panel desecration of Falls Park. a result of the millions of dollars invested in Falls Park and Wakefield, Beasley and Associates of Alpharetta, for approval without a prior “Neighborhood Meeting” as the City’s having “given” them a parking garage at taxpayers’ This F.O.I.A. request seeks to uncover details that have a direct required by The Ordinance. Scores of businesses are close expense. The public wants to know how much we have bearing on the recent approval of (DRB Docket CA 16-642) to this site in Falls Park, and hundreds, and soon-to-be already “donated” to these “private property” owners. And for the construction of this privately-owned contemporary thousands of residents live downtown and in the WestThe End. whatlending exactlygroup, did we, the and private donors, get in specialized sold taxpayers its operations. working in offices at RiverPlace “glass tower” office structure in Falls Park adjacent DAVID to andDYKES just | STAFF They all have a vital interest Main in Falls City downtown, andPark. Broad Why streetsdid the which includes return the Greenville-based “We’reTh actually the same for our “donations?” e Public wantsnettocost, know. a few feet from the historic Main Street Bridge. ddykes@communityjournals.com and the former Bank headSmall Business Administration diviwith significantly more space,” Harton not adhere The Ordinance andPalmetto the required “neighborhood United Community Bankto is #3-C. It appears that the present owners of the Bowater Property Category I: The Public wants to know if the City adhered to fourmeeting?” sion, will also move into the One space. said. quarters on East North Street. moving nearly dozen employees, The Public wants to know. (Camperdown Partnership/Easland Capital) control a parcel Last year, Palmetto Bank merged Several senior managers, including “We’re scattered about so this is a its own Planning Ordinance in this approval by the Design including several top managers, into view of these apparent of Bank. the City to properly with Unitedfailures Community Harton, eventually to getbeen everybody together,”increased he of will landmove on there FallsasParkchance that has enormously in the One building inIn downtown GreenReview Board. conform to its ownTheplanning ordinance, said. “It’s afunds great financial decision. It’sdonations. bank will take one floor –does the the well.City They include the parent compaville. value by the City taxpayers’ and by private #1-A. Why did developers, David Glenn and his son,Employees Brody, willactually seventh about 20,000 square approval a great team decision, bringing us all ny’s chief officer, head of opermove into the that contend this –isand a legally enforceable bycredit Th ese owners “own” together, millions and of dollars of Real Estate value of Centennial American Properties, try to underhandedly feet in One space once used by Certusand technology and chief inforI think it’s great for Washington Street of Review the theportion Design Board? Say it’s not so! The Publications wants that apparently arose from six sources: 1) $13.5 Bank, Harton said. mation officer, Harton said. Greenville because we keep a million lot of in City above the Brooks Brothers and secretively push through an imaginary loopholebuilding, and gain to know. funds for Falls Park; 2) Millions of dollars value from the Last year, Palmetto Bank merged people downtown, which isofimportThe space is laid out for 79 people, store, said Lynn Harton, president and approval by asking the Design Review Board for singular but thehas bank initially will movewhat 47 the with United Community Bank. ant.” chief operating officer of United Category 2: The Public questions about City’s removal of the old Camperdown Bridge; 3) Millions of dollars in permission to build a new “glass tower” on a tinyCommunity sliver ofBanks Inc. and its subsidemployees, he said. Upstate, including branch Harton has been working from an records show in regard to the history of the public/private private contributions by In thethe Carolina Foothills Garden Club and land directly adjacent and abutting Greenville’s oneiary and only and corporate personnel, UCB has 344 They will include UCB’s mortgage office in RiverPlace. bank, United Community Bank. partnership that resulted in what is today being represented 4)attracthe million dollar plus world-class Liberty Bridge, team, which is headquartered in employees, Harton said. “We were ablemembers; to get a really Banks is the historic Main Street Bridge? After all, they already nowUnited have Community a asholding entirely the private domain of the Camperdown Ltd/Harton5)said tens of thousands of dollars by local individuals and tive deal,” of the One space The bank will be subleasing its families, Greenville; the heads of secondary Blairsville, Ga.-based company pending legal contract (an “option to purchase”) on the entire Easland Propertiesmarketing, Partnership with itsand“Bowater underwriting process- Building” from developer6)Bob Hughes that RiverPlace space, heparking said. for the bank. and last but not least, the Bowater garage. Bowater property including the existing Bowater office building and several underwriters and formerly was occupied by CertusBank. The UCB employees have been and nearby parkinging; garage: In this current proposed transaction, the owners of the and parking garage. Were they trying to dodge the obvious processors, Harton said. Certus closed its downtown offices and #2-A. Years ago, did the C&S Bank, who originally owned Bowater property (“Sellers”) appear to seek to monetize these requirements of The Ordinance? The Public wants to know. the property, grant a conservation easement on some or all of generous public and private donations that have contributed Their Greenville-News development next door to the Bowater the property? Does such an easement still exist? The Public to the great increase in the value of “their” property. Therefore, Property is what is called a Planned Unit Development – “PUD” wants to know. these “owners” have a significant direct pecuniary interest. If under The Ordinance. Their purchase of the Bowater property David and Brody Glenn (“Buyers”) can persuade the City and #2-B. Did the City build the garage and give it to the then is in reality a huge addition to and modification of their already its taxpayers to permit them to proceed with their plans to owners of the Bowater Property without any financial approved Greenville-News PUD project. This is very clear. build the “glass tower” and whatever else they have in mind, contribution by those owners? If so, for what reason? And, By ordinance, aren’t these developers required to bring their then these proposed approvals would further enrich both the what “consideration,” in a legal sense, money or otherwise, entire PUD plan back before the Public for an extensive review “Sellers” and the “Buyers” of the Bowater property. They win did the City and the taxpayers receive for that gifting? Did and comment? This would include BOTH large adjoining big? Taxpayers lose? The Public wants to know. the City not get any agreement to protect Falls Park as built parcels with detailed plans for exactly what they want to do now on “their” land? If so, why not? Did the City give the garage to What is the City’s estimate of the current and future incremental and in the future, including possibly building a skyscraper atop the property owners AND GET ABSOLUTELY NOTHING value of gain to the “Buyers” and to the “Sellers” of this proposed the existing Bowater parking garage. This would force them IN RETURN? The tax-paying Public wants to know what we construction project? What about the apparent forthcoming project to expose all their plans for both parcels; otherwise it appears got in return for OUR money. to build a skyscraper atop the existing parking garage? In other that they are hiding their overall plans from us, the Public. It words, how much money are the “Sellers” and “Buyers” gaining in is standard procedure in most cities, as it should be here in return for what we, the Public, are giving up in our beloved Falls Greenville, to require builders and developers to present a fullPark? Is it in the millions of dollars? The Public wants to know. blown three-dimensional model to scale for examination and The information described in this F.O.I.A. request is based on public scrutiny for exactly what they intend to build now and in the on the writer’s best efforts, as a private citizen, to research the future. Where is it? The Public wants to know. the matters in question. This included examination of public The City appears to be allowing the LARGEST DEVELOPMENT records of the City and public property records. EVER DOWNTOWN AND A MAJOR INVASION ON FALLS Any and all documents and records described above are PARK WITHOUT ADHERING TO ITS OWN PLANNING respectfully requested under the provisions of South ORDINANCE! Why? The Public wants to know. Carolina’s Freedom of Information Act. #1-B. Under The Ordinance, this matter should have been David Sweatt 300 Pettigru Street, Greenville, SC, 29601 referred first to a special committee, which must approve any dsweatt22@gmail.com plan that may negatively impact a highly sensitive part of the NEW OFFICE AND RETAIL

UCB to move into former CertusBank space in One building


6 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.02.2016

Animal Care’s

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

Correspondent

Featuring Ruff Reporter:

Roxy

Thankful for a Second Chance

The holidays are here; it’s a time for generosity and love. I never experienced either before I came to Animal Care. I had no family, no home, no guarantee of where my next meal would come from. Now I have a warm place to sleep, loving human friends who care for me and show me affection, and best of all, hope for a forever family to call my own. 90% of dogs are finding homes quickly at Animal Care, and it’s all because of generous people like you who donate to their Second Chance Fund. They’re on a mission to create a no kill community, and everyone can pitch in to help. All it takes is a bit of your time, money or love. I’m so thankful for people like you.

GreenvillePets.org

Eighty-five-year-old Bill “Tip Top” Gressette works out at the HealThySelf Gym several times a week.

SOCIAL HEALING

Chronically ill, aging and obese find better health, friendship at the gym MELINDA YOUNG | CONTRIBUTOR

myoung@communityjournals.com

When Bill Gressette was in his mid-70s, an autoimmune disease confined him to a hospital bed. He feared he’d never get out of it. But these days, you can find Gressette, 85, in the HealThy Self gym at Bon Secours St. Francis’ Millennium campus. When Gressette was discharged from the hospital, his doctor sent him to work out in the gym for pulmonary rehab. At first, Gressette – whose nickname is “Tip Top” – resisted, saying, “I didn’t want to come to the gym.” But the octogenarian did what he was told and found that he loved it. “I got hooked like on crack cocaine and have been here ever since – six days a week,” he says. “I work out from 6 a.m. to 8:30 a.m.” The biggest draw for the retired dentist was social. Gressette knows everyone who comes to HealThy Self, and when he doesn’t, he smiles, introduces himself and quickly befriends any new faces. “I’ve got more friends here than anywhere else in the world, and how many people have friends at age 85?” Gressette says. “We have people coming in carrying oxygen tanks, people in wheelchairs, people who are restricted in what they can do and cannot do, and most come here after a medical crisis.” Social reinforcement is the key to most people’s exercise habits. They play tennis

with friends, run with a group, join after-work team sports or sweat in a gym where they see the same people every morning. But for many older, chronically ill or obese people, there are few places where they can comfortably combine fitness training with people who are like them. The HealThy Self gym at the Millennium campus is one such place.

EXERCISE IS MEDICINE BSSF isn’t alone. Several area YMCAs host the Exercise Is Medicine program, a global initiative from the American College of Sports Medicine, which is designed to reach people who need exercise but who are scared away from traditional fitness routines because of health issues. The Greenville Exercise Is Medicine program is the first collaborative that combines a medical school, health system and YMCA, says Scot Baddley, chief executive officer and president of the YMCA of Greenville. The local program, which has enrolled a few dozen people initially, includes staff from the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville and a Greenville Health System (GHS) physician and care coordinator, Baddley says. “When someone is identified in need of physical activity and an intervention to ad-

dress specific chronic diseases, the physician has to have a place to refer that patient for physical activity,” Baddley says. Class sizes are 10-12 people, lasting 12 weeks with twice-weekly exercise routines, supervised by a professional who helps participants build strength and endurance. People are enrolled based on doctor referrals, and everyone participating is obese and has a chronic illness, such as diabetes and hypertension. Participants exercise at the GHS Life Center, Caine Halter Family YMCA Downtown, Eastside Family YMCA in Taylors, GHS Family YMCA in Simpsonville and the George I. Theisen Family YMCA in Travelers Rest. The cost to participate is $199, but the YMCA also offers scholarships for those with financial need. “There’s scientific evidence that the right kind of physical activity can be more effective than prescribing medicine,” Baddley says.

MOTION IS LOTION Exercise also can help people improve their mental health, says Dr. Bobby Masocol, who is on the faculty for the family medicine residency and sports medicine fellowship at GHS. Masocol was involved with the pilot program site for Exercise Is Medicine.


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$ “I’ve had a patient get off her depression medication,” Masocol says. “A lot of people have received improvement in their mental health, because they have a social Dr. Bobby Masocol support structure within the program.” The program’s focus on group exercise activities leads to improved moods, greater motivation and a reinforcing social support structure, he says, adding, “People are motivated and want to go back.” Another new exercise program that targets people who are obese or who have chronic illnesses was started at Doctor for Life on Tanner Road in Greenville. The physician clinic includes a workout room with a personal trainer who guides and supervises patients to make certain they exercise safely, says Dr. Cheryl Sarmiento, medical director and coowner of Doctor for Life, which opened this fall. The small gym and its lap pool were designed to feel homey, a place where obese and overweight people can exercise without the stigma they might face in a conventional gym, Sarmiento says. “Motion is lotion,” she says. “Being active keeps you agile and strong, and our personal trainers make it fun and enjoyable to exercise.”

SOCIALIZATION IS HEALING BSSF was among the first to recognize the need for a stigma-free place to exercise. “We have people who wouldn’t be comfortable exercising in a traditional gym setting, and that may be because they’re overweight and have body image issues, or they have a chronic condition that they don’t feel like people in a traditional gym would understand,” says Pat Barnes, director of HealThy Self.

The health system opened its Vitality Center on the main hospital’s 10th floor in 1987, eventually evolving into the HealThy Self program at the Millennium campus. “The program is open to the community and anyone can join,” Barnes says. “Clinical programs like cardiac rehab and pulmonary rehab require a physician referral, and exercise is a standard part of treatment after a heart attack or bypass surgery.” The fitness center provides a safe place for people who are chronically ill to exercise with the oversight of clinical staff. “If you join the medical fitness program, you can come as long as you like – for the rest of your life,” Barnes says. “The basic fee is $35 per month, and people can come any time we’re open for that price.” Each fitness center attendee receives an exercise assessment, including their biometrics of height, weight and percentage of body fat. “We have 500 members now and that comes to 67,000 visits a year,” Barnes says. “Tip Top” Gressette is a good example of a HealThy Self regular attendee, and his attitude of being “nice to people because it’s not hard to say a kind word” goes a long way toward bringing people back to the gym. “A lot of people in the beginning don’t want to speak,” Gressette says. “So every time we see them, we talk to them. They might want to be in a corner, but we don’t allow that, and before long they’re hooked.” The friendly atmosphere could be doing more to bring in repeat exercisers than the prospect of better health, Barnes suggests. “People get so much out of the socialization here,” Barnes adds. “Chronic diseases like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are very isolating, so if people have a place where they can be with other people who have the same issues, it’s a tremendous help for depression.”

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

ON-TIME GRADUATION RATES

School Daze

SCHOOL

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

GREENVILLE TECH CHARTER

100.0

99.1

97.2

98.0

100.0

BRASHIER MIDDLE COLLEGE

100.0

95.8

100

96.1

98.9

Graduation rates keep rising for Greenville, but ACT scores suggest students aren’t prepared for college

GREER MIDDLE COLLEGE

98.0

96.9

97.4

92.4

95.7

WADE HAMPTON HIGH

95.4

93.1

93.3

86.5

86.8

MAULDIN HIGH

95.3

91.9

91.7

89.1

83.7

EASTSIDE HIGH

93.0

88.0

86.8

82.6

80.2

GREENVILLE HIGH

91.2

87.3

82.8

81.5

69.8

RIVERSIDE HIGH

90.7

93.4

91.2

82.3

82.0

J.L. MANN HIGH

90.1

87.7

86.2

80.0

75.7

clandrum@communityjournals.com

LEGACY CHARTER HIGH

89.6

62.5

77.5

N/A

N/A

Graduation rates for Greenville County Schools and South Carolina overall are rising. Greenville County Schools’ on-time graduation rate — defined as earning a high school diploma in four years — increased from 84.2 percent in 2015 to 86.8 percent in 2016. Since 2012, the school district’s graduation rate has increased about 20 percent. The state’s graduation rate reached an “unprecedented 82.6 percent,” S.C. Superintendent of Education Molly Spearman said when announcing the release of state report cards for schools and districts. But while the rise in graduation rates has been celebrated, it may not necessarily translate into success for some students who earn a diploma. Recent ACT results showed that only 14 percent of South Carolina’s 2016 graduates met benchmarks on the ACT that indicate they’d

BLUE RIDGE HIGH

89.1

89.7

84.2

82.7

75.0

HILLCREST HIGH

88.2

87.4

82.1

79.4

73.9

TRAVELERS REST HIGH

83.5

77.9

76.8

67.8

65.5

SOUTH CAROLINA

82.6

80.3

80.1

77.5

74.9

GREER HIGH

81.6

84.8

73.8

68.8

68.0

BEREA HIGH

80.9

80.8

74.6

71.4

64.5

WOODMONT HIGH

79.1

68.3

66.7

65.3

64.7

SOUTHSIDE HIGH

77.2

77.6

73.6

69.3

57.4

CAROLINA ACADEMY

75.8

72.4

70.6

62.4

58.7

GREENVILLE COUNTY SCHOOLS AVERAGE

86.8

84.2

81.7

76.9

72.4

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

«

Source: South Carolina Department of Education

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succeed in college, while 83 percent of those students said they aspired to attend postsecondary education. It was the first year that all high school juniors were required to take the test. In past years, only students who planned to go to college took the test. Seventeen percent of Greenville County students made scores on subject-level tests that ACT says gives them a 50 percent chance of obtaining a B or higher or a 75 percent chance of getting a C or higher in first-year college courses. The core subjects tested were English composition, algebra, reading and biology. Nationwide, 26 percent met the college readiness benchmark. Greenville County attributes its graduation rise to increased opportunities for students to retake courses they’ve failed and a bigger push to provide help earlier to students who have fallen behind. Meanwhile, a new push at the middle school level in the White Horse Road corridor should help increase graduation rates in the future. The graduation rate is calculated by dividing the number of students who graduated with a regular South Carolina diploma within four years of entering high school by the number of first-time ninth-graders, adding any students who transfer in and subtracting any who transfer to another diploma-granting school, emigrated or died. Students who take longer than four years to earn a diploma, an occupational diploma, a local or state certificate or a GED and students who leave school and whose status is not known or cannot be documented or who are incarcerated but do not enroll in a diploma-granting program are counted as non-graduates. In Greenville County, five schools had graduation rates below the state average. Three had rates below 80 percent. The two schools showing the most improvement are Carolina Academy, moving from 55.8 percent in 2011 to 75.8 in 2016, and Berea, which went from 63.1 percent to 80.9 percent. At Carolina, 800 students were loaded up on 36 buses to tour colleges and industries in three states. For Carolina Principal Michael Delaney, it was just another way he and his staff are trying to change the culture at the school. At the beginning of their senior year, Delaney has students sign a graduation gown as their pledge to do everything they can to graduate. Like Carolina students, Berea students will take a similar trip to colleges and industries. Nearly 77 percent of Greenville County Schools’ Class of 2015 was enrolled in a two- or four-year college pursuing an associate degree, certificate or diploma in fall 2015. Nearly 39 percent of the members of Greenville County’s Class of 2016 were eligible for LIFE Scholarships.


10 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.02.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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Three environmental groups, including Greenville’s Upstate Forever, are demanding that Kinder Morgan step up its cleaning efforts at a gasoline spill site in Anderson County. Upstate Forever, Savannah Riverkeeper and the Southern Environmental Law Center issued a public statement last week claiming that pollution from a ruptured gasoline pipeline near Belton is getting worse, despite cleanup efforts. “Kinder Morgan is responsible for one of

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According to the Southern Environmental Law Center, nearly two years after the Kinder Morgan pipeline spill, more than 160,000 gallons of gasoline remain in the surrounding soil, groundwater and area streams near Belton.

the largest pipeline spills in South Carolina history, yet thousands of gallons of gasoline have not been cleaned up,” said Frank Holleman, a senior attorney for SELC. In December 2014, the company’s Plantation Pipe Line ruptured and reportedly leaked 369,600 gallons of gasoline on a 365acre property near Lewis Drive in rural Anderson County. More than 160,000 gallons of gasoline remain in the surrounding soil, groundwater and area streams, according to Holleman. Melissa Ruiz, a spokeswoman for Kinder Morgan, said the pipeline company continues a “thorough and complete investigation and remediation of the site in accordance with all applicable laws and regulations.” Kinder Morgan has recovered 209,059 gallons of product and collected and properly disposed of about 2,800 tons of petroleumimpacted soil. The Houston-based pipeline company submits monthly reports to DHEC and has spent $4.3 million through September for remediation and repairs.

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However, Holleman said recent reports submitted to DHEC show pollution is higher than it was earlier this year, before Kinder Morgan started sampling from an area of Brown’s Creek near the pollution source. Holleman also said Kinder Morgan avoided testing that area of Brown’s Creek until August, choosing to instead sample downstream where Brown’s Creek merges with another creek that dilutes the pollution. “To say that we ‘avoided’ testing the area closest to the leak is nonsensical,” said Ruiz. “The first priority is to determine how far the product has migrated and to stop further migration. That is standard practice.” Kinder Morgan first tested the area of Brown’s Creek nearest to the pollution source in August. Those samples revealed water pollution more than 200 times higher than what the company had previously reported to DHEC, according to Holleman. Now, the company’s sampling results from September have been released. Compared to testing results from August, there has been a 22 percent increase in benzene, a 35 percent increase in ethylbenzene, a 23 percent increase in toluene, a 15 percent increase in total xylenes and a 12 percent increase in naphthalene. “These results show that, two years after the spill, Kinder Morgan’s water pollution continues to get worse,” said Holleman. “It is way past time that Kinder Morgan be required to take effective action to stop polluting Anderson County’s waters.” Ruiz dismissed the assertion, saying, “The claim that these contaminants are getting worse is false, and these sampling reports are being misrepresented by a coalition who simply opposes pipeline infrastructure.” “The recent reports referenced now include sampling that was taken closer to the source area; we and DHEC already knew the product was there in higher concentrations and would show higher values,” she added. DHEC spokesman Robert Yanity said that “the concentrations are higher than those

historically reported at this site; however, they are typical for release sites where freephase gasoline is present.” Kinder Morgan completed a comprehensive site assessment earlier this year that included the installation of monitoring wells and recovery trenches in Brown’s Creek to prevent pollutants from migrating downstream to nearby waterways, such as Broadway Creek and Broadway Lake. Ruiz said pollutants have not migrated downstream according to recent samples. Kinder Morgan submitted a corrective action plan to DHEC in September. The pipeline company plans to install a Surface Water Protection System with at least 49 biosparging wells at the primary spill site. That process injects oxygen into the groundwater mixed with pollution and feeds microorganisms that break down contaminants. That system will be fully operational by the end of this year. “It is not uncommon for remediation activities to proceed over multiple years. As we’ve stated before, we will continue these efforts until no further action is required,” Ruiz said. The three environmental groups are demanding a faster cleanup. “We need quick, strong action to address this unlawful pollution of Anderson County’s clean water,” said Andrea Cooper, executive director of Upstate Forever. “Kinder Morgan’s water pollution cannot continue and continue to get worse.” SELC, on behalf of Upstate Forever and the Savannah Riverkeeper, sent a 60-day notice to Kinder Morgan and DHEC on Oct. 24 that it intends to file suit in U.S. District Court against Kinder Morgan under the Clean Water Act, which allows both individuals and groups to take legal action against polluters, regardless of existing state laws. Kinder Morgan currently faces a second federal lawsuit in U.S. District Court regarding the gasoline spill. Scott and Eric Lewis claim the spill has ruined their family’s 350acre farm on Lewis Drive. Jury selection will begin this spring.

Health Events Ice on Main Now-Jan. 16 • Downtown Greenville Bring the family downtown for ice skating! Adults are $12; children 12 and under are $8. Price includes skate rental. Skate sleds for those with a disability are free of charge thanks to GHS’ Roger C. Peace Hospital. Screenings for Uninsured Women Tues., Dec. 6 • Appointment times vary • Hillcrest Memorial Hospital Uninsured women ages 40-64 who meet certain income guidelines can receive free clinical breast exams, pelvic exams, Pap smears, mammograms, cholesterol and diabetes tests, and heart disease and stroke risk assessments. Call 656-3076. Meet the Midwives Thurs., Dec. 22 • 6-7 p.m. • Greenville Midwifery Care Learn about GHS’ nurse-midwifery program and how a midwife can enhance the birthing process. Free; registration required. Resolution Run Sat., Jan. 14 • 9 a.m. • Trailblazer Park This half-marathon and 5K event is hosted by the George I. Theisen YMCA. Proceeds benefit the YMCA’s Open Doors Campaign. To register, visit go-greenevents.com. To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, please visit ghs.org/healthevents or call 1-877-GHS-INFO (447-4636).

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12.02.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 13

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USC Upstate announces new chancellor TREVOR ANDERSON | STAFF

tanderson@communityjournals.com

The University of South Carolina Upstate last Tuesday named its new chancellor to replace John Moore, who stepped down earlier this year after five years at the helm. Brendan Kelly, vice president for university advancement at the University of West Florida, will take over the role on March 1, 2017. Kelly was selected after a nationwide search for USC Upstate’s sixth chancellor in its 50-year history. He will succeed Mary Anne Fitzpatrick, who has served as interim chancellor since Moore’s departure. “To have the opportunity to lead this university at this time, especially as we celebrate its 50th anniversary, is truly exciting,” Kelly said, during a ceremony at the school’s Health Education Complex. “It’s our job to look at the next five decades … I’m excited to get to work.” USC Upstate has 40 bachelor’s degree programs in the liberal arts, sciences, business administration, nursing and teaching, as well as master’s degree programs in education, informatics and nursing. The school’s current enrollment is 6,000, including students from 36 different states and 15 countries. Since its inception, USC Upstate has produced about 26,000 graduates, 85 percent of which have remained in the area, according to the university. In addition to its main campus in Spartanburg County, USC Upstate oversees the George Dean Johnson Jr. College of Business and Economics in downtown Spartanburg and a campus in Greenville at McAlister Square. The school has 17 varsity sports teams that compete at the NCAA Division I level in the Atlantic Sun Conference. “Dr. Kelly is an accomplished scholar and academic leader, and I am confident that he is the right person to lead us into the next era at USC Upstate,” said Harris Pastides, president of USC, in a statement.

“Brendan Kelly brings exceptional experience that will be a perfect fit for USC Upstate,” Fitzpatrick said in a statement. “Much work has been accomplished over the past five years and Brendan will have a great foundation to build upon and tremendous talent to work with. There is an innovative strength and a collaborative spirit waiting to be tapped on our campus.” Kelly earned a Bachelor of Science degree in public relations with a minor in philosophy from Eastern Michigan University in 1998 and then a master’s degree in communication in 2000. In 2005, he received a doctorate degree in communication from Wayne State University. From 2000 to 2004, Kelly was an assistant director of forensics at Eastern Michigan. In 2004, he moved to Florida to serve as director of forensics for UWF. Kelly served as the department chair of communication arts from 2009 to 2013, and the director of the School of Fine, Performing and Communication Arts from 2011 to 2013. Since 2013, he has served as the vice president of university advancement, president of the UWF Foundation and CEO of the university’s historic trust. Kelly’s resume includes multiple professional accomplishments and recognitions, as well as a range of community and academic service distinctions. During the ceremony on Tuesday, Kelly fielded a range of questions from faculty members and media that focused on his views about the university’s role in supporting K-12 education, diversity and new academic programs. “There is so much interest in the Upstate of South Carolina right now,” Kelly said. “Our job is to produce … graduates who are ready to meet the world.” Kelly said he plans to evaluate the goals for the university’s campus in Greenville.

USC Upstate’s new chancellor Brendan Kelly and his family

“I haven’t been there yet,” he said. “We will be focusing on strengthening our core presence at our main campus, but we also need to make sure we’re servicing the needs

of the entire region, and [the Greenville campus] is a good access point for that.” For more information, visit uscupstate. edu.

FOR 25 YEARS

A GREENVILLE TRADITION

Roper Mountain

269 TREE PLANTINGS

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Trees are planted

47% at Schools

34% in Neighborhoods

19% in Parks and Greenspaces

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14 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.02.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

Teachable Moments Public Education Partners’ Grier Mullins retiring after 28 years of improving our schools CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Grier Mullins believes that all children should have the same kind of experiences and educational opportunities her children had. The mother of three, a former Head Start teacher and PTA president, Mullins has worked to make that happen for 28 years as executive director of Public Education Partners of Greenville County, a nonprofit organization that is independent from Greenville County Schools but works with the school district to improve public education. When teachers needed classroom materials and support for innovative teaching, PEP, which was then known as the Alliance for Quality Education, created a teacher grant program that doled out more than $2 million directly to teachers for projects. Then PEP turned its attention to mentoring firstyear teachers. Later, after the state’s teacher evaluation process fell short of meeting local teacher and district needs, PEP and the

school district created a better system of teacher evaluation. Through its “Make Summer Count” campaign, PEP is trying to raise $3.2 million to give students at Greenville County’s 29 poorest schools 12 free books from 2015 Grier Mullins to 2018. Through the program, 25,000 children have begun to build home libraries, a resource that will help combat summer reading loss. According to education expert Richard Allington, summer reading loss accounts for 80 percent of the achievement gap between rich and poor kids. When Mullins retires this month, Ansel Sanders, PEP’s associate director, will become executive director. Recently, the Greenville Journal spoke with Mullins about her nearly three-decade-long career as an advocate for children’s education.

What is PEP’s biggest achievement? Public Education Partners has not only been responsive to local education gaps over the years but also the organization’s leaders have remained knowledgeable about the latest research on what works and what matters most for children. Examining data, listening to local educators, listening to parents and working with community partners are key components of our organizational strength. We are proud of the fact we have remained independent — listening to differing voices and ideas — and we have remained nimble, ready to take action and being creative while doing so. The fact that our Greenville community — businesses, foundations and individuals — have been with us all the way has made all the difference. Our partners have been patient and persistent at the same time and we learn from each other every day. After all, this is an endeavor that values learning and doing above all else.

a teacher shortage. It’s not just in urban areas or suburban areas. It’s across the board. Greenville County is not immune to this national issue. We must ensure that our community attracts, retains and supports great teachers. Greenville has an opportunity to tackle this issue head-on if we work together on solutions, both new, innovative ideas and tried-and-true practices. Teacher effectiveness impacts student achievement and growth more than any other school factor.

What is your biggest regret? The thing you wanted to do but were unable to? There are no regrets. There have been good days and better days, but there has rarely been a day when I didn’t learn something new, maybe from a child’s perspective, many times from a teacher’s perspective, often from a parent’s perspective, sometimes from a colleague or a donor. What a great seat at the table I have had for 28 years.

What is the biggest issue facing GCS? Education in S.C. as a whole?

What’s next for you?

One of the biggest challenges facing our country in the last few years has been

I don’t know, but I can’t wait to figure it out.

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12.02.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 15

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

NEWS

Humana Gold Plus Members! Greenville native Sandi Morris won a silver medal in pole vaulting at the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio.

Olympic medalist Sandi Morris to serve as Christmas Parade grand marshal CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Greenville native and Olympic silver medalist pole vaulter Sandi Morris will be grand marshal for this year’s Greenville Poinsettia Christmas Parade on Dec. 3. Morris, a Greenville High graduate, will lead more than 75 units in the parade that will run on Main Street from Augusta Street to North Street. The parade begins at 6 p.m. Prime seating is from the Main Street bridge south toward Falls Park. Morris won a silver medal in women’s pole vault at this summer’s Olympic Games in Rio, but before that she was a record-

FOR A TOTAL OF

setting pole vaulter and all-state volleyball player at Greenville High. She competed for two years in track and field at the University of North Carolina before transferring to the University of Arkansas. While at Arkansas, she won a NCAA Indoor National Championship and four All-American honors. She holds the school’s records for indoor and outdoor pole vault. Morris has competed on two World Championship teams and won a silver medal at the 2016 Indoor World Championships. “I am very honored and excited that I will be able to make it home to take part in such a wonderful event,” Morris said in a release.

ATTENTION: Humana Gold Plus will NOT cover Greenville Health System (GHS) in 2017! If you are a GHS patient and want to continue to use the physicians and hospitals you know and trust, you need to choose a new plan before open enrollment ends December 7, 2016. Effective January 1, 2017, GHS will no longer be part of the Human Gold Plus plan. Act now! Choose one of these plans to continue to receive care from your current GHS physician: • • • • • •

Aetna Medicare Advantage Care Improvement Plus Humana Choice (different from Humana Gold Plus) United Healthcare Medicare Advantage Traditional Medicare WellCare Medicare Advantage

For assistance in selecting one of these plans, contact your insurance agent or the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227) or www.medicare.gov. We look forward to continuing to partner with you so that you can enjoy the best health possible!

4,425 TREES PLANTED

Plant a Tree. Donate Today. www.treesgreenville.org

ghs.org 17-0129GJ


feast FEAST SPECIAL SECTION

Survival of the Tastiest

Farms preserve more adaptable, better-tasting heritage breeds for future generations ANDREW MOORE | STAFF

amoore@communityjournals.com THROUGHOUT THE CENTURIES, the world’s farmers have raised thousands of different animal breeds. But today, at least one breed becomes extinct each month, and about 20 percent of the world’s cattle, goats, pigs, horses and poultry breeds are at risk of extinction, according to the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization. Agnew Hopkins blames industrial farming. “Factories are really hurting diversity, because they’re genetically engineering animals to grow bigger, longer and faster. They typically focus on certain breeds,” he said. “We’re selling our birds to restaurants, but I’m not doing this for money. I’m doing this for conservation … someone has to save them.” Hopkins, a sixth-generation farmer, oversees organic poultry production at his 450-acre family

farm in Simpsonville. And while most commercial agricultural operations make mass production a priority, Hopkins takes a different approach by raising “heritage breed” turkeys, chickens and ducks. Heritage breeds are types of livestock that have been around for hundreds of years and have remained largely unchanged by people. They’re often more adaptable to the outdoors and tastier than industrial hybrids, which are raised with antibiotics. That’s important to Hopkins, whose background is in the culinary arts. In 1996, Hopkins graduated from Charlotte’s Johnson and Wales University and worked as a chef at Magnolia’s in Charleston for eight years before returning to Johnson and Wales as an associate professor. Then he returned to the farm. About seven years ago, Hopkins started to research heritage poultry, which are especially threatened. Half of the 70 poultry breeds in the U.S. are endangered and 20 are nearly extinct, ac-

cording to the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy. His first purchase: American Standard Bronze turkeys, the same breed of bird probably served up by colonists at the first Thanksgiving. “Standard Bronze turkeys are the best birds you can get. They’re really an American tradition,” Hopkins said. “However, they’re not really the Thanksgiving bird anymore.” More than 99 percent of the 230 million turkeys produced in the U.S. each year are Broad Breasted Whites. In the 1960s, the Department of Agriculture started selectively breeding the birds to increase their weight. Today, white turkeys can weigh up to 40 pounds within 20 weeks of hatching. Most get so heavy that they can’t fly or reproduce properly. But the meat is cheaper and poultry companies prefer it, because Americans demand a lot of meat. Hopkins currently maintains a breeding stock of Will Crooks / staff

16 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.02.2016

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM


feast three toms and 15 hens that produce 60 Bronze turkeys annually for the market. He inspects each of the turkeys using American Poultry Association standards. “I have to ensure they are perfect, because even small genetic defects can affect reproduction,” Hopkins said. He added, “Part of the job is ensuring that that bloodline is constantly improving.” Heritage turkeys cost twice as much white turkeys. Hopkins’ turkeys require 27 weeks to reach processing weight. So he has to cover the cost of raising, sheltering and protecting them from April to midOctober. Between feed and USDAcertified processing fees, Hopkins spends about $4,770 on his 60 birds each year. Hopkins has to earn $78 per turkey to break even, so he charges $6.50 per pound. Each turkey can weigh up to 15 pounds. While he sells to individuals, Hopkins has found a niche market in restaurants, such as Roost and American Grocery Restaurant in downtown Greenville. Chefs are increasingly purchasing heritage breeds because of superior taste. Food critics claim heritage breeds are better than industrial breeds, which are usually pumped full of water, salt, preservatives and flavorings. In addition to heritage turkeys, Hopkins raises and sells heritage chickens and eggs to Swamp Rabbit Café and Grocery. That includes New Hampshire Reds, Delawares and White Leghorns. He also raises and sells Guinea fowl as well as Saxony and Silver Appleyard ducks to Bacon Bros. Public House on Pelham Road. The variety he offers could be crucial, as the competition is getting stiffer. According to the Livestock Conservancy, there were only 1,300 heritage turkeys in 1997. But there are about 30,000 today. “I’ve noticed a lot of heritage breed farmers appearing across the Upstate since the farm-totable movement started a few years ago,” Hopkins said. “Organic meats are much more popular now.” USDA-certified organic meats, which are generally raised without antibiotics, were the fastest-growing segment of the $31 billion organic foods industry in 2011, according to the Organic Trade Association.

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According to the Natural Resources Defense Council, retail sales of antibiotic-free chicken across the U.S. rose 34 percent, and consumer spending on it has topped $1 billion, not including restaurant and other commercial purchases. Several farms are hoping to feed the increasing demand for organic meats. Anderson resident Noah Tassie is currently transitioning out of his position as director of Greenville’s Mill Village Farms to focus on his own operation, called Red Feather Farm, in Honea Path, where he raises grass-fed Hereford and Hampshire pigs. “Heritage pigs require more time to grow out before processing. So they’re meatier than your typical grocery store breeds, and they have more marbling. They’re just a superior product,” said Tassie, who has a bachelor’s degree in sustainable development and agriculture from Appalachian State University. Tassie plans to sell the heritage pork at various locations across Greenville this winter. Other farms are focused on preservation. “Our goal is to preserve some of the very rare heritage breeds that are so important in maintaining genetic diversity,” said Jim Lyle, a fourth-generation farmer who owns Gaffney’s Brick House Farms. Lyle raises several heritage breed animals, including American Milking Devon cows and Red Wattle pigs, which are both currently listed as threatened or in critical condition by the Livestock Conservancy. Ware Shoals farmer Chris Sermons is considering purchasing Pineywoods cattle for his Bio-Way Farms. The Pineywoods is one of the oldest cattle breeds in the country, descending from Spanish cattle brought to the Americas in the early 1500s. They are now considered threatened. “The most interesting aspect of heritage breeds is the story they tell. People are digging for more information about their food instead of just turning a blind eye to the factories that are spitting out food,” Sermons said. Other heritage breed farms include Greenbrier Farms and Mini Miracles Farm. As for Hopkins, he hopes to continue preserving heritage breeds and building his niche market of restaurants. “If we don’t use heritage poultry and other animals, we’re really going to lose them forever,” he said. For more information, visit livestockconservancy.org.

STATISTIC

A DYING BREED

Source: University of Missouri

Within the past 15 years, about 190 breeds of farm animals have gone extinct across the world. There are currently 1,500 others going extinct right now. Sixty breeds have gone extinct in the last decade. Many blame the commercial farming industry, which is comprised of just a few breeds:

83%

60%

of dairy cows are Holsteins.

of beef cattle are Angus, Hereford or Simmental breeds.

75%

+60%

of pigs in the U.S. come from just three breeds.

“I’m going to choose a heritage breed over an industry breed any day of the week. They simply taste better, because they get more space to roam. So they end up having more muscle, which means more flavor.”

“It depends on the use. We purchase heritage duck for our duck prosciutto, and the meat is just 10 times better. They have way more texture and a deep iron flavor. And you’re not going to get that from a bird that’s spent its entire life in a cage.”

Trevor Higgins, executive chef at Roost Restaurant

Anthony Gray, executive chef at Bacon Bros. Public House

of sheep come from four breeds.

“Heritage breeds taste better and allow more range. We’re able to use the entire animal. So for pigs, we’re able to get the lard we need and use any remaining meat for stews and steaks.”

Greg McPhee, executive chef at The Anchorage

12.02.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 17


feast THERE ARE FEW THINGS MORE COMFORTING when the weather finally turns cold than a hot bowl of chili. But not just any chili will do for most people. For as many variations as there are, there are just as many opinions about how each should be made. Beef or venison. Beans or no beans. Spicy or mild. Beer or no beer. And how about cinnamon or chocolate, or maybe even both? Greenville chefs have been waiting longer than usual with this year’s lingering summer weather to break out their favorite versions. Now that Mother Nature seems to have granted a hint of cooler temps, those recipes will start popping up on menus around town. And while it’s nice to have options for good chili when dining out, most people think of it as a game-day or family gathering dish. To help home cooks up their game, four local chefs with long histories of chili making and an appreciation for the slow-food movement have offered up their best methods for that perfect, satisfying pot of chili.

CHEF ANTHONY GRAY, BACON BROS. PUBLIC HOUSE

CHILI SECRETS

Gray is known for his love of meat. He grew up hunting deer in south Georgia and using the venison as the base for what he calls a “three-alarm” chili his family often made over a campfire. “Ingredients are the key,” Gray says. “Use the best ingredients possible.” He explains “best” as grass-fed meat, without exception. Now, he prefers to use beef from White Oak Pastures in Bluffton, Ga., that’s available in Greenville at Publix, Earth Fare and Whole Foods. “It has that distinct, grass-fed flavor,” Gray says. Gray starts by browning the meat, and because he uses lean beef, he doesn’t drain off the small amount of fat. Then he adds in onions, garlic and peppers and cooks those down slowly until they are really soft and fragrant. The heat level of the peppers he chooses to use depends on for whom he’s cooking. “I have to back off the spice for my wife,” he says. Then come the dried spices — smoked paprika, cumin, chili powder and cayenne. Gray says he uses whole boxed tomatoes and crushes them up by hand before adding them in. Meanwhile, in a separate pot, he cooks white beans with a ham hock to give them lots of flavor before adding them to the pot. Back in the main pot, Gray adds beer — pretty much whatever he has on hand, like PBR or the like. He lets that simmer before adding in some homemade chicken stock if more liquid is needed and then uses polenta as a thickener. He also adds in some dried herbs — thyme, oregano and bay leaf. Then he adds in the cooked beans and lets it go. “The key is not rushing; let it simmer all day long,” Gray says. Gray says a recipe is merely a road map that cooks should feel free to detour from often. “Do what you like,” he says. “Food is fun. Make it your own.” Gray says during the colder months Bacon Bros. will offer a bean-free take on his chili using smoked brisket instead of ground meat. Southwestern chili at Bacon Bros. Public House

Will Crooks / staff

Low and Slow Local chefs offer up their best chili recipes and advice for making that perfect pot ARIEL TURNER | CONTRIBUTOR

aturner@communityjournals.com

CHEF JOE CLARKE, AMERICAN GROCERY Clarke goes a similar but slightly different route for his chili recipe, which will not likely ever find its way onto the restaurant’s menu. “It’s not really our thing,” he says, although he often makes it for the staff and his family when the weather starts to cool off. Clarke starts with a good quality chuck roast, cut into bite-size pieces. “The key technique to braising is browning the meat,” he says. “Don’t crowd the pan.” He uses a variety of peppers — bell, poblanos and some jalapeños or serranos for a little extra heat. Then he adds canned tomatoes and tomato paste. In addition to the typically used dried spices, Clarke adds in some ancho chile powder and often uses whole cumin seeds, which soften during the cooking process.The American Grocery chef says beer is an important ingredient — the maltier the better, such as a Newcastle Brown Ale. He adds pinto or kidney beans at the end of the cooking process

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feast so they maintain their texture without getting mushy. And then for a little extra interesting note, Clarke stirs in a little bit of feta cheese and cinnamon. On occasion, he’ll add in some lowsodium beef stock if more liquid is needed or hot sauce to punch up the flavor a bit. “This is the same chili I’ve been making for a long time,” Clarke says.

CHEF SHAUN GARCIA, NOSE DIVE On the other end of Main Street, Garcia is looking forward to putting his bison chili poutine on the menu. His take on chili, which will be layered on top of fries with cheese curds, is similar to a Mexican mole sauce with charred chilies, coffee and chocolate for depth of flavor. He uses grassfed bison cut up in stew-size pieces, browns the meat, caramelizes the onions and adds in the rest of his ingredients before letting it all simmer away in the oven. He says for the home cook, a slow cooker is the best way to let chili cook all day. “Set it and forget it,” Garcia says. “You can start a day ahead. It’s better the next day.”

CHEF JOSH DUNN, ROOST At Roost, Dunn’s chili was requested so often it became a part of the regular menu. Daniel Dobbs, Roost’s sous chef, said for any chili recipe the most important thing to remember is to take your time, don’t rush through the process and let it cook slowly.

Josh’s Beef & Poblano Chili (yields 2 ½ gallons) 2 red onions 4 poblano peppers 1 cup roasted garlic 1/4 cup lemon juice 3/4 lbs. of butter 1 1/3 cups flour 5 lbs. ground beef 1/4 bottle apple juice 1 1/2 tbs. cumin 1 1/2 tbs. coriander 1 T smoked paprika 1/4 cup chili powder 1/8 cup brown sugar 1 can V8 juice 2 cans kidney beans 1 quart beef stock 1/8 cup hot sauce Salt & pepper to taste Dice and caramelize onions and poblanos in 1/4 lb. of butter. In a separate pot, make brown roux with flour and rest of butter. Toss garlic in oil and roast 20 minutes, then puree with lemon juice. Add garlic mix and beef to onions and poblanos, brown beef. Deglaze with apple juice. Add spices and brown sugar. Simmer. Add V8 and kidney beans. Simmer. Add 1 quart hot beef stock and hot sauce. Stir in cooled roux. Salt and pepper.

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Big Honkin’ Veggie Burger at Tupelo Honey Café

Photos by Will Crooks / staff

FORGET HAMBURGER — TRY THESE HEARTY AND TASTY ALTERNATIVES

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ORDERING A CLASSIC BURGER IS WIDELY CONSIDERED A SAFE BET at almost any restaurant. After all, it’s difficult to flub putting together a beef patty with some toppings and condiments and sandwiching it all in a bun. Add a serving of hot and salty fries on the side, and you’ve got yourself a satisfying meal. But part of the enjoyment of going to restaurants is expanding one’s palate and trying something that deviates from the typical. That’s where “nonburgers” come into play. These inventive sandwich entrees aren’t conventional burgers, but they’re just as enticing. And some of them are favorites among customers at our local restaurants. Over at Nose Dive on South Main Street, the Chicken Fil-Ay sandwich — crispy fried chicken topped with pickles and Alabama white sauce on a brioche bun — is one of the restaurant’s most popular dishes, nearly outselling every other menu item. “We joke that people just come here for the chicken sandwich,” says chef Shaun Garcia. What makes the Chicken Fil-Ay such a hit with customers is the nontraditional pairing of Alabama white sauce with chicken. “Most people think of it [white sauce] as a barbecue sauce, but this is just a mayonnaise-based sauce. It’s more similar to coleslaw dressing, which works well with chicken,” says Garcia. “Being from the South, I love fried chicken, and I knew it would be something our guests would really enjoy. And I love the Alabama white sauce, so I decided to pair some of my favorite items in this sandwich.” Just a short distance down from Nose Dive on South Main Street is Grill Marks. The restaurant is one of downtown’s most recognizable burger joints, but a portion of its menu has a selection of beef-free options — even one that is entirely meatless. The unburgers “all appeal to different groups,” says Bob Munnich, COO of Grill Marks. “Actually, out of all of the unburgers, the veggie burger is still our best-seller.” The Heavenly Veggie has been a hit with diners because it avoids the two pitfalls that often make veggie burgers unappetizing: Either they try too hard to mimic the taste of beef, which can’t effectively be replicated, or alternatively turn out too bland. The Heavenly Veggie patty is a palatable blend of roasted vegetables, black beans, herbs and spices. It’s topped with spicy pepper jack cheese, lettuce and tomato. A spread of jalapeño pesto gives it an additional fresh kick and adds another dimension of flavor.

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feast The Portobello — a grilled mushroom topped with Brie cheese, pesto, roasted peppers, lettuce and tomato — is also a popular unburger, says Munnich. Portobello mushrooms are a common vegetarian substitute for red meat due to the similar texture, thickness and juiciness. The cheese, pesto and roasted peppers add bolder and savory flavors to balance the earthy taste of the mushroom. For those who’d like to get in the holiday spirit, Grill Marks also offers a turkey burger, The Gobbler, which Munnich says “appeals to a group that does eat meat but eats a little bit healthier.” Local organic turkey is topped with sage derby cheese, lettuce and cranberry relish. “It is a very traditional Thanksgiving-inspired [entree],” he says. At ONE City Plaza, Tupelo Honey Café’s current seasonal offerings include a Carolina Chicken Sandwich on the lunch and dinner menus and the Big Honkin’ Veggie Burger on the lunch menu. The Carolina Chicken Sandwich substitutes a traditional pesto spread for a pecan kale variation to give the entree a more distinct flavor profile. “We found that the marriage of those two ingredients took an otherwise ordinary chicken sandwich to the next level,” says Todd Levick, culinary support manager of Tupelo Honey Café. Pesto is typically made with basil and pine nuts or walnuts, but the restaurant wanted to put a regional twist on the sandwich. “As our roots are in the South, we chose to use a traditionally Southern nut, pecans,” Levick explains. The restaurant opted to go with kale instead of basil in the pesto as “a healthy alternative.” The Carolina Chicken Sandwich is also topped with Havarti cheese, tomato, lettuce and avocado to deliver “a healthy mouthful of flavors,” says Levick. On the vegetarian side, the Big Honkin’ Veggie Burger is a black bean patty with smoked jalapeño sauce. House-made pickles, tomato and onion — upon request — are also included. “This burger didn't happen just by accident. The flavor profile has been crafted after many years of practice,” Levick says. “It is built with layers of flavor like you would build a soup, each adding its own distinct accent … I believe that if there is one ingredient that elevates this burger, it may be the poblano peppers.” The burger’s unique smoked jalapeño sauce further enhances the burger’s robust flavors. “Adding a smoky flavor with the roasted jalapeño aioli adds another pepper component to the already complex burger,” Levick says.

Chicken Fil-Ay Sandwich at Nose Dive

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feast

Greenbrier Farms in Easley, Sharecroppers Farm in Spartanburg and Bio-Way Farms in Ware Shoals. Taylors resident Natalie Brookshire started the CSA at Mini Miracles Farms in 2010 as a way to educate people about healthy eating. “People are really disconnected from their food nowadays,” she said. “Some children don’t realize that food comes from living organisms. People have big misconceptions about produce. For example, celery can have 13 pesticides in it.” She added that her farm’s program provides healthier options to the public, offering foods grown and raised under standards established by the Organic Materials Review Institute, which tests the raw materials used in production, the production process, facility and other components to validate if the product is organic. Brookshire also stressed practical benefits. “Our subscribers get priority, meanPhotos by Kimberly Gibson / contributing ing they usually get the freshest produce available. Subscribers also usually get more than what they paid for, especially family of four. Customers pay for shares, when crops are doing well.” which can cost up to $25 or more per Chris Sermons, who owns Bio-Way week, at the beginning of a season. Farms Farms in Ware Shoals, started a CSA that generally offer CSAs in summer and fall, provides USDA-certified organic produce but some also offer them year-around. to more than 100 subscribers. The proThroughout the season, customers colgram has helped his farm thrive throughlect their shares at fixed points, such as out the winter, providing funds for seeds markets or grocery stores. Some farms and more in the offseason, according to also deliver, which is included in the price Sermons. of the share or as an added fee, or offer For small farmers, CSAs are a crucial on-site pickups. part of their direct sales. They can provide up to 40 percent of revenue and FORGING CONNECTIONS TO FOOD help them build a customer base. “CSA CSAs are nothing new. programs really create a community, They first appeared in Japan in the because we get to know our customers 1960s. Then U.S. farms started them who subscribe to the program,” Sermons in 1980, with programs first appearing said. “Building relationships can translate throughout Massachusetts. Since then, CSAs have taken the country’s small farms to sales.” by storm. Even large companies, such as CROP ROTATIONS Walmart, Target and Amazon, have startDespite the benefits, a CSA membered delivering “farmers market produce.” ship doesn’t come without risks. “When There are five CSAs in the Greenville people sign up, they need to understand area, including Mini Miracles Farms in the risks,” said Margie Levine, owner of Taylors, Reedy River Farms in Greenville, Crescent Farms. Crop failure is a real pos-

VEGGIE TALES

Local-first consumers turn to community supported agricultural programs for farm-fresh foods

ANDREW MOORE | STAFF

amoore@communityjournals.com JUST AS THE DEMAND FOR LOCALLY GROWN, ORGANIC FOOD has dramatically increased in the last five years, so has the number of chefs sourcing ingredients from small farms. But eating out every day isn’t feasible for most people. So how are consumers supporting their farm-to-table dinners? Farmers are increasingly adopting community-supported agriculture, or CSA, programs to provide consumers with cheaper, healthier options and the opportunity to directly invest in the daily farming operation. In a CSA, customers generally sign up and pay for a subscription. The farmers get help in covering their operating costs, and customers in turn receive a weekly or biweekly bag of freshly harvested produce, meats, eggs and more. Farms usually offer shares in different sizes, which range from full shares to mini shares. A full share will generally feed a

22 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.02.2016

sibility. “If we have a great tomato crop, then a customer might drown in tomatoes. But if not, customers might only get a few tomatoes in their share.” But the good news is that some farms are adopting flexible CSA models, sourcing produce from multiple farms. Mini Miracles Farm is an example. The 26-acre farm not only grows produce in-ground but also imports products from about 40 farms across the Southeast. “We protect ourselves against shortages by being multi-farm. It means less money for us, but it protects our shareholders,” Brookshire said. Brookshire also uploads weekly lists of products on the farm’s social media sites, which allows members to choose 90 percent of their 12-item share. “Our approach allows our customers to plan meals, which saves money and time,” she said. “But we also try to introduce them to new things they’ve never had.” Others are trying different approaches. Crescent Farms currently offers a produce share on a weekly basis. Levine sends out a notice every Thursday evening with the expected contents of the following week's share. Orders for a box must be placed by Sunday night. “There is no longterm commitment required,” Levine said. “We will continue the program as long as we have enough interested participants and vegetables.” Some farms have also added pastured meats and free-range eggs to their shares to provide variety. Greenbrier Farms offers a “protein share” that includes a variety of chicken, pork and beef. Other farms offer more unique meats. Mini Miracles Farms, for example, purchases elk and bison for its subscribers. “Our members really enjoy the meats and eggs, because they can store them in the fridge and freezer for later use. The meats have offered a safety net for us, because animals aren’t as susceptible to the outdoors. So unless the cows are jumping the fence somewhere, we’re in good shape,” Brookshire said.

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM


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CSAS SERVICING THE GREENVILLE AREA BIO-WAY FARMS

CRESCENT FARMS

REEDY RIVER FARMS

GREENBRIER FARMS

MINI MIRACLES FARM

SHARECROPPERS FARM

LOCATION: 197 Bio Way, Ware Shoals

LOCATION: 3111 Highway 56 South, Clinton

LOCATION: 78 Mayberry St., Greenville

LOCATION: 766 Hester Store Road, Easley

LOCATION: 708 Old Rutherford Road, Taylors

LOCATION: 4810 N. Blackstock Road, Spartanburg

ABOUT THE FARM: A Certified SC Grown farm growing a large variety of vegetables and herbs. The farm also raises grassfed pigs.

ABOUT THE FARM: A small family farm that grows USDA Certified Organic produce.

ABOUT THE FARM: Small produce farm located just off the Swamp Rabbit Trail near downtown Greenville

ABOUT THE FARM: This 300-acre farm offers USDA Certified Organic produce and grass-fed meats, including beef and pork.

ABOUT THE FARM: This small family farm offers produce and meats raised under Organic Materials Review Institute standards. It also offers eggs, milk, cheeses, breads and more.

ABOUT THE FARM: This private farm is supported through its CSA and provides various fruits and vegetables grown under Organic Material Review Institute standards.

LENGTH OF CSA SEASON: June to August, September to December

LENGTH OF CSA SEASON: May to September, September to December

LENGTH OF CSA SEASON: April to July, August to November WEEKLY SHARE SIZE: Between 15 and 25 varieties of vegetables and herbs SHARE PRICES: $420 for one session, $810 for both sessions FARM WORK REQUIRED? No PICKUP SITES: Whole Foods in Greenville, Bio-way Farms SIGN-UP DEADLINE: None CONTACT INFORMATION: chris@biowayfarm.com, 864-992-6987

LENGTH OF CSA SEASON: Late April to November WEEKLY SHARE SIZE: Full-share subscribers receive about 15 vegetables weekly. Halfshare subscribers receive the same amount, but every other week. SHARE PRICES: $850 for full share, $450 for half share. Shares can be paid in full up front or in three installments throughout the season. FARM WORK REQUIRED? Optional work-share program PICKUP SITES: Vaughnʼs Country Store in Simpsonville, Whole Foods or Swamp Rabbit Café and Grocery in Greenville and Belue Farms in Spartanburg SIGN-UP DEADLINE: None CONTACT INFORMATION: crescentfarmsc@gmail.com, 802-380-0605

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LENGTH OF CSA SEASON: November to February WEEKLY SHARE SIZE: About 10 to 15 vegetables SHARE PRICE: $250 FARM WORK REQUIRED? No PICKUP SITES: Reedy River Farms SIGN-UP DEADLINE: Program is full CONTACT INFORMATION: george@reedyriverfarms, 864-419-0385

LENGTH OF CSA SEASON: May to July, August to November WEEKLY SHARE SIZE: One grocery bag worth SHARE PRICES: $416 for vegetable shares, $507 for protein shares FARM WORK REQUIRED? No PICKUP SITES: Greenbrier Farms, The Community Tap and Whole Foods in Greenville; days and times vary each season SIGN-UP DEADLINE: None CONTACT INFORMATION: amy@greenbrierfarms.com, 864-855-9782

WEEKLY SHARE SIZE: There is a half share with six items, a full share with 12 items, a regular plus share with 18 items and a double large share with 24 items. SHARE PRICES: Between $250 and $1,275 depending on the share. Shares can be paid in full up front or through weekly installments. FARM WORK REQUIRED? No PICKUP SITES: On-farm only on Thursday 1–7 p.m., Fridays 10 a.m.–6 p.m. and Saturdays 10 a.m.–2 p.m. Delivery is available on Thursdays for select areas. SIGN-UP DEADLINE: None CONTACT INFORMATION: mmiraclesfarmsc@gmail.com, 864-631-5325

WEEKLY SHARE SIZE: A full family share provides enough vegetables for a family of four as well as one dozen eggs. The biweekly shares are the same but on alternating weeks, and half shares provide enough foods for two people and include a half-dozen eggs. SHARE PRICES: Between $200 and $675 depending on season and share. FARM WORK REQUIRED? No PICKUP SITES: On-farm from 4:30–7 p.m. on Tuesdays, Earth Fare on Pelham Road at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesdays. SIGN-UP DEADLINE: None CONTACT INFORMATION: goatsgritsandchickensohmy@gmail. com, 864-814-8695

12.02.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 23


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WHO SHOULD JOIN A CSA?

Kimberly Gibson / contributing

While CSAs provide people the chance to support local farmers and get fresh produce, there are various access issues. The first issue is cost. Most CSAs require customers to pay up front for their seasonal shares. Crescent Farms, for example, charges its Greenville and Spartanburg subscribers about $850. Subscribers should also have a “broad, creative palate,” Levin said. “We don’t allow our members to choose their shares, because we grow with them in mind. But the shares are seasonal. So they have to deal with what they get.” That means CSA subscribers will have to put their culinary skills to the test each week in order to use, for example, kohlrabi, which is a cross between a cabbage and a turnip. Kohlrabi is common in CSA shares but has been tagged “the loneliest vegetable in the world of healthy eating” due to its appearance and limited recipes. Another access issue is scheduling. People who travel or eat out a lot should try farmers markets. “If someone only cooks once a week, it could be a

real waste of food and money,” Levine said. “The farm doesn’t stop for vacations or business trips.” Farms are using different approaches to make CSAs more accessible. Some farms, including Mini Miracles Farm and Crescent Farms, provide recipes with each share. “It’s usually more work for us, but it helps our members use the foods we provide,” Brookshire said. Crescent Farms offers a program that allows customers to earn weekly shares by working at least eight hours per week on the farm. Customers must apply before the start of each season and must be able to perform physical labor for up to three hours at a time. Mini Miracles Farm offers a midseason option. “Interested customers can try our CSA to ensure it really works for them. It’s our way of reinforcing the idea that these programs are more than trends, which just burn out eventually. We really don’t want that,” Brookshire said. “Customers should pursue it as a lifestyle.”

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feast FOOD IN A BOX CSA shares are seasonal. So what could you get in your box right now if you signed up for a full share at Mini Miracles Farm? Sweet potatoes Jumbo yellow onion Romaine lettuce or kale

Apples 12 farm fresh eggs Red onions Yellow squash

Cucumbers Rainbow carrots Celery Broccoli

White rice Ground elk meat (add-ons) Milk (add-ons)

*These items are just samples. Mini Miracles Farm allows subscribers to select six of 12 items from a large selection of foods for their weekly share.

THE CSA COOKBOOK

Cooking can be difficult for CSA members who aren’t as creative in the kitchen as others. However, many farms are providing recipes and vegetable profiles for their subscribers. Try this one from Mini Miracles Farm:

Cowboy Stew with Elk Meat

By Natalie Brookshire, Mini Miracles Farm 1 lb. of ground elk meat 1 medium organic onion 1 medium organic bell pepper 1 tsp. sea or Himalayan Salt 1 tsp. Herbamare seasoning

1 tsp. garlic powder 1 Tbs. olive or avocado oil 1/3 cup tomato sauce Pinch of pepper 1 small package frozen organic mixed veggies

Dice the onion and pepper. Add oil to iron skillet over medium heat. Sauté onion and pepper for 3 to 4 minutes. Add raw elk and brown meat thoroughly. Add seasonings to meat as cooking. Add tomato sauce and frozen veggies, cooking until veggies are tender Serving instructions: Serve by itself or over rice. May add more or less seasoning to taste.

The Nutcracker

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26 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.02.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

COMMUNITY

COMING SOON• SPRING 2017 -����

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Community Voices

WATERSTONE

with Christine Greer O’Connor, Ph.D.

The Quarterlife Crisis TM

on Augusta

A WoodBine Senior Living Community

Yes, it’s a real thing

I can think of no more exciting time of life than one’s 20s and 30s. It can also be a daunting and disorienting period. What makes it exciting and what makes it daunting are the same: transitioning to adulthood. This “quarterlife period” involves making big decisions and navigating new experiences. Amid the many new experiences, like starting full-time work, moving to a new city, beginning or ending a relationship and becoming financially independent from family, the quarterlifer often is asking, “What am I going to do with my life?” As emerging adults go through transitions, it is common for them to experience a quarterlife crisis. What is a quarterlife crisis? A quarterlife crisis is when someone in their 20s or 30s experiences overwhelming stress and anxiety regarding the transition into adulthood. It is commonly accompanied by fear of making the wrong choices and a feeling that everyone else has it all figured out. I have been a therapist for quarterlife clients for more than 10 years and have seen consistent patterns that evolve with clients who are experiencing a quarterlife crisis. There are some common signs of a quarterlife crisis and some particularly helpful ways to deal with it that I would like to share.

Waterstone on Augusta is a premier senior living community offering assisted living and memory care. Downtown Location Continuous Licensed Nurse Coverage Private and Companion Suite Offerings Onsite Dietician and Community Chef Organized Programs, Events, and Activities

These are four warning signs of a quarterlife crisis: • Feeling lost in life • Feelings of self-doubt • Difficulty making decisions • Lack of motivation Here is what we need to remember: Many people struggle with these issues in their 20s and 30s, and recognizing a crisis in progress presents amazing opportunities for growth. Confront the quarterlife crisis as soon as possible, and seize the opportunity to be in control of learning how to be motivated, satisfied and intentional in life. There is no magic bullet — it takes significant work and the support of others. By recognizing the symptoms and taking action, one can create a solid foundation for long-term happiness and success. I’ll share with you three steps that you can take to begin dealing with a quarterlife crisis. 1. Take care of yourself. The quarterlife crisis is often marked by feelings of self-doubt and negative self-talk, which makes it hard to prioritize taking care of oneself (which leads to even worse feelings about oneself). So it is essential to get enough sleep at night, take naps, eat well, exercise, relax and have some fun (it’s OK to binge-watch TV or enjoy a large pizza from time to time). 2. Get comfortable with yourself. No good comes from comparing yourself with peers. Minimize the use of social media if you find yourself getting down every time you look at what others are posting. Often people live on autopilot without stopping to figure out what they really value and how they want to live their life. Use this opportunity to accept who you are and what you’re about — the good and the bad. If you can get comfortable with yourself, a lifetime of happiness awaits you.

Edward G. Burton Executive Director

Ginger Shiflett

Community Relations

Contact Us Today to Learn More.

864.605. 7236 Ginger.Shiflett@WaterstoneOnAugusta.com

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Vibrant Culture. Exceptional Care. Downtown Living.

3. Don’t go it alone. Lean on others. Countless studies have shown that our greatest satisfactions and some significant health benefits are associated with maintaining close, personal connections. This can be especially true during a quarterlife crisis. Lean on the support of caring people in your life. There are people who want to help: friends, family, mental health professionals. Navigating a quarterlife crisis is challenging, but facing it now can lead to personal growth that can enrich the rest of your life. Christine Greer O’Connor, Ph.D., is a licensed clinical social worker and founder of the Quarterlife Center, which specializes in providing counseling to clients in their 20s and 30s. Visit quarterlifecenter.com for more information.


F

eaturing Maestro Edvard Tchivzhel and 85 musicians of the Greenville Symphony Orchestra with Broadway star, Rachel York

Music and merriment abound in this holiday pops concert featuring Christmas favorites, both old and new! Fri Dec 16 7:30pm Sat Dec 17 7:30pm Sun Dec 18 3pm The Peace Center

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COMMUNITY Our Community

Let us do all your

Holiday Baking!

Community news, events and happenings

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SWEEPSTAKES

• Pumpkin Pound Cake • Cakes & Pies • Cookie Trays • Gingerbread • Gritibänz • Stollen • And so much more!

Ice on Main offers daily skating, chance to win trip to New York City

11 Sevier St., Greenville | 864.282.8580 Tues.-Fri. 7am-6pm, Sat. 8a-4pm

Make the time to #EnjoyLife!

this week Things to do Jack Lukow / Contributing

The “Skate Your Way to Broadway” sweepstakes is back at United Community Bank Ice on Main, open for its sixth season next to Greenville City Hall on the Village Green at Main@Broad, 206 S. Main St. One grand prize winner, to be announced on Jan. 9, 2017, will receive round-trip airfare for two from Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport to New York City, two tickets to see Disney’s “The Lion King” in New York and two tickets to see Disney’s “The Lion King” at the Peace Center on opening night in Greenville, tickets to skate at Rockefeller Center and a $500 prepaid gift card from United Community Bank. Weekly winners will receive a Peace Center Prize Pack. Skaters are eligible for the contest by entering the code at the bottom of their ticket at skateyourwaytobroadway.com. Skate rentals, which include admission, are regularly $10 for adults and $8 for children. Tuesdays are “SkateUnited” nights, and the cost is $5. Commemorative gloves and socks are also available for purchase at the rink with proceeds benefitting Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Carolinas. The goal is to earn enough funds to Adopt A Room at the House near Greenville Memorial Hospital for a full year.

eries ✓ Get Groc ing e Dry Clean th ✓ Pick up aundry ✓ Do the L dog and cat ✓ Feed the 2 to 5pm Cable guy n o t ai W ✓ om e Baby’s ro ✓ Reorganiz car ✓ Clean the r vacation sesitter fo u o H a d in F ✓ d tter notarize ✓ Get the le

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The rink is open daily through Jan. 16, 2017, including holidays, with extended hours during school break, Dec. 19–30. View the full schedule at iceonmain.com.

DONATION

Ride the rails with the GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail Polar Express The 2016 GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail Polar Express and Toy Drive will be held Dec. 5–9, from 6–8 p.m. at the Whistle Stop at The American Café on Main Street in Travelers Rest. A $5 donation or an unwrapped gift for a child age newborn to 10 years old is the ticket to ride on the train. The train departs six times a night, with Santa hanging out on the rooftop watching the movie “The Polar Express.” Hot chocolate is provided by Whistle Stop as well. Call either 421-4777 or 419-9290 after 9 a.m. to make a reservation to ride. .Submit community news items to community@communityjournals.com.

Crossword puzzle: page 54

Sudoku puzzle: page 54

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A new school year brings a fresh 30 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.02.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM start—and Mathnasium is here to Test Math Math Homework Help Help help setEnrichment the stage for success! Prep COMMUNITY Math Help

Math Enrichment

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school year greater than We Put the “M” in STEM. We Put the “M” last year! We make *National mathPTA does not endorse any in STEM.

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We make math make sense. * National PTA does not endorse any commercial entity, product, or service. No endorsement is implied by Mathnasium. To learn more, visit pta.org/ sponsors.

No endorsement is implied by Mathnasium. To learn more about this relationship, * National PTA does visit pta. org/sponsors. not endorse any commercial entity, product, or service. No endorsement is implied by Mathnasium. To learn more, visit pta.org/ sponsors.

Our Schools

Activities, awards and accomplishments

WASHINGTON CENTER

Student selected as Clemson Band Proudly supporting Grand teachers, Marshall schools

and parent leaders Washington Center student everywhere! and avid Tigers fan Matthew Hudson was chosen as the grand marshall to lead the Clemson Band into the stadium for the Nov. 12 game. He escorted the band into the stadium and was recognized on the field during the pregame show. Matthew and his family cheered the team from seats of honor in the band section. Matthew is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Tim Hudson.

GREENVILLE TECH CHARTER HIGH SCHOOL

High school honors veterans with assembly, photo display The high school held a school-wide assembly on Veterans Day to honor America’s veterans, especially those veterans related to GTCHS students. Iraqof veteran and Mathnasium [Location] Mathnasium of [Location] Greenville Tech 000-000-0000 (0000) 000-000-0000 (0000) recruiter Frank mathnasium.com/location mathnasium.com/location Wilburn spoke at Address Line One Address One the Line assembly. Address Line Two Address Line Two Activities during TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS the week included the display of photos of current FIVE FORKS TAYLORS active military Mathnasium of Greenville Mathnasium of Greenville Audry Astudillo stands with the display of active duty military related to personnel who are 1756 Woodruff Road Greenville, SC 29607 1488 W. Wade Hampton Blvd., Greer, SC 29650 GTCHS students. related to GTCHS 864-626-3030 864-469-2047 students. mathnasium.com/greenvillefiveforks mathnasium.com/greenvilletaylors Submit education news items at bit.ly/GJEducation.

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Mathnasium of [Location]

000-000-0000 (0000) of Science in Nursing and Master mathnasium.com/location Doctor of Nursing Practice Address Line One

The Anderson University School of Nursing proudly announces the addition of *

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Address Line Two

For more information contact Jenni Knowles by email at jknowles@andersonuniversity.edu or by calling 864-231-5639.

www.andersonuniversity.edu/nursing/graduate

South Carolina


12.02.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 31

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COMMUNITY

The Good

Events that make our community better accountability and transparency. “This is our highest possible rating and indicates that CDS adheres to sector best practices and executes its mission in a financially efficient way,” said Michael Thatcher, president and CEO of Charity Navigator. “This exceptional designation from Charity Navigator sets Center for Development Services apart from its peers and demonstrates to the public its trustworthiness.” Dana McConnell, CDS executive director, said, “We are extremely proud to have earned this distinction. This honor confirms to our donors that we are using funds appropriately in our mission of serving children and families with developmental delays and disabilities.”

DONATION

Greenville Maintenance Services Inc. provides 3,000 meals to homebound

Magnolia Park shopping center hosted its first annual tree lighting celebration on Nov. 20, featuring a toy drive benefiting Marine Toys for Tots of Greenville.

FUNDRAISER

Vintage Christmas Market benefits local animal rescue Saved by the Heart is the beneficiary of this year’s Greer Station Vintage Christmas, held Dec. 1–3 at Grace Hall, 108 Trade St., Greer. This is the second year Saved by the Heart, a local animal rescue, has partnered with Greer Station Vintage Christmas. The 2015 event helped raise funds for the rescue’s veterinary,

food and maintenance bills as well as their foster program. Jessica Monroe, Saved by the Heart director, said, “We are really thankful for the community partnerships that support our animal rescue efforts. Everyone’s involvement, from vendors to volunteers and sponsors to guests, makes our events so successful and fun.” Visit vintagechristmasgreer.com for more details.

HONOR

CDS receives four-star rating from Charity Navigator The Center for Developmental Services (CDS) earned a four-star rating from Charity Navigator, the highest rating possible from America’s largest independent charity evaluator. This top distinction was earned as a result of CDS’ sound fiscal management practices and commitment to

Meals on Wheels of Greenville recently received a major gift from Greenville Maintenance Services Inc. that will provide 3,000 meals to Greenville’s homebound this holiday season. Greenville Maintenance Services is the first major donor this season to designate a gift to the recently established Rebecca B. Hartness Giving Society, formed to honor those who give an annual gift of $5,000 or more to support Meals on Wheels of Greenville’s meal delivery program. “We are proud to support Meals on Wheels and those in our community who are confined to their homes and can’t prepare a meal for themselves,” said Tommy Jenkins, founding partner at Greenville Maintenance Services. “It’s important to us to give back to the community where we work and live and to care for those who need a helping hand.” Submit good news items to community@ communityjournals.com

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32 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.02.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

LOOK

On Nov. 20, the Augusta Road Business Association hosted its Annual Holiday Open House to kick off the holiday shopping season. Participating businesses had special events, and families could enjoy a visit from Santa, hot cocoa and carriage rides.

Photos by Demorris Giovonni Dodd / Contributing

Jack Lukow / Contributing

United Community Bank Ice on Main, an open-air ice skating rink downtown, returned on Nov. 18. Skating lasts until Jan. 16, 2017.

Magnolia Park shopping center on Woodruff Road held its first tree lighting event on Nov. 20. The celebration included a photo op with Santa, live entertainment, activities and samples from the center’s businesses. A toy drive for Marine Toys for Tots of Greenville was also held.

Zachary Hanby / Contributing

Last Saturday, the Tigers extended their winning streak against their in-state foe to three games, defeating the Gamecocks 56-7. Deshaun Watson threw six touchdowns in the victory, tying his career record for a single game. The Tigers face the Virginia Tech Hokies in the ACC Championship game on Saturday.


12.02.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 33

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Virtue and Vice

Two one-man shows take on booze, religion and spending Christmas with your teetotaling family

Hunter Gardner

ARIEL TURNER | CONTRIBUTOR

aturner@communityjournals.com

The most wonderful time of the year can often also be the most awkward time of the year when family members with differing religious views gather for the holidays. Two Charleston comedians, Hunter Gardner and Andy Livengood, have capitalized on that awkwardness by turning their own family gatherings into two autobiographical one-man shows. Gardner’s “Drinking with Jesus,” performed for the first time a few weeks ago, is composed of 16-17 character monologues that portray how alcohol can make people do crazy things — and that religion can make them do some even crazier things. “The characters are big personalities from both the church world and the party world,” Gardner says. “The show ultimately asks, ‘How do we find a balance between our virtues and our vices when we’ve gone to the edge of each of those worlds?’” Livengood’s “The Christmas Will Be Televised,” which is in its eighth year, opens on an annual Christmas party that’s been a family tradition for 30 years. Looking to get away from Bible readings and awkward conversations

about when he’s going to attend Sunday school again, Livengood sneaks off to where the kids are hanging out watching TV and inserts himself into just about every Christmas special ever televised. High-energy and fast-paced, the show features the Grinch reimagined as a rap song, a lightning-quick version of “A Christmas Story” and “A Christmas Carol”/“Star Wars” mash-up. “When you think of Christmas-themed shows, what comes to mind is a silly show geared to kids. I wanted to create a show for adults,” Livengood says. “I think the show has the right balance of childlike nostalgia and adult cynicism.” In “Drinking with Jesus,” Gardner, a Clemson University graduate, tells his own story of growing up in a strict Christian environment, partying hard in college, returning to religion to try to “save” his best friends and finally settling on a balance of respect for religion but not maintaining the beliefs of his past. “Youth group culture is kinda fun,” he says. “Frat parties are a lot like youth group parties but with a keg in the kitchen.” The narrator of Gardner’s show is Jesus, albeit a Jesus who loves NASCAR and all things Southern. “It’s my divine duty to help people find the balance,” Gardner says with a thick drawl, channeling the spirit of Southern Jesus. “You can love

the Bible but also love an ice-cold Bud Light.” Other characters include the church youth group cool guy, the one who smokes weed but still goes to every youth group event; the frat bro all-star; the cool youth pastor trying to be super hip and likeable; Devon, who loves the Dave Matthews Band, plays in the church praise band, but makes people wonder, “Does he really love Jesus?”; and a spy wearing a bulletproof vest and trying to determine if his fellow youth groupers are true believers not. When he performed the show for the first time in Charleston, Gardner says the audience seemed to really identify with the characters. “That’s what people enjoy about the show,” he says. “It’s more universal, not just my story. These characters are relatable.” Over the last seven years, Livengood, who grew up as a strict Southern Baptist, has found that his audience also identifies with his portrayal of the quintessential dry Christmas Eve. Since he was at least 6 years old, Livengood’s parents have thrown the same party with many of the same guests. Now that he’s used his parents’ guests as inspirations for characters in his show, no one asks him if he’s going to start attending Sunday school and church again. They even request he perform some of the sketches during the party. “Initially I was worried about going to the party, but people loved it,” Livengood says about the first year “The Christmas Will Be Televised” ran. “My parents come every year. My mom wishes there wasn’t so much language, but they’re very supportive.” And while the show certainly pokes fun at religion and Christmas, it’s not intended to be malicious. Livengood says, “Even a cynic like me needs a little more heart at this time of year.”

Alchemy Comedy Where: Coffee Underground, 1 E. Coffee St. When: Hunter Gardner performs “Drinking With Jesus,” Dec. 8, 9 p.m. Tickets are $8. Andy Livengood performs “The Christmas Will Be Televised,” Dec. 9, 9 p.m. Tickets are $10. Both shows run for one hour. Tickets: available at the door and at AlchemyComedy.com

Andy Livengood


34 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.02.2016

PERFORMANCES FOR ALL

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CULTURE

Unlike David Crosby, the guys in Shinedown cut their hair.

Cross-Pollination DECEMBER 13

Shinedown and Five Finger Death Punch make an unlikely but electric package VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

LANG LANG FEBRUARY 27

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For every concert tour that rakes in the bucks at the box office, there are probably four or five that don’t draw. What makes one band’s trek across the arenas of America successful and another one tank? Well, it’s mostly a crapshoot. Take the current joint-headlining tour of the alt-metal band Five Finger Death Punch and the modern-rock band Shinedown. The bands have both sold millions of albums, but their respective styles are quite different. Five Finger’s music relies on pure aggression, pitting tightly wound guitars and brutal rhythms against singer Ivan Moody’s guttural growl. Shinedown has evolved from a post-grunge group heavily indebted to Seattle bands like Alice in Chains and Soundgarden into a much more straightforward rock band that’s scored big hits with both anthemic rockers (“Devour”) and introspective ballads (“Second Chance”). There was no guarantee that they could successfully draw both their fan bases to a joint show. “We did a handful of test shows at the beginning of the year just to see what would happen, because we really don’t have a history with them at all,” says Shinedown bassist Eric Bass (yes, that’s the bassist’s name). “And it worked out really well; everything sold out.” Though Shinedown had never done test shows with other bands before, Bass says they’re relatively common tools for deciding if a tour could succeed, and in this case it was necessary because the two groups hadn’t worked together before. “The promoter wants to see if a package will work, especially when you have two bands that haven’t crosspollinated that much,” he says. “We hadn’t done anything like that before, because the

bands we tour with, we usually all know each other.” “It’s really interesting,” Bass continues. “We have a common demographic through radio, but it’s almost like when you see those pictures with two circle graphs and they kind of overlap, and whatever’s in the middle is our common ground, but it’s two separate demographics because our fans are seeing them for the first time and their fans are seeing us for the first time. It’s been hugely successful. I just think it’s the culmination of two separate styles; we’re a little more rock and they’re a little more metal, and it just works out.” As it turns out, it worked like gangbusters. By the time the tour, which includes former Motley Crue bassist Nikki Sixx’s band Sixx A.M. and up-and-coming modern rock band As Lions, kicked off in October, the ticket pre-sales were so strong that they were able to add more dates throughout the fall. The bands will ultimately play 30 shows together, including one at the Bon Secours Wellness Arena on Monday, Dec. 5. Bass says that the strong ticket sales point to both bands’ continued viability, whether their songs are still being played on the radio or not. “There’s a reason we can tour 24/7 all over the world,” he says. “If the demand wasn’t there, we couldn’t do that. We play for the fans. They’re the boss. [Shinedown singer] Brent Smith says during the show, ‘The fans decide who stays and who goes in this business.’ We really appreciate the fact that they’ve allowed us to do this as long as we have, and that we’ve continued to be able to do what we do.” In fact, for Shinedown, the only problem is narrowing their set list into an hour-and-15-minute set. “If we just played every No. 1 song we’ve had, it would be too many for a set list,” Bass says. “And that’s a fantastic problem to have.” Shinedown and Five Finger Death Punch w/ Sixx A.M. & As Lions Where: Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N. Academy St. When: Monday, Dec. 5, 6 p.m. Tickets: $40.75-$60.75 Info: 241-3800, bonsecoursarena.com


12.02.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 35

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If you’re going to see SCOTS, we hope you like fried chicken.

Tasty Twang Southern Culture on the Skids mix decades of influences into one meaty gumbo VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

Southern Culture on the Skids, w/ Wooly Bushmen and Shufflebutton

Rick Miller remembers the music that first spoke to him as a child like it was yesterday. The singer/songwriter/guitarist for Chapel Hill, N.C.’s stalwart surf/rockabilly/kitsch-rock trio Southern Culture on the Skids grew up in both North Carolina and California because of his parents’ divorce, and he absorbed as much music from both sides of the country as he could. “The first record that perked my ears up was ‘Green Onions’ by Booker T. & The MG’s,” Miller says. “And I loved Steve Cropper’s guitar sound. Then I started listening to surf music in California; stuff like Link Wray, Dick Dale and Mickey Baker. I heard an album by Blue Cheer called ‘Vincebus Eruptum.’ I heard their cover of ‘Summertime Blues’ on the radio. And I asked them at the record store who wrote it and they told me Eddie Cochran, so I got into his stuff and I loved it. It was amazing. Record stores were so awesome that way. You could go for hours through the bins cross-referencing song titles and you could learn about jazz, rockabilly, funk, all kinds of music.” That mix of styles still rings through Miller’s dazzling guitar work, which runs through the sculptured roar of surf rock into the molassesthick chords of classic Stax/Volt Records soul into the hiccupping rhythms of rockabilly. And it’s that late ’60s era that Southern Culture hearkens back to on their new album, “The Electric Pinecones,” with a bit of a twist. “On this new record, it was actually kind of a step back because we used to open up for ourselves as a band called The Pinecones,” Miller says. “We’d play an acoustic, folky ’60s kind of thing, and we’d change clothes and come back as Southern Culture and kind of step on the pedal and do the big loud stuff. I still listen to the music that informed me from back then, so I thought it would be fun to use that as ground zero for the new record. But it’s still a Southern Culture record, so that’s why

Where: Gottrocks, 200 Eisenhower Drive When: Saturday, Dec. 3, 9 p.m. Tickets: $15 Info: 235-5519, gottrocksgreenville.com

vharris@communityjournals.com

we called it ‘The Electric Pinecones.’ We used 12-string guitars, more acoustic than we ever had. The vocal harmonies we worked on more than other records. It’s not quite as in-yourface as some of the older stuff, but it was a real success for me as far as writing and playing.” The album took almost two years to make, which is a luxury the band, which also includes singer/bassist Mary Huff and drummer Dave Hartman, could afford because they own their own recording studio, called Kudzu Ranch Recorders. It’s just the most recent display in a long, stubborn streak of independence that’s woven into the band’s DNA. “A band that tours constantly like we do, it’s nice to be able to just duck into the studio when we have a couple of songs to work on,” Miller says. “It’s very convenient. And I always find it’s best to have control over your own material. For the most part we just do it all ourselves. It’s fun. It’s like having a chemistry set. You can always do some experiments. It’s great to be able to open up artistically on your own clock. In fact, we always managed and booked ourselves til we got too busy to do it. We’d been a band eight years before we got a booking agent, and we were a band for 10 or 12 years before we got a manager.” And even after they got a booking agent, the band still pretty much did the groundwork themselves. “We’d built up an audience by that time, and we had some leverage,” Miller says. “We knew where we’d be playing, and it was their job to move us into other places. We’re still with that booking agent, actually. They have Arcade Fire and a bunch of other bands, but they still take our calls.”

Celebrate a local tradition! Do you know a special child turning 6 this month?

For details, visit WMYI.com or WSSLFM.com Keyword: BIRTHDAY

If you live in Greenville or Laurens County and your child will be 6 years old in December, bring your child’s birth certificate to the Pepsi Plant and receive a FREE Pepsi Birthday Party Package! December 5th-9th, Mon.- Fri. 1pm-5pm & December 10th, Sat. 10am-12pm 751 State Park Road, Greenville, SC • 864-242-6041


36 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.02.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CULTURE

Friends in Most Places

Garth Brooks, Trisha Yearwood talk about touring, cooking and the temptation to duet

Garth Brooks came to Greenville for the first time in 25 years for a three-day stint at the Bon Secours Wellness Arena.

CINDY LANDRUM | CONTRIBUTOR

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Garth Brooks and Greenville were like old friends who haven’t seen each other in a while — you know, the kind of friends who can pick up just like no time had passed at all. It had been 25 years since the country superstar had played the Upstate, selling out Greenville Memorial Auditorium in record-setting time. But you would have never known that during Friday, Nov. 18’s concert at the Bon Secours Wellness Arena, the first in a three-show weekend stint. “What is up with you guys?” Brooks asked the crowd. “You’ve treated each song like each one was your very favorite.” Indeed. Fans sang along with every one of the songs in the classics-heavy set, from the raucous “Friends in Low Places” and “The Thunder Rolls,” complete with rumbling thunder, strobe light lightning strikes and “rain” falling from the huge screen set up on the stage, to slower-paced “Unanswered

Prayers” and “In Another’s Eyes,” a duet sung with wife and fellow country superstar Trisha Yearwood. Yearwood got her turn in the spotlight, too, in a mid-concert set that included “She’s in Love With the Boy” and “How Do I Live?” In a press conference held Friday afternoon, Brooks said the world tour began in Chicago in 2014, and one show turned into 11. Plans to mirror the 1990 tour schedule were thrown out, and the remaining cities on the tour were chosen based on where he and his band remembered they had the most fun. Brooks retired from the music business in the early 2000s and had no plans to tour again. But then casino owner Steve Wynn asked what it would take for the superstar to do a longstanding gig in Las Vegas. Brooks and Yearwood wrote a list of what it would take, a list Yearwood said included “all these things we’d never get,” including a plane. Winn said no problem. “We did ‘Callin’ Baton Rouge’ like it was new, ‘Friends in Low Places,’” Brooks said,

tearing up with the memory. “It was pretty sweet, and that was what gave me the confi-

dence to step out again.” Here are some other thoughts that came out of the press conference. Brooks on what is country music: “At one time, I was the guy that wasn’t country. I think as long as it’s sincere, it’s country.” Yearwood, who describes herself as a home cook and not a chef, on how she became a cookbook author: “I had been asked about writing an autobiography. I wasn’t ready to do that.” During that conversation, Yearwood was asked what she liked to do. When she said she likes to cook, they suggested she write a cookbook. Yearwood thought it would be a good way to get family recipes down on paper in one place. She’s written three cookbooks and has a cooking show on the Food Network. “I wasn’t looking for a second career,” she said. Garth Brooks on whether he and Yearwood will release a duets album: “We’ve been talking about it for 15 years … Finding songs you love and your partner loves, it is not as easy as you would think … The worst fights between me and Miss Yearwood have always been about music.” That’s why they decided their first joint album would be “Christmas Together,” which is not a typical duets album or a typical holiday album. Yearwood on what makes her more nervous, performing a concert in front of a soldout arena or filming an episode of “Trisha’s Southern Kitchen,” her television show on the Food Network: Neither. “Put me in front of a small audience, that’s when I’m nervous. I think it goes back to my childhood when my parents had people over to the house and they would tell me to get my guitar and play. Everybody is staring at you,” she said. “When I get in front of a small audience, I think that’s still in the back of my mind.”

Photos by Gwinn Davis / Contributing

Garth Brooks and wife Trisha Yearwood’s first duet album is “Christmas Together.”


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Featured Home

The Villas at Carriage Hills & West Georgia 9 Layken Lane, Simpsonville, SC

Home Info Price: From the high $200s to the high $400s Info: Enjoy the benefits of maintenance-free living on one level with a selection of award-winning floor plans HOA Services Provided: All lawn maintenance, irrigation, mulch applications, weed control, leaf removal, gutter repairs, pressure washing, exterior paint, driveway and sidewalk repair, roof repairs and termite bond Agent: Levi Weisser 864-207-8094 | Levi@NewStyleCommunities.com

ASK ABOUT YEAR-END SPECIALS ON MARKET HOMES So, you’ve been thinking about what life would be like without the hassles of yard work and home maintenance. We understand. If you’re like most of our home buyers, you’ve been thinking about “right-sizing” your next home for a long time. But you don’t want to sacrifice quality and you don’t want to compromise on features. We understand. You need to check out The Villas at Carriage Hills and West Georgia where architecture and natural beauty intersect with a no-maintenance platform where all exterior maintenance is handled by others – giving you the freedom to enjoy your free time.

We’ve designed Carriage Hills and West Georgia with a quaint and intimate streetscape – combined with charming architectural elements and high-quality construction practices. The well-coordinated community will be one-of-a-kind for the residents of Greenville. You’ll soon discover the benefits of maintenance-free living and the convenience of having all of life’s amenities right outside your front door. You’ll have no need for a lawn mower, edger, hedge trimmer or leaf blower. These services will now be handled by someone else. It’s time for you to enjoy the Maintenance-free Lifestyle.

Now with two locations to serve our clients! Simpsonville/Five Forks 100 Batesville Road Simpsonville, SC 29681 864.520.1000

Downtown Greer 116 Trade Street Greer, SC 29651 864.520.1001

GREENVILLEMOVES.COM


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HOME : On the market Neely Farm • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Shenandoah Farms

The Summitt at Pelham Springs

5 Elias Court · $226,000 · MLS# 1332721

116 Strasburg Drive · $299,000 · MLS# 1327019

230 Rocky Top Drive · $284,900 · MLS# 1332637

3BR/2.5BA 3 bedroom plus bonus on nearly a half acre at the end of a cul-de-sac! Visit GreenvilleMoves.com for more info! HarrisonBridge to N’hood. L on WildHorse, Elias Ct on LEFT

5BR/4BA Where can you find this size home for this price? Downstairs bedroom and bath has Murphy bed so it is multi purposed. Flooring allowance. Back is private. Bonus, fresh paint

3BR/2BA Private, safe, easy living with a view of the mountains. One level with an elevator from the two car garage to your front porch, Central vac, granite, all walk-in closets

Contact: Judy Tancibok 616-8740 RE/MAX Moves

Contact: Virginia Abrams 270-3329 Coldwell Banker Caine

Contact: Virginia Abrams 270-3329 Coldwell Banker Caine

Real Estate News

Just-Released FHA Report Shows Fresh Opportunity to Make Homeownership More Affordable

Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS hosted the 2016 Revitalization Awards

The Federal Housing Administration’s just released actuarial report shows that the Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund is on a steady financial trajectory, a finding the National Association of Realtors® believes is an opportunity to make FHA’s low-downpayment mortgage option available to an even broader swath of borrowers. “FHA’s actuarial report shows that the fund has indisputably found its footing,” said Len Fletcher, 2016 President of The Greater Greenville Association of Realtors® and Broker-Associate with RE/MAX Moves in Greer, SC. “That’s good news for taxpayers, and a reflection of FHA’s sound stewardship. It’s clear from this report that FHA can continue taking responsible steps to manage their risk even as they take action to make homeownership more affordable for lower- and middleincome buyers.” FHA’s MMIF is responsible for paying lenders if a mortgagor defaults. In a sign of continuing health, the report shows that the fund’s “seriously delinquent” rate is at a ten-year low, while the overall economic value of the fund has increased by $3.8 billion. Last year  the MMIF also achieved a 2 percent capital reserve ratio for the first time since the Great Recession. This marked an important benchmark showing that the fund had strongly rebounded, a finding reinforced by the 2.3 percent capital reserve ratio FHA reported today. FHA also reported a 3.2 percent reserve ratio for the “forward” program, which encompasses FHA’s non-Home Equity Conversion Mortgage portfolio. NAR believes that the report would have appeared even stronger if not for weaknesses in the HECM program. In light of the MMIF’s increasingly good health, NAR is encouraging FHA to reduce mortgage insurance premiums to better reflect the risk in the marketplace and fulfill its mission of serving low- and moderate-income borrowers. According to NAR estimates, the 50-basis-point premium cut announced in January 2015 provided an annual savings of $900 for nearly 2 million FHA homeowners. A recent Federal Reserve study also found that the January 2015 reduction in mortgage insurance premiums had a quick and significant effect on FHA mortgage volume. NAR also supports eliminating “life of loan” mortgage insurance, which borrowers must continue to pay until the loan is extinguished or refinanced. Conventional mortgage products, by contrast, traditionally require mortgage insurance only until a sufficient amount of equity is achieved on the property.  “FHA mortgages are an important option for buyers, but high premiums and lifetime insurance requirements can take that option right off the table,” Fletcher said. “By lowering premiums and eliminating life of loan mortgage insurance, FHA can expand on their work to serve a broad population of homebuyers. We look forward to working with them in the months ahead to bring these changes to light.” The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing over 1.1 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries. Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® represents over 2,300 members in all aspects of the real estate industry. Please visit the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® web site at www.ggar.com for real estate and consumer information. “Every market is different, call a REALTOR® today.”

The Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® presented the 2016 Revitalization Awards during the November 17th membership luncheon. Revitalization is much more than remodeling. Revitalization awards are presented to individuals that took a chance, invested a substantial amount of time and money in a property in the Greater Greenville Area. This year 2 awards were presented. One in the commercial category, and one in the residential category. The 2016 Commercial Revitalization Award, was presented to District Augusta, LLC for their work at the South End Strip Mall located at 3006-3016 Augusta St. This property was acquired as two separate, yet adjacent parcels in late 2014. The three buildings on the property were in great need of façade improvement and were lacking a sense of ‘destination’ for the few tenants already on site. The vision for this redevelopment was to not only improve the buildings and grounds, but to create a cohesive property for both new and remaining tenants to be better served, while serving the surrounding Augusta Road Community. The acquisition was well worth it, as prospective tenants were showing interest in South End; one new tenant, 9Round Augusta, relocated from another Augusta Road location while a new franchise, Barre 3, signed shortly thereafter to occupy space in the 1st building as well. The Thai Restaurant owner, who was a long-time tenant and neighborhood favorite prior to purchase by the Developer, decided to renovate his interior dining space and give a fresh appeal to his customers. Dry Clean USA, South End Alterations, and Van Nails round out the three remaining tenant spaces in the 2nd building. District Augusta LLC had a vision for the 3rd building which was formerly Kim’s Wings. A concept for a wine bar/tap room was ‘brewing’ in the mind of the developer and his team. Multiple meetings with the architect, engineer, city and state municipalities, and the neighboring church indicated that the smallest building on the property was proving to be the largest feat. The small purple building has been transformed into what is now “The O5 Restaurant”. The redevelopment at South End provides the local Community with a representative ‘Augusta Road experience’….service-based tenants and dining destinations. The 2016 Residential Revitalization Award was presented to Beth and Scott May for their work on 20 McAdoo Avenue. McAdoo Avenue is located in the Eastover Neighborhood of the City of Greenville, at the east end of Cleveland Park off Laurens Road. Originally part of a tract known as Glen Grove Park, residential dwelling construction started on McAdoo in the late 1920’s. No. 20 was constructed circa 1940. At that time, McAdoo Ave was a vibrant oak-lined middle class street, with flower gardens planted in front of tidy homes. Most homes were roughly 1000 gross square foot two bedroom and one bathroom layouts. 20 McAdoo Ave. became a rental property in 1994 and during the ensuing 20 years the home suffered significant deterioration from termite infestation and water intrusion. When purchased by the May’s in 2014, a portion of the rear wall was in danger of imminent collapse. The present homeowners obtained 20 McAdoo while searching to reduce the work commute to 10 minutes or less, gain access to the Swamp Rabbit Trail without crossing a major road, and find a lower budget property that would free up funds for other endeavors. 20 McAdoo met all three criteria. The renovation reflects the owners style while being sensitive to the character of the neighborhood. Most of the interior load bearing structure remains intact as well as the original transoms over the bedroom doors. New interior finishes re-created the original style including the picture mold trim and glass door knobs. In addition, the house is fitted with a central

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12.02.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 39

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HOME Featured Neighborhood

Brownstone Meadows Taylors, SC

Home Info Price: $244,900-$350,000’s Amenities: Community greenspace, ½ acre homesites, 9’ ceilings, decorative moulding and 7” baseboards on the main level, hardwood floors in main level living areas, Stone fireplace, walk-in pantry, stainless steel appliances, granite countertops in kitchen and master bath, cultured marble vanities in secondary baths Schools: Skyland Elementary, Greer Middle, and Greer High Contact Info: Jordan Doss | 864.915.1468 | jdoss@cdanjoyner.com

“Experience The Difference” Built by local, family-owned and operated Kirklen Homes, Brownstone Meadows is a new community of Craftsman-style homes tucked away in Taylors, S.C. With the backdrop of beautiful Paris Mountain and the S.C. sky, this intimate neighborhood offers 25 home sites and multiple floor plans for homeowners in search of country-style living with city-life amenities. For outdoor activities, you’re just minutes from the Swamp Rabbit Trail, Jones Gap and more; and for city-life, you’ll find it all in nearby Greenville and Greer. At Brownstone Meadows, three and four bedroom homes are available to suit your family’s lifestyle needs, with numerous master-on-the-main options available. Features include: 9 foot ceilings, decorative moulding, and 7 inch baseboards throughout

main level, rounded corners, stone fireplace with gas logs, granite counter tops, stainless steel appliances, full tile shower and separate tub in master, granite vanities in master, cultured marble vanities in secondary baths, ceramic tile in baths and laundry, hardwoods in downstairs main living areas, thermal windows, tankless water heater, fiber cement siding with stone and shaker-style accents and much more. Excited to be a part of the Greenville community, Kirklen Homes is committed to simplifying the home buying experience by including everything you need – and expect – on a new home without the hassle of typical upgrades. Professionally decorated model home NOW OPEN. Call to schedule an appointment.

Real Estate News

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vac system and heated bathroom floor. Views to the downtown skyline are enjoyed from all rear windows of the home, as well as from the screen porch located adjacent the kitchen. Energy efficiency is provided through new windows, double insulated exterior walls, LED lighting fixtures, tankless hot water heater, and dehumidified “dry crawl space.” The high efficiency HVAC system is controlled by a wifi enabled digital control system, and the kitchen features low energy induction cooking equipment. The combination of energy reducing strategies yields average total energy costs of about $50 per month. Since the completion of the home renovation in early spring 2015, McAdoo Avenue has seen significant investment along its short 1/10th mile length. Five homes have been or are in the process of being renovated, with one selling above asking price. Enjoying a multi-cultural character, both renters and home owners share community together. With the addition of the soon to be completed Willy Taco Restaurant near the north terminus of McAdoo, and the planned extension of the Swamp Rabbit Trail less than 1/4 mile away, continued revitalization is almost guaranteed.

GGAR would like to extend a special thank you to all of the 2016 Revitalization Award recipients for their time and extraordinary work in our community. Prizes for winners were provided by: Glenda Morrison - Chowfair Real Estate Company, South State Bank, First Citizens Bank, and Wyatt Real Estate Institute. The Revitalization Committee is comprised of REALTOR® and Affiliate Members of GGAR: Duane Bargar, Elizabeth Carper, Karen Mascaro, Glenda Morrison, Carol Robbins, Donna Sherer Staff Liaison: Leah Duke The properties were judged by Silas Tolles; Guild Mortgage and Katie Witherspoon; The Greater Greer Chamber of Commerce Awards were presented by Sherry Cantrell, 2016 Revitalization Committee Chair Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® represents 2,300 members in all aspects of the real estate industry. Please visit the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® web site at www.ggar.com for real estate and consumer information. “ Every market is different, call a REALTOR® today.”


40 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.02.2016

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HOME See You in the Garden

with Kathy Slayter

The Garden of the Mind These seeds planted in the hearts and minds of our young ones will surely take root and help to catapult them on their path. This community-wide collaborative effort springs from a place deep inside this community to nurture and grow the children of our neighborhoods. All six senses are engaged — vision, hearing, tactile, balance, smell and taste. I believe there is a seventh sense we cultivate throughout our lives: our intuition. The connection to my garden brings this seventh sense out in me.

A pre-winter show of color

It has been said that there is a mind within our mind. Some call it imagination. Some call it soul. Some label it as creativity. Whatever is there deep within our minds is generally planted at an early age. The seeds of imagination, understanding, compassion and determination are all planted in us. I recently spent a morning with my friend Kerry McKenzie at the North Franklin Head Start Center. Deeply involved in planting seeds in the hearts and minds of 3- to 5-year-old preschoolers, Kerry and others are sowing the seeds of imagination every week. Working with a program Kerry helped to develop called Choosy–Farm to Belly, she is planting the seeds of right food choices for these preschool children with the help of Feed and Seed, Greenville Hospital System, TD Bank, Clemson University, Greater Greenville Master Gardeners, Thrive Upstate, Frances Produce, Spice Society and many volunteers and parents. The Farm to Belly project offers tokens to the children to use as money in the market at their schools. The parents are given a recipe to use with the fresh local produce the kids have bought home each week. Music is part of the teaching, filling their minds with words and rhythms. Moving and dancing — along with lots of smiles — also play their part. Outside, the children have their own organic garden where they are learning about the soil, the seasons, the food that you grow and what you do with it. They have a water barrel, a compost pile, their own tools to use and, of course, the plants — vegetables grown in raised garden beds.

A spectacular fall is about to come to a close. The Coral Bark Japanese Maple, aka Sango Kaku, has put on a show of bright yellow I have never seen before. The Acer palmatum, along with all the other maples in my yard, must have enjoyed this hot, dry fall. Time still allows you to plant maple trees or shrubs of any kind, as long as you keep them watered and mulched throughout the winter. The plants will grow under the soil, establishing deep roots in preparation for the spring to come. Now is not the time to fertilize shrubs or to prune, as both will stimulate growth that could be damaged in the cold weather soon to come. Bulbs of most types can be planted now, including daffodils, jonquils, narcissus and tulips. Always prepare your holes about 6 to 8 inches deep and about as wide. It is best to cluster six or eight bulbs in the hole, add some bone meal for food and gently cover the hole with your soil. Then put a light mulch over the bed and wait. I planted some paper-white narcissus in October, and they are up and budding along a path I have at the

lake, waiting to pop open at Christmas. Pansies and more pansies are a glorious splash of color now, but if you haven’t planted already, hurry: Their roots need to be established before the cold comes to stay. The Nandina berries are a lustrous pink and loaded. Hollies and pyracantha are full of holiday color. Imagination is a thing to be let loose, to encourage and to nurture. I find it easy to engage all my seven senses when I am in my garden. It seems that the simple things are the things that I enjoy most. The smiles and light on the faces of the kids, the brilliant reds of the maples late in the fall, the rustle of the dry leaves as a wind blows through them, a walk through the neighborhood with my trusted canine companion Beau in the lead, the fragrance of good food cooking, being with those I love. And most of all, making the right choices. See you in the garden. Kathy Slayter is a Greenville Realtor and Clemson-certified Master Gardener who is passionate about growing, cooking and eating her homegrown food. Contact her at kathyslayter@gmail.com.


12.02.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 41

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HOME Featured Home

Greythorne

105 Kettle Oak Way, Simpsonville, SC 29681

Home Info Price: $314,500 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 3 Lot Size: 0.18 Acres

MLS#: 1320653 Sq. Ft: 2939 Built: 2007

Schools: Ellen Woodside Elementary, Woodmont Middle, and Woodmont High Agent: Cynthia Serra | 864.304.3372 | cserra@cbcaine.com

You’ll feel like you’re home the minute you walk through the front door of this charming 4 bed 3 bath home with bonus. Gleaming hardwoods throughout the first floor, stacked stone fireplace in Great Room. Generous kitchen with granite, stainless appliances and sunny breakfast room. Dining room w/coffered ceiling and wainscoting.

Split plan with master and 1 bedroom on first floor. 2 bedrooms, 1 bath and bonus upstairs. Screened porch, with enlarged open deck and fenced yard. This home is a must see, it’s so well maintained you’d think it was brand new.

Real Estate News

The Marchant Company Announces New Agent The Marchant Company is proud to announce the addition of Carey Fleming as a Realtor. Carey Fleming joins The Marchant Company with 28 years of experience in the Corporate and Non-profit sectors and is a graduate of Sweet Briar College and Wyatt Institute of Real Estate. Carey is a driven individual with experience in Banking, Corporate Sales, and Non-profit leadership as the Senior Director of Corporate Relations for the American Heart Association and Executive Director for the WV Board of Veterinary Medi- Fleming cine. She possesses extensive experience in relationship building and is excited to use her Real Estate license to assist others in the buying or selling of a home. Carey has been married for 33 years to her husband David and they have two sons, David III and Ian. She has returned to Greenville with a reignited love for the city and serves on the Board

of Directors of Upstate International and as Chair for the Program Committee. Outside of the office you will find Carey with her golden retriever Gus (retired service dog) or riding her horse Mismo. We are proud to welcome Carey to The Marchant Company.

Jenna White Joins Allen Tate Company Allen Tate Realtors® (www.allentate.com), the Carolinas’ leading real estate company, is proud to announce that Jenna White has joined the Simpsonville office. “We are delighted to have agents of such high caliber as Jenna. Jenna exemplifies professionalism in every aspect of the real estate transaction. We are proud to attract such a talented professional and know that our clients will be served well,” says Jennifer Hicks, Broker-In-Charge and Branch Manager of Allen Tate Realtors Simpsonville office. White continued on PAGE 44 White joins a staff of 20 licensed Realtors in


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SOLD: Greenville Transactions For the week of Oct. 31 – Nov. 4, 2016 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$1,650,000 $1,500,000 $1,450,000 NATURE’S WATCH $910,000 $910,000 $888,000 CLEVELAND TERRACE $865,000 $859,900 CLIFFS VALLEY $775,000 MAXWELL FARM $735,000 GRIFFITH FARM $713,000 SPAULDING FARMS $680,000 SPAULDING FARMS $674,845 CHAUNESSY $612,500 SPAULDING FARMS $605,000 SPAULDING FARMS $590,000 SPAULDING FARMS $590,000 $574,700 MONTEBELLO $572,000 ALTA VISTA $555,000 $525,000 DEERFIELD $505,000 $500,000 STONE LAKE HEIGHTS $469,400 BARRINGTON PARK $455,000 SYCAMORE RIDGE $450,000 WEATHERSTONE $425,000 $425,000 $400,000 HOBCAW $400,000 BELHAVEN VILLAGE AT HOLLINGSWORTH $397,780 $395,000 LAKE LANIER $393,000 THE PLANTATION ON PELHAM $385,000 ROPER MOUNTAIN ESTATES $385,000 $370,000 WESTHAVEN $365,446 ASHETON $365,000 GOWER ESTATES $362,500 T.M. HUNT $360,000 $360,000 $355,777 BRIARWOOD MEADOWS $353,179 WESTHAVEN $347,443 PELHAM FALLS $340,000 SILVER MEADOWS $335,000 SADDLEHORN $335,000 $329,800 COACHMAN PLANTATION $327,667 SWANSGATE $325,000 WINDWOOD COTTAGES $323,151 MCDANIEL GREENE TOWNHOUSE $321,000 $320,000 HAMMOND’S POINTE $319,000 KILGORE FARMS $316,065 LAUREL VALLEY $315,000 MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS $314,740 WATERS RUN $310,795 COACHMAN PLANTATION $305,000 $305,000 BELSHIRE $304,236 SADDLEHORN $304,000 LOST RIVER $298,443 THE PARK AT PENDLETON WEST $295,000 NEELY FARM - DEER SPRINGS $295,000 LOST RIVER $293,692 BEAVER RUN $290,000 $290,000 PELHAM FALLS $287,000 VERDMONT $286,162 $285,000 FORRESTER WOODS $285,000 BUIST CIRCLE $280,000 THORNBROOKE $279,900 THE PARK DOWNTOWN $277,900 MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS $277,103 BRUSHY MEADOWS $275,900 MORNING MIST $275,434 BRIDGEWATER $273,583 THE EDGE ON NORTH MAIN $270,250 $270,000 COACHMAN PLANTATION $270,000 MORNING MIST $268,990 KELSEY GLEN $265,950 $265,000 SUMMERWALK $265,000 CHANDLER RIDGE $264,900

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PERIMETER ROAD INVESTORS QUIKTRIP CORPORATION HELLBILLY RESERVES LLC CORBIN TAMI E THG 314 LLC MILL VILLAGE LLC BRYAN ANN P THOMAS ANTHONY TODD BRAMBLETT JAMES MICHAEL PATHAN NAZIFAKAUSER S (J WESTGATE ERIC S (JTWROS) GRSW STEWART REAL ESTATE HAWKINS JOSEPH O II MURRAY JAMES ANTHONY (SU JONES DAVID A NEI GLOBAL RELOCATION CO BIRD KATERINA BERGOMI LUIGI (JTWROS) PRICE DAVID R JR (JTWROS MOORE LISA A (JTWROS) COMER MARIE A MERWIN MILES B ARMSTRONG GWYNNE M (JTWR UNION JAMES SEAN (JTWROS RUSSO CHRISTOPHER FARRELL WILLIAM V BRADSHAW SCOTTY L (JTWRO BUCKNER ANNE GREEN (JTWR FOR 8 CORPORATION INC MCDOUGALD ALBERT GILLETT GIROLIMON KAMI MMRB REALTY LLC KOLLHOFF HOLGER JOSEPH RUILOVA BOBBI LYNN REVOC DEWICK ROBERT S MORRIS ROBERT W (JTWROS) COBB CASSANDRA M (JTWROS MARTIN JESSIE (JTWROS) MENON STEPHANIE BDM REAL ESTATE LLC ERWIN RODNEY O (JTWROS) CAMPBELL IAIN FRASER (JT GULLEN CHRISTOPHER R (JT CHAN KANG CHENG (JTWROS) ANDERSON CHRISTOPHER H ( CANNONS DAVID E (JTWROS) ROBB LEIGH B (JTWROS) SMITH MARY ANN MCCUTCHEON ADONIA B ROBERTS SARAH H HIGGINS BARBARA F (JTWRO MURPHY JAMES G JR DOPPELHEUER INVESTMENTS PATELL CHRISTINE L (JTWR TUTTLE RONALD C (JTWROS) MANSFIELD HARRY E (JTWRO COPELAND LAMARIO S (JTWR LOVINE ROBERT J (JTWROS) HARMON JOHNNY RAY (JTWRO ADAMSON ALISA S (JTWROS) DESAI MAUSAMI ASKLAR JOSEPH M (JTWROS) WILLIAMS MARY JEANNE PETROFES MATTHEW CAMERON ELIZABETH S (JTW KONEN BENJAMIN (JTWROS) ADAMS DOROTHY COLLINS LAAKSO CAROL WILEY HELENA B (JTWROS) MINOR JESSICA LYNN (JTWR SINOPOLI JACOB LOUIS CARTER J PATRICK (JTWROS DOUGAN WILLIAM R TURNER AMY M (JTWROS) APPLECREEK PROPERTIES LL RIDDLE JOYCE M (JTWROS) BURKETT CHARLES L (JTWRO LEWIS HAROLD J COLE JUSTIN B (JTWROS) MOLDENHAUER KURT A (JTWR PSALM 127 LLC MUNGO HOMES INC PARAJULI BASHUDEV (JTWRO BETHEA SHALEYA K QUIN KELLY H (SURV) PRUSA JULIANE (SURV) WEAVER HAROLD EDWARD (JT

7112 AUGUSTA RD PO BOX 3475 PO BOX 9813 6 MOSSY BROOK TRL 314 LLOYD ST 101 W COURT ST STE A 205 HOPE ST 3559 BALLENGER RD 312 GLEN HOLLOW RD 18 MAXWELL RD 125 GRIFFITH HILL WAY 6 RYEDALE CT 6 RYEDALE CT 9 WEATHERBY DR 529 SPAULDING FARM RD 225 BLOCK HOUSE RD 225 BLOCK HOUSE RD 15 WILTON ST 3 SISTINE CT 706 CRESCENT AVE 500 TOWNES ST 200 DEERFIELD DR 9 PINCKNEY ST 36 STONO DR 109 ROYAL TROON CT 207 DOONBEG CT 109 BENTWATER TRL 115 HIGHLAND DR 1777 N HIGHWAY 101 38 HOBCAW DR 312 ALGONQUIN TRL 103 PILGRIM RD PO BOX 696 5 LOWTHER HALL LN 109 E CRANBERRY LN 498 PACKS MOUNTAIN RIDGE RD 613 HARWINTON LN 220 HUDDERSFIELD DR 130 HIALEAH RD 655 N MAIN ST 53 MILFORD CHURCH RD 114 N CALHOUN ST 49 THORNBRIAR CT 337 MANSFIELD LN 27 RIVER WAY 331 BROWN FARM WAY 170 OAKLAWN RD 4852 ASHLEY RIVER RD 425 LADYSMITH DR 733 QUAIL RUN 16 VINTON DR 106 MCDANIEL GREENE 227 WACCAMAW AVE 8 RIDGE LN 211 PETERS GLENN CT PO BOX 3884 237 SANDUSKY LN 301 WATERS RUN LN 101 SCOTTS BLUFF DR 100 HIGH PLAINS RD 15 DAUPHINE WAY 307 SADDLEBRED DR 406 WINDWOOD ST 216 ANDERSON ST 317 DEER SPRING LN 39 WINGED BOURNE CT 140 RACCOON TRL 178 UTTER AVE 6 FERNRIDGE CT 301 FREMONT DR 224 E AUGUSTA PL 208 OVERCREEK RD 103 BUIST AVE 19 SPRINGHEAD WAY PO BOX 991 242 SANDUSKY LN 208 BRUSHY MEADOWS DR 100 VERDANA CT 88 GRAND RIVER LN 14 EDGE CT UNIT A 7 MEYERS DR APT B 441 WESTERN LN 400 ASCHOFF CT 18 BARLOW CT 237 ADAMS MILL RD 314 SUMMERWALK PL 710 PINEAPPLE POINTE

LAKE SHORE ACRES $260,000 PENNINGTON PARK $259,750 STEEPLECHASE RUN $259,285 SHADY FORD $254,000 EAST HIGHLANDS ESTATES $250,000 EAST HIGHLANDS ESTATES $250,000 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $248,982 DOVE TREE $248,500 COTTAGES AT NEELY $247,664 $245,000 KELSEY GLEN $244,675 HOWARD’S PARK $244,590 PARK RIDGE $244,375 COTTAGES AT NEELY $242,616 UNIVERSITY PARK $240,000 BRICK STREET LOFTS $240,000 VERDMONT $239,900 TOWNHOMES AT PENDLETON WEST $239,000 AUTUMN TRACE $237,000 HERITAGE POINT $235,000 WHITEHALL PLANTATION $235,000 WHITEHALL PLANTATION $235,000 TOWNES AT RIVERWOOD FARM $233,400 MORNING MIST $232,490 DEVENGER PLACE $232,000 BRYSON MEADOWS $231,000 RAVINES AT CREEKSIDE $230,200 REEDY SPRINGS $230,000 NEELY FARM - DEER SPRINGS $230,000 SOUTHBROOK $230,000 BRIDGEWATER $229,980 GRIFFIN PARK $229,900 TWIN CREEKS $229,900 WARRENTON $229,500 $229,000 SHADY FORD $227,000 $226,000 BELLE TERRACE ACRES $225,000 MORNING MIST FARM $225,000 BROOKFIELD WEST $224,900 COPPER CREEK $222,929 PENNINGTON POINTE $220,000 COUNTRY MEADOWS $220,000 $219,000 COVE AT SAVANNAH POINTE $219,000 $218,500 POPLAR FOREST $218,500 SQUIRES CREEK $218,500 HOWARDS PARK $215,985 PARK RIDGE $215,000 HIDDEN SPRINGS @ B RIDGE PLNTN $214,000 TOWNS AT WOODRUFF CROSSING $213,500 WINDSOR CREEK $212,229 RIVERSIDE COMMONS $210,365 WATERMILL $209,300 CASTLE ROCK $209,100 GOWER ESTATES $208,000 VICTORIA PARK TOWNHOMES $208,000 MOUNTAIN VIEW HEIGHTS $207,500 HERITAGE CLUB VILLAS $206,950 FLAGSTONE VILLAGE $205,000 HIDDEN SPRINGS @ B RIDGE PLNTN $201,900 FAIRVIEW POINTE $200,900 $199,900 LENNOX LAKE $199,500 $198,000 THE LOFTS AT MILLS MILL $197,000 FOX TRACE $196,539 FAIRVIEW MEADOWS $196,500 WOODLANDS AT WALNUT COVE $196,000 MOUNTAIN TRACE $194,500 HAMMETT CROSSING $194,000 LONG CREEK PLANTATION $194,000 WATERTON $192,000 COLONIAL VILLAGE $190,000 $190,000 SAVANNAH POINTE $189,942 AUTUMN WOODS $188,000 COUNTRY MEADOWS $188,000 COUNTRY MEADOWS $188,000 HAMPTON FARMS $187,975 PELHAM OAKS $187,500 $187,000 IVYBROOKE $186,500 PINE BROOK FOREST $185,000 EDWARDS FOREST HEIGHTS $185,000 WINDSOR FOREST II $184,900

PRICE SELLER EVERGREEN L L C SK BUILDERS INC EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL D R HORTON-CROWN LLC CARDEN NICHOLAS C BROOKFIELD RELOCATION IN ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC SMITH ROBERT J D R HORTON INC CROWN PROPERTIES LLC NVR INC D R HORTON-CROWN LLC REMBREY CONSTRUCTION AND D R HORTON INC EBY CARROLL S TROJAN LISA M SISSON FONDA B (JTWROS) KIM HYEJIN DENNIS CHRISTOPHER B MCINTYRE RYAN A LEVENTIS GABRIEL J AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL R GASPER MARK A D R HORTON-CROWN LLC COX TAYLOR RICHMOND (JTW WM CAPITAL PARTNERS XV L COMBEE MARGARET L D R HORTON INC GOWAN FRASER N JOHNSON ALBERTA V MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH SERRUS REAL ESTATE FUND LARTEY ISAAC (JTWROS) RENFRO DONNA S WILSON W NEIL D R HORTON-CROWN LLC CLARK MARTHA C STROUD KATHRYN P RUFFIN TEANN MERWIN ABIGAIL L REVOC T MUNGO HOMES INC SCHWIERS GENE BAXLEY BAGLEY SUSAN (JTWROS) HIPPS TERESA DUAN MINGMING OPTIMAL ONE MARKETING GR CHANDLER PAULA C PHILLIPS ANDREW D R HORTON-CROWN LLC KENDALL LESLI STONE CHARLOTTE PICCIONE ROSALIE REVOC T EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL NVR INC EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL ALDRIDGE AMY E POLLARD KATHY DIANNE MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH BRUCE PEGGY M (LIFE ESTA LAMBRECHT LINDA LEE GARR HUGHES MICHAEL W SK BUILDERS INC ADAMS JASON J HOARD MARY LOUISE PLUMMER JEANINE TRUST C & T REALTY INC EDMONDS JOAN E ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC CANCIALOSI MARCIA F BURGESS LESTER C (JTWROS HALL LAURIE LYNN D MESSER ISAAC DANIEL WANG STEVEN COSGROVE LISA A RASHLEY KATHY W SHETLEY BRENDA C BROOKS ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC HAWTHORNE ERICA L (JTWRO ELLIS LINDSAY NEI GLOBAL RELOCATION CO SK BUILDERS INC DUFALA ROBERT J (JTWROS) COX JAMES CHADWICK HICKS LAURA S SETZER LIVING TRUST SUTHERLAND T FRANK KRUEGER MARK

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BLUEBERRY PROPERTIES LLC BRANTLEY KENISHA D (JTWR STUDART BRENDA F DENDY EDDINA BROOKFIELD RELOCATION IN BOSTIAN MARY PAGE HANES BARBARA A (JTWROS) OROURKE ANGELA OSBORNE ( SINK ASHLEY B (JTWROS) JWT FARM LLC HALL CHARLES (JTWROS) GLINYANY ANDREI GREGORY GLORIA JEAN KIRK DENISE A (JTWROS) CLIFFORD ROBERT A II ROCKWOOD GABRIELLA C (JT MOFFITT CHRISTINE H (JTW SANDERS ANDREW W (JTWROS ASHE JASON L (JTWROS) KATES JEFF A AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL R KOBLISKA SAMUEL D HENSON JEAN (JTWROS) RICHARDSON BIANCA H HARRIS JAMES BRANDON MUNGO HOMES INC SILVIS DONNA A THOMAS BEVERLY A (JTWROS MITCHELL CHRISTOPHER B ( JENSEN HANNAH (JTWROS) ALSUP JASON THOMPSON RACHEL S WYLER AMY E (JTWROS) SC PREMIER RENTAL LLC DAVIS KELSEY A BREWSTER CEDRIC D VICK CHARLES TAYLOR (JTW TAYLOR CHAD B SHORTER STANLEY POULOS HRISANTHI KATHERI EMILIA RENATE MASTRONARDI JAMES P REVO ALDRIDGE AMY E (JTWROS) COPPLE MICHELLE L MINOR IVEY C (JTWROS) FARR NAKIA (JTWROS) CLARY FAMILY TRUST SPONSELLER LISA LANE DORIAN K COLLINS GRAHAM (JTWROS) ANDRADE DENISE M (JTWROS WILSON RYAN FRANCIS SAMUEL A DAS ABHAYA K HARRIS TIFFANY L COMMUNITY OPTIONS INC GIESON TAMMY VAN STODOMINGO PERCIVAL A (J CASTO-WATERS ANDREW B (J AXLEY ROSALIE R MICCIULLI MARISSA VANDERNOOT ADRIANA A (JT HENDERSON BRIAN L BROWN LISA R LEE JONG J FLAGSHIP LLC SOUTHERLAND JUNE KAREN PAYNE ALVIN L (JTWROS) DOBINSKI LINDA C (JTWROS JOHNSON DAVID W (JTWROS) MOCK CORY MICHAEL NGUYEN TIMOTHY CHI (JTWR BURGESS DONNA MARIE (SUR MCELHANNON JENNIFER (JTW HENWEIGH LLC DORMINY GEORGINA (JTWROS WIESER BEATE (JTWROS) BROWN HANNAH RHEA (JTWRO NEI GLOBAL RELOCATION CO LOGSDON DANIEL E COX TAYLOR R (JTWROS) KLEIN PROPERTY HOLDINGS- PARKS MIRANDA LLOYD MONROE PAULA ANN (JTWROS HINTEREGGER JOSEF R SNYDER CHARLES ARTHUR IV HARRISON EBONY R (JTWROS

102 TWO NOTCH TRL 216 COUNTRY MIST DR 213 TIMBER FENCE TRL 10 WINESPRING PL 314 WILLOW SPRINGS DR 314 WILLOW SPRINGS DR 235 ASHLER DR 4 CARAWAY CT 213 EVANSDALE WAY 115 SYLVAN WAY 336 KELSEY GLEN LN 432 CORAL CREEK WAY 19 GAMESFORD CT 260 EVANSDALE WAY 211 BRADLEY BLVD 114 LEVAN AVE 10 MARQUETTE RD 119 S MEMMINGER ST 4 TREBOR CT 381 HERITAGE POINT DR 6 PENN CTR W 2ND FL 105 WATERS REACH LN 313 HILLSDALE DR 101 VERDANA CT 403 WINDWARD WAY 441 WESTERN LN 62 FUDORA CIR 100 VERDAE BLVD STE 401 3 HUNTSMAN CT 6 NEYLAND DR 91 GRAND RIVER LN 105 CARRUTH ST 14 MERCER DR 70 GREENE ST APT 2903 15 MCADOO AVE 212 WINESPRING PL 125 TWINBROOK DR 29 FAIRWAY DR 17 PLUM HILL WAY 3 COBBLESTONE CT 200 DAMASCUS DR 140 SHORE VISTA LN 9 HEATHER ROSE CT 124 HIPPS DR 107 SABIN CT 206 YORKSHIRE DR 5 CREVASSE LN 205 SQUIRES CREEK RD 117 ELMHAVEN DR 210 BRENLEIGH CT 118 HIDDEN SPRINGS LN 130 ASHGROVE LN 2 WINDSOR CREEK CT 202 ALDERSIDE PL 101 RIVERDALE RD 16 FARBER RD 507 PARKINS MILL RD 407 KINDLETREE WAY 203 E FAIRVIEW AVE 700 HERITAGE CLUB DR 8 LEBANON CT 16 HIDDEN SPRINGS LN 7 KIRKSHIRE LN 28 PACK FOREST RD 208 NORTHFIELD LN 19 MAYFAIR LN 400 MILLS AVE UNIT 217 260 SCOTTISH AVE 1 MACINTYRE ST 121 WATERCOURSE WAY 5 MOUNTAINSIDE WAY 7 AGER CT 101 BRYDON CT 508 WATERSTONE WAY PO BOX 25302 12965 OLD WHITE HORSE RD 411 RARITAN CT 112 KINGSDALE CT 2707 N 118TH ST 104 MEADOW RIDGE DR 313 STALLION RD 824 TOP RIDGE DR 414 PARKINS MILL RD 311 IVYSTONE DR 509 CANNON CIR 102 ROSEWOOD DR 101 SCOTSBURN CT


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Augusta Road/Greenville Country Club Area 19 Rock Creek Drive , Greenville 29605

Home Info Price: $597,000 MLS: 1318927 Bedrooms: 4 Full Baths: 2 Half Baths: 2 Sq. Ft: 3000-3199 Lot Size: 0.35 Acre Schools: Blythe Elementary, Hughes Middle, and Greenville High Agent: Virginia Hayes | 864.313.2986 vhayes@cbcaine.com

19 Rock Creek Drive is a 3,000+ square foot home nestled on a beautifully-landscaped lot. A charming stone staircase and established plantings guide you to the front door. Upon entering you’ll discover a large living room with custom cabinetry, hardwood floors and gas-log fireplace. Adjoining the living room is an eat-in kitchen with built-in banquette and butler’s pantry, and a dining room with French doors leading to a private, outdoor courtyard. The first floor master suite features a dressing room, walk-in closet, jetted tub and shower. Rounding out the main level is a half bath, mudroom and laundry room.

The second master suite has French doors, hardwood floors, outdoor balcony, full bath with separate vanities, large tiled shower and walk-in closet. Also on the second level are two bedrooms, half bath, office/study area, and playroom. A huge bonus room with built-ins and fireplace leads to a screened porch with vaulted ceilings and access to the flat backyard – perfect for playing and entertaining. Rock Creek Drive has many fun activities and friendly neighbors – the perfect place to call home!

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FOX TRACE HERITAGE LAKES EDWARDS FOREST HEIGHTS WHISPERING OAKS WHISPERING OAKS RIVERSIDE GLEN WHISPERING OAKS WHISPERING OAKS SPARROWS POINT FAIRVIEW MEADOWS BROOKSIDE TOWNES AT BROOKWOOD II FOX TRACE TWIN CREEKS OAKWOOD ACRES CHEROKEE FOREST MOUNTAINBROOKE BEAVER RUN PARKVIEW HENDERSON FOREST SPARROWS POINT COUNTRY CHASE

$183,250 $181,500 $179,050 $178,215 $178,045 $177,000 $176,850 $175,457 $175,000 $175,000 $175,000 $174,175 $173,695 $173,000 $172,000 $171,000 $170,000 $170,000 $169,000 $168,900 $168,000 $167,500 $165,900

TURNER CONNIE KAY (JTWRO LEDBETTER BRADLEY S (JTW SMITHERMAN ALEISHA D (JT KILLIAN CAROL W LIDDELL FELICIA E (JTWRO MILLS JAMES B (JTWROS) KONDZIELSKI BETTY A (JTW RICHARDSON DANIELLE RUMI GARRETT PORTLAND I CARAWAN JUDY W DANLEY LYDIA (JTWROS) FANT RENDA E FOLCKEMER ALTON SIMONS JENNIFER (JTWROS) HELMS CHRISTOPHER M (JTW DEMKO CYNTHIA A (JTWROS) DEBOIS JOHN MANTER SUSAN H SINCLAIR ERIC A (JTWROS) VICK KRISTEN KING ELIZABETH EVERETT HOYLES ALLISON E (JTWROS WELBORN ANDREA L (JTWROS

246 SCOTTISH AVE 402 HARNESS TRL 106 OLD MILL RD 50 ENDEAVOR CIR 56 ENDEAVOR CIR 105 VALLEY GLEN CT 48 ENDEAVOR CIR 42 ENDEAVOR CIR 105 GRAYHAWK WAY 307 BLUE SAGE PL 3 LINDSEYBROOK TRL 719 ELMBROOK DR 50 BORDER AVE 30 PFEIFFER CT 3 LIVE OAK CT 202 ROBERTA DR 21 EAGLE RIDGE LN 7 HENDERSON DR 67 BEAVER RUN DR 22 SITKA AVE 23 DAHLGLEN AVE 308 ASHRIDGE WAY 300 CATTERICK WAY

SHEFFIELD FOREST $165,000 AUTUMN HILLS $165,000 STONEBRIDGE $165,000 HADLEY PARK $165,000 MULBERRY AT PINCKNEY $164,000 BROOK GLENN GARDENS $163,400 REID VALLEY $162,500 HOMESTEAD ACRES $162,000 FAIRVIEW LAKE $160,500 $160,000 SHERWOOD FOREST $160,000 SPARROWS POINT $159,000 RIVER BIRCH VILLAS $157,500 $155,000 HEATHWOOD $155,000 $155,000 $152,500 WINDSOR FOREST $152,000 IVEY SQUARE HORIZONTAL PROP REGIME $152,000 ANNACEY PARK $150,900 OAK FOREST $150,000 RIVERSIDE COMMONS $148,200 COLONIAL HILLS $147,000

ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC HERBERT DAVID W ROUSE BRADLEY MICHAEL GREAT SOUTHERN HOMES INC GREAT SOUTHERN HOMES INC WESTMORELAND DAVID J (SU GREAT SOUTHERN HOMES INC GREAT SOUTHERN HOMES INC WESTON PAUL B MLYNCZAK SUSAN C BALTZ DONALD E FOUNDATIO BROOKWOOD TOWNES LLC ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC WYLER AMY E HUGGINS WILLA CAROLE BROWN LEIGH BARKSDALE (J HAYDEN ROBERT J (JTWROS) HILL’S SIDE PROPERTIES L LANE LAVONNE M CARPENTER ROGER DALE SMITH SARAH E VAN PINXTEN ADRIANUS JAMES & COMPANY BUILDERS

PRICE SELLER NUTT AYESHA H (JTWROS) SEIGART JOHN W ROWLAND ROB W SHANBHAG NIKHIL BIGGERS ANNA D (JTWROS) CHERRETT GENEVIVE M 101 HICKORY VALLEY LLC FOLKERS BEVERLY S REVOC EDWARDS CHARTRESE T (JTW BERGMAN MARLYN J LOVE HANNAH (JTWROS) GRIEK MICHAEL R BANK OF AMERICA N A HOFFMAN TREVOR N (JTWROS HINTON GARY RAY BURNS DARRELL L BENJAMIN PETER M COLLINS GRAHAM L DAVIS FAMILY PROPERTIES BLEVINS JOHN S III HARRIS JAMES BRANDON J FOUR LLC STANDRIDGE JERRY J

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LAM MONG MCLEAN DIANE GOMEZ HERNAN A (JTWROS) HIPPS SARA BARTON HERNDON EMILY A ACHI NABIL E (JTWROS) MANG LAL BUR (JTWROS) HOTTEL DAVID T (JTWROS) CUMMINGS SABRINA L MCKINNEY ROAD LAND TRUST PARKS DORA HENDERSON TAYLOR A (JTWR CLARK EDITH S WILSON JOSHUA A BONGIORNO JON-THOMAS ADAMS JEREMY G (JTWROS) MINMUN PROPERTIES LLC KALE JOHN M (JTWROS) SOSH LLC EDELMAN KYLE E (JTWROS) JAAFARI-LAFTI MEHDI NVR INC KRONEMAN DOROTHY ARLENE

4 CONFEDERATE CIR 116 CARE LN 2 ACACIA DR 1338 ALEXANDRITE LN 3 JAY ST 1 RAVENSWORTH RD 101 HICKORY VALLEY WAY 311 HAVENHURST DR 8 WOODMORE CT 2123 OLD SPARTANBURG RD 212 SCARLETT ST 17 ASHRIDGE WAY 26 RIVER BIRCH WAY 107 WAYMAN DR 409 GRIFFIN MILL RD 3400 GLASSY MOUNTAIN RD 141 AUGUSTA CT 100 BATHURST LN 200 N MAIN ST STE 203 225 WISCASSET WAY PO BOX 27207 11 BRENDAN WAY STE 140 634 HEATHWOOD DR


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the Simpsonville office and a large network of licensed Realtors throughout the Carolinas. Since 1957, Allen Tate Realtors has focused on the needs of consumers by providing onestop shopping with choices in branches located in communities throughout the Carolinas.

Melissa K. Johnson Joins Allen Tate Company Allen Tate Realtors® (www.allentate.com), the Carolinas’ leading real estate company, is proud to announce that Melissa K. Johnson has joined the Simpsonville office. “We are pleased to welcome Melissa to our office. Melissa has hit the ground running with a sincere disposition that attracts clients. We are always looking for talent that strives to achieve excellence and she fits this bill perfectly,” says Jennifer Hicks, Broker-In-Charge and Branch Manager of Allen Tate Realtors Simpsonville office. Johnson Johnson joins a staff of 20 licensed Realtors in the Simpsonville office and a large network of licensed Realtors throughout the Carolinas. Since 1957, Allen Tate Realtors has focused on the needs of consumers by providing onestop shopping with choices in branches located in communities throughout the Carolinas.

Rosalyn Western Joins Allen Tate Company

Western

Allen Tate Realtors® (www.allentate.com), the Carolinas’ leading real estate company, is proud to announce that Rosalyn Western has joined the Simpsonville office. Rosalyn’s background in banking and accounting will be of great value to her clients during the home buying and selling process. Rosalyn has said, “My goal is flawless Customer Service.” “We are delighted to have such a remarkable licensee as Rosalyn. Rosalyn demonstrates dedication and attention to detail in her to day to day business disciplines,’ says Jennifer Hicks, Broker-In-Charge and Branch Manager of Allen Tate Realtors Simpsonville office.

«

CARPET | HARDWOOD | LAMINATE | VINYL | TILE

Classic. Timeless. Custom. From $675K

Wishing you all the hope, wonder, and joy that the season can bring! (864) 325-6266 • AugustaWalk.com

Installing More Than Just Carpet Professional Installation with a Personal Touch Greenville Carpet One 226 Pelham Davis Circle, Greenville | 864.281.0006 www.CarpetOneGreenville.com Showroom Hours: Monday–Friday 8am–6pm, Saturday 10am–2pm


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River Oaks

217 Wildlife Trail, Greer, SC 29650

Home Info Price: $414,000 Bedrooms: 3 Baths: 2.5 Lot Size: 0.70 Acres

MLS#: 1326540 Sq. Ft: 3188 Built: 1996

Schools: Buena Vista Elementary, Riverside Middle, and Riverside High Agent: Virginia Abrams | 864.270.3329 vabrams@cbcaine.com

Beautiful brick home built by one of the areas top builders. This home features deep moldings, arched doorways, and hardwood floors in the foyer, living, dining, hall, kitchen, family and half bath. A large bonus room is upstairs with walk-in attic storage.

The roof and water heater have been replaced in the past few months.

The master suite is a dream with trey ceiling, bay window and a closet that will delight anyone. Built-ins on both sides of the gas fireplace and a cathedral ceiling makes this room a gathering space for the entire family. The kitchen will please any cook with granite counters, tile backsplash, double ovens and breakfast bar.

You will always have parking for friend with a circle driveway.

A screen porch with ceramic floor and a skylight allows you to ejoy the private back yard. Good schools, wonderful neighbors, and an easy commute for work or shopping makes this an ideal place to call home. River Oaks has a pool, tennis, clubhouse and activities for all ages.

Real Estate News

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Western joins a staff of 20 licensed Realtors in the Simpsonville office and a large Moffatt was named GGAR’s Realtor of the Year in 2014. He also has network of licensed Realtors throughout the Carolinas. served on the Community Service Committee and the board of directors Since 1957, Allen Tate Realtors has focused on the needs of consumers by providing one- for GGAR as well as the Technology Committee for the South Carolina stop shopping with choices in branches located in communities throughout the Carolinas. Association of REALTORS®. Moffatt also served as regional vice president for the SC Chapter of the Council of Residential Specialists (CRS), and dedicates time to the community through Habitat for Humanity, Bob Moffatt Named 2017 President of Host & Daily Bread soup kitchen, and his church. the Greater Greenville Association of Realtors C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS is committed to building and supporting Moffatt Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS® is pleased to announce real estate leaders, and that’s evident, as 10 of our managers and assothat Bob Moffatt has been named president of the Greater Greenville Association of REAL- ciates have served as past presidents of industry associations over the years. Those inTORS® (GGAR) for 2017. Moffat has been with C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS’® Garlington clude our founder, C. Dan Joyner (GGAR), Fritzi Barbour (GGAR and SCR), David Crigler Road office since 2003 and in the real estate industry for more than 20 years. (GGAR), Rusty Garrett (SCR and WUAR), John Moore (GGAR), Donna Smith (GGAR and “I am proud of Bob’s achievements and know that this position was well-earned,” said Danny SCR), Elizabeth Gray-Carr (WUAR), Adair Smith Senn (GGAR), Wanda Reed (GGAR), Joyner, President and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS. Vicki Galloway Roark (GGAR), Ginny Wylie (GGAR), and Matthew Thrift (GGAR). “I know he will do an excellent job as president of GGAR next year.”


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FRI

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CONCERT

Chicora Voices Holiday Concert

Chicora Voices The Children’s Choir of Greenville First Baptist Church of Greenville 847 Cleveland St. 7:30 p.m. $15/GA, free to students and music teachers 238-5058 | chicoravoices.org

CONCERT

Tyler Farr Blind Horse Saloon 1035 Lowndes Hill Road 8 p.m. | $15 in advance or $18 at the door Bolstered by its hit leadoff single, “C.O.U.N.T.R.Y.,” the new album by country singer Tyler Farr, “Suffer In Peace,” is burning up the charts right now, and the odds are this show will be packed with new fans. Farr’s sound is a great example of the mix of pop, country twang and rock muscle that rules country radio these days. 233-1381 | blind-horse.com

CONCERT

Sound Quality Series Presents Christmas at Furman Furman University | McAlister Auditorium 3300 Poinsett Highway 8 p.m. | $12/adults, $10/seniors, $5/students

The Furman University Symphony Orchestra, the Furman Singers and Furman Men’s and Women’s Chorales will present “Christmas at Furman” featuring Benjamin Britten’s cantata, St. Nicholas and Tchaikovsky’s “The Nutcracker.” In St. Nicholas, conducted by Hugh Floyd, faculty tenor Grant Knox plays the title role and tells the story of the historic fourth-century Christian saint whose secret gift-giving led to the traditional role of Santa Claus. For the second half of the concert, Tom Joiner leads the FSO in extended excerpts from “The Nutcracker” including “Decorating the Christmas Tree,” “The Battle of the Mouse King,” “Transformation of the Nutcracker” and more. 294-2086 bit.ly/2fAGYhl furmanmusic@furman.edu

CONCERT

Allegaeon with Battlecross and Necromancing The Stone Ground Zero 3052 Howard St., Spartanburg 8 p.m. Allegaeon combines the brutal volume and raw power of death metal with the precision of prog-rock. You’re just as likely to sustain hearing damage from one of their songs as you are to find a guitar riff that sends you back to your old Rush records. 948-1661 reverbnation.com/venue/groundzero2

Wasted Wine Dive N’ Boar | 2541 N. Pleasantburg Drive | 10 p.m. | Free

CONCERT

DEC. 2

CALENDAR CONCERT

Headcell with Broken Testimony and Decibel Effect

Furman University, The Playhouse 3300 Poinsett Highway 8 p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m.

Soundbox Tavern 507 W. Georgia Road, Simpsonville

$10/adults and $5/students. Furman Theatre Season ticket holders admitted free.

9 p.m.

For more than 35 years, Doug Berky has toured his performance work of physical comedy, mask theatre and storytelling for audiences of all ages. Hosted by the Furman Theatre Department, artist-in-residence Berky presents a range of performance styles from his physical comedy schtick to heartwarming world tales told with masks hand-crafted by Berky in Foibles and Fables, A Puppet and Clowning Performance. Berky’s art draws inspiration from commedia dell’arte, vaudeville, mask and mime theatre and the influence of such theatre greats as Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, Carol Burnette, Red Skelton, Marcel Marceau and Tony Montanaro. 294-2125 bit.ly/2ePJxxc

Seneca’s Headcell is a metal quartet whose vocalist is just as comfortable rapping as he is singing or screaming, whatever the song requires. Their third-ever gig was opening for (hed) pe at Ground Zero, which meant they had to develop a tight, professional sound quickly. 228-7763

VISUAL ART

Opening reception for Meredith Piper Knack | 580 Perry Ave. 6-9 p.m. Knack will be having an opening reception for new local artist Meredith Piper. They will also have a few other vendors there with pop-up shops that same weekend.

CULINARY

Upstate International’s GlŸhwein Party

FRI-SUN

02-11

THEATER

“A Charlie Brown Christmas”

Riverwood Farms Clubhouse 74 Reddington Drive, Greer

7 p.m. Friday; 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Saturday; 1:30 and 5:30 p.m. Sunday Peace Center Gunter Theatre 300 S. Main St.

6:30-10 p.m.

$18-27

Members: $20, nonmembers: $25, children 5-12 years: $5

Christmas time is here! Tis the season for Charlie Brown, Snoopy and all of the Peanuts gang to bring the holiday season back to life. Discover the real meaning of Christmas in this musical adaptation of the classic animated television special that is fun for the whole family. 467-3000 peacecenter.org

Celebrate the start of the holiday season in traditional German style at Upstate International’s GlŸhwein Party. Enjoy traditional NŸrnberger bratwurst (grilled sausage), sweet stollen (Christmas bread), other German treats, GlŸhwein, German beer, hot apple cider and other nonalcoholic drinks. Space is limited, and tickets sell out, so register early to confirm your place. Reservations are required. A portion of each ticket will benefit Safe Harbor. conta.cc/2gnK0sq

FRI-SUN

02-18

vibrator play)

HOLIDAY

THEATER

“In the Next Room” (or the

Christmas Celebration Bob Jones University 1700 Wade Hampton Blvd. The best way to describe what Wasted Wine’s music sounds like is as follows: Imagine that someone built a creepy old-school funhouse, then placed it in the bowels of a 19th-century ship crewed by traveling gypsy musicians in the middle of a massive storm. The music reels and careens through various styles and moods, taking in Eastern European folk, melodramatic cabaret and straight-ahead indie rock, sometimes within the same song. Over this chaotic, kaleidoscopic maelstrom of sound, vocalists and multi-instrumentalists Robert Gowan and Adam Murphy wail, bellow, growl and moan, diving in and out of different characters’ heads and adding to the general feeling of unease the album creates. Murphy and Gowan work as a creative team during the recording process, with Gowan serving as the linear-minded half, engineering the recording and constructing a narrative flow, and Murphy being more intuition-driven. “I guess one of the ways I think about recording is similar to the process of creating a collage,” Murphy says. “When you’re doing collage work, you combine one thing with something else and occasionally things click in a way that you might not have seen before.” —Vincent Harris

4:30 p.m.11 p.m. FREE Join the university community for an outdoor carol sing around the University’s front-campus fountains where thousands of sparkling lights will be illuminated. bju.edu

FRI-SAT

02-03

THEATER

Furman Presents Mask Artist, Physical Comedian and Storyteller Doug Berky

The Warehouse Theatre 37 Augusta St. 8 p.m.except Sundays at 3 p.m. | $30/$35 A Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, Sarah Ruhl’s comedy about marriage, motherhood and communication is set in the 1880s at the dawn of electricity where an innocent

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DEC. 3

FAMILY

Kid’s Holiday Fudge-Making Class at Cabela’s Cabela’s | 1025 Woodruff Road, Ste. H101 11 a.m.

VISUAL

You and your children can become fudge-making experts just in time for the holiday season. Bring your kids in today and learn the Cabela’s secrets to fudge making success. 516-8100

10 x 10 = 100 Small Works Exhibit of 100 Artists Center for Creative Arts Village of West Greenville 25 Draper St. 9-5 p.m., Monday-Friday and 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Saturdays Opening reception on Dec. 2, from 6-9 p.m.

HOLIDAY

Girl Tribe Pop Up The Independents, w/ Horrible Girl & The Hot Mess and Prozac Dreams Radio Room 2845 N. Pleasantburg Drive 9 p.m. | $5 (over 21)/$7 (under 21)

Carol Funke Reflections

During the holiday season approximately 100 local artists have created artworks measuring 10 by 10 feet for a special exhibit of original works that will be priced at $100 or less. These works are on display in the gallery at the Greenville Center for Creative Arts beginning Dec. 2. Many well-known local artists as well as emerging artists have generously provided works at a price sure to appeal to collectors and art lovers. 735-3948 artcentergreenville.org

NOW THRU

03

HOLIDAY

46th Annual Holiday Fair 1 Exposition Drive

10 a.m.-8 p.m. Friday-Saturday; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday $6 for adults, $5 for senior citizens. Children younger than 12 are free. Parking is $5 per vehicle. The 46th annual Holiday Fair, one of the largest arts, crafts and gift fairs in the Southeast, features more than 350 crafters and commercial vendors from 15 states showcasing their unique merchandise for a three-day shopping extravaganza. HolidayFairGreenville.com

store or by calling Fiction Addiction. 675-0540 | bit.ly/2fMmYYq

For the last 22 years, Florence, S.C.’s Independents have been kicking out an addictive mix of accelerated riff-heavy punk and skin-tight ska, topped by lead singer Evil Presly’s B-horror-movie-style shock-goth lyrics. The Independents have built a rabid, loyal fan base primarily through relentless touring, and they’ve remained true to their name over their two-plus decades, steadfastly avoiding major labels and adhering to the punk principles that their mentor and manager, the late Joey Ramone, passed on to them. “We had a lot of offers, especially in the ’90s,” Presly says. “We could’ve signed with a bigger label and made a lot of money for a year and then become a tax-write off. There are a lot of bands, a lot of friends, who sold over a million records, and now they’re playing to less people than we do. It’s crazy. If a label puts a record out and has a hit with it, then after the hit, you’re gone. If we’d done a big deal, we might have a little money in our pockets, but we wouldn’t be doing what we’re doing now.” —Vincent Harris

SAT

03

LITERARY

Book signing with Melinda Long and Kate Salley Palmer Fiction Addiction 11 a.m.-noon South Carolina children’s authors Melinda Long and Kate Salley Palmer will be signing copies of their Christmas books, “The Twelve Days of Christmas in South Carolina” (Long, Sterling, board book, $7.95) and “I Know Santa Very Well” (Palmer, Warbranch, paperback, $6.95), at a book signing on Take Your Child to a Bookstore Day. This event is free and open to the public. Books may be purchased online, at the

Taylors Mill | 250 Mill St., Taylors 11 a.m.5 p.m. A collection of 50+ women-owned local businesses will come together for one day to create the ultimate girls’ day out shopping experience. Favorite boutiques, designers, jewelry makers, kid’s boutiques, calligraphers, artisans and beauty gurus will be on site to shop from, as well as local brews, coffee and snacks. bit.ly/2fooTEA

CONCERT

family. “A Christmas Carol” has been a family favorite for a century and a half and is filled with such memorable characters as Bob Cratchit, Fezziwig, the three Spirits and Tiny Tim. Come watch as mean-hearted Scrooge journeys with the Spirits of Christmas Past, Present and Future and rediscovers the true meaning of Christmas. Ticket reservations at gtc-christmascarol.eventbrite.com gvltec.edu/gtc-theatre

SUN

04

CONCERT

Tidings of Comfort and Joy

Chapman Cultural Center theater 200 E. St. John St., Spartanburg 7 p.m. | $15 First Presbyterian Church Spartanburg’s Chamber Singers presents their annual Christmas Concert. The 30-member choir will sing 13 holiday songs, many without accompaniment and all without any electronic amplification.

DEC. 3

«

CONCERT

and gentlemanly scientist named Dr. Givings invents a new device to treat hysteria in women and men. It’s called a vibrator. When his latest patient brings her own complicated marriage and sufferings to the Givings’ home, Dr. and Mrs. Givings confront the fragility of their own union and discover the truth depths of real love. 235-6948 | warehousetheatre.com

CONCERT

CALENDAR «

Southern Culture on the Skids Gottrocks | 200 Eisenhower Drive 9 p.m. | $15 God bless Southern Culture on the Skids, still out there showcasing Rick Miller’s surf-god guitar and that vaguely seedy redneck-trash-rock kitsch aesthetic. 235-5519 | gottrocksgreenville.com

SAT-SUN

03-18

Cabela’s

FAMILY

Free Santa Photos at

Cabela’s | 1025 Woodruff Road, Ste. H101 Noon-3 p.m. | Saturdays and Sundays FREE Santa is making a special stop at Cabela’s this year. Please visit us for free pictures with Santa. 516-8100

NOW THRU

04

Carol”

THEATER

Greenville Technical College Theatre presents “A Christmas

Technical Resource Center Auditorium (Building 102) on the Barton Campus Dec. 1-3 at 7:30 p.m. and Dec. 4 at 3 p.m. FREE | donations accepted Featuring a large cast, old Christmas carols and a wonderful story, this play is a must for the whole

The Black Lillies, w/ Forlorn Strangers The Spinning Jenny 107 Cannon St., Greer 8 p.m. | $15 advance/$17 door If you listen to the most recent album by Knoxville’s Black Lillies, “Hard to Please,” it’s like a mix of gritty roots-rock, bluesy stomp and just a bit of country twang. Most of the time, it sounds like a cross between Son Volt and the Drive-By Truckers. However, the country chart is where the album, the band’s fourth, has made the most impact, crashing the Top 40 and mingling in Blake Shelton and Luke Bryan territory. It might sound odd, but Lillies’ singer/songwriter Cruz Conteras doesn’t see it that way. “I’ve been into country music since I was a kid,” he says. “What’s considered ‘commercial’ changes a lot, so it’s funny that the music I’ve played has different labels. The labels and trends can change, but the country music connection is no mistake. I’ve loved it since I was a young age, and I think it’s a big part of what I do. I gravitate to classic country music. I see the connection our music has.” —Vincent Harris


HARVEST HOME

Andrew Wyeth, born (1917-2009) Jacklight, 1980 egg tempera on panel ©2016 Andrew Wyeth / Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York

In celebration of the centennial of Andrew Wyeth’s birth, the Museum presents Wyeth Dynasty, a retrospective of Andrew Wyeth’s art complemented by works of his father, N.C., his son Jamie, and his sisters Carolyn and Henriette. More than 70 examples are featured in this exhibition of works by the first family of American painting. Gallery Tour of Wyeth Dynasty Sunday, December 11 2 pm free As we celebrate the holiday season, join us for a guided tour and discover the inspiration the artist found where he felt most at home.

Exhibition presented by

Journal Wyeth Jacklight.indd 2

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1pm - 5 pm Museum closed Thanksgiving Day & Friday, Nov. 25

admission free

11/17/16 11:41 AM


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Because of the 500-seat theater’s unique and excellent acoustics, there is no need for amplification. As a result, many of the songs will be heard as they were originally written to be performed in small and intimate concert halls. Tickets are available through the church and through Mobile Meals, which will be the recipient of concert’s proceeds. 583-4531 or 573-7684

ten, Johnny Mercer and Antonio Carlos Jobim and selections from the Great American Songbook. bit.ly/2fkE2Xp

VISUAL ARTS

5 p.m. | FREE

Sundays at 2: Family Art Adventure

CONCERT

Furman Hosts Moravian Christmas Lovefeast Furman University | Daniel Memorial Chapel 3300 Poinsett Highway The Christmas Lovefeast is based on traditions originating in the early Apostolic church, then later in the Moravian church. The service includes the serving of Moravian buns and coffee and the lighting of beeswax candles. The sanctuary will be lit by pew candle staffs and decorated with red poinsettias. Furman will provide special music for the service, and the university’s Chancel Choir, directed by Furman senior Sandy Sharis, will lead the singing of traditional Christmas carols. Providing accompaniment are seniors Kevin Edens (organ) and Ann Harouny (flute) and junior Abby Ledogar (flute). bit.ly/2gfScqf

SUN-FRI

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College St. 2 p.m. Experiment with color, movement and rhythm in a fun pastels activity inspired by the Grainger McKoy exhibition. Bring the whole family. 271-7570 | gcma.org

FAMILY

Nutcracker Tea International Ballet | Cascades Verdae 10 Fountainview Terrace 3–5 p.m. | $20 All the little ladies and gentlemen will love this holiday-themed tea party, a beloved tradition and perfect “date” with parents, grandparents and friends. Attendees will enjoy treats to sip and eat and holiday-themed games and prizes in the elegant hall at the Cascades Verdae. They’ll be mesmerized by the live preview performance of “The Nutcracker” and narrated storytime, and the fabulous experience includes pictures with the Dew Drop Fairy. 879-9404 internationalballetsc.org/nutcracker-tea

CONCERT

Furman Jazz Combos in Concert Furman University, Daniel Recital Hall 3300 Poinsett Highway 8 p.m. FREE Coaching the Jazz Combos are Furman University professor of music Matt Olson and music faculty member Steve Watson. They will lead student combos in music by John Coltrane, Victor Woo-

04-16

CONCERT

Greenville Concert Band presents “Sounds for the Season” Dec. 4 at 6 p.m. at Powdersville First Baptist Church Dec. 11 at 6 p.m. at White Oak Baptist Dec. 16 at 7:15 p.m. at Fellowship Greenville FREE These concerts feature a wide selection of music for the Christmas season. greenvilleconcertband.org

MON

05

06-14

THEATER

Sinfonia Chamber Orchestra Concert

South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities First Baptist Church | 847 Cleveland St. 7:30 p.m. | FREE The Sinfonia Chamber Orchestra and the Wind Ensemble of the S.C. Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities will combine for their last concert of the semester year. The program will include the

Cantus Chamber Choir and the Governor’s School Choir Concert

7 p.m. | Tuesdays and Wednesdays | $10 & $15

7:30 p.m.

Rebecca Pender peeks out her bedroom window in rural Nebraska and sees a vision of the end of the world. The next day, she and her husband, Lucas, stand transfixed as they witness the collapse of the World Trade Center, unlocking within Rebecca’s psyche a Pandora’s box of repressed fears. “In the Middle of Nowhere” examines how fear poisons the soul like a virus, ravaging all who come in contact with it. This drama is rated PG-13. centrestage.org

The holiday season is often about children. SCGSAH December Choral Concert is a program based on music about children. From the Christ-child, to children who celebrate the holidays, to children in crisis around the world, the music presented will focus our attention on children. 282-3945

WED

07

LITERARY

Talk & Signing with Author Susan Crawford

Fiction Addiction | 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 2 p.m. | FREE Meet Susan Crawford, the author of “The Pocket Wife,” as she discusses her latest psychological suspense novel, “The Other Widow” (William Morrow, paperback, $15.99, on sale Dec. 6), which explores the dark side of love, marriage and infidelity, at a book talk and signing. 675-0540 | fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addition.com

Sterling Community Center | 113 Minus St.

CONCERT

CONCERT

Centre Stage | 501 River St.

Five Finger Death Punch & Shinedown

Though the last vestiges of nu-metal and postgrunge modern-rock have faded from the radio, bands like Five Finger Death Punch and Shinedown still find ready audiences on the road for their guitar-heavy, ultra-aggressive grooves. 241-3800 | bonsecoursarena.com

“Little Big Girl” by Claire Keane. 675-0540 fiction-addiction.com

South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities Buncombe Street United Methodist Church 200 Buncombe St.

“In the Middle of Nowhere”

FAMILY

7 p.m. | $40.75-$60.75

06

TUE-WED

CONCERT

Bon Secours Wellness Arena 650 N. Academy St.

TUE

“Overture to the Magic Flute” by Mozart, “Lieutenant Kijé Suite” by Serge Prokofiev and other orchestral works from the standard repertoire. The Wind Ensemble will share the program performing works by Percy Grainger, Ralph Vaughan Williams and others. The concert is free and open to the public. 282-3945

Wednesday Night Pickleball 6-8 p.m. | Wednesdays thru Dec. 28 | $3 Pickleball is the fastest growing sport in America. The game combines elements of tennis, ping-pong and badminton. It is easy for beginners to learn and is a challenging, fast-paced, competitive game for more experienced players. There are hundreds of Pickleball players in the Upstate. New players are always welcome. Games go on every Wednesday night at Sterling Community Center (113 Minus St., Greenville, SC 29601) starting at 6 p.m. No paddle, no problem. Loaner paddles are available. Cost is $3 with the money going to Sterling. 603-3558 | Upstatepickleball.com

THU

08

FAMILY

Storytime Thursday

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5 10:30 a.m. | FREE Bring your preschool children to Fiction Addiction for a storytime reading of the picture book

THU-SUN

08-11

THEATER

Main Stage Production: “Hamlet”

South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities Sakas Theatre at SCGSAH Dec. 8-10, 7:30 p.m. and Dec. 11, 2 p.m. Drama seniors bring to life Shakespeare’s enigmatic prince in all his passion, contemplation and contradiction and discover themselves in the embodiment of this mythic story. 282-3737

THRU FRI

VISUAL ARTS

Furman University Presents Art by Greenville Native Kate Roberts

09

Furman University Thompson Art Gallery, Roe Art Building 3300 Poinsett Highway 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-FridayReception and Talk: Monday, Nov. 14, 6-7:30 p.m. FREE Work by ceramic artist and Greenville native Kate Roberts will be on display in Furman University’s Thompson Gallery, Roe Art Building Nov. 14-Dec. 9. Thompson Gallery hours are Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Roberts’ exhibition, Indigo Curtain, is an extension of her philosophy, which says, “My practice is a meditation on time and its role in the decay of objects and memories. Inspiration is drawn from historical objects, the architecture around me or a personal relationship. My processes are repetitive and labor intensive; I draw, construct and weave using materials to depict fleeting, fragile moments and to examine the temporary physicality of an object or idea.” bit.ly/2evIUsz

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« TICKET ALERT Ticket Alert: FRI 09 Casting Crowns

Bon Secours Wellness Arena 650 N. Academy St. 10 a.m. Multiplatinum-selling and Grammy-winning group Casting Crowns will hit the road again this spring for the second leg of “The Very Next Thing” Tour, featuring K-LOVE Radio’s Male Artist of the Year Danny Gokey and special guests Unspoken. Presented by Compassion International and Museum of the Bible, the 40-city arena tour kicks off Feb. 16. The tour will stop in Greenville on March 9. Tickets go on sale Dec. 9 at 10 a.m. 241-3800 bonsecoursarena.com

CONCERT

33rd Annual Christmas with the Chorale Furman University, McAlister Auditorium 3300 Poinsett Highway 7:30 p.m. $5, $15, $30 Greenville Chorale and Hendersonville Symphony Orchestra mark the 10th anniversary of their Christmas collaboration. The concert will feature both orchestral and choral seasonal favorites, along with the beloved audience sing-along carols that make for a festive evening celebrating the season. 800-745-3000 | bit.ly/2giWrmp

SAT

10

FUNDRAISER

Sugar Creek Fun Runs

Sugar Creek III Clubhouse 119 Stonecrest Road, Greer Elf Run 3/4 mile at 2:15 p.m. and Jingle Bell Jog 5k at 3 p.m. Sugar Creek Fun Runs is having their ninth annual Jingle Bell Jog. It is a family 5K that winds through the neighborhood of Sugar Creek in Greer. People come from near and far in their holiday garb to participate. Post-race food is provided by Publix and Chick-fil-A. Prizes for top finishers will be awarded. All in a holiday block party atmosphere. go-greenevents.com/SugarCreekJBJ2016 sugarcreekfunruns.com info@sugarcreekfunruns.com

SAT-SUN

10-11

HOLIDAY

Hub-Bub’s Holiday Market

Wall Street, downtown Spartanburg Saturday 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sunday 12-6 p.m. This outdoor holiday market will offer art, crafts and gifts from local makers, as well as light appetizers and drinks. hub-bub.com

BALLET

“The Nutcracker” presented by International Ballet with Greenville Symphony Orchestra International Ballet Peace Center Concert Hall 300 S. Main St. 8 p.m. $18-$55 Starring Veronika Part, principal dancer of American Ballet Theatre (NYC). Join International Ballet for this beloved holiday production with the classical beauty of talented local dancers under artistic director Vlada Kysselova, showcasing the traditional story of young Clara and her journey with a magical Nutcracker Prince. Experience her adventurous dream with an exciting battle of toy soldiers and mice, the flurry of dazzling snowflakes and an impressive parade of nations and treats in the Land of the Sweet. With the Greenville Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Conductor Edvard Tchivzhel, bringing Tchaikovsky’s grand score to life, and featuring a live “Snowflake Choir” under the direction of Arlen Clarke, you won’t want to miss this Nutcracker. Use promo code FamilyPack to buy three tickets and get one free. 467-3000 peacecenter.org/events/detail/the-nutcracker-2

THRU SUN

11

VISUAL ART

Exhibition: Drawn South

Greenville Technical College’s RIVERWORKS Gallery 300 River St., Ste. 202 1-6 p.m. FREE Carly Drew, Katelyn Chapman and Kolton Miller are all Drawn South through their childhood immersion in and reverence for South Carolina’s culture and landscape. Their images explore and narrate their home landscape with layers of media that present a compression of history and multiple perspectives. Miller says, “It is important that the work questions the time, place and realness of your standard landscape, pushing something normally thought of as concrete into an unearthly event.” While studying together at Clemson, the three became friends and colleagues. gvltec.edu/riverworks/

SUN

11

FAMILY

Christmas at the Barn

Happy Hooves Eden Farms 4700 Dacusville Highway, Marietta 2-5 p.m. $8 Happy Hooves Therapeutic Equestrian Center will be hosting their annual holiday event and

fundraiser, Christmas at the Barn. This unique family-oriented event provides fun for the entire family at our beautiful barn setting. Children can visit with Santa, participate in “reindeer” horse and pony rides, play in the “peoplechase” wooden horse park and create beautiful arts and crafts. There is a unique live nativity conducted in one of our horse stalls. Baked goods and lunch items are available for purchase. Hot chocolate and cookies for everyone. Visitors can also tour the facility and meet some of our therapy horses and instructors while learning about the important work Happy Hooves does for our local community. Christmas at the Barn gives people the chance to create new Christmas memories and provides endless photo opportunities. 898-0043 HappyHoovesSC.com

NOW THRU

12

HOLIDAY

Indie Craft Holiday Pop-Up Shop

Monday-Saturday 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sunday 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Methodical Coffee roasting facility 3 McBeth St. This pop-up shop will feature the work of 55 artists. A curated mix of giftable art, home goods, jewelry and children’s items will be available in conjunction with a Methodical Coffee brew bar (open limited hours). makerscollective.org/holiday2016

TUE

13

CONCERT

St. Paul and the Broken Bones

Peace Center Concert Hall 101 W Broad St. 7:30 p.m. $35

14&21

THRU DEC

15

EDUCATION

Learn to Play Appalachian Music registration

Preserving Our Southern Appalachian Music | Trinity United Methodist Church 2703 Augusta St. $60 for the six week session All ages can learn to play Appalachian music. Learn to play the banjo, guitar, fiddle or mandolin. Enrollment is now open for the Winter Evening Music Program beginning Thursday, Dec. 15. This program is open to students third grade through adults of all ages. The cost is $60 for a six-week session, and rental instruments are available. To register for the Greenville location, contact Susan Ware-Snow. 979-9188 yamupstate.com

THU

15

FAMILY

Storytime Thursday

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5 10:30 a.m. FREE Bring your preschool children to Fiction Addiction for a storytime reading of the picture book “Give Please a Chance” by Bill O’Reilly and James Patterson. 675-0540 | fiction-addiction.com

VISUAL ARTS

Powerhouse rock and soul ensemble St. Paul and the Broken Bones are coming to the Peace Center. Led by dynamic frontman Paul Janeway, St. Paul and the Broken Bones have made converts out of audiences at major festivals, including Lollapalooza, Bonnaroo, Coachella, Outside Lands and Hangout, and as headliners throughout the United States and Europe. The Birmingham, Alabama-based band’s 2014 debut, “Half the City,” featured Janeway’s impassioned singing atop a blend of ’60s soul fire and otherworldly grooves inspired by the likes of Sly Stone, David Bowie and Prince. 467-3000 | peacecenter.org

WED&WED

of fly fishing but do not know where to start? Come to Cabela’s for a two-part instructional class led by our knowledgable outfitters. All equipment is included. 516-8100

Third Thursday Tour: Grainger McKoy Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College St. 11 a.m.-noon

EDUCATION

Fly Fishing University

Cabela’s | 1025 Woodruff Road Dec. 14 - Basics of Fly Fishing Dec. 21 - Basics of Fly Tying FREE Are you thinking about getting into the sport

Meet in front of The Salon near the front door at 11 a.m. and take a free docent-led tour of the exhibition Grainger McKoy. 271-7570 | gcma.org

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16

Music and merriment abound with the Upstate’s favorite holiday-themed pops concert with Maestro Edvard Tchivzhel as conductor. Celebrate the season with the GSO, International Ballet, Santa and Mrs. Claus and special guest star, acclaimed Broadway actress and singer Rachel York. 467-3000 | greenvillesymphony.org

Furman Women’s Leadership Institute Accepting Applications

Furman University | 3300 Poinsett Highway $1,350 The Women’s Leadership Institute of Furman University is now accepting applications for the 2017 class. The series for 2017, themed “Reflection, Transformation and Self,” includes four half-day sessions and a graduation ceremony, all of which take place on the Furman University campus. Scholarships are available. Sessions are scheduled for 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Jan. 24, Feb. 22, March 23 and April 19. Graduation takes place May 4, 6-8 p.m. 294-3136 | bit.ly/2fkzdMq brad.bechtold@furman.edu

FRI-SUN

16-18

CONCERT

The Greenville Symphony Orchestra presents “Holiday at Peace” sponsored by United Community Bank

FRI-JAN

16-10

THEATER

“Prince Caspian”

The Academy of Arts Ministries | The LOGOS Theatre 80 Schools St., Taylors Dec. 16, 7-10 p.m.; Dec. 17, 2-5 p.m.; Jan. 5, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; Jan. 7, 2-5 p.m.; and Jan. 10, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. | $35-$45 If you enjoyed “The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe,” then you will not want to miss the featured production of our 2016-2017 season, “Prince Caspian.” This epic production will be making its first appearance worldwide on a professional level on the Logos Theatre stage and will bring you to the world of Narnia in a new and unforgettable way. 268-9342 | theAcademyOfArts.org information@theAcademyOfArts.org

Peace Concert Hall | 300 S. Main St.

NOW THRU

12/16-12/1 at 7:30 p.m. and 12/18 at 3 p.m.

17 WEWEMAKE YOUR SMART KID MAKE YOUR SMART KID WE MAKE YOUR SMART KID EVEN SMARTER! EVEN SMARTER! $18-$39

THEATER

“Let Nothing You Dismay” Centre Stage | 501 River St.

Thurs.-Sat., 8 p.m. and Sun., 3 p.m. $15-$30

Giveyour yourchild child Give anan an KumonGive Math &your Readingchild of academic academic advantage! GREENVILLE - WOODSadvantage! CROSSING academic advantage! FOR AG

Schedule a FREE Parent Orientation today!

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Give your child an academic advantage!

©2016 Kumon North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

WE MAKE YOUR SMART KID EVEN SMARTER!

©2016 Kumon North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved. ©2016 Kumon North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

EVEN SMARTER!

It’s Christmas in Ohio, and Kevin and Allie are a young couple about to become parents to an adopted child — they’re just waiting for a phone call. Although they’ve asked their families to keep their distance until they bring the baby home, their funny and fearsome relatives have vastly different plans in mind. This comedy is rated PG-13. centrestage.org

17

DANCE

“The Nutcracker” by Greenville Ballet

Greenville Ballet Furman University, McAlister Auditorium 3300 Poinsett Highway 3 p.m. | $26, $24, $22

ES

The Upstate’s oldest classical rendition of the holiday favorite “The Nutcracker” features An838 Woods Crossing Rd. drew Kuharsky’s award-winning choreography. Greenville, 29607 Schedule aSCFREE Parent Orientation today! Schedule a FREE Parent Orientation today!800-745-3000 | bit.ly/2fCsDQw

Schedule a FREE Parent Orientation today! 864.607.9400 Kumon Math & Reading of kumon.com/greenville-woods-crossing Kumon Math of of Kumon Math&&-Reading Reading GREENVILLE WOODS CROSSING GREENVILLE WOODS 838 Woods -Crossing Rd. CROSSING

FOR AG

ES

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18

ES

FOR AGOR AG GREENVILLE WOODS CROSSING F Greenville, SC 29607 838 Woods Crossing Rd.

NOW THRU

THEATER

Christmas in Dixie Pelzer Auditorium 214 Lebby St., Pelzer

838 Woods 864.607.9400 Greenville, SCCrossing 29607 Rd. kumon.com/greenville-woods-crossing Greenville, SC 29607 864.607.9400

7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday; 3 p.m. on Sunday.

kumon.com/greenville-woods-crossing

$10 general, $8 for seniors (age 65+), $8 for military, $7 for students (18 and under)

kumon.com/greenville-woods-crossing 864.607.9400

Milltown Players presents this holiday show that

includes 10 performers and a full band on stage. Tickets can be purchased online at the box office one hour before the show starts. Online sales close two hours before the show starts. Tickets will still be available at the box office. Doors to the auditorium open 30 minutes before the show starts. milltownplayers.org

THU

22

FAMILY

Storytime Thursday

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5 10:30 a.m. | FREE

a.m.–5 p.m. hamptoniiigallery.com

FEB SUN

19

CONCERT

ZZ Top’s Tonnage Tour Peace Center

7:30 p.m. | $65-$85

Celebrate Christmas by bringing your preschool children to Fiction Addiction for a storytime reading of the picture book “Santa’s Underwear” by Marty Rhodes Figley and illustrated by Marty Kelley. 675-0540 | fiction-addiction.com

SAT

24

FAMILY

Light of the World

Springwell Church 4369 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors 3 & 5 p.m. | FREE Christmas Eve services at Springwell Church feature Christmas music and a message of hope and joy as parishioners and guests worship the One who still lights up the darkness. 268-2299 | springwell.org/ChristmasEve

THU

29

FAMILY

Storytime Thursday

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5 10:30 a.m. | FREE Bring your preschool children to Fiction Addiction for a storytime reading of the picture book “What Color Is a Kiss?” by Rocio Bonilla. 675-0540 | fiction-addiction.com

THRU SAT

31

VISUAL ART

Charlie Pate exhibit Coldwell Banker Caine’s Main Street Real Estate Gallery 28 S. Main St.

FREE Charlie Pate is a renowned Upstate painter and sculptor specializing in classical realism, preferring to paint landscapes or people and common objects in still life. Pate’s artwork will be available for purchase throughout its exhibition. 250-4676 | cbcaine.com

THRU DEC

31

VISUAL ARTS

“Recent Works: Sunsets and Fish”

Hampton III Gallery 3110 Wade Hampton Blvd., Ste. 10, Taylors FREE An exhibit by artist John Acorn will be on display through December. Gallery hours are Tuesday–Friday 1–5 p.m. and Saturday 10

More than four and a half decades after their formation in the Houston area, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees ZZ Top are set to begin a new tour in 2017. 467-3000 or 800-888-7768 peacecenter.org

TUE-SUN

21-26

Musical”

THEATER

“Beautiful: The Carole King

Peace Center | 101 W. Broad St. $35–$95 “Beautiful: The Carole King Musical” tells the inspiring true story of King’s remarkable rise to stardom, from being part of a hit songwriting team with her husband, Gerry Goffin, to her relationship with fellow writers and best friends Cynthia Weil and Barry Mann to becoming one of the most successful solo acts in popular music history. Along the way, she made more than beautiful music; she wrote the soundtrack to a generation. 467-3000 or 800-888-7768 peacecenter.org

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE? Send your event information and images to calendar@ communityjournals.com by Wednesday at 5 p.m. to be considered for publication in the following week’s Journal.


THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following:

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following:

RFP#43-12/19/16 – Digital 3D Laser Scanning System, December 19, 2016, 3:00 P.M., E.D.T.

Pole Building, IFB #4112/15/16, due at 4:00 P.M., E.S.T., December 15, 2016. A site meeting will be held at 3:00 P.M., E.S.T., December 7, 2016 at Greenville County Public Works Northern Bureau, 98 Camp Road, Travelers Rest, SC 29690.

Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org or by calling (864) 467-7200.

ESTADO DE CAROLINA DEL SUR CONDADO DE GREENVILLE EN LA CORTE DE FAMILIA C.A. No.:2016-DR-23-3932 NOTA DE ACTOS A: ELIECER J. MARTINEZ Usted ha sido notificado de acuerdo al Código de Carolina del Sur Ann Sec. 15-9-710. Que actos de custodia han sido iniciados bajo el caso arriba mencionado por Hilda Espinal Reyes. USTED HA SIDO NOTIFICADO COMO SIGUE : 1. Que dentro de treinta (30) días de haber recibido la notificación usted responderá la clasificación por escrito a la Corte del Tribunal que se encuentra localizada en el 301 University Ridge, Greenville, SC 29602 la nota y las razones para refutar intervenir ó de otro modo responder: 2. Que el Tribunal debe ser informado de su dirección actual y cualquier cambio de domicilio durante el proceso legal de custodia. 3. Que si no presenta una respuesta dentro de (30) días de recivir el edicto constituye juicio de manera predeterminada rendido contra usted para el alivio demandado en el reclamo. Nathalie M. Morgan (69848) Nathalie M. Morgan, LLC 201 West Stone Avenue Greenville, SC 29609 (864)242-6655 (864)242-6111 (facsimile)

Solicitations can be found at http://www.greenvillecounty. org/Purchasing_Dept/ or by calling 864-467-7200.

AUCTION NOTICE Notice is hereby given that on 12/10/16, at 9:00 a.m. at East North Storage, 4329 East North Street, Greenville, SC, the undersigned, East North Storage will sell at Public Sale by competitive bidding, the personal property heretofore store with the undersigned by: 1. Unit: A025, Pedro Alvarez, Misc. household; misc small tools 2. Unit: A052, John Thies, Dining room set & 6 matching chairs 3. Unit: A120, Gloria Gray, Misc household; clothing 4. Unit: B290, Olivia Janis, Turntable stereo cabinet & misc household. 5. Unit: A174, Javon Dogan, Misc household boxes 6. Unit: B266, Maxine W McElrath, Misc. household, clothing 7. Unit: B040, Christine Anderson, Misc household 8. Unit: D001, Kristen McAbee, Misc household; some children items 9. Unit: C036, Matt Spaulding, Misc tools (small) 10.Unit D026, Traci Bruce, Mountain Bike & misc household

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that White Duck Greenville, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1320 Hampton Avenue Ext., Bay 12B, Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than December 11, 2016. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Terrace Greenville, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 654 South Main Street, Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than December 11, 2016. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that BANA Liquor Store and Party Shop LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1733 Piedmont Highway, Piedmont, SC 29673. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than December 18, 2016. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

LEGAL NOTICE RATES ABC Notices $165 All others $1.20 per line 864.679.1205

|

864.679.1305

email: aharley@communityjournals.com

Santa Paws Workshop ‘Tis the season... Join us for photos with Santa, spoil your pets at Rudolph’s Retail Shop, make treats for homeless pets, satisfy your sweet tooth with Mrs. Clause’s Bakery silent auction & more!

When you finish reading this paper, please recycle it.

WEDDINGS  ENGAGEMENTS  ANNIVERSARIES Make your announcement to the Greater Greenville Area

WEDDINGS

1/4 page - $174, Word Count 140 3/8 page - $245, Word Count 140

ENGAGEMENTS

3/16 page - $85, Word Count 90 For complete information call 864-679-1205 or e-mail aharley@communityjournals.com


54 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 12.02.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

Sticking to the Goal ACROSS

1 Roman god with a bow 5 Knotting craft 12 Move like a kangaroo 15 Overquick 19 Be a wanderer 20 Moral 21 Actress Gasteyer 22 Comical Kett 23 Jack London novel 26 Dumbfound 27 Flynn of films 28 Prone (to) 29 Big name in credit cards 30 Cake coater 31 Writer Verne 33 Easy targets to attack 36 Lacking a musical key 38 Writer Bellow with a Nobel 40 Mystery novelist — Stanley Gardner 41 Relative of soul 46 Infuse with oxygen 50 Sphagnum, e.g. 51 Cookie with a “Thins” line 52 One-masted sailboats 54 Chic, ’60s-style 55 Really, really quick 59 Drive off 63 Pretty low grades 64 “That is — ask” 65 “Picnic” playwright William 66 With 13-Down, giant in

internet service 69 Sports org. with the eight teams featured in this puzzle 71 Trip to a rain forest, maybe 73 Vicious 74 Eban of Israel 77 Foreboding 80 Shimon of Israel 81 2011 Jim Carrey comedy 86 Head sweller 87 Tie up again, as shoes 88 Don’t skip, as an event 89 Oaf’s cry 93 Waters off Eritrea 95 2007-13 pickup truck model 99 Clearasil treats it 101 Designer Saarinen 102 Old TV tube 103 Be engulfed in fire 109 Ate 110 Writer Bret Easton — 111 Know — fact 112 Actor’s help 114 The blahs 117 Rake feature 118 Hawaiians and Tongans 122 Tennis’ Lendl 123 TV producer 124 In a very angry way 125 Filmdom’s — Lund Laszlo

By Frank Longo 126 Bird setting 127 Sinuous fish 128 Vilify 129 Gambol DOWN

1 Johnson of “Laugh-In” 2 Comic actor Jay 3 Elates 4 Tells in detail 5 Ex-Giant Ott 6 Gazetteer shelfmate 7 Hew 8 Falling-out 9 Masquerade 10 — -jongg 11 Chosen few 12 Papa Doc’s place 13 See 66-Across 14 Inflate falsely 15 Hero, often 16 Top-floor storage site 17 Reeked 18 With 56-Down, surfs like a pro 24 God, in Islam 25 Clever type 30 Most lazy 32 “St. — Fire” (1985 film) 33 Hero in a deli 34 Fluish, say 35 Shown with explicit detail 36 It has biceps 37 However, informally

38 Golf’s Sam 97 “Indubitably” 112 Refer to 39 — of one’s own medicine 98 “Grease” actress Eve 113 Tech support seeker 42 Dog cry 100 Erase 115 Bear, celestially 43 Naval vessel abbr. 103 Gain entry 116 “By Jove!” 44 Fitzgerald of song 104 Drab color 118 Adolescent leader? 45 Loam, e.g. 105 Forelimb bones 119 Taxing org. 47 Key of “Für Elise” 106 Close-by 120 Beret, e.g. 48 Mouth organ 107 “Exodus” protagonist 121 Senate vote 49 Lawn care tools 108 Don’s group 53 Eye creepily 109 Cuts down, as a tree Crossword answers: page 29 55 — Baba 56 See 18-Down 57 “... woman who by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan lived in —” 58 Evening, casually 59 Rear-ending car, e.g. 60 Arise 61 Natural legume case 62 Cube maker Rubik 67 Peninsula northeast of Boston 68 Brother in Genesis 70 Pre-O trio 72 Mil. missions 75 Bric-a- — 76 Yiddish writer Sholem 78 Actress Samantha 79 Italian for “new” 82 Summary 83 16th letter 84 “Don’t make — habit” 85 Nick of “Warrior” 89 Potato chip topping 90 Singer Helen or actor Jerry 91 Univ. award 92 Envision 94 Wise Sudoku answers: page 29 96 22nd letter Easy

Sudoku

photo credit - Ben Geer Keys

HOLIDAY TREE GREETINGS! Holiday Tree Greetings plant trees in parks, schools, and neighborhoods throughout Greenville County. Order your cards today at treesgreenville.org. TreesGreenville is a 501 c3.


12.02.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 55

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

BACK PAGE Community Voices

Life Is So Daily with Steve Wong

I know what you want, because I know you As the Christmas Spirit haunts our every waking moment from now until the after-Christmas depression sets in, the question I hate to hear most often is, “What do you want for Christmas?” It is actually an easy question to answer, because I want a lot of things, most of which are terribly expensive or metaphysically impossible to have. I’ll take a brand-new BMW and a do-over at raising my kids. Or I’ll take a Christmas visit from my daughter, who is a Peace Corps volunteer in Cambodia. I don’t think any of those things will be under my Christmas tree this year. A better question to be asked — but never out loud — is, “What do I want to give you for Christmas?” When I see little children sitting on Santa’s lap at the mall, giving him a list of things they want, I can’t help but think the system is setting them up for failure. Santa is magical and he can do anything… right? So where’s that pony I asked for? How about that little brother? I really began to lose faith when I asked that Mommy and Daddy stop fighting, but they got a divorce. So instead of getting a pile of good junk for Christmas, I got two — but Dad’s always arrived a day late via UPS. And if asking little kids to give you a wish list isn’t bad enough, I’m really troubled by fellow emptynesters that solicit and readily get wish lists from their adult children. Really? You want me to pay off your student loans? You need health insurance? A $500 gift card to Starbucks? Who do you think I am, Santa Claus? If you ask dumb questions, you should expect dumb answers, even from college graduates who wait tables while trying to “find themselves” in the big city. Instead of asking those we love to tell us what they want, we could more easily and thoughtfully ask ourselves, “What do I want to give that person for Christmas?” Said another way, “What do I want you to have from me?” The answer might be cash, but hopefully there is a more thoughtful, appropriate and appreciated gift idea just waiting to be creatively realized. They — fundraisers and retailers — say that Christmas is all about giving. I believe them, and I believe that gifts should be more than fulfilled obligations to friends, family and co-workers. When I consider the people in my life to whom I want to give gifts, I don’t want them to tell me what they want. I want to give them what I feel they should have from me. For example, I always give my adult son tickets to some live performance in his West Coast city. He’s not a big concert or theater fan, but I am, and I want him to experience some of the happiness I feel when I see an especially good play (“Book of Mormon”) or hear an especially good concert

(Stravinsky’s “Rite of Spring”). Even though I’ve done this for the past several years, he is always surprised when he gets an email from some local venue in his city saying he has will-call tickets to an event he never even considered attending. He’s even more surprised when he actually enjoys the play or concert. As his father, I know better than he does what his heart desires. I know he really doesn’t want soap-on-a-rope for Christmas, but I give it to him anyway every year, because it is our longstanding private joke on how silly gift giving can be. (Have you ever tried to find soap-on-arope? Last year, I had to have it custom-made by a local crafter, and it really did turn out pretty good.) Currently, I’m contemplating what to send my daughter in Cambodia, which will take forever to get there, if it gets there at all. Peace Corps volunteers need and want a lot of things: hot showers, indoor toilets, clean drinking water, to know what that meat is being served for dinner, an understanding of the native language. But here is a list of the things that I want her to have: a real book that is this year’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, gourmet jelly beans, chocolate-covered almonds, a piece of handmade jewelry, something pretty to wear that meets the Peace Corps’ and Cambodia’s dress code and a photograph of her cat that is boarding with us until her return in nine months  and 16 days, and, yes, I’m counting. She would never ask for any of these things, but as her father, I know she will enjoy them. Nothing on this list is terribly expensive. Yet every one of these items will strengthen the bond between us that not even the Khmer Rouge can break. The best gift in all this gift giving will be the one I give myself. On Christmas morning, after I give my dog Futar his annual pig ears, after the wife and I exchange small but meaningful tokens, before we head out to the relatives’ house for a day of overeating and awkward conversations, I will sit by the Christmas tree with the gas logs blazing and a strong cup of coffee… and imagine. I will see my son’s face when he realizes that his dad really does get “South Park,” and my daughter’s face as she opens a battered Christmas package filled with the little things she misses the most. Nine months and 16 days, and, yes, she’s counting. Here’s the deal: You don’t ask me and I won’t ask you what we want for Christmas. If we don’t know already, we don’t really know each other well enough to exchange gifts. Steve Wong is a writer and promoter living in the peach orchards of Gramling. He can be reached at Just4Wong@ Gmail.com.

WE INVITE YOU TO S E L L AT A U C T I O N I N N E W Y O R K G R E E N V I L L E , S C , C O N S I G N M E N T D AY Thursday, December 8, By appointment

Doyle Specialists will evaluate your Jewelry

and Fine Watches for auction consignment. We invite you to schedule a private appointment. Hilary Pitts, GG, 704-582-2258, DoyleNC@Doyle.com

Buccellati, Gold, Diamond and Sapphire Grape

Cluster Necklace and Earrings. Sold for $31,250

DOYLE.COM


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Dec. 2, 2016 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

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