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A CORNUCOPIA OF CHRISTMAS CULTURAL SIGHTS AND SOUNDS

GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, November 29, 2013 • Vol.15, No.48

Not everything slows down for the winter months – some businesses and nonprofits are finding new ways to maximize holiday income

PAGE 35

Fluor honored for dedication to education PG 4 St. Francis unveils “family-centric” NICU PG 10 Are doctors over-prescribing antibiotics? PG 12

Bringing Christmas to kids on Miracle Hill PG 28

’Tis the

SEASON

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Brian Budnar, owner of The Christmas Light Pros, tests and untangles a set of Christmas lights while working on a display installation in Simpsonville.

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It’s the most wonderful time of the year.

PUBLISHER

Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@communityjournals.com EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Susan Clary Simmons ssimmons@communityjournals.com MANAGING EDITOR

Jerry Salley jsalley@communityjournals.com

The holiday season can be the best time of year to upgrade your vehicle, or your vehicle loan.

STAFF WRITERS

Cindy Landrum clandrum@communityjournals.com Sherry Jackson sjackson@communityjournals.com April A. Morris amorris@communityjournals.com

Most vehicle manufacturers and dealers drop prices on current inventory at year-end to make room for next model year’s inventory. A lower price

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27˚

FRIDAY

49˚

29˚ SATURDAY 47˚

32˚

SUNDAY

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Our unseasonably cold weather “will continue through this week-

end… but at least it’s dry.

A chilly shopping day

2 THE JOURNAL | NOVEMBER 29, 2013

Mostly to partly sunny

Partly to mostly cloudy


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WORTH REPEATING THEY SAID IT

18

“Our medicine cabinet is nearly empty of antibiotics to treat some infections.”

New bicycles delivered to Miracle Hill Children’s Home in 2012 by Lorena Cuddy and volunteers

Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control, on the need to prescribe antibiotics sparingly to avoid entering “a post-antibiotic era.”

> 1 in 5

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

Pediatrician visits that result in an antibiotic prescription, accounting for nearly 50 million antibiotic prescriptions annually in the United States, according to American Academy of Pediatrics report.

“I hold my breath until the last gift rolls off [the trailer]. But we never leave there with dry eyes and an empty heart.”

3.2 million

Approximate number of anonymous medical records added to the Clinical Data Warehouse, a research and collaboration project housed at Clemson University

Lorena Cuddy, on delivering gifts to Miracle Hill Children’s Home for the last 20 years.

“Fluor wants to make sure young people are prepared for a future that we may not even know about.” Grier Mullins, executive director of Public Education Partnership, on naming Fluor Corp. as its Public Education Partner of the Year.

“It’s a fun thing that helps people not to go crazy during the holidays.” Helen Rowland, coordinator of St. Francis Health System’s “Maintain, No Gain” employee competition.

“Their animals are their family. They would easily give up their own food to feed their pets.”

$6.8 billion

Total that Americans will spend on holiday decorations this year, according to the National Retail Federation

Linda Teems, Meals on Wheels coordinator, on why the nonprofit provides clients with a supply of pet food.

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Partner of the Year luncheon panel members, from left: Lonnie Emard, president of IT-oLogy; Jeff McCoy, director of academic innovation and technology for Greenville County Schools; Tom Miller, principal of Berea Elementary School; Jennifer Southers, teacher at Hillcrest High School; and James Willey, teacher at Wade Hampton High School; and moderator Phil Yanov, founder of Tech After 5 and GSA Technology Council. 

Fluor’s contribution to public schools honored Public Education Partners honors company with award CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Fluor also supports A.J. Whittenberg Elementary, the state’s first elementary school with an engineering-based curriculum. Fluor employees participate in Whittenberg’s mentor program. Fluor engineers interact with students and teachers during the school’s “Fluor Week” to provide real-world experiences and activities on and off campus. The company also supports the school’s core curriculum programs and extracurricular activities for students. In addition, Fluor is one of three founding partners of the Upstate STEM Collaborative, a collaboration between some of the Upstate’s largest manufacturers, public school districts in Greenville, Pickens, Spartanburg and Anderson counties, Clemson and Furman

Some businesses and industries help schools closest to their physical address or the schools which most of their employees’ children attend. Others focus on projects that touch all the schools within a district. Fluor Corp. does both. Public Education Partnership of Greenville County honored Fluor as its Public Education Partner of the Year on Monday. “I don’t think there’s a school that Grier Mullins, executive director of Public Education Partnership hasn’t been touched by Fluor’s efforts,” said Grier Mullins, executive director universities and Greenville Tech. The collaborative is developing a of Public Education Partnership, a nonprofit founded in 1985 to support public website that will help parents and students find STEM-based activities such education in Greenville County. The Public Education Partner of the as after-school programs and summer Year Award was established in 2010. Past camps that could help increase sturecipients are Michelin, GE Power & Wa- dent interest and knowledge in those fields. ter and the Greenville Health System. Fluor has worked to help train teachWhile Greenville County businesses and industries have always supported ers in STEM as well as participated in area public schools, their support is robotics programs, Mullins said. “Much of what Fluor does is behind more critical than ever, Mullins said. Fluor provided technology upgrades the scenes. Fluor’s motivation is so to the Charles E. Daniel Observatory sincere,” Mullins said. “Fluor wants to at the Roper Mountain Science Center. make sure young people are prepared The new technology included large LCD for a future that we may not even know displays, iPads and an interactive kiosk. about.”

“I don’t think there’s a school that hasn’t been touched by Fluor’s efforts.”

4 THE JOURNAL | NOVEMBER 29, 2013


Clinical Data Warehouse to foster research APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com A unique collaboration among multiple health care systems and several universities, the new Clinical Data Warehouse will allow South Carolina healthcare providers and researchers to follow patient conditions and broaden the patient base for studies. Housed at Clemson University and operated by Health Sciences South Carolina (HSSC), the system uses anonymous patient records to allow researchers to conduct patient-centered outcomes research, HSSC said in a release. Greenville Health System, Medical University of South Carolina and Palmetto Health submitted historical data earlier this year and Spartanburg Regional Health System is scheduled to add its data in 2014. According to HSSC, the University of South Carolina developed the software while Clemson University hosts the database along with providing security and privacy. Approximately 3.2 million medical

records have been added to the database to date. The breadth and depth of information will allow clinicians to more effectively study conditions that affect smaller populations, participants say. Dr. Jay Moskowitz, HSSC president, noted that whereas one health system would yield a small study group for a rare condition like sickle cell disease, that study group could triple or quadruple with the Clinical Data Warehouse’s statewide information. This offers researchers a way to determine the potential success of a research project and build patient cohorts more easily, HSSC said. Officials predict that the compiled information will also work to attract biomedical clinical trials to South Carolina. HSSC was established in 2004 as the nation’s first statewide biomedical research collaborative. Members include Greenville Health System,  Palmetto Health, Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System, McLeod Health, AnMed Health,  Self Regional Healthcare, Clemson University,  Medical University of South Carolina and  University of South Carolina.

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OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

Spend where it counts

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

Give thanks

MARK B. JOHNSTON PRESIDENT AND PUBLISHER

mjohnston@communityjournals.com

America’s humblest of holidays reminds us once again what matters most. Tradition has it that Chief Massasoit brought 90 men to the Pilgrims’ harvest celebration in 1621 and stayed three days. He got it about right. According to the motorist group AAA, most of the 43.4 million Americans traveling more than 50 miles for Thanksgiving this week hit the road Wednesday and will head home on Sunday. Christmas may be the unassailable megastar holiday of the year, but Thanksgiving always holds the title to most-traveled. While AAA is predicting a slight decline in travelers this year – blame it on the recovery’s “sluggish pace” – the decrease will be slight. That’s because, essentially, a pilgrimage is all this humblest of holidays asks. “The primary focus of Thanksgiving, more so than any other holiday, is to gather with friends, family and loved ones and celebrate with each other,” agreed AAA’s Marshal Doney, in announcing the club’s 2013 statistics. The good news, he said, is most Thanksgiving travelers will pay the cheapest gas prices since 2010. Family pilgrims “attempting to carve out a travel budget will be happy to know that Thanksgiving will be the least expensive holiday of the year.” And this year, with the economy still teetering and headlines promising more uncertainty ahead, it’s worth remembering that America’s first Thanksgiving wasn’t about bounty, but survival. The 1621 feast opened with five kernels of corn on every plate as a reminder of all the terrors those first settlers endured. The second Thanksgiving, in 1623, was held in gratitude for rain. According to history.com, the Plymouth Plantation colonists changed a day of fasting and prayer for relief from a brutal drought to one of thanksgiving because the rain came during their prayers – followed by news that a Dutch supply ship was on its way. The same emotion inspired the first national day of Thanksgiving, designated as the last Thursday in November by President Lincoln on Oct. 3, 1863. The Civil War was in full fury, with more than a year of hard fighting ahead. The battle of Gettysburg was barely three months past. Atlanta had just fallen to Sherman. In his proclamation, the president commended to God’s “tender care all those who have become widows, orphans, mourners or sufferers in the lamentable civil strife in which we are unavoidably engaged.” And he noted, with palpable gratitude, “that in the midst of a civil war of unequalled magnitude and severity … order has been maintained, the laws have been respected and obeyed, and harmony has prevailed everywhere except in the theater of military conflict.” Lincoln’s divided nation united once again – and so, thankfully, we Americans continue to do so, despite our long history of patriots and Tories, tea partiers and progressives, Wall Street and Main Street, red states and blue states. E Pluribus Unum. Out of many, one. So it has been; so may it ever be. For this – whatever the headlines promise or 2014 brings – we can, with grateful hearts, give thanks.

SPEAK YOUR MIND The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters

6 THE JOURNAL | NOVEMBER 29, 2013

should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short

We say it because we believe it: Greenville is a fantastic place to live. If you’ve been here a while, you already know this. And if you’re a recent transplant, you’ll know it soon enough. If you’re new in town, you picked a great time to come. The holiday season, officially kicked off this week by Black Friday, is when Greenville shows itself off to its best advantage. Walk down Main Street or drive down Augusta Road – to pick just two examples – and you’ll see, live and in person, the story we’ve been telling in the pages of the Journal for years. It’s a story that the national media is starting to echo, from Esquire to USA Today to the New York Times to Forbes. You’ll see a town leading the region in coming back from tough times, becoming a thriving destination for business and leisure travelers the nation and world over. Greenville is a special, unique city. And Greenville’s uniqueness is largely thanks our locally owned businesses – businesses you’ll find nowhere else. Which is something to bear in mind as you’re making your Black Friday or Cyber Monday shopping list and deciding whether to spend your money on Main Street or the “information superhighway.” Some store owners have told me stories about customers who come in to try items out in the store, usually taking up a worker’s time, getting the benefit of his expertise and recommendations. When the time comes to ring up the sale, the customer says, “Oh, no, I think I can get a better deal on this online. I just wanted to check it out in person first.”

bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, fact-based arguments.

Yes, online shopping is convenient, and you may find good deals. But there are good deals to be found in stores all across Greenville, and they come with great service, one-on-one, every question answered (and a manager to go to if they’re not). Give local businesses the chance to show you what a good deal really is. You can read many of those owners’ stories in this week’s Upstate Business Journal. Another thing to keep in mind this time of year is that local business owners and their employees donate significantly to local charities, are likely to serve on local boards, and support a great variety of community causes and events. Why? Because Greenville is their home. What Greenville becomes affects them and their families personally. Also unlike online stores, the owners and staff of local stores pay taxes here, and that money stays here for vital things like schools, law enforcement and safety, and badly needed infrastructure improvement. As a shopper, you have more power than you may realize. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, if just half the employed U.S. population spent $50 a month in independently owned businesses, their purchases would generate $42.6 billion in revenue. That’s money that can go to creating jobs. Promoting community development. Funding city services. Supporting local charities and causes. All of us, working together, spending where it counts to keep Greenville unique and wonderful. Happy holidays.

Greenville is a special, unique city. And Greenville’s uniqueness is largely thanks our locally owned businesses – businesses you’ll find nowhere else.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of

organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Executive Editor Susan Clary Simmons at ssimmons@ communityjournals.com.


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Dreaming of a green December Slowing down during the holidays? Not for these businesses and nonprofits, who are turning cool days into hot opportunities LEIGH SAVAGE | CONTRIBUTOR

lsavage@communityjournals.com March through October, Hollywild Animal Park greets between 40,000 and 50,000 guests, most coming for safari rides, field trips and other educational experiences. As of November, regular programming is closed. But there is no rest for the staff, because in the bustling period between Thanksgiving and New Years Day, the number of visitors explodes to more than 80,000, thanks to the Holiday Lights Safari Benefit, a seasonal attraction that helps keep the nonprofit operational. “The fundraising that comes out of the benefit keeps everything running,” said Kim Atchley, director of marketing and public relations with Hollywild. “The animals need feeding year-round, caring for them through the winter so that people can enjoy them in spring and summer and fall.” While certain types of businesses wind down during the cold winter months, some area companies and nonprofits find ways to make the holiday season their busiest – and most lucrative.

In his fourth year as owner of the Greenville outpost of The Christmas Light Pros, Budnar works with about 40 homes. “It’s turnkey,” he said. “We provide the lights, put them up, maintain them, switch them out if we need to, and come back in January to take them down.” The Christmas Light Pros was founded in 1998 and has more than 20 franchises in California. The idea is spreading, with three franchises operating in Georgia and one in North Carolina. Budnar is currently the only owner operating in South Carolina. “It’s growing,” he said. “Most people come back. People can choose what they want to do. Most people like to be over-the-top.” Budnar was tinting windows in Asheville when he heard about the business from someone who had seen its popularity in California. “Everybody pays people to do everything in California,” he said, laughing. The National Retail Federation’s holi-

BRISK BUSINESS

8 THE JOURNAL | NOVEMBER 29, 2013

Roper Mountain Holiday Lights

PHOTO PROVIDED

Brian Budnar does window tinting, which keeps him busy through spring and summer. But as demand for that service dries up, Budnar has found another that peaks in December: hanging holiday lights and decorations.

day consumer spending survey found that Americans plan to spend an average of $51.60 on holiday decorations this year, totalling $6.8 billion. Emily Daniel opened Hollipops, a toy store on Woodruff Road in Simpsonville, just six months ago, but she is already doubling sales projections and expects her sales to multiply by five or six for the month of December. “In our toy store world, February is the Toy Fair when everyone reorders for spring and summer,” she said. “You really want to ramp up through December to get you through the slow January and February.” Daniel does some print advertising and uses direct e-mail and Facebook updates to bring in customers, but so far her prime location, along with word-of-mouth, have kept sales brisk. “It’s local, it’s before you get to all of the Woodruff Road traffic, it’s quick, we do free wrapping,” she said. “We’ve had amazing response in this community.” According to Deloitte’s annual holiday consumer spending forecast, the gradually improving economy will result in a 4 to 4.5 percent increase in November through January holiday sales over last year. Total holiday sales should reach between $963 billion and $967 billion. Daniel plans to capitalize on the buying mood by offering 10 percent off storewide in conjunction with Small Business Saturday, Nov. 30. She also plans to host an after-hours Ladies Night for women to come shop without the kids in tow and is also hoping to have an early-December event featuring Santa himself.

FUN WITH FUNDRAISING Roper

Mountain

Science

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Brian Budnar (right), owner of The Christmas Light Pros, and Emerson Bahia work on a Christmas display on a home in Simpsonville.

Center opened in 1985 and has grown from serving 4,600 students to serving more than 120,000 each year. But attendance peaks during the holidays, when the usual educational offerings, such as Friday Starry Nights and 2nd Saturdays, close for the season. The center loses about 1,000 admissions from people who would attend Second Saturday, and about 300 who might attend Friday night each week. But Michael Weeks, education curator, said the more than 21,000 cars, vans and buses that visit the science center for Roper Mountain Holiday Lights more than makes up for the loss. “The income that’s generated from Holiday Lights definitely makes it worth sacrificing a couple of weeks of programming,” Weeks said. “It’s the top fundraiser for our association.” The event is held in conjunction with the Rotary Club of Greenville, and the organizations split the proceeds. Last year,


JOURNAL NEWS

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each received $65,000, which allowed the science center to purchase a digital, high-definition projector system to replace the original projector from the 1980s. Weeks views the event as a beneficial fundraiser, but not necessarily a marketing tool for the center. “The lights get people out here, which is good, but it doesn’t always translate into them coming back,” Weeks said. “We want to take it to the next step as far as re-engaging these folks to come for our education programs they might not be aware of. And

we want people to know when they come to the lights, they are helping charities.” Atchley of Hollywild has similar goals. “We want to get as many coming during park season as come to the lights safari benefit, and we want to let people know that the money raised by the benefit goes to park operations, primarily caring for the animals,” she said. “We want people who come to the lights to know that their money is being used for a good cause, having this resource in our community throughout the year.”

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New neonatal care unit will offer privacy, keep kin close St. Francis constructing a family-centered space APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com New mothers in the hospital often have a private room where they can recuperate and bond with their babies. However, if a newborn is premature or has health problems, the baby often shares a room with many others where nurses and doctors can provide care. The design of neonatal intensive care units (NICU) and neonatal care units is changing nationwide to one that fosters family involvement, and Bon Secours St. Francis is building such a design at its Eastside campus for a Neonatal Care Center. This model creates a “family-centered” space that offers room for parents and family members to stay with the baby, said Ashley Freeman, administrative director of obstetrical and neonatal services. A traditional neonatal care unit has between 10 and 30 babies in one or two rooms, she said. When mom comes in

An artist’s rendering of what the new private single family rooms will look like when completed.

to breastfeed or hold her baby, it’s in this crowded space. In addition, many babies are sensitive to noise and a private room can eliminate that crying baby in the next bed, she said. The new unit will still have 10 beds in addition to all of the necessary technology like cardiac monitors, oxygen systems and a warmer, incubator or open crib. The difference is that the private rooms will also feature a couch that converts to a bed,

glider rocking chair, family space, microwave and television, said Freeman. There is a central monitor for all of the rooms. “We want to support having the family here,” she said. In addition to eliminating noisy neighbors, the benefit of having a private room is a more comfortable setting for what is called “kangaroo care” or skin-to-skin contact that is recommended for all babies and especially for premature ones, she added. Kangaroo

care can be difficult for moms in a group setting like a traditional neonatal unit. Instead of visiting her baby for hourlong periods of time, a mom will be able to spend all her time with her baby while her child still receives the level of care needed. “It’s huge for us because families can stay here with us,” she said. The family-centered design is a trend and there is research that supports moving to this type of setup, said Freeman. At this time, phase one of the project is finished and the second phase should be complete in fall 2014. Individual beds for the babies in the unit are often called “nests.” The interior of the space plays off of that term, with a bird theme featuring naturallooking materials and a bright painting on the exterior, said Freeman. “The outside of the center is gorgeous,” she said. The laminate on the floors also resembles twigs or bamboo. In addition to the benefit of having family nearby these tiny patients, Freeman predicts that leaving the hospital support may be easier for the family. “The transition to home would be easier because of the home environment here.”

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Report: Watch use of antibiotics APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com

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12 THE JOURNAL | NOVEMBER 29, 2013

Antibiotics – once the miracle cure for all sorts of infections – are becoming a less effective tool because of increasing drug resistance. Nearly 10 million children can suffer side effects like diarrhea and rashes from antibiotics that cannot help infections caused by viruses, including ear infections, common colds, sinus infections and sore throats, according to a recently released report by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Academy of Pediatrics. Using antibiotics to treat infections that will not respond to them fuels antibiotic resistance, where sensitive bacteria either are killed and the stronger survive – or they evolve and eliminate the effectiveness of the drug treatment. The new report, an update from 1998 recommendations, outlines clinical criteria for doctors to use regarding specific symptoms and their duration. The guidelines will hopefully reduce the number of antibiotic prescriptions, “giving bacteria fewer chances to become resistant and lowering children’s risk of side effects,” said the CDC. Telling the difference between a viral and bacterial upper respiratory tract infection can be very difficult, according to the report. Guidelines for ear infections, sinus infections and sore throats encourage doctors to weigh the benefits versus harms of antibiotics and prescribe judiciously. About half of ear infections clear up on their own without antibiotics, the report’s authors said. Should a doctor choose to use antibiotics, the report recommends using the one that will be the most effective in the shortest time needed. Pressure from parents can also contribute to overuse, according to a Pediatrics study: Doctors prescribe antibiotics 62 percent of the time if they perceive parents expect them and 7 percent of the time if they feel parents do not expect them. According to a September 2013


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C I N E M A S as prescribed we can preserve these lifesaving drugs and avoid entering a post-antibiotic era.” The agency’s 2013 Threat Report lists three urgent threats that could become widespread, 12 serious that can worsen without monitoring and three concerning antibiotic-resistant infections.

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NOVEMBER 29, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 13


JOURNAL NEWS

Because, Santa said so.

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14 THE JOURNAL | NOVEMBER 29, 2013

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JOURNAL NEWS

Ten at the Top grants provide seed funds for arts

Basics & 2014 Updates to the Probate Procedures from Judge Debora Faulkner Thursday, December 5, 2013

8:30am: Light Breakfast & Networking | 9–11am: Program Mackey Mortuary, 311 Century Drive, 291 Bypass at I-385, Greenville, SC

APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com

Important documents you need in your estate plan

Overview of the probate process

What is needed to start the probate process

What to do to avoid probate

Recent changes to the Probate Code

Q&A

Public is welcome. No Fee. Breakfast, program and SW CEU’s compliments of Mackey Mortuary.

RSVP by Tuesday, December 3 to Kathryn Helt, khelt@stei.com or 864.325.3526

David Edwards, CEO and president of Greenville Spartanburg International Airport, right, with Irv Welling after receiving the 2013 Welling Award for Collaboration at the Our Upstate Vision/Ten at the Top Forum.

selected as the 2013 recipient of TATT’s Welling Award for Collaboration. The award is given in honor of the organization’s founding chairman, Irv Welling, who served 2005-2011. Welling presented the award to Dave Edwards, president and CEO of the Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport. The Welling Award recognizes individuals, businesses or organizations that have worked to develop and foster regional collaborations that help make the Upstate a great place to do business, raise a family, live and learn. “The GreenvilleSpartanburg International Airport was started more than 50 years ago as a result of regional collaboration and has grown into such an important component of our region because it continues today to be a great From left: Recipients of the first Hughes Investments Elevate Upstate example of regional Grants – Red Watson, City of Greer; Arlene Young, City of Anderson; and Suzette Cross, Blue Ridge Arts Council – with Phil Hughes (right) at partnerships,” Welling said. the Our Upstate Vision/Ten at the Top Forum.

Offering affordable, compassionate care to the Upstate since 1872

© 2013 STEI

Last week, Ten at the Top (TATT), an organization that supports collaboration, partnerships and planning in the Upstate’s 10-county region, announced the recipients of the first Hughes Investments Elevate Upstate Community Vibrancy Grants. Five finalists were chosen among 30 applicants for two grants funded through Hughes Investments, which will contribute $10,000 per year over the next five years. Finalists, with an additional recipient, were selected at the recent Our Upstate Vision/Ten at the Top Forum. Chosen were the city of Anderson’s project to transform utility and traffic signal boxes into public art based on the book “Little Wren Lost and the Teakettle Call,” along with an International Destination Festival hosted by the City of Greer. In addition, sponsor Phil Hughes announced a surprise third recipient as Blue Ridge Arts Council of Seneca. Its project – 3 Part Public Art – will feature murals, interactive sculptures and custom street furniture. “The Elevate Upstate Community Vibrancy Grants are a great opportunity to provide seed funds to help communities increase the vibrancy and sense of place within their community,” said Ten at the Top Executive Director Dean Hybl. In addition, the Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport was

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NOVEMBER 29, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 15


JOURNAL NEWS

TreesGreenville Holiday Cards

Mauldin sign ordinance approved

Available online today at www.treesgreenville.org

sjackson@communityjournals.com

The 2013 Holiday Tree Greeting Card features Winter at Max Patch, photograph © Bill Robertson, 2009. www.brphoto.net.

16 THE JOURNAL | NOVEMBER 29, 2013

SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

The culmination of a year’s work received final approval when Mauldin City Council approved a “significant comprehensive revision” of the city’s sign ordinance last week. The last comprehensive update to the city’s sign ordinance was in 1999. The goal of the new ordinance is to provide additional clarity to existing standards while making the new ordinance more “user-friendly” with added definitions. According to a report from Kim Hammel, business and development services director, city staff conducted extensive research of other municipal codes, coordinated with code enforcement staff to address enforcement and interpretation concerns, and did field work to evaluate existing signage in the city and assemble photos of existing signage to illustrate signage concepts. After a first reading of the new or-

dinance in October raised several questions about enforcement and fees and A-frame signs, Mauldin city staff worked with the public and local business owners to provide additional clarification. In the new ordinance, a written warning will first be given for anyone not in compliance. If the violation has not been corrected within the given time frame, a formal written citation will be served with a penalty fee and a date to appear in Mauldin Municipal Court. For abandoned signs, language was changed to increase the time frame to 180 days before those signs need to come down, which is consistent with the “Change of Use” zoning requirement for site compliance. The new ordinance will also allow an A-frame sign to be classified as an incidental sign if it meets specific size, location and design standards. Other language in the ordinance addressed window signage and temporary advertising sign fees.


Limo company sues city City’s ordinance regulating taxis challenged CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com A company that has operated a limo service in Greenville since 2010 but has been denied a business license to operate a taxicab service has sued the city of Greenville. In the lawsuit, VIP Limo alleges the city notified the company’s lawyer that it would deny the renewal of the company’s business license because it asserted VIP Limo drivers were operating a taxi service. The city limits the number of cabs that can operate in the city. The lawsuit said VIP Limo has been operating with both limousines and sedans in the city since its business license was issued in 2010. The lawsuit said limo charges are based on an hourly rate and sedans are charged based on a flat fee or pre-agreed price

based on expected mileage, according to the lawsuit. Neither limos nor sedans pick up customers unless they have called in advance to schedule the service, the lawsuit said. The lawsuit alleges the city has stopped and harassed VIP Limo drivers and its customers. The lawsuit alleges the city’s ordinance regulating cabs is unconstitutional. The company seeks a declaratory judgment that the ordinance is unconstitutional and a permanent injunction barring enforcement as well as damages. The lawsuit was originally filed in the Greenville County Court of Common Pleas but was transferred to federal court. In its answer, the city said the plaintiffs have failed to exhaust their administrative remedies and the lawsuit should be dismissed. The city is also asking for the court to enjoin the plaintiffs from continuing to operate a taxicab service within the city limits without an appropriate business license.

JOURNAL NEWS

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NOVEMBER 29, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 17


JOURNAL NEWS

Astronaut Duke to speak CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Former South Carolina resident Charles Duke, the 10th of only a dozen astronauts to walk on the moon, will speak in Greenville on Dec. 5. The talk, “A Walk on the Moon,” is part of a special fundraiser for the Upcountry History Museum. Duke walked on the moon during the Apollo 16 mission in 1972. Apollo 16 was the 10th manned mission of the Apollo space program, the fifth to land on the moon and the first to land in the lunar highlands. Duke, who grew up in Lancaster, was the lunar module pilot for the mission and he, along with Commander John Young, spent a record 71 hours and 14 minutes on the moon. While there, Duke and Young placed and activated scientific equipment on the moon surface, conducted experiments and collected nearly 213 pounds of moon rock and soil samples. Duke filmed the only pictures ever made of Rover-2, the lunar car, in action. He was also the first person to eat grits in space.

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18 THE JOURNAL | NOVEMBER 29, 2013

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Duke served as support crew for the flight of Apollo 11 and was the backup lunar module pilot on the Apollo 13 and 17 missions. Tickets for “A Walk on the Moon” are $75 per person or $125 per couple for members of the museum. Proceeds will go to the museum’s general fund. The event includes a 7 p.m. reception with heavy hors d’oeuvers. The talk begins at 8 p.m. Tickets are available on the history museum’s website, upcountryhistory. org, or by calling 864-467-3100.


Photo Provided

JOURNAL COMMUNITY

It’s Not Too Late to Give!

Christmas on Miracle Hill Attn: Lenora Cuddy 211 Morningwood Lane, P iedmont, SC 29673

Christmas on Lenora Cuddy gathers holiday cheer for Miracle Hill Children’s Home APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com

W

While driving in Pickens County nearly two decades ago, Lenora Cuddy passed a sign for Miracle Hill Children’s Home and thought, “In my small, sheltered world, I didn’t know there were still children’s homes out there, never mind one that was so close.” The Miracle Hill Children’s Home dates back to 1958 and serves children birth to 18 years old with crisis and long-term care. When she stopped to talk to the home’s director, she said, “I realized that there are a lot of little children who have nothing – and they’re right in our own backyard. It just tugged

at my heart.” So she started an effort to provide Christmas gifts for the kids. At first it was small and the children asked for basics: shoes, socks and hair bows. The next year, she asked for wish lists with the presents they wanted most. Cuddy began raising money by selling candy canes in the mall for $1 each. Since then, support for her program has grown, and will deliver Christmas wishes for 35 children this year. MIRACLE HILL continued on PG 20

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said. “She works tirelessly to get the kids the things they ask for.” Support has steadily increased – so much so that over the last three years, Cuddy has not had to use her own funds to buy items, she said. And despite the economic downturn, support didn’t suffer. “I think people understand that we can all look around and find somebody that has less than we do, if we’re really honest,” she said. “I think people want to have a generous heart.” When delivery day arrives, a group of volunteers (including children) dress up as reindeer, Frosty the Snowman or elves to visit Miracle Hill. “It’s important for CUDDY children to help deliver the gifts,” she said. There are also children’s groups who raise funds. And there’s some nervous energy that accompanies the delivery, she said, “I hold GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Volunteers help to spend $300 to $400 on each child, and some go out at midnight on Black Friday. “They work themselves into a frenzy to get the biggest bang for our buck,” Cuddy said. Cuddy gets a special list that includes the “big gift” that a parent would normally buy each Christmas, said Kris Blackman, volunteer coordinator for Miracle Hill Children’s Home. The gifts have ranged from “Phantom of the Opera” tickets and electronics to a signed NASCAR team jacket and cooking lessons. Cuddy travels around the region in her day job as owner of Simply Safety, a safety consulting firm, and director of safety and training for Engineered Systems. She has the opportunity to ask for support and volunteers during the visits, which have offered her a platform to introduce “the best part of me,” Cuddy said. Several companies, including Eastern Industrial Supplies and Engineered Systems, have been big supporters along with multiple families and individuals, she said. In November, Cuddy gears up for the busy time and sends out a letter asking for donations and collects wish lists from Miracle Hill. They use the donations LENORA to go shopping, buying some backup gifts for new arrivals. If a child arrives just days before Cuddy’s delivery, “I could give Lenora a list and it would be done,” Blackman

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Cuddy’s program will deliver Christmas wishes for 35 children this year with the help of volunteers. When delivery day arrives, a group of volunteers (including children) dress up as reindeer, Frosty the Snowman or elves to visit Miracle Hill.

my breath until the last gift rolls off [the trailer]. But we never leave there with dry eyes and an empty heart.” Cuddy said the effort has been a true ministry for her. “They’re so overwhelmed by the thought that someone would think of them that they give back more than I give.” While she is marking 20 years of delivering Christmas gifts, Cuddy said she wants it to continue. “I hope it will live on long after I’m gone because I’m not Christmas on Miracle Hill, it’s the volunteers.” And though Christmas is weeks away, she’s still taking donations, Cuddy said. “There’s never a bad time to give.” Throughout the year, volunteers have also worked on other projects, including refurbishing a deck and yard grading for one of the cottages. Blackman sums up the relationship between Cuddy and the children’s home: “She is our Christmas angel and a dear, dear friend to the ministry.”


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

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residential, commercial and healthcare · www.panageries.com 864.250.0021 NOVEMBER 29, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 21


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Meals on Wheels feeds animal companions, too JEANNE PUTNAM | CONTRIBUTOR

jputnam@communityjournals.com

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Meals on Wheels is well known for delivering food to shut-ins, the disabled and caregivers of those who cannot leave their homes. However, the organization also reaches out to the furry companions of its client base in each community it serves. Meals on Wheels of Greenville has multiple partners that make the pet food program happen each month, said Julie Accetta, director of community relations for Meals on Wheels Greenville. “We have a grant from Banfield Charitable Trust, who also supports other pet food programs around the country. We also have kids such as the Girl Scouts who will do pet food drives.” The program, which began in 2003, came about when the volunteers brought to the organizations’ attention that recipients of food were not eating their food, but giving it to the pets. “We did want them to make that decision,” said Accetta. So the program,

Donations and volunteer time help keep the Meals on Wheels pet food program going.

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hold limit. In Greer, Meals on Wheels runs through Greer Community Ministries. According to Linda Teems, Meals on Wheels coordinator, when they interview new clients they offer pet food for one dog or one cat per household so that the family can still feed its pet without dipping into their food or giving the animal away. “Their animals are their family,” said Teems. “They would easily give up their own food to feed their pets.” The nonprofit currently serves 40 families with pets out of the 300 on their list. The food goes out every Tuesday with a rotation so that each recipient gets enough food to last three to four weeks, said Teems. Greer Community Ministries relies primarily on community donations, but does hold food drives throughout the year by businesses such as Greer FOR MEALS ON WHEELS GREENVILLE: 15 Oregon St. Greenville 864-233-6565

Memorial Hospital, said Teems. In addition to Meals on Wheels Greenville and Greer Community Ministries, volunteer Catherine Jacobson of Simpsonville started her own donation center for the pet food program in May 2006 when she connected with Meals on Wheels. “One day a fellow animal buddy called and asked me to pick up pet food and give it to Meals on Wheels at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church,” said Jacobson. “After that I talked to Greenville and volunteered to spearhead the pet food program in Simpsonville, Fountain Inn and Fork Shoals.” Jacobson and husband Bill funded the program the first year. The second year they had a yard sale fundraiser, which featured a cutest pet picture contest, dog and cat treats, and coffee and water for free. She held the last yard sale in 2010 and made $2,800 on

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average from the sales. Even so, Jacobson said that she could not have made it without donations from Saluda River Pet Food and Supply Center in Simpsonville’s bin. Jacobson is currently serving 19 dogs, seven cats, and one bird. She not only gives out pet food, but treats and toys around the holidays, and has donated pet beds, collars, and harnesses as well. In addition, she and her husband have helped pay for various medical treatments for the pets in need, ranging from wellness visits to the vet to some pet surgeries. She also has made arrangements for a mobile groomer to go on site and wash and groom dogs if she is alerted by one of her volunteers. Jacobson says she does this because “anybody could be in a situation where they could not afford to feed their animals.”

FOR SIMPSONVILLE PET FOOD PROJECT: Saluda River Pet Food & Supply Center 902 South St. Simpsonville 864-962-8200

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NOVEMBER 29, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 23


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

GHS, St. Francis offer holiday health tips

‘Tis the Season

BENJAMIN JEFFERS | CONTRIBUTOR

bjeffers@communityjournals.com

for our fresh selection of Christmas wreaths, garlands, and cut Frasier Fir trees!

Staying strong around all the pies, cookies and pumpkin rolls this time of year can be difficult. However, Bon Secours St. Francis Health System and Greenville Health System have provided some plans for their employees to stay healthy this holiday season. St. Francis has a Maintain, No Gain competition to help employees maintain their weight from Thanksgiving to New Year’s Day. The hospital offers rnamental ironwork in the deep Southpublic health programs throughout the year, but Maintain, No Gain is direflected the influence of blacksmiths, throughrected time, at employees. Participants weigh in before Thanksforging folk art into gates, balconies, and grills. giving and again at the beginning of The pieces in this Collection are January. Employees who stay within two pounds of their original weight reminiscent of that ironwork. will be eligible for a prize drawing. “It’s a fun thing that helps people not to go crazy during the holidays,” The intricate scroll designs are a tributesaid Helen Rowland, the competition’s coordinator. She said employees of St. to the skill of artisans in the past who wrought Francis have expressed appreciation that the hospital is interested in probeauty from the iron in their forges. These clean, 1135 S. Pleasantburg Dr | M-Sat 8-5:30 viding them with plans to stay healthy. distinct lines Street show as in jewelry Between Cleveland andwell Mauldin Rd as they did St. Francis dietician Johanna Brandon C111J

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said, “People just need to be accountable to someone.” This competition, she said, helps keep people accountable by emailing them tips on controlling portion size and what foods to eat. GHS, the county’s largest employer, provides holiday health programs to its employees as well. Before Thanksgiving, GHS offered holiday eating and exercise classes and a weight management class. GHS health educator Samantha Hooper said the classes give practical advice on how to “keep traditions but make them better.” Hooper said families can work together to stay healthy by going on 10-30 minute walks and keeping track of what they eat. In addition to the holiday classes, GHS offers 12-week programs for the public and employees during the entire year. Jane Witowski, a program manager at GHS, participated in one of these programs and said she appreciates “that my employer cared about me enough to give me this opportunity.” Witowski said she’s struggled with weight issues, but through the program has learned to take control of her life. She said she has also been able to take the tools she’s learned and apply them to the holidays.

A health program at GHS helped Jane Witowski in her struggle with weight issues.

Some practical advice she gives for staying healthy during this season is keeping a food journal. “I don’t surprise myself by what I eat,” she said. Also, when out shopping, she said people can incorporate exercise by taking an additional 15 minutes to walk the perimeter of the mall. Living a healthy life requires a personal commitment, she said. “The gift of health is a gift that no one else can give me.”


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Rick Perry to speak in Greenville PURCHASE TICKETS HERE http://blueridgecouncil.kintera.org/RickPerrySaluteToScouting or contact our Director of Development, Grayson Kelly at 864-556-3706 or grayson.kelly@scouting.org

Texas Gov. Rick Perry will speak on Dec. 4 at noon at the Poinsett Club ABOUT RICK PERRY— in Greenville in Governor a benefi t for the Blue Current of Texas, former Presidential Candidate and recipient Ridge Council of the Boy Scouts of of Distinquished Eagle Scout Award America. All proceeds from this event will the nearly 11,500 of “We are benefit ecstatic toyouthwelcome Gov. the Blue Ridge Council, Boy Scouts of America, a 501(c)3 non-profit Perry for this fi rst trip back to the Uporganization. state following his run for president in Goods and services of approximately $25 per the most recent presidential primary,” person were received by this contribution. said Mike Butler, Blue Ridge Council CEO, in a release. Perry is a recipient of the Distin-

guished Eagle Scout Award. He is also the author of “On My Honor: Why the American Values of the Boy Scouts Are Worth Fighting For.” Tickets are $75 Perry for general admission and lunch; $250 for patron-level sponsorships,

which include a private reception and lunch; $1,000 for Host Committee, which includes a private reception and lunch for two; and $2,500 for platinum sponsor, which includes a private reception, photo and lunch for four. To purchase tickets, visit blueridgecouncil.kintera.org/RickPerrySalutetoScouting or contact the Blue Ridge Council development director, Grayson Kelly, at grayson.kelly@scouting. org or at 864-556-3706.

South Carolina Charities Inc. has announced the 24 charities to be represented at BMW Charity ProAm presented by SYNNEX Corporation. The tournament provides risk-free opportunities for the charities to earn funds through three programs: ticket sales, volunteer recruitment and one-day pro-am team sales. For more information about fundraising, contact Mike Ivester at mivester@sccharities.org. For information about the tournament and a complete list of the charities, visit bmwcharitygolf.com.

Rejoice in the Glory of Christ’s Birth Hanging of the Greens Sunday, December 1 8:45 AM (Non-Traditional - Sisk Hall) 11:00 AM (Traditional - Sanctuary)

Wednesday Advent “Message & Music” Series 12:00 Noon (Memorial Chapel) $5 lunch after service

December 4 - Rev. Michael Turner Pastor Advent UMC

December 11 - Rev. Jim Patterson Retired UMC Pastor

December 18 - Rev. Debra Griffis-Woodberry Pastor Disciples UMC

K. Lee Scott’s Christmas Cantata: the inCarnation

Chancel Choir with Members of the Greenville Symphony Sunday, December 8 – 9:00 AM & 11:00 AM (Traditional - Sanctuary)

Christmas Eve Services with Communion

12:00 Noon (Traditional - Memorial Chapel) 3:45 PM (Non-Traditional - Sisk Hall) 5:30 PM (Traditional - Sanctuary) 10:00 PM (Traditional - Sanctuary) Nursery available for the 5:30 PM service

Buncombe Street United Methodist Church In Downtown Greenville www.bsumc.com | 864.232.7341 Journal_11.29.13

NOVEMBER 29, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 25


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Close crafting Indie Craft Parade launches monthly makers’ events

SO YOU KNOW INDIE CRAFT PARADE WORKSHOPS Dec. 5 – Winter Wreath with Julie Dodds of Willow Florals

Get up, Get out, Get Ziked! ® APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com

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Handmade is coming back in a big way. Members of the makers’ movement, those who make items by hand, gather annually for the Indie Craft Parade in September to showcase their wares: everything from paper craft and visual art to fiber art and jewelry. To encourage local interest in making and handcrafting, the Indie Craft Parade has launched a new series of monthly workshops for those who want to learn a way to create. The workshops, which range from holiday wreath making and knitting to bookmaking and home brewing, are designed in part to introduce people to a new skill, said Elizabeth Ramos, an Indie Craft Parade organizer. They can also allow crafters to connect, she said. “We want to really encourage people in Greenville to start making,” she said. Workshops encompass a range of interests, and organizers are testing them out over one year to determine if they should continue, she said. “We wanted to hit a nice range of people with a range of interests.” The workshops will be taught by prior annual festival participants. Interest is already high, Ramos said. A recent paper craft workshop sold out and organizers added another day to the upcoming wreath-making event in early December. At the paper workshop, participants stayed the entire three hours, she said, and one attendee commented at the scattered materials and glitter, “Peo-

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Feb. 6 – Learn to Knit with Deb Potter of Merciful Hearts Farm March 22 – iPhone Photography with Jivan Dave April 8 – Succulent Terrarium with Amy Walcher of Urban Digs May – Bookmaking with Cindy Leaders of Useful Books July – Homebrewing 101 with Ben Alier and Grapes and Grains

OTHER INDIE CRAFT PARADE EVENTS Dec. 7 – Indie Craft Parade Holiday Fair Jan. 18 – Kids’ Maker Faire with The Children’s Museum of the Upstate March 1 – The Makers Summit June – Etsy Global Craft Party

ple need to be given license to make a mess and be creative.” Each event is limited to between 16 to 30 people, depending on the subject and difficulty, said Ramos. A small group allows for crafters to get individual attention from the instructor and offers participants the opportunity to connect on a smaller scale, she said. “The annual event is big and a little overwhelming,” she added. This year’s main event drew 6,500 people and featured 76 artists, she said. All of the workshops are entry-level, and anyone can take part, Ramos said. “We want people to really participate and get their hands dirty.” For more information and to register, visit indiecraftparade.com/events.

If you live in Greenville or Laurens County and your child will be 6 years old in December, bring your child’s birth certificate to the Pepsi Plant and receive a FREE Pepsi Birthday Party Package!

Listen to the Ellis and Bradley Show on 100.5 WSSL or visit www.wsslfm.com for more details!

26 THE JOURNAL | NOVEMBER 29, 2013

CCJR

December 2nd-6th, Mon.- Fri. 1pm-5pm & December 7th, Sat. 10am-12pm 751 State Park Road, Greenville, SC • 864-672-2060 ext.2057 Crafters make holiday garlands at an Indie Craft Parade workshop at Anthropologie in downtown.


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NOVEMBER 29, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 27


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Newtown inspires Festival of Trees wine label CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com The Newtown, Conn., that Cheryl Childers knows is a stark contrast to the Newtown, Conn., most people know. Instead of the site of a tragic shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary that left 20 children and six staff members dead, Childers remembers a peaceful, sleepy little dairy town. Childers turned her childhood memories of Newtown into an award-winning Festival of Trees wine label design. The Festival of Trees, a fundraiser for the St. Francis Foundation, runs from Dec. 1 through Jan. 1. “Growing up, there were many nights when it would snow all night, and I remember waking up to a fresh clean blanket of white,” said Childers. “The trees were dark and bare contrasted by the stark white of untouched snow. I always wanted to somehow keep the snow pristine.” Childers is a licensed medical social worker with Bon Secours St. Francis Health System and works in Open Arms Hospice McCall Hospice House. “I was thinking back to that peaceful image in my mind when I created this piece,” she said. Childers works in various types of mediums but prefers oils. She said creating art is therapy. “When I create artwork, the world around me goes

Cheryl Childers' award-winning Festival of Trees wine label was inspired by her childhood memories of Newtown, Conn.

away, and it’s just me and the canvas,” she said. “I have had rheumatoid arthritis since I was 15, and as a teen I found that when I worked on a piece, I felt no pain. Painting allows me to find freedom in the stress of day-to-day life. It takes time to create art, but I’ve learned no matter how busy I get, there is great value in taking the time to utilize my creative side. Creativity is essential to me to help me find balance in a tilted world.”

The Latest Designer Finds Make Great Gifts

NOV. 30

The Festival of Trees features trees decorated by local schoolchildren, professional designers, local businesses and nonprofits. The trees can be viewed at three downtown Greenville hotels – the Hyatt on North Main Street, the Courtyard Marriott on South Main Street and the Hampton Inn & Suites at Riverplace. The official Festival of Trees kick-off party, “Martinis and Mistletoe,” is on Dec. 5 from 7 to 9 p.m. The event features a silent auction, cocktails, hors d’oeuvres and a live jazz band. Tickets are $50. A teddy bear luncheon will be held Dec. 7 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. The event will feature a holiday play by the Wade Hampton High drama class and holiday crafts. Those who bring a new stuffed animal will get a free photo with Santa. Tickets are $15 for adults and $10 for children ages four to 12. Children 3 and under will be admitted free. A holiday brunch will be held Dec. 8 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tickets are $35 for adults, $15 for children ages six to 12. Children 5 or under eat free. Tickets can be purchased at stfrancisfoundation. com. The private-label wine can be ordered from the St. Francis Foundation website. It is available in cabernet sauvignon, pinot noir and pinot grigio. The wine is $22 a bottle or $264 per case. Forty percent of the sale price will go to the foundation and support the Mack Pazdan Neonatal Care Center.

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Comedy fundraiser to feature Dave Coulier The Greenville County Disabilities and Special Needs Board (GCDSN) will hold a familyfriendly comedy night fundraiser on Feb. 20, 2014, featuring comedi- Coulier an Dave Coulier. Local comedian Eric Hunter will open the performance. Coulier is best known for his role as Joey for eight seasons on the sitcom “Full House.” He has also done extensive voice work for television and was host of “America’s Funniest People.” Coulier has been part of the recent Clean Guys of Comedy series along with Jamie Kennedy, Heather Mc-

JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Donald, Ralph Harris and Andy Hendrickson. The comedy fundraiser will be held at the Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre and proceeds will benefit Hunter the agency that serves Greenville County residents with developmental disabilities, autism, and head and spinal cord injuries. “This our first foray into a major event for the Disabilities Board and we hope to make the comedy night an annual event. It will be fun and clean humor for everyone’s enjoyment,” said GCDSNB Executive Director John Cocciolone.

SO YOU KNOW Tickets are $45 and sponsors are needed for the event. To become a sponsor, contact John Cocciolone at 864-451-1314 or jcocciolone@gcdsnb.org. For event information, call 864-679-0220.

NOV. 30 thanks for supporting this small business!

Goldie Blox Building games for girls to inspire future engineers Augusta Commons • 2222 Augusta St, Greenville 864.232.4731 • www.elephantstrunktoys.com NOVEMBER 29, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 29


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OUR SCHOOLS

ACTIVITIES, AWARDS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Langston Charter Middle School is offering two science camps, Lego Robotics – Level One and Lego Sumo, during the school’s winter break. The camps will be offered Dec. 30-Jan. 3. The cost of each camp is $100 and camps are open to all area youth in grades 4-8. Contact David Leeke at dleeke@langstoncharter.org for more information or to register.

Three Upstate universities – Bob Jones University, Furman University and North Greenville University – competed in the Saving Lives Together blood drive to help the Blood Connection collect 1,261 units of blood. Each university sponsored a drive to see which student body could get the largest percentage of their students to donate. BJU had 28.2 percent of its student body participate. North Greenville and Furman had 8.6 and 3.2 percent of their student bodies participate respectively. Four Blue Ridge High School senior student-athletes have signed National Letters of Intent to play athletics at the collegiate level. Girls basketball guard Ross Mathis has signed with Lincoln Memorial University. Pitcher and outfielder John Reynolds and left-handed pitcher Robert Westenreider have both signed to play baseball at Newberry College. Infielder Alex Williams has signed to play baseball at Spartanburg Methodist College. Langston Charter Middle School sixth-graders Sarah Stein, Jaeyden Hill-Mims, Isabel Welton and Emma McKay enjoy a field trip at Roper Mountain Science Center where they learned about hurricanes, energy and astronomy.

Singer and songwriter Jenn Bostic recently returned to Washington Center for an encore concert to entertain the students and staff. Washington Center students participated by playing instruments, moving, clapping and singing and, during the “Superstar” song, waving special stars that they each made. A group of dedicated fans also accompanied her on stage as backup singers. The students prepared for the event by studying the artist and her work during their music class with teacher Julie Dail.

The author of the “Sammy the Wonder Dachshund” series, Jonathan Miller, recently visited Ellen Woodside Elementary to talk to students about the importance of writing. Miller shared his writing and illustrating methods with students in all grade levels. He also promoted his newest book, “The Adventures of Sammy the Wonder Dachshund: Sammy in Space.” The Bob Jones University Bruins women’s soccer team became the first team in BJU history to win a National Christian College Athletic Association National Championship. The team beat Clearwater Christian College, the defending Division II national champion, by a score of 1-0. BJU advanced to the championship game by defeating two other teams, including the top-ranked Providence University College.  

Shannon Forest Christian School raised nearly $300 during its Rice Bowls service project. The money will help provide more than 1,100 meals to orphaned children around the world. Also, students in the Shannon Forest theory class were chosen to Skype live with Eric Whitacre, a renowned composer and Grammy Award winner. Whitacre called from London and shared some of his poetry and some works of Charles Anthony Silvestri. St. Anthony of Padua Catholic School recently celebrated the completion and opening of a new school library. After a brief ceremony recognizing the contributions and efforts to get the library ready, sixth-graders were invited to be the first students to browse the library and check out the first books.

The J.L. Mann girls cross-country team won second place in the recent 4A State meet in Columbia. Team members include Ellen Canniff, Anna Leigh Prochaska, Sequoia Brown, Abby Cason, Morgan Moseley, Elizabeth Morse, Virginia Cook and Alexus Harris. The team is led by coach Jackie Borowicz.

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY F PH REE OT OS !

OUR SCHOOLS

ACTIVITIES, AWARDS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

International educator and author Howard Eaton visited the Upstate to speak about cognitive training for students with learning disabilities. Eaton spoke to parents and educators at Greenville Technical College. He then visited Camperdown Academy and Our Lady of the Rosary schools, which both offer the Arrowsmith Program. Eaton is a proponent of the program, which strengthens academic potential by utilizing repetitive exercises to retrain the brain. From left, back row - Riley Wanser, Robert Hackl, Mandy Blanch, Howard Eaton, Deana Gasque, Brice Violette, and Garrett Baur. From left, front row - Isabelle Johnson, Ethan Hargrove, Mac Brown, Thomas Biediger, Mica Bailey, Collin Traynham, Jack Barrett and Graham Malo.

Santa is coming to Pickwick! Saturday, December 7 11 am - 2 pm

Amy Garbe’s Washington Center class is taking an active role in the community by volunteering with Meals on Wheels Greenville, which delivers hot meals to seniors. Students help by counting out the number of meals to pick up, packing up all food and drinks for delivery and personally delivering the meals. Washington Center student Britney Herbert delivers a hot meal as a volunteer for Meals on Wheels Greenville.

3219 Augusta St., Greenville • M-F 9-6; Sat. 9-3 • 864-277-4180 • ThePickwick.net

The Holiday Honor Card AN ALTERNATIVE HOLIDAY GIFT

Bob Jones Academy Elementary School students recently prepared ornaments for the Festival of Trees at the Hyatt Regency and Baptist Easley Hospital. Pictured is Katie Davis of Greenville, a fifth-grader at BJA.

Susan Babb’s third-grade history class at Mitchell Road Christian Academy investigated Native American artifacts and speculated on the uses of each artifact. They will be continuing their study of Native Americans in South Carolina through December.

 St. Anthony of Padua Catholic School is the recipient of Greenville’s Indie Craft Parade annual scholarship award. The award will be used to bring in students to St. Anthony’s After School Arts Club where they will have the opportunity to learn from Indie Craft Parade artists. The program will focus on ways to incorporate organic and found objects as participants explore their abilities as young artists.

In the Heart of Greenville Painting by local artist, Jim Reel What better way to show that you care during the holiday season than to honor family, friends, and business associates by making a gift to those less fortunate in our community. Your gift of at least $5 per card to United Ministries will provide assistance to someone who truly needs the kind of support that your donation will provide.

To place your order, please contact Teresa Skinner, Director of Development, at 864-335-2614.

Submit entries community@communityjournals.com.

606 Pendleton Street | Greenville | 864.232.6463 | www.united-ministries.org

NOVEMBER 29, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 31


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OUR COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY NEWS, EVENTS AND HAPPENINGS

On Nov. 29, the opening ceremony of the United Community Bank Ice on Main skating season takes place. The rink is located next to the Courtyard Marriott and Greenville City Hall on the Village Green at Main at Broad, 50 W. Broad St., Greenville. The season will run through Jan. 20, 2014. Admission is $10 per adult and $8 per child (12 and under), which includes skate rental. Details can be found at iceonmain.com. On Dec. 12 at 7 p.m. Year of Altruism and Congregation Beth Israel present a workshop featuring Danny Siegel, author, teacher, “Johnny Appleseed of Altruism,” and stand-up comedian. He will deliver a community-wide workshop for religious educators and youth workers on how to seamlessly integrate altruism projects into curriculum, class activities and youth programming. This is the first time that the Upstate will be bringing together a diversity of denominations, faith communities, congregations and creeds for the express purpose of stimulating the community’s young people to embrace altruism. The event will take place at Greenville First Baptist Church and is free to attend with refreshments served. Send reservations to ww.gleich@ gmail.com. Greenville Natural Health Center’s winter film series continues on Dec. 12, 6 p.m., with the documentary “The Power of Forgiveness.” The free film and discussion presented by Complete Life Coaching will be held at Greenville Natural Health Center, 1901 Laurens Road, Suite E. Seating is limited; call 864370-1140 to reserve a seat. “A Journey to Bethlehem… An Ancient Path to Christmas” will be presented by Greenville Church of the Nazarene at 1201 Haywood Road, on Dec. 7 and 8. Gates are open 5:30-8:30 p.m. each evening. The event is free and attendees are encouraged to arrive early. For more information, visit ajourneytobethlehem.com or call 864-233-4890. Virginia College in Greenville will host a friends-and-family open house for former, current and prospective students and the community on Dec. 7, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., at 78 Global Drive, Suite 200. Attendees are also invited to help spread holiday cheer by collecting Toys for Tots and non-perishable items for local families in need.

fts & Unique Gifts

Fiction Addiction will host story time readings at 10:30 a.m. on Dec. 19 for the picture book “Pete the Cat Saves Christmas” by Eric Litwin, and Dec. 26 for the picture book “Angelina Ballerina” by Katharine Holabird. For more information, call 864-675-0540.

The

The Eighth Annual Blue Ridge Community Blood Drive, hosted by the Blue Ridge High School Air Force Junior ROTC, SC-20023, will take place Dec. 13, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. At least 150 units of blood need to be collected in the multipurpose room. Visitors will sign in once inside the multipurpose room located in the rear of the school. Participants must be in good health, weigh at least 110 pounds and be at least 17 years old (16 years old with written approval from a parent or guardian).

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Dec.6th, 5:00-8:00pm

Shop with us this weekend!

Nancy Roth/Joe Ewing Antiques Trade Street Gallery Coffeehouse La Bouteille Wine & Beer Boutique, Main Street Antiques, The Bookshelf, A Better Deal, The Village Book Shoppe

32 THE JOURNAL | NOVEMBER 29, 2013

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A Child’s Haven will hold its annual Holiday Benefit Breakfast on Dec. 6, 7:15 a.m., at Embassy Suites, Greenville. Guest speaker will be Sue Mitchell, a key figure in the best-selling book “The Blind Side” and in the Oscar-nominated movie of the same title. The event is the primary fundraising event for operating funds for the agency that provides therapeutic intervention and prevention services for families and their young children who experience developmental delays as a result of abuse, neglect or poverty.  For more information on sponsorships or to buy tickets, email Mitchell ruthc@achildshaven.org or call 864-298-0025, ext. 16. 


OUR COMMUNITY

JOURNAL COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY NEWS, EVENTS AND HAPPENINGS

Grammy-nominated NewSong brings their Very Merry Christmas Tour to the Anderson Civic Center on Dec. 5. The concert features Audio Adrenaline, Sidewalk Prophets, Jason Castro and Love & The Outcome. The concert will also include local high school bands, drum lines and soloists. Tickets are $12$20 and can be purchased at andersonconcerts.com. The annual Roper Mountain Holiday Lights opens on Thanksgiving evening and will be open nightly through Dec. 30, 6-10 p.m.  In addition to the drive-through displays, visitors may park their cars and stroll through Winter Wonderland, which offers a visit with Santa nightly 6-9 p.m. and a mailbox for North Pole letters. Dog Nights, where visitors can walk their dogs through Winter Wonderland, will be on Dec. 2, 9 and 16. Cost is $10 per car, minivan or SUV, $25 for activity vans and $50 for buses. Proceeds are distributed to Rotary Charities for local distribution and the Roper Mountain Science Center Association. For more information visit ropermountainholidaylights.com. Greenville’s Holiday Fair arts, crafts and gift fair will be Dec. 5–7 at the TD Center. The weekend event features more than 300 vendors and draws more than 12,000 attendees. Hours include: Dec. 5 and 6, 10 a.m.-8 p.m., and Dec. 7, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tickets are $6 for adults, $5 for senior citizens and children 12 and younger are free. Parking is $5. Visit holidayfairgreenville.com for more information. The Furman Symphony Orchestra and Oratorio Chorus will present Handel’s “Messiah” on Dec. 6 at 8 p.m. in McAlister Auditorium on the Furman University campus. This piece originally debuted in 1742 as a fundraiser for orphans and includes the famous and familiar “Hallelujah” chorus. Tickets are $5-$12. For more information or advance ticket sales call the Furman Music Office at 864-294-2086.

Submit entries community@communityjournals.com.

–DECEMBER 16

NOVEMBER 29, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 33


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

THE GOOD

EVENTS THAT MAKE OUR COMMUNITY BETTER Meals on Wheels of Greenville announces a partnership with Fairway Subaru this holiday season to help end senior hunger. The local effort is part of Subaru of America Inc.’s national Share the Love event. Subaru will donate $250 to the customer’s choice of charity (including Meals on Wheels) for every new Subaru vehicle sold or leased during Share the Love. The event runs through Jan. 2. For more information, visit fairwaysubaru-sc.com.

The Salvation Army has partnered with Subway for the Angel Tree Campaign. Participating Subway restaurants will display paper angel tags with information about a deserving local child. The Angel Tree program gives donors an easy way to provide new, unopened toys and clothing to children who otherwise would receive few or no gifts at Christmas. All gifts will be distributed to the families by The Salvation Army in time for Christmas. Contributors can bring the gifts unwrapped to their local Salvation Army by Dec. 18. The TD Charitable Foundation has awarded $5,000 to Upstate Forever’s Value of Trees Project. In order to showcase the benefits of trees, Upstate Forever will work with schools and community organizations to temporarily install tree tags on trees in highly visible public areas. The tags will provide information on the estimated economic benefits of each tree. Any organization interested in participating in the project should contact Erika Hollis at 864-250-0500, ext. 17. Loaves & Fishes’ annual Feed the Thousands event has helped to secure donations of turkeys and holiday canned goods to be distributed to soup kitchens, food

Have a Relaxing Holiday This Year

Greenville Technical College has received four vehicles from General Motors to help support training through the college’s GM Automotive Service Educational Program, a partnership with the company. The combined value of the donated vehicles is more than $100,000. The vehicles will be used to assist students in preparing to become automotive technicians with experience on late-model cars and trucks. The Reserve at Lake Keowee Charitable Foundation raised more than $31,000 through its Fifth Annual Charitable Foundation Golf Classic. Proceeds from the event will benefit five local Upstate charities: Pickens County Meals on Wheels, Pickens County’s Feed a Hungry Child, Prevent Child Abuse Pickens County, Pickens County Senior Center, and Helping Hands Children’s Shelter. A total of 128 players participated in the tournament.

Ameris Bank and other partners in the Greenville area were able to collect 2,876 items to help feed the hungry in the Upstate. Significant contributions came from the Blythe Academy of Languages, which collected 1,227 items, and Greenville Renewable Charter School, which added about 300 items. Ameris Bank partnered with Harvest Hope Food Bank, donating a matching portion of the food drive to Harvest Hope. The food drive was part of a larger Helping Fight Hunger initiative. More than half a million food items were collected.

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WellCare Health Plans Inc. recently presented a $20,000 grant to the Centering Healthcare Institute (CHI) to help expand CHI’s pregnancy and parenting programs across the southeastern U.S. WellCare also presented CommUnity Hero Awards to Dr. Amy Picklesimer and Sarah Covington-Kolb at CHI’s annual conference. The awards recognize efforts to further the organization’s approach to maternal care. Picklesimer is the medical director for Greenville Health System’s OB/GYN Center. Covington-Kolb is the CenteringPregnancy coordinator for GHS.

Mothers Against Drunk Driving announced its list of 2013 Legislative Champions, recognizing Sens. Joel Lourie, Brad Hutto and Larry Martin and Reps. Eddie Tallon, Todd Atwater, Rick Quinn and L. Kit Spires for their leadership within the S.C. Legislature to stop drunk driving. The recognized senators and representatives supported legislation requiring ignition interlocks for all repeat and firsttime offenders with a blood alcohol content of 0.12 or greater. MADD also recognized Tallon for authoring legislation that creates penalties for DUI on a moped. 

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The American Cancer Society recently held its annual Moonlight and Magnolias Gala and presented the Susan Eison Spirit Award to Diane Gluck. The award recognizes individuals who have demonstrated a long-term commitment to the fight against cancer. Gluck served on numerous civic and nonprofit boards and has also served as an advocate for the American Cancer Society and the National Patient Advocacy Foundation. The event was presented by the Greenville Health System Cancer Institute and was also sponsored by Fuel, Indexx, Bon Secours St. Francis Health System, Pathology Consultants and Rodgers Builders. M113A

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pantries and holiday feeding programs throughout Greenville County. Through the Feed the Thousands program, Loaves & Fishes expects to provide food to more than 3,000 of Greenville’s hungry this year.

Send announcements to community@communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL CULTURE

Holiday

SIGHTS AND SOUNDS Arts organizations provide opportunities to catch the holiday spirit. S E E PA G E 3 6

NOVEMBER 29, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 35


JOURNAL CULTURE There will be plenty of holiday sights and sounds in and around Greenville this year. The Upstate’s arts community is offering a variety of concerts, plays and performances to get you in the Christmas spirit. Performances begin on Nov. 28 and run through Dec. 22. BY CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

CHRISTMAS CONCERT The Foothills Philharmonic will perform its annual Christmas concert on Dec. 4 at 7:30 p.m. at the J. Harley Bonds Center at 505 N. Main St. in Greer. A reception will follow the performance. Admission is free. For more information, call 864-268-8743. “A CHRISTMAS CAROL” Centre Stage will present Patrick Barlow’s adaptation of the Charles Dickens classic “A Christmas Carol” on Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays from Nov. 28 through Dec. 14. Tickets are $30. For more information, call 864-233-6733 or go to centrestage.org. HANDBELL CONCERT The Carolina Bronze Handbell Ensemble will hold a concert during the Greenville County Museum of Art’s Sunday @ 2 program on Dec. 1. The concert is free and begins at 2 p.m. For information, call 864-271-7570. “A CHRISTMAS STORY” Flat Rock Playhouse presents “A Christmas Story” on Dec. 4 through Dec. 22. Performances begin at 8 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday and 2 p.m. Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday. Tickets are $35 for adults, $33 for seniors, AAA and military, and $25 for students. For more information, call 1-828-693-0731 or 866-732-8008.

CHRISTMAS CONCERT The Greenville Chamber Singers will hold its annual Christmas Concert on Dec. 4 at John Knox Presbyterian Church. The free concert begins at 6:30 p.m. “JINGLE ARRGH THE WAY” The South Carolina Children’s Theatre will present “Jingle Arrgh the Way,” a musical based on an original story by Greenville author Melinda Long, in the Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre. The show runs Dec. 6 through Dec. 15. Tickets are $26 for adults and $17 for children 18 and under. All tickets to the Dec. 8 show at 5:30 p.m. are $16. For more information, call 864-235-2885 or go to scchildrenstheatre.org. BOSTON BRASS & BRASS ALL-STARS BIG BAND: CHRISTMAS BELLS Boston Brass and the Brass All-Stars Big Band will perform a Christmas concert on Dec. 6 at 8 p.m. in the Brooks Center Theatre on the Clemson University campus. Tickets are $30 for adults and $15 for students. For more information, call 864-656-7787 or go to clemson.edu/brooks.

“THE NUTCRACKER” Carolina Ballet Theatre presents “The Nutcracker: Once Upon a Time in Greenville” on Dec. 6 and 7 at 7:30 p.m. and Dec. 7 and 8 at 2 p.m. in the Peace Center Concert Hall. Tickets are $15 to $45. For more information, call 864-467-3000 or go to carolinaballet.org/seasonperformances/nutcracker.

“A CHRISTMAS CAROL” Fountain Inn Repertory Experience (FIRE) performs the Christmas classic “A Christmas Carol” on Dec. 6, 7, 13 and 14 at 7:30 p.m. and Dec. 8 and 15 at 3 p.m. Tickets are $18 for adults, $15 for seniors and $10 for students. For more information, call 864-4091050 or go to yountscenter.org. HOLIDAY CONCERT All of the orchestras of the Carolina Youth Symphony will be in concert on Dec. 8 at 3 p.m. in Furman University’s McAlister Auditorium. For more information, call 864-232-3963 or go to carolinayouthsymphony.org.

“IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE” Greenville Little Theatre presents “It’s a Wonderful Life.” Show dates are Dec. 6, 7, 8, 9, 13, 14 and 15. All performances are at 8 p.m., except for Sunday when the show starts at 3 p.m. Tickets are $26 with discounts available for seniors, children and groups of 10 or more. For more information, call 864-233-6238 or go to greenvillelittletheatre.org. HANDEL’S “MESSIAH” The Furman Symphony Orchestra

36 THE JOURNAL | NOVEMBER 29, 2013

and the Oratorio Chorus will present Handel’s “Messiah” on Dec. 6 at 8 p.m. in McAlister Auditorium on the Furman campus. Tickets are $12 for adults, $10 for seniors, $5 for youth and $3 for Furman students. For more information, call 864-294-2086.

“A CELTIC CHRISTMAS” Robin Bullock and Steve Baughman present “A Celtic Christmas” on Dec. 10 at 7 p.m. in the Simpsonville Fine Arts Center. Tickets are $10 in advance and $12 the day of the show. Advance tickets are available at the Simpsonville Chamber of Commerce, Eastside Guitars and Drums, by calling 864-430-1003 or by mailing a check to the Simpsonville Arts Foundation, P.O. Box 158, Simpsonville SC 29681. For more information, call 864-430-1003. AN APPALACHIAN CHRISTMAS Violinist Mark O’Connor and an all-star band perform a Christmas


JOURNAL CULTURE

As SEEn on…

Brooks Center Theatre on the campus of Clemson University. Tickets are $20 for adults and $15 for students. For more information, call 864-656-7787 or go to clemson.edu/brooks.

MARK O’CONNOR concert at the Peace Center on Dec. 10 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $15 to $35. For more information, call 864467-3000 or go to peacecenter.org. CHRISTMAS WITH THE CHORALE The Greenville Chorale will perform its Christmas concert on Dec. 13 at Furman University’s McAlister Auditorium. The Seneca High Honors Chorus will also appear. Tickets are $30 for adults and $15 for students. For more information, call 864-4673000 or go to greenvillechorale.com.

LESSONS AND CAROLS The Furman Chamber Choir, along with members of the Furman faculty, staff and student body, will present on Dec. 15 in the Daniel Chapel main sanctuary a service of seasonal lessons and carols. The lessons, read chronologically, tell the story of the birth of Christ. There is a performance at 3 p.m. and another at 5 p.m. The performance is free, but tickets must be obtained from the Furman music department. Doors open 30 minutes prior to the performance to seat ticketed patrons. Unclaimed seats will be released to the waiting public 10 minutes prior to each performance. For more information, call 864-294-2086. “AMAHL AND THE NIGHT VISITORS” GLOW Lyric Theatre presents the opera “Amahl and the Night Visitors” at the Younts Performing Arts Center in Fountain Inn on Dec. 16, 17 and 18 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $25 for adults and $15 for students and children. For more information, call 864-409-1050 or go to yountscenter.org.

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CELTIC WOMAN: HOME FOR CHRISTMAS – THE SYMPHONY TOUR Irish music group Celtic Woman will perform a Christmas concert on Dec. 17 at 7:30 p.m. at the Peace Center. Tickets are $65 to $95. For more information, call 864-467-3000 or go to peacecenter.org. EVENTS continued on PAGE 38

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“RUDOLPH” Greenville Little Theatre presents “Rudolph” on Dec. 13 at 10:30 a.m., Dec. 14 at 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. and Dec. 15 at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10. For more information, call 864-233-6238 or go to greenvillelittletheatre.org.

NOVEMBER 29, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 37


JOURNAL CULTURE EVENTS continued from PAGE 37

Happy Holidays from our family to yours.

“OLD TIME RADIO CHRISTMAS REVUE” FIREside Radio presents an original radio show, “Old Time Radio Christmas Revue,” on Dec. 19 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $12 for adults, $10 for seniors and $5 for students and children. For more information, call 864-409-1050 or go to yountscenter.org.

information, call 864-467-3000 or go to greenvillesymphony.org. CHRISTMAS AT THE CENTER The Fountain Inn Symphony Orchestra will perform its Christmas show, “Christmas at the Center,” on Dec. 21 at the Younts Center for the Performing Arts in Fountain Inn. The concert is at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $12 for adults, $10 for seniors and $5 for students and children. For more information, call 864409-1050 or go to yountscenter.org. CHRISTMAS CONCERT The Carolina Bronze Handbell Ensemble will perform at Ice on Main, 208 S. Main St., Greenville on Dec. 21 at 11 a.m. The concert is free. For more information, call 864-271-7570.

HOLIDAY AT THE PEACE The Greenville Symphony Orchestra, Doug LeBrecque and “American Idol” finalist LaKisha Jones perform in this annual holiday concert at the Peace Center. Shows are Dec. 20 and 21 at 7:30 p.m. and Dec. 22 at 3 p.m. Tickets are $17 to $38. Tickets for children 12 and under are half price. For more

“THE NUTCRACKER” The Greenville Ballet Theatre will perform “The Nutcracker” on Dec. 21 at 2 p.m. at Furman University’s McAlister Auditorium. Tickets are $21, $23 and $25.Tickets are available by contacting the Timmons Arena Box Office or Ticketmaster at 800-745-3000.

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JOURNAL CULTURE

Preserving the South Carolina coast he loves Artist Jim Creal to embark on lithography project

MARK OLENCKI / CONTRIBUTING

Creal raised his minimum goal on Kickstarter in three days. The campaign, which can be seen at bit.ly/jimcreal, has raised more than $7,200. The campaign runs through Dec. 14. CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF “The sights, sounds and smells of the South Carolina coast are extraordiclandrum@communityjournals.com nary and about every South Carolinian Artist Jim Creal has had a lifelong knows that,” Creal said. Creal will use the money he raises love of the South Carolina coast. From well-known places such as through Kickstarter to visit more than 25 sites. Some of the placBrookgreen Gardens and es are accessible by car; Huntington Beach State others only by boat. Creal Park to the lesser-known will explore some from the Dungannon Heritage air. He’ll photograph what Preserve in Hollywood he sees and use those phoand Nemours Plantation, tographs to help him creCreal feels a connection. ate hand-printed stone “When I am in these lithographic images. places, I feel connected to He will first draw the something transcendent scene on a flat limestone and primordial,” said Cre- Dafuskie Island block and then transfer the images to al, who is from Spartanburg. But some of the coastal habitats he paper to make works of art. “It’s a twitchy printmaking process, enjoyed going to as a child are gone. Creal wants to help preserve them but by drawing on limestone, I can do through his South Carolina Coastal Li- things that are hard to achieve on pathography Project and it appears a lot per,” Creal said. Creal has been making lithographic of other people do, too.

Artist Jim Creal at work on a lithograph

images depicting South Carolina’s barrier islands for years. He turned 60 this year and decided he wanted to create a more complete body of work. “I want to create a body of work that will help people appreciate South Carolina’s coastal habitats’ timeless beauty, their significance as vital ecosystems under stress and their value as national treasures that need to be preserved for future generations,” he said. Creal will create six large lithographic

landscapes over the next two years depicting scenes from the major coastal habitats. Each drawing could take up to three to four months to complete. After those are complete, Creal plans to spend another two years filling the collection in with lithographs of additional coastal vistas as well as the creatures and plants that live in those places. “The South Carolina coast is a special place,” he said.

NOVEMBER 29, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 39


JOURNAL CULTURE

A R T S CALENDAR NOV. 29-DEC. 5 Peace Center The Irish Tenors Nov. 29 ~ 467-3000 Carolina Bronze Handbell Ensemble Winter Concert at Greenville County Museum of Art Dec. 1 ~ 238-4639 Furman University Furman Percussion Ensemble Dec. 2 ~ 294-2086 North Greenville University North Greenville Concert Choir Dec. 3 ~ 977-7085 Bob Jones University Chamber String Orchestra Dec. 5 ~ 242-5100 Metropolitan Arts Council Open Studios Exhibit Through Dec. 6 ~ 467-3132 Centre Stage A Christmas Carol Through Dec. 14 ~ 233-6733 Greenville County Museum of Art Wizards of Pop: Sabuda & Rinehart Through Dec. 29 ~ 271-7570 Upcountry History Museum To the Moon: Snoopy Soars with NASA Through Dec. 29 ~ 467-3100 Main Street Real Estate Gallery Photography by George Lee Through Dec. 31 ~ 250-2850 Greenville Chamber of Commerce Monday Night Painters Batik Show Through Jan. 10 ~ 242-1050

LISTEN UP

BEST BETS FOR LOCAL LIVE MUSIC 1 1 / 2 9 , B L U E S B O U L E VA R D (GREENVILLE)

Zataban Veteran Upstate blues-rock group. Tickets: $5. Call 864-242-2583 or visit bluesboulevardjazz.com. 11/29, SMILEY’S ACOUSTIC CAFÉ

Charles Woods & Nitrograss Banjo virtuoso leads blazingly talented combo. Call 864-282-8988 or visit smileysacousticcafe.com. 11/29, THE HANDLEBAR

CHUCK FM presents RetroVertigo Everyone’s favorite cover band cures the Black Friday blues. Tickets: $10. Call 864233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com. 11/29, BLIND HORSE SALOON

Dustin Lynch Rising country star. Tickets: $15, $18. Call 864-233-1381 or visit blind-horse.com. 1 1 / 2 9 , B L U E S B O U L E VA R D ( S PA R TA N B U R G )

Junque Gallery Multi-genre combo plays seductive grooves. Tickets: $5. Call 864-573-9742 or visit bluesboulevardjazz.com/Spartanburg. 11/30, GOTTROCKS

The Frankness Stripped-down but sassy Americana. Call 864-235-5519 or visit reverbnation.com/venue/255976. 11/30, GROUND ZERO

Metro. Arts Council at Centre Stage Works by Marquin Campbell Through Jan. 13 ~ 233-6733

Fates Warning Legendary prog-metal group returns. Call 864-948-1661 or visit reverbnation.com/venue/groundzero2.

Greenville County Museum of Art David Drake: Potter & Poet Through Jan. 19 ~ 271-7570

11/30, RADIO ROOM

Greenville County Museum of Art Andrew Wyeth: Selected Watercolors Continuing ~ 271-7570

Our Western Sky Trio creates massive soundscapes. Call 864-263-7868 or visit wpbrradioroom.com. 1 1 / 3 0 , B L U E S B O U L E VA R D ( S PA R TA N B U R G )

Zansa Asheville ensemble blends folk, pop, African drumming. Tickets: $5. Call 864-573-9742 or visit bluesboulevardjazz.com/Spartanburg.

40 THE JOURNAL | NOVEMBER 29, 2013


JOURNAL CULTURE

SOUND CHECK

WITH VINCENT HARRIS

Zansa’s intoxicating blend Asheville band’s sound inspired by West African rhythms

TOTALLY PROFESSIONAL. DELIGHTFULLY IMMATURE.

The music of Zansa is so intoxicatingly listenable that the amount of stylistic range inside the songs might not immediately be apparent. But the Asheville-based quintet takes the clinical term “multicultural” and brings it to life. Zansa is led by singer and djembe player Adama Dembele, a 33rdgeneration West African musician who encountered a group of Asheville musicians on the Ivory Coast in the early 2000s. The players had ZANSA traveled there to study music with WHEN: Saturday, Nov. 30 WHEN: Saturday, Nov. 30 at 9:30.p.m. Dembele’s family. This mixing of at 3.p.m. cultures prompted Dembele’s move WHERE: Horizon WHERE: Blues to Asheville later in the decade. Boulevard, 99 S. Church Records, 2 W. Stone Ave., “Adama already knew some peo- Greenville St., Spartanburg ple here, and he figured that was INFO: 864.573.9742 or a good place to start,” says Zansa’s INFO: 834.235.7922 or bluesboulevardjazz.com/ blog.horizonrecords.net bassist, Ryan Reardon. “He and I spartanburg met and had similar interests: creating original music based on African rhythms and songs. The inspiration all came from when we were in the Ivory Coast together.” Zansa, whose name is Ivory Coast slang for “combination” or “blend,” is a synthesis of those seemingly disparate sources: West African drumming, modern Afro-pop and Western guitars and drums. Reardon says that, despite the potential musical differences, any problems the musicians had in fusing their styles were overcome relatively quickly. “At first, the biggest challenge came from the fact that Adama is African and we’re American and Irish,” he says. “When Adama was growing up, he learned music much differently than how the rest of us did. It’s a very aural tradition in West Africa, even with the most complicated music. “He basically learned drumming from watching his older brothers when he was very young, then playing hours on end every day. The rest of us learned from our music teachers, books, music school or picking out songs from our favorite records. So, to really tap into the West African style and develop our own sound, we all had to unlearn a little bit and throw out whatever pre-conceived notions we might have had. We each had to learn how to learn together.” The band has just released a new album called “Djansa,” which means “a celebration,” and the energetic, upbeat music lives up to the translation. Reardon says that the band was more interested in the right vibe than in precision in the studio. “Most of the tracks were recorded live in studio,” he says. “We would track a few takes of one song, and then listen back for those special moments, trying to find the takes with the best feel. There may have been mistakes, but if it had that something special it was a keeper.” Reardon says that, as evocative as the music is, the lyrics, which Dembele can sing in French, English, Baoule and Bambara, aim to be thought provoking. “The songs are celebratory, but there’s more to it than that,” he says. “‘Tolon,’ for instance, is a welcoming song that tells the story of Donsson the hunter returning to the village with food after being gone for years. ‘Sira Lon Balia’ is about finding one’s path in life. “Sometimes you take the road that seems to be a shortcut, but ends up taking you the wrong way. Sometimes the long road home is the right one. But you couldn’t have known this. You’ve got to take that first step to find out. So there are some serious themes, but we use that joyous energy to deliver the message. It’s an international dance party with a storyline.”  VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

NOVEMBER 29, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 41


JOURNAL CULTURE

SCENE. HERE.

THE WEEK IN THE LOCAL ARTS WORLD

The Ward Artist Studios and Classroom, located at 110 Wardlaw St. in Greenville, will host a series of fused glass mini-workshops to create holiday ornaments. The workshops are open to all ages, but kids under 10 must have an adult with them. The cost for ornaments range from $20-$60 each and attendees can make as many as they want. The sessions are: Nov. 30, and Dec. 7 and 14, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. In addition, there will be a series of Create Your Own six-by-six-inch slumped plate workshops. The class is $35 per plate with all materials included. The sessions are Dec. 3 and 11, 6:30-9:30 p.m. To reserve a spot, email johnsonartglass@gmail.com or call 214-321-9544. Greenville in Harmony presents “The Gift of Music” with two performances on Dec. 7 at 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. at Eastminster Presbyterian Church on Woodruff Road in Greenville. It will feature holiday tunes and other entertaining popular songs in a cappella four-part harmony, along with performances from finalists in the fourth annual Sing for Scholarships contest, an “American Idol”-style competition for high school vocalists. Tickets must be purchased in advance. For more information and tickets, visit greenvilleinharmony.com or facebook. com/greenvilleinharmony. The Hendersonville Community Band and Fletcher Community Chorus will combine for “A Wintry Mix” concert at 3 p.m. on Dec. 8 at Blue Ridge Community College Conference Hall. Tickets are $10 for adults, free admission for children. Tickets are available at the Hendersonville Visitor Center, Laurel Park Wine Market and at the door. During Chapman Cultural Center’s Sundays Unplugged program on Dec. 8, 1-5 p.m., artists from far and wide will be set up in the center’s plaza for public shopping. The assortment of local art will include photography, paintings, stained glass, metalworks, woodworks, soaps, candles, jewelry, pottery, handmade papers, tea and blown glass. The musicians for the day will be Daniel Z (1-3 p.m.) and Nick Evangelista (3-5 p.m.). In addition to independent artisans, artists from Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg and Carolina Foothills Artisan Center will be on hand. For more information, call 864-542-ARTS. The Pickens County Museum of Art & History will be presenting two new exhibitions running Dec. 7 through Feb. 6, 2014. An artist’s reception will be held Dec. 7, 6-8 p.m., to meet the artists featured in “Fire Dance: Encaustic and Mixed Media Work by Patricia Kilburg” and “A Dozen Dames: Twelve Women Making Art.” The museum is located at the corner of Hwy. 178 at 307 Johnson St. in Pickens and is open Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thursdays, 9 a.m.-7:30 p.m.; and Saturdays, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Admission is free but donations are welcomed. For more infor- Circle of Fire III by Patricia Kilburg mation, call 864-898-5963. The Office of Cultural Affairs for the City of Mauldin recently announced its 2014 season lineup at the Mauldin Cultural Center. The Railroad Concert Series will feature Gregory Porter on April 26 and Overmountain Men on May 9. Both concerts are free. The American Callboard Theatre Series officially launches March 14-15 and 21-22 with “Distracted.” On May 15-17, it will feature the Jason Robert Brown musical “Songs for a New World.” The series also will feature weeklong summer camps for children ages 8 and older in June-July. “The Snow Queen” will be the season closer in December. In addition, the city will feature the Peacock Strides for Babies 5K on Mar. 22; the Annual Garden Club Spring Fling on April 5; the Fourth Annual Mauldin BBQ Cook-Off held Sept. 26-27; and annual Christmas events hosted by the Chamber of Commerce and the City of Mauldin in early December. For more information, visit mauldinculturalcenter.org or cityofmauldin.org, or call 864-335-4862. The Mauldin Cultural Center is located at 101 E. Butler Road, Mauldin.

42 THE JOURNAL | NOVEMBER 29, 2013

Send announcements to arts@communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL HOMES

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convenience to the kitchen, which also features an awe-inspiring gas cooktop hood and side shelving as well as stainless appliances. including double ovens, pot warmer, microwave, dishwasher, a Jenn Air 4-burner gas cooktop w/ griddle and an ice maker in the island. Hardwoods grace the main living areas and plush carpeting can be found on the upstairs floors. The spacious master suite on the main level affords dual closets, hardwood floors and spectacular views of the rear grounds. The Master bath is well-equipped with two vanity areas, a center soaking tub, and elegant tile work throughout. Upstairs, all four bedrooms provide gracious closets and are topped with vaulted ceilings, and the bonus room can be used as playroom, home theatre (wired for 7.1 surround sound), office or gym. Other features include: irrigation system, outdoor lighting, and an oversized two-car garage PLUS a walk-in basement storage area! Only 10 minutes to downtown Greenville.

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44 THE JOURNAL | NOVEMBER 29, 2013

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


JOURNAL HOMES

F E AT U R E D N E I G H B OR H O OD CT RA NT YS! O RC A DE 5 D N U IN

WILLIAMSTON 3 Beds/2 Baths | 1200-1399 Sqft

CT RA NT YS! O RC A DE 7 D UN IN 1

TRAVELERS REST 3 Beds/2.5 Baths | 2000–2199 Sqft

Victoria Park, Simpsonville

Preferred Lenders

NEIGHBORHOOD INFO Directions: From I-385 take exit 27. Go West on Fairview Road for approximately one mile. Turn right on Harrison Bridge Road. Go 0.7 miles and turn left on Hipps Rd. Go one half mile and turn left on Neely Ferry Road. The community entrance will be on the left.

We are excited to introduce Victoria Park in Simpsonville SC as one of our newest communities! Featuring our Garden Series with homes from 1300 – 2500 SQFT and the Haven Series with 2600–4200 SQFT, finding a home that is a perfect fit is easy! Our floor plans feature gracious family rooms and kitchens that open the home for easy entertaining and living. Our luxurious owner suites create a welcome retreat for the end of each day. And with all the personal selections including our “Legend Series” trim package, rounded corner sheetrock and 2” faux wood blinds, your home will be perfectly suited to your needs. Legendary Communities has been named the Upstates #1 Builder. With over 50 communities, you are sure to find your ideal home! Conveniently located just off 385 in the Fairview Road area, shopping, dining and entertainment are just around the corner! With location and amenities such as swimming pool and playground, you will know you are home at Victoria Park! Visit Today!

T AC TR S! N O Y R C DA DE 38 N U IN

PIEDMONT 3 Beds/2 Baths | 1400-1599 Sqft

T AC TR S! N CO AY ER 4 D D UN IN 3

FOUNTAIN INN

Schools: Fork Shoals Elementary Woodmont Middle | Woodmont High

3 Beds/2 Baths | 1400-1599 Sqft

Contact: Deb Nalley at Legendary Homes 864.608.1241 | www.legendarycom.com Like us on Facebook.

864-527-7685

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NOVEMBER 29, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 45


JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND SPRING FOREST ESTATES

O P E N S U N D AY, D E C. 1 F R O M 2 – 4 P M GOWER ESTATES

HARTS LANE

346 SPRING FOREST DRIVE . $295,500 . MLS#1270096

124 BUCKINGHAM RD . $225,000 . MLS#1267515

110 SHEA CT . $184,999 . MLS#1265949

3BR/2BA home on nearly 4 AC, with fully equipped bungalow/stuido, salt water in-ground pool, mature trees, & landscape. Lovely homesite with country feel, just minutes from town and interstates.

4BR/2BA GREAT HOUSE GREAT PRICE! LOCATION! LOCATION! LOCATION! Hdwd floors, Fenced level backyard, Ample parking DIR: Laurens Road to Parkins Mill, Left Don Dr., Right Buckingham, Home on Right 3rd block

3BR/2.5BA This lovely home on cud-de-sac & conveniently located to Hwy 14 with easy access to everything! Woodruff Rd to Right on Hwy 14, Left on Harts Ln, Left into SD on Paranor Dr, Right on Shea

Contact: Jenny McCord (864) 313-2680 Keller Williams Realty

Contact: Jane Ellefson 979-4415 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Barry Ledford, 399-2254 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

to our clients and their families. Thank you for the opportunity to serve you!

Flat Fee Listing 864.250.2112 | www.CarolPyfrom.com 46 THE JOURNAL | NOVEMBER 29, 2013

Charlotte Sarvis, REALTOR, ABR

Janet Sandifer, REALTOR, ABR

charlottes@carolpyfrom.com

janets@carolpyfrom.com

864.346.9943

864.979.6713

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JOURNAL HOMES

ON THE MARKET COTTON MILL PLACE

SUMMERWALK

300 SOUTH STREET #111 . $249,000 . MLS#1260385

112 SUMMERWALK PLACE . $199,650 . MLS#1269395

3BR/2BA STUNNING Corner Unit in the swanky Cotton Mill Place. HISTORIC yet MODERN, CONVENIENT, DOWNTOWN Living. This unit is the only one with a PRIVATE ENTRANCE and is one of the LARGEST.

4BR/2.5BA Updated Home in Simpsonville’s Summerwalk Neighborhood. Kitchen, Baths, Floors, Lighting...all updated within the past two years and ready for new owner.

Contact: Barb Turner (864) 901-7389 Convergent Property Group

Contact: Barb Turner (864) 901-7389 Convergent Property Group

Meet

CONVERGENT PROPERTY GROUP.

Residential Property Management | Residential + Commercial Real Estate Brokerage | Investment Analysis + Advising

Greenville’s Partner for Property Management

Our dynamic team of property management and real estate professionals specializes in converging properties for lease or sale with qualified tenants and buyers. Voted Best of the Upstate 2013, we help you capitalize on the value of your real estate with income-producing solutions backed by our 10-Point Promise. Contact us today for a free consultation! (864) 751-1000 | www.convergentpg.com James McKissick, MBA Broker-in-charge james@convergentpg.com

Katie Braeunig Walsh Property Manager / REALTOR® Katie@convergentpg.com

From left to right: Wade Zebro, Dan Lemanski, Trey Varn, Barb Turner, James McKissick, Katie B. Walsh

728 N. Pleasantburg Drive Greenville, South Carolina 29607 Where Relationships Meet Results SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

/ConvergentPropertyGroup /ConvergentPG www.Convergentpg.com NOVEMBER 29, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 47


JOURNAL HOMES

R E A L E S TAT E N E W S Modest Growth Seen in Commercial Real Estate Markets

– Commercial real estate leasing patterns are showing steady but modest growth, according to the National Association of Realtors® quarterly commercial real estate forecast Bill Lawton, 2013 President of The Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® and Broker in Charge of Keller Williams Realty in Greenville, SC, projects only modest changes in the coming year. “Jobs are the key driver for commercial real estate, and the accumulation of 7 million net new jobs from the low point a few years ago is steadily showing up as demand for leasing and purchases of properties,” he said. “But the difficulty of accessing loans remains a hindrance to a faster recovery.” The gross domestic product rose from 2.5 percent in the second quarter to 2.9 percent in the third quarter. NAR’s recent Commercial Real Estate Quarterly Market Survey shows leasing activity rose 2 percent in the third quarter from the second quarter, and higher sales levels than a year ago. Yun said there have been some shifts in commercial purchases. “Investors have been looking for better yields, and have found good potential in smaller commercial properties, notably in secondary and tertiary markets,” he said. “Sales of commercial properties costing less than $2.5 million in the third quarter were 11 percent above a year ago, while prices for smaller properties were 4 percent above the third quarter of 2012.” Commercial investment in properties costing more than $2.5 million1 rose 26 percent from a year ago, while prices for large properties were 9 percent above the third quarter of 2012. National vacancy rates over the coming year are forecast to decline 0.2 percentage point in the office market, 0.6 point in industrial, and 0.5 point for retail real estate. The average multifamily vacancy rate will edge up 0.1 percent, but that sector continues to see the tightest availability and biggest rent increases. NAR’s latest Commercial Real Estate Outlook offers overall projections for four major commercial sectors and analyzes quarterly data in the office, industrial, retail and multifamily markets. Historic data for metro areas were provided by REIS, Inc., a source of commercial real estate performance information. Office Markets Vacancy rates in the office sector are expected to decline from a projected 15.6 percent in the fourth quarter to 15.4 percent in the fourth quarter of 2014. The markets with the lowest office vacancy rates presently (in the fourth quarter) are New York City, with a vacancy rate of 9.8 percent; Washington, D.C., at 9.9 percent; Little Rock, Ark., 12.0 percent; and Nashville, Tenn., 12.9 percent. Office rents should increase 2.4 percent this year and 2.5 percent in 2014. Net absorption of office space in the U.S., which includes the leasing of new space coming on the market as well as space in existing properties, is seen at 32.2 million square feet this year and 46.1 million in 2014. Industrial Markets Industrial vacancy rates are likely to fall from 9.2 percent in the fourth quarter of this year to 8.6 percent in the fourth quarter of 2014 The areas with the lowest industrial vacancy rates currently are Orange County, Calif., with a vacancy rate of 3.9 percent; Los Angeles, 4.0 percent; Miami, 6.0 percent; and Seattle at 6.3 percent. Annual industrial rents are expected to rise 2.3 percent this year and 2.5 percent in 2014. Net absorption of industrial space nationally is anticipated at 97.0 million square feet in 2013 and 104.9 million next year. Retail Markets Retail vacancy rates are forecast to decline from 10.4 percent in the fourth quarter of this year to 9.9 percent in the fourth quarter of 2014. Presently, markets with the lowest retail vacancy rates include Fairfield County, Conn., at 3.9 percent; San Francisco, 4.0 percent; Long Island, N.Y., 5.2 percent; and Northern New Jersey at 5.3 percent. Average retail rents should increase 1.4 percent in 2013 and 2.2 percent next year. Net absorption of retail space is projected at 11.0 million square feet in 2013 and 18.1 million next year. Multifamily Markets The apartment rental market – multifamily housing – is likely to see vacancy rates edge up 0.1 percentage point from 3.9 percent in the fourth quarter to 4.0 percent in the fourth quarter of 2014, with new construction helping to meet higher demand. As a rule, vacancy rates below 5 percent are considered a landlord’s market, with demand justifying higher rent. Areas with the lowest multifamily vacancy rates currently are New Haven, Conn., at 1.9 percent; Syracuse, N.Y., 2.0 percent; Minneapolis and San Diego, at 2.1 percent each; and New York City, 2.2 percent. Average apartment rents are forecast to rise 4.0 percent this year and 4.3 percent in 2014. Multifamily net absorption is projected to total 239,400 units in 2013 and 211,300 next year. The Commercial Real Estate Outlook is published by the NAR Research Division. NAR’s Commercial Division, formed in 1990, provides targeted products and services to meet the needs of the commercial market and constituency within NAR. The NAR commercial community includes commercial members; commercial real estate boards; commercial committees, subcommittees and forums; and the NAR commercial affiliate organizations – CCIM Institute, Institute of Real Estate Management, Realtors® Land Institute, Society of Industrial and Office Realtors®, and Counselors of Real Estate. Approximately 78,000 NAR and institute affiliate members specialize in commercial brokerage and related services, and an additional 232,000 members offer commercial real estate services as a secondary business. The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing 1 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries. For additional commentary and consumer information, visit www.houselogic.com and http://retradio.com. Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® represents over 1,700 members in all aspects of the real estate industry. Please visit the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® web site at www.ggar. com for real estate and consumer information. “Every market is different, call a REALTOR® today.”

48 THE JOURNAL | NOVEMBER 29, 2013

G R E E N V I L L E T R A N S AC T ION S N O V E M B E R 4 - 8, 2 013 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$835,000 CLIFFS@MOUNTAIN PARK $825,000 COBBLESTONE $750,000 $750,000 FAIRWAY WOODS $580,000 $575,000 OAKS@ROPER MOUNTAIN $552,000 $540,000 OAKS@ROPER MOUNTAIN $535,000 $525,000 $510,000 $500,000 BARRINGTON PARK $486,000 HAMMETT’S GLEN $485,000 HAMMETT’S GLEN $478,000 HOLLINGSWORTH PARK@VERDAE $471,003 $450,000 $445,000 $440,000 IVY GROVE $435,547 GLEN MEADOWS $414,000 FIVE FORKS PLANTATION $402,375 RIVERPLACE $402,000 IVY GROVE $398,915 $375,000 RIVER OAKS $372,000 COVE AT BUTLER SPRINGS $362,500 CARISBROOKE $362,000 $351,605 $325,000 PELHAM COMMONS SHOPPING CENTER $315,000 KNIGHTS BRIDGE $310,500 VALLEY OAKS $310,000 TUSCANY FALLS $303,141 RABON CHASE $303,000 TUXEDO PARK $300,000 TUXEDO PARK $300,000 RICHLAND CREEK@NORTH MAIN $290,000 CREEKWOOD $289,500 SUGAR CREEK $287,000 $285,000 $275,000 GOODWIN FARMS $267,800 HAYWOOD RD IND PARK $265,000 $262,350 $255,000 $250,000 $249,900 COPPER CREEK $245,000 PELHAM FALLS COVE@SAVANNAH POINTE $240,831 CHANDLER LAKE $240,000 MAGNOLIA PARK $238,900 BRIDGEWATER $237,275 AUTUMN TRACE $237,000 CAMELOT $237,000 AUGUSTA HEIGHTS $234,000 $232,000 BOTANY WOODS $231,700 $230,000 MERRIFIELD PARK $227,500 $225,000 TOWNES@RIVERWOOD FARM $223,000 SHOALLY RIDGE $220,234 $220,000 HOLLAND PLACE $220,000 HOLLAND PLACE $220,000 COURT SQUARE $220,000 PEBBLECREEK $218,000 $212,000 FORRESTER CREEK $206,800 RESERVES@RAVENWOOD $205,610 $205,000 MOUNTAIN LAKE COLONIES $205,000 VICTORIA PARK $202,675 HERITAGE CREEK $200,168 AVALON ESTATES $200,000 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $194,500 AVALON ESTATES $190,000 THE HEIGHTS $187,650 MEADOW BREEZE $187,370 SHADOW CREEK $187,287 SAVANNAH POINTE $184,840 GLASTONBURY VILLAGE $182,465 SHADOW CREEK $180,026 KNOLLWOOD HEIGHTS $180,000 MEADOWS@BLUE RIDGE PLTN $179,000 GARDENS@BRIDGES CROSSING $176,505 PEBBLECREEK $176,000 PLANTERS ROW $175,000 FLAGSTONE VILLAGE $169,900 THE HOLLOWS $168,000 WESTCLIFFE $167,400

BUYER

ADDRESS

WELLS FARGO SERIES 2007- SMART ANDREW 4007 STATE PARK RD REDUS SOUTH CAROLINA LLC BROWNING GERALD WAYNE 151 HANNAH LOOP SUMMIT HOMES INC GREER JANE P (JTWROS) 2 COBBLER LN PERIMETER HOLDINGS LLC ENVIRONMENTAL EXPRESS IN 1995 PERIMETER RD STE B REING CORNELIUS MICHAEL VOSS JAMES M (JTWROS) 2 ROCK CREEK CT HALL & HILL FAMILY DENTI DRS REAL ESTATE LLC 13 N IRVINE ST WOODLAND BUILDERS INC WATSON CAROLYN P 111 CHARLESTON OAK LN STUENKEL CAROL ACADEMY GREENVILLE LLC 667 N ACADEMY ST DUNN CUSTOM BUILDERS LLC COLE CAROLE C 120 CHARLESTON OAK LN MILLER CHRISTOPHER N HERRO DANIELLE C (JTWROS 316 W EARLE ST RAGSDALE NEISHA R BURKHARDT JOAN H 117 JAMES ST SYPHARD KEVIN M (JTWROS) CONNELLY JASON HENRY 25 JONES AVE SMITH & WILSON LLC FIRST FEDERAL BANK PO BOX 118068 PHILLIPS WALTER L LEAMAN CHARLES H (JTWROS 206 HAMMETTS GLEN WAY WATSON CAROLYN P SCHRADER DARLENE E (SURV 221 HAMMETTS GLEN WAY DILLARD-JONES BUILDERS L SULLIVAN YVONNE K 12 SHADWELL ST CRIGLER WINFIELD POTTER GSM PROPERTIES LLC 1053 CENTER ST MARTIN FRED M SR REV TRU COZIER JAIME L (JTWROS) 1225 PARKINS MILL RD MARIAH PATEL LLC SHAKTI RENTAL PROPERTIES 409 ELROD ST BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT HAMMOND ELLIE C (JTWROS) 135 KEOWEE AVE BAIRD CHERYL L CERAVOLO PATRICIA K 612 WHETSTONE CT NVR INC BROWN MARIA S (JTWROS) 30 PATEWOOD DR STE 257 LEONARDI ROBERT J GALBRAITH PENELOPE J 215 HIGHBOURNE DR BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT PRETULAK JARED M (JTWROS 7 GROVE VALLEY WAY LANE APARTMENTS LLC 17 LANE AVE LAND TRUST 2123 OLD SPARTANBURG RD STE 18 GLICKMAN SHARON K FLETCHER CANDY SEGARS 211 HIGH MEADOW CT LS RESIDENTIAL LLC GUILFOOS MARTIN J (JTWRO 3101 S HIGHWAY 14 STE 2 FUNK ANDREA T BURNETT JAMES R 813 LADYKIRK LN GORDANROSS PROPERTIES LL KARAMCHANDANI SONIA (JTW 3 RIVERSIDE DR MORGAN LESLIE F DRS REAL ESTATE LLC 13 N IRVINE ST SOUTHTRUST BANK OCEANWIDE HOLDINGS LLC 3 CLEVELAND CT BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT COWLEY JASON A (JTWROS) 5 KNIGHTS VALLEY DR BUCHANAN R C JR DIXON NANCY WEILL 201 VALLEY OAK DR S C PILLON HOMES INC KJERGAARD KATIE (JTWROS) 201 DANTE LN RUCKER JENNIFER M CONNOLLY DONNA (JTWROS) 110 RABON CHASE CT FORD ROAD PROPERTIES LLC BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT 1155 HAMMOND PLACE STE E-5050 FORD ROAD PROPERTIES LLC BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT 1155 HAMMOND PLACE STE E-5050 THOMAS AND SON PROPERTIE BUCHANAN DONNA 15 RICHLAND CREEK DR COELHO ANA C NAZARENO CHRISTINA A 107 CREEK SHOALS DR GARRIS JOHN E JR MARSHALL JASON R (JTWROS 210 S LADYSLIPPER LANE MCKINNEY JEFFERY L BLOOM ANDREA H (JTWROS) 9 WORTHINGTON CT TEXTRON INC A DELAWARE C DELTA PROPERTIES OF GREE 204 ROBERTS RD HAYNER RICHARD D MILES DAVID P (JTWROS) 1075 BATES CROSSING RD HAWKINS LOUIS D GTM & SON LLC 11 BYRDLAND DR HORTON MELODY C DEZEN ANDREW 7 S MEMMINGER ST WALLER DWAIN A OREGON REFLECTIONS LLC 314 BYRD BLVD SCOTT JOHN P L SQUARE COMPANY LLC PO BOX 1415 WARE KAYLA BETH (JTWROS) DE OLIVEIRA KONSTANCE DI 113 MOORGATE DR AUSTIN VICTOR DIEMER ELIZABETH J (JTWR 201 REGENTS GATE CT BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT SHAH ARPAN (JTWROS) 4 SCANAWAH CT Y AND Y DEVELOPMENT CORP BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT PO BOX 1039 CHEN JIANQIANG EL-AJARROUMI HICHAM 116 MYRTLE WAY BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT LEBEL DEBORAH J 334 BRIDGE CROSSING DR ALLEN DAVID T HIBBARD CHELSEA (JTWROS) 205 TAMORA CT BRITT JENNIFER H ERIKSSON AILEEN (SURV) 314 SAGRAMORE LN RUSH RICHARD D (JTWROS) AUNG AYE PHYU 8 WAVERLY CT RIEBLE ROLAND F FITSCHEN BROCK DAVID 196 TERRY SHOP RD SMITH CLIFFORD A LIEBANA ISAAC J 508 CHEROKEE DR DISTINGUISHED DESIGN LLC OUELLET RONNIE 2218 WRIGHT DR BANISH MATTHEW J BOLIN JANE ANN (JTWROS) 22 PARLIAMENT RD MYSHARE LLC MYSHARE LLC 11 ROBERTA DR JORDAN A WILLIAM JR TRUS BECK M LUANNE (JTWROS) 30 BRIGHTMORE DR STONEWOOD HOMES INC SCOTT ELIZABETH R 1 CANYON CT BENCHMARK INVESTORS LLC DANIEL CI LLC 1315 E NORTH ST POUNTNEY JACQUELINE GRSW STEWART REAL ESTATE 30000 MILL CREEK AVE GRSW STEWART REAL ESTATE ADAMS CAROLE M 7 NETHERLAND LN ARRINGTON WILLIAM D MOYER LESTER MARK 121 S MAIN ST UNIT 5 THORTON MATTHEW W JOHNSON CLAY M (JTWROS) 109 WHITTLIN WAY LITTLEFIELD JASON KUSSMAUL PAUL MICHAEL 116 FORRESTER CREEK DR MCLEOD FRANK A III STEWART ROBERT L II 901 POLAR DR EXT RELIANT SC LLC HAAS KATHLEEN A (JTWROS) 209 RAVEN FALLS LN TURNER SCOTTY H GEARST CAROL A 1950 HIGHWAY 11 ROBINSON JULIUS E (JTWRO DOUGLAS ELIZABETH C (JTW 110 BARTRAM TRL KB&D SERVICES LLC LILLISTON COURTNEY Q 23 DUNSBOROUGH DR FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA 1410 SPRING HILL RD MAILSTOP 7 DO JOSEPH DIEN REGAN DANIEL L (JTWROS) 9 BRADBERRY CIR ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC MARTIN COSETTE H 301 ASHLER DR FENG GANJIANG GUAN TAILAI 19 BRECKENRIDGE CT NVR INC FOWLER BARRY D JR (JTWRO 11 BRENDAN WAY STE 140 SK BUILDERS INC WATSON BOBBY N (JTWROS) 9 RISING MEADOW LN SK BUILDERS INC ALSTADTER STUART (JTWROS 313 SEDGEBROOK DR ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC NIGHTINGALE SCOTT R 205 DUCKTRAP CT ANDERSON EXCAVATING INC STOREY SANDRA M 22 KINLOCK LN SK BUILDERS INC HORNEFFER BRADLEY J 115 COLEWOOD PL MEHALL THOMAS D (JTWROS) WILLIAMSON AUSTIN C 110 BROCKMAN DR MILLER HENRY H SOLAREK PAMELA S 3 HOLLANDER DR FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA SELENT HORST SIEGFRIED ( 226 TEATICKET CT WASSERMAN GEOFF P LOVELACE ANGIE A 306 STALLINGS RD FLANAGAN MARIA R DRISCOLL LINDA A (JTWROS 21 MARSH CREEK DR ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION L FRAUNFELTER RANDY L 1 LEBANON CT HOOGEVEEN HANS (JTWROS) REDMOND JOHN 34 SHADY HOLLOW LN PARKER WILLIS F SMITH ABIGAIL R (JTWROS) 504 EASTCLIFFE WAY

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JOURNAL HOMES re atu n Sig

re atu n Sig

re atu n Sig

re atu n Sig

116 Ridge Glen - Harrison Hills

99 Echo Dr. - Caesars Head

6 Kingsway Ct. - Griffith Farm

$830,000 • 1252670 • 4 BR/3.5 BA

$750,000 • 1263130 • 3 BR/ 2.5 BA

$569,900 • 1266627 • 4 BR/3.5 BA

Under appraised value! ≈8 acre country estate, 5C gar. w/2 BR, 1.5 BA apt, 2 story barn, salt water pool and more

Amazing Views! ≈3000 foot elevation, Old Caesar’s Head community Tom Marchant 864.449.1658

Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 Chuck Miller 864.293.4778

313 Arezzo Dr. - Montebello $524,900 • 1269042 • 3 BR/3 BA

≈3963 SF custom home. MBR on main, gourmet kitchen, hdwds, 3C gar.w/epoxy floor, scn porch, fully fenced bkyd on .58 acs

Located at the base of Paris Mtn, this 2700+ SF Tuscan villa boast incredible charm, superior finishes and custom details. Mins from downtown.

Anne Marchant 864.420.0009 Jolene Wimberly 864.414.1688

Nancy McCrory 864.505.8367 Karen Turpin 864.230.5176

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3 Dillworth Ct. - Highgrove Estate

506 Summergreen Way - Warrenton

715 Neely Farm Dr. - Neely Farm

$288,000 • 1267198 • 4 BR/2.5 BA

$259,900 • 1269319 • 4 BR/3.5 BA + Bonus

$258,900 • 1268912 • 4 BR / 2.5 BA + Bonus

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101 Quail Ridge Dr. - Neely Farm $249,000 • 1269349 • 3 BR/ 2.5 BA

3000+ SF brick townhouse offering: granite, main floor MBR, dining room, laundry rm, and a screened-in porch. Immaculate condition!

3000+ SF home, great community & schools, mins to I-385 and GSP. Hdwds, fml DR, open GR w/fpl, great kitchen storage, and fully fenced bkyard

Hdwd flrs on main ,french doors, some glass cabs in kit, new carpet upstairs, new stainless appli., scr porch. Newer upds: arch. roof & sod

Entire interior just professionally painted, hardwoods refinished and brand new carpet just installed…LIKE NEW

Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 Chuck Miller 864.293.4778

Jonathan Mullikin 864.449.4132

Barb Riggs 864.423.2783

Barb Riggs 864.423.2783

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1 Matteson Brook Ln. - Matteson Brook

20 Kim St. - Augusta Rd.

1511 E. North St. - Overbrook

$247,900 • 1268724 • 4 BR/2.5 BA

$225,000 • 1267594 • 4 BR/2 BA

$207,000 • 1268843 • 3 BR/1.5 BA

209 Marefair Ln. - Remington $184,900 • 1266946 • 4 BR/2.5 BA

2600+ SF custom home featuring Lrg BRs, Master on main lvl & unique sq. windows. Upds: Stainless appl. carpet, facets/lighting. Irr. & Fenced yd.

Great location between W.Prentiss & Grove Rd. Sited on a 1/3 ac lot and has 3 BRs on the main lvl. Priced lower than appraisal!

Great house, close to downtown, recently renovated, hardwood floors, Rocking chair front porch and garage!

Highly sought after Remington SD, with amazing curb appeal and second floor deck. Open flr plan, great for entertaining. Won’t Last!

Barb Riggs 864.423.2783

Tom Marchant 864.449.1658

Mary Praytor 864.593.0366

James Akers 864.325.8413

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3385 Knighton Chapel Rd. - Fountain Inn

3 Roosevelt Ave. - Near Downttown

212 S. Woodgreen Way - Rolling Green Village

630 Old Augusta Rd. - Pleasant Valley

$179,921 • 1270302 • 3 BR/3 BA

$89,000 • 1263799 • 2 BR/2 BA

$69,900 • 1268014 • 2 BR/2 BA

For pricing contact agent • 1268961 • 3 BR/1 BA

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Log cabin on ≈2 acs. Master BR on the main lvl, gorgeous kitchen, sunroom, workshop, in-ground pool, fenced bkyd, and several outbuildings

Beautiful all brick, one story home across from Cleveland Park. Extensive updates just completed inside and out. Must see!

Joan Rapp 864.901.3839

Nancy McCrory 864.505.8367 Karen Turpin 864.230.5176

Open flr plan, Florida room and New updates! Seller to pay $5,124, 1st year’s monthly regime fee with acceptable offer. Anne Marchant 864.420.0009 Jolene Wimberly 864.414.1688

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Fannie Mae owned full brick bungalow with a fenced back yard and one car carport. Hardwoods throughout. Close to interstate and shops. Kathy Slayter 864.982.7772

RENTAL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE • Marchantpm.com

www.marchantco.com

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

|

864.467.0085 | AGENT ON DUTY: Jean E. Bartlett 864.506.4093

J53

Decades of Trust. Confidence in the Future. NOVEMBER 29, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 49


JOURNAL CULTURE

This Holiday Season Tory Burch Shoes, Monkee’s of the Westend Sam Edelman Flats, MUSE Shoe Studio

Milly Dress, Mokee’s of the Westend

Bright Berry Marmot Puffer Jacket, Mast General Store

D

uring this Holiday Season, we encourage you to

As a locally owned and

Potted Poinsettia Arrangement, Roots

Lilly Pulitzer Dress, Pink Bee

Louis Vuitton Handbag, Labels Designer Consignments

Greenville based Publishing Group, this cause is near and dear to our heart. Lindsay and Church Powers are well known faces with many of our advertisers.

Lindsay’s Outfit, Augusta 20

Virtually everything in their home was purchased from local retailers. As Lindsay said, “It’s great to go in a store and have them know your name and your taste! It’s so personal and you can shop with a lot less guilt when you know

Turquoise Tray, Carolina Furniture & Interiors

you’re helping support the

Wedding Ring & Band, Geiss & Sons

local economy.” Photography: Cox Photography; Hair & Makeup: Capello Salon; Wardrobe Styling: Melissa Stroud

Shimmer Hide Rug, Carolina Furniture & Interiors

50 THE JOURNAL | NOVEMBER 29, 2013

Lindsay’s Shoes, MUSE Shoe Studio

.


JOURNAL CULTURE

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Never On Sunday, Inc., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINEat 210 East Coffee Street, Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than December 15, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Pebble Creek Clubhouse LLC /DBA Clubhouse Grille, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 101 Pebble Creek Drive, Taylors, SC 29687. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than December 8, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Zorba Lounge, Inc, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1414 East Washington Street, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than December 8, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that VLJ Social Club, Inc. / DBA 25 Live, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 6013 Augusta Road, Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than December 8, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA IN THE FAMILY COURT THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COUNTY OF GREENVILLE 2013-DR-23-2097 Date Filed: May 15, 2013 Time Filed: 9:52 AM Jeffrey Wayne Davenport and Bridget L. Davenport, Plaintiffs, -vs- Ashley Diane Davenport; John Doe; Jeremiah Wayne Davenport, a minor under the age of fourteen (14), Defendants, TO THE DEFENDANT ABOVENAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is attached and herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to this Complaint upon the subscriber, at 304 Pettigru Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service. If you fail to answer the Complaint within the thirty- day period, the Plaintiff (s) will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein and judgment by default will be rendered against you. David J. Rutledge Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 10664 Greenville, SC 29603 (864) - 467-0999

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: IFB# 27-12/10/13, 2014 Chevrolet Tahoe SUV, December 10, 2013, 3:00 P.M. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org or by calling (864) 467-7200.

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA IN THE FAMILY COURT THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COUNTY OF GREENVILLE 2013-DR-23-2101 Date Filed: May 15, 2013 Time Filed: 9:04 AM Kimberly Smith Surrett; Nicolas Lee Surrett, Plaintiff, vs. Lindsey Eubanks; John Terry Hipps; John Doe; Jordan Tyler Hipps, a minor under the age of fourteen (14) years of age, TO THE DEFENDANT ABOVE-NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is attached and herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to this Complaint upon the subscriber, at 304 Pettigru Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service. If you fail to answer the Complaint within the thirty- day period, the Plaintiff (s) will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein and judgment by default will be rendered against you. David J. Rutledge Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 10664 Greenville, SC 29603 (864) - 467-0999

NOTICE STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF JACKSON IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE SUPERIOR COURT DIVISION 13 CvS 465 UNITED COMMUNITY BANK (GEORGIA) Plaintiff vs. HORACIO M. REPETTO AND SHAUNA A. REPETTO, Defendants NOTICE OF SERVICE BY PUBLICATION STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, GREENVILLE COUNTY To: Horacio M. Repetto and Shauna A. Repetto: TAKE NOTICE that a pleading seeking relief against you has been filed in the above-entitled action. The nature of the relief being sought is as follows: The sum of $223,680.88 as of the 25th day of June, 2013, plus interest as it continues to accrue at the rate of $35.78 per diem from said date, until the date Judgment is entered, then interest at the maximum legal rate; attorney fees in the amount of $33,552.12, and the costs of this action. YOU ARE REQUIRED to make defense to such pleading not later than January 6, 2014, and upon your failure to do so the party seeking service against you will apply to the court for the relief sought. THIS the _____ day of November, 2013. VAN WINKLE, BUCK, WALL, STARNES AND DAVIS, P.A. By: MARK A. PINKSTON North Carolina State Bar Number: 16789 Attorney for Plaintiff 11 North Market Street (28801) Post Office Box 7376 Asheville, NC 28802-7376 828-258-2991 (Telephone) 828-257-2767 (Facsimile)

LEGAL NOTICES Only $.99 per line ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Only $145 tel 864.679.1205 • fax 864.679.1305 email: aharley@communityjournals.com

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JOURNAL CULTURE

Byrnes Football

WestwoodOne’s coverage of the NFL Sunday noon midnight, Monday & Thursday night football!

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Clemson Football

LOOK WHO’S IN THE JOURNAL THIS WEEK Students at St. Anthony of Padua School celebrated Red Ribbon Week with many school-wide activities. Students in all grades decorated red T-shirts and wore them in their Red Ribbon parade through the neighborhood. The parade concluded in the school gymnasium with a pep rally and a talk by guest speakers from the Greenville Police Department. Every class also decorated the doors of their classrooms. (Right) Members of the Wade Hampton High School cheerleading squad perform at the South Carolina High School League Competitive Cheer championships at the Colonial Life Arena in Columbia.

(Below) The Mauldin High School cheerleading squad placed second in class AAAA, just one point behind the winner Lexington High, in the Competitive Cheer championships at the Colonial Life Arena in Columbia.

Clemson v. South Carolina LIVE this Saturday! College Football Today @4pm Kick-off @7pm

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52 THE JOURNAL | NOVEMBER 29, 2013

Tune in 3 hours before kick-off for Carolina Kick-off with The Rise Guys.

(Above) Seventy Upstate nonprofits attended Shine the Light on Your Nonprofit’s Reframing Your Organization’s Strategic Plan workshop at the Kroc Center. Rosalyn Allison-Jacobs, a senior consultant from nationally recognized La Piana Consulting, led the presentation and discussion. Table discussion between Upstate nonprofits about getting the board members involved in the strategic planning process. (Right) Stone Academy’s Student Council sponsored a South Carolina/Clemson Food Fight to benefit the Triune Mercy Center. The students raised 1,195 cans of food.

CHEER PHOTOS BY GWINN DAVIS / CONTRIBUTING

Every game LIVE!

THE WEEK IN PHOTOS


JOURNAL CULTURE

THE WEEK IN PHOTOS

Greenville’s Audiology Team

LOOK WHO’S IN THE JOURNAL THIS WEEK

ZACHARY HANBY / CONTRIBUTING

Clemson wide receiver Mike Williams catches a pass from quarterback Tajh Boyd in the second quarter of their game against the Citadel.

Marcy W. Stowell, MA, FAAA Alisa S. McMahon, MS, CCC-A Licensed Audiologist

University of South Carolina wide receiver Shaq Roland fights for extra yardage against Coastal Carolina in Columbia.

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Multiple solutions for your hearing needs, including: PHOTO COURTESY OF FAIRFIELD VOICE

Indians, pilgrims and turkeys were on hand to watch the competitors walk the runway.

(Below) Pete the Penguin, the mascot from the Pavilion Ice Skating Rink helped judge the Beauty Bird competition at the Greenview Child Development Center. About 230 4-yearolds participated. Each child created a turkey made from a work glove.

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The Emrys Foundation presents an evening with Virginia Postrel, author of Power of Glamour, Longing and the Art of Visual Persuasion. Join us!

8/21/13 11:28 AM

Sponsored by:

Thursday, December 5, at 7:00 pm Innovate Building 148 River Street, Greenville GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Crossword puzzle: page 54

Books will be available for purchase and signing. This event is free and open to the public. Seating is limited. Reserve your place at www.Emrys.org

Sudoku puzzle: page 54

NOVEMBER 29, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 53


JOURNAL CULTURE



WEDDINGS

FIGURE. THIS. OUT. COOKED BOOKS

By Mark Feldman

ENGAGEMENTS ANNIVERSARIES 

Make your announcement to the Greater Greenville Area

WEDDINGS 1/4 page - $174, Word Count 140 3/8 page - $245, Word Count 140

ENGAGEMENTS 3/16 page - $85, Word Count 90

For complete information call 864-679-1205 or e-mail aharley@ communityjournals.com 54 THE JOURNAL | NOVEMBER 29, 2013

ACROSS 1 Skye cap 4 Long yarn 8 Wide open areas? 14 Fix after an outage, as a clock 19 Genetics lab study 20 Yemen neighbor 21 Old Spanish sailing force 22 Small egg 23 Fingers 24 __ the Merciless: Flash Gordon foe 25 Tolstoy novel about game hunting? 27 Most texts 29 Informer 30 Intimidated 31 London novel about gentlemen coming to blows? 35 Assembled 36 Computer acronym 37 Get 38 DDE rival 40 “__ Miniver” 43 Murder mystery staple 45 Credit (to) 49 Court happening 51 Spot for a pad 52 Salinger novel about an alien abduction? 56 Good, in Hebrew 57 Clear 58 Bygone bringers of blocks

59 Spanish appetizer 63 Stir up 65 Tinted 68 Despicable 69 “What a shame!” 70 Dreiser novel about a prominent British prince? 72 Big name in elevators 73 Daffy 74 NFL pick sixes, e.g. 75 Red dye 76 Guy dolls 77 Check 79 Belief: Suff. 80 Cleo’s undoing 82 Brontë novel about the rigors of ballet training? 87 One may overlook a loch 91 Perfume with myrrh, say 92 Crowd __ 93 Crowd 95 More than feasts (on) 96 Pancake-making facilitator 97 Photo __ 100 Swiss mathematician 101 Email attachment, briefly 104 Forster novel about the mysterious death of Tutenkhamen? 109 Gulf War missile 113 Former president of Pakistan

114 Lozenges, e.g. 115 Steinbeck novel about a spiritual vegan? 118 “__.0”: Comedy Central show 119 Bad opening? 120 Booze 121 R or X 122 Curved molding 123 Not leave, with “up” 124 Corners, in a way 125 Preoccupy 126 “O, let me not be mad” speaker 127 Times in want ads DOWN 1 Sculpt, as hedges 2 “Winesburg, Ohio” author Sherwood 3 Total drubbing 4 Horn of Africa natives 5 Baja buddy 6 Crooks, in slang 7 Unsettled feelings, in Frankfurt 8 Buffalo hockey player 9 Tournament kickoff, perhaps 10 Cremona craftsman 11 Beetle, for one 12 Author LeShan 13 Bank deposit 14 Scoundrel 15 Affair 16 Haggis ingredient

17 “What __ is new?” 18 Began a round, with “off” 26 Farm mom 28 Lift 32 __ wave 33 Den 34 Actress Mazar

Hard

39 House mate?: Abbr. 40 Pair, as two odd socks 41 Earns copiously 42 Cunning 44 Approx. 46 Cliffside debris 47 Violin parts

48 Great American Ball Park player 49 Cannabis compound 50 Nike rival 53 Sure to end badly 54 “Stop, sailor!” 55 Considerable 59 Hot stuff 60 Fearful 61 Arts supporters 62 Furniture and fixtures, say 64 Gold meas. 65 Eats 66 Dickens’ Heep 67 “The Hat Makes the Man” artist 70 Wee bit 71 Pal, slangily 78 Lady, e.g. 79 Supermarket franchise initials 81 L.A. hours 83 Turning meas. 84 Hip bones 85 Call in a bakery 86 Develop 87 “Scottish Fantasy” composer 88 In a ball 89 Arterial problem 90 Exits 94 Subtly mottled, as fabric 98 Starter’s gun 99 Easy mark 101 Damage, so to speak 102 Cubes in the kitchen 103 Antagonist 105 Harriet’s TV spouse 106 Appearances 107 Beatle trademark 108 Old Testament prophet 109 Put up 110 At a distance 111 Faithful 112 Poi source 116 Collar 117 Sot’s problem Crossword answers: page 53

Sudoku answers: page 53


JOURNAL CULTURE

60 & BEYOND WITH PEGGY HENDERSON

Let it be – or at least give it a holiday try Holidays, weddings and funerals set the stage for high drama, whether one likes it or not. One wimpy way to avoid the spectacle is to fake the flu and stay home. That’s drama in itself. Just recently, my family suffered an unspeakable tragedy. I lost my nephew in the prime of his adult life. The funeral service was about as open-ended, courageous and as giving as a golden retriever. No questions asked. Just unconditional love within an extended family. Unfortunately, emotional events, whether joyful, congratulatory or griefbound, push our anxiety buttons and disrupt our ability to manage our inhibitions. Petty concerns create false perceptions and mini innuendos evolve into false truths. With the 2013 holidays upon us, I’ve been asking myself, “What are a few Miss Manners-like reminders to remember when I’m out and about these next few weeks?”

After a short tour of research sites, I found two gems. First, from a High Beam website, comes the warning: Never go into a social situation with a preconceived idea as how a meeting or a party will play out. You’re possibly setting yourself up for disappointment. Another intriguing suggestion concerns the practice of mindfulness. Mindfulness means to melt into one’s surroundings without an agenda. It’s like saying without words, “Here I am – and there you are.” Just be. Do nothing. Just be open to the sense of place and sense of where others are in the shared landscape. It’s simple yet so difficult. During a personal conversation, I’ve found it best to ask questions, listen intently, and then respond in kind. Don’t be in a rush to please. Focus all your energy and eye contact on your conversational partner. Regarding another familiar area of

social contact, when it comes to heading off gossipers, social climbers and nosy so-and-so’s, try the following: Dry humor. If asked, “How are you doing?” during a funeral, reply, “I’d rather be home playing Spider Solitaire.” That’s a surefire conversational stopper. Smile until your jaws protest. Or just change the subject. The other jewel is: Treat your relatives and immediate family like you would treat your best friend. (Good luck. I understand the concept. I honestly don’t know whether this is perennially possible.) There are so many triggers that can set a bland subject like lawn work, shopping, football or even deleted emails into chaos at the Thanksgiving table or Christmas brunch. It could be that the white wine is talking or brother Bob hasn’t sent a promised check or there’s more than one elephant in the room. Whatever. Poor

adult behavior is unacceptable and so very self-indulgent. Like the weather and the rotation of the earth around the sun, we cannot change human nature. We are stuck with it – but if we are willing, we can learn to allow a person, be it friend or family, to be themselves, and let situations unfold without our input. We can bite our tongues and not judge. Try it, if only out of curiosity. Reward yourself by eating the dessert. Or have a second cup of eggnog. Stand back, speak those words of wisdom, and let it be.

Peggy Henderson is a 60 & Beyond former freelance writer turned newspaper columnist. Besides appearing in the Greenville Journal, her column is syndicated with Senior Wire News Services. In addition, she’s a staff writer for the website Go60.us. Contact her at peg4745@aol.com

NOVEMBER 29, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 55


B: 10.25 X 11.25 T: 10 X 11 GREENVILLE JOURNAL

Grand Opening Celebration Please join us for the grand opening of CertusBank’s flagship branch located at One North Main Street.

Friday, December 6 • 11 am - 2 pm Enjoy lunch, prizes and entertainment throughout the day.

Join the conversation #CertusONE

building a future

to help our community grow and prosper At CertusBank, we are committed to changing banking for the better because it makes our community better. We invite you to join us as we celebrate the opening of our flagship branch in Downtown Greenville. Meet our teammates, enjoy lunch

on us and learn more about our innovative solutions.

CertusBank.com/OneMain

CertusBank, N.A. Member FDIC. Equal housing lender. ©2013 CertusHoldings, Inc. All rights reserved. CertusBank, N.A. is a trademark of CertusHoldings, Inc.

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Nov. 29, 2013 Greenville Journal