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bigfoot Upstate residents search for legendary creature

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2 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.26.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

GREENVILLEJOURNAL LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1999 PUBLISHER | Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@communityjournals.com EDITOR | Claire Billingsley cbillingsley@communityjournals.com STAFF WRITERS Ariel Gilreath | agilreath@communityjournals.com Cindy Landrum | clandrum@communityjournals.com Andrew Moore | amoore@communityjournals.com Sara Pearce | spearce@communityjournals.com Ariel Turner | aturner@communityjournals.com COPY EDITOR Rebecca Strelow ARTS & CULTURE WRITER Vince Harris | vharris@communityjournals.com EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Susan Schwartzkopf VICE PRESIDENT OPERATIONS Holly Hardin CLIENT SER VICES MANAGERS Anita Harley | Rosie Peck BILLING INQUIRIES Shannon Rochester DIRECTOR OF SALES Emily Yepes MANAGERS OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Ed Ibarra | Donna Johnston MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Heather Propp | Meredith Rice Caroline Spivey | Liz Tew VISUAL DIRECTOR Will Crooks

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*Annual Percentage Yield of Term Share Certificate (CD) is 3.00% APY and accurate as of 10/23/2018. Minimum deposit of $500 is required. Early withdrawal penalties apply. Specific services, rates, and fees are subject to change without notice. All deposits are federally insured up to $250,000 by the National Credit Union Share Insurance Fund (NCUSIF). Commercial accounts are excluded. All claims are based on average comparison with other financial institutions. Member NCUA. ©2018, Greenville Federal Credit Union. All rights reserved.

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10.26.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 3

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PAGE 23 See more eye-catching fashion from Fall for Greenville on Page 23. Photo by Will Crooks/Greenville Journal

THEY SAID IT

“No history book’s description or photograph can equal the education received by walking inside these pieces of history.” -Lara Kaufmann, associate director, Greenville Downtown Airport – Page 24

“If you’ve never been to a comedy show in Greenville, you’re going to see the same level of comedy that you would see in Chicago, Nashville, New York, Los Angeles — right here on our main street.” -Harrison Brookie, founder, Alchemy Comedy Theater – Page 40

“We certainly had some fine candidates. (But) in light of these priorities and others, we decided the best action was to stay the course, and we may resume the search process after the New Year.” - Knox White, mayor, city of Greenville – Page 17

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4 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.26.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Opinion Views from your community

Greenville Open Studios has significant impact on city’s cultural landscape By Alan Ethridge and Michael Cooper Scheduled for the weekend of Nov. 1011, the 17th annual Greenville Open Studios has 143 participating artists, making it a vital weekend for the area’s visual arts community. Since 2004, more than 500,000 visits have been recorded in the various studios, and over $3.1 million in art has been sold. In 2017, 38,638 visits were recorded, and the artists experienced record-high sales of $294,060. These impressive results are indicative of Greenville’s continually expanding support of our cultural offerings. Greenville’s arts community has significantly diversified over the past decade, and the weekend event showcases the talent and professionalism of the visual artists who work and live in our community. Each year since the event’s beginning in 2002, Greenville Open Studios has grown to include artists in virtually every neighborhood throughout the county. The presenting sponsors for 2018 are SEW Eurodrive, South State Bank and the Peace Center. Juergen, Christopher and Rainer Blickle, principals at SEW Eurodrive, have been very loyal supporters of Greenville Open Studios for many years, and we look forward to working with them in the future as our visual arts community continues to diversify and expand. We welcome South State Bank as a presenting sponsor for the second year, and we truly appreciate the dedication and commitment to the event by Katherine Odom and Chris Robinson of South State. The Peace Center’s sponsorship reflects the organization’s commitment to all of the arts in our community, and we thank Megan Riegel and her dynamic team for their support. The event guarantees free and convenient community access to the visual arts by creating opportunities for interaction between artists and the general public. Greenville Open Studios has evolved into the premier sales and marketing event for area artists, and the weekend also provides an excellent way to learn more about artis-

tic processes and sources of creative inspiration. Greenville Open Studios is 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, and noon–6 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 11. Several artists will have their studios open from 6–9 p.m. Friday, Nov. 9 as well, as indicated in the catalog. Please feel free to contact the MAC office at 864-467-3132 at any time throughout the weekend if you need additional information. There are several ways to select the studios you would like to visit; for an official catalog, please visit the Metropolitan Arts Council at 16 Augusta St., or visit https:// www.greenvillearts.com for an electronic version. The catalogs will be included in the Nov. 2 edition of the Greenville Journal, and they are available at many retailers throughout the downtown and Augusta Road areas. A Square Affair, an exhibit at the MAC Gallery consisting of one 12- by 12-inch work of art from each artist, provides you with a comprehensive overview of the event. The exhibit runs from Nov. 3 through Dec. 14, and the gallery is open 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mondays-Fridays. You can also visit the MAC website, https://www.greenvillearts.com, to view an extensive image gallery for most of the participating artists as well as get contact information and directions to their studios. MAC is offering a revised mobile app for the 2018 event. This year the app is accessible for all smartphone devices and can be downloaded now from the MAC website. The app will allow you to sort the 143 participating artists alphabetically, by medium, accessibility and “Open Friday.” Choose and create a map of your favorites and travel to the studios through Google Maps. This application was designed and implemented by Robojuice, and we greatly appreciate the time and investment that

this company has provided for the feature. It is imperative that we continue to support our existing cultural assets that make Greenville a remarkable place to live and work. The arts throughout Greenville County account for an estimated overall economic impact of over $220 million annually, and they play a major role in attracting new businesses and tourists to the area. If the arts are to serve the public, then the public should, in turn, support the arts so that our quality of life is maintained and enhanced. Greenville Open Studios also provides an opportunity for area corporations to purchase art from local artists for their offices. Companies such as Countybank, Elliott Davis, Greenville Health System, Greenwood Capital, McMillan Pazdan Smith, Piedmont Arthritis Clinic, South State Bank and TD Bank, to name just a few, have all purchased works by local artists for their facilities. Robert L. Lynch, president and CEO of Americans for the Arts stated, “The arts help transform American communities and, as I often say, the result can be a better child, a better town, a better nation and certainly a better world.” Greenville Open Studios certainly has a significant presence in Greenville’s cultural landscape, and we hope you will interact with the 143 artists who have helped transform our outstanding city.

Photo by Will Crooks

Alan Etheridge is the executive director of the Metropolitan Arts Council, a position he has held since 2006. Email him at alan@greenvilleARTS.com. Michael Cooper of TD Bank is the MAC Board Chairman, 2018-2019.

Artist Sylvie Buche | Photo by Will Crooks


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6 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.26.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

SEARCHING FOR

SASQUATCH DOES THE LEGENDARY CREATURE LIVE IN THE UPSTATE? SOME PEOPLE SAY YES STORY BY ANDREW MOORE Bigfoot. Sasquatch. Yeti. The Abominable Snowman. Stories of large, hairy creatures appearing to be half man and half ape have been told around campfires for hundreds of years. In the folklore of some Native American tribes, the beasts are said to be peaceful, supernatural beings with intelligence and spiritual powers. Other tribes, however, describe them as malevolent creatures who attack humans, play dangerous tricks, or steal children. For obvious reasons, the vast majority of mainstream scientists maintain that the existence of such creatures is impossible. Yet thousands of people have claimed to spot the mysterious hominids roaming the woods of North America since the 1800s. Eyewitness reports describe the creatures as bipedal primates that are 6 to 10 feet tall and weigh at least 500 pounds. The footprints left behind by Bigfoot (a singular and plural term) range in size from about 12 to 22 inches long. They are also thought to be non-aggressive creatures, whose human-like intelligence and shyness make them elusive and thus rarely seen. Some believe the creatures are descendants of an extinct species of ape that migrated from south-

ern Asia to North America across the Bering Strait during the Ice Age, while others consider Bigfoot to be a hoax or myth due to the lack of concrete evidence.

A MONSTER AMONG US Cari George has been searching for Bigfoot for years. The 34-year-old is the co-founder of the Carolina Cryptid Crew, a group of more than two dozen Bigfoot enthusiasts from the Upstate area who investigate reported sightings of the legendary creature across South Carolina, North Carolina, and Georgia. As a kid in Oconee County, George says she read and watched anything she could find about Bigfoot after a local librarian suggested a book about the creature. Her first encounter with Bigfoot happened during the summer of 2013 in the woods of Oconee County while investigating reports of sightings in the area. George claims that she and several family members were walking on a trail when a large, hairy, bipedal creature suddenly appeared from behind some nearby brush. “We stared at each other for what seemed like forever, but in reality, I’m sure it was no more than a few seconds. Then, it just turned around and left,” George said. “It was about 7 feet tall,

definitely a small one, covered in red fur, and not at all what I expected I would see when I finally did get to see one of these creatures.” While George is convinced her encounter with the creature was real, she said that she realizes that most people will not believe her and that she tries to remain skeptical of witnesses and evidence when conducting investigations of reported Bigfoot sightings. George said she and all other members of the Carolina Cryptid Crew take a “scientific” approach with their investigations and employ a variety of technology (trail cameras, night vision scopes, laser grids, parabolic dishes, etc.) to collect evidence of Bigfoot. “While we enjoy trying out new technology, especially things that paranormal investigators use, I guess our methods are more like hunters, with cameras and audio recorders, rather than guns,” George said. “I would call it scientific, because it is all about research and trial and error. When we do come across evidence, such as hair and scat, we collect it in the most sterile way possible and preserve it.” George said the group’s Bigfoot evidence includes hair and scat samples, audio recordings of the creature’s vocalizations, and two plaster castings of supposed footprints. It also includes photographs of numerous “bedding” sites throughout the Southeast.

EITHER “PROBABLY” OR “DEFINITELY” REAL 30%OF AMERICANS BELIEVE THAT BIGFOOT ISaccording to a 2012 study by Argus Reid Public Opinion


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BI G FO O T

Bi gfoot is imp os s ib le, y et t hous and s of pe op le rep or t s ight ings ev er y y ear. H ere is w hat w e know ab out t he hair y, ap e- like creat ure:

ABOUT THE LEGEN D Fo o t p r i n t | 1 7 - 2 2 i n Bigfoot | 8-10 ft

With over 13 million acres of forests, South Carolina is prime real estate for Bigfoot, according to George. In fact, the Bigfoot Field Research Organization, an online community of investigators who maintain a database of sighting reports and organize tracking expeditions for interested members of the public, lists 50 sightings across the Palmetto State since 1964. “There are a lot of sightings and has been a lot of evidence found — both auditory and physical in the Upstate. These sighting go back many decades. Many of them have local names, like the Barnes Station Booger in Iva, South Carolina,” George said. There have been 11 documented sightings in the Upstate, according to the Bigfoot Field Research Organization. The only reported encounter in Greenville County is from an unnamed resident who claims to have heard a Bigfoot vocalization near his home off Highway 11 in 1987. While most scientists attribute encounters with the creature either to hoaxes or to the misidentification of known animals, George plans to continue her search for the creature and to recruit additional investigators for her team. “I have been surprised at the reaction of the community. There are a few that say we are wasting our time and there is no way that these things exist,” she said. “However, many more people are curious and believe it is possible they exist. I’m always shocked at how many people tell me about strange encounters they or their families have had once they find out about our team.” For more information, visit www.carolinacryptidcrew.com.

scient is t s maint ain t hat t he exis t ence of

Ma n | 6 f t

SEEING IS BELIEVING

FINDING

Th e v as t major it y of mains t ream

Hair | Reddish Brown

Eyes | Red

SCIENCE SPEAKS A 2014 g enetic analysis o f 30 hair samples at t r ib ut ed t o B igfoot show ed t he hair actually came fro m bears, horses, even a p or cup ine, b ut not fr om any ape-like animals new to science.*

14% Horse 14% Canine

“BIGFOOT” HAIR SAMPLES

17% Other 3%

Dee

r

GRAPHIC BY STEPHANIE ORR

14% Cow

SASQUAT CH SIGHT INGS IN T HE UPSTAT E

34% Bear 4

1

1 1

2

1

1 There 3% have been 50 m u sightings of the H creature in South Carolina since the 1960s, according to the Bigfoot Field Research Organization, a network of more than 3,000 people who collect and analyze data on possible Sasquatch encounters across North America.

an

Some researchers, including George, hypothesize that Bigfoot are highly intelligent and capable of building nests like other primates, such as gorillas and chimpanzees, which usually use bent and broken vines, twigs, leaves, and branches to build sleeping areas. “I’m not sure how intelligent they are, but I believe if we ever get the chance to research them in a closed environment, we will find their intelligence closer to human than any other animal,” George said.

*Source:* Sykes, B. C., Mullis, R. A., Hagenmuller, C., Melton, T. W., & Sartori, M. (2014, August). Genetic analysis of hair samples attributed to yeti, bigfoot and other anomalous primates. In Proc. R. Soc. B (Vol. 281, No. 1789, p. 20140161). doi:10.1098/rspb.2014.0161

A BBE VILLE : 0 A NDE RSO N: 1 C HE ROK E E : 1 G RE E NVILLE : 1 G RE E NW O OD: 0 LA U R E NS: 1 OC O NE E : 4 PIC K E NS: 1 SPA RTA NBU R G: 2 U NIO N: 0


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10 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.26.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

EVERY VOTE COUNTS WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW BEFORE YOU HEAD TO THE POLLS NOV. 6

BY CINDY LANDRUM

When Greenville County voters head to the polls on Nov. 6, they’ll

find a variety of local and state races on the ballot. Plus, they’ll get

to decide whether the state Superintendent of Education should be changed to an appointed seat or remain an elected office.

Here’s what you need to know before you vote in the general election:

CAN I VOTE?

The deadline to register to vote in the general election has already passed. In order to vote, South Carolina requires a person to register at least 30 days prior to the election. The deadline was pushed back this year because of Hurricane Florence, but that date has already passed as well. To check voter registration information, go to https://info.scvotes.sc.gov/ eng/voterinquiry/VoterInformationRequest.aspx?PageMode=VoterInfo

HOW DO I VOTE ABSENTEE?

Qualified voters may vote absentee in person or by mail. An absentee application can be filed online no later than 5 p.m. on the fourth day prior to the election or in person at the county voter registration office of the voter’s county of residence. A person may vote absentee in person up to 5 p.m. the day before the election. For more details on who qualifies to vote absentee or who can request an application or return an absentee ballot, go to https://www.scvotes.org/ absentee-voting.

GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL DISTRICT 19 JERVARUS HOWARD DEMOCRAT

Occupation: Business owner Qualifications: Business owner, soldier, Greenville Area Development Corporation board of directors. Key Issues: transportation, growth and economic development, neighborhood safety. www.howardforcouncil.com

WILLIS H. MEADOWS REPUBLICAN

Occupation: Insurance agency owner Qualifications: Greenville County Council member since 2007, County Council vice chairman. Key Issues: growth, congestion, increasing property tax burden. www.facebook.com/WillisMeadowsCCDistrict19

THIRTEENTH CIRCUIT SOLICITOR WALT WILKINS REPUBLICAN

WHERE DO I VOTE?

Find your polling location here: https://www.greenvillecounty.org/VoterRegistration/ pdf/2018PollingLocations.pdf

Occupation: 13th Circuit Solicitor Qualifications: 13th Circuit Solicitor since 2011, served as U.S. Attorney for South Carolina, the state’s chief federal prosecutor, for 18 months. Key Issues: Proven record: office is clearing the backlog of cases; established division to target and prosecute sex crimes, focused prosecution priorities on drug dealers www.waltwilkinssolicitor.com

WHAT DO I NEED TO BRING?

LUCAS C. MARCHANT PETITION CANDIDATE

To vote, one of the following forms of identification is required: valid South Carolina driver’s license, South Carolina concealed weapons permit, South Carolina identification card, federal military identification card, U.S. passport, South Carolina voter registration card with picture. The identification must be current. For further information on candidates, visit greenvillejournal.com

Occupation: Attorney Qualifications: 12 years with the 13th Circuit Solicitor’s Office, Assistant Deputy Solicitor, Board of Directors for Meals on Wheels and the Greenville Police Foundation. Key Issues: Plans to establish a multi-agency task force to address narcotics issues, reduction of pending case docket and amount of time it takes to resolve a case Marchantforsolicitor.com


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SOUTH CAROLINA HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES DISTRICT 10 WEST COX REPUBLICAN Occupation: Attorney Qualifications: product of Anderson District 1 schools, Clemson graduate, law degree from University of South Carolina School of law, community volunteer. Key Issues: Bringing efficiency and transparency to state government, ensuring District 10 has the attention and resources it needs from its representative. www.facebook.com/WestCoxforStateHouse/ LUCY HOFFMAN DEMOCRAT

Occupation: owner of Red Iron Brand Solutions, a manufacturer of event display products. Qualifications: small business owner, has taught history at Greenville Technical College, volunteer in her church Key Issues: Education, infrastructure and support for small businesses. www.lucyforschouse.com

DISTRICT 17 JUDI BUCKLEY DEMOCRAT

Qualifications: Served in the Virgin Islands Senate for two years, small business owner, executive director of St. Croix chapter of Junior Achievement. Key Issues: Improve education, more livable wages for teachers, creation of policies that make small business ownership less cumbersome and more attractive. www.judibuckley.org

MIKE BURNS REPUBLICAN

Occupation: General contractor Qualifications: S.C. House District 17 representative since 2013; has created five businesses in the Upstate; served on boards of the Taylors Free Medical Clinic and Davis-Lar International Orphanage. Key Issues: “In God We Trust Bill” for public schools, human trafficking bill, state workforce bill for prisoner reform www.facebook.com/mikeburnsSC17

DISTRICT 19 CARRIE COUNTON DEMOCRAT

Occupation: Higher education Qualifications: MBA, believes in the American dream. Key Issues: Attraction and retention of teachers, increase in minimum wage, expansion and protection of Medicaid. www.votecarriecounton.com

DWIGHT LOFTIS REPUBLICAN

Occupation: Retired insurance agent Qualifications: South Carolina House of Representatives since 1996.

SOUTH CAROLINA HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES CON’T DISTRICT 22 JASON ELLIOT REPUBLICAN

Occupation: Attorney Qualifications: Member of the state House since 2016. Key Issues: Public safety, infrastructure, accountability, education. www.votejasonelliott.com

BK BROWN DEMOCRAT

DISTRICT 25 TONY BRYCE INDEPENDENT Occupation: Pastor Qualifications: Riley Institute Diversity Fellow, board member of the Urban League, first vice president of the Greenville NAACP. Key Issues: Education, economics and environment. www.facebook.com/boyceisourchoice LEOLA ROBINSON-SIMPSON DEMOCRAT

Occupation: Retired director at Greenville Technical College Qualifications: Six years in state House of Representatives, 16 years on the Greenville County School Board. Key Issues: Education/incentives to attract college students to teaching; improving dangerous state roads in District 25, especially White Horse Road; housing for the poor. www.facebook.com/leolarobinsonsimpsondist25

STATE ATTOURNEY GENERAL CONSTANCE ANASTOPOULO DEMOCRAT

Party: Democrat Occupation: Business owner Qualifications: Business owner, soldier, Greenville Area Development Corporation board of directors. Key Issues: transportation, growth and economic development, neighborhood safety. www.anastopouloforag.com

ALAN WILSON REPUBLICAN

Occupation: South Carolina Attorney General Qualifications: Two terms as South Carolina Attorney General, experience as an assistant solicitor and assistant attorney general. Key Issues: Keeping the office up to date on technology, helped reform the state’s domestic violence and human trafficking laws, additional prosecutorial support for the office, broadening the public integrity efforts of the office. www.wilsonforag.com


12 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.26.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

US HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES DISTRICT 3 JEFF DUNCAN REPUBLICAN

Occupation: CEO of J. Duncan and Associates Qualifications: Served on South Carolina House of Rep., S.C. House Agriculture, Natural Resources and Environmental Affairs Committee, and U.S. House of Rep. Key Issues: Supported the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, supports removal of burdensome regulations for businesses; supports nuclear energy www.jeffduncan.com

MARY GEREN DEMOCRAT

Occupation: English instructor at Tri-County Tech. College Qualifications: Member of the Anderson Area Chamber of Commerce, Foothills Alliance board member, co-chair of the Anderson chapter of S.C. Democrats Care. Key Issues: Protection of Medicare, Medicaid expansion, legalization of medical marijuana, fair pay www.marygaren.com

DAVE MOORE AMERICAN

Occupation: German specialist at the Library of Congress. Qualifications: Bronze Star Medal recipient, U.S. Army, speaks four languages, once lived in the Middle East Key Issues: Supports Alexander Hamilton’s 11 Point Economic plan, reinstatement of protective tariffs, wants legislation that would reinstate the marginal tax rate for 10 years. www.daveforcongress.org

DISTRICT 4 BRANDON BROWN DEMOCRAT Occupation: Previously worked at Jackson State University, was senior vice president for institutional advancement at Paine College. Qualifications: Founder of University Sports Classic, worked on Sen. Joe Biden’s presidential campaign. Key Issues: Fixing health care, improving education, improving conditions so more small businesses can thrive www.brandonpbrown.com GUY V. FURAY AMERICAN

Occupation: founder of The Insurance Source Qualifications: Business owner, graduate of Greenville and Spartanburg Chambers advanced political leadership programs, Leadership Greer Class 38, Compass of Carolina board of directors, youth sports coach. Key Issues: health care, immigration, guns and safe schools. www.guy4congress.com

WILLIAM TIMMONS REPUBLICAN

Occupation: Attorney and entrepreneur. Qualifications: Member of S.C. Senate since 2017. Key Issues: Stopping illegal immigration, holding the federal government accountable, rebuilding the military, passing a balanced budget amendment, fixing the health care system. www.votetimmons.com

GREENVILLE COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD AREA 18 BOB COTTER

Occupation: Owner of Upstate Instrument Repair Qualifications: Former band teacher Key Issues: Dissatisfaction with the direction the district is going, giving teachers more flexibility and finding ways to make learning fun for students.

PATT SUDDUTH

Occupation: Retired teacher and school administrator Qualifications: 16 years on the Greenville County School Board Key Issues: Increasing school safety measures, improving the graduation rate, making teacher salaries more competitive, following the school district’s strategic plan.

AREA 21 ROY CHAMLEE

Occupation: Retired from Michelin’s government affairs department Qualifications: Past board member for the South Carolina, Greer and Greenville Chambers of Commerce; served on board of trustees for Rolling Green Village; current member of the Greenville Area Development Corporation board. Key Issues: Making sure students are ready to enter the workforce; school safety.

LAFONDA MIKA DILLARD

AREA 22 ROB KENDRICK

Occupation: Owner of a real estate company Qualifications: Retired Greenville County Schools business teacher. Key Issues: Develop stronger partnerships with the community, higher education, and business; develop innovative curriculum to provide students multiple pathways to success; create learning environments to foster development of creativity, collaboration, critical thinking and communication in students www.kendrickforschoolboard.com

LYNDA LEVENTIS-WELLS

Occupation: Retired executive director of the Carolinas Institute for Community Policing. Qualifications: Twelve years on the Greenville County School Board. Key Issues: School safety


Reading Vision Correction is Here!

ADVERTORIAL

10.26.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 13

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

ADVERTORIAL

The inlay is a tiny porous ring placed in the cornea. It works like a camera aperture, returning reading vision to patients.

The Next Generation of Eye Care

Almost 114 million people in America struggle with agerelated near vision loss (presbyopia). The inlay is designed to reduce or eliminate the need for reading glasses in people generally over 40 who have good distance vision, but problems with near vision. With the Kamra procedure, patients previously dependent on readers can see things up close again – menus, text messages, food labels, computers, books, magazines – and still have clear distance vision.

Frustrated with your readers? There’s a solution.

Clemson Eye is the first and only clinic in the Upstate to offer patients reading vision correction through the KamraTM corneal inlay.

It received FDA approval in April 2015. Since then, more than 1,500 have been implanted in the United States. Note that more than 37,000 worldwide Glaucoma has been calledhave “thebeen silentimplanted thief of sight” because over the past 10 years. it doesn’t have any overt symptoms until damage is done and visionare is proud lost. It is cause of in “We tothe be second first inleading the Upstate to blindness offer patients the world, after cataracts. The only way to detect glaucoma this procedure. The Kamra is a great solution for peopleisin through eye50s exam. their 40san and who are frustrated with blurry near vision. “Glaucoma is caused when the network of tissue that drains fluid out of the space between the iris and cornea becomes blocked or drains too slowly,” says Dr. Brian Johnson, one of the eye surgeons at Clemson Eye. “The resulting pressure can damage the optic nerve and cause vision loss or blindness.” There are several risk factors that increase the chances of developing glaucoma. They include:

The inlay offers presbyopia patients a safe reading vision correction solution and freedom from the hassle of readers,” says Dr. Joseph Parisi, Chief Ophthalmologist and Medical Director at Clemson Eye. The elective procedure takes about 15 minutes and is reversible if the patient chooses. Even patients who have had previous eye surgery, such as cataract patients, or who wear bifocals can be candidates for the Kamra. Clemson Eye offers free reading vision correction consultations. To find out if you’re a candidate, call today to book your appointment. Clemson Eye’s new Greenville location is 360 Pelham Road, just off Haywood. Clemson Eye has been a leading provider of next eye care in the area for 40 years. inject® is the generation to help treat glaucoma in conjunction with cataract surgery. Studies show 80% of patients can stop their glaucoma medications after the procedure. The iStent inject® has an excellent safety profile, similar to cataract surgery The Symfony alone. One ofhas its been in use in 49 countries for several years, but the FDA approval unique features came after a randomized clinical trial of 148 patients. that trial, 77 percent of Symfony patients had 20/25 is that theIniStent inject® is actually two distances, separate devices to maximize draining vision at intermediate compared with 34 percent who ability through Schlemm’s canal. It is the smallest approved had a traditional mono-focal lens. Near vision for reading was implant thepatients human were body:able a mere 300two microns. of improvedinand to read levels ofMade smaller titanium, it is safe for future MRIs and does not interfere with lines than their mono-focal counterparts. metal detectors. The device is only approved to be used in patients moderate conjunction with “Patientswith who mild have or received theseglaucoma have beeninvery excited and cataract surgery. iStent inject®, most patients able to pleased with how With their lifestyles have improved,” Dr. are Johnson ₁,₂ maintain eyeare pressure the procedure. notes. “Thnormal ese lenses ideal forafter patients who have an active

New Technology for Cataract Patients

Clemson Eye surgeon Dr. Brian Johnson calls The Symfony lens a “game changer.” In September, Dr. Johnson became one of the first surgeons in Greenville to implant the new lens, which was just approved by the FDA in July for use in the U.S.

• People with a family history of glaucoma. Until the Symfony, cataract patientspressure, with signifi cant astigmatism • People with high intraocular or pressure were limited to monofocal lens implants that would correct either inside the eye. distance or near vision, but not both. Symfony is the first extended • Everyone overwith age 60. depth of focus lens astigmatism correction. • African-Americans. This allows excellent night vision and sharpness of vision (visual • Hispanics over the age of 60. acuity) at near, intermediate and • People with diabetes. far distances. • People who have used steroids for a long period of time. New technology innovations, like • People with physical eye injuries. the Symfony, continue to improve thegiven IOLs patients and the visual outcomes Over the years, a tiny implant has new hope. It for patients with a variety of the is called the iStent – the smallest implant ever approved by conditions. The two U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Clemson Eye,most a leader in signifi cant improvements are vastly eye care innovation, was among the first practices in the area and to offer the iStent solution to itsimproved patients. intermediate The L-shapedvision iStent an extended range acuity opens up a channel that drains fluid from the eye of andvision reduces pressure. for patients with astigmatism.

Clemson Eye Surgeon, Dr. Brian Johnson and Glaukos rep, Keith Wine

Dr. Johnson recently implanted the first Upstate patient with an iStent inject®. Recently approved by the FDA, the iStent

Cataracts are a common eye condition where the natural lens becomes clouded, impairing a patient’s vision. According to the National Eye Institute, more than 20 percent of Americans will have cataracts by the age of 65, and the prevalence increases with age. In cataract surgery, the clouded natural lens is removed and replaced with an IOL. For many patients, cataract surgery freed them from prescription glasses, but sometimes replaced them with readers. A new intraocular lens (IOL) that provides a full range of vision for cataract patients, even those with astigmatism, is now an option for many patients.

lifestyle. They meet the needs of our patients who like to golf, use a computer or five tablet, shop, uselocations, a smartphone, and drive Clemson Eye has convenient including Anderson, at night.” Easley, Greenville and Simpsonville. To help maintain Clemson, your healthy vision, call to book your appointment today. 1. iStent inject® Trabecular Micro-Bypass System: Directions for Use, Part # 45-0176. 2. Hengerer FH. Personal Experience with Second-Generation Trabecular Micro-Bypass Stents in Combination with Cataract Surgery in Patients with Glaucoma: 3-Year Follow-up. ASCRS 2018 Presentation.


14 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.26.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

GREENVILLE COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD (CON’T) AREA 28 DARRYL A IMPERATI

Occupation: Former principal of Woodmont High School Qualifications: Proven record as a school administrator. Key Issues: Being a strong voice for the area in which he will serve, advocating for parity, providing the best educational opportunities for staff and students.

LISA WELLS

Occupation: Civil engineer Qualifications: Eight years on Greenville County School Board Key Issues: Student safety, dealing with population growth, protecting existing options and expanding high quality school choice opportunities for families. www.facebook.com/lisawells.greenvilleschoolboard

STATE SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION

SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE DAVID EDMOND GREEN

Occupation: ordained minister Qualifications: former veterinary food inspector Key Issues: Create a first-class research program designed to bring healthy foods to every home in South Carolina; farmer advocacy; increase farmers’ markets throughout the state to create a fresh food pipeline. www.edmond4agriculturesc.com

HUGH WEATHERS REPUBLICAN

Occupation: Co-owner of Weathers Farms, a 650-cow dairy farm, and Weathers Trucking Inc., a bulk milk delivery service; Partner in Circle W. Farms, row crop farming. Qualifications: Has been the state’s Commissioner of Agriculture since Sept. 2004. Key Issues: Continuing to grow the state’s agribusiness economy; continuing to add agriculture jobs in the state. www.hughweathers.com

CHRIS NELUMS UNITED CITIZENS Occupation: Pastor

MOLLY SPEARMAN REPUBLICAN

Occupation: Superintendent of Education Qualifications: Has served one term as South Carolina Superintendent of Education; served as deputy superintendent of education for governmental relations; led the South Carolina Association of School Adminstrators; served in the state House of Representatives; former Teacher of the Year. Key Issues: Safety of students; working toward providing a trained school resource officer and mental health counselor www.mollyspearman.com

ISRAEL ROMERO DEMOCRAT Withdrew from race, but will still appear on ballot.

SECRETARY OF STATE MARK HAMMOND REPUBLICAN

Occupation: Secretary of State Qualifications: has been Secretary of State since 2002, eight years as Spartanburg County Clerk of Court. Key Issues: Continue to create and enhance online filings for businesses and citizens; enactment of electronic notarization to streamline transactions in real estate

MELVIN WHITTENBERG DEMOCRAT

Occupation: retired military and ExxonMobil Corporation employee Qualifications: Served on advisory boards of four nonprofit organizations, community outreach chairman of the veterans advocacy support team and black employee success team at ExxonMobil Corporation. Key Issues: Making sure all legislation signed by the governor receives the official state seal within 10 business days of receipt, implementing a “Boots to Business” initiative www.melvinwhittenburg.org

STATE TREASURER ROSALYN GLENN DEMOCRAT, WORKING FAMILIES

Occupation: President and CEO of Glenn Destiny Consulting. Qualifications: Key Issues: repairing the underfunding of the South Carolina pension plan and making it more sustainable; renewing trust in leadership; facilitating collaboration between state agencies and departments and facilitating relationships that could produce cost savings to the state. www.rosalynglenn.com

CURTIS LOFTIS REPUBLICAN

Occupation: Small business owner and founder of the Saluda Charitable Foundation. Qualifications: Two terms as South Carolina treasurer Key Issues: Transparency and accountability in state government, increase in families and contributions to the state’s 529 College Savings Plan, 226 percent increase in amount of unclaimed property returned, strategic sale of state bonds, maintenance of the state’s AAA credit rating. www.curtisloftis.com

SARAH WORK AMERICAN

Occupation: Certified public accountant Qualifications: Certified public accountant Key Issues: South Carolina cannot afford another four years of the current treasurer in terms of managing the state’s pension plan www.workforsc.org


10.26.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 15

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

GOVERNOR & LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR HENRY MCMASTER & PAMELA EVATT

REPUBLICAN Qualifications: McMaster: Governor since January 2017, two years as lieutenant governor, eight years as attorney general, four years as a U.S. attorney. Evatt: President and CEO of Quality Business Solutions. Key Issues: 1 percent reduction over five years for all personal income tax brackets; full retirement exemption for military veterans and first responders; conservative, progrowth policies that attract businesses and jobs; reforming the Department of Transportation Commission; deepening of the Charleston Harbor; complete I-73 and I-526 extension; trained law enforcement officer in each school. www.henrymcmaster.com

We always let you know who will be there when you open the door!

JAMES SMITH AND MANDY POWERS NORRELL DEMOCRAT Qualifications: Smith: State House of Representatives since 1997. Norrell: State House of Representatives since 2013. Key Issues: Access to affordable health care, making sure teacher salaries meet or exceed the Southeastern average, creating a school-to-work pipeline, lifting the cap on solar power, protecting the coast from oil drilling and exploration, task force to address coastal flooding, common sense gun safety, stopping domestic violence and fighting human trafficking. www.jamessmith.com

BRAD BIRITZ

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16 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.26.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Greenville City Council approves $5M budget surplus plan

Please Join Us for the 8th Annual

Hope and Help for the Holidays and Beyond

ARIEL GILREATH | STAFF

agilreath@communityjournals.com

A grief seminar providing hope & healing

Tuesday, November 13, 2018 9 am to 3 pm For anyone who has experienced loss and grief in their own life, as well as professionals who help grieving individuals and their families. Keynote Speaker & Morning General Session: Mitchell D. Carmody, GSP, CCP

Proactive Grieving, Hope for the Holidays and Beyond Small Group Topics: Grief and Loss Due to Substance Abuse - Mildred Williams, MA, MA, ABD You Can Lean on Me: How Grief Can Either Push Relationships Apart or Make Them Stronger - Andrew Johnston, MDiv, MA, LPC Losing Your +1: Life After the Death of A Partner - Tamara L. Hanna, LPC Whispers of Love, Signs & Synchronicity of Continuing Connections - Mitchell D. Carmody, CGSP, CCP Lessons Learned From Our Journeys of Healing: From Grief to Grace After the Death of a Child - Alice Ann Holman, BA, MEd, M+30, NBPT and Jan James, BA, MEd

I Want to Be a Grief Buddy: What Do I Do? - Christopher M. Strom, Grief Support Group Leader Music & Grief: Creative Resourcing in Bereavement - Cathleen Flynn, MA, MT-BC Stigma Surrounding Mental Illness & Grief & Loss - Mildred Williams, MA, MA, ABD

Hope and Help for the Holidays and Beyond

Grief 101: Who Are You as a Griever? - Mitchell D. Carmody, CGSP, CCP Hope After Suicide - Dan Taylor, Doctor of Ministry

Probate Court: How to Plan My Estate Administration - Judge Debora A. Faulkner

A seminar for loss, hope and healing

Closing Message of Hope: Rev. Claire Ripley

Tuesday, November 11, 2014 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Our teams have been honored to come together each year to provide this special day of education, hope and healing to our community. We consider it a privilege to provide this important day at no cost to you. Lunch is included as well as educational credits (CEU’s) for professionals. First Baptist Greenville, Fellowship Hall 847 Cleveland St.

To register, please visit HolidayGriefSeminar.com Greenville, SC 29601 by Friday, November 9. RSVP by Friday, November 7 If unable to register online,This orseminar for questions: 864-325-3526. is for anyone who has experienced loss and grief, as well as professionals who help grieving individuals, such as Nurses, Counselors First Baptist Greenville, Fellowship Hall, 847 Cleveland St.,and Therapists, Social Workers, Chaplains, Clergy Members, Guidance Counselors, Psychologists and Educators. Greenville, SC 29601 ( 4 .0 hrs. Continuing Education Credit available. More information upon request. )

Presented by

GREENVILLE MEMORIAL GARDENS

and

WOODLAWN

Memorial Park, Funerals and Cremations

Greenville’s city council will spend $4.9 million of its $8 million budget surplus on affordable housing, public transportation, and neighborhood investment. The surplus comes from the city’s requirement to put 20 percent of its budget in reserves for emergencies and auxiliary funds — $1.25 million of the funds have already been spent on repairs to City Hall. The council approved $1.5 million for affordable housing by way of the Greenville Housing Fund, a nonprofit the council created to address the city’s shortage of affordable homes, at its meeting Monday night. The approval came after four residents spoke during the public comment section urging the council to dedicate more resources to affordable housing. The council approved a $1 million infusion to Greenlink, which Mayor Knox White said can be leveraged as a local match against state and federal funds to total $3.75 million. The funds will provide a mid-life overhaul to 12 existing Greenlink buses — extending their life for another five years — buy two 30-foot diesel buses, buy two additional Proterra buses on top of two buses purchased with federal grant money, and buy three smaller cutaway buses, which will replace two existing ones.

The Greenlink funding is critical for the city’s aging bus fleet, according to Gary Shepard, director of public transportation. “From day one, we’ve had an aging fleet that needs to be replaced,” Shepard told council members. The increased bus fleet will result in an increase in operating costs on top of existing operating issues, and White said the city already increased transportation’s operating budget by $150,000 this year. But Shepard recently told county council the transit system would need an additional $1.5 million in its operating budget by 2021 to maintain service because of diminished federal funding. “In the weeks ahead, we’ll be looking at a way to increase the operational funding in addition to what we did earlier,” White said. White said one option could be using the settlement funds from a lawsuit with the Greenville Health System. Legislators and county officials sued GHS because the nonprofit doesn’t pay property taxes. This year, a judge ruled in favor of a settlement allowing GHS to pay $2 million to the county and its cities. White said the settlement has resulted in about $425,000 per year to the city, which could be an option for boosting the transit system’s operating budget. County council has also been addressing Greenlink’s low operational budget in its


10.26.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 17

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM meetings. The county provides $451,223 per year to its operations, while the city provides $599,098 plus $480,000 in contributed management services and $260,021 in hospitality tax money for trolleys. City council approved spending $1 million to neighborhood investment, which White said will go toward improved planning and infrastructure, including neighborhood and commercial corridors, facade improvements, sidewalks, and traffic light controls. White said the city manager will be asked to make a plan proposal to the council in the near future, and the investment could help with an existing plan to improve the Wade Hampton Boulevard corridor.

“In our normal budget, we’ve boosted funding for all the neighborhood projects for about the third year in a row, which is about $1 million for sidewalks, road repaving, trails, and things like that. So it’s supplemental to that,” White said. The council also approved $1.4 million as a local match to federal funds garnered for the Greenville Transit Authority facility. White said after the allocations, there is still money left in the reserves in case of emergencies. “The reason we’re doing all of this is a response to growth and to better manage growth in the city,” White said. The city will take a final vote on the surplus allocations on Nov. 12.

By federal government definition, affordable housing is housing that takes no more than 30 percent of a household’s income. Will Crooks/Greenville Journal

Greenville City Council postpones search for city manager ARIEL GILREATH | STAFF

agilreath@communityjournals.com

Greenville won’t have a new city manager until after the holidays, city council decided Monday morning. Mayor Knox White said the city has major announcements coming soon regarding affordable housing, transit, and neighborhood planning. “We decided at the end of the day, we’d rather stay the course and continue where we are,” White said. “It’s very disruptive to have a new city manager come in.” White said the city will ask Nancy Whitworth to stay on as interim city manager until the search is complete. The search for a new city manager started after John Castile, Greenville’s city manager for eight years, announced he was stepping down in the spring. His last day was Aug. 31. Jill Silverboard, deputy city manager in Clearwater, Florida, and Bryan C. Woods, assistant city manager

in New Braunfels, Texas, were the two finalists left for the position after Charlotte Assistant City Manager Debra Campbell withdrew her name from the running to take the city manager job in Asheville. “We certainly had some fine candidates,” White said. “(But) in light of these priorities and others, we decided the best action was to stay the course, and we may resume the search process after the New Year.”

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18 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.26.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Business leaders watching what County Council does with Greenlink funding CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

The leader of the Downtown Transportation Coalition, a group of downtown businesses pushing for better public transportation, says all eyes are now focused on the Greenville County Council.

“We’re encouraged by what we see from the Greenville City Council and Mayor Knox White,” said Jon-Michial Carter, CEO of ChartSpan Medical Technologies and organizer of the coalition. “Now, all eyes are on the county as we wait and watch to see where the leadership will come from. We’ve got to get County Council’s attention.”

Greenlink predicts that by 2021, the transit system will need an additional $1.5 million annually from the city and county to maintain service at current levels. Photo provided

Greenlink director Gary Shepard recently told the County Council that by July 2021 the transit system will need an additional $1.5 million annually from the city and county to maintain service at today’s levels because of diminishing federal funding. Extending bus service to 11:30 p.m. on weekdays and Saturdays would take another $1.4 million annually, Greenlink officials said. Greenlink’s long-range plan calls for extending hours by 2020. It also calls for eventually adding Sunday service. The plan to ultimately expand service to more areas of the county, improve bus frequency, and extend hours would require $5 million more annually — about doubling Greenlink’s current budget. That plan would also cost $7 million more in onetime capital expense for more buses. Greenlink’s long-range plan also calls for opening a new maintenance facility, something for which the bus system recently received an $11 million federal grant. The grant requires a $2.75 million local match. The Greenville City Council took $1.4 million out of the city’s budget surplus for part of that local match, and another $1 million to help buy new buses and refurbish Greenlink’s existing fleet. Members of the coalition say Greenville’s public transit system is inadequate to get employees to work and threatens the area’s

ability to attract and retain businesses, especially downtown. “I don’t think you can find anyone to say that we have an adequate system,” Carter said. “We’re going to run out of parking [downtown] and we have no viable bus system. How are you going to move the citizenry around if you don’t have places to park them or buses to move them?” Earlier this month, County Councilman Rick Roberts called the money the county provides Greenlink a “disgrace.” “We’re not funding it to the point to where we almost ought to say we don’t care,” Roberts had said. According to a funding analysis prepared for County Council, the city’s revenue per capita is greater than the county’s due to the concentration of valuable mixed-use real estate in the city that is assessed at 6 percent as opposed to more residential properties that are assessed at 4 percent. The county receives no business license revenue and relies on property tax millage for budgeted operations and capital improvements. The analysis said that if County Council wanted to increase funding for the Greenville Transit Authority, which owns Greenlink, it would have to reduce other county services or raise property taxes. The county has not raised property taxes in 25 years.

Clemson extends contract for Clements, recommends $1.5 million life insurance policy ARIEL GILREATH | STAFF

agilreath@communityjournals.com

Clemson University’s board unanimously approved a request to create a split-dollar life insurance policy for President James Clements by investing $300,000 over five years. The board also approved a contract extension to November 2023. Before the extension, Clements’ contract ended in February of 2022. The life insurance compensation is pending approval by the Clemson University Foundation, which would invest the $1.5 million and receive a return on investment after the five-year period. If Clements stays at the school for five years, he’ll be eligible to receive an annuity from the policy after retirement and benefits after death. Clements’ salary of $901,330 won’t change, of which only $312,530 of his salary is paid by the state; the other $588,800 is paid by the foundation. Clements was hired by the university in

2013 with a salary of $775,000. Before board members took a vote at Friday’s meeting on the life insurance policy, member David Wilkins said the compensation committee recommended the benefits because of Clements’ performance, current market data, and the desire to give Clements an incentive to stay on for five more years. “After President Clements’ excellent performance review at the close of our most recent fiscal year, the compensation committee was unanimously charged by the board of trustees to bring back a recommendation to enrich the president’s benefits package,” Wilkins said. “Based on our review of the market, this benefit I’ve outlined is reasonable.” The board also approved letting the university use the Clemson paw trademark in “drink responsibly” advertisements with alcohol companies in a 7-2 vote, with board member Bill Smith abstaining and members Ronnie Lee and Bob Peeler voting against it. Smith abstained from the vote because his son-in-law works for JMI, the marketing

company Clemson’s athletics department would use to procure the advertisement partnerships.

Tillman Hall at Clemson University

THE BOARD ALSO APPROVED SALARY INCREASES FOR: • Vice President of Development and Alumni Relations Brian O’Rourke, from $255,028 to $305,000. • Vice President for Research Tanju Karanfil, from $278,091 to $320,000. • Dean of the College of Engineering, Computing and Applied Sciences Anand Gramopadhye, from $300,148 to $350,000. • Dean of College of Education George Petersen, from $232,313 to $250,000.

Clemson President James Clements

Photos provided by Clemson University

James Clements’ salary will remain unchanged at $901,330 annually.


10.26.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 19

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

Committee to review SC Charter School Act ARIEL GILREATH | STAFF

agilreath@communityjournals.com

South Carolina representatives have formed an ad-hoc committee to review the state’s charter school law after a year of heated tension between the only two entities that sponsor the public schools across the state. The South Carolina Public Charter School District was the only statewide authorizer of charter schools in the state until last year when Erskine College announced the creation of its Charter Institute at Erskine. South Carolina’s Charter School Act, which was written in 1996 and most recently amended in 2012, allows the creation of charter schools through the SCPCSD, local school districts, and institutions of higher education through a 10-year contract. The act allows for these entities to retain 2 percent of each charter school’s state appropriations. In July 2017, Erskine announced it would start sponsoring charter schools and already had two schools lined up — schools that were already established in the SCPCSD. Following suit, 10 char-

ter schools ended up transferring from the SCPCSD to Erskine. Seven of the schools had been placed in “caution” or “breach” status with the district for poor academic performance, two were not open long enough to have a performance status in the district, and one transferred after its 10-year contract was up. The SCPCSD board and leadership did not approve the transfers — which is required in the charter act — citing a national phenomenon called “authorizer shopping,” where failing schools switch authorizers to evade accountability. The schools have argued they weren’t authorizer shopping, but instead wanted more support from their authorizer, which Erskine promised to provide. In total, the Charter Institute at Erskine has approved 20 schools — 13 opened in August this year and six are slated to open in 2019. Berkeley Preparatory Academy, which was initially approved to open in 2018 as Cane Bay Preparatory Academy, was approved by the institute’s board in February to delay its opening until 2019. Cameron Runyan, CEO of the institute, said the school

won’t open until fall 2020 because of an issue with water and sewer infrastructure. At the ad-hoc committee’s first meeting Oct. 16, representatives heard from leaders with the Charter Institute at Erskine, the SCPCSD, and a Florida-based organization called Excellence in Education. Rep. Bill Taylor, R-Aiken, chairman of the committee, said there are no specific plans of action intended to come from the committee. “What prompted all of this are the concerns of Erskine’s rapid growth as an authorizer, and at some point, it was decided by leadership to form an ad-hoc committee to look into not only the Erskine situation, but to look at all of the charter schools from A to Z and to look at the legislation that’s been in place for a number of years,” he said. Taylor said it was the first of many meetings for the ad-hoc committee, which has its next meeting scheduled tentatively for Nov. 13. At the meeting, Taylor asked Runyan how the school planned on using its education department’s faculty and stu-

dents to tutor the charter schools’ students — something Erskine has brought up at its institute meetings and on a handout given to members of the ad-hoc committee. Runyan said the college is working on a program where all 500 students could help tutor the charter students, not just the education department. “Next time around, I want to personally delve into how 500 college students, who have their own set of issues — and maybe not in education — are going to work down in Hardeeville and Mount Pleasant and Goose Creek,” Taylor said. After Superintendent Elliot Smalley with the SCPCSD presented, Rep. Lisa Bennett, R-Charleston, asked him to be prepared to answer questions at the next meeting about the district’s 2017 audit as well as any database problems the district has had. A representative of the district’s auditor, McGregor & Co., presented the 2016-17 audit at a SCPCSD meeting, which had several findings primarily dealing with maintaining personnel activity, disbursements, tax filings, and some unbalanced documents.

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ARIEL GILREATH | STAFF

agilreath@communityjournals.com

Following the national trend, South Carolina scores dropped on the ACT for 2018 graduates. The ACT is a timed, standardized test with a 36-point grading scale that was administered to all 11th-graders in South Carolina for the 2016-2018 graduating classes. South Carolina’s average composite score fell from 18.7 to 18.3 this year, the composite score for Greenville County Schools fell from 19.4 to 18.7, and nationally, the composite score fell slightly from 21 to 20.8. The benchmarks are intended to show a student’s readiness level for corresponding college courses. Most South Carolina student scores fell in the “Not Ready” range: Only 20 percent scored “Ready” in science, 24 percent in math, 30 percent in reading, and 42 percent in English. In historically underserved subgroups, the scores were even worse — only 2 percent of African American students met the college readiness benchmark for all four subject areas. ores released by ACT Inc. on Tuesday are from the 2018 cohort of graduates, all of which were required to take the ACT their junior year in 2017. The 2019 graduates had the option of choosing between The ACT or SAT as 11th-graders this past spring after a change in state law. In South Carolina, average ACT scores dropped significantly from 2015 to 2016, when the law started requiring all juniors to take the test. In 2015, South Carolina had an average ACT score of 20.4, which dropped to 18.5 in 2016. Greenville County Schools had an average score of 21.9 — above the national average of 21 — which dropped to 19.2 in 2016. The scores after the law changed were more consistent from 2016 to 2017 — increasing by 0.2 points. From 2017 to 2018, scores decreased by 0.4 points statewide and threequarters of a point in Greenville. Nationally, scores decreased by 0.2 points. Jason McCreary, di-

rector of accountability and quality assurance with Greenville County Schools, said his theory is that something changed with the test to cause the drop. “It’s going to be a wild phenomenon that 1,914,817 students did less well on average than the students last year,” McCreary said. “Just in statistics, that’s pretty odd that you would have that kind of fluctuation. So to me, the most obvious change would be that something occurred — either the difficulty level increased or there was something about the administration — that caused this change.” But Ed Colby, senior director of public relations with ACT Inc., said there’s been a national downward trend in English and math scores for years, while science and reading scores have remained relatively static. In math, national scores are at a 14-year low. “This is something that has been going on and continued this year,” Colby said. In 2017, South Carolina students experience technical difficulties while taking the ACT where some students’ screen froze, but the timer for the test kept running. Colby said it stemmed from a national outage with the company’s server provider, Amazon Web Service, and was out of their control. About 96 percent of South Carolina districts administering the test online reported technical difficulties. A statement from ACT Inc. to school districts in May of 2017 said the issues might have impacted the students’ test-taking strategies and “compromised the validity of some

student scores.” In a statement about the most recent scores released on Tuesday, the South Carolina Department of Education referenced the 2017 incident and said the majority of students took the test as a junior “when ACT’s state test administration was plagued with technical difficulties causing the company to issue a statement acknowledging some student scores may not be valid.” But Colby reiterated the technical problems would not have impacted the scores, and he urged caution when looking at one year’s scores over another rather than the trend. “That could be a one-year situation — we like to look for trends before we start thinking about, is there some trouble indicated here?” Colby said. “Certainly you don’t want to see scores go down, but it can happen from one year to another; you can see yearto-year changes that don’t necessarily reflect an overall trend.” McCreary said he expects to see an increase in scores for the 2019 graduating class because students who did not want to take the test were not required. “Our teachers and our students work hard — ACT for a long time has been a reflection of the classroom instruction — and it’s disappointing whenever you see that you didn’t hit the mark and were not increasing like we expect,” McCreary said. “That’s why it really causes us to pause and ask the question, if this is happening everywhere, then why? And what’s the common denominator?”

AVERAGE ACT COMPOSITE SCORES South Carolina required all students in the graduating classes of 2016-2018 to takethe ACT in 11th Grade | Infographic by Venngage


10.26.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 21

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

COMMUNITY

GIVING

MATTERS presented by the Community Foundation of Greenville

Donor-advised funds make it easy to be both smart and caring BY REBECCA HOWERTON

Autumn’s brief interlude before the holiday season is a great time to thoughtfully reconsider charitable giving. Contributing to a donor-advised fund is one way to maximize the amount available for organizations doing the work you care about, while minimizing your tax burden. Donors can deduct the full amount of their contribution to a DAF in the year it is made, then take their time to make thoughtful decisions regarding its distribution to qualified 501(c)(3) organizations, according to Mark Cooter, managing partner of South Carolina Upstate practice for Cherry Bekaert LLP. “You can make a tax-deductible contribution by Dec. 31, and use that to pre-fund your charitable giving to a church, school, or charitable organization for the next year, three years, or 10 years,” said Cooter, who serves on the board of the Community Foundation of Greenville. There are a number of situations where the funds make practical sense. For example, a donor may wish to donate appreciated stock to a small charity that is ill-equipped to deal with receiving a gift of stock. Donating the stock to a DAF, which can sell it, and then making a distribution to the small charity simplifies the process. The donor gets the full benefit of the gift and a community foundation is not required to pay capital gains tax. Since the standard deduction has increased under the new tax law, some donors may decide to make a

larger contribution to a DAF in some years, and take the standard deduction in others, while keeping their distributions to charitable organizations consistent over time. Advantages of DAFs include their ease of administration, offering professional management at a lower cost than setting up a private foundation, Cooter said. “The fund allows you to set up a gift over a period of years rather than all at once,” he said. “It’s a way for you to make sure your wishes are followed, with someone else executing your wishes on your behalf. If you are charitably inclined, there’s no downside.” Greenville residents Brice and Amanda Smith established their donor-advised fund in 2016. “We chose the Community Foundation because of their unique ties to Greenville, and their established reputation for identifying and addressing the needs of our community,” Brice Smith said. “We have lived in Greenville for 20 years, and we are constantly amazed at the strong sense of philanthropy that runs so deep in our community.” One of the organizations the couple supports is the Greenville Area Parkinson Society, which offers support, education, and advocacy for people in Greenville living with this disease. “My father was diagnosed with Parkinson’s over eight years ago, and GAPS has been a tremendous support to him and my family,” Smith said. Of the Community Foundation’s 250 funds, the

Brice and Amanda Smith, shown here with their family, elected to establish a donor-advised fund in 2016. | Photo provided

vast majority are DAFs, said Bob Morris, president of the foundation. Donors can recommend grants to any qualified 501(c)(3) charity, but Community Foundation assets are used only for Greenville County. “The common characteristic of the people who establish a donor-advised fund with us is that they are smart and caring — a combination of Albert Einstein and Mother Theresa,” Morris said. Most donors contribute cash or appreciated stock to start or add to their funds. The Community Foundation also accepts real estate and closely held stock, often as part of the sale of a large parcel or the sale of a business. “While many mutual fund companies and banks offer donor-advised funds, our clients help underwrite our grants through fees,” Morris said. “This allows the Community Foundation to invest in vibrant arts programming, provide academic support for lowincome families, and invest in our nationally recognized public parks.”


22 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.26.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Meals on Wheels celebrates 50 years, 12 million meals in Greenville MELODY WRIGHT | STAFF

mwright@communityjournals.com

Meals on Wheels of Greenville has delivered more than 12 million meals to seniors and homebound individuals for 50 years. To celebrate this milestone, the organization wants the community to get involved. “As we look to the next 50 years, it’s going to take every single one of us to continue serving the homebound and seniors in Greenville County,” said Catriona Carlisle, Meals on Wheels of Greenville executive director. “Please consider how you can get involved — volunteer your time, make a gift, or refer someone who needs our services — and together we can continue to make an impact in our community for years to come.” Delivering much more than hot, nutritious meal to its clients, Meals on Wheels brightens individuals’ days with human interaction. “Fifty years is a tremendous milestone

— one only made possible because of the Greenville community,” said Virginia Vanvick, communications coordinator. “It has taken the collective generosity of so many to get here.” Beginning in 1968 with 20 meals prepared in the Westminister Presbyterian Church kitchen for local seniors, Meals on Wheels of Greenville has been 100 percent funded by the community. Looking to the future, Vanvick said the organization will look at innovative ways to continue to serve clients, wisely use resources, and encourage community involvement. The organization also plans to continue emphasizing service to seniors, a population that is expected to grow in the next few years. “Our mission is about so much more than just a daily meal,” Vanvick said. “We provide independence, friendship and hope to a population that’s often forgotten. And it’s only possible because of the generosity of our community.”

Executive director Catriona Carlisle spoke at the 50th anniversary celebration. Photo provided

F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N visit mealsonwheelsgreenville.org

New lounge. New bistro. Same comfortable feeling. There’s a big, beautiful expansion about to take shape. With more independent living options, more dining, more lounges, more activity rooms, and more ways to enjoy life than ever before.

I n d e p e n d e n t L i v i n g | A s s i s t e d L i v i n g | M e m o r y C a re | R e h a b i l i t a t i o n | S k i l l e d N u r s i n g

Groundbreaking Fall 2018. To learn more, call 864.991.3100. One Hoke Smith Blvd., Greenville, SC 29615 | RollingGreenVillage.com Part of Greenville. Part of your family.

Rolling Green Village is a not-for-profit community.

.


10.26.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 23

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

FASHION Fall for Greenville PHOTOS BY WILL CROOKS

Fall for Greenville always delivers on the food, drinks, and music, but as Greenville Journal photographer Will Crooks discovered, it also serves up fashion. Crooks bypassed the usual event photos this year to capture festival-goers’ style. Crooks’ photos show a cross section of looks ranging from urban cowboy to modern monochromatism.

CAPTURED


24 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.26.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM Photo provided by the Collings Foundation

WWII BOMBER AND FIGHTER AIRCRAFT LAND IN THE UPSTATE MELODY WRIGHT | STAFF

mwright@communityjournals.com

Crossword puzzle: Page 54

Some unique living history is visiting Greenville this weekend during the Wings of Freedom Tour. The B-17 Flying Fortress Nine O Nine, B-24 Liberator Witchcraft, B-25 Mitchell Tondelayo bombers, and P-51 Mustang Toulouse Nuts fighter will fly into the Greenville Downtown Airport to allow visitors to explore these rarities of aviation history. The Collings Foundation, a nonprofit educational foundation, hosts its nationwide Wings of Freedom Tour to honor World War II veterans and teach people the heritage and history. The 2018 tour is the 29th year of the interactive, living-history event, which visits an average of 110 cities in more than 35 states each year. Wings of Freedom is the longest-running historic aircraft tour in the world, said Hunter Chaney, Collings Foundation director of marketing. The tour gives participants a memorable experience touring and flying in the fully restored WWII aircraft, he said. “WWII is the worst, most horrific and terrible conflict that humans have been through since we have been on this small

blue marble,” Chaney said. “As children of this generation, it is up to us to keep this history close, to remind ourselves freedom is not free and democracy is fragile.” These bomber and fighter aircraft engage people today in World War II history that goes beyond what can be read about or seen in documentaries. From the past, lessons can be learned. “Never forget the horror of war, never forget what happens when tyrannical leaders spew hate and dissension,” Chaney said. “Do not be complicit or complacent. For if we do, this will inevitably creep back again. If we forget this history, again, we will ultimately be repeating it.” Local World War II veterans will often attend the tour, which allows the community to express thanks for their service to the U.S. — a chance that won’t last forever. The support of the community and local airports is vital to the operation of Wings of Freedom. Chaney said the hourly operating cost of the B-17 alone is about $5,500. That cost, plus hours of maintenance time, makes operating the aircraft expensive. “Without the support, this tour would cease to operate,” he said. “And, that would

WHERE

be a great loss to our country as a whole.” The airports hosting the tour are responsible for supplying ramp space and a place for operations. Greenville Downtown Airport associate director Lara Kaufmann said the airport staff is thrilled to share their love of aviation with others and take part in this living history. Wings of Freedom has stopped in Greenville for the past eight years. While seeing and hearing the aircraft elicit memories in some, it’s a first-time experience for others. Participants can see what it was like 70 years ago. “[It was] a time when flying crew members traveled many hours with no cabin pressurization, no oxygen, and no heat, bundled up in their flight suits in very cramped quarters,” Kaufmann said. “No history book’s description or photograph can equal the education received by walking inside these pieces of history.” During this weekend, the developing Military History Center of the Carolinas military history museum will have free open houses and extended hours.  More information on this can be found at greenvilledowntownairport.com. Photos provided by the Collings Foundation

Greenville Downtown Airport (GMU), located at Runway Cafe, 21 Airport Road Ext.

WHEN

2-4 p.m. on Oct. 26 9 a.m.-4 p.m. on Oct. 27-28

COST

$15 (adults) and $5 (12 and under) for tours $450 for B-17 or B-24 flights (30 minutes) $400 for B-25 flights (30 minutes) $2,200 for half hour of P-51 flight training* $3,200 for full hour of P-51 flight training* Sudoku puzzle: Page 54

LESSON RESERVATIONS CAN BE MADE BY CALLING 800-568-8924


10.26.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 25

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

OUTSIDER

National Park Service warns tourists of increased bear activity along Blue Ridge Parkway ANDREW MOORE | STAFF

amoore@communityjournals.com

For more information, visit www.lakeconesteenaturepark.com.

Hike under the stars at Lake Conestee Nature Park ANDREW MOORE | STAFF

amoore@communityjournals.com

With autumn bringing cooler temperatures and shorter days to the Upstate, you might consider resigning yourself to a long, lazy season inside. But outdoor recreation doesn’t have to stop when the sun goes down. Lake Conestee Nature Park in Greenville will host a guided night hike on Saturday, Nov. 3. “We started hosting night hikes three years ago,” said Sarah Whitmire, director of education at Lake Conestee Nature Park. “The purpose of the night hike is to educate people on the nocturnal animals that call Lake Conestee home and to help ease fears about walking in the woods at night.” The 1-mile hike, which costs $10 per person, will begin at 6:30 p.m. at Lake Conestee’s Reedy River Bridge entrance off Mauldin Road and end at 8:30 p.m. at its West Bay Observation Deck, according to Whitmire. A park map can be downloaded here: https:// bit.ly/1gHnFkY. Along the way, as participants enjoy the moonrise, hike leaders will provide information on the nocturnal animals that reside at Lake Conestee Nature Park, according to Whitmire. “For this hike we will focus on nocturnal mammals like coyotes and foxes,” Whitmire  said. “Those are two very common nocturnal animals we find in the park, so they will definitely be discussed. We will also have lots of opportunities to see beaver activity.” Whitmire said hike leaders will use a high-powered green spotlight to help participants view any wildlife they might encounter during the hike.

“The green tint helps our eyes stay adjusted to the night and is less startling to the wildlife,” she explained. Hike leaders will also bring along pelts, bones, and other artifacts that participants can observe and touch, according to Whitmire. The hike will also feature several activities designed to demonstrate the nocturnal adaptations of animals and humans. “Having the group stare at a burning candle for a minute with one eye closed helps to demonstrate how our eyes adapt to seeing in the dark. The eye that was closed with be able to see much more clearly than the eye staring at the light,” Whitmire said. “This is a great intro into why we won’t be using flashlights during the hike and why they shouldn’t check their phones. The more they rely on their night vision the more they are able to see.” Although the hike is open to all ages, Whitmire said children must be able to stay silent when asked and for prolonged periods of time. Registration is required and will close at midnight Thursday, Nov. 1. Those who are interested can register at: https://bit.ly/2J3PfJh.   Whitmire said the hike is limited to 40 participants, who will be divided into two groups. Those who register will  receive an email the week of the hike that includes a meeting location and other details. Flashlights will not be allowed during the hike but participants can use them for the walk back to their car, according to Whitmire. Recommended wear for the hike consists of long pants and closed-toe shoes. Water is another recommendation.

Upstate residents visiting the mountains this fall may want to keep an eye out for black bears, not foliage. Caitlin Worth, a public affairs officer for the Blue Ridge Parkway in North Carolina, said an alert will remain in effect for the 469-mile scenic highway and its campgrounds through the remainder of the fall season due to increased black bear activity. The alert was issued in June by the National Park Service. “Bears are very active 5 TIPS FOR HIKING SAFELY along the parkway at IN BEAR COUNTRY this time,” the alert says. “Bears are wild animals Hike during daylight hours. Bears are that are dangerous and most active during early morning and late unpredictable. Do not afternoon hours.  approach bears or allow Watch for tracks, scat, and tree markings left them to approach you!” by bears.  Worth said bear sightNever let your small children run ahead or ings are common during wander. the fall foliage season, Make noise to avoid surprising a bear. when an estimated 2 million tourists visit the Blue Carry and know how to use bear spray, Ridge Parkway to watch which is available at many outdoor retailers.  the leaves transform Source: U.S. Forest Service from shades of green to autumn hues.  Bears in North Carolina also tend to become more active in the fall as they prepare for colder weather and search for food, according to Worth. While bears don’t truly hibernate during the winter months, they usually put on weight before locating a den and entering a long period of sleep. Campers and picnickers should store food, coolers, utensils, cookstoves, and other scented items in a closed vehicle or bear-proof container, according to Worth. They should also keep their  areas clean by picking up food scraps and disposing of all garbage in a secure trash can or dumpster.  Worth said feeding bears or allowing them access to human food and garbage can cause them to lose their instinctive fear of people. These bears may begin approaching people in search of food and become more unpredictable and dangerous, damaging property and injuring campers and hikers.  Studies have shown bears that lose their fear of people by obtaining human food and garbage never live as long as bears that feed on natural foods and are shy and afraid of people, according to the National Park Service. Many are hit by cars and become easy targets for poachers. If a bear enters a campsite or picnic area, visitors should give the animal space and not feed it, according to Worth. Federal regulations state that willfully approaching a bear within 50 yards or any distance that disturbs or displaces a bear is illegal along the parkway.  Park rangers patrol picnic areas and campgrounds to enforce regulations, according to the National Park Service. Citations can result in fines of up to $5,000 and jail sentences lasting up to six months. Worth said parkway visitors should stay calm and stand their ground if approached by a black bear instead of screaming or running away, which may cause the bear to attack. If an attack does occur, however, visitors should try to escape to a secure place, act aggressively, or fight back.  For more information, visit www.nps.gov.


26 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.26.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Our Community

Community news, events, and happenings

EDUCATION

Cook, Kroc Center executive director, said in a release. “We hope this event is fun experience for local families as well as a fundraiser for those in need.”

Wade Hampton High School raises over $300,000 for charity

MEMORIAL

South Carolina fallen firefighter honored at National Memorial Service

Students at Wade Hampton High School raised $306,000 during Spirit Week and presented the check to Clement’s Kindness. The funds raised will help address the medical, psychological, social, emotional, and financial needs of Upstate families impacted by pediatric cancer or serious blood disorders.

During the 37th National Fallen Firefighter Memorial Service, a South Carolina firefighter who died in the line of duty was honored among over 100 other fallen firefighters. The U.S. Fire Service held the memorial at the National Fire Academy in Emmitsburg, Maryland. At age 48, Darryl Wayne Frost of the Town of Duncan Fire Department died from a heart attack on Nov. 20, 2014. His death came after he responded to three emergency calls within 24 hours. His named was added to the National Fallen Firefighters Memorial at the academy. SOCIAL

The Assembly to present two debutantes at Annual Ball

FESTIVAL

The Greenville Kroc Center hosts Kroctoberfest The Kroc Center will present Kroctoberfest, a free family festival, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Oct. 27 to celebrate its seventh anniversary. Several paid activities at the annual fall event will raise funds to support the Kroc scholarship program. Lawn games, dodgeball, concessions, face-painting, mini-pumpkin decorating, bounce houses, and more will be featured at this year’s festival. In partnership with The Traveling Peddler, food concessions and small plates will be available at Kroctoberfest. Proceeds from the ticket drawing, tennis tournament, and KrocFit challenge will benefit the scholarship fund. The Salvation Army Kroc Church will also host an outdoor movie night at 7:30 p.m. with concessions to benefit the Kroc Church. “The Kroc Center is excited to host our family fall event, Kroctoberfest,”Steve

The Assembly will present two young women at its 95th Annual Ball Nov. 17 at The Poinsett Club. Katherine Rowan Earle, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Oliver Perry Earle IV, is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Perry Earle III and Mrs. Jack Rowan Byrd and the late Mr. Jack Rowan Byrd and the great-granddaughter of the late Mrs. Oliver Perry Earle Jr. Her great-great-grandmother, the late Mrs. Fletcher Jordan, was a charter member of The Assembly. Miss Earle, a student at Anderson University, will be presented by her mother. Helen Regina Hayn Arrington, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Battle Arrington III, is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Battle Arrington Jr. and Dr. Carol Regina Graham and the late Mr. Jackie Christian Bissinger and the great-granddaughter of the late Mrs. Nelson Battle Arrington. Her great-great-grandmother, the late Mrs. John White Arrington, was a charter member of The Assembly. Miss Arrington, a student at Clemson University, will be presented by her mother. Submit community news items to www.greenvillejournal.com/submit.

It’s that time of year again! Join us!

10TH ANNUAL MARTINIS & MISTLETOE

Event at ROOTS OF GREENVILLE and PALMETTO OLIVE OIL CO.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1 • 5-9PM Kick off the Holiday season right and shop early during our premier holiday event. Be the first to see all of this year’s Christmas Decor and Gifts. Pre-order your Fresh Wreaths and shop for unique holiday gifts while enjoying free martinis and delicious treats you’ll want at all of your holiday events this year. There will be specials offered on this 1 night only – you don’t want to miss this! • Pre-order your fresh holiday wreaths from Roots for 20% OFF during the event. • 15% OFF your entire purchase of Olive Oils & Vinegars at Palmetto Olive Oil Co.

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WWW.LEGACY.COM/OBITUARIES/GREENVILLEJOURNAL

OBITUARIES & MEMORIALS

Submit to: obits@communityjournals.com

Dr. Clarence Medlin Easley

DEATH NOTICES FOR OCTOBER 10 – OCTOBER 20, 2018 John Calvin Langley, 87, of Travelers Rest, passed away on Saturday, October 20, 2018. The Howze Mortuary of Travelers Rest assisted the family.

Bobbie Jean Skelton Reynolds McWhite, 86, of Simpsonville, passed away on Saturday, October 13, 2018. Thomas McAfee Funeral Home assisted the family.

William Joseph Rippon, 89, of Greenville passed away on October 18, 2018. Thomas McAfee assisted the family.

Anne Rivers Brooks, 87, of Simpsonville, SC passed away on October 19, 2018. Holcombe Mortuary assisted the family.

Martha Beinor, 74, passed away on Monday, October 15, 2018. The Palmetto Mortuary assisted the family.

Mary Edith “Edie” Holt Wood, 76, of Greer, SC, died Friday, October 19, 2018. The Wood Mortuary assisted the family.

Boyd L. “Yank” Rosa, 79, husband of Linda Benson Rosa, passed away on Saturday, October 20, 2018. Thomas McAfee Funeral Home assisted the family.

Jeffery “Jeff” Harper Clark, 57, of Greenville, passed away October 17, 2018. The Wood Mortuary assisted the family.

Terry Keith Holliday, 59, of Greenville, died Saturday, October 20, 2018. Thomas McAfee Funeral Home assisted the family.

Nina Owens Daniel, 97, passed away on October 12, 2018.t Robinson Funeral HomeDowntown, Easley assisted the family.

Janet (Sellards) Kyser May 26, 1940 ~ October 18, 2018

Janet Kyser, 78, wife of Harold Kyser,

passed

away

Thursday,

October 18, 2018. Born in Nolan, WV, she was

Kyser,

and

Daniel

Kyser;

one

sister,

Patsy

Chaffin

a daughter of the late William

and

Sellards and Lucille Graves.

Brett; and two

Mrs. Kyser proudly served her

husband,

brothers,

Bill

country as a member of the United

Sellards

and

States Navy. Most recently, she

wife, Rose, and

volunteered at the Free Clinic on

Butch

Wednesdays and with Meals on

and

Wheels every Thursday.

Shannon.

In addition to her husband of

Graves wife,

A visitation was held Wednesday,

57 years, she is survived by two

October

daughters, Janet Eicke and husband,

McAfee Funeral Home, Southeast

Brian, and Patricia Colpitt and

followed by the funeral service in

husband, John; one son, Dan Kyser

the Chapel. Memorials may be made

and wife, Erin; four grandchildren,

to Meals on Wheels, 15 Oregon St.,

Hunter Colvin, Katelyn Eicke, Laurel

Greenville, SC 29605.

24,

2018

at

Thomas

September 24, 1925 – October 17, 2018

Dr, Clarence Medlin Easley, son of Lida Medlin Easley and Claire McKinney Easley, passed away October 17, 2018 at the age of 93. He was educated in the Morristown, TN schools. He joined the Navy at 17 years old, his senior year of high school. He was a hospital Corpsman with the 4th Marine Division during WWII, with 4 major campaigns, Kwajalien, Saipan, Tinian and Iwo Jima. He received a Bronze Star and a Purple Heart following Saipan and a 2nd Bronze Star following Iwo Jima. Dr. Easley finished UT Knoxville in PreMed and received his MD degree at UT College of Medicine in Memphis in 1951. Following his internship at Greenville General Hospital, he practiced General Medicine in Dandridge, TN. He returned to Greenville to enter the OB/GYN Residency program in 1953, completing it in 1956. Dr. Easley joined Dr. Williard Hearin and Dr. Joseph Moore in 1957, establishing the first Group Practice of OB/GYN in Greenville. Dr. Eddie Ellison joined the practice in 1960 before it later became Greenville OB/GYN. Throughout his career, Dr. Easley continued his interest in and dedication to the Greenville Residency Program, including teaching of the Residents for 13 years after retirement from private practice in 1989. For this, he was honored by the C.M. Easley Symposium and Resident Research papers program. During his medical career, Dr. Easley served as Chairman of the Department of OB/GYN Greenville Hospital System, President of the Medical Staff, Acting Director of Medical Education and various hospital committees. He also served as President of the SC OB/GYN Society,

Executive Committee of South Atlantic OB/ GYN Society and member of South Central OB/GYN Society, MMA, and SCMS. Dr. Easley was an active member of Westminster Presbyterian Church serving as a teacher, Deacon, Elder, Trustee and Clerk of Session. He was most proud of his chairmanship of The Columbarium Committee. Under the auspices of the PCUSA, he served as a Volunteer in Missions, making 15 mission trips including Lesotho, Malawi, Rwanda and the Dominican Republic. He was also proud of his help in establishing the Kalikumbi Clinic on the border of Malawi and Zambia. He was predeceased by his first wife, Jenny Lee Helton Easley; his sister Beatrice E. Quillen and his brother Dr. William K. Easley; and his parents. Dr. Easley is survived by his wife, Elliott Adams Easley; children Lee Easley Harris (Steve Sernak), Nancy M. Easley, and Robert C. “Bob” Easley; step-children, Capers A. Easterby and Elliott E. Crudup (Josiah); six grandchildren; four step-grandchildren; and two great grandchildren. A memorial service was held on Sunday, October 21, 2018 at Westminster Presbyterian church. The family received friends following the service. Memorials may be made to Westminster Presbyterian Church, 2310 Augusta Road, Greenville, SC 29605, The Easley Mission Fund or the charity of choice.

Plan for “someday” today.

Thomas McAfee Funeral Homes can help you plan ahead, allowing you to design personalized arrangements that are a reflection of you. Contact us to receive complimentary information about the following: Funeral Planning Guides Cost Estimates & Payment Plans Cremation Services

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Mark Your Calendars Constance Schulze

WEEKEND HOURS Friday, Nov. 9th 6:00 – 9:00 P.M.

(select studios only)

Saturday, Nov. 10th 10:00 A.M. – 6:00 P.M.

Sunday, Nov. 11th Noon – 6:00 P.M.

143 ARTISTS 89 LOCATIONS 1 WEEKEND

THE CATALOGUE

Greenville Open Studios allows you to experience the life of local artists at work in their studios for one full weekend, November 10 – 11.

Find a copy of the 2018 catalogue in each of the artists’ studios, in the MAC office at 16 Augusta Street, in various retail locations throughout downtown and in the November 2nd edition of the Greenville Journal.

This free, self-guided tour is a unique experience to engage with our community’s incredible talent, learn about artistic processes, enhance or begin your art collection and become inspired.

A SQUARE AFFAIR

MORE INFORMATION

OPEN STUDIOS EXHIBIT

Visit our website for more information on Open Studios as well as a directory of the 143 participating artists with additional images, artist statements and contact information.

Make MAC your first stop the week before or the weekend of Open Studios. An exhibit of 12 x 12 (x 12) inch works from the 143 participating artists will be on display in our gallery from November 5 – December 14.

www.greenvilleARTS.com @macARTScouncil #MACopenstudios Visit our Instagram between October 22 – 28, @macARTScouncil for a chance to win $500 worth of artwork from the Open Studios exhibit at MAC!

Mike Vatalaro


Darin Gehrke

Glory Day Loflin Sunny Mullarkey McGowan Nadia Barbotin

Kevin Clinton

Angela Zajac-Bruch

Shane Bryant Garland Mattox

Kelli Emig Nancy Mary Jaramillo

Will Donovan Elaine Quave

Andy Gambrell

Michael McDunn


30 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.26.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

QUICK CHANGE With transitional plants, your containers can bridge two seasons

This Week

words by Julia Sibley-Jones | photo by Chelsey Ashford

Y

our neighbor’s front porch looks inviting and seasonal with effortless containers, but did they plant them? There’s a very real possibility that Pretty Pots filled them. Before you get started, ask a few questions: What is the scale and style of your house? Do you have low-hanging eaves, a taller-than-usual door or other architectural features? What colors do you like and what would complement your front door? Is your location sunny, shady, sheltered, or open? “Go bigger than you think,” says Joy Gregory. Gregory, owner of Greenville-based planting service Pretty Pots, believes it’s better to have a few large pots rather than a lot of little ones, and bigger pots mean less watering and maintenance because the soil can hold moisture.

RESIST THE URGE TO PURGE

You want to rip everything out and jump right into fall, but the problem is it’s still hot and daytime temperatures can stay warm into November. A better idea is to spruce your existing summer containers by using what Gregory refers to as “transitional plants.” Start by cleaning out any dead plants. Next, deadhead remaining flowers and trim off one-third of the foliage. “Don’t be afraid you’re hurting the plants," she says. “Just think of it like giving them a haircut.” Now add in a few transitional plants like euphorbias (Gregory likes ascot, blackbird and any shade of bronze). She’s also fond of coral bells, ornamental grasses, sedum, creeping Jenny and dichondra (silver falls), all which make excellent container choices. Barberry bush is a non-evergreen shrub that is hardy and deer resistant. Gregory loves to use them because the foliage has amber, yellow and deep-red leaves that change with the season. They also stay relatively small, can live in sun to partial shade, and the berries attract birds. Another option is black lace elderberry, a shrub with lacy, purple foliage and clusters of pink flowers with a slight lemony scent. Fall is a great time to capitalize on foliage for color and texture. Many plants and shrubs have attractive berries and or leaves that change color with temperature changes. “You can have a beautiful fall container with lots of color and texture without any flowers at all,” Gregory says. Finally, as temperatures get cooler, add in fall elements such as pumpkins and gourds, bittersweet or birch twigs, feathers, pods or other natural elements.

THE RULE OF THIRDS

When planting a container, Gregory says it’s best to think in thirds. Plan for the bottom third of the pot to be drainage (foam peanuts or gravel); the middle third needs a mix of soil and compost. Reserve the top third for the plants, which then have room to spread and mound, spill over or grow upright. For the first week, check the pot every day. If it’s not moist mid-way down, then your container needs water. Even if a container is in shade, a breezy spot can wick water as though the plants were in full sun.

For more information about Pretty Pots, visit www.prettypotsgreenville.com.


Luxury Service at Every Price Point DILLARD-JONES CUSTOM BUILT

14 Timbers Edge Way, Cliffs Valley $1,375,000 MLS#1353929 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918 Cynthia Jenkins 843-696-7891

136 High Rock Ridge Drive, Cliffs at Glassy $1,295,000 MLS#1364118 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918

608 Raven Road, Cliffs at Glassy $1,275,000 MLS#1374669 Damian Hall 864-561-7942

59 Grand Vista Drive, Ridges At Paris Mnt. $1,199,000 MLS#1369348 Holly May 864-640-1959

CUSTOM BUILT ON 5 ACRES

TO BE BUILT

109 Southkee Road, Travelers Rest $821,200 MLS#1367871 Shannon Donahoo 864-329-7345

1029 Woodburn Road, Spartanburg $685,000 MLS#1366189 Holly May 864-640-1959

100 Spring Valley Road, Greenville $674,900 MLS#1373464 Michael Mumma 864-238-2542

65 Blacks Drive, Greenville $589,999 MLS#1377666 Michael Mumma 864-238-2542

203 Southview Ledge Road, Cliffs at Glassy $575,000 MLS#1353158 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918 Cynthia Jenkins 843-696-7891

2921 Augusta Street, Augusta Road $472,500 MLS#1375270 Debra Owensby 864-404-8296

94 Park Vista Way, Hunters Ridge at Green Valley $439,500 MLS#1377991 Debra Owensby 864-404-8296

416 Santa Cruz Way, Courtyards on West Georgia $425,000 MLS#1377681 Holly May 864-640-1959

8 E Blue Ridge Drive, Greenville $174,500 MLS#1378013 Sherry Cantrell 864-630-7892

150 Millwood Lane, Wellford $169,900 MLS#1378577 Heidi Anderson 864-901-5536

UNDER CONTRACT

26 Brookdale Avenue, Greenville $242,000 MLS#1373046 Shannon Donahoo 864-329-7345

109 Creeks Edge Court, Rolling Green Village $179,000 MLS#1378434 Kennie Norris 864-608-0865

BlackStreamInternational.com | 864-920-0303


32 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.26.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

On the market Augusta Walk • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

D T Smith Est • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Country Club Estates • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Cleveland Forest • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

6 Augusta Walk Ave. · $899,000 · MLS# 1366337

13 E Tallulah Drive · $849,000 · MLS# 1377536

40 Douglas Drive · $585,000 · MLS# 1378861

78 Fernwood Lane · $549,000 · MLS# 1373382

3BR/3.5BA Come visit our Model Home and learn more about building your custom home in Augusta Walk! From downtown Greenville, follow Augusta Street; Augusta Walk on right.

5BR/4.5BA Stunning, new construction home in the heart of the Augusta Road area built by local, custom builders. Augusta Street to E. Tallulah Drive. Home on left.

Contact: Lora Pfohl 864-313-2235 The Marchant Company

Contact: Blair Miller 864-430-7708 Wilson Associates

4BR/4BA This warm Country Club property offers a mountain home aesthetic with the convenience of walking distance to Augusta Road. Augusta Road- turn onto Byrd Boulevard. Right onto Douglas Drive.

4BR/3BA Fabulous, updated traditional brick home just steps from Cleveland Park and the Swamp Rabbit Trail. Enjoy living close to downtown. Right onto Fernwood Lane. Home on Left. See Sign.

Contact: Laura McDonald 864-640-1929 Wilson Associates

Contact: Blair Miller 864-430-7708 Wilson Associates

Chatelaine • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Sherwood Forest • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Advertise your home with us Contact:

Caroline Spivey | 864-679-1229 cspivey@communityjournals.com 208 Castellan Drive · $295,000 · MLS# 1378011

303 Scarlett Street · $260,000 · MLS# 1370770

3BR/2.5BA Opportunity to decorate/design your next home and experience fabulous views of Thornblade golf course - all with lower maintenance living! Pelham Road to Old Boiling Springs Road. Chatelaine Subdivision.

3BR/2BA Completely updated 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom home in the highly sought after Sherwood Forest area. Within minutes of downtown Greenville. Left on Scarlett St. First house on the right.

Contact: Blair Miller 864-430-7708 Wilson Associates

Contact: Angela Rodriguez 864-609-7219 Wilson Associates

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10.26.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 33

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Featured Home

North Main

1743 N Main Street, Greenville, SC 29609

Home Info Price: $1,375,000 Bedrooms: 5 Baths: 5 Lot Size: 0.45 acres

MLS#: 1374297 Sq. Ft: 5600-5799

Schools: Summit Drive Elementary, League Middle, and Greenville High Agents: Nick Carlson | 864-386-7704 nick@wilsonassociates.net wilsonassociates.net

Restored and Renovated! This 5 bedroom, 5 bath Tudor Revival not only has the charm of the era but the modern conveniences of today. The owners have meticulously restored this home as well as commissioned craftsmen to maintain and add to the details of what makes this a true estate. Be greeted by a welcoming covered front porch that has a great flow from either the formal entry or the formal living room. Huge dining room opens to a side patio that is perfect for a complete outdoor seating and dining area.

Kitchen has been renovated and includes all top of the line appliances. Master suite on the second level is a true oasis. Multiple closets, fireplace, sitting room and huge bathroom with double vanities, separate water closet, perfect soaking tub and an oversized shower. Third floor could be the perfect guest suite with an oversized room that could be a den as well as a sitting room in the private suite. Superb private grounds with a restored pool, bluestone surround, and an excellent flow for entertaining.


34 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.26.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

SOLD: Greenville Transactions For the week of Sept. 24 – 28 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$4,281,040 COMMERCE CENTER $1,465,000 $925,557 LOST RIVER $920,000 ROE ROAD SHOPPING CENTER $840,000 CLAREMONT $810,000 $790,000 $789,000 MOUNTAINVIEW ACRES $760,000 GRIFFITH FARM $720,000 BRAYDON@HOLLINGSWORTH PARK $694,994 $690,000 $680,000 $637,500 THORNBLADE $635,000 BRAYDON@HOLLINGSWORTH PARK $615,000 BELLAGIO $578,000 MAHAFFEY PLANTATION $572,000 $540,000 RIVER WALK $532,000 SYCAMORE RIDGE $490,000 LAKE LANIER $480,000 $470,000 STAFFORD GREEN $469,900 OAKWAY $460,000 $442,000 TUSCANY FALLS $426,000 OAK MEADOWS $425,000 HOLLINGTON $417,000 OAK CREST $412,500 BRIGHTON $408,000 RIDGESTONE COTTAGES $405,347 BELHAVEN PARC $402,820 COTTAGE HILL $395,000 RIVER DOWNS $392,000 SUGAR CREEK $392,000 CLEAR SPRINGS $385,000 TUSCANY FALLS $385,000 COPPER CREEK $372,827 $370,000 HOLLINGTON $347,255 ASHCROFT $342,400 THE RESERVE AT RICHGLEN $337,240 MATTHEWS CREEK $336,000 $327,795 THE TOWNES AT FIVE FORKS $325,210 BRIDGEWATER $325,000 STONE ESTATES $324,000 SHENANDOAH FARMS $319,500 LINKSIDE $317,000 WEST FARM VILLAGE $316,184 SKYLAND PARK $315,000 STILLWATERS $314,000 HOLLY TREE PLANTATION $310,000 GREYTHORNE $307,000 EAGLES GLEN AT KIMBRELL $304,882 TWIN LAKE COTTAGES $300,000 ENCLAVE AT CLIFFS AT GLASSY $300,000 KING’S CROSSING $298,000 EAGLES GLEN AT KIMBRELL $297,587 COUNTRY CLUB ESTATES $295,000 $294,500 EAST HIGHLANDS ESTATES $293,750 LAKE FOREST HEIGHTS $293,500 WOODLAND CREEK $293,500 THORNBROOKE $292,500 BROWNSTONE CROSSING $289,500 $283,000 THE TOWNES AT FIVE FORKS $282,720 HAWTHORNE RIDGE $281,000

ADAMS EMILY J LIVING TRU 135 COMMERCE CENTER DRIV AUGUSTA CT INVESTMENTS L LOST RIVER LLC ROE ANNA HAMILTON PERFECT TREVOR C CRAIG AND KARA LLC KUENN JEFFREY WARREN (JT RASOR LLC CHAN EDWARD HO (JTWROS) RED CLAY INVESTORS LLC SKATELL HELEN W ACADEMY GREENVILLE LLC 500 MILLS LLC MOLLOY JEANNE M TRUSTEE TWINING JOHN ROBERT (JTW JUDKINS CONNIE D (JTWROS EDWARDS ROBERT J VERDIN T M III HAMMOND ARLENE P STREET DANIEL SCOTT (JTW HAGY LOUISE LAW JTB LLC OF GREENVILLE MUNGO HOMES INC THOMPSON KENNETH & MICHE RYAN THOMAS MILLER LLC LEOPARD ANGELA OWENS (JT LAWRENCE KELLI (JTWROS) INMAN ELOLA (JTWROS) BELL LAURA REVOCABLE THE GUERRA ANTONIO (JTWROS) ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC KEYES BECKY S SWEET BRIAN F ROGERS DEBORAH F WERNERT JOEL P (JTWROS) HARGROVE PAMELA S (JTWRO MUNGO HOMES INC BLANKENSHIP JEREMIAH B ( SWILLING MOLLY HOPE (JTW D R HORTON INC DAN RYAN BUILDERS SOUTH HOLT STEVE A DISTINGUISHED DESIGN LLC NVR INC MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH GAMES JUSTIN CHASE (JTWR HONEYCUTT MICHAEL L JR NASIM NANCY L (JTWROS) MUNGO HOMES INC S O’ROURKE ASSOCIATES LL AMBRIA PROPERTIES LLC PUFAHL BRIAN M WARD AMY (JTWROS) D R HORTON INC TWIN LAKES COTTAGES DEVE BCAT 2014-12TT D R HORTON-CROWN LLC D R HORTON INC TUTINO RHONDA ANN HOWARD AMANDA JEANETTE POWELL BENJAMIN C NANNEY CARL F KYKER JAMES V LEE DONGJAI DIGREGORIO BARBARA M CISSON JOAN T NVR INC MERITAGE HOMES OF S C IN

BUYER

ADDRESS

SUBD.

BEACON HILL DEVELOPMENT CRAIG & KARA LLC DARRAGH CALLIE ROGERS MERITAGE HOMES OF S C IN TRAVELERS REST ENTERPRIS LAUTZENHEISER MICHELLE A LUCENDA COMPONENTS INC GOSNELL ALICIA DAWN (JTW JAVA HOLDINGS LLC GONZALEZ JESSICA S (JTWR LINDSTEDT GEORGE W III ( BUI CALVIN M (JTWROS) CJ CHASE INVESTMENTS LLC MULLIKIN JAMES THOMAS MCCUTCHEN TONYA S LAUDERDALE D CHRISTOPHER BELKNAP JACQUELYN N JONE SINGH KATHLEEN (JTWROS) GOODWIN FOUST PROPERTIES LAWRENCE KELLI B (JTWROS SNYDER GREGORY (SURV) SHERWOOD KEITH PILZER PROPERTIES LLC XU JIAN JIN (JTWROS) PRESLEY ELIZABETH (JTWRO KING DANIELLE WATSON (JT HOLLAND ALLISON E (JTWRO DUNNAVANT SUSAN T MOORE AMY L (JTWROS) PONOMAREV PAVEL V (JTWRO DAO PHUONG M (JTWROS) NASIATKA MARILYN M (JTWR WILCOX DAVID R SANCHEZ ARIEL (JTWROS) ROBERTS CHARITY HOPE (JT TWINING JOHN T (JTWROS) TOMCO MICHELLE (JTWROS) LACHMILLER FAMILY REVOC SMITH JESSICA DAWN (JTWR ALLSTON JONATHAN R (JTWR MASON JAY (JTWROS) BEARE SCOTT DAHL DIANNE M (JTWROS) WARD AMY BETH (JTWROS) CHAPARRO DAVID (JTWROS) DUBROFSKY CAROLYN (JTWRO KETHARAM SARAVANAN (JTWR CHAPMAN MELANIE L HARRIS BRENELL K (JTWROS SHIRLEY GRAESON FAITH (J OSTROWSKI ROSE GAY WEGE JENNIFER L MOFFITT JOHN EDWIN JR (J HANSON GEOFFREY (SURV) YATES CHARLES (JTWROS) ALSIP CHRISTINA (JTWROS) SK BUILDERS INC DREW DEBORAH MCCRAW CHRISTOPHER A FLANDERS JEANNETTE S REV PENNELL RICHARD H III DAVIDSON WILLIAM A AYERS CHANDLER AUSTIN HOWELL GRAHAM GAMES JUSTIN CHASE (JTWR MURDOCK JOSEPH P (JTWROS SWEETING DANIEL B (JTWRO WILLIAMS DONNA LYNN (JTW CARLINI KAREN BARTON GROVE KAYLA M (JTWROS)

2643 AUGUSTA ST 346 FEASTER RD 8 ABERDEEN DR STE A 8800 E RAINTREE DR STE 300 5784 WEMBLEY DR 47 ROLLESTON DR 400 LESLIE DR APT 1020 15 HIGHLAND DR 1500 WADE HAMPTON BLVD 128 GRIFFITH HILL WAY 218 CHEDDINGTON DR 100 ASHTON WAY 667 N ACADEMY ST 214 BARNETTE RD 903 THORNBLADE BLVD 17 VERDAE CREST DR 5 BELLAGIO WAY 36 GRIFFITH CREEK DR 114 CLAIR DR 1011 RIVER WALK DR 209 WHITWORTH WAY 29 PERKINS ROW 509 W BUTLER RD 319 CANNOCK PL 6 OAKWAY CIR 158 STALL ST 2 VERSILIA LN 101 SPRING MEADOW DR 2 SHELDRAKE PL 949 PALM AVE 16 STEADMAN WAY 31 HAVERCROFT LN 9 JACKSON PARC CT 100 TRELLIS ST 107 DARTMOOR DR 318 SILVER CREEK RD 101 RED BLUFF RD 108 VERSILIA LN .151 LEIGH CREEK DR 39 N AVONDALE DR 200 ABBEY GARDENS LN 412 CASTLEFORD PL 103 QUAIL CREEK DR 24 MATTHEWS CREEK LN 539 HIPPS RD 67 HEMINGWAY LN 58 GRAND RIVER LN 16 TABOR ST 3 ROANOKE HILLS CT 127 LINKSIDE DR 4 GUERNSEY WAY 26 SKYLAND DR 301 FARMERS MARKET ST 110 RAVENWOOD LN 212 DAIRWOOD DR 103 NOBLE WING LN PO BOX 561 112 N KNIGHTSBRIDGE CT 104 FOXHILL DR 100 VERDAE BLVD STE 104 28 DOUGLAS DR 206 TAYLOR RD 308 WILLOW SPRINGS DR 104 SWEETBRIAR RD 208 WOODLAND CREEK WAY 11 SPRINGHEAD WAY 15 CROYDON WAY 642 BELVUE RD 63 HEMINGWAY LN 120 JONES PEAK DR

LONGLEAF $280,448 THE OAKS $280,000 HAVEN AT RIVER SHOALS $280,000 ARBOR WOODS $279,000 OAKS AT GILDER CREEK FARM $278,757 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $277,400 WARRENTON $275,000 HUNTERS WOODS $274,900 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $271,600 WALNUT RIDGE $271,214 GRAYSON PARK $271,101 MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS $270,000 CLIFF RIDGE COLONY $270,000 AUTUMN TRACE $270,000 RUNION ESTATES $270,000 PELHAM SPRINGS $269,500 THE VILLAGE AT ADAMS MILL $266,357 SUGAR CREEK $265,000 GRAYSON PARK $261,847 GREYSTONE AT NEELY FARMS $259,900 TOWNHOMES@PENDLETON WEST $257,500 PEBBLECREEK $256,000 SHOALLY RIDGE $254,900 THE OAKS AT FOWLER $254,857 SHERWOOD FOREST $253,000 PROVIDENCE SQUARE $250,194 RAVINES AT CREEKSIDE $249,900 DEVINN PLACE $249,800 GRIFFIN PARK $249,725 100 EAST $249,500 WINDY RIDGE $247,323 THE OAKS AT FOWLER $243,335 NORTHGATE TRACE $240,000 BROOKSIDE VILLAS $235,490 HOWARDS PARK $234,900 VILLAS @ WEST GEORGIA $234,000 WILDWOOD ACRES $232,100 MEADOWS@GILDER CREEK FARM $230,000 HOWARDS PARK $229,900 EASTRIDGE $229,900 TRIPLE CREEK $227,990 WINDY RIDGE $225,133 $225,000 TOWNS@WOODRUFF CROSSING $225,000 HERITAGE CLUB VILLAS $225,000 TRIPLE CREEK $222,900 HERITAGE LAKES $222,500 ANNANDALE ESTATES $221,000 NEELY FARM - LAUREL BROOK $221,000 $219,000 $218,960 RIVERSIDE COMMONS $218,000 $217,000 ANNANDALE ESTATES $216,975 CYPRESS LANDING $215,990 REEDY SPRINGS $215,000 WILLOW GROVE $214,990 LEGACY PARK $214,475 TRIPLE CREEK $213,810 FONTANA FOREST $212,500 BROOKSIDE VILLAS $212,000 MORNINGSIDE $212,000 ANNANDALE ESTATES $210,255 HAMMETT CROSSING $210,000 HOWARDS PARK $209,200 TRIPLE CREEK $208,090 ALLISON’S MEADOW $205,000 RICHMOND HILLS $203,000 HOWARDS PARK $202,966 SHEFFIELD FOREST $202,750

PRICE SELLER D R HORTON INC HOLLIS MICHAEL H (JTWROS YATES CHARLES DAVID MARK III PROPERTIES INC PETERSON GARY T (SURV) BELL LARRY R (JTWROS) NUNNELY EDDIE JR KOST COREY J (JTWROS) MCLAMB DONALD (JTWROS) ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL STEWART ERICA (JTWROS) HICKS J VIRGIL BETTY W MAHARAJ LINDSEY DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL NEWMAN JAMES B & STEPHAN EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL MERRITT JOHN MARK EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL HOLLAND ALLISON ELIZABET DE BRUIN BRYAN GODWIN RAYMOND W FERGUSON CHRIS J (SURV) D R HORTON INC CRUTCHLEY MORGAN O SK BUILDERS INC JONES REVOCABLE TRUST SK BUILDERS INC EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL 100 EAST VENTURE LLC ESSEX HOMES SOUTHEAST IN D R HORTON INC FOSTER SARA DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL D R HORTON-CROWN LLC MARK III PROPERTIES INC FALON SHANNON M HITCHCOCK CECIL M IV D R HORTON-CROWN LLC WINESETT CARRIE W (JTWRO D R HORTON INC ESSEX HOMES SOUTHEAST IN BLAKELY JOSEPH K WALCOTT GARY V HESTER CAROLL D D R HORTON INC DECKERT FRED NVR INC COSTA JUSTIN RENAISSANCE CUSTOM HOMES ADAMS WILLIAM T JR LIVIN MITCHELL DAPHNE WILMOTH NATHAN G NVR INC D R HORTON INC BOONE JERRY W (JTWROS) D R HORTON INC EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL D R HORTON INC KR INVESTMENTS GVL LLC DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL BOTANY PROPERTIES LLC NVR INC MCNEILL NICOLE L MARK III PROPERTIES INC D R HORTON INC SEGARS JO ANN S LIVINGSTON JUSTIN T D R HORTON-CROWN LLC MCCORMACK AMANDA LEE (JT

BUYER

ADDRESS

WEST EMILY C (JTWROS) WATTS ALBERT SANVIDGE (J CHAPPELL CATALINA (JTWRO CRESCENT HOMES SC LLC JPMORGAN CHASE BANK N A HERMAN JANE M REACH LAUREN ELIZABETH ( POSEY TIFFANY SHREE’ NASIM MOHAMMED (JTWROS) SPEARS DENISE L WILLIAMS JAMES E SR (JTW RABON JESSICA KELLIHER ( POLK PAMELA P FRAZIER ERICA N BUTLER JUDY ANN (JTWROS) BABB CATHERINE L FREELAND GLADYS S (JTWRO SARAVIA PABLO R (JTWROS) DAVIS AUSTIN J (JTWROS) MORROW ASHLEY C BUCKSHORN DAVID B (SURV) HARVEY BRYAN S (JTWROS) SKINNER MODIES LAMAR PALOVICH GREGORY FRANCIS FREITAG STEPHANIE DUNCAN ANNIE (JTWROS) ORR STACIE L HERNANDEZ NANCY A MUNDEN COREY A RICHARDS MATTHEW MATTISON MORTY D (JTWROS CHRISTON MICHAEL A (JTWR CONRAD KAYE N KRISHNAMURTHY KOMALA MCELROY JEFFREY DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C IN CIRCLE CLUB LLC RUDISILL ASHLEY A (JTWRO ESTEVES VIVIANE (JTWROS) HINTON CLAYTON F (JTWROS DALTON CAROLINE (JTWROS) HOYLER TAMRA L BRUNSON-SMITH JOSEPH C ( HEBERT AUSTIN MICHAEL WEBB JO AYN HARPER (JTWR ROLLINS JAMES A (JTWROS) MILLS MONICA MAGDALENSKI JOSEPH (JTWR AYERS ANN M (JTWROS) COLLINS BOBBY J (JTWROS) BEACON HILL DEVELOPMENT CHANDAK MEENAKSHI (JTWRO MCCLARAN HOLLY DAYE HENDRICKS ROBERT LEE JR ARNOLD TIA N DUNCAN NANCY BELINDA ESCOBAR-ROMERO HECTOR AL NAHMIAS SANDI R ANDRADE KRISTIN HALL KELSEY (JTWROS) DOLDER BETTY ANN (JTWROS DIERKING AARON W (JTWROS LAWLESS SANDRA (JTWROS) SIEVERS ERIN H D R HORTON-CROWN LLC MARTIN MICALE ANTOINE REICHEL SASCHA MARTIN MARTIN LINDSEY M (JTWROS BACHMAN JONATHAN JAMES BAKER AARON MICHAEL

604 TROUTDALE LN 5 OAK BROOK WAY 157 SAINT JOHNS ST 572 SAVANNAH HWY 3415 VISION DR 806 SHANDWICK DR 528 MORNING CREEK PL 305 FOXWORTH LN 401 ASHLER DR 200 GENTLE SLOPES WAY 208 HEARTHWOOD LN 210 SANDUSKY LN 117 COLUMBINE WAY 2 SPRINGLEAF CT 510 DEWY MEADOWS DR 139 PELHAM SPRINGS PL 203 NEARMEADOWS WAY 613 PHILLIPS RD 9 FOXBOURNE WAY 6 TREECREST CT 305 ARLINGTON AVE 307 SASSAFRAS DR 108 CANYON CT 801 ARROWRIDGE BLVD 13 NOTTINGHAM RD 30 VERONA CIR 105 FUDORA CIR 513 HIPPS RD 20 ARNOLD MILL RD 25 DRAPER ST APT 339 11 FOWLER OAKS LN 3 COMMON OAKS CT 900 N MAIN ST APT 12 1140 WOODRUFF RD STE 106 PMB 2 911 LIBERTY WALK LN 211 CENTURY DR STE 100C 1167 CLUB CIR 16 RED JONATHAN CT 912 LIBERTY WALK LN 127 LANTANA CT 218 TRIPLE CREEK DR 30 FOWLER OAKS LN 24 WOODFERN CIR 21 DAVIS KEATS DR 1203 HERITAGE CLUB DR 216 TRIPLE CREEK DR 303 HARNESS TRL 1 FAIRMEADOW WAY 303 WILD HORSE CREEK DR 223 ROGERS AVE 2643 AUGUSTA ST 14 IRVINGTON DR 15 MCCLARAN LN 643 LYNNDALE CT 14 SPYGLEN WAY 222 REEDY SPRINGS LN 711 STREAMSIDE DR 2857 WESTPORT RD 517 GALVESTON ST 203 PENNWOOD LN 11 CREEKHAVEN LN 404 RICHBOURG RD 641 LYNNDALE CT 100 COTTER LN 100 VERDAE BLVD STE 401 214 TRIPLE CREEK DR 106 SKIPPING STONE CT 103 LYNCHBURG DR 1006 LOUVALE CT 18 VAILLE DR

Real Estate News

Blackstream Christie welcomes Jorge Alvarado

Alvarado

Blackstream Christie’s is proud to welcome Jorge Alvarado to our team. Alvarado is attentive, caring, and compassionate. He believes in the importance of being a strong communicator and a good listener; furthermore, Alvarado values the importance of putting his clients

first. With his extensive background in Customer Service, along with his experience within the Mortgage Servicing Industry, Alvarado’s goals are to offer his clients a seamless transition whether purchasing or selling property. These skills set him apart, as Alvarado is not only able to assist his customers while searching for their first home, but well after they have closed on their home. Alvarado is bilingual in Spanish and is very comfortable assisting his Spanish-speaking clients as

they navigate the home buying or selling process. Yet, regardless of his clients’ preferred language, Alvarado knows the importance of going through this process with a trusted advisor to lead the way. That is his goal and his commitment to each and every one of his clients. You can count on him to be with you every step of the way! When not working, Alvarado loves to play sports and is currently running and playing in a men’s baseball league; he also plays flag football.


10.26.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 35

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

Anna Hill Miller AnnaSellsGreenville.com

G ET S

e ric ★★ P w ANNA ANNAMILLER MILLER GETS GETS5 STARS! 5 STARS! Ne

★★★★★ ve but ★★★★★ “Perfectly “Perfectly “Has “Has thethe shy” matched ourour inside inside track track to to “Aggressive “Aggressive butbut matched AUGUSTA ROAD • 116 CURETON STREET

needs” needs” Greenville” Greenville” not not pushy” pushy” ate Agen t 4 Beds/3 Baths • $549,000 •wh MLS# 1377427 Authentic Craftsman in the heart of Augusta Road area! This 4 bedroom 3 full bath home oozes charm me is someon It’s It’s not often oftthat en that youFRONT you findfiaPORCH. nd Real a Real Estate Estate Agent Agent whowho earns earns top top withnot its ROCKING CHAIR 9ft CEILINGS, beautiful HEART PINE flcustomer oors,customer molding, glass door knobs. Large living spaces and Open fl oorplan make it a perfect home for family gatherings and customers sa satisfaction satisfaction marks marks yet at yetthe at the same same timetime is someone is someone you’you’ d call d call a friend. a friend.

THE SEXTON real OF SPRINGWOOD

entertaining. Spacious kitchen is the hub of the home with ample counter space and a large pantry for ex-

Butden But that’s that’s what what Anna Hill’s Hill’s customers customers say about sayfireplace about her. tra storage. Huge off the kitchen withAnna vaulted ceiling and wood burning willher. be your favorite esta te, spot for watching football in the fall. Inviting deck provides great outdoor living space. Walk 2 blocks to

Greenville cemetery is the oldest in the state — and adroitly cared for

ForFor a diff a diff erent erent approach approach to real to real estate, estate, think think Anna. Anna.

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words by John M. Nolan Springwood Cemetery is a remarkably historic place in the heart of downtown Greenville and I’ve noticed that it’s one of the most un-changing aspects of our constantly evolving landscape of downtown growth.   Did you know that Springwood Cemetery is the oldest municipal cemetery in South Carolina? We would naturally think that Charleston would hold this distinction, having been settled by English colonists in 1670. Its oldest city cemeteries, however, are all connected to churches, and Charleston’s oldest public cemetery — Magnolia Cemetery — dates to 1850.   Springwood Cemetery was officially founded in 1829 with its earliest grave dating back to 1812. Elizabeth Blackburn Williams was the mother-in-law of Chancellor Waddy Thompson, one of Greenville’s early civic leaders. She wanted to be buried in the estate’s gardens and that site is now part of Springwood.  A cemetery’s caretaker is called a sexton and Springwood has had just a few. The earliest appointment went to a British immigrant named George Morris in the late 1800s. While looking into the life of the third sexton, John Garraux, I stumbled across an intriguing connection to the Biltmore Estate. According to Lucile P. Ward’s book, “God’s Little Acre on Main Street,” Frederick Gottlieb Garraux came from Berne, Switzerland, in 1867 to work as a cabinetmaker at Biltmore. In the early 1870s the family moved to Greenville, where Frederick’s interest turned to farming. He and his wife, Elizabeth, began to plant and harvest productive grape vineyards.   It was Frederick and Elizabeth’s son, John, who became Springwood’s third sexton in 1910. He grew up in the newly developing neighborhood of “North Main.” Historian Suzanne Case relates that the street was called “Swiss Street” in honor of the family’s heritage and in 1911, just after John assumed the role of sexton, the street was renamed Garraux Street. Just a few years later, the city provided a house for the sexton located just behind the fence of Springwood Cemetery.   Springwood no longer has a sexton and the sexton’s dedicated home was demolished decades ago. For years, the Friends of Springwood Cemetery fundraised for the cemetery’s needs. Today, the city of Greenville cares for the grounds. It is the final resting place for more than 10,000 citizens connected to Greenville, about 2,600 of which were buried without gravestones.

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36 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.26.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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ARTS & CULTURE

Q&A

W I T H L A U R A C O L G AT E

Greenville Symphony Orchestra Concertmaster B Y PA U L H Y D E

N

ext to the conductor, the Greenville Symphony Orchestra’s concertmaster Laura Colgate is the star of the show. She’s the first-chair violinist, occupying the honored spot immediately to the left of conductor Edvard Tchivzhel during concerts. Colgate, who’ll participate in the orchestra’s “Ghostbusters” concert Tuesday and masterworks programs on Nov. 3-4, was appointed to the concertmaster’s position this season after a nationwide search and an intensive audition process. “She’s a true virtuoso who possesses all of the important qualities for this leading position in the orchestra – a beautiful, rich sound, outstanding technical skills and impressive experience,” Tchivzhel said. But what exactly does a concertmaster do? Colgate’s most prominent role is that of soloist. The great works of the concert hall often feature big violin solos. Colgate will be spotlighted in at least two this season: Rimsky-Korsakov’s “Scheherazade” in January and Richard Strauss’ “Ein Heldenleben” in February. That, by itself, calls for a highly skilled and experienced musician, but Colgate’s work doesn’t end there. continued on PAGE 38

Concertmaster Laura Colgate will have the spotlight for at least two violin solos this season. Photo by Will Crooks/Greenville Journal


38 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.26.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM She often participates in the auditions of new members of the orchestra. Plus, as leader of the violin section, she designates how a piece is to be bowed – so that the two-dozen violinists are one unified artistic machine. During a rehearsal, Colgate may actually conduct the orchestra from the first violinist’s chair when Tchivzhel steps away from the podium to hear the music from the audience’s perspective. Colgate, like many concertmasters, also has a ceremonial role: Before the start of every performance, she steps onto stage prior to the conductor, takes a bow and cues the oboe to play an “A” – the note on which the entire orchestra proceeds to tune. At the end of the concert, the conductor shakes her hand, symbolically thanking the entire orchestra for a successful performance. The peripatetic Colgate not only serves as the Greenville Symphony’s concertmaster but also occupies the same role with the El Paso Symphony and performs regularly with the IRIS Chamber Orchestra in her hometown of Memphis. Meanwhile, Colgate actually lives in Takoma Park, Maryland and is co-founder and artistic director of the Boulanger Initiative, a Washington, D.C.-based

organization that promotes music by women composers. “I do a lot of jumping around,” she said, with a laugh. Despite her many other commitments, Colgate will perform with Greenville Symphony on every Masterworks program and in most of the smaller chamber and Spotlight Series concerts. Colgate has been praised by the Cleveland Plain Dealer as “remarkably poised … sensitive and majestic.” She has performed across Europe, Asia and North America. She recently completed her doctorate at the University of Maryland, focusing her dissertation work on women composers. The Journal recently caught up with Colgate by phone while she was in Memphis, where she was performing with the IRIS Chamber Orchestra. The Journal’s Paul Hyde will present a free pre-concert talk one hour before the Greenville Symphony’s Nov. 3-4 “Beilman Returns” concerts. Write to Paul at paulhydeus@yahoo. com. Follow him on Facebook and Twitter: @PaulHyde7.

Q&A

W I T H L A U R A C O L G AT E

THE JOURNAL Welcome to your first season with the Greenville Symphony! How do you like Greenville and its orchestra? LAURA I’ve been so impressed with all of it. The city is absolutely charming. I love COLGATE Greenville. It has been nice to get to know the downtown area especially. The orchestra has been so warm and welcoming and so much fun to play with, and they’re so open to new ideas. I feel such a positive energy toward wanting to be the best orchestra they can. THE JOURNAL Your many commitments – in Greenville, El Paso, Memphis and Washington, D.C. – would seem to keep you constantly on the move. Is that so? LAURA I actually feel that I’ve enjoyed more stability this year than I’ve had in previous COLGATE seasons. I’ve been on many tours when I’ve been in a city just for a night or two nights, living on buses or planes. I did a “West Side Story” tour for nine months and two legs of the “Star Wars in Concert” tour. That was a good chunk of my life on a bus. I’ve done that throughout my life since I was 18. THE JOURNAL Are there positive aspects to working with a different set of musicians almost every week? LAURA Yes, I find a lot of creative stimulation from change and travel and just having COLGATE the opportunity to play with different musicians. I like new challenges. It makes you see your own playing in a different way. I think it’s always suited my personality and I think it has pushed me to be a better musician. THE JOURNAL And what are your impressions of Edvard Tchivzhel, the orchestra’s longtime music director and conductor? LAURA He really wants to make the highest quality of music possible. He strives to COLGATE make the orchestra the best it can be, and he’s really a pleasure to work with. He’s a fantastic conductor.

An Evening with Alonzo King November 8 - 7:30 p.m. SCGSAH Sakas Theatre 15 University Street, Greenville, SC 29601 LINES Ballet founder Alonzo King has been called a visionary choreographer who is altering the way we look at ballet and was described by the New York Times as having “astonishing originality.” In this special, multi-media event, presented by the S.C. Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities, King will share details about his company and his body of work as a part of the 2018-2019 Presidential Guest Artist Series—Connecting Lines: Dance Across the Arts. This series is free and generously sponsored by The Graham Foundation. Learn more at www.scgsah.org/presidential-guest-artist-series.

For more information call or visit our new website!

864.282.1570 | www.GSAFoundation.net SCGSAH Foundation | PO Box 8458 | Greenville, SC 29604


COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

10.26.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 39

TURNS OUT THE BEST THINGS REALLY ARE FREE

Named one of South Carolina’s “10 Best Attractions,” by 2018 USA TODAY 10Best and as one of the Top Three Things to Do in Greenville by U.S. News & World Report Travel, the Greenville County Museum of Art is home to the world’s largest public collection of watercolors by renowned American artist Andrew Wyeth. When you visit the GCMA, you’ll discover a carefully curated selection of American art, including one of the world’s best institutional collections of works by America’s most acclaimed living artist, Jasper Johns. The museum’s unrivaled Southern Collection highlights a collection of clay vessels created by the enslaved potter David Drake and one of the largest collections of paintings by William H. Johnson outside the Smithsonian.

Greenville County Museum of Art

And admission is always free! Learn more at gcma.org.

Wed - Sat 10 am - 5 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm

Journal Best things free.indd 2

420 College Street on Heritage Green 864.271.7570 gcma.org admission free

1/30/18 2:28 PM


40 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.26.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

New South Comedy Festival serves up laughs from across the country SARA PEARCE | STAFF

spearce@communityjournals.com

An intimate evening featuring live music and selections of classical and contemporary dance.

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 17TH 3 PM & 7 PM THE WAREHOUSE THEATRE FOR TICKETS VISIT INTERNATIONALBALLETSC.ORG

©JERRY FINLEY PHOTOGRAPHY

DON’T MISS a chance to meet the dancers and performers at our post-performance reception. Tickets available online.

The fifth annual New South Comedy Festival, produced by Greenville's Alchemy Comedy Theater, kicks off Thursday, Nov. 1. The Upstate festival will feature more than 300 comedians in 24 shows over the course of 10 days. While this may seem overwhelming, the masterminds behind the 10-day comedy fest have it under control. Harrison Brookie, founder of Alchemy Comedy Theater, along with Ben Burris, Shivani Nadarajah, and Alrinthea Carter — all current performers, teachers, or founders of Alchemy Comedy Theater — go through a grueling, yet hilarious, process of choosing each act. “We spend about two weeks going through the submissions,” Carter says. “Comics will send in videos and descriptions of their act and we have a committee of four that sit for two weeks and watch videos and talk about it and see how they can fit in the show. We kind of build the voice of the festival a little bit.” With almost 100 submissions this year, the four comedians had a lot of options. There will be acts coming from all over the United States, including Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, and Austin, Texas. “We want it to be a good representation across the country,” Carter says. “We want to be able to bring a varied amount of comedy here to Greenville. A lot of people in Greenville haven’t been exposed to improv other than us, so we want to show them everything we can.” New South Comedy Festival is primarily about serving up laughs, but there is an educational aspect of the festival for comedy newcomers as well as seasoned comics. Each comedian coming to town will help teach a series of workshops to help the resident Alchemy comics and other guests hone their comedic skills. “The workshops cover writing sketches, doing improv, storytelling on stage, being a female improviser,” Carter says. “It’s just different skill sets that we need as comics. Improv is more of an academic form of comedy and we are always learning so we want to be able to offer those classes to our players and those who are flying in.” New South Comedy Festival has brought some well-known acts to the stage of Al-

The New South Comedy Festival brings comedians and improvisers from all over the nation to Greenville’s own Alchemy Comedy Theater. Photos provided by Alchemy Comedy Theater

chemy Comedy, which is nestled inside Coffee Underground. Two years ago, comedian Amber Nash, known for her character of Pam Poovey on the show “Archer,” was a hit with the audience. Some of the most-anticipated guests this year include Eric Hunnicut, a member of The Reckoning based in Los Angeles; Sisters Three, a New York Times critic’s pick composed of Elana Fishbein and Elena Skopetos; and Eitan Levine from New York, known for his work with Elite Daily and PITtv’s “Who Won the Internet.” Guests can also expect to see plenty of local comics as well as those from Alchemy Comedy and No Expectations Comedy. “One of our goals in the festival is to get someone to come to the festival who can’t come next year because they are on ‘SNL’ or they write for a show,” Brookie says. “That is super satisfying for me.” It’s happened before: Musical improv guests Pop Roulette have been featured on Comedy Central and “Saturday Night Live.” Brookie says the most-important goal of New South Comedy Festival is to bring attention to the already-thriving comedy scene in Greenville.

“We want people to know that there are great improv and stand-up comedy shows here in Greenville every week,” Brookie says. “Obviously we see more people come out to shows during the 10 days of the festival, but we see a huge increase in people coming to our regular shows after the festival.” The quality of the performances will rival that seen in larger cities, Carter says. “If you’ve never been to a comedy show in Greenville, you’re going to see the same level of comedy that you would see in Chicago, Nashville, New York, Los Angeles — right here on our Main Street,” he says. “You’re going to see so many types of humor, family comedy, teen comedy, not-sofamily-friendly shows. We have something for every comedy fan.”

NEW SOUTH COMEDY FESTIVAL WHEN Nov. 1-10 WHERE Alchemy Comedy Theater, Coffee Underground, 1 E. Coffee St. TICKETS $5-15 INFO www.newsouthcomedy.com


10.26.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 41

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

SC Governor’s School student wins international poetry contest ARIEL GILREATH | STAFF

agilreath@communityjournals.com

Maggie Olszewski doesn’t want to be a professional writer. The 17-year-old was named one of 15 of the 2018 Foyle Young Poets — an international contest in London where 6,000 young poets submitted 11,000 poems for consideration. It’s not that Olszewski doesn’t love to write — she’s been writing short stories and poems since first grade — she just doesn’t want her ability to survive to hinge on her writing. “I do love writing, but I don’t think I want to be a ‘writer,’ with a capital ‘W,’” Olszewski said. “It’s super hard to make it as a writer, and especially as a poet.” Columbia native Olszewski submitted a few poems to the Foyle Young Poets contest from her creative writing portfolio with the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities, where she’s a senior. She said she almost didn’t submit the one judges ultimately selected, titled “At a Funeral.” “I actually wrote it as a short story in fiction class first quarter,” Olszewski said. “In fiction class, it was about two sisters that had been abandoned by their parents, and I didn’t like it, so I didn’t turn it in. I got to poetry (class), and I had no ideas for workshop one day, so I pulled it up and was like, ‘I’m just going to make it into a poem.’” The poem focuses on a brother and sis-

Maggie Olszewski is a senior this year at the South Carolina Governor's School for Arts and Humanities. Photo by Will Crooks/Greenville Journal

ter with two polar bears, which were added in the final draft. “Before it was more about the siblings’ relationship, and then I just wanted it to be about mourning and losing a parent, and how that might impact somebody,” Olszewski said. When she writes, Olszewski said it’s typically a reflection of her own emotions,

but it’s not just how she expresses those emotions, it’s how she copes with them.

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‘At the Funeral’ by Maggie Olszewski Brother and sister take polar bears. Brother parks his between two F-150s but sister’s won’t stay, instead follows her to the front row of fold-out seats and licks her wrists when hungry, so she digs through her pockets for bits of raw seal. After the ceremony, she feeds brother’s bear too. Family members say nothing because there aren’t any rules against bears. Brother and sister take polar bears for a walk, all the way to the Arctic and back. Bundled to their chins, they watch their bears ask other bears why it’s so cold here. And other bears say it could be colder. Sun a gravestone. Ice the body being buried. Time for the reception, sister finds hers scraping its claws

through layers of white to brown, scraping an H, an E, Help, Heaven, Hello, and brother can’t find his at all. Sister takes hers into the funeral home and for a snack it eats its whole plate, crunch of ceramics. Mother says nothing because their father is dead. Mother says nothing but feeds the bear his shoes, his wallet, a wedding invitation he left magnetised to the refrigerator which now sits filled with fish. And sister hates the bear and the way it smells but falls asleep on a bench with her face in its fur, rubs its ears now she’s out of seal, does nothing to make it leave though she wonders why it stays.

“Even though I don’t want to do it professionally, I do need to write,” she said. “It’s not a matter of what I want to do, it’s kind of like when I feel sad, the only way I can think to express that is through a poem or through a story or nonfiction essay.” Olszewski wrote a series of poems this year addressing Laika, the first animal launched into orbit by the Soviet Union in 1957, after reading about the dog’s death. Laika died within hours of the launch, from overheating. “They were all about my emotions,” Olszewski said. “It was really cathartic in the best way.” Olszewski said she initially wrote “At the Funeral” when she was dealing with emotions about her own family. “Whatever I’m feeling, I find a way to try to say that,” Olszewski said. “Poems this quarter have been about heartbreak and losing a friend — whatever is going on in my life, I try to express it without calling anyone out.” Olszewski was the only U.S. contestant to win the 2018 Foyle Young Poets contest.

Pictured are Linda Cely, owner of Balloons Décor and More, and Club President Randy Vogenberg.

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42 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.26.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Paul’s Picks...

Premiere of ‘Ghostbusters’ with orchestra, plus a star violinist

PAUL HYDE | CONTRIBUTOR

P

aul’s Picks of the Week: “Ghostbusters Live in Concert” and “Beilman Returns” — two programs by the Greenville Symphony. Let’s take them one by one. “Ghostbusters”: The Greenville Symphony has got a tasty Halloween treat for the Upstate: a screening of the original “Ghostbusters” with the music score played by a live orchestra — the Greenville Symphony. Tuesday’s screening at the Peace Center actually is a world premiere: It’s the first time the hilarious 1984 film has been seen with a live orchestra. Ray Parker Jr.’s No. 1 hit, “Ghostbusters,” also will be spotlighted. “Ghostbusters” features Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd, Harold Ramis and Ernie Hudson as parapsychologists who start a ghost-catching business after their careers in academia go awry. “Ghostbusters Live in Concert” will travel around the world, featuring local orchestras at each stop.

In Greenville, the score will be conducted by Peter Bernstein, the son of the prolific composer who wrote the score, Academy Aw a r d - w i n n e r Elmer Bernstein. Peter Bernstein also orchestrated Peter Bernstein the original film. Halloween treat: The Greenville Symphony will screen the original 1984 film “Ghostbusters” with a live orchestra performing Elmer Bernstein’s music score this Tuesday at the Peace Center. Conducting the performance will be Peter Bernstein, son of the composer and orchestrator of the film. “Working with my father as an orchestrator all those years ago was a unique and wonderful time,” Bernstein said. “To be able to bring that score back to life and conduct it is thrilling both professionally and personally.”

Fun facts

If you go

• “Ghostbusters” will be projected onto a 26.5- by 15-foot screen.

What: “Ghostbusters” With Live Orchestra, featuring the Greenville Symphony Orchestra

• About 65 musicians will be involved in the performance.

When: 7:30 p.m. Tuesday

• Live concerts with film have been increasingly embraced by orchestras, but it’s still a relatively rare experience.

‘Beilman Returns’ Violinist Benjamin Beilman, one of finest musicians of his generation, returns to perform Brahms’ Violin Concerto with the Greenville Symphony, Nov. 3-4 at the Peace Center. The young violinist was last seen in Greenville in a 2016 performance of Beethoven’s Violin Concerto. Also on the program will be two main-

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stays of the classical repertoire: Wagner’s Prelude to “Die Meistersinger” and Dvorak’s Seventh Symphony On the podium will be the orchestra’s longtime music director Edvard Tchivzhel. The Journal’s Paul Hyde will present a free pre-concert talk one hour before the Nov. 3-4 “Beilman Returns” concerts. Write to Paul at paulhydeus@yahoo.com. Follow him on Facebook and Twitter: @PaulHyde7.

GREENVILLE SYMPHONY PRESENTS ‘BEILMAN RETURNS’ WHEN 8 p.m. Nov. 3; 3 p.m. Nov. 4 WHERE Peace Center TICKETS $19-$75 INFO 864-467-3000 or www.peacecenter.org


10.26.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 43

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

Centre Stage looks at mental health with ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest’

OCT. 26 - NOV. 1 The Art House of Greenville Back from the Dead Oct. 26-27 ~ (212) 279-2848

SARA PEARCE | STAFF

spearce@communityjournals.com

While many are familiar with the 1975 film “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” they may not know that it was first a play. Published in 1962, the novel was adapted into a play starring Kirk Douglas, who bought the rights for the movie. About 10 years later, Douglas’ son Michael would produce the film version, which won acclaim for its portrayal of mental-health treatment in the United States. With its mainstage production of “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” Centre Stage hopes to pay homage to the original Broadway show as well as continuing the discussion surrounding mental health. Laura Nicholas, director and set designer, says the play effectively spotlights mental-health issues, even though it is set more than 60 years ago. “Cuckoo’s Nest” centers around Randle P. McMurphy (Dave LaPage) who fakes insanity to get out of serving jail time and ends up in a mental hospital where he is under the scrutiny of Nurse Ratched (Tiffany Nave Stewart). McMurphy rebels against her intense caregiving and encourages other patients to do the same. Nicholas explains that, while the movie has remained popular over the years, the play stays true to the book and has some key differences. “The movie is still great and is completely historically accurate because they found the actual hospital where this took place and set it in the time when it happened in the ’50s and so that is really great for visual research,” Nicholas says. “But the film removes the narrator, which is very important. A lot was taken out of it, a lot of the language for example, and a lot of the humor as well.” Another key difference is that the entire play takes place in the day room, except for one scene in the electric shock therapy room. Nicholas says the Centre Stage set will be accurate to the hospital in which the play was set, and representative of the time. Portraying mental health patients onstage can be difficult, Nicholas says, and there is a balance between having fun with the work and ensuring that each portrayal is respectful and honest. “In rehearsal, we’ve talked a lot about the different perspectives of the charac-

A R T S C A LE N DA R

Greenville Center for Creative Arts Contemporary Print Collective Annual Fair Oct. 26-28 ~ 735-3948 Greenville Concert Band Childhood Favorites Oct. 26 & 28 ~ 214-5807 Greenville Little Theatre Wait Until Dark Oct. 26-Nov.11 ~ 233-6238 SC Children’s Theatre Click, Clack, Boo! Through Oct. 27 ~ 235-2885 Peace Center Anastasia Through Oct. 28 ~ 467-3000 The Warehouse Theatre Sweat Through Oct. 28 ~ 235-6948 Younts Center for Performing Arts The Little Mermaid Through Oct. 28 ~ 409-1050 Emrys Reading Room Jo Watson Hackl Oct. 29 ~ 616-6630 SC Arts Alliance Art Collecting 101 Workshop Oct. 29 ~ 314-0712 Greenville Symphony Orchestra Ghostbusters Oct. 30 ~ 467-3000 Genevieve’s at the Peace Center Fine Arts Center Jazz and R&B Oct. 31 ~ 467-3000 Genevieve’s at the Peace Center Late Baroque – Bach & Bordeaux Nov. 1 ~ 467-3000

Randall McMurphy in the Centre Stage production of “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” | Photo by Wil Crooks/Greenville Journal

ters and how they feel about what’s going on,” Nicholas says. The cast has focused on each character and how that character’s condition affects his or her interpretation of and reactions to the action. While the play is set in the 1950s, Nicholas says there are many parallels to how mental health is viewed today. “It has become more and more apparent that we just didn’t understand the brain or chemical imbalance or depression or even someone who is gay or has PTSD or a stutter; like in the play, they just weren’t understood,” Nicholas says. “These are all things that now are treatable, but at this time they would have just been taken to an institution. That same kind of concept is still very prevalent today. There are things we still don’t understand. But the only way to understand it is

to talk about it and that’s something that a play can do.” This is one of Nicholas’s main goals in staging the show. She says this show has taken her out of her comfort zone as a director, and she hopes the audience has a similar experience. “Hopefully this will help us talk more about mental-health awareness, she says. “It’s something that will continue to be relevant. As long as there’s a negative stigma around it, it’s something that should be talked about.”

‘ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST’ WHEN Thursday, Nov 1-17, check for times WHERE Centre Stage, 501 River St. TICKETS $19-$34 INFO www.centrestage.or

Centre Stage One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest Nov. 1-17 ~ 233-6733 Furman University Thompson Art Gallery Lineage: Tom Flowers & Family Through Nov. 2 ~ 294-2995 SC Children’s Theatre The Teddy Bears’ Picnic Through Nov. 20 ~ 235-2885 Metro. Arts Council @ Centre Stage Imaginary Tails: Works by Vivian Morris and Freda Sue Through Nov. 23 ~ 233-6733 Greenville Center for Creative Arts Textiles: A History of Expression Through Nov. 28 ~ 735-3948 Main Street Real Estate Gallery Works by Nathan Bertling Through Dec. 31 ~ 250-2850 Greenville County Museum of Art Bob Jones Museum Highlights Through Dec. 30 ~ 271-7570 Andrew Wyeth Watercolors Through Jan. 13 ~ 271-7570

Keeping our ARTbeat strong w w w.greenvillearts.com

16 Augusta Street

864. 467.3132


44 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.26.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

‘WAIT UNTIL DARK’ BRINGS CAT-AND-MOUSE THRILLS TO GREENVILLE LITTLE THEATRE STAGE VINCENT HARRIS | ARTS & CULTURE WRITER

vharris@communityjournals.com

Some of you might remember the 1967 film “Wait Until Dark,” in which a recently blinded woman named Susan Hendrix (played by Audrey Hepburn) is caught in a cat-and-mouse game with a trio of thugs attempting to steal a heroin-stuffed doll that’s inadvertently made its way into her apartment. At the film’s climax, Hepburn and the head thug, Roat (played by Alan Arkin), attempt to outsmart one another in Susan’s apartment, which is largely pitchblack except for occasional bursts of light from a match or an opened refrigerator. It’s one of the most suspenseful scenes in film history, and it also takes place in near-total darkness. Which begs the question: When the stage version is performed at the Greenville Little Theatre this Friday, how on earth are they going to convey that same high-wire tension without the benefit of camera tricks and intense close-ups? Well, “Wait Until Dark” actually started out as a play before it was a film, so it all works very well onstage. And besides, the director of the Little Theatre’s version, Allen McCalla, says there’s a lot of drama to be found in the shadows. “There’s really nothing so exciting as being in a dark theater,” McCalla says. “There are two sections of the play where it’s pitch-dark onstage, and the only light comes from match strikes, though we do help it out a little bit. But it’s thrilling. I love plays like this.” McCalla says he’s had "Wait Until Dark" on his directorial wish list for years. “I saw the movie when I was 12 years

old, and I’ve been a fan of it ever since,” he says. “I love seeing thrillers onstage, so this was one that was always in the back of my mind.” Thrillers, whether onscreen or onstage, take a great deal of precision to execute correctly. Add in the fact that the lead character, played in this production by Claire Clauson, is blind, and rigorous rehearsal becomes even more vital than it normally is in a Greenville Little Theatre production. “Rehearsal is very important for every play,” McCalla says, “but it’s particularly important for a play like this. It takes an entire team. During rehearsal, I have people sit out in the audience and look at different angles. You’re trying to tell the story so that you have the full amount of suspense. Theater is storytelling, and you can’t tell it properly unless you rehearse things a lot.” Luckily, McCalla says, in Clauson, he found the right actress to carry the load. “You need a highly skilled actor,” he says, “somebody who has a lot of vulnerability, but can muster strength. And Claire is fantastic in the part. People are going to love her.” For Clauson, the role presented just the right mix of challenge and excitement. “First of all, the most well-known iteration of the show is the film with Audrey Hepburn,” she says with a laugh. “Anytime you’re taking on something like that in can be a little intimidating. But once we started getting into rehearsals, we found our version of Susan. Once we were able to do that, I was able to take out of my mind that it’s a big role. It’s intimidating that a lot of this play is resting on my shoulders, so instead, I think, ‘This is a person whose

The cast of Greenville Little Theatre’s production of “Wait Until Dark” | Photo by Escobar Photography

life is changing today; how does she react to it?’ She takes it moment by moment, and that’s what makes it approachable.” Regardless of who has played the role of Susan Hendrix, McCalla says the audience will be drawn in by her struggle to turn the tables on the criminals attempting to run a con game on her. “You have this blind woman who’s the heroine, and these bad guys working against her, which is already a fantastic premise,” he says. “If you get them into the story, the audience feels along with the character: They feel the anxiety; they’re

Halloween Week Oct. 29, 30, & 31 5-11pm

engaged. Here’s a woman who finds her inner strength and gets one up over these evil forces working against her.”

‘WAIT UNTIL DARK,’ BY FREDERICK KNOTT, ADAPTED BY JEFFREY HATCHER WHEN 8 p.m. Oct. 26-27, Nov. 1-3, and Nov. 8-10; 3 p.m. Oct. 28, Nov. 4 and 11 WHERE Greenville Little Theatre, 444 College St. TICKETS $20-$28 INFO 864-233-6238, www. greenvillelittletheatre.org


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DRIVIN’ N’ CRYIN’

Rockers aren’t ready to rest on 33-year career

Expect to hear some classic hits from Drivin’ N’ Cryin’ when the band performs Saturday, Oct. 27, at The Spinning Jenny. VINCENT HARRIS | ARTS & CULTURE WRITER

vharris@communityjournals.com

When it performs Saturday at The Spinning Jenny in Greer, the veteran Atlanta quartet Drivin’ N’ Cryin’ will be more than happy to play the hits. You’ll hear the towering riff of “Fly Me Courageous,” the chugging rock-radio hit “Build A Fire,” and the immortal neocountry ballad “Straight To Hell,” along with all the other staples from the band’s 33-year career. But bassist Tim Nielsen, who forms the nucleus of Drivin’ N’ Cryin’ alongside singer-songwriter-guitarist Kevn Kinney, is quick to add that the band isn’t a nostalgia act and, if he has anything to say about it, it never will be.

“It’s about keeping the story interesting,” Nielsen says. “It’s about keeping our fanbase engaged and having a reason to go on the road. It’s not just ‘we’re going on the road to play the hits.’ We’re going to play the hits, but the goal is to be promoting something." In this case, the band is promoting a new, limited-edition 45 rpm single containing a rerecording of its pile-driving rocker “Powerhouse” with “Livin’ By The Book’” on the B-side. But that’s just one of many projects the band has in the pipeline. Members are finishing up a new collaborative album with Aaron Lee Tasjan, a fast-rising alt-country artist who was once Drivin’ N’ Cryin’s lead guitarist. The band recently reissued its cult-classic 1989 album “Mystery Road,” which is where

“Straight To Hell” first appeared. There’s even a tentative plan to release Kinney’s 1990 solo album “MacDougal Blues” on vinyl for the first time. Perhaps most notably, after decades of being a band too country for rock radio and too rock for country radio, the band’s friend, Darius Rucker, took “Straight To Hell” into the mainstream country Top 40 (with some help from Jason Aldean and Luke Bryan on vocals) when he released it as a single from his 2017 album “When Was the Last Time.” “It took a lot of cojones for Darius to be a black mainstream country singer in the South singing a song called ‘Straight To Hell’ and expecting it to get played on country radio,” Nielsen says with a laugh. “It was crazy for him to try to pull that off. But it’s going to help new people discover

all of our other music, which is the bottom line.” The flurry of activity is part of a fiveyear plan of releases and other projects that Nielsen and Kinney have undertaken since deciding to manage the band themselves, a move Nielsen says is one of the best decisions they’ve ever made. “We make our career decisions together, and we’ve experienced a lot of great success over the past couple of years, both musically and as a business,” he says. “I think it’s partially because we’ve cut out all of the BS that these managers we’ve had in the past have tried. If we decide we want something, we go get it. We figured out how to get 'Mystery Road' rereleased. We’ve maintained strong relationships with guys like Darius, who has always been a fan, so he decided to cut ‘Straight To Hell’ and get it on mainstream country radio. The story keeps on going; we don’t want to be a band that rests on one or two hits from 25 years ago.” And at the heart of it all is the relationship between Kinney and Nielsen, a friendship and partnership that’s lasted for nearly 40 years. “It all started when I saw this guy pop up onstage at a club one night and play a couple of songs,” Nielsen says with a laugh. “I went up to him after he came offstage and said, ‘Who are you? That was really great! You sound like Ray Davies and you look like Johnny Ramone!’ He played me a cassette of his demos, and they were really great, and I suggested that we should do something. And for some reason, we’ve really just continued to click together.”

DRIVIN’ N’ CRYIN’, WITH RUST WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 27 WHERE The Spinning Jenny, 107 Cannon St., Greer TICKETS $17 in advance, $20 at door INFO 864-469-6416, www.thespinningjennygreer.com


46 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.26.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

feast CAROL’S ICE CREAM SERVES UP NOSTALGIA WITH A MODERN TWIST

Carol’s Ice Cream features delightful creations, such as this coconut cream ice cream donut sandwich, in a comfortable setting.

Chinese checkers and a tub of ice cream at grandma’s house: Those were the inspirations for chef Alex George’s new ice cream shop, Carol’s Ice Cream, that opened this summer in the Village of West Greenville. The shop at 1260 Pendleton St. next to The Village Grind recently established consistent hours of operation, Thursday-Sunday, with the goal of expanding to six days a week. George, the chef at Golden Brown & Delicious restaurant just across the street, remembers his paternal grandmother, Carol, before she passed away seven years ago, serving ice cream from one of the giant value tubs. There was nothing fancy about it, but she added her own special touch, scooping it into a bowl and then whipping the ice cream with a spoon until it was creamy and smooth. “I don’t like chewing ice cream,” George says. Chinese checkers games were also a staple at grandma Carol’s house, and that inspiration is seen in the new shop from the wall-sized conceptual mural on the right wall to the wooden game boards available for customers to play. And as to the soft ice cream, George has kicked that up a notch. Instead of scooping pre-frozen ice cream into dishes and adding toppings, he is using

WORDS BY ARIEL TURNER | PHOTOS BY WILL CROOKS liquid nitrogen at minus 320 degrees Fahrenheit to freeze the liquid ice cream mix to order while the customer watches — often wide-eyed with loud exclamations when the nitrogen “smoke” billows out of the mixing bowl and down the counter. Ordering at Carol’s is slightly different than a typical ice cream shop, and while similar to a Marble Slab or Spill the Beans create-your-own model, the execution is entirely different. First, you choose your base — vanilla custard, chocolate sorbet, coconut cream, or seasonal fruit sorbets. George says he has plans to create tea sorbets, as well. The vanilla custard is the only flavor that uses cow’s milk. The others are all vegan-friendly. Then you choose a flavored syrup made in house, such as coffee, hazelnut, pineapple, pumpkin, lavender, or mint. The syrup will be poured in during the mixing process. Once those two choices are made, the pre-portioned ice cream base is poured into the mixing bowl of an orange KitchenAid mixer. While the whisk arm spins around the bowl, liquid nitrogen is poured in slowly. The flavor is added, and the process continues until the ice cream or sorbet reaches the correct frozen — but not hard — consistency. Additional toppings, also made in house

except for the sprinkles and maraschino cherries, include gluten-free cookie dough, brownies, cinnamon streusel, milk crumb, and pizzelles. George says his goal for all of the components is that they are either made in house or at least, he’s involved in the process, such as toasting the nut toppings. That’s led him to the decision to make his own Oreo-style sandwich cookies, which

he hasn’t done yet, but says he will soon. Speaking of sandwiches, doughnut ice cream sandwiches are also on the menu. George is known for his yeasted doughnuts he serves for brunch and special occasions at GB&D, and those same doughnuts are used to create the “bread” with ice cream as the filling. Grilled in a special press, they are served warm. George says he sees those as a big seller when the outdoor temps dip. Now that his staff is solidly trained, George wants to begin advertising specials or staff recommendation for flavor combinations, such as pumpkin and cheesecake syrups — a current seasonal favorite combo. For those not as adventurous or wanting to spend around $6 for a single dish, Carol’s also offers soft-serve vanilla ice cream, made from scratch and dispensed from a soft-serve machine, for $1.50.

IF YOU GO

• Carol’s Ice Cream • Open 4-9 p.m. ThursdaysFridays, 2-9 p.m. Saturdays, 2-7 p.m. Sundays • Follow @carolsicecream on Instagram for updates


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small plates

Look sharp

A correctly sharpened knife is an underestimated necessity for home cooks. Dull knives are dangerous and inefficient, plain and simple. Most professional chefs either sharpen their own knives or have a consistent sharpening FOOD NEWS service, but now, we regular people (or & EVENTS chefs) can have our knives sharpened BY ARIEL TURNER by an expert that happens to also be a chef. Dogwood Custom Knives, with knife-maker extraordinaire Dan Eastland, has partnered with Husk Greenville chef and sharpening expert Shamil Velazquez to offer sharpening services at Eastland’s studio, 213-D Riverside Court, Greer. Drop offs are 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Thursdays, starting Oct. 24, and pick up is noon5 p.m. Mondays. Or, they’ll sharpen while you wait noon-3 p.m. Mondays. Pricing is $10 minimum, with $3 per inch plus a $5 service fee for the total order. Check out https://www.dogwoodcustomknives.com for more information.

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE BÉLA FLECK, ZAKIR HUSSAIN, EDGAR MEYER WITH RAKESH CHAURASIA, BANSURI NOVEMBER 6

This menu is not fake news

NOVEMBER 8

Photo by Matthew Murphy

The menu is out for Greenbrier Farms’ fifth annual Campfire Social Charity Event Nov. 8, and it looks almost too good to be true. This, however, is not an instance of fake news, and aren’t we all relieved. The nitty gritty: Greenbrier Farms is at 766 Hester Store Road, Easley; tickets are $80 per person, and are still available at http://www. greenbrierfarms.com. And without further ado, here are the menu deets. Craig Kuhns, Greenbrier Farms: Fire roasted al pastor beef, drip cooked root vegetables, pickled salsa verde. Shawn Kelly, Fork and Plough: Sweet potato and coconut soup, Thai pork and peanut sandwich. Anthony Gray, Bacon Bros. Public House, Greenville: Whole hog gumbo. Tobin Simpson, Project Host: Southern bibimbap with Greenbrier pork (both meat and vegetarian versions). Jon Buck, Husk Restaurant, Greenville: Southern-style beans, rice, and braised greens. Jamie Cribb, The Kennedy: Ember roasted butternut squash, tikka masala, yogurt, Carolina Gold peanut rice. Kyle Lee McKnight, Barrister’s at The Esquire Hotel: Assorted Greenbrier vegetables: grilled salad, smoked carrots with barbecue beer-can cabbage, local cheese. Christian Hansen, Blue Ridge Creamery: Special selection of locally produced artisanal cheeses. Adam Cooke, Due South Coffee: Coffees, mocktails, and small bites. Jeanne Hall, Bossy Baker: Molasses ginger bars and toffee cookie bars. Anne Marie O’Hara, Emily Dallam, and Elizabeth Gibbs, The Chocolate Moose Bakery & Cafe: Red velvet mini cupcakes, pumpkin mini cupcakes, brown-butter chocolate chip cookies with sea salt, salted caramel banana pudding, and chocolate mousse.

dorrance dance november 18

No more errands Postmates has launched in Greenville. This delivery service allows customers to order from any restaurant or merchant and have it brought to their door. Really, they say any restaurant or store in the service area. I’m still digesting the ramifications of that: no more running errands, ever? No more irresponsible, hangry shopping in the grocery store resulting in the purchase of five bags of frozen pizza rolls? The possibilities seem almost endless. I will definitely be giving this a try. To order, visit https:// postmates.com or download Postmates on iOS or Android. Delivery fees start at $3.99; customers can, however, pay $9.99 per month for unlimited delivery or $7.99 per month when paid annually. Right now, to celebrate the launch, Postmates is giving customers $4 off their first Chipotle order when they use the code CHIPOTLE134. So go get yourself a burrito from the comfort of your own sofa, and you might as well have them pick up the margarita ingredients, too. Because you can.

GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY!

GROUPS


48 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.26.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

AROUND TOWN  PLAN YOUR WEEK WITH THE UPSTATE’S BEST LOCAL ACTIVITIES  |  FIND MORE ONLINE AT EVENTS.GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM ‘Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horrors’ ■■ 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. ■■ Chapman Cultural Center, 200 E. St. John St., Spartanburg ■■ $25 Spartanburg Philharmonic kicks off its 2018-19 Espresso chamber concert series with the silent horror film, “Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horrors.” “Nosferatu” returns to the Chapman Cultural Center with live musical accompaniment by the Spartanburg Philharmonic chamber ensemble. The classic film is based on the hit novel “Dracula” by Bram Stoker, but because the book was still under copyright at the time the movie was made, the writers changed names and locations. ‘Martin Lawrence: Lit AF Tour’ ■■ 8 - 11 p.m. ■■ Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N. Academy St. ■■ $48 – $136 Martin Lawrence returns to the stage as the host of this comedy event, which features a number of comedians. Furman Symphony Orchestra and soprano Alison Trainer ■■ 8 - 9:30 p.m. ■■ McAlister Auditorium, Furman University, 3300 Poinsett Highway ■■ $5 – $15 The Furman Symphony Orchestra will open “American Classics” with masterworks “Karelia Suite” by Jean Sibelius; “Knoxville: Summer of 1915” by Samuel Barber, featuring Furman soprano Alison Trainer; and Howard

Hanson’s Symphony No. 2 “Romantic.” The concert is conducted by Thomas Joiner, Furman professor of violin and director of orchestral activities, and Charlie Baldwin, Furman senior piano performance major.

SATURDAY | OCT.27 Drug Take-Back Day ■■ 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. ■■ Greer Commission of Public Works and Greer Police Department, 301 McCall St., Greer ■■ Free The Greer Commission of Public Works and the Greer Police Department are accepting unwanted prescription drugs, including over-the-counter medications, prescription medications, and pet medications. Sharps and liquids will not be accepted. A drop box is available 24/7 at the Greer Police Department or Greer Memorial Hospital. Vintage Market at the Park ■■ 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. ■■ Trailblazer Park, 235 Trailblazer Drive, Travelers Rest ■■ $2 This market brings together 100 vintage vendors and makers along with local musicians and food trucks. Drug take-back day and shred day ■■ 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. ■■ AnMed Health North Campus, 2000 E. Greenville St., Anderson, and Anderson Mall, 3131 N. Main St., Anderson ■■ Free AnMed Health is teaming up with the city of Ander-

Beilman Returns

Violin Virtuoso Benjamin Beilman returns to Greenville, taking the stage by storm in one of the greatest violin concertos ever written, Brahms’ passionate Violin Concerto.

Edvard Tchivzhel, Conductor | Benjamin Beilman, Violin

Nov 3 at 8pm | Nov 4 at 3pm | The Peace Center greenvillesymphony.org | 864.467-3000 Journal Print 1/4 pg Beilman.indd 2

Funded in part by

10/19/18 11:42 AM

OCT. 27

Scarlet Stitch

Smiley’s Acoustic Café, 111 Augusta St. 10 p.m. | Free

CONCERT

FRIDAY | OCT. 26

You’ve probably heard of bands who got together through a Craigslist ad, but how about one that got together because of a Craigslist ad for firewood? That’s how vocalist Deb Carter, a dynamic, powerful singer with a voice reminiscent of the Indigo Girls’ Amy Ray, came to join up with the Athens, Georgia, band Scarlet Stitch. “I happened upon the band while looking for firewood on Craigslist,” Carter says. “I wandered to the ‘Musicians’ section and Scarlet Stitch needed a new lead singer. I auditioned in 2010, and I went home thinking, ‘Wow, me, a Brooklyn, New York, chick in a Southern town playing Southern rock with a bunch of Southern guys.’ I was all over it.” The band’s music is a haunting mix of acoustic folk and electric rock anchored by the songwriting chemistry between Carter and guitarist Duke Wayland. “When I began making music with Deb everything opened up for me,” Wayland says. “I felt like I was finally playing with someone who got it, and we have always just seemed to gel from the writing process to the stage. For me if there’s no Deb Carter there is no Scarlet Stitch.” son Police Department and the Anderson County Sheriff’s Office for Prescription Drug Take-Back Day. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration will provide safe disposal of unused or expired medication. Shred-A-Way will be on site to ensure secure disposal of unwanted documents. Only pills will be accepted.

Bark in the Park ■■ 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. ■■ Conestee Park, 840 Mauldin Road ■■ Free The 5K Run and Walk-a-Thon, entertainment, prizes, and dog costume contest will be featured at Bark in the Park” The first 150 dogs with their humans will


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AROUND TOWN  MORE AT EVENTS.GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM CONCERT

OCT. 28

J. Roddy Walston and The Business, with Illiterate Light Radio Room, 110 Poinsett Highway 8 p.m. | $15 in advance, $20 at door

If you’re going to check out J. Roddy Walston and The Business at the Radio Room on Sunday, don’t sleep on the opening act, Illiterate Light. The Virginia band is a guitar-and-drums duo, but their music, showcased on two recent singles “Better Than I Used To” and “Growin’ Down,” doesn’t rely on the wall-of-sound style that similar groups like The White Stripes and The Black Keys used. They prefer to layer their sound and go for pure-pop melodies with a bit of a psychedelic touch. “When you think of The Black Keys and The White Stripes, those duos tend to go down the blues-rock avenue where the guitarist doubles up on the amps and the drummer plays heavier,” says Illiterate Light singer-guitarist Jeff Gorman. “And we love blues-rock, but pretty early on we wanted to see if there was a way to retain that full sound and do it from more of an alternative or psychedelic approach.” receive goodie bags.

SUNDAY | OCT. 28 Tryon Hounds barn tour ■■ 1 - 5 p.m. ■■ Crescent Ridge Farm, 642 Bent Oak Drive, Columbus, NC ■■ $35 Guests can spend the afternoon in the Carolina Foothills countryside during the peak fall foliage for a selfguided tour of four unique barns in the heart of Tryon horse country. Each one has its own story to tell along with the horses that live there. All barns will feature a tailgate of light refreshments and equestrian art. Sundays at 2: Music in the Galleries ■■ 2 - 3 p.m. ■■ Greenville County Museum of Art, 420 College St. ■■ Free Participants can take a musical tour from classics to contemporary Broadway, presented by the Pride of Greenville Men’s Chorus. ‘The Hanging Tree Has No Leaves’ book signing ■■ 2 - 4 p.m. ■■ Majority Baptist Church, 400 Hudson Barksdale Blvd., Spartanburg ■■ Free The poetry of Pamila Miller Ndanyi depicts historical and contemporary social injustices, as well as a vast array of topics, using free verse and rhyme. While Ndanyi’s accounts are realistic and heartfelt, her poetry does not leave the reader hopeless. From her suggestions of how to create peace in a chaotic world to her appreciation for nature and family, a recurring theme is that kindness can cure most social ills. ‘Howl-o-ween Spooktacular’ ■■ 5 - 8 p.m. ■■ Aloft Greenville Downtown, 5 N. Laurens St. ■■ Free The “Howl-o-ween Spooktacular” will give pet parents the opportunity to bring their dogs dressed in their best Halloween costumes. The contest winner will be announced at 6 p.m., and the grand prize is a weekend stay at Aloft Greenville Downtown. Runner-up prizes will be provided by participating partner, Lucky Pup Rescue SC. Guests can also enjoy refreshments avail-

able for purchase at the hotel’s W XYZ bar and live music by DJ FWB. Emrys FUNraiser ■■ 4 - 6 p.m. ■■ The Velo Fellow, 1 Augusta Road No. 126 ■■ $35 Guests are invited to join Emrys for an afternoon of laughs with “Mary Louise and Veranda” of the Cafe and Then Some.

TUESDAY | OCT. 30 Youth Mental Health First Aid program ■■ 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. ■■ University Center, 225 S. Pleasantburg Drive ■■ $50 The Youth Mental Health First Aid program is primarily designed for adults who regularly interact with young people. It is designed to teach parents, family members, caregivers, teachers, school staff, peers, neighbors, health and human services workers, and other caring citizens how to help an adolescent (ages 12-18) who is experiencing a mental health or addictions challenge or is in crisis. ‘Ghostbusters’ with live orchestra ■■ 7:30 - 9:45 p.m. ■■ Peace Center, 300 S. Main St. ■■ $25 – $75 “Who ya gonna call?” Ghostbusters! It’s all treats and no tricks for the eyes and ears this Halloween as the classic “Ghostbusters” movie starring Bill Murray and Dan Aykroyd comes to Greenville in celebration of its 35th anniversary. Participants can shake, shiver and howl with laughter as they watch the original movie, while the Greenville Symphony Orchestra performs the film’s musical score live. ‘NF: Perception World Tour’ ■■ 8 - 11 p.m. ■■ Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N. Academy St. ■■ $28.50 – $45.50 Following success on the charts, on tour, online, and on his own terms, platinum-certified Michigan rapper NF shares a brand-new track entitled “Why” along with its music video. It marks the first new music from the artist since the 2017 release of his third full-length album, “Perception.”

THERAPY FOR EVERYBODY Your Wait Time Will Be…

From two day shipping to grocery concierge services to being able to know in real time which traffic route is the fastest just by pulling up an app on your phone—we live in a day and age of instant gratification and convenience. Wouldn’t it be nice if healthcare worked the same way? What if, at the onset of pain, injury, or physical inconvenience, you were able to contact your healthcare provider and be seen within a week? a couple of days? a matter of a few hours? As evidenced by the growing number of urgent care facilities in the Upstate, there’s certainly a need that’s being addressed in the community. However, when you’re in need of a specialist, the process can become lengthy and in some cases, your health care should not be put on hold. Fortunately, the state of South Carolina recognizes this sense of urgency and has Direct Access regulations in place that allow you to be seen by a physical therapist for up to 30 days, no referral needed! At Elite Integrated Therapy Centers, we make it our mission to accommodate you within 24-48 hours. During your first visit, we will evaluate the issue and create a plan to treat the root cause of the problem, not just the symptoms. On the back end, we will loop in your primary care physician to keep things on pace, just in case we anticipate going over that 30 day mark. Physical therapy is a great option to not only address your issues quickly, but is also cost effective in the long run. For example, a recent study found seeing a physical therapist within 14 days of onset of pain can minimize health care costs by 50%! Curious as to what physical therapy can treat? While physical therapy is commonly thought of for back pain or athletic injuries, it can address so much more: muscle pain, joint pain, vertigo, TMJ/lock jaw, pre- & post-surgery, pain pre- & post-pregnancy, and incontinence, to name a few. Why put your healthcare on hold? Call today to speak with one of our team members at Elite Integrated Therapy Centers!

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50 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.26.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

go au naturale ...keep it clean!

AROUND TOWN  MORE AT EVENTS.GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM WEDNESDAY | OCT. 31

THURSDAY | NOV. 8

Halloween spooky story night ■■ 7 - 10 p.m. ■■ Coffee Underground, 1 E. Coffee St. ■■ Free The public is invited to join six top Greenville writers in an evening of spooky fun as they read their most bonechilling tales. Guests may wear costumes and compete in the “Tell Us the Scariest Thing that Ever Happened to You” contest to win a door prize.

The B-52s ■■ 7:30 p.m. ■■ Peace Concert Hall, 300 S. Main St. ■■ $45 – $75 Formed in 1976 and named after Southern slang for exaggerated bouffant hairdos, The B-52s’ thrift store aesthetic and genre-defying songs were the talk of the post-punk underground. Over time, they created a lexicon of songs and styles that would set the standard for the development of the alternative music scene for the next decade.

FRIDAY | NOV. 2 811 Hot Air Balloon ■■ 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. ■■ Lowe’s, 1370 W. Wade Hampton Blvd., Greer ■■ Free The 811 Hot Air Balloon is currently on a cross-country trip to spread the message of 811 — the number to call before digging. This is the second Greer visit from the balloon; this year’s theme is “Shovelman,” which attendees will get to see displayed on the side of the balloon. The event is open to the public, and people are encouraged to visit with the pilot and have their digging questions answered. Day of the Dead ■■ 4:30 - 5:15 p.m. ■■ Hughes Main Library, 25 Heritage Green Place ■■ Free The public can celebrate Hispanic heritage with a special edition of bilingual story time. Reedy Reels Film Festival opening night ■■ 7 p.m. ■■ The Venue at Falls Park, 631 S. Main St. ■■ $75 The opening night of the 2018 Reedy Reels Film Festival will feature a premiere VIP Party to kick off this year’s festival. Guests can walk the red carpet and celebrate with other patrons of the arts and this year’s filmmakers at The Venue at Falls Park in downtown Greenville. Live music and a presentation of films will be featured.

MONDAY | NOV. 5

A buffer of native plants and trees near waterways improves water quality by slowing stormwater down and filtering pollutants. Let it grow! Bare riverbanks erode over time. By letting plants and trees grow, deep roots hold soil in place. Not only does wildlife need clean water, it needs safe habitat too. Buffer zones provide shady space for species that rely on the Reedy.

To learn more, visit:

www.cleanreedy.org #cleanreedy

Ben Rector brings piano ‘Magic’ ■■ 7:30 p.m. ■■ Peace Concert Hall, 300 S. Main St. ■■ $25 – $45 Independent pop singer-songwriter Ben Rector presents “Magic: The Tour.” The 28-date national headlining tour brings the spellbinding, piano-fueled pop of his latest album, “Magic” to life. Camino will open. “Magic: The Tour” follows Rector’s 2015-16 tours “The Biggest Tour I have Done so Far Tour” and “The Brand New Tour,” a 73-date total run that included a sold-out, two-night stand at the Ryman Auditorium, as well as performances at Atlanta’s The Tabernacle, Chicago’s House of Blues, and more.

TUESDAY | NOV. 6 Béla Fleck, Zakir Hussain, and Edgar Meyer ■■ 7:30 p.m. ■■ Peace Concert Hall, 300 S. Main St. ■■ $15 – $50 Masterful genre-benders and the leading virtuosos on their respective instruments, Béla Fleck (banjo), Zakir Hussain (tabla), and Edgar Meyer (bassist) move with ease among the worlds of classical, bluegrass, and world music. Fleck, Hussain, and Meyer will touch on multiple musical styles during their concert at the Peace Center Concert Hall.

Athena Leadership Symposium ■■ 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. ■■ Greenville Convention Center, 1 Exposition Drive ■■ $35 – $70 This program is inspired by recipients of the Athena Leadership Award, presented at the chamber’s annual meeting to women who have made significant contributions to Greenville in promoting community prosperity and quality of life. The Athena Leadership Symposium strives to equip Greenville’s business community with the knowledge and resources needed to create greater gender balance in senior-level positions. Campfire social charity event ■■ 6 - 9 p.m. ■■ Greenbrier Farms, 766 Hester Store Road, Easley ■■ $80 Greenbrier Farms’ fifth annual campfire social charity event will be a collaboration of celebrated chefs cooking over smoke or flame using Greenbrier Farms’ pastured meats and certified organic produce, while breweries share favorite brews. This event will feature live music from Amongst the Trees. Proceeds benefit Project Host.

FRIDAY | NOV. 9 Stephen Stills and Judy Collins ■■ 8 p.m. ■■ Peace Concert Hall, 101 W. Broad St. ■■ $35 – $65 Known as part of Crosby, Stills & Nash, Stephen Stills met Judy Collins 50 years ago. For this event, the two music legends will pull from their rich catalogs, debut songs from their upcoming album, and share warm and intimate stories from their journeys and the 1960s folk and Laurel Canyon scenes they helped build. Sarah McCoy book signing ■■ 2 - 3:30 p.m. ■■ Fiction Addiction, 1175 Woods Crossing Road No. 5 ■■ $10 – $29 Author Sarah McCoy will be discussing her latest novel, “Marilla of Green Gables,” the tale of life at Green Gables before Anne, at a book talk and signing. The novel, set in rural Prince Edward Island in the 19th century, imagines the young life of spinster Marilla Cuthbert, and the choices that will open her life to the possibility of heartbreak — and unimaginable greatness. Great Big Benefit Bash ■■ 6:30 - 9 p.m. ■■ Zen Greenville, 924 S. Main St. ■■ $80 This fundraiser benefits children in foster care. Guests can enjoy food and drinks, live music, and learn about Fostering Great Ideas, a local nonprofit working with children, families, and the community to improve the experience and outcomes of children in foster care.


Who you gonna call?

Movie with LIVE Orchestra & Costume Contest The Peace Center • Tuesday, October 30 • 7:30 p.m. Experience the classic 1984 movie starring Bill Murray and Dan Aykroyd in a whole new way as the blockbuster hit plays on the big screen and the Greenville Symphony Orchestra performs the soundtrack LIVE!

Two Costume Contests One for Adults and one for Children with Fantastic, “Spooktacular” Prizes! Visit greenvillesymphony.org for contest details.

Tickets: 864-467-3000 or purchase online: greenvillesymphony.org THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS! “Who You Gonna Call Sponsor” “Media Sponsor”

“Proton Pack Sponsor”

Pacolet Milliken Enterprises, Inc

“Slimer Sponsor”

Timothy E. Hughes, D.M.D.


52 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.26.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

AROUND TOWN  MORE AT EVENTS.GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM ONGOING EVENTS ‘Wings of Freedom Tour’ ■■ 2 - 4 p.m. Oct. 26; 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Oct. 27-28 ■■ Greenville Downtown Airport, 21 Airport Road Extension ■■ $5 – $15 Participating in the Collings Foundation’s “Wings of Freedom Tour,” the B-17 Flying Fortress Nine O Nine, B-24 Liberator Witchcraft, B-25 Mitchell Tondelayo bombers, and P-51 Mustang Toulouse Nuts fighter will fly into the Greenville Downtown Airport for a visit. Friends of the Library semi-annual used book sale ■■ 3 p.m. Oct. 26, 10 a.m. Oct. 27, and 1 p.m. Oct. 28 ■■ Merovan Center of Woodruff Road, 1200 Woodruff Road, Suite E2 ■■ Free The semi-annual Friends Used Book Sale has over 70,000 books — mysteries, cookbooks, local history, children’s classics, picture books — as well as movies, CDs, and record albums. St. Giles Presbyterian Church Pumpkin Patch ■■ 10:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. weekdays, 8:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Saturdays, noon-6:30 p.m. Sundays through Oct. 31 ■■ St. Giles Presbyterian Church, 1021 Hudson Road ■■ Free Church members will be on hand to greet the tractortrailer truck, unload the 2,000-plus pumpkins, and open the patch for the season. A wide assortment of pumpkins, minis, and gourds will be available for sale. A photo prop board will be set up so that parents can photograph their children during their annual pumpkin patch visit. For more than 15 years, St. Giles Presbyterian Church has sold pumpkins in its pumpkin patch to benefit the church youth groups.

Love Your Smile At Meyer Dentistry we offer you our years of experience along with progressive technology and techniques in a calm relaxed atmosphere. Dr. James Meyer emphasizes overall dental health as prevention for the longevity of your smile. Offering comprehensive dental services from a regular check up to veneers, crowns, whitening or a full smile makeover; we will help you maintain or create a smile you love

ONE APPOINTMENT CROWNS, VENEERS, FILLINGS ORTHODONTICS FOR ALL AGES – WHITENING

1212 HAYWOOD RD. SUITE 300, GREENVILLE 864-213-4442

W W W. M E Y E R D E N T I S T R Y. C O M

‘Lineage: Tom Flowers and Family’ ■■ 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. weekdays through Oct. 31 ■■ Thompson Gallery, Roe Art Building, Furman University, 3300 Poinsett Highway ■■ Free This exhibition honors the creative spirit that has grown through three generations and inspired six visual artists, all connected through family ties. Tom Flowers taught art at Furman University from 1959 through 1989. ‘Sampling the Old Masters: Highlights from the Bob Jones Museum’ ■■ 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Wednesdays-Saturdays, 1-5 p.m. Sundays through Dec. 30 ■■ Greenville County Museum of Art, 420 College St. ■■ Free Only a few miles apart, the Greenville County Museum of Art and the Bob Jones Museum span centuries and continents. For the first time, the two museums have collaborated to present “Sampling the Old Masters: Highlights from the Bob Jones Museum.” Annual pumpkin patch ■■ 11 a.m. - 7 p.m. daily through Oct. 31 ■■ Abiding Peace Lutheran Church, 401 Batesville Road, Simpsonville ■■ Free Abiding Peace Lutheran Church and Academy will hold it’s third annual pumpkin patch. The church will be selling all sizes, shapes, and colors of pumpkins and gourds. All proceeds will be going to hurricane relief efforts.

Hispanic Heritage Month art exhibit ■■ 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays through Oct. 31 ■■ Hughes Main Library, 25 Heritage Green Place ■■ Free Local Hispanic artists display their work in various media. ‘Emerge’ at Upstate Gallery on Main ■■ Noon - 5 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays through Nov. 3 ■■ Upstate Gallery on Main, 172 E. Main St., Spartanburg ■■ Free Upstate Gallery on Main, sponsored by the University of South Carolina Upstate, is hosting the opening a new exhibition by South Carolina artist Leah Cabinum. “Emerge” is a sculptural installation and spatial experience exhibition. Cabinum creates immersive installations, sculptural objects, and drawings made from diverse materials not necessarily associated with art. ‘Click, Clack, Boo! A Tricky Treat’ ■■ 10:30 a.m. - 2 p.m. Oct. 27 ■■ The Salvation Army Kroc Center, 424 Westfield St. ■■ $11 Guests can join Duck, Pig, and all beloved barnyard friends in the spook-tacular event of the season. No tricks, all treats are offered up in this tasty musical. Costumes are encouraged. This event is most enjoyed by children ages 3 and up. ‘The Boys in the Band’ ■■ 8-10 p.m. Oct. 26-27, Nov. 1-3; 3 p.m. Oct. 28 ■■ Greenville Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 1135 State Park Road ■■ $15 Set in 1968 just before the Stonewall riots, “The Boys in the Band” features nine gay men at a birthday party in New York City where the insults flow as freely as the booze. This event will be the Deep South premiere of the new, updated version of the classic American play. ‘The Teddy Bears’ Picnic’ ■■ 9:30 - 11:40 a.m. Nov. 5 and Nov. 20 ■■ South Carolina Children’s Theatre, 1200 Pendleton St. ■■ $11 “The Teddy Bears’ Picnic” is back by popular demand and ready for a whole new crew of wee ones. Mama Bear and Baby Bear invite participants to join them in the woods to help set up the perfect pretend picnic. Participation is encouraged. This event is most enjoyed by ages 18 months to 5 years old. Estimated run time is 30-40 minutes. Israeli Folk Dance ■■ 7 - 9 p.m. Mondays through Nov. 5 ■■ Sears Shelter McPherson Park, 120 E. Park Ave. ■■ $3 – $10 This five-week class, co-sponsored by Greenville Parks and Recreation, presents basic Israeli dances as well as more recent choreographies. Greenville International Folk Dancers seeks to build community and intercultural understanding through dance while offering a moderate exercise opportunity. No prior experience is needed, and no partner is needed. Outshine homework-help program at CDS ■■ 3:30 - 4:45 p.m. through Dec. 12 ■■ Center for Developmental Services, 29 N. Academy St. ■■ Free CDS will host Outshine, a program to help cultivate young minds. Students ages 5-13 will be able to attend


10.26.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 53

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

AROUND TOWN  MORE AT EVENTS.GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM SunSquabi, with Marvel Years The Firmament, 5 Market Point Drive 8 p.m. | $17-$20

CONCERT

NOV. 1

“Community for the Community”

The first thing you’re going to notice about the Boulder, Colorado, trio SunSquabi is how fluid their mix of experimental jam-rock and electronic dance music works. The band can stretch a groove into all sorts of different shapes and keep it danceable at the same time, adding some synthesized whooshes and whirrs to keep things interesting. The second thing you’ll notice is that somehow this band that creates a huge sound is actually a trio. Let’s start with the mix of jam-rock and electronics. “I think the most exciting part of both of them is that there are really infinite possibilities, sonically,” says guitarist and synth player Kevin Donohue. “By using electronics, we can create almost any sound we can think of. And combining that in an improvisational setting really lets the music come out in an organic and natural way.” As for the trio setup, Donohue says it’s the ideal way to present SunSquabi’s music. “It creates a nice setting where everyone can equally contribute and feel creatively free,” he says. “Having just three of us allows us to have a solid foundation, and we can add just about any instrument without anyone getting in each other’s way.” and receive extra homework help for various school subjects. Volunteers can earn hours for honor societies and clubs. Grief Share ■■ 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Wednesdays through Nov. 21 ■■ Mauldin First Baptist Church, 150 S. Main St., Mauldin ■■ Free Grief Share is a support group for individuals who are struggling with the loss of loved ones. The 13week sessions utilize Bible-based videos and group discussions to assist participants with their grief experience. Swamp Rabbit Running Series ■■ 6 p.m. Thursdays through Dec. 27 ■■ Swamp Rabbit Cafe & Grocery, 205 Cedar Lane Road ■■ Free Participants are invited to run the Swamp Rabbit Trail every Thursday. The runners can reconvene at the Swamp Rabbit Cafe & Grocery and all participants will receive 20 percent off any food or beverage purchase at Swamp Pizza in the Swamp Rabbit Cafe & Grocery. ‘Wait Until Dark’ ■■ 8 p.m. Oct. 26-27, Nov. 1-3, Nov. 8-10; 3 p.m. Oct. 28, Nov. 4, 11 ■■ Greenville Little Theatre, 444 College St. ■■ $28 This masterfully-constructed, spine-tingling thriller centers around a blind woman who is unwittingly at the center of a sinister plot. A Broadway hit and Audrey Hepburn movie, this classic suspense tale moves from one moment of suspense to another as it builds

toward an electrifying, breath-stopping final scene. ‘Letters to Sala’ ■■ 7:30 - 9 p.m. Nov. 1 -3 ■■ CCES Hartness Performing Arts Center, 245 Cavalier Drive ■■ $10 Christ Church Episcopal School Upper School fall play will be “Letters to Sala.” Adapted from the book “Sala’s Gift” by Ann Kirschner and based on a true account, it is a remarkable story of a young girl’s survival during wartime Germany — five years, seven Nazi labor camps, and more than 350 hidden letters. ‘One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest’ ■■ 8 p.m. Nov. 1-3, Nov. 8-10, Nov. 15-17; 3 p.m. Nov. 4, 11 ■■ Centre Stage, 501 River St. ■■ $15 – $30 “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” is the unforgettable story of a mental hospital and its inhabitants. It is a powerful exploration of both the beauty and the danger of being an original. Note that this performance contains adult themes, language, and violence. ‘Silent Sky’ ■■ 7:30 p.m. - 11 p.m. Nov. 8-10, Nov. 15-17 ■■ Billingsley Theatre, North Greenville University, 7801 N. Tigerville Road, Tigerville ■■ $5 – $12 Lauren Gunderson’s “Silent Sky” chronicles Henrietta Swan Leavitt, an astronomer at Harvard College Observatory in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Leavitt’s discoveries, dismissed until men could take credit for them, provided the key to measuring the distance between Earth and other galaxies.

The US Navy SEAL is the World’s Most Elite Military Operator. Each SEAL has exceptional attributes that contribute to success in any environment, military or civilian. When a SEAL is ready to explore a transition from the military, the SEAL Future Fund (SFF) provides a pathway to empower the individual to achieve success.

SFF is coming to Greenville – ready to serve the community. We are looking for elite individuals and institutions interested in supporting our best-in-class transition programs through networking, mentoring, coaching and providing academic, internship and job opportunities and general support. Please fill out the form online to be contacted by one of our team members. We look forward to hearing from you!

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE?

Submit your event information by Friday two weeks prior to publishing date at: www.bit.ly/GreenvilleJournalCalendarOfEvents Events are run online and in print on a space-available basis. Publication is free, but not guaranteed.

Learn more about SEAL Future Fund at

SEALFutureFund.org


54 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.26.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

C5 Across ACROSS

1 Patronize for purchases 7 Tennis segment won without loss of a point 15 Dude 20 Actress Duff or Swank 21 Not righted, as wrongs 22 Epic about Troy 23 What a siemens is a unit of 26 Open into flower 27 Seamless shift 28 Get fixated 29 Scottish port 30 Viper type 33 — T (just so) 34 Broiling bar 35 Diverse assortments 44 Flip out 46 “— help if ...” 47 — Khan (Islamic title) 48 Elicit an encore, say 49 Italian entree 55 Ore- — 56 Gift getter 57 Signs off on 58 “My treat” 59 Mars vehicle 61 “Dilate” artist DiFranco 62 Formerly 63 Oakland team 65 Flukes 70 Many a released prisoner 72 Grandpa Walton player

by Frank Longo Will 73 Tarzan player Ron 74 Draw out 75 Jai — 76 Reagan’s “Star Wars” prog. 77 Tries to trim down 82 Luau chow 83 Dartboard’s rings, e.g. 88 Astral bear 90 Alternate spelling of a word: Abbr. 91 Fair-hiring abbr. 92 Actor Kevin of “Weeds” 93 Part of a routine baby immunization 99 Churn up 100 Stetson, say 101 Ending of ordinals 102 Flow stopper 105 Err in finding the total of 108 Fruity pastries 110 Jaffa citizen 114 Assembly associated with a church creed 118 Put off 119 Cheapest ship quarters, formerly 120 Take out of the pier 121 Number of dwarfs 122 Infuriated 123 Gazes

DOWN

1 The Bible’s Queen of — 2 Far from flat, as terrain 3 Balsam fir or pine extract 4 Lobby orgs. 5 Part of MFA 6 Beginner 7 Jean- — Godard 8 — whim 9 Actors Kilmer and Avery 10 “And on and on”: Abbr. 11 Bit of babble from a crib 12 Once-a-year 13 Old Persian 14 Academy email ending 15 Activity-tracking device 16 Stretchy 17 See 65-Down 18 Mille — (Minnesota county) 19 Fruity beverages 24 Apple buy 25 Police cruiser 31 Post-it note, informally 32 Gyro breads 34 Utah’s lily 36 Winans with 12 Grammys 37 Be fond of 38 French for “summer” 39 Govt. health agency 40 Tardy 41 Pitted garnishes 42 The Green Party’s Ralph 43 Trades jabs 44 Watch readout, for short 45 “So that’s your trick!” 50 For the — (temporarily) 51 Self-pride 52 Run up, as expenses 53 The “A” of OAS: Abbr. 54 Bana of “Troy” 60 Poem of exaltation 61 Suffix with pent62 Whale locale 63 Keepsake 64 At least one 65 With 17-Down, Princess or Royal Caribbean 66 Ad — committee 67 Baldwin of “Aloha” 68 Eye suggestively 69 British soldier of old 70 Add zing to 71 Beautify 75 Prefix for “height” 76 Food filter 77 Three, in Ulm 78 Optimistic declaration 79 Interior-design magazine 80 Saints linebacker Manti — 81 Tax form ID 84 Egg-shaped things 85 Salt, chemically 86 Clergyman’s area: Abbr. 87 Ltd. cousin 89 Civil War folk song 94 Trendy 95 Pursued

96 Hauled (off) 97 Clothes 98 Trendy 103 1970s-’80s sitcom 104 Gets as much as one can out of 105 Docs’ orders 106 Big name in slushes 107 1970s-’80s skit show 108 “Toodles!”

Sudoku

by Dale Wasserman

NOVEMBER 1–17, 2018 SPONSORED BY THE FAUST BOYER GROUP OF RAYMOND JAMES & ADG PREFERRED PAYROLL

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Medium

109 Read digitally 111 — -chef (#2 in a kitchen) 112 Peewee pup 113 Cost an arm — leg 115 Belief system 116 Epoch 117 Guided Crossword answers: Page 24

by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan

Sudoku answers: Page 24


10.26.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 55

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA PUBLIC NOTICE A Certificate of Need is being applied for A&T Care to be a Home Health Agency that can service clients in your area. As a home health agency it would be in our scope and nature to be able to provide skilled nursing care and to practice maintaining clients activities of daily living in the privacy in clients home. The estimated project capital cost would cost approximately 6,000.00.

SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING OF COMPLAINT AND NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS (NON-JURY MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE) C/A NO: 2018-CP-23-04181 DEFICIENCY WAIVED Freedom Mortgage Corporation, PLAINTIFF, vs. Francisco Mendez; Vania N. Mendez; DEFENDANT(S) TO THE DEFENDANTS, ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, or otherwise appear and defend, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscriber at his office, Hutchens Law Firm P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, except as to the United States of America, which shall have sixty (60) days, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, or otherwise appear and defend, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein, and judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity for Greenville County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. TO MINOR(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE, AND/OR TO MINOR(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THE PERSON WITH WHOM THE MINOR(S) RESIDES, AND/OR TO PERSONS UNDER SOME LEGAL DISABILITY: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff immediately and separately and such application will be deemed absolute and total in the absence of your application for such an appointment within thirty (30) days after the service of the Summons and Complaint upon you. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to

the Master in Equity in/for this County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. NOTICE OF FILING OF SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing Summons, along with the Complaint, was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, on August 8, 2018. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT pursuant to the South Carolina Supreme Court Administrative Order 2011-05-02-01, (hereinafter “Order”), you may have a right to Foreclosure Intervention. To be considered for any available Foreclosure Intervention, you may communicate with and otherwise deal with the Plaintiff through its law firm, Hutchens Law Firm, P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202 or call 803-726-2700. Hutchens Law Firm, represents the Plaintiff in this action and does not represent you. Under our ethical rules, we are prohibited from giving you any legal advice. You must submit any requests for Foreclosure Intervention consideration within 30 days from the date of this Notice. IF YOU FAIL, REFUSE, OR VOLUNTARILY ELECT NOT TO PARTICIPATE IN FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION, YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY/ AGENT MAY PROCEED WITH A FORECLOSURE ACTION. If you have already pursued loss mitigation with the Plaintiff, this Notice does not guarantee the availability of loss mitigation options or further review of your qualifications. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY.

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION IN THE DISTRICT COURT, JEFFERSON COUNTY Case No. DV-18-900122 Visiting Angels, Plaintiff vs. Martin Peacock; Defendant TO: Martin Peacock, You are hereby notified that on 6/1/18 a Garnishment was filed against you naming Wells Fargo Bank as Garnishee. You have the Right to Claim Exemption from Garnishment. By Order of Publication entered by the Court and notice be published once a week for four consecutive weeks in a newspaper of general circulation. Defendant must respond to this publication and make their answer known to the Court 30 days from the last date of publication so that monies withheld by the court can be disbursed to Plaintiff’s counsel. Done this ___day of____ , 20___ Clerk of Court Of Counsel: Karen Schwartz McClure 1609 Richard Arrington Jr. Blvd. South Birmingham, AL 35205 (205) 933-9451

PUBLIC NOTICE There will be a PUBLIC HEARING before the GREENVILLE COUNTY BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS ON WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2018 at 3:00 P.M. in CONFERENCE ROOM –D at GREENVILLE COUNTY SQUARE, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, S.C., for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the petitions listed below. PERSONS HAVING AN INTEREST IN THESE PETITIONS MAY BECOME PARTIES OF RECORD BY FILING WITH THE BOARD, AT LEAST THREE (3) DAYS PRIOR TO THE SCHEDULED DATE SET FOR HEARING, BY WRITING THEIR ADDRESS, A STATEMENT OF THEIR POSITION AND THE REASONS WHY THE RELIEF SOUGHT WITH RESPECT TO SUCH PROPERTY SHOULD OR SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED. CB-18-46 APPLICANT: LARRY D. CANTY TAX MAP#: 0575.28-01-102.00 LOCATION: 604 BRIAR THISTLE COURT, SIMPSONVILLE SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception to allow a Dental Lab as a Home Occupation CB-18-47 APPLICANT: THE CARPENTERS CHAPEL TAX MAP#: 0585.04-01-003.00 LOCATION: FORK SHOALS ROAD, SIMPSONVILLE SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception to obtain a grading permit for installation of a detention pond on the property CB-18-48 APPLICANT: TAKE HEART CHURCH, INC. TAX MAP#: 0412.00-01-002.00 LOCATION: 1330 FORK SHOALS

ROAD, GREENVILLE SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception for new church/ owner to continue use as a church CB-18-49 APPLICANT: GREENVILLE TECHNICAL COLLEGE TAX MAP#: 0632.01-01-031.00 LOCATION: 2522 LOCUST HILL RD, TAYLORS SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception for installation of a student Courtyard, Amphitheater, Band Shell & Pavilion on site CB-18-50 APPLICANT: SOUTHSIDE CHRISTIAN SCHOOL TAX MAP#: 0539.03-01-024.02 LOCATION: 2211 WOODRUFF ROAD, SIMPSONVILLE REQUEST: Use by Special Exception to allow replacement of the scoreboard at the Baseball Stadium CB-18-51 APPLICANT: MORNING SIDE BAPTIST CHURCH TAX MAP#: 0540.02-01037.00/0540.02-01-037.02/ 0543.02-01-037.00/0543.0201-038.00 and 0543.02-01041.00 LOCATION: 1107 and 1115 PELHAM RD, 10 & 14 ASHBURN PLACE, GREENVILLE SC REQUEST: Variances from Left Side setback for two existing sheds at 1107 Pelham Rd and existing residential structures at 10 & 14 Ashburn Place; and Use by Special Exception to allow incorporation of three adjacent single-family residential properties into the existing church property for church use CB-18-52 APPLICANT: WILLIAM W. BROWN – Legacy School Properties, LLC TAX MAP#: 0125.00-02-001.00/ 0125.00-01-001.00/ 0125.00-01-014.00/0125.0001-015.00/0125.00.01-026.01/ 0125.00-01-021.01/0137.0011-001.01/0137.00-11-001.00/ 0138.00-01-003.00/0140.0003-001.01 & 02 LOCATION: WOODSIDE AVENUE/E. BRAMLETT RD/N. VANCE ST/E. MORGAN ST/W. WASHINGTON ST, GREENVILLE SC REQUEST: VARIANCE from setback requirements for Proposed Press Box on E. Bramlett Road and placement of shipping containers on N. Vance Street; and Use by Special Exception to allow use of the designated properties by Greenville Triumph Professional Soccer for up to two years CB-18-53 APPLICANT: JOSEPH LARRY CANDID TAX MAP#: 0541.06-01-041.00 LOCATION: 107 WOODVIEW DRIVE, TAYLORS SC REQUEST: VARIANCE from Right Side setback to allow addition of a garage

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Thomas Creek Brewery, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 2054 Piedmont Highway, Greenville, South Carolina 29605. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than November 11, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Coastal Crust Greenville intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 1254 Pendleton Street, Greenville, SC 29611. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than November 11, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that M & R Restaurant Group, LLP intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1133 WOODRUFF RD., GREENVILLE, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than November 11, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Topgolf USA Greenville, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 201 Clifton Court, Greenville SC 29615-5768. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than October 28, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

LEGAL NOTICE RATES

ABC Notices $165 Summons, Notices, Foreclosures, etc. $1.20 per line

864.679.1205 | email: aharley@communityjournals.com

AMENDED SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING OF AMENDED COMPLAINT AND AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS (NON-JURY MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE) C/A NO: 2017-CP-23-04900 DEFICIENCY WAIVED The Bank of New York Mellon, f/k/a The Bank of New York as successor in interest to JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. as Trustee for NovaStar Mortgage Funding Trust, Series 2005-3, NovaStar Home Equity Loan Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2005-3, PLAINTIFF, vs. Reveda Moon a/k/a Revada Moon, individually and as Personal Representative for the Estate of Linda G. Wharton; Cauvetress Martin; Emmanuel Wharton; N. W., a minor, DEFENDANT(S) TO THE DEFENDANTS, ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, or otherwise appear and defend, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscriber at his office, Hutchens Law Firm P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, except as to the United States of America, which shall have sixty (60) days, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, or otherwise appear and defend, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein, and judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity for Greenville County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999.

TO MINOR(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE, AND/OR TO MINOR(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THE PERSON WITH WHOM THE MINOR(S) RESIDES, AND/OR TO PERSONS UNDER SOME LEGAL DISABILITY: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff immediately and separately and such application will be deemed absolute and total in the absence of your application for such an appointment within thirty (30) days after the service of the Summons and Complaint upon you. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity in/for this County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. NOTICE OF FILING OF AMENDED SUMMONS AND AMEDED COMPLAINT TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing Summons, along with the Complaint, was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, on August 4, 2017; that the forgoing Amended Summons, along with the Amended Complaint, was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, on May 4, 2018. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT pursuant to the South Carolina Supreme Court Administrative Order 2011-05-02-01, (hereinafter “Order”), you may have a right to Foreclosure Intervention. To be considered for any available Foreclosure Intervention, you may communicate with and otherwise deal with the Plaintiff

through its law firm, Hutchens Law Firm, P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202 or call 803726-2700. Hutchens Law Firm, represents the Plaintiff in this action and does not represent you. Under our ethical rules, we are prohibited from giving you any legal advice. You must submit any requests for Foreclosure Intervention consideration within 30 days from the date of this Notice. IF YOU FAIL, REFUSE, OR VOLUNTARILY ELECT NOT TO PARTICIPATE IN FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION, YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY/ AGENT MAY PROCEED WITH A FORECLOSURE ACTION. If you have already pursued loss mitigation with the Plaintiff, this Notice does not guarantee the availability of loss mitigation options or further review of your qualifications. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY. NOTICE TO APPOINT GUARDIAN AD LITEM A MINOR DEFENANT TO: YOU ARE SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem within thirty (30) days after the service of this Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff immediately and separately and such application will be deemed absolute and total in the absence of your application for such an appointment within thirty (30) days after the service of the Summons and complaint upon you.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Dream Play Group LLC DBA “Gizmo Bar”intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 245 N. Main St., Greenville SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than October 28, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that ACE’s Bar and Grill intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 3326 New Easley Hwy., Greenville, SC 29611. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than October 28, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110


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3411 Augusta Road | Greenville, SC 29605 | 864-277-5330

3411 Augusta Road | Greenville, SC 29605 | 864-277-5330

October 26, 2018 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

October 26, 2018 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.