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IN THIS ISSUE

UNRAVELING JUPITER’S MYSTERIES • WASHINGTON CENTER’S LABOR OF LOVE • ART PUSHES BOUNDARIES

GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, September 21, 2018 • Vol.20, No.38

CREATING A NEW

MAULDIN A STORY OF LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION

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Conceptual rendering by Street-Works Studio

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LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1999 PUBLISHER | Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@communityjournals.com STAFF WRITERS Ariel Gilreath | agilreath@communityjournals.com Cindy Landrum | clandrum@communityjournals.com Andrew Moore | amoore@communityjournals.com Sara Pearce | spearce@communityjournals.com Ariel Turner | aturner@communityjournals.com COPY EDITOR Rebecca Strelow ARTS & CULTURE WRITER Vince Harris | vharris@communityjournals.com EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Susan Schwartzkopf VICE PRESIDENT OPERATIONS Holly Hardin CLIENT SER VICES MANAGERS Anita Harley | Rosie Peck BILLING INQUIRIES Shannon Rochester DIRECTOR OF SALES Emily Yepes MANAGERS OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Ed Ibarra | Donna Johnston MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Heather Propp | Meredith Rice Caroline Spivey | Liz Tew VISUAL DIRECTOR Will Crooks LAYOUT Bo Leslie | Tammy Smith ADVERTISING DESIGN Michael Allen | Amanda Walker EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT | Kristi Fortner CHAIRMAN | Douglas J. Greenlaw

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Cynthia Simpson wearing NW 77th

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“They told us in training, ‘If you can smell (ammonia), then don’t worry about it, because you’re going to die.’” NASA astronaut Terry Virts - Page 10

“His retirement left a huge hole in the quality of track coaches in Greenville County.” Ed Boehmke, retired track and field coach for Eastside High School, speaking of Sam McCollum, a longtime coach and social studies teacher at Wade Hampton High School - Page 18

“From an economic standpoint, Mauldin has been almost an oxymoron.” Van Broad, Mauldin’s community development director - Page 4

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CITY ON THE GROW

Construction spending in Mauldin, the 17th-largest city in the state, has increased by 150 percent since 2016. Will Crooks/Greenville Journal

Mauldin is changing from a pass-through city to one where residents, businesses want to stay CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

M

auldin is going through a growth spurt. The city that had a reputation as a sleepy bedroom community to growing Greenville, a reputation that Mauldin City Councilman Taft Matney said was largely self-cultivated, has seen a boom in construction spending over the past three years. Since 2016, construction spending has increased 150 percent, from nearly $18.4 million to more than $46 million, and city officials say the growth is overdue and not expected to end anytime soon. “One thing Mauldin has going for it is, as the real estate adage says, ‘location, location, location,’” Matney said of the city’s proximity to interstates 385 and 85, the Southern Connector, and the Inland Port. “If product needs to be moved, Mauldin provides options. If it’s a servicebased company, they still need to move people in and out, and our easy access allows them to do so.”

Most of the increase has come from the commercial side. New commercial-construction permits have skyrocketed, going from four in 2016 to 85 in 2018. The value of those permits has increased from just over $9.4 million in 2016 to nearly $34 million in 2018. The projects have included a new mortgage center for BB&T, the U.S. facility of Caristrap International, a new plant for Morley Cos., and Anyone Home’s new operations center. “From an economic standpoint, Mauldin has been almost an oxymoron,” said Van Broad, the city’s community development director. “It’s the 17th-largest city in the state with 25,000 people, but it’s been underserved. Everything outside Mauldin was growing, but nothing inside was.” Mauldin is now benefiting from that. While many of the other municipalities in Greenville County are built out, Mauldin is not, Matney said. “That gives us a competitive advantage,” he said.

And Mauldin is benefiting from Greenville’s success, too. While Greenville’s growth has spurred increased land values, property in Mauldin is still affordable, Matney said. “For anybody who thinks trickle-down doesn’t work, this is an example of trickledown working,” he said. “If proximity to amenities such as downtown Greenville without the associated price tag is attractive, Mauldin is the place to be.” Same but different Broad has experience in helping a Greenville County city grow. Before he came to Mauldin in 2015, Broad was Fountain Inn’s economic development and cultural affairs director. While some of the challenges are the same, some are completely different. Fountain Inn’s challenge was to revitalize a downtown that had more than 60 percent of its buildings empty. Mauldin doesn’t have a traditional Main Streetanchored downtown like most cities. Its

Main Street is U.S. Highway 276, a multilaned thoroughfare. Mauldin has had a plan to redevelop up to 24.5 acres of land near City Hall bounded by North Main Street, Jenkins Street, a railroad, and East Butler Road into City Center, a walkable, mixed-used village with shopping, dining, and apartments. A little over 11 of those acres are owned by the city. “This will be a game changer,” Broad said. He said he hopes the city is close to a deal with a developer for the project. “It’s a redeveloper’s palette.” Broad said City Center and the projects that have already been completed or announced will go a long way to stop the economic leakage from the city. “There’s a huge hunger and energy to see City Center done,” he said. “It will change the mindset of people in town. When people see things happening, they believe that things can move forward.” Broad said the latest retail market data showed Mauldin had a leakage of more than $33 million dollars in retail and restaurant


09.21.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 5

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

A conceptual rendering by Street-Works Studio shows what BridgeWay Station, an urban village planned along Interstate 385 in Mauldin, might look like.

sales, meaning residents leave Mauldin to shop and to eat out. “Just imagine if we could capture onequarter or one-half of that,” Broad said. “What park could we build, how many police officers could we hire? That money is already here. That’s money that’s here but is going out of Mauldin.” While City Center would transform the U.S. Highway 276-Butler Road section of Mauldin, BridgeWay Station will transform the other end of Mauldin, Matney said. BridgeWay Station is a new mixed-use community that will feature more than 1 million square feet of retail and restaurants, Class A office space, residential, and hospitality and entertainment venues along a new main street. The project is being done by Hughes Investments, whose projects include RiverPlace and Falls Park Place. Mauldin’s growth and more-aggressive sales pitch is working — the city was the top-ranked community on Money Magazine’s “Best Places to Live” list. It was recognized by Nerdwallet as one of the 10 best cities to start a business. “We’ve got a good story to tell,” Broad said, “and people are getting the message.”

Mauldin Sports Center photo by Will Crooks/Greenville Journal

Mauldin has seen a surge in commercial and residential cosntruction since 2016 and city officials expect the trend to continue as the city focuses on expanding the city limits, population, and its commercial tax base NUMBER OF NEW RESIDENTIAL NUMBER OF NEW COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL PERMIT COMMERCIAL PERMIT YEAR CONSTRUCTION PERMITS VALUATION CONSTRUCTION PERMITS VALUATION 2018 60 $12,375,777.19 85 $33,831,109.44 2017 29 $7,870,669.91 10 $32,111,845.82 945 E. Main Street, Spartanburg, SC 29302 26 Rushmore Drive, Greenville, SC 29615

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Reading Vision Correction is Here! Advanced Treatment for Dry Eye The inlay is a tiny porous ring placed in the cornea. It works like a camera aperture, returning reading vision to patients.

Dry Eye affects an estimated 25 million Americans and is the most common reason for a visit to an eye specialist. It is a complex disease involving the tear quantity, quality, inflammation, and eyelid oil or Meibomian Gland Dysfunction (MGD). Causes include age, medications, health and environmental conditions, and contact lenses. It is more common in women than men. Dry Eye occurs when there are insufficient tears to provide adequate moisture or when the tear film over the eye is of poor quality. “If left untreated, Frustrated with your readers? There’s a solution. dry eyes become uncomfortable with symptoms of scratchiness, stinging, itching, burning, light sensitivity, fluctuating vision, Clemson Eye is the first and only clinic in the Upstate and tired eyes,” says Dr. Joes Parisi, Chief Ophthalmologist at to offer patients reading vision correction through the Clemson Eye. Traditional treatment includes artificial tear drops TM Kamra inlay. and lifestylecorneal changes, but there are some advanced therapies.

Almost 114 million people in America struggle with ageOver the past 15 years, research has revealed that Meibomian related near vision loss (presbyopia). The inlay is designed Gland Dysfunction is the leading cause of eye discomfort for over to reduce or eliminate the need for reading glasses in people 86% of patients with Dry Eye. It occurs when the eyelid oil glands generally over 40 who have good distance vision, but become blocked due to inflammation and thick secretions and problems with near vision. can no longer produce normal lipids or oils needed for a sustained

With procedure, patients previously dependent healthythe tearKamra film. Then more rapid evaporation of your tears leads on readers can see things up close again – menus, to inflammation and results in a gradual, progressive losstext of the messages, labels, computers, books, magazines – and Meibomianfood glands. still have clear distance vision. During a Dry Eye exam, the doctor will check to see if the glands

It approval in Aprilprocess. 2015. The Since then, more arereceived releasingFDA oil during the blinking Lipiview® test than 1,500 have been implanted United States. Note provides an accurate digital image of in thethe Meibomian glands and that more than 37,000 have been implanted worldwide over blink function. If the test shows the gland function has dropped the past 10 years. off and there is ‘Evaporative Dry Eye’, then the doctor will recommend cutting edge treatment either with LipiFlow® or “We are proud to be first in the Upstate to aoff er patients otherprocedure. therapies like omega-3 this Thartificial e Kamratears, is a Restasis, great solution forsupplements people in or punctal plugs. their 40s and 50s who are frustrated with blurry near vision.

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The inlay offers presbyopia patients a safe reading vision correction solution and freedom from the hassle of readers,” says Dr. Joseph Parisi, Chief Ophthalmologist and Medical LipiFlow® is the only electronic Director at Clemson Eye. device cleared by the FDA for

treatment of MGD with clinical studies of safety and effectiveness. The elective procedure takes about 15 minutes and is Through advances in the application of Vectored Thermal reversible(VTPTM) if the patient chooses. Even patients have Pulsation technology, LipiFlow® utilizes awho patented had previous eye surgery, such as cataract patients, or who algorithm of precise heat applied wear bifocals can be candidates for the Kamra. to the inner eyelids with directed gentlevision massagecorrection to remove Clemson Eye offers free reading the Meibomian consultations. To find out ifblockages you’re afrom candidate, call glands. This treatment is designed today to book your appointment. to restore the natural oil flow to Clemson Eye’s new Greenville is 360 Pelham the location tear film that covers the eye’s surface and glands. Road, just off Haywood. Clemson Eyesave hasthe been a leading

providerDry of Eye eyetreatments care in the area fora40 years. Overall, may make sufferer more comfortable and often improve the quality of vision. Anyone with symptoms of Dry Eye should visit an eye care professional specializing in Dry Eye treatment.

Basic vs. Laser Cataract Surgery New Technology for Cataract Patients

Life expectancy in the United States has been increasing steadily over the past century. Americans who reached 65 in 2011 are projected to live another 21 years to age 86.1 Cataracts are a common eye condition where the natural lens Cataracts are a common eye condition where thethan natural lens As a result, many Americans working longer expected. becomes clouded, impairing are a patient’s vision. According to the becomes clouded, impairing a patient’s vision. According to But the Visual health important to than being20 able to work at any age. National Eye isInstitute, more percent of Americans will as National Eye Institute, more than 20 percent of Americans will we age, vision becomes of and a challenge for a greater number have cataracts by the agemore of 65, the prevalence increases with have cataracts byare theoften age of and the prevalence increases with of us.In Cataracts the65, culprit. age. cataract surgery, the clouded natural lens is age. In cataract surgery, the clouded natural lens is removed and replaced with an IOL. Cataracts, a clouding the an eye’s natural lens, affect about 22 removed and replacedofwith IOL. million Americans over age 40. By 80,them more than 90% of For many patients, cataract surgeryage freed For many patients, cataract surgery freed them cataracts can lead 2 Left untreated, Americans will have a cataract. from prescription glasses, but sometimes replaced from prescription sometimes to blindness. Theyglasses, are the but leading cause ofreplaced vision loss in the U.S. them with readers. A new intraocular lens (IOL) them with readers. A new intraocular lens (IOL) that provides provides full known range of oftreatment vision for forfor cataract Surgery is the aaonly cataracts. that full range vision cataract patients, even those with astigmatism, is now an an patients, surgery, even those with astigmatism, is now Cataract a 15-minute out-patient procedure, is one of the option for many patients. optionand formost manycommonly patients. performed surgeries in the U.S.3 People safest Clemson Eye surgeon surgeon Dr. basic BrianorJohnson Johnson calls The Thsurgery. e with cataracts can opt Dr. for laser cataract Clemson Eye Brian calls Symfony lens a “game changer.” In September, Symfony lens a Surgery “game changer.” In September, Basic Cataract Dr. Johnson Johnson became became one of of the the first first surgeons surgeons in in Dr. Basic cataract surgeryone involves removing the diseased lens and Greenville to implant the new lens, which was just Greenville to implant thelens. newThe lens,monofocal which wasintraocular just implanting a monofocal lens approved by the FDA in July for use in the U.S. approved the FDA in Julyfocal for use in the U.S. clears yourbyvision at a single point. This manual, bladed surgical procedure is covered by Medicare and most health insurance plans. However, if you wore eye glasses before your basic cataract surgery, you will still need them after the surgery.

Laser Cataract Surgery Carol’s Cataract Story “Laser surgery Laser cataract surgery involves using Carol Bridges opted for laser cataract surgery. Bridges is a youngat-heart American who chose to forgo retirement and continue a laser and computer-guided software with the multifocalThe Symfony has been in use 49 countries for several years, but Until the Symfony, cataract patients with significant astigmatism working part-time. Sheuse is in aindental hygienistfor inseveral Pickens, SC, but and system to create incisions that are up The Symfony has been in 49 countries years, Until the Symfony, cataract patients with significant astigmatism very much depends on good vision to perform hertrial work. to 10 limited times more precise than lens has changed were to monofocal lensmanual implants that would correct either the FDA approval came after a randomized clinical of 148 were limited to monofocal lens implants that would correct either the FDA approval came after a randomized clinical trial of 148 incisions. Here, havenot theboth. option distance or nearpatients vision, but Symfony is the first extended patients. In thatstarted trial, 77 percent of Symfony patients had 20/25 When to notice diming patients and driving distance or near vision, but not both. Symfony islife.” the first extended my patients. In she that trial, 77 percentcolors of Symfony had 20/25 of advanced lenses correct correction. depth of focus lensthat withcan astigmatism becoming more difficult, she booked an eye exam. At herwho exam, vision at intermediate distances, compared with 34 percent depth of focus lens with astigmatism correction. vision at intermediate distances, compared with 34 percent who nearsightedness, farsightedness and/or This allows excellent night vision her eye doctor, Dr. Joe Parisi, confirmed she had cataracts. This allows excellent night vision had a traditional mono-focal lens. Near vision for reading was astigmatism. had aAfter traditional mono-focal lens. Near for reading and sharpness of vision (visual discussing all the options withvision him, Bridges chosewas laser and sharpness of vision (visual improved and patients were able to read two levels of smaller acuity) at near, intermediate and improved and patients were able to read two levels of smaller cataract surgery with an advanced multifocal lens implant. “Through laser cataract surgery with acuity) at near, intermediate and lines than their mono-focal counterparts. advanced lenses, we can deliver the farbest distances. lines “I than their mono-focal counterparts. far distances. work at close range all day long. The laser surgery with the possible visual outcomes for our cataract “Patients who have received thesemy have been very excited and multifocal lens has changed life. It’s very made my work New technology innovations, like “Patients who have received these have been excited andso New patients,” says Dr. Don Glaser, the eyetechnology innovations, like much easier. Itheir don’tlifestyles have to have bother with glasses anymore. It’s pleased with how improved,” Dr. Johnson the Symfony, continue to improve surgeon at Clemson Eye’s Anderson pleased with howsays theirBridges. lifestyles have improved,” Dr. Johnson the Symfony, continue to improve wonderful,” the IOLs and the visual outcomes notes. “Th ese lenses are ideal for patients who have an active clinic. “Regardless of their age, Clemson the IOLs and the visual outcomes notes. “These lenses are ideal for patients who have an active Eye Exams for the All Seniors for patients patients with with aa variety variety of of lifestyle. They meet meet needs of of our our patients patients who who like like to to golf, golf, Eye patients enjoy excellent restored for lifestyle. They the needs If you think you haveshop, a cataract, a dilated eye and examdrive is the only conditions. Th e two most vision, whereby they are entirely conditions. free of use a computer or tablet, use a smartphone, The two most use away computer or tablet, useeye a smartphone, and drive for 4 to confirm it. Anshop, annual exam is recommended or much less dependent on eye glasses.” significant improvements are are vastly vastly at night.” significant improvements at night.” all seniors to help ensure your visual health, quality of life, improved intermediate intermediate vision vision and and A portion of the cost of laser cataract improved and ability to continue working, should you so desire. Call – Carol Bridges, an extended extended range range of of vision vision acuity acuity surgery and advanced lens implants is an Clemson Eye today to book your appointment. Dental Hygienist covered by Medicare and most health for patients with astigmatism. for patients with astigmatism. 1. “Retirement now requires those living longer to work longer,” Jill Schlesinger, and Clemson Eye insurance plans. However, an additional Chicago Tribune, Oct. 16, 2013. 2. The Givan Herbert Eye Institute. University of California, Irvine. Cataract Surgery. payment is required. If you’re a Clemson Cataract Patient http://www.eye.uci.edu/cataract.html. [Accessed March 29, 2013]. Eye patient, you have the option of 3. http://www.aao.org/publications/ eyenet/200609/pearls.cfm 4. Clemson Eye Laser Cataract with Advanced Intraocular Lens Replacement Results, 2015. 24-month, 0% payment plans.


09.21.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 7

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The former Mauldin Elementary School facility now is home to the Mauldin Cultural Center. Photo by Will Crooks/Greenville Journal

Cultural programming playing role in Mauldin’s growth CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

There are distinct differences in the challenges Van Broad faced in Mauldin as community development director and Fountain Inn as the head of economic development and cultural affairs. While both cities needed to grow, Fountain Inn had a traditional downtown and Mauldin didn’t. Fountain Inn needed to attract businesses period, while Mauldin needed to attract different types of businesses. But there’s a common thread between the two cities besides Broad — the importance of arts and cultural events to attract people, who would then attract businesses. In Fountain Inn, the old high school was turned into a cultural center where art classes, theater productions, and concerts were held. In Mauldin, the elementary school had already been turned into the Mauldin Cultural Center, but there was a dearth of events. The year Broad started working for Mauldin, the city didn’t have a farmers market and only two concerts had been held in the amphitheater. Keira Kitchings, who now directs the Mauldin Cultural Center, noticed, too. “When I drove through Mauldin for the first time, I thought Mauldin looked like it had nothing going on,” said Kitchings, who had worked in Jacksonville, Florida, and went to school in Rock Hill, which serves as a suburb of Charlotte. “But when I interviewed, they said they wanted something new and different.” So Kitchings increased programming,

Better Health Together Take a Loved One to the Doctor Day Sat., Sept. 22 • 8 a.m.-1 p.m. • McAlister Square This event raises awareness of ways to stay healthy among minority communities. Bring a family member or friend who hasn’t been to the doctor in a while to take advantage of free health and wellness screenings that can identify early warning signs of dangerous conditions. Finding these conditions early gives a person the best chance of beating them. Note: Prostate exams from 8 a.m.-10 a.m. only. No registration required. Upstate Farmers Markets Saturday mornings, through Sept. 29 (Downtown Fountain Inn and Trailblazer Park) or Oct. 27 (Downtown Greenville) Come visit GHS’ kid-themed Spuds & Sprouts booth at farmers markets in Greenville, Fountain Inn and Travelers Rest. Each week (once a month in Fountain Inn and Travelers Rest) we’ll offer kid-themed activities and information around nutrition and healthy lifestyle choices. Plant-based Primer: A Beginner’s Guide to Eating a Plant-based Diet Mondays, Oct. 1-22 • Noon-1 p.m. • GHS Life Center®, 875 W. Faris Road Join Lauren Limbird from American Grocery for plant-based discussions, cooking demonstrations and lunch. Topics range from tailgating to plantbased protein sources. Preregistration and payment of $10 required for each session. To learn more or register, call (864) 455-4231.

Van Broad and Keira Kitchings pose in the Mauldin Cultural Center. Photo by Will Crooks/Greenville Journal

including art and community-education classes. She moved the city’s farmers market to Tuesday nights and added music, food, and drink. The city has a Friday night beach-music series, an annual barbecue cook-off, and a public art trail. About 30,000 people go through the Cultural Center each year. “The Cultural Center has become the identity of the Mauldin community,” Broad said. “This is where the community meets and connects.”

The “Dirt” on South Carolina’s Soil Mon., Oct. 15 • 6-7:30 p.m. • GHS Life Center, 875 W. Faris Road About 80 percent of plant problems are related to poor soil. Learn at-home tests that can identify problems with your soil and remedies for those issues from Master Gardener Suzy Seagrave in this free class. Registration required by Oct. 12; call (864) 455-4231. Unless noted otherwise, registration is required for each event. To register, learn more or see a schedule of events, visit ghs.org/events.

ghs.org 18-0815GJ


8 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.21.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

COSMIC QUESTIONS

Light the Path featuring Coach Danny Ford

Clemson astrophysicist works to unravel the mysteries hiding beneath Jupiter’s clouds

Simple Science: Everything you need to know before reading Jupiter is the fifth planet from our sun, and is 2½ times more massive than all the other planets in our solar system combined. The gas planet is surrounded by 79 known moons.

Join The Salvation Army for Light the Path, our annual meeting & banquet, on October 4 at 6 PM at Taylors First Baptist. Come celebrate with us, hear highlights of our year, enjoy a BBQ meal catered by Henry's Smokehouse and get your favorite Clemson shirt autographed by Coach Danny Ford! All are welcome to attend. Purchase tickets at salvationarmygreenville.org

A NASA-led team of scientists, including Clemson University astrophysicist Máté Ádámkovics, recently detected signs of water deep beneath the surface of Jupiter's clouds. The discovery could lead to more information about the chemical composition of Jupiter and other gas planets. It could also help astronomers determine which planet formation theory is correct. This view of Jupiter was captured by NASA’s Juno spacecraft on May 19, 2017. ANDREW MOORE | STAFF

amoore@communityjournals.com

Floating in the vastness of space, nearly 500 million miles from the sun, Jupiter has long been regarded as one of the least likely places to find extraterrestrial life. The planet, which is composed mostly of hydrogen and helium, lacks a solid surface for life to develop, and its atmospheric pressures and temperatures are likely too extreme for organisms to adapt to. But recent research by a national team of scientists, including Clemson University astrophysicist Máté Ádámkovics, indicates that Jupiter may be more hospitable than previously thought. While analyzing the gas giant earlier this year, Ádámkovics, along with scien-

tists at NASA and several other universities, found hints of hydrogen and oxygen hidden deep beneath the Great Red Spot, a hurricane-like storm that’s been swirling around in Jupiter’s atmosphere for more than 150 years. The discovery, which was featured in last month’s issue of The Astrophysical Journal, supports past models that have predicted abundant amounts of water within Jupiter’s atmosphere, according to Ádámkovics, an assistant professor in Clemson’s physics and astronomy department. “Water may play a critical role in Jupiter’s dynamic weather patterns, so this will help advance our understanding of what makes the planet’s atmosphere so turbulent,” Ádámkovics said in a statement. “And, finally, where there’s the potential for liquid water, the possibility of life cannot be completely ruled out. So, though it appears very unlikely, life on Jupiter is not beyond the range of our imaginations.” Scientists have long theorized that Jupiter’s atmosphere is composed of three distinct cloud layers: a top layer made of ammonia ice; a middle layer made of ammonium hydrosulfide crystals; and a bottom layer made of water ice and vapor. Previous spacecraft missions have investigated the planet’s lower atmosphere, but researchers have been unable to fully analyze the chemical composition of the Great Red Spot due to its dense clouds, which make it difficult for orbiting probes and Earth-based telescopes to detect electromagnetic energy. Ádámkovics and other members of the team, however, were able to measure infrared radiation leaking from beneath the storm’s clouds by formulating and analyzing data collected by the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility and Keck 2 telescope, both of which are located at the Mauna Kea Observatory in Hawaii. Combined, the instruments were able to detect light at infrared wavelengths, revealing which elements were protruding through the clouds of Jupiter. Ádámkovics and other members of the team used data from the ground-based telescopes to analyze the absorption patterns of a form of methane gas. Because Jupiter is too warm for methane to freeze, its abundance should not change from one place to another on the planet, according to NASA. By comparing methane gas emissions from

the Great Red Spot to similar emissions from other areas of Jupiter, the team discovered three distinct layers of clouds blocking the infrared signal of the methane from passing through the planet’s Ádámkovics atmosphere. The deepest cloud layer is at 5 to 7 bars, the team concluded, right where the temperature reaches the freezing point for water. A bar is a metric unit of pressure that approximates the average atmospheric pressure on Earth at sea level, according to NASA. Altitude on Jupiter is measured in bars, because the gas planet doesn’t have a solid surface from which to measure elevation. During analysis, the team also detected large quantities of carbon monoxide emitting from the Great Red Spot, suggesting there’s an abundant supply of oxygen in Jupiter’s atmosphere to bond to hydrogen to form water when the pressure and temperature are just right. In fact, the pressure of the water, combined with the measurements of carbon monoxide, imply that Jupiter has two to nine times more oxygen than the sun, according to Ádámkovics. “Jupiter is a gas giant that contains more than twice the mass of all of our other planets combined,” Ádámkovics said. “And though 99 percent of Jupiter’s atmosphere is composed of hydrogen and helium, even solar fractions of water on a planet this massive would add up to a lot of water — many times more water than we have here on Earth.” Ádámkovics said the data collected during the team’s recent analysis of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot could help researchers better estimate how much water exists on the entire planet by supplementing information collected by NASA’s Juno spacecraft. The probe, which has orbited Jupiter since 2016, is using its own infrared spectrometer and microwave radiometer to search for signs of water in the planet’s atmosphere. The mission will continue through 2021, when the Juno spacecraft is expected to crash into Jupiter’s clouds. If the probe does manage to detect signs of water in Jupiter’s atmosphere before the end of its mission, the ground-based observation technique developed by the team to measure infrared radiation could be applied not just to the Great Red Spot, but to the entire planet. The technique could also be used to


09.21.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 9

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The twin telescopes at the W.M. Keck Observatory in Hawaii are the largest optical and infrared telescopes in the world. The observatory is located atop Mauna Kea, a dormant volcano. Photo Credit: iStock by Getty Images.

study the chemical composition of other gas planets, according to Ádámkovics. This could help astronomers determine which planet formation theory is correct. Most scientists agree that planets form over millions of years as dense clouds of interstellar dust and gas fuse to rocky cores. This model, however, is unable to produce cores large enough, in a short enough period of time, to convincingly explain how gas planets like Jupiter came to be. Ádámkovics said he plans to continue

collecting and analyzing data from the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility and Keck 2 telescope in order to better understand Jupiter’s atmosphere. “Jupiter still has many mysteries,” he said. “But we’ve never been more ready or more able to solve them.”

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NASA astronaut Terry Virts is seen here in the International Space Station’s Cupola module, a 360-degree Earth- and spaceviewing platform. The module also contains a robotic workstation for controlling the station’s main robotic arm, Canadarm2, which is used for a variety of operations including the remote grappling of visiting cargo vehicles. Photo by NASA.

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It was Jan. 14, 2015, and NASA astronaut Terry Virts was orbiting Earth at about 18,000 mph aboard the International Space Station when an on-board sensor triggered a flurry of caution lights, including one indicating a toxin in the atmosphere — in this case, leaking ammonia coolant. “Launches and landings are dangerous, but an ammonia leak is probably the deadliest type of emergency you can have in space,” Virts explained during a recent phone interview from his home in Texas. “They told us in training, ‘If you can smell it, then don’t worry about it, because you’re going to die.’” Virts didn’t smell ammonia, but he and two other crew members evacuated the American section of the station and camped out in the Russian section, which uses a different cooling system, for 11 hours, until NASA was able to trace the caution lights to a malfunctioning computer signal. “We spent an entire day thinking the leak was real,” said Virts, who was then commander of the ISS. “It was definitely one of the scarier moments I had on the space station." That moment is just one of many that will be recounted by Virts during an upcoming presentation at the Peace Center in downtown Greenville. The presentation, which is set for Mon-

day, Sept. 24, at 6 p.m., will feature Virts as he talks about his journey aboard the ISS and shares space photography from his new book, “View From Above: An Astronaut Photographs the World.” Published by National Geographic, with a foreword by Apollo 11 astronaut and moonwalker Buzz Aldrin, the 304-page book presents “astonishing aerial images of Earth, along with captivating tales of life at the edge of the atmosphere,” according to a synopsis. Virts, a Maryland native, first launched on the space shuttle Endeavour in 2010, serving as pilot for the mission. Four years later, he was assigned as commander for Expedition 43, which launched on a Russian Soyuz spacecraft and docked at the ISS, where Virts spent 200 consecutive days in space conducting scientific experiments and spacewalks before returning to Earth in 2015. Throughout the seven-month mission, Virts also snapped thousands of aerial photos of Earth and life aboard the orbiting laboratory. In fact, to be exact, Virts shot 319,275 photos, the most anyone has ever taken in space. His book includes photos of lightning storms over the Himalayan Mountains, the ice fields of Patagonia in South America, the pyramids of Egypt, and countless other visuals showcasing the natural beauty of Earth. In 2010, when Virts first visited the


09.21.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 11

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM International Space Station as pilot of the Endeavour, he installed an observatory module, which allowed him to snap photos with a 360-degree view of the station. Virts said the photos included in his new book provide unique perspectives of economic, political, and environmental issues impacting Earth. For instance, his photos of South and North Korea at night, which he snapped in 2014, offer visual evidence of the growing economic disparity between the neighboring countries: The south was illuminated by city lights, while the north was almost completely black. The book also includes a collection of photos depicting everyday life aboard the ISS, including candid shots of his crew mates, including former U.S. Navy captain and NASA astronaut Scott Kelly, and Samantha Cristoforetti, an astronaut with the Italian European Space Agency. “Most people will never get a chance to visit space, so my goal with this book was to share the experience as best as I could through words and photos,” said Virts, who retired from NASA in August 2016. “I touch on launches, landings, and just about all other aspects of living in space.” Virts said that while his photography is likely to garner the most attention, he’s

most proud of his book’s narrative, which he penned himself. “View from Above” is organized by the different stages of a space mission, according to Virts, with chapters devoted to “Leaving Earth,” “Our Place in the Universe,” “Deliveries from Home,” and “Return to Earth.” “I think the fact that I wrote this book without the help of a ghost writer or coauthor is pretty impressive,” Virts said jokingly. “My English teacher probably thought I would be the last student to write a book.” “But during my time with NASA, I came to realize that communication skills are more important than the technical skills sometimes,” he added. “If you have this amazing trip to space and experience all these great things but you’re not able to share it with people, then why even bother?”

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC LIVE WITH ASTRONAUT TERRY VIRTS WHEN Monday, Sept. 24, at 6 p.m. WHERE Peace Center, 300 S. Main St. PRICE Tickets are $20 and may be purchased by calling 864-467-3000 or 800888-7768, in person at the Peace Center Box Office, or online at www.peacecenter.org.

On March 1, NASA astronauts Terry Virts and Barry Wilmore ventured outside the International Space Station for their third spacewalk in eight days. Virts and Wilmore completed installing 400 feet of cable and several antennas associated with the Common Communications for Visiting Vehicles system known as C2V2. Boeing’s Crew Transportation System (CST)-100 and the SpaceX Crew Dragon will use the system in the coming years to rendezvous with the orbital laboratory and deliver crews to the space station. Photo Credit: NASA

For a Q&A with Terry Virts, go to www.greenvillejournal.com

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Proposed parking garage equipment would utilize license plate recognition CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Imagine being able to make a reservation in one of Greenville’s parking garages to ensure you have somewhere close to park when attending a big event such as Fall for Greenville, or a sold-out performance at the Peace Center or the Bon Secours Wellness Arena. Or being able to enter and exit a garage without an access card because monthly parkers are recognized by their cars’ license plates? Or finding out the garage where you had planned to park is full and seeing where the next-closest parking garage with an open space is without having to drive around from garage to garage and level to level. Greenville city is considering buying parking-system equipment that will make all of that possible.

The new system has a $3 million price tag, according to Mike Murphy, the city’s director of public works. The city could take the money from the surplus of parking revenue it has built up, he said. But Kai Nelson, director of the city’s office of management and budget, said that if part of the money is used for the new equipment, it couldn’t be used to help fund a new parking garage or parking decks in the areas of downtown that are or soon will be feeling the pinch from development. The city was considering adding levels to the Spring Street garage, but dropped that idea because of its at least $5 million price tag and the disturbance to adjacent residences and businesses. The new levels would have been able to serve the federal courthouse that will be built at the corner of East North and Spring streets across from the Greenville County Courthouse.

Parking issues are even more of a problem in the West End, which has seen plenty of new development and will see more with the redevelopment of County Square, which provides parking for Fluor Field, Falls Park, theater events, and West End restaurants and shopping. Greenville County has agreed to contribute $15 million to build parking in the West End. Mayor Knox White said the parking garage equipment the city is considering could relieve pressure on parking garages. The new system would allow for a mobile parking application that would allow people to search for a parking space based on garage location, availability, and price, and to reserve a spot and pay for it in advance. In addition, the new equipment would allow vehicles to enter and exit parking garages without a ticket. Automatic payment on exit, including time spent in the garage

over what was paid for in advance, would be facilitated by license plate recognition. The new system would also allow the city to sell more monthly parking in highdemand garages because the city would have better data on when monthly parkers used the garage and how often. “It would provide more parking spaces in the parking garage system because we will know what’s available,” said White, who said parking is the top source of complaints the City Council now receives. “We could increase the number of spaces we lease out because we’ll be able to see the vacant spaces throughout the day.” In addition, the new system would allow the city to use dynamic pricing. For example, the city could charge less for monthly rooftop parking, something that could help those who work in the service industry downtown.

Judge denies temporary injunction in McPherson Lane barricade lawsuit CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Circuit Judge Thomas Cooper Jr. has denied a request to remove a temporary barrier on McPherson Lane and prevent the installation of a permanent one while a lawsuit filed by two residents on a nearby street is pending. In an order filed Sept. 10 on a request for a temporary injunction, Cooper ruled the plaintiffs, Fred Crawford and Marc Balsa, did not show they would suffer irreparable harm if the injunction was not granted, that they did not show they would likely succeed on the merits of the litigation, and there was no adequate remedy at law. Residents of McPherson Lane, Cothran Street, Warner Street, Camille Avenue, and McDaniel Court voted earlier this year to request, through the city’s traffic-calming program, construction of a permanent barricade that turned part of McPherson Lane into a one-way street. The request was approved by the Greenville City Council. Crawford and Balsa filed a lawsuit last month alleging the partial closing of McPherson Lane wrongfully interferes with the free and lawful flow of traffic on a city street dedicated to public use and it was for the benefit of a few residents. The lawsuit came after more than a yearlong battle over whether a barricade that turned one block of McPherson into a one-way street would be permanent.

A barricade on McPherson Lane has forced some neighborhood residents to navigate the busy intersection of Augusta Street and Faris Road. Will Crooks/Greenville Journal

Residents of McPherson and four other nearby streets — Warner Street, McDaniel Court, Camille Avenue, and Cothran Street — said they were promised the barricade as an answer to their concerns over increased traffic because of the redeveloped shopping center at the corner of Augusta Street and Faris Road. But residents of other streets in the neighborhood objected to the one-way, saying they weren’t notified the barricade would be erected and their streets were being adversely affected by increased traffic. The city has since said it will change its traffic-calming process and one-ways and street closures will not be options. In his order, Cooper said the only harm the plaintiffs identified as warranting an injunction is “loss of access to [McPherson Lane]. However, neither the plaintiffs nor the general public have lost access to McPherson Lane. The street is not closed. Rather, McPherson Lane is open

to the public and freely accessible to all who wish to utilize it. The traveling public simply must drive in one direction on that street. The plaintiffs identify no facts demonstrating that driving in one direcA barricade on McPherson Lane Photo by Will Crooks

tion results in any harm, much less irreparable harm.” In his denial, Cooper said the plaintiffs have not demonstrated a likelihood of success of the merits on several causes of action in their lawsuit. In addition, Cooper’s order said the plaintiffs were not entitled to an injunction because they had adequate remedy. “The designation of McPherson Lane as a partial one-way was lawfully done at the City Council’s discretion. If Plaintiffs disagree with the way the City Council exercised its discretion, City Council members may be removed at the next election,” the order said. The plaintiffs can also seek traffic-calming measures, the order said.


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Washington Center nature trail made for people in Greenville with disabilities ARIEL GILREATH | STAFF

agilreath@communityjournals.com

It’s taken three years, but the Washington Center is finally crossing the finish line on completing its nature trail — a project Principal Penny Rogers has called “a labor of love.” The nature trail, like the Washington Center, is unique to Greenville County — it’s the only trail built intentionally for people with profound disabilities and is fully compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act. Now, it will also be open for the public to use after school hours. The Washington Center is a public school that opened in 1972 for students ages 3 to 21 with severe or profound lowincidence — or rare — disabilities. “We tell people all the time that you could go your whole life and never meet anybody with a true low-incidence disability, because there aren’t many of them, and a lot of times, they have issues that keep them from being out in the community,” Rogers said. The school has 125 students from across the county, and Rogers said that often, the only opportunity they get to go out in the

The Washington Center nature trail is fully ADA compliant and open to the public during non-school hours. Photo by Will Crooks

portant for our kids to be introduced to our community and for people in the community to get to know our kids,” Rogers said. The problem that staff often encounter is finding a place that can accommodate the children and their equipment. “I love the Swamp Rabbit Trail myself, but

gave $100,000 to the center and is the largest donor for the project. An Eagle Scout project made up of wind chimes and flower beds sits off to one side

of the path. The trail is expected to have two more Eagle Scout projects this year, including a rock sensory garden, before its official opening. The Greenville County Schools board of trustees signed a lease agreement in August with the city of Greenville to allow public use of the trail when school is not in session. Mari Steinbach, director of the city’s Parks and Recreation Department, said it’s a unique trail in the county because of its accommodations for people with disabilities. “We looked at it as a great way to help ensure a fully accessible nature space,” Steinbach said via email. The playground at Sara Collins Elementary, which is already open to the public during nonschool hours, provides easy access to the nature trail since it sits on the school’s property. The center hasn’t planned an official unveiling for the nature trail yet — it’s still awaiting a few additions, including the installation of more handrails, but Rogers said the hope is to unveil it later this year in a way that honors all of the donors. “So many people have been involved in this project that it’s almost impossible to list them all,” Rogers said. “Every time I look around, somebody is just doing something that is very kind.”

“Every time I look around, somebody is just doing something that is very kind.” Washington Center Principal Penny Rogers community is when they’re at school. More than half of the students at the center are wheelchair-bound, nearly all of them are nonverbal, about 60 students must be fed via tubes, and many suffer from seizures. “We have parents that either don’t have the type of vehicle that can take kids or they have kids who are medically so complicated that that holds them back, or whose behaviors are such that they’re not going to chance going to Haywood Mall,” Rogers said. “We can take all the staff we need, all the supplies — we take everything, and we take them grocery shopping, we take them to restaurants all over town, we take them to the Festival of Lights, we take them bowling, we take them swimming, we take them horseback riding.” One of the school’s primary goals in taking students out is to give them a chance to have experiences they wouldn’t have at home. “The other half of that is we think it’s im-

I can see how I wouldn’t love it if I was pushing a wheelchair with 50 bicycles whizzing by me,” Rogers said. “We can take them off campus in buses, and we do it all the time, but as far as taking them out on the sidewalk, there’s not a good place to do that.” Rogers had the idea to build the trail three years ago in what was an overgrown, wooded area shared between the center and Sara Collins Elementary School. Initially, Rogers thought the project would cost about $50,000 and take little time to complete, but after three years and more than four times the initial estimated cost, the trail is finally close to being finished. Shared by the Washington Center and Sara Collins Elementary, the trail is made of paved concrete wide enough to fit two wheelchairs side-by-side. Tall pine trees overlook the winding path. An eagle is marked on some of the path’s bricks as a tribute to Eastside High School, which

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Wade Hampton High track to be named after longtime coach ARIEL GILREATH | STAFF

agilreath@communityjournals.com

Wade Hampton High School’s track facility will be named after Sam McCollum, a longtime coach and social studies teacher who taught at the school for 30 years. The initial request was made by Rick Zeller, chair of Wade Hampton’s social studies department who taught and coached alongside McCollum from 1986-2006. “Coach McCollum represents what is best of teachers and coaches in this district. Coach McCollum was loyal, caring, hard­working, and a role model for many who needed a ‘father figure’ in their lives,” Zeller said in the letter to the district. After Zeller made the request, several letters of support for the name change came from the principal, athletic directors, and even McCollum’s former athletic rival — Ed Boehmke, retired track and field coach for Eastside High School. “His retirement left a huge hole in the quality of track coaches in Greenville County,” Boehmke said in a letter he sent to Greenville County Schools board members in August. “A lot can be said about winning records and championship season (of which Sam had a few), but more can be said about the quality of his athletes and the love and admiration that athletes have for their coach as well as the many life lessons of teamwork, respect, and work ethic that Sam instilled in his athletes.” The Greenville County Schools board of trustees voted unanimously to approve the name change to the Sam McCollum Track and Field Facility at a meeting in August. “He was the best and finest coach to touch thousands of students’ lives, not only as a social studies teacher, but also as a football coach, a great track coach, as well as even coaching one year of girls soccer,” board member Lynda Leventis-Wells said.

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Submit to: obits@communityjournals.com

DEATH NOTICES SEPTEMBER 9, 2018 – SEPTEMBER 14, 2018 Eric R. White, 53, of Greenville, passed away on September 9, 2018. The Wood Mortuary assisted the family. Jeremy Ira Loftis, 47, of Mauldin, passed away on September 10, 2018. The Wood Mortuary assisted the family. Eugene “Gene” James Baur, Sr., 86, of Greenville, passed away on September 11, 2018. Thomas McAfee Funeral Home, SE Chapel, assisted the family.

Henry Frances Page, Jr., 80, of Greenville, passed away on September 11, 2018. Thomas McAfee Funeral Home assisted the family. Thomas Olin Edens, 84, of Marietta, passed away on September 13, 2018. The Howze Mortuary assisted the family. Rev. John Willett Vess, Sr., 89, of Liberty, passed away on September 13, 2018. Robinson Funeral Home, Downtown Chapel, assisted the family.

Larry G. Clardy, 71, of Greenville, passed away on September 11, 2018. Thomas McAfee Funeral Home, Downtown Chapel, assisted the family.

Joseph Hamilton, 98, of Greer, passed away on September 14, 2018. The Wood Mortuary assisted the family.

John Rickard “Rabbit” Waddell, 84, of Taylors, passed away on September 11, 2018. The Wood Mortuary assisted the family.

Suzanne Gantt Richert, 79, of Greenville, passed away on September 14, 2018. Mackey Mortuaries assisted the family.

Lucie Randolph Sparkman Townsend September 20, 1940 – September 12, 2018 Lucie Sparkman Townsend, “Rannie”, passed away in her home surrounded by her family on Wednesday, September 12, 2018. A native of Aiken SC, Mrs. Townsend was the daughter of the late William Buck Sparkman, Jr. and Lida Lorenz Sparkman Burns. She studied music at Converse College and worked as Director of Senior Adult Ministries at Christ Church Episcopal, Program Director at Kanuga Conference Center, and retired from her professional life as a Liturgical Assistant at Christ Church. In addition to her professional life, Mrs. Townsend served the community of Greenville on various boards and committees including the vestry of Christ Church, and also volunteered at The Greenville Hospital System and The Greenville Symphony Orchestra. She was a member of Christ Church Greenville, past member of Kanuga Conference Center’s board of directors and board of visitors, The Assembly, and The Huguenot Society of South Carolina. Mrs. Townsned was married to the late Thomas Pinckney Townsend, Jr., and was also preceded in death by her son, William Bacot Townsend. Survivors include her son, The Reverend

Thomas Pinckney Townsend III (Laura) of Saint Simons Island, Georgia; a daughter Julia Townsend Easterby of Greer; a brother William Buck Sparkman III of Bradenton, Fl; three grandsons, one granddaughter, and one greatgranddaughter. Funeral services were held at Christ Church Episcopal, Greenville SC at 11:00 AM, Thursday September 20, 2018. Interment followed immediately in the memorial garden at Christ Church. The family received visitors at The Cascades at Verdae on Wednesday evening, September 19, 2018 from 5-7pm in the ballroom. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Kanuga Conference Center, P.O. Box 250, Hendersonville N.C. 28793 or to the Jasmine Road Ministry in care of Christ Church Episcopal, 10 North Church St. Greenville SC 29601. Online condolences may be shared with the family at MackeyMortuary.com.

Alfred B. Robinson

November 30, 1928 – September 10, 2018 Alfred Burgess Robinson, age 89, passed away Monday, September 10, 2018 in Easley. Born in Easley on November 30, 1928, he was a son of the late William Alexander and Mary Burgess Robinson. An Eagle Scout in Troop 37, Mr. Robinson graduated from Easley High School with honors in 1945 and Clemson College in 1948 with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Economics. He received the Shanklin Medal for maintaining the highest scholastic average in Military Science. He commanded a cadet company during his senior year and was a member of Senior Platoon, Tiger Brotherhood, and Blue Key. He was a member of Clemson’s official big band, the Jungaleers, and continued to perform in Jungaleer events throughout his life.  In 1948, Mr. Robinson was called to active duty being assigned as Cadre to the Leadership School in Fort Jackson, South Carolina. He returned to inactive status in 1950 and joined the reserves due to family business demands. After his father’s death in 1953, he took over the family’s business, Robinson’s Department Store, and Robinson Funeral Home. In 1992, he founded Robinson Memorial Gardens. In addition, he was active in real estate development. Mr. Robinson was an active member of the community including serving as President of Pickens County United Way, Easley Rotary Club, and Easley Chamber of Commerce. He served on the Board of the State Chamber of Commerce, the Pickens County Library, the S. C. Funeral Service Board, the Friends of the Library, and the YMCA. He was a former Board Member and President of Selected Independent Funeral Homes 1990-1991, an international association of family owned funeral homes. He was a former Chairman of the Combined Utilities of the City of Easley, former Board Member of Southern

Bancorporation for Southern Bank and Trust, and a member of the Poinsett Club, Green Valley Country Club, and Pawleys Island Yacht Club. He currently was serving as a board member of S. C. Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities. As a lifelong member of Easley Presbyterian Church, he served as Chairman of the Board of Deacons, an Elder of the Session, and former Chairman of the Worship Committee. Surviving are his children; two daughters, Corinne Margot Mauldin and Caroline Jütte Robinson Fleming; two sons, Alfred Burgess Robinson, Jr. (Sallie) and Christopher Payne Robinson; one brother, William Alexander Robinson, Jr. (Mary); and eight grandchildren, Mary Catherine Mauldin Hadaway, Charles Hubbard Hadaway, III, Eliza Cunningham Fleming, Peter Wallace Fleming, IV, Alfred Burgess Robinson, III, Evelyn Frances Robinson, Anna Eberhardt Robinson, and John Wickliffe Robinson. He was predeceased by his wife, Margot Martha Jütte Robinson, and her son, William Kennedy Mauldin, II; a sister, Mary Elizabeth Robinson, and a granddaughter, Martha Robinson Fleming. The family received friends   Saturday at Robinson Funeral Home-Powdersville Road. Funeral services were held Sunday, September 16, 2018, officiated by Reverends Dr. William P. Seel and Christie S. Gravely. Burial followed in Robinson Memorial Gardens,  1425 Powdersville Road, Easley. Escort of Honor were the members of Easley Rotary Club. Memorials may be made to Easley Presbyterian Church, 200 South 1st Street, Easley, S.C. 29640 or the charity of one’s choice.

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09.21.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 21

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Our Community

Community news, events, and happenings

FUNDRAISER

Center for Developmental Services announces annual Eggs Benefit Hosted by the Center for Developmental Services, the seventh annual Eggs Benefit will be Oct. 4 at the Poinsett Club in downtown Greenville. The event includes breakfast at 7:30 a.m. and the program from 8-9 a.m. Proceeds will help more than 7,600 children with developmental delays and disabilities who receive assistance from CDS each year, according to a news release.  Reservations for the benefit breakfast must be made at www.eggsbenefit.com, and additional information on sponsorship can be found by calling 864-331-1314 or emailing joy.blue@cdservices.org. Located in the Upstate, CDS is a multidisciplinary treatment facility for children with disabilities and developmental delays. Children receive therapy, diagnosis, legal help, day care, and a family support network at CDS.

attendees to pose in football regalia. Cancer Survivors Day is free and open to all cancer survivors and their families; registration is required by calling 864512-2255. “We get to celebrate the patients and their caregivers. When patients are diagnosed with cancer, they see us sometimes as much as they see their family because they come in for treatment as often as two to three times a week,” assistant vice president of oncology services Samantha Carter said in a news release. “We get to hold their hands through the journey. They are family to us, just like we’re family to them.”

NONPROFIT

Miracle Hill Ministries CEO awarded Order of the Palmetto Miracle Hill Ministries president and CEO Reid Lehman recently received the Order of the Palmetto presented by Gov. Henry McMaster. A ceremony was held at the Greenville Rescue Mission to honor Lehman with the state’s highest civilian honor. He received recognition for his lifetime service and achievements of significance. “Reid Lehman is not a man who says, ‘We have problems, how do we fix it?’ Instead, he has a vision of where we want to go and says, ‘Now let’s get there,’” McMaster said of Lehman at the ceremony. “When you have strong people who are determined to get something good done, it is an unstoppable force.” Serving the nonprofit for nearly 35 years, Lehman has developed many community partnerships to further assist homeless children and help adults receive necessary care. “The sacrificial work at Miracle Hill is done by the folks on the front lines — those visiting foster homes, serving in cottages at the Children’s Home, the counselors and case managers at the missions,” Lehman said upon receiving the award. “This much-appreciated recognition represents the people who really deserve it, the people who give their lives away every single day.” CELEBRATION

AnMed Health holds Cancer Survivors Day celebration Hundreds of cancer survivors in the Upstate will celebrate victories in their battles against cancer from 2-4 p.m. Sept. 23 at the Anderson Civic Center. The AnMed Health Cancer Survivors Day is football-themed and will feature entertainment, games, shopping, and tailgate food. Survivors, along with family and friends, may join the celebration in their favorite football jerseys or football garb. A photo booth will also be available for

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RACE

Sponsorships available, registration open for 2018 Komen SC Mountains to Midlands Race for the Cure Susan G. Komen South Carolina will host the SC Mountains to Midlands Race for the Cure on Sept. 29 at Fluor Field in Greenville. The race marks 25 years of Susan G. Komen being active in the sate. For sponsorship and registration information, participants should call 864-234-5035 or email deb@komensc.org. All fees and donations will fund breast cancer services and research. With over 2,000 participants, volunteers, and supporters attending, the race will celebrate survivors and remember lost loved ones. “Be bold with us,” Komen South Carolina fund development manager Deb Osborne said in a news release. “Your 2018 sponsorship and race registration will help us reduce breast cancer deaths. Susan G. Komen has set a bold goal to reduce the number of breast cancer deaths in the U.S. by 50 percent by the year 2026. This bold goal requires bold action. Your support for the Race for the Cure will help us.” Submit community news items to www.greenvillejournal.com/submit.


Decor’s the thing review by Jill Hendrix

“Furniture Makes the Room: Create Special Pieces to Style a Home You Love,” by Barb Blair — Chronicle Books, $28 If you have ever rescued furniture from the side of the road, inherited furniture your relatives no longer want, or are a hands-on person looking for a new project, look no further than “Furniture Makes the Room: Create Special Pieces to Style a Home You Love,” which details 15 projects and ideas that can then be applied countless ways for your own furniture. “Furniture Makes the Room” is Barb Blair’s second publication. She refers to her first book, “Furniture Makeovers,” as “Furniture 101” while this book is an advanced version that goes deeper into design and usage. For those of us lucky enough to call Greenville home, we can see Blair’s work in person at Knack Studio, 580 Perry Ave., in the Village of West Greenville. “Furniture Makes the Room” begins with a tutorial on how to select a project and warns of some pitfalls in the process. Each project gives the history of the acquisition of the furniture, examples of what is interesting about the piece, and the thought process for the design. Blair spends a lot of time talking about preparation, and it is clear that she takes planning seriously. She believes it is much better to create a piece you love that complements your decor versus a quickly painted piece soon relegated to a corner. One transformation is a feather-decal armoire. In this update it is all about the details —inside and outside the piece. Feather appliques add elegance and a touch of whimsy. Wallpaper on the front of the drawers inside the armoire gives the extra design flair to make the piece special. And then Blair shows the armoire in a living room, art studio, and bedroom. It could also work as a bar or storage element in a dining room. Thankfully, after showing all these dramatic transformations, Blair then has a

This Week Finding inspired spaces from book pages

section where she reveals her toolbox and favorite tricks of the trade. Gone are the days of marking off a painting area with boring straight-edged painters tape; scallops, chevrons, and waves are now available. The next section is a detailed step-by-step of the various techniques utilized in the book — repairs such as filling, techniques such as distressing, flecking, spray paint, milk paint, lettering, and weathering with paint. There is also a detailed section on stripping, part of the meticulous preparation that Blair employs. The book ends with a complete section of resources. Many of these resources are local and well-known in the Upstate. Photos are crisp and clear and more in the coffee-table-book genre than that of typical how-to books. “Furniture Makes the Room” is beautiful, educational, and a recommended read for the Greenville do-it-yourselfer.

Jill Hendrix worked for the editorial department of St. Martin’s Press and lived in New York City for more than five years before returning to her hometown of Greenville to open Fiction Addiction, an independent bookstore located at 1175 Woods Crossing Road, Greenville. Visit www.fiction-addiction.com.

Quick picks “Styled: Secrets for Arranging Rooms, From Tabletops to Bookshelves,” by Emily Henderson with Angelin Borsics — Potter Style, $21 The anti-decorating book, “Styled,” from HGTV personality Emily Henderson, is full of witty and purposeful advice about rearranging almost any space so that it feels finished, updated, and a reinvigorated reflection of you. Henderson walks readers step-by-step through arranging almost any home surface. With more than 300 pages of insider tips and tools, Henderson lifts the veil on trade secrets of design professionals. Best of all, she tells readers how to work with what they have.

Graphic designer Lina Legare recommends this book, saying “styling is working with what you have and making it look like it belongs in the pages of atHome.” “The Welcoming House: The Art of Living Graciously,” by Jane Schwab and Cindy Smith — Rizzoli International Publications, $25 This book is co-written by best friends and interior decorating partners Jane Schwab and Cindy Smith, whose Charlotte, North Carolinabased design studio Circa Interiors & Antiques has garnered national acclaim. This book is more than a beautiful centerpiece — it’s an

invitation to stay awhile. It serves a dual purpose in the home of Kate Madden — a coffeetable book and a guest book. “I have friends and family sign or write a note in it after we entertain or when they stay overnight to remember their visit by,” she says.


09.21.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 23

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

Featured Neighborhood

Grand Opening of Lincoln Park 2 Bishop Lake Way, Taylors, SC

Neighborhood Info 5 MOVE-IN READY HOMES AVAILABLE! Price: $222,990-$285,990 Amenities: Community swimming pool Standard Features: Hardwood flooring and crown molding throughout main living areas, stainless steel appliances and granite countertops in kitchen and fiber cement siding *Square footage, pricing and standard features are subject to change without notice

Schools: Crestview Elementary, Greer Middle, and Greer High Contact: Becca Jett 864-406-5000 | Becca.Jett@CrescentHomes.net

Please join us for the Grand Opening of Lincoln Park, a Crescent Homes Community! Attendees Automatically Enter to Win a Grand Prize Giveaway of a Luxury Weekend in Charleston! Perfectly situated between Greer and downtown Greenville with easy access to Spartanburg, Lincoln Park, located in Taylors, SC is a beacon of convenience. Outdoor fun is always nearby with Northside Park, Otter Creek Water Park, Falls Park and Swamp Rabbit Trail just around the corner. The welcoming community features a wide range of floor plans to choose from within Crescent Homes’ popular Palmetto Series product line, including ranch plans, master down options and spacious two story designs. Homes range from 3-7 bedrooms and 1,500-3,000 sq ft.

When: Wednesday, September 26 from 12-2 pm Where: Lincoln Park Model Home 2 Bishop Lake Way, Taylors, SC If using GPS, use 708 Old Rutherford Rd Taylors, SC 29687

Catering by White Duck Taco Gift Cards to first 15 RSVPs

Real Estate News

Brenden Stevenson joins the Easley office of C. Dan Joyner, Realtors Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, Realtors is pleased to announce that Brenden Stevenson has joined the company’s Easley office as a sales associate. Stevenson was born in Minnesota and moved to South Carolina at a very young age. He graduated from Powdersville High School and immediately thereafter acquired a job at FedEx Ground. Real estate runs in Steven-

son’s family, as his late great-grandfather was a broker in Marysville, Ohio. His great-grandfather encouraged his grandfather to work in real Stevenson estate and, Stevenson’s aunt is a broker out west. This multi-generational family real estate perspective has given Stevenson confidence that this career is what he was born to do. “I am delighted to welcome Brenden to our office. His knowledge of the

area will certainly serve as an advantage to his home buying and selling clients,” said Jennifer A. Hicks, brokerin-charge of the Easley office.

Tiffany Clemens joins the Pleasantburg Office of C. Dan Joyner, Realtors Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, Realtors is pleased to announce that Tiffany Clemens has joined the company’s Pleasantburg office as a sales associate. Clemens is originally from Okla-

homa and is proud to call Greenville her new home. With a background in customer service, she is confident that she can meet and exceed Clemens her client’s needs. In her spare time, she enjoys spending time with friends and family, and she also volunteers at Animal Care and the Greenville Humane Society. “We are very excited for Tiffany to join our office, especially since she has continued on PAGE 26


24 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.21.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

On the market Augusta Road • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Thornblade • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

6 Stone Hollow · $699,000 · MLS# 1372002

107 Golden Wings Way · $569,000 · MLS# 1376367

52 Castellan Drive · $475,000 · MLS# 1372120

14 Greenridge Drive · $287,900 · MLS# 1371258

5BR/4.5BA Move-in ready on private lot in the Augusta Road area! Master on main with renovated bath and walk in closet. Augusta Street to Cureton Street. Turn right on Stone Hollow.

4BR/3BA Fabulous opportunity to live in sought after Thornblade community. Updated all brick home situated on lot with ample back yard. L-Thornblade Blvd. R-Father Hugo Dr. L-Golden Wings Way. On right.

4BR/3BA Wonderful French European Classic style home with amazing view! Everything you would want in a home! A Must See! Old Boiling Springs Rd, Left into subdivision, home on left

3BR/2.5BA Maintenance-free living just minutes from the heart of downtown. New quality construction and interior design detail with high end features. E North Street to Keith Drive. Right on Lowndes Hill.

Contact: Blair Miller 864-430-7708 Wilson Associates

Devenger Place • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Contact: Linda O’Brien 864-325-0495 Wilson Associates

Ricelan Springs • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

CHATELAINE • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Contact: Tim Keagy 864-905-3304 BHHS C Dan Joyner

Inglewood • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

The Cottages at Overbrook • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Contact: Nick Carlson 864-386-7704 Wilson Associates

Advertise your home with us Contact:

Caroline Spivey 864-679-1229 220 Hedgewood Ter.· $229,900 · MLS# 1374965

102 Wild Rice Drive · $227,500 · MLS# 1371320

121 Inglewood Way · $180,000 · MLS# 1375479

3BR/2.5BA Fantastic home in great area. Over 2200 SF. Level backyard. A Must See! Devenger Rd, Left on Hudson Farm, Right on Hedgewood Terrace

4BR/2.5BA Great home in awesome location! Just minutes from everywhere! Lots of upgrades throughout. Come see this home! Bridges Rd, Right into subdivision, home on right

Contact: Tim Keagy 864-905-3304 BHHS C Dan Joyner

Contact: Tim Keagy 864-905-3304 BHHS C Dan Joyner

3BR/2.5BA One level, open floor plan. Updated kitchen with granite, bamboo floors, and lots of lights. Schedule your appointment today! Pelham Road headed toward Haywood Road. Take right into Inglewood.

cspivey@communityjournals.com

Contact: Debi Garrison 864-630-8334 Wilson Associates

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09.21.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 25

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

More front-door color trends

Yikes!CALL IKE’S

Color pop: A bright-hued front door does best against a whitewashed or neutral facade. Consider: Lowe’s collegiate licensed product, CLM (as in, C-L-E-M-S-O-N) Orange.

Bright like the sun: Yellows and golds refresh and brighten dull exteriors. More muted shades can act as a neutral, but don’t be afraid to go bold. Consider: Farrow & Ball Citron No. 74.

We’re here to handle your smallest or biggest problems. 864-232-9015 ikescarpet.com 128 Poinsett Hwy., Greenville

Seeing red: Bricks, cinnamons, corals, and even rusty pinks call attention to beautiful masonry and high-end hardware. Multiple (two or three) coats add depth. Consider: Benjamin Moore Moroccan Red.

Looking for a small project with big impact? Try fresh paint on your front door by Heidi Coryell Williams There aren’t many home-improvement projects that require as little effort and deliver as much return on your time and investment as a front-door refresh. Primer (important to prevent chipping on this high-traffic touch point), a gallon of paint, plus a couple of hours of sweat equity are all any weekend warrior needs to deliver on this honey-do item. If you’re not sure what color to choose, consider going a little outside your comfort zone. Grab a pile of paint chips and tack them to your door to begin narrowing color choices. Keep in mind that the most impactful front doors are those that offer contrast to an exterior, pulling in elements of the landscape or a roof line. Once you narrow down your hue to two or three selections, it’s worth picking up some paint samples. Roll on a few stripes and see how they brighten and deepen with the daylight. Older wooden doors will need sanding and priming. Keep in mind a higher-gloss paint will do better on exterior doors, not just because it stands up to nicks and dents better but also because it highlights the architectural textures and details often inherent to front doors. A roller will give you faster, fuller coverage, but consider going over your coat with a highquality paintbrush, for a more dimensional, hand-painted look.

CARPET • RUG UPHOLSTERY CLEANING —— RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL ——

Little blue box: Best set against grays and accented with topiaries, this versatile color ranges from a masculine midnight blue to Mediterranean sky. Consider: Sherwin Williams Loch Blue 6502.

Paint like a pro

Crossword puzzle: Page 50

Apply paint and primer in a dust-free area so that no particles ruin the door surface. Remove and soak door hardware in mild soap, making sure the door is completely dry before reinstalling. Use a high-gloss paint for durability and easy, wipe-off cleaning, and select a color that lends contrast and impact for ultimate curb appeal. Sudoku puzzle: Page 50


26 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.21.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

SOLD: Greenville Transactions For the week of Aug. 20 – 24 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$21,050,000 $2,125,000 $1,975,000 $1,503,000 RIVER HOUSE CONDOS $1,500,000 $1,409,150 $890,000 $863,000 DEERLAND PLANTATION $840,000 $835,000 PARK PLACE ON HUDSON $813,041 LEDGESTONE $792,000 GREEN VALLEY ESTATES $675,000 KILGORE PLANTATION $669,000 AZALEA SPRINGS $625,000 $621,000 SPAULDING FARMS $603,150 SPAULDING FARMS $603,150 $600,000 GOWER ESTATES $595,000 GOWER ESTATES $594,992 GLEN MEADOWS $515,000 $515,000 $500,000 RIVERVIEW $487,500 COACHMAN PLANTATION $478,500 KILGORE FARMS $475,000 LAUREL LAKE $472,500 PARK PLACE ON HUDSON $472,413 ASHETON LAKES $460,000 STAFFORD GREEN $459,471 CARRONBRIDGE $452,280 GLEN MEADOWS $450,000 STAFFORD GREEN $442,710 GLEN MEADOWS $440,000 STONE LAKE HEIGHTS $428,000 $425,000 ROPER MOUNTAIN ESTATES $425,000 GREEN VALLEY ESTATES $420,000 CAROLINE COURT $412,000 $400,000 $399,000 BELL’S GRANT $392,000 CHEROKEE PARK $387,700 KNIGHTS BRIDGE $386,000 THE PRESERVE AT PARKINS MILL $382,001 BELHAVEN VILLAGE@HOLLINGSWORTH $375,600 CHANDLER LAKE $375,362 KINGS CROSSING $366,281 ROPER MOUNTAIN OFFICE PARK $365,000 THE RESERVE AT RICHGLEN $364,990 PARKERS LANDING $363,132 ASHCROFT $360,713 STONEHAVEN $360,000 LIBERTY PARK $359,000 $355,000 WEATHERSTONE $352,500 ROCKY CREEK ESTATES $350,285 ROCKBROOKE NORTH $350,000 THE LOFTS AT MILLS MILL $350,000 PARKERS LANDING $348,600 POINSETT CORNERS $345,000 CARRONBRIDGE $344,655 KILGORE FARMS $339,000 100 EAST $335,000 MARES HEAD FARM $329,548 HOLLY TRACE $329,000

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3350 RIVERWOOD PKWY STE 750 406 GEORGIA ST PO BOX 2381 3350 RIVERWOOD PKWY STE 750 154 RIVER PLACE UNIT 51 20 JERVEY RD STE 103 210 HEMINGFORD CIR 26 E EARLE ST 2395 ROPER MOUNTAIN RD 18 VICTORY AVE 100 S HUDSON ST UNIT B10 27 STILL CREEK CT 112 E ROUND HILL RD 4 KILGORE CT 11 AZALEA SPRING CT 2353 STANFORD RD 2707 N 118TH ST 524 SPAULDING LAKE DR 207 JONES AVE 1124 WEMBLEY RD 328 HENDERSON RD 605 GLEN MEADOWS DR 217 ABERDEEN DR 174 E MAIN ST STE 603 103 RAPID RIVER TRL 441 WESTERN LN 316 CARTERS CREEK CT 11 AVENS HILL DR 100 S HUDSON ST UNIT B-11 406 MOSSY LEDGE LN 305 CANNOCK PL 108 BRENNAN PL 5 BELLSPRING CT 313 CANNOCK PL 116 PINEHAVEN WAY 219 ASHFORD AVE 5 POINSETT AVE 501 MEADOWSWEET LN 114 W ROUND HILL RD 2221 MURPHY CT PO BOX 277 547 FOREST CT 315 NEWFORT PL 301 GROVE RD 208 CANDLESTON PL 1209 E WASHINGTON ST #201 110 ALISTER DR 217 TEA OLIVE PL 2 ELMWAY LN 121 VENTURE BLVD #A 300 BEVY CT 203 WALNUT HILL CT 428 CASTLEFORD L 2 TROWBRIDGE CT 25 VALERIE DR 501 SIENA DR 109 BRANDAU LN PO BOX 25938 6 REDWATER WAY 400 MILLS AVE UNIT 201 5 LAKEWAY PL 101 W COURT ST STE B 22 BRENNAN PL 224 PETERS GLENN CT 8672 W FAIRWAY WOODS DR 201 CORONET LN 154 CIRCLE SLOPE DR

AMBER OAKS FARM $326,191 KELSEY GLEN $323,500 CAMELOT $320,000 EAGLES GLEN AT KIMBRELL $317,095 WATERS RUN $311,755 COVE AT SAVANNAH POINTE $311,000 TOWNES AT THORNBLADE $310,000 PARK HILL $310,000 WEST FARM VILLAGE $310,000 VERDMONT $310,000 NEELY FARM - DEER SPRINGS $305,000 AUGUSTA HEIGHTS $305,000 AMBER OAKS FARM $300,982 MEADOW BREEZE $300,000 FIRETHORNE $296,785 NORTHWOOD $295,000 BELSHIRE $290,100 WHITEHALL PLANTATION $290,000 MEADOW POINTE $290,000 WHITEHALL PLANTATION $289,600 COTTAGES@HARRISON BRIDGE $289,000 $289,000 GRAYSON PARK $287,614 JONES MILL CROSSING $287,450 SOUTHBROOK $285,000 HAWTHORNE RIDGE $280,000 WINDY RIDGE $279,991 HOLLY HILL $279,900 TWIN CREEKS $279,000 PELHAM FALLS $275,000 $275,000 COTTAGES AT NEELY $273,000 GRAYSON PARK $272,563 BROWNSTONE MEADOWS $269,756 SPRING FOREST AT BUTLER $268,500 AVALON ESTATES $264,900 WESTVIEW $260,000 $260,000 CREEKWOOD $258,900 BRIDGEWATER $258,750 WILDAIRE ESTATES $255,000 MOSS CREEK $252,900 MORNINGSIDE ROLLING GREEN $252,000 MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS $251,090 VILLAGE MARKET EAST $250,000 REMINGTON $248,000 THE OAKS AT FOWLER $247,092 ELMWOOD HEIGHTS $245,000 ONEAL VILLAGE $243,000 $242,500 GLENS @ LEXINGTON PLACE $242,000 WOODLANDS AT WALNUT COVE $240,000 BROADMOOR $240,000 $240,000 OAKS AT GILDER CREEK FARM $240,000 $240,000 ENCLAVE AT LEXINGTON PLACE $239,900 $239,900 PLEASANT MEADOWS $237,525 HAVEN AT RIVER SHOALS $236,000 CROFTSTONE COMMONS $235,000 HERITAGE CREEK $235,000 COUNTRY MEADOWS $235,000 WALKERS CROSSING $232,000 TIMBERLAKE $227,900 ANNANDALE ESTATES $226,980 CHEVY CHASE $224,900

PRICE SELLER SK BUILDERS INC DAVIDSON ERICA G (JTWROS CAMAK MELISSA S D R HORTON INC NVR INC ABARCA JOSE D WILLIS EMILY M MCCORKLE PAGE B MUNGO HOMES INC MOORE CINDY D LAXTON MICHAEL EDDIE NOLAN JULIE SK BUILDERS INC HUDNALL JANET DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL BURKET BETH E NVR INC ROBINSON KELLY JARRETT ELLIOTT ELIZABETH N JONES DAVID T III DWELLING GROUP LLC HOLLIDAY ILSE K EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL SABAL HOMES AT JONES MIL MEADOWS KENDRA M MERITAGE HOMES OF S C IN ESSEX HOMES SOUTHEAST IN NORRIS WENDY ELIZABETH TANKSLEY BRANDY N (JTWRO BERRETH BLAKE I (JTWROS) MATTHEWS NICOLE CHANTELL TAYLOR CHRISTINE EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL KIRKLEN HOMES LLC HUMPHREY GREGORY M (JTWR LEONARD MICHAEL C WILLIAMS DONALD W CAROLINA CRAFTED CONSTRU FALLET MARCEL CUTLER MELINDA L GAFFNEY KATHRYN M STC PROPERTIES INC HUNTINGTON FOREST KAY (J NVR INC CHI-OFFICES AT VME LLC SANDERS LEAH M D R HORTON INC GARZON ANNA S WOLFF TINA M COOK WELDON RHOTEN MARIA M (JTWROS) DIPERRI CHRISTINA S (JTW TUTEN CASSY E (JTWROS) VEHAUN KARLEY ELIZABETH KEATON KIMBERLY ADKINS K4 PROPERTIES LLC REDFERN SHERRILL W HOOTMAN JAMIE MCGEE PROPERTIES OF GREE WALTZ COURTNEY WHITE ANDREW JAMES (JTWR WIEBE JOSHUA M (JTWROS) RAY AND SONS INVESTMENTS SIPPEL THOMAS BARKLEY JR SHOCKLEY DOUGLAS A (JTWR NVR INC PITMAN ARCHIE A

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522 TURNING LEAF LN 47 BARLOW CT 304 LANCELOT DR 101 NOBLE WING LN 6010 EMERALD HILL CT 15 WADMALAW CT 338 SCOTCH ROSE LN 108 AUGUSTA CT 23 GUERNSEY WAY 402 HAYWORTH DR 5 ATCHISON WAY 5 WAVERLY CT 516 TURNING LEAF LN 31 RISING MEADOW LN 129 ROSECREST LN 202 GALLIVAN ST 21 LOVVORN CT 4 WATERS REACH LN 32 COLLINS RIDGE DR 10 BRIGHTHAVEN CT 104 SUNLIT DR 5712 STATE PARK RD 254 HEARTHWOOD LN 501 CULLEDON WAY 212 SELDEN WAY 113 JONES PEAK DR 21 FOWLER OAKS LN 106 HOLLY HILL LN 14 BRENAU PL 234 ROCK RD 333 FLATROCK RD 241 EVANSDALE WAY 300 HEARTHWOOD LN 1 KIRKLEN LN 300 SPRING FOREST RD 12 BRECKENRIDGE CT 304 ANDELLA DR 34 FOX HUNT LN 4 WEYCROFT CT 1209 E WASHINGTON ST #201 7 BRIARWOOD BLVD 10 MOSS ROSE CT 11 WOODTRACE CIR 416 SANDUSKY LN 2817 WOODRUFF RD 102 CALGARY CT 8 COMMON OAKS CT 201 LEGRAND BLVD 22 KELVYN ST 510 N MAIN ST 1031 MEARES DR 248 WATERCOURSE WAY 5 SHERBROOK LN 11 GROVELAND DR 509 GRIMES DR 104 DARLINGTON AVE 6 KENTUCKY DERBY CT 2734 STANDING SPRINGS RD 117 PLEASANT MEADOW CT 260 CHESTATEE CT 4 WEDGEWATER CT 31 OPEN RANGE LN 6 MEADOW VALE CT 208 S CHANCELOR DR 17419 BLAND MILLS LN 3 FAIRMEADOW WAY 101 KEELER DR

Real Estate News cont. enthusiastically embraced our tools and training and is ready to assist clients with the latest available to help them meet their real estate goals,” said Fritzi Barbour, broker-in-charge of the Pleasantburg office.

Pelham Road office of C. Dan Joyner, Realtors welcomes Bailey Spring Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices

C. Dan Joyner, Realtors is pleased to announce that Bailey Spring has joined the company’s Pelham Road office as a sales associate. Spring Prior to joining C. Dan Joyner, Realtors, Spring taught preschool-aged students for more than three years. Originally drawn to real estate because of her love of

helping people, she looks forward to helping buyers find their dream home where they can make lifelong memories. In addition, Spring welcomes the opportunity to help her clients sell their current homes. A Greenville resident since 2014, she’s an enthusiastic member of our wonderful community. “I am delighted to welcome Bailey to our office. Her knowledge of the area will certainly serve as an

advantage to her home buying and selling clients,” said Vicki Galloway Roark, broker-in-charge of the Pelham Road office.

Wes Boyd Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Greenville Coldwell Banker Caine recently welcomed Wes Boyd as a residential sales agent to its Greenville office. As the former president of a


09.21.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 27

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

Real Estate News cont. document shredding business, Boyd had the opportunity to work closely with people and provide excellent service. Boyd Boyd’s goal is to continue going above and beyond to serve his clients as a licensed Realtor. Starting his first company at 23 years old and starting another a couple years later, Boyd values staying on the move and achieving his goals. Originally from the Asheville, North Carolina, area, he has lived in the Upstate for seven years. He and his wife have been married for 11 years and have two children. He enjoys going to the beach and being outdoors. “It is a privilege to have Wes join our team,” said Stephen Edgerton, president and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “His gogetter attitude and experience will serve him well in residential real estate.”

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OCTOBER 12, 13 & 14 Friday 10 am – 5 pm • Saturday 10 am – 5 pm • Sunday 1 pm – 5 pm at the Greenville County Museum of Art Featuring 27 dealers from across the country exhibiting the best antiques, fine and folk art, and design in the Southeast! n Meet designer and stylemaker Danielle Rollins! n $10 admission, good for all three days n To learn more, visit gcma.org/antiques n

Greenville County Museum of Art Greenville, South Carolina

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Harrison Brookie Photo by Will Crooks/Greenville Journal

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‘BEAUTIFULLY GROTESQUE’ Angel Jenkins’ art pushes boundaries, challenges viewers WORDS BY SARA PEARCE | PHOTO BY WILL CROOKS

Beautiful. Grotesque. Controversial. Uncomfortable. These are some of the words that Angel Jenkins uses to describe her work. Jenkins is one of three recipients of the 2018-19 Brandon Fellowship, a program designed to develop local emerging artists between the ages of 21 and 30 and provide them with mentorship and community within the Greenville arts scene. Jenkins, 22, is originally from Middlesboro, Kentucky. She moved to Spartanburg for her mother’s job, but also hoped to pursue her art in a bigger city. She credits her mother as her greatest inspiration. “My mother is the closest person to me,” Jenkins says. “She’s the strongest person I know. I’ve always looked up to her. She saw something in me and in my art and pushed me to keep going for it.” Jenkins, like many young artists, wasn’t quite sure how she wanted to pursue art in order to make it a career, but decided to attend Converse College and major in studio art. “It took me a while to figure out where I was going with art, and to figure out what I wanted to talk about,” Jenkins says. As a senior in college, she began thinking about how to challenge viewers to

think about what it is to sexually objectify a woman. As time went on, Jenkins noticed herself continuing to gravitate toward the female form and the mainstream idea of what a woman should look like. “I focused on the idealization of that form and eating disorders and the insecurities of women,” Jenkins says. “That’s where it started for me, because I am insecure and getting better. It was a therapeutic avenue for me to put myself in to see that I am beautiful and don’t need to look a certain way to be beautiful.” Jenkins’ art tries to push boundaries and make viewers question why they react the way that they do. Some of her morecontroversial early work entailed taking pornographic images, cutting them up, and printing them in CMYK (an acronym for cyan, magenta, yellow and black — the four inks used in color printing). She then screen-printed them on a mirror. “I wanted to immerse the viewer and allow them to be a part of the image to create conversation,” Jenkins says. “It makes the viewer ask ‘why am I looking at this?’ and ‘should I be looking at this?’ It can make the viewer uncomfortable or bring pleasure, but it makes them question why they feel they do.”

Jenkins describes her work as “beautifully grotesque.” “There is a beautiful aspect that draws the viewer in, but also that grotesque side that shows different parts of the female form mashed together in a way that they

Jenkins looks forward to the experience she will gain as a Brandon Fellow. “I want to get involved in the community more and meet other artists,” she says. “I want to work toward getting my work known. The Brandon Fellowship will open

“There is a beautiful aspect that draws the viewer in, but also that grotesque side…” Angel Jenkins

shouldn’t be,” Jenkins says. “It is meant to make the viewer think. I push those pornographic images together to create this uneasy feeling in the viewer.” Jenkins isn’t entirely sure what the future holds, but knows that it will include pursuing her career in art. As a Brandon Fellow, she is looking forward to the challenges she is presented with and knows she will have to work to make her pieces subtler so that they can be viewed and appreciated by all audiences.

doors for me in terms of that, but also to open my mind to create new work for a new audience.” She hopes to get her Master of Fine Arts degree in the future and continue to create art that challenges her audience to look back at themselves as well as society as a whole. “Though I like the more explicit and controversial things, the Brandon Fellowship is a way to challenge me to come up with a different way to express that concept to reach a broader audience,” Jenkins says.


MAKE GCCA YOUR FIRST STOP, FIRST FRIDAYS.

FRIday, OCT 05 6–9pm EXHIBIT OPENING AT GREENVILLE CENTER FOR CREATIVE ARTS SPONSORED BY

MAIN GALLERY: Textiles, A History of Expression Featuring the work of Alice Schlein, Sasha de Koninck, Beth Andrews, Kristy Bishop, and Meredith Piper and Last Words by Susan Lenz

FRIday, NOV 02 6–9pm EXHIBITS MAIN GALLERY: Textiles, A History of Expression (through November 28) COMMUNITY GALLERY: Opening of new work by local artists

UPCOMING EVENTS OCTOBER Contemporary Print Collective Print Fair Fri., Oct. 26, 5:30pm–9pm, Sat., Oct. 27, 10am–6pm, Sun., Oct. 28, 12pm–5pm. NOVEMBER ARTalk: Moody Black, “Textile Child” Tues., Nov. 13, 6–7pm. MAC Open Studios Nov. 10 & 11

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32 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.21.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

GREENVILLE SHOWCASE Centre Stage announces first Cabaret Benefit Series, supports arts accessibility MELODY WRIGHT | STAFF

mwright@communityjournals.com

The lineup for Centre Stage’s 2018-19 Cabaret Benefit Series features children’s music, Broadway show tunes, Christmas classics, big-band music, and feel-good summer hits. Showcasing Greenville’s talented actors and vocalists, each standalone event is a one- or two-night-only fundraising performance. “This series was designed to entertain and dazzle while all supporting wonderful causes,” Taylor Marlatt, series director, says. “All proceeds from the Cabaret Benefit Series will support Centre Stage’s outreach programs and operating expenses. Not only will audiences experience an incredible concert event, but they will ensure the arts are accessible to all in our community through our outreach programs.” With each piece chosen to reach a di-

verse audience, the cabaret series will be enjoyable for a variety of music lovers, Marlatt says. The Cabaret Benefit Series was created in response to Centre Stage’s first cabaret, “A Christmas Cabaret,” as an end-of-theyear fundraiser in 2017. “Audiences loved that all the songs were crowd-pleasers and the level of talent was top-notch,” Marlatt says. “We realized we could expand upon that show and use these wonderful performances as fundraisers for the season and are excited to produce an entire series in 2018-19.” All tickets are $50 and include appetizers and desserts from Upstate restaurants, as well as wine and champagne at intermission. “Bippity Boppity Boo” has special pricing of $42 for adults and $35 for children 12 and younger. Tickets can be purchased online at centrestage.org. Here’s the series lineup.

Bluegrass & Big Band Chuck Nation Bluegrass Band joins the Chorale to present, “Come Away to the Skies: A High Lonesome Mass,” by Wes Ramsay & Tim Sharp. Along with the Greenville Jazz Collective, the Chorale will feature three “Sacred Concerts” composed by jazz great Duke Ellington combining big band jazz sounds with sacred texts.

Saturday October 20 8:00 PM TICKETS:

864-467-3000 Pre-concert talk with Paul Hyde • 7pm Peace Center Concert Hall Lobby

Dr. & Mrs. Douglas Kennemore

‘Bippity Boppity Boo: A Princess & Villains Party’ 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Oct. 6  Children of all ages can enjoy fairy-tale classics like “Someday My Prince Will Come,” “When You Wish Upon a Star,” “A Whole New World,” “Poor Unfortunate Souls,” and “Let it Go” at the magical party. All princesses and villains can dress up as their favorite characters for a day of treats, goodies, pictures with favorite characters, and a musical singalong performance.  ‘A Christmas Carol: ON AIR,’ 7 p.m. Dec. 18  Attendees will be transported back to the golden age of radio — the 1940s. Fe a t u r i n g holiday musical performances, the radio show version of Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol” brings holiday cheer to Greenville. Featured vocalists and an ensemble of local performers give life to holidays past, present, and future. ‘Sinatra,’ 7 p.m. Feb. 12-13 Guests can celebrate the month of love with crooner Frank Sinatra’s classic romantic songs. Dave Halston will bring Sina-

tra back to the stage for this tribute performance. Ol’ Blue Eyes’ songs will set the stage for Valentine’s Day week. ‘Showstoppers: An Evening of Broadway Hits,’ 7 p.m. April 9-10  Past and present Broadway favorites will be performed by some of Greenville’s top vocal talents for a powerful concert. Featuring classics from “Phantom of the Opera,” “Les Miserables,” “Waitress,” “Wicked,” “Guys and Dolls,” and “Chicago,” the event won’t disappoint.  ‘Summer Lovin’: the Hottest Concert Event of the Summer,’ 7 p.m. July 30-31 Participants are invited to some summer fun with show tunes and songs such as “Heat W a v e , ” “ H e r e Comes the Sun,” “Summertime,” “Soak Up the Sun,” “Surfin’ U.S.A.,” “You Are My Sunshine,” and “Grease” classic “Summer Nights.” The summery event will help you beat the heat while keeping it cool.


MAC invites you to

GET CARDED

for buy-one-get-one-free tickets to the best shows in town.

SC Children’s Theatre

With a donation of $50+ to the Metropolitan Arts Council you will receive an ArtCard entitling you to buy-one-get-one free tickets for one show at each of the following venues. Valid for one full year!

*select shows only

Get your ArtCard today:

16 Augusta Street | Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 467-3132 | greenvilleARTS.com/donate @MACartscouncil | #GVLarts


34 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.21.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

BACKSTAGE WORDS BY SARA PEARCE PHOTO BY WILL CROOKS

Q&A

WITH HARRISON BROOKIE, ALCHEMY COMEDY THEATER FOUNDER

Harrison Brookie, founder and current executive director of Greenville’s Alchemy Comedy Theater, was hooked on comedy right away. He has been involved in comedy since 2004 and has played an integral role in the growth of Greenville’s comedy scene over the years. He now oversees and performs with eight shows at Alchemy Comedy Theater each week, and they are gearing up for the fifth annual New South Comedy Festival in November. Catch Brookie serving up laughs at Coffee Underground every week. When did you first become involved in comedy, and when did you know this was something you wanted to do long term? Like improv itself, I kind of stumbled into it. After being cast in my college team at Clemson University, I knew almost immediately this would be something I’d do for a long time. Don’t believe me? Sign up for an Improv 101 class and catch the bug! You’ll find we are building a supportive community built on doing something seriously funny.

What has been your most challenging show or scene and why? After almost a decade and a half, it’s hard to remember any one single scene. I have a distinct memory of accidentally slapping a fellow cast member on stage. The rest of the group supported the idea so hard we all ended up slapping each other silly. Now that I think about it, it was more fun than challenging.

What has been your most enjoyable project or performance and why? My greatest job in Alchemy has been seeing the leadership and talent drawn to the theater. There have been so many amazing folks taking over as executive producer, ar-

tistic director, house manager, coaching. The theater has grown way beyond what one person can oversee. My favorite experience is to walk into the theater, being greeted by staff I didn’t know were scheduled, to see a hilarious show I didn’t create.

What is your favorite sketch? In addition to our weekly improv comedy shows, we also produce seasonal scripted sketch comedy shows. One of my favorite sketches I’ve ever written was entitled “Might Morphin Power Racists.” Any attempt to describe it here would not do it justice. Just take my word for it that it brought down both systematic racism against oppressed minorities and live-action space ninjas from the 1990s.

Which comedians inspire you? Can I say my kids? I’ve got three and one on the way. My goal isn’t to make them funny; it’s just to keep them that way.

What do you most enjoy about Greenville’s comedy scene? I’d bet Greenville has more live comedy shows and classes per capita than any city of comparable size. Our bustling downtown draws in so many great audiences looking to laugh. I freaking love this town.

How has Greenville’s comedy scene changed since you first became involved? Audience numbers have not only increased, but so has their comedy palette. Our first year was spent educating our patrons on just what improv is exactly. Now folks come into our little underground theater ready for anything and everything. Our theater has gone from a plucky four performers to over 80 in just seven years. But I won’t be happy until everyone is doing improv. Yes, that means you, too.


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36 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.21.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

She Returns From War’s latest album features dreamy pop, wistful balladry VINCENT HARRIS | ARTS & CULTURE WRITER

vharris@communityjournals.com

The first album from Charleston’s She Returns From War, the musical vehicle for singer-songwriter Hunter Park, 2015’s “Oh What a Love,” was 10 songs of ragged, raw country-rock led by Park’s propulsive acoustic rhythm guitar and her reedy, almost childlike voice. Park’s way with a melody was immediately apparent, and her rootsy approach was appealing to anyone who liked the rough-hewn, folkier moments of bands like Drivin’ N Cryin’ or Drive-By Truckers. It made Park and her band a hot property on the regional music scene, with the Charleston City Paper calling it a “cosmic Americana treasure” and Connect Savannah hailing her “dreamy, rootsy blend of language and melody.” But the band’s new album, “Mirrored Moon Dance Hall,” is light years beyond even that strong debut. Working with producer Wolfgang Zimmerman and musicians from other Charleston bands like Susto, The Artisanals, and Brave Baby, Park has created a kaleidoscopic collection of songs, working in barbed-wire elec-

tric guitars (“Psychic Voyage”), sweeping string arrangements (“Athena”), dreamy, multilayered guitar pop (“Dream Machine”), and twilit, wistful balladry (“Farther”). Lyrically, Park has created a loosely defined concept album about the depression, confusion, and difficulty of being a young transgender person in the South, something she’s intimately familiar with. It’s quite a musical leap from the band’s first album, and it was also supposed to be out early this year; then it was supposed to come out in May. It’s finally being selfreleased by the band on Friday. There are various reasons for the delay, but the biggest factor, Park admits, was that she wanted to make sure the timing felt right. “It’s been pushed back several times because we wanted to make sure we were doing it the right way,” she says. “And we were looking for the right way to release it. We were shooting for early 2018, and then it got pushed back to May, then September, and finally my drummer, JP Chapa, said, ‘Let’s just set the date and roll with it.’ And I’m glad that he did that, because I get too in my own head sometimes and

She Returns From War will perform at the Radio Room Sept. 26. Photo provided

All Adoptions think I’m not ready to release it for one reason or another.” Ultimately, Park calls self-releasing the album rather than looking for a record label “the best decision we could make,” and says she’s very proud of the finished product. “I was able to expand things sonically, and dive deeper into my approach,” she says. “I think the album is something I’m really happy with, so in the end it was all worth it.” Park credits Zimmerman, and the extended recording schedule, with allowing her to make “Mirrored Moon Dance Hall” exactly what she wanted it to be. “Wolfgang is an incredible person,” she says. “We didn’t say no to anything, we didn’t shut anything down. We worked together really well because I respected where he was coming from and he respected where I was coming from. Our personalities are very different, but there was a sort of Zen in that. We were able to balance each other out. And it wasn’t like the first album, where we had to record it in a week.”

Park has also become more comfortable with talking about her experience being transgender in the South, a topic that comes up often in interviews and one that, in the past, she was happier speaking about musically than in the press. “It was a struggle to talk publicly about that stuff at first, but eventually I was just able to accept it because I felt like I worked as hard as I could on a piece of art, and a lot of my experiences are written about and spoken about on this album,” she says. “It’s one of those things where I have to own it because it’s part of my life, and explaining my life to people helps support the art.”

SHE RETURNS FROM WAR WITH GRACE JOYNER, MOURNING DOVE, AND VILAI HARRINGTON & THE HAMPTONES

WHERE Radio Room, 110 Poinsett Highway WHEN Wednesday, Sept. 26, 7 p.m. TICKETS $8 INFO 864-609-4441, www.radioroomgreenville.com


09.21.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 37

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

Greenville Record Fair focuses on love of music, renewed popularity of vinyl vharris@communityjournals.com

Last June, Rolling Stone magazine published a story pronouncing both compact discs and downloads dead, espousing both streaming and the vinyl LP as the current — and future — musical-delivery methods of choice. No less an authority than Jack White, former White Stripes singer-songwriterguitarist and founder of the thriving independent label Third Man Records, said, “I definitely believe the next decade is going to be streaming plus vinyl — streaming in the car and kitchen, vinyl in the living room and the den. Those will be the two formats. And I feel really good about that.” This news didn’t come as a surprise to Gene Berger, owner of the downtown independent record store Horizon Records. The store has been open for 43 years, and while Berger still sells CDs, vinyl LPs have been the backbone of his business for most of the past decade. In fact, the resurgence in the sales of new and used vinyl — not to mention record players — kept Horizon afloat during some lean years after the 2008 financial crash. “I wasn’t even sure we’d be able to stay open,” Berger says. “What the financial crisis didn’t clobber, the internet did. But vinyl became insanely popular again at a level I could never have predicted, and it continues to be so. In fact, we just expanded the racks because we keep getting more and more records.” Berger thinks the renewed popularity of vinyl — and of his store’s fortunes — comes at least partially from a pushback against the impersonal nature of down-

loads and internet shopping in general. “There’s this resistance to that internet world and an openness to this experience of shopping with a passionate and knowledgeable retailer,” he says. “And I like to think we’re one of those.” Perhaps the Greenville Record Fair is an outgrowth of that passion. For the past decade or so, Berger has brought a few dozen vinyl vendors to town with boxes and crates full of new, used, and collectible records and let Greenville’s record collectors loose to roam through the stacks. This year’s Greenville Record Fair kicks off at 10 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 22, at the Sears Recreation Center at McPherson Park. There will be 40 vendors at the fair, including Horizon and the nearby Cabin Floor Records. “It’s kind of a branding thing and a focus on Horizon, even as it’s a big sale with all of these dealers,” Berger says. “But I also think it tends to build community. We like doing it, and we keep it really simple. It’s always within a block of the store, and we only do it once a year. “And sometimes at 6:30 a.m. on a Saturday when I’m there setting it up, I wonder why I’m even doing that,” Berger says with a laugh. Yes, it’s an opportunity for Horizon to make a splash, but Berger also says it’s a chance for people who love records and music to get together and share their knowledge. “It’s 40 tables of dealers from all over the Southeast, from Maryland and Virginia down to Atlanta,” he says. “Some of them do it every weekend, and others are

Local DJ Tavo Ramirez shops during the 2015 Greenville Record Fair. Photo by Wes Gilliam.

THE 2018 GREENVILLE RECORD FAIR WHERE Sears Recreation Center, McPherson Park, 120 E. Park Ave. WHEN Saturday, Sept. 22, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. TICKETS Admission is free INFO 864-235-7922, www.horizonrecords.net

just weekend warriors. You’ll have everything from trash-and-treasure, jockey-lot type stuff to very pricey, rare collectibles that you’d never have a chance to see. But the main thing is that you get to look at the cover art and talk to the dealer about it. There’s a lot of knowledge that floats through here. I don’t think there’s such a thing as a Ph.D. in record collecting, but a lot of these guys are very knowledgeable.” While people are digging through the crates at the Sears Recreation Center, Ho-

rizon will have a storewide sale going on, with a little extra incentive to drop by: an in-store performance by Athens, Georgia, singer-songwriter Michelle Malone and her band at 2 p.m. “I remember the day in 1988 when Michelle shuffled up to the counter in a black leather jacket and worn-out cowboy boots and consigned her first record (“New Experience”) to Horizon,” Berger says. “She can rock, she’s an incredible guitar player, and we’ve become friends over the years.”

A GUT-BUSTING HIT!” “

PHOTOS BY MATTHEW MURPHY

VINCENT HARRIS | ARTS & CULTURE WRITER

“HILARIOUS! NONSTOP PANDEMONIUM.”

OCTOBER 2-7

MICHELLE MALONE WHERE Horizon Records/The Bohemian Cafe, 2 Stone Ave. WHEN Saturday, Sept. 22, 2 p.m. INFO 864-235-7922, www.horizonrecords.net

GROUPS (15+)


38 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.21.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Godsmack, Shinedown bring joint summer tour to Greenville VINCENT HARRIS | ARTS & CULTURE WRITER

vharris@communityjournals.com

Between the two bands, Godsmack and Shinedown have sold around 30 million albums worldwide, so it was reasonable to assume that their joint summer tour would be successful. But neither band expected that the tour, which will make a stop at the Bon Secours Wellness Arena on Friday, would be one of the biggest events of the summer, routinely packing 15,000-20,000-seat arenas to capacity. In fact, the co-headlining jaunt has been so successful that it’s original end date of Sept. 2 vanished almost immediately, with dates being added into October. Sure, both bands have had big radio hits with their respective styles. Godsmack’s ominous, Tool-style metal has helped them place six songs at the top of the modern-rock charts, including “Awake,” “Voodoo,” “Straight Out of Line,” and “I Stand Alone,” and they’ve also won four Grammy awards. Shinedown has taken more mainstream, anthemic hard rock to the No. 1 spot 12 times with songs such as “Save Me,” “Devour,” “Second Chance,” and “Sound Of Madness,” trailing only Van Halen and Three Days Grace in total No. 1 hits. But as tickets for their summer tour went on sale earlier this year, neither band was prepared for the response the shows got. “Before we even got to town, we’d look at the percentage of tickers that had been sold, and we were all in shock,” says Godsmack drummer Shannon Larkin. “When we started to see the numbers, we went to Shinedown and said, ‘Oh my god, guys we think we have something special here.’ And it elevated the mood of the whole tour.” “The fans have been really digging it, and we couldn’t be happier with it,” says Shinedown’s Eric Bass, who, appropriately enough, plays bass. “Honestly, we’re

humbled by it. You never go into anything with expectations like that; we just work hard and keep our heads down.” The tour has essentially brought Godsmack and Shinedown full circle, because once upon at time more than a decade ago, the two bands toured in a different situation. “I think it was 15 years ago when the first Shinedown record came out and no one really knew who they were,” Larkin says. “But we thought they were great, so we chose them to open for us. And we’ve watched them have this meteoric rise. We’ve been so proud of them; we feel like their big brothers. To see them come up and have this co-headlining status with us has been just awesome.” Both bands have new albums out; Shinedown’s “Attention, Attention” was released in May and Godsmack’s “When Legends Rise” came out in April. And perhaps one of the reasons these two multiplatinum acts were somewhat surprised by the tour’s success is that their new music changes things up quite a bit. For the first time, Shinedown looked inward for a producer, putting Bass be-

hind the board the entire project. The result was a darker, more conceptual piece than anything the band had done before, centering around Bass and singer Brent Smith’s battles with depression and substance abuse. “We wanted to talk about the journey we’ve been on through our music,” Bass says. “Each song is like a chapter in a book. And I felt like I had my finger on the pulse of this record; I knew what it wanted to be, It just called out to me, and I had to tell the band that I knew how it would fit together. I think it’s the greatest record we’ve ever made.” Godsmack’s new album is in some ways a step in the opposite direction from Shinedown’s. “When Legends Rise” is far more polished and melodic than anything they’ve done before, and it features a couple of firsts for the band: They used outside songwriting collaborators for the first time, and they recorded their first ballad, the piano-based “Under Your Scars.” “I think that (singer-songwriter-guitarist) Sully Erna came up with the idea for this album because we’d all turned 50,” Larkin says. “He wanted to use different

In this day and age, we think that connecting with someone is sending them a text or liking a post on social media. But we don’t want to just make a connection; we want to be part of the connection. TOGETHER WE CAN BE PART OF THE CONNECTION.

producers and make the production not quite as heavy, trying to make it where we could perform these songs onstage at 50plus years old and not feel like we’re actors up there trying to pretend we’re 25.” Judging by the response to their tour, though, neither band’s fanbase seems put off by the changes. “We tried things in the studio we’ve never done, so there were doubts that crept into our minds about whether or not it was going to be successful,” Larkin says. “How is our fanbase is going to take it? Are they going to buy tickets? We were climbing the walls with apprehension. But this just proves to me that there will always be people who want to go see our rock ’n’ roll live.”

GODSMACK AND SHINEDOWN WHERE Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N. Academy St. WHEN 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 21 TICKET $45.50-$65.50 INFO 864-241-3800, www.bonsecoursarena.com

Many thanks to our donors and blood drive sponsors who responded with tremendous outpouring ahead of Hurricane Florrence.


09.21.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 39

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All-Bernstein program spotlights electrifying music Paul’s pick of the week: The Greenville Symphony Orchestra’s big season opener, “Happy Birthday, Bernstein!”

A R T S C A LE N DA R

WHY GO The Greenville Symphony pays tribute to composer Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990), spotlighting electrifying music from “West Side Story,” “Candide,” “Age of Anxiety,” and other works.

10th Anniversary Celebration

PAUL HYDE | CONTRIBUTOR

This is the music of the American soul — big, brash, restless, vitally alive. “He is No. 1 of all American composers,” Edvard Tchivzhel, music director of the Greenville Symphony, said of Bernstein. “If he didn’t do anything else than write ‘West Side Story,’ he’d still be considered a genius. It’s a masterpiece.” The orchestra will take two bites of that particular apple, performing the Overture to “West Side Story” and the Symphonic Dances from “West Side Story.” Also featured will be the effervescent “Candide” Overture, the irrepressibly jazzy “Divertimento” and the thought-provoking Symphony No. 2 (“Age of Anxiety”) — the latter a portrait of the uneasy post-World War II world. “We’ve put together an Edvard Tchivzhel accessible program that presents different sides of Bernstein’s genius,” Tchivzhel said. Yun-Chin Zhou is the featured pianist in “Age of Anxiety.” What to listen for: Classical musicians turning into a roaring jazz orchestra and shouting “Mambo!” (like combative Jets and Sharks) twice during the Symphonic Dances. Bernstein’s music juxtaposes heartbreakingly beautiful ballads with powerful themes that capture the manic energy of the teeming metropolis. What makes this unique: An orchestra rarely devotes an entire concert to music by one composer, but orchestras around the world have been recognizing Bernstein’s centenary. This concert is Greenville’s contribution to those international celebrations. Fun facts: “West Side Story” was inspired by Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet.” Originally, it was the story of a Jew and a Catholic falling in love. Later the

story became one of ethnic conflict among Puerto Ricans and Anglos in New York City. Original title: “Gangway.” Then it was renamed “East Side Story.” Finally, it acquired the name “West Side Story.” The Greenville Journal recently caught up with Tchivzhel, the orchestra’s longtime music director, to talk about this opening program of the symphony’s 71st season. The Journal: You’ve called Bernstein America’s No. 1 composer. What do you love about him? Edvard Tchivzhel: He did everything. He was a composer, conductor, educator, and an all-around showman. He was an accomplished pianist as well, a virtuoso. I don’t know who to compare him to because to do only one of these things well would take a lifetime. It takes time to appreciate all sides of his genius. The Journal: What’s your assessment of Bernstein the composer? Tchivzhel: He had such energy. I don’t know how he was so productive, how it was possible. I would compare his productivity to Mozart, who wrote so many pieces. Maybe if Bernstein had not worked at such an exhausting pace, he would still be with us today. The Journal: Did you ever see Bernstein conduct? Tchivzhel: In 1959, when I was a schoolboy in Leningrad, my parents took me to see him conduct the New York Philharmonic in the Great Hall, where I would conduct an orchestra myself many years later. The Cold War was in full force. He conducted and was soloist in Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue,” and it was amazing to see a classical conductor play this jazzy piece. The Journal: How did that go over with Soviet censors? Tchivzhel: Jazz was considered the art of the capitalistic, spoiled, decadent West. It was music that you could find on the black

SEP T. 21-27 Main Street Friday

Soul Intent Sep. 21 ~ 232-2273 10 Central Avenue Studios Sep. 22 ~ 360-0301 The Warehouse Theatre

Rocky Horror Picture Show Through Sep. 22 ~ 235-6948 Greenville Symphony Orchestra

Happy Birthday, Bernstein! Sep. 22-23 ~ 467-3000 Carolina Music Museum

Fabio Parrini & Louise Dubin Sep. 23 ~ 520-8807 SC Children’s Theatre

Shrek the Musical Through Sep. 23 ~ 467-3000

The Greenville Symphony Orchestra pays tribute to Leonard Bernstein in its season opener. Photo by Paul de Hueck, courtesy the Leonard Bernstein Office, Inc.

market. The government was very unhappy because here was an American trying to teach Russian audiences what to think. (Laughs) But they had to endure his appearance with the New York Philharmonic because it was part of a cultural exchange. The Journal: What do you remember about his conducting style? Tchivzhel: He was a dynamic conductor. Every second he enjoyed music-making. He made everyone enjoy it, as well. In that time in Russia, nobody moved that way. He is still my No. 1 favorite conductor because of his communication with the orchestra and his emotional involvement.

Emrys Reading Room

Thomas McConnell Sep. 24 ~ 616-6630 Greenville Center for Creative Arts

Member Show Through Sep. 26 ~ 735-3948 Artist Guild Gallery of Greenville

Paintings by Bob Santanello Through Sep. 30 ~ 239-3882 Greenville Little Theatre

Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Through Sep. 30 ~ 233-6238 Main Street Real Estate Gallery

Works by Kate Furman Through Sep. 30 ~ 250-2850 Greenville Chamber of Commerce

Works by Sarah Farrar & Lu Wixon Through Oct. 5 ~ 242-1050 Metro Arts. Council @ Centre Stage

Paul Hyde, a veteran Upstate journalist, will present a free preconcert talk one hour before the “Happy Birthday, Bernstein!” concerts at the Peace Center. Follow Paul on Facebook and Twitter: @PaulHyde7.

Works by Shannon & Steve Dudar Through Oct. 5 ~ 233-6733 Centre Stage

Dreamgirls Through Oct. 6 ~ 233-6733 Metropolitan Arts Council

Works by Aldo Muzzarelli & Yelitza Diaz

GREENVILLE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: “HAPPY BIRTHDAY, BERNSTEIN!” EDVARD TCHIVZHEL, CONDUCTOR; YUN-CHIN ZHOU, PIANIST

WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday; 3 p.m. Sunday (free preconcert talk by the Journal’s Paul Hyde, one hour before performance) WHERE Peace Center TICKETS $19 to $75 INFO 864-367-3000 or www.peacecenter.org

Through Oct. 19 ~ 467-3132 SC Children’s Theatre

The Teddy Bears’ Picnic Through Nov 20 ~ 235-2885 Greenville County Museum of Art

Bob Jones Museum Highlights Through Dec. 30 ~ 271-7570

Andrew Wyeth Watercolors Through Jan. 13 ~ 271-7570

Keeping our ARTbeat strong w w w.greenvillearts.com

16 Augusta Street

864. 467.3132


feast

SUNDAY SUPPER

Fifth annual Mill Village Farms Sunday Supper benefits at-risk youth WORDS BY ARIEL TURNER | PHOTO BY WILL CROOKS Chefs Robert Simms and Chris Gibson of Tupelo Honey Greenville plan to serve a version of this panseared coastal filet of fish “blackened style” over Carolina dirty rice for the dinner’s third course.

It’s not always just about the food. While guests of the fifth annual Mill Village Farms Sunday Supper will dine on some of the best culinary offerings in the Upstate, about 50 at-risk youth currently employed by the nonprofit farm operation stand to benefit from the annual fundraiser. “The Sunday Supper is incredibly important by providing financial support for Mill Village Farms and our youth-employment programs,” says Dan Weidenbenner, executive director of Mill Community Ministries. “Funds raised help Mill Village Farms empower and employ at-risk youth to learn valuable skills for a prosperous transition into adulthood. Youth at Mill Village Farms benefit by receiving mentoring (and) classroom and handson experiences to learn career, personal finance, and wellness skills. Youth are also employed to serve their community 40 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.21.2018

by growing and distributing fresh and healthy fruit and vegetables.” This local farm-to-fork experience in the style of the James Beard Sunday Suppers will be held from 6-9 p.m. Oct. 28, and feature chef Joe Trull from Grits & Groceries, chef Jeff Kelly from Stella’s Southern Brasserie, chef Alex Castro from Larkin’s on the River, and chefs Robert Simms and Chris Gibson of Tupelo Honey Greenville. The venue, Larkin’s Catering & Events’ newly opened “L” at 211 E. Broad St., will be transformed into a lush garden party experience with live entertainment, auction, and locally sourced cuisine with cocktail and wine pairings by Larkin’s sommelier Bruce Wise. Mill Village Farms, a 501(c)(3) part of Mill Community Ministries, began in the spring of 2012 with an urban farm model targeting mill-village communities desig-

nated by the federal Department of Agriculture as food deserts. Their concept is simple: build small, sustainable, organically managed farms that promote holistic development in local communities. The nonprofit includes the Sullivan Street Farm at 28 Bolt St.; Serenity Farm on Saluda Dam Road which includes a more-than half-acre garden, free-range chickens, rabbits, goats, ducks, and sheep; their largest farm to date, Minnie Farm at 8 Boling Road; and a new produce cart set up on the corner of Richardson Street and McBee Avenue in downtown Greenville. This year, the farms will employ about 50 at-risk youth from the surrounding communities, and the Sunday Supper benefit makes that possible. “The funds will help support both garden and youth-employment stipends,” Weidenbenner says. “One example is

funds will be raised to help provide employment stipends for at-risk youth to have a first-time paid job opportunity with Mill Village Farms.” To create an event truly showcasing what Mill Village Farms provides, some of the current youth employees will work the event while a few others have gone on to work for the restaurants represented. Additionally, the farms will supply as much of the ingredients for the dinner as possible.

FIFTH ANNUAL MILL VILLAGE FARMS SUNDAY SUPPER WHEN 6-9 p.m. Oct. 28 WHERE Larkin’s “L” Venue, 211 E. Broad St. TICKETS $125, www.millvillagefarms.org/sundaysupper

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM


feast

small plates FOOD NEWS & EVENTS BY ARIEL TURNER

Congratulations!

Richard Hardaway Richard won a $300 gift package from Mary Kay provided by Linda Cely, Mary Kay Beauty Consultant.

Pictured are weekly SuperRaffle Winner Richard Hardaway and Rotary Club President Randy Vogenberg.

The Farehouse opens The Farehouse from chef Michael Marut and his team opens officially this Friday, Sept. 21, in Taylors Mill. The restaurant held a soft opening of sorts over the weekend during Indie Craft Parade, serving pizza and smoked pork sandwiches to hungry shoppers. The full menu rolls out on Friday, though, after the staff has had a few more days in the kitchen. It includes beer cheese dip with pretzels (beer from neighbor 13 Stripes Brewery), smoked trout dip, ricotta dip made with house-made ricotta, a Reuben with house-made sauerkraut, grilled pimento cheese with applewood smoked bacon, New York-style pizza on dough using spent grains from 13 Stripes, house-made cauliflower pizza crust for the gluten-conscious, custom pasta bowls, smoked pork, and weekly specials using local farms’ products. The private wine room is the crown jewel, but the bar itself is also a thing of beauty. The leatherbound post-Prohibition cocktail book Marut discovered when going through his deceased father’s bar has provided the inspiration for the spirits menu.

North Greenville Rotary Club

E L F F A R R E P 2018 SU P U R C H A S E YO U R T I C K E T AT

www.RotaryRaffle.org

.

And so does Foxcroft Wine Foxcroft Wine Co., has postponed its grand opening — but just for one day — until Sept. 22. The wine bar from Charlotte, North Carolina, that’s been under construction at 631 S. Main St. in the former Brazwells space for several months will be a welcome addition to our growing West End food options.

SOOOOOIE For all you barbecue fans, Mauldin’s annual Mauldin BBQ Cook-off features more than 25 cookers from all over the Southeast, competing to bring the best barbecue to Mauldin. The festival opens Friday night, Sept. 21, at Mauldin Cultural Center, 101 E. Butler Road, Mauldin, with the Anything Butt competition, where participating cookers serve anything but their barbecue to pique your taste buds. Saturday features the main event, a barbecue cook-off competition with a panel of certified ’cue tasters from the South Carolina Barbeque Association. The public will also have a chance to cast their vote for the best barbecue and the winner of the People’s Choice Award. Visit mauldinbbq.com for more info.

Growltemberfest The Southern Growl Oktoberfest, noon-11 p.m. Sept. 22, will feature 10plus Oktoberfest beers, 10-plus pumpkin beers, more special beers, a German food menu, live music, and an outdoor beer garden. The taproom and restaurant is located at 6 S. Buncombe Road in Greer.

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

09.21.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 41


42 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.21.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

AROUND TOWN THRU SUN

23

FARM - TO FORK FUNDRAISER

OCT. 28 - 2018 DOWNTOWN GVILLE

LARKIN’S L VENUE INFO & TIX AT: MILLVILLAGEFARMS.ORG/SUNDAYSUPPER

YOUR ADVENTURE STARTS RIGHT WHERE YOU ARE TIGERVILLE • GREER • ONLINE

LEARN MORE AT NGU.EDU

OPEN HOUSE

SEPT. 29, 2018 • NOV. 9, 2018 NGU.EDU/OPENHOUSE

PERFORMING ARTS

‘Shrek The Musical’

South Carolina Children’s Theatre Peace Center Gunter Theatre 300 S. Main St. | Adult: $28; child: $19 schedule varies, see website for dates and times Everyone’s favorite ogre is back in this hilarious stage spectacle based on the Oscar-winning smash-hit film. Tony Award-winning “Shrek The Musical” brings all the beloved characters from the film to life on stage and proves there’s more to the story than meets the ears. This event is most enjoyed by ages 4 and up. www.scchildrenstheatre.org THRU FRI

VISUAL ARTS

THRU SUN

PERFORMING ARTS

28

Simple Machines’

Furman University’s Thompson Art Gallery | Roe Art Building 3300 Poinsett Hwy. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. | FREE Furman University Department of Art presents “Simple Machines,” an exhibition of ceramics by Matthew Wilt. His work is inspired by historical ceramics as well as the flotsam and jetsam of contemporary culture. 864-294-2995 | www.bit.ly/2MC3vxH

30

‘Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat’

Greenville Little Theatre 444 College St. | times vary Adults: $35; seniors: $33; juniors: $25 “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat” will open the 2018-19 season of Maximum Greenville

Little Theatre. The full-length musical is a reimagining of the Biblical story of young Joseph, sold into slavery by his brothers after his father favored him with a gorgeous colored cloak. With a mix of music and dancing from ’50s rock to calypso to country, this show is hailed for its family-friendly storyline, universal themes, and unforgettable music. 864-233-6238 www.greenvillelittletheatre.org PERFORMING ARTS

‘Dreamgirls’

Centre Stage | 501 River St. 8-10:30 p.m. | Thursday-Sunday | $22-$35 This hit Broadway musical follows three hopeful young singers plunged into the marvelous and merciless world of the music industry after getting their big break at an amateur competition. When ambitious manager Curtis Taylor Jr. spots The Dreamettes at a talent show, he offers the chance of a lifetime: to be backup singers for national star Jimmy Early. Featuring hit songs like “I Am Changing” and “And I Am Telling You I’m Not Going,” “Dreamgirls” tells the story of breaking down barriers and the power of music. 864-233-6733 | www.centrestage.org COMMUNITY

Greater Greenville Master Gardener Association grants program

Greater Greenville Master Gardener Association FREE The 2018-19 GGMGA Community Grants Program Committee is looking to provide fund-


You’re invited to

Community Fest @ Greenville Tech Saturday, October 6 • 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Bring your whole family to this fun day of learning through hands-on activities and demonstration booths on our Barton Campus! Our community partners and several local major employers will be on campus. Local food truck concessions will be available for purchase. First 1,000 attendees will receive free GTC gift bags! RSVP today! Activities and demonstrations will include • 3D Printing • EMT Ambulance Simulator • Learn & Practice CPR • Arts & Crafts • Culinary Demonstrations • Massage Therapy • Dental Hygiene Puppet Show • Sustainable Agriculture • Square Wheel Trike • Community Health Fair & Free Screenings • Robotics • Make your own slime! • Bows and bandages for your stuffed animals!

RSVP today! https://GTCFest2018.eventbrite.com Community Fest is sponsored by

Play. Discover. Experience.


44 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.21.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

AROUND TOWN ing to 501(c)(3) nonprofit organizations and schools within the Greenville community that have projects fostering gardening education. Interested applicants should visit www.ggmga. org for application information and forms. The application deadline is Sept. 30. www.ggmga.org THRU OCT

01

LESSONS & TRAINING

Introduction to International Folk Dance

Greenville International Folk Dancers Sears Shelter, McPherson Park 120 E. Park Ave. 7-9 p.m. | Mondays | $8 This four-week class, co-sponsored by Greenville City Parks and Recreation and Greenville International Folk Dancers, introduces basic steps and styling for dances drawn from community dance traditions around the world. GIFD seeks to build community and intercultural understanding through dance while offering a moderate exercise opportunity. No prior experience is needed, and no partner is needed. 864-905-3631 | greenvilleifd@gmail.com www.greenvilleinternationalfolkdance. weebly.com THRU OCT

08

LESSONS & TRAINING

Community Tree Keeper Course

TreesGreenville | Clemson Extension 301 University Ridge, Suite 4300 9-11 a.m. | Mondays | $25 and up The Community Tree Keeper Course is designed for TreesGreenville volunteers, master garden-

ers, master naturalists, park hero volunteers, and anyone interested in learning more about how to properly plant, care, and maintain a healthy urban forest. The minimum age is 18 years old. Master gardeners can earn continuing education hours. www.treesgreenville.org/treekeepers/ THRU OCT

19

VISUAL ARTS

Palmetto Luna Arts presents “Muzzarelli-Diaz Art’

Palmetto Luna Arts The MAC Gallery | 16 Augusta St. times vary | FREE “Muzzarelli-Diaz Art” is an exhibition produced by a Latin-American couple in which hope and the search for freedom are a constant. Palmetto Luna Arts strives to foster an understanding of Latino culture in South Carolina. www.greenvillearts.com THRU NOV

03

VISUAL ARTS

‘Emerge’

Upstate Gallery on Main 172 E. Main St., Spartanburg noon-5 p.m. | FREE Upstate Gallery on Main, sponsored by the University of South Carolina Upstate, is hosting the opening a new exhibition by South Carolina artist Leah Cabinum. “Emerge” is a sculptural installation and spatial experience exhibition. Cabinum creates immersive installations, sculptural objects, and drawings made from diverse materials not necessarily associated with art. 864-503-5838 | www.mulliganarts.com

THRU NOV

14

RELIGION/SPIRITUALITY

Grief Share

Mauldin First Baptist Church 150 S. Main St., Mauldin 6:30-8:30 p.m. | FREE Grief Share is a support group for individuals who are struggling with the loss of loved ones. The 13-week sessions utilize Bible-based videos and group discussions to assist participants with their grief experience. www.fbcmauldin.org THRU NOV

20

PERFORMING ARTS

‘The Teddy Bears’ Picnic’

South Carolina Children’s Theatre The Salvation Army Kroc Center 424 Westfield St. schedule varies, see website for dates and times $11 “The Teddy Bears’ Picnic” is back by popular demand and ready for a whole new crew of wee ones. Mama Bear and Baby Bear invite participants to join them in the woods to help set up the perfect pretend picnic. Participation is encouraged. This event is most enjoyed by ages 18 months to 5 years old. Estimated run time is 30-40 minutes. www.scchildrenstheatre.org THRU DEC

12

FAMILY & EDUCATION

Outshine homework-help program at CDS

Center for Developmental Services 29 N. Academy St. 3:30-4:45 p.m. | Wednesdays | FREE CDS will host Outshine, a program to help cul-

tivate young minds. Students ages 5-13 will be able to attend and receive extra homework help for various school subjects. This is a great way for volunteers to earn hours for honor societies and clubs. 864-331-1445 www.cdservices.org/event/outshine-2018/ THRU DEC

30

VISUAL ARTS

‘Sampling the Old Masters: Highlights from the Bob Jones Museum’

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College St. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. | FREE Only a few miles apart, the Greenville County Museum of Art and the Bob Jones Museum span centuries and continents; for the first time, the two powerhouses have collaborated to present “Sampling the Old Masters: Highlights from the Bob Jones Museum.” www.gcma.org THRU DEC

31

COMMUNITY

Swamp Rabbit Running Series

Swamp Rabbit Cafe and Grocery 205 Cedar Lane Road 6 p.m. | Thursdays | FREE Participants are invited to run the Swamp Rabbit Trail every Thursday. The runners can reconvene at the Swamp and all participants enjoy 20 percent off any food or beverage purchase at Swamp Pizza. www.bit.ly/2CIchGb

New lounge. New bistro. Same comfortable feeling.

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Groundbreaking Fall 2018. To learn more, call 864.991.3100. One Hoke Smith Blvd., Greenville, SC 29615 | RollingGreenVillage.com Part of Greenville. Part of your family.

Rolling Green Village is a not-for-profit community.

.


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CONCERT

The Work was one of the most popular bands on the Greenville music scene in the 2000s, playing an infectiously funky brand of jam-rock that was experimental without ever being inaccessible. They made a go of it nationally after years of packing Upstate venues, even releasing an album (“Bring Back the Good”) recorded with Athens producer John Keane (R.E.M., Indigo Girls) in 2005. But after a while, The Work became a little too much like, well, work for the musicians involved. “The Work was always a social band,” says bassist and singer Mark Dye. “There was a lot of friendship, both between the band members themselves and between us and our crowd. When we were really serious about doing it all the time, it became a job.” Now that the band (Dye, guitarists Mitch Towles and Charles Hedgepath, singer-trumpet player Craig Sorrells, percussionist Jeff Holland, keyboardist Matt Jennings, and drummer Jason Owens) have all begun working on their own projects, Dye says The Work’s occasional reunion gigs are nothing but fun. “We’re still able to get along with each other personally, and we enjoy each other’s ideas,” he says. “I think that’s what keeps us coming back together: It’s still fun.”

SEP

hibitions: The Chef’s Kitchen presented by Ingles; Outdoor Oasis sponsored by Davis Services Inc. www.SouthernHomeandGardenShow.com

21-22

SAT

FRI-SAT

FOOD & DRINK

Mauldin’s eighth annual BBQ Cook-off

Mauldin Cultural Center 101 E. Butler Road FREE The annual festival is a showcase of the heritage of the Mauldin community, from its food to its music. The Mauldin BBQ Cook-off features more than 20 cookers from across the Southeast, competing to bring the best barbecue to Mauldin. The festival opens Friday night with the Anything Butt competition, where participating cookers serve anything but their barbecue to pique tastebuds. Sliders, grilled chicken, and smoked cobbler are just some of the options. Saturday features the main event, the BBQ Cook-off competition with a panel of certified barbecue tasters from the South Carolina Barbeque Association. Members of the public will also have a chance to cast their votes for the best barbecue and the winner of the People’s Choice Award. Paired with live music and family fun, the event runs from 6-9 p.m. Friday and from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. Entry is free, and food prices vary. 864-335-4862 www.mauldinbbq.com/about/ events@mauldinculturalcenter.org FRI-SUN

21-23

COMMUNITY

Southern Home & Garden Show

TD Convention Center 1 Exposition Drive times vary Adults: $7; seniors (55 and up): $5; children (12 and under): free The Home Builders Association of Greenville’s Southern Home & Garden Show, presented by American HomePride, is the largest and mostpopular home and garden event in South Carolina. The home show will feature the following ex-

22

COMMUNITY

Transformation Walk and Run

United Ministries First Baptist Greenville | 847 Cleveland St. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. | walk: free; run: $30 One of Greenville’s longstanding communitywide events, United Ministries’ Transformation Walk celebrates the lives being transformed right here in Greenville. Beginning at First Baptist Church, participants have the option to register to walk or run the certified 5K route. All proceeds benefit United Ministries’ programs in education and employment, crisis assistance, and homeless services. www.united-ministries.org/transformation-walk/

Join us this season in Genevieve’s theater lounge for an intimate listening room experience

EDWIN MCCAIN WITH

AROUND TOWN The Work’s Family Reunion SEP. 21 Gottrocks, 200 Eisenhower Drive | 9 p.m.

AND MAIA

SHARP AND SPECIAL GUESTS

PHILLIP LAMMONDS

GABE DIXON

NOVEMBER 2

JANUARY 25

JILL SOBULE

DAVID WILCOX

COMMUNITY

‘Mystery on the GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail’ special event

Berea Stations Events Inc. Swamp Rabbit Station at Berea Sulphur Springs Road and Pinsley Circle 4-6 p.m. | FREE A special event highlighting the release of the new, interactive children’s book, “Mystery on the GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail,” will be from 4 to 6 p.m. Sept. 22 at the Swamp Rabbit Station at Berea, located at Sulphur Springs Road and Pinsley Circle. Various children’s activities will be featured, and copies of the book will be available for purchase. www.sites.google.com/site/swamprabbitstationberea/home HOBBIES & SPECIAL INTERESTS

Greater Greenville Rose Society Rose Show

Patewood Building 255, 255 Enterprise Blvd. 7 a.m.-3 p.m. | FREE The Greater Greenville Rose Society will host a free rose show. The public is invited to exhibit

MARCH 1

MAY 3

PEACE VOICES SONGWRITERS WORKSHOPS ALSO AVAILABLE


46 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.21.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

BE A CAVALIER

CONCERT

IT’S A GREAT DAY TO...

AROUND TOWN Fozzy, with Adelitas Way Point Drive SEP. 22 The Firmament,7 5p.m.Market | $22-$25 Chris Jericho has spent much of the past three decades bringing a rock-star-style showmanship to the wrestling ring, becoming one of the most-popular stars for the WCW and the WWE. But for the past eight years or so, when he hasn’t been slaying the crowd in the ring, he’s been an actual rock ’n’ roll frontman, leading his band Fozzy through seven albums of tight, muscular hard-rock. Fozzy plays a style of music that Jericho says is “like if Metallica and Journey had a bastard son and it was raised by AC/DC,” and he says that as a frontman, he’s brought some performance lessons over from his time in the squared circle. “When I first started wrestling, I wanted to be the ultimate rock ‘n’ roll frontman in a wrestling ring,” Jericho says. “I took all these tricks I learned from Paul Stanley and David Lee Roth and Freddie Mercury and all these great frontmen and put them into a wrestling character. Then it was just a matter of taking those characteristics and putting them back into rock ‘n’ roll when we started Fozzy. The most important thing when you’re the lead singer or a wrestler is connecting with a crowd. And if you make them feel and believe what you’re doing, you’ll always have a good show.” from 7-10 a.m. or to attend from 1-3 p.m. Exhibiting rules and regulations are posted on www.carolinadistrict.org. 864-884-9853 COMMUNITY

10th Avenue Studios 10th Anniversary

Julia Peters 10 Central Avenue Studios 10 Central Ave. 1-5 p.m. | FREE Julia Peters, owner and artist in residence, announced the celebration of 10 years of operation at the 10th Avenue Studio location. New artwork from Peters and the other artist in residents will be exhibited along with student art work from the Julia Peters Studio classes. The celebration will include the art show and sale, music, and food. 864-607-1837 www.10centralave.com SAT-SUN

22-23

Find out why at our

OPEN HOUSE October 4 at 9:30 am & 6:00 pm

Register at www.cces.org or 864.331.4223 CHRIST CHURCH EPISCOPAL SCHOOL CCES is a college preparatory school serving students in K5-12th grade in Greenville, SC. Christ Church Episcopal School admits students of any race, color, and national or ethnic origin.

MUSIC

Bernstein musical tribute

Greenville Symphony Orchestra Peace Center | 300 S. Main St. times vary | $19-$75 Greenville Symphony Orchestra kicks off its 71st concert season with a 100th birthday celebration for the legendary composer and conductor, Leonard Bernstein. This musical tribute features several of his well-known hits, as well as one of his most-innovative works, his “Second Symphony,” starring the young piano virtuoso, Yun-Chin Zhou. 864-232-0344 | www.greenvillesymphony.org SUN

23

HOBBIES & SPECIAL INTEREST

Golf tournament benefiting United Way

Greer Commission of Public Works Village Greens Golf Club 13921 Asheville Highway, Inman noon-4:30 p.m. | $250/team The Greer Commission of Public Works will

host a fundraising golf tournament to benefit United Way of Greenville County. Lunch is at noon and the shotgun start is at 1:30 p.m. The cost is $250 per team of four and includes mulligan and red tee. Prizes: first place — $200 cash and four Yeti Rambler tumblers; second place — $100 cash; third place — a round of golf per player at Village Greens Golf Club. 864-449-2587 www.greercpw.com/news VISUAL ARTS

Sundays at 2: David Drake

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College St. 2-3 p.m. | FREE The public is invited to enjoy a docent-led tour and experience the powerful story of David Drake, whose pottery vessels are featured in the exhibition “Art and Artists of South Carolina.” Drake, an enslaved African-American who worked in South Carolina’s Edgefield District, was known only as “Dave” before 1865. 864-564-4064 | www.gcma.org TUE

25

PERFORMING ARTS

Brandi Carlile

Peace Center 300 S. Main St. 7:30 p.m. | $55-$85 Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter Brandi Carlile will perform at Greenville’s Peace Center. Carlile’s current tour celebrates her acclaimed new album “By the Way, I Forgive You.” 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768 www.peacecenter.org BUSINESS/PROFESSIONAL

2018 Upstate Regional Summit

Ten at the Top | TD Convention Center 1 Exposition Drive 7:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. | $60 The mission of Ten at the Top is to encourage collaboration and partnership on cross-sector and cross-jurisdiction issues that impact economic vitality and quality of life in the Upstate.


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AROUND TOWN Held every other year, the Upstate Regional Summit is an opportunity for leaders and interested stakeholders from across the Upstate to gather together in one location to reaffirm the value of thinking regionally as a component of community success while learning more about, and discussing, some of the key issues facing the region. The theme for 2018 is “Winning the Future” and the entire event is themed around how to ensure the Upstate is best positioned for future success. Program Overview: 7:308:40 a.m. — Networking and Sponsor Expo; 8:45-9:55 a.m. — Opening Session; 10:05-10:50 a.m. — Breakout Session One; 11-11:45 a.m. — Breakout Session Two; noon-1:30 p.m. — Keynote Luncheon featuring Polly Labarre. 864-283-2317 | www.eventbrite.com/e/2018upstate-summit-tickets-47305820984 WED

26

MUSIC

Vince Gill

Peace Concert Hall 300 S. Main St. 7:30 p.m. | $55-$85 Country music star Vince Gill is one of the most-popular and most-recorded singers of the past quarter-century. Gill achieved his big breakthrough in 1990 with “When I Call Your Name,” which won both the Country Music Association’s Single and Song of the Year awards as well as a Grammy Award. 864-467-3000 | 800-888-7768 www.peacecenter.org THU

27

PERFORMING ARTS

Marcel Portilla Band in celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month

Peace Center | TD Stage | 300 S. Main St. 7:30 p.m. | FREE In celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month, the Peace Center presents the Marcel Portilla Band in a free concert for the community. The Marcel Portilla Band plays a fusion of new Latin, tropical, and reggae music. Hailing from Colombia, Ecuador, Puerto Rico, and the United States, its members blend sultry Latin rhythms with modern pop tunes, rhythm and blues riffs, and quaking rock arrangements in a must-see, highenergy performance. Led by South American singer/songwriter Marcel Portilla, the band uses music to spread a message of diversity, love, and peace. They perform originals like “Amor Electronico” and “Amarte a Ti,” and blend classic dance and club covers from hit artists such as Juanes, Carlos Vives, Oscar de Leon, Marc Anthony, and Ricky Martin. This concert is free, but tickets should be reserved. 864-467-3000 | 800-888-7768 www.peacecenter.org

to Los Angeles, he became a studio guitarist for television, movies, and records. His credits include “Hill Street Blues,” “Magnum, P.I.,” “The A-Team,” “Hunter,” and “Hardcastle and McCormick.” Watson has recorded two successful contemporary Jazz albums, and in August of 2018 released his first straight-ahead jazz CD “Reflections.” www.wheelsessions.com MUSIC

Marcel Portilla Band

Hispanic Alliance TD Stage | 300 S. Main St. 7:30-10:30 p.m. | FREE In celeration of Hispanic Heritage Month, the Peace Center, in collaboration with the Hispanic Alliance, presents the Marcel Portilla Band. MPB plays a fusion of new Latin, tropical, and reggae in a unqiue way. Hailing from Colombia, Ecuador, Puerto Rico, and the U.S., members blend sultry Latin rhythms with modern pop tunes, rhythm and blues riffs, and quaking rock arrangements all in a must-see high-energy performance. 864-250-8968 | www.bit.ly/2wvkpTX communityinfo@hispanicalliancesc.com CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

27-06

PERFORMING ARTS

‘Antigone’ by Sophocles

North Greenville University’s Billingsley Theatre 7801 N. Tigerville Road 7:30-10 p.m. adults: $12; students: $5 “Antigone” is an ancient story with a contemporary voice. Using a variety of theatrical styles, this collaborative piece will highlight creative design and direction to explore the opposing worlds of man’s law versus God’s law. 864-663-0169 www.ngu.edu/theatre

MUSIC

FRI

28

Buddy Guy

Peace Concert Hall | 300 S. Main St. 8 p.m. | $45-$65 Buddy Guy is a Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductee, a pioneer of Chicago’s fabled West Side sound, and a living link to the city’s golden days of electric blues. Guy has received seven Grammy awards and 37 blues-music awards — more than any other artist. He has been honored with the Billboard Magazine Century Award, a Kennedy Center Honor, and the Presidential National Medal of Arts. Rolling Stone magazine ranks him No. 23 in its “100 Greatest Guitarists

THIS STORY TOUCHED THE WORLD

AND CELEBRATES THE BEST THAT WE CAN ALL BE. It speaks to what people really feel in their hearts. I’ve seen Come From Away twice and I’m still very moved by it. We need it, especially right now.” - TOM BROKAW

Women in Business networker

Zen Greenville | 924 S. Main St. 5:30-8:30 p.m. | $100 Greenville’s inaugural Women in Business networking event will benefit Miracle Hill’s Shepherd’s Gate, a program for Upstate women in dire need. Miracle Hill’s communications and marketing director Sandy Furnell will present a video and share the moving stories of Shepherd’s Gate. Also at the event, women can share their business passion with others, and even practice their “15-second, action-oriented” business introduction on all who attend. Food and beverages are included; a cash bar will be available. A 50/50 for Shepherd’s Gate and door prizes will also be a fun addition to this event. 864-569-8631 | UpstateNaturally@gmail.com CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

The Great Blue BBQ

Lake Conestee Nature Park 601 Fork Shoals Road 5:30-7:30 p.m. | $35 Barbecue, live music, beer and wine, and a silent auction will take place at the event. Author Drew Lanham will speak about his book “The Home Place: Memoirs of a Colored Man’s Love Affair with Nature.” Announcements will be made regarding the future of the park and the Upstate birding community. All proceeds benefit Lake Conestee Nature Park. www.bit.ly/2wPUwix

MUSIC

SCIENCE & TECH

The Wheel Sessions Greenville Unitarian Universalist Fellowship 1350 State Park Road 7:30-9:30 p.m. | $15 Steve Watson was a member of The University of Miami Concert Jazz Band that toured Switzerland, Cyprus, Syria, Jordan, Egypt, and Tunisia. From 1978 through1984, Watson was a member of Bruce Hornsby’s band. After moving

Upstate Women in Technology City Range Restaurant | 615 Haywood Road 12-1 p.m. | $20 Lunch & Learn is open to women who want to learn more about IT and find new ways to impact lives through social programs in the Cognitive Era. Participants must register online. www.uwitsc.com

Steve Watson Trio, Wheel Session 52

THU-OCT

IBM WATSON and Artificial Intelligence in Social Services’

COME FROM AWAY Book, Music and Lyrics by Irene Sankoff and David Hein Directed by Christopher Ashley

THE REMARKABLE TRUE STORY OF THE SMALL TOWN THAT WELCOMED THE WORLD.

APRIL 16-21 ON SALE TODAY AT 10AM!

GROUPS (15+)


48 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.21.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CONCERT

AROUND TOWN Ruen Brothers, with The Brooks Dixon Band Highway SEP. 23 Radio Room, 1109 p.m.Poinsett | $10 in advance, $13 at door

Homes A Harvest of

From the cover to the vintage roots-rock music to the bare-bones production, the new album by Scunthorpe, England, siblings the Ruen Brothers (actual names Henry and Rupert Stansall), called “All My Shades of Blue,” sounds like it could’ve been recorded in the late 1950s or early ’60s. But this duo is no revival act. Heavily influenced by their father’s love of bands like The Rolling Stones and The Everly Brothers, the Stansalls worked closely with producer Rick Rubin (Johnny Cash, Tom Petty, the Beastie Boys) to put a fresh twist on classic sounds. “Rick wanted to represent us in the best way possible, but also in the way that was most true to us,” Rupert says. “He helped us realize our strongest points, which are singing harmonies together and playing guitars together, and he was very hands-on. He came in every day and listened to all of our demos and suggested great ideas, but he never really got in the way of what we were doing.” of All Time.” The legendary blues artist’s 18th solo LP, “The Blues is Alive and Well,” is the latest triumph in an already-legendary career. 864-467-3000 800-888-7768 www.peacecenter.org SAT

29

COMMUNITY

Women In Business Expo

McAlister Square 225 S. Pleasantburg Drive 10 a.m.-4 p.m. | FREE Women are invited to the Women In Business Expo. Admission and parking are free. The first 500 guests will receive free tote bags. A fashion show will be at 1 p.m. Guests will discover a variety of local businesses and organizations that are striving and thriving to be the best in their communities. 864-569-8631 UpstateNaturally@gmail.com PERFORMING ARTS

ticket outlets: Clark’s Jewelers | Dobson Gifts | Gage’s Greenville Symphony Office | Guild of the Greenville Symphony | Home at Last | Horizon Records inSIDEout at Home | Pak Mail on The Parkway Silver Lily Boutique | Three Generations Boutique Wild Birds Unlimited | Wrapsodies ADVANCE TICKETS

$25 TOUR DAY TICKETS $30

visit guildgso.org or call 864.370.0965

Spartanburg Philharmonic’s 90th season

Twichell Auditorium 580 E. Main St., Spartanburg 7-9 p.m. | $12.50-$45 The Spartanburg Philharmonic begins its 201819 season celebrating its 90th anniversary and its new music director, Stefan Sanders. The concert will be followed by an after-party where ticket holders can join the Philharmonic’s board, staff, and musicians in Wilson Hall to toast and celebrate the Philharmonic’s history. 864-596-9724 www.bit.ly/2oNuRmj PERFORMING ARTS

‘Peter Pan: The Ballet’

Carolina Ballet Theater Gunter Theatre 300 S. Main St. times vary | $20-$40 The ballet is a retelling of Sir James Barrie’s classic play about the boy who never grew up and the adventures that ensue. Peter Pan will land in Greenville for two full performances. www.carolinaballet.org/peter-pan-ballet/

PERFORMING ARTS

Unijams Music Fest

Bon Secours Wellness Arena 650 N. Academy St. 8-11:30 p.m. | $64-$161 Luminous Entertainment, LLC presents Unijams Music Fest featuring Yandel, De La Ghetto, Yella Beezy, Smoke Purpp, and Jon Z. www.bit.ly/2p0rTL9 SAT-SUN

29-30

VISUAL ARTS

Art on Main Fine Art/Fine Craft Festival

Arts Council of Henderson County Main Street, Hendersonville, NC 10 a.m.-5 p.m. | FREE The Arts Council of Henderson County presents the 59th annual Art on Main, a festival featuring fine arts and crafts. Meet around 100 juried fine artists who will show and sell their work. See live artist demonstrations, and enjoy charming and historic Main Street Hendersonville nestled in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, one hour north of Greenville. www.acofhc.org/art-on-main SUN

30

VISUAL ARTS

Sundays at 2: Family Art Adventure

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College St. 2-3 p.m. | FREE The public is invited to gather outside and create sidewalk art to welcome visitors to the Greenville County Museum of Art. The whole family is invited to work as a team. 864-564-4064 | www.gcma.org

OCT TUE

02

PERFORMING ARTS

Charles Tompkins opens Hartness Organ Series

Furman Department of Music Daniel Memorial Chapel 3300 Poinsett Hwy. 8-9:30 p.m. | FREE Furman University organist and professor of music Charles Boyd Tompkins will present the


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AROUND TOWN first recital in the 2018-19 Hartness Organ Series. The performance features the Hartness Organ, a three-keyboard, 42-stop instrument built in 2003 by C.B. Fisk organ builders of Gloucester, Massachusetts. 864-294-2086 | www.bit.ly/2x0W4Wi furmanmusic@furman.edu THU

04

COMMUNITY

2018 Eggs Benefit

Center for Developmental Services The Poinsett Club | 807 E. Washington St. 7:30-9 a.m. | FREE The seventh annual Eggs Benefit fundraiser will be held Oct. 4 at the Poinsett Club in Downtown Greenville. This is a special breakfast for members of our community to come to learn more about the Center for Developmental Services and what its partnership offers Upstate families. Breakfast will be served at 7:30 a.m., and the program will begin at 8 a.m. This event has helped CDS raise more than $650,000 since its inception, and all of the money raised goes back to helping the morethan 7,600 children with developmental delays and disabilities that CDS serves each year. www.eggsbenefit.com CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

Rock Out Hunger

Loaves & Fishes Fluor Field | 945 S. Main St. 7-10 p.m. | $25 Rock Out Hunger, an annual Greenville event, will feature live music from Dangermuffin and tastings from the state’s best distilleries. The event will be in downtown Greenville at Fluor Field. All proceeds go to support Loaves & Fishes’ mission to rescue food, which would otherwise be wasted, and deliver it to agencies that feed the hungry in the community. 864-232-3595 www.loavesandfishesgreenville.com/roh/

THU-SAT

04-06

FOOD & DRINK

Oktoberfest

NOMA Square 220 N. Main St. FREE NOMA Square, beside the Hyatt Regency Greenville, will be transformed into a Bavarian biergarten during a free three-day community celebration. Don your lederhosen or dirndl and enjoy German food featuring grilled bratwurst, pretzels with beer cheese and mustard, sauerbraten, and more. There will be a selection of brews from Paulaner Brewery, such as Munich Lager, Hefe-Weizen, or a stein of Paulaner’s Oktoberfest. The event features live entertainment, games, and contests including cornhole, Jenga, the chicken dance, a stein-holding competition, and a bratwurst-eating contest. www.nomasquare.com/oktoberfest/ THU-THU

04-25

PERFORMING ARTS

Fall Bluegrass and Harvest Market

Travelers Rest Trailblazer Park | 235 Trailblazer Drive 5:30-8:30 p.m. | Thursdays FREE The Fall Bluegrass Music and Harvest Market celebration will be at Trailblazer Park. Participants should come early for local produce, baked goods, arts, and crafts from the farmers market. Food trucks will be on site, and craft beer and wine will be in the beer stand. The open-air amphitheater makes for a great eveing of bluegrass. Participants are encouraged to bring lawn chairs or blankets. 864-834-8740 www.trailblazerpark.com/bluegrass-andharvest-market.html info@TrailblazerPark.com FRI

COMMUNITY

HOBBIES & SPECIAL INTERESTS

05

Legionnaire’s Square Dance Club Landmark Hall | 156 Landmark Drive, Greer 6:30-8:30 p.m. | FREE The Legionnaire’s Square Dance Club is hosting an open house. The public is invited to see what Western-style square dancing is all about. They can bring partners or come alone. Lessons will be available soon. 864-630-0591 legionnairessquaredance@gmail.com

Center for Developmental Services Furman University Golf Club 400 N. Highway 25 Bypass 11 a.m.-5 p.m. | $300 for 4-man team The Ned Marshall Memorial Charity Golf Tournament presented by AC Controls has selected the Center for Developmental Services as its beneficiary for the 2018 tournament. Money raised from the event will go directly to help the 7,600 children with developmental delays and disabilities that CDS and its partners serve each year. www.cdservices.org/event/ned-marshallmemorial/

Legionnaire’s Square Dance Club open house

PERFORMING ARTS

Kickin’ Cancer

WSSL 100.5 FM Revel Event Center | 304 E. Stone Ave. 8 p.m. | $25; VIP: $100 WSSL 100.5 FM is partnering with Cancer Survivors Park Alliance to bring an intimate, country music performance featuring an all-female line-up with Carly Pearce and up-and-coming artists Rachel Wammack and Clare Dunn. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. www.bit.ly/2NmMsj3

Ned Marshall Memorial Charity Golf Tournament

FRI-SAT

05-06

CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

Artisan’s Craft Bazaar

Younts Center for the Performing Arts 315 N. Main St., Fountain Inn 9 a.m.-6 p.m. | FREE Artisan’s Craft Bazaar features unique, hand-crafted works from artists throughout the Southeast. 704-740-6030 | www.smmcc.org/409

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE? Enter your event information at www.bit.ly/GreenvilleJournalCalendarOfEvents by Friday two weeks prior to publishing date.

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA NOTICE OF ELECTIONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, GREENVILLE COUNTY The General Election for federal, state, county and various local offices will be held on Tuesday, November 6, 2018. Any person wishing to vote in this election must register no later than Sunday, October 7, 2018. Voter Registration by mail forms will be accepted if postmarked by Monday, October 8, 2018. In addition to normal business hours, the Greenville County Voter Registration & Election Office will open on Saturday, November 3, 2018 from 9:00-1:00 for in-person voting. Voters will be asked to provide one of the following Photo IDs at their polling place. • S.C. Driver's License • ID Card issued by S.C. Department of Motor Vehicles • S.C. Voter Registration Card with Photo • Federal Military ID • U.S. Passport If you have one of these IDs, you are ready to vote. Voters should remember to bring one of these IDs with them to the polling place. Voters without Photo ID can get one free of charge from the Department of Motor Vehicles or their county voter registration office. Voters who encounter an obstacle to getting a Photo ID should bring their paper voter registration card without a photo with them to their polling place. These voters can then sign an affidavit swearing to their identity and to their obstacle to obtaining a Photo ID and vote a provisional ballot. This ballot will count unless the county board of voter registration and elections has grounds to believe the affidavit is false. For more information on Photo ID, visit scVOTES. org or contact your county board of voter registration and elections. At 9:00 a.m. on November 6, the County Board of Voter Registration and Elections will begin its examination of the absentee ballot return envelopes at County Square, 301 University Ridge, Suite 1900, Greenville SC 29601, (864) 467-7250 At 12 noon on November 9, the County Board of Canvassers will hold a hearing to determine the validity of all provisional ballots cast in this election. This hearing will be held at County Square, 301 University Ridge, Suite 1900, Greenville SC 29601. The following precincts and polling places will be open from 7:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m.: Precincts & Polling Places Aiken-Alexander Elementary School; Altamont Forest-Redeemer Presbyterian Church Asheton Lakes-Five Forks Baptist Church; Avon-First Church of God; Baker Creek-Valley Brook Outreach Baptist Church; Belle Meade-Disciples Fellowship Baptist Church; Bells Crossing-Bells Crossing Elementary School; Belmont-Belmont Fire Station Hdqt; Berea-Berea Elementary School; Boiling Springs-Devenger Rd Presbyterian Church; Botany Woods-Lutheran Church of Our Saviour; Bridge Fork-Kingdom Life Church; Brook Glenn-Brook Glenn Elementary School; Canebrake-Buena Vista Elementary School; Carolina-Carolina High and Academy; Castle Rock-Washington Baptist Church; Chestnut Hills-Dunean Baptist Church; Circle Creek-Cross Roads Baptist Church; Clear Creek-Pleasant View Baptist Church; Conestee-Reedy River Missionary Baptist Church; Darby Ridge-Velocity Church; Del Norte-Brushy Creek Elementary School;-Devenger-St Giles Presbyterian Church; Donaldson-Donaldson Center Fire Station Hdqt; Dove Tree-Dove Tree Clubhouse; Dunklin-Dunklin Fire Station Hdqt; Eastside-Eastside High School; Ebenezer-Heritage Elementary School; Edwards Forest-Taylors Elementary School Enoree-Enoree Career Center; Feaster-Eastside Presbyterian Church Fork Shoals-Fork Shoals Elementary School; Fountain Inn 1-Younts Center for Performing Arts Fountain Inn 2-Fountain Inn Activities Center; Fox Chase-Northwood Baptist Church Frohawk-Grace United Methodist Church; Furman-Woodlands at Furman Gowensville-Gowensville Community Center; Granite Creek-Pleasant Grove Baptist Church; Graze Branch-Holly Ridge Baptist Church; Greenbriar-Messiah Lutheran Church; Greenville 01-League Academy; Greenville 03-Summit Dr. Elementary School; Greenville 04-Stone Academy; Greenville 05-Sears Shelter; Greenville 06-Pilgram Rest Baptist Church; Greenville 07-W Greenville Recreation Center; Greenville 08- West End Community Development Center; Greenville 10-Springfield Baptist Church; Greenville 14-Sterling School; Greenville 16-Augusta Rd Baptist Church; Greenville 17-St Matthew United Methodist Church; Greenville 18-Augusta Circle Elementary School; Greenville 19-Pleasant Valley Connection Center; Greenville 20-Blythe Academy; Greenville 21-Meals On Wheels; Greenville 22-Sanctuary Church; Greenville 23-Sara Collins Elementary School; Greenville 24-Beck Academy; Greenville 25-McCarter Presbyterian Church; Greenville 26-E North St Academy; Greenville 27-Overbrook Baptist Church; Greenville 28-Francis Asbury United Methodist Church; Greenville 29-J L Mann High School; Grove-Grove Elementary School; Hillcrest-Hillcrest Middle School; Holly Tree-Faith Baptist Church; Jennings Mill-Cleveland First Baptist Church; Kilgore Farms-Gilder Creek Farm Clubhouse; Lakeview-Lakeview Middle School; Laurel Ridge-St Mark United Methodist Church Leawood-Hampton Park Baptist Church; Locust Hill-Fairview Baptist Church; Long Creek-Rocky Creek Missionary Baptist Church; Maple Creek-Southside Baptist Church; Maridell-New Liberty Baptist Church; Mauldin 1-Mauldin Cultural Center; Mauldin 2-Forrester Woods Clubhouse; Mauldin 3-Mauldin First Baptist Church; Mauldin 4-Mauldin United Methodist Church; Mauldin 5-Mauldin Miller Fire Station #1; Mauldin 6-Mauldin High School; Mauldin 7-Mauldin Middle School; Mission-Morningside Baptist Church; Monaview-Monaview Elementary School; Moore Creek-South Greenville Fire Station #6; Mountain Creek-Mountain Creek Baptist Church; Mountain View-Mountain View Elementary School; Mt Pleasant-Mt Pleasant Community Center; Neely Farms-Christ Community Church; Northwood-Northwood Middle School; Oakview-Oakview Elementary School; Oneal-Eastside Apostolic Lutheran Church; Palmetto-Grace Church; Paris Mountain-Piedmont Park Fire Station Hdqt; Pebble Creek-Pebble Creek Baptist Church; Pelham Falls-Cornerstone Baptist Church; Piedmont-Piedmont Community Center - Beattie Hall; Pineview-Canebrake Fire Station Hdqt; Poinsett-Duncan Chapel Elementary School; Raintree-The Bridge Church; Ranch Creek-Robert E Cashion Elementary School; Reedy Fork-Reedy Fork Baptist Church; River Walk-River Walk Clubhouse; Riverside-Riverside High School; Rock Hill-Mitchell Rd Elementary School; Rocky Creek-Rocky Creek Baptist Church; Rolling Green-Rolling Green Retirement Center; Royal Oaks-Rock Of Ages Baptist Church; Saluda-Unity Baptist Church of Berea; Sandy Flat-Double Springs Baptist Church; Sevier-Sevier Middle School; Silverleaf-Heritage Bible Church; Simpsonville 1-Simpsonville City Park Center; Simpsonville 2-Plain Elementary School; Simpsonville 3-Simpsonville United Methodist Church; Simpsonville 4-Renovation Church; Simpsonville 5-Center for Community Services; Simpsonville 6-Calvary Baptist Church; Skyland-Skyland Elementary School; Slater Marietta-Slater Marietta Elementary School; Southside-Southside High School; Sparrows Point-Immanuel Lutheran Church; Spring Forest-Greenville Nazarene Church; Standing Springs-Standing Springs Baptist Church; Stone Valley-Springwell Church; Stonehaven-Advent United Methodist Church; Suber Mill-Praise Cathedral; Sugar Creek-Sugar Creek Clubhouse; Sulphur Springs-Armstrong Elementary School; Sycamore-First Presbyterian Church; Tanglewood-Tanglewood Mill School; Taylors-Taylors Ministry Center; Thornblade-Airport Baptist Church; Tigerville-Tigerville Elementary School; Timberlake-Aldersgate United Methodist Church; Trade-Needmore Recreation Center; Travelers Rest 1-Travelers Rest City Hall; Travelers Rest 2-Renfrew Baptist Church; Tubbs Mountain-Enoree Baptist Church; Tyger River-Chandler Creek Elementary School; Verdmont-Hopewell United Methodist Church; Wade Hampton-Faith Baptist Church; Walnut Springs-Clear Spring Baptist Church; Ware Place-Ellen Woodside Elementary School; Welcome-Welcome Elementary School; Wellington-E North Church; Westcliffe-Westcliffe Elementary School; Westside-Agnew Rd Baptist Church; Woodmont-Woodmont Middle School; Woodruff Lakes-Woodruff Rd Christian Church

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Jesse Rogers/ DBA Bootleggers intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, & WINE at 2824 Geer Highway, Marietta, SC 29661. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than September 30, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

LEGAL NOTICE RATES ABC Notices

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50 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.21.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

Living A Life Of E’s ACROSS 1 Renounces the throne 10 Hexa- plus two 14 Best results possible 20 Right Guard, e.g. 21 Oom- — (polka sounds) 22 Drink of beer after a shot 23 2014 Oscar show host 25 In a position facing 26 Standing in good — 27 “Put it — tab” 28 Tiny charge carrier 29 In times past 30 Grazing site 32 Sociologist who coined “survival of the fittest” 36 La-la lead-in 39 Mushroom variety 41 Tavern 42 Author and activist on Alabama’s state quarter 45 Little — (tots) 46 Appends 50 Egg shapes 51 Get defeated 52 “Kapow!” 54 Bar garnish 55 Kosovo citizen 56 LXX / X 57 He wrote “He’s Just Not That Into You” with Liz Tuccillo 61 Ticklish red Muppet 62 Dawn direction

64 A, in Argentina 65 Part of many German names 66 Suffix with lion or seer 67 Player of Colonel Klink on “Hogan’s Heroes” 72 — -pitch 75 “The Catch” network 76 Wedded 77 Verve 78 Verge 82 “The Pink Panther” co-star 86 “— you with me?” 87 End a flight 88 Bird-related 89 Tahiti, par exemple 90 Posterior 92 Egyptian peninsula 93 Vapor 94 Guitar’s kin, for short 96 Longtime “What’s My Line?” panelist 98 Amer. body with 100 members 102 “Aladdin” figure 103 Cagey 104 1965-66 poet laureate 108 Chichi retreat 110 Coop cackler 111 PC key 112 Mani- — 113 “There Is Nothin’ Like —” 117 Not tardy 119 “Nurse Betty” star

October 12 - 14

By Frank Longo

124 Vexes 125 A hat hides it 126 Deviations 127 Drive home 128 Finds to be refined 129 Small-stakes poker DOWN 1 Fruit drinks 2 Boxing prize 3 Portion (out) 4 Utopian 5 Denounces 6 Ending for dull or drunk 7 — kwon do 8 Mem. of the U.K. 9 Canonized Fr. woman 10 Where drinks are on the host 11 Monterey County city 12 “— playing our song” 13 Balking beast 14 Ink-squirting sea creature 15 Gives a ring 16 “I taut I — a puddy tat!” 17 Newton who was knighted 18 Come together 19 Enthusiasm 24 —’easter (storm type) 28 Currently has the stage 31 Just fine 32 Hint-offering columnist 33 Architectural add-ons 34 Twiddled digit

downtown greenville,

SC

FALL for TUNES. FALL for TASTE. FALL for TAPS.

35 Zora — Hurston 97 “— the season to be jolly” 114 Not “fer” 36 The ones there 99 Dishonors 115 Come together 37 Make merry 100 Emerge 116 Irish Gaelic tongue 38 Make fearful 101 — -weenie 118 “— done it!” 40 Trust 104 Bazaar units 119 Frat letter 43 Bodily joint 105 Creed part 120 Electric jolt 44 Brain wave test, for short 106 PC key 121 Ending for ethyl 47 Sup stylishly 107 Fritz out 122 Chaney of old chillers 48 Blockbuster rented them 109 Writer — Rogers St. 123 Run after K 49 Places Johns Crossword answers: Page 25 52 Nota — 53 Top competitive effort, informally 54 Novelist Sarah — by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan Jewett 56 “Live” and “learn,” e.g. 58 Shah or czar 59 She played Miss Brooks 60 Lena of song 63 Gremlin’s kin 68 Be worthy of 69 Bodily joint 70 Appointment calendar 71 Vestige 72 Inbox junk 73 Jeans-maker Strauss 74 Big elevator name 79 Copenhagen citizens 80 Make twisty 81 Uplift morally 83 Devour 84 Claims on property 85 That miss 91 “Bus Stop” playwright William 92 Move aside 94 Of no help 95 Smallville’s Clark Sudoku answers: Page 25 Easy 96 Drinking sprees

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THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: IFB# 22-10/05/18 – FIVE BRIDGE PROJECTS, October 05, 2018, 3:00 P.M., E.D.T. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org or by calling (864) 467-7200.

SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING OF COMPLAINT AND NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS (NON-JURY MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE) C/A NO: 2017-CP-23-01742 DEFICIENCY WAIVED Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, As Trustee For Securitized Asset Backed Receivables LLC Trust 2007BR3, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-BR3, PLAINTIFF, vs. Juanita L. Todd; Katrinna A. Todd; Crescent Creek Homeowners Association, Inc.; Tower Homes, Inc.; South Carolina Department of Revenue, DEFENDANT(S) TO THE DEFENDANTS, ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, or otherwise appear and defend, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscriber at his office, Hutchens Law Firm P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, except as to the United States of America, which shall have sixty (60) days, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, or otherwise appear and defend, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein, and judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity for Greenville County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. TO MINOR(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE, AND/OR TO MINOR(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THE PERSON WITH WHOM THE MINOR(S) RESIDES, AND/OR TO PERSONS UNDER SOME LEGAL DISABILITY: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff immediately and separately and such application

will be deemed absolute and total in the absence of your application for such an appointment within thirty (30) days after the service of the Summons and Complaint upon you. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity in/for this County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. NOTICE OF FILING OF SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing Summons, along with the Complaint, was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, on March 15, 2017. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT pursuant to the South Carolina Supreme Court Administrative Order 2011-05-02-01, (hereinafter “Order”), you may have a right to Foreclosure Intervention. To be considered for any available Foreclosure Intervention, you may communicate with and otherwise deal with the Plaintiff through its law firm, Hutchens Law Firm, P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202 or call 803726-2700. Hutchens Law Firm, represents the Plaintiff in this action and does not represent you. Under our ethical rules, we are prohibited from giving you any legal advice. You must submit any requests for Foreclosure Intervention consideration within 30 days from the date of this Notice. IF YOU FAIL, REFUSE, OR VOLUNTARILY ELECT NOT TO PARTICIPATE IN FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION, YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY/ AGENT MAY PROCEED WITH A FORECLOSURE ACTION. If you have already pursued loss mitigation with the Plaintiff, this Notice does not guarantee the availability of loss mitigation options or further review of your qualifications. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY.

SUMMONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE FAMILY COURT THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT CASE NO.: 2018-DR-23-3073 Shayne Michael Hensey and Angela Michelle Hensley, Plaintiffs, vs. Cheyenne Darian Kelly and John Doe, Cheyenne Darian Kelly and John Doe, Defendants. TO THE DEFENDANT: John Doe: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you (and which has been filed in the Office of the Clerk of Court) and to serve a copy of your answer to said Complaint upon the subscriber at the address shown below, within thirty (30) days after the date of such service, exclusive of the day of service. If you fail to answer the Complaint within that time, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Kimberly G. Montanari, SC Bar Number 017236 306 Northeast Main Street Simpsonville, South Carolina 29681 Telephone (864) 963-4848 Facsimile: (864) 228-8230 Attorney for Plaintiffs

SUMMONS 2018-CP-23-03911 STATE OF SC GREENVILLE COUNTY COURT OF COMMON PLEAS BLUE NOTE HOLDINGS, LLC v. DAVID V. BULLARD, et al. TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: You are hereby summoned and notified that an action has been filed against you in the Greenville County, SC court in action number 2018CP-23-03911. You have thirty (30) days from the last date of publication of this notice to answer the complaint. You must also serve a copy of your answer upon the Plaintiff or the Plaintiff’s attorney at the address shown below. If you fail to answer the Complaint, judgment by default could be rendered against you for the relief requested in the Complaint. Samuel Lindsay Carrington, Esq. 408 East North Street Greenville, SC 29601

SUMMONS (NON-JURY, QUIET TITLE) STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS CASE NO.: 2018-CP-23-01484 Angel Alifanow and Crystal Alifanow, Plaintiffs, vs. Judy Lynn Barrett and Johnathan King, as heirs-at-law of Betty Elaine Wooten White; Joel S. Cleland, Scott Cleland, William T. Cleland, any other heirs, distributees, devisees, legatees, or assignees of Betty Elaine Wooten White, or anyone claiming any interest in real property located at 17 Hilltop Ave., Greenville, SC, including any unknown heirs who may be in the military service of the United States of America, being a class designated as John

Doe, and any minors or persons under legal disability, being a class designated as Richard Roe, the Greenville County Tax Collector, and Greenville County, Defendants. TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVENAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to the said Complaint on the subscriber at his office, 105 S. Maple St., PO Box 1842, Simpsonville, SC 29681, within thirty (30) days after the service thereof, exclusive of the date of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for a default judgment which will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. The Complaint in this action was filed on March 12, 2018. TO SUCH DEFENDANTS AS MAY BE INCOMPETENT, UNKNOWN HEIRS IN THE MILITARY SERVICE OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, MINORS, OR PERSONS UNDER A LEGAL DISABILITY: An Order has been filed in this action on August 13, 2018, appointing Attorney Jason M Ward, whose business address is 105 S. Maple St., Simpsonville, SC 29681, as Guardian ad Litem NISI for you, This appointment shall become absolute upon the expiration of thirty days following the last date of publication of the Summons herein, unless you or someone in your behalf, on or before the last mentioned date, shall procure someone else to be appointed as the Guardian ad Litem to represent you in this action. LIS PENDENS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an action has been commenced and is pending in the Court of Common Pleas for Greenville County, South Carolina (reference made to the Lis Pendens filed on March 12, 2018 in this action), upon the Complaint of the Plaintiffs against the above-named Defendants for the purposes of seeking to quiet title to and confirm the Plaintiffs’ tax title to the property described below: All that certain piece, parcel or lot of land lying and being in the State of South Carolina, County of Greenville, designated as Lots 2 and 3 on plat of H.J. Martin property recorded in Plat Book G at Page 139 in the Register of Deeds Office for Greenville County. Reference is made to said plat for a more detailed description. Derivation: This being that same property conveyed to Angel or Crystal Alifanow by deed of the Greenville County Tax Collector dated March 30, 2010 and recorded March 30, 2010 in Deed Book 2370 at Page 1738 in the Greenville County ROD Office. TMS No.: 0156000800300 Property address: 17 Hilltop Ave., Greenville, SC 29609 David F. Sullivan Law Firm, LLC David Sullivan 105 S. Maple St., PO Box 1842 Simpsonville, SC 29681 (864) 757-1524 (office) 866276-0750 (fax) title@davidfsullivanlaw.com Attorney for Plaintiffs

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept bids for the following: Oak Grove Lake Dam Repair and Improvements, IFB #2310/18/18, until 3:00 PM, EDT, Thursday, October 18, 2018; a Mandatory Pre-Bid Meeting will be held 10:00 AM, EDT, Wednesday, October 3, 2018 at #101 Oak Grove Lake Road, TMS #0540040101501. Solicitations may be found at http://www.greenvillecounty. org/procurement/ or by calling (864) 467-7200.

Greater Greenville Sanitation Commission NOTICE OF A PUBLIC HEARING Hearing of the Commission to enlarge the boundaries of the Greater Greenville Sanitation District to include 2 Cunningham Road off Old Spartanburg Rd and to provide public notice thereof. PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that on October 23, at 4:00 p.m. at Greater Greenville Sanitation Commission Headquarters located at 1600 West Washington Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, a public hearing will be held for the consideration of enlarging the boundaries of the Greater Greenville Sanitation District to include 2 Cunningham Road off Old Spartanburg Rd. Anyone wishing to be placed on the Agenda for Public Comment is asked to call Greater Greenville Sanitation Commission at 232-6721 extension 209 between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Monday thru Thursday. Public comments will be limited based on the number of persons addressing the Commission. Public comment can also be posted on the website. www.GGSC.gov

SUMMONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF SPARTANBURG IN THE FAMILY COURT SEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 2018-DR-42-1133 Christopher Mark Lominac, Plaintiff, Vs. Cheryl Payne Lominac, Barbara Payne and Kenneth Dustin McCall Defendants. TO: THE DEFENDANTS NAMED ABOVE. YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to the Complaint on the undersigned, at his office located at Holland & Usry, P.A.,101 West St. John Street, Ste. 206, Spartanburg, SC 29306, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, judgment by default will be rendered against you and the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint. John R. Holland HOLLAND & USRY, P.A. 101 West St. John Street, Ste. 206 Spartanburg, SC 29306 864-582-0416 864-585-9499 (Fax)

SUMMONS AND NOTICE (NON-JURY) STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS COUNTY OF GREENVILLE 2018-CP-23-02719 Pendleton Capital Partners, LLC, Plaintiff, Vs. The unknown heirs of the following deceased persons: Lexie Shannon, Donald Shannon, Maxine Sullivan Orr, Henry Leon Orr, William A. Sullivan and Carolyn Sullivan; the following persons believed to be alive: John Heyward Sullivan, Dawn Shannon, Donald Shannon, Jr., Tanya Orr, Geneva Orr, Mahlon Orr, and “John Doe”, representing a class made up of all unknown parties who may have some right, title, or interest in the property having Tax Map #0122.00-14007.00, Defendants YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED

and required to answer the Third Amended Complaint in this action, (which Third Amended Complaint was filed on June 25, 2018) and to serve a copy of your Answer to this Third Amended Complaint upon subscriber at 11 Whitsett Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the date of such service. If you shall fail to answer the Third Amended Complaint within that time, the Plaintiffs shall proceed in default proceedings against you and shall apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Third Amended Complaint. TO: INFANT(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (AN IMPRISONED PERSON) YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a Guardian ad Litem to represent you in

this action within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. TO: INFANTS(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (INCOMPETENT OR INSANE) AND TO, (GENERAL TESTAMENTARY GUARDIAN)(COMMITTEE) WITH WHOM S(HE) RESIDE(S): YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad Litem to represent said infant(s) under fourteen years of age (said incompetent or insane person) within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. YOU WILL FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that William Brandon Bell, 710 Hunts Bridge Road #8, Greenville, SC 29617 has been appointed Guardian ad litem for all unknown heirs of Lexie Shannon, Donald Shannon, Maxine Sullivan Orr,

Henry Leon Orr, William A. Sullivan and Carolyn Sullivan; and that Charles W. Crews, Jr., 125A Woodruff Place Circle, Simpsonville, SC 29681 has been appointed Guardian ad litem for all unknown parties who may have some right, title or interest in the subject property. In the event you have a claim to the real property which is the subject of this action, more particularly described in the Third Amended Lis Pendens, you should contact the appropriate Guardian ad litem listed above or your attorney. All persons under a disability have the right to have a Guardian ad litem of their choice appointed if the request is timely made to the Court. THIRD AMENDED LIS PENDENS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an action has been commenced in the Court upon third amended

complaint of Plaintiff against Defendants regarding quieting title to property located in Greenville County. The subject property is described as follows: ALL that piece, parcel or lot of land lying and being in State of South Carolina, County of Greenville, known as Lot 3 Donwood Subdivision shown in plat book A, page 521 recorded in the ROD Office of Greenville County. Reference is made to said plat for a more detailed description. LESS however any portion previously conveyed and subject to restrictions of record. Tax Map #0554.05-01-119.00 C. Richard Stewart Attorney for Plaintiffs 11 Whitsett Street Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 235-2019 SC Bar No: 5346

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September 21, 2018 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

September 21, 2018 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.