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GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, September 9, 2016 • Vol.18, No.37

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2 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.09.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

GREENVILLEJOURNAL LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1999 PUBLISHER | Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@communityjournals.com EDITOR | Chris Haire chaire@communityjournals.com MANAGING EDITOR | Jerry Salley jsalley@communityjournals.com

You profit because we don’t.

DIGITAL OPERATIONS MANAGER Danielle Car ASSOCIATE EDITOR Emily Pietras | epietras@communityjournals.com STAFF WRITERS David Dykes | ddykes@communityjournals.com Caroline Hafer | chafer@communityjournals.com Cindy Landrum | clandrum@communityjournals.com Andrew Moore | amoore@communityjournals.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Melinda Young | myoung@communityjournals.com Vince Harris | vharris@communityjournals.com Ariel Turner | aturner@communityjournals.com OPERATIONS MANAGER | Holly Hardin CLIENT SER VICES MANAGERS Anita Harley | Jane Rogers BILLING INQUIRIES | Shannon Rochester MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Nicole Greer | Jenny Hall | Donna Johnston Annie Langston | Emily Yepes VISUAL DIRECTOR | Will Crooks LAYOUT Bo Leslie | Tammy Smith ADVERTISING DESIGN Kristy Adair | Michael Allen EVENTS & ACCOUNT STRATEGY | Kate Madden

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As a not-for-profit alternative to banks, Greenville Federal Credit Union offers members more money-saving advantages. Greenville Federal Credit Union is truly a low-cost alternative to traditional banking. We have all the products and services found at traditional banks but we are fundamentally different in that our members (account holders) are also owners. Our philosophical difference is huge - we view and treat our members as owners, not as potential sources of income. As a not-for-profit entity, our focus has always been to help our members prosper by providing money-saving advantages and reasonably priced financial services. Joining a credit union is better for you. Isn’t it time to consider joining ours?

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page three

They Said It

“I begged for God to change his mind.”

“As part of my treatment, they give me a whole lot of steroids once a week … and I’d grab my guitar and start banging around and making noise. It was very therapeutic.” Bob Esposito, singer and guitarist, on the cancer treatments he was receiving while forming the Contra Blues Band.

Photo by Will Crooks

Christina Custodio, mother of Isaiah Custodio, who suffered a life-threatening rupture of blood vessels in the brain in September 2015.

“We will continue to fight this because it does not make sense.” Karen Tannenbaum, an Aberdeen Drive resident and one of the opponents of the plan to build a Chick-fil-A drive-thru at the corner of Augusta Street and Aberdeen Drive.

“This hot chicken sandwich qualifies as the best chicken sandwich I’ve had in recent memory – and I’ve eaten a lot of Chick-fil-A.” Andrew Huang, sampling the menu at Oakblue Kitchen on Main Street.

The Big Number

$2,500,000

“Joint” Effort, Top Result Orthopaedics at Patewood Ranks Among Nation’s Best Make no bones about it—GHS’ Patewood Memorial Hospital has been recognized as a top hospital in orthopaedics by U.S. News & World Report! Patewood Memorial Hospital is #19 in the nation for 2016-17—the only hospital in South Carolina to be ranked in orthopaedics. Patewood also was named High Performing in hip replacement. In addition, GHS’ Greenville Memorial Hospital was named High Performing in three areas: heart failure, colon cancer surgery and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. These achievements would not be possible without all members of our healthcare team—doctors, nurses, allied health professionals, support staff and volunteers—combining their joint efforts to deliver high-quality care. Thanks to their skill and dedication, GHS continues its patient-focused mission to heal compassionately and improve constantly. Learn more at ghs.org/usnews.

Pledged by Melvin K. and Dottie Younts to the Clemson University Athletic Cornerstone Program, which renamed the South Club area of Clemson Stadium in the couple’s honor.

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4 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.09.2016

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OPINION Views from your community

How Big Is Too Big?

Greenville’s growing pains from a millennial’s perspective IN MY OWN WORDS

By Kaitlyn Hudson

I recently asked a newcomer to the area what they thought of Greenville. They replied, “Greenville is great. Let’s just hope it doesn’t get too big.” What do you mean, too big? I wanted to ask. Aren’t you proud that Greenville has become such a hot spot? Don’t tell me you aren’t secretly satisfied whenever you share yet another Top 10 list featuring Greenville knowing that your friends in Columbia will see it. Don’t tell me you dislike the atmosphere of Main Street or the view of Falls Park. We may see pictures of the park and walk down Main all the time,

Drawn Out Loud

but they’re still pretty awesome. While I love the idea of Greenville continuing to grow, I also understand where the fear of becoming too big comes from. Greenville hasn’t grown just a little bit – it’s come close to doubling since 1990. In fact, Greenville County grows by about 8,000 people per year, according to the U.S. Census. While growth brings new jobs and new housing opportunities, it’s still tough for many millennials to find either. And with growth has come added traffic, higher costs and even less parking. The increase of individuals calling Greenville home is also affecting nightlife. In my experience, I’ve noticed casual

by Kate Salley Palmer

downtown bars that once offered a laidback, fun atmosphere have become wildly packed by 10 p.m. on a weekend night, with hour-long wait lines. Bouncers who used to recognize my friends and me now hurriedly ask to check our IDs, bending them under flashlights to check for authenticity. Places like these have become so popular, it leaves millennials looking for other places to go. In the words of Yogi Berra, “Nobody goes there anymore. It’s too crowded.” While the influx of shiny new restaurants and bars are nice, is that what Greenville is asking for? Do we need more semi-fancy establishments added to downtown, or would the millennial crowd in Greenville be more satisfied with more casual places to hang out? The downtown lunch scene begs the same question. A few months ago, Chick-fil-A announced a new satellite location on Main Street intended for tourists and people working downtown. While several residents disapproved of another chain restaurant on Main, Chick-fil-A was filling a need, especially one for young professionals who might not have the time – or money – for a sit-down meal at a sitdown restaurant. Jane Jacobs, author of “The Death and Life of American Cities,” says it

well: “There is no logic that can be superimposed on the city; people make it, and it is to them, not buildings, that we must fit our plans.” Of course, I’m not against new restaurants in downtown to try, and I feel that most millennials would probably agree. However if we’re going to keep growing at the pace we’re going and attracting more millennials to the area, we need to make sure there are enough options to meet everyone’s needs. For our generation, it’s more casual, affordable options to eat and socialize. Greenvillians love to describe our city as the next Charlotte or Atlanta in a few decades. While I think whoever came up with this had good intentions, I don’t think it was exactly what Greenville’s city planners had in mind when mapping out downtown. Is our goal to become exactly like another town? In my opinion, it’s not a matter of how big Greenville will grow. It’s how Greenville will grow big. Let’s not be as concerned with the rising number of Greenville’s population, but how we’re growing to accommodate everyone, including the millennial generation. Kaitlyn Hudson is an associate at Complete PR and a Greenville native.

Speak your mind The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, factbased arguments.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Editor Chris Haire at chaire@communityjournals.com.


Your Life. Our Best.

Be our guest on Thursday, September 22nd at 4:00pm.

At Cascades Verdae, we offer a way for people to live a longer, happier and healthier life. So, the real question isn’t, when will you be ready. It’s what are you ready for?

First, you’ll participate in a brief informational session and tour showcasing life at Cascades Verdae. Then, we encourage you to stay for a curated dining experience crafted by Executive Chef Joey Pearson and his team.

If you’re curious about what life among a community of engaging, dynamic (and yes, retired) people looks like, we invite you to be our guest and participate in a low-key, low-pressure experience at Cascades Verdae.

Cascades Verdae

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Space is very limited. Please RSVP to (864) 528-5372.

Greenville, SC 29607

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6 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.09.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS GPYay

Furman, Clemson, Wofford score positive nods in Princeton Review’s annual Best Colleges list

proximately 143,000 college students this year. The company then translates answers and ranks colleges in 62 categories that range from “town-gown relations” to “most conservative students.” Only about 15 percent of 2,500 four-year colleges are featured in the book. Multiple South Carolina colleges made the cut this year. And while some of the rankings are worth boasting, some are not. Here is what the Princeton Review found out about South Carolina colleges:

ANDREW MOORE | STAFF

CLEMSON UNIVERSITY

Clemson students are football fanatics with a knack for community relations; Furman students are green thumbs; and Wofford students are likely Republican, according to the Princeton Review’s “Best 381 Colleges,” which was released last Monday. The New York-based college admission services company releases a book annually that profiles and rates the best U.S. colleges. The ratings are based on an 80-question survey that asks students to rate their schools on various topics and to report their experiences. The Princeton Review surveyed ap-

Clemson garnered top spots in multiple categories this year, including a third place ranking in the “Their Students Love These Colleges” category, which is based on the survey question, “How satisfied are you with your school?” Clemson is the only four-year institution in South Carolina to be ranked in six categories. The university was also listed as one of the “Best Southeastern” colleges and as one of 200 “Colleges That Pay You Back,” a category based on academics, cost and financial aid to graduation rates, student debt and alumni salaries and job satisfaction. “The accolades that Clemson received

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from The Princeton Review this year not only reflect the emotion, engagement and excitement that help make up the Clemson experience, but also highlight the university’s commitment to ensuring that students are prepared to be competitive and successful in the job market,” said Robert Barkley, Clemson’s director of admissions. Other categories: Clemson has the fifth-best student career services, which has helped a large number of students attain internships or co-op experience. In fact, the percentage of Clemson graduates who participated in an internship or co-op program increased from 61 percent in 2009 to 71 percent in 2015, according to the Clemson Center for Career and Professional Development. With good reason, Clemson earned fifth place in the “Students Pack the Stadiums” category. Clemson issues about 12,000 student tickets per game. Clemson secured ninth place in the “Town-Gown Relations” category, which is based on the survey question, “How well do students at your college get along with members of the local community?” Clemson earned the 10th place spot in the “Everyone Plays Intramural Sports” category, which is based on the survey question, “How popular are intramural sports at your school?” Clemson landed in 11th place in the “Happiest Students” category, which is based on the survey question, “How happy are you?”

FURMAN UNIVERSITY Furman earned two rankings this year. The university got a fifth place ranking for being an “impact school” and was also listed as a “green college.” These categories are based on survey questions about community service, student government, sustainability and student engagement on campus. Furman students volunteer every week through the Heller Service Corps. The 50-year-old service organization works with social service agencies to help children, older adults and those who are developmentally disabled. And Furman is the only liberal arts school in the nation to offer a bachelor’s degree in sustainability science. The university is also known for putting undergraduate and graduate students in the field to conduct research. In fact, multiple students are helping biology professor John Quinn with his USDA-funded project to understand how silvopasture – a landscape that combines pasture, trees and animals – can improve agriculture sustainability. Furman was also listed as one of the “Best Southeastern” colleges and as one of 200 “Colleges That Pay You Back.” “To be recognized nationally as a best value is gratifying, but to know that our students believe we are providing many opportunities for public engagement on our campus and in the wider community is truly meaningful,” said Furman President Elizabeth Davis.

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Other categories: Furman landed in 12th place in the “Little Race or Class Interaction” category, which is based on the question, “Do different types of students (black/white, rich/poor) interact frequently and easily at your school?”  

WOFFORD COLLEGE Wofford is the place to be if you want to join a fraternity or sorority, as it placed 13th in the “Lots of Greek Life” category, which is based on the question, “How popular are fraternities and sororities at your school?” Wofford is the only four-year institution in South Carolina to be ranked in this category. The Spartanburg-based school also seems to be a hotspot for right-wing politics. It placed 17th in the “Most Conservative Students” category, which is based on the question, “Politically, are you left-wing, Democrat, middle, Republican, right-wing?” Wofford was also listed as one of the “Best Southeastern” colleges. The guide notes that the school “is increasing efforts to attract a more diverse student body” and that students say their “classmates ‘are accepting of everyone and willing to take other’s values into consideration’ no matter where they come from.” Wofford was also listed as one of 200 “Colleges That Pay You Back.” “It’s an honor to be recognized consistently as one of the country’s best institutions of higher education. The Princeton Review is highly respected for its college guide, and to have been a part of this list for 25 years makes us proud,” said Wofford president Nayef H. Samhat.

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON The College of Charleston has appeared in headlines across the nation since it was named the nation’s 15th biggest party school by the Princeton Review. It could have something to do with the fact that the college also earned a No. 17 spot in the “Lots of Beer” category and  a No. 15 spot in the “Lots of Liquor” category. Just one day after the rankings were issued, the College of Charleston announced that it was temporarily banning all alcoholrelated activities at its fraternities and sororities. The college cited disruptive parties and excessive drinking among students. “This is not a knee-jerk reaction to an isolated incident, but rather a serious response to a series of dangerous behaviors connected to some members of our fraternities and sororities, ranging from disruptive parties out in the community this month to recent medical transports related to extreme intoxication,” College of Charleston President Glenn McConnell wrote in a message to the campus community on Tuesday. McConnell added that he consulted with

NEWS leaders from the Greek life community before making the decision and that the ban will be lifted after the  college’s Division of Student Affairs has finished a review of the situation and after each chapter’s members have completed additional education regarding substance abuse, high-risk behaviors and bystander intervention. The College of Charleston joins a hefty list of colleges and universities across the state addressing on-campus alcohol use. In 2014, Clemson University suspended all alcohol-related activities at its 24 fraternities following reports  of alcohol abuse, sexual misconduct and the drowning of a 19-yearold fraternity member. In 2015, the University of South Carolina ordered 13 fraternities to stop recruitment activities due to alcohol, risk-management violations and more.  Other colleges and universities across the nation have addressed the issue as well, with Dartmouth and Bates banning hard liquor. And recently, the University of Virginia implemented restrictions on hard liquor at fraternities and sororities,  requiring that a bartender be hired to serve hard liquor at events. On a more positive note, the College of Charleston earned a No. 13 spot in “College City Gets High Marks” category, which is based on students’ perceptions of the surrounding city. Also, the college was listed as one of the “Best Southeastern Colleges” and as one of the nation’s most environmentally responsible colleges.

09.09.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 7

The quality you expect and the compassion that can only be found here.

THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA As a former student, it’s disappointing to see the University of South Carolina lacking notable accomplishments this year. The Columbia-based university was listed as one of the “Best Southeastern Colleges” and as one of  the nation’s most  environmentally responsible colleges. But  that’s no  surprise considering the university has an entire dorm called “Green Quad” that’s dedicated to sustainable practices. It even has a community gardening program and greenhouse for residents to grow food. However, it doesn’t make up for the fact  that the university earned the No. 17 spot in the “Students Study the Least” category, which is based on the survey question, “How many out-of-class hours do you spend studying each day?” It’s safe to assume that the Princeton Review didn’t survey students at Thomas Cooper Library.

For more information princetonreview.com

stfranciscancercenter.org


8 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.09.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

Understanding

Grief

Seminars for the community, educators and professional caregivers featuring Michelle Post What to Do About the “S” WordSuicide CPR & First Aid

A free seminar for educators September 20, 2016 3:00pm to 5:00pm

What Have You Done for YOU Lately?

Stress Management for Grievers

A FREE seminar for anyone experiencing grief or loss September 20, 2016 6:45pm to 9:00pm

Understanding Young Hearts: Tips, Tools and Techniques to Heal Grieving Children and Teens

A full day workshop for professional caregivers $35.00 Registration Fee for Professionals seeking CEU Credit

September 21, 2016 8:30am - 4:00pm All seminars are located at the TD Convention Center 1 Exposition Drive Greenville, SC For more information or to make a reservation, call (864) 235-8330 or register online at www.thomasmcafee.com. Presented as a public service by:

GPATS wants public input on transportation plans ANDREW MOORE | STAFF

amoore@communityjournals.com

The Greenville-Pickens Area Transportation Study (GPATS) has started developing its new long-range transportation plan called Horizon2040, and they’re asking the public to weigh in. GPATS is one of 11 federally mandated organizations across the state that approves the scheduling and allocation of funds for transportation infrastructure projects. Its coverage area includes Greenville and Pickens counties as well as parts of Spartanburg, Anderson and Laurens counties. Projects can include roads, highways, mass transit systems, freight systems and bicycle and pedestrian facilities. “We basically decide which transportation projects get funding and when they get it,” said GPATS transportation planning manager Keith Brockington. The projects, which are submitted by counties and municipalities, are funded through state and federal gas tax money. But every 10 years, GPATS has to create a longrange transportation plan (LRTP) to figure out which projects will receive priority scheduling and funding. Selected projects are slated for completion in at least 25 years. GPATS uses multiple approaches to create the plan. For Horizon2040, GPATS has hired Raleigh-based Kimley-Horn and Associates Inc. to create a Travel Demand Model, which details traffic conditions throughout the region. GPATS will evaluate whether or not a submitted project will change those conditions. GPATS also plans to assemble a study team of local planners and engineers as well as recruit the help of SCDOT and the Federal Highway Administration to evaluate fatalities and more at proposed project areas. GPATS also plans to consider the environmental impact of proposed projects as well as economic development and public input. GPATS will hold public meetings across the region in October. “We really need to hear what projects are important to residents and what issues they have with the current transportation infrastructure,” said Brockington. “This is their chance to let us know. It really could result in a project happening.” Horizon2040 will be completed next summer. And LRTPs typically include more than 100 road widening and intersection projects across the region. But not all selected projects will be scheduled for funding through GPATS.

“We’re probably not going to be able to schedule projects for funding that are outside the Top 15 spots. We can only add a few of those projects to the short-range plan every five years. So even our top projects are a ways out from being completed,” Brockington said. That short-range plan is called the Transportation Improvement Program (TIP). GPATS adds about four or five transportation projects from the LRTP to TIP every five years as funding comes available. Those projects are then slated for completion in six years. GPATS adds a limited number of projects to TIP because it receives only $18 million every year for allocation purposes. Most of the projects on the LRTP are multimilliondollar road-widening or intersection projects. One of the most recent additions to TIP is the Woodruff Road Parallel project, which adds a $27 million four-lane divided parkway between Verdae boulevard and Miller roads. Construction could begin in 2021. Greenville County Councilman and GPATS Chairman Butch Kirven said “financial constraints” limit the county to road-widening and intersection projects. “We get enough money to address the areas that need to be fixed. And then we go in a descending order from there. But of course, we run out of money before we can get to the projects near the bottom.” For Horizon2040, GPATS will also include projects from the 2035 LRTP, which is an updated version of the 2030 LRTP that was created in 2007. GPATS is required by the federal government to update its 10-year plan every five years. Some projects from the 2035 LRTP have remained in the Top 15 positions and will likely remain there or will be moved to the Top 10 spots in the Horizon2040 plan, according to Brockington. He added that public input still matters. “You’ll still see some projects shifting and being added in the lower rankings,” said Brockington. “The lower ranked projects might not receive funding through us, but just having it on the list is a good thing. State and federal agencies look at our list of projects when considering their own projects. So there’s still a chance for them.” GPATS will be holding a public input and information meeting about Horizon2040 on Thursday, Oct. 20, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Suite 400 at Greenville County Square, 301 University Ridge. For more information, please visit gpats.org

These current LRTP projects in Greenville County will likely be listed in the Top 15 positions of Horizon2040: 1 Grove Road Project

What is it? This project will widen sections of a 1.3-mile stretch of road between White Horse Road (U.S. 25) and Faris Road (Greenville) to three lanes. Some sections might be widened to five lanes. How much does it cost? $10,400,000 Current LRTP ranking: 5 2 Howell Road Project

What is it? This project will widen sections of a 1-mile stretch of road between E. North Street (Greenville) and Edwards Road (Taylors) to three or five lanes. How much does it cost? $7,850,000 Current LRTP ranking: 9 3 Miller Road Project

What is it? This project will add multiple center turn lanes to sections of a 2.65mile stretch of road between Woodruff Road (Simpsonville) and Old Mill Road (Mauldin). It also provides upgrades to select intersections. How much does it cost? $5,120,000 Current LRTP ranking: 11 4 Fairview Road Project

What is it? This project will add multiple center turn lanes to sections of a 3.10mile stretch of road between Harrison Bridge Road and S.C. 418 in Fountain Inn. It also provides upgrades to select intersections. How much does it cost? $6,700,000 Current LRTP ranking: 12 5 Conestee Road Project

What is it? This project will widen sections of a 1.5-mile stretch of road between Mauldin Road and Fork Shoals in Greenville to three lanes. How much does it cost? $6,000,000 Current LRTP ranking: 13 6 Harrison Bridge Road Project

What is it? This project will widen sections of a 1.20-mile stretch of road between Fairview Road (Fountain Inn) and Neely Ferry Road (Simpsonville) to five lanes. How much does it cost? $8,600,000 Current LRTP Ranking: 14


09.09.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 9

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

NEWS

County agrees to poultry plant expansion at farmers market ANDREW MOORE | STAFF

amoore@communityjournals.com

On Tuesday, Greenville County Council released its rights to 28 acres of undeveloped land just off Pine Knoll Drive. Now, the land is being sold to House of Raeford Farms, according to a Greenville County official with knowledge of the project. “The private agribusiness company has pledged to modernize the plant, equipment and the processes there to achieve the highest industry standards. That will be a vast improvement over what is there now,” the official said. The North Carolina-based company, reportedly has plans to expand its current poultry processing plant, which is situated on four acres adjacent to the Greenville State Farmers Market on Rutherford Road, according to the county official. House of Raeford Farms declined to comment. The purchase would create a capital investment of $46 million and 1,000 jobs within five years of the purchase, according to county documents. The plant, which is operated by subsidiary company Columbia Farms, has been subject

to federal investigation. In 2008, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency detained about 300 workers after it found that 777 of 825 workers had submitted false documents to get their jobs. It was the largest immigration raid in the Carolinas. The land is part of the Greenville State Farmers Market site. The S.C. Department of Agriculture is not selling the retail area of the market or the restaurant, according to Stephanie Sox, communications director for the agriculture department. “We will continue to offer the same fresh certified S.C. grown produce and products that the market patrons enjoy,” Sox said. In 1979, the county deeded the land and its Greenville Farmers Market to the state. The state, however, could only have the land if it was used to continue the county’s farmers market, establishing revisionary rights. The state agreed and the S.C. Department of Agriculture opened the Greenville State Farmers Market (GSFM) in 1980. Since then, the S.C. Department of Agriculture has overseen the market and nearby property. Now, with no restrictions, the agriculture department plans to sell the land. While not confirming the sale, the S.C.

Department of Agriculture “has been evaluating options for the long-term sustainability of the GSFM that may include selling a portion of undeveloped property or property that is no longer needed,” Sox said. GSFM could get some upgrades if the sale happens. The county and state agreed that profits from the sale would go toward the renovation or replacement of the remaining GSFM property, facilities and equipment; efforts to replace and rebuild income streams lost due to the sale of property; and marketing and business development to support GSFM and local food systems. The state also agreed to pay $150,000 directly to Greenville County at closing to enhance community-based farmers, which includes grants to the Simpsonville and Travelers Rest farmers markets, according to county documents. The state was considering building a new GSFM in another location, according to Hugh Weathers, director of the S.C. Department of

Agriculture. “Unfortunately, neither the land sale proceeds, projected operating revenue, nor consumer market research in the Greenville area supports this,” Weathers wrote to the county in July. He added that what the “SCDA is proposing is a good compromise, and the opportunity cost for Greenville, the state and the agriculture industry is too high.” The state plans to move forward with the propsed sale, which was approved by the State Fiscal Accountability Authority last week. This is a developing story with more information to come.

Wondering what life as a University of South Carolina Upstate student is really like? Don’t take our word for it! Take advantage of these opportunities to find out more.

LEARN MORE! Take a campus tour on

Visit us for

FAB FRIDAY

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November 4

March 3

November 19

December 2

April 7

March 25

February 3

April 29

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Greenville Campus

November 1

March 7

November 15

February 7

April 4

February 14

All events in Spartanburg begin at 3:30 p.m. in the Health Education Complex.

All events in Greenville begin at 3:30 p.m. in the University Center Greenville.

To register, call 800.277.8727 or visit, www.uscupstate.edu


10 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.09.2016

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Beat the Heat with a new loan from GHFCU!

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Developers will have to apply for TIF money as city looks to spread help to its corridors CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

With the special funding source that has paid for downtown and West End improvement projects over the last three decades drying up, Greenville City Council members are looking to spread development throughout the city. TIF districts allowed the city to use increased tax revenue that new development in the central business district and West End would generate to finance the cost of the infrastructure needed to support that development.

“The challenge is to figure out how to keep the growth going and spread it throughout the city.” Greenville City Councilwoman Gayle Sprague

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Over the years, the city has issued bonds to pay for taxpayer-funded improvements such as city parking garages, sewer improvements and streetscaping to coincide with private development. Land values increased, generating new tax revenue to pay off the bonds and fund more work in the district. Greenville last year collected $8.2 million from the central business district TIF and another $1.4 million from the West End TIF. State law was changed to allow counties and cities to either negotiate the revenue split or opt out of TIFs and collect their share of the money. That means the city’s portion will be cut to $2 million to $2.5 million per year. A City Council committee is recommending the money be put into a

fund to help pay for the public portion of public-private economic development partnerships. Unlike the TIFs, the city could use the money to pay for projects outside of downtown and the West End, and for the first time, developers could have to fill out an application to get the funds. In the past, there really was no formal process for developers to request the city’s help. The proposed application includes the total amount of private money to be invested in the project, how much money the developer wants from the city and why the city’s financial assistance is needed. The city will consider several items when deciding whether to approve public investment, including consistency with the city’s strategic plan, job creation or retention and potential to serve as a catalyst for other development. In addition, it will consider community impacts, including creation or preservation of workforce housing and the potential increase in the city’s tax base. “The city needs to be clear in its priorities,” said Councilwoman Gaye Sprague, who is chairing the Council committee. “We have to set priorities on where do we want to incentivize development and what types of developments will be the catalyst for the growth our citizens want to see. The challenge is to figure out how to keep the growth going and spread it throughout the city.” Mayor Knox White asked Sprague how the city’s own initiatives would fit in, such as new parking garages and making Heritage Green feel more connected to the rest of downtown. “We’ve got lots of infrastructure that we want to do where a developer isn’t knocking on our door,” he said. White said when developers ask for city help, the city should ask for their help as well. For instance, if a developer wants help with a project in the downtown area, the city could ask that some of their parking be public. “We need to be better negotiators,” he said. “We have the opportunity to ask for something.”

What is a TIF? A tax increment financing district is a method cities use to encourage development in blighted areas. Property tax allocations to various taxing bodies are frozen at the levels when the TIF was started. Any increased tax revenues collected as a result of an increase in property values within the district go into a fund that is used for projects to promote more redevelopment.


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12 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.09.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

Seeing the light

Eat. Drink. Listen. Get your all-inclusive tickets now. euphoriagreenville.com

Clemson scientists study innovative way to combat opiate addiction using nanotech and lightsensitive proteins MELINDA YOUNG | CONTRIBUTOR

myoung@communityjournals.com

A Clemson University team received a $6 million National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to study the use of light to control brain cells, a strategy that could lead to untold neurological cures. Called optogenetics, the science involves using light-sensitive proteins to alter proteins in the brain. Theoretically, if they are able to change the chemistry of the brain, then they could develop new treatments for opiate addictions, seizures and other problems related to the brain. But the basic

science, in which the Clemson researchers are engaged, is many years away from patients having actual treatments, says Stephen Foulger, a lead investigator and the Greg-Graniteville Endowed chair and professor at Clemson. “We had this idea that wasn’t being demonstrated anywhere and was fairly novel,” Foulger said. Foulger’s team conducted preliminary research, including some pro bono work, before the project obtained NSF funding. “The idea is you have to take risks sometimes.” This is a great time to be on the cutting edge of the neurosciences, making the risk well worthwhile, Foulger added. “The Obama administration started the BRAIN Initiative,” he said. “It’s like in the 1960s when space was the new frontier – now, understanding the brain is the new frontier.” The Clemson team is collaborating with medical professionals, neuroscientists, biochemists, material scientists and physical chemists – like Foulger – to make great strides in brain research. Foulger’s local team is working with scientists at institu-

tions across the United States, including the University of Alabama at Birmingham, the University of South Carolina and the University of New Mexico.

“You go through the skull with glass-laser optics, shooting those into the brain, and the rats will stop eating the drug.” Stephen Foulger, Clemson professor

“We have these different people with different interests, focused on moving this project forward,” he says. “The global idea

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NEWS is to use light technology to alter brain behavior – not just for seizures and addiction, but also to understand how the brain works.” The researchers already have seen how rats which are addicted to opiates, and who will eat the drug until they die, suddenly change when light-sensitive proteins are inserted and then activated in their brains. “You go through the skull with glass-laser optics, shooting those into the brain, and the rats will stop eating the drug,” Foulger says. “But it’s awful to go through the brain, and we never want to open up a body if we can help it,” he says. “So we thought about coming up with something that will gener-

ate light with X-ray exposure, and that was a seminal moment for this project.” With nanotechnology, it’s possible to create nanoparticles that have a shell, allowing them to emit light when exposed to radiation. The idea is to make particles sequester in the brain where they need to be and then hit them with a mild X-ray source to make light, he explains. The NSF grant is for four years, and Foulger says he’s optimistic his team can generate additional funding down the road to continue their work on developing a tool that one day could “cure” people of opiate addictions and other neurological problems.

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14 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.09.2016

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NEWS

Mor Chikin?

Developer still plans to pursue Augusta Street Chick-fil-A drive-thru despite intense opposition CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

CPC Greenville LLC thinks Augusta Street is the perfect location for a drive-thru Chick-fil-A. Some nearby residents don’t. A public hearing where Greenville’s Board of Zoning Appeals was expected to decide whether to grant the restaurant a special exception to zoning laws that prohibit any additional drive-thrus on the busy street has been postponed until October. The developer wants to demolish the buildings where Vaughn Russell Candy Shop, Cheeseburger House, Empire Spirits liquor store and the Saluda River Pet Food & Supply Center are currently located and build the drive-thru in their place on the corner of Augusta Street and Aberdeen Drive, with entrances and exits on two residential side streets — Aberdeen and Conestee avenues. The property is across the street from Lewis Plaza, which is being redeveloped and will contain a Harris Teeter grocery store.

The application said there are two restaurants with drivethrus nearby: Como Pete’s and McDonald’s. “Clearly, a drive-thru restaurant — a commercial use — is appropriate here,” the application said. The application said the drive-thru would have enough stacking room for 25 cars and enough space to prevent traffic from flowing out of the property. CPC Greenville LLC asked that a public hearing before the BZA be postponed until Oct. 13. “The project is still very much on go,” said Greenville attorney Lindsay Carrington, who represents the developer. “It’s really just a timing issue.” Carrington said the delay would allow the developer more time to work with the city, the state Department of Transportation and neighborhood residents. Nearby residents will continue to work against the project, saying the drive-thru would make the traffic nightmare on Augusta worse, create issues with pedestrian and cyclist safety and increase the number of drivers who use residential streets as a cut-through. Residents collected nearly 700 signatures on a petition asking the BZA to reject the proposal. They used a passage of S. Truett Cathy’s “Eat More Chikin’, Inspire More People: Doing Business the Chick-fil-A Way” as one of their arguments. Cathy wrote that his restaurant built its first drive-thru-only restaurant in Greenville in 1993. “Near the parking lot of McAlister Square Mall we built a small drive-thru with two windows, designed to do about $750,000 worth of business per year. Well, the first

year we did $1.4 million. Cars were lined up across the mall parking lot and backed up down a four-lane highway.” On its petition, residents said, “This is an inappropriate and unwanted development by an out-of-state developer who can find a better location for its heavy-traffic business proposal.” Karen Tannenbaum, an Aberdeen Drive resident who is one of the leaders of the opposition, said the City Council changed its C-2 zoning last year to prohibit additional drivethrus for good reason. “There’s no compelling reason to change it,” she said. “We will continue to fight this because it does not make sense.”

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NEWS IN BRIEF Animal Care’s

UNIVERSITY

ITT Technical Institute second forprofit college to close in Greenville

Correspondent

ITT Technical Institute, which had a campus in Greenville, is closing. ITT Education Services Inc. said the U.S. Department of Education’s “unwarranted actions” banning the company from enrolling new students who rely on federal financial aid to pay for tuition forced it to cease operatons at all of its 130 campuses in 38 states. The U.S. Department of Education said ITT Educational Services has been the subject of state and federal investigation and this year has twice been found to be out of compliance with the standards of the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools. In addition to banning ITT from enrolling new students with federal aid, the Department of Education increased the amount of cash reserves the college must have from $93 million to $247.3 million. ITT Educational Services has laid off most of its more than 8,000 employees nationwide. Those remaining will help students with their records and future educational options. “For more than a half century, ITT Tech has helped hundreds of thousands of nontraditional and underserved students improve their lives through career-focused technical education,” the company said. “This federal action will also disrupt the lives of thousands of hardworking ITT Tech employees and their families.” The company said it had no intention of shutting down prior to the most recent sanction despite challenging regulatory environment that now threatens all proprietary higher education. ITT Tech is the latest for-profit college wrapped up in the federal government’s crackdown on forprofit schools that it says have sucked up billions of dollars in federal aid while failing to deliver on promised training and jobs. ITT Educational Services received an estimated $580 million in federal money last year. In June, Brown Mackey College announced it would close all but four of its campuses, including Greenville. Education Management Corp., a company that paid $100 million to settle a lawsuit by the U.S. Department of Justice over the college’s aggressive recruiting practices, owns Brown Mackey. Three other for-profit colleges have campuses in Greenville — Strayer University, Virginia College and ECPI College of Technology. - Cindy Landrum

PARKS

Portion of Swamp Rabbit Trail to close temporarily A section of the Greenville Health System Swamp Rabbit Trail that links Cleveland Park to Falls Park temporarily closed on Tuesday because of work on the second phase of the Cancer Survivors Park. Phase two of the park, which has a $3.4 million price tag, includes rerouting part of the Swamp Rabbit Trail, removing the Chamber’s lower level parking lot and building the foundation of the park’s education center, said Kay Roper, executive director

Thoroughfare Food Truck owners Neil and Jessica Barley

of the Cancer Survivors Park Alliance.

try to create an award-winning breakfast recipe.

Phase two also includes replacement of the “cheese grater” metal bridge on the Swamp Rabbit Trail near Church Street and the Chamber of Commerce building with a 12-foot-wide pedestrian bridge that has design features similar to Greenville’s signature Liberty Bridge. The bridge will be named the Spirit of Survivorship Bridge, acknowledging the $500,000 raised by Greenville High and J.L. Mann Academy as part of the schools’ Spirit Week fundraiser.

Neil, who is also the truck’s chef, has crafted a French toasted bagel stuffed with bacon, goat cheese and fig jam. It’s a testament to his culinary approach.

A boardwalk, the first phase of the Cancer Survivors Park, which is located between Church and Cleveland streets, opened in February. It will provide access to Falls Park via Church Street until mid-October, when it will be closed until mid-January. After the boardwalk is closed, trail users can access Falls Park via Cleveland Street and Camperdown Way. Maps will be posted on either end of the construction side to assist trail users in navigating around the closure. The trail section is expected to reopen Jan. 15. Additional temporary closures may be required before construction concludes in mid-March. A third phase includes an education center and gardens. When the $7.5 million park is complete, a once overgrown and an inaccessible area, will provide greater connectivity for Falls Park and Cleveland Park. The park is the culmination of a decades-long effort. - Cindy Landrum

FOOD TRUCK

Thoroughfare Food Truck enters national breakfast contest Greenville’s Thoroughfare Food Truck is celebrating September, also known as National Breakfast Month, by creating what could be a $25,000 bagel. Owners Neil and Jessica Barley have entered the Thomas’ Breakfast Battle. The contest, which is held by one of the country’s largest bagel producers, pits 50 food trucks against each other as they

“The bagel is just something that everyone has sitting around their kitchen. And that’s what we liked about it. We enjoy taking simple foods and adding a lot of flavor. It makes our recipes approachable for our customers. I mean it’s honestly something they can make at home. And that’s what we’ve done this time. It’s kind of a French toast and bagel hybrid that has all this flavor packed into it,” said Neil. Since 2013, the duo has used that philosophy to create a menu full of simple yet unique foods, including tater tots drenched in white cheddar gravy. However, that menu is only available for dinner. That could change if Thoroughfare wins the contest. “Part of this whole thing is to just compete nationally. But it could catapult our bigger plans forward,” said Jessica. “Brunch has really been getting a lot of attention in Greenville for a while with more and more downtown restaurants offering it. So I think we could do some special pop-up brunches here and there across town if we won.” It wouldn’t be the first time the duo has served brunch. Thoroughfare has partnered with Greenville’s Quest Brewery several times for morning yoga and brunch sessions, which were “pretty successful,” according to Neil. He added that brunches wouldn’t happen until early spring and that he would adjust the menu, which would include changing their chicken sandwich to a biscuit. The five-week contest begins on Sept. 12. Thoroughfare must garner enough votes to make it to the next round, which will feature only 25 trucks. Residents can cast their votes for Thoroughfare Food Truck online at ThomasBreakfastBattle.com. Thoroughfare will begin offering its French toasted bagel to customers starting on Sept. 18. It will be available for purchase until October. The duo also plans to provide the recipe to customers so that they can make it at home. - Andrew Moore

Featuring Ruff Reporter:

Timmy

I’m waggin’ all the way to the waterpark.

Waterpark, waterpark,WATERPARK! That’s all I can think about. It’s the end of summer and waterparks are closing for humans, but that means us dogs get to take over! They call it Waggin’ at the Waterpark, and it’s my absolute FAVORITE day of the year. I’m going this Saturday (Sept. 10) to Discovery Island, and then again on Sept. 24 to Otter Creek. I’m so excited I have been wearing my goggles all day. Make sure you tell your people to buy their tickets in advance before they’re sold out. If you get tickets for both dates, you can even save a few bucks. Trust me, you’ll want to go to both. Tell them to visit GreenvilleRec.com for more information. I CAN’T WAIT!!!

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16 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.09.2016

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

BUILDING THE FUTURE After 60 years, the work of Greenville’s Community Foundation is just getting started MELINDA YOUNG | CONTRIBUTOR

myoung@communityjournals.com

Leland Outz / Contributing

Sue Priester, vice chair, and Robert Morris, president of the Community Foundation of Greenville

If one were to put a green dot on a Greenville city map to mark each place impacted by the Community Foundation of Greenville, it would look like a pasture; hardly a block in the city hasn’t been touched. There would be multiple green spaces in the county, as well. The six-decade-old organization has donated more than $100 million in funds to hundreds of Greenville projects and organizations since it was founded in 1956. And to hear Robert W. Morris, the foundation’s president since 1999, tell the story, the work has barely begun: “We plan to grow our asset base to $100 million by the end of 2018. We’re currently at $60 million.” In the last few years, the Community Foundation has collaborated with some of the area’s other large foundations. By pooling funds and resources, the organizations can have a big, collective impact, Morris said. An example of the foundation’s future focus is OnTrack Greenville, a project that

focuses on helping middle school students succeed and graduate from high school. The collaborative initiative is led by the United Way. “They identified a social innovation fund grant, requiring other private contributors to support this strategy to help middle-grade students,” Morris said. “Then the federal government gave a $1 million grant per year for three years to the United Way for a coordinated process to support middle school students through high school with counseling and after-school enrichment programs.” The Community Foundation and other private and corporate foundations stepped up to provide matching funds, raising a total of $6.6 million, divided evenly over three years. The Community Foundation’s commitment so far is $450,000, but this could grow to a total of $750,000 if the federal grant is renewed for two more years, Morris said. The project was started a few years ago,

so the funders don’t know if it will be a success, but so far there are positive signs of students improving their record of behavior, attendance and grades, he said. Collaborations like the OnTrack Greenville project help to harvest the power of philanthropy, said Sue Priester, vice chair of the board of the Community Foundation. “In Greenville you have a number of smaller funders, corporate funders and the big three of United Way, the Hollingsworth Fund and the Community Foundation,” Priester said. “They’re all helping Greenville citizens and investing their philanthropic dollars to good ends, but what if they could work in a coordinated fashion, devoting sufficient philanthropic dollars to really move the needle and get things done?” These types of collaborative projects are what could help solve major community problems, she said. Ambitious social collaborative projects might be a 21st century priority for the

Community Foundation, but it doesn’t mean that the foundation has given up on small, grass-roots efforts. In fact, those also are on the rise. For instance, Clement’s Kindness Fund for Children began as a grass-roots project when the Haynsworth family was motivated to do something good for their community after their son Clement’s death at 24. Knox and Priscilla Haynsworth worked with the Community Foundation to raise more than $2 million. The money went to benefit the children’s day hospital at the BI-LO Charities Children’s Cancer Center of the Greenville Health System and the Bon Secours St. Francis Health System’s Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Program. The foundation has helped more than 200 projects that work this way: a person or small group decides to fund a signature project and asks the foundation for help in raising money for that purpose. Instead of startcontinued on PAGE 18


09.09.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 17

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

NEWS

Celebration day

Community Foundation gives $600,000 to four nonprofits MELINDA YOUNG | CONTRIBUTOR

myoung@communityjournals.com

The Community Foundation of Greenville gave a total of $600,000 in anniversary grants on Sept. 8 to four local nonprofits in celebration of the foundation’s 60th anniversary. The organizations include the Greenville Center for Creative Arts, Camperdown Academy, the Greenville Free Medical Clinic and the S.C. Children’s Theatre. “We decided to give $100,000 for each decade,” says Sue Priester, vice chair of the Community Foundation’s board and the chair of the 60th anniversary grant committee. “We wanted projects that would be transformative to take the nonprofits to a new place and expand the mission,” Priester says. “We wanted to find organizations that could use this funding, ideally, by 2018 and that could leverage our grant to attract other grants.”

The Community Foundation gave $100,000 to the Greenville Center for Creative Arts, which is located in the historic Brandon Mill in the Village of West Greenville. The arts center opened in 2015 and now plans to buy the mill building to make its home permanent, Priester says. Camperdown Academy, which works with children with dyslexia and other learning disabilities, received $125,000. Camperdown Academy plans to double its space with a new building. In addition, one of the academy’s board members offered a 50 percent match to the Community Foundation, which will increase the gift by more than $60,000. Also in celebration of its 60th year, the Community Foundation gave $125,000 to the Greenville Free Medical Clinic. Founded in 1987, the free clinic has primary care services at its downtown Greenville location, as well as satellites in Greer, Simpsonville and Berea, but it “didn’t have the abil-

ity to offer specialty care at the satellites,” Priester says. “We’re helping to fund a comprehensive array of medical services.” The funding will help cover the costs of new equipment, supplies and new technology. The S.C. Children’s Theatre will receive $250,000. Serving 43,000 children and families in the Upstate, the Children’s Theatre plans to build a new $10 million performance, education and administrative center on Augusta Street. The Community Foundation funding will go toward construction of the 34,000-square-foot facility with a 300-seat theater. “They have an opportunity to buy property next to their existing facility, and they’re in the beginning phase of their capital campaign, so we feel this grant will be a big spur to attracting new money,” Priester says. “It’s time for the theater to have its own home.” The Community Foundation is one of more than 700 community foundations na-

tionwide. These philanthropic groups were designed to pool donations to improve a specific place. “One of our goals is to grow the philanthropic community of Greenville,” Priester says. “When it’s expensive and harder for government to provide services, we look to philanthropy to do so much.” The foundation’s first grant after it was formed in the mid-1950s was to fund a survey of the county’s water, sewer and fire protection needs, laying the groundwork for residential and commercial growth in the 1970s. Later, the foundation funded the county’s first mass immunization campaign to protect children from polio, measles, tetanus and other diseases. The foundation has two grant application deadlines this fall, including a 4 p.m., Sept. 30, 2016, deadline for the Walter D. Johnson Trust Grants and a midnight Oct. 2, 2016, deadline for the Capacity Building Grants.


18 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.09.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS continued from PAGE 16

GROWING GIVING $100 million

total CF giving over 60 years

$10 million

average amount of CF grants made annually in recent years

$8.4 million

largest donation given to the foundation, establishing the Margaret Linder Southern Endowment Fund in 2013

$3.6 million

donated by Greenville Women Giving, a special initiative of the Community Foundation

$1 million

the Kroc Center in Greenville in 2006 received the largest gift CF ever made

$450,000

committed to OnTrack Greenville Middle Grades Success Initiative in 2014

$5,675

first funds collected in 1956

Jamie Moon, the president of the Institute for Child Success, which has received $75,000 in grants from the Community Foundation.

committee. Moon also is the president of the Institute for Child Success, a local nonprofit that has benefited from the foundation’s largesse, receiving $75,000 in grants from the Community Foundation. “These grants make that nonprofit better able to do the things it’s supposed to do,” Moon said. “The overall philosophy is to have a large impact on a large number of organizations where a little extra funding could have a big impact.” For example, there might be a nonprofit that provides people rides to their doctors’ appointments, but the group can’t get the word out because the website is so outdated. A $15,000 capacity building grant could help the organization revamp its website and reach more people. “Or an organization might be thinking about expanding its facility and needs a capital campaign or feasibility study to see if it’s possible to raise the funds now,” Moon said. “It’s hard for a nonprofit organization to get access to those types of funds.” The Community Foundation also is continuing the work it has done for 60 years, raising funds through legacy gifts from Greenville families who want to create an endowment fund or to give unrestricted funds to benefit any of the county’s nonprofit works. In 2014, the foundation received its largest gift to date from Margaret Linder Southern, a former schoolteacher. Southern bequeathed $8.4 million in her will to the foundation for the formation of an endowment to help the Greenville Humane Society and early child education and special needs programs, Morris said. The Humane Society receives half of the funding. Other recipients have included the Meyers Center, A Child’s Haven and the

Children’s Museum of the Upstate. In 2014, the Community Foundation received $3.4 million to help the homeless from the Jim and Kit Pearce Endowment, the foundation’s largest gift from a person still living. The Pearce money has benefited the Greenville Area Interfaith Hospitality Network, Triune Mercy Center, United Ministries, Gateway House, Habitat for Humanity, Homes for Hope, Project Host, Harvest Hope and Greer Community Ministries. A decade earlier, in 2004, the foundation received $3 million in unrestricted funds from Jean Harris Knight. Knight’s money made it possible for the foundation to honor its 50th anniversary with a $1 million gift to the construction of the Kroc Center, west

Leland Outz / Contributing

ing their own nonprofit group, they can use the foundation’s infrastructure, pay a small fee and ultimately accomplish their goals. Another example of the foundation’s signature projects is the sculpture of Dr. Virginia Uldrick, located at the S.C. Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities, which she founded in the 1980s. Greenville’s Community Foundation also has shifted its focus to projects that can have a big impact with smaller-sized grants, from $10,000 to $20,000 each. Every year, the foundation distributes a total of $120,000 in these small grants, and since 2013, the grants have been used to help organizations grow. Called capacity-building grants, these grants fund things like technology upgrades and hiring outside consultants for longrange strategy planning. “Capacity building is a phrase we use in the nonprofit world to talk about how you make your organization stronger,” said Jamie Moon, who has served on the Community Foundation’s capacity building grants

of Academy Street. Knight’s donation also helped create the Lake Conestee Nature Park and benefited Greenville Women Giving and Community Works, which helps public school teachers become first-time homebuyers, Morris said. “Shortly after we gave the grant to Community Works, a gentleman named William Marion Gilfillin said to me over lunch that he liked that grant and he’d make a gift to us in his estate,” Morris recalls. “When he died in 2014, he left us $1.4 million unrestricted, a very nice gift, and this year we’re using that in two ways: one is we’re supporting OnTrack Greenville, and, in honor of our 60th anniversary, we’re giving away $100,000 for each decade of our existence.”

The Haynsworth family — from left, Suzanne, Anne Marie, Knox Sr., Knox III, Knox Jr. and Priscilla — was motivated to found the Clement’s Kindness Fund for Children after son Clement died at age 24.


09.09.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 19

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COMMUNITY

Amazon surprises School for the Deaf and the Blind with big donation

New devices make learning more accessible for students ARIEL TURNER | CONTRIBUTOR

aturner@communityjournals.com

Elementary students filed into the library last Tuesday morning at the S.C. School for the Deaf and the Blind’s Spartanburg campus without a clue why they were there. Their teachers knew, as did the rest of the staff, visitors and media poised to get the imminent reaction shot of their surprised faces. After brief announcements by school officials and a representative from Amazon’s distribution center in Columbia, the black curtain tied with a foot-wide orange ribbon at the front of the room was ripped open to reveal a dozen orange-shirted Amazon employees toting boxes of Kindle Paperwhites and Fire tablets, specifically designed for deaf and blind students. The reaction was as anticipated — screams of delight. Each employee took a box to a table for the students to tear into and discover the new media they will get to use for the remainder of the school year. School for the Deaf fourth-grader Paige Covert, 9, said she was excited to download “Dr. Suess” and “Lily Lemon Blossom” books to her new Kindle Fire at school. She already has one at home she uses to read, play games and watch her favorite movie, “Frozen.” Keosha Haney, a tier-three associate with Amazon, unboxed the surprise for Paige’s class and said being there for the reveal was important to her because her friends’ children are students there and a family member was a former employee. This wasn’t just part of the job for her. In total, Amazon donated 38 Paperwhites equipped for the visually impaired, 30 Fire

tablets for hearing-impaired students, 20 Echos for use with the visually impaired, five TVs with Amazon Fire sticks, $2,500 in virtual content and a year of Prime benefits for the entire school. Rita Easler, the school’s technology integration coordinator, said Amazon donated Kindles to the school two years ago, and the company contacted them again this year about providing more technology. They kept the secret under wraps for three to four weeks, she said. “They wanted to make things easier, more accessible for our students,” Easler said. After the reveal, Easler invited several students into another room for a demonstration of the Echo, a 9.25-inch tall cylindrical voice command device with functions including question answering, playing music and controlling smart devices. These will be especially helpful for the visually impaired students, she said. “How fast can a cheetah run?” Easler asked it. “Alexa,” as the program is called, answered “75 miles per hour.” The students debated whether or not this would be considered cheating if they used it for their homework. “Alexa, play ‘Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star,’” Easler said. After a brief sound bite from a children’s recording, Easler noticed the students covering their ears. “Alexa, stop,” she said, prompting much laughter and many thank yous from the listeners. One student shouted out, “This is better than Siri,” Apple’s equivalent. “Siri’s a great app, but I’m different,” Alexa responded.


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09.09.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 21

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COMMUNITY Game On

Greenville’s Audiology Team

Having trouble listening in demanding environments?

with Vincent Harris

And it begins

Frustration and exhilaration on the field for Clemson and South Carolina in week one Let’s face it: The first week of the college football season can be scary and unpredictable. Just ask LSU, Oklahoma, Notre Dame and UCLA, who all lost to teams they theoretically had no business losing to. And while you’re at it, ask Tennessee, TCU and Michigan State, who came away with wins after some terrifying moments in their respective contests. So with that in mind, let’s turn to the season openers for the Gamecocks and the Tigers, two games that were, depending on the moment, dull, sloppy, exhilarating, idiotic, gutsy and, perhaps more so than anything else, educational. Here’s what we know now about Clemson and USC after their hard-fought wins against Auburn and Vanderbilt.

Let’s all take a deep breath. By kickoff time, people who make a great deal of money predicting these sorts of things had Clemson favored by 6 1/2, so a final score of 19-13 over Auburn isn’t really as disastrous as it might have felt. It’s also important to remember that all of college football has had an offseason to figure out how to handle Deshaun Watson, and for all

Licensed Audiologist

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Clemson:

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The rumors of QB Perry Orth’s demise were greatly exaggerated. After a shaky first half that saw Orth bypassed in favor of freshman Brandon McIlwain, Orth seemed like he was destined to become a footnote, and not a great one at that. He started his night off 1 for 4 amid some serious chaos and miscommunication with his receivers. But with the game on the line in the second half, Orth stepped into the comfortable USC role of “scrappy quarterback whose instincts outweigh his talent” and went 10 for 15, converting five out of six third downs of 6 yards or more. The question of who’s going to end up steering this team’s offense has never been more alive. Will Muschamp’s defensive skills are as sharp as ever. As much of a slog as this game was, the Gamecocks nevertheless carried out a solid defensive strategy tailored to Vanderbilt’s reliance on short passes and runs. USC got pressure on the Commodores’ quarterback on nine out of 25 dropbacks. Even if they started to get a little gassed by the end of the game, they were still oppressive enough to rattle Vandy’s inexperienced quarterback. It’s not especially fun to watch, but solid defense in the trenches can win close games for you.

Marcy W. Stowell

Alisa S. McMahon

of his incredible skills, he still tends to make some bad decisions when he’s pressured or hurried. And let’s not forget that until they suddenly grew up during the tail end of last season, Clemson had some hard-fought, skin-of-their-teeth wins against Louisville and Notre Dame. As Dabo Swinney said himself after the game, they found a way to win, which happened a good bit last year, too. It’s also worth noting that Clemson’s ability to turn out a clock-killing grind of a drive actually looks a bit stronger than last year. The Tigers ground Auburn down during a 3-minute drive late in the fourth quarter behind workhorse Wayne Gallman’s chunk-yard rushing, going 60 yards in 10 plays and leaving the War Eagles about 40 seconds to try to score. It was nice to see Mike Williams (174 yards receiving) returning at 100 percent as well. How ’bout that Tigers D? If this game was any indication, the Clemson defense hasn’t lost a step. Behind veterans like Christian Wilkins (six tackles and a fumble recovery) and Ben Boulware (an interception that essentially ended the game made up for a bone-stupid roughingthe-passer penalty) and beast-mode freshman Dexter Lawrence (no 340 lb. defensive tackle should be able to move that quickly), the defense held Auburn to 87 yards rushing. Vincent Harris covers music and sports for The Greenville Journal. Reach him at vharris@ communityjournals.com.

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22 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.09.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

COMMUNITY The Good

Events that make our community better

DONATION

DONATION

South Club area of Clemson Stadium renamed for donors

Greenville Tech receives $25,000 for scholarships

Clemson fans and Fountain Inn philanthropists Melvin K. and Dollie Younts pledged the sixth Cornerstone Gift to athletics. The recently renovated 600-seat South Club area at Memorial Stadium will now be named the Melvin and Dollie Younts South Club in appreciation of their $2.5 million commitment. The Clemson Athletic Cornerstone Program is a vital part of the new athletics facilities initiative. With new facilities, upgrades Clemson President James P. Clements (left) with Dottie Younts, Beth Clements and Melvin K. Younts. and rebuilds planned for or under way for football, basketball, baseball, tennis, soccer and academic support, it is the most comprehensive change to the athletics facilities ever undertaken at Clemson.

VOLUNTEER

Volunteers needed for Fall Rebuild in Inman Volunteers are needed for the Christmas In Action Fall Rebuild 2016 in Inman on Oct. 1. Volunteer teams, either skilled or unskilled in home repairs, are welcome. Call 576-7101 or email amathis@ciaspartanburg.org.

Tracy Long and Jason Green of Baldor hold the check standing with (left) Kelvin Byrd and David Clayton from the Center for Manufacturing Innovation and (right) Kristy Way and Les Gardner of the Greenville Tech Foundation.

The foundation of Baldor Electric Company has donated $25,000 to Greenville Technical College. The fund created will provide scholarships for students enrolled in certificate and/or degree options in CNC programming, computer technology, electronics engineering technology, engineering graphics technology, engineering transfer, machine tool technology, mechanical engineering technology or mechatronics programs at the college’s Center for Manufacturing Innovation. Scholarship funds may be used for tuition, fees, books, supplies and housing.

The Smart, Easy Way to Save for College. No matter how old your child is, saving for college is the smart thing to do. And while there are many ways you can save for this important investment, Future Scholar – South Carolina’s 529 College Savings Plan – is the smart way to save. It’s easy to open an account and anyone can contribute, helping pave the way for a bright future for your loved one.

To find out more, visit FutureScholar.com.

Reasons to study a Future Scholar 529 College Savings Plan: • Funds grow tax free on Federal and South Carolina state income tax • Contributions are tax deductible • Easy to open with no minimum contribution • Anyone can contribute • Account owner maintains control • Funds can be used for just about any college

FutureScholar.com The Office of State Treasurer Curtis M. Loftis, Jr.

To learn more about Future Scholar and its investment objectives, risks and costs, read the official statement available at FutureScholar.com before investing. Check with your or the beneficiary’s home state to learn if it offers tax or other benefits for investing in its own 529. Not paid for with state funds.


Greenville Journal 09.09.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 23

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COMMUNITY Our Schools

Activities, awards and accomplishments

BOB JONES UNIVERSITY

Taylors resident joins BJU Bruins basketball team Taylors resident Marquez Fisher has been added to the 2016-2017 Bob Jones University Bruins men’s basketball team. Fisher, a forward, joins four additional new recruits to the team. “We’re very excited about our team and the players we have joining us this year,” head coach Neal Ring said. “I think we will have a tight-knit group that will learn to play together as we progress though the season.” Fisher was a standout at Travelers Rest High School. He was named MVP twice throughout his high school career as well as being named All-State, All-County and All-Region. In 2014, he was named the Male Athlete of the Year for his school and named among the best players in North and South Carolina as a North-South All-Star.

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School receives $17,000 grant Powdersville Elementary School in Anderson School District One received a $17,000 environmental stewardship grant from Michelin North America. Melissa Wilcox, a fifth-grade teacher at Powdersville, wrote the grant in hopes of furthering the problem-based learning unit on healthy honeybee hives third-graders had completed the year before. The vision for this project is to expand the bee project with education on sustainability and nutrition in the classroom and into the community. By taking advantage of research and gardening ideas at Clemson University, part of the project will install for each third- through fifthgrade classroom a raised bed garden (used for pollinator friendly flowers and vegetables) that not only supports the bee project but provides an opportunity for hands-on learning that has real-life implications in the community. The project will foster school and community partnerships and provide increased student opportunities for real world problem solving and hands-on learning, aligned with South Carolina College and Career Readiness Standards and the Profile of a South Carolina Graduate.

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Two Greenville-area students join class of 2020 James Madison University welcomes two Greenville-area residents to the class of 2020. Kaitlyn Bresette of Greenville, majoring in communication sciences and disorders, and Morgan Cox of Easley, majoring in sport and recreation management, join the incoming freshman class of students from 33 states, the District of Columbia and 19 countries around the world.

ST. ANTHONY OF PADUA CATHOLIC SCHOOL

School featured at Greenville Drive More than 300 people came out for the St. Anthony School Family and Friends Night at the Greenville Drive. The event included on-field activities and recognition with St. Anthony students and staff, the first pitch by the Rev. Patrick Tuttle and a performance of the National Anthem by the St. Anthony Mixed Choir.

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24 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.09.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

LOOK

Tigers vs. Tigers In its first game of the season, Clemson beat Auburn 19-13 at Jordan-Hare Stadium in Auburn, Ala.

Zachary Hanby / Contributing


09.09.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 25

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LOOK

Sun and smiles Labor Day weekend was the last time locals could enjoy Greenville County Rec’s water parks until next spring — luckily, the weather was perfect.

Cindy Landrum / Staff

Carolina Lightning player Calvin Durrence slides in safely to home in a game against the Simpsonville Thunder in a 9U game in the Labor Day Fall Kick-Off tournament.

Ariel Turner / Staff

Workers put watercourses and restrooms into place at Runway Park at the Greenville Downtown Airport.


26 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.09.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

COMMUNITY Our Community

Community news, events and happenings

CAMPAIGN

United Way kicks off 2016 campaign More than 1,000 volunteers and representatives from local businesses and organizations attended the United Way of Greenville County 2016 community campaign kick-off Tuesday at the TD Convention Center. Jennifer Johnsen, Shareholder with Gallivan, White & Boyd, P.A., is serving as chair for this year’s Community Campaign. At the event, Johnsen and other key volunteer leadership outlined why a successful campaign is important to help individuals and families throughout the Greenville community lead safe, stable and successful lives.

CONSERVATION

At age 34, he was one of the youngest partners in the company’s history. White’s close friends and family established the James P. White Scholarship Endowment in 2002 to provide need-based scholarships to deserving Clemson students. To date, 42 of the scholarships have been awarded. The university’s Jewish Student Association and Muslim Student Association will participate in the ceremony, and Clemson President Emeritus James F. Barker will speak.

ARTIFACT

New in-box WWII-era stretcher found in Christ Church Episcopal What is believed to be a WWII-era litter, or stretcher, was found in its original box, deep in a closet at Christ Church Episcopal in Downtown Greenville as preparations were being made for its upcoming church restoration. The stretcher will be donated to a new museum, the future Military History Center of the Carolinas’ (MHCC) U.S. Military History Museum and Education Center. The museum will be located at 14 Airport Road Ext. and is adjacent to the Greenville Downtown Airport’s Runway Park within a block of the proposed Swamp Rabbit Trail extension. Visit greenvilledowntownairport.com for more information.

Upstate Forever protects Hickory Hills property Upstate Forever has recently chosen to protect Hickory Hills, a hunting property located in Union County, just outside the small town of Jonesville. The tract is now permanently protected from development through a conservation agreement made possible in part by funding from the South Carolina Conservation Bank. Upstate Forever is a nonprofit, membership-based organization promoting sensible growth and the protection of special places in the Upstate of South Carolina. Hickory Hills’ 315 protected acres were once a farm, part of a larger property owned since 1805 by the Means family, whose members included generals and a South Carolina governor. Significant historic structures still stand there today, including homes of enslaved workers. The Means family residence, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, sits on an adjacent tract. “My partners and I are delighted to protect this property with a conservation agreement with Upstate Forever,” said Norman Pulliam, one of the landowners. “Our long-term goal is to keep it within our families and not see it developed.” Upstate Forever currently protects more than 20,000 acres on 106 properties across the Upstate and has nearly 2,000 members, two offices and a staff of 19. For more information, visit upstateforever.org.

MEMORIAL

Clemson to honor 9/11 victims, including alumnus Clemson University will commemorate the 15th anniversary of the nation’s deadliest terrorist attacks with a public memorial ceremony Sunday, Sept. 11, at 3 p.m. in Tillman Hall. It is coordinated by the student organization Tiger Platoon, which promotes awareness of Clemson’s rich military heritage. The memorial will honor the victims of 9/11 as well as local first responders and law enforcement. There will be a tribute to Clemson alumnus James Patrick White, who was killed in the attacks on the World Trade Center, where he worked at the Cantor-Fitzgerald global financial services firm.

SEMINAR

Christ Church Rector, the Rev. Dr. Harrison McLeod, assisted with the donation process.

15th annual grief seminar open to public

Thomas McAfee Funeral Homes announces the 15th annual Grief Seminar that will take place on Sept. 20-21 at the TD Convention Center. The three-seminar series is a public outreach project aiming to provide a resource to those experiencing grief in their personal and professional lives. Michelle Post, a licensed marriage and family therapist and continuing education provider, will speak. Post internationally consults and trains in areas of grief, death notification with children and teens, stress and burn-out prevention, group facilitation, ASIST suicide prevention, executive leadership and team-building. The seminar begins on Tuesday with “What to Do About the ‘S’ Word – Suicide CPR and First Aid” from 3–5 p.m. This seminar is geared towards school professionals, teachers, nurses, social services and administrative staff. Designed specifically for the general public, “What Have You Done for YOU Lately? Stress Management for Grievers” will be presented from 6:45-9 p.m. This seminar is designed to provide coping mechanisms for anyone experiencing stress in their life as a side effect of the death of someone close to them. On Wednesday, 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m., Post will present the professional caregivers’ workshop “Understanding Young Hearts: Tips, Tools and Techniques to Heal Grieving Children and Teens.” For more information, visit thomasmcafee.com.

The Anderson University School of Nursing proudly announces the addition of

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South Carolina


09.09.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 27

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HOME

Featured Home

LedgeStone

5 Still Creek Court, Greer, SC 29651

Home Info Price: $647,800 MLS: 1328583 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 3.5 Sq. Ft: 3943 Lot Size: 0.60 Acres Built: 2008 Schools: Oakview Elementary, Riverside Middle, and Mauldin High Agent: Melissa Morrell | 864.918.1734 mmorrell@cdanjoyner.com

Quality Craftsmanship abounds at this painted brick & stone home built by Dillard Jones. Situated on a 0.60 acre wooded lot with manicured grounds and tree-lined backyard. The outdoor living is awesome with a covered rear porch, double-sided gas log fireplace, and large deck with steps to the sprawling yard. The interior is impressive with a wide foyer showcasing the custom ceiling and trim detailing. The home office/study features a bay window, decorator colors and French Doors. The dining room with its painted wood ceiling beams and traditional wains

coating mix the old and new with grace. The vaulted family room showcases a center gas log fireplace. The heart of the home is the kitchen with its nearby breakfast room and keeping room with double-sided fireplace. The kitchen offers a gas cooktop, granite countertops, tiled backsplash, and serving bar. The master suite on main level features a tray ceiling and large bath with two sinks, jetted tub, tiled shower, and his/her closets. Upstairs you’ll enjoy two bedrooms with Jack and Jill bath, a third bedroom with its own private bath, and large bonus room!

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28 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.09.2016

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HOME Huntington • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Crossword puzzle: page 50

PLANTATION GREENE

5BR, 3BA • 3,900 sq. ft. $433,000 • MLS 1327205 Beautiful brick home, stately two story foyer with cascading double stairs. Spacious gourmet kitchen, walk-in pantry, and grand center island. Large great room with stone fireplace. Main Level guest suite. Luxury Master Suite upstairs and an additional 3 bedrooms. Desirable Eastside neighborhood with many amenities. Come see!

North Main • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

4 Huntington Ct. · $1,675,000 · MLS#

14 Calaverdi Court · $739,500 · MLS# 1318073

301 W Earle St. · $659,900 · MLS# 1328502

5BR/5.5BA Private, sophisticated oasis. 10 minutes to downtown Greenville. Renovated and expanded. Incredible outdoor space, pool, tennis court, and outdoor kitchen. Roper Mountain Rd. to Huntington Rd. to Huntington Ct.

4BR/4.5BA Gorgeous Dunn Custom Builder Home With Open Floor Plan. Master and Additional Bedroom on Main Level. Must See!!! Woodruff Road, Left on Bennett’s Bridge Road. Southampton on Left.

4BR/5BA Come view this historic property within walking distance to downtown Greenville. From Downtown N Main St left onto W. Earle St.

Contact: Tom Marchant 449-1658 The Marchant Company

Contact: William E. Dunn 630-8246 Dunn Custom Builders

Laurel Lake • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Silverleaf • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Contact: Jackie Joy 346-6781 Jackie Joy Properties

Bells Creek • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

200 Goldenstar Lane · $419,000 · MLS# 1328192

217 E Shefford Street · $262,500 · MLS# 1326007

130 Horsepen Way · $224,900 · MLS# 1327008

4BR/3BA Gorgeous! Large private yard, Open FP, MBR plus another BR on main. Screen porch, bonus room, Beautiful! Right into Laurel Lake, 200 Goldenstar Lane

3BR/2.5BA Newly renovated kitchen including granite countertops, stainless steel appliances, backsplash (July 2016). Roof (2016). Deck & private lot with creek. Old Spartanburg, Left on W Silverleaf, Right onto E Shefford

4BR/2.5BA Amazing Home W/Fantastic Upgrades! Flex Room On Main! Exterior Fenced Lot! Wonderful Condition! Bells Crossing School! Hurry! Woodruff To R@Scuffletown, Continue To L@ Bells Creek Subdivision, R@Horsepen

Contact: Maggie Aiken 616-4280 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner REALTORS

Contact: JASON MULLINS 517-8557 Allen Tate

Contact: Pam McCartney 630-7844 BHHS C Dan Joyner

121 Cottonpatch Court, Greenville

Southampton • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Advertise your home with us Contact:

Annie Langston 864-679-1224 alangston@communityjournals.com

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Sudoku puzzle: page 50


09.09.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 29

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HOME Featured Neighborhood

Cureton Place

15 Cureton Street, Greenville, SC 29605 M

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Home Info Price: $400,000 + Bedrooms: 3 Baths: 3

MLS#: 1315852 Sq. Ft: 1700-2100+

Schools: Blythe Elementary, Hughes Middle, and Greenville High

Distinctive townhomes in Greenville’s most desirable neighborhood. One of these ten unique homes could be yours. Enjoy modern amenities amid the historic and sought-after Augusta Road area. With 10 luxury 2 and 3 bedroom townhomes, Cureton Place offers exceptional design and quality and the convenience of living just off Augusta Road. Lined with beautiful trees and surrounded by lovely homes, Cureton Place is in the heart of it all. Restaurants, boutiques, grocery and coffee shops plus award-winning parks and the Swamp Rabbit Trail are a short walk or bicycle ride from your front door.

Designed in keeping with the character and charm of the Augusta Road area, the townhomes at Cureton Place feature high-quality stone and hardi plank exteriors and craftsman style garage doors. Each townhome offers a spacious floor plan, including oversized balconies and porches for endless hours of outdoor entertaining and enjoyment. The clean, classic design offers the perfect blend of modern and traditional. Private elevators and garages are standard in each townhome!

Becky Orders 864.270.0743 borders@cdanjoyner.com

Leigh Irwin 864.380.7755 lirwin@cdanjoyner.com

CONSTRUCTION IS UNDERWAY!

Real Estate News

That Relaty Group Welcomes Two Agents Alison McCormack is a member of the National Association of REALTORS, the South Carolina Association of REALTORS, and the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS. Formerly an attorney from New Jersey, Alison transitioned into real estate shortly after moving to the upstate in 2010. Her attention to detail, and ability to research and solve problems, makes the buying or selling experience simple and enjoyable for her clients. Alison prides herself on being accessible and available at all times. McCormack Alison is a graduate of Denison University and The University of Buffalo School of Law. She is also a licensed horse show judge. She and her husband C.J., have four grown children, and are involved with numerous dog and equine rescue groups. Lauren Dorrity is a member of  Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS®,South Carolina Association of REALTORS®, and National Association of REALTORS®. A gradu-

ate of Liberty University Graduate School, North Greenville University School of Business, and Wyatt Institute of Real Estate, Lauren brings over six years of combined experience in the commercial and residential real estate sectors to represent her clients in their real estate transactions. As a real estate associate, Lauren strives to work in a cross functional capacity to deliver results. She has a keen understanding of the importance of home staging when it comes to selling a home efficiently and quickly, and uses her eye for design and interior decorating to guide Dorrity clients as they prepare to list their homes on the market.  Lauren is knowledgeable and equipped in multiple facets, and her primary endeavor it to ensure a smooth transition for her clients from the home selection phase, through contract negotiations, and into occupancy. A native of Greenville, Lauren carries her diverse experience, coupled with her propensity for growth and development, to both her profession and her continued on PAGE 30


30 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.09.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

HOME Featured Home

The Courtyards on West Georgia Road 350 Laguna Lane, Simpsonville

Home Info Price: $425,000 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 4

MLS#: 1324521 Sq. Ft: 3154

Contact: Virani Homes viranicustom.com 864-634-5203

OPEN: TUESDAY-SATURDAY 11:00-5:30 SUNDAY 1:00-5:30

Everything you want and need in one property with top-notch construction. This home features predominantly main floor living, a side entry garage, private lot, security system and upgraded closet systems. In addition, this home incorporates breathtaking custom interior finishes such as exposed brick and amazing electrical fixtures and is offered at an affordable price. The 3 bedrooms on the main level with a Bonus Room over the garage and a fourth bedroom upstairs make this home ideal. This home features all the necessities you would expect in a custom home.

The Dining room is expertly placed adjacent to the Kitchen and Great Room and features a coffered ceiling and overlooks the front porch. The kitchen features an island with granite counters and stainless steel appliances. The Master is elegant in design with extensive molding, tray ceiling, deluxe bathroom with granite counters, a zero-entry ceramic tiled shower and an upgraded Master Closet System. Come see this beauty for yourself or take a virtual tour from the comfort of your living room – https://vimeo.com/160450898

Real Estate News continued from PAGE 29

community. As a current member and treasurer of the North Greenville Alumni Board of Directors, a previous title holder in the Miss South Carolina Scholarship Pageant Organization, and a past South Carolina Guardian Ad Litem, Lauren has developed a foundation built upon leadership, ethics, and achievement.  In addition, she also enjoys volunteering as a Camp Grace Teacher for Grace Church, and with Junior Achievement of Upstate SC in her free time. Whether you are a first time home buyer, or veteran home owner looking to sell, Lauren will be fabulous from start to finish!  

Allen Tate Announces July Winner’s Edge Graduates – Upstate

Barbara McFerron – Easley/Powdersville Dale Cabler – Greer Exclusively for  Allen Tate  Realtors,  Winner’s Edge  is a required, comprehensive real estate training program. The curriculum includes the latest in national real estate trends, technology, license law, sales and marketing techniques, integrated with detailed information about the local real estate market. As a result of this intensive course of study, Realtors are equipped with the latest tools in the industry in order to serve their clients in a knowledgeable, caring and professional manner.  Since 1957, Allen Tate Realtors has focused on the needs of consumers by providing onestop shopping with choices in branches located in communities throughout the Carolinas.

Joel DeWeese Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Greenville

Allen Tate Realtors®, the Carolinas’ leading real estate company, has announced that Coldwell Banker Caine recently welcomed Joel DeWeese as a residential sales agent to the following individuals have graduated from the company’s Winner’s Edge training in its Greenville office. the Upstate region:

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Montebello

329 Sorono Drive, Greenville, SC 29609

Home Info Price: $1,100,000 MLS: 1328559 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 4/2 Sq. Ft: 4600-4799 Lot Size: 0.31 Acre Year Built: 2007 Schools: Summit Drive Elementary, Sevier Middle, and Wade Hampton High Agent: Clint Miller | 864.395.3421 Clint@MarchantCo.com

You will be enamored by this extravagant, eye-catching, Tuscan architecture and design. This home is located in prestigious Montebello at the base of Paris Mountain and is set in the community’s premiere ‘Villaggio di Montebello’ area. The amazing panoramic and breathtaking views of Greenville and the Blue Ridge mountains are featured throughout the home located just minutes away from Downtown Greenville. Established with luxury, functionality, and exclusivity, the home features a dramatic two-story foyer with a striking grand staircase, an open floor plan, gourmet kitchen and much more. Two-story living made easy by

taking the quaint elevator to the upstairs loft where you can relax by the gas fireplace or enjoy entertaining your guests with your own custom made bar area. The travertine tile balcony awaits you with spectacular sunsets, picturesque views of the downtown skyline, and sweeping mountain vistas that will leave you breathless. The large master suite is a private retreat with access to the awe inspiring private balcony, oversized “dream” walk-in closet, and luxurious master bath. This home is architecturally stunning from the curb appeal into its amazing interior. This home exclusively awaits you with its Italian inspired charm!

Real Estate News

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A native of South Carolina, Joel joins Coldwell Banker Caine with nearly a decade of marketing, entrepreneurship, and real estate experience. He attended Tri-County Technical College and received degrees in marketing and management. Joel received his real estate license in 2008 and has worked in sales, marketing, and management within the field. He has a passion for nonprofit fundraising, also gaining experience as a fundraising coordinator for a healthcare center in Clemson. Joel enjoys the outdoors in his spare time – kayaking, mountain bik- DeWeese ing, and hiking as much as he can. He also actively utilizes the Swamp Rabbit Trail and explores local breweries in the Upstate. In addition to his fundraising work in the healthcare realm, Joel co-founded a nonprofit fundraising company for animal rescues. “We are delighted to welcome Joel to our Greenville team,” said Stephen Edgerton, president and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “He has already become an indispensable asset thanks to his tenacious work ethic and inspirational creativity.”

Tylie Barwick Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Greenville Coldwell Banker Caine recently welcomed Tylie Barwick as a residential sales agent to its Greenville office. Tylie has been in the real estate industry since 2002 and joins Coldwell Banker Caine with abundant experience in new homes sales and residential brokerage. She holds a business degree from Spencer College in Baton Rouge. Originally from Louisiana, Tylie now enjoys calling the Upstate home. She is enthusiastic about community involvement through her membership on the board of Defenders for Children and participation in Auc- Barwick tion for a Cause for animals in need. In her spare time, Tylie enjoys competitive racing, both in boats and automobiles. She also enjoys capturing the world around her through photography. Tylie likes to spend time with her family, including four children and eleven grandchildren. continued on PAGE 33


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SOLD: Greenville Transactions For the week of August 8 – 12, 2016 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$11,206,500 $6,450,000 $1,667,000 $1,250,000 $1,200,000 $900,000 STONEBROOK FARMS $654,900 CHANTICLEER TOWNS $625,000 $620,000 PARKINS MILL COURT $590,000 ALLEGHENY $547,500 ALLEGHENY $532,000 GRIFFITH FARM $512,500 IVY GROVE $489,540 BROOKSIDE FOREST $477,000 BELHAVEN VILLAGE @ HOLLINGSWORTH $457,350 RIVER WALK $450,000 ASHETON $439,000 RIVER OAKS $433,200 HAMMOND’S POINTE $432,000 SUGAR CREEK $430,000 MILLER’S POND $427,000 CARILION $425,780 BEAVER RUN $424,000 S I RANCHETTES $410,000 FOREST PARK $410,000 $405,000 KILGORE FARMS $405,000 GOWER ESTATES $392,500 SUNSET HILLS $385,000 ELLINGTON PARK $383,500 SILVER MEADOWS $378,000 SYCAMORE RIDGE $370,000 HOLLINGTON $369,900 GARRISON WOODS $361,000 NORTHWOODS $360,000 WESTHAVEN $357,089 RIVERBEND ESTATES $355,700 RIVER OAKS $354,600 WESTHAVEN $353,990 SUGAR CREEK $353,900 CLEAR SPRINGS $337,698 SUGAR CREEK $336,000 CHANDLER LAKE $332,371 WESTHAVEN $331,404 COACHMAN PLANTATION $320,437 SOUTHERN OAKS PLANTATION $319,000 VERDMONT $317,000 WESTHAVEN $316,209 LINKSIDE $315,000 TOWNES AT THORNBLADE $307,150 KELSEY GLEN $306,570 COUNTRY VIEW $300,000 HUNTERS RIDGE $295,000 KING’S CROSSING $293,527 $290,000 $289,900 $287,000 $285,000 $277,000 MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS $274,900 PLANTATION HILL $273,000 COUNTRY CLUB ESTATES $273,000 $270,000 TUSCANY FALLS $268,056 BOXWOOD $267,000 KINGSGATE $266,000 MARES HEAD FARM $265,130 THE EDGE ON NORTH MAIN $260,000 HOLLY TREE PLANTATION $259,900 BROOKFIELD GARDENS $259,900 COLEMAN SHOALS $259,000 MCSWAIN GARDENS $256,000 $255,000 SADDLE CREEK $255,000 HUDDERS CREEK $255,000 ABNEY MILLS BRANDON PLANT $250,000 CASTLE ROCK $250,000 HOWARD’S PARK $247,500 TOWNHOMES AT PENDLETON WEST $247,500 NORTHCLIFF $245,000 HERITAGE CREEK $245,000 AMBER OAKS FARM $238,856 RAVINES AT SPRING MILL $238,000 WASHINGTON HEIGHTS $237,157 HERITAGE CREEK $236,000 JONESVILLE LANDING $235,000

EDGEMONT APARTMENTS LLC EXECUTIVE CABINETRY LLC PARC SOUTH LLC POINT DEVELOPMENT LLC ANDERSON UNIVERSITY OF A DEMPSEY FAMILY LLC SIZEMORE DEBORAH W EVANS ANN N RYAN’S FAMILY STEAK HOUS LANCASTER KEVIN E DOTSON BRETT P AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL R SHANNON DAVID P MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH EDWARDS CLINT E (JTWROS) NVR INC KORNACKI RICHARD A (JTWR HUMPHREYS CHARLES J LAZARUS DEVELOPMENT CORP NAGY PAUL HENRY ESMACHER JULIA H VAN RHYN STEPHANIE DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL LANE GALE EARNEST MARCEDES ANNA B RICHARDSON BETTY T 541 LOWNDES HILL ROAD LL STRUPP BRUCE A JR GREER DAVID K RAMSEUR DAVID D (JTWROS) TYLER KATE (JTWROS) HOOVER CUSTOM CONSTRUCTI DOLLAR DEBBIE (JTWROS) FLOYD JAMES EARL (JTWROS REED CLIFFORD WAYNE WILLIAMS DAVID D R HORTON-CROWN LLC MIDDLEHOUSE BUILDERS INC BURROUGHS BOB L D R HORTON-CROWN LLC KEILMAN JENNIFER MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH MEECE ERIN MCCALL (JTWRO MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH D R HORTON-CROWN LLC MUNGO HOMES INC GALBRAITH ROBERT B STARACE DENNIS SCOTT (JT D R HORTON-CROWN LLC GOESS BRIAN C TOWNES AT THORNBLADE LLC NVR INC PATRICK RITA B (JTWROS) CHARRON JAN K (JTWROS) D R HORTON-CROWN LLC LOKAMY H DALE MADHAVAN PRATHIMA RICH BARBARA S HEIN MAUREEN H RITCHIE JUDITH MORRIS DIANA Y BURNS INVESTMENTS LLC ALLPASS MATTHEW DOUGLAS CASTANO SEIR ADAMS STEPHEN R PARISEAU BRAD C (JTWROS) JACKSON JACOB HUNTER MCCARTER D FAMILY TRUST WEEGO BRIAN W JACQMAIN GEOFFREY T DAN RYAN BUILDERS S CC L QIAO JIANXIANG MILLER GWENDOLYN F SIMICICH JO ANNE TURNER CECIL R LATTA STEVEN BRUCE FIRST CHICAGO TRUST VOIGT RUTH ELAINE MARK III PROPERTIES INC BROCKMAN WAYNE K AMBRIA PROPERTIES LLC MITCHELL JAY F SK BUILDERS INC CURRIER JACKIE A RED CLAY INVESTORS LLC DARE CASEY V SINCLAIR KIMBERLY L

BUYER

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HCG GREENVILLE II LLC NL VENTURES X GRANDVIEW ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC PARAMOUNT HOTEL GROUP LL RICE BETTY JO (JTWROS) AZA INC HUMPHREYS CHARLES J BENNETT C LEE (JTWROS) OPEN FLAME LLC MARCHAND DAVID P AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL R CLEMENCE ELLIOTT I IV MARCEDES ANNA B SUTTON PATRICK (JTWROS) RAMSEUR DAVID D (JTWROS) GRIVICH SHANE (JTWROS) RENNER JEFFREY D (JTWROS CAULDER ALICE LINDSAY WE MCHENRY EDGAR RONALD TRU PATRICK RITA B (JTWROS) CLARK CAREY MAXWELL (JTW SHADEL ROBERT F (JTWROS) FARNSWORTH DANIEL J (JTW GAILOR DOUGLAS EUGENE (J ADAMS DAVID M JR (JTWROS RED CLAY INVESTORS LLC COTTAGES AT OVERBROOK LL BERARDI CHRISSIE MEECE SCOTT H LANCE CHARLES D JR (JTWR BIANCO K VALERIE DOMM DIANE M (JTWROS) COLYER LAURA G (JTWROS) MILHAM CRAIG (JTWROS) WEAVER CHIQUITA A (JTWRO JACOBS ADAM D (JTWROS) BALAKRISHNAN YUVARAJ DEVINE ADRIENNE R (JTWRO SCOTT CHERYL G (JTWROS) COX CHRISTOPHER (JTWROS) MATHEWS DEBORAH L (JTWRO MARINELLI DEBORAH I (JTW PURVIS APRIL SOURIA (JTW WOLFSHEIMER DAVID WARREN JOSHUA BRADY ZACKERY (JTWROS) DUDLEY CAROLYNN B ESCALONA PRISCILLA G (JT WANG FENFEN (JTWROS) JOHNS ANDREW (JTWROS) ANDERSON JULIE D COPE DOUGLAS (JTWROS) BENNETT ALEXANDREA (JTWR WINKLER KENNETH I (JTWRO EDDY BRIAN (JTWROS) PEDROE LLC MASON GREGORY A (SURV) ROWELL JOHN H JR COKER JUSTIN T BURTNER ANNE M (JTWROS) DUSSO JAMES E (JTWROS) REVAN DEREK E (JTWROS) MCGRATH THOMAS M IV CLARK KIM EVANS (JTWROS) ADAMS STEPHEN R (JTWROS) ALLEN KATHLEEN J (JTWROS BLANKEN MICHAEL A (JTWRO MCCARTER WILLIAM R NICKLES THOMAS C CUMBUS AMY TREECE (JTWRO BALLENGER JESSICA A (JTW LEAMON MARSHA DAY BOBBIE JOANN (JTWROS TURNER BARBARA A (JTWROS BREWTON MARY ELIZABETH F FRANKLIN CALVIN PATEL ARPIT HAWKINS CHARLES MATTHEW D R HORTON-CROWN LLC MARTINEZ KYLE DAVID SPEEDLING KAREN M (JTWRO AUGUSTINE THERESA M (JTW LATHROP BROOKE P (JTWROS BURROUGHS BOB L (JTWROS) CULMER ELIZABETH K (JTWR REIGEL MELINDA G (JTWROS BAITSELL ADAM M

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SHADY FORD $234,430 DOVE TREE $230,000 MCSWAIN GARDENS $230,000 WOODGREEN $229,500 HERITAGE CREEK $229,000 HALF MILE LAKE $227,250 MORNING MIST FARM $224,777 BRYSON MEADOWS $223,066 NEELY FARM - LAUREL BROOK $222,000 NEELY FARM - DEER SPRINGS $219,500 TIMBERLAKE $217,500 COUNTRY HAVEN $216,500 SUGAR CREEK $216,000 SUMMERFIELD $212,000 KELSEY GLEN $212,000 HAVEN AT RIVER SHOALS $210,000 HERITAGE POINT $208,500 BUXTON $208,000 LANSFAIR @ ASHBY PARK $208,000 CHARTWELL ESTATES $205,131 CHARTWELL ESTATES $205,131 AVONDALE FOREST $205,000 JONESVILLE LANDING $205,000 HALTON GREEN $205,000 NORTHSIDE GARDENS $203,000 COUNTRY MEADOWS $200,000 $198,000 THE ENCLAVE AT LISMORE $197,985 GARDENS AT BRIDGES CROSSING $196,000 NEELY FARM - IVEY CREEK $195,000 BRADLEY OAKS $193,000 BUTLER STATION $191,000 BRENTMOOR $187,977 $187,927 HAMMETT GROVE $186,000 WATERTON $186,000 REVIS FALLS $185,800 SUPER HWY HOMESITES $185,000 MORNING MIST FARM $185,000 MILLER HEIGHTS $182,000 CRIPPLE CREEK $180,000 RIVER MIST $179,900 HERITAGE CREEK $179,500 PEBBLE CREEK VILLAGE $178,777 FAIRVIEW LAKE $178,000 DEL NORTE $175,000 HUNTERS WOODS $175,000 CANEBRAKE $169,000 HEATHWOOD $167,500 DEL NORTE $165,500 GRANITE WOODS SOUTH $165,000 WINDSOR FOREST $165,000 HERITAGE LAKES $165,000 INGLEWOOD $165,000 PLEASANT VIEW ESTATES $165,000 GLEN GARRY $164,900 WAGON CREEK $162,000 WELLINGTON GREEN $161,680 WATERMILL $161,600 EASTDALE $160,000 TOWNES AT BROOKWOOD $160,000 CEDAR RIDGE $160,000 REEDY FALLS $159,000 CUNNINGHAM ACRES $158,000 HOLLIDAY HILLS $155,101 $155,000 $153,000 BRENTWOOD $153,000 OAKHURST VILLAS $150,000 HOLLY SPRINGS $150,000 $149,500 WESTHAVEN $149,000 CEDAR GLEN $149,000 SHERWOOD FOREST $148,000 GLEN GARRY $147,500 FOXWOOD $146,500 CEDAR GLEN $146,000 CHARTWELL ESTATES $142,000 CRESCENT CREEK $140,000 CARLTON PLACE $135,500 CARLTON PLACE $135,000 GREENS AT ROCKY CREEK $135,000 LAKEWOOD $134,000 QUINLAN ACRES $132,000 GIBSON HEIGHTS II $131,000 HILL PLACE $130,500 ROLAND HEIGHTS $130,000

PRICE SELLER D R HORTON-CROWN LLC HOHL GUENTER H & KYRIA M WEDMORE LUCAS HARTMAN TODD CHRISTOPHER RAINES EMILY S DURHAM BARRY LEE MOSS DANIEL M MUNGO HOMES INC CULLIP AARON D MARTIN DEBORAH L SPEAKER LAURA LEE RUSEK BRATCHER RODNEY E CANONICO PAOLO BARBERIS( SHIRLEY HEINDRICH D HARING MARC E BROCKHOEFT EDWARD NGUYEN LANH THI GOLDSMITH ROBERT L JR FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA SK BUILDERS INC SK BUILDERS INC EC REAL ESTATE INVESTMEN MAMBEYGI FRANK KWS PROPERTIES LLC AUSTIN JOSHUA P (JTWROS) HITZIG HERBERT F (JTWROS HEISS REBECCA S (JTWROS) EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL THATCHER RICHARD THOMAS FOULKROD JOHN E NUNEMAKER CHRISTINE S REID KEVIN B (JTWROS) HELLAMS BRENDA SOUTHSTAR CUSTOM BUILDER KISEL YELENA MAUNEY CHRISTOPHER M RAFLO HOWARD DAVID AHLUM AMY JAYNE MATTHEWS WILLIAM R THAKORE CHINMAY P (JTWRO CRIST CHRISTOPHER A STAUFFER MATTHEW S YATES LESLIE Y WALSH BRIAN D MOORE AMBER C BLANKEN SERENA F ATKINS DANIEL S (JTWROS) GOULDING SHAWN M EWC LLC CHAPMAN CHRISTOPHER C MYERS RICHARD W ALLISON JULIE HOWEY JON A PERKINS BROOKE L TAYLOR KIMBERLY F WILLIAMS HAROLD LAMAR II TULP SHIRLEY DEAN BORIS STELLA K EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL RAMEY WILLIAM H BROOKS DONALD A (JTWROS) WIESNER CONNIE E DRUMMOND SHERMAN F JR KEASLER COLTON E TOMLINSON ANDREA N HALL JUDY F CARSWELL THOMAS S JR DARNELL JASON P SCHULTZ CAROLINE M FELKER MICHELE K OWENS ELIZABETH MARK III PROPERTIES INC CHILDS NICHOLAS A STEINER ELAINE H (JTWROS RENO KEITH WINTON MARK R BAUSBACK MAX D GULLA DAYANA DION LISA MADSEN LAUREN M DCKP3 LLC SHEA MICHAEL P BEAR KATHLEEN A GRIGGS NATHAN R SHARPLESS MELISSA W BAILEY DOUGLAS A (JTWROS PORTER STEVEN EUGENE

BUYER

ADDRESS

HAMILTON FREDERICK W JR SLUSSER DARRELL P FLECK CONNOR H ROTH ERICK J (JTWROS) WOOD WILLIAM D JONES ELBERT F HILL TERENCE (SURV) MORA MARIA (JTWROS) MAUNEY CHRISTOPHER (JTWR GOFF DAVID W JR BOAN JAMES E (JTWROS) BARNETTE AMBER (JTWROS) LEWIS PAULINE L WILKES HOLLIS REEVES (JT SANCHEZ VICTOR SYMENSKI PHYLLIS TIEN JENNIFER MCLEISH KIMBERLY THUY (J MILLER CAROLYN BOST POLU ARCHANA CHAPPIDI PREETHI NOBLITT BRENT (JTWROS) KILE JOHNNA L (JTWROS) ADVISOR PROPERTIES LLC PERKINS BROOKE L (JTWROS MOUBRAY BRITTANY E HARDING IAN R (JTWROS) DIEZ DANIELA (JTWROS) ESKEW PHILIP M H2H PROPERTIES LLC ORIOLE PROPERTIES LLC SULLIVAN COREY D NEW PENN FINANCIAL LLC JENNINGS STEPHEN P JR MOORE TRACY S LOCKWOOD KELLIE SCHERIAU NIKOLAS WILLIAM HACKLER STEPHANIE B (JTW GRINDEL CAROLLEE CARPENTER KATRICE L (JTW VAN REIJN MELANIE E (JTW RETA JUAN E CANTU COLEMAN WILLIAM D BAILEY VIVIENNE M ALLEN DELVEXCIO L DOWNEY BRITTANY (JTWROS) GARZA JESSE (JTWROS) RAMOS FELIX JESUS (JTWRO APARICIO GABRIELA OLIVAR HYLTON JANE FITZGERALD DAVIS JUSTIN B (JTWROS) MILLER RODRECAS DEMON SCHWEIGERT ADDIE GROVENBURG TIMOTHY S SALTERS ANDRAY L SHEA TATIANA S DEWILDE AMY ELIZABETH (J JONES KYLE R WEINER KURT M JACOBS PAUL M (JTWROS) MIES BEATE RAYMOND NICCOLE JARRETT ALBERT RAPHAEL ( LINK ALISHA (JTWROS) PONDER ERIN CAMILLE SANTOIANNI RAYMOND (SURV LEWIS CAMERON S MOORE CHASE MCCRAW (JTWR FLENNIKEN STEPHANIE M BRANNON BRADY A MORRIS DEANNA L (SURV) D R HORTON-CROWN LLC BALLESTER DAVID (JTWROS) STONE HANNAH D (JTWROS) BURNS CASSANDRA MMS PROPERTIES LLC WILSON GEORGE III (JTWRO MILLER CATHY D SODEN RONALD E (SURV) PRICE HENRY L VEMULAPALLI SREENATH CARPENTER CAROL MARIE MCKINNEY MELISSA BROOKS BJORN-GUSTAF J (J WARE VELEKA R HUFSTETLER JOEL DAVID PALMETTO HERITAGE PROPER

116 WINESPRING PL 4 DOVE TREE RD 104 MIMOSA DR 100 RED MAPLE CT 46 OPEN RANGE LN 303 COLD BRANCH WAY 303 TULIP TREE LN 303 GIBBY LN 344 NEELY CROSSING LN 1 ATCHISON WAY 18 SELWYN DR 103 SUPERIOR WAY 105 GREY STONE CT 103 TANNER CHASE WAY 320 KELSEY GLEN LN 137 SAINT JOHNS ST 165 HERITAGE POINT DR 206 CRESTWOOD DR 206 LANSFAIR WAY 42 NAUTICAL DR 741 E EL CAMINO REAL APT 235 1 ARMSDALE DR 11 JORDAN CREST CT 30 PARKINS LAKE RD 104 LULLWATER RD 107 OAK WIND CIR 220 CRESTWOOD DR 212 WERNINGER CT 102 MYSTIC CT 105 LINWOOD CT PO BOX 4068 300 HYDE PARK LN 109 MACINTYRE ST 1617 FAIRVIEW RD 103 CIRCLE GROVE CT 32940 MISTY LN 104 REVIS CREEK CT 16 SHADOW LN 3 JERICHO CT 104 SAXON FALLS CT 4164 BERRY MILL RD 10 RIDGEBROOK WAY 18 GOLDEN ACRE CT 66 MADELINE CIR 4 SUMMERLIN PL 609 GREAT GLEN CT 111 FOXHOUND RD 118 SARATOGA DR 2502 E LEE RD PO BOX 1300 18 OLIVINE WAY 118 BATHURST LN 106 STEEPLECHASE CT 178 INGLEOAK LN 38 RAYNES CT 18 SAINT ANDREWS WAY 108 WAGONCREEK DR 120 HALTON RD STE 3 30 ALTAMIRA WAY 305 DELLROSE DR 40 BAY SPRINGS DR 3 ASH PT 30 HIDDEN RIVER PL 2 COACHMAN DR 2604 N LEE CIR 333 BLAKELY AVE 120 ELIZABETH LN 606 BRENTWOOD WAY 11 OAKHURST AVE APT B 101 BEECHWOOD CT 117 MAPLE DR 1371 DOGWOOD DR SW 310 WHIPPORWILL CT 304 ROBIN HOOD RD 117 SAINT ANDREWS WAY 3 SUNBELT BUSINESS PARK DR 207 NIGHT HERON DR 28 SEASIDE LN 209 CRESCENT CREEK CT 119 W HAMPTON ST 125 ARBOR CREEK WAY 128 MISTY CREST CIR 306 BALCOME BLVD 2 RIO VISTA DR 101 CONNER DR 403 HILL LN PO BOX 1145


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HOME Featured Home

Brookside Forest

6 Oak Bridge Place, Greenville, SC 29605 SE pm OU1 • 2-4 H EN er 1 OP eptemb ,S nday

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Home Info Price: $649,000 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 2/3

MLS#: 1321633 Sq. Ft: 3600-3799

Schools: Blythe Elementary, Hughes Middle, and Greenville High Agent: Leigh Irwin 864.380.7755 | lirwin@cdanjoyner.com

Fantastic location in one of the few gated communities in the Downtown Greenville/Augusta Road area! This beautiful cape cod sits on a quiet cul de sac only minutes from downtown Greenville, 1 minute from I 85 and few minutes from Woodruff Road shopping. You will enjoy the short walk or golf cart ride to the Greenville Country Club or to restaurants on Augusta Road. Enter this home and note the large living areas, 2 fireplaces, wet bar, plus huge dining room! Designer colors throughout ,9 foot ceilings and a huge covered porch that runs the length of the back of the home are just a few of the features that will wow you!

The flow of the main level is perfect for entertaining as there are three sets of French doors that open to the covered porch, deck and backyard with Koi pond. The kitchen boasts double ovens and gas cook top. Upstairs you will find 3 additional bedrooms, a loft, plus bonus room. There are 3 half baths in this home. One upstairs could easily be converted to a full bath. Don’t let this opportunity slip by!

Real Estate News continued from PAGE 31

“We are pleased to welcome Tylie to our Greenville team,” said Stephen Edgerton, president and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “Her warm personality and vast real estate experience will surely benefit our company and her clients.”

Allen Tate, Carolina Panthers Celebrate A Decade of Partnership In 2007, Cam was a college freshman, Luke was still in high school and Ron was a linebacker coach in San Diego. Allen Tate Realtors had just entered the Raleigh market and Upstate South Carolina wasn’t even on the radar. A lot has happened in the past decade. We’ve seen the birth of the iPhone, iPad, Kindle and Google Glass; the publication of the last Harry Potter book; and more superhero movies that we can count. We’ve weathered the downturn (and recovery) of the global economy, played in a second Super Bowl and learned a dance called the Dab.

But one thing has remained steadfast: the partnership of the Carolina Panthers and Allen Tate. Since 2007, the relationship between these two Carolina “home” teams has grown and prospered on a solid foundation of shared values and a commitment to excellence. “It’s been a terrific run. The Carolina Panthers are an exemplary organization, with outstanding players, coaches, management and support staff. We are so, so proud to be affiliated with the Panthers organization,” said Pat Riley, president and chief operating officer, Allen Tate Companies. Allen Tate began its long-term relationship with the Panthers in 2007, when the Carolinas’ real estate leader commemorated its 50th year in business by celebrating every time the Panthers crossed the 50-yard-line during a home game at Bank of America Stadium. Today, both Allen Tate and the Carolina Panthers have strong teams and are well-positioned for success in the upcoming season. Later this month, Allen Tate and the Panthers will team up for the 4th Annual Prowl the Den Contest, where 25 lucky fans and their three guests each will win a behind-the-scenes tour of the Panthers’ Den. “With each new season, we find new ways to collaborate and complement each other’s successes. It’s like a great marriage that just keeps getting better,” said Riley.


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Newfound Joy A year after suffering a brain hemorrhage, Isaiah Custodio is taking back his life

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com PHOTOS BY WILL CROOKS

Christina Custodio had just finished grocery shopping when she got a call from a trainer at Mauldin Middle to pick up her son, Isaiah, because he couldn’t finish football practice. Isaiah’s head was pounding and he was vomiting. Everyone thought he was dehydrated, although it wasn’t as hot on Sept. 8, 2015, as it had been in previous practices. When Custodio got there, Isaiah could barely walk and had to be helped to the car. “I thought he was being dramatic,” she said. On the way home, Isaiah could speak only in one-word sentences. “Hurt. Home. Help,” Isaiah said to his mother. “Help” scared her. She thought it was an odd word for her son to say. She rushed him to the emergency room. Custodio noticed Isaiah’s pupils were fixed and one was bigger than the other. When she told the nurse, he looked at Isaiah and rushed out of the room. “That’s when I knew it was serious,” she said. After a CT scan revealed

severe bleeding on the brain, Isaiah was rushed into emergency surgery to stop the hemorrhaging. “Later we found out that the way Isaiah was presenting in the ER was like people do when they’re dying,” she said. A year later, Isaiah is back practicing. But instead of practicing at outside linebacker, he’s rehearsing for his first role in a South Carolina Children’s Theatre production. Isaiah plays several roles in the theater’s production of “Beauty and the Beast,” which opens Saturday and runs through Sept. 25. “He’s come a long way, but he’s got a ways to go,” Custodio said. CHANGE HIS MIND Custodio said she had always felt Isaiah would die at a young age. That thought was something she never talked about. About a week and a half before that football practice, Custodio told friends at lunch that she had

this weird feeling something was going to happen. Looking back, said she thinks it was God’s way of preparing her for what was ahead. “Really, God, he’s only 13,” Custodio remembers thinking. “I begged for God to change his mind.” Isaiah had suffered a ruptured brain arteriovenous malformation. AVMs are abnormal tangles of blood vessels that cause irregular connections between the arteries and veins. Brain AVMs are rare, affecting less than 1 percent of the population, according to the Mayo Clinic website. After the three-hour surgery, Isaiah could not walk or talk. He spent two weeks in pediatric intensive care and another four at the Roger C. Peace Rehabilitation Hospital. He spent one week last June and two weeks in July at the Neuro-Integrative Functional Rehabilitation and Habilitation Center in California, which offers very specialized therapy

Beauty and the Beast Who: South Carolina Children’s Theatre When: Sept. 10, 11, 17, 18, 24 and 25, 1:30 p.m. Sept. 10, 11, 17 and 24, 7 p.m. Tickets: $18 to $27 Extra: Sign language interpretation will be available at the 7 p.m. performance on Sept. 24

for people who have suffered brain injuries. “They’ve got a high success rate,” Custodio said. The family has raised money to get there the first two times, but Custodio said she doesn’t know when, or if, Isaiah will be able to go back because of time and expense. Isaiah’s right side was affected by the AVM. He wears a brace on his leg and he doesn’t have much use of his right arm. “First, I was in a wheelchair. Then I had a walker. Then I was in a brace,” Isaiah said.


36 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.09.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CULTURE “Now I want to get the brace off. Even if I have a hand I don’t use, it is going to be better.” Progress comes more slowly now, Custodio said. “It comes little by little. Sometimes, it’s hard to tell,” she said. “At first, literally every day we could see a difference in his speech and movement.” Doctors found another AVM in his brain. Although only a fraction of AVMs rupture, doctors said given Isaiah’s history, it had to be treated. He underwent radiation in late June to shrink it. Last week, the family received notification that insurance has approved 20 more days of therapy for Isaiah. NEW ROLE Isaiah, who appeared in three plays at Mauldin Middle, has an ensemble role in “Beauty and the Beast.” He’s a member of a mob and a carpetbagger. His mother pushed him to try out for the show as an activity to replace football, but he didn’t want to at first. “I just thought [the SCCT] did small plays,” he said. “Oh, so you’re a diva,” his mother said. “I’m not a

diva. I’m just particular,” he said. Isaiah didn’t think he’d get a role in the play after he sang two lines in his audition and forgot the rest of the words. “I just sang, ‘Da da da da da,’” he said. “I thought I wouldn’t make it.” Now, he’s glad his mother made him try out. “They sing like professionals,” he said. He’s adjusting to a new school — Brashier Middle College — and the academic challenge that goes with high school and overcoming his brain injury. Custodio said that Isaiah is pretty much the same kid he was before his injury. “He’s funny, caring and joyful,” she said. “There’s a balance. He’s gained some things and lost some things. He has some wisdom, maturity and insight that he didn’t have before. We don’t have bad days. We have bad moments. It’s a challenge, but we can’t think of it as a bad thing. You can find joy in any circumstance. We’re not necessarily happy with the situation, but we have joy.”


NOT ALL DRAMA IS FOUND IN THEATER.

Syd Solomon (1917-2004) Cloudcall, 1968

Don’t miss Syd Solomon: Concealed and Revealed NOW ON VIEW Recognized today as an innovative Abstract Expressionist painter, Syd Solomon (1917-2004) advanced techniques he first learned as a camouflage artist for the U. S. Army during World War II. Solomon settled in Florida where he created a body of work that reflects his mastery of color and movement. He is credited with developing the medium that is acrylic paint. Solomon enjoyed national attention, and his works are included in more than 100 public collections, including the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and the Joseph Hirshhorn Collection.

Journal Syd Solomon.indd 1

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1pm - 5 pm

admission free

8/30/16 10:36 AM


38 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.09.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

feast

Korean flavors steal the spotlight at Oakblue

"

Andrew Huang is an editor-at-large of TOWN Magazine. Follow his food misadventures on Twitter and Instagram at @rooftoptales and #huangry.

the same impact on me. It’s a matter of consistency. On one occasion, the chicken was a flat, characterless kind of spicy and a slow accumulation of heat that was unnoticeable until halfway through the sandwich when I realized sweat was beading on my forehead. However, when I tried the sandwich later, I got the bright, scorching, juicy Nashville-style hot chicken I’d been hoping for. It’s punishingly spicy and antithetically crave-worthy. When it lives up to its namesake, this hot chicken sandwich qualifies as the best chicken sandwich I’ve had in recent memory – and I’ve eaten a lot of Chick-fil-A. The Korean barbecue plate was an improvement. Galbi – Korean short ribs chopped laterally through the bone – is the centerpiece of this plate, although it also comes with rice, a cup of napa kimchi, some chogochujang sauce and a side. The ribs have a layer of char, which provides a nice bit of carbonized crunch that balances out the

"

K-Popping

Oakblue Kitchen is an intriguing addition to the Main Street dining scene, a place that leans heavily on American and European traditions despite the proliferation of sushi bars and other international fare. Self-described as a restaurant of Southern staples, Korean barbecue and craft cocktails, Oakblue, in particular its Korean offerings, is particularly daring for our downtown culinary landscape. To be sure, Korean flavors are not entirely exotic or unknown to Americans, or even Greenvillians. Los Angeles restaurateur Roy Choi made his mark with a gourmet Korean food truck in 2008, and that trend has found its way east – just look to Asheville’s El Kimchi food truck or the Korean barbecue tacos at either Local Taco location in Greenville. (Oakblue’s John Ko is the former owner of the latter.) And to be sure, we have our own excellent, homegrown, mom-and-pop restaurants like Korean BBQ and Kimchee. However, until Oakblue, Greenville hadn’t seen a restaurant that combines the easy accessibility of Main Street with a prominent feature of Korean flavors. Located in the North Main space, Oakblue has an interior that appropriately reflects the hipness of its concept. It’s a clean, urban interior – grays, exposed brick and piney tabletops – and while dim, tables are appropriately spotlit in each booth. I ordered the ssam plate, the hot fried chicken sandwich and the Korean barbecue plate. They are, essentially, a sampling of all the things on Oakblue’s menu that I’ve not seen elsewhere on Greenville’s Main Street. (You’ll also find pulled pork, brisket, a pimento cheese plate and the ubiquitous chicken tenders on the menu.) Ssam – the literal translation of which means “wrapped” – is basically a Korean lettuce wrap, and at Oakblue, the dish ends up being the most indicative of the restaurant’s potential. The plate comes with three variations of ssam: pulled pork and cabbage relish; chopped brisket and pickled onion slaw; and galbi (Korean short ribs) with daikon. A cup of ssamjang – a thick, spicy and garlicky sauce – comes on the side. Each variation takes the same formula – protein and tangy, crunchy, pickled vegetables wrapped in a lettuce leaf – but there’s a uniquely Southern or Korean spin to each. The wraps offer a punchy mouthful of flavor, even before the addition of ssamjang, which adds a mild, earthy, lingering spicy dimension. The fried chicken sandwich doesn’t have

Oakblue’s chogojujang is like sriracha but better in every way.

sweetness imparted by the galbi’s marinade. Again, the sauce is excellent: the chogojujang is thick and a little grainy, and has more of a chili note than the ssamjang. It’s also incredibly addictive. Oakblue’s chogojujang is like sriracha but better in every way. All told, I wish Oakblue gave more attention to the Korean aspect of their concept. Yes, by even listing Korean food as part of their core identity, Oakblue is doing something different for Main Street. However, the menu still leans heavily towards the Southern staples aspect – there were only four Korean-influenced items on their full menu when I visited. And that’s a shame, because the ssam plate speaks to the creative potential of melding Southern and Korean, and the Korean condiments are a worthy highlight. Those elements deserve more time in the spotlight. WORDS AND PHOTOS BY ANDREW HUANG

Oakblue Kitchen 109 N Main St., Ste A, Greenville oakbluekitchen.com Ssam plate, $6; hot fried chicken sandwich, $9; Korean barbecue plate, $14


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feast

TUNES FOR EVERY TASTE AN EVENING WITH

CHRIS THILE SEPT. 13

Growler Haus plans new location in Village of West Greenville

Upstate-based craft beer venture Growler Haus plans to open a new location in the Village of West Greenville. Craig Kinley, who founded the concept in 2012, said he has signed an agreement for 2,400 square feet of indoor space and an 800-square-foot beer garden at 12 Lois Ave. Kinley has targeted the first quarter of 2017 for the location’s opening. It will be his company’s fourth addition to existing sites in Anderson, Fountain Inn and downtown Spartanburg. “The Village of West Greenville is an area that we’ve been looking at for some time,” Kinley said. “The energy and momentum in the community is something that we’re very excited to be a part of.” In addition to the new location, Kinley said Growler Haus is rolling out a few changes. The first is the launch of a new menu in Spartanburg and Fountain Inn. The menu features a selection of tapas items, paninis, flatbreads and desserts. It will replace the company’s current food offering by Greenville-based Table 301 restaurant group’s Papi’s Tacos concept, which were scheduled to exit those Growler Haus locations on Sept. 3. —Trevor Anderson

S C H U B E RTI A D A P E AC E C H A M B E R C O N C E RT

with Miles Hoffman and The American Chamber Players

RJ Rockers raises prostate cancer awareness with special caps

Spartanburg-based RJ Rockers Brewing Co. and more than 40 other craft brewers across the country will participate in the nonprofit Pints for Prostates’ “Crowns for a Cure” campaign. The campaign allows companies to swap their regular beer caps — referred to as “crowns” in the industry — for caps with messages that encourage men to learn more about the importance of regular health screenings. RJ Rockers is the only brewery in South Carolina partaking in the campaign this year. “Reaching Americans through Crowns for a Cure and the universal language of beer is something that we at RJ Rockers are very proud and honored to be a part of,” said Taylor White, head brewer at RJ Rockers. Pints for Prostates, founded in 2008 by prostate cancer survivor and beer writer Rick Lyke, has distributed more than 1.6 million bottle caps this year. —Trevor Anderson

SEPT. 29 G U N T E R T H E AT R E

GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY!


40 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.09.2016

Join Us

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Where He Once Belonged Seth Walker returns to his beginnings with “Gotta Get Back” VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

Join The Cliffs for a spectacular evening of tasting and toasting as we sample more than 150 incredible wines, enjoy delectable food pairings and chef stations, a beer garden supported by local North and South Carolina breweries, handcrafted spirits from around the world, enlightening culinary demonstrations throughout the evening, live music and lots of dancing.

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By 2014, singer/songwriter Seth Walker had released eight critically acclaimed albums of bluesy roots-rock that all met with critical acclaim. He’d been praised for his loose-limbed acoustic-based music by everyone from the Wall Street Journal to Delbert McClinton (who said “The first time I heard Seth Walker at a small club in Nashville, I was impressed like I haven’t been impressed in 30 years”). But as the writing for his ninth album got underway, Walker felt restless. “It felt like I was getting a little calculated,” Walker says. “I was trying to steer things with my writing, and I needed to get back to why I started doing this in the first place, to the muse.” From that uneasy feeling came the title track of Walker’s new album, “Gotta Get Back.” The song is a briskly strummed acoustic ballad with gospel touches and a yearning vocal performance from Walker. “I’ve lost my way,” he sings, “and I gotta get back.” “That song kind of got the ball rolling,” says Walker, the son of classically trained musicians. “And then to take it a step further, I got my father involved to do the string arrangements, and I got my mom and my sister involved, and it literally took me back to the very beginning of my music and my connection with them.” “Gotta Get Back” isn’t a concept album, but there’s a recurring theme of movement and change throughout the record. Songs like “Home Again,” “Turn This Thing Around” and “Blow Wind Blow” mirror Walker’s travels from Austin to Brooklyn to

New Orleans on his search for the muse. New Orleans is an especially prominent influence on “Gotta Get Back,” from the ragged-but-right rhythms to the mixture of musical styles on display, gospel, folk and laid-back soul. “Rhythmically alone there are a lot of nods to New Orleans music,” he says. “There’s that push and pull. I don’t know if you’ve ever been, but the breath of the city is syncopated. All the streets are crooked. It’s wrong in all the right ways. When you talk to folks down there, it sounds like they’re playing a piano when they talk. Music is just a part of them.” The album was produced by Jano Rix, of the Atlanta roots-Americana band The Wood Brothers. “Jano’s an extremely talented guy,” he says. “He has a way of letting music unfold. And that’s a tricky thing for a producer, because you want it to be loose, but you also have to control it to a certain degree. It’s like holding a bird. You don’t want to squeeze it too tight, but you don’t want it to fly away, either.” Rix and Walker, who will play an albumrelease show at Horizon Records on Tuesday with his band, worked hard on the song sequence, which leads “Gotta Get Back” from the bouncy “High Time” to a string of orchestrated, more thoughtful songs toward the end. “Sequencing is always a dance,” Walker says. “It’s funny how the songs themselves flow from one to another, and it takes a while to figure out. It’s actually one of the hardest parts of a record. But I like the flow of it and it seems to really work.”

Seth Walker Band Date: Tuesday, Sept. 13, 7 p.m. Venue: Horizon Records, 2 W. Stone Ave., Greenville Tickets: Admission is free Info: 235-7922; horizonrecords.net


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Outfielders and Orchestras Chamber music lecture series focuses on the way athletes, artists think CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Mary Noble Ours / Contributing

At first glance, it may not look like an outfielder preparing to catch a fly ball and a musician playing Schubert have much in common, Miles Hoffman, the violinist who hosts the NPR radio show “A Minute with Miles” and host of the Peace Center’s new chamber music program, begs to differ. “There’s a lot going on in their minds simultaneously,” Hoffman said. An outfielder has to decide whether to catch a ball backhanded, on a short hop or on the fly, a decision made faster than the action can be put in words. A musician is very much aware of where to put his fingers as he makes each note, some of which is automatic because of the hours and hours of practice and rehearsals. But not all is muscle memory, Hoffman said. “If I played a very fast run in rehearsal that

American Chamber Players

morning and the F-sharp was out of tune, when I’m playing that music in that night’s concert, I’m going to make sure that F-sharp is in tune,” he said. But in addition to making sure they hit that problematic note, the musician may be thinking about how they would like the person in the front row to stop fanning themselves with their program or even where to go to dinner, Hoffman said. What goes on in a performer’s mind when

on stage is the subject of “Catching a Fly Ball: What Goes On in a Performer’s Mind During a Performance,” the first in a series of chamber music lectures and concerts. The lecture is Sept. 15 at 6:30 p.m. in the Gunter Theatre lobby. Two weeks later, on Sept. 29 at 7:30pm, audience members will get to use their insight during the season’s opening concert, “Schubertiad!” The concert will feature five pieces by Franz

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Schubert and is Hoffman’s recreation of a Schubertiad, an informal musical gathering of Schubert and his friends. The concert will feature five pieces of music, all of which feature a different combination of instruments and voice. Some of the pieces on the program are well known; others are not often performed. “The variety is what we love to present,” Hoffman said. “You can’t beat the music.” The concert will feature the American Chamber Players and guests soprano Kyoko Saito, horn player Brice Andrus, pianist Reiko Uchida and double bass player Tim Easter.

Peace Chamber Program What: “Catching a Fly Ball,” Classical Insights Chamber Music Lecture Series When: Sept. 15 Where: Gunter Theatre lobby Cost: Free What: “Schubertiad” When: Sept. 29 Where: Gunter Theatre Tickets: $45 Information: peacecenter.org

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CULTURE Sound Bites

DANGERMUFFIN W/ BIG DADDY LOVE Gottrocks, 200 Eisenhower Drive, Greenville Friday, Sept. 9, 8 p.m. $12 in advance/$15 at the door Dangermuffin, a trio from Folly Beach, S.C., plays a signature mix of jam-band experimentation with a solid roots-rock foundation, and if you want to simply enjoy that combination just for kicks, singer/guitarist Dan Lotti says that’s cool. “Our music is eclectic with a lot of groove, and I think you can take it on a surface level and enjoy the grooves and the melodies,” he says. “Or if you want to dig a little bit deeper, there’s a lot there. Sometimes that gets lost in the translation.” Indeed there is a lot going on in the band’s music. Their most recent album, “Songs for the Universe,” is an extended experiment with alternate tunings and musical frequencies with a lyrical bent towards larger-than-average themes. “A lot of the songs deal with what I would call archetypes,” Lotti says. “The sun, the ocean, things that we can all relate to. And we tried to do it all with a little bit of free expression and fun.”

CONTRA BLUES BAND Soundbox Tavern, 507 W. Georgia Road, Simpsonville Saturday, Sept. 10, 9 p.m. Free The Contra Blues Band doesn’t care too much about what the current cover bands on the Upstate circuit are playing. They prefer more obscure artists like Chris Knight, Reckless Kelly or Cross Canadian Ragweed. And if their stripped-down The Mavericks-meet-The-Blasters sound isn’t to your liking, that’s fine, too. “We decided that we didn’t need to be another band out there playing the usual stuff you hear on the radio all day long,” says the band’s singer/ guitarist Bob Esposito. “Screw that. We’re just going to play what we like: underrated, wellwritten songs.” Perhaps that devil-may-care attitude comes from the circumstances in which the Contra Blues Band formed: through Esposito’s cancer diagnosis. “As part of my treatment, they give me a whole lot of steroids once a week,” he says. “My girlfriend was getting tired of me on those days, and [drummer] Lee Wessinger would come over and set up his drums, and I’d grab my guitar and start banging around and making noise. It was very therapeutic.”

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ITALO & THE PASSIONS, W/ THE HEAD, THE FUTURE BABES AND THE JAM JAMS Radio Room, 2845 N. Pleasantburg Drive, Greenville Friday, Sept. 9, 9 p.m. $5 (21 + over)/ $7 (under) Italo & The Passions singer Mike Granata specializes in a frenzied, grainy yowl that’s part madman, part jilted lover and part ecstatic preacher. While the band (guitarist Casey Taylor, bassist Drew Pack and drummer Brandon Gallagher) creates basic but surprisingly versatile guitar-heavy roots-rock, Granata can beg and plead and cajole with the best of them. Taylor says that there’s a reason that Granata pours so much heart, soul and sweat into his performances. “One hundred percent of Mike’s lyrics and the skeletons of the songs are all about his love life and heartache and whatnot,” he laughs. “Usually when he brings a song into practice, we can settle by the end of the session on what we want it to be. From there it’s just running through it and listening for anything that pops up that we might want to add.” Want to submit a show to Sound Bites? Email vharris@communityjournals.com.


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CULTURE

R.I.P. Jason Bryant

㈀ ㄀㘀ⴀ㈀ ㄀㜀 匀攀愀猀漀渀 吀椀挀欀攀琀猀 一漀眀 伀渀 匀愀氀攀℀

Beloved actor was a fixture with the Upstate Shakespeare Festival, Children’s Theatre CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

It was fitting for Greenville’s theater community to say goodbye Monday to actor and theater teacher Jason Bryant at the amphitheater in Falls Park, a place he spent entertaining thousands of people over the years. They were there by the hundreds, actors he shared the stage with in the Upstate Shakespeare Festival or South Carolina Children’s Theatre, students whom he taught and audience members whom he entertained. Bryant died last week of a heart attack. He was 40. “He’s the guy we all aspire to be,” said John Fagan, the longtime director of the Upstate Shakespeare Festival. “This is one of those losses that just hurts. He leaves a hole that nobody will fill, but everybody is going to do their damnedest to fill in whatever part of the hole they can.” Bryant had a way of making everyone feel like he had known them forever, even if they had just met, Fagan said. “He never met a stranger. He had an amazing heart.” Fagan remembers shortly after he moved to Greenville and got a job at The Warehouse Theatre, he walked into the old loft and heard a voice say from the back row, “Well, hello. How are you?” The voice was Bryant, then a fresh-faced high school kid from Woodmont High and the Fine Arts Center. “We became friends and worked together and then we became brothers. He was a big guy with an even bigger heart and personality.” He also never turned down a challenge, especially one from Fagan, who is known for wacky stagings of Shakespeare. “He was fearless as an actor,” Fagan said. “He would take any crazy idea I had and make it work 10 times better than I ever

Jason Bryant

thought it would.” Even when that meant wearing a Princess Jasmine costume for a staging of “Comedy of Errors.” Brock Koonce remembers his first day as a student at the Fine Arts Center, when fellow student Bryant welcomed him and made him feel comfortable. Many summers later, after college, he saw Bryant working as a bouncer at Wild Wings. Bryant told him he needed to come “play down in the park.” “I’m going to be mad if you don’t come to the park and play. And you don’t want me mad. I have minions all over this place,” Bryant said, laughing. Koonce heeded the warning. “I auditioned for that summer’s Upstate Shakespeare Festival, and aside from marrying my wife, it was the best decision I’ve made,” he said. Traysie Amick, who worked with Bryant at the Children’s Theater, said, “If you let him, he could make you feel so brave. This made him the perfect educator and the perfect ensemble member.” Bryant was born in Brooklyn, but lived in Piedmont for most of his life. He was a graduate of Clemson University. He is survived by his father, James Sr.; his mother, Jeannette; his elder brother, James; his sisters Jeri, Janeen and Jamela; five nieces and nephews; many aunts, uncles and cousins; and his goddaughter Emily.

䘀伀刀 䄀 䘀唀䰀䰀 匀䔀䄀匀伀一 䰀䤀匀吀䤀一䜀 嘀椀猀椀琀 礀漀甀渀琀猀挀攀渀琀攀爀⸀漀爀最

2222 Augusta St, Suite 10 Greenville, SC 29605 864.248.4844 Monday- Friday: 9am-6pm Saturday: 9am-5pm Sunday: Closed

Be the Talk of the Playground pigtailsandcrewcuts.com/greenville


44 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.09.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CULTURE Sound Check Notes on the Music Scene with Vincent Harris

Branding the Band

91 grants totaling $4.2 million in 10 years

72 more than

organizations touched since 2006

530 members

We invite you to join

Greenville Women Giving in our journey of learning, working and giving together for a greater Greenville. greenvillewomengiving.org Giving Collectively | Granting Strategically | Growing a Greater Greenville

2016-2017 Partners

All Gigs Matter to teach musicians business pro-tips VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

Sometimes when you’re watching an amazing performer onstage, it’s easy to forget that, whether they’re having a moment of sheer musical transcendence or simply delivering a song well, this is as much a business for them as it is an art. Making a living as a musician, especially locally, takes a lot of hard work behind the scenes, from booking and promoting shows to staying skilled on whatever your instrument might be.

how successful they are at it, we knew they would be a good fit,” Pyles says. “And having attended Jamie’s shows, I’ve been amazed at how professionally she presents herself, right down to her set list. I never realized how many songs you have to have to gig professionally.

And to hear Angela Pyles tell it, there are a lot of horror stories out there about musicians not being prepared or blowing gigs. Pyles, who along with Tez Sherard Kanika Richardson runs a small-business workshop program called Mind Your Business, There’s so much work is involved in doing this. is friends with local singer/songwriter Jamie And Jamie is a voice teacher, so this is a great Wright, who performs around the Upstate opportunity for her to educate the younger in various settings with her namesake band. generation that desires a gig.” Through a conversation with Wright, Pyles Despite the name, the seminar is as much decided that Mind Your Business should host a about creating an effective brand and devising seminar for working musicians, “All Gigs Matter: a social media strategy as it is about playing a Treat It Like a Pro and Increase Your Gig Flow.” professional show. “Branding is so important, “It started with Jamie telling me stories because it’s your name,” Pyles says. “It’s more about how people lose gigs or have contracts than saying, ‘My name is Angela Pyles and this terminated because they showed up late or is my band.’ It’s about how you present yourself they weren’t dressed professionally,” Pyles and your product. For example, when Jamie says. “Or they’d bring their significant other to posts her events, she does it on a certain day a show when they weren’t supposed to. And at a certain time, because in the mornings and eventually, I asked her if it was possible that early afternoons, everyone’s at work. So little they were doing these things because they just things like that are important when it comes to didn’t know.” marketing. If this is your passion, you need to do it right.” That idea led to All Gigs Matter, which will take place at Coffee Underground downtown this Saturday. The seminar, which will include Vincent Harris covers appearances by Wright and Upstate drummer music and sports for Tez Sherard, will cover branding, promotion, The Greenville Journal. contracts and more topics of concern for Reach him at vharris@ musicians trying to make a living. communityjournals.com. “We wanted to show musicians how to gig professionally,” Pyles says. “You can make money doing this if you do it right. And we’re not just telling you to say this or do that, but we’re telling you why; we’re talking about the reasons behind these strategies. “ Pyles could scarcely have picked a better pair of players for the seminar. Wright and Sherard are two of the busiest musicians in the Upstate; Sherard alone has played with just about everyone on the local scene, including Edwin McCain. “Seeing how Jamie and Tez are constantly marketing themselves and

“All Gigs Matter: Treat It Like a Pro and Increase Your Gig Flow,” featuring Tez Sherard & Jamie Wright Date: Saturday, Sept. 10, 10:30 a.m. Where: Coffee Underground, 1 E. Coffee St., Greenville Admission: Event is free, but registration is required. Info: bit.ly/all-gigs-matter


09.09.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 45

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

Independent Ale House 110 Poinsett Highway FREE ipagreenville.com

Brother Oliver with Poet Radio Dive ‘n’ Boar 2541 N. Pleasantburg Drive FREE divenboar.com

Grass Backerds Soundbox Tavern 507 W. Georgia Road, Simpsonville 228-7763

Earsight with The Reed Miller Project Gottrocks 200 Eisenhower Drive $7 in advance; $10 at the door 235-5519 gottrocksgreenville.com

FRI-SAT

09-10

EDUCATION

Sippin’ Safari The Greenville Zoo 150 Cleveland Park Drive 6:30-9:30 p.m. $55 or $20 for designated driver The 10th annual sampling event presented by the Greenville Zoo Foundation transforms the zoo into a pathway of wine and food tasting stations, live music, tours of the zoo and a silent auction. The purpose of Sippin Safari is to raise awareness and funds for various programs around the zoo and Greenville Zoo Foundation. 627-4200 sippinsafari.eventbrite.com

marketplace offers handmade clothing, jewelry, pottery and leatherwork. Children’s activities include Renaissance-themed crafts and a tea party with the princess. 208-4609 | theenchantedchalice.com hall.teresa@gmail.com

FRI-OCT

09-07

VISUAL ARTS

What I See – In Living Color

Furman University Hosts 37th Annual Cellobration

Centre Stage | 501 River St.

Furman University Daniel Recital Hall and McAlister Auditorium 3300 Poinsett Highway

Photography by Irv Welling 233-6733 | centrestage.org

8-9:30 p.m. Faculty recital: $15 for adults, $5 for students This program of the South Carolina chapter of String Teachers Association (SCASTA) includes a faculty recital on Friday at 8 p.m. in Daniel Recital Hall. Tickets required. Cellobration will close with a free cello choir concert on Saturday at 5:30 p.m. in McAlister Auditorium. 294-2019 | bit.ly/2bjTVdE cellobration@furman.edu

FAMILY

Upstate Renaissance Faire Greenville Unitarian Universalist Fellowship North Greenville Campus 1135 State Park Road Friday evening and all day Saturday

SEPT. 9 COMMUNITY

Downright

SEPT. 9 FUNDRAISER

CONCERTS

SEPT. 9

CALENDAR

2-6 p.m. | Tuesday-Friday FREE

THRU SAT

10

FAMILY

Story Time & More: I Am Special

The Children’s Museum 300 College St. 10 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Free There are so many wonderful things that make each of us special. Join us as we read “What I Like About Me” and make a special picture frame to take home. Free with admission. tcmupstate.org

SAT

10

CONCERT

Music in the Woods

$12 for adults, $10 for children, discounted tickets available online

Paris Mountain State Park Amphitheater | 2401 State Park Road

Events include continuous performers on two stages — folk music, dancers, wandering minstrels, storytellers, jugglers and jesters — along with exhibits, demonstrations and carnivallike games of combat and skill. The artisan

2 p.m.-4 p.m. | Weekly Free with paid park admission This Saturday afternoon series that runs through Oct. 29 features local favorite Darby

9/11 15th Anniversary Commemoration Bob Jones University | Front Campus FREE Bob Jones University is commemorating the nearly 3,000 lives lost on Sept. 11, 2001, with a display of American flags at the front of the campus. BJU students set up the flags on Sept. 7 near the school’s Wade Hampton Boulevard entrance. Each flag represents one of the 2,977 victims — from 115 countries — who perished in the terrorist attacks. In addition, two light beacons will represent the World Trade Center towers and a wall of remembrance will feature the names of those who died. A piece of steel girder from the North Tower of the World Trade Center in New York City will be publicly displayed in the University’s Welcome Center. “Fifteen years ago, the world was forever changed by the attacks on 9/11,” said BJU President Steve Pettit. “It is my hope that these displays will honor those who lost their lives that horrific day in New York City, Washington D.C., and Shanksville, Pa.” The display will remain in place through Sept. 15. The public is invited to view the piece of steel girder from the North Tower of the World Trade Center in the lobby of Welcome Center. The lobby is open weekdays from 7:30 a.m.-10 p.m. Wilcox. The weekly lineup includes mostly folk-style muscians. Food, coolers and pets on leashes are encouraged. Alcohol is prohibited. 244-5565 southcarolinaparks.com/parismountain

SPORTS

Clemson Tigers Opening Game Clemson University Memorial Stadium 1 Ave. of Champions, Clemson 12:30 p.m. | Various ticket prices The Troy Trojans come to Death Valley for the first home game of the Tigers’ 2016 season. ticketmonster.com

CONCERT

Local Green Presents Swamp Rabbit Music Fest Swamp Rabbit Lodge | 790 Roe Ford Road 12-10 p.m. | Advance, $10 or $15 at the door This local music fest organized by Swamp Rabbit Inn and Local Green will feature some of the

Local Green family’s songwriters performing their original material in an intimate setting. The line-up: Mark Dye, Baby Kudzu & The Business, The LOZ Band (acoustic), Doug Jones, Angela Easterling & Brandon Turner, Lesley Diane, Kelly Jo, Rush Morgen, Darby Wilcox, Vilai Harrington and Lerm/Kyle (Four14). 517-4617 | swamprabbitinn.com swamprabbitinn@gmail.com

FAMILY

Preserving Your Family’s Story Greenville County Library System Hughes Main Library 25 Heritage Green Place 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE Learn how to manage your family’s treasured historical documents and photographs during this free workshop. Call 242-5000 x2169 to register. greenvillelibrary.org explore@greenvillelibrary.org

«


46 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.09.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CALENDAR 676-2180 | GreenvilleRec.com jdilworth@greenvillecounty.org

Trailblazer Park 235 Trailblazer Drive, Travelers Rest

VISUAL ARTS

10 a.m. $25 preregistration; $30 at the door The first CX race in Greenville includes a full schedule of youth, amateur and professional races. Course will have two dismount sections, a challenging hill (or two) and many long straightaway sections for riders to pick up speed. Kids 9 and younger race free. 239-961-1902 startsmartcycling.com info@startsmartcycling.com

« HEALTH/FITNESS

Waggin at the Waterpark

Coffee and Conversation with Glenn Miller Hampton III Gallery Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors 11 a.m.-noon Join mixed media artist Glenn Miller for a discussion of his exhibition on display through Sept. 17. 268-2771 | hamptoniiigallery.com

SAT-SUN

10-11

FAMILY

Weekend Programs: Anatomy of the Heart The Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. Saturday from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. and Sunday from 2-3 p.m. Free What is an anatomical model? Join us at the museum to learn how the heart works and create your own model with clay today. Free with admission. tcmupstate.org

SAT-SUN

10-25

THEATER

“Beauty and the Beast”

The Peace Center Gunter Theatre | 300 S. Main St. The Academy Award-winning film comes to life in this romantic and beloved take on the classic fairytale. The story tells of the relationship between Belle, a young woman in a provincial town, and the Beast, who is really a young prince trapped under the spell of an enchantress. This “tale as old as time” is filled with beautiful music, dance and live theatre 467-3000 scchildrenstheatre.org

SUN

11

$17 preregister, $22 day of The waterparks have gone to the dogs! Fourlegged friends and their owners are invited to

7 p.m. | $75 M. Judson Booksellers & Storytellers invites guests to meet author Mark Essig and discuss his new book “Lesser Beasts” over dinner. Bacon Bros. chef Anthony Gray has crafted a fourcourse menu drawing inspiration from the book. 603-2412 | mjudsonbooks.com

THRU MON

12

EDUCATION

Register Now: Educational Institutions Tax Seminar

Hilton Greenville 45 W. Orchard Park Drive 10 a.m.-3 p.m. $50 (includes all course materials and lunch) Register by Sept. 12 for the Sept. 15 course, designed for tax professionals and managers working for school districts and universities. Topics covered include sales, use and local taxes that impact educational institutions, software, maintenance and similar service contracts and exemptions and exclusions. 803-898-5800 | dor.sc.gov/ted/index

MON

12

Brandon Mill Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St., Ste. A

«

SEPT. 12 Shuffle Chamber Music Recital Clemson University Brooks Center for the Performing Arts 141 Jersey Lane, Clemson 7:30 p.m.

Sundays at 2: Art 101 Landscapes

A shuffle concert changes the generally understood rules of performance. The audience chooses what pieces will be performed. From the classics to jazz to Broadway, shuffle concerts offer music for every taste. The ensemble of piano, oboe, clarinet, violin, cello and soprano provides a menu of more than 30 musical works, and neither the audience members nor the performers know which works will be requested. The result: a unique performance each time. clemson.edu/brooks

FREE Join Furman University professor Dr. Sarah Archino and delve into the history and tradition of landscape painting as featured in the exhibition “The Poetry of Place.” 271-7570 | gcma.org media@gcma.org

The Peace Center Peace Concert Hall 300 S. Main St. $25-$45

Arts Classes

Fall session I classes run through Oct. 22 artcentergreenville.org

An Evening with Chris Thile

7:30 p.m.

VISUAL ARTS

FREE

2-3 p.m.

8 a.m.-2 p.m.

M. Judson Booksellers & Storytellers 130 S. Main St.

VISUAL ARTS

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College St. Discovery Island Waterpark 417 Baldwin Road, Simpsonville

Sunday Sit-Down Supper

CONCERT

Greenville CX-Cup presented by Cycle Haus

SEPT. 13

CUISINE

CONCERT

HEALTH/FITNESS

SEPT. 10

Discovery Island for a fun-filled day of swimming. Second chance event is Sept. 24 at Otter Creek.

The new host of “A Prairie Home Companion,” multiple Grammy Award-winner and MacArthur Fellow, member of Punch Brothers and Nickel Creek, Thile is a mandolin virtuoso, composer and vocalist. With his broad outlook that encompasses classical, rock, jazz and bluegrass, Thile transcends the borders of conventionally circumscribed genres. He first rose to fame as a member of Grammy Award-winning trio Nickel Creek, with whom he released three albums and sold more than two million records. In 2014, along with a national tour, the trio released a fourth album, “A Dotted Line,” their first since 2005. As a soloist, Thile has released six albums including his most recent, “Bach: Partitas and Sonatas, Vol.1,” which was produced by renowned bassist Edgar Meyer. In February 2013, Thile won a Grammy for his work on “The Goat Rodeo Sessions,” collaborating with Yo-Yo Ma, Edgar Meyer and Stuart Duncan. In September 2014, Thile and Meyer released their latest album collaboration, “Bass + Mandolin,” which won the Grammy for Best Contemporary Instrumental Album. Punch Brothers released their latest album, “The Phosphorescent Blues,” in January 2015. 467-3000 peacecenter.org


09.09.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 47

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

CALENDAR

13

Educational Travel with GTC - Information Session

“The Volunteer” Centre Stage | 501 River St. 7 p.m. | Sept. 13-14, 20-21 | $10-$15 The Fringe series presents this world premiere, written by C. Kay “Andy” LandisIt. The plot follows the interaction of a young psychology grad student on the first day of volunteering in a prison with a strong-willed prison inmate. As lights flicker and sirens wail, the two are caught in a lockdown that forces hidden agendas to be revealed and the desperate battle of the minds to end in a startling conclusion. 233-6733 | centrestage.org

«

MON-OCT

12-20

LESSONS

Learn To Play An Appalachian Musical Instrument Trinity UMC | 2703 Augusta St. Thursday Evenings

EDUCATION

Learn how to play the banjo, guitar, fiddle or mandolin. Register now for classes beginning Sept. 15. These lessons are open to children and adults. Children must be at least 9 years old. The fee is $60 for 6 weeks of lessons. Also, rental instruments are available. Contact Susan Ware-Snow. 979-9188 | yamupstate.com susu9196@gmail.com

$60 for six weeks of lessons

Greenville Technical College Buck Mickel Center 216 S. Pleasantburg Drive

$75/person

Free Greenville Technical College has three exciting educational travel trips planned for 2017, and the community is invited to participate. Find out if you’d like to be a part of one of these exciting opportunities and learn more about trip details and itineraries at this information session for Peru (March 17-23), Italy (March 17-24) and London (May 26-June 3). Sponsored by GTC’s International Education Center and Economic Development and Corporate Training. 250-8856 | gtcabroad2017.eventbrite.com Bonnie.Smith@gvltec.edu

«

HISPANIC HERITAGE MONTH ACTIVITIES SEPT. 9

SEPT. 16

Bilingual Story Time

Jaramillo Dance Academy Performance

Greenville County Main Library Meeting Room A | 25 Heritage Green Place 6-6:45 p.m. | Every Friday

Greenville County Library System | Hughes Main Library 25 Heritage Green Place | 6-6:50 p.m.

FREE Spanish bilingual story time 242-5000 ext. 2634 | greenvillelibrary.org

SEPT. 9-OCT. 14

Feeling Latino

FREE A special edition of Bilingual Story Time will feature a demonstration of dancing to Latin beats. 242-5000 ext. 2634 | greenvillelibrary.org kallen@greenvillelibrary.org

SEPT. 16

Metropolitan Arts Council | MAC Gallery | 16 Augusta St. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. | Monday-Friday

“Ayer, Hoy y Mañana” Hispanic Heritage Month kick-off event

FREE

Clemson University | Library Bridge 116 Sigma Drive, Clemson | 6 p.m.

MAC, Palmetto Luna Arts, the Hispanic Alliance and the Hughes Main Library collaborate to present this exhibition of work by 12 Greenville-area Hispanic-Latino artists. 467-3132 | greenvillearts.com | mac@greenvillearts.com

SEPT. 9-OCT. 31

Hispanic Heritage Art Exhibit Greenville County Library System | Hughes Main Library 25 Heritage Green Place FREE Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month! The Hispanic Heritage Art Exhibit at the Hughes Main Library in downtown Greenville features the works of artists from Colombia, Nicaragua, Honduras, Ecuador, Cuba and Mexico. The extensive display includes ceramics, sculpture, painting and more. 527-9293 | greenvillelibrary.org | explore@greenvillelibrary.org

FREE Begin exploring Hispanic and Latino culture through a celebration that fuses food, entertainment and fellowship. Meet members of the various Latin-based organizations represented at Clemson University and discover programs that are featured through the month-long celebration.

SEPT. 17

Lollipops Concert: Drum Dream Girl Greenville County Main Library | Meeting Room B 25 Heritage Green Place | 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE The Greenville Symphony Orchestra (GSO) presents storybased musical programs featuring Daniel Kirkpatrick, percussion. Ages 3-8. 527-9248 | greenvillelibrary.org

Dinner with the Anchorage and Hedges Family Estate M. Judson Booksellers & Storytellers 130 S. Main St. 6:30-10 p.m.

Sept. 13 from 6-8 p.m. Sept. 16 from 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

Each year, Americans observe National Hispanic Heritage Month from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, by celebrating the histories, cultures and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America. Here’s what’s going on locally.

SEPT. 13 CUISINE

THEATER

SEPT. 13-21

TUE

The Anchorage & M. Judson Booksellers presents their first farm-to-table dinner. Ticket price includes hors d’oeurves and a four-course familystyle dinner with accompanying wine pairings from Hedges Family Estate. The special guest of the evening is author Boo Walker. Email The Anchorage with dietary restrictions or concerns. mjudsonbooks.com info@theanchoragerestaurant.com

SEPT. 17

Hispanic Heritage Masks Greenville County Main Library Meeting Room A | 25 Heritage Green Place 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. FREE Decorate a mask before or after attending the Lollipops concert. For ages 2-10.

SEPT. 20

Creation Station: Pottery Greenville County Main Library Story Room | 25 Heritage Green Place 4-5 p.m. FREE Children ages 6-12 and an adult caregiver can work with artist Diana Farfán to craft and glaze a clay pot. Finished pots will be available for pickup after the Oct. 14 Bilingual Story Time. Registration required. 527-9248

SEPT. 23

Ballet Folklorico Guadalupano & Caique Vidal and Batuque Furman University | Trone Center Front patio 3300 Poinsett Highway 7 p.m. FREE Furman celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month with Ballet Folklorico Guadalupano, a traditional Mexican folk dance group, and Caique Vidal and Batuque, an Afro-Brazilian band. hispanicheritagemonthsc.com/events


48 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.09.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CALENDAR « FAMILY

Story Time & More: My Senses The Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. 10 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Daily until Sept. 17 Free We have so many fun experiences using our senses. This week we’ll be focusing on our sense of touch. We will use our fingers to make marvelous masterpieces by finger painting. Free with admission. tcmupstate.org

COMMUNITY MEETING

Simpsonville Garden Club Meeting Rotary Club 126 South Main St., Simpsonville 2-4 p.m. Third Tuesday FREE The Simpsonville Garden Club will hold a meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 13, 126 South Main St. Guidelines for horticulture (garden) specimen preparation for the South Greenville Flower Show on Sept. 17 will be discussed. The Simpsonville Garden Club meets the third Tuesday of every month. Anyone with an interest in gardening is welcome to attend. For more information visit www.simpsonvillegardenclub.com. simpsonvillegardenclub.com simpsonvillegardenclub@yahoo.com

438-4621 NavyLeague.UpperSCCouncil@yahoo.com

EDUCATION

Code Club Greenville County Library System Hughes Main Library 25 Heritage Green Place 6:30-8 p.m. FREE Complete code challenges, learn basic computer programming skills and learn to create a website. libguides.greenvillelibrary.org/codeclub explore@greenvillelibrary.org

EDUCATION

Cook Local: Early Autumn Vegetarian

$30

15

September Supper (Farm-to-Table Dinner) Greenbrier Farms 766 Hester Store Road, Easley 6:30-9 p.m. $70/person Celebrate summer’s ending and the promise of fall with a farm-to-table dinner featuring a four course, Mediterranean-inspired, family-style feast, with a signature cocktail, craft beer and select wine pairings. The dinner is a collaboration between Greenbrier’s executive chef, Josh Sweat, and Jennifer Glover of Carolina Girl Cooks. The meal will highlight Greenbrier’s late-summer harvest, house-made charcuterie and grass-fed lamb, with special accents of Jennifer’s gourmet tea cookies in both sweet and savory applications throughout the meal. There will be music, conversation and the sound of twilight crickets. 855-9782 greenbrierfarms.com/September-Supper

15&06

Chapman Cultural Center West Wing Conference Room 200 E. St. John St., Spartanburg

CONCERT

Sept. 15, Oct. 6

Ben Folds

FREE

7:30 p.m. | $35-$55

Horizon Records 2 W Stone Ave.

Furman University Daniel Recital Hall 3300 Poinsett Highway 8-9:30 p.m. FREE Furman University Partners in the Arts will host a concert featuring Decoda, the Affiliate Ensemble of Carnegie Hall, a chamber ensemble comprised of virtuoso musicians, entrepreneurs and passionate advocates of the arts. Based in New York City, the collective creates innovative performances and engaging projects with partners around the world. 294-2086 bit.ly/2c0mOMJ Furman.Music@furman.edu

FREE The Austin singer/songwriter plays a rare in-store show on the heels of his new album, “Gotta Get Back.” His band blends ragged roots-rock and New Orleans soul. 235-7922 horizonrecords.net

EDUCATION

Navy League of the U.S. Dinner and Speaker Poinsett Club 807 E. Washington St. $33 per person inludes dinner and program

FRI

16

FAMILY

Member Preview: Science + You

The Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. 6-8 p.m. FREE

Third Thursday Tour: Syd Solomon

Members can join us from 6 p.m.-8 p.m. to explore our newest exhibit! Special activities and professionals from the medical community will help shape our Science + You night. tcmupstate.org

11 a.m.-noon FREE When listening to his latest album, “So There,” it becomes quite clear that Ben Folds has hit a new groove in his musical career. Folds is a genre-defying, multiplatinum singer/songwriter/ producer who began his career as the front

Upstate Forever and Chapman Cultural Center invite the public to free viewings of the PBS documentary series “10 That Changed America.” The four episodes each tell the stories of 10 American places – parks, towns, homes and buildings – and explore the impact they have had on us. Come to the viewings and join in on community discussions on Thursday, Sept. 15, 5:30-7 p.m.; and Thursday, Oct. 6, 5:30-7 p.m. 250-0500 | upstateforever.org

VISUAL ARTS

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College St.

6-8:30 p.m.

SERIES

“10 That Changed America” Documentary Series

255-3385 swamprabbitcafe.com/cooklocal baker@swamprabbitcafe.com

THU

CUISINE

THU & OCT

This meal is part of the new season for the popular vegetarian series. As always, participants will dine on their creations.

Seth Walker Band

A dinner meeting will feature guest speaker Michael Hoffman, the terminal manager for the S.C. Inland Port in Greer. Cash bar opens at 6 p.m. and dinner is served at 6:45 p.m. Membership is not required to attend this event. Poinsett Club requires a coat and tie in the evening.

Furman Hosts Affiliate Ensemble of Carnegie Hall, Decoda

6-8 p.m.

CONCERT

14

CONCERT

Swamp Rabbit Café & Grocery 205 Cedar Lane Road

The Peace Center | Peace Concert Hall 300 S. Main St.

WED

man and pianist for the ultra-successful indie group Ben Folds Five. After they disbanded, Folds recorded 2001’s “Rockin’ the Suburbs,” playing nearly all the instruments and collaborating with artists including “Weird Al” Yankovic and John McCrea of the band Cake. From there, Folds continued to fine tune his sound, experimenting with new genres and working with a variety of musicians and talents, from William Shatner to the chamber music group yMusic. 467-3000 peacecenter.org

Meet in front of The Salon near the front door for a docent-led tour of the exhibit. 271-7570 gcma.org

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE? Send your event information and images to calendar@communityjournals.com by Friday at 5 p.m. to be considered for publication in the next week’s Journal.


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NOTICE OF ELECTIONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, GREENVILLE COUNTY The General Election for Federal, State, and County officers, and local candidates will be held on Tuesday, November 8, 2016. Any person wishing to vote in this election must register no later than Saturday, October 8, 2016. The Greenville County Voter Registration & Election Office will open on Saturday, November 5, 2016 from 9:00-1:00. Voters will be asked to provide one of the following Photo IDs at their polling place. • S.C. Driver's License • ID Card issued by S.C. Department of Motor Vehicles • S.C. Voter Registration Card with Photo • Federal Military ID • U.S. Passport If you have one of these IDs, you are ready to vote. Voters should remember to bring one of these IDs with them to the polling place. Voters without Photo ID can get one free of charge from the Department of Motor Vehicles or their county voter registration office. Voters who encounter an obstacle to getting a Photo ID should bring their paper voter registration card without a photo with them to their polling place. These voters can then sign an affidavit swearing to their identity and to their obstacle to obtaining a Photo ID and vote a provisional ballot. This ballot will count unless the county board of voter registration and elections has grounds to believe the affidavit is false. For more information on Photo ID, visit scVOTES.org or contact your county board of voter registration and elections. Also included on the ballot a local county question on Sunday Sales of Alcohol. At 9:00 a.m. on November 8, the County Board of Voter Registration and Elections will begin its examination of the absentee ballot return envelopes at County Square, 301 University Ridge, Suite 1900, Greenville, SC 29601, (864) 467-7250. At 12 noon on November 11, the County Board of Canvassers will hold a hearing to determine the validity of all provisional ballots cast in this election and certify the results of the election. This hearing will be held at Council Chambers, County Square, 301 University Ridge, Suite 1900, Greenville, SC 29601, (864) 467-7250. The following precincts and polling places will be open from 7:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m.: Precincts Greenville 01 Greenville 03 Greenville 04 Greenville 05 Greenville 06 Greenville 07 Greenville 08 Greenville 10 Greenville 14 Greenville 16 Greenville 17 Greenville 18 Greenville 19 Greenville 20 Greenville 21 Greenville 22 Greenville 23 Greenville 24 Greenville 25 Greenville 26 Greenville 27 Greenville 28 Greenville 29 Aiken Altamont Forest Asheton Lakes Avon Belle Meade Bells Crossing

Polling Places League Academy Summit Dr Elementary School Stone Academy Sears Shelter Mount Calvary Baptist Church W Greenville Recreation Center West End Community Development Center Springfield Baptist Church Sterling School Augusta Rd Baptist Church St Matthew United Methodist Church Augusta Circle Elementary School Pleasant Valley Connection Center Trinity United Methodist Church Meals on Wheels Sanctuary Church Eastlan Baptist Church Beck Academy McCarter Presbyterian Church E North St Academy Overbrook Baptist Church Francis Asbury United Methodist Church J L Mann High School Alexander Elementary School Redeemer Presbyterian Church Five Forks Baptist Church First Church of God Disciples Fellowship Baptist Church Bells Crossing Elementary School

125 Twin Lake Rd 424 Summit Dr 115 Randall St 100 E Park Ave 115 Cedar Lane Rd 8 Rochester St 404 Vardry St 600 E McBee Ave 99 John McCarroll Way 1823 Augusta St 701 Cleveland St 100 Winyah St 510 Old Augusta Rd 2703 Augusta St 15 Oregon St 302 Parkins Mill Rd 625 S Pleasantburg Dr 901 Woodruff Rd 2 Pelham Rd 1720 E North St 1705 E North St 1800 E North St 160 Fairforest Way 1601 W Bramlett Rd 6150 Old Buncombe Rd 112 Batesville Rd 709 Brushy Creek Rd 105 Crestfield Rd 804 Scuffletown Rd

Belmont Berea Boiling Springs Botany Woods Brook Glenn Canebrake Carolina Chestnut Hills Circle Creek Clear Creek Conestee Darby Ridge Del Norte Devenger Donaldson Dove Tree Dunklin Eastside Ebenezer Edwards Forest Enoree Feaster Fork Shoals Fountain Inn 1 Fountain Inn 2 Furman Gowensville Grove Jennings Mill Lakeview Laurel Ridge Leawood Maple Creek Maridell Mauldin 1 Mauldin 2 Mauldin 3 Mauldin 4 Mauldin 5 Mauldin 6 Mauldin 7 Mission Monaview Mountain Creek Mountain View Neely Farms Northwood Oakview Palmetto Paris Mountain Pebble Creek Pelham Falls Piedmont Pineview Poinsett Raintree Reedy Fork River Walk Rock Hill Rocky Creek Rolling Green

Belmont Fire Station Berea Elementary School Devenger Rd Presbyterian Church Lutheran Church of Our Saviour Brook Glenn Elementary School Buena Vista Elementary School Carolina High School and Academy Dunean Baptist Church Cross Roads Baptist Church Pleasant View Baptist Church Reedy River Missionary Baptist Church New Velocity Church Brushy Creek Elementary School St Giles Presbyterian Church Donaldson Center Fire Dept Dove Tree Clubhouse Dunklin Fire Station Eastside High School Heritage Elementary School Taylors Elementary School Enoree Career Center Eastside Presbyterian Church Fork Shoals Elementary School Younts Center for Performing Arts Fountain Inn Activities Center Woodlands at Furman Gowensville Community Center Grove Elementary School Cleveland First Baptist Church Lakeview Middle School St Mark United Methodist Church Hampton Park Baptist Church Southside Baptist Church New Liberty Baptist Church Mauldin Cultural Center Forrester Woods Clubhouse Mauldin First Baptist Church Mauldin United Methodist Church Mauldin Miller Fire Station #1 Ray Hopkins Senior Center Mauldin Middle School Morningside Baptist Church Monaview Elementary School Mountain Creek Baptist Church Mountain View Elementary School Christ Community Church Northwood Middle School Oakview Elementary School Grace Church Piedmont Park Fire Station Hdqt Pebble Creek Baptist Church Cornerstone Baptist Church Piedmont Community Center - Beattie Hall Canebrake Fire Dept Duncan Chapel Elementary School The Bridge Church Reedy Fork Baptist Church River Walk Clubhouse Mitchell Rd Elementary School Rocky Creek Baptist Church Rolling Green Retirement Center

Vaccines, spay or neuter, testing & microchip included!

701 Fork Shoals Rd 100 Berea Dr 1200 Devenger Rd 2600 Wade Hampton Blvd 2003 E Lee Rd 310 S Batesville Rd 2725 Anderson Rd 21 Allen St - Fellowship Hall 705 Anderson Ridge Rd 110 Old Rutherford Rd 25 Lakewood Dr - Family Cntr 1720 Reid School Rd 1344 Brushy Creek Rd 1021 Hudson Rd 2291 Perimeter Rd 2 Sugarberry Dr 11353 Augusta Rd 1300 Brushy Creek Rd 1592 Geer Hwy 809 Reid School Rd 108 Scalybark Rd 830 Garlington Rd 916 McKelvey Rd 315 N Main St 610 Fairview St 1500 Trailhead Ct 14186 Hwy 11 1220 Old Grove Rd 5 Church Dr 3801 Old Buncombe Rd 901 St Mark Rd 875 State Park Rd 410 S Main St 1798 N Hwy 25 101 E Butler Rd 424 Piney Grove Rd 150 S Main St - Fellowship Hall 100 E Butler Rd 802 Miller Rd 203 Corn Rd 1190 Holland Rd 1115 Pelham Rd 10 Monaview St 255 W Mountain Creek Church Rd 6350 Mountain View Rd 700 Harrison Bridge Rd 710 Ikes Rd 515 Godfrey Rd 2801 Pelham Rd 2119 State Park Rd 1300 Reid School Rd 8508 Pelham Rd 3 Main St 100 Hillside Church Rd 210 Duncan Chapel Rd 257 Harrison Bridge Rd 3115 Fork Shoals Rd 103 River Walk Blvd 4124 E North St 1801 Woodruff Rd 1 Hoke Smith Blvd

Royal Oaks Saluda Sandy Flat Sevier Silverleaf Simpsonville 1 Simpsonville 2 Simpsonville 3 Simpsonville 4 Simpsonville 5 Simpsonville 6 Skyland Slater Marietta Southside Spring Forest Stone Valley Stonehaven Suber Mill Sugar Creek Sulphur Springs Sycamore Tanglewood Taylors Thornblade Tigerville Timberlake Trade Tubbs Mountain Wade Hampton Walnut Springs Welcome Wellington Westcliffe Westside Woodmont Woodruff Lakes Mt Pleasant Baker Creek Bridge Fork Castle Rock Fox Chase Frohawk Granite Creek Graze Branch Greenbriar Hillcrest Holly Tree Kilgore Farms Locust Hill Long Creek Moore Creek Oneal Ranch Creek Riverside Sparrows Point Standing Springs Travelers Rest 1 Travelers Rest 2 Tyger River Verdmont Ware Place

Rock of Ages Baptist Church Unity Baptist Church of Berea Double Springs Baptist Church Sevier Middle School Heritage Bible Church Simpsonville City Park Center Plain Elementary School Simpsonville United Methodist Church Renovation Church (prev named Westside) Center for Community Services Calvary Baptist Church - Atrium Skyland Elementary School Slater Marietta Elementary School Southside High School Greenville Nazarene Church Springwell Church Advent United Methodist Church Praise Cathedral Sugar Creek Clubhouse Armstrong Elementary School First Presbyterian Church Tanglewood Middle School Taylors First Baptist Church Airport Baptist Church Tigerville Elementary School Aldersgate United Methodist Church Needmore Recreation Center Enoree Baptist Church Faith Baptist Church Clear Spring Baptist Church Welcome Elementary School E North Church Westcliffe Elementary School Agnew Rd Baptist Church Woodmont Middle School Woodruff Rd Christian Church Mt Pleasant Community Center Valley Brook Outreach Baptist Church Kingdom Life Church Washington Baptist Church Northwood Baptist Church Grace United Methodist Church Pleasant Grove Baptist Church Holly Ridge Baptist Church Messiah Lutheran Church Hillcrest Middle School Faith Baptist Church Gilder Creek Farm Clubhouse Fairview Baptist Church Rocky Creek Missionary Baptist Church South Greenville Fire Station #6 Eastside Apostolic Lutheran Church Robert E Cashion Elementary School Riverside High School Immanuel Lutheran Church Standing Springs Baptist Church Travelers Rest City Hall Renfrew Baptist Church Chandler Creek Elementary School Hopewell United Methodist Church Ellen Woodside Elementary School

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Five Below LLC/ DBA The Velo Fellow intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON AND OFF premises consumption of BEER/BREW PUB at 1 Augusta St. Suite 126, Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than September 25, 2016. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

105 Donaldson Rd 12 Piney Rd 3800 Locust Hill Rd 1000 Piedmont Park Rd 2005 Old Spartanburg Rd 405 E Curtis St 506 Neely Ferry Rd 215 SE Main St 611 Richardson St 1102 Howard Dr 3810 Grandview Dr 4221 N Hwy 14 100 Baker Cir 6630 Frontage Rd 1201 Haywood Rd 4369 Wade Hampton Blvd 2258 Woodruff Rd 3390 Brushy Creek Rd 103 Sugar Creek Rd 8601 White Horse Rd 510 E Curtis St 44 Merriwoods Dr 200 W Main St - Ministry Center 776 S Batesville Rd 25 Tigerville Elementary School Rd 7 Shannon Dr 202 Canteen Ave 881 Tigerville Rd - Youth Center 500 W Lee Rd 301 Bethany Rd 36 E Welcome Rd 4108 E North St - Fellowship Hall 105 Eastbourne Rd 400 Rainbow Dr 325 N Flat Rock Rd 20 Bell Rd 710 S Fairfield Rd 8323 Augusta Rd 416 Holland Rd 3500 N Hwy 14 888 Ansel School Rd 627 Taylor Rd 1002 S Buncombe Rd 260 Adams Mill Rd 1100 Log Shoals Rd 510 Garrison Rd 906 Highway 14 404 Grimes Ave 1300 Locust Hill Rd 239 Rocky Creek Rd 1800 W Georgia Rd 2200 Mays Bridge Rd 1500 Fork Shoals Rd 794 Hammett Bridge Rd 2820 Woodruff Rd 1111 W Georgia Rd 6711 State Park Rd 951 Geer Hwy 301 Chandler Rd 1420 Neely Ferry Rd 9122 Augusta Rd

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP #16-09/28/16, ADA Consulting Services, September 28, 2016, 3:00 P.M. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org/ Procurement/ or by calling (864) 467-7200.

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP#17-09/26/16 – 2017 Type “I” Ambulances, September 26, 2016, 3:00 P.M., E.D.T. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org or by calling (864) 467-7200.

When you finish reading this paper, please recycle it.

GREATER GREENVILLE SANITATION COMMISSION NOTICE OF A PUBLIC HEARING Hearing of the Commission to enlarge the boundaries of the Greater Greenville Sanitation District to include certain properties located on Mauldin Road off South Pleasantburg Drive and to provide public notice thereof. PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that on September 27, at 4:00 p.m. at Greater Greenville Sanitation Commission Headquarters located at 1600 West Washington Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, a public hearing will be held for the consideration of enlarging the boundaries of the Greater Greenville Sanitation District to include certain properties located on Mauldin Road off South Pleasantburg Drive. Anyone wishing to be placed on the Agenda for Public Comment is asked to call Greater Greenville Sanitation Commission at 864-232-6721 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Monday thru Thursday. Public comments will be limited based on the number of persons addressing the Commission. www.GGSC.gov

SUMMONS NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE FAMILY COURT Case #: 2015-DR-23-4559 Amanda Cutolo and Geno Cutolo, Plaintiffs, vs. Kyndall Robinson, and John Doe, Defendants. In the interests of: Grace Sloan Robinson, DOB 6/30/15 minor under the age of 18 (eighteen) years, TO: THE DEFENDANTS ABOVENAMED YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, of which a copy is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscriber at 112 Lovett Drive, Greenville, SC 29607, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, the Plaintiff will apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint. IN THE EVENT YOU ARE AN INFANT UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE OR AN IMPRISONED PERSON, you are further summoned and notified to apply for the appointment of a Guardian ad Litem to represent you in this action within fifteen (15) days after the service of the Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. Richmond Callaway Law Firm, LLC Amy Richmond Callaway, Esq. #12582 112 Lovett Drive Greenville, SC 29607 (864) 234-7304 ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFFS


50 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 09.09.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

51 Pickup ACROSS

1 Move springingly 7 — mater 11 Impact sound 15 Outfielder Slaughter 19 With 49-Across, it’s between Greece and Turkey 20 Hive buzzers 21 Moniker for Lincoln 23 Automobiles that are really dirty? 25 Edited work 26 Tooth doctors’ org. 27 — Fridays (dining chain) 28 “The Matrix” actor eases pain? 30 Draw up new boundaries for 32 Apple’s mobile devices run on it 33 Olds antique 34 WNW’s opposite 35 Showy flight maneuvers done by some birds? 40 Boy band of pop 42 Geologic time periods 43 Suffix with Wisconsin 44 — Schwarz 45 Traffic sign 49 See 19-Across 50 Deep-down faiths? 55 Sound, as an argument 59 “That’s clear” 60 Cloning material 61 Auto tankful

By Frank Longo 62 Alligator’s cousin 65 Bit of design info 67 Persian Gulf country 69 Serenade your purveyor? 73 Horse riding movements 74 Bedazzle 75 Events with witnesses 76 NY hours 77 Lyric-penning Gershwin 79 Longtime youth org. 81 Skilled in 85 “Whatever happened to your faith?” 90 Vow for the nuptials 91 What might follow “tra” 92 Bit of body ink 93 Fertility clinic cells 94 Ring sealing a junction 97 Seizes 100 Give some yuletide plants moisture? 103 Mrs., in France 106 “— and Stimpy” 107 Depressed 108 Chaise spot 109 Test done by a marine aquarium keeper? 114 Suffix with 36-Down 115 Diner bill 118 Providing nourishment 119 Bill of fare at an outdoor eatery on a clear night? 122 Had profits equaling losses

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123 Helen of — 124 Grippers on golf shoes 125 Soup containers 126 For fear that 127 Besides that 128 Grammer of “Frasier” DOWN

1 “Qué —?” 2 Necessary: Abbr. 3 Océano filler 4 Tchr.’s union 5 W. Coast engineering school 6 Puzzles 7 Easy as — 8 Tap mishap 9 Piddling 10 Tear into 11 Drive- — (pickup windows) 12 One using a weeding aid 13 Promoted insufficiently 14 Dallas’ — Plaza 15 Major finale? 16 Easily fooled 17 Reed instruments 18 Get a feeling 22 Offshoot 24 Zoologist Fossey 29 Refusals 30 Rocker Ocasek 31 — -dieu (pew addition) 35 Real pain 36 Sword type

37 Part of S&L 38 See 121-Down 39 City on Utah Lake 40 Scot’s refusal 41 Longtime CBS show 44 Least restricted 46 Forum robes 47 Studio sign 48 “Hey ... you” 50 Sci-fi captain 51 Nature 52 Gym set 53 Rubber stamp go-with 54 Charles de — Airport 56 Skin woe 57 Ziploc item 58 Pen fixtures? 63 “— longa ...” 64 “Maybe later” 66 Inferior dog 68 Faint cloud 69 Obama girl 70 PC chip giant 71 Anesthetize 72 Chanteuse Edith 73 Cry weakly 78 Watchful 80 Opposite of 95-Down 82 — torch (luau lamp) 83 “Zip- — -Doo-Dah” 84 Little ’uns 86 Tattle (on) 87 Owns 88 “— had it!” 89 Frontier figure Wyatt 94 Took ill 95 Just slightly 96 — -pitch 98 Palmer of the links

99 Actor Harvey 100 Nursery cry 101 “— Fideles” 102 Greet 103 “Hardball” network 104 Tierney of “Liar Liar” 105 Rocker John 107 Fragrance 110 Ticks off 111 Part of YSL

Sudoku

Easy

112 PC key abbr. 113 Evil group in “Get Smart” 115 Caddy picks 116 Initial stake 117 Not at all idle 120 Seedy loaf 121 With 38-Down, old New York Giants great Crossword answers: page 28

by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan

Sudoku answers: page 28


09.09.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 51

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

BACK PAGE Community Voices

Where I’ve Been with Bill Koon

The Next Ex Since the start of the current political campaigns, which began back in the Bronze Age, how many candidates have been introduced as “the next president of the United States?” If all these claims held true and all the candidates showed up at the White House next January, imagine the chaos. The place would look like a Motel 6. Think about the squabbles: Donald and Melania Trump would square off against Hillary and Bill in a fight for the presidential suite. Trump would also want the Lincoln bedroom so he could put up a plaque saying “The Donald slept here, too.” The lettering could match that of the new neon sign on the lawn: “TRUMP PLAZA 2.” I don’t think he plans to rename the Washington Monument or the Smithsonian – yet. Bill would be back in the doghouse; Ben Carson could sack out on the sofa or in the La-Z-Boy; Chris Christie gets the pantry (note that I avoided assigning him to the Oval Office); Ted Cruz gets a spot in the guardhouse at the entrance along with an automatic weapon (he’ll be banned from the basketball court with its “rings”); Marco “Polo” Rubio gets the pool house (if there is one); “Feel the Bern” Sanders would get space in the furnace room. Jeb Bush and Carly Fiorina would get rollaways in one room or another. And I’d stash a sleeping bag in case I have forgotten someone. We could do the same kind of thing for the failed vice presidents – “ex-next VP.” Sarah Palin might get first choice at the VP digs over at the Naval Observatory, but no one knows where Sarah is. I have heard rumors that she has gone into the witness protection program and has assumed a new identity in the Yukon – with her dog team. I have also heard that Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus is keeping her in solitary confinement until just after the November election. Give me a hallelujah, please.

The Konduros family is following in their father’s footsteps by using a Donor Advised Fund at the Community Foundation to support charities that align with their passions.

864-233-5925 • www.cfgreenville.org

But that scenario is only a bit of my nonsense. Much more serious is this: Could the failed candidates use this as an official title: “Ex-next president of the United States?” We have a couple of good ex-presidents, but I’m not sure about the ex-next presidents. Could it go on a letterhead? Could John McCain or Al Gore put on their resumes that they are ex-next presidents? What if you were an ex-next president twice? Would that call for separate entries or could you lump them together? If Donald Trump fails at the polls in November, could he advertise his casinos as owned by an “ex-next president?” If Hillary fails, can Bill promote himself as “an ex-next first spouse?” The possibilities are endless. Meanwhile, though, we have picked up on some of this lingo at our house. For example, at the end a meal, my wife, the Bride, will rise and gesture with her right hand. She says, “I’m proud to introduce the next dishwasher in this household” and then wave me to the sink. I’m looking forward to being the ex-next dishwasher. In another moment, she might introduce me as the next person to carry out the garbage or to mow the lawn. Or she might introduce our daughter, known here as the Privileged Child, as “the next one to make up her bed or get off her smartphone.” She would be doing just what the politicians do: making ordinary people and ordinary tasks sound really good and hopeful. I might follow suit by making some announcements in the manner of the representatives casting the votes of their states during the nominating process – as in, “as representative of the great state of LaLa Land, where the grass is greener and the sun always shines and the unemployment rate is minus 10, I am proud to cast these votes for the next president of the United States.” I might say, for example, “As a member of this household and part owner of this beautiful little house, with its new roof, tucked behind the construction site of the new Harris Teeter store and facing the proposed site of a new Chick-fil-A, I’m proud to announce our unanimous vote for a second mortgage.” I’ll pull up now – before I become “the next ex-columnist” for the Greenville Journal. Bill Koon lives in Greenville. He can be contacted at badk@clemson.edu.

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Sept. 9, 2016 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

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