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GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, August 1, 2014 • Vol.16, No.31

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JOURNAL NEWS

WORTH REPEATING THEY SAID IT

“I spent 20 years in fine dining and didn’t want to own a place like that. I just wanted a funky place where the food was really, really good.” SC Chef Ambassador Heidi Trull on her restaurant, Grits & Groceries.

“When I hear about all the bullying, yeah, I get it. I can see that. But you know? That’s not new either. Just on the Internet in general, you can hide behind fake identities and fake profiles and things like that to say all kinds of heinous things.” Dr. Kevin Treu, professor and chairman of Furman’s computer science department, on the unfairness of blaming the creators of Yik Yak for its misuse by cyberbullies.

“You look out your window and you see a wall.” Greenville resident Emily Moss, arguing for larger side setbacks between houses in the city of Greenville’s new infill regulations.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“It is Israel’s mission to destroy these tunnels and dismantle the terrorist means of Hamas as quickly as possible. We are deeply concerned about the casualties on both sides of the conflict.”

1 Rank of Presbyterian College among Money magazine’s best college buys in S.C.

243 Number of CareerSkillsNow participants, 203 of whom have landed new jobs

44 Members of Team USA who will compete in the Para-Cycling Road World Championships in Greenville this month

17 Diameter in inches of the Mega Danny Cake at FunnelDelicious, a world-record contender for largest funnel cake

Devon Anker of the Greenville Jewish Federation

“I believe that some of the strongest things are broken.” Greenville Middle School student, in an essay about life’s challenges for a writing assignment called “This I Believe.”

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Results inconclusive on elephant’s death SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com After the Greenville Zoo’s beloved 44-year-old African elephant, Joy, died suddenly while en route to her new home at the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo in Colorado last month, zoo officials set out to try to determine why. The Cheyenne Mountain Zoo received Joy’s final necropsy report from Colorado State University (CSU) Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories. The results were inconclusive, but did confirm that no significant preexisting conditions were missed during the multitude of initial tests that were performed prior to Joy’s shipment, and that all signs indicated that she was healthy enough for transport, according to Cheyenne Mountain Zoo’s veterinarian. Greenville Zoo officials say they don’t know exactly what happened and never will, but they believe Joy passed away quickly and suddenly, as there was no

Photo Courtesy of Greenville Zoo

evidence of struggling or trauma. Heat wasn’t a factor, as her travel trailer was climate-controlled, and the conditions of the trailer were checked at each stop, zoo officials said. At no time along the journey was it deemed that the trailer was too warm. Having an animal die during transport is a rare occurrence for Association of Zoos and Aquariums institutions, but the older and larger an animal is the more complications a move can have, officials said.

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OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

A solution to consider We do not choose where we are born, the family we become a part of, the geographical location, or even our race ethnicity. Biologically, we don’t choose our genes, our hair color, or our blood type. We are just born. For the rest of our lives, we try to survive. Everything we know that comes after birth is the result of our family of origin. We are not born with a strong work ethic, full of character, wise beyond our years, and ready to lead the country. All that we become, for good or bad, has everything to do with what we see modeled in our families and neighborhoods as children. If all you ever knew was that you really did not have a home, that you stayed at multiple places for different periods of time, bouncing between your aunt, your sister and your mother because your mom could not stay out of jail, what would that say about life? Chances are, your mother saw the same thing growing up, and maybe her mom too. We are all born with free will. We all seek love and acceptance. Gangs are formed around this concept. We all know the danger there, but if your emotional bucket is empty, life is super scary, and you have no one to really count on, you can see how joining a small group, a gang, might seem prudent. I haven’t said anything that you probably do not know. What I am asking you to consider is a solution. If you meet successful people who come from families of origin that are less than stable, consistent, and loving, often referred to as a rough start, there is usually a common thread for their ability to overcome. It’s a mentor. It’s someone who was there consistently, maybe not a full-time caregiver, but someone consistently taking an interest in their lives. It is someone encouraging them, filling up their emotional bucket, helping them to believe they have worth, gifts and abilities. This

SPEAK YOUR MIND The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters

6 THE JOURNAL | AUGUST 1, 2014

IN MY OWN WORDS by LISA GILSTRAP

person could be a neighbor, a cousin, a teacher, a coach, or a Big Brother or Big Sister. The Big Brother Big Sister Program celebrated 40 years in Greenville this Thursday, July 31. The program is far more than just being a buddy to a child. It is a formidable solution that offers children who are at risk a real chance at believing they have purpose and can make good decisions that will not only help them live a better life, but will help them encourage those around them to make better decisions as well. National research has shown that positive relationships between youth and their Big Brothers and Big Sisters

have a direct and measurable impact on children’s lives. Little Brothers and Sisters are more confident in their schoolwork performance, able to get along better with their families, 46 percent less likely to begin using illegal drugs, 27 percent less likely to begin using alcohol, and 52 percent less likely to skip school. If you would like to be a part of the solution or read more about this great organization, you can find more information at bbbs.org.

Lisa Gilstrap is a mortgage banker with Southern First Bank in Greenville.

should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short

Good choices begin at home The big lesson on research and data about poverty is the limited effectiveness of public policy. To begin with, we measure poverty poorly in the U.S. and because of that are forever stuck with something like 12 to 15 percent, no matter how good or ill the economy performs. Fortunately, even with this silly measure, most of poverty is temporary, with more than 75 percent moving out of the poverty ranks in fewer than 36 months. For those healthy folks in longterm poverty, nearly all have made one of the big three mistakes: quitting high school, using drugs or having kids without a partner. Of these, choosing to have a child without a spouse is the most pervasive. New experimental research tells us that poverty can reduce the quality of decision-making, with poorer households focusing less on the long term. But, as I have noted, the problem is with the quality of decisionmaking, not the options available to them. Becoming affluent requires good choices repeated throughout life. It is no doubt harder for poor people to make these affirmative choices, given the relative absence of good example and the lack of resources to support them. But it is also true that making these choices is also hard for children in affluent families, simply because these are tough, demanding choices. Becoming poor requires poor choices repeated throughout life. It is no doubt easier for poor people to make these negative choices, given the relative absence of good example; but is also true that making these poor choices befall many in all economic classes. Given this, there should therefore be a convergence towards average or middle income by children of both rich and poor parents alike.

bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, fact-based arguments.

IN MY OWN WORDS by MICHAEL HICKS

Notice, of course, that the language is all about choice, for that is what it is, and is what serious research on poverty has been focusing on for a generation. Poor teenagers know as well as rich ones what causes babies. They are simply more likely to make a bad choice, and less likely to rebound from the mistake. This has a long impact. New research from the inequality project at Harvard finds that income mobility across generations is unchanged in half a century. Moreover, this study finds that parental income explains less that 10 percent of their adult child’s earnings. Education and single parenting are much larger factors. It is what kids learn at home, not how much their parents make, that affects income mobility. So the problem is the limits to policy. We spend upwards of $150,000 per child on a high school education, but about one in seven kids fails to graduate. We spend enormous sums on public contraception and abortion as well as sex education. There are hundreds of programs, yet the share of births to single moms grew from five to more than 40 percent over 50 years of our war on poverty. If we wish to intervene with policy, it is going to have to aim directly at the parent-child interaction, and it is going to have to be all about choices.

Michael J. Hicks is the director of the Center for Business and Economic Research and a professor of economics in the Miller College of Business at Ball State University.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of

organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Executive Editor Susan Clary Simmons at ssimmons@ communityjournals.com.


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JOURNAL NEWS

Yik Yak stirs up cyber-controversy for local founders EMILY PRICE | STAFF

eprice@communityjournals.com While their peers are still cashing checks tucked in their graduation cards, two 2013 Furman graduates –Yik Yak CEO Tyler Droll and COO Brooks Buffington – have transformed from students to tech power players. The two recently raised $10 million from major Silicon Valley investors to fund Yik Yak, a controversial locationbased social app that allows users to post messages anonymously to other users in their 1.5-mile radius. Yik Yak and its Upstate-educated creators have spent the summer as fodder for a lineup of national media outlets including The Today Show, the Wall Street Journal, Wired, Business Insider, The Huffington Post and CNN – yet the coverage is often grim. The shroud of anonymity Yik Yak provides its users – a distinguishing characteristic of the social app from its competitors, paired with an equally core location-based function – has cast darkness on the young developers’ virtual attainment of the American entrepreneurial dream.

THE SILICON VALLEY (ANTI-REALITY) BUBBLE

With the element of wonder at the duo’s catapult to riches and power, the national media’s Yik Yak narrative typically portrays the app as the perfect tool for defamation, cyberbullying and school terrorism threats. “Why these secret-messaging apps make high school a nightmare,” intoned ABC News. Fox News offered a “Psychiatrist’s view: Yik Yak is most dangerous app I’ve ever seen.” In some nationally publicized cases, entire student bodies have evacuated in response to threatening anonymous posts. According to a student report on Christ Church Episcopal School’s student news site, cces.org, the CCES upper school hosted a school-wide assembly in March

Yik Yak COO Brooks Buffington (left) and CEO Tyler Droll (right).

8 THE JOURNAL | AUGUST 1, 2014

“I think that the technology is ethically neutral. This happens over and over and over again. It goes back to the printed word and television and the Internet. Everything else is first going to be the downfall of human society.” Dr. Kevin Treu, professor and chair of Furman’s Computer Science department.

“to address the app and the damage done to the student body.” The same month, the Oconee County School District blocked its servers from accessing Yik Yak. Asked about the app’s impact in Greenville County middle and high schools, district spokesperson Oby Lyles said, “Social media sites are a means to communicate. But whether the communication is by mouth or writing on a social media site, it becomes an issue for us when it crosses into the school domain. When it becomes disruptive to the school is when we could get involved, depending on what the issue is.” Lyles said Yik Yak has not been a public school issue. When the district became aware of the problems with Yik Yak last school year, Droll and Buffington had already begun geo-fencing, or setting a virtual perimeter, for the app’s access, he said. College students were always Yik Yak’s targeted audience, Buffington said, and the company began to take “proactive measures” in geo-fencing “after recognizing younger demographics were using the app inappropriately.” So far, Yik Yak has successfully blocked 85 percent of the U.S.’s primary and secondary schools from accessing the app on school property. “Cyberbullying doesn’t align with Yik Yak’s mission of creating beneficial social communities,” Buffington said. “While the majority of college students understand the importance of acting responsibly on social media … we found the majority of high school students have not yet reached this level of maturity.” Yik Yak implemented an age restriction of 17, but access must be managed via parental controls.

SOCIAL ANARCHY AND “THE SCHOOL DOMAIN”

Experts say it’s no surprise that high schoolers would be eager to tap into a hyperlocal social network of mostly unregulated chatter confined to their 1.5-mile radius. Cyberbullying is nothing new, but with Yik Yak has come an ugly tangle of semiphantom social interactions contained neatly within the boundaries of the school. The app doesn’t require an email signup to participate. This absent paper trail can affect a young person’s sense of accountability for what is displayed in the schoolyard, where youth have always suffered the growing pains of socialization, experts say. As a licensed practicing counselor for

children and adolescents, Dixie Neff, Ed.S, says she’s listened to and treated many cases of cyberbullying. She spent 10 years in the public school system before entering private practice two years ago. “I’ve seen cutting from it, because kids are so upset they have no other way to get it out,” she said. “I’ve seen kids want to leave their school. I’ve talked to kids who want to get out of the school they’re in because there was so much bullying on technology. “Some rumor got out, and the rumor just destroyed them at that school,” Neff said. “And a lot of times parents don’t have a choice – they have to send them to that school.” Of all the cyberbullying tactics she’s witnessed, rumors have the most impact, Neff said. “Sexual rumors, and rumors about people’s families. If someone is cutting, or going to a counselor – rumors like that.” Girls are also involved with noted frequency. “It’s almost like being mean is glorified,” Neff said. She cited shows such as the popular “Real Housewives” franchise as being “all mean ... and here they are on TV, and they are beautiful and they are glorified and they are wealthy. And it’s like, it’s the thing to be mean. It’s a cultural thing.” While mean girls and school gossip aren’t new, technology moves rumors through the halls at phenomenal speed, she said. “It’s that immediate access to information. Someone hears a rumor, and access is so easy they put it on and within 10 seconds it’s spread throughout. It’s just amazing how quickly information is disseminated.”

A SMOLDERING GUN VS. “COOL TECHNOLOGY”

Neil Jones, a local intellectual property attorney with extensive experience in the digital realm, said while “law has struggled at times to keep up with technology,” it’s possible a technology’s inventors could be held legally accountable for its misuse. “If you provide users with access, and the platform, and then depending on how you encourage users to act on your website, there could be an issue,” he said. “You could be liable.” He pointed to Napster – the peer-to-peer file-sharing Internet service – as an example. “Napster was, ‘We don’t think we violate a copyright by providing our peer-topeer file-sharing platform; all you users out there get together and share music. We’ll be the platform for sharing music,’”

Jones said. “Was Napster violating anyone’s copyright in the traditional way of ‘copying’ music? Not really; it was the users who were downloading and doing the copying. Napster was merely allowing the mutual access to music libraries. … But Napster, of course, had to change their way of doing business.” Dr. Kevin Treu, professor and chairman of Furman’s computer science department, knows Yik Yak CEO Droll personally from Droll’s days at Furman. Though he was not Treu’s student, Treu described Droll as “a surpassingly excellent” student. In an iPhone app development course taught by a colleague, Yik Yak’s tech muscle was “the star of the class,” Treu said. “I think that the technology is ethically neutral,” he said. “This happens over and over and over again. It goes back to the printed word and television and the Internet. Everything else is first going to be the downfall of human society.” Treu’s department does interject a framework of ethics into its curriculum. The computer science introductory course addresses the “ethical responsibility of the IT professional,” and a more advanced course addresses morals, law and society in the digital age. Treu believes the criticism of Droll and Buffington is unfair. “Some [new technologies] are obvious what good they can do. But something like this, a geo-tracking communication tool, we need to figure out to use our better instincts rather than our worse instincts … we have to learn how to use it appropriately.” Twitter is a “classic case,” he said. The social networking service has “evolved and found its niche in a way that is very productive for sharing news, for people of some notoriety or prominence to be able to communicate directly with one another, for movements to start with trending … whereas at first, people were like, what on earth would you even use this for?” Droll and Buffington say they see Yik Yak as a medium for commentary on current events and general knowledge related to a local area, and a place users can discuss personal and community issues

“Certainly having a big-time legendary venture investor in your deal is a very strong signal in the market that somebody believes this isn’t just silliness, there’s real value to be created here.” Matt Dunbar, managing director of the Upstate Carolina Angel Network


JOURNAL NEWS they may not feel comfortable addressing in a public forum. Yik Yak’s anonymity allows content to be judged for the content, not the author, they say, and provides a ready-made audience without the time and effort involved in building a digital following. Treu says when he first heard about Yik Yak, he saw it as “the ultimate, ‘Is there a doctor in the house’ app … If someone gets sick or hurt, and we need help immediately, it seems like the perfect kind of tool for something like that: To put the word out to people in close proximity.” He also sees the potential for abuse. “When I hear about all the bullying, yeah, I get it. I can see that. But you know? That’s not new either,” he said. “Just on the Internet in general, you can hide behind fake identities and fake profiles and things like that to say all kinds of heinous things.” Treu is impressed with the way Droll and Buffington have handled the backlash and worked to minimize the issues of abuse. “I believe those guys are pioneers in [geo-fencing],” he said. “Getting all that data from Google about the school boundaries, and having it not work within those boundaries – I think that’s the kind of way you respond to adversity and then help the technology to improve and move along. “

PUTTING $10M TOWARD A “BETTER INSTINCTS” PRACTICE

Matt Dunbar, managing director of the Upstate Carolina Angel Network, said from a business perspective, the high-profile investment dollars awarded Yik Yak indicate the tool’s potential. “I hadn’t heard of [Yik Yak] until they started raising some money and it started becoming notorious,” he said. “I have a ton of respect for [investor] Tim Draper. Tim comes from sort of venture capital royalty… Certainly having a big-time legendary venture investor in your deal is a very strong signal in the market that somebody believes this isn’t just silliness, there’s real value to be created here.” Buffington and Droll do not diminish the guiding role their investors play. Droll said they’ve “made it a strong focus to surround the table with extremely smart and experienced people such as a director at Google, well-known investors, and successful entrepreneurs.” Though Dunbar himself does not engage with the app, he predicts investors are “not betting on gossip. What they’re betting on is a tool that a lot of people find useful and valuable and just like a lot of things, start out in one direction and have one sort of silly purpose … Maybe even Twitter as an example, where it started all seeming kind of silly, but you’ve seen it evolve to the point it’s become an impor-

YIK YAK FACTS  Yikyakapp.com  An app compatible with iPhone/ iPad/ iTouch; 4 out of 5 stars in the App Store

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 Launched on Furman’s campus Homecoming weekend in November 2013 by Furman grads Tyler Droll (CEO) and Brooks Buffington (COO)  A location-based bulletin board that displays posts from within 1.5 mile radius  Users are anonymous with no sign-up required; users can choose to add a username with each post and names can be changed post to post  Posts referred to as “yaks”; users referred to as “the herd”  Users can up-vote and down-vote posts; best posts move to the top of the board while the worst move to the bottom (and eventually disappear)  Users can reply to posts and report posts  17+ age restriction  Geo-fencing (blocking app access within a certain perimeter) is available for schools by request through yikyakapp.com; currently 85 percent of U.S. primary and secondary schools are geo-fenced  Recently launched 2.0 version has a “Peek” feature that allows users to tap into specific networks outside their 1.5 mile radius; current Featured Peeks include Hogwarts, The Interning Wolves of Wall Street, Capitol Hill’s Interning Politicians, Meanwhile in London and select colleges

tant business and marketing tool.” The user engagement, virility and certain key features of Yik Yak have the potential to evolve, and Draper’s involvement – paired with his track record – is promising, Dunbar said. “It’s like with any new technology. Any technology can be used, and often is, for ill purposes initially, and maybe even beyond that,” he said. “But hopefully as those technologies become better understood, and have a little bit of time to get seasoned in the marketplace, the market finds the real value. There’s not real value in gossip. There is real value in real-time communication, and we can see that in lots of different ways.”

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GREG BECKNER / STAFF

While it makes sense to have a dog park near the Swamp Rabbit Trail and downtown, Cleveland Park is not the right place, Greenville Mayor Knox White told members of Save Canine Corner, a group of dog owners seeking to reverse the city’s decision to close the Cleveland Park recreation area for dogs. Several dog owners and regular users of Canine Corner spoke at Monday’s City Council meeting, asking that the recreation spot remain in operation even after a new dog park opens later this month at Conestee. “The dog park is a central part of Greenville’s image of being family friendly,” said Phyllis Muller, one of the organizers of the Save Canine Corner effort. Closing Canine Corner would be a mistake, especially with the increase in housing options downtown, said another organizer, Michael O’Connell. One of the announced developments includes its own dog park. “Reducing pressure on Canine Corner is a step in the right direction,” said O’Connell, who lives off North Main Street near Stone Lake. “But downtown needs a dog park. Once Canine Corner is closed, there will be no public space within six miles of my home where dogs can legally be let off a leash.” City Parks and Recreation Director Dana Souza said opening a second dog park in Conestee would not alleviate the problems associated with Canine Corner.

“We thought when the county opened up the dog park on East North Street by the Pavilion, it would alleviate some of the problems, but it did not,” he told council. Canine Corner is too close to residential areas and the Reedy River, and lacks the space to separate large and small dogs. All “are conflicts we cannot change,” he said. Residents of Cleveland Forest have complained about Canine Corner for years, and those complaints have been increasing, he said. Councilman David Sudduth said the decision to close the park was not a knee-jerk reaction. “It’s been everything but that,” he said. “We’ve been holding off the neighborhood for years mainly because we wanted an option. The new park gives us that.” The new dog park should open in late August or early September. After a transition period, Canine Corner will be closed. The new park will have separate areas for large and small dogs, fences with rounded corners to minimize confrontations between dogs and bench seating for dog owners. White told Save Canine Corner members the city is very sensitive to neighborhoods. “I see the desirability of a downtown dog park near the Swamp Rabbit Trail,” he said. “I hope construction of the dog park at Conestee will not stop us from building a dog park downtown, perhaps on the west side on the trail.” He urged Save Canine Corner members to begin working with the city on such a park now.


JOURNAL NEWS

Money ranks PC as best college buy in SC New ranking considers cost of degree, job market success CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com According to Money magazine, Presbyterian College is South Carolina’s best college. PC ranked first in the state in Money’s new college ranking that pays particular attention to how much money a diploma will cost and how much money that diploma will be worth in the job market after graduation. Mark Schneider, former commissioner of the Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics, and his company, College Measures (which collects and analyzes data to drive improvements in higher education), said one of the most important messages to come out of the rankings is that students don’t have to pay a lot to get a high quality education that really helps them in the job market. Kim Clark, Money senior writer who created the rankings, said the rankings provide students and parents with a list of colleges that are the most likely to do a great job educating a student and helping that student into a well-paying job. The magazine ranked only the colleges with graduation rates at or above the median for their type. The ded in the rank665 schools included

ings nationwide represent 44 percent of all colleges and universities. Presbyterian College in Clinton ranked first out of 11 South Carolina schools listed. It was 84th nationally. The Citadel added the most value – outperforming the averages on graduation rates, student loan defaults and graduates’ earnings – and is the most affordable college in the state, Clark said. The rest of South Carolina’s top five are Wofford, Clemson and USC. Furman, the most expensive school, in the state was sixth. Nationally, the top five are Babson College in Massachusetts, Webb Institute in Glen Cove, N.Y.; MIT, Princeton, Stanford, Harvard, Harvey Mudd College in California, Cooper Union in New York City, Brigham Young University and California Institute of Technology. To learn more about the rankings, go to time.com/money/ collection/moneys-best-colleges. Avg. est. Early career student earnings as debt upon reported to graduation Payscale.com

Money’s valueadded grade

Rank in Overall S.C. rank

School name

Est. net price of a degree

1

84

Presbyterian College

$101,709

$13,174

$42,800

B+

2

114

Citadel Military College of South Carolina

$95,797

$21,599

$50,900

A-

3

134

Wofford College

$136,699

$11,533

$40,900

B+

4

138

Clemson University

$124,837

$23,941

$49,000

B

5

261

University of South Carolina – Columbia

$100,345

$13,691

$41,300

B-

6

359

Furman University

$168,755

$11,603

$41,400

B

7

487

Winthrop University

$111,782

$21,237

$38,500

B-

8

536

College of Charleston

$109,724

$12,067

$36,700

C+

9

569

South Carolina State University $116,158

$28,975

$44,100

B+

10

614

Coker College

$106,934

$23,341

$29,700

B+

11

646

Coastal Carolina University

$107,140

$27,544

$35,600

C+

Health Events Splash n’ Dash Sat., Aug. 2 or 9 • 8 a.m. • GHS Family Y & Laurens Family Y This event for kids ages 3-16 includes a pool swim followed by a crosscountry run. Fee: $15. To register, visit ghs.org/splashndash. The Skinny on Belly Fat Tues., Aug. 19 • 12-1 p.m. • Caine Halter Y Discover how losing a little around the middle can help you gain a lot, courtesy of GHS family medicine doctor Philip Way, MD. Free; registration required. Prostate Health: What Every Man Needs to Know Wed., Aug. 20 • 12:15-1:15 p.m. • GHS Life Center® Join GHS urologist Erik Busby, MD, for a discussion on prostate health, including current screening guidelines. Free; registration required. Diabetes 101 Fri., Aug. 22 • 1-2 p.m. • GHS Life Center Learn the basics about diabetes. Free; no registration required. Call 4558752. Meet the Midwives Tues., Aug. 26 • 6-8 p.m. • Greenville Midwifery Care Find out about GHS’ nurse-midwifery program and how a midwife can enhance the birthing process. Free; registration required. Understanding Your Cancer Risk Mon., Sept. 15 • 12:15-1:15 p.m. • GHS Life Center Learn how to identify your hereditary risk for cancer from GHS medical oncologist Carla Jorgensen, MD. Free; registration required. To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, please visit ghs.org/healthevents or call 1-877-GHS-INFO (447-4636).

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Source: Money Magazine

AUGUST 1, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 11


JOURNAL NEWS

Greenville Region Workforce Collaborative trains skilled workers, wins national honor APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com The National Fund for Workforce Solutions has honored the Greenville Region Workforce Collaborative with a Council Award for Exemplary Industry Partnership. The collaborative was the brainchild of a group of educators, workforce developers and businesses that launched a program in 2009 called Greenville Works to help fund or offer in-kind services to train and place workers. That program launched CareerSkillsNow, which trains participants in advanced skills. The impetus for the collaborative grew out of a 2007 survey which revealed that roughly two-thirds of businesses in the Upstate’s manufacturing sector had workforce problems, said John Baker, executive director of the Greenville Region Workforce Collaborative. The National Fund for Workforce Solutions provided the funding to create the Greenville Region Workforce Collaborative, Baker said.

243

number of CareerSkillsNow participants, 203 have landed new jobs The collaborative started out simply working to equip employees with entrylevel readiness, he said, utilizing the WorkKeys skills assessment, and increasing participation from a handful to 60 companies. The next step was secondtier training to help workers move up in an industry, he said. Another goal was to work toward family-sustaining wages. The collaborative opted to focus on transportation manufacturing, which encompasses car, bus, aviation and rail manufacturing, Baker said. The initiative modeled itself after a United Way pilot program, which included case management along with training. The initial group received 150 hours of training, resulting in a nearly 80 percent placement rate for employment, Baker said.

United Way is now a larger funder and fiscal agent for the collaborative

A NEW SKILL SET

LaChrisha Miller is one Upstate resident who found a better job through CareerSkillsNow. After a layoff from her previous post as a document control specialist, Miller took a WorkKeys test and through CareerSkillsNow, obtained certificates in safety, quality practices and measurement and manufacturing processes. She was hired and promoted to a quality engineer in manufacturing. When another layoff came, she had a new position within just a few days, Miller said. The additional training has “allowed me to market myself,” Miller said. “It’s one of the best decisions I ever made in regards to my career.” The added support of having a case manager helped her tremendously in finding a job, she said. The case manager also checked in after she was hired to make sure everything was going well. Case managers also help trainees learn soft skills like conflict resolution, punctuality and conduct in the workplace, Baker said.

THE NEXT LEVEL

The collaborative recently moved into a second-tier training initiative that brought on technical schools like TriCounty Tech, Greenville Tech and Spartanburg Tech, said Baker. A CNC machining course and a chemical operator course were also added, eventually training 100 people with the funds from the National Fund for Workforce Solutions. Most of those got promoted, received a raise or were hired, he said.

COLLABORAT IVE MEMBERS City of Greenville Greenville Area Development Corporation Greenville Chamber Greenville County Schools Greenville County Workforce Investment Board Greenville Technical College Greenville Works Personal Pathways for Success readySC South Carolina Department of Employment and Workforce South Carolina Manufacturing Extension Partnership University Center of Greenville

Because of the two tiers of training, many participants went from unemployment to making $45,000 a year, Baker said. Much of the program’s success is due to moving from the “train and pray” model to specifically identifying what employers need, he said. The collaborative’s next step is to work toward recruiting temporary employees in manufacturing companies who would make excellent permanent employees and pursuing the training that would take them to that next level.

ZOO FIRES UP GIRAFFECAM ONCE AGAIN Baby Watch 2014 is kicking into full gear at the Greenville Zoo, as Autumn, the zoo’s 7-year-old Masai giraffe, is expected to give birth to her second calf any day now. Jeff Bullock, zoo administrator, says “we might be getting close,” and that he expects Autumn to give birth in the next week.

presented by

Nearly 1 million viewers worldwide watched the live stream on the zoo’s GiraffeCam when Autumn gave birth to Kiko in October 2012. Once again, the giraffe cam will allow viewers to keep an eye on Autumn and watch the birth. View the Giraffe Cam at friendsgreenvillezoo.org.

12 THE JOURNAL | AUGUST 1, 2014


JOURNAL NEWS

New infill regulations win council approval SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com Greenville City Council gave firstreading approval Monday night to new regulations for infill development in city neighborhoods. While some neighborhood representatives remain unhappy with the changes – which address garage locations, driveways, stormwater and trees – others called the regulation package a reasonable step forward. The regulations were drafted by a task force of 17 homebuilders, architects, realtors, neighborhood representatives and council members who spent six months examining issues raised by neighborhood residents incensed by renovation and new construction they deem inconsistent with the surrounding neighborhood – from poorly located garages to vanishing tree canopies to yards that were more concrete than grass. The city Planning Commission approved the recommended standards in July. City Council is expected to make a minor change on second reading to the portion dealing with trees after several audience members complained the wording was changed after Planning Commission approval. Bob Bainbridge, a spokesman for the North Main Community Association (NMCA), told the council he opposed the ordinance due to “12 words snuck into the ordinance” between planning commission approval and its appearance before council. Michael Kerski, the city’s planning and development manager, said the ordinance wording for the tree section will be revised before second reading. He said the section was changed because the staff noted several scenarios in which the proposed wording could prove difficult to follow. For example, an R-9 subdivision with existing 6,000-square-foot lots would be required to have three canopy trees on each lot, making it impossible to develop. In another example, the proposed regulations required three trees per lot for large subdivisions, when the standard should be six. All in all, Kerski called the new infill standards “a major step forward.”

While some neighborhood representatives remain unhappy with the changes... others called the regulation package a reasonable step forward. Two Greenville residents, Emily Moss and Vic Rosenthal, urged the council to increase side setbacks from 5 feet to 10 or 15 feet. Rosenthal said he had a monster house built next door that would have put his house in the shade if the sun hadn’t been on the other side. Moss said a 5-foot setback is too narrow when a 4,000-square-foot, twostory house with a basement is built next to a more typical home in her neighborhood. “You look out your window and you see a wall,” she said. Task force member David Crigler suggested the city revisit the changes in six to 12 months to see if further tweaking is needed. The second and final reading of the infill ordinance changes will be at the next regular city council meeting on Aug. 11. In other business, the council reviewed a proposed reform to allow the decision-making process for nightclubs and bars, event venues and other uses with similar after-midnight characteristics to change from special exception to conditional use. This would streamline the process and allow only those applications up for appeal to go to the Zoning Board of Appeals. Kerski said the change saves time and gives the city more policing over conditions. “Now, when a bad idea comes over the counter, it takes two months’ staff time and when it’s time to go before the BZA [board of zoning appeals], the applicant withdraws it,” he said. With the change, “when a bad idea comes over the counter, it goes to the committee and they say no. It saves two months of work.” Cindy Landrum contributed to this story.

What’s Right in Health Care Greenville Memorial Achieves Baby-Friendly Designation Greenville Memorial Hospital has earned Baby-Friendly Designation. This international designation recognizes hospitals and birthing centers that offer an optimal level of care for infant feeding and mother/baby bonding. Learn more at ghswomens.org. Clemson University Receives $11 Million Grant Clemson University—GHS’ academic research partner—received $11 million from the National Institutes of Health to expand research on growing tissue to help treat debilitating diseases and injuries. Much of the work will take place at GHS’ Patewood Medical Campus, and GHS doctors will serve as mentors. Furman Names Executive Director of GHS Partnership Eli Hestermann, a Furman University biology professor, has been named executive director of the academic undergraduate partnership between GHS and Furman. Dr. Hestermann will work with Furman and GHS to develop programs for undergraduate college students interested in pursuing careers in health care. Dialogue on Issues Involving Veterans The Warehouse Theatre and GHS are partnering on a series of events to encourage dialogue on issues involving veterans. First up is “Warehouse Theatre Forum: From Shell Shock to PTSD.” This free event is scheduled for Wednesday, August 6, 6 p.m., at Greenville’s Warehouse Theatre. The forum will precede the August 8-30 run of Strange Snow, a play about a Vietnam vet fighting his demons and struggling with the past. To learn more, visit warehousetheatre.com.

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JOURNAL NEWS

Gambling ringleader sentenced to 1 year, 1 day Case led to firings of two Greenville County sheriff’s deputies CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com A man who ran an illegal gambling operation in Greenville County for 24 years and whose case led to the firings of two Greenville County deputies was sentenced on Tuesday to one year and one day in federal prison. Izzat M. Khalil, 54, of Travelers Rest, will also forfeit $194,522 in gambling proceeds, according to U.S. Attorney Bill Nettles. During the sentencing hearing, Khalil’s attorney told U.S. District Judge Mary Geiger Lewis that Khalil bought one deputy a truck and wrote checks to that deputy’s wife to pay for their daughter’s church activities in return for information on search warrants. Khalil’s attorney said his client bought the other deputy furniture for tips on when he was about to be arrested. Greenville County Sheriff Steve Loftis has identified the deputies as Major Shea Smith,

formerly the third-highest-ranking officer who headed the Sheriff’s Office administrative department, and Sgt. David Hayes. The Sheriff ’s Office has said a criminal investigation is underway. Khalil had faced a prison term of 27 months to 33 months. He had asked to be sentenced to probation or time served because he had given authorities information on gambling operations in Greenville and Spartanburg counties as well as other crimes in addition to evidence about “police corruption” involving two deputies. The motion said Khalil entered a consent settlement with the IRS to pay $34,000 in back taxes and to obtain a federal gambling license. He has obtained a license every year since and pays taxes as required, the motion said. Federal Magistrate Judge Kevin McDonald on Wednesday denied Khalil’s request that his bond be reinstated so he could selfreport to prison. Khalil’s bond had been revoked in May after a judge found that he had continued to be involved in gambling while he was out on bond. Khalil’s attorney has filed an appeal of McDonald’s ruling.

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Upstate Jewish community holds Israel support rally Members of several about the casualties on both Jewish congregations and sides of the conflict.” Anker others gathered in downsaid the group is praying for town Greenville’s NOMA a quick end to the conflict. Square this week for a Rabbi Julie Kozlow of ConStand for Peace in Israel gregation Beth Israel read a event. Speakers addressed prayer for peace. Jonathan the conflict between Israel Rosen read a letter from his and Hamas, which has eswife, who was staying in Iscalated since early July. rael. Referencing a tunAnker said that the event nel network created by was organized in conjuncHamas, Devon Anker tion with others throughout of the Greenville Jewthe nation and world to supish Federation said, “It port Israel. Rabbi Jeremy APRIL MORRIS / STAFF is Israel’s mission to deMaster of Temple of Israel stroy these tunnels and dismantle the and Rabbi Leibel Kesselman of Chabad terrorist means of Hamas as quickly Greenville and the Upstate also spoke as possible. We are deeply concerned during the event.

Green Mountain is county’s newest outdoor playground SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com In the valley of Oil Camp Creek, near Jones Gap State Park, is a 139-acre piece of land that was once in foreclosure and slated to become a housing development. Today, it’s Greenville County’s newest outdoor sanctuary. Naturaland Trust, a land conservation organization founded by Greenville lawyer Tommy Wyche in 1973, recently acquired the forested property at Green Mountain to permanently protect the land. Homeowners Betsy and David George came across the property and fell in love. They said the 145-acre parcel was way more than they were intending to buy, but the couple stretched their money and purchased it, with the hopes they could find some way to conserve the land. Mac Stone, executive director of Naturaland Trust, said the couple contacted Naturaland, and the staff worked with them to secure the property. “Betsy and David are poster children for our organization and are a good example of how Naturaland Trust and homeowners can work together,” Stone said. The Georges kept six acres that they maintain. The rest is protected. Funding to buy the land came from partners of Naturaland Trust, including South

Photo by Mac Stone

Carolina Conservation Bank, the Graham Foundation, Hollingsworth Funds, John I Smith Charities and the Symmes Foundation. Stone says Naturaland has protected more than 80,000 acres of land and owns more than 3,500 acres. Green Mountain has the potential to someday connect to Ashmore Heritage Preserve or Caesars Head State Park, Stone said. For now, he encourages the public to come and enjoy the natural springs, bustling trout stream, hardwoods and wildlife. Access to the Green Mountain property is through a small strip of land with a gate off Oil Camp Creek Road, where visitors can enter and cross the creek. There are no marked hiking trails, but several naturally formed trails are available. “It’s a wild mountain and you can pick a point and start walking towards it,” Stone said. No hunting or camping is allowed.


JOURNAL NEWS

Same-sex couples denied marriage certificates SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com

Intersexed] and allied individuals,” according to the group’s website. Hill said it’s a grass-roots organization with 300 members focused primarily on transgender issues. Craig Metcalf and Mark Gunnells also applied for a license. “It’s more meaningful than ever to fight this discrimination,” said the couple, who got engaged earlier this year. The two also said they are “hopeful” that the Virginia ruling will prompt South Carolina to change its laws.

In a quiet and peaceful procession, five LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) couples, joined by clergy, friends, family and supporters, made their way Wednesday morning from the Warehouse Theatre in downtown Greenville to the probate court to apply for marriage licenses. As each couple was denied a license, they emerged from the probate court office to the cheers of the 50 or so supporters. The couples took this action two days after the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals issued a ruling in Bostic v. Schaefer, upholding a lower court finding that Virginia’s ban on single-gender marriage is unconstitutional and that same-sex couples have a fundamental right to marry. South Carolina Attorney General Alan Wilson GREG BECKNER / STAFF has said he will continue Same-sex couples and their supporters march to the Greenville to defend South Carolina’s County probate court annex. constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage and civil “Every day that Amendment One reunions. Gov. Nikki Haley has voiced pub- mains on the books hurts families like lic support for Wilson’s decision. the ones who live in Greenville County,” Aaron Sarver, communications di- said Rev. Jasmine Beach-Ferrara, execurector for the Campaign for Southern tive director of the Campaign for SouthEquality, which organized the proces- ern Equality, which coordinates the WE sion, said the Virginia ruling paves DO Campaign. the way for marriage equality in South Launched in 2011 as an initiative of the Carolina, North Carolina, West Vir- Campaign for Southern Equality, the WE ginia and all the states within the 4th DO Campaign has involved more than Circuit. 115 lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgenIvy Hill and Misha Gibson were der couples requesting or recording maramong those seeking a marriage license. riage licenses in their hometowns across The Piedmont couple, who are engaged, the South. have been denied marriage licenses twice “This law is being challenged in the before in Greenville and participated in a courts, and these brave couples are national rally. standing up because they have a funda“Today, there is a special hope in the air mental right to marry and to have their that soon we will be able to come to this marriage recognized in their home state. office and get a yes,” said Hill. We call upon the courts to act quickly to Hill is also the program director of strike down this law and also call upon Gender Benders, an Upstate organiza- elected officials to take a stand against tion that “strives to create a safe and Amendment One,” said Ferrara. supportive space for transgender, gender “We’re one step closer now – as long variant, LGBTQQI [Lesbian, Gay, Bisex- as it takes,” she said. “We’re not backing ual, Transgender, Queer, Questioning, down.”

Physician News GHS welcomes these new doctors! Family Medicine Telicia Allen, MD Keystone Family Medicine Simpsonville, 454-5000

Ophthalmology Alan Leahey, MD Carolina’s Eye Care Mauldin, 236-9888

Philip Way, MD Riverside Family Medicine–Eastside Greenville, 454-2700

Orthopaedics John Tokish, MD Steadman Hawkins Clinic of the Carolinas Greenville, 454-7422

Gastroenterology Madhusudhan Sunkavalli, MD GHS Gastroenterology Greenville, 455-2888 General Surgery Stephen Mittelstaedt, MD Greer, 797-9400 Neurosurgery Sharon Webb, MD Southeastern Neurosurgical & Spine Institute Greenville, 797-7150 Oncology and Thoracic Surgery Sharon Ben-Or, MD Greenville, 455-1200

Pediatric Gastroenterology Liz Dancel, MD Greenville, 454-5125 Plastic Surgery John Jarrell IV, MD Plastic Surgery & Aesthetics Greenville, 454-4570 Radiology M. Ryan Gossage, MD GHS Outpatient Radiology Greenville, 295-4410

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AUGUST 1, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 15


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Xavier Alonte Fleming is set to go to trial Monday in a Greenville County court on one count of murder and one count of possession of a weapon during a violent crime. Fleming was arrested and charged in December 2011 for the murder of Steven Terrell Crowell. Fleming was 18 at the time of the incident. According to police documents, a verbal fight took place between Fleming and Crowell, and Fleming allegedly fired multiple shots. Fleming turned himself in and has been incarcerated since his arrest. He is facing the possibility of life without parole or a death sentence. While in jail awaiting his murder trial, Fleming has also been convicted of thirddegree assault and battery and sentenced to 30 days consecutive. He was also charged with indecent exposure, for which he will go to trial at a separate date. Clemson University police arrested three men on Tuesday in connection with the theft of a large piece of printing equipment from a loading dock at Godfrey Hall July 11. The machine was sold for scrap. Ronnie Dale Young, 57, of Central; Elmer Eugene Garner, 48, of Clemson; and Tyson Urian Reese, 25, of Clemson were charged with grand larceny, value $10,000 or more. The men are not students or employees of Clemson University. Young was released on a $10,000 surety bond and Reese and Garner each were released on $10,000 personal recognizance bonds.

All of the subjects were taken into custody and charged with the misdemeanor charge of Prostitution. If convicted, the penalty for a first-offense charge is $200 or 30 days in jail. The operation also included other charges ranging from driving under suspension, simple possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. Demetrus Allen Sims, 47, was arrested this week in conjunction with an armed robbery at the Pizza Hut at 111 State Park Road. Sims is charged with armed robbery and possession of a weapon during a violent crime. According to police reports, Greenville County sheriff ’s deputies received a 911 call on July 27 around SIMS 10:45 p.m. saying as employees were closing the store for the night, a black male knocked on the side door, telling employees he had left his phone inside the restaurant. Employees unlocked the door and allowed him to enter. The subject reportedly walked to the cash register area, pulled a handgun and demanded money, according to the report. Sims remains in the Greenville County Detention Center on a $35,000 bond.

Deputies arrested 27 people during a three-day prostitution sting conducted by the Greenville County Sheriff ’s Office Directed Patrol Unit. The sting was held on July 17, 18 and 23. All of the individuals arrested approached undercover officers and either agreed to a sexual act in exchange for money, or attempted to pay for a sexual encounter, reports showed.

Gary Cliffton Hamilton, 56, was convicted July 30 by a Pickens County jury for first-degree criminal sexual conduct with a minor – victim under 11 years of age, as well as lewd act on a minor. Evidence presented during the trial established that between Aug. 1 and Aug. 31, 2011, Hamilton sexually assaulted a 3-year-old victim in a church parking lot in Pickens County. Hamilton was sentenced to 32 years in prison and will have to serve at least 85 percent of his sentence before possibility of parole.

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JOURNAL NEWS

US Para-Cycling team announced Organizers mark one month before Road World Championships in Upstate APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com Local, national and international representatives gathered in Greenville this week to announce the roster for the United States team for the upcoming International Cycling Union (UCI) Para-Cycling Road World Championships to be held in Greenville Aug. 28-Sept. 1. Ian Lawless, Team USA’s high-performance cycling director, said that the U.S. is fielding its largest team to date with 27 men and 17 women slated to compete in events that use adaptive bicycles, tandem bikes, tricycles or hand-cycles. Competition is open to athletes who ride with an amputation or limb loss, visual impairment, use wheelchairs or have a brain injury, cerebral palsy or stroke. The five-day event features time trials and road races in addition to an opening ceremony and parade of nations in down-

town Greenville. Louis Barbeau, Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) technical delegate, said he expects more than 350 athletes from approximately 40 nations to attend the competition that is a qualifier for the 2016 Paralympics in Rio de Janeiro. Barbeau said the course at CU-ICAR is “beautiful and challenging” and he encouraged Upstate residents to come out to see the action. Lawless said since the competition will be held in Greenville this year, U.S. athletes will be coming to town about a week earlier to train and acclimate themselves. Many will arrive for a training camp in Travelers Rest on Aug. 18, he said. Local athletes on the U.S. team are Lance Footer, Aaron Trent and Ryan Boyle, a Furman University student, said Lawless. Greenville Mayor Pro Tem David Sudduth said winning the international event propelled the city from Greenville, S.C., to “Greenville, USA,” the words used when the initial announcement was made. The championships strike a balance between economic development and quality of life, Sudduth said. For a schedule of events, visit greenvillesc2014.com and teamusa.org for more information about the U.S. team.

TEAM USA FOR PARA-CYCLING TRACK WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS MEN Joe Berenyi Matt Bigos Ryan Boyle (Furman student) Dan Cnossen Jon Copsey Tom Davis Alfredo “Freddie” de Los Santos Lance Footer (Taylors, S.C.) & pilot Shawn Olin (tandem) Will Groulx Mark Gyulafia Aaron Keith Todd Key Jason Kimball Will Lachenauer Scott Martin Frank Matzke Chris Murphy Steven Peace Anthony Pedeferri Clark Rachfal & pilot Dave Swanson (tandem)

David Randall Oz Sanchez Brian Sheridan Aaron Trent (Greenville, S.C.) Matt Updike

WOMEN Monica Bascio Shawn Cheshire & pilot Mackenzie Woodring (tandem) Patty Collins Alicia Dana Muffy Davis Megan Fisher Samantha Heinrich Allison Jones Oksana Masters Shawn Morelli Greta Neimanas Jennifer Schuble Jill Walsh Jamie Whitmore Karissa Whitsell & pilot Lisa Turnbull (tandem)

AUGUST 1, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 17


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When Grief Goes Awry: Dealing with Complicated Mourning A full day workshop for professional caregivers Grits and Groceries chef Heidi Trull with “Rudy Cox,” the restaurant’s iconic landmark. “Rudy” was the winning name given the oversize bantam in the restaurant’s “Name the Rooster” contest.

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Culinary emissary

Upstate SC Chef Ambassador focuses on local food and local tourism APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com The route to Saylors Crossroads near Belton wends its way through shady, wooded areas and fields filled with cattle. At the pastoral crossroads, hungry drivers arrive at a down-home gourmet spot that’s a destination for locals and travelers from far afield: Grits & Groceries. Situated opposite a pasture dotted with grazing goats and guarded by a giant rooster sculpture, Heidi and Joe Trull’s small restaurant fits cozily inside a converted Depression-era store and serves up fresh comfort food crafted from local ingredients. The menu changes every week based on what’s available from local growers, said chef Heidi Trull.

KITCHEN DIPLOMAT

Trull stands at the stove, overseeing

WORLD TRAVELER: Heidi Trull says she did not learn how to make Japanese food during her time in Japan, but while working in St. Louis, Mo. She visited Japan “to make sure I was doing it right.”

EVERYTHING BUT THE SQUEAL: “One of the things I love in South Carolina is how we cook a pig – whole hog barbecue. Everywhere I’ve lived, all over the world, I’ve always cooked a pig to show people how you’re supposed to do it and what you’re supposed to eat.”

the preparation of country ham and blueberry fritters loaded with fresh fruit and drizzled with a sweet glaze, and talks

about her new role as one of four South Carolina Chef Ambassadors. The post is a program to combine efforts of the state Department of Agriculture and the South Carolina Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism to feature agricultural assets, destinations and food. State Agriculture Commissioner Hugh Weathers said, in addition to the Certified SC Grown and Fresh on the Menu efforts, the ambassador program is “a next stage of letting South Carolina food connect South Carolina farmers to South Carolina consumers.” Potential events include farmers’ market appearances, cooking demonstrations and participating in tailgating events. “Agriculture and tourism are already linked. We have the Heritage Corridors [agricultural and historical],” said Trull.

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CULINARY continued on PAGE 20

AUGUST 1, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 19


JOURNAL COMMUNITY CULINARY continued from PG 19

And she is looking forward to using culinary events to showcase the amenities of the state parks and draw new visitors. “We have awesome state parks in South Carolina. I’d like to get our South Carolina local food into the state parks through cook-offs, contests and farmers markets,” she said. A farm-to-fork dinner at Oconee State Park is a possibility because of its history and facilities, she said. “It was a WPA [Works Progress Administration] project and has a huge hall that was built to feed up to 200 men – it’s the perfect place to have a party.” Trull wants to attract more South Carolinians for day trips to convenient destinations like parks in Oconee, Sumter or Spartanburg, she said. “It’s a resource we already have.” Her other focus is alerting food purchasers to the

availability of South Carolina products. “Sysco carries a ton of South Carolina-produced products, but you just don’t know it,” she said. Trull is working with the company to create a catalog for purchasers that showcases the locally grown or produced food. Educating consumers about where their food comes from is a cause for Trull, she admits. “I grew up on a 6,000-acre farm in Sumter and there’s not much agriculture left. I like for people to see where their food comes from … to understand why they should pay a little more for local and why your tax dollars should stay in your community,” she said.

ARRIVING AT THE CROSSROADS

Trull’s model of sourcing locally and crafting good food is working. Grits & Groceries is approaching its 10th year in business and has a devoted following of diners who show up regularly for doses of shrimp and

A waitress waits on a guest at Grits and Groceries. The restaurant is housed in an old general store constructed in the 1920s.

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grits, stuffed French toast, praline bacon, banana pudding and weekly specials. The couple, who met while working together, did not intend to open a restaurant after selling Heidi Trull’s restaurant, Elizabeth’s, in New Orleans just before Hurricane Katrina came through. However, when they decided to locate near family after the birth of their son, they kept passing that vacant store outside Belton, Trull said. “It was the superstore of its day, but hadn’t been used since the ’70s,” she said of the space that was initially four walls and one sink and lit with a single bulb. Now its walls are lined with art, culinary memorabilia and foodstuffs, and the tables sport traditional checkered tablecloths. After working and learning in New Orleans, Japan, Greece, France and other U.S. locations, Trull said she wanted to depart from fine dining. “I spent 20 years in fine dining and didn’t want to own a place like that. I just wanted a funky place where the food was really, really good,” she said. “I want to make something you recognize, but use the freshest ingredients.” The plan was for Joe, former pastry chef at Emeril Lagasse’s French Quarter restaurant, Nola, to help out for a year and move on, she said. Nearly a decade

SOUTH CAROLINA CHEF AMBASSADORS UPSTATE – Chef Heidi Trull Grits & Groceries, Belton MIDLANDS – Chef Brandon Velie Juniper, Ridge Spring PEE DEE – Chef Cooper Thomas Victor’s Bistro, Florence LOWCOUNTRY – Chef Brian Waters Saltus River Grill, Beaufort Advisor is Steven Janowski of the Governor’s Mansion

later, Joe is still in the kitchen creating homemade desserts and the staff has grown to a dozen. Saturdays are popular and the Trulls feed approximately 350 people in one day. “As far as being an ambassador, that’s what I’m most proud of: We are the sole income provider for five families in our community,” said Trull, noting that opting for local food really can work. To celebrate Grits & Groceries’ 10th year, the restaurant will not be expanding, but extending its reach with a new cookbook and six of its in-house products bottled to sell with each copy, said Trull.

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Greenville Middle School students write about life’s challenges As a writing project this past school year, Greenville Middle School seventhgraders penned essays about what they believe. The compositions cover topics important to them in today’s world – bullying, fitting in, overcoming adversity, family relationships. Teacher Kim Townsend said the project “wasn’t about changing the world. It was about what changed them, how they got to this place in their lives.” Below are three of those essays. (Names have been withheld due to school privacy concerns).

STRONGER AT THE BROKEN PLACES I believe that some of the strongest things are broken. My parents were divorced in 2008. It has been six years since then. My mom, sister and I live in Greenville now. We moved here two years ago. We had to find a new church, a new school, a new Boy Scout Troop, and new friends. It has been pretty hard, but it’s been two years since the move and we have it figured out now, well, for the most part. Life was tough when we first got here. I didn’t know anyone, we didn’t know the town, we didn’t even know where the closest Chick-fil-A was! Soon after the move we started looking for churches to go to and found Buncombe Street. We went there for a while and came into contact with their troop, Troop 9. I started going to their meetings every Wednesday and still do. I started going to Greenville Middle and quickly made friends. It wasn’t really hard for me since I’m a pretty outgoing person. My dad comes to Greenville all the time, whether it’s for Scouts on Wednesdays or something like NJHS. My mom, sister and I all are stronger now. The move made us realize that nothing could break up our family on the inside. This divorce broke our family physically, but it will never be able to break our family emotionally and in our hearts. This is what I believe.

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I don’t have a tragic history. I have a good life and in that regard I am lucky. The only problem is, now this is going to sound cheesy, but, I don’t know where I belong. I have friends that at points in time I don’t think I deserve. And I know that only a choice few actually know the real me. I never show who I really am because I am afraid. Afraid of what others will think. I tell others to be themselves and that it doesn’t matter what others think, but I never follow my own advice. So I write. Writing is my getaway. I can be myself. I live out my dreams through the stories I write. Thoughts that boil up inside, feelings that bubble and churn. Things I need to release but can’t say out loud. People ask how I come up with my stories and I just politely shrug and smile. I try not to compare myself but sometimes it’s hard. So I live out the person I wish I was through my stories. In the story I might be brave, smart, agile, talented. I like to think of myself as humble, but that also means I don’t know if I really am humble, if that makes any sense. I want to be complimented, but when I am, I can’t help but feel that I’m being teased. I don’t expect any good remarks, so when they come, I am paralyzed. I know that sounds self-centered and it sounds like I’m asking for pity, but if there is one thing I have no trouble admitting about myself is that I don’t need or want sympathy. I am stronger than most people think, and don’t take kindly to being treated like a wounded animal. I guess that makes me defensive and rather short-tempered. In all the stories I write I find that those characteristics show in the characters I create. They may be brave but short-tempered. Caring but bitter. Talented but different. Different. I shouldn’t feel like I don’t fit in because I believe there is nothing to fit in to. There is no such thing as normal, no such thing as different. Only originality. It’s a subliminal action, but there isn’t a main character in a story I have written that is “normal.” And I’m not talking superpowers making then “abnormal.” Take away the powers and you are left with a character that doesn’t fit in, doesn’t


JOURNAL COMMUNITY care what others think, and is independent. But the reader still loves them. So how come if someone doesn’t “fit in” in real life they are shunned, ignored, etc.? It doesn’t make sense. I know what I believe. There is no such thing as normal.

FINDING GOOD IN UNEXPECTED PLACES Some things in this world are hard to understand, like why the sky is blue, or why bad things happen to good people. One thing I have failed to understand is how one word or aspect can change a person forever. When I was five, the only thing I thought about was why I never got my way. When I got a little older, I asked why people never got their way in general. Now, I ask which way is the right way. In my childhood years, my family and I suffered along with my mother, who was a struggling alcoholic. She always told me to go the way I feel is right, but which way is really right? I always told her that her way was never the right way, but then again, what may seem like the wrong way could actually be right if you think about it, because it could be happening for a reason, a reason that forms your future for the better. I always told myself that when my mom left, it was best because I believed that her alcoholism was an event in my life that will help me get stronger and better prepared to depend on myself, and learn from her mistakes. Her absence has been for the better for both of us, and I know she chose the right way, because I now have someone better to fill the empty place, and that is my stepmom, who means the world to me. A few years after my mom’s abandonment in our hearts, we were starting to give up on everything. We wanted to run away from our problems and ignore them instead of facing them. Right before we did, my stepmom came into the picture, and changed our lives forever. Now, my life is better than it has ever been, and what seemed like the wrong way in the beginning, turned out to be the right way all along. So go with the way that may seem wrong, it just might turn out to have a better outcome than you think.

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THE WEEK IN PHOTOS

LOOK WHO’S IN THE JOURNAL THIS WEEK

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Simpsonville’s pig parade supports K-9 unit Simpsonville businesses are helping citizens save their bacon in support of the Simpsonville Police Department’s K-9 unit. Throughout the month of August, 18 customized piggy banks will be on parade in businesses such as Emily Elizabeth Paper Boutique, Bargain Babies, Simpsonville City Hall, Carolina Olive Oil, Karen Crowder’s Allstate Agency and Hillcrest Animal Hospital. Whether customers wish to put money in Karen Crowder’s MayHam or drop coins in Simpsonville City Hall’s DeerHog, all funds will be counted prior to Bacon Labor Day on Sept. 1 at Simpsonville City Park. For more information, visit baconlaborday.com or facebook. com/baconlaborday.

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AUGUST 1, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 25


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THE GIST OF IT

Building a better board EVENT: Shine the Light Nonprofit Forum TITLE: Developing and Engaging a High-Performing Board DATE: July 16, 2014 Susan Meier KEYNOTE: Susan Meier, Meier and Associates in Washington, D.C.

PANEL: Scot Baddley, YMCA of Greenville; Chandra Dillard, Furman University; Kathy McKinney, Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd, P.A. WHO WAS THERE: More than 125 Upstate nonprofit leaders and board members TOPIC: Board leadership for nonprofit organizations LOCATION: Kroc Community Center

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Susan Meier, principal at Meier and Associates, brings more than 25 years of governance and nonprofit experience to her work. From 2004 to 2011, Meier served as the vice president of consulting and training for BoardSource, the nation’s premier governance resource for nonprofit organizations. She works collaboratively with nonprofit executives and board leadership to identify governance challenges and opportunities and to implement proven strategies to address a broad array of governance issues.

INTRODUCTION: I always say, “If you’ve seen one board, you’ve seen one board,” because no two boards function exactly the same way. RECRUITING A HIGH-PERFORMING BOARD: Know what skills, personalities and influences you are seeking and why. Be proactive and build an ongoing pool of candidates. An effective board recruitment process begins with cultivating prospects and recruiting members, follows with engaging the members, continues with providing leadership opportunities for the members, and ends with renewing/rotating members. Board-building is an ongoing process.

ENGAGING A HIGH-PERFORMING BOARD: How do you keep good board

26 THE JOURNAL | AUGUST 1, 2014

members? Be the kind of board that will attract them – high-performing! Three key elements to engage a high-performing board: Make meetings matter, re-

frame the work of the board and ask catalytic questions. Efficiently handle the “business of the board” at meetings to make them more effective, and then spend most of the time on issues of the greatest importance. A board should manage only two things: the executive director and itself. A board that works together has the confidence to ask the tough questions and push the organization to its highest performance. What can you expose your board to that will expand their understanding of what you are trying to do?

WORKING IN CONSTRUCTIVE PARTNERSHIP: The success of the executive director and the success of the board are interdependent upon one another. Trust between the executive director and the board emerges when there is a high degree of accountability. Encourage open, candid communication and define role clarification and respect.

THREE MODES OF GOVERNANCE: Fiduciary: oversight, what are we going to do? Strategic: planning, how are we going to do it? Generative: sense making, why are we going to do it? Governing a board requires framing the right problem, asking the right questions and ensuring the right results.

FINAL THOUGHTS: A small board of highly engaged members is always better than a large board with “dead wood” on it. Shine the Light Nonprofit Forums is an annual series of educational workshops presented by DNA Creative Communications. These seminars in nonprofit management include fundraising help, strategic planning, branding exercises and leadership development. The sessions are designed for nonprofit professionals, executive directors and board members to provide insight and training in operating a healthy nonprofit organization. Since its launch in 2010, more than 1,200 participants and 375 nonprofit organizations have attended a Shine the Light Nonprofit Forum event.


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

THE WEEK IN PHOTOS

LOOK WHO’S IN THE JOURNAL THIS WEEK

2014 SUMMER ON AUGUSTA The Augusta Road Business Association kicked off the 2014 Summer on Augusta festivities last Thursday. The festival took place all along Augusta Road in shopping centers and even in vacant lots. Featured events included Capers Place Block Party, Grillin’ & Chillin’, Primrose School Playdate, Tomato (Mater) Pie Contest, Shaggin’ on Augusta, Blockhouse Summer Bash and Sounds for Hounds. There were eight local bands and musicians featured during the four days. Supporting sponsors included Muncaster Financial Services, Southern First Bank and Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, Realtors.

AUGUST 1, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 27


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Swish, swish, spit Oil pulling latest fad for those obsessed with oral hygiene JEANNE PUTNAM | CONTRIBUTOR

jputnam@communityjournals.com In a society focused on improving health as naturally as possible, the folk remedy oil pulling has become something of a fad. Oil pulling is the process of swishing oil – coconut, sunflower, sesame, or essential oils – in a person’s mouth for 10 minutes twice a day or 20 minutes once a day, prior to brushing teeth, and then spitting it out, which should also remove bacteria from the person’s mouth. “I have had many patients do it [oil pulling] for years,” said Dr. Marina Ponton, doctor of acupuncture and Oriental medicine at Greenville Natural Health. While there is not a lot of medical research on oil pulling, the process has been around since before toothpaste and the toothbrush, Ponton said. “I don’t know if it pulls toxins out of the

body, but it helps pull bacteria out of the mouth. Using the oil helps break down bacterial collections such as dental plaque.”

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Ponton views the practice as “kind of like another way of flossing” and has done it herself over the years to help preserve her teeth. While Ponton has not

seen an actual difference in her mouth, she said she does not have cavities or other oral issues common to other people her age. However, Dr. Ryan O’Malley of O’Malley Dental dismisses the practice, saying oil pulling would have little effect, as the plaque that forms on teeth contains proteins as well as bacteria and is not easily dissolved. O’Malley referenced a study that did find positive effects of oil pulling on halitosis, or bad breath. O’Malley said oil pulling should be researched through a double-blind study with every participant performing the oil pulling for the same length of time. He noted that those doing oil pulling are performing the process for 20 minutes each time versus four minutes of traditional oral care. “Someone willing to do this [oil pulling] would be willing to brush more and floss more,” he said. O’Malley said he recommends those patients who do practice oil pulling still brush, floss, use a fluoride mouthwash, and visit the dentist every six months.

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HAVE YOU SEEN THIS?

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Over the Edge to send fundraisers rappelling from top of Bank of America tower APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com Some fundraisers entail sipping wine and bidding on spa weekends in silent auctions, but rarely do they involve clinging to the side of a 15-story building. This October, however, Greenville will play host to Over the Edge for a Brighter Tomorrow, a fundraising event that gives a group of people the chance to rappel 228 feet down the face of the Bank of America building in downtown Greenville. The Goodwill Foundation purchased a license for the Oct. 4 Over the Edge event and is now offering seats to Upstate nonprofits that want to raise funds through the event, said foundation board member Debbie Wallace. Participants pay a flat fee to participate and then raise funds to support a nonprofit. Prior experience is not required and each “edger” receives training before the exercise. Participants wear a full-body industrial harness and use industrial descender equipment controlled by rappelling professionals

for safety. The events usually raise six figures, said Wallace, and American Idol finalist Delvin Choice has signed on to represent the Greenville Family Partnership. Some participants will be “persuaded” to rappel through backers’ donations, such as through a “Toss the Boss” campaign. The number of a building’s stories dictates the number of participants and Greenville has qualified for 70 rappelling spots, said Wallace. The Hughes Development Corporation helped secure the Bank of America building and organizers are talking with Upstate nonprofits that want to participate, she added. For more information, visit otegreenville.com or call 864-991-6311.

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Work continues on the Green Pond Landing Event Center on Hartwell Lake. The center will host the Bassmaster Classic in 2015. When completed the landing will have six new boat launch ramps with floating docks, 158 boat trailer parking spaces, a 500-seat amphitheater, two new courtesy docks, several 20-by-20-foot open area pavilions, rest rooms and parking spaces for 114 single vehicles.

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AUGUST 1, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 29


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ESCAPE

Discover life at 15 mph in Peachtree City SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com In Peachtree City, Ga., life slows down – and it has nothing to do with the zombies nearby. Referred to as “the bubble” by locals, this small city about 30 minutes south of Atlanta moves along at 15 miles per hour, seemingly entrenched in its own world and ensconced from the big-city woes just beyond its borders. Cars give way to golf carts as the preferred mode of transportation – and with more than 90 miles of golf cart paths and plenty of golf carts-only parking, getting around is pretty easy at 15 miles per hour. Peachtree City was master-planned by developer Joel Cowan, who had a vision

for the rural farm country he romped in when he was a kid. Cowan started planning the community in 1959 when “everything about the south side of Atlanta was bad,” he said. He put a lot of thought into the design, even traveling to London to see the “new idea” of something called a master-planned community. Cowan served as Peachtree City’s first mayor from 1959 to 1963 and still lives in the community he helped shape. The city has five “villages” designed with the concept that each would have the services and amenities residents needed within walking distance. “It was the biggest investment in an uncertain future,” said Cowan. But it worked. Today, the 37,000 residents and visitors

have access to four golf courses, tennis courts, an aquatic center and three lakes. It consistently makes CNN and Money magazine lists of “the best places to retire” and “top 100 places to live” and residents say it’s like “living at a resort every day.” Crime is low, schools are good and home prices are affordable. A neighbor could be a celebrity such as Zac Brown, an athlete or a pilot working for Delta Airlines hub. Two resorts – Dolce and The Wyndham Peachtree – both host a large amount of corporate retreats for companies such as Chick-fil-A, Microsoft, IBM, GE and many others that “prefer to be near Atlanta but not right in the city.” In fact, Pitney Bowes built what is now the Dolce Resort as its corporate conference center in the 1980s to be “away from the gentleman clubs in downtown Atlanta” and free of distractions. Both resorts can arrange golf cart rentals so visitors can feel like a local. In both Peachtree City and the nearby town of Senoia, movie studios have been a major industry ever since Georgia introduced tax incentives to the film industry in 2002. The area is often referred to as “Hollywood of the South.” Two large studios

– Pinewood Studios and Raleigh Studios – film movie and TV shows such as “What to Expect When You’re Expecting,” “Joyful Noise” and “Drop Dead Diva.” The Peachtree City Convention and Visitors Bureau has its own “Southern Hollywood Film Tour” that will show visitors some of the popular filming sites. About 15 minutes from Peachtree City in Senoia, though, the zombies reign. AMC’s “The Walking Dead” is filmed in and around the town and at the nearby 120-acre Raleigh Studios facility. The cult-like following the TV show has amassed attracts fans from all over the world. Revelers can walk down Main Street and imagine themselves in Woodbury where the “Governor” ruled in seasons three and four. The small community was economically dead with about five stores open on Main Street until six years ago, when three local businessmen created Senoia Enterprises and started buying property and redeveloping the town, said Scott Tigchelaar, president of Raleigh Studios and Senoia Enterprises. The town was starting to make a comeback when “The Walking Dead”

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY “just added fuel to the fire,” he said. Senoia now has about 4,000 residents, 50 retail shops with a waiting list, and two Southern Living Idea Homes. Country/folk singer Zac Brown recently opened a flagship restaurant and event venue called Southern Ground Social Club in downtown Senoia. For more information, visit visitpeachtreecity.com.

THINGS TO DO EAT:

an indoor heated pool. 201 Aberdeen Parkway, 770-487-2666

Georgia Shrimp Company Live jazz music some nights. Menu features fresh seafood and Southern dishes. One of the owners is from South Africa, and some native dishes are also on the menu. 100 N. Peachtree Parkway #36, 770-631-9114 Zac Brown Southern Ground Social Club Southern-style dishes with a twist along with live shows nightly. 18 Main Street, Senoia, 770-727-9072

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Wyndham Peachtree Hotel and Conference Center The Wyndham sits on 18 acres overlooking the Flat Creek Golf Course. The hotel and conference center has 250 guest rooms, two pools, four fire pits, tennis courts and a fitness center. 2443 Highway 54 West, 770-487-2000

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“The Fred,” The Frederick Brown Jr. Amphitheater, is Peachtree City’s 2,500-seat outdoor amphitheater and event venue. Catch national and regional concerts. Unique areas inside the theater offer places to have a picnic or dinner while enjoying the show. 201 McIntosh Trail, 770-631-0630

Dolce Hotel and Resort Located on 40-acres and lush grounds, Dolce has 233 guest rooms, some with a lake view. The hotel also has bicycle rentals, tennis courts and

Southern Hollywood Film Tour Visit filming locations in Peachtree City and Senoia. Peachtree City Convention and Visitors Bureau, 201 McIntosh Trail, 678-216-0282

Due South Owners Michael Smith and Bryan Gardner created the restaurant to bring the downtown Atlanta restaurant scene down home to Peachtree City. 302 Clover Reach, 770-629-5847

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AUGUST 1, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 31


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Greenville’s smallest restaurant packs a big punch with rebranding CLAIRE RUHLIN | CONTRIBUTOR

P lease recycle this paper when done.

Don’t buy cheap clothes Buy good clothes, cheap. 1922 Augusta St. Greenville, SC 29605 labelsgreenville.com | 864.631.1919

Mike Pennington, co-owner of FunnelDelicious, the newly rebranded deli and specialty dessert shop formerly known as Funnelicious, always knew he wanted a world record. He just wasn’t sure what he wanted it to be. That is, until the Mega Danny Cake. “I know I’m not gonna be the fastest or the tallest or anything like that,” Pennington says, “so why not make something that’s a world record contender?” In 2012, one year after Funnelicious opened its brick-and-mortar shop, the business added the Mega Danny Cake to its menu. Seventeen inches in diameter, the fried dessert is served in a pizza box, the only container capable of accommodating its enormity. Since then, the cake has garnered heavy-duty press for Greenville’s smallest restaurant, including spots on the Travel Channel and, more recently, a shoutout on Buzzfeed. But don’t be fooled: Fried indulgences aren’t the only treats FunnelDelicious offers. Besides cookie dough balls and bacontopped funnel cakes, the restaurant now serves deli items and healthier choices. “We’ve been a business for three years under Funnelicious and we have always had a bit of an identity mistake,” Pennington said. “The biggest misconception is that we’re mistaken for just funnel cakes and fried desserts.” This is one of the reasons behind the company’s decision to rebrand. Since changing names, Pennington and the FunnelDelicious team have been pulling out all stops in an effort to promote the eatery’s renewed image. Even the new FunnelDelicious logo highlights the “deli” in “delicious.”

“We say we serve the world’s widest funnel cake.” Mike Pennington

“We do have great hand-dipped corn dogs,” Pennington said. “We make our batter every day and dip our corn dogs. We have hot dogs, sandwiches, wraps.” While the original Funnelicious storefront opened three years ago, the company has been feeding Greenville for a good 20 years. Pennington’s father, Steve, began Rhino Concessions, the parent company of FunnelDelicious, in the mid’90s as a special-events food service that offered catering and concessions. Today, Pennington runs the restaurant alongside his father, his stepmother, and Paula Jackson, the store manager. “We’ve always done festivals and carnivals and fairs. It’s what we do, it’s what we’re good at: fun foods and desserts,” Pennington said. But working at the mercy of public events took its toll, and they decided to put down roots. “We didn’t really have anything that was ours, that was year-round. So we decided to open up our own place and be more of our own bosses.”

LIFE MOMENT #12: You’ll pack their lunch for the first day of school in this kitchen.

32 THE JOURNAL | AUGUST 1, 2014

It took roughly six months to renovate their Augusta Street headquarters, but after a $150,000 investment encompassing everything from new paint and plumbing to trees and a sidewalk, Funnelicious – not FunnelDelicious – opened its doors in 2011. “The freedom you have with your own store is that you can do whatever you want. You can develop your own image, you can open, you can close or do whatever you want,” Pennington said. Part of this freedom is the ability to refine their brand. FunnelDelicious has incorporated the new logo into T-shirts, social media, website – everything but the sign out front, which will be revamped soon. “It’s not an easy process,” Pennington said. “It’s really hard to rebrand because you don’t realize how much your logo and brand is on everything.” While they enjoy more freedom in their business, the team still provides catering services and healthy boxed lunches – with a FunnelDelicious twist. “Anyone can make a turkey sandwich, but what makes it different is a turkey sandwich with fried bacon and mashed potato balls or cheese balls and oreo balls for dessert. We make the standard lunch a little bit more fun,” Pennington said. With an official storefront, trademarked name and new menu items, FunnelDelicious is by all accounts rolling full speed ahead. But did Pennington ever get his world record? “We submitted to Guinness, and they wanted to go on weight. They said their minimum weight was gonna be like 400 or 500 pounds.” He pauses. “So I won’t say it’s a matter of if – it’s a matter of when. But as of right now, we say we serve the world’s widest funnel cake,” he says, laughing.

LIFE’S MOMENTS HAPPEN IN A HIGHLAND HOME. WWW.HIGHLANDHOMESSC.COM 864.233.4175


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OUR COMMUNITY

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COMMUNITY NEWS, EVENTS AND HAPPENINGS

On Aug. 7, 10-11:30 a.m., Dick Jenson will be recording interviews with World War II veterans and any citizen who remembers something about Aug. 14, 1945, at the Reedy River Baptist Church, 871 N. Hwy 25 Bypass, Travelers Rest. No appointment is necessary and there is no obligation. In addition, The Spirit of ’45 will host its Main Celebration of the End of World War II on Aug. 10, 3 p.m., at the Reedy River Baptist Church. Outdoor and indoor exhibits begin at 2 p.m. Visit travelersresthistoricalsociety.org for more information.

ECPI University will lead a coalition of local chambers of commerce to host an Upstate Career Fair on Aug. 5, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., at TD Convention Center. Held in conjunction with the Greenville, Spartanburg Area, and Greater Greer Chambers of Commerce, the event is expected to draw more than 50 employers and is targeted toward professionals, veterans and recent graduates from all area colleges. Employers interested in participating can still reserve a booth by contacting Suzanne Jones at 864-288-2828 or SuJones@ecpi.edu.

The fall Switch-A-Roos Consignment event to be held on Aug. 8-10 at the TD Convention Center in Greenville is free and open to the public. The event features new and gently used children’s and maternity clothes, baby equipment, toys, games, books, sporting equipment and household items. Public sale hours are Aug. 8, 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Aug. 9, 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; and Aug. 10, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. For more information, visit switcharoosconsignment.com.

Greenville Health System’s Greenville Memorial Hospital has received the Mission: Lifeline Gold Receiving Quality Achievement Award for implementing quality improvement measures outlined by the American Heart Association for the treatment of heart attack patients. Greenville Memorial earned the award by meeting criteria and standards of performance for the quick and appropriate treatment of STEMI patients to open the blocked artery. Before patients are discharged, they are also started on aggressive risk-reduction therapies.

Independent bookstore Fiction Addiction, 1175 Woods Crossing Road, Greenville, hosts a free children’s story time every Thursday morning at 10:30 a.m. The following books will be read in August: “The Nuts: Bedtime at the Nut House” by Eric Litwin on Aug. 7, “Ninja Boy Goes to School” by N.D. Wilson on Aug. 14, “Hey, Blue!: Tails on the Trail” by Stephanie Morgan on Aug. 21, and “Max Makes a Friend” by Rosemary Wells on Aug. 28. For more information, call 864-675-0540.

Baptist Easley Hospital recently received an Excellence in Patient Care award given by Studer Group. The organization will receive the award at Studer Group’s 12th annual What’s Right in Health Care conference on Aug. 7-8 for their exemplary “Room was always clean” results on the HCAHPS patient survey.

The Greenville Road Warriors will host their second annual Hockey Demo Day held at Dick’s Sporting Goods on Woodruff Road, Greenville, on Aug. 2, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. The event will be a hands-on opportunity for fans of all ages to learn the growing sport of hockey. The Road Warriors official practice facility, The Pavilion, will provide equipment needed so everyone can participate. There is no charge to come out and play.

National Parks Service Southeast Regional Director Stan Austin announced that four National Park units in North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia will begin to consolidate operations on or about Sept. 1. The four units represent significant stories of the American Revolution in the southern United States. Kings Mountain National Military Park, Cowpens National Battlefield, and Ninety Six National Historic Site are located in South Carolina. Overmountain Victory Trail spans parts of Tennessee, Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina. The four units will be formed into a “group” under one general superintendent who will manage all four.

The Upcountry History Museum will host a Family Fun Day: Castle Build Challenge on Aug. 3, 1-4 p.m. Bring the whole family for a day of castle construction. From Legos and recycled boxes to Minecraft and sand, families can construct castles of all kinds. The day is free to members, $5 for adults, and $3 for children. For more information, visit upcountryhistory.org.

Premier Inc. has recognized Baptist Easley as a QUEST Award for High-value Healthcare finalist. Only 37 hospitals received finalist recognition for achieving top performance in any five of the six areas measured in Premier’s QUEST collaborative, including harm, mortality, readmissions, costs, patient experience and evidence-based care. Only three hospitals in South Carolina were Quest finalists.

Jeff Dunham, comic ventriloquist and star of Comedy Central specials, comes to the Upstate’s Bon Secours Wellness Arena on Nov. 7 as part of his Disorderly Conduct tour. Dunham is known for his sidekicks, including Walter the Grumpy Retiree, Achmed the Dead Terrorist, Bubba J, Peanut and José Jalapeño. Tickets go on sale Aug. 1 at 10 a.m. Tickets are available at the arena box office, Ticketmaster.com, Ticketmaster outlets or at 800-745-3000.

To help effectively address mental health nationwide, FamilyWize Community Service Partnership, Inc. and the United Way have teamed together on a prescription savings program to help residents purchase prescription medications they otherwise might not be able to afford. People in need of prescription assistance can receive a FamilyWize card through community agencies and partners or through familywize. org. The card requires no enrollment or activation.

National Night Out will be held on Aug. 5, 5-8 p.m., at the Pleasant Valley Connection, 510 Old Augusta Road, Greenville. The night will feature food, activities, games and more. For more information, contact Jan Howard at 864-236-0151, ext. 103.

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AUGUST 1, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 33


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

THE GOOD

EVENTS THAT MAKE OUR COMMUNITY BETTER

Operation Homefront and Dollar Tree, Inc. have joined forces to gather school supplies for military children nationwide with the Back-to-School Brigade program. The supplies can be purchased by customers at any of the more than 40 Dollar Tree and Deals stores in the Greenville area and placed in collection boxes in each store. Stores will collect supplies through Aug. 14. Participating stores include the locations at Marketplace Shopping Center, Shoppes at Woodruff and Whitehorse Commons. For more information, visit operationhomefront.net. On Aug. 9, two local high school seniors, Brooke Lee and Mary Michael Newman, are hosting The Drive for the Difference golf tournament at the Furman University Golf Club. It will be held to support the work of Love146, an international human rights organization working to end child trafficking and exploitation. For more information, visit donate.love146.org/greenville/events/drive-for-difference/e31658. The Upstate South Carolina chapter of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, a conservation organization, will hold its 17th annual Big Game Banquet on Aug. 23 at the Poinsett Club in Greenville. This year’s banquet will feature interactive games, drawings and an auction. Individual tickets are $80, which includes an annual membership. Couples can purchase two tickets for $125. In addition, children and young adults can attend the event for a reduced rate. To purchase tickets or for more information, visit rmef.org or call Brad Wolford at 864-421-2291. Cascades Verdae recently honored veterans with a Quilts of Valor presentation. The veterans, also Cascade members, received this surprise honor in front of the entire community and were recognized for their service and dedication to their country. The quilts were presented to the following: Bill Abele, Korean War veteran from 1951-1953; Jim Faulkner, served in the U.S. Marine Corps four years; Robert Frantz, served in the

(Left) Jean Loussarian standing with quilts she made for veterans. (Right) George Holzberger holding his quilt made by Loussarian.

Navy during the Cold War era just past WWII; and George Holzberger, served as a Navy Corpsman in the Marine Division of WWII. The Pride of Greenville Mens Chorus will host Miss Coco Peru on Sept. 12 for a concert at Midtown Artery in Greenville. The event will also feature guest emcee Patti O’Furniture and a portion of proceeds will benefit Upstate Pride. Ticket cost is $60 and includes two drink tickets. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit pogmc.com. On the 10th anniversary of supporting the Urban League of the Upstate Project Ready Pre-College Enrollment program, BMW Manufacturing donated $25,000. This gift brings BMW’s total support to $275,000. Project Ready Pre-College Enrollment offers services including academic advising, scholarship application assistance, standardized test prep workshops, college tours, college application assistance and service learning opportunities.

Protect your world Auto • Home • Life • Retirement

Daily Bread Ministries – Greer STEP received a $100,000 donation toward the construction of the Greer Shelter to Empower People (STEP) facility from the John I. Smith Foundation at the Greer Soup Kitchen, 521 E. Poinsett St., Greer. The donation will enable Daily Bread Ministries to proceed with groundbreaking at the STEP facility site on Oct. 1. The Poinsett Club recently presented a $1,070 gift to Upstate Warrior Solution, a charitable organization that assists Upstate veterans and their families with transitioning to civilian life. The gift is a result of a series of military lectures offered through the Poinsett Club since 2010. To date, the Poinsett Club has donated more than $6,000 to military charities in honor of series speakers.

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Submit entries to community@communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL CULTURE

RHYTHMS BY THE

Jackie Evancho

Alton Brown Live – Edible Inevitable Tour

RIVER

Christmas with Aaron Neville

STAR POWER

SWINGIN’ MEDALLIONS South Carolina’s band for beach music, frat rock, R&B and shaggin’!

The Brian Setzer Orchestra Christmas Rocks

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The Joffrey Ballet

Peace Center balances popular returnees, new acts in 2014-15 CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com If the Peace Center’s 2014-15 season were to be described in culinary terms, it would be a well-balanced meal: a little bit of comedy, a little bit of dance, a large serving of music and a whole heap of nationally and internationally known talent. Dessert is the Broadway Series the Peace Center announced in April, which includes “Once,” “The Book of Mormon,” “Disney’s Beauty and the Beast,” “Wicked,” “Pippin,” “Rodgers + Hammerstein’s Cinderella,” and “Kinky Boots.” Tickets for the single-night shows and “Once” go on sale to the general public on Saturday at 10 a.m. Tickets may be purchased online at peacecenter.org or at the Peace Center’s Box Office. Summer hours are Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m., Saturday from

11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and two hours prior to every scheduled performance.

p Keb’ Mo’ Tuesday, Sept. 16, 7:30 p.m.

A three-time Grammy winner, Keb’ Mo’ calls his new album, “BLUESAmericana,” a signpost of artistic and personal growth. A rough patch in the musician’s marriage inspired many of the album’s songs. Mo’ has collaborated with performers such as B.B. King, Buddy Guy and Bonnie Raitt.

u Ron White Thursday, Oct. 9, 7:30 p.m.

Ron White first rose to fame during the “Blue Collar Comedy Tour.” He’s now a Grammynominated comedian and a feature film actor. With this take on modern life and growing up in small-town Texas, he has sold more than 14 million albums.

Alton Brown Live – Edible Inevitable Tour Wednesday, Oct. 22, 7:30 p.m.

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 29 7:30 PM RustedRoot.com

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The Food Network star combines comedy, talk-show antics, a multimedia lecture, live music and “extreme” food PEACE CENTER continued on PAGE 36

AUGUST 1, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 35


JOURNAL CULTURE PEACE CENTER continued from PAGE 35

experimentation in his unique show. He’s the author of seven books and a judge on “Food Network Star.” During “Alton Brown Live,” Brown invites audience members on stage to be his assistants.

u Kathy Griffin Friday, Oct. 24, 8 p.m.

A two-time Emmy winner, comedienne Kathy Griffin returns to the Peace Center to skewer celebrity culture and her own ups and downs on the Hollywood “D-List.” When Griffin won a Grammy for “Calm Down Gurrl,” she became the third woman ever to win the Best Comedy Album award, joining Whoopi Goldberg and Lily Tomlin.

In Collaboration: The Milk Carton Kids and Sarah Jarosz Saturday, Oct. 25, 8 p.m.

These Grammy-nominated folk artists unite for a show. Their initial performance on “Austin City Limits” was widely heralded for the uncommon chemistry the artists have found together.

Natalie Cole Sunday, Nov. 9, 7 p.m.

Natalie Cole has released her first Spanish-language album, “Natalie Cole En Espanol,” her first new studio album in five years. She revisits the rich repertoire of Latin standards that once opened new vistas for her father, the legendary crooner Nat King Cole.

Los Angeles Guitar Quartet Monday, Nov. 24, 7:30 p.m.

The Los Angeles Guitar Quartet is recognized as one of America’s premier instrumental ensembles.

Christmas with Aaron Neville Monday, Dec. 8, 7:30 p.m.

New Orleans R&B and soul artist Aaron Neville returns to the stage with classic hits like “Tell It Like It Is,” songs from his album of doo-wop standards, “My True Story,” and Christmas favorites.

The Brian Setzer Orchestra Christmas Rocks! Tuesday, Dec. 9, 7:30 p.m.

The three-time Grammy winner and his 18-piece orchestra will perform hits such as “Rock This Town,” “Stray Cat Strut” and “Jump, Jive and Wail” and reimagined Yuletide classics.

Uchida for a recital in the Gunter Theatre.

STOMP Saturday, Jan. 10, 4 p.m. and 8 p.m.

STOMP combines dance, music and theatrical performance in a stage show that the Los Angeles Times calls as fresh and fun as ever.

p

The Joffrey Ballet

Tuesday, March 24, 2015, 7:30 p.m.

Called “America’s Company of Firsts,” The Joffrey Ballet celebrates in 2015 its 20th anniversary of being in Chicago. Robert Joffrey founded The Joffrey Ballet in 1956. It has become one of the top dance companies in the world.

Martha Graham Dance Company Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2015, 7:30 p.m.

For nearly 90 years, the Martha Graham Dance Company has altered the scope of contemporary dance. For 2015, they will break new ground again by performing commissioned repertory work by choreographer Foniadakis.

Jackie Evancho Sunday, Feb. 22, 2015, 3 p.m.

q Susan Boyle in Concert

Jackie Evancho, a child soprano prodigy, became a breakout star on “America’s Got Talent” and became the biggest-selling debut artist of 2011.

Monday, Oct. 27, 7:30 p.m.

Susan Boyle became an instant international sensation with her performance of “I Dreamed a Dream” on “Britain’s Got Talent.” Her Peace Center appearance is part of her first solo American tour.

p Keith Lockhart with the BBC Concert Orchestra Tuesday, April 7, 2015, 7:30 p.m.

Keith Lockhart, a Furman University graduate, returns once again to Greenville, this time as principal conductor of the BBC Concert Orchestra.

p Kenny Rogers Christmas Show Tuesday, Dec. 16, 7:30 p.m.

Pilobolus

Kenny Rogers is a CMA Willie Nelson Lifetime Achievement Award winner known for timeless classics such as “The Gambler,” “Lady” and “She Believes in Me” as well as his holiday classics.

From the Top with host Christopher O’Riley Thursday, Nov. 6, 7:30 p.m.

Hosted by acclaimed pianist Christopher O’Riley, this NPR favorite celebrates the performances and captivating stories of young classical musicians. Each year thousands of musicians ages 8 to 18 from around the world audition for his show.

36 THE JOURNAL | AUGUST 1, 2014

Thursday, April 9, 2015, 7:30 p.m.

Pilobolus pushes the boundary of movement, breaks down barriers between disciplines and challenges the way the audience thinks about dance.

u Miles Hoffman

Audra McDonald

Thursday, Jan. 8, 7:30 p.m.

p An Evening with Garrison Keillor

Thursday, April 23, 7:30 p.m.

Viola soloist and Converse College professor Miles Hoffman will team up with soloist Reiko

Thursday, March 12, 2015, 7:30 p.m.

Garrison Keillor, a master storyteller and host of public radio’s “A Prairie Home Companion,” returns to the Peace Center to tell tales about the citizens of Lake Wobegon.

Audra McDonald, winner of six Tony Awards and two Grammys, returns after a 2012 performance that wowed the Peace Center audience. She’ll perform her favorite show tunes and songs from her album “Go Back Home.”


Artists turn to Front Porch, Potluck New arts collaborative offers smorgasbord of art in new festival CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Southerners love front porches and potlucks. A group of Greenville-area artists wants to capitalize on both to expand multi-disciplinary arts offerings. The Potluck Community Arts Festival that begins Aug. 6 is just that – a little bit of music, a little bit of theater, a little bit of visual art, a little bit of choreography, a little bit of film. The festival is the brainchild of Governors School of the Arts alumni Breanna Foister, Tim Giles and Prestiss Standridge, as well as Cortney McEniry, a director and playwright who met Foister when both were working at McCarter Theatre Center in New Jersey. “We wanted to produce something that showcased new artists in South Carolina, paying particular focus to supporting new work,” Foister said. But the group wanted to do more than produce a weekend of art – so they formed an organization, the Front Porch Arts Collective, that would provide arts education, partner with community organizations and promote local artists. “We love the name Front Porch for what it represents in our culture – a place to converse, to question, to dream, to create,” the artists wrote on the collective’s website. “Front porches are usually raised above the ground, easily visible to others. They’re a place for gathering neighbors and reflecting in solitude.” The Potluck Community Arts Festival kicks off on Wednesday at Due South Coffee at the Taylors Mill. The event will feature the electronic R&B music

SO YOU KNOW WHAT: Potluck, a Community Arts Festival WHERE: Various spots in Greenville WHEN: Aug. 6-9 AUG. 6: Kick-off Party, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Clemson Center for Visual Arts Greenville Gallery The Village of West Greenville 1278 Pendleton St., Greenville

JOURNAL CULTURE

ART CONDITIONED. IT’S COOL INSIDE!

AUG. 7: Porch Light Playwrights, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Due South Coffee 250 Mill St., Taylors

Greenville County Museum of Art

AUG. 8: The Mill Project, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Clemson Center for Visual Arts Greenville Gallery The Village of West Greenville 1278 Pendleton St., Greenville

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1pm - 5 pm

AUG. 9: Open House, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. The Artistry 12 Andrews St., Greenville

free admission

TICKETS: $10 each or $30 for Potluck Pass INFORMATION: frontporchartscollective.com

GCMA 3614 Journal Art Conditioned.indd 2

7/2/14 5:22 PM

of Rich Engli$h and photographs of the West Greenville community curated by David Bram of Fraction Magazine. On Aug. 7, an ensemble of Greenville actors will present staged readings of works by Upstate playwrights Travis Ballenger, Foister, Bryson Howard, McEniry, Jacob Perkins and Abby Rosebrock. The event will be held at the Clemson University Center for Visual Arts Greenville Gallery on Pendleton Street in The Village of West Greenville. Friday, Aug. 8 will feature the Mill Project, a multidisciplinary work combining Greenville’s mill village history with original music, film and live choreography. South Carolina musicians Daniel Machado of the band The Restoration, Alexa Woodward and Mel Washington will participate. The Mill Project will be held at Clemson’s Greenville Gallery. On Saturday, Aug. 9 is an open house and the closest thing to a potluck, Foister said. Events at the open house will include a film screening, jam session concert, poetry readings and creation of visual art on site. The open house will be held at The Artistry on Andrews Street in the Village of West Greenville.

AUGUST 1, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 37


JOURNAL CULTURE

A R T S CALENDAR

Be Freshwater Friendly To Flush or Not to Flush? on your property!), causing environmental concerns as well as costly repairs.

By Trent Bowles Pump Station and Grounds Maintenance Supervisor at ReWa.

Be Freshwater Friendly is an educational campaign that was developed by Renewable Water Resources (ReWa) to educate the Upstate on how small changes to our day-to-day actions can have a great impact on our local rivers, lakes and streams. We are excited about the recent launch of our new focus, Potty Protocol - To Flush or Not to Flush. Over the past few years, we, at ReWa, have seen a significant increase in the amount of blockages that have occurred due to items being flushed that are not truly flushable. Walk down the cleaning aisle at your local grocery store and you will see products labeled as “flushable,” but are they? Many items that you and I use on a daily basis should never be flushed! These items include dental floss, “flushable” wipes, diapers, rags, feminine products and much more. All ReWa trunk lines flow by gravity, and at low points, pump stations bring the water up to higher elevation so that the wastewater can continue to flow properly. These pump stations frequently get clogged with cloths, diapers, strings and many other items that should be thrown into the trash can! These items can also cause blockages in the sewer system (even in the lines

So far this year, ReWa staff has responded to 28 blockages in pump stations in our service area. Considerable man hours are expended on the task of removing these items that can cause major mechanical failures which results in additional costs to ReWa and our customers. Pump station repairs can sometimes require extended periods of work in a confined space greatly increasing the safety risk associated with the removal of the unwanted material for staff as well. Pump stoppages greatly increase the likelihood of sewer overflows which pose environmental and community risks - we really want to avoid those! From the perspective of someone who witnesses these complications first hand, I would like to encourage you to be aware of what you flush down the toilet because flushing the wrong items can definitely cause issues down the line! So, my response to the question “to flush or not to flush” would be… for the sake of the sewers… trash it, don’t flush it!

BeFreshWaterFriendly.org 38 THE JOURNAL | AUGUST 1, 2014

AUGUST 1-7 Main Street Friday The Bad Popes Aug. 1 ~ 232-2273 GLOW Lyric Theatre Festival Rent Aug. 1-9 ~ 467-3000 Metropolitan Arts Council Flat Out Under Pressure Exhibit Through Aug. 1 ~467-3132

LISTEN UP

BEST BETS FOR LOCAL LIVE MUSIC 8/1, SMILEY’S ACOUSTIC CAFÉ

Stereo Reform Electro-rock dance duo. Call 864-292-8988 or visit smileysacousticcafe.com. 8/2, GROUND ZERO

Communion of Darkness II Multi-band black metal festival. Call 864-948-1661 or visit reverbnation.com/ venue/groundzero2. 8/2, RADIO ROOM

Our Western Sky

Centre Stage Shout! The Mod Musical Through Aug. 2 ~ 233-6733

Atmospheric rock trio plays final show. Call 864-263-7868 or visit wpbrradioroom.com.

Greenville Little Theatre The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) Through Aug. 3 ~ 233-6238

8/6, GOTTROCKS

Upstate Shakespeare Festival Antony and Cleopatra Through Aug. 3 ~ 235-6948

Daryl Hance Former Mofro guitarist brings the rock/funk. Call 864-235-5519 or visit facebook. com/GottRocks.Rocks. 8/7, GOTTROCKS

Makayan

Reedy River Concerts Mystic Vibrations Aug. 6 ~ 233-6733

Jam-rock. Call 864-235-5519 or visit reverbnation.com/venue/255976.

Furman Music by the Lake Come Dance with Me Aug. 7 ~ 294-2086

8/7, INDEPENDENT PUBLIC ALE HOUSE

Piedmont Natural Gas Downtown Alive Emily Lynch Aug. 7 ~ 232-2273 Metro. Arts Council at Centre Stage Ceramics for the Wall: Works by David Young Through Aug. 25 ~ 233-6733 Greenville Chamber of Commerce Works by Steve Garner and Diane Hopkins-Hughs Through Aug. 29 ~ 242-1050

Treehouse Jam-reggae. Call 864-552-1265 or visit ipagreenville.com. 8 / 8 , B L U E S B O U L E VA R D (GREENVILLE)

Shannon Hoover Trio Innovative and popular Upstate jazz bassist. Tickets: $5. Call 864-242-2583 or visit bluesboulevardjazz.com. 8/8, HORIZON RECORDS

Christian Lee Hutson

Greenville County Museum of Art Content of Our Character: From States Rights to Civil Rights Through Sep. 21 ~ 271-7570

Singer/songwriter plays acoustic in-store set. Call 864-235-7922 or visit blog.horizonrecords.net.

Legacy of Impressionism: Languages of Light Through Sep. 21 ~ 271-7570

Mac Arnold & Plate Full O’ Blues

8 / 8 , M A I N S T. F R I D A Y S

Beloved Upstate blues legend. Visit bit.ly/mainstfridays. 8/14, DOWNTOWN ALIVE

RetroVertigo Upstate’s most beloved cover band. Visit bit.ly/downtownalive.


SOUND CHECK

WITH VINCENT HARRIS

Songs of a lifetime For Greenville native Emily Lynch, music became “more than a casual thing”

VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR | vharris@communityjournals.com

NOSH LIKE YOU

MEAN IT.

AUGUST 21–31

Listening to Emily Lynch’s 2011 self-titled debut album is a startling experience. Rather than sounding like the tentative first steps of an artist beginning her journey, the album bursts with confidence. Lynch’s clear, expressive voice seems at times to echo Dolly Parton’s legendary soprano, the production is first-rate, and the songs are brimming with memorable melodies, hummable choruses and finely tuned lyrics. It’s surprising to hear a country singer/songwriter so fully formed on her first release. Perhaps it’s not surprising, then, to find out that Lynch, a Greenville native, has been singing more or less all of her life. WHO: Emily Lynch “I’m the oldest of three girls, and I’d always sung with my family,” Lynch says. “My dad plays WHERE: Downtown Alive, NOMA Square, Main Street, Greenville guitar and piano, and we were always singing around the house or in the choir at church.” WHEN: Thursday, Aug. 7, 5:30 p.m. And then, like a lot of people who enjoy playINFO: bit.ly/downtownalive ing music, Lynch’s life went in another direction, albeit briefly. “I went to Clemson on a rowing scholarship, of all things,” she says, “but I think that was when I realized how much I needed music in my life. It was more than just a casual thing. So I began to really explore songwriting. My dad had taught me a few chords on guitar, and I picked it back up. Towards the end of college I started really digging in and learning songs. I got very focused and started writing a lot. My last year at Clemson, I just couldn’t stop thinking that music was really what I wanted to do.” So after graduating, Lynch began pursuing her dream. “I ended up getting an internship at a local studio in Greenville, which was owned by a label called OMG Entertainment, and I was in charge of listening to people’s CDs that they would submit,” Lynch says. “The president of the label knew I did my own music, and he introduced me to Dan Hannon, a producer in Atlanta. Dan was the one who saw something in my crappy little garage-band recordings and said, ‘I’m willing to work with you. If you focus, you can do this.’ We talked every day and I’d send him a song or more a day. I wrote songs to the extent that my mom was like, ‘I’m worried about you. You need to get out of the house.’” Lynch says that Hannon’s honesty about her songs helped her become a better writer. “His critiques were never, ‘This is amazing, you’re doing a great job,’” she says. “It was more like, ‘I see what you’re going for, but why don’t you go deeper here?’ And that was a priceless gift, because you can’t get better unless you have somebody telling you what you’re not there yet.” Since her debut, Lynch has endured some ups and downs as a performer. “I put out the record in 2011 and toured, but since then I went through a couple of musical heartbreaks,” she says. “I had a trio with two other girls, and it was really nice, but that fell apart. Over the last two years, I’ve moved more in a songwriting direction, writing a lot in Nashville and Atlanta for other artists.” She’s worked with some of the hottest songwriters in Nashville, including Rob Crosby (Martina McBride’s “Concrete Angel,” Eric Paslay’s “Friday Night”), Shane McNally (Kacey Musgraves’ “Merry Go Round”) and Brandy Clark (Miranda Lambert’s “Mama’s Broken Heart”). “I think collaboration is a beautiful thing,” she says. “I wanted to get better. Nashville has the best songwriters in the world, and I decided I wanted to explore that.” Though she’s planning on releasing an EP in the near future and she’s committed to continuing her songwriting efforts in Nashville, Lynch says that it’s difficult to be patient about her career sometimes. “I wake up every morning thinking about it,” she says. “I have to remind myself of how far I’ve come.”

JOURNAL CULTURE

2 FOR $20, 3 FOR $30 MENUS Local restaurateurs team up to offer you the chance to experience some of the area’s best cuisine at an appetizing price! Be sure to check the Greenvill efor participating restaurants, menus, and more! AUGUST 1, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 39


JOURNAL CULTURE

40 THE JOURNAL | AUGUST 1, 2014


JOURNAL HOMES

Featured Homes & Neighborhoods | Open Houses | Property Transfers

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED HOME

DETAILS 428 E Parkins Mill, Greenville Recent price adjustment! Incredible 5600+ sq ft custom-built home perfectly situated close to Greenville’s amazing Downtown and close to all that the Eastside has to offer. Easy access to Sara Collins Elem, Beck Middle, JL Mann High, St. Joseph’s and Christ Church School. 10' ceilings, solid hardwood 8' doors on the main level, 9' ceilings upstairs, marble floor in foyer, extensive crown molding, plantation shutters, central vac system, tons of closet and attic storage, new paint and carpet in much of the house. Private, main-level master suite with master bath, steam shower with glass surround, dual vanity, jetted tub and large his/her closets The perfect spot for an office is directly off the foyer with built-ins. The family room with French doors that lead to a 24' x 13' covered porch and 13' x 10' screened porch, overlooking private, professionally landscaped, irrigated backyard. The kitchen is a chef ’s dream with loads of cabinetry, walk-in pantry, high-end stainless appliances, granite countertops. Huge laundry room with folding area, large sink, cabinets and built-in ironing board. Upstairs are three bedrooms, two full baths and large bonus room. Incredible opportunity! Pristine condition!

HOME INFO

Price: $1,089,000 | MLS: #1284169 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 3 full, 1 half Square Footage: 5600–5799 Schools: Sara Collin Beck Academy | JL Mann Tom Marchant 864.449.1658 tom@marchantco.com The Marchant Compant www.tommarchant.com To submit your Featured Home: homes@greenvillejournal.com

Agent on Call in Easley/Powdersville

Agent on Call in Greenville/Greer

Agent on Call in Simpsonville

Kim Redden 864.608.0253

Tammy Kingsley 864.561.2811

Tracy Tchirkow 864.238.2561

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

AUGUST 1, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 41


JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND

O P E N S U N D AY, A U G U S T 3 F R O M 2 – 4 P M

RIVERWALK - LYMAN AREA

AUTUMN TRACE

127 RIVERWALK DRIVE . $187,500 . MLS# 1273848

202 PLUM ORCHARD COURT . $199,900 . MLS# 1283537

4 KNOLL RIDGE DRIVE . $219,000 . MLS# 1284109

3BR/3BA Open floor plan with large bonus in District 5 Schools! Hwy 29 to Lyman, Turn Left on Hampton Rd, go 2 miles to Right on Zimmerman, Left into Riverwalk.

4BR/3BA Simply Gorgeous Inside & Out! Immaculate! 385 South to Exit 31, Left- Hwy 14, Right-Pollard, Left @ 1st entrance to SD, Right-Saybrook, Left-Farm Brook, Right-Plum Orchard

4BR/2.5BA Wonderful finishes, wood floors, 4 bedrooms plus loft. Fenced back Batesville Rd to Right on Hammett Bridge Rd, Left on Circle Rd, Right into Hammett Grove on Knoll Ridge Drive

Contact: Hope Jeter | 430-2934 Berkshire Hathaway C. Dan Joyner REALTORS

Contact: Carolyn Laws-Irwin | 451-9407 Berkshire Hathaway C. Dan Joyner REALTORS

Contact: Phyllis MacDonald | 313-3753 Berkshire Hathaway C. Dan Joyner REALTORS

STONEWYCK

STONE LAKE

ROPER MOUNTAIN ESTATES

500 STEAMBOAT COURT . $234,900 . MLS# 1277595

103 STONE LAKE DRIVE . $384,900 . MLS# 1277122

404 MEADOWSWEET LANE . $398,000 . MLS# 1281692

4BR/2.5BA Great culdesac lot in Woodruff Rd. neighborhood. I-385S to LT on Woodruff. RT on HWY 14. RT into S/D on Stonewyck. LT on Gunnison. LT on Steamboat.

4BR/2.5BA Charming home. Minutes from Downtown, North Main & community pool Rutherford Rd to Stone Lake Dr, Home on Left.

4BR/3.5BA Stunning home situated on a gorgeous .5 acres. Roper Mountain to Left on Snipes, Right on Marigold, Right on Roper Mountain Court, Left on Meadowsweet, Home on Right.

Contact: Chet Smith | 458-7653 Berkshire Hathaway C. Dan Joyner REALTORS

Contact: Virginia Hayes | 313-2986 Berkshire Hathaway C. Dan Joyner REALTORS

Contact: Roger Tate | 630-2999 Berkshire Hathaway C. Dan Joyner REALTORS

LAUREL LAKE

CARSON’S POND

204 GOLDENSTAR LANE . $419,000 . MLS# 1282280

204 GREAT PINES DRIVE . $349,900 . MLS# 1283273

4BR/3.5BA Gorgeous home on .8 acre private yard! Open floor plan, gleaming hardwood floors, MBR on main, Bonus Room, Roof 2011 Roper-Mountain, R Anderson-RIdge, L Bennetts Bridge, R Laurel Lake

4BR/2.5BA You will not want to miss out on this beautiful 4 bedroom/2.5 bathroom home on large lot with in-ground pool! From Bennett’s Bridge/296, Right-Carson’s Pond Subdivision, Left-Great Pines Drive.

Contact: Pam McCartney | 864-630-7844 BHHS Spaulding Group

Contact: Christina Taylor | 803-414-1261 Allen Tate Realtors

42 THE JOURNAL | AUGUST 1, 2014

HAMMETT GROVE

When you are done reading this paper, please recycle it. SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


JOURNAL HOMES

F E AT U R E D H OM E

RE AL ESTATE NEWS Pending Home Sales Slip in June After three consecutive months of solid gains, pending home sales slowed modestly in June, according to theNational Association of Realtors®.

The Pending Home Sales Index,* a forwardlooking indicator based on contract signings, declined 1.1 percent to 102.7 in June from 103.8 in May, and is 7.3 percent below June 2013 (110.8). Despite June’s decrease, the index is above 100 – considered an average level of contract activity – for the second consecutive month after failing to reach the mark since November 2013 (100.7).

Jon Pickhardt, 2014 President of The Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® and Coowner of Flagship Properties SC and The Office Centers LLC in Greenville, SC , says the housing market is stabilizing, but ongoing challenges are impeding full sales potential. “Activity is notably higher than earlier this year as prices have moderated and inventory levels have improved,” he said. “However, supply shortages still exist in parts of the country, wages are flat, and tight credit conditions are deterring a higher number of potential buyers from fully taking advantage of lower interest rates.”

504 Pawleys Drive, Five Forks Plantation This 4,885 SF Genavieve floorplan is BUILT FOR ENTERTAINING! It features 5 Bedrooms (Owner’s Suite on the First Floor), a BASEMENT with FINISHED RECREATION ROOM, 4.5 Baths and a 3-CAR GARAGE. The open kitchen has a MORNING ROOM, large island, granite countertops, gas cooktop, wall oven/microwave and pantry. The first-floor owner’s suite offers a private owner’s bath with dual walk-in closets. The basement offers 1,420 SF of conditioned basement storage space. You’ll enjoy our Million Dollar Amenities Package including a large clubhouse with a relaxing wrap around porch, a junior Olympic pool, lighted tennis courts, a paved walking path, athletic fields and 1.3 acre scenic pond. Come visit this home at our Open House Sat 10-1 or Sun 1-3.

HOME INFO Price: $489,900 | MLS: #1282874 Bedrooms: 5 Baths: 4.5 Square Footage: 4,885 Schools: Monarch Elementary | Beck Academy JL Mann High Contact: 864.234.1497 | Ryan Homes RyanHomes.com To submit your Featured Home: homes@greenvillejournal.com

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

Despite these headwinds, Pickhardt ultimately expects a slight uptick in sales during the second half of the year. “The good news is that price appreciation has decreased to its slowest pace since March 20121 behind much needed increases in inventory,” he said. “With rents rising 4 percent annually, potential buyers are less likely to experience sticker shock and can make smart decisions on whether or not it makes sense to buy or continue renting.” The PHSI in the Northeast fell 2.9 percent to 83.8 in June, and is 3.2 percent below a year ago. In the Midwest the index rose 1.1 percent to 106.6, but remains 5.5 percent below June 2013. Pending home sales in the South dipped 2.4 percent to an index of 113.8 in June, and is 4.3 percent below a year ago. The index in the West inched 0.2 percent in June to 95.7, but remains 16.7 percent below June 2013.

Pickhardt forecasts existing-homes sales to be down 2.8 percent this year to 4.95 million, compared to 5.1 million sales of existing homes in 2013. The national median existing-home price is projected to grow between 5 and 6 percent this year and in 2015. The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing 1 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.

Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® represents over 1,800 members in all aspects of the real estate industry. Please visit the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® web site at www.ggar.com for real estate and consumer information. “Every market is different, call a REALTOR® today.”

AUGUST 1, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 43


JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND

O P E N S U N D AY, A U G U S T 3 F R O M 2 – 4 P M

SEVEN OAKS

VERDMONT 406 HAYWORTH DRIVE $289,000 MLS# 1284475

19 E INDIAN TRAIL $189,900 MLS# 1283958

3BR/3.5BA You are invited to come enjoy Music in the Park from this pristine Charleston inspired home Sunday evening!! 385 exit 27- Harrison Bridge- Neely Ferry Hayworth Dr.

4BR/3BA Location Location! Fabulous 4 br, 3bath home ready for you to move right in and enjoy. Wade Hampton Blvd L Edwards Mill R E. Woodburn

Contact: Charlene Panek | 864-404-9544 Coldwell Banker Caine

Contact: JoAnn Williams | 864-420-4019 Allen Tate

ON THE MARKET FISHER KNOB/ LAKE JOCASSEE

BOTANY WOODS

15 ROLLINGREEN RD. . $249,500 . MLS# 1280755 4BR/2BA Amazing value in Botany Woods! Updated kit. & main bath w/granite counters; Lrg deck o’looking fenced yard; walk-out basement; lg. laundry rm, hw flrs throughout; Ex schools & amenities! Contact: Rex & Kary Galloway | 864-630-1111 Berkshire Hathaway C. Dan Joyner REALTORS

215 WHITEWATER . $1,825,000 . MLS# 20148297 6BR/5.5BA Spectacular rustic mountain home on Lake Jocassee with all new plumbing, electrical, heat pumps and kitchen appliances. www.LakeJocasseeRealEstateExpert.com click on Fisher Knob Scroll down to click into listing - VIDEO! Contact: Mike Roach | 866-371-2911 Top Guns Realty

44 THE JOURNAL | AUGUST 1, 2014

When you are done reading this paper, please recycle it. SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


JOURNAL HOMES

F E AT U R E D N E I G H B OR H O OD The Townes at Thornblade Enjoy the freedom of home ownership at The Townes at Thornblade, a gated, maintenance-free townhome community located just off I-85 in Greer. There are three unique two story floorplans to choose from, ranging in size from 2,450-2,740 square feet. Each Townhome features high quality finishes, nine-foot ceilings, an Owner’s Suite on the main level, two-car garage, bonus room and 2 1/2 baths. The floorplans are designed to maximize usable space and offer unique features such as an additional owner’s suite, fourth bedroom and third full bath. Neighborhood amenities include landscaped and irrigated grounds, private gated access, and a community pool.

NEIGHBORHOOD INFO Priced from: $260’s | Schools: Buena Vista Elementary | Northwood Middle | Riverside High Contact: Cothran Homes | 864.214.3024 | Website: cothranhomes.com To submit your Featured Neighborhood: homes@greenvillejournal.com

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VERDMONT

404 Hayworth Drive 4BR/3.5BA • MLS#1281588 $268,500

COACHMAN PLANTATION 59 Scotts Bluff Drive 4BR/2.5BA • MLS#1282936 $322,500

Helen Hagood SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

W

NE

HAMMETT CREEK

108 Highfield Court 4BR/3.5BA • MLS#1279057 $549,500

U NS

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ALTA VISTA

51 Belmont Avenue 5BR/3.5BA • MLS#1279356 $579,500

Ranked #3 again! Out of 150 agents. #12 in Greenville County! 864.419.2889 | See my listings and more at HelenHagood.com.

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AUGUST 1, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 45


JOURNAL HOMES

PE OPL E , AWA R D S , H ON OR S

Local realtor testifies in Senate hearing SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

Flood Insurance Reform Act went into effect last year.

Local realtor, Donna Smith, broker-incharge of the Simpsonville and Garlington Rd. offices of Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS testified before a Senate subcommittee earlier this week in Washington, D.C. regarding the impact of flood insurance costs on market values.

“The Federal Emergency Management Agency appears determined to get implementation right,” said Smith. “In the four months since the law’s enactment, FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate and Director David Miller have engaged Realtors® and other stakeholders to ensure a successful rollout of the law’s rate relief and refund provisions for property owners, who are still reeling from the wide swings in insurance costs over the past few years.”

sjackson@communityjournals.com

Smith serves as the chair of the National Association of Realtors Flood Insurance Task Force. “We are so proud of Donna’s leadership on flood insurance and for representing us and the National Association of Realtors so well while testifying in front of the Senate Subcommittee in Washington, D.C.,” said David Crigler, executive vice president and COO of C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS. The NAR provided testimony before the U.S. Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Homeland Security. “Congressional action and the timely implementation of the Homeowner Flood Insurance Affordability Act relieved property owners of costly premium hikes and stabilized housing markets where flood insurance is required for a mortgage,” said a NAR spokesperson. “There are additional steps that need to be taken, however, to fully address remaining issues.”

Within two months of implementation, FEMA announced its intention to hold 2013 rates constant through 2015 and in some cases even reduce rates. The agency has also provided guidance to insurers to issue refunds this fall to property owners who paid amounts in excess of 2013 rates. “The progress so far has been encouraging, but there is still more work to be done,” said Smith. “FEMA still needs to set up an Office of the Advocate called for by the Biggert-Waters Act to provide property buyers with the timely help they need to address problems with flood insurance and other rate issues that they face. It is also critical that FEMA and the NFIP ensure the long-term accuracy of flood rates and maps. Homeowners need an independent government advocate who has experience and access to the necessary information to fully investigate and resolve suspect rate quotes.”

Within a month of the legislation’s implementation, FEMA issued rate-relief PHOTO PROVIDED guidelines to insurers so that homebuyers would not have to pay more than current owners would at the time of their next flood insurance policy renewal. The relief also applies to current homeowners who bought a new policy or let one lapse, not just to owners who Donna Smith, broker-in-charge of the Simpsonville and bought property after Garlington Rd. offices of Berkshire Hathatway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS the Biggert-Waters

46 THE JOURNAL | AUGUST 1, 2014

G R E E N V I L L E T R A N S AC T ION S J U N E 3 0 – J U LY 4, 2 014 $2,999,931 $2,900,000 $1,900,000 $1,862,500 ROCKY CREEK BUSINESS PARK $1,475,000 $1,412,500 $1,200,000 CHANTICLEER $900,000 $899,000 $865,000 $760,000 $750,000 $685,000 KINGSBRIDGE $685,000 KINGSBRIDGE $685,000 PARK HILL $666,484 GRIFFITH FARM $643,000 AUGUSTA RD HILLS $600,000 CLAREMONT $588,329 $565,000 GOWER ESTATES $557,000 MCRAE PARK $535,112 GLEN FOREST DRIVE DVLMT $535,000 SPAULDING FARMS $520,000 $500,000 VILLAGGIO DI MONTEBELLO $490,000 SYCAMORE RIDGE $458,935 $453,200 $450,000 SYCAMORE RIDGE $450,000 ASHETON $445,000 WELLINGTON $440,645 IVY GROVE $439,000 $430,000 $416,250 BRUCE FARMS $410,000 BERKSHIRE PARK $407,000 SUGAR CREEK $405,000 $400,000 TRAXLER PARK $397,500 PARIS MOUNTAIN HEIGHTS $385,500 STRATTON PLACE $375,000 FOREST HEIGHTS $365,000 SILVER MEADOWS $359,900 COVE AT BUTLER SPRINGS $354,900 SUMMER PLACE $352,000 ROPER MOUNTAIN ESTATES $350,000 MILLCREEK ESTATES $350,000 HOLLINGTON $344,890 BRAEMOR $333,000 $332,500 TERRA PINES ESTATES $324,000 GOWER ESTATES $320,000 SUMMERSET PLACE $320,000 $315,000 HOLLY TRACE $312,000 BOXWOOD $311,300 COLEMAN SHOALS $310,000 SUGAR CREEK $308,000 SUGAR CREEK $299,000 WOODFOREST $298,000 WATERSTONE COTTAGES $296,000 LAUREL LAKE $295,000 SUGAR CREEK $295,000 HOLLINGTON $294,900 CARISBROOKE $293,000 BRAEMOR $292,000 BOXWOOD $291,900 WOODSIDE CIRCLE $289,900 CARILION $280,500 MORNING MIST $280,110 ADAMS CREEK $278,357 CARILION $275,000 THE EDGE ON NORTH MAIN $272,750 SUGAR CREEK $272,500 OAKLAND HEIGHTS $272,000 $270,000 CARILION $265,987 THE VALLEY @ GILDER CREEK FARM $265,900 CARILION $265,433 WATERSTONE COTTAGES $264,475 THE RESERVES AT RAVENWOOD $262,000 ROPER MEADOW $260,000 VERDMONT $260,000 MEADOW BREEZE $260,000 FOXCROFT $258,000 VERDMONT $254,147 DEER RUN $250,000 SUGAR CREEK $250,000 NEELY FARM - HAWTHORNE RIDGE $246,000 WEST FARM $245,162 SILVERLEAF $245,000

CNL APF PARTNERS LP ARCP AP GREENVILLE SC LL 8377 E HARTFORD DR STE 200 HICKORY RIDGE LLC RFHADVISORS HICKORY RIDG 2413 WADE HAMPTON BLVD SDI PROPERTIES USA INC PROGRESSIVE CONSULTANTS 219 PHILEMA RD STE 109 OLD STAGE ROAD ASSOCIATE 1420 OLD STAGE ROAD LLC 211 GRIFFEN AVE ALIDADE 240 FEASTER LLC 240 FEASTER REALTY LLC 8633 SOUTH BAY DR RSL ASSOCIATES INC GOLDEN OAKS INDUSTRIAL P 53 W JACKSON BLVD APT 530 MCCALL DUKE K JR ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC 16 W MCELHANEY RD NOBLE PAULA B THORNTON DALLAS (JTWROS) 5 ABBOT TRL BLANDIN JAMES S 1027 PARTNERSHIP LLC 200 CINDYS GATE JAY FAY N RALLIS RONALD DEAN JR 1708-C AUGUSTA ST #303 BANK OF AMERICA N A TRUS YUZE HOLDINGS LLC 209 RICELAN DR UNITED HOUSING CONNECTIO WORLD ACCEPTANCE CORPORA PO BOX 6429 BALLENTINE VICTORIA J TR JONES JAMES C (JTWROS) 2139 NOE RD BARTHEL LINDA CARTUS FINANCIAL CORPORA 107 POWERS GARDEN RD CARTUS FINANCIAL CORPORA DANEKAS MEGAN M 107 POWERS GARDEN RD CAMWOOD LLC ARSCOTT GREG (JTWROS) 115 ABERDEEN DR ZYLSTRA BRIAN DAVIS RYAN C (JTWROS) 128 GRIFFITH HILL WAY CROMWELL FANNIE H GOUCH CHARLES DAVID (JTW 327 RICE ST VIRANI LLC POLLOCK ALLISON W 599 CREEKVIEW DR FAULKNER CHARLES D (JTWR HIDALGO CHRISTOPHER C (J 436 MCIVER ST COUSAR LAURA C SOLE TRUS RUSH TIMOTHY (JTWROS) 138 STONEHAVEN DR BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT NATARAJAN SUNDAR (JTWROS 10 MCRAE PL HAMMACK PAUL E COLLINS PAUL A (JTWROS) 37 RIDGE DR O’BRIEN GEORGE F WRIGHT BRADFORD K 226 BLOCK HOUSE RD CROMWELL FANNIE H GOUCH CHARLES DAVID (JTW 327 RICE ST KLEIN DENISE LAINE BARR WILLIAM D III (JTWR 313 AREZZO DR TUSCAN BARBARA L HAMBY MARK R (SURV) 3 SYCAMORE RIDGE DR HUNT ANNA WILLIAMS (JTWR FRONTUS1 LLC 22 FRONTUS ST NCB INVESTMENTS INC 15 WELLINGTON AVENUE LLC 15 WELLINGTON AVE ALEXANDER FRED R LYDA CHARLES D 39 SYCAMORE RIDGE DR DAVIS JOHN T BURNS JAMES WORTH III (J 213 HUDDERSFIELD DR D R HORTON INC YOUNG LARRY M JR (SURV) 105 CHANBURY CT HARRISON JAMES E JARRELL JOHN ARTHUR IV ( 28 GROVE VALLEY WAY EIKEN JANNA MELIA BOMAR GEORGE E LIVING TR 92 CAROLINA WAY RICHARDSON JEFF R JR SPINKS INVESTMENTS INC PO BOX 8624 ATTWOOD BEVERLY JOYCE GANSER CAROLYN M (JTWROS 305 BRUCE FARM CIR GALLOWAY REX B BAKER GARY BENJAMIN (JTW 8 BERROW WAY SNOW EDWARD A MOONEY SCOTT (JTWROS) 205 SUN MEADOW RD WEBSTER DOROTHY C PARKER JOHN P (JTWROS) 306 ROCK CREEK DR ULLOM CAITLIN E MURPHY ANNEMARIE E 16 BYRD BLVD MILLS CAROLINE C MAYERS MICHELLE 115 MANLY DR YOUNKIN EDITH B FIORAMOSCA JADISON H (JT 125 WHITTINGTON DR JOHNSTON WILLIAM R (JTWR MORRIS FRANK P JR 414 LONGVIEW TER COBBLESTONE HOMES LLC SIMONINI ROBB L (JTWROS) 324 BROWN FARM WAY LS RESIDENTIAL LLC MCDERMOTT JULIE A 20 WISCASSET WAY MOORE JAMES P HILDEBRANT STEVEN (JTWRO 104 SUMMERPLACE DR SARMENTO GARY F PINDAK JANET R (JTWROS) 5 W THISTLE LN KILGORE TERESA MARY WILSON BRYAN K 105 MILL CREEK RD BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT TAYLOR DEREK S (JTWROS) 336 ABBEY GARDENS LN D R HORTON INC BECK JAMES M (SURV) 1 LATHERTON CT SMITH TAYLOR F WHITE JOHN RHOADES JR (J 215 CLEVELAND ST WHITEHOUSE SCOTT P WEIR THOMAS ANDERSON JR 100 TERRAMONT DR BOYD DAVID F PLATING CHRISTOPHER P (J 240 PIMLICO RD EATON ROBERT RICHARD TRU MCCOMBE SCOTT D (JTWROS) 201 CLUB VIEW DR RUNION CANDACE D BSG ASSETS LLC 109 LAURENS RD BLDG 2 STE A ALLEN DAVID C VILLANI FAMILY REVOC LIV 9 HOLLY TRCE CARR DONAVAN N HOCK CLAY A 20 MOSS WOOD CIR PHILLIPS JAMES O JR FREEMAN JOEL TRAMELL (JT 105 CARISSA CT ORIOLE PROPERTIES LLC EDWARDS JOHN M (JTWROS) 229 SUGAR CREEK RD TURNER PATTI J WOODRUFF CHARLES (SURV) 109 CLIFFWOOD CT TOROK JOHN RHOADS REGINALD III (JTW 200 MARNIE LN ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC IVESTER THOMAS B (JTWROS 334 OWASSO DR HOWARD MELISSA M DEVITO DANIEL S (JTWROS) 21 JUNEBERRY CT STILWELL JASON D SAUM STUART L (JTWROS) 104 SUGAR CANE CT BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT DEMARRAIS SETH (JTWROS) 342 ABBEY GARDENS LN ABERNETHY MAX DAVID JR FOSTER BRENT A (JTWROS) 7 BLACKWATCH WAY D R HORTON INC RUTHERFORD PAUL H (SURV) 2 LATHERTON CT BLEITZ ADAM TRUSTEE MULVIHILL JOSEPH B 312 MOSS WOOD CIR JOY PROPERTY INVESTMENTS STIEGLER TANYA (JTWROS) 412 ASHLEY AVE BRIGHT TIMOTHY D SCHULTE REGINA ELIZABETH 10 HOGARTH ST D R HORTON - CROWN LLC AUSTIN MEKOSHA C 104 E FARRELL DR D R HORTON - CROWN LLC PATEL VIRENKUMAR 123 ADAMS CREEK PL CARILION VENTURES LLC DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C 318 PRADO WAY CAPITAL FOUNDATIONS LLC HUMEN ALLISON S 24 EDGE CT UNIT B ATKINS SHIRLEY E MORENO ANDRES BENJAMIN ( 224 BRIAR CREEK RD SAUM GRACE D ROBINSON (J WIENANDS BETTINA HELEN 150 BUIST AVE GREER STATE BANK ACE RESTAURANT PROPERTIE 3429B RUTHERFORD ROAD EXT DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL GRIGGS ALLYSON 221 CASTLEMAINE DR ATTAWAY DAVID C (JTWROS) CAMPBELL ROBERT H (JTWRO 13 BRAEBURN DR DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C MEMENGA NANCY J 217 CASTLEMAINE DR ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC GORDON MELANIE CORETTA 322 OWASO DR SIMEK DOUGLAS PRUNKEL FRANZ E (JTWROS) 34 COPPERDALE DR HOLZMAN HANS PETER TABOR NEIL THOMAS (JTWRO 36 WILLOW OAK CT GSPANDL JOSEPH (JTWROS) HOLDNAK JOSEPH JR (JTWRO 4 VALCOURT CIR SK BUILDERS INC WELCH WALTER R III (JTWR 94 RISING MEADOW LN FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA BIDIER MELISSA BREWER (J 105 CASTLEWOOD DR DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C KIEFFER JESSE 22 CACHET CT POYNTER CLIFFTON J GREGORY JENNIFER CASEY ( 116 THISTLEDOWN WAY BOWERS TIMOTHY (JTWROS) MOORE CHARLES C (JTWROS) 113 SWEETWATER CT CARSON RICHARD S (JTWROS HALSTEAD BRIAN L 114 WHIFFLETREE DR MUNGO HOMES INC RICHARDSON CONDY AMES SR 9 BELGIAN BLUE WAY MEADORS SMITH A JR THOMPSON JESSE DANIEL (J 110 BANISTER CT

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AUGUST 1, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 47


JOURNAL CULTURE

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA LEGAL NOTICES Only $.99 per line ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Only $145

tel 864.679.1205 • fax 864.679.1305 email aharley@communityjournals.com SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: Indexing Services, Monday, August 18, 2014, 3:00 P.M. Solicitations can be found at http://www.greenvillecounty. org/Purchasing_Dept/RFP.asp or by calling 864-467-7200. SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: Concrete Services for Greenville County, IFB #0908/21/14, 3:00 P.M. A pre-bid meeting and site tour will be held August 11, 2014 at 9:00 A.M., E.D.T, at Greenville County Procurement Service Office, County Square, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville SC 29601. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org or by calling (864) 467-7200. NOTICE OF AUCTION Notice is hereby given that on 8/16/14, at 9:00 a.m. at Woodruff Road Storage, 1868 Woodruff Road, Greenville, SC, the undersigned, Woodruff Road Storage will sell at Public Sale by competitive bidding, the personal property heretofore stored with the undersigned by: 1. Unit: A010, Katherine M Flanagan - Furniture/Misc. 2. Unit: B083, Kathleen Lyons Weights 3. Unit: B286, Charlie W Heath Plumbing Supplies 4. Unit: F20, Michael D Allman Christmas Items, Golf Clubs, Appliances/Misc.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that 1310 CLR Inc., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1310 Cedar Lane Road, Greenville, SC 29617. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than August 17, 2014. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Phoenix Inn of Greenville, LLC dba Phoenix Inn of Greenville, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 246 N. Pleasantburg Drive, Greenville SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than August 17, 2014. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

PUBLIC HEARING A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2014 AT 6:00 p.m. (or at such time as other public hearings are concluded) IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC, 29601, FOR THE PURPOSE OF RECEIVING PUBLIC COMMENTS REGARDING THE CAESAR’S HEAD FIRE SERVICE AREA OPERATIONAL BUDGET AND MILLAGE LEVY FOR THE 2015 TAX YEAR. THE CAESAR’S HEAD FIRE SERVICE AREA, UNDER CONTRACT WITH THE CEDAR MOUNTAIN FIRE AND RESCUE DISTRICT, HAS REQUESTED THAT GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL APPROVE AN INCREASE OF ONE AND ONE-TENTHS (1.1) MILLS, BRINGING THE TOTAL MILLAGE FOR OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE TO SIXTEEN (16.0) MILLS; PURSUANT TO S.C. CODE ANN. §§ 6-1-320(A) (1) AND WHICH REPRESENTS THE THREE PROCEEDING PROPERTY TAX YEARS AS ALLOWED BY STATE LAW. BOB TAYLOR, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

NOTICE OF AUCTION The Greenville County Sheriff’s Office in Greenville SC has 474 weapons to be auctioned by open bid. The bid will be for the whole lot. To bid you need to have a class III federal license. We will want a credit to be used on weapons and ammo. For an appointment to preview the guns please call Ellen Clark at 864-467-5224 appointments will be made for the week of August 25th- 29th . For any questions please call Tim Jones at 864-467-5369.

FORFEITED LAND COMMISSION SALE Properties owned by the Forfeited Land Commission (FLC) of Greenville County will be sold at auction by Meares Auction Group on Tuesday, August 12 at 10:00 a.m. in the Greenville County Council Chambers located at 301 University Ridge, Greenville, SC 29601. Details can be obtained in the Forfeited Land Commission section of the Greenville County Treasurer’s web page –http:// www.greenvillecounty.org/ County_Treasurer/ or in the Greenville County Treasurer’s Office, located at 301 University Ridge, Suite 600, Greenville, SC 29601, telephone number (864) 467-7210.

When you finish reading this paper, please recycle it.

PUBLIC HEARING A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2014 AT 6:00 p.m. (or at such time as other public hearings are concluded) IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC, 29601, FOR THE PURPOSE OF RECEIVING PUBLIC COMMENTS REGARDING THE ASHWICKE SPECIAL TAX DISTRICT OPERATIONAL BUDGET AND MILLAGE LEVY FOR THE 2015 TAX YEAR. THE COMMISSIONERS OF THE ASHWICKE SPECIAL TAX DISTRICT HAVE REQUESTED THAT GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL APPROVE AN INCREASE OF FOUR (4.0) MILLS IN THE DISTRICT’S AD VALOREM PROPERTY TAX LEVY FOR OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE, BRINGING THE DISTRICT’S TOTAL LEVY TO ELEVEN AND FOUR-TENTHS (11.4) MILLS; PURSUANT TO S.C. CODE ANN. §§ 6-1-320 (A) (1) AND (F). BOB TAYLOR, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

PUBLIC HEARING A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2014, AT 6:00 p.m. (or at such time as other public hearings are concluded) IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC, 29601, TO RECEIVE PUBLIC COMMENTS REGARDING AN ORDINANCE TO CREATE A SPECIAL TAX DISTRICT IN THE BRUTONTOWN COMMUNITY; TO DEFINE THE BOUNDARIES OF THE DISTRICT AND THE PURPOSES FOR WHICH IT IS CREATED; TO ESTABLISH THE BRUTONTOWN SPECIAL TAX DISTRICT AS AN ADMINISTRATIVE DIVISION OF GREENVILLE COUNTY; AND TO IMPOSE AN ANNUAL FEE OF $50.00 ON ALL IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY LOCATED WITHIN THE DISTRICT AND AN ANNUAL FEE OF $25.00 ON ALL UNIMPROVED REAL PROPERTY LOCATED WITHIN THE DISTRICT. BOB TAYLOR, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

GREENVILLE COUNTY ZONING AND PLANNING PUBLIC HEARING There will be a public hearing before County Council on Monday, August 18, 2014 at 6:00 p.m. in County Council Chambers, County Square, for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the following items: DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2014-30 APPLICANT: Larry W. Strange for LSTB, LLC CONTACT INFORMATION: 1strange@greenvillefence.com or 864-420-4587 PROPERTY LOCATION: Churchill Circle, 1 Fork Shoals Road and 5215 Old Augusta Road PIN: 0391000100400, 0391000100500, 0391000100600 and 0391000100700 EXISTING ZONING: R-12, SingleFamily Residential and C-2, Commercial REQUESTED ZONING: S-1, Services ACREAGE: 2 COUNTY COUNCIL: 25 – Gibson DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2014-31 APPLICANT: Timmy Gibbs CONTACT INFORMATION: 864-906-1211 PROPERTY LOCATION: 21 Rosemond Drive PIN: WG02040200510 EXISTING ZONING: S-1, Services REQUESTED ZONING: R-S, Residential Suburban ACREAGE: .99 COUNTY COUNCIL: 25 – Gibson DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2014-33 APPLICANT: Harpreet Kaur Chahal CONTACT INFORMATION: chahal7@yahoo.com or 646462-1925 PROPERTY LOCATION: 2821 Poinsett Highway PIN: 0434000200300 EXISTING ZONING: R-10, SingleFamily Residential REQUESTED ZONING: O-D, Office District ACREAGE: 1.07 COUNTY COUNCIL: 19 – Meadows

DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2014-34 APPLICANT: Chip Fogleman, FRF Inc. for Nellie T. King CONTACT INFORMATION: rlf@frfinc.net or 864-2718633 PROPERTY LOCATION: 819 Log Shoals Road PIN: M006030100901 EXISTING ZONING: R-S, Residential Suburban REQUESTED ZONING: R-12, Single-Family Residential ACREAGE: 26.5 COUNTY COUNCIL: 24 – Seman DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2014-35 APPLICANT: Roger H. Patterson, Jr. CONTACT INFORMATION: 864-505-6717 PROPERTY LOCATION: Corner of Donaldson Road and Kascar Place PIN: 0401000200500 and 0401000200600 EXISTING ZONING: C-2, Commercial REQUESTED ZONING: S-1, Services ACREAGE: 0.4 COUNTY COUNCIL: 25 – Gibson DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2014-36 APPLICANT: Mark G. McCrary for Jim S. Kimbell CONTACT INFORMATION: mukmccrary@yahoo.com or 864-350-3010 PROPERTY LOCATION: 525 W. Parker Road PIN: 0136000900101 EXISTING ZONING: O-D, Office District REQUESTED ZONING: R-7.5, Single-Family Residential ACREAGE: 0.410 COUNTY COUNCIL: 23 – Norris All persons interested in these proposed amendments to the Greenville County Zoning Ordinance and Map are invited to attend this meeting. At subsequent meetings, Greenville County Council may approve or deny the proposed amendments as requested or approve a different zoning classification than requested.

PUBLIC HEARING A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, AUGUST 19, 2014, AT 6:00p.m. (or as soon thereafter as other public hearings are concluded), IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC, 29601, FOR THE PURPOSE OF DETERMINING WHETHER THE BOUNDARIES OF THE GREATER GREENVILLE SANITATION DISTRICT SHOULD BE ENLARGED TO INCLUDE CERTAIN PROPERTIES LOCATED WITHIN THE DREXEL TERRACE SUBDIVISION FOR THE PURPOSE OF ORDERLY COLLECTING AND DISPOSAL OF REFUSE, GARBAGE AND TRASH WITHIN GREENVILLE COUNTY. THE NEW BOUNDARY LINES TO RESULT FOR THE GREATER GREENVILLE SANITATION DISTRICT WOULD INCLUDE GREENVILLE COUNTY TAX MAP NUMBERS ("TMS#") 0538010102301, 0538010104000, 0538010104200, 0538010104201 0538010104400, 0538010104600, 0538010104800, 0538010104900, 0538010105000, 0538010105100, 0538010105200, 0538010105300, 0538010105400, 0538010105500, 0538010105600, 0538010105700, 0538010105800, 0538010105900, 0538010106100, 0538010106300, 0538010106401, 0538010106600, 0538010106700, 0538010106800, 0538010106900, 0538010107000, 0538010107100, 0538010107201, 0538010107300, 0538010107400, 0538010107500, 0538010107700, 0538010107800, 0538010107900, 0538010108000,

0538010108100, 0538010108200, 0538010108300, 0538010108400, 0538010108500, 0538010108600, 0538010108700, 0538010108800, 0538010108900, 0538010109000, 0538010109100, 0538010110400, 0538010110500, 0538010110600, 0538010110700, 0538010110800, 0538010110900, 0538010111000, 0538010111100, 0538010111200, 0538010111300, 0538010111400, 0538010111500, 0538010111600, 0538010111700, 0538010111800, 0538010111900, 0538010112000, 0538010112100, 0538010112200, 0538010112300, 0538010112400, 0538010112500, 0538010112600, 0538010112700, 0538010112800, 0538010112900, 0538010113000, 0538010113100, 0538010113200, 0538010113300, 0538010113400, 0538010113500 and 0538010113600 A MAP OF THE NEW BOUNDARIES AND LEGAL DESCRIPTIONS ARE AVAILABLE IN THE COUNTY COUNCIL OFFICE. THE REASON FOR THE PROPOSED ENLARGEMENT IS TO PROVIDE FOR THE ORDERLY COLLECTION AND DISPOSAL OF REFUSE. NO ADDITIONAL BONDS WILL BE ISSUED BY THE DISTRICT, NOR WILL THERE BE ANY CHANGE IN THE COMMISSION OR IN THE PERSONNEL OF THE PRESENT COMMISSION OF THE GREATER GREENVILLE SANITATION DISTRICT. BOB TAYLOR., CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

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JOURNAL CULTURE

SCENE. HERE.

Submit entries to arts@communityjournals.com.

THE WEEK IN THE LOCAL ARTS WORLD

The Simpsonville Arts Foundation presents the Flying Saucers on Aug. 1, 8 p.m., at the Tater Shed. The group’s sounds range through the ’50s and ’60s and include everything from rock ‘n’ roll and early country to doo-wop and surf. The event is free and family friendly. The Tater Shed is located behind the Simpsonville Arts Center, 110 Academy St., Simpsonville. For more information, visit safiarts.org. Hampton III Gallery, 3110 Wade Hampton Blvd., will host a Coffee and Conversation with artists Allison Anne Brown, Michael Marks, Mike Vatalaro and Doug Young on Aug. 2, 11 a.m.-noon. For more information, visit hamptoniiigallery.com. The Warehouse Theatre will host a forum, From Shell Shock to PTSD, on Aug. 6, 6 p.m., at The Warehouse Theatre. The event is part of an ongoing series designed to encourage dialogue on issues

involving veterans. The event precedes the Aug. 8-30 run of “Strange Snow,” a play about a Vietnam vet fighting his demons and struggling with the past. To learn more, visit warehousetheatre.com. Country newcomer Chris Lane will perform at the Blind Horse Saloon, located at 1035 Lowndes Hill Road in Greenville, on Aug. 23 at 7 p.m. For tickets and more information, visit blind-horse. com/events.html. The third annual Art on the Trail fine arts and crafts festival in Travelers Rest’s Trailblazer Park is seeking submissions. The festival includes a new Upcycle Alley featuring artists who use otherwise discarded items in their work, a new location and trolley service from the park to downtown Travelers Rest. Categories include: pottery, drawing/pastel/ painting, fiber arts, glass, jewelry, metal, mixed

media (2-D and 3-D), photography, printmaking, sculpture, woodwork and upcycled art. Applications must be submitted before midnight on Aug. 29. Visit artonthetrail.com for additional information and to apply. Artist Judy Verhoeven will lead a three-day workshop in collage-making on Sept. 5 and 7, 1:30-4:30 p.m., and Sept. 6, 10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Students will experiment with painting, drawing, tearing and cutting images to compile into dynamic collages. Students will use a variety of recycled papers, including maps, books, sewing patterns, magazines and photocopies. The cost is $139 and includes a box lunch on Sept. 6. To register, visit gcma.org. The workshop will be held at the Greenville County Museum of Art, 420 College St., Greenville.

AUGUST 1, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 49


JOURNAL CULTURE

FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

KIDDY LIT

By Amy Johnson

119 “The Gondoliers” bride DOWN 1 Forgoes the gimme 2 Like Dracula’s visage 3 Tiny republic formerly called Pleasant Island 4 Yankee legend, familiarly 5 Wall St. trader 6 Fish tank flooring 7 Old Bologna bread 8 Wiimote inserts 9 Stop: Abbr. 10 Most mournful 11 One with a second 12 Med sch. subject 13 Poker game tell, maybe 14 Batting figures 15 Mastermind 16 “The Robots of Dawn” author 17 Disco light 18 “Sesame Street” store owner 24 Poet Elinor 25 Cop’s quarry 31 Lab greetings 33 Prime meridian std. 34 Source of brown fur 35 Carbon compounds 37 Receded

ACROSS 1 Beijing Zoo attraction 6 It’s often seen in sheets 11 Spreadsheet figures 15 Foolhardy 19 TWA competitor 20 Cowboy’s rope 21 Baylor, for one: Abbr. 22 Analogy words 23 Tolstoy tale of child’s play? 26 Robert De __ 27 Giga- x 1,000 28 St. Laurent of fashion 29 Upper-bod muscle 30 Hit song of 1950 32 Get cozy

34 Like Death Valley 35 Stud site 36 Carson tale of wellbehaved classroom clock watchers? 40 Certain school team activity 44 Kick 45 __ double take 46 Botanical coating 47 “Fernando” band 48 Matches at the poker table 50 Hoover and Mossyrock 54 Dickens tale of math woes?

58 Drink that lost the second part of its name in 1961 59 Mended, in a way 60 Israel’s Iron Lady 61 War movie staples 62 Diplomatic rep. 64 Nods, say 65 Evade 67 1921 sci-fi play 68 Biol. or chem. 69 Artichoke servings 71 Earth has one 72 Overdo the buffet, say 74 These, in Juarez 75 Palahniuk tale of a rowdy slumber

party society? 80 Half a fish 81 Welles of “War of the Worlds” 82 “Return of the Jedi” dancer 83 Apollo landers, briefly 84 Grannies 86 Samoan capital 87 Gets 89 Orwell tale of Beanie Baby breeding? 95 Oregon coastal city 96 Late notice? 97 Berlin School psychological theory 102 Excitable cell

103 Billionaire bank founder Andy 104 Latin trio member 106 Wind in a pit 107 Parisian’s “to be” 108 Updike tale of an idle cereal mascot? 112 Employee IDs 113 Actor Morales 114 What a white flag may mean 115 Complete 116 __ drive 117 “Father of the American Cartoon” 118 “Symphony in Black” et al.

38 Noggins 75 The Devil’s label? 39 Hardly a doer 76 Tom of “The Dukes 40 Code word of Hazzard” 41 Timeline chapter 77 Straight man 42 Pool on a pedestal 78 Base decision maker 43 “The Aviator” Oscar 79 Undergrad degs. nominee 81 Not a great chance 47 Skunk River city 85 Hendrix hairdo 48 Highway breaker? 86 Comment from one 49 Came down rushing in 51 Last Supper attendees 87 Actress Scacchi 52 PC processing unit 88 Condo divs. 53 “Absolutely, amigo!” 89 Having the most 55 Races with sulkies marbles 56 Tattoo parlor supplies 90 Sub-Saharan menace 57 PABA part 91 Reversals 58 Texarkana-born 92 “You can’t get out ‘90s candidate this way” 61 Julia’s “Notting Hill” 93 Building beam co-star 94 Shooting marbles 62 “If I may butt in ...” 98 Dessert cart goodie 63 Phoenix suburb 99 Drives the get65 “Take it!” response, away car for in a jazz club 100 Blows, perhaps 66 City on the Rhein 101 Aquarium swimmer 67 Latvia’s most 103 Predisposition populous city 104 Be up against 70 Rapidly shrinking 105 Mickey and Minnie ecosystem 109 Pres. Mandela’s land 71 Didn’t __ beat 110 Winter outburst? 72 Rice style 111 “Shame on you!” 73 Jim Morrison’s Crossword answers: pg. 16 alma mater

Hard

Sudoku answers: page 16

WE ARE BREWING SOMETHING GREAT. SEE WHAT’S TAKING SHAPE AT GSP. This summer, expect to see some exciting changes in our concourse area. Courtesy of WINGSPAN, this new addition is only the beginning of our transformation. To learn more about the Terminal Improvement Program, visit elevatingtheupstate.com.

50 THE JOURNAL | AUGUST 1, 2014


JOURNAL CULTURE

THE CLASSROOM WINDOW WITH TREVOR BARTON

Words over the water for the world’s loneliest whale In the northern Pacific Ocean lives a giant whale named 52 Hertz. Scientists named him that because when he sings, the frequency of his whale song is around 52 hertz. When other whales sing their songs, they sing at frequencies between 15 and 25 hertz. No other whale can hear 52 Hertz’s song. He is known as the loneliest whale in the world. Normally whales are communal creatures. They live their lives in family groups. They migrate from warm waters to cooler waters to give birth and find food. They follow the same migration route from year to year. 52 Hertz is different. He lives alone. He does not follow a migration route. He roams the ocean, a lonely, wandering whale. We do not know what kind of whale 52 Hertz is. He could be a deformed blue or fin whale. He could be a cross breed of those two types of whales. He could be a kind of whale we have yet to discover. He is an unknown whale. Soon a team will set out on a sevenweek expedition in search of 52 Hertz. Will they find him? Will he find them? Does he want to be found? I wonder. In December 2004, the New York Times published a story about 52 Hertz titled “Song of the Sea, A Cappella and Unanswered.” Readers responded to the story with deep empathy and loneliness. They wrote messages and created art – expressed thoughts and feelings that they, too, were like 52 Hertz – that they, too, were singing unheard, wandering songs. 52 Hertz’s story reminds me of an-

other story, too. It is a story about us as human beings and the world in which we live. It is a story of the ways we are lonely, of the ways we are apart, separated by class, race, sex, religion, sexual orientation, culture, political ideology – separated in so many ways by so many things. It is a story of the ways we talk at each other instead of to each other, a story that asks the questions, “Can we hear each other? Can we listen to each other and learn to build a better world together for every human being and for

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every living thing?” We send out our words and hope that someone will hear them and sing back to us. We send our words over the water... and listen... and hope. I created this small Fibonacci sequence poem in wonder of 52 Hertz and in hope that we will learn to listen to each other. Trevor Barton is a reading intervention teacher at Berea Elementary School. He believes we all have stories to tell and loves to listen.

52 HERTZ Whale Song Lonely Where Are You? Wandering, Singing Singing Unheard Wandering Songs “Can You Hear Me? Are You There? Are You? I Am Alone” Listening, Longing For Songs Gently Sung “I Hear You, Words On Water, I’m Here, I’m Here» We Sing At Diff’rent Frequencies Migrate Along Diff’rent Routes Wandering, Wondering Unheard, Unknown, Wandering The Sea Words On Water Singing Unheard Wondering Songs Wondering, Singing Who Are You? Gentle Song Whale

August 27 - September 1, 2014 Carolina Point Parkway greenvillesc2014.com AUGUST 1, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 51


Feel the Wind......

to rain. e u d d e n o p t s Event po NEW date is

......Saturday, August 2, 2014

Best Hand $2000 • Worst Hand $250 • Door Prize Drawings Registration 8 A.M. • First Bike out 9 A.M. • Last Bike out 10 A.M. Registration fee $25 (includes a FREE t-shirt) Dual Starting Locations: Laurens Electric Cooperative, 2254 Hwy. 14, Laurens, SC Ride Will End At: Harley-Davidson of Greenville

or

Harley-Davidson of Greenville, 30 Chrome Drive, Greenville, SC

FOOD WILL BE AVAILABLE from Quaker Steak & Lube

Benefitting

Laurens Electric Cooperative is celebrating its 75th Anniversary by doing 75 Acts of Kindness

Contact: David Hammond at 864-683-1667

• PO Box 700 • Laurens, SC 29360 • LaurensElectric.com

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Aug. 1, 2014 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

Aug. 1, 2014 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

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