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SHOELESS JAM ROCKS THE VILLAGE • TEACHER OF THE YEAR • KRAZY FOR KOMBUCHA

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ONCE AND FUTURE CITY PARK

The Kiwanis Train was a staple of McPherson Park during the 1950 and ʻ60s. McPherson Park was originally named City Park. Photo courtesy of the Coxe Collection, Greenville County Historical Society

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OPINION

Views from your community

A Conversation for All Households By Kendra Lindsay

As an African-American woman, wife, and mother of two sons, it has become extremely clear to me that the conversation regarding race and racism cannot be one that is only held in the households of people who look like me. Over the past several years, my husband and I have had extremely difficult conversations with our sons regarding race and racism. Very often it has been challenging for our sons to understand because of their young ages. My life is just like yours. It is filled with the regular hustle and bustle of parenting. Our days are filled with homework and after-school activities, as well as preparing our sons for a time when we will not be there to protect them. It is very frightening to consider that we cannot shelter our children from harm in its various forms. As parents, isn’t that our biggest fear? The events that took place in Charlottesville, Va., on Aug. 12, 2017, magnified the urgency to make racism a relic of the past. I have become more resolute in my commitment to do whatever I can to smother the flickering embers of racism, the very existence of which could engulf us all. In order for us to move forward, there needs to be a shared effort by all people of goodwill to work hard to create a better environment for our children. As with most things, it will have to start in our homes. Thirty years ago, James Baldwin said, “Not everything that is faced can be changed. But nothing can be changed until it is faced.” We are long overdue for facing the topic of race and racism.

“Not everything that is faced can be changed. But nothing can be changed until it is faced.” James Baldwin

I think many have reached the point where they feel as though something must be done, but they feel helpless with such a seemingly overwhelming task. However, we have reached a critical point. Something must be done now. I am blessed to have a group of friends from different socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds. We often have very challenging conversations that come from divergent points of view. However, there is always a level of respect and commitment to understand one another even when we do not agree. The subject of race or racism is often treated as though it is impolite to discuss it, but there is simply no way for us to grow if we continue to talk to people who already see things the same way that we do. Every day we send our children into multicultural environments, but rarely do we talk with them about the experiences and challenges their peers may be facing or the challenges they may be facing themselves. As parents and caregivers, it is imperative that we engage in these conversations. The events in Charlottesville did not occur in a bubble. We all need to become proactive when it comes to racism. We can take simple steps, such as expanding our social circles and engaging in open and honest dialogue with our friends from different backgrounds. It is also important to exercise empathy and see the value of opinions beyond our own. Though we all come from varied upbringings, it is those differences from which we can draw our strength. One of the most beautiful things about our country is its diversity. The more that we use our diversity to our advantage, the stronger we will become. The events in Charlottesville are a reminder of what happens when we work contrary to our ideals. Finally, we should take the approach of “see something, say something” and not allow casual or blatant racism to take place in our presence. Speak up. Speak out. Let’s work together to create the change that we want to see. Kendra Lindsay is a South Florida native who moved to Greenville four years ago. She is a freelance editor, spin instructor, blogger, wife, and mom.

Speak your mind

The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, factbased arguments.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Editor Chris Haire at chaire@communityjournals.com.


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NEWS

MAKING THE GRADE

Greenville Schools puts plans in place to prevent struggling readers from repeating the third grade

WORDS BY CINDY LANDRUM

Educators have long maintained that third grade is one of the most critical years in a child’s education. The reason is quite simple: It’s the grade where students stop learning to read and begin reading to learn. Third-graders who aren’t reading at grade level by the end of the year could be forced to repeat the year unless they fall under a handful of exemptions. But Greenville County Schools are not waiting until third grade to intervene with struggling readers. In fact, the district’s focus for the past several years has been to get students reading at grade level by the end of second grade so they are ready to make the big shift between second and third grade, said Jeff McCoy, the district’s associate superintendent for academics. “We’re more likely to retain in kindergarten and first grade if a student is significantly below grade level,” he said. An Annie E. Casey Foundation study found students who don’t read proficiently by third grade are four times less likely to graduate from high school. If those struggling readers come from poor families, they are 13 times more likely to be high school dropouts. And high school dropouts are 63 percent more likely than those with high school diplomas to be incarcerated. Supporters of the retention provision of the 2014 law say it gives students who are struggling to read additional time to develop the reading skills necessary for academic success in fourth grade and beyond. But critics say it is a short-term gain that comes with long-term consequences.

HOLDING BACK

Seventeen states and the District of Columbia have laws that require students who aren’t reading at grade level by the end of third grade to be held back. Some, like South Carolina, have a list of exemptions such as students receiving special education services, students who were previously retained because of a reading deficiency, English language learners, or students who show proficiency through a portfolio instead of standardized tests. In 2016, only 44 percent of third-graders met or exceeded standards in English Language Arts on the SC READY test, South Carolina’s statewide assessment. Up to 227 Greenville County students would have potentially been retained based on their test scores if the law had

In 2016, only 44 percent of third-graders met or exceeded standards in English Language Arts on the SC READY test. been in effect at the end of the 2016-17 school year, McCoy said. But the district did not calculate how many of those students would have qualified for an exemption. One provision exempts third-graders from being retained if they’ve previously been held back.

PLAYING CATCH-UP

McCoy doesn’t think the third-grade retention provision will have a huge impact on Greenville Schools. That’s because the district already has a plethora of programs in place to get students reading at their grade level before it gets to that, he said. Four years ago, the district began phasing in a balanced literacy approach that includes reading aloud, independent reading, guided reading, phonemic awareness, and phonics instruction. “The goal is to catch them up as early as possible,” he said. All schools have used the approach for at least a year, McCoy said. The program will be evaluated this year. Guided reading gives students the opportunity to read at just their right level. Students are placed in groups who read at the same level, and demonstrate similar reading behaviors and instructional needs. With the right book, students can experience success instead of failure and confidence instead of frustration. Research shows the approach helps all students read in-

creasingly difficult texts with understanding and fluency, whether they are struggling or reading at grade level. State- and district-provided literacy coaches work with students and teachers on strategies to improve reading skills, said Brook Glenn Elementary Principal Bernice Jackson. “We work with students at their level and expect a year’s growth or more,” she said. Through a book buddies program, students in upper grades are paired with younger students. Some students asked to form a book club, she said. Students also are allowed to pick out books on subjects they like. Jackson recalled teaching vacation bible school one year and having many children who didn’t want to read aloud. One boy told her he used to be like that, too, until his mom bought him books about football. “It was a sport he played, and that helped him decode words,” she said. “Children are more motivated if they’re interested in the subject. The ‘Harry Potter’ books, as thick as they were, were popular because they wanted to read them.”

Up to 227 Greenville County students would have potentially been retained based on their test scores if the law had been in effect. OTHER BOOSTS

Greenville County Schools’ focus on literacy begins before kindergarten. Nearly 1,900 students are enrolled in 4-K classes where early literacy is the focus, and schools work with parents to teach strategies they can use at home. Title I schools offer


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NEWS Public Education Partners of Greenville County provides students in schools with high populations of children from low-income homes with books so they have something to read during the summer to combat learning loss. parenting and literacy training, while the district’s child development centers offer early literacy training to child care centers in their geographic areas. “Reach Out and Read” is a communitybased program that provides children’s books for pediatricians to give to parents during well-baby checks. The program, funded through grants from the Duke Endowment, Greenville First Steps, and United Way, also trains pediatricians in read-aloud strategies for parents. In addition, Public Education Partners of Greenville County provides students in

schools with high populations of children from low-income homes with books so they have something to read during the summer to combat learning loss. Studies have shown students who read less than six books during the summer can lose up to three months of reading skills. Books are given to students in pre-K through fifth grade. The school district conducted a pilot summer camp for 30 4-K and 5-K students this past summer. Two hundred twenty-five rising third- and fourth-graders attended summer reading camp as well, McCoy said.

Health Events Talk with the Docs Wed., Aug. 30 • 11 a.m. • Facebook Live Visit the GHS Facebook page to take part in a live discussion with our doctors on how to ease kids back to school, keep them well during the school year and more. Caregiving ABCs Sept. 7-Oct. 10 • 6-8 p.m. • Patewood Medical Campus This six-week educational series is for those caring for a loved one with a memory health condition. Free; registration required. Girls on the Run Sept. 19-Dec. 2 • Times and locations vary This program combines training for a 5K with esteem-enhancing workouts for girls ages 8-15. Visit ghs.org/girlsontherun. Men’s Health Forum Thurs., Sept. 21 • Noon-1 p.m. • Hilton Greenville Join GHS urologist William Flanagan, MD, for a discussion on men’s health and recommended screenings. Lunch provided. Free; registration required. Meet the Midwives Tues., Sept. 26 • 6 p.m. • Greenville Midwifery Care & Birth Center Learn about GHS’ nurse-midwifery program and how a midwife can enhance the birthing process. Free; registration required. To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, visit ghs.org/healthevents.

ghs.org 17-0861GJ


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NEWS EDUCATION

Roper Mountain’s new exhibit will bring dinosaurs ‘back to life’

1.05

Dinosaurs may be extinct, but Greenville’s Roper Mountain Science Center is working to resurrect the prehistoric giants. The center, which provides handson courses for elementary and middle school students, is planning to open an outdoor exhibit next year that features realistic replicas of dinosaurs, according Roper Mountain Science Center's newest exhibit will to Michael Weeks, director of Roper feature between 14 and 16 replica dinosaurs, including Mountain Science Center. a Triceratops. Photo by Andrew Moore. “We started planning this years ago after seeing similar exhibits at facilities and Conference Center and Harrison Hall of museums across the country,” said Weeks. “With Natural Sciences. Each station will include a the recent revival of the ‘Jurassic Park’ series, we panel with details about the resident dinosaur’s knew it was time to finally do it. Dinosaurs are species, habitat, and anatomical characteristics, very popular right now.” according to Weeks. The prehistoric-themed exhibit will feature While the dinosaurs won’t be animatronic, more than a dozen replicas of herbivorous visitors and students can use a free augmented and carnivorous dinosaurs, including a reality app, called Aurasma, to bring the fiberglass Tyrannosaurus rex that stands about 19 feet tall. replicas to life on their smartphones and tablets, It will also include a Brachiosaurus, the largest according to Weeks. When a visitor or student known dinosaur, a plated Stegosaurus, a three- scans one of the exhibit’s educational panels with horned Triceratops, a group of Velociraptors, and their device, a digital version of that station’s various other species. resident dinosaur appears in the app. The dinosaurs will be located at individual The center had already installed a juvenile “field stations” scattered along the center’s triceratops along the trail for visitors and nature trail, which spans more than a mile students to test out. through the wooded area between the Wilkens NEWS continued on PAGE 10

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NEWS

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“The center doesn’t have enough indoor space for animatronic dinosaurs, so we’re getting the next best thing,” he said. “Aurasma is great, because it allows people to see how the dinosaurs would have moved and behaved when they were alive. In a way, it does sort of bring them back to life.” Weeks added that while the center’s dinosaurs didn’t live in South Carolina, they did have distant relatives throughout the state. In 1992, for instance, paleontologists unearthed the bones of an unidentified genus of theropod, a cousin of the T. rex, in Florence. “Our dinosaurs don’t have a direct connection to South Carolina, but they’re definitely going to give us a chance to discuss our state’s fossil record with students,” said Weeks. Officials expect the dinosaur exhibit to expand the center’s paleontology curriculum for visiting middle schools. Over the years, the center has used a collection of dinosaur fossils to teach third-graders about early environments and other subjects. Now, using the models, the center plans to teach eighth-graders about the diversity of life and environmental changes that have occurred during Earth’s history, and the relationships between past and existing life forms. The shapes of the center’s dinosaurs, for instance, are based on skeletal remains from more than 65 million years ago. And the colors

and scales on the skins will resemble those of Komodo dragons and alligators, some of the closest living relatives to the dinosaurs. “The idea is to have students recognize similarities and differences between our dinosaurs and modern animals,” Weeks said. “There will be a lot of connections for them to find.” The exhibit could also boost public attendance at Roper Mountain Science Center. “We’re hoping the dinosaurs bring in more people,” Weeks said. “I’d like to think adults love dinosaurs just as much as kids.” The center hopes to install the exhibit’s remaining dinosaurs sometime next year and hold a grand opening for the general public. But for now, it’s seeking out corporate sponsors to fund the $50,000 exhibit. “It may be delayed, but we’re pushing to open the exhibit before our Butterfly Adventure next spring,” Weeks said. —Andrew Moore

Tucker Hipps’ parents settle lawsuits against Clemson, Sigma Phi Epsilon The parents of Tucker Hipps have settled their lawsuits with Clemson University, a national fraternity, and three fraternity members. On Sept. 22, 2014, Hipps, a Clemson student, went on a pre-dawn run with several members of the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity and 26


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NEWS other pledges. Later that day, Hipps’ body was discovered in Lake Hartwell underneath the bridge where they had been running, According to the settlement, Clemson University will pay Cindy and Gary Hipps $250,000 and establish a scholarship in Tucker Hipps’ name for a Boys State camper to attend the school. In a prepared statement, the Hippses said, “We lost our only son, Tucker, in a senseless way. No student should ever go to college and expect to participate in dangerous activities. No student should ever experience hazing. If your son or daughter is joining an organization and you have concerns, please be diligent. Please contact the college or university. Please talk to your children. Please take advantage of the information which is now made public about these organizations through the Tucker Hipps Transparency Act by looking at the school’s website.” According to court records, Clemson “will educate its student body and employees that all allegations of hazing are to be reported to appropriate law enforcement agencies and that the Clemson University Police Department will continue to place an emphasis on training for responding to hazing incidents.” The university also issued a joint statement with the Hipps family that talked about changes Clemson made before and after Tucker Hipps’ death to change its Greek system, including adding new staff members to implement leadership and health/wellness programing, as well as increasing

new member education on hazing, alcohol, sexual misconduct, and academic success. The statement said as a result of the changes, the 2016-17 academic year saw a substantial decrease in major charges and violations of the student code of conduct by fraternity members. The university will also dedicate a pew in the Cadden Chapel in Tucker Hipps’ name and will determine if preserved flower arrangements from his funeral are appropriate to display in the narthex of the chapel. According to the settlement, Sigma Phi Epsilon agreed not to take any steps to recolonize a chapter of the fraternity at Clemson before an inperson meeting with the Hippses and Clemson. The fraternity is suspended until December 2019, and cannot recruit new members or conduct organized activities. The fraternity shall develop a case study on Hipps’ experience as part of the summer development training for regional directors and in the curriculum taught by the member safety team by May 1, 2018, the agreement said. The fraternity shall invite the Hippses to speak at its leadership programs as well, the settlement said. “Upon return to Clemson University, the new chapter of Sigma Phi Epsilon shall serve as a change agent and model for others. During the recolonization period, money shall be raised for the Tucker Hipps Foundation,” the agreement said. —Cindy Landrum NEWS continued on PAGE 12

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NEWS Junior Kelly Bryant is the new starting quarterback for the Clemson Tigers. Photo by Joshua S. Kelly

NEWS continued from PAGE 11

SPORTS

Kelly Bryant named Clemson starting QB The biggest offseason question for the Clemson Tigers has been answered. After Monday’s practice, head coach Dabo Swinney announced that junior Kelly Bryant will be the team’s starting quarterback. “This has been a great competition. I’m really proud of all the guys, because they are just good people. I love to see competitors, and they all want to be the guy, but I love to see them happy for somebody else,” Swinney told TigerNet. “It’s been a really good, spirited competition, but this part of the competition is over, and Kelly won it.” Swinney also praised Bryant’s growth and progress, adding that the quarterback is “really playing with a ton of confidence.” Redshirt freshman Zerrick Cooper and freshman Hunter Johnson are No. 2 and 3 on the depth chart, respectively. “We hope to get all three quarterbacks experience in the first part of the season,” Swinney said. Bryant has appeared in 12 games for the Tigers, often being used as a rushing threat behind center. His most memorable performance came during his freshman season in a 58-0 blowout against Miami, when he scored two rushing touchdowns. In his career, Bryant is 13-22 passing for 75 yards with a touchdown and interception. The Tigers kick off their season on Saturday, Sept. 2, at noon in Death Valley against the Kent State Golden Flashes. —Emily Pietras

GOVERNMENT

South Carolina sues opioid company for deceptive marketing South Carolina Attorney General Alan Wilson has filed a lawsuit against Purdue Pharma, a manufacturer of OxyContin and various opioids. The lawsuit contends that the pharmaceutical company violated an earlier agreement with the

state by continuing to unfairly and deceptively market its opioid products, contributing to South Carolina’s rising death toll from opioid overdoses. “My office is obligated to take action as South Carolinians continue to fall victim to Purdue’s deceptive marketing of its highly addictive opioid products without care for the lives and families it is jeopardizing,” Wilson said in the statement. In 2007, the company signed an agreement with South Carolina and other states to reform its opioid marketing after it was accused of encouraging doctors to prescribe OxyContin for unapproved uses and failing to disclose its potential for addiction. Wilson, however, says Purdue has continued to downplay the addictiveness of its opioids and overstate their benefits “to increase its market share and profits” rather than reform its marketing efforts to comply with the law. He also alleges the company told doctors that patients who receive prescriptions for opioids would not become addicted and dismissed addiction as a “pseudo addiction.” “While there is a time and place for patients to receive opioids, Purdue prevented doctors and patients from receiving complete and accurate information about opioids in order to make informed choices about their treatment options,” Wilson said. Wilson wouldn’t say how much money the state is seeking from Purdue, but he said the company provides more opioids, largely through Medicaid, than any other drug maker in South Carolina. Since 2011, more than 3,000 South Carolinians have died from prescription opioid overdoses. Greenville County is at the epicenter of the state’s opioid problem. In 2015, 71 people died from opioid overdoses, rivaling the number of lives lost in car accidents. The year before, 65 people died from overdoses, according to the Greenville County Coroner’s Office. Purdue has denied Wilson’s allegations. ­— Andrew Moore


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14 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 08.25.207

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

Sarai, who has lived in the United States since age 11, asked the audience at Triune Mercy Center to vocally support the Dream Act introduced by Sens. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., and Dick Durbin, D-Ill. Photo by Joshua S. Kelly

DREAM ON Upstate student immigrants urge legislators to pass Graham’s Dream Act EMILY PIETRAS | ASSOCIATE EDITOR

epietras@communityjournals.com

On Aug. 17, six recipients of former President Barack Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) immigration policy took to the podium at Triune Mercy Center to share their stories and experiences, and advocate for the passage of the Dream Act, a bipartisan piece of legislation introduced last month by Sens. Lindsey Graham, RS.C., and Dick Durbin, D-Ill. The proposed Dream Act would “allow immigrant students who grew up in the United States to earn lawful permanent residence and eventually American citizenship,”

according to a press release from Sen. Graham’s office. Requirements include that recipients graduate high school or obtain a GED and “pursue higher education, work lawfully for at least three years, or serve in the military.” Proficiency in English, knowledge of United States history, and a clean criminal record are also among the stipulations. “These young people have lived in America since they

were children and built their lives here. … We should not squander these young people’s talents and penalize our own nation,” Sen. Graham said in a statement. “Our legislation would allow these young people — who grew up in the United States — to contribute more fully to the country they love.” Through DACA, which was announced in June 2012, cer-

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08.25.207 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 15

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

NEWS tain undocumented immigrants who were brought to the United States as minors can be granted temporary protection from deportation and work authorization. Among other requirements, DACA recipients must prove they are attending or graduated from high school or college, and that they have no criminal background.

and Ilse Isidra, addressed how they will be unable to practice medicine in South Carolina under current policy. Murillo, who has lived in the United States since age 9, is a fifth-year senior majoring in biology at Furman University. He hopes to attend medical school and become a doctor. Isidra is a senior in the nursing program at USC Upstate.

“I would like to stay in my community. I would like to be where my roots are from. I’d like to stay in my church and be able to be with my friends.” Ilse Isidra

The Dream Act is being introduced during a time when the status of DACA remains uncertain. During the 2016 election cycle, then-presidential candidate Donald J. Trump promised to revoke the executive order as one of his first actions as president. Although the policy is still in place, 10 attorneys general, including South Carolina’s Alan Wilson, notified U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions in June that they would sue the Trump administration if DACA were not overturned by Sept. 5. “If DACA is revoked, that means all the students who applied for DACA all of a sudden now cannot legally work. In South Carolina, it means they can’t study at state colleges and universities, and they can also actually be deported,” said Will David of Ground Up Greenville. Ground Up Greenville, as well the Hispanic Alliance and Latinos Unidos @ Clemson University, presented Thursday’s event, called Dream On. But while DACA has expanded protections and opportunities for some undocumented immigrants, the policy has its limitations. Most notably, DACA does not provide a path to citizenship. And in South Carolina, DACA recipients are not eligible to receive in-state tuition at colleges and universities, and they are also prohibited from obtaining an array of professional licenses. Immigration reform advocates have challenged these restrictions. “They work so hard in school. They have so much more to contribute to South Carolina,” said Sarah Montero-Buria, community engagement and strategy manager at Hispanic Alliance. “South Carolina needs nurses. South Carolina needs doctors. …. We need these kids, and we need them to work. Not just for social justice reasons but also from an economic perspective.” Two of the event’s speakers, Keny Murillo

The Dream Act, Murillo said, “will be the solution that would allow young immigrants like myself that came here to continue our studies, to continue to stay here in this country and contribute further to our community and this nation, which we already do.” Isidra, who arrived in the United States at age 4, said the possibility that she would have to move to another state to practice nursing was “another bump in the road.” “I would like to stay in my community. I would like to be where my roots are from. I’d like to stay in my church and be able to be with my friends,” she said, before asking the audience to consider contacting their elected representatives to express support for the Dream Act. Sarai, a young woman who has lived in the United States since age 11 and declined to give her last name, also urged the audience to vocally support the passage of the Dream Act. “My vision for South Carolina is one where it leads the charge in changing the status quo. It is time for us to seize our day, to make our history and say proudly that even though our past haunts us, this day we fought for a South Carolina that is inclusive, cohesive, and congruent with its values,” she said. “This is not an impossible dream, simply because I know firsthand Southerners like doing the right thing. And I believe Sen. Graham is already doing so by introducing this bill.” The DACA recipients also expressed that although they were not born in the United States, it is where they feel they belong. “Some people think that I would go to school here and go back to Honduras, but the truth is, I don’t see Honduras as my home,” Murillo said. “I see the United States as my home. … This is really all I know. This is really where I want to stay.”


16 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 08.25.207

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COVER

WHAT’S IN A NAME

Plenty, say residents in the vicinity of Greenville’s newest major park WORDS BY CINDY LANDRUM

City Park. That’s what Greenville’s planned multimilliondollar sprawling signature park just to the west of downtown is currently called. But that’s not necessarily what its name will be in the future. Some residents who live in the vicinity of the future park say the name should pay homage to the area’s past, especially Mayberry Park, a park created in the 1920s for blacks in a marshy meadowland on the edge of the Reedy River that was prone to flooding. “One thing I want to keep is the area’s identity,” said Mary Duckett, a long-time Southernside resident and president of the Southernside Neighborhoods in Action, a group that works for improvements in the inner-city neighborhood. “I grew up at a time when that was the only park we could go to.” The land where City Park will be built is the home of two smaller parks — Mayberry, which was created for the city’s African-American population during the Jim Crow era, and Meadowbrook, the home of the Greenville Spinners baseball team until 1972. City Council has not Mary Duckett. Photo by Will Crooks yet addressed naming the park, but Mayor Knox White said he expects that would need to be done now that Darren Meyer, a principal with consulting firm MKSK, has been contracted to work on detailed plans and phasing. He said he expects different sections of the park will have their own names, and that the overall park will have a name as well. Councilwoman Amy Doyle said City Park could be like Central Park in New York City, where areas of the park have their own identities such as Spanish Harlem, Strawberry Fields, and Tavern on the Green. “It’s all Central Park, but each has their own identity,” she said. Duckett expressed similar sentiments, saying, “They can call the whole thing City Park, but we need to have some identity in the park.”

The land where City Park will be built is home to two smaller parks — Mayberry, which was created for the city’s African-American population during the Jim Crow era, and Meadowbrook, the home of the Greenville Spinners baseball team until 1972.

HISTORIC PARKS

The city has 39 parks, ranging from the big parks — Cleveland Park and Falls Park — to neighborhood parks such as Croft, Ella Mae Logan, and Pinckney Fludd. The city’s parks are typically named after people or physical characteristics. If City Park becomes the official name for the new park, it won’t be the first time Greenville has had one. McPherson Park was known simply as City Park from the time Caroline Choice donated 2.5 acres of land to the city to create the park in the 1880s until it was named after John A. McPherson, the longtime head of the city’s Park and Tree Commission, in 1941. McPherson Park was once the only park in the city. Hundreds of white Greenvillians flocked to the park, which in-

cluded a bandstand, every summer for Chautauqua programs. Greenville’s first zoo was there, too, beginning with a pair of white-tailed Virginia deer. Another alderman suggested a herd of sheep to cut down on mowing costs. His idea was not adopted, though. The zoo moved to Cleveland Park in 1954. Ironically, John McPherson played a role in the creation of Mayberry Park. After McPherson became head of the Park and Tree Commission in 1914, he lobbied for the city to plant trees and build more parks. He pushed for a major park near the Reedy River. Eventually, W. C. Cleveland gave the city 110 acres around Richland Creek and the Reedy River for the park, one considered by many long-time Greenvillians as “the city park.” The majority of an $110,000 bond approved by Greenville voters in June 1924 went for improvements for Cleveland Park. But


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COVER

MCPHERSON PARK TO GET A MAKEOVER About a half-million dollars in improvements are planned for McPherson Park during the upcoming year as part of the city’s push to improve neighborhood parks. “I have a lot of hope for McPherson Park,” said City Councilwoman Amy Doyle, a big proponent of parks who pushed for money to be included in the city’s capital improvement plan. “It is a gem and an asset to downtown.” The city is seeking bids this month for the replacement and rehabilitation of the park’s five bridges. Before the bridges are replaced, invasive plants, trees, and debris will be removed from Richland Creek. In addition to the rehabilitation of the creek, stormwater modifications will be done, including the replacement of a new cement drainage ditch around the tennis courts with a natural culvert, repaving the parking lot with a pervious surface to reduce flooding, and reworking pathways to the creek. Lastly, the park’s miniature golf course will be dismantled and replaced with a new one. The McPherson improvements are part of $2.04 million the City Council budgeted for neighborhood parks as part of this year’s capital improvement plan. The money will come from an agreement with Greenville County to share some of the tax money generated by the reorganization of the county’s recreation department four years ago. Fifty-eight percent of city residents live within a half-mile of a park or community center. In District 1, which encompasses

some of the money was allocated to refresh City Park. McPherson urged the city to purchase 15 acres from Edwin Mayberry west of Hudson Street to create a park for “negro children.” In 1938, the City Council decided to use almost half of Mayberry Park’s land to build a baseball park — Meadowbrook Park — for the newly reorganized Greenville Spinners.

MOVING FORWARD

The first visible sign of work on the new City Park will come in mid-September, when the city is scheduled to move its public works department from its current facility on Hudson Street to its new home on Fairforest Way.

the North Main and East North Street area, 67 percent of residents are within a half-mile of a park. That falls to 42 percent in District 4, a more industrial and commercial part of the city that includes Gower Park, Legacy Park at Hollingsworth, and the Wenwood Soccer Complex. The city’s parks and recreation department evaluated the city’s 34 neighborhood parks and found a laundry list of needs — from accessibility issues to fields that needed new fencing, tennis and basketball courts that needed resurfacing, restrooms that needed major repair, and playground equipment that had gotten to the end of its useful life. Under the plan, Gower Park would get new and renovated restroom facilities, playground equipment, and renovated picnic shelters. At Timmons Park, baseball field lighting would be upgraded, restrooms replaced, picnic shelters repaired, tennis courts resurfaced, and accessibility improved. Other parks would get help, too. The West Greenville Community Center would get $100,000 in lighting, electrical, and heating and air conditioning improvements, while $100,000 is earmarked for shelter repairs in 13 parks. Mary Steinbach, the city’s new parks and recreation director, has said most of the neighborhood parks projects on the list wouldn’t rise to capital improvement project status by themselves, but they do collectively. Steinbach added that working on several new playgrounds or paving and restriping basketball and tennis courts throughout the system could yield better prices. —Cindy Landrum

The move will pave the way for work to begin on the park, the city’s signature park on the west side and one that Mayor White said could be as transformative to that area of the city as Falls Park was to the West End. The City Council has approved using up to $2 million in tourist-related funding a year for 10 years for construction of the park. City Park is expected to include a great lawn, a “sprayground” water feature, a picnic area, basketball courts, and the transformation of Welborn Street into a pedestrian promenade. City Park could also include a veterans memorial and related features. Groundbreaking for City Park could be held as early as spring 2018.

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08.25.207 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 19

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COMMUNITY

Animal Care’s

Correspondent

CLASS ACT

Plain Elementary’s Suzanne Billings named Greenville County Teacher of the Year

WORDS BY CINDY LANDRUM | PHOTO BY WILL CROOKS

Suzanne Billings asked her dad to coach her recreation softball and basketball teams because she wanted to be on good teams. It turns out he taught her — and her teammates — much more than the fundamentals of the game. “Whether you were brand new to the game or you had been playing for a long time, he met you at your level,” she said. He also taught acceptance and teamwork. When a new kid joined the team, it was assumed that player would quickly become a strong part of the team based on teamwork and collaboration, she said. Those are traits that are important in teaching, too, said Greenville County Schools’ newest Teacher of the Year. “My dad taught me to be a leader and a collaborator, which is a big part of teaching,” said Billings, who is starting her second year as a fourth-grade teacher at Plain Elementary School in Simpsonville. “Teaching is not about having an idea that’s better than somebody else’s. It’s about how we

can work together so all of our students benefit. We’re strong because we’re together,” she said. “Most of my ideas are not original. They came from someone else. Good teaching is good teaching. To get these ideas from other teachers makes me a stronger teacher.” Billings, who is beginning her 19th year in education, said learning doesn’t stop. “It’s kind of like laundry,” she said. “There’s always something to do.” The award-winning teacher said she has learned from other veteran teachers, teachers in the beginning of their careers, and her students. “What works for one kid may not work for another. I need many different strategies. There’s always something I can try,” she said. She said her students can be teachers as well. “I’m the teacher and leader, but I’m not the only one in the classroom.” Billings’ mantra is “Imagine. Create. Inspire.” It started as a tagline for her website, but it has turned into so much more. “Teaching is imagining the purpose of the knowledge, creating an understanding and

desire to utilize this information, and then applying and inspiring uses for new learning,” she wrote in her Teacher of the Year application. “My reward in teaching is observing students who imagine, create, and inspire for themselves, not just for a teacher or parent.” Billings creates a positive, inclusive classroom community. “I ensure each student views him or herself as a speaker, listener, teacher, and supporter,” she said. “This community team environment instills ownership of learning and allows each student’s talents and abilities to shine.” She said making sure teachers have the support they need is the biggest challenge in education, from community support to mentoring programs that support new teachers past their first year in the classroom. “Having a community of support pushes success, whether you’re an athlete, whether you’re a student, no matter what field you’re in. In teaching, that’s huge,” she said. The attention has made Billings uncomTEACHER continued on PAGE 21

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TEACHER continued from PAGE 19

fortable. “I’m where I am because of who I work with. I represent what other teachers are also doing and striving for,” she said. “You give me a pat on the back, it’s like, ‘Thank you. Oh, my goodness.’ You write me a note, and it’s golden,” she said. “To me, having one parent say, ‘Thank you. You made a difference.’ Or having that child say, ‘I love being in your class’ or ‘I’m going to miss you’ — those are the things we do this for. That appreciation, that recognition that we are professionals — that means a lot.” First runner-up is Anjosia Ellerbe, business education teacher at Wade Hampton High School. Second runner up is Erin Rigot, a communications teacher at League Academy. Ashley Jenkins, a 10th-grade world history teacher at Woodmont High School, was named third runner-up. Other Greenville County Teacher of the Year finalists were Scott Buhr, physics and earth science, Hillcrest High School; Jeremy Bowen, mathematics, J.L. Mann High Academy; David Dejesa, social studies-speech and debate, Riverside High School; Chancey Greco, sixthgrade English language arts, Greenville Middle Academy; Lauren Long, eighth-grade English, Hillcrest Middle School; and Thomas McAuliff, third grade, Taylors Elementary School. In addition to an application and an interview, the 10 finalists were observed in the classroom by the judges. Katie Inclan, a second-grade teacher at Plain Elementary School, was named the elementary-level Emerging Teacher of the Year. When she realized students were not mastering certain math skills, she researched best teaching practices to create a new math curriculum for small-group instruction. She shared the idea with peers and assisted them in adapting the ideas for their classrooms. Greenville Middle Academy seventh-grade science teacher Matt Giacalone is the secondary-level Emerging Teacher of the Year. He shares his enthusiasm for science with his gradelevel team by working one-on-one with a student or by offering support at school functions. He also collaborates with organizations to bring field trips into the school to highlight science, math, and technology. The Emerging Teacher of the Year Awards are sponsored by Greenville Federal Credit Union and recognize second- or third-year teachers for outstanding performance. Each receives $500, a crystal award, and $500 for their school.

2017-18 GREENVILLE COUNTY TEACHER OF THE YEAR Suzanne Billings

Fourth grade Plain Elementary School FIRST RUNNER-UP Anjosia Ellerbe

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SECOND RUNNER-UP Erin Rigot Communications League Academy

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22 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 08.25.207 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

COMMUNITY Our Community

Community news, events, and happenings

Sports Clips recently made a big donation to Make-A-Wish South Carolina.

PHILANTHROPY

PHILANTHROPY

Milliken donates more than $325K to United Way of the Piedmont

Sport Clips donates $20K to Make-A-Wish South Carolina

Milliken announced it will donate more than $325,000 to the United Way of the Piedmont. As part of the company’s annual campaign, Milliken Gives, this community-centric gift was made possible through the charitable contribution of associates at the company’s headquarters in Spartanburg with a matching gift from the Milliken Foundation.

Sport Clips locations in the Piedmont, Upstate, and Midlands recently raised and donated $20,000 to Make-A-Wish South Carolina. The funds came from various locations’ fundraising efforts. Submit community news items to community@communityjournals.com.

Our Schools

Activities, awards, and accomplishments

SCHOLARSHIPS

H. C. Jennings Scholarship Foundation funds presented The Harold C. Jennings Foundation presented scholarships on Aug. 3 to children of police officers. The recipients for the 2017-18 scholarship awards are as follows: Caroline Flavell, daughter of Cpl. Collis Flavell, a rising freshman at Anderson University majoring in criminal justice; Patrick Galvin, son of officer Pat Galvin, a previous scholarship winner who will be a junior at Greenville Technical College majoring in nursing; Ryan Huntington, son of Cpl. Mark Huntington, a sophomore at The Citadel majoring in mechanical engineering; McKenzie Hyatt, daughter of Cpl. Kevin Hyatt, a freshman at Clemson University majoring in business; Sydney Long, daughter of Lt. Jeff Long, a freshman at North Greenville University majoring in physical therapy; Michael Madden, son of retired Capt. Mike Madden, a freshman at Piedmont Technical College majoring in computer technology; Darby McJunkin, daughter of retired Cpl. Joey

WE MEAN BUSINESS. MBA AT ANDERSON UNIVERSITY

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Human Resources | Healthcare Leadership | Supply Chain | Marketing

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McJunkin, a junior at Greenville Technical College majoring in accounting; Kara Mills, daughter of Sgt. Charlie Mills, a freshman at Greenville Technical College majoring in dental hygiene; Jalen Neely-Pearson, daughter of Sgt. Travis Pearson, a previous scholarship winner who will be a senior at USC Upstate majoring in criminal justice; Jesse W. Nelson, son of Cpl. Mark Nelson, a freshman at Greenville Technical College in the college transfer program; Collin Owens, son of Capt. Stacey Owens, a freshman at Greenville Technical College in the college transfer program; Travis Pearson, son of Sgt. Travis Pearson, a previous scholarship winner who will be a sophomore at Greenville Technical College majoring in criminal justice; and Boyce Roulette, son of retired Cpl. Blake Roulette, a previous scholarship winner who will be a sophomore at Clemson University majoring in management. Submit education news items at bit.ly/GJEducation.


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Featured Home

Downtown Greenville 8 James Street, Greenville, SC 29609

Home Info Price: $499,000 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 3 Lot Size: 0.22 Acre

MLS#: 1348095 Sq. Ft: 2400-2599

Schools: Stone Elementary, League Middle, and Greenville High Agent: Nick Carlson | 864.386.7704 nick@wilsonassociates.net wilsonassociates.net

FABULOUS OPPORTUNITY ON HISTORIC JAMES STREET Perfect 4 bedroom, 3 bath home within walking distance of downtown. Loads of charm and character, from the wrap around front porch, to the tree lined street. Large living room and dining room with lots of windows for natural light. Great kitchen with peninsula, built in butlers pantry, and great storage. Two large bedrooms downstairs share a jack and jill bathroom. Upstairs

master suite as well as a large room that can be a bedroom or den. Great basement with tons of potential for future use. This property also boasts a large 2 car garage with workshop area. Convenient location near shopping, restaurants, and downtown. Great home!


24 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 08.25.207 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

HOME : On the market McAlister Lake • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Parkins Mill Area • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Stone Lake • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

101 McAlister Lake Dr. · $875,000 · MLS# 1339427

19 Craigwood Road · $630,000 · MLS# 1350711

126 Lakecrest Dr. · $619,900 · MLS# 1346708

67 McRae Place · $599,900 · MLS# 1347595

5BR/5f2hBA Beautifully appointed all brick estate on 3+ acres. Fabulous floorplan and upgrades. Exquisite outdoor living space and immaculate landscaping! US-123S to Rock Springs. R Dayton School. Continue onto McAlister.

4BR/3.5BA Beautiful/newly renovated one level home in highly desirable area. Large lot, charming street, and close to Downtown/GHS. Move-in ready! East Parkins Mill to Craigwood Road, fourth home on right.

5BR/4.5BA New Price on this fabulous gem! In town, good living with a lake in your backyard! Chick Springs to Lakecrest Dr. 29609

6BR/6BA Amazing Custom Home W/New Interior Paint & New Stamped Concrete Around I/G Pool! Large Lot! Four Levels Including Basement!Five Forks! I385s To L@Woodruff, Continue To L@Sunnydale, L Into Mcrae Park

Contact: Blair Miller 430-7708 Wilson Associates

Contact: Valerie Miller 430-6602 The Marchant Company

Weatherstone • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Augusta Road Area • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Knollwood Heights • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Duffie Woods • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Contact: Angela Reid 350-6670 Coldwell Banker Caine

McRae Park/031 • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Contact: Stephanie Kestner 202-0477 Allen Tate

219 Weatherstone Lane · $374,900 · MLS# 1342306

13 Keowee Avenue · $320,000 · MLS#

119 Gail Drive, Mauldin · $249,500 · MLS# 1349118

112 Lost Tree Lane, Simpsonville · $239,900 · MLS# 1346576

4BR/2.5BA Gorgeous custom built home in great neighborhood! Master on main, 3 bedrooms + bonus room upstairs, and beautiful yard! Left on S. Harrison Bridge, right on Weatherstone Lane.

3BR/2.5BA Quaint bungalow with almost 10’ ceilings! Approximately 1,750 SF. Master bathroom en-suite with double sinks, walk-in shower and walk-in closets. Augusta Street to Right onto Cateechee, Left onto Keowee.

4BR/2.5BA Spacious 4Br/2.5Ba In Awesome Location To Everything In Greenville! Highly Desired Neighborhood! Notorious Schools! Backs To Nature! Motivated Sellers! Laurens Rd(Hwy 276)S Towards Mauldin, R@Knollwood@Light, R@Locke Lane, R@Gail Drive

4BR/2.5BA Immaculate 4Br/2.5Ba Near Hwy 14! Loaded With Extras Including Renovated Master Bathroom & Screened Porch! Ready To Roll Today! Hurry! 385S To Exit31, L Toward Simpsonville, L@Hwy14, R@Pollard, L@Duffie, Right.

Contact: Barb Riggs 423-2783 The Marchant Company

Contact: Laura McDonald 640-1929 WIlson Associates

Contact: Melissa Tomberg 252-6621 Allen Tate

Contact: Rosalyn Western 320-2259 Allen Tate

Real Estate News

Emory Young Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Spartanburg Coldwell Banker Caine recently welcomed Emory Young as a residential sales agent to its Spartanburg office. Emory joins Caine with widespread experience in the housing inYoung dustry. He was a general manager for two builder companies and was even named a “Top Ten Builder” for both. Most recently, he was a real estate agent at another upstate firm. Connected in the community, Emory volunteers with the Greenville Humane Society and the Georgia English Bulldog rescue. When he has free time, you can find Emory spending it with his wife, three children, and his own bull dog, Muffin. Emory has a passion for white water kayaking and enjoys hitting the waters in unique places around the world. “We proudly welcome Emory to our Spartanburg office,” said Stephen Edgerton, president and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “His extensive knowledge in the building industry and previous experience in real estate will set him apart in today’s competitive market.”

The Marchant Company is proud to announce the addition of Realtor Chris Drewer As the Upstate’s “Signature Real Estate Agency,” The Marchant Company is a small boutique business of just 40 agents that is consistently a top performer in Greenville. Drewer The Marchant Company is proud to recognize the following REALTOR® who has joined the company: Chris Drewer joins The Marchant Company as a newly licensed South Carolina Realtor but he is no stranger to the business. For over two decades he sold multi-million dollar properties on a private island in the Bahamas as well as personal residential and commercial transactions. With this experience under his belt and as a current business owner, Chris has the skills and abilities to meet all of your real estate needs. He is passionate about real estate and has gained experience as a top producing agent and grew his business from scratch in a very competitive industry. With determination, experience, and passion Chris has what it takes to get the job done well. He joins Valerie Miller

Properties of The Marchant Company as their fourth Realtor on the team.

Tammy Gras Joins The Greer Office Of C. Dan Joyner, Realtors Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS is pleased to announce that Tammy Gras has joined the company’s Greer office as a sales associate. Gras Born and raised in Greenville, South Carolina, Gras lived in Atlanta, Georgia for over 20 years. After a successful track record in sales, she and her husband, Alain, returned to the Upstate.  Upon her relocation, Gras started her career in real estate. “I have joined C. Dan Joyner REALTORS as I want to be the best that I can be doing what I love: helping others find their new home and embark on the next phase of their story, while representing the number one company in the upstate, a name that is respected,” commented Gras. “I am delighted to welcome Tammy to our office. Her knowledge of the area will certainly serve as an advantage to her home buying and selling clients,” said Pat Allen, Broker-In-Charge of the Greer office.

Berkshire Hathaway Homeservices C. Dan Joyner, Realtors Announces Top Producers For June Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS® announces  the top producers from each of its residential sales offices for the month of June. These agents and teams earned the highest gross commission incomes  (GCI) based on closings completed June 1 – 30, 2017. Anderson Office                     Top Teams: 1. The Clever People 2. Amy Tippitt Team 3. Foronda Hall & Associates Top Individuals: 1. Mike Stroud 2. Dianne Robinson 3. Hannah Johnson Augusta Road Office                       1. Beth Joyner Crigler 2. Suzy Withington 3. Keith Boling 4. Charee McConchie 5. Rebeckah Macfie 6. Rebecca Faulk Boiling Springs Office 1. The Hazzard Team 2. Melissa Robison 3. Alex Ly


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HOME Featured Home

Parkins Mill

3 Faversham Circle, Greenville, SC 29607 OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY AUGUST 27TH, 2-4 PM

Home Info Price: $599,900 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 3.5 Lot Size: 0.60 Acres

MLS: 1345652 Sq. Ft: 3100-3200

Schools: Sara Collins Elementary, Beck Middle, and JL Mann High Agent: Helen Hagood 864.419.2889 | hhagood@cbcaine.com

Ready for that next move? Come see this wonderful family home with impressive renovations such as a custom designed kitchen with rich knotty pine cabinetry to the updated luxurious baths demanded by today’s buyers. The current owners have done it for you. You will love the layout with spacious bedrooms, an large den adjacent to the kitchen with a wood burning fireplace plus the formal living room is ideal for a home office. There is even an additional first level cozy den with a full hall bath. With plush new carpet throughout and a fresh

neutral wall color, it’s ready for your furnishings and displaying your art. Love the outdoors? Entertain with ease on the rear deck that runs the length of the home with a state of the art sound system run from the touch of an APP on your I Phone. The fenced rear yard is very private and there is even a 16 X 25 detached storage building with electricity to store all the stuff that clutters up your garage. The list of major updates will impress you. Priced well below a recent certified appraisal ready to be snatched up by a savvy buyer.

Real Estate News continued Easley/Powdersville Office     Top Team: 1. Sheri Sanders Team Top Individuals: 1. Twila Kingsmore   2. Linda Ballard 3. Carol Houston Garlington Road Office Top Teams: 1. Donna O. Smith & Partners 2. Ronda & Chris Holder Top Individuals: 1. Dennis Chenault 2. Sheila Smalley

3. Eddie Burch Greer Office Top Teams: 1. Jan Walker Team 2. The Shepherd Team Top Individuals: 1. Jill Chapman 2. Jada Barnette 3. Paige Haney N. Pleasantburg Office Top Teams: 1. The Chet & Beth Smith Group 2. The Keagy Team 3. MacDonald HomeTeam

Top Individuals: 1. Melissa Morrell 2. Maggie Aiken 3. Robbie Haney Pelham Road Office Top Teams: 1. The Toates Team 2. Spaulding Group 3. Pam McCurry Team Top Individuals: 1. Sam Hankins 2. Jenny McCord 3. Jennifer Van Gieson Simpsonville Office

Top Teams: 1. Cousins & Associates 2. Bob & Linda Brown Group Top Individuals: 1. Debbie Hearn 2. Elizabeth Mekker 3. Jeff Szubinski “We are honored to congratulate these teams and agents on a stellar month of results,” said Danny Joyner, CEO, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS. “Most importantly, each of these agents has attained these accolades as a result of their dedication to putting our clients first.”


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SOLD: Greenville Transactions For the week of July 24 – 28, 2017 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$13,875,000 $2,000,000 $1,305,000 HOLLINGSWORTH PARK@VERDAE MANOR $1,060,000 $850,000 TRAXLER PARK $810,000 COBBLESTONE $760,000 BARRINGTON PARK $754,000 MONTEBELLO $652,500 TUXEDO PARK $634,000 $575,000 $565,000 STONE LAKE HEIGHTS $550,000 SPAULDING FARMS $547,500 SYCAMORE RIDGE $535,000 RIVERBEND ESTATES $517,000 THE OAKS AT ROPER MOUNTAIN $510,500 UPSTATE COMMERCIAL PARK $482,500 SYCAMORE RIDGE $475,500 FIVE FORKS PLANTATION $450,000 $439,700 STONEFIELD COTTAGES $429,667 KILGORE FARMS $415,000 LAKE FOREST HEIGHTS $415,000 KNIGHTS BRIDGE $404,000 LOST RIVER $402,401 $395,000 TERRA WOODS $390,000 CLEAR SPRINGS $385,000 PINE VIEW $375,000 $370,000 SUMMIT AT CHEROKEE VALLEY $365,000 PARIS GLEN $356,000 ASHCROFT $354,828 CARILION $353,064 COPPER CREEK $348,691 THE LOFTS AT MILLS MILL $345,000 COPPER CREEK $337,018 STONEFIELD COTTAGES $336,041 LAKE LANIER $330,000 NORTH HILLS $329,900 TUSCANY FALLS $329,000 FORRESTER HEIGHTS $327,000 POOLE PLACE $325,000 RIVER OAKS $320,000 THE LOFTS AT MILLS MILL $320,000 KILGORE FARMS $317,079 LOST RIVER $316,425 $315,000 MALLARD CREEK $315,000 $300,000 SUGAR CREEK $300,000 BRUSHY MEADOWS $300,000 HUNTERS RIDGE $295,000 WEST FARM $293,500 CRESCENTWOOD VILLAGE $292,000 $290,000 DOVE TREE $290,000 OAKS AT GILDER CREEK FARM $287,500 SUGAR CREEK $286,500 CAMERON CREEK $285,000 $285,000

SUN LIFE ASSURANCE CO OF WINDSOR/AUGHTRY COMPANY F & J SERVICES LLC NASEER FARRUKH (JTWROS) LEW HOLDINGS LLC KENNEDY GEORGE L III (JT STOLIC ANNA MARIE TRUST WATSON MARK LAYTON (JTWR MCMASTER GINA ROSSI MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH GHIRLANDA ROBERT J (SURV CLAYTON GREER O ECKHARDT NAOMI (JTWROS) GOAD CHARLES KEVIN RACZKOWSKI DAVID T MARTIN BARBARA J (JTWROS LAZARUS DEVELOPMENT CORP DYER HOLDINGS LLC CRIDER CHARLES F (JTWROS LEHNER ERIC (JTWROS) MUTUAL HOME STORE OF GVI ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC KNABLE CHRISTIE B CLINKSCALES PEGGY S STEIFLE BENJAMIN G MERITAGE HOMES OF S C IN FACILITIES GROUP OF SOUT CULBRETH ROGER B MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH FUNDERBURK JOSEPH E JOHNSON SAMUEL W SLUSSER BRITNI K (JTWROS SECRETARY OF VETERANS AF D R HORTON INC DAN RYAN BUILDERS SOUTH MUNGO HOMES INC SIMPKINS CAROLYN W MUNGO HOMES INC ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC WARNER ALAN E BIANCHI JENNIFER D DECRESCENZIO MARY LOUISE SPIDELL SCOTT (JTWROS) CARLTON ZACHARY SHEA (JT EPIFANO GENE M KLINEDINST JOHN S (JTWRO MERITAGE HOMES OF S C IN MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH IV FUND GLOBAL LLC REY DANIEL R BAKER A A TRUSTEE BROOKS KATHKLEEN VAUGHN COLVIN E HANCOCK JAMES R (JTWROS) MUNGO HOMES INC SERRUS REAL ESTATE FUND DISTINGUISHED DESIGN LLC PETER AND MARTHA LLC DODGE JERRELD W II BENTLEY ALISA MARIE (JTW WAGNER KELLY J TRUST THE GILSTRAP THOMAS REVOCABL

BUYER

ADDRESS

SUBD.

ROIB 385 GREENVILLE LLC 301 RIVER STREET INVESTO TSN REALTY L L C GLENN-GOODWIN AMIE ANDER GBP INVESTMENTS LLC STACHELEK JEFFREY J (JTW COOPER DOUGLAS L (JTWROS BOLLI AMY W STEVENS CAROL B (JTWROS) WU CAI RONG (JTWROS) LORD KERRY P HARRIS HAYLEY M (JTWROS) DODSON CATHARINE F ANSTETT STEVEN (JTWROS) BROWN JENNIFER PARKER (J BECK CANISHA M (JTWROS) HAWKINS RODGER E (JTWROS TBH INVESTMENTS LLC REECE JOYCE BLOME GEOFF H BRAINS ON FIRE PROPERTIE MAEFS DIANE BAYES DEBORAH (JTWROS) BLAIR MARY B DARLING SARA VIKTORIA (J JOHNSON GARY BRUCE NAMASTE LOFT APARTMENTS RUNDLE DANIEL R & SUSAN HILLEWAERT BRANDI J CALK ANNA E (JTWROS) REY ANGELA B (JTWROS) MCINTYRE JOHN E (JTWROS) CROCKETT JOSHUA L OLDROYD HEIDI (JTWROS) LONGWORTH CHARLES M (JTW PATEL RASIKBHAI AMBALAL ROSS ANN CLARKE PATEL RAJNIKANT G BEAMON LENNIE A (JTWROS) MARCHANT TRELAWNEY E JONES CONSTANCE B CHAPMAN SHARON D (SURV) SINCLAIR MALLORY NESBITT ROBERT M BRANNON JANE B (JTWROS) LYONS CATHERINE G SPERBER LEE ADAM (JTWROS DISALVATORE MARIANNA E DENT JENNA (JTWROS) SURIYAMONGKOL DAN ABM HOLDINGS LLC ENLOW JESSICA HENDLEY (J LEONARD JOEL E (JTWROS) ROBINSON RHONDA L AUTREY JASON D LYNAM NANCY T HULL WILLIAM HARRY (JTWR JONES NATALIE FLOOD (JTW DUGAN SHANNON R (JTWROS) BAEZ DANIEL PHILLIP (JTW CRONICAN JAMES M (JTWROS HOMES OF HOPE INC

504 RHETT ST 40 W BROAD ST STE 500 185 CANFIELD DR 8 WELLING CIR 20 LOCOMOTIVE WAY 42 MOUNT VISTA AVE 719 BRIXTON CIR 6 SAINT HELAINE PL 4 SANTA MARIA CT 1 MURDOCK LN 370 BLAKELY AVE 277 E OLD MILL RD 108 LAKECREST DR 10 NORTHBROOK WAY 105 TURNHOUSE LN 200 SCENIC RIVER WAY 2 CHARLESTON OAK LN 3554 REAGLWOODS DR 104 FAZIO CT 7 DRAYTON HALL RD 148 RIVER ST STE 100 675 PONDEN DR 1 THORNCLIFF CT 305 SWEETBRIAR RD 1 HUNTINGTOWER LN 310 QUAIL HUNT RD 146 EMMA BRYANT WAY 2 WINDY CT 124 ANGEL FALLS DR 343 PINE FOREST DRIVE EXT 141 ACKER RD 220 CLUB CART RD 207 MONTGLEN CT 100 ASHCROFT LN 533 PALLADIO DR 113 LEIGH CREEK DR 400 MILLS AVE UNIT 325 105 LEIGH CREEK DR 624 PONDEN DR 705 CALVERT AVE 11 RUSSELL AVE 217 DANTE LN 508 RIVANNA LN 2444 POOLE RD 113 RIVER OAKS RD 400 MILLS AVE #215 219 PETERS GLENN CT 6 HEYDON HALL CT 112 LADSON ST 26 S CEDARBLUFF CT 2718 WADE HAMPTON BLVD STE D 105 MEADOW CREEK CT 1 MEADOW MIST TRL 117 GRAMERCY CT 101 BRAHMAN WAY 1147 PARKINS MILL RD 101 JONES KELLEY RD 205 DOVE TREE RD 106 RED ROME CT 202 OAK RIDGE CT 343 CAMERON CREEK LN 3 DUNEAN ST

$285,000 $284,500 PEBBLECREEK $279,900 CAMELOT $269,900 THE TOWNES AT HIGHGROVE $269,200 PEBBLECREEK $268,000 BROOKFIELD GARDENS $264,139 COVE AT SAVANNAH POINTE $262,000 HAWTHORNE RIDGE $260,000 HIGHCREST TOWNES@HOLLINGSWORTH $260,000 COVE AT SAVANNAH POINTE $260,000 GRIFFIN ROAD $260,000 LANSFAIR @ ASHBY PARK $260,000 MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS $257,900 REEDY SPRINGS $257,000 HOLLY TRACE $257,000 THE RESERVES AT RAVENWOOD $256,000 TOWNES SQUARE $255,000 RUNION ESTATES $250,972 PLANTERS ROW $250,500 PLEASANT MEADOWS $250,300 LONGLEAF $250,198 ONEAL VILLAGE $249,685 HARTWOOD LAKE $249,470 COTTAGES AT NEELY $247,000 PELHAM SPRINGS $245,900 NORTHCLIFF $245,900 KNOLLWOOD HEIGHTS $245,500 TOWNES AT RIVERWOOD FARM $245,000 COVE AT SAVANNAH POINTE $244,000 FORRESTER WOODS $242,000 TANNER’S MILL $241,000 SUMMER WOOD $239,900 HIDDEN SPRINGS@B RIDGE PLNTN $237,269 CARVER PARK $235,000 FONTANA FOREST $234,000 JONESVILLE LANDING $229,900 RUNION ESTATES $228,390 EDGEBROOK $227,074 COVE AT SAVANNAH POINTE $225,000 $224,000 BEAVER RUN $222,500 SUMMERWALK $221,900 TOWNES AT CARDINAL CREEK $213,495 FORRESTER WOODS $212,000 THE HEIGHTS $211,000 HAMMETT GROVE $211,000 $211,000 HIGHLANDS $210,000 BETHEL GREENE $208,000 HUNTERS WOODS $205,500 COUNTRY MEADOWS $205,000 SUMMERFIELD $205,000 NEELY FARM - LAUREL BROOK $202,000 HERITAGE LAKES $200,000 AVONDALE FOREST $199,900 LOCKELAND PARK $199,900 KING ACRES $199,900 LONG CREEK PLANTATION $199,000 BOULDER CREEK $199,000 LOCKELAND PARK $197,600 EASTRIDGE $197,000

PRICE SELLER JOSEPH ALEXANDER S (JTWR SHOWVAKER CURTIS L FULLER BONNIE K JAMES CAROL A (JTWROS) MOODY WADE H KRAMER BERANRD C III DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL SMITH JARED R MERITAGE HOMES OF S C IN SHF VERDAE LLC CLARK DANA ELIZABETH (JT DISTINGUISHED DESIGN LLC CROWSON SYBIL P PARNELL SUZANNE M STRINGER JEAN KALMYK SVITLANA (SURV) MIDDEKER THOMAS GOHEAN IAN CHARLES DAN RYAN BUILDERS SOUTH AL-BAZI EMILE MCGEE PROPERTIES OF GREE D R HORTON INC DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL D R HORTON-CROWN LLC D R HORTON INC CARLTON BEVERLY T NORTON DAVID MICHAEL MCCASKILL JACOB A COLLYAR LISA RAMLER JARED W (JTWROS) MAZZARO CATHERINE T LOESCHER RACHEL B (JTWRO POOLE DAVID SK BUILDERS INC COMING HOME DESIGN & REN SHOPS ON CLEVELAND LLC HANSON CURTIS M DAN RYAN BUILDERS SOUTH SK BUILDERS INC AUTREY JASON D (JTWROS) BUVALLA LEA A & D HOMES LLC HERMINA AYAD (L-EST) NVR INC COONEY KIMBALL A (JTWROS MORAN MATTHEW D BUTTO EVA MARIE HENNING STEVE M CE INVESTMENT GROUP LLC BEAUFORT CLEVELAND C BENNETT EDWARD M WEIL JOHN D AND META TRU PATEL KETAL D HULTQUIST JENNIFER D PETTY VALERIE B ANDERS CARLOS D TOMLANOVICH JOHN (JTWROS WEISBECKER LEAH R HEGGIE DIANNE MURPHREE ALLISON J (JTW SUNCREST HOMES LLC BAUS GILBERT A

BUYER

ADDRESS

GS BESSINGER LLC HAFEMANN THOMAS S (JTWRO CLYNE LINDA S (JTWROS) HICKS JAMES E III (JTWRO WINGATE JOHN WAYNE (JTWR ANNICCHIARICO MARK G (JT BRANTLEY BLAINE E DYER NATHAN W (JTWROS) HONG LIU (JTWROS) NVR INC HUTCHINSON JACQUELINE L HERNANDEZ GABRIEL H ADAMS ROBERT M JR BENNETT ROGER L JR (JTWR VANDEVELDE DALE R (JTWRO CLEMENTS ANDREW S SCHEIDWEILER CHRISTIAN BEASLEY MARY HUNTER (JTW BUFFALOE REAL ESTATE HOL ABUNIJEM JAD MOHD COWAN STEPHANIE J WEEKS WILLIAM STEPHEN (J KANZ BRECKEN L BARNES ROBERT JR (JTWROS RACZKOWSKI DAVID (JTWROS DEMPSEY DAVID R (JTWROS) YUKISH NICHOLAS R WARD STEVEN BJORK SARA C ANGEL JOHANNA (JTWROS) SCHWEITZER JOSEPH T WONN BRENDAN D BALDWIN JENNY L (JTWROS) RAPP JAMES A (JTWROS) COTTINGHAM ELIZABETH EVA BAUGHMAN DARYL (JTWROS) BEAVER BRITTNEY (JTWROS) BUFFALOE REAL ESTATE HOL BATYCKI ANTHONY N (JTWRO MODRAK EMILY B CONNER DANIEL LEE (JTWRO TAMER JERAMY L (JTWROS) GONZALEZ LUZ FRUTOS (JTW PEYNADO KIMBERLY R SANTOS ISABELA CARVALHO ANDRADE ESTEFANY (JTWROS TURNER JOSHUA SCHMIDT ROBERT M FRESHWATER REALTY LLC LSG SANTA CRUZ PROPERTY ALEXANDER LEONARD A ANDREAS JOHN JR (JTWROS) MCLAUGHLIN BRIAN P (JTWR CARTER PORSCHE LAUREN (J ANDRUCHOWICZ ANA (JTWROS CARTER BRIAN A JACOBIA ANTHONY S (JTWRO KELLEY MARCIE DARLENE (J BRUNIES CAROL L (JTWROS) HINES ANDREW JACOB (JTWR CARRAGHER DANIEL J COULTER AUTUMN S (JTWROS

90 N ROYAL TOWER DR 141 SUNSHINE DR 204 PEBBLE CREEK WAY 512 LANCELOT DR 33 DILLWORTH CT 3 HOPPIN JOHN LN 111 SUMMER OAK LN 308 SABIN CT 328 LOST LAKE DR 11 BRENDAN WAY STE 140 116 SHEEPSCOT CT 478 GRIFFIN RD 309 ASHBY PARK LN 6 PLATTE LN 230 REEDY SPRINGS LN 112 CIRCLE SLOPE DR 244 RAVEN FALLS LN 20 TOWNES SQUARE LN 8 INDIAN SPRINGS DR 6 FRIENDSPLOT CV 5 ANA ROSE CT 305 HILBURN WAY 28 NOVELTY DR 270 HARTWOOD LAKE LN 269 EVANSDALE WAY 2 PELHAM SPRINGS PL UNIT 1C 214 KILBURN LN 104 LOCKE LN 51 REDDINGTON DR 103 SABIN CT 416 PINEY GROVE RD 5 SAWLEY CT 1 RUSTCRAFT DR 15 PITMAN AVE 101 TUSKEGEE AVE 1601 STATE PARK RD 109 JORDAN CREST CT 8 INDIAN SPRINGS DR 308 WHEATFIELD CT 209 ST LUCIE DR 8 N AVONDALE DR 130 RACCOON TRL 103 SUMMER HILL RD 109 EMERYWOOD LN 116 BOULDER RD 108 SHALE CT 11 STREAM CROSSING WAY 306 RUSSELL AVE PO BOX 474 5601 FREEDOM BLVD 109 HUNTING RIDGE CT 10 PLEASANT KNOLL LN 9 CANSO ST 1 INDIAN LAUREL CT 108 HARLEQUIN CT 5 NOVA ST 267 SLEEPY RIVER RD 403 OLD CHICK SPRINGS RD 2 COLTSFOOT CT 325 MELLOW WAY 430 PEAKSVIEW DR 112 LANTANA CT

NEW PRIC E Jill & Brian Norman, realtors® 864.380.2252 | NormanGroupSC.com

AUGUSTA ROAD AREA ~ 32 Waccamaw Circle , Greenville ~ 0.64 Acre Cul-de-sac Lot

4BR/4.5BA • Built in 2014 • Bonus room, hardwoods on both levels, 10’ ceilings • MLS: 1342340 • $649,900


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HOME See You in the Garden

with Kathy Slayter

Just Around the Corner

It’s time to think about your fall garden I find myself with conflicting feelings about September in the garden — should I or shouldn’t I? After a long, hot season of planting, weeding, harvesting, and preserving the garden bounty and battling the everchanging list of pests, I want a break. But having a garden is a commitment, like having children, and the tasks are never done. All sorts of fall veggies can go into your cleaned and prepared space. My favorites for the fall garden include looseleaf lettuce, beets, kales, chards, mustards, collards, and cabbage. Radishes are tasty, too, in the cool weather. Turnips, carrots, and spinach can be sown, as well as garlic, shallot, and onion bulbs or sets.

Lawn care in the fall is specific to your type

AUGUST 27 | FROM 2-5PM

1797 ALTAMONT ROAD | GREENVILLE, SC 29609

of grass. Learn what type of grass you have and what it needs now and adhere to it. For me, I have well-established fescue, and as a rule of thumb, I feed my lawns four times a year, including over the Labor Day holiday. I keep the grass cut as high as possible until that shift in nighttime temperatures later in

Photo by Fluffymuppet via Flickr Creative Commons

You should get seeds and Calendula, one of the main fall and winter blooming bedding plants sets in the ground before mid-September due to several factors, including changing sunlight, the fall. Now is also a good time to trim your soil temperature, and air temperature. If you maple trees, as well as divide and transplant decide not to plant vegetables, then a cover hostas. crop would be a good option, which then can be turned into garden beds in early November The moon pulls with a magnetic force on the waters that course through all that is for final rest until next spring. alive. You just felt it with the experience of The annual flowers of fall will soon be on the eclipse. It influences the great tides of parade in the garden centers. Do try to put the ocean, as well as the water that courses together a container garden for the front or through every cell of every living thing. In back porch and put some color out at the addition to its pull on the waters within the mailbox. The main fall and winter blooming soil, seed, and plants, the moon also exerts a bedding plants to be found include calendula, gravitational pull on the ground. alyssum, snapdragon, and pansy. Certain As the season shifts, I would encourage you to strains of dianthus – it looks and smells like watch how the moon moves across your land. carnation – can be found. Take time to visit Observe the high tides and low tides for the the local nurseries, as their displays will be month, the waxing and the waning of the moon. spectacular in an attempt to sell you all their Try to sense the celestial pulling within you. wonderful plants. Fishermen fish by the moon, and some of us It is worth an afternoon or more to visit garden with the moon. As we shift into fall, several nurseries for ideas on putting your and the light changes, the air and soil cool — own container garden together. Remember notice the subtle shift within you. Take time the rule of three: Each pot needs a “filler,” to notice things. See you in the garden. a “thriller,” and a “spiller.” You can use small boxwoods for your filler and ivy as a conservative spiller. Pinterest has loads of photos for ideas also. Bulbs can be added to your containers for blooming in the early spring. Purchase only fall and winter color. Do this soon so your plants can get established before the change of season.

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feast Words by Ariel Turner | Photos by Will Crooks

DRINK TO YOUR HEALTH W The kombucha craze comes to local bars and breweries

hen it comes to kombucha, first things first: It’s pronounced kom (like dot-com) boo (what a ghost says) cha (cha-cha now, y’all). You may have seen kombucha in glass bottles in the refrigerator section at the grocery store or possibly heard its virtues extoled by your yogi neighbor and wondered what it was all about. In Greenville today, kombucha has earned a bit of a cult following. When the beverage’s fans discover a fellow ’bucha lover, there’s an instant bond, a bond that inevitably leads to a discussion about their favorite flavors and brands. Some may even take a selfie of themselves holding a bottle and post it on social media to prove their dedication. There also may or may not be a secret kombucha handshake. (Just kidding, we think.) If you were to ask a local die-hard kombucha drinker, they’ll likely tell you Greenville is still very new to the ’bucha scene, especially compared to our northern neighbor Asheville, N.C., and our southern culinary muse Charleston. But the fermented bev is becoming more widely available around here and not just by the bottle, as is most common. Kombucha is now available at bars in at least a half dozen restaurants and breweries in Greenville, where it’s drawn from a tap just like beer. Kava Konnection on Wade Hampton first began to offer Asheville-made Buchi on tap

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back in 2015. Swamp Rabbit Pizza and Grateful Brew also serve Buchi on tap. Happy + Hale entered the scene this spring with two kinds of Raleigh-made Tribucha, while Pour Taproom and 13 Stripes Brewery recently added Asheville-brewed Lenny Boy to their lineup. But for the rest of you uninitiated folk, you’re probably still wondering, what the heck is this trendy beverage? Kombucha is an ancient drink. The ancient Chinese called it the “immortal health elixir,” and it has been around for more than 2,000 years. But only relatively recently has it made its way into the Western diet. According to the official Merriam-Webster definition, kombucha is “a gelatinous mass of symbiotic bacteria and yeasts grown to produce a fermented beverage held to confer health benefits; also: the beverage prepared by fermenting kombucha with black tea and sugar.” If some of you just had an instinctive gag reflex, it’s understandable. A “gelatinous mass” of anything doesn’t exactly sound health promoting. And frankly, we live in a society terrified of bacteria, for better or for worse. Most of us carry around a travel size anti-bacterial hand sanitizer. But for the official, scientifically proven record, all bacteria aren’t bad. For instance, sourdough bread? It’s created by starting with a mixture of bacteria and yeast. In baking, that’s called the “starter.” With kombucha, it’s called a SCOBY (symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast).

And in this case, the SCOBY is used to turn plain ol’ black or green tea and sugar into an effervescent tonic that, when produced in a sanitary and controlled environment, is believed to promote good health. Those health benefits come from the probiotics the fermentation creates. Probiotics are gaining more ground in not just the natural health realm but also in traditional medical circles, as more research is conducted on their benefits. According to claims, a lack of probiotics has been linked to everything from digestive problems to depression. There’s still a lot we don’t know, though, so do your own due diligence if you have concerns. Also, be aware that fermentation creates a negligible amount of alcohol in each serving, similar to vinegar. In other words, it’s not considered an alcoholic beverage. Different fruits and spices are often added to the base kombucha to create a variety of flavors that can range from refreshing mango to spicy ginger and jalapeño. If you’re unsure about what brands or bottles to try first, go to a bar that serves it on tap and ask for a taste. For instance, Kava Konnection offers a four-flavor flight of the Buchi variety they serve Buchi for around $6. They also offer growler pours of it for $9 if you find one you really like. And it’s important to note that, similar to beer, bottled kombucha will taste differently than the draft variety.

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LOCAL BLUES WUNDERKIND MARCUS KING’S NEW MUSIC FEST page

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SCCT’S KID-APPROVED 2017-18 SEASON page

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A JAM GOOD TIME IN THE VILLAGE page

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KIDDING AROUND SCCT season brings children’s books, animated movie to life CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

W

“PINKALICIOUS,” SEPT. 16–24

hen the South Carolina Children’s Theatre puts together its new season, it looks for a mix of new shows and fan favorites, says artistic and education director Betsy Bisson. It seems like they nailed it for its upcoming season. Three of the productions in the 2017-18 season that begins in September are based on favorite children’s books — “Pinkalicious,” “Junie B. Jones is Not a Crook,” and “The Musical Adventures of Flat Stanley.” Another was inspired by a popular animated movie, while the other features Santa Claus. Tickets are on sale now. Main Stage tickets are $27 for adults and $18 for children under 18.

If you like pink, this is the show for you. This returning favorite, last performed by SCCT in 2014, is adapted from the book series by Elizabeth and Victoria Kann. It tells the story of a girl who eats too many pink cupcakes and ends up turning pink with what her doctor describes as the second worst case of pinkitus he’s ever seen. The cure is green food coloring. But Pinkalicious, who loves pink, doesn’t want to give up her newfound pinkness. Instead of eating green food coloring, she again overloads on pink cupcakes. The next day, she wakes up red and reluctantly decides that green food coloring really is the answer. “The story ends happily and the finale reminds us that pink is love, pink is joy, and pink helps you happily live ever after,” Bisson said.

“SANTA CLAUS: A NEW MUSICAL,” DEC. 1–10

This musical is brand new and has previously been performed only at Casa Manana in Texas. Santa has announced his decision to retire, and the search is on for someone who can handle the difficult task of delivering toys to children all over the world. Santa returns from his toy run with his potential replacement, Nick, a web designer, and Nick’s daughter, Bee. But not everybody is thrilled with Santa’s choice, especially Henchy, the head elf, who has visions of becoming the new Santa himself. Nick has a lot to learn, and Henchy is not going to make it easy for him. But Bee comes to the rescue. The musical is filled with original, upbeat songs.


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CULTURE “JUNIE B. JONES IS NOT A CROOK,” JAN. 26–FEB. 4, 2018

SCCT audiences love Junie B. Jones, and the irrepressible girl returns again in 2018, this time in a new adaptation that combines two books, “Junie B. Jones is Not a Crook” and “Junie B. Jones Loves Handsome Warren.” Junie B. loses her new mittens. She doesn’t find them in the lost and found, but she does see a colorful pen that she thinks may catch the attention of the new, handsomest boy in kindergarten. Finders keepers, losers weepers?

“THE MUSICAL ADVENTURES OF FLAT STANLEY,” APRIL 28–MAY 6, 2018

SCCT has presented Flat Stanley on its 2nd Stage, but this is its first time on the theater’s Main Stage schedule for the play based on the popular “Flat Stanley” book series by Jeff Brown. Stanley Lambchop dreams of traveling the world and having adventures, just the opposite of his “too ordinary” life. But that all changes when he wakes up one morning flat because his bulletin board had fallen on him during the night. Now, he can mail himself anywhere. Stanley has many adventures, including in Paris, where he helps the Louvre museum’s problem with art thieves.

“MADAGASCAR: A MUSICAL ADVENTURE,” JUNE 16–24, 2018

In this play based on the first of four “Madagascar” animated films produced by DreamWorks, Alex the lion is the king of the urban jungle, also known as New York’s Central Park Zoo. He and his best friends — Marty the zebra, Melman the giraffe, and Gloria the hippo — have lived their lives in captivity. But Marty’s curiosity gets the better of him and the animals escape. They end up in Madagascar. The show features an upbeat score, including “Move It, Move It,” a featured song Bisson says may well lead to a dance party in the house. “This seemed a fun, upbeat, modern take on the grass-is-always-greener-somewhere-overthe-rainbow theme,” she said. “In time, our heroes decide there is no place like home. It’s a great summertime offering.”

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DOWN BY THE RIVER

We always let you know who will be there when you open the door!

Stop Light Observations take to the banks of the Toogoodoo River to record their third album VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

In 2013, the Charleston quartet Stop Light Observations released their second album, called “Radiation.” It was a blend of stomping acoustic blues, snake-hipped heavy Southern rock, the occasional nod to acoustic roots music, and atmospheric, wide-screen balladry. That sounds like enough for one band’s sonic palette, right? Well, apparently it wasn’t enough for SLO. In 2015, they released two surprising singles called “Helicopters” and “All I Can Think About,” songs that more or less abandoned everything the band had done on “Radiation” and dove headfirst into electronic dance music and funk grooves. It was a startling musical shift, and the songs were enough of a curveball that they made the direction of the band’s next album highly unpredictable. And while 2016’s “Toogoodoo” turned out to be a mix of the electronic style and their more roots-oriented earlier music, it was perhaps more surprising for how it was recorded. Despite sounding like a highly polished, meticulously crafted collection of songs, the album was actually recorded live along the banks of the Toogoodoo River near Edisto, in a cabin owned by SLO keyboardist John Keith Culbreth’s parents. The band essentially moved a studio into the cabin, which presented enough problems that they barely had time to worry about the style of music they were going to play. “We were too busy thinking about the challenge of how to even record,” says guitarist Louis Duffie. “It was kind of a daunting task.” In fact, with a total of about two weeks in which to record before a group of renters came in to start their vacation at the cabin, the band was wondering what the hell they’d been thinking, especially when it took almost three days to get the first track done. “It was one of those things that sounded cool on paper,” Duffie says with a laugh. “When you’re hanging out with your boys drinking beers, you say, ‘Yeah, we should record down by the Toogoodoo,’ and it sounds cool, and then later it’s like ‘Man, are we going to be able to make this sound good?’ I didn’t even know some of the songs when we moved in there, and we started to kind of freak out because we knew we wanted to do at least 11 or 12 songs. There was a real time crunch.” But after the initial hurdles of setting up the studio, it turned out that the time limit, and the location, worked well for the band. “It really pushed us to not be lazy,” Duffie says. “And the music came a lot easier when

Stop Light Observations

Shore Fire Media

we sunk into the vibe. We even set up a mic on the porch that captured the cicadas and the flow of the water and crickets.” As for the sound on “Toogoodoo,” which puts singer Will Blackburn’s emotional vocals over anthemic rock with touches of electronics layered into the music, Duffie says it was something that came naturally. “We didn’t have any preconceived ideas of what the songs had to sound like,” he says. “Maybe it’s our downfall, but we’ve never really had a pinpointed sound. It’s good to have that mindset.” In the end, the process included both triumphs and frustrations for Stop Light Observations, who will play the second night of the Shoeless Jam arts and music festival in the Village of West Greenville on Saturday. “The hardest part was doing it live,” Duffie says. “We had to get used to the concept of everyone doing it perfectly and not overdubbing. It presented some good times and some tense times. It was a test, and everyone felt the pressure, and I learned that everyone could step up to the plate when the time came.”

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OLD CROW MEDICINE SHOW

TREVOR NOAH

Deborah Cox as Rachel Marron in The Bodyguard. © Joan Marcus.

CULTURE

WAKE UP CALL INSPIRATION AWAITS

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

The Revivalists bring their brand of boisterous funk and soul to Zoo Tunes

AT A GLANCE

2017- 2018

VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

LISTEN/ESCUCHA: CELEBRATING HISPANIC HERITAGE Free Peace Voices Event SEPTEMBER 7

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LES MISÉRABLES

The key word to keep in mind when it comes to the New Orleans band The Revivalists is “big.” They’re a big ensemble: seven players on nine different instruments. The music they play is big, bursting with a powerful horn section, rippling Hammond organ and piano, and a deep-in-thepocket rhythm section. The whole thing is topped off by the openhearted testifying of big-voiced singer David Shaw, who rivals any modern soul singer you’d care to name. It’s as if a late ’60s Stax-Volt soul revue ran smack into a funky roots-rock band and fused their sounds. And in the last two years, “big” is also a term that can apply to their success. On the strength of a huge hit single, “Wish I Knew You,” the past two years have been huge for The Revivalists. The song hit the Top 10 on four different Billboard charts, including Rock and Adult Alternative; it’s been streamed 22 million times on Spotify; and the band has appeared on “Ellen,” “Jimmy Kimmel Live,” “Today,” and “Conan.” The Revivalists have also been on the road more or less nonstop, playing the New Orleans Jazz Fest, Bonnaroo, and the Telluride Music Festival, along with headlining their own shows. So despite all the ink, sales, and progress, keyboardist and trumpet player Michael Girardot says it’s been hard to take in while the band’s been on the road. “There are certain moments when we see it,” Girardot says. “We’ll come back to a place that we haven’t been since last year, and we’re at a bigger venue and there’s twice as many people. So there are these moments where you can look back and think things have really changed from where we were 10 years ago. But day-to-day, you really don’t notice. We’re just working so hard on playing good shows.” A good show is what Greenville fans are in for when The Revivalists play at the Greenville Zoo on Aug. 25 as the final band of the 2017 Zoo Tunes series, which raises money for the Greenville Zoo Foundation’s work in the areas of animal care, conservation, and education. And if you’re familiar with the tracks on the band’s most recent album, “Men Amongst Mountains,” you might be a

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DREW HOLCOMB AND THE NEIGHBORS Rock the River Concert Series SEPTEMBER 21

TAJMO: THE TAJ MAHAL & KEB’ MO’ BAND OCTOBER 5

vharris@communityjournals.com

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The Revivalists

Brantley Gutierrez

bit surprised by what you hear when they’re onstage. “With our band, the songs on the record we do for the record, and the songs for the stage we do for the stage,” Girardot says. “They’re two different genres, the studio and live performance. For instance, if you look at ‘Wish I Knew You,’ which on the radio edit is just over three minutes long, the live version is like seven minutes long. We add sections, hit the chorus again, and add audience participation, but that’s part of what we do. We want to make sure that the song is best for the record when we record it, but when we perform it it’s best for the live show.” Girardot is still surprised that “Wish I Knew You” was the breakout song from “Men Amongst Mountains,” pointing out that even their record label went with another song, “Keep Going,” as the first single. “It’s hard for us to see it with a fresh set of eyes,” he says. “Sometimes it takes someone who has a better perspective than someone who’s been working on the songs for a year. We didn’t realize it was going to be a big hit. We all have our favorite songs on the album, and even with all of our label’s expertise, and they’re great, it’s really hard to predict what’s going to click with people.”

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CULTURE

COME TOGETHER

Welcome to our newest Doctor of Audiology, Dr. Maggie Robertson

Jacob Blickenstaff

The Marcus King Band

Marcus King organizes family reunion festival in Black Mountain, NC VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

Twenty-one-year-old blues guitar phenom and Greenville native Marcus King has spent much of the last two years on the road, touring nonstop. He and his six-piece namesake band have been relentlessly playing shows behind their 2016 self-titled album, which was produced by former Allman Brothers Band singer and guitarist Warren Haynes. And during that time, King says he and the band had to make some sacrifices back home. “We end up missing a lot of birthdays, weddings, holidays, and we missed a lot of family reunions,” King says. So at the beginning of 2017, with a full slate of shows ahead for his band, King thought, why not create a family reunion of his own? And that’s where the idea for The Marcus King Band Family Reunion Festival came from. The two-day music festival will take place at the Pisgah Brewing Company in Black Mountain, N.C., on Oct. 6 and 7 and will include performances by the MKB, Blackberry Smoke, Allman Brothers percussionist Jaimoe’s group the Jasssz Band, former Meter George Porter Jr., Revivalists singer David Shaw, and more. “We decided to come together and have

one big family reunion where all of our families could come and we can all celebrate as one,” King says of the original idea. “And after that, you find somewhere that can facilitate that idea and allow you to block out a couple of dates on a whim, just having faith that you’re going to do something cool there. The people at Pisgah Brewing Company have always been cool to us, and we’ve done a lot of playing in the area.” Pre-sales for the festival began on Wednesday through King’s website. Tickets are available to the public on Friday.

Dr. Robertson looks forward to serving patients in both the Greenville & Travelers Rest offices

Davis

“We end up missing a lot of birthdays, weddings, holidays, and we missed a lot of family reunions.” Part of the proceeds from the event will go to two Greenville nonprofit organizations, Cannabis Forward, an organization that raises awareness of the medical benefits of marijuana, and Mental Health America of Greenville County, a mental health advocacy, awareness, and service organization. “Cannabis Forward was one I thought of immediately,” King says. “They sponsored our last event in Greenville, and they’re just phenomenal people. And the message they’re trying to get across is an important one, that cannabis can really be used to help a lot of medical issues.” King adds, “The other charity I spoke to [Upstate musician] Charles Hedgepath about, and he helped me find this great organization that helps train professional counselors, coaching people on how to speak to someone in their time of need. It’s a blessing to be able to help.”

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IN THE SPOTLIGHT

AUG. 26

FESTIVAL

India Day The richness of Indian culture and heritage will be on full display at this year’s India Day. The daylong event gives attendees an opportunity to take in the sights, sounds, tastes, and traditions of India, offering both entertainment and education to the public. India Day also aims to support local entities including Ronald McDonald House Charities, Meals on Wheels, and the Vedic Center of Greenville. The event is hosted by the India Association of Greenville (IAG), a nonprofit formed in 1970 that provides Greenville families and individuals who have ties to India with “a forum for cultural and social interaction.” “Years ago, the Upstate Indian community consisted of 10 to 15 families. In order for these families to meet and celebrate all festivals, IAG was formed,” says Cima Mathur, one of the event’s organizers. “As the Upstate and Greenville area began to expand, and more families from the subcontinent migrated and were raising their children, India Day was started to get awareness to the community, as well as to teach their own children the roots of their forefathers.” Over time, India Day has transformed into a large-scale festival. “India Day has grown tremendously,” Mathur says. “It used to be in neighborhood clubhouses. Then we went over to the TD Convention Center and two years ago to downtown Greenville, where we saw more than 6,000 people attend.” Planned activities for India Day include open mat yoga, interactive dance workshops, a fashion show, a cultural parade, food vendors, informational exhibits on the nation’s four regions, a cooking show, henna and rangoli art, jewelry and clothing vendors, and more. The event will conclude with a Bollywood-style dance party and live DJ. —Emily Pietras

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IN THE SPOTLIGHT

SEP. 1

COMEDY

Shane Lucas Price Comedian Shane Lucas Price’s outlook on life was fundamentally shaped by a medical crisis. At 17, his gallbladder ruptured, and following surgery, he was placed in a medically induced coma for three days. “It was a battle for about nine years,” he says. After Price’s first year at Chaminade University of Honolulu, he landed in the hospital again. Doctors told him he had six months to live. To cope with the shock, Price turned to watching comedy specials. And despite his diagnosis, Price says his doctors “never gave up.” The experience “shaped who I am now and 100 percent shaped my comedy,” he says. “The way I view life now is completely different. I’m a super happy person, but I laugh at super dark things. It was the only way I was going to make it. Laugh in the face of death,” he reflects. “I started to feel better. I was taken off the liver transplant list just five years ago. Made me a better, stronger person. I’m glad it happened. When you value life, good things happen.” Shortly after he began to try stand-up comedy in 2011, Price was fired from his “cushy TV job.” But he has no hard feelings, calling it the “best thing that ever happened to me.” Price’s stand-up topics range from anecdotes about fatherhood to his fears to his impressions. He describes his style as “animated.” “I’m going to paint the picture,” he says. “Sometimes it’ll be a Pollock; other times it’s a Monet.” Price has opened for notable comedians such as Hannibal Buress, Katt Williams, Bo Burnham, Amy Schumer, and Greenville’s own Rory Scovel, whom Price calls “a magical man.” And those experiences have been invaluable. “I wouldn’t be where I’m at. Made me write tighter and turn over material faster,” he says. “It also shows me that I’m on the right track. Just have to keep putting in the work.” —Emily Pietras

A R T S C A LE N DA R AUG. 25 - 31, 2017

Main Street Fridays

Next Level Band

Aug. 25 — 233-2273 Furman University Thompson Gallery

Recent Work by Liz Rundorff Smith

Through Aug. 25 — 294-2074 Greenville County Museum of Art

Music in the Galleries Aug. 27 — 271-7570

Greenville County Museum of Art

African-American Art from the Greenville Collection Through Aug. 27 — 271-7570 Peace Center

“The King and I”

Through Aug. 27 — 467-3000

WHEN Saturday, Sept. 1, 7:30–8:45 p.m. WHERE Alchemy Comedy, 1 E. Coffee St. ADMISSION $10 INFO alchemycomedy.com

Piedmont Natural Gas Downtown Alive

Gimme the Gig Contest Winners Aug. 31 — 232-2273

Metropolitan Arts Council

Greenville Woodworkers Guild Exhibit

SEP. 7

Through Sep. 1 — 467-3132

MILITARY

Upper South Carolina Council of the Navy League – Quarterly Dinner Meeting The Upper South Carolina Council of the Navy League will host a quarterly dinner meeting on Sept. 7, featuring guest speaker Porter Halyburton. Halyburton, a U.S. Navy commander and radar intercept officer during the Vietnam War, was shot down in North Vietnam in 1965 and held captive for nearly eight years in the notorious prison camp dubbed the Zoo and the Hanoi Hilton. He was 24 years old at the time of his capture. Halyburton’s story is chronicled in James Hirsch’s 2004 book, “Two Souls Indivisible.” When Halyburton was captured, racial tensions in the U.S. were high, and the North Vietnamese intentionally put the white Halyburton in the same cell as Fred Cherry, a black Air Force pilot, “believing that their antipathy toward each other would break them both,” the book’s summary reads. But that plan failed. Despite their “initial suspicions,” Halyburton and Cherry ultimately became close friends during their imprisonment, forming a bond that was crucial to surviving “prodigious suffering and unspeakable torture.” The Navy League is a civilian organization that supports the United States’ sea services: the Navy, Coast Guard, Marines, and Merchant Marines, says board member Chuck Pringle. Through their quarterly dinner meetings, as well as some corporate contributions, the organization also helps to financially support Naval ROTC and sea cadet programs in area high schools. For Pringle, the talks that occur at the dinner meetings reflect the importance of keeping history alive. “These are typically about historical events and developments of our sea services. We should never forget the lessons of history. These are particularly meaningful from a naval history standpoint, but they also have a broader perspective certainly,” he says. “I’m of a different generation, and when I talk to my younger friends these days, it’s amazing how much they’re missing in terms of what took place that makes us great. That’s the purpose, to raise that kind of awareness.” And Halyburton is one of many renowned speakers the organization has been able to present over the years. Pringle adds, “Some of the speakers we’ve had have just been phenomenal. … Through the connections we have locally — we have a number of Naval Academy grads and veterans and retired flag officers, like admirals — we’ve been able to arrange an interesting array of speakers.” Reservations to attend the dinner meeting must be submitted by Sunday, Sept. 3. The event is open to the public. Attendees are asked to note that the Poinsett Club dress code requires a sport coat for men in the evening. —Emily Pietras

Greenville County Museum of Art

“Wyeth Dynasty” “In a Mirror, Darkly” Works by Carew Rice

All through Sep. 10 — 271-7570 Greenville Chamber of Commerce

Works by Laura Nance & Dan Williams Through Sep. 15 — 242-1050 Riverworks Gallery

Works by Paul Yanko

Through Sep. 24 — 271-0679 Greenville Center for Creative Arts

Annual Showcase Exhibition Through Sep. 27 — 271-0679

Main Street Real Estate Gallery

Works by Kiah Bellows

Through Sep. 30 — 250-2850 Greenville County Museum of Art

“Victoria Wyeth: My Andy” Through Oct. 22 — 271-7570

Works by Grainger McCoy Through Dec. 31 — 271-7570

WHEN Thursday, Sept. 7, 6 p.m. WHERE The Poinsett Club, 807 E. Washington St. ADMISSION $33/person INFO bit.ly/2wba9SX, contact Mike Epprecht via 864-438-4621 or navyleague.uppersccouncil@yahoo.com

w w w.greenvillearts.com 16 Augusta Street

864. 467.3132


Health Iss u

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We’re Here for You! Compounding Solutions Pam Bramlett, RPh

Certified Hormone Specialist

864-558-0507 115 Pelham Rd., Suite 12, Greenville Monday - Friday 9:30 am - 5:30 pm www.MyCompoundingSolutions.com

CULTURE VISUAL ART

THRU FRI

Liz Rundorff Smith Exhibit

25

Furman University, Thompson Art Gallery, Roe Art Building | 3300 Poinsett Highway 9 a.m.-5 p.m. | FREE Liz Rundorff Smith, art school director for Greenville Center for Creative Arts (GCCA), will present “Found Paintings” on the campus of Furman University. Rundorff Smith served as program director for Greenville’s Artisphere arts festival from 2006-16. Exhibit is open Monday-Friday. Reception and talk will be held Aug. 25, 6-7:30 p.m. 864-294-2995 | bit.ly/2uVgZZ3

MUSIC

FRI

25

Greenville Heritage Main Street Fridays

NOMA Square 5:30-9:30 p.m. | FREE Kick off the weekend with Main Street Friday. Bring the whole family down for a night of fun. There will be inflatables for the kids in the Sabal Homes Kids’ Area, beverages for the adults from KW Beverage, and dancing for all ages at the CPI Security Stage!. Aug. 25 features the party and R&B sounds of Next Level Band. gvilleevents.com

FUNDRAISER

Chop Cancer Upstate

TD Convention Center | 1 Exposition Drive 6 p.m. | $150 This amateur cooking competition, benefiting the Cancer Survivors Park Alliance, will feature 18 local celebrities and Upstate community leaders battling away in the kitchen and help CHOP Cancer. Their culinary creations – featuring cancer-fighting ingredients — will be judged by professional chefs and well-known foodies – and you get a say in who wins through online voting. chopcancerupstate.com

FRI-SUN

25-03 Webber”

THEATER

“Music of the Night: The Music of Andrew Lloyd

Flat Rock Playhouse | 2661 Greenville Highway, Flat Rock, NC | Wednesday and Thursday evenings at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday evenings 8 p.m., matinees Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. | $15-50 The Flat Rock Playhouse 2017 season continues with the legendary music and lyrics of one of musical theater’s greatest composers: Andrew Lloyd Web-

AUG. 25 CONCERT

en’s m o W

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Specialize We in

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ber. Featuring songs from Broadway sensations like “Evita,” “Cats,” and “The Phantom of the Opera,” “Music of the Night: The Songs of Andrew Lloyd Webber” plays on the Mainstage. 828-693-0731 | 866-732-8008 flatrockplayhouse.org

SAT

26

CONCERT

2017 Biltmore Concert Series

Biltmore Estates | 1 Lodge St., Asheville 7:30 p.m. Celebrate summer at Biltmore with the estate’s 21st annual concert series. Aug. 26 will feature the Goo Goo Dolls: Long Way Home Summer Tour 2017 with Special Guest Phillip Phillips. 866-336-1255 | biltmore.com/concerts

COMMUNITY

BeWell Mauldin Market

Mauldin Outdoor Amphitheater 101 East Butler Road, Mauldin 8 a.m.-noon | Saturdays through Aug. 26 | FREE The market features a variety of vendors from around the Upstate selling locally sourced and produced items including produce, dairy, eggs, honey, gifts, clothing, accessories, treats, pastries, and more. The market will also feature free healthy activities such as small-group fitness, health screenings, and cooking demos.

COMMUNITY

TD Saturday Market

Greenville Health System Main Street between Court and Washington streets | Saturdays through Oct. 28 | FREE TD Saturday Market presented by Greenville Health System brings farm-fresh produce, baked goods, meats, cheeses, seafood, and other specialty foods to downtown Greenville. This year’s market features the Lowes Foods Front Porch.

EDUCATION

Paris Mountain State Park Fourth Saturday

Paris Mountain State Park | 2401 State Park Road 10 a.m.-3 p.m. The Friends of Paris Mountain State Park will host a program at 10 a.m., called Migratory Birds of the Upstate. After an introduction inside, Jeff Click of the Greenville County Bird Club will lead a familyfriendly trail walk focused on birds of our area. Meet at the Park Center for this two-hour program. No registration is required, and there is no charge for this program beyond park admission. Interpretive Ranger Cathy Taylor will present a program at 1 p.m. called

https://soundcloud.com/kenny-george-band

Kenny George Band w/ The Travelin’ Kine and Mac Leaphart Gottrocks 200 Eisenhower Drive 9 p.m. | $12

Aiken’s Kenny George Band has recently been through both the best and worst of times. They’ve just released their new album, an infectiously catchy blend of acoustic country and electric rock called “Borrowed Trouble,” easily their strongest studio work. But then a few weeks ago, their much-beloved drummer, Bucky Brown, suddenly died, leaving the band heartbroken and facing a string of live shows that had already been booked. “I felt kind of lost as to how to approach it,” George says. “There were definitely times where I wondered, ‘How are we going to do this?’” After a brief regrouping period, and an outpouring of love from their fans and fellow musicians, the band has decided to soldier on with fill-in drummers, at least in the short term. “Everyone loved Bucky,” George says. “He could talk to anything about anything. He would’ve wanted us to keep going, because this was as much his dream as ours. But as for the future, I’m not real sure, to be honest. Right now, the next step is just playing and doing what we do.” —Vincent Harris


08.25.207 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 39

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

CULTURE

SAT-SUN

26-27

NOBLE DOG

AUG. 27 CONCERT

Turtle Trail Naturalist Hike, presenting tools, tips, and hand-outs to encourage the pursuit of natural wonder. On a 1-mile hike along the Turtle Trail, participants will practice some of these skills. This two-hour program costs $7 per person, payable at the admission booth instead of admission, and will begin at the Park Center. Registration is required. Limit 25. 864-244-5565 | friendsofparismountain.com ctaylor@scprt.com

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FUNDRAISER

Upstate S.C. Law Enforcement Memorial Softball Tournament

1320 HAMPTON AVE SUITE 8 GREENVILLE, SC 29601

864.412.5222

Greer Police Department | Century Park 3605 Brushy Creek Road, Greer | $250/team Public safety agencies from across the Upstate will compete in the softball tournament to honor law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty. All money raised goes to support the families of fallen officers in Upstate South Carolina. gallaghersarmy.com/upstate-sc-law-enforcementmemorial-softball-tournament/

28

COMMUNITY

Jeff Duncan’s 7th Annual Faith & Freedom BBQ

Anderson Civic Center 3027 Martin Luther King Jr Blvd. 6 p.m. | $35 South Carolina’s largest annual gathering of conservatives will feature special guest Sen. Joni Ernst. 803-807-1034

Shaun Williams w/ Kathy Hall & Aaron Burke

GARDENING

Shaun Williams is probably best known to Upstate music fans as the singer and guitarist for the rock trio Archer vs. Gunman, but he’s actually been performing solo acoustic for far longer than AvG has been around. “I really like the fact that it’s just me and a guitar,” Williams says, “and I really like that the songs get stripped down to their bare bones. I don’t have a band to hide behind and the songs don’t either. It can be really self-affirming for me and for the songs. If they’re actually good, it’ll show without all the sheen.” In fact, one of the things Williams likes to do in the solo acoustic setting is take Archer vs. Gunman’s tough, heartfelt rock songs and strip them back down to their roots. “A lot of those songs work really well without the big band arrangement and at a slower tempo,” he says. “But I’ll also be playing some newer stuff that’s quieter and more introspective.” —Vincent Harris

Greater Greenville Rose Society

MD360’s community room 11402 Anderson Road, Medical Center Powdersville 7 p.m. Greater Greenville Rose Society will meet in Powdersville. Interested persons are invited to attend. greenvillerosesociety.org

MON-OCT

28-28

HEALTH AND FITNESS

Women’s Exclusive 5K Training Program for Spinx Runfest

Swamp Rabbit Cafe | 205 Cedar Lane Road | $160 Join a registered dietitian nutritionist and certified run coach for an eight-week 5K training program exclusively for women that are new to running or returning after time off. This program, limited to 25 women, leads up to the Spinx Runfest on Oct. 28. This program can help participants learn about better food choices, overcome training hurdles, uncover easier access to healthy habits, and provide motivation and personal guidance. Wendie Schneider, owner of Pantry Doctor LLC, is a registered dietitian nutritionist, and Tracey Ashall is a certified run coach. There will be group runs Mondays and Thursdays at

Sans Souci Community Gardens Concert Series | 12 Ethelridge Drive | 7 p.m. $5 donation encouraged

6 p.m. at the Swamp Rabbit Café and Saturday mornings at 8:30 a.m. Training begins Aug. 28 at 6 p.m. at Swamp Rabbit Café. 864-614-1556 | info@pantrydr.com bit.ly/2g0J4Lm

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MON

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CULTURE 29

Book Talk & Signing with Debut Southern Author Leah Weiss

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 2 p.m. FREE Southern author Leah Weiss will discuss her debut novel, “If the Creek Don’t Rise,” at a book talk and signing at Fiction Addiction. Leah will be introduced by her friend and fellow author Sue Inman, Greenville author of “Year of the Snake: 1989.” This event is free and open to the public and refreshments will be served, but please RSVP to Fiction Addiction if you plan to attend. Books can be purchased online, at the store, or by calling Fiction Addiction. 864-675-0540 fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com

WED

30

AUG. 30

LITERATURE

COMMUNITY

Greenville Chamber Advocacy Breakfast

Embassy Suites Golf Resort & Conference Center 670 Verdae Blvd. 8-9:30 a.m. $25/investor or $40 for general admission Rep. Jeff Duncan from South Carolina’s 3rd congressional district will share an update on what’s coming up as Congress prepares for debates over the budget, debt ceiling, and tax reform. You won’t want to miss this opportunity to engage with your local congressman. Register by Aug. 28. 864-239-3748 greenvillechamber.org kbusbee@greenvillechamber.org

Fall is for

Planting!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6xxz6hnS-nY The ScanSource Reedy River Concert Series feat. The Fillmore Brothers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XMb-VPzrHfU

TD Stage | 300 S. Main St. | 7 p.m. | Free

THRU THU

31

COMMUNITY

TCMU August Events

Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. | Free with admission Visit The Children’s Museum of the Upstate for reccurring events like Random Acts of Science, Off the Wall, and Storytime, as well as special one-time events. This month’s events center around the theme of space. All events and activites are free with museum admission. tcmupstate.org

THU

31

MUSIC

Piedmont Natural Gas Downtown Alive

NOMA Square 5:30-8:30 p.m. FREE Grab your friends and head to NOMA Square after work for Downtown Alive. Bring your dancing shoes and enjoy the sounds of local and regional bands on the Rowdy Gents Stage. Aug. 31 will feature the country/alternative rock sounds of the Grayhound Band. gvilleevents.com

LECTURE

“Meet the Press” Moderator Chuck Todd

Furman University | McAlister Auditorium 3300 Poinsett Highway 5:30-7 p.m. $15 Chuck Todd, NBC News political director and moderator of “Meet the Press,” will be the keynote speaker for the program “Alternative Facts and Partisan Media: Missing Walter Cronkite.” His talk is part of the series “Media and Politics in a Post-Truth Era” presented by the Riley Institute at Furman and the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. 864-294-2998| bit.ly/2uJgp4i

TLC

GARDEN DESIGN Specializing in… • Custom Container Gardening • Landscape Consultation & Design • Annual & Perennial Beds

864-553-9566

Traci Carver - Horticulturist email: carvertlc@yahoo.com

For the past several years, the veteran Upstate quartet True Blues has gathered together some friends and performed as The Fillmore Brothers, playing a concert to pay tribute to the Allman Brothers Band and their 1971 masterpiece of Southern rock and high-wire improvisation, “At Fillmore East.” But this year, their performance is a little more meaningful. “With Gregg [Allman] and [drummer] Butch Trucks passing away this year, it really made us want to approach the City and see if we could do it again as part of the Reedy River Concert Series, and they said yes,” says drummer Joe Cash, who will be playing in tandem with Honey & The Hot Rods drummer Freddie Wooten. Reproducing the marathon jams, epic power, and deceptively agile touch of the Allman Brothers is no easy task, but Cash says the group is up to the challenge. “It’s a hard project to do, but it’s an honor and blessing to be able to pull it off,” he says.” —Vincent Harris

CONCERT

TUE

THU-NOV

31-13

COMMUNITY

Meet MHAGC

Mental Health America of Greenville County 429 N. Main St., Ste. 2 FREE Have you heard about the work of CRISISline and other programs of Mental Health America of Greenville County (MHAGC) but have never had the chance to see it for yourself? Sign up for an upcoming “Meet MHAGC!” events: Thursday, Aug. 31, 9-10:30 a.m.; Monday, Sept. 11, 1-2:30 p.m.; Thursday, Sept. 21, 9-10:30 a.m.; Monday, Oct. 9, 1-2:30 p.m.; and Monday, Nov. 13, 1-2:30 p.m. Learn more about our organization and efforts at an upcoming “Meet MHAGC!” event. Please RSVP with name, organization (if applicable), title (if applicable), and an email/ phone number. 864-467-3598 MHAGC@MHAGC.org

SEP FRI-SAT

01-02

THEATER

Furman Theatre Presents Shanley’s “Danny and the Deep Blue Sea”

Furman University | The Playhouse 3300 Poinsett Highway 8 p.m. with matinee on 9/2 at 3 p.m. | $5 Directed by guest artist Carol Sutton, the play by the Academy and Tony Award-winning John Patrick Shanley is described as “an explosive, deeply affecting study of alienation and the redemptive power of love.” It features Furman senior Elli Caterisano as Roberta and Sam Nelson (Class of 2017) as Danny. Mature subject matter. 864-294-2125 | bit.ly/2uTWCLk Mickie.spencer@furman.edu

SAT

02

COMMUNITY

Summit for Change

Greenville Young Democrats West End Community Development Center 404 Vardry St. | 1-3:30 p.m. | FREE The Greenville Young Democrats are hosting a summit for all organizations working to bring about progressive change in Greenville and to see how they can work together to push forward their agendas, to make passion into policy. Every organization that attends will have the opportunity to address the summit in three- to five-minute remarks and set up an information table for their organization. It will be a great chance to network, share the great work they’ve done, and bring others to their cause. Jalen Elrod at 864-915-7020

SUN

03

CONCERT

Spiritfest

Bon Secours Wellness Arena 650 N. Academy St. 5 p.m. | $42-$52 Spiritfest 2017 returns to The Well with incredible gospel music and worship. Artists include Tye Tribbett, Tamela Mann, The Rance Allen Group, and Travis Greene. 864-241-3800 | bonsecoursarena.com info@bswarena.com

WED

06

LITERATURE

Fiction Addiction Parents & Grandparents Party

Fiction Addiction | 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 6 p.m. | $15/adult, children are free Tickets can be redeemed for $10 off merchandise at the event The store will serve refreshments, talk about new and upcoming children’s books, give recommendations for kids and grandkids, and give away advanced reader editions of children’s books. Be sure to RSVP. 864-675-0540 | fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com

WED-SAT

06-30

VISUAL ARTS

SC WaterMedia Exhibit

West Main Artists Co-Op 578 W. Main St., Spartanburg Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; and Saturdays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. | FREE For the first time in more than 10 years, the South Carolina WaterMedia Society’s annual Traveling Exhibit will come to Spartanburg in September 2017 and will be on public display at West Main Artists Co-Op. A private preopening event for donors will be held Sept. 5, and the free public reception will be held Saturday, Sept. 9, 5-8 p.m. 864-804-6501

WED-DEC

06-14

EDUCATION

Fall 2017 Language Classes

Upstate International 9 S. Memminger St. Mondays-Thursdays $50 for membership; $90 for regular classes; $300 for intensive classes Upstate International (UI) is proud to offer classes in numerous languages that accommodate a variety of skill levels. Whether you are a beginner, advanced, or anywhere in between, UI’s language classes will give participants confidence and skills needed to develop proficiency in a foreign language. Programs are flexible and taught by passionate native teachers who love to share their culture and language. Programs are geared toward engagement and exploration, not rote memorization. Taking a language class at UI is an experience that will widen cultural horizons, build valuable skills in language and comprehension, and bring the world to the classroom. 864-631-2188 info@upstateinternational.org

WED-MAY

06-MAY

VISUAL ARTS

Art Classes from Crooked Roads Surface Design

Crooked roads Surface Design | 314 Wilton St. $50/month Charlie Slate is offering regular after-school classes in her home studio. Elementary, middle, and high school students are invited to participate. crookedroads.com

THU

07

FAMILY

Storytime Thursday

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 10:30 a.m. | FREE Fiction Addiction hosts a free children’s storytime each Thursday This week’s featured story is “Black Belt Bunny” by Jacky Davis and illustrated by Jay Fleck. 864-675-0540 fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com


COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

CULTURE LECTURE

FRI-SUN

Huguenot Mill | 101 W. Broad St. 6:30 p.m. | FREE The Peace Center’s 2017-2018 Peace Voices program presents Listen/Escucha: Celebrating Hispanic Heritage featuring Vera Gomez with Mariam Estrada, Elena Cruz, and Virgilio Sebastian. A first-generation child of immigrants, Vera Gomez will be joined by the Peace Center’s Peace Voices poets – Elena Cruz (Fine Arts Center), Mariam Estrada (Greenville High graduate), and Virgilio Sebastian (Greenville High graduate) – for an evening of poetry that uplifts and encourages. 864-467-3000 | 800-888-7768 | peacecenter.org

Greenville Little Theatre 444 College St. $30 The Greenville Little Theatre presents Agatha Christie’s “The Mousetrap” as the season opener to the 2017-2018 season. “The Mousetrap” is the first of six MainStage productions in what is being called the Season of Surprise, and is also the 25th season for Greenville favorites Allen McCalla (executive artistic director) and Suzanne McCalla (producing director). Directed by Sam McCalla, this cast features Emily Grove, Craig Smith, Carter Allen, Catherine Christophillis, Robert Simms, Latreshia Lilly, Evan Harris, and Luke Brooks. 864-233-6238 greenvillelittletheatre.org

Listen/Escucha: Celebrating Hispanic Heritage

FRI

08

FUNDRAISER

11th Annual Sippin’ Safari

Greenville Zoo | 150 Cleveland Park Drive 6:30-9:30 p.m. $20 for designated drivers, $45 til 9/1, $55 after 9/1 Sippin’ Safari 2017 will feature over 40 great wines to sample, a beer garden, amazing food from local restaurants and vendors, and live music from TJ Laser and The New Detroits. Guests must be 21+. bit.ly/SippinSafari2017

MUSIC

Nathan Angelo: “A Matter of Time” Album Release

Spinning Jenny | 107 Cannon St., Greer 8-10:30 p.m. | $10 adv./$14 doors Local singer-songwriter Nathan Angelo will perform an album release show with special guest Kyshona Armstrong. The show will feature songs from Angelo’s new record, “A Matter of Time.” 423-432-5837 | nathanangelo.com

FAMILY

Children’s Book Illustrator Alice Ratterree to Celebrate Launch of New Picture Book

Fiction Addiction | 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 4-6 p.m. | FREE Greenville children’s book illustrator Alice Ratterree will be celebrating the launch of her new picture book, “Dangerous Jane,” by Suzanne Slade at her launch party. 864-675-0540 | fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com

VISUAL ARTS

Paul Yanko Artist Reception and Gallery Talk

Greenville Technical College Riverworks Gallery | 300 River St., Ste. 202 6-9 p.m. | FREE Riverworks Gallery presents Paul Yanko’s site-specific wall mural plus recent mixed media works on paper: “Snap to Grid,” “Migrate from Center,” and “Deviate and Expand.” Exhibit can be viewed through Sept. 24. gvltec.edu/dva

MUSIC

End of Summer Dance Party

Radio Room | 110 Poinsett Highway 9 a.m.-11:45 p.m. | $8 Enjoy funky and fresh vapordance and phenomenal blasts of bass in this end of summer smash hit for all ages. If you have the need to live layers deep in irony, love posting fresh memes, blurry neon lights, thicc/ kawaii bass, obscure ‘90s subcultural references, badly translated Japanese, or have an unquenchable thirst for impossible aesthetics, then this dance party will destroy your sadmemes. Wash away the shame of watching the “Emoji Movie” with Carpoolparty’s funky and fresh blend of disco, hip-hop, funk, and vaporwave and then lose your mind to bass connoisseur, YUKI. It’s the only way to say goodbye to this summer. 864-326-6052 | carpoolpartymain@gmail.com

08-01

TUE

09

THEATER

Agatha Christie’s “The Mousetrap”

COMMUNITY

Truck Inn Tuesdays

Swamp Rabbit Inn 1 Logan St. 6-9 p.m. Enjoy Automatic Taco food truck, live music, and local beer. Sept. 9 will feature the Swamp Rabbit Music Fest.

FUNDRAISER

#JackIsAFighter

The Elks Lodge 7700 Pelham Road 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Jack is a happy 2 1/2-year-old recently diagnosed with pre-B childhood acute leukemia. He will be undergoing treatment for the next three years. Join the Elks Lodge in his fight against leukemia. Stop by and grab barbecue plates and raffle tickets.

LITERATURE

Southern Author Panel Talk & Signing

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 2 p.m. $10 Meet these Southern authors at a book talk, followed by a Q&A session and a book signing. The event features Roger Johns (author of “Dark River Rising”), Lawrence Thackston (author of “Carolina Cruel”), Sean Keefer (author of “The Solicitor”), and Brock Adams (author of “Ember”). Each ticket admits one and can be redeemed for $10 off any of the featured authors’ books prior to or at the event. 864-675-0540 fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com

THRU SUN

10

VISUAL ARTS

“In a Mirror, Darkly”

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College St. Wednesdays-Saturdays 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sundays 1-5 p.m. | FREE Explore the issues and images created when white artists portray black subjects and experiences in this insightful exhibition. 271-7570 | gcma.org

VISUAL ARTS

Exhibition: “Carew Rice”

Greenville County Museum of Art | 420 College St. Wednesdays-Saturdays 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sundays 1-5 p.m. FREE Renowned silhouettist and South Carolina native Carew Rice captured the Lowcountry landscape and its people in these captivating silhouettes from the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s. 864-271-7570 | gcma.org

VISUAL ARTS

Wyeth Dynasty

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College St. In celebration of the centennial of Andrew Wyeth’s birth, the Museum presents Wyeth Dynasty, a retrospective of Andrew Wyeth’s art complemented by works of his father, N. C., his son Jamie, and his sisters Carolyn and Henriette. More than 80 examples are featured in this exhibition of works by the first family of American painting. 271-7570 | gcma.org

SUN

10

CULINARY

A Celebration of American Grocery

M.Judson Booksellers & Storytellers 130 South Main St. | 7 p.m. | $100 M. Judson will host Joe Clarke and his team from American Grocery for an evening of remembering this groundbreaking Greenville institution. The format will be familiar — yes, there will be a cocktail — with four courses of the food that made AGR what we’re going to miss most in the West End. But attendees will also get to hear from Joe and Darlene about all the great plans in store for this dynamic duo. 864-603-2412 mjudsonbooks.com/presale-agr-sunday-supper

CONCERT

Concert Series feat. Pan Harmonia

Greenville Center for Creative Arts | 25 Draper St. $20 in advance | $25 day of Based in Asheville, N.C., Pan Harmonia has created quite a name for itself across the region. Its visionary director, flutist Kate Steinbeck, has been lauded for the alluring and enchanting music she presents. This fall marks Pan Harmonia’s 18th season of exquisite and exhilarating performances. Don’t miss this opportunity to experience captivating acoustic sounds performed by world-class musicians in the Village of West Greenville. There will be refreshments available. Treat yourself and friend to an unparalleled experience — sumptuous sounds surrounded by art. Seating is limited for these events. Series dates include Sept. 9, Nov. 13, March 18, and April 29. 828-254-7123 PanHarmonia.org

THRU MON

11

EDUCATION

South Carolina Children’s Theatre fall registration

Registration is open for fall acting classes. Register by Aug. 28 and receive the early enrollment discount, $25 off each class. Use the code earlyfall2017. Classes will start the week of Sept. 11 in our temporary location at 1200 Pendleton St. in the West Village. scchildrenstheatre.org

THRU TUE

26

COMMUNITY

Free Coffee Tuesdays Seasons Cafe 1054 E. Butler Road

7:30 a.m. Tuesday mornings Seasons Cafe and Catering is offering a space for parents to stop by after dropping off the children at school to enjoy a free hot coffee when you purchase a homemade cinnamon roll. info@seasonscafeandcatering.com

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE? Send your event information and images to calendar@ communityjournals.com by Wednesday at 5 p.m. to be considered for publication in the following week’s Journal.

08.25.207 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 41

Understanding

Grief

Seminars for the community, educators and professional caregivers featuring Dr. Harold Ivan Smith Assisting Grievers in the Community

A FREE seminar for educators September 26, 2017 3:00pm to 5:00pm

How Long Does ‘Normal’ Grief Last? A FREE seminar for anyone experiencing grief or loss September 26, 2017 6:45pm to 9:00pm

If I Were Grieving ‘Right’ Should I Be Done by Now?

A full day workshop for professional caregivers $35.00 Registration Fee for Professionals seeking CEU Credit

September 27, 2017 8:30am - 4:00pm All seminars are located at the TD Convention Center 1 Exposition Drive Greenville, SC For more information or to make a reservation, call (864) 235-8330 or register online at www.thomasmcafee.com. Presented as a public service by:


42 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 08.25.207 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

Torment of the Timid 62 Engine conduits 1 Garam — (spice mix in 64 Suffix with acetyl Indian cuisine) 65 Fa follower 7 Core PC component 67 Parking area 10 Praiseful poem title starter 68 Riddle, part 4 15 Cheering yells 73 Grizzly baby 19 Off the mark 76 Joanne of “All the King’s 20 Some little batteries Men” 21 “Time waits for —” 77 Male doll 22 Dismounted from a horse 78 Rambled on and on 23 Start of a riddle 82 Adam’s second son 26 Musical pitch 84 Neuters 27 Moisten again 86 Mars, to Greeks 28 A — (like some logic) 88 — time (ever) 29 Like ore 89 Invalidate 30 Set of rules 91 Riddle, part 5 31 Riddle, part 2 94 Singer Adams 35 San Luis —, California 95 “The Greatest” fighter 38 — Poke (candy brand) 96 Beaver, e.g. 39 Singer Lovett 97 See 58-Across 40 With 50-Down, happened 98 Kind of tide to meet 100 Moo goo — pan 41 Laundry-day spray 102 Traps, as by a winter 46 Great sorrow storm TOTALLY PROFESSIONAL. DELIGHTFULLY IMMATURE. 48 Top-floor storeroom 105 End of the riddle TOTALLY TOTALLY PROFESSIONAL. PROFESSIONAL. DELIGHTFULLY DELIGHTFULLY IMMATURE. IMMATURE. TOTALLY PROFESSIONAL. DELIGHTFULLY IMMATURE. 52 Riddle, part 3 113 Diner grub TOTALLY PROFESSIONAL. DELIGHTFULLY IMMATURE. 56 Reptile withPROFESSIONAL. a spiny back TOTALLY DELIGHTFULLY IMMATURE. 114 In most cases: Abbr. 57 Like meat prepared per 115 Repair, as a shoe bottom Muslim law 116 Longtime Toyota 58 With 97-Across, like late 120 Andean ancient payments 121 Riddle’s answer 59 Felt sick 124 Den noise 61 PlumTOTALLY parts PROFESSIONAL. DELIGHTFULLY 125 Kagan of the court IMMATURE. TOTALLY PROFESSIONAL. DELIGHTFULLY IMMATURE. ACROSS

By Frank Longo

126 Teacup part 127 Frozen fries brand 128 Long dagger 129 Winona of “Mermaids” 130 — -Caps (candy brand) 131 Cooking oil brand DOWN

1 Bryn — College 2 Arthur of the court 3 Ragout, e.g. 4 James of “Gunsmoke” 5 Portable computer 6 Passing vote 7 Island near Naples 8 Politico Sarah 9 Make — (employ) 10 Nobelist Eugene 11 ICU figure 12 Atlanta university 13 Not too wild to domesticate 14 Counterpart of round-trip 15 Increase by degrees 16 Detached 17 Dhoti wearer 18 Mill metal 24 — -Locka, Florida 25 Start of the old Ipana toothpaste jingle 32 Station 33 More humble 34 Mill debris 35 Lawn care brand 99 Court jester, e.g. 110 “Over There” songwriter 36 Religion of Iran 101 In back 111 Last Oldsmobile model 37 Counting everything 103 Cardinal Borgia 112 Untilled field 42 Wraps, as a healing ankle 104 Draws forth 117 Letters before chis 43 “It’s — of do or die” 105 Wade Boggs’ base 118 Start over on 44 Some are civil: Abbr. 106 Vietnam’s capital 119 Hot — oven 45 Sever 107 Acting award 122 Reno-to-Spokane dir. 47 Olive of the comics 108 Steadied by attaching a 123 NYSE index 49 Kite’s trailer rope to 50 See 40-Across 109 Snaky letters Crossword answers: page 39 51 Play’s actors 53 Barber’s sprinkle-on 54 Greek epic by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan 55 Singer k.d. 56 Start of a denial 60 Footballer Boomer 63 “ER” figure 64 Berlin article 66 Allow to attack 69 Through the roof 70 City east of Phoenix 71 Without blinking — 72 MacFarlane of “Ted” 73 Bit of pasta, informally 74 Lyft rival 75 Flock of quail 79 Forays 80 Boredom 81 Gold-medal swimmer Amy Van — 83 Usurer 85 Beltmaking tool 86 Rumpus 87 Wand 90 Genuflection joint 92 Big families 93 Power co. 95 In a mockingly humorous way Sudoku answers: page 39 Medium

Sudoku


08.25.207 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 43

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that NS Stark LLC/ DBA Liquor Express intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of LIQUOR at 225 East Butler Road, Mauldin, SC 29662 To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than August 27, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that YWB LLC /DBA WHAT ALES YOU intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 105 C New Plaza Dr., Greenville, SC 29617. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than September 10, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Liability Brewing Company intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of WINE, and the sale and ON & OFF premises consumption of BEER at 109 W. Stone Avenue, Greenville, SC 29609 To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than September 10, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Dailey Cigar LLC / DBA /TCB intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 23 College Street, Greenville, SC 29601 To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than August 27, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: IFB# 07-10/17/17, Greenville County Pavilion Renovation/ Expansion Project, October 17, 2017, 3:00PM. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org/ Procurement/ or by calling (864) 467-7200. PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE There will be a PUBLIC HEARING before the GREENVILLE COUNTY BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS ON WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2017 AT 3:00 P.M. in CONFERENCE ROOM –D at GREENVILLE COUNTY SQUARE, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, S.C., for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the petitions listed below. PERSONS HAVING AN INTEREST IN THESE PETITIONS MAY BECOME PARTIES OF RECORD BY FILING WITH THE BOARD, AT LEAST THREE (3) DAYS PRIOR TO THE SCHEDULED DATE SET FOR HEARING, BY WRITING THEIR ADDRESS, A STATEMENT OF THEIR POSITION AND THE REASONS WHY THE RELIEF SOUGHT WITH RESPECT TO SUCH PROPERTY SHOULD OR SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED. CB-17-40 APPLICANT: GREENVILLE BISTRO, LLC TAX MAP#: 0543.01-01-001.01 LOCATION: 805 Frontage Road, Greenville SC REQUEST: APPEAL Code Violation notice issued on 5/24/17 CB-17-46 APPLICANT: KEVIN SMITH TAX MAP#: B003.01-01-093.00 LOCATION: 504 Eastcliffe Way, Greenville SC REQUEST: APPEAL Zoning Administrator’s Decision CB-17-47 APPLICANT: EASTLINK CHARTER SCHOOL TAX MAP#: T029.04-01-034.15 LOCATION: 3550 Rutherford Road, Taylors SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception for a school on site LEGAL NOTICE The public will have opportunity to comment on Greenville County’s grant application for the 2017 Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) program from the US Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance beginning on August 25, 2017 through September 15, 2017 at 12 noon at the Greenville County Office of Management and Budget, 301 University Ridge, Suite 200, Greenville, South Carolina 29601. The purpose for the comment period is to receive comments from the public concerning the Greenville County JAG grant application for FY2017 in the amount of $163,164. Said grant application would fund the Department of Public Safety, Forensics Division at $39,388 for training and supplies; the Department of Public Safety, Records Division at $15,000 for temporary staff to work on special projects; the Circuit Solicitor’s Office at $54,388 for contractual services to continue the Adult and Juvenile Drug Courts; and the Sheriff’s Office for $54,388 for equipment. Written comments regarding the proposed JAG grant application must be received by mail, fax or email in the Office of Management and Budget no later than 12 noon on September 15, 2017, attention to Office of Management and Budget, 301 University Ridge, Suite 200, Greenville, SC 29601, fax no. (864) 467-7340, email ‘rparris@greenvillecounty. org’. Questions regarding the JAG grant application should be addressed to Ruth Parris at (864) 467-7020.

AUCTION NOTICE Notice is hereby given that on 9/9/2017, at 9:00 a.m. at East North Storage, 4329 East North Street, Greenville, SC, the undersigned, East North Storage will sell at Public Sale by competitive bidding, the personal property heretofore store with the undersigned by: 1. Unit: A200, Kelvin Hunter, Misc household & Alum wheels 2. Unit: A120, Gloria Gray, Misc household; clothing 3. Unit: B266, Maxine McElrath, Misc household; clothing 4. Unit: A197, Shanell Deluca, Misc craft & garden items 5. Unit: A020, Mark Bradberry, Misc. household; boxes; etc 6. Unit: A028, Thomas AdamsAbercrombie, Clothes; shoes; misc furniture 7. Unit: C0211, Deonna Dotson, Furniture; Misc. household 8. Unit: C006, Patricia Dougherty, Misc household; Children items; shop vacs 9. Unit A110, Tonya Edwards, Washer/Dryer; side by side refridge; electric stove; misc household AMENDED SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING OF AMENDED COMPLAINT AND NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS (NON-JURY MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE) C/A NO: 2016-CP-23-02960 DEFICIENCY WAIVED The Bank of New York Mellon Trust Company, N.A., f/k/a The Bank of New York Trust Company, N.A. as successorin-interest to all permitted successors and assigns of The Chase Manhattan Bank as Trustee for IMC Home Equity Loan Owner Trust 1998-7, PLAINTIFF, vs. Walter Lee Hewins and Dorothy Hewins; and if Walter Lee Hewins and Dorothy Hewins be deceased, then any children and heirs at law to the Estate of Walter Lee Hewins and Dorothy Hewins, distributees, and devisees at law to the Estate of Walter Lee Hewins and Dorothy Hewins; and if any of the same be dead any and all persons entitled to claim under or through them also all other persons unknown claiming any right, title, interest or lien upon the real estate described in the complaint herein; Any unknown adults, any unknown infants or persons under a disability being a class designated as John Doe, and any persons in the military service of the United States of America being a class designated as Richard Roe; CIB Financial, Inc.; First Greensboro Home Equity, Inc., DEFENDANT(S) TO THE DEFENDANTS, ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, or otherwise appear and defend, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscriber at his office, Hutchens Law Firm P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, except as to the United States of America, which shall have sixty (60) days, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, or otherwise appear and defend, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein, and judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity for Greenville County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals

pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. TO MINOR(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE, AND/OR TO MINOR(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THE PERSON WITH WHOM THE MINOR(S) RESIDES, AND/OR TO PERSONS UNDER SOME LEGAL DISABILITY: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff immediately and separately and such application will be deemed absolute and total in the absence of your application for such an appointment within thirty (30) days after the service of the Summons and Complaint upon you. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity in/for this County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. NOTICE OF FILING OF AMENDED SUMMONS AND AMENDED COMPLAINT TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing Summons, along with the Complaint, was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, on May 12, 2016; that the Amended Summons and Amended Complaint was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County on June 28, 2017. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT pursuant to the South Carolina Supreme Court Administrative Order 2011-05-02-01, (hereinafter “Order”), you may have a right to Foreclosure Intervention. To be considered for any available Foreclosure Intervention, you may communicate with and otherwise deal with the Plaintiff through its law firm, Hutchens Law Firm, P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202 or call 803726-2700. Hutchens Law Firm, represents the Plaintiff in this action and does not represent you. Under our ethical rules, we are prohibited from giving you any legal advice. You must submit any requests for Foreclosure Intervention consideration within 30 days from the date of this Notice. IF YOU FAIL, REFUSE, OR VOLUNTARILY ELECT NOT TO PARTICIPATE IN FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION, YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY/ AGENT MAY PROCEED WITH A FORECLOSURE ACTION. If you have already pursued loss mitigation with the Plaintiff, this Notice does not guarantee the availability of loss mitigation options or further review of your qualifications. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY.

Driving for Diapers A DIAPER

FOR FANS

GAME NIGHT: August 30, 2017 Join the Greenville Drive and Help Knock Diaper Need Outta The Park! We’re asking all Greenville Drive Fans to help launch Operation Dry Baby Bottoms by bringing diapers to the game and dropping them off at the Diaper Bank of the Carolinas table in the concourse.

OPERATION

Dry Baby Bottoms

From Sept. 1-30, 2017 Help Upstate Families In Need of Diapers. • BUY DIAPERS & DROP THEM OFF at a designated location (found at DiaperBankoftheCarolinas.org). • HOST A DIAPER DRIVE at your office, church, school or within your neighborhood. Get creative, even your book club can participate. • DONATE DOLLARS for Diapers on the Diaper Bank of the Carolinas website at DiaperBankoftheCarolinas.org.


August 25, 2017 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

August 25, 2017 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.