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DRUMMING UP BUSINESS

Using musical methods to help companies communicate PAGE 32

‘GET BETTER’

Greenville filmmakers premiere ‘handmade’ movie. PAGE 10

THE SCORECARD IS IN

Room for economic improvement, says Chamber PAGE 25

GREENVILLEJOURNAL

Greenville, S.C. • Friday, July 20, 2012 • Vol.14, No.29

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Greenville County’s newest elementary school models ‘the school of the future’

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Worth Repeating They Said It

“We want our children to wonder.” Melodie White, instructional coach at the soon-to-open Monarch Elementary School.

Quote of the week

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Nancy Walker, on the decision to start a herd of Devon cattle at Walker Century Farms.

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“We take life one day at a time now.” Lana Kuykendall, on her family’s philosophy after her recovery from necrotizing fasciitis.

“In those months, I wrestled with God and, like Jacob, walked away limping and joyful and blessed.” Greenville Journal intern Givens Parr, on her time spent at L’Abri Fellowship, a Netherlands commune, during her gap year between high school and college.

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Crawford named executive director of Legacy Charter



 

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Fred Crawford, who became principal of a struggling Greenville Tech Charter High a decade ago and turned it into one of the state and nation’s best charter schools, is Legacy Charter School’s new executive director. Legacy, which has two campuses in the renovated old Fine Arts Center on Washington Street and a renovated old Parker High on Greenville’s Westside, is expected Fred Crawford in Ms. Kalena Bennett’s secondto serve more than 600 students in kinder- grade class at Legacy Charter Elementary School. garten through 11th grade this year. “We intend to provide a world-class degrees. Seven graduates earned two education for our children and to do college degrees. that, you’ve got to have top-notch in“With the added ability to work with structors and you have to build a strong students beginning in K5 at Legacy Charleadership team around them,” said ter School, I see no reason why we can’t William Brown, Legacy’s board chair- replicate those results,” Crawford said. man. “I bet you could find no better In the geographic area that surrounds person to lead us.” the schools, what Legacy officials have While Crawford was principal, called the “Legacy Zone,” only half the Greenville Tech Charter High was the students earn high school diplomas. first charter school in South Carolina “These students are hearing things to be named a National Blue Ribbon that are possible for them that they’ve School, and in 2007 was honored as a never heard before,” Brown said. “We National Charter School of the Year by believe every one of our students can go the Center for Education Reform. to college and graduate from college.” Crawford will be taking over the Legacy has longer school days and a helm at a school that has struggled with longer school year than most schools. It enrollment and student achievement. also requires 45 minutes of physical edLegacy was rated below average on its ucation each day, the only public school latest school report card with nearly half in South Carolina to do so. of its elementary students not meeting “Things are coming together,” Brown standards on the state’s achievement said. “We obviously believe our aptest in math and 64 percent not meet- proach is working. And, yes, we know ing standards in science. we still have a long ways to go.” At the middle school level, the school The high school portion of Legacy was ranked “at-risk,” and more than half uses the early college model and has of its students did not meet state stan- a working agreement with Greenville dards in all of the core subjects tested Technical College, Crawford said. – English language arts, math, science Crawford said Greenville Tech Charand social studies. ter High has students from low-income “I am excited to share Legacy Char- families who qualified for free and reter School’s vision of empowering un- duced-price school lunches. derserved urban students to become “It shows the model can work,” he said. college graduates and productive, fit, Crawford said the school’s goal is to principled citizens,” Crawford said. have 100 percent of its students graduGreenville Tech Charter High rou- ate on time and then go on to post-sectinely placed 100 percent of its gradu- ondary education. ates into college or the military, and “There is so much uncapped potennearly half of the school’s graduates tial,” he said. leave high school having earned about Crawford’s successor at Greenville one year’s worth of college credits. This Tech Charter High has not been named. past spring, 17 Greenville Tech Charter High students graduated with high Contact Cindy Landrum at school diplomas and two-year college clandrum@greenvillejournal.com.


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Shoulder Surgery at the Speed of Life. A rendering shows planned improvements to a terminal at Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport.

GSP concourse expansion work to begin by August New website will provide information to travelers during duration of 48-month project By Cindy Landrum | staff

Work to expand the GreenvilleSpartanburg International Airport concourses will begin in late July or early August, the first terminal work in the airport’s $115 million renovation. Construction has already begun on the airport’s new rental car customer center in Garage A, but that work has gone mostly unnoticed by the majority of the airport’s passengers. The terminal renovation work is expected to take 48 months. The airport unveiled a new website Wednesday, www.elevatingtheupstate. com, that will serve as an information hub about construction and highlight key aspects of the program. GSP President and CEO Dave Edwards said the program would make GSP one of the most efficient airports of its size. “To maintain efficiency while the program is underway, communication is critical,” he said. The terminal improvement program – which will have three phases – will modernize and expand the terminal building, improve traffic flow and upgrade the facility. “We’re not trying to be Atlanta or Charlotte,” said Kevin Howell, the airport’s deputy director. “We want that small feel and to be customer-centric. People don’t want us to mess up the easy-in, easy-out of GSP.” By early August, workers will begin construction on expanded restaurant space and restrooms for Concourse A and B. The ticket counter will be moved to a portion of the terminal’s north wing

this summer. That work is expected to be complete in fall 2013. The second part of Phase 1 will focus on the baggage claim area. The work will include new baggage carousels, a curbside canopy and covered walkway to Garage A, a glass facade on the front of the terminal and a new concessions area for people who are dropping off and picking up passengers and can’t get past screening. Those renovations may begin by the end of 2013, officials said. Phase 2 will begin in early 2014 and includes the airport’s in-line automated screening, a “grand hall” space facing the garden in the post-screening area, continuation of the glass facade and canopy, a new landside garden near the flagpole for those who will not have access to the runway garden and new finishings for the concourses. Phase 3 will wrap up the project, Howell said. By that time, all of the airlines will have new ticket counters, and new administrative offices and a public conference room will be built. Howell said workers would do as much of the construction at night as they can to minimize impact to passengers. Airport officials are encouraging passengers to reserve their parking spaces online.They said passengers should get to the airport within the Transportation Security Administration’s guidelines. “Shaving any time off the 1.5 hours is not a good idea today and it will be less of a good idea a year from now,” said GSP spokeswoman Rosylin Weston. The airport is calling its terminal improvement project Wingspan. Information on the project is also available on the airport’s blog, regular website and social media platforms such as Facebook. The terminal renovation should be completed in 2016. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@greenvillejournal.com.

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

Deny cafes a toehold The city of Spartanburg has set the example for other Upstate local governments in refusing to grant the smallest toehold to Internet sweepstakes cafes, the latest stealth attack by a powerful gaming industry determined to entrench video poker in the Palmetto State again. The Spartanburg council is using emergency moratoriums to deny business licenses and rezoning requests to cafes peddling electronic games South Carolina’s top law enforcement officials insist are video poker by another name. Although defenders claim the games are equal to fast-food promotions that include game pieces with food and drink purchases, the state attorney general’s office says the electronic machines are gambling devices and “illegal per se,” spokesman Mark Plowden told the Journal. It is immaterial that players buy a phone card or Internet time first: They are playing Vegas-style games of chance on computer screens, and any prizes won can be claimed on the spot in cash or saved as points for future games. As Plowden said, a pig smeared with lipstick is still a pig. The games’ proponents are using the same tactics that entrenched video poker so deeply in South Carolina two decades ago: They open new cafes as soon as old ones are shut down, relying on conflicting rulings from impressionable magistrates and the protection of senators willing to kill any limiting legislation. This year’s bodyguards were Sens. Robert Ford and Jake Knotts, who killed a House bill shepherded by Rep. Phyllis Henderson that clarified the new games as illegal. Two decades ago the industry pawn was Sen. Jack Lindsey, now deceased, who slipped one sentence into a complicated law that his colleagues failed to catch. That sentence allowed video poker machines to give payouts – and the game grew from a smattering of machines to a $3 billion-a-year predator that took a decade to kill. The industry barons were so powerful they took out a governor and spent millions thwarting law enforcement in the courts and trying to buy a Legislature that would bend to their will. Foiling them took the combined cunning and courage of South Carolina’s canniest minds in the General Assembly and Supreme Court. Now, in today’s echo chamber, local governments are forced to mount piecemeal resistance while Henderson and Sen. Larry Martin, the dead bill’s champion on the Senate side, gird to fight again next year. Like Spartanburg, Sumter County and the city of Columbia are using their regulatory powers to banish the cafes outright. Irmo Town Council chose to play into the industry’s hands instead, with a $500-per-machine fee – paltry change to a $3 billion-a-year predator that knows cash-strapped governments grow addicted to fees. In Greenville County, where the cafes are popping up with increasing speed, Sheriff Steve Loftis is gathering ammunition for a County Council work session on the proliferation in August. Greenville Mayor Knox White told the Journal he is unaware of any cafes operating within the city and “right now we have no plans to enact any ordinances on the subject.” That’s a “see no evil” attitude the city needs to change. Spartanburg sets the wiser example, choosing to “act proactively to keep these machines from becoming entrenched,” as city spokesman Will Rothschild said. South Carolina history is proof enough that rooting the gambling barons out is far harder than preventing their arrival in the first place.

Summer is slow, so reenergize The temperature has been steadily above 90 degrees for more than a month. Everyone is at the beach or on vacation. Things are just slow. Is that being said in your office? Is it said every year around this time? The middle of South Carolina summer takes hold like a kudzu vine when it comes to wanting to be idle in businesses. People take the slow time and simply accentuate it. There are distractions galore, and the heat is brutal even if you aren’t a damn Yankee like I am. So what should you do to get out of the summer doldrums when business gets slow? Reenergize. Do. Create. Think. Work. Call up a potential client or business partner and get coffee or lunch. Reenergize that relationship. Engage new people by networking – and not just hand-off business cards networking. Develop and establish your ideas. Don’t be afraid to pick up the phone or send that email. Reenergizing doesn’t have to be about meeting new people or reconnecting. Take your staff off-site to a swimming pool or go hiking. Have some fun. This will allow them to get their energy flowing. Now is the time to create. Look at your company’s business model. Reexamine your website and social media presence. Create some work to do. You will be amazed at what you can accomplish. Don’t just think business has to be done in the confines of the office: Go outside and walk downtown. Get out there and connect with people in new and different ways. Great things can result simply from meeting others in a non-work setting. Help fill the business void by hosting an event and giving people something to do. One of my clients, Liquid Catering, did that with a major grand-opening party for its downtown showcase on a Wednesday night. The response

IN MY OWN WORDS by JOHN BOYANOSKI

was huge because people were looking for something to do. Try volunteering with a new group, or volunteer maybe for the first time. Many nonprofits need volunteering slots filled in the summer months because so many people are on vacation. Reach out to a group that you think would interest you and get going. Volunteering is a great way to make connections. And speaking of vacations, don’t be afraid to strike up business while out of town. Yes, people are trying to relax, but people have a lot of downtime waiting for seats at a restaurant or waiting to board an airplane. Instead of burying your nose in your phone, talk to people around you. If you get to know them and what they do, you might find that you can do business together. Practice your elevator pitch for you or your company among friends at a party or social get-together. This will help make you more at ease when striking up conversations, but it also helps you codify your goals and work ideas. However, don’t over-practice: You don’t want to sound forced when talking about what you do. Make sure to follow up with anyone you meet with an email, phone call – or, best of all, a hand-written letter. Just because it’s hot doesn’t mean you can’t develop and grow your business. John Boyanoski is the president and owner of Complete Public Relations, a Greenville-based strategic and media affairs firm.

IN MY OWN WORDS FEATURES ESSAYS BY RESIDENTS WITH PARTICULAR EXPERTISE WHO WANT TO TELL READERS ABOUT ISSUES IMPORTANT TO THEM. THE JOURNAL ALSO WELCOMES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR (MAXIMUM LENGTH OF 200 WORDS). PLEASE INCLUDE ADDRESS AND DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER. ALL LETTERS WILL BE CONFIRMED BEFORE PUBLICATION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT ALL LETTERS FOR LENGTH. PLEASE CONTACT SUSAN SIMMONS AT SSIMMONS@GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM.

6 GREENVILLE JOURNAL | JULY 20, 2012


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New school, new approach

Monarch Elementary could be model for elementary schools of the future By Cindy Landrum | staff

need to know.” Examples include “Why is it important to establish habits that promote a healthy lifestyle?” “Where are the bees in Simpsonville?” “Where is my place in space?” Students will select a variety of inquiry activities to help them arrive at answers.   A final product or performance will show what students have learned during the process. Students at Monarch will explore four categories of health sciences: medical, research, environmental and nutrition. The school is partnering with the Greenville Hospital System: Students and parents enter the school’s doctors and nurses are expected main entrance during a recent tour. to work with the school on lessons and the hospital is provid- the state’s learning standards. “I think with this approach, ing students with pedometers as a part of Monarch’s emphasis on we’re looking into the future,” White said. “It’s easier to do healthier lifestyles. Some things won’t change: math from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. and multiplication tables will still reading from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., have to be memorized like “the but we could find no research old days.” But spelling will no that shows teaching subjects in longer entail students’ memo- that way is better for children.” What school officials did find, rizing a list of words they’ll be tested on at the end of the week. she said, was the best educationInstead, White said, students al systems throughout the world will learn strategies they need use the inquiry-based approach. “People have got to know how to know to help spell. The words they learn during the week will to figure out an answer,” she said. The school’s cafeteria will be different from those they are tested on to make sure they have feature healthier lunches. learned the strategies and can Gone from the menu are transfer them to different situa- school cafeteria staples such as chicken nuggets, hot dogs and tions, White said. Overman said that while the pizza. In their place will be a school’s approach will be differ- menu that focuses on minient, the faculty still has to teach mally processed, mostly made-

Greg Beckner / Staff

Monarch Elementary, Greenville County’s newest elementary school, which will open in Simpsonville this fall, is not the typical elementary school. In fact, it is a glimpse into what elementary schools will look like in the future. Students won’t have separate classes for math, English language arts, science and social studies. Instead, subjects will be embedded into a health science-based curriculum taught through inquiry-based projects. Students will have iPads – starting in the fourth and fifth grades this year and reaching into the lower grades as money becomes available – and will use some of the hundreds of thousands of apps available for the devices. They’ll use Activ tables: interactive tables with touch-sensitive LCD screens that can accommodate up to six students at a time. And, in keeping with the school’s health/science focus, student chairs will rock, allowing students to make adjustments to their positions for comfort as well as to keep themselves alert and engaged so they can learn. “We’ve got to do things differently,” said Principal Vaughan Overman. “Kids today are so tech-savvy. Their mode of learning is so different. Kids’ brains are wired differently and we

have to respond to prepare them for tomorrow’s world.” While schools have been integrating curricula across subject areas for years, Monarch is taking it to a different level. “They’ll be working on all subject areas in all parts of the day,” said Melodie White, the school’s instructional coach. Monarch is one of only a few elementary schools in the country to focus on health sciences, OverVaughan Overman, man said. Elementary The idea is Monarch principal not to have a school that attempts to create a bunch of budding doctors and nurses, although there are 13,209 different jobs that incorporate health sciences, White said. “It’s all about creativity and communication. If our children can ask questions and come up with good answers, they’ll be good at anything they want to do. Those kids will be prepared to go into any career.” A project- and inquiry-based curriculum is the “ultimate in differentiated instruction,” Overman said. The project-based learning starts with an entry event to spark curiosity. “We want our children to wonder,” White said. Coupled with a “driving question,” the entry event gives students “a

from-scratch entrees with an emphasis on fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains and less salt. Each day a vegetarian entree will be offered. The school will also be one of the first in Greenville County to have eBooks in its library. In fact, Overman said she cut the number of shelves in the library in half to open up space for more collaborative learning. Monarch Elementary, located on Five Forks Road in Simpsonville, is designed to ease overcrowding at Oakview, Bell’s Crossing, Bethel and Mauldin elementaries. Students already attending the four schools are being given the option to finish their elementary school years at those schools, but parents have to provide transportation. Monarch has a waiting list for students who want to attend on special permission, Overman said. And, in keeping with the school’s uniqueness, one of its fundraisers will be the Monarch Rock. People can reserve the rock for special occasions such as birthdays or other big events and for $10 a day, spray-paint the rock with a message “appropriate for display in front of an elementary school.” Money raised will be used to support the school’s needs, including technology.

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10 GREENVILLE JOURNAL | JULY 20, 2012

J72

July 20-29

By JERRY SALLEY | staff

Greenville-based filmmakers Chris White and Emily Reach White like to describe their approach as “mom and pop.” “Chris and I write these quiet little artsy movies, raise the funds to make them, produce them with trusted friends and colleagues, and now we share them with the world,” Emily Reach White explained. “All of it out of our basement.” The Whites’ latest film, “Get Better,” was inspired by Emily Reach White’s relationship with her father, who died in 2007 of late-stage Lyme disease. It is the couple’s most sophisticated film to date, said Chris White. The film follows a week in the life of Ellie Alexander and her chronically ill father, Roy. Her established routine gets disrupted with the arrival of her childhood friend Stu, a New York producer who comes to document Roy’s life and winds up exposing the wounds and resentments caused by Roy’s disease. “Get Better” stars New York-based actors Marisa Viola as Ellie and Monica Wyche as Stu. Robert Linder, a Tryon, N.C., actor who once sang at New York’s Metropolitan Opera and has appeared

in productions at Greenville’s Warehouse Theatre, plays Roy. David Wright, a Columbia songwriter and multi-instrumentalist, provided original music for the soundtrack. The themes of illness and survival resonated especially strongly with the filmmakers when Linder was diagnosed with a brain tumor shortly before filming began last November. The Whites decided to take the film to their actor, shooting for seven days at Linder’s Tryon home while he commuted to the Gibbs Cancer Center in Spartanburg for radiation treatments. Emily Reach White described “Get Better” as “a prayer for our friend Robert.” Since June, the Whites have been showing the film at venues throughout the Southeast, including Atlanta, Asheville, Columbia and Spartanburg. On Sunday, July 22, the Warehouse Theatre will host a screening at 7 p.m. In addition to Tryon, the Whites shot “Get Better” in Greenville, Greer and Landrum. The film was produced for $10,000, said Chris White, very little money by Hollywood standards. Funds were raised through the online donation platform Kickstarter. Two of the Whites’ previous films – last year’s “Taken In” (one of the chief locations of which was the South of the Border roadside attraction on I-95 at the North Carolina/South Carolina border), and 2010’s short film “Good Life,” which starred Chris White and daughter Harriet and was filmed at


journal community Ristorante Bergamo in downtown Greenville – were also funded through Kickstarter. “There’s never been a moment in cinema like the one in which we are presently living,” said Chris White. “Emily and I want to make a living making films we love, with people we love, for people we love. By launching our own distribution company, we are poised to do just that.” The Whites named their distribution company Paris MTN Scout in honor of “a long-forgotten (and completely fictional)

cadre of pre-WWII boy explorers and adventurers who built a complex system of caves, forts, and traps in and around Paris Mountain to protect its inhabitants from the shenanigans of moonshiners, ex-Confederates and Elmer Gantry-like itinerant evangelists,” explained Chris White. “We like to think our approach to creation mirrors the spirit of those quixotic young men.” Partnering with Columbia-based TrenMedia, the Whites have recently made their two full-length films available for DVD purchase or streaming on the Paris

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MTN Scout website, www.ParisMTNScout.com. And they are actively seeking more “artistically ambitious, microbudget, non-cynical feature films by emerging writer-directors” to distribute, they said. “There are plenty of people around the world who find themselves where we were last summer with ‘Taken In,’” said Emily Reach White. “We had a terrific, handmade movie but had spent everything we’d raised on the production of the film. We had no way to share it with the world, and thus, no way to use the

work to provide for our family.” “Em and I are a strange mix of film artist and entrepreneur,” added Chris White. “We aspire to make great films, non-cynical films. But we also want people to buy them. We’d like to make a little money doing it. Fortunately for us, Internet technology allows us to do just that.” For more information on “Get Better,” visit www.GetBetterTheMovie.com or www.ParisMTNScout.com. Contact Jerry Salley at jsalley@greenvillejournal.com.

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY Location Map County launches Grove Creek study

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Watershed study to survey floodplain, allow county to plan for future development By APRIL A. MORRIS | staff

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In an effort to continue reducing the impact of flooding on areas in Greenville County, the county has launched a new study of the Grove Creek watershed to document waterways and pinpoint potential flooding trouble spots. Over the next few months, crews will walk approximately 30 miles of streams in the 35-square-mile Grove Creek watershed that includes areas around Bracken Road, West Georgia Road and Highway 8 around Williamston and Piedmont, said the county’s floodplain administrator, Robert Hall. The crew will walk the streams, mapping their exact location and also survey the elevation of bridges, culverts and roads. The Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) has designated an approximate flood zone for the area, but the data is not specific, said Hall. Documenting the areas where flooding is likely to occur will help to prevent problems

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like those encountered in the Brushy Creek area, where homes that were constructed before floodplain planning routinely filled with creek water after heavy rains. The county worked to improve area storm water measures and later launched a buyout plan in 2007 that has resulted in the purchase of approximately 100 homes to date, said Hall. Some structures were moved, but the majority of them were demolished. He says Grove Creek is “an area that has not been developed as much as some of the other areas we’ve studied, like Brushy Creek.” Surveying this area allows floodplain management to get out in front of potential development, he said. Data collection and surveying by Woolpert Inc. will go on for up to four months, Hall said, and then all the information will be used to create detailed models and maps that can be submitted to FEMA to revise the existing flood maps. The study costs $819,490 and is funded by the county. The Grove Creek study is similar to ones the county has performed in the Brushy

Grove Creek Watershed

Creek and Rocky Creek areas on the east side of the county, the upper Reedy River area that extends from Travelers Rest into the city of Greenville, and the Gilder Creek area near Mauldin, said Hall. Though analyzing the data from the Grove Creek study will take time, the result will ultimately help to alleviate flooding problems and prevent floodwater damage, he said. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@greenvillejournal.com.

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Lana Kuykendall goes home at last

By april a. morris | staff

More than two months after she began a harrowing ordeal and battle for her life against necrotizing fasciitis, sometimes called “flesh-eating disease,” 36-year-old Lana Kuykendall has gone home. She faces months of rehabilitation ahead to regain full use of her legs, which underwent multiple surgeries to halt the infection, but also the reality that she will finally be with her infant twins, Abigail and Ian, full time. The day before her release on Tuesday, Lana Kuykendall, along with her husband, Darren, spoke publicly for the first time since she was admitted to Greenville Memorial Hospital. Kuykendall went to the hospital on May 11, just days after the birth of her babies. She told reporters she noticed a skin discoloration on her left thigh, thought it was a blood clot, and asked her husband to take her to the hospital. Between the time they left for the hospital and received treatment – a matter of minutes, said Darren Kuykendall – she had deteriorated from feeling “sick all over” to suffering considerable pain and being severely ill. “I’m very grateful to God for helping me through what he has helped me through,” Lana Kuykendall said. She said she doesn’t remember the time she was in intensive care, but does know her

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husband was there with her every day. She said she was also grateful to hospital staff. “I didn’t realize how many people were involved in my care.” Her husband said he “got to see firsthand how strong she is and how good the care was. I’m so grateful that she is still here with me because it was very scary and stressful for a good while.” Darren Kuykendall said that he knew that amputations were a real possibility. “I was just scared for her life more than the amputation of her legs.” The couple had a friend who also survived necrotizing fasciitis in 2007. Dr. Bill Kelly, an epidemiologist at Greenville Memorial, said Kuykendall’s quick action saved her life. Dr. Spence Taylor, vascular surgeon and vice president of academics at GHS, said, “You can literally see the abnormality of the tissue. These infections grow so rapidly that you can actually see the skin change in front of your eyes.” Taylor said much of the credit goes to a group of acute care surgeons he calls “Jedi Knights.” “They’re the heroes and they’re the ones who made it happen,” he said. Greenville Hospital doctors rushed Kuykendall to surgery, and every day over the next 11 days she underwent more surgery to remove infected skin, tissue and muscle, Darren Kuykendall said. She had more than 20 surgeries and spent a total of 38 days in intensive care, 30 of those sedated. The bacteria that cause necrotizing fasciitis are common, including some that live in the body, such as group A streptococcus, the cause of strep throat infections, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

Darren (standing) and Lana Kuykendall with their twin babies, Abigail and Ian. Lana Kuykendall returned home this week after 10 weeks in the hospital undergoing treatment for flesh-eating bacteria.

The bacteria causes an infection in a damaged area, such as the site of a bruise, or where the skin is pierced, said Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease specialist at Vanderbilt University’s School of Medicine. Kelly said Kuykendall’s is not the first case of necrotizing fasciitis at GHS. He calls it “not common, but not rare” and said the cases vary in severity. The Kuykendalls said their twins were cared for by family and friends. Lana Kuykendall said she did not worry about them because a family member quit her job to help care for the infants. “At times, I’m able to focus on the fact

that the best thing for them is for me to get better and at other times I break down and cry,” she said. After moving to Roger C. Peace Rehabilitation Hospital on June 21 and several weeks of aggressive physical therapy, Kuykendall can walk more than 250 feet on her own and care for her twins, said Dr. Kevin Kopera, medical director of Roger C. Peace. Initially, she was so weak, she couldn’t stand without braces. “To Lana’s credit, she wanted the most aggressive approach,” Kopera said. Kuykendall now faces home therapy and months of outpatient therapy, he said. When asked about the aggressive rehabilitation she chose, Lana Kuykendall said, “I had to do it. I had to get better and the way to get better is to work hard.” She said she is looking forward to going home and has been getting used to having people help her with everyday tasks. She added that she had planned to return to work at some point and still may. “We take life one day at a time now.” One day the couple would like to resume a favorite pastime, traveling, maybe even to visit her best friend in Australia, she said. A fund has been set up to help the Kuykendall family with medical costs. Donations can be sent to GHS Federal Credit Union, 211 Patewood Drive, Greenville, SC 29615, 864-455-7112. The website www.faithhopelana.com also provides information about fundraisers. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@greenvillejournal.com.

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Susan Sellers* was 45 years old when she decided to adopt. She was looking for a child around 11 years old, but decided to adopt a teenager when she saw her daughter’s photo at the Department of Social Services open house. That was two years ago. “When people heard I was going to adopt a teenager they thought I was crazy, but it has been the best experience I have ever had,” the Greenville resident said. According to the South Carolina Department of Social Services, 1,216 children are currently in foster care statewide. Of those, 477 are free for adoption, meaning parental rights to them have been terminated. Another 739 are in the process of having parental rights terminated. In Spartanburg County, 208 children now wait in foster care, with approximately 33 percent of those having special needs. Greenville County has 345 children in care; of those, 21 percent have special needs. “Most people want babies, but the truth is that children who end up in the foster care system tend to be older,” said Isabel Blanco, DSS deputy director. The greatest need is among teenage males, 13 to 18 years old, she said. “There are children in the state who are free and ready for adoption, but they are not always the type of child people are looking for: the age, the sex, the child may have special needs. If people are looking for a healthy newborn child, there is a wait,” said Carl Brown, executive director and founder of the South Carolina Foster Parent Association, headquartered in Elgin, just outside Columbia. Brown and his wife have three adopted children and have fostered 156 children over the past 38 years. “You have to decide what kind of child you are willing to take,” he said. “How far will you go if they have learning disabilities, physical disabilities, or emotional issues? You have to have a heartfelt calling to do special things in this world. Adoption is a special thing.” Many people want to adopt a per-

fect child with no health issues and no behavioral problems, but “that’s not the kind of kids that are involved in the system. These are kids who have been hurt,” said a Spartanburg DSS employee who is father to two adopted children. “They blame themselves; they feel like outcasts – rejected, abandoned – and that has consequences.” This may lead to behaviors that will need to be dealt with, he said, “but even healthy teenagers are

a lifelong family,” Blanco said. States are now urged to make this a priority through whichever avenue is safest for the child, be it adoption or reunification, she said. Typically, foster children are relocated often, spending long periods of time in foster care with no sense of permanence, Blanco said. Such children are less likely to finish high school, have children at a young age, be arrested, be homeless or have

“You have to decide what kind of child you are willing to take. How far will you go if they have learning disabilities, physical disabilities, or emotional issues? You have to have a heartfelt calling to do special things in this world. Adoption is a special thing.” Carl Brown, executive director and founder of the South Carolina Foster Parent Association

hard to handle. That doesn’t mean every child is going to be acting out. Absolutely not … (but) our goal is to open people’s eyes so they know what they are getting into, so we don’t further traumatize the children …It’s going to take time and effort on the part of the parent, but love does help these guys heal.” For those worried about the prospect, Sellers said adopting a teenager can definitely work out. “I am shocked at how much I love my daughter and how much she needs me. She can bring me the greatest joy and the greatest grief all at one time, and we haven’t known each other very long. I always thought there would be a little distance there, but she’s my daughter. There is no question.” Sellers is in the process of adopting a second child; this time, a teenage son. Before Congress passed the 1997 Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA), reunification was the primary goal for foster children, leaving many in the system for years, according to adoption.org. Children often aged out of the system. Since the law’s passage, nearly all states have increased their number of adoptions for all ages. “Before this law was passed there was not an urgency to get a child to

post-traumatic syndrome, she said. Almost a quarter of young homeless people in America “are people who left the foster care system and don’t have a place to go,” added Brown. Teen adoptions consistently account for 10 percent of all adoptions, according to the S.C. Children’s Foster Care Review Board. Matching is the biggest hurdle to finding teenagers a forever home. Potential adoptive parents must go through an extensive home study and background check. A social worker meets with the family and ensures the house adheres to safety codes. Once a family decides on a child, there are visits and a pre-placement trial period. “You have to be honest on the forms they give you,” Sellers said. “You have to be honest about what you can handle and step back and leave it to God.” “Most adoptions work out if you match the right parents with the right child,” Brown said. People thinking of fostering or adoption can visit SCfpa.com, heartfeltcalling.org or scheartgallery.org to see some of the children who are looking for forever families. Contact Nichole Livengood at nlivengood@greenvillejournal.com.

*Names and personal details have been changed to protect children and families.


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Grass-fed cattle fills healthy niche

LOVE LIFE!

Walker Century Farms builds thriving business selling Devon cattle and free-range pork By CHARLES SOWELL | staff GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Bill and Nancy Walker with one of their Red Devon cows at Walker Century Farms.

pasture. “Bill and I took a trip to North Carolina to see some Devons,” Nancy Walker said. “When I first saw them, I said, ‘I like these cows.’ ” “That was enough for me,” Bill Walker said. As the herd grew, the Walkers started selling some of their beef to staff at the AnMed Health Medical Center, Bill Walker said. Next came sales to people outside the hospital and, eventually, the restaurants. The Walkers opened their store in May. The farm store is an old portable classroom that the couple saw near a local school with a for-sale sign on it, Mary Walker said. In addition to their Devon cattle, the Walkers sell heritage breed pork. The hogs are raised free-range with supplemental feedings. They also carry various vegetable and dairy products from area producers. A Devon rib-eye has a lovely texture and flavor when cooked on the grill. The meat lacks the heavy marbling of grainfed animals and, Nancy Walker said, the steak has more of the good cholesterol and omega 3 and omega 6 ratios. The family divides the farm chores. “I’m the only one without a day job,” Nancy Walker said. She sees the farm as part of a heritage that goes back more than a century. “We’re a certified Century Farm,” she said. “Raising cattle in much the same way as Bill’s grandfather did.” Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@thegreenvillejournal.com.

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Nancy Walker’s battle with breast cancer was the defining moment in the decision that led to founding Walker Century Farm’s grass-fed cattle business. “I was diagnosed in 2003,” she said, “and went through the whole regimen of treatments from chemo to surgery to reconstructive surgery. Afterward, my husband (Dr. Bill Walker, a pulmonary physician) decided we needed to start eating healthy and dug into the issue of just what constitutes a healthy diet.” Grass-fed beef came up as the most logical way for the family to change their eating habits. “Bill had been thinking about getting back into the cattle business on the family farm, so we purchased Devon cattle, which do very well on a grass diet.” Today, Walker Century Farm is stepping into the niche soon to be vacated by Live Oak Farm near Woodruff, which will likely go on the auction block if owner Ron Wilson is convicted of fraud charges in connection with his precious metals business. They opened a farm store in May of this year and have a thriving business selling their beef to Greenville restaurants catering to high-end clients. If need be, it’s a hole the Walkers are happy to fill as they grow their red cattle in the rolling hills just east of Anderson off Interstate 85. “I was leery of cattle at first,” Nancy Walker said. “We had been renting the farm to another cattle grower who kept Limousin cattle. They scared me.” The large French breed is one of the oldest cattle varieties in Europe. They look very similar to the Devon cattle the Walkers now raise, except for one difference: Devons are notoriously gentle; Limousins, not so much so. As soon as the Walkers stepped into the pasture, about a dozen Devons ambled up to greet the couple, with none of the typical jostling when a face associated with food and care arrives in the

JULY 20, 2012 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL 15


journal community

CDS installs new executive director Rebecca Davis has roots in Upstate nonprofit community By april a. morris | staff

The Center for Developmental Services (CDS), a one-stop facility that offers support for families and individuals with developmental evaluation, treatment, education and support, welcomed a new executive director earlier this month. Rebecca H. Davis comes to CDS following a stint as executive director of the Children’s Center for Hope and Healing in Gainesville, Ga., a nonprofit that works to stop child sexual abuse and prevent child exploitation. And though Davis trained at Georgia Southern College and Emory University, she has returned to nonprofit work in the Upstate. She once worked with the South Carolina chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association in Anderson and as the director of development and volunteer ser-

vices for Pendleton Place Children’s Shelter in Greenville. Davis and her husband kept their Upstate home during their Georgia years. He had previously worked with Asbury Hills Methodist Camp and Retreat in northern Greenville County. She said they always thought they would come back to the area at some point. Davis said her first job after college was in the nonprofit sector, working for a foundation that supported the work of two Christian international schools in India. “I’ve just always been attracted to the sense of mission that working with a nonprofit brings. There’s just a whole lot of satisfaction about being involved in human services,” she said. “I know that the work of the organizations that I’ve had the privilege of being a part of makes a difference in people’s lives.”

While at Pendleton Place, she created a business plan to launch a thrift store to benefit the nonprofit. When the idea didn’t fly at Pendleton Place, she launched The Sock Exchange, a store that benefited eight nonprofits. Donors could choose which nonprofit they would support with their donations. After several years running the store, Davis went on to work with the Alzheimer’s Association, serving the entire state. Being a part of a unique organization like CDS that centralizes services for residents with developmental challenges is exciting for her, Davis said. Six partner agencies focus on everything from hearing issues and developmental delays to early intervention from Greenville County Disabilities and Special Needs Board and behavioral evaluations. The current B:10”BabyNet, GHS partners include T:10” Clarity, FamChildren’s Hospital,

ily Connection, KidVentures and Greenville County Schools. In addition to the partner organizations, CDS offers centralized records for many clients, a resource library and the natural, informal collaboration of the partners located in the facility, said Davis. Having a child with Asperger’s Syndrome has given her experience with the challenges of raising a special-needs child, Davis said. She remembers shuttling to multiple appointments and knows firsthand how beneficial the centralized experience can be. “I know how difficult it can be for someone to even navigate that ‘life course,’” she said. “I have a lot of appreciation for co-location.” Some families can spend up to 20 hours each week during appointments at CDS, she said. The center saw 6,500 children for a total of 22,000 visits in 2011. This early in her tenure, Davis

Rebecca H. Davis is the new executive director for the Center for Developmental Services.

can’t say exactly what the future plan may be for expansion of the center or the possibility of taking on additional partners, but she said the organization “belongs to the community and I feel very excited about the possibilities for CDS. It does an excellent job already, and I feel we can do even more to help support families who are challenged by having someone in the family who has special needs.” Contact April A. Morris at amorris@greenvillejournal.com.

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First Steps holds benefit auction

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C I N E M A S IN BIG THEATER

resource director, the auction was originally intended to help child care providers “get rid of some of their equipment that had been in storage, and at the same time generate some income.” It turned out, however, that a variety of nonprofits stood to benefit from the auction. Chris Manley, director of ReWiGo ministries, said the auction is “truly a win-win” for all involved. ReWiGo experienced a financial boost last year from the successful sale of an entire storage unit’s worth of equipment. In addition to the sale profits, ReWiGo will save money by canceling its storage fees. The nonprofit can now use the extra funds towards achieving its mission to create safe, healthy, sustainable home environments for elderly, disabled and impoverished people. Auction attendees will enjoy good deals on a variety of items, from antiques and exercise equipment to children’s toys and games, while supporting the work of many commendable organizations in the community. The old Armstrong Elementary School is located in Greenville on 20 Martin Drive. For more information about the auction or about Greenville First Steps, visit www.greenvillefirststeps.org or call 864-239-3753.

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Sometimes you just know David McGee, Funeral Director David McGee knew, at a very young age, what career path to follow – indeed, he was only six years old when he discovered his heart’s calling. A death in the family exposed him to grief, but also to the soothing comfort of sincere compassion. Thus, he determined to one day help others, too. As a child, David served as unofficial caretaker to the local historical cemetery, tending flowers, tidying gravestones and learning the tales of his hometown’s forefathers. He often re-imagined his Matchbox cars as hearses in peaceful funeral processions. “I felt drawn to tradition,” David recalls. “I had a respect for reverence.”

Contact Givens Parr at gparr@greenvillejournal.com.

The Tennessee native graduated from David Lipscomb University in Nashville before heading to Atlanta’s Gupton-Jones College of Funeral Service, where he was a member of Pi Sigma Eta. A member of St. Paul UMC in Greenville, David has dedicated the past 30 years to re-gifting the compassion he received as a child. He is committed to helping families in Greenville celebrate and remember the ones they love most. “No detail is too small,” says David. “I am so grateful to have this as my life’s work.”

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Greenville First Steps will host the second annual Nonprofit Surplus Auction to benefit churches, nonprofits, and child care providers on Friday, July 20, at 10 a.m. at the old Armstrong Elementary School. The fundraiser allows the beneficiaries to bolster their budgets by selling gently used equipment and household items. Lewis Auctions of Greenville is donating its auctioning services. Auctioneer Ashley Lewis said in a statement, “We wanted to find a way to give back to the community as a thank-you to these organizations for the impact they are having.” She noted that when an organization makes a sale, the agency “will be able to keep 100 percent of what the item sells for. It’s a pure profit fundraiser; you can’t get that from a dance and dinner event.” Fifteen nonprofits will participate, including ReWiGo, A Child’s Haven, Strides, Bon Secours Health System, New Horizon Family Health Services, UU World of Children Child Care Center, and the Center for Developmental Services. The inaugural Nonprofit Surplus Auction of 2011 brought in over $4,500 for the organizations involved. According to Beth Jamieson, First Steps community

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JULY 20, 2012 | Greenville Journal 17


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In response to citizen requests earlier this spring, Greenville County Council passed a text amendment to the zoning ordinance on Tuesday that will allow homeowners to keep chickens in certain residential areas. The amendment provides for county residents to maintain chickens on property with single-family detached dwellings and two-family dwellings in particular zoning districts. The amendment allows for up to eight chickens on a single property. No roosters are allowed. The birds must be in an enclosure. A minimum of four square feet of floor space must be provided for each chicken if the birds are allowed access to a larger enclosure, or 10 feet of floor space if they are not. Coops or enclosures are considered accessory structures and must conform to accessory structure guidelines and be located in the rear or side yard, according to the amendment. A $50 permit fee is required to include the accessory building permit and an initial inspection of the structure. “We’ve had four or five people each year apply to keep chickens,” said councilman Fred Payne, who chairs the Planning and Development Committee that drafted the amendment. No one spoke in opposition to the amendment on Tuesday, but Jim Hargett said he opposed the limit of eight chickens, especially for larger properties, as well as the exclusion of roosters. The City of Greenville has an ordinance on keeping chickens that is less specific regarding the number of birds allowed, saying instead that residents cannot keep birds in quantities that “disturb the peace, interfere with use of property, cause damage or cause unreasonable disturbance.” The city does not ban roosters. A Greenville spokesman said the city receives one or two complaint calls on chickens each year and does not charge a permit fee. In other action, County Council approved a 25-year lease agreement with the S.C. National Guard at the South Carolina Technology and Aviation Center. The agreement allows the National Guard to construct a field maintenance facility and readiness center, the second phase in a project called the S.C. Aviation Center of Excellence. County officials also said progress continues toward the first meeting of the fivemember interim Disabilities and Special Needs Board. The county received confirmation letters from Gov. Nikki Haley for all five board nominees on July 13. The nominees received their confirmation letters last week, said Clerk to Council Theresa Kizer. The new board may meet for the first time next week, possibly July 26, for an orientation session, said interim board member Alex McNair. S.C. Department of Disabilities and Special Needs director Beverly Buscemi is assisting with drafting the agenda, he said. The date is still being finalized, interim executive director David Goodell said Tuesday. Initially, the board plans to meet regularly on the fourth Thursday of the month. In addition to McNair, interim board members include Judy Gilstrap, Pearlie Harris, Bob Ariail and Jay Rogers. The board’s website, www.gcdsnb.com, has been restored after being taken down in March. The Greenville County Council is scheduled to meet again on Tuesday, Aug. 21, at County Square. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@greenvillejournal.com.

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journal community

County takes steps to save Old Pelham Mill

The Old Pelham Mill, one of the first cotton mills in the state, may soon be renovated.

and stabilization, but I understand the cost to stabilize and restore the building will be much more than that.” County Councilman Joe Dill said he believes the entire project could be done with the money at hand. “We really need to get to work on this,” he said. “The floor of the building is in bad shape and has fallen in at a couple of spots. This is the kind of thing we could draw tourists traveling on (Interstate) 85 with just a sign.” The old mill building was part of the justification for creating the park in the first place, recreation department documents show. “The Greenville County Historic Preservation Commission donated this 13acre site bordering the Enoree River to the District in 1988,” the department’s website shows. “It was home to the first textile mill in Greenville County outside of the city limits of Greenville. Its location, near the Hwy 14 I-85 interchange, positions it to be a potential gateway to Greenville. The scenic and historic elements parallel that of downtown’s Falls Park.” Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@greenvillejournal.com.

c o x p h o t o g r a p h y. n e t M101A

The Greenville Recreation Department is working with historic preservation experts to stop the degradation of the Old Pelham Mill with an eye toward restoring one of the first cotton mills in South Carolina. “We recently (on July 2) signed a contract with DP3 Architects,” said Ty Hauk, director of greenways for the recreation department. “The project will focus on protecting the historic building and taking the next step to restore the building to the best level possible within the constraints of funding.” Partners in the project include the Greenville County Historic Preservation Commission and Renewable Water Resources, Hauk said. Mann Batson, a Travelers Rest historian, is concerned that the old mill’s condition has deteriorated in recent years. “I hope it will be possible to restore the building, but the longer it goes without repairs and stabilization, the less likely that will be.” Gene Smith, recreation department executive director, said the building’s current condition can be traced to a state Department of Transportation project to widen state Route 14 10 or 12 years ago. “A bunch of folks down in the Pelham area were upset about the threat to the mill,” he said. “The highway department rushed to get it from its previous site to ReWA property adjacent to our Pelham Park.” There is no doubt the building has deteriorated in recent years, Smith said. “Funding has always been an issue with this project and that’s the case today. We have $170,000 on hand for restoration

patrick cox/contributing photographer

By CHarles Sowell | staff

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Spartanburg Regional • 101 East Wood St. • Spartanburg SC 29303 • 1.877.455.7747 • gibbscancercenter.com JULY 20, 2012 | Greenville Journal 19


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Words of Wisdom By: Richard deBondt

It is HOT! Time for Rosé. The traditional summertime table wine of Europe is ideal for our Carolina summers. Great for picnics and light snacks, it also serves well with red meat dishes that might cry out for big red wine in cooler times. Who needs high-alcohol heavyweights when you break into a sweat just walking across the patio? Rosé is the thing. Just about every traditional red wine region has its Rosés. Bordeaux, the Rhone, Rioja, and even Burgundy all have important Rosé products. Producers can’t help themselves wanting to make Rosé. Winemakers’ get hot and thirsty too! A similar situation exists in California, Oregon, and Washington. Even wineries famous for expensive red wine occasionally release rosés from every grape imaginable. Provence, in the South of France, is legendary for Rosé. Estate grown Provence Rosé can be $35. Don’t be shocked at the price, these wines are classic, dry, elegant and worthy of special attention. However, if your backyard barbeque has less royal standards, good, dry Provence Rosé can be under $15. For all but the elite, youth is a virtue. Drink the youngest available. Throughout the rest of Europe Rosé is common. The best examples tend to mention a region rather than a grape. Look for Bordeaux, Tavel, Lirac, Rioja, or Navarra; not for Merlot, Cabernet, Grenache, or Syrah. There are even classic European districts famous for slightly sweet fresh Rosé, notably Anjou in the Loire valley. Don’t overlook the U.S.A as a source for premium Rosé. “White Zinfandel” (Rosé really) still tops the sales charts but there are many fine dry alternatives. Pinot Noir producers often make “Vin Gris”. However many good U.S. bottles will bear the name of the principle grape from which they are made. Any top producer is likely to make good Rosé, although there is no region dedicated to the style. Again, youth is generally a virtue. Richard deBondt founded Northampton Wines in Greenville in 1975. With his business partner David Williams, he oversees retail wine and restaurant operations, along with wine travel.

Northampton Wines www.northamptonwines.com 211-A East Broad Street • 271-3919 20 GREENVILLE JOURNAL | JULY 20, 2012

The Blood Connection expands to serve 3 hospitals in Western N.C. Piedmont-based operation also covers Upstate S.C. and parts of Georgia By APRIL A. MORRIS | staff

The Blood Connection of Greenville recently announced that it will be expanding its collection and distribution efforts into Henderson and Polk counties in North Carolina. The center will serve as the primary blood supplier for Pardee Hospital and Park Ridge Health in Hendersonville along with St. Luke’s Hospital in Columbus. Gregory Hart, The Blood Connection president and CEO, said that the North Carolina hospitals had used other blood suppliers, but approached The Blood Connection to partner for an adequate and safe blood supply. He said the center also has one of the lowest service fees in the nation. The Blood Connection processes and distributes blood in a 6,570-square-mile area, including Upstate South Carolina and northeastern Georgia. According to Hart, the center supplies blood to multiple hospitals in all of those areas, in-

cluding Greenville, Spartanburg, Union, Cherokee, Oconee, Pickens, Greenwood, Laurens, McCormick and Newberry counties in South Carolina and Stephens County in Georgia. “The Blood Connection is known for its state-of-the-art blood center and high standard of quality and service. Our new partner will provide us with fast and effective in-house testing, as well as the ability to quickly solve issues with blood compatibility,” said Park Ridge CEO Jim Bunch. The Blood Connection has increased its ability to collect, process, test and distribute blood components, including plasma and platelets. Two years ago, the company expanded into Spartanburg, Union and Cherokee counties. Hart said the expansion will provide approximately 4,000 blood units, 600 plasma units and more to the three North Carolina hospitals. Overall, the goal is for The Blood Connection to have 125,000 collections over a year’s time, said Hart, which roughly translates

SO YOU KNOW The next Upstate blood drive for The Blood Connection will be the Rock ‘n’ Roll Up Your Sleeve event on July 20, at several locations throughout the area. Donors get a T-shirt and the chance to win two pairs of tickets to see Def Leppard and an autographed guitar. Visit www.thebloodconnection.org for locations and times.

to 70,000 donors. The Blood Connection holds 12 blood drives each day in its service area and has added blood drives in Henderson and Polk counties, Hart said. Thanks to generous donors, the area has not experienced a blood shortage in quite some time, he said. However, there are several types that represent a continual need, including RH negative, O negative and B negative, he said. Donors who can provide those types are always in demand. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@greenvillejournal.com.

Funeral home adds Starbucks By APRIL A. MORRIS | staff

In times of trouble or sorrow, a simple thing can often provide comfort. At Robinson Funeral Home in Easley, the staff has always worked to help offer solace in whatever form they can – even in an ordinary cup of coffee. And as part of the downtown location’s expansion of the lobby and other areas, Robinson Funeral Home will also be serving up a gourmet cuppa joe in its Coffee Corner, due to open later this summer. The funeral home has proffered consolation with the hot beverage for generations, says general manager Chris Robinson, and now has opted to add espressos, cappuccinos and lattes to the mix. The Coffee Corner will serve up Starbucks coffee through a food service agreement with the coffee giant, said Robinson. All of the staff, who

will arrive early in the morning and work through any evening visitations, will be trained by Starbucks. The new area will include a counter, fireplace, outdoor seating, Wi-Fi and a television, he said. The decision to add Starbucks was a natural extension of the funeral home’s gradual move into catering services, Robinson said. “We wanted to have our own area where people could escape from the stress of losing a loved one,” he said. “People talk about how Starbucks isn’t just coffee, it’s an experience. Even though it’s a sad time, we want people to have as positive an experience as possible.” Contrary to some media reports, the Coffee Corner will not be located adjacent to the chapel, Robinson said, but on the opposite side of the building to preserve the privacy of the visitation rooms. The coffee area will be adjacent to the new lobby, with two doors that

will have shades. “You can actually walk through the lobby and into the building and not know it’s there,” he said. “We don’t want it to be too overwhelming to people and too obvious.” Robinson’s foray into the brewing business has been met with jibes in its national coverage, but local reaction has been favorable, he said. “We’ve had a ton of positive feedback and people are excited about it and can’t wait to come in.” What’s more, the media attention may bring in walk-in customers that aren’t there for a funeral service. Robinson said his isn’t the first funeral home to have a coffee shop. Their plans were created by the same architect who created a coffee spot for a funeral home in Texas. Bailey Family Funeral Home in Kentucky also has a coffee shop, according to its website. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@greenvillejournal.com.


journal community

Augusta Road Business Association Presents...

on Augusta JULY 20 - 29, 2012 Sidewalk Extravaganzas • Festivities • Sales & Events Prize Drawings • Parties • Treats, Eats & Drinks Kids activities • Music & Much More! View events schedule at www.onlyonaugusta.com Participating Businesses Antiques on Augusta Lewis Plaza Merchants Assoc. Bernhardt House of Violins Meals on Wheels Costless Outlet Muse Shoe Studio Foxfire Gallery & Kitchen Shops Music Together of Greenville Gage’s NY Butcher Shoppe Garrison Opticians Paisley & Paper Harrison Lighting Palmetto Olive Oil Co. Kate Carlyle Phil Hyman Photography L’s on Augusta The Pickwick Pharmacy & Soda Fountain Wireless Communications, Verizon Premium Retailer

Reedy River Dentistry Roots Savvy Ten Thousand Villages The Bakery off Augusta The Elephant’s Trunk The Embassy Flowers The Grey Goose The Pink Monogram

JULY 20, 2012 | Greenville Journal 21


journal community

our community

community news, events and happenings

The designers who worked on the 2010 Showhouse at Saluda Cottages in Flat Rock along with new professionals have created a 2012 Design Showhouse at “Interlude,” July 21 through Aug. 5. Tickets are $25. Events include a presentation on July 24 by decorator, author and syndicated columnist Carleton Varney, president of Dorothy Draper & Co., at Blue Ridge Community College in Flat Rock, and a luncheon with lecture and demonstration by Ron Morgan, one of the most sought-after floral designers in the United States, on Aug. 2 at the Hendersonville Country Club. Tickets for each special event are $75. For more information, call 828-697-0208 or visit www.historicflatrockinc.org. The Augusta Road Business Association will present Summer on Augusta from Friday, July 20, to Sunday, July 29. As part of the event, Ten Thousand Villages will present a World Festival with Jeff Holland on July 21 at 10 a.m., featuring an interactive, family drum event. On July 24, the store will hold a blood drive from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. And on July 27, the store will offer picnic discounts along with Bakery Off of Augusta, Palmetto Olive Oil, Roots of Greenville and New York Butcher Shoppe. For more information, call 864-239-4120 or visit www.onlyonaugusta.com. Greenville Memorial Hospital and Spartanburg Regional Medical Center were ranked in the top five hospitals in the state, according to the U.S. News & World Report annual Best Hospitals rankings released earlier this week. The 23rd annual edition featured more than 720 of the nation’s roughly 5,000 hospitals. Medical University of South Carolina took the top spot and GHS was ranked second. Other Upstate hospitals that made the state list were Spartanburg Regional Medical Center at No. 3 and AnMed Health in Anderson at No. 7.

to the Pleasant Ridge Camp & Retreat Center to experience the zip line and 55-foothigh alpine tower. They will learn mountain biking skills at Gateway Park’s new Flow Park and visit Table Rock State Park and Lake Conestee Nature Park. Register online at www.greenvillerec.com or call Joe Lanahan at 864-288-6470 (Ext. 142). Monroe Free, president and CEO of Habitat for Humanity of Greenville County, has been named the chairman of the board of the newly founded Habitat for Humanity South Carolina Association of Habitat Affiliates. The HHSCA exists to serve the local needs of Habitat affiliates by seeking statewide opportunities to build affiliate capacity, by facilitating communication among South Carolina affiliates, by coordinating statewide and regional training for affiliates, by developing a statewide disaster response plan and by promoting Free advocacy for Habitat for Humanity affiliates. The International Center will host a two-day celebration of the summer Olympic Games on July 27-28. There will be an Olympics Upstate Global Professionals Drop-In on July 27, 4:30-7:30 p.m. RSVP for this event by calling Whitney Walters at 864-631-2188. Local riders and the world’s best flowboarders will compete in the FlowRider Pro/ Am set for Aug. 5 at Greenville Rec’s Discovery Island Waterpark. Riders will compete for awards and prize bags in men’s, women’s, junior’s, master’s and pro divisions. Practice time is 8 to 10 a.m. The competition is 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Register before Aug. 5 at the park or call 864-963-4345. For additional information email mwhirley@gcrd.org.

Greenville Rec’s Rec N Crew Adventure Camp is set for Aug. 13-17 for ages 6-11. Activities will include hiking, climbing and geocaching. Campers will take field trips

The One. 22 Greenville Journal | JULY 20, 2012

Accord.

If you are sponsoring a community event, we want to share your news. Submit entries to e-mail: greenvillecommunity@greenvillejoural.com

Wade Hampton Blvd, Greer • 864-877-9090 dickbrookshonda.com


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

THE GOOD

EVENTS THAT MAKE OUR COMMUNITY BETTER

Mellow Mushroom locations in Greenville and Spartanburg will be holding an allday fundraising event in support of The Transportation Museum of the World featuring the Miniature World of Trains on Tuesday, July 24. Diners should mention that they want to donate to the museum and the Mellow Mushroom will take 10 percent of the meal total (excluding tax and alcohol) and donate it. The museum mascot will be at the Greenville location from noon until 2 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. for photographs. For more information, visit www.miniatureworldoftrains.com/eventscalendar.htm. The FATZ restaurant located at 1361 W. Wade Hampton Blvd. Suite A in Greer will host a pancake breakfast from 7:30–10 a.m. on July 28 to benefit the Blue Ridge Corps of Cadets Band. Tickets for Short Stacks for Big Change are $7 and can be purchased by contacting Shannon Good at 864-350-9994. All attendees are encouraged to bring a donation for the Blue Ridge Corps of Cadets Band. Wells Fargo recently presented $150,000 to Harvest Hope Food Bank to recognize the completion of the company’s Border to Border Hunger Challenge. The Border to Border Hunger Challenge was a statewide matching campaign to help the South Carolina Food Bank Association (SCFBA) raise funds to feed hungry families across the entire state. Wells Fargo agreed to match donations made to the state’s four food banks one-to-one once they collectively raised $150,000. During the one-month Border to Border campaign, the four food banks in the SCFBA raised a total of $406,103 in donations. Combined with the matching $150,000 from Wells Fargo, the total for the campaign came to $556,103, which will provide the SCFBA members the resources to distribute more than 2.7 million meals. Harvest Hope Food Bank’s portion of this donation is $70,000, which will provide the resources to distribute 350,000 meals. Woodward & Zwolinski has completed a pro-bono rebranding initiative for Langston Charter Middle School. The project included a new logo and letterhead design, sports team mascots, leadership awards, and special T-shirt designs for sports teams and the school’s community service day. Langston Charter focuses on core academics, small single-gender classes, leadership training and community service, ethical conduct, patriotism and parent involvement. The Salvation Army of Greenville County invites the community to a special Open House on Tuesday, July 24, from 3 to 6 p.m. The Open House will take place at the main campus at 417 Rutherford St. (between Stone Avenue and Rutherford Road). Guests will have the opportunity to meet the new Salvation Army Officers and the Advisory Board members, view the facilities, learn about the nonprofit’s pro-

grams, find out about volunteer opportunities and learn how to “Be a Shield.” Offsite programs such as The Salvation Army Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community and The Salvation Army Boys and Girls Club will have information tables as well as staff on hand to share program details. For additional information, contact Pamela Garcia at 864-235-4803, extension 217. Greenville Literacy is collecting genLeadership Greenville Class 38 recently tly used books for the 11th annual Really cut the ribbon on its project, a new garden/patio area at the Ronald Good, Really Big, Really Cheap Book Sale, McDonald House designed to create a which will take place on Saturday, Aug. 18, restful environment for families who are at McAlister Square. Book donations can be staying there while their children are brought to the Downtown Learning Center treated at local hospitals. at McAlister Square, 225 S. Pleasantburg Drive, Suite C-10, Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 467-3456 to let the staff know that you are coming, and they will have a cart to meet you near the back door at the McAlister Square location. Tax statements are available for donations. There are also collection sites across Greenville County. Go to greenvilleliteracy.org for locations. Greenville Literacy accepts fiction, nonfiction, paperback and hardback editions (no magazines or encyclopedias, please). Donations of children’s books are especially needed. DNA Creative Communications (DNA), in collaboration with the Community Foundation of Greenville, the Hollingsworth Funds, Inc, and United Way of Greenville County, is hosting a seminar, “Web Fusion 2.0: Finding Your Web Future,” on July 25 to help nonprofits round out their online communications. The seminar will feature a special presentation by the authors of the recently-released book “101 Social Media Tactics for Nonprofits,” Melanie Mathos and Chad Norman. “Web Fusion 2.0” will be held at the Salvation Army Ray & Joan Kroc Corps Community Center from 8 a.m. to noon. The seminar will also include roundtable discussions. In addition to the special presentation by Mathos and Norman, Debbie Nelson of DNA and Dan Rundle of The Worthwhile Company will introduce their annual pro bono programs, Live Here Give Here and Web for Good. Both will answer questions on their application and selection processes and how they structure these relationships. To register for the workshop, visit www.dnacc.com or call 864-235-0959. Session registration is $65 and includes breakfast and materials. Send us your announcement. E-mail: greenvillecommunity@greenvillejournal.com

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JULY 20, 2012 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL 23


journal community

UNITED WAY OF GREENVILLE COUNTY CONGRATULATES THE 2012

UNITED WAY SPIRIT AWARD WINNERS United Way of Greenville County has honored Fluor Corporation, Greenville businessman and philanthropist Bob Yeargin, and local nonprofit Greenville County First Steps as the inaugural winners of its United Way Spirit Awards. United Way Spirit Awards honor those companies, individuals and nonprofit organizations in Greenville County who embody the spirit of “LIVE UNITED,” answering the call-to-action to “Give, Advocate, Volunteer,” with great zeal and dedication. United Way is proud to recognize this year’s inaugural winners for all that they do to make Greenville County a better place to live and work for all of us.

Spirit Award for Corporate Leadership

Spirit Award for Individual Leadership

Spirit Award for Nonprofit Leadership

FLUOR CORPORATION

ROBERT H. YEARGIN

GREENVILLE COUNTY

Dick Wilkerson presents the 2012 Spirit Award to Annette Allen, vice president and general manager of Fluor Corporation.

As a corporate citizen committed to social responsibility, Fluor strives to make a sustainable impact in Greenville County through employee volunteerism and philanthropy. This proactive community engagement has left an indelible mark on the community, specifically in Fluor’s signature issue areas of education, social services, community and economic development, and the environment. In addition to the generous corporate and employee gifts provided each year in support of United Way and many local nonprofits, Fluor Corporation’s stellar volunteer program, Fluor Cares, provides more than 10,000 volunteer hours each year to the Greenville County community.

Tim Reed (right) presents the 2012 Spirit Award for Individual Leadership to Bob Yeargin.

Meeting United Way of Greenville County’s vision in the areas of school readiness, high school graduation and financial stability would be a much more difficult task to achieve without the support and stability provided to United Way by Bob Yeargin. Bob’s visionary support and leadership, as displayed by his role in the founding of the Tocqueville Society and establishing the Poinsett Society endowment, has gone a long way in providing the stable, long-term financial resources needed to dream big for the future of our community and create lasting change.

FIRST STEPS

Susan Shi (left) presents the 2012 Spirit Award to Linda Brees, member of the Greenville County First Steps Board of Directors.

Greenville County First Steps is accomplishing extraordinary things for young children and families in our community. Through collaboration with other likeminded agencies and programs, First Steps was not only able to survive the state budget crisis of 2008, but has expanded its impact by smartly leveraging public and private dollars in effective programs, including the highly successful Nurse Family Partnership with the Greenville Hospital System. This spirit of collaboration is evident in all that First Steps does. Last year alone, the staff contributed 415 hours of time to other nonprofit agencies, boards and committees.

This ad made possible because of the generous support of The Greenville Journal. 24 Greenville Journal | JULY 20, 2012


JOURNAL BUSINESS

T.B.A. Word is a new radio station is coming to town in a few weeks …

Room for improvement

Greenville’s economic scorecard shows some upward trends – but ‘there’s a lot of work to be done’ By DICK HUGHES | contributor

Greater Greenville has modestly reversed a 10-year slide in per capita income relative to the nation and its competitive regional rivals, according to the Greenville Chamber’s 2012 Economic Scorecard. Comparative gaps remain large when Greater Greenville is contrasted with peer regions, however, both with state rivals like Charleston and the “world-class” cities of the new economy Greenville seeks to emulate. The area also still lags in the most important stimulus to wealth – educational attainment. Even as new programs are put in place to address that shortcoming, “more work must be done to ensure we are optimized for the benefit of the area,” the scorecard’s executive summary concludes. Clemson’s Institute for Economic and Community Development prepared the Economic Scorecard, which examines vitality in four areas: innovative activity, entrepreneurial environment, industry

In this chart, two areas of the Upstate are highlighted: the three-county Greenville Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) and the 10-county Upstate SC region. GRAPHIC PROVIDED BY THE GREENVILLE CHAMBER

strength and human capital. As measured against regional peers, Greater Greenville is “in the middle to low end of the pack, so there is a lot of room for improvement in each of those areas,” said Hank Hyatt, the chamber’s vice president for economic development. The one exception is innovation: The Greenville metropolitan statistical area, which en-

compasses Greenville, Pickens and Laurens counties, trails only Lexington, Ky., in innovative activity. In that sector, which includes employment in computer, science and engineering occupations, Greenville rises well above the national average. In the much-desired entrepreneurial sector, the Upstate made only modest improvement.

While the Greenville MSA did somewhat better, “there’s a lot of work to be done,” Hyatt said. In terms of industrial strength, the Greenville MSA ranks at the top when measured against smaller regional peers, but falls to the bottom when compared to larger peer regions and the national average. “We stand at about 91 percent of the U.S. rate for having highwage industries, but only about 79 percent for high-wage jobs,” the chamber said. The four strategic areas have become the focus of the Upstate community organizations the chamber mobilized five years ago to “create one of the premier business communities in the world.” Year-to-year changes are less important than the framework to advance “in all four drivers of income simultaneously,” Hyatt said. Greenville has not always lagged in the wealth index. After reaching 101 percent of the national average in 1998, the coun-

Cyclists (and cycling wanna-be’s) can take advantage of a new mobile bicycle delivery service that’s just opened downtown. Bike The Rabbit rents and delivers bikes to residents and visitors interested in tackling the Swamp Rabbit Trail … Look for Postcards from Paris to open another location in Greenridge in the early fall … Word is a yogainspired athletic apparel store that makes gear for yoga, running and “other sweaty pursuits” will set up shop in Mayme Baker Studio’s old space behind Chicora Alley in late August …

SCORECARD continued on PAGE 26

ARRIVE EARLY MAKE A STATEMENT.

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JULY 20, 2012 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL 25


JOURNAL BUSINESS

SCORECARD continued from PAGE 25

Per Capita Income Levels, Greenville MSA and Proximate MSAs

Professional Speak Out

ty’s per capita income went on a long slide, reaching a low of 91 percent of the national average in 2009. That downward trend was reversed in 2010 with “slight upticks” for the county and the Upstate. “Hopefully, this result signals a trend of future growth in per capita income,” the Clemson researchers said. To make that point in real terms, the chamber said if Greenville County’s per capita income of $33,917 in 2010 matched the national average of $39,937, the result “would be $1.59 billion in extra spendable income in our community each year.” If the 10-county Upstate – which collectively has less per capita income than Greenville County alone – achieved that level, it would generate $11 billion in spendable income. All of which underscores

CPA? CFO? IDK?

By Anna T. Locke If you think that your CPA is digging deep into your financials, looking for issues that you should be concerned about, think again. Most CPAs focus on compliance obligations – taxes, financial statement compilation, perhaps an audit – and not on coaching you on how to improve your business. In fairness, your CPA probably can't serve you as a CFO might. Because you don’t immerse him in your business, include him in strategy sessions, or debate staff changes, he’s not equipped to monitor your performance – much less plan and forecast the future accurately. His perspective is limited largely to past performance, not future opportunity. CPAs differ greatly from CFOs. CPAs use historical data that you provide to compile financial statements based on generally accepted principles after your accounting period ends. These are acceptable to third parties like banks, and it is assumed that you read and understand them.

(1999 and 2010)

GRAPHIC PROVIDED BY THE GREENVILLE CHAMBER

the association between educational achievement and income, Hyatt said. “There’s a benchmark figure of around $737 in additional per capita income for every percent point

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT

A CFO focuses on the goals and strategies of your business, establishes and monitors key performance indicators that signal opportunities – or warnings – to management, works to maximize the value of your business, and coaches you on your financials, including the issues they unveil and trends they indicate.

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H.S

Associate

Bachelor

Graduate/ Professional

Charleston

88.0

8.0

31.9

11.4

Little Rock

87.5

7.2

26.2

8.7

Columbia

87.3

8.6

29.8

11.2

Lexington, Ky.

85.3

6.7

28.6

11.5

Jackson, Miss.

85.0

7.2

27.4

10.5

(#2)

26.9

9.5

22.8

7.9

Greenville MS

83.3

8.3

Upstate

81.9

9.0 (#1)

TARGET REGIONS

H.S

Raleigh/Durham Austin, Texas

Associate

Bachelor

Graduate/ Professional

89.2

8.5

41.4

14.5

87.5

6.4

39.4

13.7

Charlotte MSA

86.3

7.9

39.2

10.1

Nashville, Tenn.

86.0

6.7

29.7

10.6

Greenville MSA

83.3

8.3

26.9

9.5

United States

85.6

7.6

28.2

10.4

South Carolina

84.1

8.4

24.5

8.8

The cited percentages were as of 2010. Cities are listed in order of high school graduates; ranking positions vary at different levels of of attainment. C62R

26 GREENVILLE JOURNAL | JULY 20, 2012

SOURCE: U.S CENSUS BUREAU, 2010 AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY AND GREENVILLE CHAMBER

increase in baccalaureate degrees. So if we go from our 26 to 28 percent of folks with a baccalaureate to 30 percent, that makes a significant difference in per capita income.” The Greenville MSA and the Upstate trail their regional competitors and the nation in the percentage of residents with high school, bachelor’s and graduate degrees. The exception is associate degree graduates. The state and Upstate region have higher percentages of residents with associate degrees than all others, and therein lies the challenge, said David Taylor, president and chief executive officer of Greenville’s University Center. “What happens a lot of times is people get into the two-year degree program at Greenville Tech for accounting, for example, but have a child and a job and wonder, ‘How am I going to get my bachelor’s?’ “The closest option is to go to USC Upstate at Spartanburg. Well, can you commute four days a week for two years while you are working and have a family? What happens? It comes to a screeching halt.” Taylor believes that after years of “this struggling per capita income and this struggling education situation … the dynamic has completely shifted. I think this is a bellwether moment for Greater Greenville for taking

the next step.” “All the right people have come together” to make more higher education options available, affordable and accessible for the core population, he said. Those changes include Clemson and the University of South Carolina expanding graduate business programs, USC Upstate’s plans to double or triple its University Center programs and Anderson University’s first programs at the center. “When we do that,” he said, “lo and behold, the person who might have a high school level or associate level (degree) has an opportunity to get a bachelor’s in accounting, marketing or finance and go to work for ScanSource, Synnex, TD Bank, CertusBank.” Taylor said real gains in income will come when companies can draw on the local population for at least 80 percent of their high-paying professional positions. “It is the only way to really raise the watermark. You can’t stand in the ocean and throw water and think the ocean is going to rise, and that is the situation we have.” Contact Dick Hughes at dhughes@ greenvillejournal.com.


journal business

By Dick Hughes | contributor

After some “head fakes in the past,” the residential real estate market has taken “meaningful strides toward recovery,” the South Carolina REALTORS Association said, based on June sales and other signs. Statewide, the association’s multiple listing service recorded an increase of 5 percent in sales, a 1.9 percent increase in median sales price and a 15.7 percent decline in the inventory of housing on the market – the latter a continuation of the trend toward a better balance between supply and demand. In the Upstate, the Greater Greenville market showed strong gains in June and Spartanburg did moderately well. The picture was spotty in the rest of the Upstate. Sales of residential homes

and condos were up 9.9 percent over June of last year in Greater Greenville, which includes Greenville, Pickens and Laurens counties. Sales were up 3.6 percent in Spartanburg. They were down in the rest of the Upstate. The median home price rose 6 percent in Greenville to $159,000. Spartanburg’s median price rose by an even greater margin – 8.4 percent to $127,000. One of the key metrics Realtors use to gauge activity is the number of days between a listing and a sale. That dropped to 94 days in Greater Greenville, the lowest in the state and well below the state average of 134 days. In Spartanburg, the average in June was 171 days on the market, up 14 percent from a year ago. That index also rose throughout

the remainder of the 10 Upstate counties. SCR, the state association of Realtors, saw enough encouraging indicators in June activity to be upbeat. “Residential real estate has finally taken some meaningful strides toward recovery, and they’ve all been selfpowered without divine (or government) intervention,” SCR said. “Yes, there have been some head fakes in the past, but there’s real reason to believe that market turnaround awaits us.” Housing in the $200,000$300,000 range is experiencing the greatest gain in appreciation, 14.5 percent, and has the shortest dayson-the-market with the exception of homes selling for $100,000 or less, SCR said. Contact Dick Hughes at dhughes@ greenvillejournal.com.

Dealmakers

Local Real Estate Transactions

Randal Bentley, president of Lee & • David Sigmon represented VJW-I Associates, represented Babaloo Enin sale of a 2,500-square-foot office/ terprises and Spartan Enterprises in retail building at 108 Mills Ave., leasing 20,000 square feet of industrial Greenville, to Montgomery Propspace at 36 Littlejohn Court, Greenville, erties, Greenville. to the automation software division of • Charles Humphreys and Rick CauSiemens Corp. Todd Younghans of then represented Callista in leasCushman & Wakefield Thalhimer reping 1,500 square feet of retail space resented Siemens. at Suite 7, 1178 Woodruff Road (Woodruff Gallery Shopping CenColdwell Banker Commercial ter), Greenville, to White LLC. Caine announced: • Sammy DuBose and Larry Crain • Charles Humphreys and Pete Brett represented 3 PE in leasing 6,400 represented TMJ Holdings in leassquare feet of office space at 725 ing 2,349 square feet of office space Lowndes Hill Road, Greenville, to at Suite 210, 15 Brendan Way, Benefits in a Card. Greenville, to TSA Choice. • Pete Brett and David Sigmon represented AVTEX Partners, XI, in the • Larry Crain represented Onin sale of a 2.24-acre site at 304 W. Butler Staffing in leasing 1,750 square feet Road, Mauldin, to QuikTrip Corp. of office space, Suites B & C, 114 Williams St., Greenville, from WilNAI Earle Furman announced: son Properties. Keith Jones and Scott Jones repre• Sammy DuBose represented Wells Fargo Bank in the sale of a sented the landlord of 157 Landmark 94,947-square-foot industrial facility Drive, Greenville, in leasing 10,000 at 11220 Honea Path Highway, Honea square feet of office space to Airgas Specialty Gases. Path, to CUJO.

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JULY 20, 2012 | Greenville Journal 27


journal business

The buzz is real

What They’re Saying about Greenville

Greenville’s long list of national accolades are earned, not sought By jennifer oladipo | contributor

You could buy the kind of promotion Greenville has received in the national press lately, but Greenville doesn’t have to. Since 2009, the city has garnered some version of national award, ranking or honor every few months. The accolades highlight almost every aspect of Greenville life, from education to economy to “coolness” of varying sorts. While the City of Greenville, the Greenville Chamber and the Convention and Visitors Bureau occasionally seek recognition, they say they can take only a small part of the credit. Most of the compliments appear to come from a genuine buzz that reaches far beyond the city and county limits. The recent “Best Small City for Cycling” recognition in the June issue of Bicycling Magazine was actively pursued. Jennifer Stilwell, chief marketing officer

28 Greenville Journal | JULY 20, 2012

with the Convention and Visitors Bureau, said the CVB began courting Bicycling in late 2011, then hosted the journalist when she visited, making sure she saw the best of Greenville. It turned out Greenville actually wasn’t large enough to be considered. “However,” said Stilwell, “they were so impressed with us they decided to name us a best small city. We were one of just three.” For the most part, the increased recognition appears to be an organic phenomenon. Stillwell said Greenville’s careful planning has earned it a reputation among municipal professionals elsewhere as a place to find best practices. They tend to share what they have seen after visiting. Also, one recognition sometimes generates another. For instance, the City of Greenville applied for and won a 2009 American Planning Association “Great Places in America” designation for Main Street. It was

one of 10 that met 30 specific standards used to make the decision. That put Greenville on the radar when Travel and Leisure magazine highlighted “America’s Greatest Main Streets” this past May. The magazine was looking for streets with grand architecture, eclectic small businesses and a community orientation, which would appeal to travelers. They especially appreciated downtown’s walkability. Other times, it is simply a matter of the numbers working in Greenville’s favor. Repeated mentions in Forbes magazine that list Greenville among the best places for jobs, business, or “bang for the buck” come from rubrics that measure statistics such as foreclosures, real estate taxes, educational attainment and travel time to work. The phrase “on the map” is inescapable when discussing the effects of these accolades. While it is impossible to measure the exact impact, recruiters can shed some

• No. 13 Best Cities for Young Professionals, 2012, Forbes • No. 2 City for Happy Marriages, 2012, RealAge • No. 1 Micro City of the Future (North and South America), 2011/2012, fDi Intelligence

light on at least one aspect. They are often actively involved in convincing individuals that Greenville is the place for them to settle. In the past, it was more difficult to get candidates to come to Greenville for a first visit, said Julie Godshall Brown, president of Godshall Staffing. “Overall, we’re just not an unknown anymore, and I think these accolades have a lot to do with that,” she said. Ava Smith, president of Flat Fee Recruiting, said the national attention “does raise an eyebrow” among the types of high-achieving professionals that companies want to lure to Greenville. It also impacts how locals in that same demographic

• Winner, Best of the Best Water Taste Test, 2011, American Water Works Association • Top 10 Most Affordable Cities, 2010, Relocate America • Artisphere one of the Top 20 Events in the Southeast, 2009, Southeast Tourism Society

are seeing their hometown. “Because of that recognition, along with other things, I see more of the young professionals remaining in Greenville,” Smith said. Recruiters take full advantage of the publicity. The feedback loop continues as newcomers use it to entice family and friends to follow them to Greenville. They will surely be touting the upcoming August/September issue of Global Trade magazine, which will feature Greenville as the “Best Kept Secret” in its list of top 50 cities. That might still be true in global trade, but back at home, the secret is out. Contact Jennifer Oladipo at joladipo@greenvillejournal.com.


JOURNAL BUSINESS

Greenville News building for sale on Main Street By DICK HUGHES | contributor

The Greenville News has put its office building on Main Street in downtown Greenville on the market, saying it no longer needs so much space with digital delivery eating into print. The building sits on prime real estate – 0.7 acres at 305 S. Main St. at the intersection of Main and Broad streets across from the Peace Center. It has a market value of $3.6 million, according to county tax records. “The ongoing transformation of our business, with increasing emphasis on digital delivery, has fundamentally altered the facility and space requirements,” said Steve Brandt, president and publisher. Gannett, the company that owns The News and 81 other newspapers, either has sold or has on the market several buildings housing its community newspapers as it downsizes print operations to refocus on digital news and advertising sites. Grace Martore, Gannett’s chief executive officer, told Wall Street analysts on June 21 that Gannett has $100 million in real estate on the market. Brandt said the “news, advertising, marketing and accounting staffs” and other Gannett-units could move to another location or lease space from the purchaser of the building. Gannett has a regional service-call center in the building. Brandt said the “bedrock commitment” of The News to serve the news,

information and advertising needs of the community will not change. “We are passionate about these things, and our dedication to them is not dependent on a street address.” CBRE/The Furman Co. is the listing broker for the sale and will handle marketing. “Because of the high value and key location within the growing downtown Greenville market, it is prudent for Gannett to consider transitioning from a real property ownership position to that of tenancy,” said Steve Na-

varro, president of The Furman Co. The News’ printing plant on Falls Street is not included in the sale listing. In addition to The News, the Asheville Citizen-Times, a sister Gannett paper, has been printed there since January 2009. Multimedia constructed the building in 1968 for the newspaper and its extensive interests in broadcast and syndication. It passed into Gannett’s hands in 1995 when Gannett bought Multimedia for $1.7 billion. Gannett sold the Multimedia Entertainment division in 1996. With poetic irony, The News announced the listing for sale on its online site Monday and in its print edition on Tuesday. Contact Dick Hughes at dhughes@greenvillejournal.com.

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Carolina Fitness Joins Forces With Proaxis

Carolina Fitness by Ramona plans to open a fitness center in downtown Greenville in September. Ramona Leary, the owner, said the facility would support a Proaxis clinic for physical therapy at Proaxis’ corporate offices at 103 N. Main Street on the Piazza Bergamo. Carolina Fitness by Ramona will offer “group fitness classes, spin bikes, free weights and a cardio theater … (along with) personal training for individuals or small groups, nutritional consultations and a large health bar offering smoothies, protein shakes and healthy snacks,” said Leary. He said the staff will include a massage therapist to work with Proaxis’ medical therapists.

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Southern First Bancshares, the holding company for Greenville First Bank and Southern First Bank, is expanding into the coastal market with a branch in Charleston. The Greenville-based company hired Len Howell, who was regional executive for National Bank of South Carolina for the last 13 years, as executive vice president and Charleston regional executive. Art Seaver, chief executive officer of Southern First, said Howell “has been extremely successful in serving the Charleston market and we believe that his leadership and performance will add significant depth to our executive team.” The bank said it expects to open the Charleston branch on East Bay Street in the current quarter. The company has three offices in Greenville and one in Greer operating as Greenville First and two in the Columbia market as Southern First. A third branch in Columbia is under construction in Forest Hills. Southern First, which was founded in 1999, reports assets of $760 million.

FDA Approves Lab for Test

The Greenville CLIA lab of the British company Lab21 has been approved by the FDA to offer a diagnostic test to determine whether patients with colorectal cancer are suitable for treatment with the drug Erbitux. The lab is one of nine in the United States approved by the FDA to offer the test. Lab21 said the test has been routinely used in Europe since 2008. The approval makes Lab21 “well positioned to be the first provider of this valuable service to the regional cancer community,” said Michael Bolick, president, in a statement from Cambridge, England.

Firm Closes In on Acquisition

KEMET Corp. has moved closer toward the first step in eventual acquisition of NEC Tokin, a Japanese rival in the global capacitor business. The European Union last week cleared the Simpsonville-based company to complete the first stage of the acquisition. KEMET has an agreement with NEC Tokin to acquire the company in three steps. Initially, KEMET will pay $50 million for 34 percent interest and $50 million in a second step to bring its equity to 49 percent in a joint venture. In the final stake, KEMET would acquire the remaining 51 percent for an amount “based on multiple performance at that time.” The acquisition would make KEMET one of the largest makers of tantalum, ceramic, aluminum, film, paper and electrolytic capacitors in the world. KEMET CEO Per-Olof Loof told financial analysts the union will result in “one of the most exciting component solutions in the world. Ever since I joined KEMET, I have felt that without a real presence in Japan we cannot truly call ourselves global.” The acquisition of NEC Tokin still requires regulatory approval from China, which has aggressively extended the capacitor business of its companies. KEMET expects the transaction will close during this quarter.

30 Greenville Journal | JULY 20, 2012


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EDTS, an information technology consulting firm with offices in Greenville and Augusta, Ga., has acquired Axios Data of Augusta effective immediately, EDTS announced. With the acquisition, EDTS has more than 40 IT professionals, “placing it among the upper tier of Southeastern IT firms,” the company said. EDTS specializes in networking, security and managed support services in a broad range of industries with a particular focus on healthcare, manufacturing, distribution, professional services and state and local government. “Not only are we adding depth to our team, but we are adding talented colleagues that we know embrace our EDTS culture of client service first,” said Charles Johnson, chief executive officer of EDTS. Inc. Magazine has named EDTS one of the 5,000 fastest growing companies in America.

County Shares a Planner

Greenville County has designated its first employee to work jointly for the county and for the Greenville Area Development Corp. The county said that Brooke Ferguson, a demographic and market research analyst in the county’s planning and development department, would provide “expert assistance in site certification and selection” to the GADC. “This sharing of resources is yet another action by Greenville County that highlights our commitment to growing our economy,” said Joe Kernell, county administrator. “This is an effective, efficient use of our best asset – our people.” Jerry Howard, president and chief executive officer of GADC, said Ferguson’s “proven success working with municipalities, utilities and other community stakeholders will provide GADC a valuable service.” The county pays Ferguson’s salary; the shared portion of her duties would be considered an “in-kind contribution” to GADC, a spokesman said. The GADC is a nonprofit entity supported by public and private funding.

Refreshing Fresh Market’s Home

The Forest Park shopping center on South Pleasantburg Drive, where The Fresh Market is the anchor, has a new owner. Kimco Realty Corp. of New York said it paid “approximately $11.8 million” for the 52,000-square-foot shopping center. The company said Fresh Market “serves the upscale neighborhoods bordering the Greenville Country Club.” Kimco said it believes it can increase occupancy from the current 79 percent by repositioning the center “to better appeal to these upscale patrons, as well as the 15,000 students at nearby Greenville Technical College.” The acquisition of Forest Park was one of four shopping centers Kimco bought as a package from EDENS, a Charlotte, N.C., shopping center operator, for $63.8 million. The others are in Asheville, Charlotte and Davidson, a Charlotte suburb.

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At times, the workplace can become so stressful or complex that it makes people feel like banging on something. Jeff Holland thinks that is a great response. He has turned a passion for drums and other percussion instruments into Drum4Work, a consultancy that applies the methods of music to human relations. It seems counterintuitive that an hour or day of playing drums, tambourines and all manner of exotic percussion instruments could be a method for improving work. But people often get “trapped” by their work routines, said Holland, and the unexpectedness of music and play can literally drum important principles about communication and teamwork into their heads. It is also an instant stress reliever. Corporate drumming has been around for about 20 years, falling under the general category of alternative corporate team-building events. Although such companies are a rarity in the Southeast, Drum4Work is part of a network of 2,000 to 3,000 such facilitators in the country, said Nellie Hill, president of the Drum Circle Facilitators Guild. Drum4Work operates in the Carolinas, Tennessee, Georgia and Florida, and works with musicians from throughout those areas. Past clients include Michelin, the Peace Center and all manner of small and large companies. One such company was Worthwhile, a Web services company that was about to double its staff. “It was important to understand that as we grow, you don’t just sit down with your nose down at your desk anymore,” said Mike McCurdy, then director of production. It was a hard sell to the very conservative management, but the program brought the team together at a critical time, and was a lot of fun, McCurdy said. Drum4Work went to Shanghai in 2010 when Holland’s friend Marc Gwinn wanted to raise morale at his company. He said Chinese culture makes people reluctant to speak up or stand out, so drumming was a real deviation. Gwinn said it was clear that his employees enjoyed themselves, and new friendships were formed.

Photo by R. Corvey

By jennifer oladipo | contributor

Drum4Work's Jeff Holland uses percussion to help businesses learn communication and teamwork principles.

Holland’s work is sometimes about fostering a common mode of expression in a culturally diverse workplace. At one company, he remembered, older workers were effectively being forced out by early retirement, younger new workers felt underappreciated, and a group in the middle seemed unsympathetic to the other two. When they physically arranged themselves into those three camps at their Drum4Work session, Holland split them up. He had older workers create a beat and pass it to the younger ones to take over, and everyone used instruments to express big and small changes they would like to see at work. They physically worked out the relational shifts that needed to take place, helping older workers see their contributions and younger ones begin to take more ownership. Holland said such goals are explicit during the sessions. Shop talk, however, is avoided. “I realized that people don’t want to hear about their business. They absolutely want to escape that.” There is a delicate balance between having fun and taking the activity seriously. Once the stress and inhibitions are inevitably reduced, “my job as a focus a lot of the time is harnessing (group energy) as much as introducing,” Holland said. Gwinn points out that one session will not fix a company. Even when the session accomplishes its goals, maintenance and reminders afterward are what make for lasting changes in the workplace. To that end, Holland encourages people to keep a drum or shaker at their desk, for those times when they need to put some rhythm back into their routines. Contact Jennifer Oladipo at joladipo@greenvillejournal.com.


Journal Sketchbook Winfred Rembert’s life is carved in leather Craft learned in prison tells story of work in cotton fields, Civil Rights movement By Cindy Landrum | staff

Winfred Rembert was sent to work in a Georgia cotton field when he was six. He was arrested as a teen for making off with a car while trying to escape two white men who were chasing him after gunshots rang out at what had been a peaceful Civil Rights march in Americus, Ga. He was nearly castrated by the KKK during a near lynching – a lynching he said was stopped by a white man wearing large wing-tip shoes. He spent time working on a Georgia chain gang. Rembert, who now lives in Connecticut, tells his story through art, now on exhibit at the Greenville County Museum of Art through Aug. 19. Instead of canvas, Rembert uses leather. Instead of brushes, he uses knives, bevels and hammers. Instead of paint, he uses vivid commercial leather dyes that are “painted” into the substrate to achieve rich and varnished hues. He uses a craft he learned from a fellow prison inmate to create images both personal and rooted in the South of a half-century ago. The images range from chain gangs to baptisms, pool hall and kitchen scenes, from church services to cotton fields. Rembert left the South for Connecticut in the 1970s after he got out of prison, part of a migration of African-Americans fleeing the South for freedom and jobs. He

FIRE wants to make 5th season a classic

Musicals, childhood favorites and live radio shows on tap By Cindy Landrum | staff

Winfred Rembert, “Dinner-Time in the Cotton Field,” 2001. Dye on carved and tooled leather. 27 x 34 3⁄4 inches. Private collection.

found work as a longshoreman, a career he pursued until an injury forced him to retire in the mid-1990s. It was then that his wife, Patty, a woman he met while working on that Georgia chain gang, suggested that Rembert, who has had no formal art training, tell his stories.

According to the catalog for “Winfred Rembert: Amazing Grace,” Rembert begins his work by purchasing one “side” of vegetable or oak-tanned cowhides from a Connecticut leather factory. He sketches an image on paper, then Rembert continued on page 34

Fountain Inn Repertory Experience, the community theater based in the city’s old high school turned visual and performing arts center, starts its fifth season in October. The season is centered on Broadway classics that will allow all of its repertory companies – serving children as young as six to seniors – to participate in the milestone season. FIRE got its start at a time when other theaters across the country were struggling to keep their doors open because the economy was beginning to tank. Yet the Fountain Inn Visual and Performing Arts Center has been able to expand its programming, from live theater to local musical and singing groups to outside performers. The season kicks off on Oct. 5 with “The Sound of Music,” one of the world’s most beloved musicals. Anita Sleeman, director of education and programming Fire continued on page 35

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JOURNAL SKETCHBOOK The Invisible In Canal (IIC) is virtually undetectable! As shown in this image.

Heard & Not Seen This hearing aid does for your ears what a contact lens does for your eyes: Improves your hearing without anyone knowing it’s there.

Winfred Rembert, “All Me II,” 2002. Dye on carved and tooled leather. 31 1/2 x 37 3/4 inches. Collection of the artist.

Breaking News

At a recent gathering of the American Academy of Audiology (AAA), scientists revealed a hearing aid microchip processor so small that it can fit inside a hearing aid shell custom formed to your ear canal to fit right next to the ear drum. It sits so deep in the canal that it ends where other hearing aids begin. And that makes it completely undetectable to anyone else. In fact, we like to say it’s “invisible.”

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Despite its miniature size, the processor inside the “Invisible-In-Canal” hearing aid is so powerful it supports the most sophisticated advances in digital The IIC sits so deep in the canal it ends where other hearing aids begin. hearing technology to date. It is so fast, that it samples the listening environment 2,000 times per second and makes automatic adjustments to the sound it delivers to your ear. When someone is talking, it is designed to quiet the background noise in-between syllables and amplify the speaker’s voice so that you can clearly hear and understand the words.

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traces that image onto a piece of leather. After he sprays the leather with water, Rembert begins to cut the image into the leather with a swivel knife. He uses more than 100 different tools to create shading, textures, patterns and other three-dimensional impressions, the catalogue said. He then paints the scene with commercial leather dye. “Ain’t much room for a mistake and that takes practice,” he said. He said his jailhouse “teacher,” T.J., was not a good man. He was jealous of Rembert’s abilities and stole his leatherworking tools. “I kind of wish T.J. could see what I’m doing now,” he said. “Amazing Grace,” an image of pickers in a cotton field with musical staffs superimposed on them, is in the permanent collection of the Richard M. Ross Art Museum at Ohio Wesleyan University. “‘Amazing Grace’ is one of the songs I remember that was sung in the fields. I

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just loved to listen to that singing. Singing was the only thing about the fields that I loved,” Rembert said. “Dunlap’s Quarters II” shows quarter houses a farmer had built for his workers. “All of his workers were black. Dunlap did all types of work: cut wood to sell, picked cotton, shook peanuts, pulled corn,” Rembert wrote. “The Quarters were large and consisted of about 50 houses. But like every farmer, cotton was his big crop. And he had the workers to do it.” Rembert said he visited Dunlap in 2006 before he died. “Winfred Rembert Going North?” shows a black man with two bags and a loaded car. A woman stands nearby. “They’re surely leaving home. No more picking cotton for 2 cent a pound. Got to be something better. I believe they’re going north because that’s what everybody talked about during dinner time in the cotton field,” Rembert wrote. In “The Struggle,” Rembert pictures some famous African-Americans such as Michael Jordan, Michael Jackson and Tiger Woods in a cotton field. “I just wanted to show that, even though these folk may never have been in a cotton field, they are still connected to the cotton field,” Rembert wrote. “So it is possible to go through the cotton fields, corn fields, peanut fields and watermelon patches with all the rest of us and still end up being famous or even being president of the United States.” Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@greenvillejournal.com.


JOURNAL SKETCHBOOK

N

FIRE continued from PAGE 33

and assistant director of the center, will direct the show – her first time directing a Rodgers and Hammerstein collaboration. “I feel strongly our audience will love it,” she said. “They’ve been asking for it.” The musical crosses all of FIRE’s repertory companies, making it a show for all ages, both performing and watching. The second show on FIRE’s schedule – Disney’s “My Son Pinocchio” – puts a new twist on Disney’s show about the puppet and his toy-making woodcarver father, Geppetto. The story is told from the father’s point of view. Stephen Schwartz, the musical theater lyricist and composer who wrote “Godspell” and “Wicked,” wrote “My Son Pinocchio.” Show dates are Nov. 16-18. FIRE’s Christmas show will be “Miracle on 34th Street,” the classic play that centers on a small girl’s belief in Santa and a climatic courtroom decision. The play’s six-show run begins Dec. 7. “Barefoot in the Park,” the romantic Neil Simon comedy, is next on the slate beginning Feb. 15. “Alice in Wonderland Jr.” will follow, with four shows the weekend of March 22 through March 24.

PE O OW

N The season concludes with a twoweekend run of “Gypsy” in April. In addition to its Main Stage productions, FIRE will also be doing three FIREside Radio shows. The shows will be live, but they will be taped for play later on Fountain Inn’s radio station, WFIS. “We love the idea of nostalgia,” Sleeman said. “Live radio focused the attention on what live entertainment is all about.” The first FIREside Radio show will be “Treasure Island” on Aug. 16. “War of the Worlds,” one of the most famous broadcasts of all time, will be performed on Oct. 26. “A Christmas Carol” will be performed on Dec. 18 and Dec. 19.

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JULY 20, 2012 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL 35


JOURNAL SKETCHBOOK

Arts Calendar Jul. 20-26

Fountain Inn Arts Center Disney’s Aladdin Kids Jul. 20 ~ 409-1050 Greenville Shakespeare Company As You Like It Through Jul. 23 ~ 770-1372 Downtown Alive Reggaeinfinity Jul. 26 ~ 232-2273 Furman Music by the Lake Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy Jul. 26 ~ 294-2086 Main Street Real Estate Gallery Photography by Kim Sholly Jul. 26 – Sep. 30 ~ 250-4177 Furman University Thompson Gallery Works by Osher Students Through Jul. 27 ~ 294-2998 Upstate Shakespeare Festival Henry V Through Aug. 5 ~ 235-6948 Centre Stage Beehive – The 60s Musical Through Aug. 11 ~ 233-6733 Metro. Arts Council @ Centre Stage Photography by Tommy Wyche Through Aug. 21 ~ 233-6733 Greenville Chamber of Commerce Works by Georgia Harrison Through Aug. 31 ~ 242-1050 Greenville County Museum of Art Lowcountry Through Sep. 9 ~ 271-7570 Portrait of Greenville Through Sep. 30 ~ 271-7570 Merge Works by William Abbott and Cindy Roddey Through Sep. 12 ~ 373-9330

36 GREENVILLE JOURNAL | JULY 20, 2012


JOURNAL SKETCHBOOK

SCENE. HERE.

THE WEEK IN THE LOCAL ARTS WORLD

Designer Showhouse

“Interlude”

South Carolina Christian author Marcia Moston will be signing copies of her debut memoir, “Call of a Coward: The God of Moses and the MiddleClass Housewife” at her launch party at Fiction Addiction’s new store location, 1175 Woods Crossing Rd., on Saturday, August 4, from 1-3 p.m. For more information, call 864-675-0540 or visit www. fiction-addiction.com.

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The Upcountry History Museum will host History After Dark on July 26, 6:30 p.m., with “A Col“Red Reflections” by Pat Cato. lector’s View: An Evening with Scott Blackwell.” Mixed Media on Canvas. 24 Blackwell has collected pieces of folk art from x 24. Ongoing show at Ellie’s around the Southeast and visitors can get to know Uptown Café at 61 Beattie Place, him and the artists featured in his collection durdowntown Greenville, 864-2413262.www.patcatoart.com ing a screening of the documentary, “All Rendered Truth.” The evening will also feature a special collector’s tour of the Uniquely Southern Folk Art exhibit. The event cost is $7-$10, free for supporting members. For more information and to make reservations, call 864-467-3100 or visit www.upcountryhistory. org. In addition, on July 28 at 11 a.m., the museum is hosting the GHS Family Centennial Celebration, a family event featuring folk art crafts, a live performance, and tours of the GHS exhibit. This event is free.

Showhouse Tickets $25

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July 24th features Carleton Varney legendary interior decorator. August 2nd features celebrated floral designer Ron Morgan. Available online, The Flat Rock Book Exchange, and by mail: HFR, P.O. Box 295, Flat Rock, NC 28731

The Fountain Inn Center for Visual & Performing Arts will present Disney’s “Aladdin Kids” on July 19 at 7:30 p.m. and July 20 at 10 a.m. This production is the result of the Simply Sensational Summer Camps, led by directors Heather McCall and Hope Tinnin. Come enjoy Aladdin and Jasmine as they take a magic carpet ride above the streets of Agrabah and sing a “Whole New World.” The Oscar-winning song is just one of the numbers campers sing during the play. Tickets are $5 and are available at Fountain Inn Center Box Office, online at www.ftinnarts.org , by phone at 864-409-1050, or in person at 315 N. Main Street, Fountain Inn, SC 29644.

www.historicflatrockinc.org For Information Call (828) 697-0208

Showhouse Property Is Not Handicapped Accessible • Children Over 12 Are Welcome

Greenville Chautauqua will present “Frederick Douglass: His Personal & Professional Relationship with President Abraham Lincoln” on Aug. 4, 1-2 p.m. Charles Everett Pace portrays the black abolitionist who visited President Lincoln in August 1863 to urge for equal pay for black soldiers. A year later on August 19, 1864, Douglass returned to the White House at the president’s request. A deep respect and friendship ensued. This show is free and like all other Chautauqua events, the audience can interact with the performers. The performance will be at Centre Stage, 501 River St., Greenville. For more information, call 864-244-1499 or 864-360-7500. Send us your arts announcement. E-mail: greenvillearts@greenvillejournal.com

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The value of vagabonding

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Reflections on a gap year By Givens Parr | contributor

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My philosophy teacher finished writing in my yearbook, punctuating his note with a Tibetan word. “A special word,” he said, smiling. “Emaho (ay-mah-hoe). It means, ‘Oh how wondrous!’” Lover of language that I am, I could have wept. I adored my word. I felt he had presented me with a self-contained celebration, had inscribed the letters on my forehead like a grace-given tattoo. It was not an earned gift, but one of inspiration. To be lived and shared. At that moment, I’m not sure either of us understood the prescience of his angular script. I certainly wouldn’t have predicted that, come September, I would be penning him a letter from Tibet itself. The spring of 2011 found me on the cusp of graduation. I had accepted an offer of admission for college, was prepared to move on from my high school community, and my diploma was signed and sealed, soon to be delivered. But the conviction to wander was gnawing at my bones. I wanted to make a classroom of the world, to wring out my mind, to fly a long way away. My feet itched. I wrote to my college-tobe, requesting a one-year deferral. The admissions officer responded with consent. I had successfully enrolled in the School of Life. In autumn, rural China left me breathless. I traveled from province to province in the backs of buses and on crowded overnight trains. I didn’t shower for days at a time and yet felt cleaner that I had my whole life. Villagers welcomed me into their homes and took me into their fields to pick

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vegetables. Their generosity of time and space humbled and instructed me. Peace soon grew out of the knowledge that I needed nothing beyond one foot in front of another, beyond the view of Jade Dragon Snow Mountain that brought me to my knees and then to tears, beyond the look on the 10-yearold monk’s face when I offered him my bicycle or the circle of laughing Naxi minority villagers shucking corn around a fire. In the winter, my Chinese home-stay family in the city of Kunming claimed me as daughter, granddaughter, sister. My nainai knit me socks and told me stories about the Cultural Revolution. Yeye cooked vast meals with vegetables I had never seen before, and Ma doted on me when I washed the dishes. My six-yearold sister sang songs with me as I hung laundry out to dry. I spent afternoons at a local hospital of traditional medicine, mentored by a tui na doctor who healed people with the work of her hands. Winter unfolding into spring took me to the Netherlands where I lived at L’Abri Fellowship (a commune of sorts) in the countryside. There, I pored over books of theology, philosophy and great literature. I let lifequestions multiply in my mouth, and I asked them all. I learned the value of labor and pitted my strength daily against the tasks required to keep L’Abri functioning. Together, members of the community split wood and scrubbed toilets, tiled floors and prepared dinner. I found joy in working with my hands, in repairing what was once broken and using it anew. I learned to love the people who lived alongside me, in all of their peculiar and wonderful and terrible forms. Existence

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Joan Herlong

Givens Parr spent a year after high school traveling in China and the Netherlands. She will attend Brown University in the fall.

became an act of serving and receiving, an exercise in patience and in grace. In those months, I wrestled with God and, like Jacob, walked away limping and joyful and blessed. Returning to the Carolinas for the summer, I had fresh eyes to recognize the capacity for adventure and rich experience all around me. I got a job and navigated Greenville as an empowered young adult – seeking community, holding responsibilities, and knowing that time is my resource, relationships are the investments worth holding, and love is the universal prerogative. In all these places, I have been both humbled by my shortcomings and grateful for the awareness that leads to change. And grateful, in no short measure, for every good door I went through and every strong arm that helped me to open it. My life has become characterized by Wonder. Emaho is always on my lips. To anyone approaching ends, bridges or beginnings, I say, do not fear — either the narrow gate or the road less traveled. Tap every resource for beauty. Whether we go or stay, a season of wonder is at hand. “Allons! The road is before us! It is safe – I have tried it – my own feet have tried it well – be not detain’d!” -Walt Whitman, “Song of the Open Road” Givens Parr graduated in 2011 from Phillips Academy Andover in Massachusetts. She is a longtime student of Mandarin, a painter, a writer and a seeker of Truth. This summer, Parr served as an intern at the Greenville Journal and in the fall will be a freshman at Brown University. Parr highly recommends “Vagabonding” by Rolf Potts to wonderers and wanderers of any age. Contact Givens Parr at gparr@greenvillejournal.com.


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proofing. Large screened in porch with IPE hardwoods. Custom bar area in downstairs rec room and wine cellar is perfect for entertaining, and separate guest suite. Master bedroom has a wall of windows, large his & hers closets, huge bathroom with separate shower and soaking tub. All baths include Radiant Heat flooring. Home is pre-wired for intercom and internet hard-wiring. 3 tankless hot water heaters, central vacuum, premium hardwood flooring throughout. Huge entertaining patio with multiple entertaining areas, outdoor Fireplace, and pre-plumbed for outdoor kitchen area.

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JULY 20, 2012 | G R E E N V I L L E J O U R N A L 39


F E A T U R E D OPEN

S U N D AY,

O P E N J U LY

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H O U S E

FROM 215

2–4PM

River

Wa l k

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Wonderful 4 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath home in desirable River Walk. The spacious kitchen with center island, silestone counter tops and tile back splash opens to a large breakfast room. Beautiful great room with fireplace and built in cabinetry which leads to the living room, which owners are using as a music room. Upstairs you will find the master suite with walk in closet, jetted tub, double sinks and separate shower. There are 3 additional bedrooms plus a bonus room. Home is in move in condition... new roof in August 2011 and new carpet throughout. Enjoy summer evenings on the deck overlooking the beautifully landscaped yard. River Walk boasts award winning schools, clubhouse, pool, swim team, tennis courts, playground and walking trails that weave throughout the neighborhood.

HOME INFO Price: $385,000 | MLS#1243233 4 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths, 3200-3399SF Bethel Elementary Mauldin Middle Mauldin High Contact: Margaret Marcum 864.420.3125 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

O P E N THE CLAREMONT

UPSTATE’S

T H I S PRIMARY

W E E K E N D

SOURCE

FOR

OPEN

HOUSES

SUN 2-4PM (7/22)

RIDGELAND AT THE PARK SAT-SUN 1:30-5PM

THE OAKS AT ROPER MTN

SUN 2-4PM

BENNETTS CROSSING SUN 2-4PM (7/22)

PROVIDENCE

200 CHAMBLEE BLVD - $749,000 4BR/3.5BA. Beautiful home under construction in gated community 4 car garage.MBR on main. Great Rm & Living Rm & much more. From GVL, I-385 to Roper Mtn Rd exit, turn L, go approx 5 miles & turn R into SD. Margaret Marcum/Leigh Irwin, 4203125/380-7755 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1232943

164 RIDGELAND DRIVE - $539,000 2BR/3BA. Wonderful open floor plans, 10’ clngs, granite countertops, stainless appliances, 10x12 covered patios & much more. McDaniel Avenue from Augusta Rd. Left on Ridgeland, follow signs to Sales Center Beth Crigler, 678-5263 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1222397

119 CHARLESTON OAK LANE - $488,500 3BR/3.5BA. Elegant hm w/bonus room is being newly constructed. From GVL take I-385 S to Roper Mtn Rd Exit, Turn L, continue across Garlington, just after light @ Feaster @ Roper Mtn turn Left into The Oaks. Cynthia Rehberg/Rhett Brown, 8849953/915-9393 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1229267

484 S. BENNETTS BRIDGE RD - $450,000 4BR/3.5BA. Southern Living! Horses permetted. 3.93 acres, Gated entry. Beautiful private property, Woodruff Rd into Five Fors Area, L at Traffic light on Bennetts Bridge Rd, Go approx 1 mile, home on Left. Kate Anderson, 363-3634 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1243327

213 PROVIDENCE WAY - $429,000 4BR/2.5BA. Gorgeous kitchen, stainless appliances, glazed cabinets, solid surface countertops. Huge fenced, level lot with salt water pool. LARGE bedrooms. Hardwoods and tile throughout. Open floor plan. Andy & Leslie Abney, (864) 444-0123 MLS#1241592

STONEHAVEN

SUN 2-4PM (7/22)

CHAPEL HILL ESTATES SUN 2-4PM (7/22)

FAIRVIEW CHASE

POWDERHORN

BLYTHEWOOD

101 BROOK HOLLOW CT - $374,850 4BR/3BA. Stunning home in wonderful location. Spacious rooms, master on 2nd flr. This home has all you could want and is move-in ready. Woodruff Rd to Right on Hwy 14, Left on Maxwell Rd, R on Brook Hollow Tim Keagy,, 905-3304 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1241809

9 JUDGES LANE - $199,000 3BR/2BA. Super clean one owner home. New roof. Split floor plan. A minute from Skyland Elem & Blue Ridge High Schools. Turn Left off Hwy 14 onto Fews Chapel, SD on Left. Eddie Burch,, 608-9991 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1241992

40 G R E E N V I L L E J O U R N A L | JULY 20, 2012

SUN 1-4PM (7/22)

12 HEATHERFIELD DR - $169,900 3BR/2.5BA. Great home in great location. Open floor plan, neutral colors, master main, screened porch & more. 385 to Fairview Rd, L into SD on Rivers Edge, 2nd L on Heatherfield Tim Keagy, 905-3304 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1237185

SUN 2-4PM (7/22)

1010 POWDERHORN RD - $154,900 3BR/2.5BA. Adorable home with split floor plan. Sunken LR, scrnd porch, irrigation system & great landscaping. 385 S to Exit 27, turn L back over 385, cross Main St into SD, Hm is in the back on SD on R. Kathy Fleming, 918-2142 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1239562

SUN 2-4PM (7/22)

SUN 2-4PM (7/22)

RIVER WALK

SAT-SUN 2-4PM (7/22)

215 RIVER WALK DR - $385,000 4BR/2.5BA. Wonderful home w/bonus room in desirable River Walk. Beautifully landscaped lot. Must see! Hwy 14 to Five Forks Rd at the light, R on Parkside, L on River Walk Dr, Home on L. Lois Leder, 918-5067 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1243233

WALKERS CROSSING

SUN 2-4PM (7/22)

1029 BLYTHEWOOD DR - $154,900 103 N. CHANCELOR DR - $148,000 3BR/2BA. Immaculate home convenient to 3BR/2BA. Gorgeoug ranch, great location Anderson, Easley & Greenville. Quiet, country culdesac street, New carpet & paint, fenced setting. 85 South to Hwy 86, Exit 35, Turn L, yard & oversized deck. Woodruff Rd to R on Turn L after strip mall into SD, Home on L. Hwy 14, R into SD, R on N. Chancelor Janie Billie Toney, 906-5759 Prudential C. Dan Gibbs, 901-3403 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Joyner Co. MLS#1240983 Co. MLS#1242278

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3BR/2BA Rive r R i d g e Must see! 3/2 ranch conveniently located to I-385, I-85 and Greenville Tech Campus. Amenities include a pool, tennis courts and large soccer field for children to play. Won’t last long!! Hilary Hurst (864) 313-6077 MLS#1236595

Kelsey Glen, Simpsonville Kelsey Glen offers an rare opportunity to live in a quiet, established community offering scenic mountain views and over 47 acres of secure common area at a fantastic value all while being just 1.5 miles from the Woodruff Rd corridor known for great shopping and restaurants. You will feel worlds away from the hustle and bustle but yet you are just minutes away from all the conveniences! Kelsey Glen boasts a Community Pool, Cabana, and play area in addition to the 47 acres of

common area, and a variety of homes to fit your lifestyle. Whether you are searching for single or multi- level living, customizing opportunities, a fantastic value, or the perfect homesite, we have just what you want at a price you can afford. Kelsey Glen features new Ryan Homes in 2 villages: The Meadows and The Enclave. With our award winning floor plans, our fantastic value, our financial stability and our ENERGY STAR® Certification, it’s easy to see why Ryan Homes is the #1 Builder in the Upstate!

400 Aberdeen Dr. | $325,000 4BD/3BA MLS#1242455

103 Beechridge | $205,000 3BD/2BA MLS#1239148

NEIGHBORHOOD INFO

2BR/2BA H a m p to n R i d g e Cute bungalow with lots of charm! New roof, light fixtures, vaulted ceilings, and energy efficient appliances to name a few things on the long list of updates! Also a storage room on left side of home. Hilary Hurst (864) 313-6077 MLS#1242615 SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

Amenities: Pool, Cabana, Play Area, 47 acres of Common Area

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864.616.3685 | sreid@cbcaine.com JULY 20, 2012 | G R E E N V I L L E J O U R N A L 41


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HONORS

The Reserve at Lake Keowee Introduces Village Point at Marina Park: Waterfront neighborhood’s quality, flexibility, and value targeted to retirement, second-home buyers Sunset, SC – For the first time in its 12-year history, The Reserve at Lake Keowee is releasing a neighborhood of fourteen homes along an area known as Marina Park, a stone’s throw from the community’s amenity-centric waterfront Village. Village Point, as the neighborhood is called, presents the trifecta of what secondhome buyers are seeking: remarkable beauty and quality, flexible floor plans, and value. Village Point features three home plans, ranging in size from approximately 2,650 to 3,750 square feet, each of which may be customized by adding terrace levels, garages, and upper levels. The neighborhood is located within five minutes or less by foot or golf cart from 10 of The Reserve’s most popular amenities. Inside the grounds, Village Point is a haven on the water, featuring pedestrian pathways accented by statuary and manicured landscaping. Pricing for homes in Village Point begin in the mid-

$600,000s, and the homes qualify for entry into the community’s residential rental program. Homes in Village Point have been designed by the Atlanta, Ga.-based firm Lew Oliver, Inc., and will be built by Pyramid Construction, a well known, trusted general contractor within The Reserve that constructed the community’s Pool Pavilion complex, Tennis & Fitness facility, Guest House Cottages and Laurel Pond neighborhood. “The architecture of the Village Point at The Reserve at Lake Keowee will be, in essence, the quintessential summer lake cottage,” describes Lew Oliver, architect of the project. “Found in lake districts and coastal villages of the Eastern Seaboard, the homes are free-form vernacular and shingle styled, with asymmetrical gables, ribbon windows, and rambling porches. Designed for capturing the summer breezes, the designs are open and casual. Interiors will be comfortable and

R E A L

E S T A T E J U LY

SUBD.

PRICE $8,700,000 CLAREMONT $940,000 $690,000 KINGSBRIDGE $675,000 RIDGELAND AT THE PARK $557,000 MAHAFFEY PLANTATION $550,000 SPRING FOREST ESTATES $538,835 THE CLIFFS AT MOUNTAIN PARK $510,508 SCHWIERS AT CLEVELAND $495,000 SANIBEL OAKS $467,500 RIVER WALK $455,000 FIVE FORKS PLANTATION $439,000 SYCAMORE RIDGE $416,900 BROOKSIDE FOREST $390,000 ROPER MOUNTAIN ESTATES $381,500 RIVER WALK $380,000 MCRAE PARK $375,725 $375,000 FIVE FORKS PLANTATION $365,000 FIVE FORKS PLANTATION $365,000 NORTHGATE $365,000 SUGAR MILL $360,000 SUGAR CREEK $360,000 GARDENS AT THORNBLADE $355,000 PLANTATION GREENE $353,627 HAMMETT CORNER $335,698 MYSTIC MTN RIVER EDGE ESTATE $335,000 BENNETTS GROVE $317,166 SHADOWOOD $315,000 SHADOWOOD $315,000 HOLLINGTON $286,400 COTTAGES AT RIVERWOOD FARM $286,250 COTTAGES AT RIVERWOOD FARM $285,000 MCBEE MILL $280,000 SUNSET HILLS $275,000 MCDANIEL HEIGHTS $275,000 PELHAM FALLS $268,000 SUNSET HILLS $266,000 PELHAM FALLS $260,500 KILGORE FARMS $259,255 HOLLINGTON $245,000 SHENANDOAH FARMS $245,000 WHITEHALL PLANTATION $245,000 THE FARM AT SANDY SPRINGS $241,708 STRATFORD FOREST $235,000 THE EDGE ON NORTH MAIN $232,000 SILVERLEAF $228,000 HERITAGE CREEK $223,618 ABERDEEN HIGHLANDS $220,000 GOWER ESTATES $220,000 ADAMS RUN $219,000

SELLER ROAD BAY INVESTMENTS LLC FLOREZ CLAUDIA A RCC INVESTMENTS LLC CANUP CLAUDE R JR RIDGELAND HOLDINGS LLC HARRIS DANYEL M WILLIAMS DAVID K (SURV) HUGO PROPERTIES LLC COBURN BETTE LEE DOUD JAMES P HARTIN CURTIS W DOYLE JOSEPH W FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTG A TOOLE VIRGINIA L KELLER MICHAEL B WRIGHT JONATHAN P BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT DMRST PROPERTIES LLC NI LONG-WEN AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL R OGLETREE CYNTHIA M HARRIS DANIELLE T WHITTEN JAMES B JR COOK MARY T NVR INC S C PILLON HOMES INC LINDLER BROOKE E ZIEGLER RUTH M REESE CHARLES H CARTUS FINANCIAL CORPORA BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT MILAM CRAIG A AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL R HOLLAND GRETCHEN D SWARTZ JOHN J MARTINS DANIEL J DAUM JOSEPH M SEABOLT JULIA L POWELL FRANK M IV BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT CLARK SCOTT C SHIRLEY DWIGHT E NELSON ROBERT J IV D R HORTON INC LAY JAMES R ALDERMAN ANGIE WALL JANET S C PILLON HOMES INC BERNARD MICHAEL MTA PROPERTIES LLC LANG BARRY J

BUYER COVINGTON GREENVILLE LLC KUMAR MONIKA CBNA-SC LLC DAVIDSON LARRY S (JTWROS MIKA GARY D (JTWROS) LIZURICK EDWARD (JTWROS) WYATT-INGRAM STUART GEOR INDYMAC VENTURE LLC COBURN MARK E TULEIBITZ JOHN A (JTWROS PEED DURWOOD L (JTWROS) HAUCK JOEL A (JTWROS) KO JUNG-TYNN GENE GOODMAN GLORIA M MULLINS ELIZABETH H MCCURRY KRISTI A RADHAKRISHNAN GUNALAN KING LESLIE J AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL R BURRY BEVERLY H MCDOUGALD GEORGE R III MOORE HAROLD J (JTWROS) COLUMBIA SCOTT F (SURV) CORBETT CLAUDETTE POWELL CHARLES C FOWLER DALE FISHER WILLIAM MATTHEW PRUDENTIAL RELOCATION IN CARTUS FINANCIAL CORPORA BAILEY JANE H GARNETT JEROME AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL R SHEMROSKE ELIZABETH W (J GREEN MARTHA M CRICK ALAN L (JTWROS) STONER BENJAMIN R (JTWRO SCOTT MEAGAN M (JTWROS) GOODEN RUTH W WOLFORD LEAH F (JTWROS) CROWL CHRISTOPHER C PATEL MADHUBEN S PAGE JANET MARIE (JTWROS GIVEN DOUGLAS A (JTWROS) STOKES BRIDGETTE JONES ELIZABETH S STOECKLEIN CHRISTOPHER WARDLE CHERIE ROSEANN (J WEATHERRED MARTHA P (JTW CREEK AARON T EADES KIMBERLY S LIVING HENSLEE JOSEPH D (JTWROS

42 G R E E N V I L L E J O U R N A L | JULY 20, 2012

non-pretentious, but with a nod to style. The finish palette includes mountain rock, handmade brick, wood shingles and siding, with Arts and Crafts period colors. Clustered on the most prominent peninsula in The Reserve, the village will be entirely pedestrian friendly, convenient to the Town Center, boat slips, clubhouse, and amenities, only minutes away on foot.” “We have a couple of key reasons to be very excited about Village Point,” states Chuck Pigg, Community Manager of The Reserve at Lake Keowee and Vice President of Greenwood Communities and Resorts (the community’s development partner). “First, it feels great to be officially ‘back in the development business’, bringing this new product to market after prudent dormancy during the real estate recession. Second, we are releasing our most compelling home packages to date. Never have we been able to sell property so close to the water at this price point.

Our lakefront homesites have historically averaged 25 percent higher than what we’ve been able to create here within Village Point. We got creative with this, and we expect to be successful.” Rutledge Livingston, The Reserve at Lake Keowee’s Director of Sales adds that “buzz has been building for Village Point since earlier this year. More than 150 people from across the country signed up to be a part of an exclusive Interest List, long before the first plans were drawn. We already have a handful of reservations for specific homes and feel that the neighborhood is being very well received.”

T R A N S A C T I O N S 2-6,

ADDRESS PO BOX 638 15 TRAVERTINE CT 6602 CALHOUN MEMORIAL HWY 3 BROADSTONE CT 168 RIDGELAND DR #200 55 GRIFFITH CREEK DR 125 HARTS LN 17 CRESCENT PINYON WAY 31 HARVEST LN 901 SUGAR OAK CT 6 WOLF RUN DR 26 OSSABAW LOOP 217 WHITWORTH WAY 171 MARSHALL BRIDGE DR 3 FOXGLOVE CT 1 MAPLE BROOK CT 19 MCRAE PL 409 E CAMPERDOWN WAY 6 PENN CENTER WEST 2ND FL 303 PAWLEYS DR 240 E AVONDALE DR 104 SUGAR MILL CT 222 E SHALLOWSTONE RD 40 LATOUR WAY 19 WINDRUSH LN 230 WANDO WAY 5 PERRO LANE 16260 N 71ST AVE 40 APPLE RIDGE RD 3 SHADOWMIST DR 248 ABBEY GARDENS LN 6 PENN CENTER WEST 2ND FL 304 MEDFORD DR 15 CRABAPPLE CT 4 MEYERS DR 118 NEWMAN ST 202 BARLEY MILL DR 6 SEMINOLE DR 4 BARLEY MILL DR 32 ASHBY GROVE DR 10 CADOGAN DR 19 ROANOKE HILLS CT 102 WYNTERHALL DR 182 PENDOCK LN 119 HAGOOD ST 11 B EDGE CT 105 CROSSWINDS ST 200 OPEN RANGE LN 309 MELVILLE AVE 139 BUCKINGHAM RD 202 SPRING LAKE LOOP

2012

SUBD. BROOKFIELD WEST THE RESERVES AT RAVENWOOD THE COVE AT SAVANNAH POINTE MEADOWBROOKE UNIVERSITY PARK WOODGREEN WOODGREEN WOODSTONE COTTAGES PH.II PELHAM FALLS KELSEY GLEN KELSEY GLEN LAKEVIEW FARMS CHANTICLEER GREYTHORNE KELSEY GLEN PARKSIDE AT LISMORE SHOALLY RIDGE SUMMERFIELD SAVANNAH POINTE DEVENGER PLACE HERITAGE CREEK REMINGTON SHELLSTONE PARK HERITAGE CREEK BOULDER CREEK LENNOX LAKE SILVER RIDGE FARMS PARKER’S PLACE CARTERS GROVE OAKWAY THE RIDGES AT PARIS MTN. KNOLLWOOD HEIGHTS COPPER CREEK PLANTERS ROW HOLLYTON FOX TRACE GARLINGTON PARK LANSDOWNE AT REMINGTON TANNER’S MILL REEDY SPRINGS FOX TRACE NEELY FARM - LAUREL BROOK HERITAGE LAKES CHARTWELL ESTATES HERITAGE CREEK THE HOLLOWS

PRICE $217,202 $216,500 $215,849 $212,566 $210,000 $205,000 $204,000 $204,000 $203,885 $203,000 $202,435 $201,245 $200,000 $200,000 $199,768 $198,000 $196,371 $195,000 $195,000 $195,000 $194,876 $194,000 $191,280 $185,000 $184,800 $183,000 $183,000 $183,000 $180,000 $180,000 $179,000 $177,500 $177,000 $175,000 $175,000 $173,838 $173,509 $172,500 $171,000 $170,000 $170,000 $169,586 $168,900 $167,500 $166,550 $166,200 $165,000 $165,000 $161,000 $160,000 $159,900

SELLER ADAMS SIMPSON EVERETTE J COLUMBIA SCOTT F D R HORTON INC TI SAVANNAH POINTE LLC MADDOX ALICIA B (JTWROS) CHANDLER LESLEY E MIERKE PETER AMERICAN ESCROW AND CLOS ROSEWOOD OF THE PIEDMONT BECKER EMILY B MARK III PROPERTIES INC NVR INC ASPDEN FLETCHER FIELDSTONE DEVELOPMENT G S C PILLON HOMES INC EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION CO EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL FURMAN UNIVERSITY FOUNDA STONEWOOD HOMES INC LOFTIS CAROL ANNE ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC SCHARPF ROBERT N S C PILLON HOMES INC D R HORTON INC PALMETTO BANK THE S C PILLON HOMES INC STAUFFENEKER TYLER HEJNAR ANDREW M THOMPSON RICHARD W CLEMENTS GEORGE Z FRAZEE CAROLYN F LATIMER AUSTIN C SCOTT RICHARD L CHATHAM LLC CRICK ALAN L MUNGO HOMES INC KIRKLAND KEITH R SR ABRAHAM JOHN F MCCLAFFERTY KATHRYN ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC KLINE LYNN B D R HORTON INC WESTMORELAND JERRY SIMPSON SUSAN H ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC DOW JEFFERY S KUTTAN JEENATH WEBB MICHAEL D NELSON LISA K FULLER EDNA

BUYER CITIMORTGAGE INC JENSEN AMANDA P (JTWROS) SANDERS CHAD BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT CROW BRUCE E (JTWROS) BERG JUSTIN AMERICAN ESCROW AND CLOS KOKOSZA FRANK GANDLEY KAREN S DAVIS ANDREW ELLIOTT GODDEYNE MONIQUE D AYCOCK WILLIAM J FISCHER RICHARD M JR (JT COLE BARBARA WHITE (JTWR BLIVEN JAY (JTWROS) HILLS LISA D MALICI AKAN UNDERWOOD CARL R (JTWROS POLICICCHIO CONSTANCE D POWELL FRANK M IV NGUYEN ANH HOANG (JTWROS HENSON BRIAN P CANTRELL AMANDA C COLORUNDO MICHAEL MORRIS DEE ANN SIDHOM VICTOR HOADE JANET M (JTWROS) TINSLEY JAMES T JR (SURV GSAA HOME EQUITY TRUST 2 STRATTON HOLLY (JTWROS) ADAMS WARREN SCOTT SHILLENS EDWARD C JR WILSON MICHAEL A (JTWROS SWEET REPOSE LLC CRICK A WAYNE STONE DAVID FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG LONG RICHARD W (JTWROS) BETTINI GEORGE M JACKSON JOSELYN G WILLIAMS JAMES D WINSTON JACLYN M BAKER BARBARA A (JTWROS) BAYNE JOSHUA BURTON LATONYA WORKMAN JOHN R HARLESS JEFFREY ALLEN RASMUSSEN MICHAEL D COWARD MEGAN L WIESNER SAMANTHA WHITE JOAN B (SURV)

ADDRESS 1111 NORTHPOINT DR BLD 4 STE-1 202 GILDERBROOK RD 25 RAVEN FALLS LN 1155 HAMMOND PL STE E-5050 6 MIDDLECREEK WAY 128 BROOKSIDE CIR 111 RED MAPLE CT 111 RED MAPLE CT 307 BROWNSTONE CIR 15 BRIARPARK DR 26 REDVALES RD 14 REDVALES RD 950 WAX MYRTLE CT 35 DOUGLAS DR 123 KETTLE OAK WAY 108 KELSEY GLEN LN 608 MILLERVALE RD 3300 POINSETT HWY 10 BARRIER WAY 105 TANNER CHASE WAY 23 SAMPIT DR 119 TERRENCE CT 261 OAK BRANCH DR 8200 ROBERTS DR STE 100 408 WORCHESTER PL 211 WIMBERLEY FARMS LN 2012 OLD CHARLESTON CIR 309 LAKE LENNOX DR 3476 STATEVIEW BLVD 121 EAGLE PASS DR 4 WESTOVER PL 4624 COACH HILL DR 1045 LAKEVIEW CIR PO BOX 605 PO BOX 642 106 PILGER PL PO BOX 650043 9 LESLIE CT 115 ROPER MOUNTAIN RD 1 DANDIE DR 118 CARRIE CT 105 SALTHOUSE RD 633 IVYBROOKE AVE 309 WHIXLEY LANE 205 REEDY SPRINGS LN 239 SCOTTISH AVE 409 WILD HORSE CREEK DR 114 HARLEQUIN CT 206 CHARTWELL DR 237 OAK BRANCH DR 7 SHADY HOLLOW LN

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


journal sketchbook

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Rhythm & Bluezz Old School, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 730 S Pleasantburg Drive, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 22, 2012. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that The Cliffs Members Club, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 250 Knightsridge Road, Travelers Rest, SC 29690. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than August 5, 2012. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that P.F. Changâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s China Bistro, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1127 Woodruff Road, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than August 5, 2012. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that The Cliffs Members Club, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 200 Fire Pink Way, Landrum, SC 29356. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than August 5, 2012. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

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328 Furman Hall Rd. Greenville, SC 29609

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PUBLIC NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: Provide equipment, materials, labor, tools, supplies, transportation and fuel required to relocate Stenhouse Road across from East Standing Springs Road, AUGUST 13, 2012, 3:00 P.M., E.D.T. A mandatory pre-proposal meeting and site visit will be held at 9:00 A.M., E.D.T., July 31, 2012, Suite 100, Procurement Services Division, 301 University Ridge, Greenville, SC 29601. Complete package of plans (CD) and specifications (Hard Copy) available for a non-refundable fee of $100.00. These are available at the Procurement Services Division, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, County Square, Greenville, SC, 29601.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that World Market, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 1125 Woodruff Road, Bldg H, Suite 500, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 22, 2012. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

LEGAL NOTICES Only $.79 per line ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Only $145 tel 864.679.1205 â&#x20AC;˘ fax 864.679.1305 email aharley@communityjournals.com

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE GREENVILLE COUNTY BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS There will be a PUBLIC HEARING before the GREENVILLE COUNTY BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS ON WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2012 AT 3:00 P.M. in CONFERENCE ROOM â&#x20AC;&#x201C;D at GREENVILLE COUNTY SQUARE, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, S.C., for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the petitions listed below. PERSONS HAVING AN INTEREST IN THESE PETITIONS MAY BECOME PARTIES OF RECORD BY FILING WITH THE BOARD, AT LEAST THREE (3) DAYS PRIOR TO THE SCHEDULED DATE SET FOR HEARING, BY WRITING THEIR ADDRESS, A STATEMENT OF THEIR POSITION AND THE REASONS WHY THE RELIEF SOUGHT WITH RESPECT TO SUCH PROPERTY SHOULD OR SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED. CB-12-27 APPLICANT: FRANK GAGNON/ CAROL GAGNON PROPERTY: Tax Map #170-4-22; 6 Perry Road, Greenville, SC REQUEST: Appeal from the Zoning Administratorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Decision to continue multi-family use in Single-family Zoned District. CB-12-28 APPLICANT: NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSING CORP of GREENVILLE PROPERTY: Tax Map #150-113; 31 2nd Avenue, Poe Mill, Greenville, SC REQUEST: Variance for a Reduction in the FRONT Setback Requirement. CB-12-29 APPLICANT: NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSING CORP of GREENVILLE PROPERTY: Tax Map #150-125; 1235 1st Avenue, Poe Mill, Greenville, SC REQUEST: Variance for a Reduction in the FRONT Setback Requirement. CB-12-30 APPLICANT: NE GREENVILLE CONGREGATION of JEHOVAHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S WITNESSES PROPERTY: Tax Map #538.71-19; 1400 Old Spartanburg Road, Greer, SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception for Addition at the Rear of the Existing Structure CB-12-31 APPLICANT: St. JOSEPHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s CATHOLIC SCHOOL PROPERTY: Tax Map #M11.11-3.29; 100 St. Joseph Drive, Greenville, SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception for Concession Stand & Press Box at Existing Football Field

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GREENVILLE COUNTY ZONING AND PLANNING PUBLIC HEARING There will be a public hearing before County Council on Monday, August 20, 2012 at 6:30 p.m. in County Council Chambers, County Square, for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the following item: DOCKET NUMBER: CP-2012-02 APPLICANT: Greenville County Planning Commission CONTACT INFORMATION: tmeeks@greenvillecounty.org or 467-7270 TEXT AMENDMENT: Amendment to the Imagine Greenville County Comprehensive Plan to include the Coordination Element All persons interested in this proposed amendment to the Greenville County Comprehensive Plan are invited to attend this meeting. At subsequent meetings, Greenville County Council may approve or deny this proposed amendment.

PUBLIC NOTICE FEE PLACEMENT ADJUSTMENT THIS NOTICE SHOULD SERVE TO ALERT CUSTOMERS WHO OWN PROPERTIES THAT ARE OCCUPIED WITH MOBILE HOMES, THAT ON JUNE 26, 2012, THE GREATER GREENVILLE SANITATION COMMISSION VOTED UNANIMOUSLY TO REINSTITUTE THE PREVIOUS POLICY OF PLACING SANITATION FEES ON EACH MOBILE HOME LOCATED ON A PROPERTY ON THE ANNUAL PROPERTY TAX STATEMENT OF THE FREEHOLDER OF THE PROPERTY. THIS POLICY CHANGE WILL BE EFFECTIVE AS OF THE 2012 ANNUAL PROPERTY TAX CYCLE.

RY

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that The Bar None Lounge, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 2909 Old Buncombe Road, Greenville, SC 29609. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 22, 2012. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

EVE

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that The Community Tap, Inc., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 205 Wade Hampton Boulevard, Greenville, SC 29609. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 29, 2012. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

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-AIN3Ts WWW.POPPINGTONS.COM JULY 20, 2012 | Greenville Journal 43


journal sketchbook

Feed Your Inner Food Enthusiast

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week The Paint By Numbers project at the Artists Guild gallery is comprised of 24 mosaic panels, which will be assembled into one work.

RESTAURANT WEEK

Local restaurateurs have teamed up to bring you the 4th Annual Foodie Fest! This year’s event promises to be even bigger and better as restaurants will be offering “3 for $30,” “2 for $20,” or “Buy 1, Get 1” menus.

photos by Greg Beckner / Staff

FEST

Artist Edith Hardaway fills in one of the paint by number spaces. The project is part of the guild’s fifth anniversary celebration and is a fundraiser for the Artists Guild Gallery Juried Small Works Exhibition, which runs at the gallery from Oct. 1-31. Anyone who would like to take part in the Paint By Numbers Project can stop by the gallery at 200 North Main St. from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday. The project is open to adults and children, and donations will be accepted.

After six years of waiting, Harry van Bergen’s bells have finally arrived downtown. This week, a carillon holding 22 bells donated by van Bergen, whose company had previously designed bells for Furman University and First Baptist Greenville, was installed in a sculpture at RiverPlace. An electronic keyboard will control the bells, which were the last to be cast at the van Bergen family foundry in the Netherlands in 1959.

Visit us on Facebook and UpstateFoodie.com for new additions, menus, and more!

COMING A u g u s t 17- 2 6 facebook.com /foodiefest2012

Prepare your palate. Crossword puzzle: page 46

44 Greenville Journal | JULY 20, 2012

Sudoku puzzle: page 46


journal sketchbook

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week

photos by Greg Beckner / Staff

An owl created from recycled materials by Diane Lee. Third- through eighth-grade teachers created animal sculptures from trash as part of Greenville County Schools’ Summer Academy. The workshop was designed for classroom teachers and art teachers who wanted to be creative with junk and discover ways to recycle materials at their schools. The session was presented by Greer Middle School art teacher Louise Rogers.

Students at work at the J. Harley Bonds Career Center. The center is one of only four technology centers in the nation to receive the national 2012 Technology Centers That Work (TCTW) Gold Improvement Award based on the progress of local center leaders and teachers in improving center practices and raising student performance. The award was presented by Dave Spence, president of the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), at the 26th Annual HSTW Staff Development Conference in New Orleans. Spence praised the center for its achievement, pointing out that it takes dedication and hard work on the part of technology center leaders and teachers to make progress in preparing students for college and careers in an increasingly competitive world. He presented the award before an audience of more than 5,000 educators from across the nation attending the HSTW Conference.

RESIDENTIAL

COMMERCIAL

Lifeguard Calvin Hazel III performs CPR during lifeguard continuing education at the Westside Aquatics Center. Lifeguards undergo seven hours of ongoing education and training per month as part of their employment.

Lifeguard Morgan Fowler checks the pulse and breathing of her “patient” during CPR continuing education at the Westside Aquatics Center.

Lifeguard Kristen Shepard, left, checks her “patient’s” condition while fellow lifeguard Morgan Fowler, center, watches Senior Guard Justin White read off the rescue and patient scenario to Shepard. Included in the seven hours of training and education each lifeguard must have are updates of current first-aid and rescue procedures, physical training and CPR.

GRAHAM KIMAK LANDSCAPE DESIGNS 864.631.1730 | Greenville, SC grahamkimaklandscapedesigns.com

FROM C O N S U L T A T I O N THROUGH C O M P L E T I O N

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• Certified – Association of Professional Landscape Designers • 21 Years Design Experience • Landscape Architecture Bachelors Degree • Scaled Drawings; Master Plans • Installation Management • Outdoor Living Spaces • Landscape Lighting • Pools and Water Features • Fireplaces and Firepits • Garden Accessories and Furniture • Garden Club Lectures

JULY 20, 2012 | Greenville Journal 45


journal sketchbook

figure. this. out. By Peter A. Collins

O CHE

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TW

“Anemic verit...”

July Special! Buy a bottle of wine to enjoy on our patio or dinning room between 4-7PM & receive a complimentary cheese plate.

Fresh food...fast! Visit both our locations:

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Two Chefs Deli & Market 104 South Main St. • 864.370.9336 Two Chefs To Go Pelham Rd./Hwy. 14 • 864.284.9970 www.TwoChefsDeli.com

GOS Big Think the the e v a h s e x Bo es? c i r p t s e w lo OS Contact G st co for a free lysis. a n a s g n i v a s

Across

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everything for your office...

864-233-5346 www.gos1.com 310 E. Frontage Road, Greer, SC 46 Greenville Journal | JULY 20, 2012

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Office supplies, printing, furniture, coffee service, and promotional items

1 Abbey denizens 6 Bar lineup 11 Black __: covert missions 14 Take for a spin? 19 “The Tempest” spirit 20 Weird Al Yankovic spoof of a Michael Jackson hit 21 With 43-Across, cocktail made with Curaçao 22 Asian princess 23 Film about the appliance supervisor at Sears? 26 Woodard of “Cross Creek” 27 Shelf-clearing sale 28 Baltic capital 29 Inability to make good pitches? 30 Rover’s reward 31 Film about a small chicken that won’t stay away? 34 Milk: Pref. 38 Volleys 40 Make __ of: jot down 41 In need of liniment 43 See 21-Across 44 Lab medium 45 Feature of a two-ltr. monogram 48 Film about a sculpture that defies description? 53 Sent the same 97-Down to 54 Tributes 55 More learned

56 “SNL” alum Oteri 57 Gravy absorber 58 “Since __ Eyes on You”: Faith Hill song 61 It means nothing 62 Pitcher Jesse with a record 1,252 regularseason appearances 63 Film about a smoothlegged fellow? 65 Film about a deli specializing in heros? 67 Well-harmonized 70 La __ Tar Pits 72 Deli offerings 73 Fed. property manager 76 Prepare chestnuts 77 Inclined 79 Less respectful 81 Not working 82 Film about following a pack up a mountain? 86 Salem-to-Reno dir. 87 Educ. for tots 88 Lennon collaborator 89 Olay competitor 90 Prepare in a pan 92 Placing in direct competition 96 Richard who played the garage attendant in “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” 97 Film about fans of confessional rock music who enjoy spicy food? 100 Over simplified? 102 Christie’s Miss 103 Prompter lead-in 104 Improved, as one’s skill level

109 Bill’s “Groundhog Day” co-star 110 Film about a prince’s affair with actress Fletcher? 113 Not moving 114 AQI monitor 115 Up from Méjico 116 Vagabond 117 Early strings 118 Urge 119 Evil spirit 120 Assuages

33 Brand on vermicelli 34 Wooden slats 35 Sound in an allergist’s office 36 Congo River area denizen 37 Brown of publishing 39 ABA member

42 Language that gave us “slogan” 44 Oxygen-dependent bacterium 46 Former Ford div. 47 Peculiar: Pref. 49 Romanov title 50 “Les __”

51 Consumes 52 Blood bank supply 53 Word with house or shop 56 It may decide an election 59 Return remark 60 Puccini’s “Vissi __” 62 Ontario’s second most populous city 63 Where “F” means “Ford” 64 Reprimand to a dachshund? 66 Miss America accessory 67 Bearded flower 68 Some okays 69 Pitcher’s goal 71 Municipal rep. 73 Yields 74 “I __ reason ...” 75 Bad lighting? 78 “... __ tango” 80 Holiday card drawing 82 Bandleader Shaw 83 Strive for 84 Still competing 85 Cargo unit 87 Young hens 91 Aim (to) 92 Nursery rhyme merchant 93 “__ have to do” 94 Words after “ever after” 95 Parachute color? 97 Modern letter 98 12-time All-Star Ramirez 99 L’__ du Tour: French cycling event 101 Slippery swimmer 104 Opposite of ecto105 Claimed psychic detection 106 Reunión attendees 107 Edward’s adoptive mother in the “Twilight” series 108 Bank acct. additions 110 “You, there!” 111 Water tester 112 Pitcher’s asset

Crossword answers: page 44

Down

1 Cleo’s lover 2 Like some surgery 3 Kid in Cádiz 4 Brewpub supplies 5 Potential powerhouse not to be “awakened” 6 Humdingers 7 Lewis Black delivery 8 Cockpit approx. 9 Old powdered apparel 10 Caterer’s can 11 Pair of horseshoes? 12 Carrier founded in 1927 13 Watch kids 14 Arnold, notably 15 Squirrel’s treat 16 Subtle case crackers 17 Aired again 18 Looks like a rake 24 Extinct kiwi cousin 25 Tiny pest 29 Hr. some stores open 31 Humdrum 32 Miller’s “__ From the Bridge”

Easy

Sudoku answers: page 44


in my own words with courtney tollison, ph.d.

Preserving history in modern ways I am marrying this weekend and have thus been engaged in the process of moving out of my condo in historic Mills Mill. The transformation of Mills Mill, Monaghan Mill and other structures throughout this area are excellent examples of how historic structures can be utilized in modern ways. The history of Mills Mill is highly representative of our area’s textile history. Captain Otis Prentiss Mills, who had served in the Confederate Army, founded the Mills Manufacturing Company in 1894. He built Mills Mill, which produced high-quality bedding, twills and satin, in 1894-1897. The building is over 100,000 square feet, but the company had a rough start, and when it began operation it had a capacity of only 5,000 spindles. Just after the turn of the century, however, the mill expanded to include nearly 30,000 spindles and over 700 looms. The mill employed approximately 500 people, and like many mills in the Textile Crescent, developed entire communities. Mill employees lived in the houses that surrounded the mill, worshipped in one of the two churches built by the mill, engaged in recreational activities at the YMCA, and checked out books at the library. Later, tennis courts, croquet grounds, and a baseball park where the Mills Mill Millers competed against other textile league teams were added. Nearby, on the other side of the village, was Captain Mills’ 300-head dairy farm, known as Millsdale. His son later developed much of that property – hence Mills Avenue, East and West Prentiss, and Otis Street, the streets that run par-

journal sketchbook

HAVE YOU SCANNED YET?

allel on either side of Mills Avenue. Mills Mill was very much a part of how the Upcountry became known as the Textile Capital of the World, a moniker we embraced to the area’s economic benefit for over half a century. Our primary sports and entertainment venue was even known as Textile Hall. During World War II, Mills Mill was one of the many mills in the area that engaged in government contracts to assist with defense efforts. Mills Mill produced herringbone fabric for the Marine Corps during the war, and received a coveted E Award for Excellence in 1943. That success, however, began to decline in the decades after the war. Along with many other mills in this area in the 1960s and 1970s, the mill ceased operation. In 1982, the building was nominated and received listing on the National Register of Historic Places. During the 1980s and 1990s, the mill was repurposed as a shopping center, music venue and business space. When I used to visit with my mother as a child, I remember that the smell of that old mill was still fairly strong. We have not always done as well as we could in regards to preserving those structures that are vestiges of our community’s history and culture. Greenville’s Records Building, designed by the famed American architect Robert Mills, is gone, for instance. Thankfully, Mills Mill is not. Dr. Courtney Tollison is Assistant Professor of History at Furman and Museum Historian at the Upcountry History Museum.

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See? If you take your kids to the Farmer’s Market, they may become chefs! Food For Thought Culinary Delights Chef Liz Minetta Bardsley chef owned

400 E. McBee Ave. Near Publix at McBee Station

864.271.2171

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Furnishing a new place? Bring a truck!

JULY 20, 2012 | Greenville Journal 47


Saturday, July 21, 2012 Best Hand $2000 Worst Hand $250 Door Prize Drawings Registration 8 A.M. First Bike out 9 A.M. Last Bike out 10 A.M. Registration fee $25 (includes a FREE t-shirt) Dual Starting Locations: Laurens Electric Cooperative 2254 Hwy. 14, Laurens, SC or Harley-Davidson of Greenville 30 Chrome Drive, Greenville, SC Ride Will End At: Harley-Davidson of Greenville

FOOD WILL BE AVAILABLE from Quaker Steak & Lube Contact: David Hammond at 864-683-1667 PO Box 700, Laurens, SC 29360

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July 20, 2012 Greenville Journal