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GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, June 28, 2013 • Vol.15, No.26

Learning by Design THE FINE ARTS CENTER PLANS TO TAKE HIGH SCHOOLERS INSIDE THE ART OF ARCHITECTURE

Exhibits show many aspects of patriotism PAGE 27

Family spends four days homeless for film project PAGE 15

Best bets for Independence Day fun PAGE 20

Opportunities, challenges for women-owned businesses JUNE 28, 2013

BY CINDY LANDRUM AND APRIL A. MORRIS, STAFF WRITERS

TO FINE ARTS CENTER DIRECTOR Roy Fluhrer, a piece of great architecture is as overwhelming as a great piece of art. They both use the same elements, he says. A building sculpts space, time, spirit and imagination, using color and form like a painting, adding in elements of music and theater. “Architecture is fine art,” he said.

It is also the Fine Arts Center’s newest program, created in collaboration with Clemson University’s top-ranked architecture school. The FAC “Art of Architecture” program is believed to be the first in the country in which a student studying architecture in high school can earn credits in a premier college architectural program. Students who gain acceptance into Clemson’s architecture school can carry forward up to eight architecture credits earned at the FAC. FAC continued on PAGE 8

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY KRISTY ADAIR / STAFF

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journal news

greenville Journal locally owned and operated since 1999 For delivery requests, call 679-1240 Publisher

Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@communityjournals.com Executive Editor

Susan Clary Simmons ssimmons@communityjournals.com

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MANAGING editor

Jerry Salley jsalley@communityjournals.com

Vehicle loans as low as

staff writers

2.49

Cindy Landrum clandrum@communityjournals.com Sherry Jackson sjackson@communityjournals.com April A. Morris amorris@communityjournals.com

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photographer

Greg Beckner gbeckner@communityjournals.com

AND

$50**

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news layout

Kristy Adair

Tammy Smith

PrODUCTION Manager

Holly Hardin Client Services ManagerS

Anita Harley

Jane Rogers

Billing Inquiries

Shannon Rochester Circulation Manager

Greenville

David M. Robinson

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© The Greenville Journal is published by Community Journals LLC. All rights reserved. All property rights for the entire contents of this publication shall be the property of Community Journals, no part therefore may be reproduced without prior written consent.

We will beat other lenders’ rates by a quarter percent+ if the terms and collateral requirements are comparable (excluding automobile manufacturer and captive finance company 0% rate offers.) • Receive a $50 Gift Card upon closing of your new purchase or refinanced vehicle loan. • Pre-owned vehicles with less than 30,000 miles and less than 2 years old, enjoy the same low rate as new vehicles.

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www.greenvillefcu.com 800.336.6309 *Annual Percentage Rate is based on a 36-month term. Your loan rate and term amount may vary depending on individual credit history and underwriting factors. A 36-month loan with 2.49% APR would have monthly payments of $28.86 per thousand borrowed. All credit union rates, fees, terms, and conditions are subject to change at any time without notice. +Rate floor is 1.99%, offer excludes current loans held by Greenville Federal Credit Union. **Receive a $50 gift card when you finance your vehicle loan with the credit union, loans below $5000 are not eligible for gift card, good from April 1 through June 30th, 2013. ©2013, Greenville Federal Credit Union. All rights reserved. Member NCUA.

Your savings federally insured to at least $250,000 and backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Government

NCUA

National Credit Union Administration, a U.S. Government Agency

72˚ can expect unsettled “ We weather for the last day

FRIDAY

91˚

70˚ SATURDAY 88˚

69˚

SUNDAY

83˚

of the month…Sunday.

WYFF News 4 Chief Meteorologist

John Cessarich

For weather information, 24 hours a day, visit WYFF4.com

Scattered storms…mainly late

2 THE Journal | JUNE 28, 2013

Only an isolated storm

Scattered showers, storms


journal news

Worth Repeating They Said It Quote of the week

“What gave me courage was that there are moms doing this every day – and they didn’t sign up for it.”

28%

Percentage of South Carolina children living in poverty in 2011, compared with 23 percent for the U.S.

Jara Jones, who volunteered to live homeless with her two teenagers for four days and be filmed for the Greenville County United Way.

Greg Beckner / Staff

“By definition [a Wing Ding] is a party. What better way to describe our gathering of Wings?” Shirley Stephens-Garcia, co-founder of the Gold Wing Road Riders Association, on naming the first Wing Ding motorcycle convention 35 years ago.

“Architecture is a fantastic opportunity to engage young minds. It gets them to think critically about the spaces they live in and engages them as citizens.”

$20,000

Estimated cost to provide medical care and adoption services for the animals that Greenville County Animal Control seized last week from a Fountain Inn puppy mill

Catherine Smith, a Greenville architect who will teach in the new Fine Art Center architecture program.

“It is important for laws to be clear for us to enforce them.” Simpsonville Police Chief Steve Moore, on the city’s newly amended Discharge of Firearms ordinance.

“When families struggle, as so many of ours are right now, communities need to be strong to help families give children what they need to grow into productive citizens.” Sue Williams, CEO of the Children’s Trust, on the latest Kids Count report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

18

Miles of bike lanes in Greenville County

13,000

Number of touring motorcycles expected to descend on the Greenville area next week for the Gold Wing Road Riders Association’s annual Wing Ding convention

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formation leading to the arrest of anyone involved. For Clemson students and alumni, the rock is a strong symbol of the school’s past and an iconic image for photographs. Made of white flint, Howard’s Rock has stood on top of the football stadium section known as “The Hill” since 1966. But the rock gained its name after coach Frank Howard told his players that only after defeating Wake Forest would they have the right to touch the rock. Now at every home game, the players touch the rock as they run down onto the field, remembering that they have to give that “110 percent” to earn the right to touch the rock again. For more information about the newly released evidence, visit clemson.edu/media-relations/4959.

This image of the suspect vehicle was captured by city cameras.

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JOURNAL NEWS

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

A cyclist makes his way down River Street in Greenville using the bike lane.

Connecting the county by 2 wheels or 2 feet BikeWalk Greenville allows residents to suggest bike lane and sidewalk locations APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com In order to form a more connected community, Greenville County residents now have the means to use their own online connectivity to offer input on where they would like to see more two-footed or two-wheeled transportation paths. Launched in early June, a new online tool created for BikeWalkGreenville by software engineer and cyclist Mike Nice allows community members to tag stretches of road they believe are in need of sidewalks, bike lanes, or other forms of pedestrian safety. In just a few weeks and with little exposure, more than 150 entries have already been logged, said Frank Mansbach, a volunteer with the group. Suggestions have poured in from across the county, from downtown Greenville and Woodruff Road to Marietta and Scuffletown Road. Nice is a former mountain biker and now GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail rider. He can ride in his neighborhood, he says, but can’t connect to other areas because there are no safe ways to get there on his bike. Creating maps has been a hobby for years, so Nice created an inter-

active map for BikeWalkGreenville. Users can find a street or intersection that interests them and draw a line where they would like to see an improvement, either for cyclists or pedestrians. They can also add a description. Since the tool has only been active a few weeks, a single “hot spot” has not yet emerged, Nice said, but he hopes to eventually develop a site that will show users all of the suggestions made. BikeWalkGreenville’s goal is to increase awareness of the need for alternative transportation options. Mansbach says the group wants to urge Greenville County Council’s support of sidewalks and bike lanes, as the majority of roadways in the county are not city streets. BikeWalkGreenville is partnering with other like-minded organizations in this goal, including the Greenville Spinners and LiveWell Greenville, he said. Nice said he hopes the information gathered with the mapping tool will offer guidance to city and county officials when money becomes available for road maintenance or improvements at the flagged locations. Other cycling groups in areas beyond the Upstate are also interested in the software, he said.

Health Events You Go Girl Sprint Triathlon Sun., July 7 • 7 a.m. • GHS Life Center® This event includes a 250-yard swim, 10-mile bike ride and 2.5-mile run. Cost: $55. Register at setupevents.com. Let’s Talk About Mental Illness Fri., July 19 • Noon-1 p.m. • Centre Stage Join a panel of GHS experts for a discussion on mental illness. Lunch provided. Free; registration required. Overcoming Daily Challenges of Living With MS Sat., July 20 • 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m. • Hilton Greenville Find out about education and support for those living with multiple sclerosis and their caregivers. Cost: $5 (includes lunch). To register, call 1-800-344-4867. Splash & Dash Sat., July 20 or Aug. 3 • Sites vary This event for kids ages 3-16 includes a pool swim and cross-country run. Cost: $15. For details, visit ghs.org/splashndash. Understanding Pancreatic Cancer Tues., Aug. 20 • 12:15-1:15 p.m. • GHS Life Center Join GHS surgical oncologists Brian McKinley, MD, and Wes Jones, MD, to learn signs, symptoms and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Lunch provided. Free; registration required. Take a Loved One to the Doctor Day Sat., Sept. 14 • 10 a.m.-2 p.m. • Kroc Center This annual event includes free health information and screenings. To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, please visit ghs.org/healthevents or call 1-877-GHS-INFO (447-4636).

MAKE A SUGGESTION Suggest a bike lane or sidewalk location at bikewalkgreenville.org.

ghs.org 130502GJ

JUNE 28, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 5


JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

A beginner forever Requiring motorcycle riders to take – but never to pass – a skills test is not a safety advance. In the sort of logic that endears the Palmetto State to late-night comedians, new rules took effect this month that require motorcyclists to take a skills test when they renew their beginner’s permits – but if they fail, it won’t matter. They still get the permit, with no limits other than the “daylight only” restriction they faced before. In fact, they never have to pass a road test at all, or get a full motorcycle license, or even take a motorcycle education program, though the state encourages it. As long as they make a “bona fide attempt” to pass the skills test each time they renew, these aptitude-impaired bikers can ride on a beginner’s permit for the rest of their days. And the state considers this progress. Prior to this safety advance, anyone of legal age could ride in perpetuity on a learner’s permit without applying for a full license or facing a road test on a DMV course. It finally dawned on the state Department of Motor Vehicles that, absent a skills test, “we don’t know if they are truly capable of operating a motorcycle,” executive director Kevin Shwedo admitted to reporters in announcing the new rules earlier this month. Apparently the DMV noticed that large numbers of bikers were abusing the licensing system, which grants a beginner’s permit to anyone 15 or older who can pass a vision test and multiple-choice written test. Technically, the state expects beginner permit holders to apply for a full license within the first year the permit is issued. They can start taking the road test after six months. But a lot never do. By DMV estimates, at least 30 percent of the 112,000 motorcycles registered in the state are operated by bikers riding on beginner permits. Shwedo said some have been renewed dozens of times, telling the SC Radio Network the agency discovered one biker who “had been operating on a beginner’s permit consistently since 1992.” The consequences can be deadly, as the DMV acknowledges: 36 percent of the state’s motorcycle deaths since January 2011 have involved drivers holding beginner’s permits or an expired or suspended license. Meanwhile, fatalities are climbing: The Governor’s Highway Safety Association reported in May that motorcycle deaths in the state are up 11 percent since 2011, with 113 confirmed by September of last year. The average age at death was 41, the DMV said; the oldest killed in 2011 was 79. It’s good news that the DMV now admits that allowing bikers to ride 20 years without a road test is a dereliction – but putting no limit on the number of times they can fail the test and keep riding is worse. Shwedo has admitted as much, telling the (Hilton Head) Island Packet if riders “can’t operate their bike after a year or two of practice, they don’t need to be on the road at all.” Even the most skilled motorcyclists are 34 times more likely to die in a motor vehicle crash than car occupants. Shwedo is right: if riders can’t pass a skills test after two attempts – and that’s generous – they need to be off the road until they do.

Hospice’s role in Medicare reform The last seven months have been a roller coaster of economic and political uncertainty. Medicare costs have incrementally risen over the past decade and, among other causes, have added to the national debt. With government funding cuts aimed at lowering the deficit in progress and even more looming in the future, Congress has proposed cutting funding from Medicare in an effort to lower the national debt. Ultimately, both politicians and health care providers are asking the same question: “How do we maintain or improve the quality of health care provided while reducing the cost?” As the CEO of Hospice Care of South Carolina (HCSC), I am getting more and more questions about where I think hospice and end-of-life care is headed with all the recent talk of funding cuts. While sensible reform is definitely needed, I believe that increasing, not decreasing, hospice funding and admissions could help save the Medicare system. Studies show that by 2016, Medicare could be bankrupt. Some have proposed raising the Medicare eligibility age from 65 to 67. Others have alternative suggestions such as raising Medicare premiums for higher-income patients, increasing other taxes and premiums or a complete redesign of Medicare’s copays and deductibles. While imposing a copayment could reduce Medicare costs, it does not consider the many Medicare patients who would have difficulty affording new copayments for end-of-life care in a hospice care program or in a skilled nursing facility. These individuals would ultimately be forced to be treated for acute problems at a hospital, an outcome frightfully more expensive for the patient and Medicare as a whole. A Duke University study shows that Medicare patients who enrolled in hospice received better care at a significantly lower cost to the government than those who did not use the Medicare hospice benefits. Another report from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai shows that if 1,000 more Medicare recipients enrolled in hospice before death, annual savings to Medicare could amount to between $2.4 million to $6.4 million. Conversely, those who visit the hospital for end-of-life medical care open themselves up for costly treatments at a lower comfort level.

IN MY OWN WORDS by DAVID POWELL

These include intensive care unit stays, feeding tubes or physical therapy only weeks before death. Hospice operates on a daily reimbursement rate and allows patients to seek care in the easiest and most comfortable setting. Instead of the more aggressive procedures, hospice care provides a variety of treatments that manage discomfort and pain towards the end of life. Options can range from in-home care to treatments in hospice facilities that focus on improving the quality of life towards the end. At HCSC, we hire hospice and palliativecertified physicians and staff to take care of our patients’ medical, emotional and spiritual needs. On top of higher quality care, the Duke University study shows that hospice also reduces Medicare spending by an average of approximately $2,000 per person compared to normal care. Could increasing hospice enrollments help decrease the deficit and lower Medicare costs for end-of-life care? I believe so. At HCSC, we believe that seniors should consider hospice over other options for not only the cost savings, but because of the quality of care. No one is turned away for an inability to pay and, actually, the current benefit covers all terminal diagnosis-related costs for medicine, equipment and services. So we return to the question, “How do we maintain or improve the quality of health care provided while reducing the cost?” It is shown that more hospice admissions lessen the overall Medicare cost, which alleviates funding from the government, which ultimately trickles down to us as taxpayers. Plus, hospice also can provide a gentler and less aggressive level of care than they might receive elsewhere. Talk to your legislators about the dangers of increasing out-of-pocket costs for hospice care, and don’t be afraid to consider hospice care when you or a loved one is looking at end-of-life care options. Your voice could be the catalyst for positive Medicare system reform.

David Powell is CEO of Hospice Care of South Carolina.

IN MY OWN WORDS FEATURES ESSAYS BY RESIDENTS WITH PARTICULAR EXPERTISE WHO WANT TO TELL READERS ABOUT ISSUES IMPORTANT TO THEM. THE JOURNAL ALSO WELCOMES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR (MAXIMUM LENGTH OF 200 WORDS). PLEASE INCLUDE ADDRESS AND DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER. ALL LETTERS WILL BE CONFIRMED BEFORE PUBLICATION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT ALL LETTERS FOR LENGTH. PLEASE CONTACT EXECUTIVE EDITOR SUSAN SIMMONS AT SSIMMONS@GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM.

6 THE JOURNAL | JUNE 28, 2013


JOURNAL NEWS

Riegel, Buchanan given Order of the Palmetto Two Greenvillians were awarded the Order of the Palmetto, the highest honor a civilian can receive in South Carolina, this week. Megan Riegel, president and CEO of the Peace Center, was awarded The Order of the Palmetto by Gov. Nikki Haley on June 25. State Sen. Larry MarRiegel tin presented the award during a board of trustees meeting at the Peace Center. According to a Peace Center press release, the theater “has an economic impact of $25 million annually and generates $1.1 million in annual tax Former Ambassador David Wilkins presents the revenues” under Riegel’s leadership. In addition, the Peace Center’s 20th Order of the Palmetto to Cecil D. Buchanan. anniversary campaign, initiated by Riegel and the board of trustees in David Wilkins, the former U.S. am2010, surpassed its $21.5 million goal bassador to Canada, presented Buin two years, with $23 million current- chanan with the award at a ceremony ly raised, which has helped to fund the dedicating American Legion Greenexpansion and renovation of the prop- ville Post 3 to Buchanan. erty. “South Carolina is blessed by your Also, according to the Peace Cen- tremendous work and community ter, “Riegel’s leadership since 1997 has service,” said Haley in a message read helped the theater’s annual fundrais- by Wilkins at the ceremony. “Thank ing program to grow from $400,000 you for your efforts to make our state to $1.9 million and its annual endow- an even better place to live, work and ment to grow from $6 million to $26 learn.” million.” Buchanan has been a member of the Cecil D. Buchanan, a Korean War American Legion for 43 years, and is a veteran who helped build a Greenville past Post 3 commander. He has been American Legion post, was given the honored as Legionnaire of the Year by Order of the Palmetto June 23. four past Post 3 commanders.  

What’s Right in Health Care GHS Recognized As a TAVR Center GHS is one of two hospitals in the state to be recognized as a TAVR Center. This means GHS has met all FDA guidelines required to perform Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR), an innovative surgical option for patients too ill to undergo traditional open-heart surgery. To learn more, visit ghs.org/TAVR. Medical Office Building Opens in Greer GHS is making services more accessible to Greer residents through a new medical office building on its Greer Medical Campus. The building houses radiation and medical oncology services, as well as specialties such as plastics, ENT, urology and colorectal. GHS Pharmacist Named Preceptor of the Year Presbyterian College School of Pharmacy presented GHS pharmacy manager John Pearson, PharmD, with the Preceptor of the Year Award. Dr. Pearson was selected for his work to create a rotation structure at GHS that serves as a model for other hospital partners. The structure is unique in that it exposes students to all aspects of a hospital pharmacy, acclimates them to the latest technology and encourages them to be an integral part of the healthcare team. Joint Replacement Program Earns Gold Seal of Approval GHS’ Patewood Memorial Hospital has been awarded The Gold Seal of Approval by The Joint Commission for its Total Joint Replacement Program, which involves knee, hip and shoulder replacements. It is the only hospital in South Carolina to receive the Gold Seal for its shoulder replacement program. This two-year certification recognizes Patewood Memorial Hospital for having all of the elements of a well-run disease management program. The Joint Commission’s certification process involves analyzing a hospital’s compliance with consensus-based national standards, effective and consistent use of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, and a review of performance measures specific to the hip, knee and shoulder.

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journal news FAC continued from COVER

One-of-a-kind partnership Greenville County Schools Superintendent Burke Royster said the FAC program is unique, a one-of-a-kind partnership between a public school district and a school of architecture that allows qualified students to earn degree-level credit, not just general college credit for work done as a high school junior or senior. “It provides our students with the opportunity to be career- and collegeready,” he said. Program coordination makes the timing less than ideal for recruiting the first class of students during the summer, he said, but the district hopes to have a viable class for the charter group. PHOTOS BY Greg Beckner / Staff

Director of the Fine Arts Center Dr. Roy Fluhrer makes opening remarks at the press conference at the Fine Arts Center where it was announced that the Fine Arts Center is entering a partnership with Clemson University.

Royster anticipates the architecture program to be the first of many such collaborations. “We hope it will also serve as a model and challenge for other career and professional areas.”

‘An obvious evolution’

Superintendent of Greenville County Schools W. Burke Royster makes a few remarks at the press conference.

Bill Pelham, a Greenville architect and Clemson graduate, is underwriting the first year of the FAC program and was instrumental in getting Clemson’s School of Architecture involved. Pelham said he was already impressed with the FAC since his daughter was a student there, and considers the program a “brilliant idea” and natural fit. “It’s such an obvious evolution and a next step for them,” he said, as the school already effectively combines art and science in programs such as technical theatre. Kate Schwennsen, chair of Clemson’s School of Architecture, said the FAC program will offer students “a direct connection between high school and college” and the chance to discover if they want to pursue architecture as a career.

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“When you look at an undergraduate architecture degree, especially the first two years, it’s really skill building and vocabulary building. Students look and analyze how the built environment is shaped, what went into its design. Students at the Fine Arts Center will do the same thing, but at a different pace than the university.” Robert Hogan, director of Clemson’s School of Architecture undergraduate program

She said the first time she walked into the Fine Arts Center, “I thought there is terrific potential here” for a mutually beneficial relationship. Interested applicants must first win acceptance into the FAC, which requires a portfolio of work demonstrating previous visual arts experience, an academic transcript and teacher recommendation. Applications for the architecture charter class will be accepted through July 26. Up to 15 students will be admitted for the program’s first year, which begins in August.

Building skills “Art of Architecture” will be a four-year sequential program. Students will analyze architecture, do Greenville-based projects and learn what good architecture is, said Robert Hogan, director of Clemson’s School of Architecture undergraduate program. “When you look at an undergraduate architecture degree, especially the first two years, it’s really skill building


JOURNAL NEWS

Kate Schwennsen, chair of Clemson’s School of Architecture.

existing shell building and a small urban park in or around Greenville. Students will also attend Clemson Architectural Foundation lectures, visit Clemson’s School of Architecture and attend a design studio review. Third-year students will design a small pavilion for a park and a storage facility for a recreation park in the Greenville area, visit construction sites and work with a community design build project in a Clemson design studio course. Fourth-year students will study social responsibility of architects through design of a residence for an elderly couple, one of whom is confined to a wheelchair, using sustainable design practices, as well as a halfway house for homeless families. Hogan said program coordinators are also considering having FAC students study at one of Clemson’s urban-based off-campus site in Charleston; Genoa, Italy; or Barcelona, Spain during the summer.

‘SCULPTURES PEOPLE LIVE IN’

Art of Architecture instructor Catherine Smith.

and vocabulary building,” he said. “Students look and analyze how the built environment is shaped, what went into its design. Students at the Fine Arts Center will do the same thing, but at a different pace than the university.” First-year students will analyze at least two good existing pieces of architecture; visit the offices of an architect, a landscape architect, an interior designer and a city planner, Hogan said – all with the goal of introducing them to the importance of good design. “Walking in downtown Greenville, there’s a certain rhythm of the buildings. Trees create a canopy. Pedestrians are separated from the streets,” he said. “When you look, you realize there’s a certain uniqueness of design. That didn’t happen by chance.” Second-year students will design a small studio and sales facility for an artist in an

Catherine Smith, a Greenville architect who will teach the FAC program, calls architecture the “most massive of all sculptures.” Architecture creates “sculptures people live in, work in and drive adjacent to,” she said. “Its core concepts are based on art – color, balance, volume, proportion and scale. Architecture is a fantastic opportunity to engage young minds. It gets them to think critically about the spaces they live in and engages them as citizens.” Smith said students will benefit from the FAC program even if they decide not to pursue architecture as a career. “Architecture is a very analytical art form. My goal is to train critical thinkers.” Schwennsen agreed, saying students who don’t go on to study architecture will become “better clients, better users of buildings and better citizens.” As far as the number of students coming to Clemson from FAC, Schwennsen said, “We’re hopeful we’ll get a few each year. We’ll take as many as we can get.” Clemson’s architecture program accepts about 80 students per year and usually receives seven times that number of ap p l i c a nt s , Hogan said. CINDY LANDRUM clandrum@communityjournals.com APRIL A. MORRIS amorris@communityjournals.com

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journal news

10 THE Journal | JUNE 28, 2013


JOURNAL NEWS

GREENVILLE CITY COUNCIL FROM THE JUNE 24 MEETING

City funds police equipment, purchases Pete Hollis property APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com Earlier this week, Greenville City Council approved appropriation of $130,500 from the Law Enforcement Special Revenue Fund to purchase equipment for the city’s police department. The funds will be used to purchase surveillance equipment for the vice and narcotics units, a forensic upgrade to allow access to data from smartphones, consolidation of the weapons inventory, and bulletproof vests, according to the request. The city works to equip the police department adequately and ensure officers’ safety while they keep residents safe, said Councilman David Sudduth. Allocations from the special revenue fund cannot be used for brick-and-mortar improvements, but for training and equipment, he said. The technology upgrades will help streamline some processes, such as access to forensic information via mobile devices, Sudduth said. Formerly, paper was the communication tool; now, officers can access some information remotely. This

decreases turnaround time for tests and receiving results, he said. In other business, council approved the appropriation of $969,000 from the Viola Street Tax Increment Fund to purchase two pieces of property at Pete Hollis Boulevard. The council passed a resolution to proceed with the purchase of the Green Plaza property, which is eventually slated for demolition. No timetable has been set for the demolition and potential mixeduse development on the spot. The purchase of another smaller piece of property at the corner of Pete Hollis and Mulberry Street was stalled because the appraisal returned was lower than the city’s offer. Negotiations will continue with the owner, said Sudduth, and the council plans to consider the purchase resolution for the property at its next meeting. The purchase is part of a revitalization effort along Pete Hollis Boulevard, one of the gateways into Greenville’s city center. Greenville City Council is scheduled to meet again on July 22, 5:30 p.m., in council chambers on the 10th floor of City Hall.

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JOURNAL NEWS

MAULDIN CITY COUNCIL FROM THE JUNE 17 MEETING

Mauldin Council approves $16.1M budget SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com Mauldin City Council approved a $16.1 million budget for FY 2014 last week that represented a 3.97 percent increase over the prior year and no property tax increase. The budget passed 5-2, with council members Larry Goodson and Dale Black opposing, after the council removed an option to raise sewer fees by $3.25 a month. Council agreed to readdress sewer fees in January 2014 with public hearings to be scheduled. The budget includes $250,000 budgeted towards capital improvements throughout the city, a 3 percent merit increase for city employees and the addition of four new employees: three firefighters and one school resource police officer. There is also $85,000 to complete construction above the City Council chambers to make room for new public works offices. Council also unanimously approved $4,000 in funds to adopt a new logo and branding for the city. The new logo “represents Mauldin as being a progressive city with traditional values,” said City Administrator Trey Eubanks.

Business and Development Services Director Kim Hamel reported that building permits within the city are nearing the pre-recession levels of 2008, with 30 commercial permits issued in May and 101 residential permits, a majority of those for townhomes being developed. Economic Development Director John Gardner told the council that the Meadowbrook subdivision on Tanner Road is considering annexing into the city of Mauldin. Gardner and other city representatives met with the homeowners association earlier this month. Subdivisions seeking annexation usually do so for additional city services such as curbside debris removal, recycling/waste services and additional police. Eubanks reported that a DOT project to improve the appearance at the I-385/Butler Road interchange is kicking off this week. Council also agreed to look into the cost of tornado sirens after public comment from a resident who voiced concern that there is no public warning system within the city of Mauldin.

The next regular meeting of Mauldin City Council will be July 15, 2013, at 7 p.m. in the City Hall council chambers.

Falls Park makes top 10 TripAdvisor, a popular travel website, announced its 2013 Travelers’ Choice awards winners this week with Greenville among the top 10. Other cities included on the list were New York, Chicago and San Francisco. Falls Park on the Reedy ranked the ninth-best park in the United States, finishing just behind Forsyth Park in Savannah, Ga. Central Park in New York was No. 1. However, Falls Park beat out Charleston’s Waterfront Park, which was in 11th place, and Atlanta’s Piedmont Park, which was ranked 19th. Rankings were determined by the quality and quantity of each attraction’s traveler reviews and also included landmarks, museums and amusement parks. Falls Park itself was Greenville’s top-ranked attraction, with 544 reviews. To see all of the Travelers’ Choice Awards, visit tripadvisor. com/travelerschoice.

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journal news

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Simpsonville moves forward with firearm ordinance

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Simpsonville City Council approved an amended Discharge of Firearms ordinance at first reading on Tuesday. The amended ordinance will allow Simpsonville’s new gun shop to build a shooting gallery, which has drawn mixed reactions from Simpsonville residents. At the June 11 meeting, both Kevin Glenn and Bill Johnston spoke in support of the proposed shooting range. “I think the gun range is a positive thing,” said Johnston. “We are very excited about the opening,” said Thomas Wirthlin, Gun Shop and Indoor Range co-owner. “Our purpose is to train and educate and our range is being built to NRA standards. It will be a pistol range only and all guns must be loaded inside the building and unloaded before leaving.” However, at Tuesday’s meeting, resident Mike Newman argued that Wirthlin had “failed to follow the NRA’s 793-page Resource Manual, which required that Wirthlin acquire the local ordinances and zoning regulations before building.” Newman called the ordinance “another instance of changing a law to accommo-

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date one business owner because of his failure to perform due diligence.” In addition to changing the ordinance to accommodate the shooting range, the council debated the rephrasing itself. Of most interest was the phrase, “the discharge of firearms in cases of urgent necessity,” found in Section B of the proposed ordinance. Councilwoman Geneva Lawrence said she has reviewed the ordinance with experts she respects and “it seems that only a sentence needed to be added to the current ordinance. I am not against the range, but the amended ordinance is too wordy and complicated.” Lawrence said the current version of the ordinance put too much responsibility on the taxpayers and was not clear enough for the police. Police Chief Steve Moore told the council in his opinion the ordinance “seemed vague on the urgency statement. It is important for laws to be clear for us to enforce it. As long as urgent necessity is defined, it is fine if cast onto a regular citizen.” The ordinance ultimately passed 5-2 with the agreement that future amendments would be made with assistance from Moore.

julius welborn ward 4

george curtis ward 5 sylvia lockaby ward 6 perry eichor Mayor

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

“If you don’t have a vehicle to find these places and the time to just wait, there’s just a lot of red tape and roadblocks.”

In their

JARA JONES, who volunteered to live homeless with her two teenagers and be filmed.

SHOES Family lives homeless for four days – on film

PHOTO PROVIDED BY ERWIN PENLAND

Jara Jones of Greer and her two teenaged children volunteered to be filmed continuously for four days as they navigated the United Way support system with nothing but the clothes on their backs, a car and $40 APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com At campaign kickoff time, Greenville County United Way typically shows a video to illustrate how the money pledged helps the needy in Greenville County. This year, for the first time, the people in the campaign film making the rounds are not actors, but Greenville residents. Three, in fact: Jara Jones of Greer and her

two teenaged children, who volunteered to be filmed continuously for four days as they navigated the United Way support system with nothing but the clothes on their backs, a car and $40. Erwin Penland, the campaign’s ad agency for about 15 years, created the video, said CEO Andy Mendelsohn. In prior years, the agency featured “doom to bloom” success stories and wanted to try something different, he said.

UNITED WAY continued on PAGE 16

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“Because the economy is showing signs of life, there’s a perception out there that it’s not quite as bad as it used to be, and that’s just not true,” he said. The Penland team sought volunteers and deliberately opted not to follow someone who was homeless. “We thought they wouldn’t appreciate it and it probably wouldn’t work,” Mendelsohn said. Instead, the team devised a plan to have a film crew follow “a

family that is OK, that in fact donates to the United Way … and take everything away from them and have them feel what it’s like. And have us feel what it’s like vicariously through them.” Few families responded to the call, he said, but then Jara Jones came forward. Jones volunteers for Greenville Area Interfaith Hospitality Network (GAIHN), which houses homeless families through local church congregations. With this, “I was in a position to help families even more,” she said. Jones said she broke the news to her 16-year-old son, Hunt, and 13-year-old daughter, Meredith, slowly. “They already get taken to this volunteer effort or that, and not always willingly.” It took some negotiating to convince her son, she said, but the trio did the filming in May. The rules were straightforward: There was no help beyond local agencies. The family couldn’t go home, and they had no idea where they were going to sleep each night or how they would find food. Easing the kids’ minds was one of the ordeal’s most difficult aspects, said Jones. Also asking for help, something she had already done once after a layoff and found incredibly challenging.

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journal community

61,000 people

are food insecure every day. That means that each day they do not know where at least one of their meals will come from. This group varies from week to week.

19,161 calls

were made to 2-1-1 in 2012, and the top two needs were rent assistance and utility assistance. This is a 14% increase over last year

more than 67,000 people receive food stamps. A 4% increase over last year.

1 out of every 2

Almost students qualifies for free or reduced lunch. That equates to 34,055 children.

More than 221,000

individuals are medically underserved. That number would fill up the BI-LO Center 11 times.

1 in 4 children

under 5 years old are living in households with incomes below the poverty level. Source: United Way of Greenville County

UNITED WAY continued from pg 15

“It makes you feel like a personal failure that you can’t take care of your own family,” she said. “But layoffs happen … or other crises happen that zap family resources and put people on the street.” As they moved around seeking assistance, the family also found help from others who were in the same situation, Jones said. One woman she met in a shelter gave them $10, she said. “She has nothing and she gave me $10 and that meant a lot to us.” When the crew wasn’t filming during the early morning hours, the family created video diaries, capturing some of the most poignant footage. “They’re a mess, they’re exhausted and they’re scared,” Mendelsohn said. Jones said, “My kids refused to go to school because they didn’t get a shower the night before, they had to sleep in the car and my daughter had to wear my dirty

shirt. We learned a new routine and learned that there’s a homeless trail around town.” Jones said she hopes their participation helps donors to “put up a mirror and say ‘Imagine if this was you.’ That your family had to go through this and how you would feel about that – how would you deal with it?” Art Seaver, chair of the United Way campaign, applauds Jones and admitted he was “a touch nervous” about a reality-based video. However, he said, the campaign leadership wanted “to try any and every strategy to help share what the United Way does, and that’s literally helping those in need today and preventing future needs.” Jones said the four-day experience was difficult, but not compared to the reality the genuinely homeless face. “What gave me courage was that there are moms doing this every day – and they didn’t sign up for it.”

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State’s child well-being now lags behind Georgia and Alabama Kids Count reveals effects of recession on nation’s children APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com It’s no secret that the economic woes of recent years have touched adults nationwide, but those effects have also created hardships for children. According to the Kids Count Data Book, a yearly study released on Monday by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the nation saw modest improvement in the wellbeing of children and families last year. But the overall well-being of South Carolina’s children declined by comparison. Drawn from 2011 data, the Kids Count report ranks states and the nation on four areas: family and community, economic well-being, education and health. The report aims to provide policy makers and citizens with “benchmarks of child well-being and to enrich local, state and national discussions concerning ways to secure better futures for all our children.” According to the report, South Carolina’s most drastic change was a drop from 34th to 44th place nationally in economic well-being in just one year. Percentages of children in poverty, in homes with a high housing cost burden, whose parents lacked secure employment and teens not in school and not working all increased. The state also fell behind Georgia and Alabama in overall child well-being to 45th in the nation, according to the study. The national rankings put New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Minnesota and New Jersey in the top five for overall well-being and Louisiana, Arizona, Nevada, Mississippi and New Mexico in the bottom five. The Palmetto State did enjoy some statistical improvements, however. South Carolina’s education indicators revealed more children attending preschool, more fourth-graders proficient in reading and more eighth-graders proficient in math. Nationally, math and reading scores have steadily improved, according to the report, but researchers still found the poverty rate higher in the U.S. than in countries with which America competes academically. In addition, the gap in standardized test scores between low-income

and affluent students has grown approximately 40 percent since the 1960s. Health indicators in South Carolina, such as the number of low-birth-weight babies, children without health insurance, child deaths and teens who abuse drugs or alcohol, also improved. Other states were outstripping the Palmetto State, however, resulting in its rank slipping from 40th to 44th. The state’s position remained stable for family and community indicators at 43rd nationally, with fewer teen births and fewer children in households where the head lacks a high school diploma. The number of children in single-parent families increased to 43 percent and children living in high-poverty areas also increased. Poverty can have lasting effects on the development of young children, who eventually become the adults who drive the nation, the foundation said. “Poor parenting, inadequate nutrition, frequent moves and changes in nonparental caregivers, insufficient cognitive stimulation and unsafe environments can actually suppress brain development,” according to the report. Kids Count recommends investing in programs that weave together high-quality early childhood programs with those that support new parents. The Children’s Trust of South Carolina is a statewide organization that supports public and private prevention efforts to keep children safe. Sue Williams, CEO of the Children’s Trust, said in a statement, “As South Carolina copes with the lingering effects of a persistent recession, investing in strategies that support children and families is critical for South Carolina’s future. Programs like home-visiting, preventing child abuse and neglect, and family strengthening are more important than ever. “When families struggle, as so many of ours are right now, communities need to be strong to help families give children what they need to grow into productive citizens,” she said. Williams added that advocates are hopeful Gov. Nikki Haley’s efforts to bring jobs to the state will contribute to financial security for families and children.

so you know To read the entire Kids Count Data Book, visit datacenter.kidscount.org.

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Gold Wings ride into Greenville SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com More than 13,000 touring motorcycles are expected to descend on the TD Convention Center and Greenville area July 3- 6 for the Gold Wing Road Riders Association’s (GWRRA) annual Wing Ding convention. In its 35th year, the convention attracts motorcycle riders and enthusiasts from all over the country and is the largest singlemarque motorcycle gathering of its kind. According to the organization’s website, the event is a “once-a-year chance for our members, and everyone else who wants to see the world’s largest Gold Wing trade show, to gather to party!” Co-founder Shirley Stephens-Garcia coined the term “Wing Ding” in 1979, before the very first convention held at the Point Hilton Resort in Phoenix, Ariz. “By definition [a Wing Ding] is a party,” she said. “What better way to describe

Gold Wing Road Riders Association members show off their bikes at a previous Wing Ding convention.

our gathering of Wings?” “This was unlike any other motorcycle organization or rally at that time” and still holds true today, agreed co-founder Paul Hildebrand. So began GWRRA’s long tradition of holding Wing Dings in convention centers or fairgrounds that have in-

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A custom paint job makes a GWRRA member's motorcycle distinctive.

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door, air-conditioned facilities. While the majority of motorcyclists attending the Greenville gathering will be Honda Gold Wing riders, other touring bikes are also welcome. The event will feature hundreds of exhibitors and manufacturers on hand to show off their latest products and services. The website promises an abundance of activities, rider safety training, charity benefits, friendly competitions and entertainment, including a Grand Parade.


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

A Gold Wing Road Riders Association Drill Team performs.

The GWRRA encourages the public to come enjoy the parade, which will feature more thn 800 motorcycles, flags from all 50 states and riders of all ages as they travel a nine-mile course around town.  Greenville has hosted the event in three previous years – 1995, 2001 and 2008 – and is “thrilled to have the convention back in town for 2013,” says Todd Bertka, senior sales manager at VisitGreenvilleSC. The city of Greenville will host a welcome party for convention attendees Tuesday evening, July 2, at Heritage Green in downtown Greenville, allowing attendees exclusive access to the Children’s Museum of the Upstate, the Upcountry History Museum and the Sargent Wilson

Museum and Gallery. “This gives attendees a chance to check out a cool location and discover a little bit more of Greenville,” Bertka said. Heritage Park in Simpsonville will also play host to the convention by providing reserved lawn seating and a special motorcycle display area and bike parade at the Charter Amphitheatre during the Fourth of July fireworks at Heritage Park. VisitGreenvilleSC estimates that the direct economic impact of the event will be significant, with $5.1 million in visitor spending. That includes revenue from an estimated 10,442-plus room nights, with additional visitors utilizing campgrounds and RV parks for accommodations.

Thurs July 4th to Mon July 7th Closed Sunday

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www.PalmettoHG.com • 2422 Laurens Rd • 864.234.4960 JUNE 28, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 19


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

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Giveaways! Raffles! Crafts! Product demos! Food! And more!

Bring in this ad or mention “Teddy Bear” for 20% OFF one item! Expires 6/29/13. Limit one coupon or discount per item per transaction. Please limit one coupon per customer.

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TOUR DE FOURTH

FREEDOM, FIREWORKS, AND FUN ARE ON THE MIND OF MANY AS JULY FOURTH COMES UPON US. HERE’S A LIST OF ACTIVITIES HAPPENING AROUND THE UPSTATE TO CELEBRATE INDEPENDENCE DAY

JUNE 28

JULY 4

SC FESTIVAL OF STARS

HILLBILLY DAY

Saluda Street/Cross Ave., Ninety Six; 6-10 p.m. Concert in the Park featuring The Swinging Medallions with amusement rides, food and craft vendors. For more information: townofninetysixsc.com

120 Verner Mill Road, Mountain Rest; 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. One of the oldest festivals in the state. Clogging, square dancing, country and bluegrass music, crafts, food, soap making and old-time games. Free admission and parking.

JUNE 29 SC FESTIVAL OF STARS

Saluda Street/ Cross Ave., Ninety Six; 10 a.m.-11 p.m. Main Street parade at 10 a.m., live entertainment, music, contests, antique autos, helicopter rides and much more all day. Fireworks at 9:45 p.m. For more information: townofninetysixsc.com LAKE RUSSELL FREEDOM BLAST

Blue Hole Recreation Area at Lake Russell, Calhoun Falls; 7-11 p.m. Features a concert with the Fabulous Expressions, fireworks show and an inflated water slide for kids. For more information and tickets: Call the Calhoun Falls Chamber of Commerce office at 864-4188672.

JULY 3 CLEMSONFEST

Clemson University Beach and Outdoor Recreation Area, Clemson; 5:30-10 p.m. Live music, games, food, crafts and fireworks. For more information: cityofclemson. org/city/clemsonfest

20 THE JOURNAL | JUNE 28, 2013

RED, WHITE & BLUE

Court Street to Camperdown Street; downtown Greenville; 5-10:30 p.m. Free event featuring one of the state’s largest fireworks displays, musical entertainment on two stages, activities in the Zaxby’s Kidz Zone and a variety of popular food and beverage vendors. For more information: greenvillesc.gov/ PublicInfo_Events/RedWhiteBlue.aspx RED, WHITE, AND BOOM

Barnet Park, 248 E. St. John St., Spartanburg; 5:30-10:30 p.m. Featuring patriotic music, food, kids’ activities and fireworks. LIGHT UP THE LAKE 2013

Veteran’s Park, Union; 6:30-9:30 p.m. Featuring music and fireworks. For more information: Call 864-4291670 or visit unionscrec.com. INDEPENDENCE DAY AT HERITAGE PARK

Featuring the Greenville Symphony Orchestra Charter Amphitheatre at Heritage Park, Simpsonville; 8 p.m. Cost before July 4: $5 for general admission lawn tickets, $75 single seat at VIP table, and $300 VIP table (seats 6). Lawn tickets are $10 on July 4. For more information: charteramphitheatre.com/event_july4.html


journal community

County seizes 142 dogs from puppy mill Betty Starr with Greenville Animal Care gets affection from a dapple miniature dachshund, one of the rescued dogs from a Fountain Inn puppy mill.

amorris@communityjournals.com

Greg Beckner / Staff

Late last week, Greenville County Animal Control officers seized 142 dogs, a cat and several other animals from a puppy mill at a home on Dunklin Bridge Road in Fountain Inn. The animals were transported to the Greenville County Animal Care shelter on Furman Hall Road, said Greenville County spokesperson Bob Mihalic. Dale Ferguson surrendered the animals to Animal Care, said Mihalic, and was issued 10 citations: four for animal cruelty, one for running a puppy mill, three for animals without rabies vaccination, one for hoarding and collecting animals and one for not disposing of an animal properly. Authorities believe that Ferguson was selling or attempting to sell the animals, Mihalic said. Many of the animals need medical care and several have had litters of puppies in the few days that they have been at the facility, said Mihalic. The seized animals will not be available for adoption until they are assessed, spayed or neutered, which could happen as early as this week, he added. The capacity of the shelter is 600, but it

routinely houses 800 and rescue groups have been offering assistance. “We’re making it work,” he said. On Monday, 11 rescue groups had visited the shelter to assess which animals each could take. In 2012, the facility received an average of 1,700 animals per month, including those coming from Spartanburg County, according to its records. Officials estimate the cost to provide medical care and get the adoptable animals

to new homes is approximately $20,000, Mihalic said. The community has been generous with donations, giving almost half that amount as of Tuesday, he said. The case is a reminder that “there are always animals in need at Animal Care,” he said. Anyone wishing to donate funds, food, towels or blankets, volunteer at the shelter or serve as a foster family should contact Animal Care at 864-467-3950 or visit greenvillecounty.org/acs.

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journal community

City of Greer proclaims Carolina Day sjackson@communityjournals.com At the request of the Daniel Morgan Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution, Greer City Council and Mayor Rick Danner issued a proclamation at last week’s council meeting recognizing June 28 as Carolina Day. Carolina Day traditionally celebrates the American victory at the Battle of Sullivan’s Island on June 28, 1776, and chapter president Donny Carson said the group requested the designation to “to keep people aware of the significance and sacrifice that these people made.” While Greer is the first to memorialize the day in the Upstate, Carolina Day is already commemorated across South Carolina, including a large celebration in Charleston, with religious services, parades and ceremonial events. The battle at Sullivan’s Island took place six days prior to the Declaration

of Independence and was the first major patriot victory of the American Revolution, producing many South Carolina heroes such as William Moultrie, William Jasper, Donny Carson, Francis Marion president of the and John RutDaniel Morgan ledge, Carson Chapter of said. the Sons of “It was a rethe American markable victoRevolution ry,” he said, noting “the symbols on our flag depict that battle.” The Palmetto tree symbolizes Colonel Moultrie’s defense at Sullivan’s Island and the crescent denotes the emblem worn on the Revolutionary soldier’s caps, he said. Thomas C. Hanson / contributing

SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

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amorris@communityjournals.com In an 8-3 vote this week, the Greenville County School Board approved a 5-mill tax increase on debt service to help fund technology, security enhancements, classroom renovations and other facility improvements. The increase comes shortly after a 3.9mill increase in May for the district’s operations budget and translates to about a $20 tax increase for owners of a $100,000 house, said district spokesperson Oby Lyles. Voting against the tax hike were board members Crystal Ball O’Connor, Lisa Wells and Lynda Leventis-Wells. Voting in favor were Kenneth E. Baxter, Debi Bush, Joy Grayson, Megan Hickerson, Roger Meek, Danna Rohleder, Chuck Saylors and Patrick Sudduth. Glenda MorrisonFair was absent. Lyles said the increase, which would raise the total millage to 47.5, would af-

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fect auto and homeowners along with Call Today For Your 14 DAY businesses. This is the first tax increase since 1999, when the district began Risk Free Trial With Hearing Aid the BEST program to build multiple Technology Recommended For schools. YOUR Hearing Loss, YOUR Life, EXpERIENCE LYRIC HEARING FOR YOURSELF! District documents show the money † YOUR Budget. risk free trial • Complimentary Lyric Screening will be used specifically for upgrading the district’s wireless network capabilOffers expire May 31, 2013 ity to add additional wireless access points to support the 36,659 instructional computers in the system, as well as security changes in multiple schools, including intercom systems and video surveillance system updates. Major entrance renovations for secuDavis, Au.D. Doctor of Audiology Kristin Davis, Au.D. Doctor of Audiology rity are planned or Kristin underway for seven Premier Lyric Hearing Professional Premier Lyric Hearing Professional schools. Other projects funded include ren703 W. Poinsett Street, Greer, SC 29650 17 years Experience Improving Patient Satisfaction With Their Hearing HealthCare ovations and reconfiguration of instructional space at the Enoree, Don703 W. Poinsett Street, Greer, SC 29650 • www.greeraudiology.com aldson, Golden Strip and Bonds career www.greeraudiology.com centers. Athletic projects included CALL TODAY FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT! field lighting, field renovations, track *Individual patient needs may vary. Duration of device battery life varies by patient and is subject to individual ear conditions.**Lyric is water resistant, not waterproof, and should not be completely submerged under water. †Professional fees may apply. Annual subscription begins the first day of trial. Lyric is not appropriate for all patients. See resurfacing at multiple schools and a “Dr. Davis has improved my quality of life. She did a very thorough and professional evaluation a Lyric Provider to determine if Lyric is right for you. Lyric, Distributed by Phonak, LLC ©2013. All rights reserved. MS025831 NEW904 stadium expansion at Mauldin High of my hearing problem and fit me with a comfortable, inconspicuous hearing aid that has School. brought back happy days. The follow-up care has been outstanding!” – Dr. Larry McCalla

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JUNE 28, 2013 | The Journal 23


journal community

our community

community news, events and happenings

Greenville First Wesleyan Church will hold a garden dedication on June 30 at 11:45 a.m. at the end of worship service. There are at least 15 beds in the garden and the produce will be shared with the community. The church is located at 103 S. Texas Ave., Greenville. For more information, call 864-295-0945.

TMG

Six Spartanburg Community College students recently graduated from the BMW Scholars program. The SCC graduates included: Phillip Allison, Travis Bolt, Mitchell Bragg, Shane Bullman, Rashik Jones and Chancellor Thrift. SCC is currently accepting applications for the program until July 1. Students are accepted into the program based on a skills assessment test and other criteria. Apply online at sccsc.edu.

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Free workshops are being offered to owners of Android and iPhones at the Verizon Wireless Greenville stores. An Android workshop will be held on July 2 and July 16, 6-7 p.m., at 469 Congaree Road. Another Android workshop will be held on July 9 and July 23, 6-7 p.m. at 4 Market Point Drive. The iPhone workshop will be held on July 9 and July 23, 6-7 p.m., at 469 Congaree Road. An additional iPhone workshop will be held on July 16 and July 30, 6-7 p.m., at 4 Market Point Drive. Registration is required. For more information, visit verizonwireless.com/workshops.

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A Summer Grief Series, educational sessions for those who have lost a loved one in the last year, will begin on Monday, July 15. Meetings will be held at 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. Both groups will meet for five consecutive weeks at Hospice of the Upstate’s Sadler Center, 1835 Rogers Road, Anderson. Topics include Symptoms of Grief and Common Feelings, Normal and Abnormal Grief and Coping Techniques for Handling Stress. Both series are free and open to the public. Participants are welcome to bring a friend. Call Donna Davis, bereavement coordinator, at 864-328-1950 to register.

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COMMUNITY NEWS, EVENTS AND HAPPENINGS

A private audiology practice Five-yearold Katherine Bezner performs a basket toss at the cheer finale event for Mauldin High School’s cheer camp while five-year-old Grace Hunt looks out at the crowd. The camp had 195 girls between the ages of 5 and 13 attend. The camp is a fundraiser for the Mauldin High cheerleaders.

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InnoVenture will host the Clemson Summer Innovation Series at the University Center of Greenville from 5-7 p.m. July 29 and Aug. 29 with faculty and students joining featured presenters to provide insight on the development of ideas. On July 29, Michael Gara, the director of technology management for the Clemson University Biomedical Engineering Innovation Campus (CUBEInC), will be the featured presenter. The event will be held at the Greenville Hospital System University Medical Center Patewood campus. On Aug. 29, Gregory Pickett, the associate dean of the College of Business and Behavioral Science, will be the featured presenter. Pickett will discuss Clemson’s Master of Business Administration in Entrepreneurship and Innovation (MBAe) program. The Joint Commission awarded the Gold Seal of Approval to Greenville Health System’s Patewood Memorial Hospital for its total joint replacement program, involving knee, hip and shoulder replacements. Patewood Memorial is the only hospital in South Carolina to receive the commission’s Gold Seal for its shoulder replacement program. This two-year certification recognizes Patewood Memorial for having all of the elements of a well-run disease management program. In 2012, 288 total hip replacements, 478 knee replacements and 110 shoulder replacements were performed. Several Intercollegiate National Religious Broadcasters (INRB) Student Awards were awarded to North Greenville University mass communication students at the 2013 National Religious Broadcasters Convention and Exposition held in Tennessee. The INRB comprises Christian students with an interest or major in broadcasting, journalism or media communications. In the Short Film category, Justin Robinson won second place with his film titled “Create.” In the Longer Film category, Chelsea Bailey, Jonathan Derbyshire and Josh Weir won second place honors with their film titled “Allegiance.” Anna Moseley won third place in the News and Sports Radio category with “NGU Basketball.” In addition, Chelsea Bailey was awarded the Bob Dobbs Essay Scholarship. This week, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services kicked off its Health Insurance Marketplace education effort with a new website, healthcare.gov, and a 24hour consumer call center to help Americans prepare for open enrollment and ultimately sign up for private health insurance. The new site will help users understand choices and select coverage that best suits their needs when open enrollment in the Health Insurance Marketplace begins Oct. 1. Sharecare, a health and wellness social engagement platform, recently announced that Greenville ranked number three in its 10 best cities for a happy marriage. The survey results were measured by a sample of 250,000 people who took their RealAge Test, which measures anti-aging benefits of marriage (4.2 years younger for a man and 2.5 years younger for a woman). To find out each city on the list’s recipe for wedded bliss, check out blog.sharecare.com.

Send announcements to community@communityjournals.com.

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JUNE 28, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 25


journal community

the good

events that make our community better

Slow Food Upstate recently awarded grants to the following: Field and Flower Farm where Ed Phillips is raising a pair of Guinea Hogs from the Ark of Taste, Greenville Organic Foods Organization (GOFO) for their work with school gardens and education programming for teachers, Timberock at Hopkins Farm for raising Ark of Taste American Bronze turkeys and New Hampshire chickens,SC Organization for Organic Living (SCOOL) for an annual conference, Slow Food on Campus, Clemson University for their twice monthly meal service with community involvement, and Travelers Rest High School for their International Baccalaureate program school garden and community service project, donating food from the garden to local soup kitchens. TD Bank’s Charitable Foundation recently donated $140,500 to nonprofit organizations in South Carolina from February through April 2013. The foundation awarded 15 grants to nonprofit organizations that provide affordable housing, financial literacy and education, and environmental programs in South Carolina during the quarter, including: Anderson Interfaith Ministries, Neighborhood Outreach Connection Virtual Learning Center, South Carolina Philharmonic Inc. and Habitat for Humanity of Greenville County. Mill Village Farms and Loaves & Fishes recently launched the Good to Go Mobile Market, a mobile produce market for the greater Sullivan and West Greenville communities. The market aims to fulfill both organizations’ missions of increasing access of healthy food to those in the Greenville community who live in underserved neighborhoods. Produce provided at Good to Go will be sourced from Marvin’s Produce and Mill Village Farms. Youth ages 13-18 involved in Mill Village Farms grow the fresh produce from several urban farms in Greenville while training in basic job skills, entrepreneurship and organic farming. The teens will also assist in operating the Good to Go Mobile Market. For more information about the market, visit goodtogogreenvile.org. For more information on Mill Village Farms, millvillagefarms.org.

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The Wounded Warriors Family Support’s High Five Tour rallies Americans to say “Thank You” and show their appreciation to our country’s military families for their sacrifices. 
This summer, the Wounded Warriors Family Support GT500 “Super Snake” Mustang will hit the road for the High Five Tour 2013. During the five-month tour, the Mustang will cover more than 21,000 miles, traveling to more than 60 cities in 48 states. Foothills Mustang Club will host the Mustang at Texas Roadhouse, 3140 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors, on July 4, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. It will also be on display at Fluor Field. On July 8, 4-7 p.m., the vehicle will be at Fairway Ford on Laurens Road. Everyone is invited to show their support by signing the car with a message of support for veterans and their families. Wounded Warriors Family Support has also pledged $500,000 toward building two “smart homes” for deserving wounded warriors and their families in Fayetteville, N.C., and Guthrie, Okla. For more information and to donate, visit highfivetour.com. Arts Alive, a fundraiser for the Travelers Rest Artists Alliance (TRAA), will be held at Hotel Domestique on Saturday, July 20. The evening event will celebrate the artists, makers, and performers who represent the cultural fiber of Travelers Rest and the surrounding area. Live visual and performing arts demonstrations, local musicians, and cuisine provided by nearby food artisans and restaurants will provide attendees with an enjoyable and lively arts experience. In addition, there will be a silent auction. Tickets for the 7-10 p.m. event can be purchased in advance for $35 per person and $60 per couple or $40 per person the night of the event. For more information, call 864-6076233 or visit ArtinTR.org. DNA Creative Communications, in collaboration with the Community Foundation of Greenville, Hollingsworth Funds Inc., and United Way of Greenville County, recently kicked off the 2013 Shine the Light on Your Nonprofit educational series with its first event, “The Funder-Grantee Dynamic: A Candid Conversation.”  The event broke previous attendance records with more than 130 attendees. The next session, “Successful Public Relations: Telling and Selling Your Story,” will be held on Aug. 7 at the Kroc Community Center. To find out more or to register, visit dnacc.com or call 864-235-0959, ext. 4. Meals on Wheels of Greenville recently received a 2013 Community Enrichment Grant from the Community Foundation of Greenville in the amount of $6,200 to fund Project Safe Food, an ongoing initiative to ensure meal recipients receive hot, nutritious meals from the organization. Project Safe Food will provide a warming cabinet and insulated meal delivery bags that will keep food delivered to homebound clients at a safe temperature to prevent food-borne illnesses. Bon Secours St. Francis Health System recently announced that the Catholic Health Association honored director of community relationship building Maxim Williams as one of the 10 young professionals for the national “Tomorrow’s Leader” Award. Williams was selected for his work in supporting the system’s mission of building healthy communities, including the Sterling community. He was honored during the Catholic Health Assembly in Anaheim, Calif.

Send announcements to community@communityjournals.com.


Journal culture Freedom is not free

“Rolling Thunder” events help photographer show human cost through bikers and Vietnam wall

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Freedom is not free.

Photos by J. Michael Johnson

It’s a belief photographer J. Michael Johnson – best known for his images documenting bikers and the motorcycle lifestyle – seeks to emphasize through photographs taken over the years at “Rolling Thunder’s Ride for Freedom,” a motorcycle ride from the Pentagon to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington D.C. held each Memorial Day since 1988. PATRIOTIC continued on page 28

JUNE 28, 2013 | The Journal 27


JOURNAL CULTURE PATRIOTIC continued from PAGE 27

“Rolling Thunder,” a nonprofit first launched to bring attention to soldiers left in Vietnam as POWs and MIAs, derives its name from a 1965 bombing campaign against North Vietnam called “Operation Rolling Thunder.” Johnson’s photographs are featured in the exhibition “Nam Era: Never Forgotten – A Photographic Tribute by J. Michael Johnson” that opens Saturday at the Pickens County Museum of Art and History. It is one of two exhibitions at the museum with patriotic themes opening in time for the Fourth of July. The other, “American Colors: Patriotism Reflected in Art,” features work from 39 artists from the Carolinas. “The early Sunday morning walks into the depth and quietness of ‘The Wall’ lets me capture veterans visiting names on ‘The Wall’ that represent the real human cost of freedom,” Johnson said. “The names of young boys and girls growing up too fast, fighting a war on foreign soil and, in so many cases, giving their lives fighting for American freedom in a land that some say God forgot – Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia.” Johnson was in the Air Force during the Vietnam era but never went to Vietnam.

“The movement toward these ideals has sometimes been unsteady, sometimes heroic, sometimes controversial … but the concept continues to inspire.” – A LLE N COLE MA N

He said he started photographing bikers and the motorcycle lifestyle on a dare after he saw a report about the Sturgis, S.D., motorcycle rally on television while eating breakfast with a friend. “I do not ride,” he said. “I always just photographed people.” He went to Daytona Bike Week in 1997 and shot 40 rolls of film there. Twelve of his images were published in “Easyriders” magazine. While there, he saw a guy standing on a street corner with a “Rolling Thunder” patch on his motorcycle jacket. Johnson went to the next “Rolling Thunder” and has only missed one since – when he had jury duty.

28 THE JOURNAL | JUNE 28, 2013

“There have been times I’ve started to shoot something but never pressed the shutter because it was too personal a moment for the Vietnam vet. There are parts of this exhibit that live only in my head because I made the decision to let an award-winning image go because their personal privacy was much more important than a photograph,” he said. A special veterans’ preview of Johnson’s exhibit will be held Friday, June 28, from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. Since he made that first trip to Daytona, Johnson’s work has been featured in “Easyriders,” “Biker” and “In the Wind” magazines, and he has provided commercial photography services to companies in the motorcycle industry. Johnson is a co-founder of the Spartanburg Photo Guild and he has served two terms on the board of the Spartanburg Art Museum. Not surprisingly, “American Colors” has a patriotic theme. Museum director Allen Coleman, who curated the exhibit, said the American concept of patriotism “resides in diverse culturally negotiated understanding – the perceptions, contradictions, questions, problems and issues that continue to be challenged and redefined around the ideal of freedom and love of country.” Those perceptions “may be fixed in a persistent struggle to define and achieve freedom and expression,” he said, “or might exist in a comfortable zone where one is simply sure of his own feeling.” Coleman said the American narrative has reflected a striving toward personal or communal success and individual freedoms within social, economic and political fabrics of shared rights. “The movement toward these ideals has sometimes been unsteady, sometimes heroic, sometimes controversial … but the concept continues to inspire.” Artists included in the exhibition are Kathy Bell, Stanley Bermudez, Greg Bowling, Vickey Brickle-Macky, Linda Hyatt Cancel, Brad Carraway, J.J. Casey, Clinton Coleman, Ashley Davis, Melody Davis, Darryl DeBruhl, Trent Frazor, James Greene, Chris Hardwick, Carol HasBrouck, Ernesto Hernandez, Mary Lou Hightower and Lauren Hill. Also, Amanda Illian, Lynn Ingram, Diarmuid Kelly, Lauraette Kirkland, Tracy Landers, April M. Leland, Dabney Mahanes, Hamed Mahmoodi, Mark Malmgren, Eve Martin, Frank McGrath, Donna N. Minor, John Moore, Mark Mulfinger, Kevin Pang, Grace Scherer, Sara Dame Setzer, Kirkland Smith, Tom Supensky, Wendyth T. Wells and Jane Woodward are featured. A third exhibit, “Legacy: Drawings & Paintings by Melody M. Davis,” also opens Saturday.

Frank McGrath, “Six Flags”

SO YOU KNOW:

Darryl DeBruhl, “Red White Bike and Blue”

WHAT: “Nam Era: Never Forgotten – A Photographic Tribute by J. Michael Johnson” WHO: Taylors photographer J. Michael Johnson WHERE: Pickens County Museum of Art and History, 307 Johnson St., Pickens IN ADDITION: “American Colors: Patriotism Reflected in Art” and “Legacy: Drawings & Paintings by Melody M. Davis” also run from June 29-Aug. 15.

Carol HasBrouck, “WWII Soldier”

WHEN: Saturday through Aug. 15 – Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 9am-5pm; Thursdays, 9am-7:30pm; Saturdays, 9am-4:30pm

 Special veteran’s preview of the

exhibit will be held Friday, June 28, from 10am-3pm

ADMISSION: Free INFORMATION: 864-898-5963

Linda Cancel, “O Hay Can You See”

Mary Lou Hightower, “Patriot’s Pride”

Kirkland Smith, “Disposable America”


journal culture

scene. here.

the week in the local arts world

The Fountain Inn Center for Visual and Performing Arts, located at 315 N. Main St. in Fountain Inn, will present the Young Artist Series. The series features three talented artists who have risen to state, national and international status. This new series will feature Caleb Borick, piano, June 29 at 7 p.m.; Amy Goto, cello, July 13 at 7 p.m.; and Abigail Kent, Celtic and pedal harp, July 27 at 7 p.m. These young artists bring their talents to the Upstate after recently participating in the Piccolo Spoleto Rising Star series. All performances are free and open to the public, and will have a reception after the show. For more information, call 864-4091050.

trists, clinicians and guests from National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI). To register for the July 19 event, visit ghs.org/healthevents or call 1-877-447-4636. Tickets for “Next to Normal” are $30 for adults and $25 for juniors. Student rush tickets are available 15 minutes prior to show time for $20 with school ID. The South Carolina Children’s Theatre will hold Annie auditions on July 1 or July 14. They are look for first graders-adults to participate in the production. Auditions will be held at SCCT Headquarters, 153 Augusta Street, Greenville. Spartanburg’s Empty Bowls project is cranking up early this year. The public is invited to make clay bowls that will be used to raise funds for a local charity. There is no charge to participate. The event is July 20, 10 a.m.-noon and 1-3 p.m. at Chapman Cultural Center. Instruction, clay and materials provided. For more information, call Nancy Williamson at 864-621-2768. "Beach Illusion" by Edith McBee Hardaway. Mixed media. May be seen at the Artists Guild Gallery of Greenville, 200 N. Main St.

Centre Stage presents Tom Kitt’s and Brian Yorkey’s “Next to Normal” July 11-27, with performances on Thursday–Saturday Want to see your artwork here? at 8 p.m. and on Sunday at 3 p.m. In adSend a high-res image to dition, Centre Stage is partnering with the arts@communityjournals.com. Greenville Health System to present two panel discussions during the run of this musical. The first discussion will be held after the 3 p.m. performance on July 14 with open seating and starting around 5:15-5:30 p.m., and the second one will be a noon Lunch & Learn on July 19, which will require free registration. Both panel discussions are titled, “Let’s Talk About Mental Illness” and will include local doctors, psychologists, psychia-

The Pride of Greenville Men’s Chorus will present “Let’s Talk About Love” on July 29 and 30, 7:30 p.m. at the Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St., Greenville. The group will be joined by the Community Chorus, Cantaria: The Gay Chorus of Asheville and a small orchestra. Tickets are $20 for adults and $15 for students, available at warehousetheatre. com or at the door. A portion of the concert proceeds benefit the Greenville Unitarian Universalist Fellowship. For more information, visit pogmc.com. Bob Jones University recently announced the schedule for its 2013–2014 concert, opera and drama series. Performances are open to the public and feature: Canadian Brass, Oct. 8; “Cyrano de Bergerac,” Nov. 20–22; Georgia Boy Choir, Feb. 27; “Aida,” Mar. 18-22; and “Twelfth Night,” May 7-8. For more information, visit bju.edu/tickets or call 864-7701372. Individual tickets or season tickets will be available for purchase on Sept. 2.

Send announcements to arts@communityjournals.com.

THESE LADIES KNOW HOW TO HAVE FUN. THEY ALSO KNOW REAL ESTATE. Meet us at the closing table!

Flat Fee Listing 864.250.2112 | www.CarolPyfrom.com

Charlotte Sarvis, REALTOR, ABR

Janet Sandifer, REALTOR, ABR

charlottes@carolpyfrom.com

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864.346.9943

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JUNE 28, 2013 | The Journal 29


journal culture

listen up

best bets for local live music 6 / 2 8 , M a i n S t r e e t F r i d ay s

The Swingin’ Richards Unusual power-trio. Admission is free. greenvillesc.gov/PublicInfo_Events/ MainStFridays.aspx 6/29, Radio Room

Our Western Sky Atmospheric rock. Call 864-263-7868 or visit wpbrradioroom.com/home. 6 / 2 9 , B l u e s B o u l e va r d

Russ Corvey Smooth jazz all-star guitarist. Tickets: $10. Call 864-242-2583 or visit bluesboulevardjazzgreenville.com. 6/29, The Handlebar

Seven Handle Circus Rip-snorting new-grass. Tickets: $9. Call 864-233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com. 7/2, The Handlebar

Trapt Platinum-selling hard-rockers. Tickets: $16. Call 864-233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com. 7/4, Gottrocks

Four 14 Genre-spanning jam-rock. reverbnation.com/venue/255976 7 / 5 , M a i n S t r e e t F r i d ay s

Derrick Dorsey Band Country/rock/soul party. Admission is free. greenvillesc.gov/PublicInfo_Events/ MainStFridays.aspx 7/5, Radio Room

Megan Jean & The KFB Hard-driving, foot-stomping acoustic mayhem. Call 864-263-7868 or visit wpbrradioroom.com/home. 7/6, The Handlebar

Eric Lindell Greasy, Southern-fried Cajun blues. Tickets: $12 in advance; $15 day of show. Call 864-233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com.

30 THE Journal | JUNE 28, 2013


journal culture

sound check

with vincent harris

Way past generic Our Western Sky chooses authenticity over mass consumption The music of Our Western Sky is as vast as the band name suggests. The trio creates ambient-style soundscapes refitted as tough but melodic rock, calling to mind groups like Athens, Ga.’s Maserati. Their songs are both expansive and melodic, inviting close attention and rewarding the listener with layers of melody and instrumental skill. The band formed as a meeting of the minds between two already-popular Upstate bands, East North and Culture Prophet, and quickly began attracting discerning music fans who were tired of the generic bar-band sound that occasionally overloads the Greenville music scene. Who: Our Western Sky, with the Basement Banshees Our Western Sky released their self-recorded album, “Lost SeaWhen: Saturday, June 29, 10 p.m. sons,” last December, and they’re playing the Radio Room at 2845 Where: The Radio Room, 2845 N. Pleasantburg Dr., Greenville N. Pleasantburg Dr. on Saturday, Information: 263-7868 or wpbrradioroom.com June 29. I spoke recently with drummer Chris Morris about the band’s formation and their music. How did Our Western Sky come together? East North and Culture Prophet played a lot of shows together, so we were already friends. And Michael [Barksdale, of Culture Prophet, who plays guitar in Our Western Sky] sent me a text message one day asking me if I liked this band called Appleseed Cast, and I told him I did. He said he was thinking about putting a project together that was similar to them. And of course, we ended up not sounding anything like Appleseed Cast, but we liked what we were doing enough to keep going with it.

FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION. Masterpieces of American Landscape from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston - through September 15 Wyeth vs. - through September 22 Southbound - through October 6

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1pm - 5 pm

CLOSED JULY 4th

free admission

1378 GCMA Journal Freedom.indd 3

6/26/13 3:02 PM

In cooperation with Greenville Health System

Was there a lot of common musical ground between you, Michael and bassist Matthew Mashburn? We definitely had mutual interests. Michael is like the bridge between us because he likes everything. But we all have things in common that we’re really keen on. Culture Prophet incorporated a lot of electronic elements into their music; was there a temptation to do that with Our Western Sky? Not really, because the intention of the band was to take inspiration from the music we liked as teenagers. So there wasn’t a whole lot of electronic music going on back then. And I also think Michael was looking to do more stuff live as opposed to in the studio. It’s totally different now. Tell me about recording “Lost Seasons.” We had all recorded in other studios where we had to pay lots of money to make the record, and they always ended up not sounding like we wanted them to. So we decided to do it ourselves, so that we could have control over every single aspect. We did most of the tracks at my house in one day, and then we took those over to Michael’s studio to polish all of the tracks. We had to borrow some equipment and bring in some people, but we were able to do it more or less on our own, and the recording process essentially cost us nothing. The band plays music that can be more challenging than your average three-piece rock band; were you worried about your songs attracting an audience? The audience that we’re going for is the one we’re attracting. A lot of music that’s made for mass consumption, I think that it lacks an authenticity. It’s very general; it’s very broad. And what we’re doing is very specific. Would I love it if more people were hearing our stuff? Of course, but we’re happy with the amount of attention we’re getting. The style of music that we play is more for people who want to think about what they’re listening to and make a more personal connection. VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

Music by Tom Kitt Book and Lyrics by Brian Yorkey

NEXT TO NORMAL is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI). All authorized performance materials are also supplied by MTI. 421 West 54th Street, New York, NY 10019 Phone: 212-541-4684 Fax: 212-397-4684 www.MTIShows.com

A FEELEVERYTHING MUSICAL

www.centrestage.org •

JULY 11- 27 THU-SUN FOR TICKETS

233-6733

JUNE 28, 2013 | The Journal 31


journal culture

A r t s Calendar

AMISH FURNITURE

Solid Wood – Made in America

Greenville Chamber of Commerce Artists of 10 Central Avenue Studios Through Jul. 12 ~ 242-1050 The Blood Connection Works by Bruce Schlein & Alan Weinberg Through Aug. 14 ~ 255-5000

J u n e 2 8 - J u ly 4 Carolina Ballet Theatre Summerworks Finale Performance Jun. 28 ~ 467-3000

July 4th SALE in progres s!

Main Street Fridays The Swingin’ Richards Jun. 28 ~ 232-2273

Metropolitan Arts Council at Centre Stage Works by Garland Mattox Through Aug. 19 ~ 233-6733 Greenville County Museum of Art Landscapes from the Southern Collection Through Sep. 8 ~ 271-7570

Main Street Real Estate Gallery Works by Julie Hughes Shabkie Through Jun. 30 ~ 250-2850

Quality, AMISH furniture is available for every room of your home. Choose from 7 different woods, custom sizes, and choice of finish. Order your new dining furniture now for the holidays and save!

Wyeth vs. Through Sep. 22 ~ 271-7570 William H. Johnson: Native Son Through Sep. 29 ~ 271-7570

Reedy River Concerts 246th Army Band Jul. 3 ~ 232-2273

Southbound Through Oct. 6 ~ 271-7570

Greenville Symphony Orchestra 2013 Independence Day Patriotic Pops Jul. 4 ~ 232-0344

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Metropolitan Arts Council Flat Out Under Pressure 2013 Exhibit Through Jul. 12 ~ 467-3132

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JOURNAL HOMES

REPRESENTATIVE FINISHES

Featured Homes & Neighborhoods | Open Houses | Property Transfers

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED HOME

HOME INFO 120 E. Augusta Place, Greenville Oasis Custom Homes, another brand new home TO BE BUILT in the heart of established Augusta Road Area, on 1/3 acre “walk out basement lot” on E Augusta Place. Three bedrooms, two and a half baths about 2800 square feet, plus 2 car attached garage/ this home will feature all the same fine finishes that Oasis Custom Homes always includes, such as site finished hardwood floors, 9 ft ceilings, granite counters in the kitchen AND baths, true Jack’n’Jill bathroom for the kids’

G

Joan Herlong, Owner, Broker in Charge AugustaRoad.com Realty, LLC | 864.325.2112 To submit your Featured Home: homes@greenvillejournal.com

ILDING ... with your family

ASIS CUSTOM HOMES

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

in mind.

C23R

BU UILD

O

bathrooms, and a truly luxurious master bath with dual sinks, separate glass/ceramic tile shower and tub, separate water closet and walk in closet with custom organizers.  Oasis kitchens ALWAYS feature custom cabinetry by local cabinet maker, and top of the line stainless steel appliances, ceramic tile backsplash and DESIGNER LIGHTING THROUGHOUT.   Oasis is ready to customize this for you, or will cost out your own plans for this lot.  Contact listing agent Joan Herlong.

Price: $449,605| Square Footage: 2800 Bedrooms: 3 Baths: 2 full, 1 half | Garage: 2-car attached Schools: Blythe Elementary | Hughes Middle Greenville High

· oasiscustomhomes.com · 864-292-5901

Marketed exclusively by Joan Herlong, BIC 864-325-2112 AugustaRoad.com

JUNE 28, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 33


journal Homes

Ope n T h i s W e e k e n d

O p en S un d ay, J une 3 0 f r o m 2 – 4 p m

MLS #1259650 TRAVELERS REST

5 Beds/2.5 Baths | 3400-3599 Sqft

MLS #1256255 GREER 3 Beds/2 Baths | 1800-1999 Sqft

121 Aberdeen Drive, Greenville

MLS #1253212 AUGUST ROAD AREA, GREENVILLE

4 Beds/3.5 Baths | 3600-3799 Sqft

Completely renovated brick ranch home situated on over half an acre in popular Augusta Road area. Located just minutes from Downtown Greenville and Augusta Road. Within walking distance of restaurants and shopping. Incredible open floor plan. Owners have done an amazing job in refurbishing this home. 3 large bedrooms and 2.5 baths. Updated gourmet kitchen complete with granite counter tops, tile back splash, stainless steel appliances that include double convection ovens plus an incredible over sized eat-in kitchen island. Kitchen is joined with a huge breakfast area and a keeping room. Home boasts of 3 fireplaces of which 2 are wood burning and 1 is gas. Per seller, home has all new thermal windows, new architectural roof, new HVAC unit, all new electrical, new kitchen appliances, new circular driveway and front porch. The owners also added a gorgeous new master bathroom and walk-in closet plus lots of decorative landscaping. The home has hardwoods throughout....Owners love their neighbors and the privacy of their back yard. Hate to leave!!!

Home Info Price: $599,900 | MLS: #1260405 Bedrooms: 3 Baths: 2.5 Square Footage: 3000-3199 Schools: Augusta Circle Elementary Hughes Middle | Greenville High Contact: Charlotte Sarvis | 864.346.9943 Carol Pyfrom Realty To submit your Open House: homes@greenvillejournal.com

MLS #1254173 GREENVILLE

2 Beds/ 2.5 Baths | 2200-2399 Sqft

kw ®

KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY

®

Each Keller Williams Realty Office is Independently Owned and Operated

34 THE Journal | JUNE 28, 2013

for more information

JournalHOMES.com


journal Homes

Featured Home T AC TR S! N CO Y ER 3 DA D UN IN

EASTSIDE 4 Beds/2.5 Baths | 3400-3599 Sqft

CT RA NT YS! O RC A DE 4 D UN IN 1

MAULDIN 3 Beds/2 Baths | 1600-1799 Sqft

520 Carilion Lane, Greenville Fantastic 6 Bedroom, 4.5 Bath EarthCraft, Energy Star Certified Home in the Beautiful Carilion Subdivison. Very Flexible Floorplan with a Separate Downstairs Living Space, Perfect for Entertaining or Fantastic Guest Quarters. The Main Level is Fabulous! Formal Dining Room with Butler’s Pantry, Large Living Area with Stacked Stone Fireplace, Beautiful Hardwood Floors. Great Kitchen with Custom Cabinetry, Granite Countertops, Updated Appliances, and Separate Eating Area. Large Master Suite with Sitting Area, Jetted Tub, Separate Shower, and Double Vanities. From the sitting area, the French Doors lead onto a Large Deck. Separate Washer/Dryer Room with Sink and custom cabinets. Three Bedrooms and Two Bathrooms Upstairs. Attic Storage and a Separate Walk-in Storage Area. Downstairs you will find the Coolest Separate Living Space. Stained and Stamped Concrete Floors, Full Separate Kitchen, Bedrooms, Great Media Room pre-wired for Surround Sound. All opens up to a Downstairs Patio. All Situated beside the Community Green Space which almost Doubles the Yard Space. Quality Home with Wonderful Community Amenities Makes the Home Better than Perfect!

T AC TR ! N O Y RC A DE 1 D N U IN

EASLEY 3 Beds/3 Baths | 2800-2999 Sqft

T AC TR S! N CO Y ER 7 DA D UN IN

Home Info Price: $429,900 | MLS: #1261323 Bedrooms: 6 Baths: 4.5 Square Footage: 4600-4800 Schools: Duncan Chapel Elementary Berea Middle | Travelers Rest High Nick Carlson | 864.386.7704 | ncarlson@cbcaine.com Coldwell Banker Caine To submit your Featured Home: homes@greenvillejournal.com

special to the journal

GREENVILLE 3 Beds/3 Baths | 1800-1999 Sqft

864-527-7685 JUNE 28, 2013 | The Journal 35


journal Homes

oPEN THIS WEEKEND Kingsbridge

O p en S un d ay, J une 3 0 f r o m 2 – 4 p m Green Valley

Augusta Road area

5 Dempsey Glen Lane . $699,900 . MLS#1261724

250 Foot Hills Rd . $674,900 . MLS#1257671

121 Aberdeen Drive . $599,900 . MLS#1260405

63 Fabulous 4 bedroom and 4.5 baths with 3 car garage with workshop area in gated Kingsbridge! Mature landscaping with circular drive and private backyard on cul-de-sac lot!

5BR/3.5BA 5BR/3 full & 3 half BA. Elegant traditional Southern brick home on beautiful Golf Course lot. Poinsett Highway pass Furman, Left on Roe Ford Rd. Right on 25, Left on Foot Hills, Home on Left.

3 Completely renovated brick ranch home situated on over half an acre in popular Augusta Road area. Located just minutes from Downtown Greenville and Augusta Road.

Contact: Charlotte Sarvis 864-346-9943 Carol Pyfrom Realty

Contact: Vicki G. Roark 979-8425 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Charlotte Sarvis 864-346-9943 Carol Pyfrom Realty

The Oaks At Roper Mountain

Somerleaf

Greenville Country Club Area

111 Charleston Oak Ln . $552,526 . MLS#1251473

5 Somerleaf Way . $516,000 . MLS#1261556

40 Douglas Dr . $509,900 . MLS#1248942

4BR/4BA New construction in maintenance free community. Hardwood floors, granite countertops, ss appliances, screened porch & more. 385 to Roper Mtn exit, cross Garlington, Left into SD.

4BR/4.5BA Amazing full brick home with privacy fenced lit. Formal DR/LR, den, gourmet kitc, 2 fp’s, office, laundry room, mstr w/luxurious BA. Woodruff Rd to Hwy 14 South, Left on Brown, Left on Somerleaf. Open daily 2-4 p.m.

4BR/4BA Completely renovated home with beautiful hardwood floor, open floor plan, fabulous kitchen, 3 fp’s, screened porch & deck. Augusta Rd to Douglas Dr, Home on Right.

Contact: Cynthia Rehberg 884-9953 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Brenda Kinne 349-6910 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Beth Crigler 420-4718 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Sycamore Ridge

Creekwood

Gower Estates

8 Sycamore Ridge Dr . $429,900 . MLS#1255131

112 Creek Shoals Drive . $353,000 . MLS#1258285

2012 Cleveland St. Ext . $297,500 . MLS#1260373

4BR/3.5BA Amazing custom home. Mstr on main, Huge reduction.385 South to Hwy 417, Left on Laurens Rd, Left on Curtis, Right on Howard, Left into SD, Right on Player, Left on Sycamore, Home on Right

5BR/4.5BA REDUCED! Gorgeous home w over 5300 finished SF! Open FP, granite counters, HW flrs, finished W/O Bsment, media room, backs to natural area. Community w lazy river pool and nature trails!!

4BR/2.5BA Well built Earl Gaulden contemporary has a lovely setting in a great neighborhood. .85 acres. Circular drive, extra parking.

Contact: Linda Brown 884-0966 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Pam McCartney 630-7844 Spaulding Group at Prudential C. Dan Joyner

36 THE Journal | JUNE 28, 2013

Contact: Ron McDaniel 979-6633 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

for more information

JournalHOMES.com


JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND GRAMLING HILL

O P E N S U N D AY, J U N E 3 0 F R O M 2 – 4 P M PEBBLE VALLEY

PEBBLE CREEK

216 CARBANDY DRIVE . $294,900 . MLS#1256048

14 BERNWOOD DRIVE . $269,500 . MLS#1261053

108 PEBBLE CREEK WAY . $250,000 . MLS#1257218

3BR/2.5BA This one has it all! Inground pool, sunroom, all appl, gas log fp, walk-in closet, all brick.Hwy 357 North, R on Holly Springs, L on New Cut Rd, R on Holston Creek Church Rd, L on Carbandy, Home on L

30 This custom, all-brick home is located in the Pebble Creek area in the Pebble Valley subdivision. The main level features hardwood floors, a built-in bookshelf in the foyer and a beautiful fireplace.

.42 Acres Large Cape Cod in desirable Pebble Creek. Spacious rooms with LR, DR, Eat-in Kitchen, Den w/ fireplace, bonus rm, 3 bdrms, 3.5 baths, .42 acre lot w/ wonderful outdoor living space, 2 car garage.

Contact: Sharon Calhoun 346-0821 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Mikel-Ann Scott 864-630-2474 Carol Pyfrom Realty

Contact: Kathy Harris (864) 201-9393 Coldwell Banker Caine

TUCKER BRANCH

PHEASANT HILL

MAPLEWOOD

33 DONEMERE WAY . $199,900 . MLS#1249245

426 LONGSPUR CT . $120,000 . MLS#1256520

426 MAPLEWOOD CIRCLE . $119,900 . MLS#1257131

3BR/2.5BA Craftsman style, Energy Star home. Upgrades & advanced technology. 385 S to Exit 23, Hwy 418. Go apprx. 1/2 mile and turn Left. Turn Right at light on S. Main, Go 1/2 mile & turn Left into SD

3BR/2.5BA District 5. Gorgeous 2 story home on culde-sac. Spacious kitchen with all appliances. I-85 North toward Spartanburg to Exit 63, turn Right on Hwy 290, go 2.5 miles , Turn Left on Veery Lane into SD

3BR/2BA Perfect location. Nice home. I-85 North to Exit 56, Left on Hwy 14, 1.6 miles Right on Hwy 80, 2.1 miles Left on Hwy 101, 1st Right on Maplewood Cir, Left on Maplewood Circle, Home on Left.

Contact: Kate Anderson/Kristin Brady 363-3634/908-7200 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Courtney Thompson 641-8655 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Bob Schmidt 313-4474 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

WHISPERING PINES

170 OAK HILL DR . $105,000 . MLS#1261404 3BR/2BA All brick ranch with large deck & separate wrkshp. Only 12 min. to downtown. From Downtown Gville, take Hwy 20 South, Pass under 185, 5th Street on Right is Oak Hill Dr. Open Sunday, June 30 6:00 p.m. Contact: Sharon Gillespie 553-9975 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

GLENLEA

SEARCH THE HOTTEST NEIGHBORHOODS.

19 MARAVISTA AVE . $88,500 . MLS#1254895 3BR/2.5BA Lovely townhome in great location. Open floor plan, large L & DR, laundry on 2nd floor, rear patio w/ storage room. Buncombe Rd to Duncan Chapel, Left on Montague, Left on Perthwood, Right on Maravista Contact: Scott Holtzclaw 884-6783 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

JournalHOMES.com JUNE 28, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 37


JOURNAL HOMES

R e a l e s tat e D i g e s t P e o P l e , Aw A r d s, H o n o r s.

Hamilton & Company Hosts Realtor Open House June 21.

Shop local. It Matters.

Brunch was provided by Chef Brian Sonoskus with Tupelo Honey.

BehindTheCounterONLINE.com

Custom Build – Renovations – Design

TURNING DREAMS I N T O R E A L I T Y Agents on call this weekend

SHELBY JORDAN 329-7811 PELHAM RD.

KIMBERLY ARNOLD 616-7310 SIMPSONVILLE

38 THE JOURNAL | JUNE 28, 2013

HOPE HAWKINS 567-6792 WOODRUFF RD.

JULIA DICKEY 879-4239 GREER

JOY STEVERSON 337-0625 PLEASANTBURG

REGINA L. SALLEY 979-9646 POWDERSVILLE

C111R

highlandhomessc.com – 864.233.4175

Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at cdanjoyner.com.

GINGER SHERMAN 313-8638 AUGUSTA RD.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

JournalHOMES.com


JOURNAL HOMES

PEOPL E, AWA RD S, HONOR S Coldwell Banker Caine Names Upstate’s Top Producers from May Coldwell Banker Caine recently recognized its top producing agents in property sales and listings from each of its offices. The top producing agents from each office are ranked by the total volume of business closed last month and include: • Easley: Carol Walsh, Susan McCoy, Melissa Hall • Greenville: Jacob Mann, Sharon Wilson, Virginia Abrams • Greer: Faith Ross, Charlene Panek, David Glenn • Seneca: Pat Loftis, Jere duBois, Reg Tatum • Spartanburg: Annette Starnes, Francie Little, Kaye McIntyre Top listing agents in each office are recognized for listing the highest total volume of residential properties last month and include: • Easley: Lori Brock, Susan McCoy, Kathy Gallamore • Greenville: Jacob Mann, Sharon Wilson, Helen Hagood • Greer: Alicia Waynick, Shelbie Dunn, Linda Wood • Seneca: Pat Loftis, Jere duBois, Connie Williams • Spartanburg: Francie Little, Annette Starnes, Beth Beach

Celebrating a

growing

team of REALTORS®

Coldwell Banker Caine Opens Fourth Real Estate Gallery Coldwell Banker Caine will host the grand opening celebration of its fourth Real Estate Gallery at 118 S. Pendleton St in Downtown Easley on Friday, June 21 at 5 pm.  Expanding on Coldwell Banker Caine’s strategy to better facilitate real estate research and activities as they happen, the Old Market Square Real Estate Gallery offers agents the technology and flexibility they need to conduct business, while on the go, paired with stylish interior design features.  This unique space has a technology bar – a signature feature of Coldwell Banker Caine Real Estate Galleries – with computers for agent use, and television systems strategically placed for viewing properties and displaying presentations.  Additionally, multiple conference rooms and sitting areas are available to accommodate agent and client meetings of all kinds.   “The way people look for homes, purchase properties and research new communities is changing,”  said Brad Halter, President of Coldwell Banker Caine and Coldwell Banker Commercial Caine, “and Coldwell Banker Caine is accommodating that new approach to real estate services while continuing to serve the folks of the Greater Greer community. We’re thrilled to continue to serve the Easley market in our new Real Estate Gallery at Old Market Square,”  Coldwell Banker Caine’s other Real Estate Galleries are located in Downtown Greenville at 428 S. Main Street, in Mauldin at 150 Tanner Road, Suite C and in Downtown Greer at 104 Trade St.

Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® Announces Top Producer Office Awards for May  Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® announced the Top Producer awards for May 2013. Top Producers for Listings: • Easley/Powdersville Office –Linda Ballard and Sheri Sanders Team • Garlington Road Office – Reba Mofrad and Donna O. Smith & Partners • Greer Office – Regina Kaminski and Jan Walker Team • Pleasantburg Office –  Bob Morgan and Brandt/Mullins Family Team • Simpsonville Office – Susan McMillen and June & John Cousins Team Top Producers for Sales: • Easley/Powdersville Office – Lisa Watson and Sheri Sanders Team • Garlington Road Office – David Hartness and Donna O. Smith & Partners • Greer Office – Paige Haney and Jan Walker Team • Pleasantburg Office –  Robbie Haney and The Chet & Beth Smith Group • Simpsonville Office – Susan McMillen and June & John Cousins Team  Top Producers Overall • Anderson Office – Holly Gunnels and The Clever People(Woodbury) • Garlington Road Office – David Hartness and Donna O. Smith & Partners • Greer Office – Paige Haney and Jan Walker Team • Pleasantburg Office – Robbie Haney and Chet and Beth Smith Group • Simpsonville Office – Susan McMillen and June & John Cousins Team • Pelham Road Office – Della Toates and Spaulding Group

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

by welcoming

Lynn Norman Coldwell Banker Caine proudly welcomes Lynn Norman to our Greenville team. Visit us online at cbcaine.com.

JUNE 28, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 39


journal Homes

R e a l E s tat e N e w s Foreign Home Buyers Continue to Identify U.S. as Profitable Investment, Realtors® Report

(June 24, 2013) – International home sales in the U.S. declined in the past year, but are at their second highest level in recent years and are over six percent of total existing-home sales in value. According to the National Association of Realtors® 2013 Profile of International Home Buying Activity, interest in U.S. properties continues to grow, signaling that America continues to be regarded by international buyers as a great place to own property.  The survey, which asked Realtors® to report their international business activity within the U.S. for the 12 months ending March 2013, showed that total international sales were $68.2 billion, down approximately $14 billion from the previous year. The decline is attributed to a number of temporary factors, including economic slowdowns in a number of major foreign economies, tighter U.S. credit standards and unfavorable exchange rates. Of total international transactions, $34.8 billion (51 percent) were attributed to foreign buyers with permanent residences outside the U.S. and $33.4 billion (49 percent) were attributed to buyers who are recent immigrants or temporary visa holders residing for more than six months in the U.S. “Foreign buyers are experiencing hurdles not only abroad, but also here in the U.S. when it comes to purchasing property,” said 2013 President of The Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® and Broker in charge of Keller Williams Realty in Greenville, SC, Bill Lawton. “Difficult economic conditions, particularly in Europe, have impacted foreign buyers, but several factors in the U.S. have also affected their purchasing power here. Tight credit standards have made financing challenging for immigrants, and low housing inventories have made finding a house difficult. However, none of these factors appear to be permanent.” Foreign buyers continue to have a substantial interest in U.S. properties. Over a five year time frame more than 70 percent of Realtors® reported a constant or increasing level in the number of international clients contacting them. “Realtors® provide international buyers with a significant advantage when purchasing property in the U.S. Realtors® who have earned NAR’s Certified International Property Specialist designation have received specialized training and are well prepared to service the international market,” said Lawton. Twenty-seven percent of Realtors® reported having worked with international clients this year. The most important factors influencing international clients’ purchases reported by Realtors® were that the U.S. is viewed as a desirable location and that the real estate market is regarded as a profitable investment. Realtors® reported purchases from 68 countries, but five have historically accounted for the bulk of purchases; Canada (23 percent), China (12 percent), Mexico (8 percent), India (5 percent) and the United Kingdom (5 percent). These five countries accounted for approximately 53 percent of transactions, with Canada and China the fastest growing sources over the years. Canadian buyers were reported to purchase properties with a median price of $183,000, with the majority purchased in Florida, Arizona and California. Chinese buyers tended to purchase property in the upper price ranges with a median price of $425,000 and typically in California. Sixty-two percent of Mexican buyers purchased property in California and Texas, with a median price of $156,250. International buyers tend to cluster in specific locations based on countries of origin, as well as several other factors. “Many factors influence foreign buyers’ decisions on where to purchase in the U.S., but the most important are proximity to home country, presence of relatives and friends, availability of job and education opportunities, and the climate,” said Lawton. “International buyers also differ on the type of desired property. Some are looking for trophy properties while others are interested in modest vacation homes.” Five states made up 61 percent of reported purchases; Florida (23 percent), California (17 percent), Arizona (9 percent), Texas (9 percent) and New York (3 percent). About half of foreign buyers preferred to purchase in a suburban area, while a quarter preferred a more central city/urban area. A majority purchased a detached single-family home and 63 percent used all-cash. Based on the reported international transactions, the mean and median prices of purchases were higher when compared to purchase prices of domestic buyers. For the 12 months ending March 2013 the median international home price was $275,862 and for domestic buyers it was $179,867. The types of homes purchased by international buyers frequently tended to be different from the types of homes purchased by domestic U.S. buyers. International buyers are more likely to be substantially wealthier and looking for a property in a specialized niche. The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing 1 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries. Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® represents over 1,600 members in all aspects of the real estate industry. Please visit the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® web site at www.ggar.com for real estate and consumer information. “Every market is different, call a REALTOR® today.”

40 THE Journal | JUNE 28, 2013

G r e e n v i l l e T R A N S AC T ION S june 3 - 7, 2 013 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$33,600,000 $3,366,500 $1,900,000 $1,790,000 $1,085,000 CLIFFS AT GLASSY $908,000 SPAULDING FARMS $685,000 MONTEBELLO $637,500 $630,000 THORNBLADE $630,000 $625,000 GARDENS AT THORNBLADE $600,000 $560,000 FOREST HILLS $559,000 JENKINS ESTATES SOUTHWEST $532,269 $512,000 $510,000 $499,000 THORNBLADE $490,000 RIVER WALK $482,500 CHANTICLEER TOWNS $467,500 TUXEDO PARK $449,235 COLONIAL ESTATES $445,500 HIGHGROVE $440,000 THE VALLEy@TANNER ESTATES $430,000 CLEVELAND PLACE $417,500 $413,000 RIVER WALK $395,000 RIVER WALK $377,000 BENNETTS CROSSING $375,000 $375,000 BLUE WATERS $356,000 VILLAGGIO DI MONTEBELLO $350,000 THE PLANTATION ON PELHAM $347,000 THE RIDGE AT SUNSET $345,000 LEAFMORE WOODS $343,500 HOLLAND TRACE $340,000 COTTAGES@RIVERWOOD FARM $340,000 BERKSHIRE PARK $335,000 NORTHGATE $323,000 $316,676 GOWER ESTATES $315,000 HOLLAND TRACE $313,300 RIVER DOWNS $310,000 HOLLY TRACE $309,000 KILGORE FARMS $306,000 CARSON’S POND $303,000 TRAXLER PARK $302,500 SOUTHBROOK $300,000 $300,000 HUNTERS LANDING $298,000 BOTANY WOODS $297,500 $289,900 PELHAM FALLS GREYSTONE AT NEELY FARMS $287,900 LAKE LANIER $280,000 MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS $279,990 CURETON CORNERS $279,900 TUSCANY FALLS $278,505 SUGAR CREEK $275,000 LINDEN PARK $267,500 WOODLAND CREEK $267,070 NEELY FARM - DEER SPRINGS $261,000 COLONIAL ESTATES $260,000 PARKVALE $260,000 $258,170 RESERVE@PLANTATION GREENE $255,900 $255,000 $252,500 BLACKBERRY FARM PELHAM FALLS $252,200 $251,014 WOODLAND CREEK WHITEHALL PLANTATION $250,500 $250,000 $250,000 VILLAGE OVERLOOK CREEKWOOD $248,000 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $246,900 DIXIE HEIGHTS $245,000 $245,000 HOLLINGTON $245,000 STRATFORD FOREST $245,000 THE PARK DOWNTOWN $243,900 FAIRWAY VIEW $242,500 TRAXLER PARK $242,500 MERRIFIELD PARK $240,000 KILGORE FARMS $240,000 PARK RIDGE $239,000 HOLLY TRACE $235,500 THE GARDENS@ROSE RESERVE $234,900 GRESHAM PARK $231,934 HOLLY TRACE $230,700 CROSSGATE AT REMINGTON $229,300 STONE LAKE HEIGHTS $227,000 DOVE TREE $226,500

BUYER

ADDRESS

MILLENNIUM PROPERTY LL L KBS LEGACY PARTNERS MILL 5141 CALIFORNIA AVE STE 100 BIG BLUE SKY I LLC SC TELCO FEDERAL CREDIT PO BOX 10708 CALFRAN PROPETIES S C GE ARC CVGVLSC001 LLC 106 YORK RD KRAUS PETER AILERON TR LLC 3048 N THOMPSON LN CONCORD LAND & DEVELOPM CHICK-FIL-A INC 5200 BUFFINGTON RD COTHRAN JOHN C BARTLETT EILEEN M 85 THE CLIFFS PKWY SCHEMM MARTHA J ALEXANDER KIMBERLY ANNE 530 SPAULDING FARM RD MCGEHEE JEFFERSON J (JTW MEREDITH DONALD R JR (JT 1 MONET DR RUNGE CHILDREN TRUST ADAMS CRAIG J 232 WOODLAND WAY BERNHARDT LINDSEY TRUSTE MEADE RICHARD F (JTWROS) 408 THORNBLADE BLVD MCDONALD JAY MATTHEW (JT KIRBY MARK C 31 PINCKNEY ST GALLANT STEPHEN G MAYNTZ FRED G (JTWROS) 63 LATOUR WAY TERRY JOHN D JR SMITH ERIC NELSON 108 AUGUSTA CT SMITH ANGELA MARIE (JTWR JONES PRESTON A JR (JTWR 105 E LANNEAU DR CHAPMAN DANIEL FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG 14221 DALLAS PKWY STE 100 SMITH KATHERINE G BROWN HELEN M (JTWROS) 21 W TALLULAH DR GAFFNEY RANETTE M HARRILL E DIXON JR (JTWR 1 LA VISTA CT GODFREY JANELLE BREWER CHARLES H JR (JTW 2058 CLEVELAND ST EXT DEMBO DAVID M DIAL JULIAN SYDNEY III ( 1211 THORNBLADE BLVD HEARD AIMEE P STICKLER DWAYNE (SURV) 208 RIVER WALK CT FLINT CORT R JR DENNIS JOHN D 217 HIDDEN HILLS DR BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT BRACALL BRENNA L 112 MURDOCK LN RUGGIERI JEFFREY MILLER MATTHEW A (SURV) 27 TIMROD WAY MCBRIDE ELKE MOHOMMAD SHARDA (JTWROS) 237 HIGHGROVE CT BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT SETZER DIANA G (JTWROS) 5 ABBY CIR BEAUDROT MARTHA T CLYATT CLARENCE R JR (JT 6 LANDSDOWN AVE DAVIS NANCY CAROLINE KIG POE NELSON C III 21 HARCOURT DR ROLLISON FRED N WHITE WILLIAM M 106 GILDERVIEW DR RISH JEFFREY L WITHERSPOON JOHN ALAN (S 223 RIVER WALK BLVD VILLAVERDE ERICA K PALMER ANNE M (JTWROS) 104 BENNETTS CROSSING CT EGW PROPERTIES LLC K O B ENTERPRISES LLC PO BOX 27049 KREBS ERIC O BLACKMON JANTZEN (JTWROS 211 BALLYHOO CT BARRETT JASON T SPRADLIN W DUANE 224 LUCCA DR WILLIAMS ANDREA B KUMAR ANISHA (JTWROS) 14 KENSINGTON RD J G RESOURCES LLC TMG LAND COMPANY LLC N/O/D BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT SPEIGHTS ALVELES (JTWROS 19 LEAFMORE CT PASKVAN CHRISTIAAN ROLAND STACY S 111 HOLLAND TRACE CIR GREIN JOSHUA J SAINZ DANIELA P (JTWROS) 108 ALDGATE WAY ROSS BETTY B WHITSON PETER (JTWROS) 10 ELLINGTON CT BATEMAN MATTHEW (JTWROS) PERPALL ELIZABETH A (JTW 37 N AVONDALE DR SYNOVUS BANK CRIMSON HIGHWAY 25 LLC 4675 MACARTHUR CT STE 1550 JONES MARY LOWE SEAVER DAVID K (JTWROS) PO BOX 8380 KIRKUS JASON B MIZZELL JESSICA A 102 HOLLAND TRACE CIR ALTON SCOTT P (SURV) BONINI ERIC R 100 DARTMOOR DR FARRA DEIDRE S ROGERS CHARLES BRITT JR 201 HOLLY CREST CIR GHETIE CRISTIAN N HOLBROOK BRANDON A (JTWR 5 PETER BROOK CT MEADOWS CHRISTOPHER T STONE LORI L (JTWROS) 121 CARSONS POND DR PERRIN NEILL M OLES DOUG (JTWROS) 36 MOUNT VISTA AVE PRITCHETT LAWRENCE F FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG PO BOX 650043 CASHMAN JEFFREY P (JTWRO GADD-LANE ROBIN M (JTWRO 7 HUNLEY LN COBBLESTONE HOMES LLC BUCKLEY JUDITH L 141 EMMA BRYANT WAY MARTIN KELLY P JR MERCIER KERRI G (JTWROS) 8 SOUTHWICK LN MARSHALL ALAN R COLE ELIZABETH T 465 RIVER WAY DR MARETT ERICA J MALONE KRISTIN G 412 WORCHESTER PL MCGAHEE BORDEN B PARNES DIANA B (SURV) 616 OTIS BLVD NVR INC BAYRON JOAN 200 RIO GRANDE PL JOHNSTON A E III TRUSTEE FIEVET CHARLES J (JTWROS PO BOX 1010 S C PILLON HOMES INC JAMES JENNIFER A (JTWROS 111 VERSILIA LN WIENOLD MICHAEL P TRUSTE KELKER JENNIFER SLOANE 105 SUN MEADOW RD BROWN NANCY W FOSTER ANDREW P III (JTW 23 WORTHINGTON CT NVR INC PEREZ ISMEL 30 PATEWOOD DR STE 257 MCCALLUM MARTEL A SCOTT PAULA M 6 BRAYWOOD CT COMPTON GLORIA J MELLARD AMANDA ANDERSON 3 CHISOLM TRL CHASE RYAN E BATSON RYAN J (JTWROS) 225 SUMMIT DR MCCUEN WILLIAM G REVOCAB PRINCESS HOLDING CO INC 329 S MAIN ST GREENE VILLAS LLC MILLER ELIZABETH ANN 64 BARNWOOD CIR ESCHINGER GERALDINE D GAGE PROPERTIES LLC 74 GRIFFITH CREEK DR AUSTIN NORMAN K (JTWROS) BERGLUND HUGH 812 BRIELLE CT GAMBINO SUZANNE HELEN L BERRETH BLAKE I (JTWROS) 141 CIRCLE RD NVR INC ROSE DOUGLAS 221 MEADOW ROSE DR LOGAN DEBORAH WEBB JUSTIN P (JTWROS) 107 WYNTERHALL DR MAYS LEANNA BATES GUINN MARTHA JOAN 153 FALL CREEK RD SRJ TIMBERLANDS LLC URBANA CLIFFS RE LLC 5420 LBJ FREEWAY STE 1000 DEVINE PATRICIA S (JTWRO LYNCH BETHANY A (JTWROS) 274 MEADOW BLOSSOM WAY ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC REECE MICHELLE R 206 ASHLER DR CRAWFORD JOSEPH O GARCIA ANDRES 33 STATION CT APT 410 LOCATION CUBED INC CASSIDY ROBERT G (JTWROS 301 HAVILAND AVE JAHANBAKHSH BABA AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR 23815 STUART RANCH STE 302 EPPES CHARLES W JR DUFFIELD JAMES C 15 S WARWICK RD PATTERSON KATHRYN H BARTON CAROL J (JTWROS) 204 E PARK AVE UNIT 102 SCHOLZ INGE UNIVERSAL ANDREW C (JTWR 6 GOLF VIEW LN SHRUM SIDNEY J SMITH KATHERINE GLENN 31 ROCK CREEK DR KOELBL CHRISTIAN JOY O ( HERON FRANCES MANNING 121 SEABURY DR FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG CZARNIECKI BLAIRE 1101 DOWNS BLVD APT 116 REMBREY CONSTRUCTION & MANN BRYAN A (JTWROS) 8 CABRINI CT LANPHERE KRISTINE S KERKO CHRISTOPHER J (JTW 315 CIRCLE SLOPE DR ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC FISHER CANDICE L (JTWROS 717 RAVEL CT EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL NELSON ELISHA R 1 CARTER RUN CT RESIDENTIAL ASSET SECURI KALMYK SYITLANA 112 CIRCLE SLOPE DR D R HORTON INC STEWART ANGELA M 107 KINGS HEATH LN GRAVLEE CAROL G (L-EST) LONG MARY FRANCES 120 TWIN LAKE RD FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA MOTZ CHRISTINA 1 ROSEBAY DR

for more information

JournalHOMES.com


journal Homes re atu n g Si

re atu n g Si

26 Donatello Ct. - Montebello $2,790,000 • 1261438 • 5 BR/5FL & 2HF BA Unbelievable in town estate on 4.5 acres of immaculate grounds. Top of the line details and exquisite finishes. You must see to believe!! Nancy McCrory 864.505.8367 Karen Turpin 864.230.5176

e tur na g i S

$1,050,000 1261096

re atu n g Si

Office bldg conversion to this one of a kind residence 2850 SF, 3BA/2BA, 2 car garage, balcony, roof top terrace. No regime or parking fee.

116 Ridge Glen - Harrison Hills

re atu n g Si

102 Veronese Dr. - Montebello

$895,000 • 1252670 • 4 BR/3.5 BA

Valerie Miller 864.430.6602

8 Acre Estate includes 5 car garage w/2 BR. 1.5 BA apartment, 2 story barn and salt water pool Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 Chuck Miller 864.293.4778

25 S. Laurens St. - Downtown e tur na g i S

Lot re c A

$749,000 • 1261495 • 5 BR/4.5 BA Custom home w/amazing quality features, architectural detail & prof. landscaped yard. Gourmet kitchen, granite, fresh paint, new carpet & refinished hdwds

Nancy McCrory 864.505.8367 Karen Turpin 864.230.5176

m sto Cu

3080 Earls Bridge Rd. - Easley

8255 Geer Highway - Cleveland

109 Shadowood Dr. - Shadowood

106 Wren Way - Swangate

$499,900 • 1237373 • 4 BR/3.5 BA

$439,000 • 1250926 • 3 BR/2 BA

$335,000 • 1258892 • 4 BR/3.5 BA + Bonus

$299,000 • 1250156 • 2 BR/2 BA +office

Mini Estate, 3500 sf w/two MBR suites on 2.20 ac, 3 lvl-4600 sf barn. Great features with many updates Anne Marchant 864.420.0009 Jolene Wimberly 864. 414.1688

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g tin Lis

Caesars Head, $150K Reduction, Great views, 3200 ft elevation Tom Marchant 864.449.1658

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All brick on pvt, wooded acre lot! Fresh interior paint and updated lighting. 3rd flr can be Kid/ teen area w/1BR,1BA & Bonus Barb Riggs 864.423.2783

g tin Lis

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g tin Lis

10 Brook Run Ct. - Neely Farm

1511 E. North St. - N. East St. Area

311 Driftwood Dr. - Piedmont

$275,000 • 1261196 • 4 BR/2.5 BA + Bonus

$224,900 • 1261043 • 3 BR/1.5 BA

$219,900 • 1261395 • 3 BR/3FL & 2HF BA

Incredible home on quiet cul-de-sac offering cathedral ceilings, wooded fenced backyard, scrn porch & deck. New carpet throughout & hdwds downstairs.

Barb Riggs 864.423.2783

es nc a i l pp wA Ne

Lovely renovated home, mins to d’town. Unfinished basement. New detached 2-car garage & AC unit. C-1 zoning, Rental potential! James Akers 864.325.8413

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ce Pri

503 Westbury Way - The Brooks

128 A & B Hyde Cr. - Maudlin

$144,900 • 1260475 • 4 BR/2.5 BA

$111,921 • 1236205 • 4 BR/2 BA

Fannie Mae owned. Part of Autumn Woods community w/amenities. Convenient to Fairview Rd. New electric appliances, paint and carpet. Kathy Slayter 864.982.7772

Lrg home w/lower level offers tons of space. Deck off MBR, scrn porch, partial fenced yard, lrg workshop, 5 bay detached garage! James Akers 864.325.8413

Completely redone duplex inside and out. Income producing of $1325 Joan Rapp 864.901.3839

212 S. Woodgreen Way - Rolling Green Village $69,900 • 1250650 • 2 BR/2 BA

Great sunny floor plan includes a Florida room and dining room w/hardwood flrs. New updates include ss appliances, carpet in BR & fresh paint throughout

Anne Marchant 864.420.0009 Jolene Wimberly 864. 414.1688

Great floor plan, hardwood floors, deck, ≈2500 SF Tom Marchant 864.449.1658

n tio oca L at Gre

101 Ramblewood Ave. - Midtown $179,500 • 1250944 • 3 BR/2 BA

Well maintained in super location! Lrg corner lot on cul-de-sac. Hardwood floors, tile baths. Mins from d’town Greenville, FAC, BJU, shopping. Mary Praytor 864.593.0366

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5 Fairhope Ln. - Hidden Ridge $51,000 • 1261907 • 3 BR/2 BA

Fannie Mae owned. Great for first time buyer or student. Located adjacent to the back gate of Furman University Kathy Slayter 864.982.7772

RENTAL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE • Marchantpm.com

www.marchantco.com

special to the journal

|

864.467.0085 | AGENT ON DUTY: Chuck Miller 864.293.4778

J53

Decades of Trust. Confidence in the Future. JUNE 28, 2013 | The Journal 41


journal culture

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA LEGAL NOTICES ONLY $.79 PER LINE • ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION ONLY $145 TEL 864.679.1205 • FAX 864.679.1305 • EMAIL aharley@communityjournals.com

PUBLIC HEARING A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, JULY 16, 2013, AT 6:00 P.M. (or at such time thereafter as other public hearings are concluded), IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC 29601, FOR THE PURPOSE OF RECEIVING COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC REGARDING A REQUEST TO TRANSFER THE OWNERSHIP OF A SURPLUS RIGHT OF

WAY ADJACENT TO MARION STREET / CAMDEN DRIVE TO THE ADJOINING PROPERTY OWNERS (REFERENCED TO AS TMS# WG06030200800). THE PORTION TO BE TRANSFERRED WAS DEEDED TO GREENVILLE COUNTY ON MARCH 6, 1953 PER DEED BOOK 473, PAGE 523 BUT WAS NEVER BUILT UPON. BOB TAYLOR, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that OHouse, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 1143 Woodruff Rd., Suite G, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than June 30, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that MLJG,LLC dba Bubbly A Dry Bar, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 20 West McBee Ave., Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this license/ permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than June 30, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 715 Howard Street, Landrum , SC 29356. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 7, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 100 Middleton Way, Greer, SC 29650. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 14, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that White Horse Social Club, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 6119 White Horse Road Ste 15, Greenville, SC 29611. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 7, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that CPR BURGER, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1025 WOODRUFF ROAD STE D-101, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 7, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 800 Fairview Street, Fountain Inn, SC 29644. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 7, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 324 S. Line Street, Greer, SC 29651. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 14, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Empire Spirits, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1618 and 1620 Augusta Street, Greenville, SC 29605. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 14, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 6726 Augusta Road, Greenville, SC 29605. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 7, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 701 Mauldin Road, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 7, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 1904 Gap Creek Rd., Greer, SC 29651. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 14, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 400 Sulphur Springs Road, Greenville, SC 29617. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 7, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 6008 White Horse Road, Greenville, SC 29611. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 7, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that C and T Wines, LLC DBA/ Vino’s Etc., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON AND OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 500 East McBee Avenue, Suite 103 and 104, Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 7, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 5301 Old Augusta Road, Greenville, SC 29605. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than July 7, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

42 THE Journal | JUNE 28, 2013

NOTICE COUNTY OF GREENVILLE 2012-CP-23-06389 Mr. Tech Safety, Inc., Plaintiff, vs- Barney Ray Shorter and Crane Training Group, LLC, Defendants. TO: BARNEY RAY SHORTER, DEFENDANT: PLEASE TAKE NOTICE the said Barney Ray Shorter’s whereabouts being unknown, service is hereby effected upon you by publication of the Summons hereinabove set forth, wherein Mr. Tech Safety, Inc., by his Complaint, seeks relief from the said Defendant. The original Summons and Complaint was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, on October 5, 2012. PRUITT & PRUITT J. Calhoun Pruitt, Jr. Attorney for the Plaintiff 101 North Murray Avenue Anderson, SC 29625 June 14, 2013 (864)224-3121

PUBLIC HEARING A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, JULY 16, 2013, AT 6:00 P.M., (or as soon thereafter as other public hearings are concluded), IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC, 29601, FOR THE PURPOSE OF DETERMINING WHETHER THE BOUNDARIES OF THE GREATER GREENVILLE SANITATION DISTRICT SHOULD BE ENLARGED TO INCLUDE CERTAIN PROPERTIES LOCATED OFF OF W. MOUNTAIN CREEK CHURCH ROAD, EAST LEE ROAD, HARTSVILLE DRIVE, BALD ROCK DRIVE, AND ALTAMONT ROAD FOR THE PURPOSE OF ORDERLY COLLECTING AND DISPOSAL OF REFUSE, GARBAGE AND TRASH WITHIN GREENVILLE COUNTY. THE NEW BOUNDARY LINES TO RESULT FOR THE GREATER GREENVILLE SANITATION DISTRICT WOULD INCLUDE: A. THAT CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY LOCATED OFF OF W. MOUNTAIN CREEK CHURCH ROAD DESCRIBED AS GREENVILLE COUNTY TAX MAP NUMBERS (TMS#) P036000100900, P 0 3 6 0 0 0 1 0 1 3 0 0 , P036000101307, AND P036000101309; B. THAT CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY LOCATED OFF OF E. LEE ROAD DESCRIBED AS GREENVILLE COUNTY TAX MAP NUMBER (TMS#) T031000302300; C. THAT CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY LOCATED OFF OF HARTSVILLE DRIVE DESCRIBED AS GREENVILLE COUNTY TAX MAP NUMBER (TMS#) T031000320300; D. THAT CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY LOCATED OFF OF BALD ROCK DRIVE DESCRIBED AS GREENVILLE COUNTY TAX MAP NUMBER (TMS#) 0465000100207; AND E. THAT CERTAIN REAL PROPERTY LOCATED OFF OF ALTAMONT ROAD DESCRIBED AS GREENVILLE COUNTY TAX MAP NUMBER (TMS#) 0462000100704. A MAP OF THE NEW BOUNDARIES AND LEGAL DESCRIPTIONS ARE AVAILABLE IN THE COUNTY COUNCIL OFFICE. THE REASON FOR THE PROPOSED ENLARGEMENT IS TO PROVIDE FOR THE ORDERLY COLLECTION AND DISPOSAL OF REFUSE. NO ADDITIONAL BONDS WILL BE ISSUED BY THE DISTRICT, NOR WILL THERE BE ANY CHANGE IN THE COMMISSION OR IN THE PERSONNEL OF THE PRESENT COMMISSION OF THE GREATER GREENVILLE SANITATION DISTRICT. BOB TAYLOR, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

SUMMONS FOR RELIEF STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS 2012-CP-23-06389 Mr. Tech Safety, Inc., Plaintiff, vs- Barney Ray Shorter and Crane Training Group, LLC, Defendants. TO THE DEFENDANT ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, of which a copy is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Plaintiff on the subscribers at their office at 101 North Murray Avenue, Anderson, South Carolina, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service; and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, the Plaintiff, Mr. Tech Safety, Inc., in this action, will apply to the Court for the said relief demanded in the Complaint. PRUITT & PRUITT J. Calhoun Pruitt, Jr. Attorney for the Plaintiff 101 North Murray Avenue Anderson, SC 29625 (864) 224-3121 June 14, 2013

SUMMONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, COUNTY OF LAURENS IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS CASE NO.: 2013-CPWHITNEY BOOKER, Plaintiff, v. RAISHA COHEN, Defendant. TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVENAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your answer to the said Complaint on the subscriber at his office at 112 Wakefield Street, P.O. Box 10496, Greenville, South Carolina 29601 within thirty days (30) after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service; and, if you fail to appear and defend by filing an answer to the Complaint within the time aforesaid, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Respectfully submitted, FLETCHER N. SMITH, JR., Attorney at Law 112 Wakefield Street (29601) Post Office Box 10496, F.S., Greenville, South Carolina 29603 LAURENS, South Carolina Dated: Monday, March 25, 2013

PUBLIC HEARING A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, JULY 16, 2013, AT 6:00 P.M. (or at such time as other public hearings are concluded) IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC, 29601, FOR THE PURPOSE OF RECEIVING PUBLIC COMMENTS IN REGARDS TO THE DONALDSON FIRE SERVICE AREA OPERATIONAL BUDGET AND MILLAGE LEVY FOR THE TAX YEAR 20132014; AND TO PROVIDE FOR THE EXPENDITURES OF THE REVENUES RECEIVED BY THE DONALDSON FIRE SERVICE AREA DURING THE TAX YEAR. THE DONALDSON FIRE SERVICE AREA BOARD HAS REQUESTED THAT GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL APPROVE THE MAINTENANCE OF THE DONALDSON FIRE SERVICE AREA’S MILLAGE OF FIFTYONE AND SIX-TENTHS (51.6) MILLS FOR OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE. THE REQUEST OF THE DONALDSON FIRE SERVICE AREA BOARD REPRESENTS NO INCREASE FROM LAST YEAR’S AD VALOREM PROPERTY TAX MILLAGE LEVY FOR OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE. BOB TAYLOR, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL


journal culture

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

PUBLIC HEARING A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, JULY 16, 2013, AT 6:00 P.M., (or as soon thereafter as other public hearings are concluded), IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC, 29601, FOR THE PURPOSE OF DETERMINING WHETHER THE BOUNDARIES OF THE GREATER GREENVILLE SANITATION DISTRICT SHOULD BE ENLARGED TO INCLUDE CERTAIN PROPERTIES LOCATED IN THE DEL NORTE SUBDIVISION FOR THE PURPOSE OF ORDERLY COLLECTING AND DISPOSAL OF REFUSE, GARBAGE AND TRASH WITHIN GREENVILLE COUNTY. THE NEW BOUNDARY LINES TO RESULT FOR THE GREATER GREENVILLE SANITATION DISTRICT WOULD INCLUDE: THOSE AREAS IN THE DEL NORTE DESCRIBED AS GREENVILLE COUNTY TAX MAP NUMBERS (“TMS#”) 0538010102200 0538090104800 0538090109800 0538090114900 0538100119800 0538010102304 0538090104900 0538090109900 0538090115000 0538100119900 0538010103202 0538090105000 0538090110000 0538090115100 0538100120000 0538010115700 0538090105100 0538090110100 0538090115200 0538100120100 0538020101000 0538090105200 0538090110200 0538090115300 0538100120200 0538040100505 0538090105300 0538090110300 0538090115400 0538100120300 0538090100100 0538090105400 0538090110400 0538090115500 0538100120400 0538090100200 0538090105500 0538090110500 0538090115600 0538100120500 0538090100300 0538090105600 0538090110600 0538090115700 0538100120600 0538090100400 0538090105700 0538090110700 0538090115800 0538100120700 0538090100500 0538090105800 0538090110800 0538090115900 0538100120800 0538090100600 0538090105900 0538090110900 0538090116000 0538100120900 0538090100700 0538090106000 0538090111000 0538090116100 0538100121000 0538090100800 0538090106100 0538090111100 0538090116200 0538100121100 0538090100900 0538090106200 0538090111200 0538090116300 0538100121200 0538090101000 0538090106300 0538090111300 0538090116400 0538100121300

0538090101100 0538090106400 0538090111400 0538090116500 0538100121400 0538090101200 0538090106500 0538090111500 0538090116600 0538100121500 0538090101300 0538090106600 0538090111600 0538090116700 0538100121600 0538090101400 0538090106700 0538090111700 0538090116800 0538100121700 0538090101500 0538090106800 0538090111800 0538090116900 0538100121800 0538090101600 0538090106900 0538090111900 0538090117000 0538100121900 0538090101700 0538090107000 0538090112000 0538090117100 0538100122000 0538090101800 0538090107100 0538090112100 0538090117200 0538100122100 0538090101900 0538090107200 0538090112200 0538090117300 0538100122200 0538090102000 0538090107300 0538090112300 0538090117400 0538100122300 0538090102100 0538090107400 0538090112400 0538090117500 0538100122400 0538090102200 0538090107500 0538090112500 0538090117600 0538100122500 0538090102300 0538090107600 0538090112600 0538090117700 0538100122600 0538090102400 0538090107700 0538090112700 0538090117800 0538100122700 0538090102500 0538090107800 0538090112800 0538090117900 0538100122800 0538090102600 0538090107900 0538090112900 0538090118000 0538100122900 0538090103100 0538090108000 0538090113000 0538090118100 0538100123000 0538090103200 0538090108100 0538090113100 0538090118500 0538100123100 0538090103300 0538090108200 0538090113200 0538100118200 0538100123200 0538090103400 0538090108300 0538090113300 0538100118300 0538100123300 0538090103500 0538090108400 0538090113400 0538100118400 0538100123400 0538090103600 0538090108500 0538090113500 0538100118500 0538100123500 0538090103700 0538090108600 0538090113600

0538100118600 0538100123600 0538090103800 0538090108700 0538090113700 0538100118700 0538100123700 0538090103900 0538090108800 0538090113800 0538100118800 0538100123800 0538090104000 0538090108900 0538090113900 0538100118900 0538100123900 0538090104100 0538090109000 0538090114100 0538100119000 0538100124000 0538090104101 0538090109100 0538090114200 0538100119100 0538100124100 0538090104200 0538090109200 0538090114300 0538100119200 0538100124200 0538090104300 0538090109300 0538090114400 0538100119300 0538100124300 0538090104400 0538090109400 0538090114500 0538100119400 0538100124400 0538090104500 0538090109500 0538090114600 0538100119500 0538100124500 0538090104600 0538090109600 0538090114700 0538100119600 0538100124600 0538090104700 0538090109700 0538090114800 0538100119700 0538100124700 0538100124800 0538100130800 0538100137700 0538110101400 0538110106400 0538100124900 0538100130900 0538100137800 0538110101500 0538110106500 0538100125000 0538100132700 0538100137900 0538110101600 0538110106600 0538100125100 0538100132800 0538100138000 0538110101700 0538110106700 0538100125200 0538100132900 0538100138100 0538110101800 0538110106800 0538100125300 0538100133000 0538100138200 0538110101900 0538110106900 0538100125400 0538100133100 0538100138300 0538110102000 0538110107000 0538100125500 0538100133200 0538100138400 0538110102100 0538110107100 0538100125600 0538100133300 0538100138500 0538110102200 0538110107200 0538100125700 0538100133400 0538100138600 0538110102300 0538110107300 0538100125800 0538100133500 0538100138700 0538110102400 0538110107400 0538100125900

0538100133600 0538100138800 0538110102500 0538110107500 0538100126000 0538100133700 0538100138900 0538110102600 0538110107600 0538100126100 0538100133800 0538100139000 0538110102700 0538130100100 0538100126200 0538100133900 0538100139100 0538110102800 0538130100102 0538100126300 0538100134000 0538100139200 0538110102900 0538130100300 0538100126400 0538100134100 0538100139300 0538110103000 0538130100600 0538100126500 0538100134200 0538100139400 0538110103100 0538130100700 0538100126600 0538100134300 0538100139500 0538110103200 0538130100800 0538100126700 0538100134400 0538100139600 0538110103300 0538130100900 0538100126800 0538100134500 0538100139700 0538110103400 0538130101000 0538100126900 0538100134600 0538100139800 0538110103500 0538130101100 0538100127000 0538100134700 0538100139900 0538110103600 0538130101200 0538100127100 0538100134800 0538100140000 0538110103700 0538130101300 0538100127200 0538100134900 0538100140100 0538110103800 0538130101400 0538100127300 0538100135000 0538100140200 0538110103900 0538130101500 0538100127900 0538100135100 0538100140300 0538110104000 0538130101600 0538100128000 0538100135200 0538100140400 0538110104100 0538130101700 0538100128100 0538100135300 0538100140500 0538110104200 0538130101800 0538100128200 0538100135400 0538100140600 0538110104300 0538130101900 0538100128300 0538100135500 0538100140700 0538110104400 0538130102000 0538100128700 0538100135800 0538100140800 0538110104500 0538130102100 0538100128900 0538100135901 0538100140900 0538110104600 0538130102200 0538100129000 0538100136000 0538100141000 0538110104700 0538130102300 0538100129100 0538100136100 0538100141100 0538110104800 0538130102401 0538100129200 0538100136200 0538100141200 0538110104900 0538130102500 0538100129300 0538100136300 0538100141300

0538110105000 0538130102600 0538100129400 0538100136400 0538110100100 0538110105100 0538130102700 0538100129500 0538100136500 0538110100200 0538110105200 0538130102800 0538100129600 0538100136600 0538110100300 0538110105300 0538130102900 0538100129700 0538100136700 0538110100400 0538110105400 0538130103000 0538100129800 0538100136800 0538110100500 0538110105500 0538130103100 0538100129900 0538100136900 0538110100600 0538110105600 0538130103200 0538100130000 0538100137000 0538110100700 0538110105700 0538130103300 0538100130200 0538100137100 0538110100800 0538110105800 0538130103400 0538100130300 0538100137200 0538110100900 0538110105900 0538130103500 0538100130400 0538100137300 0538110101000 0538110106000 0538130103600 0538100130500 0538100137400 0538110101100 0538110106100 0538130103700 0538100130600 0538100137500 0538110101200 0538110106200 0538130103800 0538100130700 0538100137600 0538110101300 0538110106300 0538130103900 0538130104000 0538130104100 0538130104200 0538130104300 0538130104400 0538130104500 0538130104600 0538130104700 0538130104900 0538130105000 0538130105100 0538130105300 0538130105400 0538130105500 0538130105600 0538130105700 0538130105800 0538130106000 0538130106100 0538130106200 0538130106300 0538130106400 0538130106500 0538130106600 0538130106700 0538130106800 0538130106900 0538130107000 0538130107100 0538130107200 0538130107300 0538130107400 0538130107500 0538130107600 0538130107700 0538130107800 0538130107900 0538130108000 0538130108100 A MAP OF THE NEW BOUNDARIES AND LEGAL DESCRIPTIONS ARE AVAILABLE IN THE COUNTY COUNCIL OFFICE. THE REASON FOR THE PROPOSED ENLARGEMENT IS TO PROVIDE FOR THE ORDERLY COLLECTION AND DISPOSAL OF REFUSE. NO ADDITIONAL BONDS WILL BE ISSUED BY THE DISTRICT, NOR WILL THERE BE ANY CHANGE IN THE COMMISSION OR IN THE PERSONNEL OF THE PRESENT COMMISSION OF THE GREATER GREENVILLE SANITATION DISTRICT. BOB TAYLOR, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

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journal culture

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week

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44 THE Journal | JUNE 28, 2013

St. Anthony of Padua School celebrated the arts recently with an Arts Festival. As part of the day, local artist Charles Pate visited the school for an artist talk and demonstration with students and teachers.


journal culture

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week

Golfers get ready to head out onto the course at the Preserve at Verdae for the start of the Junior Achievement Golf Tournament.

The first-place winners of the Junior Achievement Golf Tournament held at the Preserve at Verdae, TTI company.

The second-place winners of the Junior Achievement Golf Tournament, Team Geico.

On June 17, the South Carolina Governor’s School for Science and Mathematics, in partnership with the Greenville County School District, kicked off two weeks of iTEAMS camps for Greenville County students. iTEAMS, being held June 17-20 and June 24-27 at Hughes Academy of Science and Technology, is a day camp for rising seventh-, eighth- and ninth-graders who have an interest in technology and entrepreneurship. iTEAMS, or “Innovation, Technology & Entrepreneurship Among Middle Schoolers,” is a four-day camp hosted by GSSM in partnership with districts across the state at no cost to campers.

Crossword puzzle: page 46

Sudoku puzzle: page 46

JUNE 28, 2013 | THE Journal 45


journal culture Martha Franks Baptist Retirement Community Laurens, South Carolina

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www.bellcleaners.com 46 THE Journal | JUNE 28, 2013

Across 1 Sixth-day creation 5 Iraqi port 10 Exchange 14 Supermodel with a Global Chic collection 18 Jared of “Lonely Hearts” 19 Places of worship 21 Kent State state 22 Upscale 23 11-part documentary with the episodes “Caves” and “Deserts” 25 Lopsided win 26 Trumpeter, e.g. 27 Motorcade wheels 28 Flea market transactions 30 Meager 32 Happy outdoorsman? 34 Grafton’s “__ for Malice” 35 “The Little Sparrow” 36 “My Cousin Vinny” Oscar winner 37 “Peanuts” Halloween setting 42 E. African land 44 Year-span separator 47 After-dinner drink 48 Noodlehead 49 Quaint writer 51 Despondency 53 Personal quirk 54 Resort NE of Los Alamos 55 __ Reader: eclectic magazine

56 “Beats me!” 58 Fancy pillowcase 61 Blast cause 62 “Let __!”: “Move on!” 63 Power dept. 64 __-pah band 66 Personal ltrs. 68 Yamaha seat, perhaps 71 It can help you put on a coat 75 Italian fashion center 76 Get takeout, say 78 “Bus Stop” playwright 79 Visiting the Getty Center, briefly 80 Turkish honorific 82 NASA hire 84 Landing strip 86 Britney’s ex, in tabloids 87 Long lunches 89 Schlep 91 “... farm, __” 92 Aptly named novelist 93 “Dust Tracks on __”: Zora Neale Hurston autobiography 95 Apple product 97 Bank ad number 99 El Al home: Abbr. 100 Soapbox delivery 103 Humidor item 105 Radio host John 106 __ Balls: Hostess snack food 107 1942 Cooper role 109 Hospitality 112 From now on 114 Iron target 118 Berry touted as a

superfood 119 Org. with part of a prominent statue in its logo 121 Fruity pastry 123 It may be ear-to-ear 124 Wild way to run 125 Doddering 126 Sussex streetcar 127 Dover delicacy 128 Breadbasket bunch 129 Parts of goblets 130 It often takes place in a bar

Down 1 Skier’s mecca 2 Editing mark 3 Hardly at all 4 Rainier’s locale 5 Cricket players 6 Bass in a glass 7 It may be glassy 8 Less common 9 Dance and such 10 Touchy subject 11 Villagers below Mount Crumpit 12 Goal 13 Visits on a whim 14 “Believe you me!” 15 Cut 16 Constitutional subj.? 17 Abbr. on Manhattan mail 20 SeaWorld headliner 24 Tooth coating 29 Tired 31 They may be used for

emphasis 33 Hybrid language 35 A former ace might be one 36 Doohickey 37 Sound unit 38 Reality TV matriarch Jenner

Medium

39 Ethical complaint 40 “Hurry!” 41 Olympics city, e.g. 42 Furnish 43 Everyone, in orchestral scores 45 Noted Mayflower passenger

46 Origin 50 “Spanglish” actress Téa 52 Phone button sequence 57 Alley in comics 59 Pay (up) 60 Will Smith film series, briefly 63 “Personal Witness: Israel Through My Eyes” author 65 Injured badly 67 Playground ride 69 Grand __ Opry 70 Bowler, for one 72 Lead __: EPA concern 73 Flexible Flyers, e.g. 74 Recent “SNL” regular Bill 77 Inventor’s monogram 80 Urgent acronym 81 Trusted adviser 83 College hoops coach with 876 victories 85 Really funny 88 Grueling workplace 90 Freaks out 92 Capital west of Winnipeg 94 Downsizing event? 96 Turn down 98 Cross words 101 Note in a D major scale 102 Free stuff 104 Will Smith’s role in 60-Down 107 Weight room sound 108 “__ Meenie”: Kingston/Bieber song 109 Wits 110 High opening 111 Track boundary 112 Tremendously 113 Holders of buried treasures 115 Joan of art 116 “Winter’s Tales” author Dinesen 117 Words of lament 120 Org. in Clancy novels 122 Spreading tree

Crossword answers: page 45

Sudoku answers: page 45


WHERE I’VE BEEN

JOURNAL CULTURE

WITH BILL KOON

Lost in all the best places With the vacation season washing over us, I am reminded of how much I have enjoyed being lost on various trips. That may sound strange to those who have, and know how to use, MapQuest or a GPS. But the ones who have been paying attention to my columns know that I’m a technophobe – I’m not very good with the stuff and I’m not crazy about being tracked by a satellite when I’m on my way to a wine shop or a payday loan company. Furthermore, I don’t like it when a GPS, only a machine, pretends to be a suave woman talking to me in a seductive voice. I have a friend who turns on his GPS just to feel wanted. He likes being told, sweetly, where to turn and which way to go. He especially likes hearing that he has “gone too far.” I swear, I think he is going to buy his GPS a big diamond ring and propose to it. But I, innocent of the technology, have gotten to see a lot of unexpected sites while lost in places like New York and San Francisco. This past summer, I got to see a Quaker village while trying to get to Cleveland. I’m especially good at getting lost in foreign cities, an adventure enriched by my inability to say much more than “beer” in any language other than English. I will take a sleeping bag with me if I ever have to go back to Venice. One Christmas, we were looking for a particular restaurant in Barcelona. A kind citizen noted our confusion and directed us to “turn right at the Virgin.” “The Virgin,” it turns out, is a statue on the corner of a prominent building where several streets converge with the city’s main drag, La Rambla. We found the statue easily enough, but turning right was another matter. Did my benefactor mean we should “turn right” at the Virgin, or did he mean we should turn one way or another, “right at the Virgin”? Or was he giving me some religio/politico advice? The Bride and I did a rock, paper, scissors exercise which led us to choose the wrong street – which took us down a tight alley to a small plaza behind Barcelona’s art museum where an avant-garde artist was using fruit and candy to create a holiday design on the pavement. Once she finished, she distributed the edibles to the crowd. We looked distressed enough to get a banana, which kept us on our feet until we found our restaurant. I hope that one day, here in South Carolina, I’ll have a chance to direct a foreign tourist to “turn right” at the Beulah Land Baptist Church. He’ll be as confused as we were, I bet. We once tried to drive from Munich to the Bride’s native Austria. We took the back roads through the mountains because we are too cheap to pay the big tolls on the autobahn. Of course, we got lost beyond reasonable doubt. We finally stopped at a rural shop where a bunch of geezers were sitting around gabbing and watching the traffic go by. We asked about getting to Salzburg. They had little English and their German was in a dialect different from our dialect. But we communicated enough to find out that we could not get to Salzburg from there. They slapped their thighs and clapped in hilarity. Finally, they were able to tell us that, at a nearby train station, we could drive our VW up onto a flatbed railroad car and have ourselves – lock, stock and barrel – pulled backwards through a mountain tunnel from Germany into Austria. That we did, with only a little fear as we sat in the car rumbling through the dark in the hope that there would be light, and a highway, ahead. The jaunt cost us slightly more than the autobahn tolls but was more fun than Disney’s “White Knuckle” roller coaster. We are at work now on a “Top Ten” article about the best places in the world to be lost. Send us your stories. First prize is a holiday in a posh resort – which we will announce once we figure out how to get there. Bill Koon lives in Greenville. He can be contacted at badk@clemson.edu.

JUNE 28, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 47


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June 28, 2013 Greenville Journal