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‘No opinions, just representation’ JEFF SUMEREL HAS A NOVEL IDEA FOR WASHINGTON: PURE DEMOCRACY. PAGE 9

SPARTANBURGJOURNAL Spartanburg, S.C. • Friday, May 25, 2012 • Vol.8, No.21

Bringing home the WAR on CANCER NEW TREATMENT CENTERS GIVE HOPE TO MORE UPSTATE RESIDENTS

WOODWORKER SURVIVES WHERE CONTEMPORARY ISN'T COOL. PAGE 19

PAGE 8

A rendering of the new Gibbs Cancer Center Pelham under construction off of Highway 14. The 10,000 square foot $7 million facility is expected to open in the spring of 2013.

Study shows many S.C. seniors face threat of hunger PAGE 11

Motorcycle accident claims life of parks director Brian Wofford. PAGE 7


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A federal judge has ordered a $6.9 million settlement in a lawsuit against former Greenville businessman John Ludwig, who is best known for crashing his Maserati sports car into a Greenville house in 2009 and killing the homeowner inside. U.S. District Judge Timothy M. Cain ordered approval of the Consent Judgment Agreement of April 18 between Gilbert, P.A. Portfolio LLC and SDI Funding LLC. “Accordingly,� the judge wrote, “all of the assets of SDI Funding, LLC that are the subject of this litigation have been transferred to P.A. Portfolio, LLC; provided, however, that this transfer shall not affect the Receiver’s authority to consummate any sales of such assets previously approved by the Court, and the Receiver is authorized to execute any documents necessary to complete such transactions.� According to court documents, SDI, through its manager, Ludwig, entered into a Loan and Security Agreement dated March 2, 2007. As of July 31, 2011, the balance due from SDI under the loan agreement included $6,913,068 in principal and interest and applicable fees, and the loan was in full default. Ludwig was forced to sell his information technology company, SDI Networks, after a collection of legal and personal issues following the Maserati crash. SDI Funding was formed to provide financing for contractors and real estate ventures. Ludwig received a probationary sentence for the Maserati incident, but was sentenced to three years in prison by Circuit Judge Victor C. Pyle in January on assault charges related to a November argument with his wife. Ludwig was found guilty of “slapping or touching his wife in the back of the head� during the argument.

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Ludwig pleaded guilty to reckless homicide after the 2009 Maserati crash. According to police reports, he lost control of the car along Roe Ford Road, traveled 490 feet through a field, uprooted a 25foot pine tree and crashed into the home of Bill Bardsley, who died at the scene. The probationary sentence handed Ludwig by Circuit Judge Eugene Griffith shocked then-13th Circuit Solicitor Bob Ariail, outraged the community and sparked accusations of a two-tiered justice system. Ludwig’s court appearances date back several years. He received probation after pleading guilty to assault of a high and aggravated nature in connection with a July 2008 case in which he kicked in the door of the home of a man who was involved with his then-estranged first wife. Ludwig was also found guilty of criminal domestic violence first offense for hitting his then-estranged wife in February 2009, two months before the fatal wreck. His jail sentence was suspended and Ludwig paid a $1,000 fine. Writer Cindy Landrum contributed to this report. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@thespartanburgjournal.com.

CORRECTION An article in our May 11 issue, “In the Loop,� incorrectly stated that James Stowell with American Hearing Loop installed the hearing loop at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Greenville. Scott Peyton, of Wireless Hearing Solutions in Michigan, performed that work. Also, the cost per room for the loops at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Furman University is $10,000, not $1,000. Finally, we incorrectly printed the name of the venue in Spartanburg’s Chapman Cultural Center where a hearing loop has been installed – it is the David Reid Theatre. The Journal regrets the errors.

4 SPARTANBURG JOURNAL | MAY 25, 2012


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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OPINION

VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

See the Upstate on 2 wheels How well a city embraces terms like “bike-friendly” and “livability” has come to speak volumes about its culture and quality of life. Greenville and Spartanburg alike have made a fine success of both: green spaces and bike lanes abound as avid cycling communities have helped local leaders transform both cities into places where cycling is a familiar sight. Never is this more obvious than in the sweaty month of May – National Bike Month – when the two cities shine as regular hosts of high-profile cycling events: the Spartanburg Regional Pro Cycling Classic on May 4, the annual Assault on Mount Mitchell that drew 1,200 cyclists from across the nation this past Monday, and the USA Cycling Pro Championships spinning into Greenville for the seventh – and last – time this weekend. The two cities have attracted professional bike racing by promoting an Upstate terrain well-suited to the sport: urban bike trails to rural flatlands, rolling hills to ferocious mountain climbs. National championship organizers “want it to be the survival of the fittest,” as Greenville spokeswoman Angie Prosser told the state Municipal Association’s “Cities Mean Business” magazine. The Upstate easily rises to the challenge. Spartanburg’s Assault on Mt. Mitchell – now in its 37th year – is a grueling endurance race that starts downtown and ends 102.7 miles away on the highest peak east of the Mississippi, with rural rollers, Blue Ridge Parkway switchbacks and 11,000 feet of climbing in between. In Greenville this weekend, the USA Cycling Pros will pedal a twisting, 33-kilometer course in and out of the urban center that carries the peloton over Paris Mountain four times. The challenge of the course kept the pro race in Greenville four years longer than originally planned and helped the city win the UCI Para-cycling Road World Championships for 2014. But the larger goal has always been to make cycling a joy for all, not just the hard-core enthusiasts in spandex. The result, for both cities, has been miles of bike lanes, interconnecting trails and a dedicated effort to make streets safer for cyclists of all ages and skill levels. Their success is demonstrated by their mutual designations as a Bronze Level, Bicycle-Friendly Community by the League of American Bicyclists – Greenville since 2009, and Spartanburg since 2007, the first municipality in the state to win the title. The designations are good for four years, and Spartanburg just learned it has re-earned the Bronze Level for another four. The league cited the city’s quadrupling of its bicycle lanes to eight miles, the development of a new county and citywide Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan, and a variety of projects completed or underway, including mountain biking trails in Duncan Park and the B-Cycle bike share system, the first in the South. Likewise, Greenville is deep into developing its own Bikeville, with 13.4 miles of bike lanes now in place and 65 more miles envisioned in the master plan the city adopted in 2011. This Bikeville is about a citywide, bicycle culture that includes car-free street events, skills classes for all ages, neighborhood “bike boulevards” and a proliferating network of trails and bikeways for riders of all abilities. There are few more colorful sights than 1,000 cyclists spinning out of downtown Spartanburg toward Mt. Mitchell, or the USA Cycling Pro peloton powering through Greenville’s Cleveland Park in tight formation. But the happiest sight, for these city fathers, is the family pedaling through the park on a sunny afternoon because it’s easy, safe and fun.

Government shouldn’t tilt the field for anyone When people ask me if I’m pro-business or pro-labor, I say I’m neither: I’m pro-freedom. Freedom is the only political principle that cannot be bent to serve special interests. Freedom allows everyone – left or right, young or old, rich or poor – to make their own choices according to their own values. Government’s job shouldn’t be to tilt the field for one team or another, but to guarantee a level playing field for everyone. That’s why I’m against forcing workers to join unions, congressional earmarks for favored groups, government bailouts of Wall Street, and energy subsidies – for oil companies and for green energy. Look at recent events surrounding the Boeing Company, one of South Carolina’s most important employers. When Boeing’s home state labor union ganged up with President Barack Obama’s National Labor Relations Board to try to sue Boeing for building a new factory in North Charleston, I strongly supported Boeing’s freedom to build factories wherever they pleased. More recently, dust has been kicked over the extension of the Export-Import Bank, a federal program that subsidizes American businesses’ exports. Because Boeing receives Ex-Im subsidies, and because I favor winding down the Ex-Im Bank instead of increasing its budget, some ask if I went from being pro-Boeing to anti-Boeing. Neither. All I’ve ever been is pro-freedom. Freedom isn’t perfect, but it is fair. Any time government hands out favors, it will be unfair to someone. When Washington picks winners and losers, in the end taxpayers always lose, and Ex-Im is no exception. Ex-Im started out decades ago with a lending cap of $5 million to help American companies sell into a “global economy” that barely existed. Today, the cap has ballooned to $100 billion in a booming global economy. And what have the American people gotten for their money? Loans of $10 million to benefit the nowbankrupt Solyndra. Millions in loans to another solar company to sell solar panels to itself. Another $600 million in loans to Enron projects. All this after Ex-Im has already sought its own $3 billion taxpayer bailout. This isn’t a criticism of an agency, or an ad-

IN MY OWN WORDS by U.S. SEN. JIM DEMINT

ministration, but of government subsidies in the first place. When government stays out of markets, businesses focus on their customers. Quality improves, prices fall and everyone wins. When government steps in, businesses turn their attention to their congressmen and hire influence peddlers instead of innovators. Competition sags, the pace of innovation slows, prices rise, and product quality suffers. Defenders say Ex-Im is needed because Europe subsidizes their exporters. But Europe says the same thing about Ex-Im. We’re in a bidding war with other countries for the biggest subsidies. Still, exporters say the cost of doing business in America is too high to compete. I agree. We have the highest corporate tax rate in the world, so let’s cut taxes. Let’s reform our insane, $1.75 trillion-per-year regulatory state. Let’s create a better-prepared workforce for the future. Let’s repeal the government takeover of health care and put an end to predatory lawsuits filed against innocent businesses. In short, let’s fix the rules of our game to make all our exports competitive rather than rigging them for one company or product at a time. Our policies should make the United States the best place in the world to buy, sell, farm, manufacture, patent, invent, invest, innovate and educate – for everyone in every industry. Look at what today’s ad-hoc economic policymaking has done to America – where a collection of narrow special interests vie for the favoritism of discredited politicians while we mount unsustainable debt onto the backs our children and grandchildren. That is what I’m against. What I’m for is a level playing field, a clear set of rules that guarantee the freedom of entrepreneurs to make and sell what they want and the freedom of consumers to buy what they want. I’m not for big business or big labor. I’m for big freedom, for everyone. U.S. Sen. Jim DeMint is a Republican from South Carolina.

IN MY OWN WORDS FEATURES ESSAYS BY RESIDENTS WITH PARTICULAR EXPERTISE WHO WANT TO TELL READERS ABOUT ISSUES IMPORTANT TO THEM. THE JOURNAL ALSO WELCOMES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR (MAXIMUM LENGTH OF 200 WORDS). PLEASE INCLUDE ADDRESS AND DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER. ALL LETTERS WILL BE CONFIRMED BEFORE PUBLICATION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT ALL LETTERS FOR LENGTH. PLEASE CONTACT SUSAN SIMMONS AT SSIMMONS@THESPARTANBURGJOURNAL.COM.

6 SPARTANBURG JOURNAL | MAY 25, 2012


Cycle crash claims park director

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By CHARLES SOWELL | staff

Spartanburg is still trying to deal with the tragic death of city parks system director Brian Wofford in a motorcycle accident last week. Wofford was a Wofford star on the football field at Spartanburg High School and at Clemson University, where he snagged 179 catches for 2,273 yards and 10 touchdowns in 1999. “Brian was a special friend to me and a special young man. Brian was just an outstanding person. He always had that big smile on his face. It is going to take a long time for the community to get over him. We will certainly never forget him. I’ve never had anything affect me as badly as this,” said Spartanburg Mayor Junie White. Wofford, 34, was buried on Wednesday at Heritage Memorial Gardens. He was killed last Friday in a motorcycle accident at the intersection of Riedville Road and Plateau Street. Wofford’s motorcycle struck a car driven by Jewell Cote of Pacolet, 20, who turned into Wofford’s path. Wofford died about 20 minutes after the 11:25 a.m. crash, Highway Patrol reports show. The crash is under investigation. Wofford was wearing a helmet at the time of the crash. Wofford was key to Spartanburg High winning back-to-back state football championships in 1994 and 1995. In November 2008, Wofford was named the city’s parks and recreation superintendent. Less than two years later, the state Recreation and Parks Association named him the young professional of the year. “He cared deeply about this city,” said city manager Ed Memmott. “I will never forget Brian’s thoughtfulness and how much he cared for our youth and residents in need. We all are just at a loss right now. His family is in our prayers.” Wofford leaves behind a wife, Boisha, and 11-year-old daughter, Kaelyn. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@thespartanburgjournal.com.

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Opening new fronts in the ‘War on Cancer’ Spartanburg Regional’s Gibbs Cancer Center to build new center in Greer; other health systems also expanding treatment options By april a. morris | staff

The Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System recently broke ground on a 10,000-square-foot cancer center – not in Spartanburg, but at the Village Hospital campus on Highway 14 in Greer. The Gibbs Cancer Center opened in 1999 in Spartanburg and became affiliated with the M.D. Anderson Physicians Network in 2006. David Church, vice president for oncology and support services, says the Gibbs Cancer Center is expanding to the Greer area so patients will not have to travel as far for treatment. The expansion is part of the center’s master plan “to improve cancer treatment in that area,” he said. “Eighty to 85 percent of cancer care is given at a local center.” Focusing on cancer treatment locally is a trend nationwide and is part of the nation’s emphasis on the “war on cancer,” Church said. Before the advent of regional cancer centers, patients had to travel to other states to receive treatment; now they don’t have to leave home, he said. The Gibbs Center’s affiliation with M.D. Anderson means that the care is high-quality and vetted regularly by the internationally renowned physicians network, Church said. Gibbs also is a Community Clinical Oncology Program of the National Cancer Institute. Spartanburg Regional is hardly alone in the building boom. Across the Upstate, other cancer care centers are busy with expansion plans. Earlier this year, the Greenville Hospital System announced a merger with the Cancer Center of the

8 SPARTANBURG Journal | MAY 25, 2012

Carolinas, which is expected to be completed in July. Dr. Larry Gluck, medical director of oncology programs at the Greenville Hospital System, said that after the merger, the healthcare system will have the largest group of oncologists in the Upstate. Because of Greenville Hospital’s link with the medical school at the University of South Carolina, Gluck said, there is also a focus on research, including the Institute for Translational Oncology Research (ITOR), which is designed to translate research to patient care. The system’s fellowship-trained surgeons and new designation as a Cancer Center of the Carolinas’ National Cancer Institute (NCI) Community Clinical Oncology Program offer a high level of sophistication, he said. The Bon Secours St. Francis health system is also working to expand its cancer treatment capabilities by establishing a radiation therapy program with a linear accelerator, due to open in late 2013 or 2014. To house the accelerator within a required vault, they are also applying to build a dedicated cancer center at their Millennium campus and add a new surgery robot. This expansion is the answer to the needs of patients who want full cancer treatment services from a faithbased provider, said Dan Duggan, St. Francis’ chief operating officer. “Care is fragmented when you don’t have full service,” he said. Nearly a decade ago, St. Francis determined a need for additional radiation treatment in the area, and the expansion of services in Greer is the response, Duggan said. Cancer

Spartanburg Regional Health Care System CEO Bruce Holstien, right, with Jimmy and Marsha Gibbs at the groundbreaking for the new Gibbs Cancer Center Pelham.

rates are increasing due to the aging of the population and the need for localized cancer care is increasing with them, added Teri Ficicchy, executive vice president and chief nursing officer. In order to build the facility at the Millennium campus, St. Francis has applied for a state Certificate of Need, or CON, now under review. This review process is governed by the state Department of Health and Environmental Control and driven by the SC Health Plan, which is revised every two years. A 24-member panel reviews applications from all healthcare providers – from hospitals and surgical centers to substance abuse facilities and nursing homes – that wish to establish a service or expand. The CON system reduces healthcare costs and helps prevent duplicate services, according to the DHEC website. Without it, the potential for splintered care would increase, as well as specialty “boutique” hospitals and out-

patient service centers for diagnostic imaging, ambulatory surgery and radiation therapy, the website said. The Upstate’s recent expansion of cancer treatment services is mirrored statewide, said Beverly Brandt, bureau chief of DHEC’s Bureau of Health Facilities and Services Development. Healthcare systems in Charleston and Myrtle Beach are also planning to add or expand cancer treatment options. The Gibbs expansion “was held up for several years due to an appeal,” she said. “The case settled and we have been kept informed of the progress of this project since the CON was issued in 2011.” Asked whether the Upstate expansion was due to competition among the healthcare systems or a movement to expand patient choice, Brandt said, “The SC Health Plan does not specifically address competition or treatment options, but does address improved accessibility and duplication of services.”

She said population growth, cancer rates and “utilization of existing services are important factors in demonstrating need. In making a decision, we evaluate accessibility to services and how this balances with duplication of existing services within a service area.” Based on an August 2011 DHEC cancer report, the focus on cancer treatment may be warranted. According to the report, 488 people in 100,000 were newly diagnosed with cancer in Greenville in 2004-2008. The rate was 466 in 100,000 in Spartanburg. The statewide average was 478 in 100,000. The American Cancer Society estimates that 26,570 new cancer cases will be diagnosed in South Carolina in 2012. As for the need for additional cancer treatment services in the Greer area, Gluck said Greenville Hospital System has provided comprehensive cancer treatment at Greer Memorial Hospital since 2008. He said he believes the expansions may be due to each hospital’s plans rather than a major need for more cancer treatment in the area. Duggan said that some of the expansion may also be driven by patient preference and the new emphasis on choice. “We totally believe in patient choice,” he said. Whatever the motivation, the expansion of cancer treatment services in the Upstate is a positive trend that will increase the quality of care, Church said. “It’s good for everybody,” he said. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@ thespartanburgjournal.com.


‘No opinions, just representation’

JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Jeff Sumerel has a novel idea for Washington: pure democracy By JERRY SALLEY | staff

Jeff Sumerel has a few different campaign slogans in mind. “It’s been said to lead, follow, or get out of the way. I promise to get out of your way” is one. “Politics as unusual” is another. There’s a reversal of Barry Goldwater’s classic slogan: “In my heart, I know you’re right.” And there’s “Don’t vote for me – vote for you!” But the slogan featured most prominently on his campaign materials – boiling down to two words the philosophy behind his bid to take Trey Gowdy’s seat as the next U.S. congressman from South Carolina’s 4th District – is “Just Representation.” Sumerel wants to introduce democracy, in its purest and most direct form, to Washington. He will have “no opinions” of his own, he said, and his votes will be determined not by his own conscience, but by what the people in his district in the Upstate tell him to do. Everything he does in Congress will first be subject to a vote by his constituency, and the majority rules. But what may surprise those who only know Sumerel from his often quirky and comedic film and stage work is that he’s absolutely serious. “It’s not a prank, by any means,” said Sumerel. “We want to be respectful of the process. It’s not a joke to us at all.” Becoming a candidate with no opinions, who would be “just a representative,” grew out of his observations of modern political discourse. “It’s so extreme right now,” he said. “The machine’s gotten so big. There’s so much opinion after opinion after opinion, and it’s always changing. The only way to counter that is with something else as extreme, so that would be… say nothing. Have no opinion.” Sumerel turned to his longtime friend and collaborator, Sam Reynolds, tapping into his “expertise in IT design and interfacing as well as creative strategy, spirited willingness and keen common sense.” They began working on a way for the citizens of District 4 to express their will electronically. Their idea is to take any bill that comes before Congress for a vote and present it in layman’s terms, and also to provide the full text “if you want to wade through it,” Sumerel said. Residents of

Greenville's Jeff Sumerel, known for his eccentric films and comedy performances, is getting serious with his Congressional bid.

District 4 can then vote directly, via the Internet or phone, on whether Sumerel should vote “aye” or “nay” on the bill. The logistics are a work in progress. “It wouldn’t be perfect,” Sumerel said, “but (the system) is not perfect now.” Direct democracy is not a new idea; it dates back as far as ancient Athens, was part of the discussion that spawned the Federalist Papers, and is being employed now to a limited degree in the government of Switzerland. Still, Sumerel has found resistance to the concept. “I’ve had people say, ‘Oh, these people will never vote for good things.’ Well, I don’t know what to do about that,” he said. “Do we need to move? Or do you need to get more involved with your community and help educate them if you think they’re ignorant on the issues?” With the campaign philosophy established, Sumerel then began looking for a political party that would help him implement it. He found receptive minds in the South Carolina Green Party – first in the county caucus of six people who met in the Hughes Main Library in downtown Greenville, then at the state convention, which convened at a Mediterranean restaurant in Columbia. The state convention was “very sincere and spirited and small,” remembered Sumerel. “It was 22 people, but it was the largest turnout they’d had, I was told.” When the convention was over, the South Carolina Green Party had nominated Roseanne Barr to run against Barack Obama, and Jeff Sumerel to run against Trey Gowdy. “If I don’t keep trying some things that might seem crazy, it’s easy to get complacent,” said Sumerel. “It’s always that

thing of ‘somebody ought to do this.’ Well, okay, why not me? I don’t mind looking like an idiot.” “I see Jeff Sumerel’s campaign in general as being an effort to call into question the existing system and to stimulate thought about the changes we need to make to create a truly democratic system,” said David Whiteman, Ph.D., a faculty member of the Department of Political Science at the University of South Carolina, and a member of the steering committee of the state Green Party. “His campaign focus on ‘no opinions’ might not articulate the Green Party philosophy directly, but in a campaign in which he may be outspent by hundreds of thousands of dollars, it’s an innovative way to call attention to the need for fundamental reform.” Sumerel plans to document the entire process for the public record. But this is not just an excuse to make a film, he said. “That wasn’t the motivation, but it would be sort of stupid not to document it, since I have that skill and the resources.” Despite his reputation as a comedic writer and performer (his prior film work includes the infomercial parody “The Power of Ignorance” and “Kudzulla,” a satire aimed at urban sprawl), Sumerel is finding his message is taking root. “When I say, ‘This empowers you after the election,’ that really seems to resonate,” he said. “Usually, when the election’s over, you say ‘Well, that’s it. My guy won, and maybe he or she will do what they said.’ Or if they didn’t win, you say, ‘All right, I’ll try again in two years.’ But this would be tangible. You could say, I actually voted, and I know it’s there, and I can point to it.” The reception has surprised even the candidate. “I assumed people would say, ‘Oh, Jeff, that’s crazy,’” he said. “But they actually say, ‘You know what? That’s not such a bad idea.’ I don’t think they’re saying I’ve got a chance to win, but then again, after some conversation, they say, ‘Well, what if?’” Contact Jerry Salley at jsalley@thespartanburgjournal.com.

SO YOU KNOW Follow Jeff Sumerel’s campaign at www.justrepresentation.org.

History Hub Tracy Power, Ph.D., Coordinator of the South Carolina Historical Marker Program, will publicly discuss the process of reviewing, researching, and revising historical marker text. Thurs., May 24, 7-8 p.m., at the Chapman Cultural Center, free. Presented by the Spartanburg County Historical Association. Lunch & Learn Vivian Fisher, Ph.D., will publicly discuss the process of her research of early Spartanburg City Directories, Sanborn Insurance Maps, and plat books that reveal the importance of John A. Lee and his family in Hampton Heights. Fri., May 25, 12:30-1:30 p.m., at the Chapman Cultural Center, $5. Bring your lunch, if you like. Presented by the Spartanburg County Historical Association. Footloose This musical stage production that was made famous through Hollywood movies is brought to life by the students of Spartanburg School District 7. It is a story of rebellious students who just want to dance. Fri. & Sat., May 25 & 26 at 7 p.m.; Sat. & Sun., May 26 & 27 at 3 p.m. At the Chapman Cultural Center. $15/adults; $10/students. Boys & Girls Clubs Art Exhibit The Boys & Girls Clubs of the Upstate present their annual photography exhibit at the Chapman Cultural Center. Mon.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. COLORS Art Exhibit COLORS, a children’s outreach program by the Spartanburg Art Museum, presents recent works by inner-city kids. At the Chapman Cultural Center. Mon.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Furniture Exhibit Function & Awe. Upstate artist Michael McDunn showcases his unique blend of heirloom and contemporary wood furniture. Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Spartanburg Art Museum. Pottery Exhibit Emerging Works/Ancient Roots. Upstate artist Mike Vatalaro exhibits his collection of pots and ceramics, all with a strong Asian influence. Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Spartanburg Art Museum. Guild Exhibit Holbein Holbein | Wright Wright. Upstate artists Amy Holbein (painter) and Patty Wright (photographer) share gallery space for May. Serious photos of the Dupree House’s decline; diverse paintings, from non-objective to realism. Mon.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m., in the Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg’s gallery at the Chapman Cultural Center. Free. History Exhibit Celebrities of Spartanburg. Spartanburg has a strong history of celebrities both homegrown and imported. See the timeline and share in the pride. Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Spartanburg Regional History Museum.

542-ARTS ChapmanCulturalCenter.org 200 E. Saint John St. Spartanburg

MAY 25, 2012 | SPARTANBURG JOURNAL 9


journal community News and information from Spartanburg Regional

healthmatters regional fellows leadership program honors 25 graduates Spartanburg Regional congratulates the following 2012 Regional Fellows this year: Cyndi Beacham Rebecca Bomar Jane Breeden Sally Coker Donna Cowan Ed Davidson Gwen Gray

Geoff Haas Rich Harris Pamela Heath Coby Hennecy Teresa Hough Letitia Jones

Molly Talbot-Metz John Moore Joy Oates Caroline Robertson Rob Sanborn Allen Smith

Elaine Smith Roy McBee Smith Jr. Mary Snoddy Chris Steed Josh Thompson Angela Viney

skin cancer—a year-round threat Basking in the sun as well as any exposure to ultraviolet rays (sunlight or tanning beds) is a serious yearround threat to your skin. This—the largest organ of your body—is a main target for cancer. The most common of all cancers, skin cancer accounts for nearly half of all cancers in the United States. There are two types: Non-melanoma skin cancers (basal or squamous cell) develop on sun-exposed areas of the body, like the face, ears, neck, lips and the backs of the hands.

FACT: While skin cancer is more common on sun-exposed areas, you can get skin cancer anywhere.

Melanoma accounts for only a small percentage of skin cancer, but it is far more dangerous than other skin cancers and causes most skin cancer deaths. Both are highly curable if found early. More than 2 million cases of basal and squamous cell skin cancer are found in this country each year, according to the American Cancer Society. Melanoma will account for more than 75,000 cases of skin cancer in 2012. The good news is that you can do a lot to protect yourself and your family from skin cancer. Risk factors for both types of skin cancers include: unprotected and/or excessive exposure to UV radiation, fair complexion, family history, multiple or atypical moles, severe sunburns as a child, occupational exposures to coal tar, pitch, creosote, arsenic compounds or radium. The best ways to lower the risk of non-melanoma skin cancer are to avoid intense sunlight for long periods of time and to practice sun safety: seek shade, slip on a shirt, apply sunscreen, wear a hat and avoid the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Finding possible skin cancers doesn’t require X-rays or blood tests—just your eyes and a mirror. Suspicious-looking changes in the skin should be checked out by a doctor. Visit our website for more health tips, events and classes, spartanburgregional.com.

is high blood pressure stalking you? keep your guard up! Did you know that high blood pressure usually has no symptoms? In fact, many people have this disease for years without knowing it. That’s why it is often referred to as the “silent killer.” The only way to find out if you have this disease is to have your blood pressure checked. High blood pressure directly increases the risk of coronary heart disease (which leads to heart attack) and stroke, especially when it’s present with other risk factors. High blood pressure can occur in children or adults, but it’s more common among people over age 35. Although the exact cause of high blood pressure is unknown, there are several factors and conditions that may increase risk: being overweight or obese, smoking, little or no exercise, stress, too much salt in the diet, drinking too much alcohol and/or ethnic background. It may run in families and those with diabetes, gout or kidney disease could have high blood pressure. According to the American Heart Association, a normal blood pressure reading is systolic (top number) of less than 120 and diastolic (bottom number) of less than 80. High blood pressure begins with a systolic of 140 or more and a diastolic of 90 or more. Check your blood pressure at least every two years starting at age 18. If you’re older than 40, check it often. Many shopping malls, pharmacies and grocery stores have blood pressure machines available for free. The key to avoiding or managing heart disease is better lifestyle habits. Start by knowing how many calories you should be eating and drinking to maintain your weight. Don’t eat more calories than you know you can burn every day. Increase the amount and intensity of your physical activity. Aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate physical activity on most days of the week. For more information on hypertension and prevention of heart disease, please call the Joe R. Utley Heart Resource Center at 560-4472. MKTG62L

TUNE IN TO HEALTH MATTERS on WSPA’s 6 and 11 p.m. newscasts to learn more about the latest advances in medical care at Spartanburg Regional.

10 SPARTANBURG Journal | MAY 25, 2012


The empty cupboard Study says more senior citizens face hunger challenges By april a. morris | staff

An estimated 17.1 percent of elderly people in South Carolina faced the threat of hunger in 2010, ranking the state in the top 10 in the nation, according to the latest Senior Hunger in America report commissioned by the Meals on Wheels Foundation. Mississippi had the highest rate at 21.53 percent and North Dakota had the lowest at 5.52 percent. “There is no question that we are failing our seniors, some of the nation’s most vulnerable citizens. The numbers spell out our failure with clarity, and at the same time they call us to action,” said Enid A. Borden, chief executive officer of the Meals On Wheels Research Foundation, in a statement about the study. Released in May, the Senior Hunger in America 2010 report used data based on 18 questions in the Core Food Security Module (CFSM). The module is used by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to establish the official food insecurity rates of households nationwide. Based on the answers given, researchers determine whether the respondents faced a “threat of hunger,” were “at risk of hunger” or were “facing hunger,” the lowest food security level. The 18 questions included whether respondents could afford to eat balanced meals, ran out of food before they had money to buy more, or ate less than they thought they should due to limited funds. Most questions focused on the past 12 months. Food insecurity “is associated with a host of poor health outcomes for seniors such as reduced nutrient intakes and limitations in activities of daily living,” the study said. “This implies that the recent increase in senior hunger will likely lead to additional nutritional and health challenges for our nation.” The report revealed that 9.48 percent of South Carolina senior citizens were at risk of hunger and 2.21 percent were facing hunger. Addressing hunger in senior citizens presents unique challenges tied to income, isolation and social attitudes, said Susan Douglas, executive director of

Loaves and Fishes, a nonprofit that delivers surplus food to Upstate agencies. “After single-parent families, our next biggest population served is seniors,” said Douglas. Access is the biggest issue for seniors besides income, she said: If they don’t have transportation, they can’t travel to shop. Seniors can be difficult to reach regarding food security and assistance, Douglas said. “Seniors don’t talk about it; they’re sometimes embarrassed and they’re independent.” Even so, “I don’t think seniors are significantly worse off except there are more people entering senior status,” she said – a view shared by Greenville Meals on Wheels Executive Director Liz Seman. The Greenville Meals on Wheels chapter, which will serve its 10 millionth meal this year, delivers 1,500 meals a day to homebound senior citizens, Seman said. Though GMW has not seen an increase in referrals (which typically run about 100 each month), she said she expects that to change in the near future. “We are going to see our Baby Boomer volunteers eventually become our clients,” she said. In Spartanburg, “our outreach staff is finding that more younger seniors, in their 60s, are facing hunger,” said Jayne McQueen, president of Mobile Meal Service of Spartanburg County. “It is definitely a growing trend.” Older senior citizens often are discovered and helped, she said, but the younger seniors are falling through the cracks. Mobile Meal Service typically serves an average of 1,800 people each day, she said. Some seniors are left to face hunger because of the mobility of families, McQueen said, a point that Seman also makes. “We have a more mobile society; family is no longer nearby to help,” McQueen said. “We find that some people also may be nearby, but don’t choose to take care of their senior relatives.” Studies like the 2010 Senior Hunger in America report allow local programs to correlate the information to their own regions, Seman said. “The whole hunger picture in Greenville is a total cradle-to-grave scenario,” she says, and meal-delivery organizations serve just a portion of the residents facing hunger in the Upstate. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@thespartanburgjournal.com.

journal community

upcoming events mobile mammography unit dates

Our unit has appointments available at the following locations by calling 864-560-7999. June 6: Food Lion, 1130 W. Cherokee Street, Blacksburg June 7: Family Physicians at 290, 1575 E. Main Street, Duncan June 8: Wal-Mart, 165 Walton Drive, Gaffney June 27: Inman Family Practice, 12230 Asheville Highway, Inman

cancer survivors day Sunday, June 3 • 2–5 p.m.

Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium

Gibbs Cancer Center is hosting its annual Cancer Survivors Day. This free event includes food, music and dance. All cancer survivors are invited to attend with their caregiver.

express yourself: a creative grief workshop for kids

Tuesdays, June 5-June 26 • 10–11:30 am. Kids 6-12 are invited to join the Express Yourself creative grief support group, where friendships, feelings, and creativity come together. To sign up and find out more, call Spartanburg Regional Hospice 560-3856.

center for health and healing mind-body skills group Thursdays, June 14–August 9 • 10 a.m.–12 p.m. Bearden Josey Center for Breast Health

Participants learn to use a range of the most effective tools for self-care and stress management. Tuition for the course is $300, and financial assistance is available for those who qualify. Call 560-1981 to register.

freedom from smoking

Mondays, June 18–July 30 • 6:30–8 p.m. Cardio-Pulmonary Rehab, 299 East Pearl Street

This exciting smoking cessation program meets weekly for support and guidance through the smoke-free journey. The fee of $75 covers all materials. Call 560-4472 to register.

lapband® information session Wednesday, June 13 • 6:30–9 p.m.

gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy information session Wednesday, June 20 • 6:30–9 p.m.

Family Medicine Conference Room, Spartanburg Regional Outpatient Center

These free classes cover detailed information about weight loss surgery. They are led by Paul Ross, M.D., and Jason Johnson, D.O., who have performed more than 1,800 combined surgeries in their careers. To register, visit spartanburgweightloss.com or call 560-7070.

day of dance

Saturday, June 23 • 9 a.m.–12 p.m. Thomas E. Hanna Family YMCA, 151 Ribault Street

There will be healthy snacks, door prizes and free health screenings for adults and children (children must be with an adult at all times), including blood pressure, body mass index, height, weight, heart health risk factors and diabetes risk assessment. Non-members are welcome for a $5 donation, which will go to the Partners with Youth Campaign. Register at spartanburgregional.com.

spartanburgregional.com MKTG52I

MAY 25, 2012 | SPARTANBURG Journal 11


journal community

Program encourages students to make healthy food choices By april a. morris | staff

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A program developed by a Wofford College psychology professor to encourage elementary school students to make healthy food choices is reaching approximately 8,300 students in Spartanburg County and attracting nationwide attention. Healthy Eating Decisions was launched in 2009 by Dr. Dave Pittman as a way to help students choose the healthiest food options in the school cafeteria line. A member of the Spartanburg Childhood Obesity Task Force, Pittman said he had the idea for the program after hearing from school nutrition service employees about the confusion students face at lunchtime. “The food service staff care very deeply about serving good food to the students. Schools are seeing the impact of childhood obesity on a daily basis and want to do something to help improve the health of their students,” Pittman said. “It’s especially challenging for our younger students; they’re given three choices on entrees and very little direction on what is the healthiest choice.” Pittman designed a program that would be free, fit with what schools were already offering and provide the guidance the students were missing. Before offering it in school lunch lines, Pittman surveyed two Spartanburg schools to see how many students were making the healthier choices on their own. He made a startling discovery: “In absence of our program, less than 3 percent of students were making the healthy choice.” After the program was introduced in the two schools, 10 percent of students there were choosing the healthy option, he said. Now 16 Spartanburg County schools have adopted Pittman’s Healthy Decisions system. To participate, the schools submit their menus to Healthy Eating Decisions, where they are evaluated according to nutritional criteria developed by a pediatric dietician and returned to the schools with the healthiest meal combination highlighted. When a student chooses all the healthy options along with white milk, they get to ring a bell in the cafeteria and receive public recognition. “The idea is that the school is emphasizing the healthy choice and recognizing who makes a healthy choice,” Pittman said. Healthy Eating Decisions has proven to be a free, simple and sustainable program that 42 percent of Spartanburg County elementary school students are

Janie Long, 7, a first-grader at Jesse Boyd Elementary School, takes grapes as a healthy side dish during lunch.

now part of, Pittman said. The approach has already brought about systemic change. One school experienced such a decline in the demand for flavored milk, he said, the cafeteria stopped offering vanilla and strawberry, two of the highest-sugar flavors. Pittman’s ideas are now garnering national attention: Healthy Eating Decisions was recently featured in Food Service Director magazine and will be profiled in Childhood Obesity Journal this June. School systems in Louisiana and Massachusetts have contacted Pittman about the program, he said. This spring, along with a push to target schools across South Carolina – nine other counties have already signed on – Pittman said participating Spartanburg schools have entered a friendly competition to see which one had the highest number of students choosing healthy foods over an eight-week period. Last week, Healthy Decisions honored Jesse Boyd Elementary School with a cash prize for achieving a 48 percent daily average of students choosing the healthiest lunch option. Other participating schools averaged 24 percent. “The main thing that it’s done for our children has been to educate them and introduce them to choices they may have never encountered before,” said assistant principal Meredith Rose. She said the community effort to support the program included not only Wofford College, but the cafeteria staff, parents and the school’s improvement council. “Teaching healthy choices is not a short-term goal,” Pittman said. “This is not something that you could change in a week, month or even a year.” The challenge comes in knowing what to choose, he said. “Some days, the whole-grain cheese pizza is the healthy choice.” Contact April A. Morris at amorris@thespartanburgjournal.com.


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journal community

our community

community news, events and happenings

The World of Coca-Cola in Atlanta offers free admission to active and retired members of the armed forces year-round and this weekend for Memorial Day. The attraction also is opening a new exhibit featuring artwork from a decorated veteran this Thursday. David Clayman: Abstract Wood Constructions will feature artist David Clayman’s interpretations of the Coca-Cola bottle through 15 original abstract wood constructions. The World of Coca-Cola recently became the new home of Coca-Cola’s 126-year-old secret formula. For the first time in history, the vault containing the secret formula is now visible to the public. The museum includes a fully functioning bottling line, more than 1,200 artifacts and a tasting room with more than 60 beverages from around the world. At the recent eighth annual Upstate Diversity Leadership Awards, presented by Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System and hosted by the Riley Institute at Furman University, the Greenville Chamber of Commerce, the Anderson Chamber of Commerce and the Spartanburg Chamber of Commerce, awards were presented to recognize three individuals, three organizations and one K-12 school for their outstanding achievement in promoting diversity in the Upstate community. Spartanburg School District 7 received the award for Outstanding Nonprofit Organization. The first annual Spartanburg Day School 5K benefitting Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Upstate featured more than 140 runners and raised $9,000. The school’s community service organization, ASTRA, planned and organized the event. Spartanburg Day School has been affiliated with the school-based BBBS program since its establishment in Spartanburg in 2000.  A Spartanburg Day School student, Keegan Patrick Duesterhaus, was named one of the winners in the competition called “Picture This: The 5 W’s of Judicial Diversity – Who? What? When? Where? Why?” Duesterhaus was awarded an iPad for himself and one for the school in the competition sponsored by the League of Women Voters of Spartanburg County. “We wanted to give students the chance to learn about the importance of judicial diversity, so we asked them to explore visually the notion that a diverse judiciary is important to South Carolina because it instills in citizens confidence that the courts are fair and impartial,” said Linda Bilanchone, chair of the project. The winning visual media can be seen on the Facebook page called “The Gavel.” AdvanceSC has renewed a $15,000 grant that provides students attending Union County High School’s Career and Technology Center the opportunity to enroll in Spartanburg Community College’s (SCC) dual-credit welding program offered at the Union County Advanced Technology Center (UCATC). The AdvanceSC grant, funded by Duke Energy, will allow eight high school students to enroll and begin taking classes in SCC’s welding program during their senior year in high school. Upon graduation, these students can seamlessly continue the welding program as full-time SCC

aily! D g in iv r r A s m te I g New Sprin 864.234.4960 Next to Pep Boys 2422 Laurens Rd Greenville PalmettoHG.com 14 SPARTANBURG Journal | MAY 25, 2012

students. This is the third consecutive year that AdvanceSC has awarded the grant to Union County High School. “We are so pleased to receive this AdvanceSC grant,” said Dr. Kristi Woodall, Union County School District superintendent. “It gives our students the opportunity to learn skills that will help them compete in the workforce after graduation.” More than 30 years ago, Dr. Lewis P. Jones, professor of history at Wofford College, began the Leadership Spartanburg program with an overview of the county’s history. Today, Dr. Doyle Boggs follows in Dr. Jones’s footsteps and leads Leadership Spartanburg bus tours. “Historic Spartanburg County: 225 Years of History,” a new book by Boggs, covers his time as Jones’s successor and includes photos from the Spartanburg County Historical Association collection. “Historic Spartanburg County” is currently available for $15 at the Regional History Museum in the Chapman Cultural Center on E. St. John Street, Spartanburg, and will be coming soon to other locations. Call 864-596-3501 for more information. In an art exhibit entitled Function & Awe, master woodcraftsman Michael McDunn of Greenville will present his heirloom, yet contemporary, furniture in the Spartanburg Art Museum through Aug. 4, Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. at the Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg. This exhibit showcases work produced since 1982. All custom furniture pieces are crafted on location at his studio in Greenville and can be found in private homes and public places. For more information about Function & Awe, please call the Spartanburg Art Museum at 864-542-ARTS. If you are sponsoring a community event, we want to share your news. Submit entries to: Spartanburg Journal, Community Briefs, 148 River St., Suite 120, Greenville, SC 29601 or e-mail: spartanburgcommunity@thespartanburgjournal.com

county council from the may 21 meeting

Spartanburg County Councilman Roger Nutt was the lone holdout on approving the county’s $80 million budget set to take effect on July 1. Nutt objected to paying for $800,000 in hospitality tax money to operate Tyger River Park. Calling it a “matter of principle,” Nutt said the money should be used for new things to attract visitors, not maintenance. Also on principle, Nutt opposed restoring $3,150 in funding for the Children’s Center of the Upstate and Children’s Advocacy Center. The hospitality tax is due to expire in 2030. Nutt and Sheriff Chuck Wright were honored as Friends of the Taxpayer before the regular council session by the Citizens for Efficient Government, a local branch of the South Carolina Association of Taxpayers. The group commended Nutt for his investigation of the parks commission and for supporting a sunset date for the county’s hospitality tax. Nutt also received the Local Government Award from the state Republican Party. County Administrator Katherine Hubbard told council the improving economy has put more money in the county’s coffers, with revised budget projections showing an extra $50,000 in the till. What the expected additional money will be used for is a matter of debate on council. During a public hearing on the budget, Pat Gotautas, who works at the clerk of court’s office, urged council to give priority to a 2-percent raise, county workers’ first in four years. The raise would cost the county $500,000. Coroner Rusty Clevenger asked council to fund a new full-time staff member at his office to deal with state-mandated investigations. Council next meets on June 18 in Chambers at the County Administration Building at 366 N. Church St. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@thespartanburgjournal.com.


JOURNAL BUSINESS

Employment picture improves in Upstate By CHARLES SOWELL | staff

Adeptus Architecture was awarded the $80 million “Residential Honors College and Greek Village Student Housing” project at the New Jersey Institute of Technology in Newark.

Big stage, small footprint Small Upstate architecture firm takes on the national firms By DICK HUGHES | contributor

With ambition, talent and high technology, Adeptus Architecture has grown in 25 years from a small firm doing small projects in the Upstate to a smaller firm doing larger and more varied projects on a national stage.

It’s what Barry Agnew had in mind in 1986 when he left a Greenville firm that “did a very narrow range” of architecture to go out on his own to do a wide range of work. For the first 10 years, he focused on “relatively small work in commercial, residential, office buildings, restaurants and churches” with construction costs around $10 million

annually. Adeptus today is responsible for more than 10 times that. Just two projects alone, one in Newark, N.J., and the $12-million Cherokee County administration building, represent more than $100 million. Recently, the firm changed its name from Agnew-Rincon Architecture to Adeptus, “specialized expertise” in Latin, to recognize “the progression of our practice over the last 25 years … (and) expansion of our client base to a national venue,” Agnew said. In one of its biggest scores, Adeptus was ADEPTUS continued on PAGE 16

Spartanburg’s jobless rate held steady at 8.6 percent in April, down from 10 percent a year ago, while Greenville slipped a notch to 7 percent from 7.1 percent, the state Department of Employment and Workforce reported this week. Statewide the unemployment rate was down from 8.9 percent in March to 8.8 percent in April. The decline came despite a workforce reduction of 6,055 to slightly more than 2.1 million, due to many people abandoning the search for work. The agency said the ranks of the unemployed declined by 2,799 to 189,865 persons. “While this is great news, we’re going to keep working hard to make our state the most competitive in the country for business development and bring more jobs for our people,” said Gov. Nikki Haley. The agency said 28,290 people have found jobs in the past year, showing the state’s economy continues to improve. “The decline in the state’s unemployment rate couJOBS continued on PAGE 16

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JOURNAL BUSINESS ADEPTUS continued from PAGE 15

awarded contracts in early 2011 for the $84-million Warren Street Village being constructed by the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) on the perimeter of its urban Newark campus. Adeptus won the commission, which is part of a larger urban renewal project, in a year-long design competition with major national firms. The challenge was to not only design the structures, but to bring a holistic approach to the 3.4-acre village comprising dorms, an honors college, restaurant, office space, convenience store and fitness center surrounding green space. After a year of planning and “consensus building” with college and city officials, planners and residential neighbors, ground was broken on the village on May 1. “We are doing all the interior design, all the furniture, all the interior finishes, all the communications and technology equipment,” Agnew said in an interview. “We are doing this as a LEED silver facility, so we are doing the sustainability studies as well.” The firm’s decision six or seven years ago to compete nationally for more design-image architecture “is starting to blossom as we are doing some major urban projects that are helping with our

notoriety,” Agnew said. The firm now is working with clients in 15 states. To Agnew’s point, out of the NJIT project came feelers from Rutgers University, which is interested in a “number of projects” on its urban Newark campus, and a feature scheduled for this fall in Strategize Magazine, a national publication aimed at high-level corporate and institutional officers. Being able to take on these varied aspects of a major project in an urban setting was beyond Adeptus’ capability 1020 years ago, but “the technologies we use in our business today allows us to do that kind of work.” Interior design has become a “growing part of our practice,” Agnew added, a pay-

ture rather than outsourcing it to another firm, giving you a higher degree of being able to tie everything together.” Computer imaging and communications technology have changed the nature of architecture, allowing relatively small firms to take on large projects anywhere in the country without breaking the bank with overhead. If a presence is needed on site, Agnew said, all you need is an airport. Other-

“Clients will strongly consider us now who would not have in the past when they wanted a local presence to have an architect available on short notice.” Barry Agnew, managing principal and senior mentoring partner for Adeptus, on how the internet has broadened the firm’s clientele.

off from his decision several years ago to become one of the few licensed architects to be certified as an interior designer. Having that extra expertise is “very attractive to clients because you can coordinate the interior design with the architec-

wise, the Internet’s vast capability for communicating and moving documents back and forth and the ability for instant teleconferencing allows for daily management of projects anywhere without leaving Greenville, he said. “Clients will strongly consider us now who would not have in the past when they wanted a local presence to have an architect available on short notice.” The economies are significant. A few years ago, when it had spread its client base regionally, Adeptus had “settled in around the $50-million-a-year range” doing 30-40 projects a year and had a technical staff of 20, including architects and draftsmen. With technological advances, outsourcing of engineering and a horizontal hierarchy, Agnew today keeps Adeptus’ staff to 10 “highly trained” architects doing around 20 much larger projects of signifiJOBS continued from PAGE 15

USC Upstate turns your options into opportunities whether you are just starting college, transferring from technical college, or returning to learn.

16 SPARTANBURG JOURNAL | MAY 25, 2012

www.uscupstate.edu • (864) 503-5000

pled with the number of jobs announcements in recent months show positive signs of growth and stability for South Carolina’s economy,” said Abraham Turner, the agency’s executive director. All but one of the sectors surveyed showed increases in employment between March and April, when not adjusted for seasonal fluctuations. Non-farm payrolls increased by 13,500 workers. As far as the state’s metro areas, the jobless rate dropped in Florence to 9.4

cantly more construction value. “We are trying to have fewer, but higher-level, employees. We no longer employ middle-level draftsmen. Everybody in the firm is at project manager level or above.” The business that propelled Adeptus from local to regional to national was university work. Early on, the firm won the commission for the renovation of Clemson’s Fike Recreation Center and that “got us interested” in larger institutional projects, Agnew said. “One thing led to another and we started spreading out in university work. About seven years ago we ... were practicing up and down the East Coast a little bit. Then as a national firm we accepted commissions in Chicago, Missouri, Indiana, Pennsylvania and Florida. We started doing university work on a broader scale.” Agnew finds university work fulfilling because it “is an opportunity to do a lot of different buildings, everything from dormitories to athletic facilities to classroom buildings to administration buildings. The second thing is that most universities are extremely image-conscious and that lends itself to design-oriented structures.” Agnew was quick to add that in pursuing large national projects, Adeptus is not abandoning “our roots in the Upstate” and will continue to do commercial and institutional projects locally. As an example, he cited the work the firm did with local officials and residents in making design elements of the new Gaffney administration building reflect “the historic nature of the city and the architecture of the old cotton mills.” “I am revitalized in my career,” said Agnew, now 54, who has seen his ambition to take on a wider array of design challenges come together with a firm of “young and talented architects” building a national reputation. Contact Dick Hughes at dhughes@ thespartanburgjournal.com. percent in April compared with 9.5 percent in March. In Charleston and Columbia, jobless numbers held even at 7.1 percent and 7.5 percent, respectively. Marion County reported the highest jobless rate in April at 16.8 percent. Marlboro reported a jobless rate of 15.7 percent and Barnwell was 13.7 percent. Lexington County claimed the lowest jobless rate at 6.6 percent in April, down from 6.7 percent in March. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@ thespartanburgjournal.com.


JOURNAL BUSINESS

THE FINE PRINT During the Spartanburg Young Professionals Town Hall event, Spartanburg professionals will have the opportunity to ask established leaders questions about the future of their county – and hear feedback on how the next generation of leaders can be a part of its growth. The Spartanburg Young Professionals Town Hall is scheduled for Thursday, May 31, 7:45-9 a.m., at the George in downtown Spartanburg. The session is hosted by Spartanburg Young Professionals (SYP), an affiliate of the Spartanburg Area Chamber of Commerce, for members age 40 and under, in an effort to connect current and future leaders in a discussion regarding the future of Spartanburg. Patty Bock, Director of Economic Development for the City of Spartanburg, will facilitate the discussion. Panelists include Bill Barnet, CEO of The Barnet Company and former mayor of Spartanburg; John Bauknight, co-founder of RJ Rockers Brewery; and Foster Chapman, president and CEO of Johnson Development. Each panelist will give his vision for Spartanburg, and Bock will present questions submitted by SYP members prior to the event. The event is free to current SYP members and $10 for guests. Breakfast will be provided beginning at 7:45 a.m. with the program beginning at 8 a.m. Go to the events page of www.spartanburgchamber.com to register.

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X-R-I Opens Duncan Facility

X-R-I Testing has opened a new testing facility in Duncan. The facility, located at 1875 East Main St., Suite 5, is currently Nadcap (formerly the National Aerospace and Defense Contractors Accreditation Program)-accredited to perform both radiographic and liquid penetrant testing. Nadcap accreditation for magnetic particle testing is expected later in 2012. The Duncan facility will also provide consulting services to companies with internal NDT operations. Robert Broaddus, president of X-R-I Testing, a leading provider of nondestructive testing (NDT) services to the aerospace, automotive and power generation industries nationwide, said, “With an established and growing manufacturing base in South Carolina and throughout the domestic southeast, our goal is to continue expanding our footprint in this region to support the various industries here that require nondestructive testing services. Opening the Duncan facility is another step toward that goal. ” A privately held company, X-R-I Testing has over 70 years of experience in providing nondestructive testing services, including radiographic, liquid penetrant, magnetic particle, eddy current, ultrasonic and thermography to the aerospace, automotive, defense and power generation industries.

E. Coli Traced to Restaurant

c o x p h o t o g r a p h y. n e t M101A

The state Department of Health and Environmental Control identified the Spartanburg restaurant linked to a recent Escherichia coli outbreak as El Mexicano, located on East Main Street in Spartanburg. DHEC confirmed last week that the E. coli outbreak is associated with El Mexicano, which voluntarily allowed the agency to release its name. The agency said, “DHEC finds no specific link identified between (the) restaurant (and the) disease outbreak.” Ten people have reported symptoms related to E. coli 1057, including two who have Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, an E. coli-related illness characterized by kidney disease specifically in children. There has been one lab-confirmed case of E. coli 1057 and the others have reported symptoms of the food-borne illness. DHEC originally reported 11 cases. Those affected were infected the last week of April and first week of May.

MAY 25, 2012 | SPARTANBURG JOURNAL 17


journal business

Thanks for turning in another stellar performance. Another year, another immensely successful BMW Charity Pro-Am presented by SYNNEX Corporation. We want to offer our sincere thanks for once again making our tournament the Nationwide Tour’s most exciting event, and more importantly, for helping us to make a positive impact on the lives of so many. We would especially like to thank our generous sponsors as well as the members and staff of The Carolina Country Club, The Greenville Country Club and Thornblade Club, our volunteers and all of the spectators that attended the 2012 tournament. As always, your hospitality and graciousness were especially appreciated by the celebrities, Tour professionals and amateurs who participated. Thanks to everyone who made the 2012 tournament a success and congratulations to this year’s champions who made it part of theirs.

2012 Champions Professional Champion - Nick Flanagan Pro-Am Champion - Fabian Gomez/Brian Todd Pro-Celebrity Champion - Martin Piller/Andy Buckley

Pro-Am/Pro-Celebrity Team Results: 1: Gomez/Todd T2: Watkins/Wood, T2: Dickerson/Casner, 4: Fritsch/Allan, 5: Van Aswegen/Klam, 6: Coe/Merritt, T7: Tambellini/Yates, T7: Piller/Buckley, T7: Svoboda/Johns, T10: Renner/Mandrell, T10: Fathauer/Sorbo, T10: Gronberg/Dyer, 13: Parel/Baro, 14: Edstrom/O’Quinn

STUDENT TRANSPORTATION OF AMERICA®

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Acument IT, Aggreko, Agilysis, American Credit Acceptance, American Storage, Bank of America, Baxter Enterprises, BB&T, Bella International, Benore Logistics, Benteler Automotive, BF Company, Blue Cross Blue Shield, BMW Performance Driving School, Bondtex, Bradshaw Automotive, The Capital Group, Chick-fil-A, Cintas, Clayton Construction, CompuCom, CUICAR, Delta Dental, Dixon-Hughes, DMX Transportation, Economic Futures Group, EMS-CHEMIE, Fabricare, FEV Engine, Firehouse Subs, Ford and Harrison LLP, Fox Commercial Properties, Gestamp, Greenville Business Magazine, Greenwood Capital, Greyrock Management Solutions, Griffin Gear, Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd, Henniges Automotive, Hospitality America, Indexx, ISO Poly Films, Jackson Marketing Group, JM Smith, Lincoln Energy Solutions, Longleaf Holdings, Lumbee, M Dohmen, Mail Sort Inc., Marriott Spartanburg, MAU, MG Grand Day Spa, Michelin, NAI Earle Furman, Net3, Nucor Steel, Omnisource, OnCore Golf, Palmetto Benefit Mgmt., Panera Bread, Pepsi, Pilot Freight, PrintTek, Pro-Sano Systems, redi-Group, Republic Services, Rochling, Rogers Electric, Ryder, SAM Group, SC Ports Authority, SC Tac, Smoke On The Water, Southern Mechanical, Spartanburg Coca-Cola, Spectrum Properties, Spinx, SSI, St. Francis, Table 301, TD Bank, Thrifty Car Rental, TI Automotive, TOWN Magazine, Upstate Automotive, USC Upstate, Veleta Wines, Verizon Wireless, Vining Sparks, Waste Management, Wells Fargo, White Oak Management, Wireless Solutions, Xerox, Young Office.

18 SPARTANBURG Journal | MAY 25, 2012


Journal Sketchbook

Upstate Farm Tour showcases local agriculture By april a. morris | staff

McDunn continued on page 20

farm continued on page 20

Greg Beckner / Staff

working with wood, in all its forms, is a way of preserving it and to showcase its versatility and extreme beauty.” McDunn’s work can be found in corporate offices, including Michelin, Raycom Media, Liberty Corporation and the former Carolina First Bank, as well as in private homes and public places. McDunn, who was the resident woodworker at the Greenville County Museum of Art for five years, also repairs furniture, something he

If you’ve ever wanted to meet the farmer who produced that succulent summer tomato or luscious berry that you picked up at the farmers market or savored in a local restaurant meal, next weekend’s Upstate Farm Tour offers ample opportunity. Sponsored by the Carolina Farm Stewardship Association and Whole Foods Market, the sixth annual self-guided tour on June 2 and 3 features 24 farms throughout the Upstate, including those in Anderson, Greenville, Greenwood, Laurens, Oconee, Pickens and Spartanburg counties. This year, there are seven new farms, producing everything from certified organic beef to cut flowers. Showcasing the diversity of the farms is a way to educate the consumers about what their local farmers produce, says Diana Vossbrinck, tour coordinator. “We really want people to not only buy local food, but we also want to connect people with the farmers who produce it.” Highlights of tour additions include the first time cut flowers have been featured at Field and Flower, certified organic beef at Gibson Farms, and Timms Mill’s waterpowered gristmill. Huckleberry Farm is a producer of fancy-breed chickens and Friends at the Farm grew out of a need for fresh, local produce for a restaurant and catering business, says Vossbrinck. In addition to the tasty crops, farm visitors also get the chance to see heritage turkeys, buffalo and alpacas, not to mention goats, cows, rabbits, worms and sheep on the tour. If they bring along an ice-filled cooler, they can depart with products purchased from the farms they visit. Several thousand people are expected to attend, and after visiting multiple farms, travelers get hungry. Loath to leave their visitors to forage at a fast food joint, Vossbrinck said the

Woodworker Michael McDunn in his Greenville shop. McDunn, who creates unique contemporary furniture, has a show at the Spartanburg Art Museum.  

McDunn’s style evolved from need to survive where contemporary wasn’t cool Exhibition at Spartanburg Art Museum showcases furniture created since 1982 By Cindy Landrum | staff

When Greenville master woodworker Michael McDunn opened his custom furniture business, he didn’t want to just build furniture that copied the style of popular 18th-century pieces. He wanted to design more contemporary pieces, the kind that would fit in a modernlooking open living space on New York City’s 10th Avenue or in a sleek stainless-steel office building. But he had to make a liv-

ing in South Carolina, a place where contemporary furniture styles were the exception, not the rule. “The work I do evolved from my need to survive in a part of the country where, for many years, contemporary furniture styles were quite unacceptable,” McDunn said. “This forced me to design furniture that was fitting for both 18th-century as well as more modern environments.” About 25 pieces of McDunn’s work are on display in “Function & Awe,” an exhibition at the Spartanburg

Art Museum. The exhibition, which runs through Aug. 4, showcases work McDunn has produced since 1982. Much of McDunn’s work has an Asian feel incorporating free-form pieces of wood that may have been destined for mulch, firewood or a landfill. “From the beginning of my involvement with using an obscure piece of wood to make something lovely and fine, everything has fallen into place to keep me firmly entrenched in woodworking, sometimes as art, sometimes as craft,” he said. “I feel that

MAY 25, 2012 | SPARTANBURG Journal 19


JOURNAL SKETCHBOOK MCDUNN continued from PAGE 19

says has helped him with construction techniques and how important proportion is to a piece of furniture’s functionality. “Doing repairs, I’m able to find out what fails down the road,” he said. “I don’t want to do those same things in my own work.” McDunn said wood selection alone can change the appearance of a piece. He made a curly maple dresser, a piece of furniture with the exact proportions of a Sheridan, and one just like it in walnut. The walnut dresser sold quickly. It took a while before anybody bought the curly maple one. “The curly maple dresser was bright and lively. It would become the centerpiece of the room,” he said. “The wood selection alone can change where the pieces go completely.” The curly maple piece will be in the Spartanburg Art Museum show. McDunn also likes to use marquetry and parquetry in his furniture. Marquetry is pictures made from veneer, and parquetry is geometric patterns. Two tables in the Spartanburg

exhibit incorporate this technique. One is a table McDunn made for the Fine Arts Center, Greenville County Schools’ fine arts school. The elliptical table has a sunburst made out of different colors of veneer. Around the outside of the table are pictures of items representing each of the disciplines taught at the school. The center of the table features a piece of bur-

SO YOU KNOW What: “Function & Awe” Who: Michael McDunn Where: Spartanburg Art Museum When: Through Aug. 4, Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Information: 582-7616

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row wood that looks like the folds of a human brain. The second table was made for a hobbyist woodworker and the marquetry features a selection of the man’s antique tools. The man didn’t want the table to have a traditional pedestal or legs, so McDunn built the pedestal out of strips of mahogany that were shaped to fit a form he had built. The table won first place in the prestigious East Tennessee Woodworkers Guild competition. McDunn said designing a piece of furniture for a person is almost like making his or her clothes. “It’s a personal thing,” he said. “You’ve got to get to know them. You want them to be happy with the piece 30 years from now.” McDunn is a member the Southern Highlands Craft Guild, the Furniture Society, the American Marquetry Society, the American Association of Woodturners, and the Society of American Period Furniture Makers. He is a founding member of the Greenville Woodworkers Guild.

FARM continued from PAGE 19

B:10”

Contact Cindy Landrum at T:10” clandrum@thespartanburgjournal.com.

tour now provides a place to sample dishes created with local products at two meal stops. Split Creek Farm in Anderson will host chef Joe Fredette of SummaJoe’s Searing Pans and Homemade Pizza, who will be cooking locally sourced meals. Pastry chef Lisa Marvel of Marvelous Pies will be crafting local sweets at Red Fern Farm in Gray Court. And to further expand the public’s knowledge, Slow Food Upstate is hosting workshops on bees and native plants at Parson’s Produce and BioWay Farms. This weekend event is an excellent way to allow the public to see the staggering diversity in the small and eco-friendly farms of the Upstate, says Vossbrinck. “These farmers are not just growing local food,” she said. “They’re doing it in a sustainable manner.” Contact April A. Morris at amorris@thespartanburgjournal.com. Upstate Farm Tour June 2-3, 1-6 p.m. both days $25 per vehicle for both days in advance, $30 per vehicle day of tour Tickets available online, at Whole Foods, TD Saturday Market and at farm stops. 919-542-2402, www.carolinafarmstewards.org

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20 SPARTANBURG JOURNAL | MAY 25, 2012


journal sketchbook

scene. here.

the week in the local arts world

The Mike Vatalaro: Emerging Works/Ancient Roots exhibit continues until June 2 in the Spartanburg Art Museum at the Chapman Cultural Center, Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mike Vatalaro is a former chairman of the art department at Clemson University. Admission to the museum is $4 for adults, $3 for seniors, $2 for children, $2.50 for college students and $7 per family. For more information, call 542-ARTS. The Showroom at HUB-BUB presents a special evening with author Dorothea Benton Frank on Thursday, June 14, 7-9 p.m. She is touring in support of her new book, “Porch Lights” and will talk about the new book and her writing life. Dorothea Benton Frank is the New York Times best-selling author of “Lowcountry Summer,” “Return to Sullivans Island,” “Bulls Island,” “The Land of Mango Sunsets” and more. The $30 ticket includes a signed copy of the book. This event will be limited to 150 people. You may purchase one companion ticket with your $30 ticket. Call 864-582-0056 or visit www.hub-bub.com for more information and tickets.

in good keeping

Marvin Hamlisch, one of the world’s greatest living composers, will perform at Spartanburg’s Chapman Cultural Center on Tuesday, June 26, at 8 p.m. as a benefit for The Spartanburg Little Theatre. As a composer, Hamlisch has won three Oscars, four Grammys, four Emmys, a Tony and three Golden Globe awards. He has written music for Broadway shows like “A Chorus Line,” “They’re Playing Our Song,” and “The Goodbye Girl” in addition to motion picture scores. Tickets are $40 ($30 for Little Theatre season members), and a complete sellout of the 500 seats is expected. Call 864-542-ARTS or visit www.chapmanculturalcenter.org for information or tickets.

Store your sundries in handmade canisters that preserve an ancient tradition. Influenced by Ming China, Vietnam’s blue and white ceramics have been cherished around the world since the 15th century. In the famous pottery village of Bat Trang, skills are passed down through generations.

Send us your arts announcement. E-mail: spartanburgarts@thespartanburgjournal.com.

THE HUNT IS ALMOST OVER.

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2 West Lewis Plaza on augusta ugusta road, Greenville, SC 29605 Use this logo for reductions only, do not print magenta. Do not reduce this logo Mon–fri 10–5:30, Sat 10–4 more thanri 35%. Magenta indicates the clear area, nothing864-239-4120 should print in this space. You may reduce the logo to 30% without the tag and strap lines. greenville.tenthousandvillages.com find us on facebook and Twitter Color of Wood Block Motif critical match to Pantone 1805. Letters print Pantone Process Black.

May is gifts, gifts, gifts

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honor the bride and groom’s special day with beautiful, fairly traded, handcrafted wedding gifts. We are ready with gift suggestions for weddings, graduates and teachers.

MAY 25, 2012 | SPARTANBURG Journal 21


JOURNAL HOMES F E AT U R E D H O M E S & N E I G H B O R H O O D S | O P E N H O U S E S | P R O P E R T Y T R A N S F E R S

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HOME INFO Price: $550,000 4 Bedrooms, 3.5 Baths, 3,304 SF Seminole Drive, Augusta Road Area, Greenville Take advantage of this unique opportunity in the Sunset Hills area of Augusta Road. Surrounded by a traditional neighborhood with mature trees overhanging the streets, and within walking distance to Augusta Circle Elementary. This gorgeous home combines traditional craftsman architecture with modern luxuries and green technologies. Inside you’ll find an open floor plan with a spacious master suite on the main level, large walk-in closets, and a spa-inspired master bath. Modern luxuries will

include a gas fireplace, a huge gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets, granite counter tops, an outdoor fireplace, hardwood floors and Energy Star appliances including a tankless water heater and high efficiency heating and air conditioning systems. Living areas are spacious and open and include large dining and family rooms. Don’t miss your opportunity to own brand new construction in the convenient and established Augusta Road Area! Plans developed by: Reynolds Croft Design Group

Inviting Front Porch, Master Bedroom Suite on Main, Large Formal Rooms, and Energy Efficient Appliances Contact: Patrick Franzen 864.250.1234 patrickfranzen@msn.com Highland Homes www.highlandhomes.com Send us your Featured Home for consideration. homes@greenvillejournal.com

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22 S P A R T A N B U R G J O U R N A L | MAY 25, 2012

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$1,750,000 $212,006 $211,000 $200,261 $178,601 $162,400 $155,000 $154,000 $150,000 $150,000 $149,900 $140,000 $140,000 $135,000 $135,000 $129,900 $126,000 $115,900 $115,900 $111,000 $110,000 $110,000 $109,500 $106,682 $101,250 $96,900 $92,900 $90,000 $89,900 $87,167 $80,806 $76,500 $69,900 $66,026 $60,000 $50,000 $49,734 $49,734 $47,500 $45,000 $35,500 $34,400 $34,000 $32,000 $31,900 $28,500 $28,341 $25,000 $20,000 $10,000 $7,000 $5,000 $5,000 $4,255 $2,500 $2,500 $2,500 $2,500 $2,000 $500 $500

THE SPARTANBURG HERALD JOURNAL STONEWOOD HOMES INC LEGER, ERNEST J CRIBB, WILLIAM T STOKES, RONALD P RODGER C JARRELL REAL ESTATE HAMBY, EDITH CAROLINE SMITH, GORDON H KAPPA LLC HENDLEY II, WILLIAM DAVID AMANTE, MILDRED E PALISADE PARTNERS LLC BRANEN, IRIS R BISHOP, CARROLL R MIKE SEAY CONSTRUCTION BOWERS, JEFFERY T BUSTILLO, AURORA RODGER C JARRELL REAL ESTATE AJD HOLDINGS LLC OLIVER, MICHAEL PALMETTO RENTALS LLC PALMETTO RENTALS LLC HARRISON, WILLIAM K MILLER, RENEE B CAROLINA PROPERTIES DAVIS, CHRISTINE WEST RODGER C JARRELL REAL ESTATE BRAASCH BUILDING GROUP LLC HRB PROPERTIES LLC HUBBARD, KEITH R COLLINS, EMMLESS J WILSON, LARRY L RODGER C JARRELL REAL ESTATE KELLETT, DALE PHILOR PROPERTIES INC CAROLINA PROPERTIES PLUMLEY, MICHAEL PLUMLEY, MICHAEL EKSTAR INC BRAASCH BUILDING GROUP LLC SECETARY OF VETERANS AFFAIRS VU LLC TSYMBALYUK, NIKOLAY SOUZA, HELEN HAMILTON, VICTOR LAMONT WILSON, BETHANY R HINES, NANCY R SOUTH TYGER PROPERTIES LLC SEABROKERS INC ZUBER, STACY KENNEDY, PATRICK JOSEPH TOMKO, IRENE A TOMKO, IRENE A ARTHUR STATE BANK BRITT, RICKY LAUGHTER, JANET J TODD, RUSTY LIVINGSTON, EWELL HARRELSON, MIKE BURNETT, WILLIAM GOSSWEILER, ANDREW

NL VENTURES VIII WEST MAIN 189 W MAIN ST CAMPBELL, ADAM N 232 HARVEST WOOD LN NGUYEN, LONG 12 KNEE RUN WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL 211 SWANSEA RD CORAL RIDGE INVESTMENTS LLC 409 OLD IRON WORKS RD PATTON, JENNIFER N 116 WILD HEATHER DR YONKIN, CORRIE HIGHWAY 357 POTTER, ROGER V 146 PLUMCREEK LN GOLDNER, VINCENT K 256 DORIS ANN CT NORTHSIDE DEVELOPMENT 452 MILL ST BRYANT, WILLIAM R 5061 BIBLE CHURCH RD BANK OF TRAVELERS REST 480 STONE RD YOST, JEANNE P 449 RAMBLING ROSE WAY THOMANN, PETER 331 COURSON CT CHAPMAN, APRIL R 133 HARVEST RIDGE DR BARNETT, HARRY G 123 RAVINES LN MARQUESS, EUGENE 362 SEA BREEZE WAY SIMPSON, SHAYLA D 214 GEORGIA QUEEN DR ORTEGA, TIFFANY ELLIOTT 503 ITASKA CT SUEHIRO, STEVEN T 407 FAIRBANKS CT JACKSON, LILLIE 204 QUARTERMASTER RD MCROBERTS, ELLA 6317 GREENFIELD DR TIMOSHKIN, MIKHAIL A 483 HAMMETT RD FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE 504 WHITE ROSE LN ARTHUR STATE BANK 2256 S PINE ST FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE 108 PAWNEE DR LOGAN, NATASHA 151 LONGVIEW DR S C PILLON HOMES INC LOT NUMBER: 103 VAN KAMPEN, BOB 839 DAMSON PLUM CT WELLS FARGO BANK N A 652 MEGA DR FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE 450 BROWNING RD THOMAS, KAY W 414 WOODGROVE TRCE MARTIN, WILLIE M 1918 EL CAMINO REAL FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE 380 GIBSON RD MACE, TIM 334 SUMMER MEADOW TRL ARTHUR STATE BANK 716 UNION ST FLEMING, WILLIAM H 106 APOLLO AVE FLEMING, WILLIAM H 106 APOLLO ST PONDILLO JR, JAMES JOSEPH 674 DRIFTWOOD DR S C PILLON HOMES INC 553 HORTON GROVE RD LAWRENCE, TIMOTHY B 1565 JOHN DODD RD VU, HUNG K 240 CENTER ST YEFIMOV, SERGEE A 394 EDWARDS RD FIRST SOUTH BANK 958 NANTAHALA DR VU LLC 240 CENTER ST JACKSON, RICHARD J 770 HIGHWAY 357 WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL 115 PEACHWOOD ST D R HORTON INC 522 HUNTING BOW LN ORLANDO INVESTING CORP 896 CHATTOOGA RD OMEGA HOMES USA LLC 207 ARDMORE RD PERRY, JAY 216 ALLEN ST 326 LONESOME PINE LANE LAND TRUST 326 LONESOME PINE LN 326 LONESOME PINE LANE LAND TRUST 330 LONESOME PINE LN CASEY, ALAN M LOT NUMBER: 1A THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON 224 E ARLINGTON AVE FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE 644 WILKINS RD ASHMORE, WILLIAM R VARNER ST FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE 124 INVIEW DR HENJES, DOUG CLAYTON DR GREENVILLE COUNTRY REDEVELOP 6 HARDIN ST PARRIS, JEFFREY SCOTT 140 BULLINGTON RD

ADDRESS

MAY 25, 2012 | S P A R T A N B U R G J O U R N A L 23


journal sketchbook

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week

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Photos by Greg Beckner / Staff

Nationwide Tour professional Justin Bolli of Greenville hits a shot out of a bunker on the 8th hole at the Greenville Country Club’s Chanticleer course during the 2012 BMW Charity Pro-Am gold tournament.

Crossword puzzle: page 26

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Sudoku puzzle: page 26

24 SPARTANBURG Journal | MAY 25, 2012

Actor Robert Morrow watches his shot from the rough head toward the 18th green at Greenville Country Club’s Chanticleer course during the 2012 BMW Charity Pro-Am gold tournament. Twenty-four celebrity golfers were paired with amateurs and Nationwide Tour professionals for the four-day event held at the Carolina Country Club in Spartanburg, the Thornblade Club and Greenville Country Club’s Chanticleer course. 

Course marshal Bob Vander Zander holds up the quiet sign before a golfer putts during the 2012 BMW Charity Pro-Am gold tournament.

Nationwide Tour professional Nate Smith of Santa Cruz, Calif., left, talks with rules official Michael Combs of Pinehurst, N.C., about moving his ball off an obstruction before hitting his next shot. Smith’s ball landed on mesh used to keep sod in place, and he couldn’t hit the ball without fear of his club getting caught in the mesh. Combs ruled Smith could move his ball one club length away from the obstruction. 


journal sketchbook

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week

Above: Second-grader Zane Boyd, 8, prepares to throw the “javelin” during field day activities at the Jesse Boyd Elementary School. Jesse Boyd Elementary is an International Baccalaureate World School, and with the 2012 Olympics fast approaching, the field day was called the Jesse Boyd Olympics. Each class picked a country to represent in the Olympics. Right: Danna Navarro, 7, leaps into the air during the high jump competition at the Jesse Boyd Elementary School field day.

Photos by Greg Beckner / Staff

Participants in the 50-yard dash take off from the starting line at the Jesse Boyd Olympics.

presented by Greenville Scottish Games

Embrace your Scottish roots or borrow ours at Greenville’s biggest Scottish Games ever. Gallabrae is now on its way with more parading, caber tossing, stone throwing, sheep-herding, piping, drumming, dancing, and merrymaking than you can handle. This will be a Memorial Day Weekend you won’t soon forget. VISIT GALLABRAE.COM FOR MORE INFO.

- DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE -

GREaT ScOT! PaRaDE – TONIGHT – FRI, May 25 6PM – MaIN STREET MaIN STREET FRIDay - 5:30 PM - HyaTT PLaZa - FURMaN UNIVERSITy -

GREENVILLE ScOTTISH GaMES – SaT, May 26 GaTES OPEN aT 8:30 aM cELTIc JaM – SaT. NIGHT, May 26 aT 8PM Members of the Wofford College graduating class of 2012 make their way to the main building for the college’s commencement exercises. The college’s 158th commencement exercises were held on Sunday, May 20, conferring degrees to 300 graduates.

Wofford College President Benjamin Dunlap congratulates graduates as they cross the stage at the main building during the college’s 158th commencement exercises.  

MAY 25, 2012 | SPARTANBURG Journal 25


journal sketchbook

figure. this. out. Suitable employment

By Ed Sessa

U P S T A T E

DINING

See what you’ve been missing

HEADING OUT TO EAT THIS WEEKEND? NEED SOME suggestions? Adams Bistro American Grocery Arizona’s Blockhouse Blue Ridge Brewing Company The Bohemian Brick Street Café The Brown Street Club Cafe at Williams Hardware Chophouse ‘47 CityRange Davani’s Devereaux’s Fonda Rosalinda’s Ford’s Oyster House The Galley Restaurant The Green Room Handi Indian Cuisine Hans & Franz Biergarten Harry & Jean’s John Paul Armadillo Oil Company The Lazy Goat Liberty Tap Room & Grill Mary Beth’s The Mellow Mushroom Midtown Deli Nami Asian Bistro Nantucket Seafood Grill Northampton Wine Café Nose Dive On The Border Open Hearth Steak House P. Simpson’s The Plaid Pelican Portofino’s Italian Restaurant Rick Erwin’s West End Grille Ristorante Bergamo Roman’s Macaroni Grill Runway Café Ruth’s Chris Steak House Saffron’s West End Café Sassafras Southern Bistro Smoke on the Water Soby’s New South Cuisine Stax Billy D’s Stax Omega Diner Stella’s Southern Bistro Stellar Restaurant & Wine Bar Thaicoon Ricefire &Sushi Bar The Trappe Door Travinia Italian Kitchen Trio A Brick Oven Café Yia Yia’s

Upstate UpstateFoodie .com Feed Your Inner Food Enthusiast

26 SPARTANBURG Journal | MAY 25, 2012

Across 1 Quran religion 6 Spaceship Earth locale 11 Cotillion honoree 14 Fischer’s game 19 NFL ref’s aid 20 Tire 22 __ flush 23 Scientist who is tedious to a fault? 25 Rome’s Fontana di __ 26 Invitation on the road 27 Old Colgate competitor 29 Zipped 30 Olin of “Chocolat” 31 Lean (toward) 33 “Milk’s favorite cookie” 35 Bread maker not earning his bread? 40 Vulnerable area 44 Pound and Cornell 45 Meditative practice 46 Jewel cases? 47 Blowgun ammo 48 Fool, to Puck 50 Arranger growing into her job? 53 Les États-__ 54 Large pitcher 56 “The Valachi Papers” author Peter 57 __-car 58 Something seen in anger? 59 Jib, for one 60 Den sleeper 62 Play areas 63 Attorney who turns

heads? 67 Watch with astonishment 70 “Do __ others, then run”: Benny Hill 71 Blubber 72 Actress Lupino 75 Williams who played Potsie on “Happy Days” 76 Turf defender 78 Ride to hail 79 Grade qualifier 80 Nightclubbing club pro? 84 Sanctify with oil 86 Flier with Chicago H.Q. 87 Future J.D.s’ exams 88 China’s Sun __-sen 89 Lamebrained 90 Some candlelight vigils 92 Belle in blue? 96 __ infra: see below 97 Thailand, formerly 98 “The future __ what it used to be”: Yogi Berra 99 Hula accompanists 101 Security concerns 104 Old film short 109 Authority 111 Practitioner who likes to practice? 114 Guinness choice 115 Fantasy land 116 Valse, par exemple 117 Libertines 118 Folded sleeper

119 Tecumseh transport 120 Butter substitutes Down 1 Library catalog no. 2 Gin fizz flavoring 3 Traditional wisdom 4 Surrounded by 5 16th-century work also known as “La Gioconda” 6 Urging (on) 7 Ready-made 8 Aquatic bird 9 Big-eyed bird 10 V-sign, to a maître d’ 11 Regular paper 12 Celtic language 13 Data unit 14 Old PC monitor 15 Flicka and Fury 16 Like fireworks displays 17 Except 18 Hydroplaned 21 Samantha of “Doctor Dolittle” 24 Secluded valley 28 Pricey mushroom 31 List of events, briefly 32 Make (one’s way) 34 Finally turned (to) 35 Madagascan tree climber 36 Important layer 37 Sure competitor 38 Pool legend, familiarly 39 Côte d’__ 40 Epic narrative

41 Does in 42 Mexicali-to-Tijuana dirección 43 Casual farewells 46 Junkyard warning 49 Sprang 50 Dracula portrayer Lugosi 51 Insect stage

Easy

62 Assad’s country 63 Really long time 64 Organs usually found in pairs 65 Banned apple spray 66 Honeycomb substance 67 Prepare to hit the road 68 Hosni’s predecessor 69 Beatles hit with the line, “Treasure these few words till we’re together” 72 Pelvic bone-related 73 “Search me” 74 Words after lost or gained 76 Bitty biter 77 Smart and 99: Abbr. 78 Bordeaux block? 79 1972 video game debut 81 Basketball Hall of Famer Dan 82 Constellation named for a stringed instrument 83 Place to sow one’s oats? 85 Mario franchise company 91 Muscle or bone 92 Wedding path 93 Serenaded 94 Colorful tee 95 Legal memo starter 97 Bypass 99 Old map initials 100 Green Hornet’s sidekick 102 Part of HEW: Abbr. 103 Florentine flower? 104 “Come __!”: “Welcome!” 105 List ender 106 Reel nylon 107 Big petrol seller 108 AAA suggestions 110 They may decide some close games, briefly 112 Fond du __, Wisconsin 113 Dockworkers’ org.

52 Bring up 55 22-year-old Stanford graduate who became a pro golfer more than six years ago 59 Adorned with sequins 60 Church hall shout Crossword answers: page 24 61 Tonsillitis M.D.

Sudoku answers: page 24


journal sketchbook

in my own words with ashley holt

Marriage browse Because she is one of the few people still speaking to me after all these years, I spend a lot of time with my wife, Melissa. My craving for her constant attention means I tag along on routine excursions I might usually avoid, and that would surely have gone more smoothly without me. In essence, I am clingy, inviting myself along to food and clothes-shopping trips to quell separation anxiety. Fortunately for Melissa, she has become adept at ignoring me. Take the grocery store. Like most men, I can pull off a solo trip for groceries in about three minutes. I grab some burger buns, a few cans of SpaghettiO’s, and still have a couple of minutes left to flirt pathetically with an underage checkout girl. Knowing that I could make, or perhaps even beat that time on my own makes it all the more painful to shop with the wife. While she, the healthconscious vegetarian, carefully scrutinizes nutrition labels on grass-fed hummus and so forth, I’m left loitering with my hands in my pockets. So I have to entertain myself as best as I can. One game I developed is called Count the Shreks, in which I keep a mental tally of every item on the grocery store shelves featuring the hideous cartoon film star (during the release of “Shrek 2,” I counted 48 food products in Publix alone). If Shrek is out of season, I play Count the Spongebobs, Count the Elmos or Count the Biebers.

“Twenty-six Biebers,” I will dutifully report to Mel. No response. She’s deeply engrossed in the ingredients list of a Paul Newman salad dressing. This gal is focused. This is something I’ve noticed among the other couples shopping at Bi-Los, craft fairs and Pottery Barn outlets. The women all have this alert, caffeinated, driven look in their eyes – a feline readiness to pounce on any available item and scrutinize it in detail. Women’s brains become supercharged in this environment. They can instantly calculate the sale percentage of a discount shower curtain liner and pinpoint the exact shade of green on a table lamp to determine whether or not it will match the drapes. They will smell everything. By contrast, the men on these outings all look like they’ve been hit on the head with a socket wrench: dazed expression, jaws slack with confusion and fatigue. If asked their opinion, they are forced to confess they didn’t know they had drapes at all, much less what color they might be. They are most certainly NOT in their element. Pushing a cart through aisles of housewares or produce seems to deprive the male brain of oxygen, and they invariably appear lost and somewhat frightened. If there are kids in tow, the man will be assigned disciplinary duties while the female huffs each individual candle or underarm deodorant.

God help the male shopper if anyone has a birthday coming up or has landed in the hospital. Choosing the right greeting card could take hours. It can all feel pretty emasculating to the domesticated male. But the worst indignity of all, the place where the Luckiest Guy in the World is made to feel like a complete eunuch, is the little chair outside the women’s dressing room. This is the throne of shame, the Guy Chair, where the husbands and boyfriends are left to contemplate the total evaporation of their youthful masculinity while their beloved tries on closeout fashions. Sitting there with no manly preoccupations, he must endure the hostile glare of the other female shoppers, who see not a dutiful husband awaiting his soul mate, but a lonely perv hanging out among racks of bras and panties, surrounded by strange women who are about to get undressed. To complete the humiliation, the store will surround the Guy Chair with pornographic display materials – advertisements featuring well-toned, perfectly-lit women lounging in their underwear. The other shoppers will wonder, rightfully, which unthinking wife invited this leering creep into their sacred realm of discount pantyhose in the first place. Couldn’t she find a sitter? The plight of an adult male shopper hasn’t really changed since our mothers dragged us along on retail excursions in childhood. Even today, while “mommy” is dedicatedly rummaging through half-off

hair dye, we are desperately searching for anything toy-like to distract us from our pain – a DVD, a staple gun, a Chewbacca t-shirt, some Pittsburg Steelers adhesive bandages. Anything that requires batteries. It’s sad. But I like to think that the hopeless, brain-dead men being herded down the aisle by their better halves might still retain some of their prehistoric macho instincts. They might spring to life if, say, the lawn and garden department were to explode and six or seven rabid rhinos came charging out of the flames. It’s comforting to believe the males would then shake off their stupor, utilize some Maybelline as war paint, MacGyver up some Lysol and Bics into flamethrowers and capture the rampaging beasts with some matching Martha Stewart tablecloths ($29.95 this Saturday only). I hope they can take care of it, because I’m too busy counting Biebers. Ashley Holt is an illustrator and opinionated crank living in South Carolina. His neurotic quirks and extreme sensitivity to broad social trends are chronicled in The Symptoms, an illustrated blog. Holt’s work has appeared in many defunct publications and hard-to-sell books. He is considered a complete failure by those envious of his genius. Check out his website at www. ashleyholt.com.

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MAY 25, 2012 | SPARTANBURG Journal 27



May 25, 2012 Spartanburg Journal