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CITY COUNCIL VOTE BRINGS PROPERTY TAX HIKE NEARER

GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLE GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, May 23, 2014 • Vol.16, No.21

Freedom WRITERS Inspired by a Journal article, the Writers Block program helps prisoners turn their reality into art PAGE 8

Supporters, protesters sound off on roads referendum PAGE 17

New Conestee park will go to the dogs PAGE 18

GHS announces Spartanburg, Anderson expansion PAGE 22

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www.greenvillefcu.com 800.336.6309 *Annual Percentage Rate is based on a 36-month term. Your loan rate and term amount may vary depending on individual credit history and underwriting factors. All credit union rates, fees, terms, and conditions are subject to change at any time without notice. A 36-month loan with 1.99% APR would have monthly payments of $28.64 per thousand borrowed. **Receive a $50 gift card when you finance your vehicle loan with the credit union, loans below $5000 are not eligible for gift card. +Rate floor is 1.74%, offer excludes current loans held by Greenville Federal Credit Union. Offer good from April 1 through June 30, 2014. ©2014, Greenville Federal Credit Union. All rights reserved. Member NCUA.

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66˚

FRIDAY

88˚

59˚ SATURDAY 82˚

58˚

SUNDAY

83˚

We can expect warm days “and pleasant nights for the

Memorial Day weekend.

A stray storm possible

2 THE JOURNAL | MAY 23, 2014

Plenty of sunshine

Mostly to partly sunny


JOURNAL NEWS

WORTH REPEATING THEY SAID IT

“Writing allows me to be who I am. Before I got to the CBU, I was still afraid to be who I really was. I wasn’t able to open up. I’ve become unchained.”

$6.9 million Increase in Greenville’s general fund from last year, according to a proposed budget before City Council now.

42

Willie, an inmate in the Character Based Unit (CBU) at Perry Correctional Institution, and participant in the Writers Block prisoner writing program. QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“We are not the victims of poor planning, but of unexpected successes.”

Average age of Greenville’s six fire stations

$90,000

David Dejesa, a Riverside High debate coach, on the need to raise at least $15,000 to send 14 students to the National Speech and Debate Tournament in Kansas.

“We’ve been pinching ourselves throughout the entire rehearsal process, saying, ‘Oh, my God. We’re doing ‘Les Miz.’” Samuel Lloyd, who plays Marius in Greenville Little Theatre’s upcoming production of “Les Miserables.”

“Don’t fear death. It makes you weak. We need you to fight your way back to us.”

“Don’t mix beer, wine and liquor all at once. You may end up singing ‘Happy Birthday’ to yourself by yourself in front of an entire bar.” Columnist Diane Irving, reflecting on life lessons learned on the eve of her 30th birthday.

Navy SEAL Thom Shea’s wife Stacy, the night before Shea left for Afghanistan.

% 3OF0 F

YOUR ENTIRE E PURCHAS

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2 out of 3

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JOURNAL NEWS

Bright seeks ‘limited government, maximum liberty’ State senator to challenge Graham in U.S. Senate primary

What’s something that people don’t know about you? How my business problems from a few years ago result in a keener understanding of the fragile nature of our economy. No one on a government paycheck could possibly understand this. As I travel the state, I have met so many people who tell me about losing a good job, or struggling to keep a business afloat despite the increasing burden of government. Lindsey Graham has never run a business and has had the government as the primary source of his paycheck, so it is no wonder that he doesn’t understand what ordinary Americans and small businesses are going through.

SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com As one of the six Republican challengers running to unseat U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham, State Sen. Lee Bright made national headlines earlier this year when he raflled off a semi-automatic AR-15 rifle as part of his campaign. Bright is a Spartanburg native, is married and has two children. He is director of business development for BBD LLC and operates a trucking brokerage business. He previously served as a member of the board of Spartanburg County School District 6, was elected to the state Senate in 2008 and was re-elected to a second term in 2012. This week, Bright was in Greenville, giving away a handgun at a campaign rally and barbecue. The Journal asked Bright to weigh in on questions as the June 10 primary quickly approaches. What’s the one most important issue that you are running on? Perhaps you are looking for a single issue, but that’s not the best way to respond to your question. The most important reason to defeat Lindsey Graham is that he is no longer a smallgovernment conservative and he is no longer remotely in touch with South Carolina. He is now a creature of Washington, and therefore part of the problem. He cannot ever again be part of the solution. Graham’s isolation from the reality outside of Washington impacts every issue he touches and how he views conservatives like Ted Cruz.

sage is superior, the grass roots is overwhelmingly on our side, and when we force a runoff we’ll get a lot of national and in-state support to defeat him.

afraid to take the tough stands.

Lee Bright

We are literally fighting to determine whether America as founded survives or is lost. What made you decide to challenge Lindsey Graham? What makes you a better candidate? After six years in the state Senate, I realized that most of the problems we face originate in the bloated federal bureaucracy in Washington. We made a good start a few years ago by replacing moderate wishy-washy members of the House like Bob Inglis with committed conservatives like Trey Gowdy. South Carolina needs to make a stand for liberty and limited government in Washington. If South Carolina doesn’t, who is going to? Lindsey Graham won’t make that stand against Washington – he’s part of the problem now. We need someone with a proven conservative track record, and I’ve shown in my six years in the state Senate that I am not

What endorsement have you not received but think would be a huge step? I have great admiration for Sens. Cruz, [Rand] Paul and [Mike] Lee, but I understand that sitting senators simply do not endorse against other sitting senators in their party. I also have tremendous respect for Tim Scott – but again, he’s a sitting Republican senator. It’s clear that a U.S. senator named Lee Bright would have far more in common with all of these senators than Lindsey Graham ever will, and I would bet that in their heart of hearts, they are pulling for me. It would be nice if it were known publicly. And of course, I think if Sarah Palin had a chance to review our field, she would be a Lee Bright supporter too. So any or all of those would be huge. We’ve received a lot of endorsements from individuals and groups in and outside of South Carolina, but the only thing that matters is the support of the voters. Our polling shows that we are gaining support from South Carolina Republicans every day and that Sen. Graham has been steadily losing support since January.     What is the biggest challenge you think you are facing in this race? The special-interest money being funneled to Graham, and the perception in Washington that Lindsey Graham is unchallenged are the two main obstacles. The way they analyze the race in Washington – it’s as if they don’t have a clue about how our primary system works. Which means, when Graham loses

What about your campaign fund – do you have enough to run a successful race? Lindsey Graham has proven particularly talented at getting contributions from big businesses who profit by influencing the government. For any challenger, fundraising is tough, especially in this economic climate. So far we have been able to run a very strong campaign. We have offices in every region of the state, a very talented campaign team, and thousands of precinct chairmen and volunteers all over the state. We’ve also been able to use some very innovative technologies which have multiplied our efforts. We can’t afford to give away as much free barbecue as Sen. Graham, but our team is working harder than anybody out there. That’s what we’re about to find out. Certainly, aside from Lindsey Graham, who has a lot of Washington insider donors, none of the candidates have the money they would like. But our mesAdSlick_02

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JOURNAL NEWS

Rice stumps for Graham JEANNE PUTNAM | CONTRIBUTOR

jputnam@communityjournals.com Former U.S. Secretary of State Dr. Condoleezza Rice came to Greenville on Monday to stump for U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham’s reelection at a luncheon attended by 1,100 people. Rice, who currently serves as a professor in global business and the economy at Stanford University, participated in a question-and-answer discussion with Graham moderated by David Wilkins, former U.S. Ambassador to Canada. The Q&A covered a myriad of topics, ranging from Iran’s nuclear program and Russia’s invasion of Crimea to the future of the Republican Party. Rice said that without the U.S. standing watch, as when the country entered World War II in Europe during the time of the Soviet Union, a “vacuum” develops that allows “bad things” such as Al Qaeda to fill it. According to Rice, it is this type of vacuum that has allowed Iran to become a danger because the country wants to shift the power in the Middle East to itself and is doing it through building nuclear arms. Rice said that the sanctions against Iran should be enforced and that the country should believe that the U.S. will bring military force, if necessary. She called for federal defense cuts to not “gut military forces,” particularly when dealing with Russian President

in a few weeks it is going to send shockwaves through Washington. What are your views on the polarization in Washington and how (or whether) it can be addressed? Does this vitriolic partisanship hurt the country? First of all, partisanship and polarization is a symptom of having two very different views on how we should organize our affairs. It is not the disease. Our founders, and Ronald Reagan, and other conservatives understand that the best path is through limited government and maximum liberty. World history proves it. Common sense proves it. Human nature dictates it. The Democrats, and all liberals, and all too often Lindsey Graham, do not believe that. The main problem in Washington is that the Democrats have become increasingly strident in their efforts to

Vladimir Putin. Rice said in order to deal with Russia, the country must also adopt an energy policy that “makes sense” because the Russian economy is vulnerable Rice through its export of oil. She also recommended that the U.S. reinforce NATO because Putin will not attack wherever U.S. forces are. Finally, both Graham and Rice acknowledged that in order for the Republican Party to survive and win seats, it must evolve since the country is always changing. “This country does not work on automatic,” said Rice. “‘We the people’ has become more inclusive” as the country has developed. Rice pointed to how the Constitution has evolved, first from counting her ancestors as three-quarters of a person, to allowing for “separate but equal” treatment, and then ending segregation, which allowed her to eventually become secretary of state. Even with Rice’s endorsement, Graham still has pastor Det Bowers, state Sen. Lee Bright, businessman Richard Cash, attorney Bill Connor, attorney Benjamin Dunn and PR executive Nancy Mace to face in the Republican primary on June 10. Two Democrats are also vying for his seat.

grow government – and Republicans like Lindsey Graham have done nothing to stop them. In the state Senate I have a reputation for being a fearless advocate for the conservative Republican agenda on matters of principle, but I have also been able to work with my colleagues when it is in the best interests of the state. Do you believe consensus is necessary to address issues like maxedout entitlements, health care reform, immigration reform, the sputtering recovery, etc.? We’ve addressed all these with a supposed “consensus” for decades, and what do we have? A disaster on all fronts. No, what we need is for the right ideas to triumph in the election, and for some good policies to be advanced and signed. We do not need consensus with liberals – we need to defeat them.

Health Events Incontinence: Information Every Woman Should Know Fri., May 30 • Noon-1 p.m. • Marriott Spartanburg Join GHS’ Jeffrey Garris, MD, MS, a pelvic medicine specialist, to learn about bladder control issues. Free; registration required. Vet Talk Fri., May 30 • Noon-1 p.m. • Centre Stage Be part of the discussion on how to care for veterans in the Upstate. Free; registration required. Understanding Pancreatic Cancer Thurs., June 5 • 12:15-1:15 p.m. • GHS Life Center® Join GHS surgical oncologist Brian McKinley, MD, to learn about pancreatic cancer. Lunch provided. Free; registration required. Cancer Survivors Day Sun., June 8 • 2-3:30 p.m. • Embassy Suites Cancer survivors and their family members are invited to attend a celebration of life in honor of National Cancer Survivors Day®. Event includes entertainment, exhibits and dessert. Free; registration required. Men’s Health Week Roundtable Discussion Tues., June 10 • Noon-1 p.m. • GHS Life Center Attend an informal discussion on health issues affecting men. Lunch provided. Free; registration required. Meet the Midwives Tues., June 24 • 6-8 p.m. • Greenville Midwifery Care Learn about GHS’ nurse-midwifery program and how a midwife can enhance the birthing process. Free; registration required. To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, please visit ghs.org/healthevents or call 1-877-GHS-INFO (447-4636).

ghs.org 14-21378971GJ

MAY 23, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 5


JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

Let the revolution begin Clearly, our April 2 communitywide forum on the homelessness crisis was a precedent-setting event – the very first time that service providers, volunteers, students and just “plain folks” drew together in Greenville to ponder perhaps the most critical issue facing our community. The mission was not merely to talk, but to find “the solution.” Nearly all the attendees realized, of course, that our forum was to take the first steps in the path toward “the solutions,” plural. To end homelessness, multifaceted systems must be changed, some by revolution, but most by determined evolution. This in mind, most of the evening was spent in diagnostics, not prescriptions: What are the sources of homelessness? What needs to be changed? What are the obstacles? Where are the models for success? What civic nerves need to be touched? The most immediate next steps are to review the knowledge gleaned from the discussions at the forum, compile them in an intelligible, comprehensive form, and share the unified information with the participants. The sharing will likely then also be with the media, city/ county leadership, and people and organizations that have established themselves as catalysts for positive change. To my mind, the sharing of information should lead to another roundtable with many of the original participants, ones who could become agents for change, people with the influence to convert ideas into actions. This will be quite a challenge, getting the corporate, business, industrial, professional and political sectors of the community to the table to hear, speak and react. But, it will be a necessary step. At the same time, I hope the group of more than 200 participants will morph into task forces with specific

SPEAK YOUR MIND The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters

6 THE JOURNAL | MAY 23, 2014

IN MY OWN WORDS by MARC WILSON

assignments: Work on the pieces of the puzzle that will ultimately be reunited into an action plan of “who needs to do what and when.” A key issue that we will repeatedly face is how to convert our good intentions and plans into reality. Thus, implementation of the plan will be the ultimate challenge.

At this point, the operative phrase of the plan is “in my mind.” The leadership of the initiative, not I, will ultimately determine the strategy for moving forward. We are all eager for those critical next steps to be set into motion. All the while, a carefully chosen committee of Year of Altruism will ponder our ongoing role as a catalyst for identifying key issues, energizing the community, and birthing the solutions. This is our most essential assumption – that YOA will continue even after YOA is “officially” over in June. What a wonderful start we had at our first forum. We now need to determine a modus operandi for taking the tasks forward. We resolve that by the time, if ever, we are “finished,” the face of homelessness will change radically for the better. It will be another reason to shout, “Yeah! THAT Greenville!” Marc Wilson is a rabbi and founder/director of Year of Altruism in Greenville.

should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short

A call to action On Mother’s Day, safe amidst my own family, my thoughts often turned to the more than 270 women in Nigeria who were without their daughters. The Islamist terrorist group Boko Haram may have many motives in this shocking act of kidnapping these young women. They have said they will sell the girls into slavery, though that may not have been the primary goal. These stolen girls – ripped from their families and their futures – are the current face of human trafficking in the world. In the U.S., there is a growing call to action for the country to “do something.” But the sad reality is that human trafficking goes on every day in every country. The U.S. State Department estimates 27 million people are enslaved in the world at any given time. They are sold as sex workers and forced laborers, and sometimes their organs are harvested for sale. Up to 80 percent of women and girls who are trafficked outside of their native countries are sold as sex slaves. Victims and the type of slavery they are taken for vary by region, according to the United Nations. But across all regions, two-thirds are children. In Africa, 68 percent of victims are children; 49 percent are sold for forced labor; 36 percent into the sex trade. In Europe and Central Asia, 82 percent of trafficking victims are adults; only 16 percent are children. Sixty-two percent are sold for sex slaves; 31 percent for forced labor. In the Americas, 73 percent of trafficked individuals are adults; 27 percent are children. Fiftyone percent sold as sex slaves and 44 percent as forced laborers. In Southeast Asia and the Pacific region, 61 percent are adults, 39 percent are children with 44 percent sold into the sex trade and 47 percent into forced labor. Dining for Women supports grassroots organizations that work to empower women and girls in the most impoverished parts of the world. Often these organizations are fighting the

bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, fact-based arguments.

IN MY OWN WORDS by MARSHA WALLACE

underlying issues that hold women and girls back and contribute to a climate and a society where human trafficking can thrive. Girls fall into the hands of human traffickers in many ways. Sometimes they are kidnapped; sometimes they are lured by never-to-be-met promises, sometimes they are sold by their families. No matter how it happens, it is always the result of desperation and hopelessness. What can we do? As an organization, we support programs like Somaly Mam, Her Turn, Lotus Outreach, Prevent Human Trafficking and Love 146 that focus on the fight against human trafficking. Through them, we have learned that – like most culture wars – this one cannot be won quickly or easily. We fight it every day by attacking the underlying causes that allow it to flourish: poverty, lack of education, lack of opportunity, gender inequality. We believe that providing education for girls and economic opportunities for women will empower them to be change agents, to strengthen the core of their families and communities, to change their societies. It is slow work. Today, the world’s attention is on this issue; if we can hold it after this crisis no longer commands headlines, we will have a greater ability to help these women and girls to overcome the inequality and ignorance that allows trafficking to flourish. That would really be doing something. Marsha Wallace of Greenville is the founder of Dining for Women. She is a member of the board of directors, public speaker and advocate for the rights of women and girls around the world. Learn more at diningforwomen.org.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of

organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Executive Editor Susan Clary Simmons at ssimmons@ communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL NEWS

Tax hike closer after City Council vote JOE TOPPE | STAFF

jtoppe@communityjournals.com Following a unanimous approval by City Council Monday, Greenville is one step closer to raising property taxes for the first time since the early 1990s. The proposed 2014-2015 operating budget would include an increase of four mills to the existing millage rate of 85.4 and a percentage increase to select city fees. The money provided by the increase in city rates and fees would allow a $6.9 million expansion to the upcoming operating budget’s general fund. In an interview with the Journal earlier this month, Kai Nelson, director of the office of management and budget, said property taxes comprise nearly half of the city’s general fund revenues, and in order to meet the financial demands for the 2014-2015 fiscal year, the proposed budget recommends increases to the millage rate, building permit and plan review fees. If the average cost of a home in Greenville is $200,000, a homeowner could expect to pay $32 per year based on the millage increase, he said. Nelson said an additional $6 per year on sewer and 62 cents per year on stormwater would be added to homeowners’ fees with houses valued at $200,000. “Under the proposed budget, the homeowner could expect to pay $38.62 more than last year,” he said. Beginning on July 1, the proposed budget would include a general fund of $74,609,477, a $6.9 million increase from last year’s fund. The general fund accounts for municipal services such as parks and recreation, development, city personnel, police and fire, Nelson said. The expansion of this year’s general fund can be largely attributed to the priority placed on improving pubic safety and citywide fire protection, he said. Costing $1 million per year to operate, a new east side fire station will require the construction of a $1.3 million facility and 12 full-time firefighters. Nelson said an additional $2 million would focus on improvements to existing fire stations throughout the city. With an average age of 42 years, each of Greenville’s six fire stations contains deferred maintenance, he said. Of the

$6.9 million difference between the current and upcoming fiscal year, the improvements to the city’s fire protection will account for $3.3 million of that overall number.

“Under the proposed budget, the homeowner could expect to pay $38.62 more than last year.” Kai Nelson, director of the office of management and budget

An approximate $1.5 million increase in the city’s annual payroll is expected for the upcoming year with $600,000 of that total set aside for 30 new positions and the remaining $900,000 set aside for existing compensation adjustments (merits). Capital equipment purchases are expected to account for some of the $6.9 million difference between the two fiscal years and include the purchase of a $950,000 vehicle for the fire department. Nelson said the proposed budget would also include an additional $690,000 in capital improvement projects. The capital investments would involve projects including streets and sidewalks, improvements to the Village of West Greenville, neighborhood parks, and the commercial corridors, he said.

2014-2015 GENERAL FUND EXPENDITURES 27% FOR POLICE 21% FOR FIRE

What’s Right in Health Care GHS Nurses Receive Palmetto Gold Award Nine GHS nurses received the S.C. Nurses Foundation’s Palmetto Gold Award. This award is given annually to nurses who demonstrate excellence in patient care and commitment to the nursing profession. GHS Palmetto Gold Award winners are Susan Ballew, Ashley Burriss, Michelle Cruice, Bonnie Garner, Beth Hedrick, Jennifer Justus, Shannon McCandless, Peggy O’Harra and Terry Williams. Right Care, Right Time, Right Place GHS has four MD360® locations to meet your non-emergent medical needs during the day, at night and on weekends. Sites are staffed by boardcertified doctors committed to delivering high-quality medical care. Visit ghsMD360.org to find the location nearest you. Fit Family Challenge The Fit Family Challenge is a healthy family lifestyle program that offers fitness classes, expert advice and nutrition information. During the challenge period, families set goals, keep track of healthy habits online and log weekly minutes of activity. Participants also can win prizes. It’s never too late to join! For more information, go to FitFamilyChallengeSC.com. National Bike Challenge This event unites people who ride bikes and encourages those who don’t to begin riding. Visit nationalbikechallenge.org to join the challenge and log the miles you ride outdoors now through Sept. 30. Be sure to sign up with the Greenville Gears, our local community team.

11.7% FOR PUBLIC WORKS 11% FOR NON-DEPARTMENT/ TRANSFER/DEBT SERVICE 10.1% FOR PARKS AND RECREATION 6.4% FOR OMB 5.3% FOR LEGISLATIVE AND ADMINISTRATION 3.7% FOR ECONOMIC AND COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT 2% FOR HR 1.3% FOR PUBLIC INFORMATION

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MAY 23, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 7


JOURNAL NEWS

Journal article spurs creative writing program at Perry The Writers Block could be expanded to other prisons CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com I write because I must I write to release To bring inner peace To make sense of confusion It’s a Tuesday morning, and a dozen men make as much of a circle as they can out of the four rows of short metal benches on which they sit. One by one, each reads a piece of poetry or prose about tape they had written out longhand on legal pads or sheets of looseleaf paper the week before. They tell about a grandfather’s extensive collection of eight-track tapes, of cardboard boxes transformed into structures by duct tape, of tape that holds cars together at speeds of 200 mph. Some speak so quietly their words can barely be heard; others’ voices are confident and strong. Their stories are poignant, humorous, thought-provoking. After each is finished reading, the other men recall a word or a phrase that stuck with them, a simple but powerful way for them to let the other know they were listening, really listening. This is a group of serious writers. But it is no ordinary writing group. Members all wear state-issued khaki jumpsuits with SCDC stenciled on the back and stripes down the leg. They are prisoners at Perry Correctional Institution, one of the state’s maximumsecurity prisons, a place where the state sends those convicted of the most violent of crimes.

I write because There is no place I cannot go No dream I cannot have

When Carol Young Gallagher was president of the Emrys Foundation, a literary arts group in Greenville, she met weekly with the group’s administrative assistant to go over the mail, sign checks and the like. At the beginning of their meeting in a bookstore that would serve as the Emrys office that week in 2010, the assistant slid the mail across the table. With a slight nod, she brought Gallagher’s attention to the letter on top of the pile. The return address in the left-hand corner contained a name Gallagher didn’t recognize and “PCI-Q1A119.” When Gallagher turned the letter over to open it, she saw a faded red stamp across the back that read, “Department of Corrections has not censored this letter; therefore the Department does not assume responsi-

8 THE JOURNAL | MAY 23, 2014

bility for its contents.” Inside was a letter from Kevin, an inmate at Perry who had read a 2010 story in the Greenville Journal about Emrys and wanted Gallagher’s help to find somebody who would conduct an advanced creative writing program for inmates in Perry’s Character Based Unit. Kevin’s last name cannot be used under Department of Corrections policy. The CBU was established in 2010 at the suggestion of inmates who, as Kevin said, “wanted to live above the prison culture.” The unit focuses on “pro-social” conduct, and the prisoners in it – handpicked from the general population because of their good behavior and desire to change – are required to sign a social contract. Inmates in the unit are required to contribute through work assignments and expected to participate in classes, of which The Writers Block is one. Respect is key. Kevin said the atmosphere in the CBU is noticeably different than other prison units. “I know some people say we should lock them up and throw away the key, but some of these guys will get out and be our neighbors,” said Larry Cartledge, Perry’s warden. “We want to put a better citizen in the community when they get out than they were when they came in.”

I am from broken rules to follow a Big brother who broke them first, I am from I told you he wouldn’t be nothing and I proved them

Gallagher, who has a background in English and education and worked with emotionally disturbed children at Marshall I. Pickens Hospital, wanted to design and conduct the program herself. She took the idea to the board. When Anna Katherine Freeland, now the organization’s president, heard it, she immediately was in, too. “It was clear the two of us personally wanted to do this,” said Freeland, who said she had wanted to work with a prison writing program since she attended Converse College’s creative writing program 16 years before. “We were the only ones to raise our hands.” Each Tuesday, the two women park their car in a dirt-and-gravel parking lot and walk several hundred yards towards a fence covered with layers of razor wire. There’s a buzz before they are let in the first gate into the prison complex. The door slams behind them. At the guardhouse, they hand over their driver’s licenses. In return, they get visitors’ ID badges. Another door buzzes and the pair proceeds to the lobby where they remove their shoes and turn their pockets inside out. After walking through a metal detector, they stop, turn around and hold out their arms so they can be patted down. They finally get access to “the yard” and proceed to walk in the middle of two yellow

therapy, but he is hard-pressed to think of a word that would better fit. Inmates write about things on paper they’d never talk about in conversation, he said. Woody, who is in prison for murder, said before he got into the writing program three months ago, he held back from expressing himself because he didn’t think anybody cared. Willie, who said he’s two-thirds of the way through his 30-year sentence, calls what he writes a “soul portrait.” He said he’s a black cowboy who was always the outcast. “Writing allows me to be who I am,” said Willie, who could not read or write when he got to prison. “I’ve discovered it’s OK to be weird, to be different. Before I got to the CBU, I was still afraid to be who I really was. I wasn’t able to open up. I’ve become unchained.” GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Writer Carol Young Gallagher listens as an inmate at Perry Correctional Institution reads his work aloud during the writing workshop called The Writers Block.

lines painted on the sidewalk to the CBU. Cartledge, who became warden after the writing program had already started, said at first he had some reservations about two women going into the communal area of “The Rock” to teach the class. In most prisons, volunteers teach classes or conduct programs in educational wings, not inmates’ living spaces. “Having them go into their living area is a tutor going into the home of a student,” Cartledge said. Kevin said some corrections officers don’t like the CBU because it is “boring and too laid back.” When Gallagher and Freeland enter, there are no hoots or hollers. Members of The Writers Block sit on the metal benches bolted to the floor. Some inmates not in the program read, watch TV or type reports or letters on one of three computers. Another works with an abused dog as a part of the prison’s “Healing Species” program. State Department of Corrections Director Bryan P. Stirling supports The Writers Block and other programs designed to help in the rehabilitation and re-entry of inmates. “These classes and programs allow inmates a constructive outlet to deal with the reality of prison life. We believe this allows for a safer prison environment,” he said.

I write because it gives me a voice, a voice echoing hopes and dreams, where fantasy is more comforting than present reality, a voice that momentarily rises above the cacophony in my head and brings quiet comfort to my un-still thoughts Kevin says it’s too cliché to say writing is

I am from cigarettes, tequila, and women, Where the mixture of all three satisfies the palette; I am from my children’s love, from their hearts, From their eyes; I am from mistakes, regrets, and atonement Colin, who will turn 30 in June, is serving a life sentence without parole. He had faced the death penalty. He is a published writer – three of his poems were published in an anthology when he was in sixth grade. He still keeps in touch with his high school English teacher who encouraged him to write. When he was in the county jail, he’d send her one of his poems and she’d critique it, he said. The Writers Block was the first class he signed up for once he got into the CBU dorm. Writing is Colin’s way to cope – cope with his surroundings, cope with his past, cope with what he’s put his family through. He said he writes to younger family members who still look up to him, trying to get them to realize where making the wrong choices can lead. He said his sister graduated from college, and he was her reason to succeed. He’s trying to become a better writer. “We’re always our own biggest critic,” he said. To mark the third anniversary of the program, Emrys is going to publish a book of the inmates’ writing in the fall. The writing program will be expanded to Leath Correctional Institution, a women’s prison in Greenwood, this fall. Gallagher and Freeland said they want to form a nonprofit, The Writers Block Foundation, to expand the writing program statewide. “This is not a prison writing program,” Freeland said. “This is a group of writers who happen to live in a prison. It’s amazing writing that needs to be read.”


JOURNAL NEWS

Woodruff Road residents speak out on development Rezoning would allow up to 113 new units for proposed condos APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com Nearly 100 East Woodruff Road residents filled Greenville County Council chambers on Monday during a rezoning public hearing to show opposition to a proposed condominium development at the intersection of Woodruff and South Bennetts Bridge roads. Neighbors said they are no strangers to development, but object to the density of the project that could include up to 113 units, a proposal that was amended from an initial 151 units. Mark III Properties is requesting a rezoning from R-S (rural suburban), which allows up to four units per acre, to R-M6, which allows up to six units per acre. The 27-acre property is within the East Woodruff Road Area Plan (EWRAP), which allows density of up to four units per acre, beyond R-S zoning in other areas of the county. The EWRAP is a five- to seven-year plan created by citizens, stakeholders, the Planning Commission and county planning staff to outline recommendations for the area, which has experienced explosive growth. Paul Harris of Blue Water Civil Design represented the developer and said traffic studies indicated that the condominium development would not add more car trips than a subdivision of 75 singlefamily homes located on the same spot. Harris added that the developer would construct sidewalks and help to create connections between adjacent parcels. Residents voiced concerns about increased traffic and congestion in the area without adequate infrastructure. Steve Burry recommended an update of the EWRAP, which was adopted in 2008. He encouraged infrastructure improvements and requested a hold

on future projects with road issues. “How can adding more density to this area do anything to Five Forks but add to the problem and hurt everyone?” said Burry. Councilman H.G. “Butch” Kirven, who represents the area, voiced concern about the developer’s approach in both instances, which “didn’t show any respect for the plan [EWRAP] or the county’s ordinances that were on the books. They sort of came in here and said, ‘This is what we want, here’s what ya’ll are supposed to give us.’” The EWRAP allows for denser development. “It’s still one-and-a-half to three times greater than the EWRAP allows,” said Kirven. He added that after the rezoning is granted, the developer is not required to build condos with open space, but could construct apartments instead. Councilman Fred Payne suggested the project be delayed until after the county considers a potential November referendum on an additional 1 percent sales tax to fund road improvements. “The East Woodruff Road citizens are not opposed to growth, but want to make sure growth is managed as not to smother the potential before it is ever attained,” said resident Joey Hensley, adding that infrastructure, community involvement and pedestrian amenities are considerations. Following the hearing, residents gathered outside and informally discussed the possibility of annexation into Simpsonville or Mauldin. Several residents told the Journal that they did not oppose development, but felt that it should be within the parameters of the EWRAP. “We just want them to abide by the East Woodruff Road Area Plan,” said Kyle Horton. He said annexation should be considered and that the EWRAP plan is working well. Council’s Planning and Development Committee is scheduled to consider the rezoning request on June 2, and a second reading by full council is scheduled for June 17.

BY THE NUMBERS

42.9% 2,126 42.9% – rate of population growth in the East Woodruff Road area between 2000 and 2007, according to Greenville County Planning

2,126 – number of new residences built in the same 2000-2007 time period, according to Greenville County

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JOURNAL NEWS

Legacy Charter School sues NCAA Lawsuit said probationary status has kept some students away CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Legacy Charter School has sued the National Collegiate Athletic Association over the association’s review of the school’s curriculum for college athletic eligibility purposes. In the lawsuit filed in Greenville County Court of Common Pleas, Legacy Charter alleges the NCAA arbitrarily placed the school on probationary or “extended evaluation status” after the school sought certification from the NCAA Eligibility Center that its core classes met NCAA academic standards. Legacy said administrators and coaches from other schools in the area have used Legacy’s extended evaluation status and lack of a list of NCAA Eligibility Center-approved courses to dissuade prospective

students and student-athletes from attending. “Legacy is really all about academics,” said William Brown, the school’s founder and board chairman. “Somehow that’s been lost in all this. We’re asking them to do the right thing.” The NCAA has asked that the lawsuit be dismissed. “The NCAA is confident in the arguments raised in our motion to dismiss currently before the court, the primary of which is the lawsuit fails to allege a valid legal claim,” the NCAA said in an email. All high school student-athletes who plan on attending any NCAA Division I or II school must register with the NCAA Eligibility Center and meet academic and amateur requirements to be certified. To be certified, students must graduate from high school, successfully complete all core courses, have a minimum 2.0 grade point average in those core courses and have a minimum qualifying score on the SAT or ACT. The NCAA Eligibility Center

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maintains a list of approved core courses for every high school in the country that has registered with it. Athletes from schools whose core courses hadn’t been certified are reviewed for initial eligibility on an individual basis. According to the lawsuit, Legacy applied for an NCAA academic review in September 2012. The school resubmitted the application on Jan. 31, 2013, after the NCAA mistakenly combined the materials it submitted with materials submitted by an unrelated charter school with the same name. Two weeks later, Legacy was notified it had been placed on “extended evaluation,” a status that would last two full academic certification cycles, according to the lawsuit. The same correspondence indicated there were “no immediate issues” with the school’s application, the lawsuit said. According to the lawsuit, the NCAA told Legacy it was on extended evaluation status because it was not a member of the South Carolina

High School League. The lawsuit said other schools in the Carolinas and Tennessee that do not participate in their state’s high school athletic league are not in extended evaluation status. At least three Legacy students play football at their assigned public high school based upon their academic records and transcripts at Legacy, the lawsuit said. Legacy does not have its own football program. Three of Legacy’s “sister” charter schools with identical academic programs – Greenville Tech Charter High School, Brashier Middle College High School and Greer Middle College High School – have already been certified, the lawsuit said. Legacy is seeking a declaratory judgment that the NCAA has failed to act in good faith and deal with the school fairly. In 2012, basketball coaches at three Greenville high schools accused Legacy of recruiting players for its startup basketball team. Brown would not comment on whether he thought the NCAA’s action was related to that.

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JOURNAL NEWS

Joy meets world Greenville Zoo’s African elephant packs her trunk for Colorado SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com Greenville Zoo officials announced this week that Joy, the zoo’s last remaining African elephant, will have a new home in the mountains of Colorado. After an extensive search, working directly with the Elephant Species Survival Program (SSP) to identify available Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) accredited facilities and working independently with a recognized elephant sanctuary, plans have been finalized for Joni (publicly known as Joy) to move to her new home at Cheyenne Mountain Zoo in Colorado Springs, Colo. Timing for her move is yet to be determined. “This was a difficult decision, and Joni will be missed dearly by the Greenville Zoo staff and community,” said Greenville Zoo director Jeff Bullock. “However, Cheyenne Mountain Zoo has an amazing program for maturing elephants that will help elephants like Joni thrive. The facility and community are ready to welcome and embrace her as one of their own.” In 2012, the AZA posted new standards for keeping elephants, and over the course of the Greenville Zoo’s

master planning process, it was determined that it would not have enough space to house an elephant exhibit in the future. As a result, the Greenville Zoo staff formed an Animal Management Committee to begin a search for a new home for its two elephants, Ladybird and Joni. Before the committee finalized its plans, Ladybird died in March. “Elephants are very social animals, and with Ladybird’s passing, the search for a new home for Joni became even more critical,” said Bullock. “While there are many wonderful facilities in the U.S., the committee wanted to ensure that wherever Joni went, her needs would be met, both in the short and long term.” The committee sent a comprehensive questionnaire to five facilities across the country. The questionnaire was designed to garner information about their elephant programs, staff, facilities and medical care capabilities. Zoo staff then conducted telephone interviews with three of the facilities. Subsequently, one facility withdrew from consideration and the other two requested site visits to meet Joni and determine whether they could manage her needs. “The process was long and arduous, but the committee was determined to find the best place for Joni to live out the rest of her life,” said Dr. Heather Miller, deputy administrator for animal health. “Cheyenne Mountain Zoo staff visited our zoo and spent time with Joni and her zookeepers. In an effort to aid her in the transition, they have adopted the name Joni, which is the original name given

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Joni, aka "Joy," the Greenville Zoo's last African elephant, will be leaving soon for a zoo in Colorado.


JOURNAL NEWS to her by the zookeepers and trainers who cared for her.” Joni is expected to move to Cheyenne Mountain Zoo’s brand-new Encounter Africa exhibit, where she will be introduced to four other mature female African elephants. The zoo built the facility to specifically meet the daily needs of aging elephants. The zoo provides regular exercise, a yoga program to keep the elephants’ joints moving and a three-acre “vacation yard” that includes a wooded area for times when the elephants might look for alternative enrichment. The exhibit also includes a waterfall feature where the elephants

can bathe in a cascade of water, or submerge themselves in the pool. Miller and elephant manager Christine Dear will accompany the transport of Joni in a separate vehicle in the event medical treatment is needed. Dear will stay at Cheyenne Mountain Zoo for several days to help Joni acclimate to her new surroundings before returning to Greenville. “In our hearts and minds, we truly believe Cheyenne Mountain Zoo is the best new home for Joni,” Bob Chastain, Cheyenne Mountain Zoo president and CEO, said. “Transferring her to Cheyenne Mountain Zoo will provide her with several social opportunities, ad-

ditional living spaces and exceptional veterinary care for her age-related conditions. We are sure our community will be excited to meet her, and our staff welcomes her arrival.” Future plans for the Greenville Zoo’s elephant enclosure and barn space include a large three-story tropical building to house multiple different species. Zoo and city staff are currently working alongside the Friends of the Zoo to determine what might be the best temporary use of the space until that time. “While the committee recognizes that nothing could take the place of our beloved elephants, the committee is looking

at a variety of unique uses for this space that will engage guests for the next few years and honor the memories that the zoo shares with the community,” said Miller. Joni is a 44-year-old African elephant who arrived at the Greenville Zoo in 1977 at the age of 7. She remained the zoo’s only elephant until she moved to Columbia’s Riverbanks Zoo and Botanical Gardens in 1997 while the elephant barn underwent remodeling. Ladybird arrived in 2006 and became Joni’s companion for the next eight years. The zoo will hold a farewell celebration for Joni daily June 5-8 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. near the Elephant Exhibit.

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JOURNAL NEWS

Appeals court vacates decision in school case Humanist group wanted to stop school from holding events in chapel CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com A federal appeals court ruled that a U.S. district judge provided no legal analysis for denying a preliminary injunction that would have prohibited Greenville County Schools from holding school events in places of worship. The case will be reheard by another judge. The American Humanist Association and a Greenville County family filed a lawsuit against Greenville County Schools because Mountain View Elementary School held its fifth-grade graduation ceremony in the Turner Chapel on the campus of North Greenville University, a private Christian college. The lawsuit, filed last year, also alleges that the inclusion of schoolsponsored prayers during the event violated the separation of church and state clause in the U.S. Constitution. U.S. District Judge G. Ross Anderson Jr. denied the humanist association’s request for a preliminary injunction that would have prohibited Greenville County Schools from holding school events in a place of worship as well as forbidding student-initiated prayer during school events. The plaintiffs, who were listed as Jill, John and Jane Doe in the lawsuit, also requested their identities be kept under seal. On Friday, the Court of Appeals said Anderson provided no analysis for his

decision and no written order. The appellate court remanded the case back to the district court and ordered it reassigned to a different judge. Mountain View held its fifth-grade graduation ceremony in the chapel in 2012 and 2013. In court papers, Mountain View Principal Jennifer Gibson said the event was moved from the school cafeteria because the cafeteria was “too small, cramped and uncomfortable” for the ceremony as the school population grew. Only three members of each fifth-grader’s family were permitted to attend. People who couldn’t get in often gathered in the hallway, blocking the exits and creating a safety concern, district officials said. Gibson said in court papers the decision to move the event to the chapel had nothing to do with North Greenville University being a religiously affiliated institution. Gibson said in her affidavit that the 2014 program will eliminate “any school-sponsored or endorsed invocations, prayers or benedictions,” a change she said was made after she heard about the association’s complaints following the 2013 ceremony. In 2014, the student speakers will be allowed to give messages of their own choosing. The messages will not be reviewed, censored or edited by any teacher or administrator, Gibson’s affidavit said. Lawyers for the American Humanist Association said in court documents that the chapel is an “overtly Christian place of worship, embellished with Christian iconography, including a cross and stained-glass windows.” The association contends that there were numerous alternative secular venues available.

Nine Times Preserve open for visitors The newly protected 1,648-acre Nine Times Forest in Pickens County will be open for visitors through a partnership between Naturaland Trust and the SC Department of Natural Resources (DNR), Upstate Forever announced this week. SCDNR will manage recreational uses on the property, including hiking, fishing, hunting and birding. Public use will be during daylight hours and limited to foot traffic only. In 2007, Upstate Forever worked

14 THE JOURNAL | MAY 23, 2014

with The Nature Conservancy to protect 560 acres at Nine Times Preserve, and the property is now owned by The Nature Conservancy. A second tract was protected in late 2013. Nine Times sits at the intersection of the Southern Blue Ridge Mountains and the Piedmont. It is home to seven forest types, mountains and a variety of wildlife, including rare bird species. For more information, visit naturalandtrust.org/nine-times-forest or upstateforever.org.


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ize their manufacturing education programs. Approximately 14 million students are enrolled in career-technical education programs in nearly 1,300 public high schools and 1,700 two-year colleges, according to the study. Hardin said Upstate manufacturers are responding to the budding workforce by becoming farsighted in their hiring approach. Manufacturing companies are beginning to look at employees as long-term investments, he said. “Hiring managers are looking for people with advanced degrees for not only the job at hand, but also for possible promotion down the road.”

As advanced software, robotics and electronic automation become essentials of production and manufacturing, industry employers are saying an educated workforce will be needed for the job. The shift in technology is steering companies away from traditional assembly-line workers to skilled tradesmen with a solid educational foundation, said Chad Hardin, technical recruiter with Godshall Professional Recruting and Staffing in Greenville. As the economy recovers, production and manufacturing specific to the Upstate is increasing, he said. Any form of extended education ranging from basic certifications to advanced degrees is becoming necessary for employees of the industry. Hardin said certain traditional manufacturing jobs could be repetitive and required little training to perform. Technological advances over the last two decades Chad Hardin, technical recruiter with Godshall have necessitated advanced Professional Recruiting and Staffing education, he said. Career institutions such as Greenville Technical College and Tri-County Technical College adHardin said employers are looking dress educational areas specific to for versatile certifications and deproduction and manufacturing. grees in disciplines such as machine A study conducted by the George- tool technology, maintenance, drafttown University Center on Educa- ing and design. tion and the Workforce revealed The requirement is specific to the 42 percent of manufacturing jobs industry, he said. Certain positions would require some postsecondary cross industry lines and include aueducation or degree by 2018. A simi- tomotive, aerospace and textiles. lar study performed by the ManThe innovations in technology powerGroup in 2012 indicated that have demanded a reeducation of machine operators and engineers the workforce, and a certification or are among the top 10 hardest jobs to degree is expected to improve the fill for U.S. employers. likelihood of finding manufacturing “In a little more than three years jobs while highlighting the candinearly half the jobs in production date’s prospects of promotion. and manufacturing will require “Companies are embracing autosomething beyond high school,” mated machinery to maintain comHardin said. petitive efficiency, but a person will The National Center for Educa- need to be in place to manage that tion Statistics reported that many sophisticated technology,” Hardin schools are beginning to modern- said.

“In a little more than three years nearly half the jobs in production and manufacturing will require something beyond high school.”


County roads referendum drives forward APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com Greenville County Council moved a referendum on a 1 percent local option sales tax to fund road improvements closer to the voters Tuesday night. The ordinance to include a referendum on the November ballot passed second reading in a 7-3 vote. Council members heard lengthy public input in support and opposition to the ordinance and debated about potential wording of the referendum, including breaking it into four or two parts: road improvement and construction, bridges, pedestrian facilities and resurfacing. Motions to divide the projects on the referendum wording failed. An attempt made by Councilman Sid Cates and supported by Councilman Joe Baldwin to hold the vote until a representative for District 26 takes office failed in a tie vote. In addition, an attempt by Councilman Willis Meadows to require the SC Department of Transportation (SCDOT) to administer any projects on state roads also failed. County Administrator Joe Kernell said that the county could work on state roads

without having to pay up to 40 percent in administration fees to SCDOT. Work on state roads is a matter of contention for opponents of the 1 percent local option sales tax, because in addition to its own roads, the county would also work on state-owned roads. Councilman Joe Dill said the state wants counties to pay more, mentioning the State Legislature cutting the Local Government Fund by approximately $25 million and the county having to make up the difference. “We’re going down that road of let’s pick up the tab for everything,” he said. “That’s what they want us to do.” If passed, a 1 percent local option sales tax would generate approximately $65 million annually, according to county officials. It would expire in eight years and citizens would have to vote again on any continuation. The funds would be used to complete a list of road projects that are included in the referendum. Opponents of the sales tax say the state should pay for improvements to its own roads and the system of state gas tax collection and distribution needs reform. Kirven countered that the county has waited years for the state

to fix the roads and it is clear the state is not going to do anything. Wearing green T-shirts, representatives of the local chapter of Americans for Prosperity and No Tax Hike SC gathered outside County Square before the meeting in opposition of putting the referendum on the ballot and spoke during the public input time. Supporters of the referendum wore stickers reading “My Roads, My Vote” – the slogan of Citizens for a Better Greenville County, a coalition backed by local businesses, realtor groups, chambers of commerce and nonprofits. A public hearing and final reading for the referendum ordinance is scheduled for June 3. In other business, Willis Meadows introduced a resolution for another referendum on the November ballot that would reduce county property tax millage from 51.9 mills to 50.9 mills. The resolution was referred to the Committee of the Whole. The Committee of the Whole will also consider an ordinance for a referendum on the November ballot to allow the SC Department of Revenue to issue temporary permits for businesses in the

JOURNAL NEWS

HOW THEY VOTED... Second reading by County Council of ordinance to put a 1 percent local option sales tax referendum on the November ballot. Joe Baldwin...............................Yes Jim Burns.................................absent Sid Cates....................................No Joe Dill.......................................No Lottie Gibson.............................Yes Butch Kirven...............................Yes Willis Meadows.........................No Xanthene Norris........................Yes Fred Payne.................................Yes Liz Seman...................................Yes Bob Taylor..................................Yes

unincorporated areas of the county for the Sunday sale of alcoholic beverages for on-premises consumption. Greenville County Council is scheduled to meet again on June 3 at 6 p.m. at County Square, 301 University Ridge, Greenville.

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JOURNAL NEWS

An accidental checklist Card offers guidelines for motorists after accidents JOE TOPPE | STAFF

jtoppe@communityjournals.com

Conestee Dog Park construction to begin New park to open in August. Smaller dog park at Cleveland Park will close in September. JOE TOPPE | STAFF

jtoppe@communityjournals.com

18 THE JOURNAL | MAY 23, 2014

JERRY SALLEY / STAFF

On the books for several years, the city’s newest pet amenity at Lake Conestee Nature Park is finally set to begin construction – while the existing dog park at Cleveland Park is set to be closed. The City of Greenville’s Park and Recreation Department held a public meeting at Hughes Main Library Tuesday to inform the community of the new dog park. The park, located on the site of the old municipal stadium near the entrance to Lake Conestee Nature Park off Mauldin Road, will be over an acre in size, said Edward Kinney, Greenville’s senior landscape architect. The site will include two areas for both large and small dogs and a shade shelter, he said. The park will also be ADA-accessible. Kinney said the park would feature upgrades from the existing dog park at Cleveland Park including a water fountain, benches and additional parking. The small crowd attending the public meeting showed appreciation for the new park’s design but did ex-

press some concerns on the location and availability of the proposed water fountain and spigot. Through funds provided by a capital improvement project, the city has set aside approximately $90,000, with $20,000 of that total provided by the county, for the park’s construction, he said. The plan has been in operation for several years and has already gone through City Council and been presented to Greenville County, Kinney said. “We are ready to start building; we just wanted to inform the public before we got underway,” he said. Construction is expected to begin in June and finish in August. In addition to making the public aware of upcoming construction at Lake Conestee, city officials also presented information on the usage of the Canine Corner at Cleveland Park. Kinney said the existing dog park falls short on many of the city’s best practices and will be closed. The old park is smaller than an acre without adequate parking or shelter, and it does not have separate areas for large and small dogs, he said. “The new park will address these areas.”

A statue of a Great Dane greets visitors to the Canine Corner at Cleveland Park.

The sound of a car accident is unforgettable: the screeching tires, the “crunch” of folding metal, and the sudden gasp of passengers just before impact. The crucial moments that follow are often confusing, marked by a fumbling for identification and insurance cards, and a frantic search for injuries. Greenville trial attorney Brian Smith has launched a campaign aimed to focus victims of auto accidents in the few vital seconds following the experience with an 11-step guideline. Smith said people are flustered after an accident, do not always think logically and are often wrongfully placed at fault. It can be difficult to remain calm and answer questions after such an event, he said. People often do not take stock of possible injuries and seek out the appropriate medical help. Smith said a general lack of knowledge could adversely affect victims of auto accidents. Always seek medical treatment, document the scene and witnesses, and do not panic, he said. “Often, people are wrongfully put at fault because of how they acted after the accident.” The campaign includes free driver’s license-sized cards focusing on guidelines to follow after an accident such as remaining calm, assessing yourself and passengers for injuries, looking for witnesses, exchanging information, cooperating with police and seeking medical attention. A driver can store the card in his wallet or glove compartment like an insurance card and read it following the accident, Smith said. “It is important for people after an accident to take a few moments to recollect themselves,” he said. “Anyone can be in an accident, rich or poor, and our goal is to help accident victims take the right steps in the stress of the moment.” Drivers can receive a free accident advisor card by visiting btsmithlaw.com.


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Shea was awarded a Silver Star, the nation’s third-highest military decoration for valor, for his actions in battle.

Thom Shea in the field.

Lessons in leadership

Photos Provided

Former Navy SEAL says language determines success on battlefield, in boardroom CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Thom Shea was hurled against a wall, a rocket blast interrupting the temporary quiet that had enveloped a vil-

lage in the Kandahar province in southern Afghanistan. After he tried to communicate with the other Navy SEALS in his platoon over his headset – once, twice… five times with no response – Shea was convinced he was NAVY SEAL continued on PAGE 20

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the last one left. Then he heard his wife Stacy’s voice. “Don’t fear death. It makes you weak. We need you to fight your way back to us,” she said. Those were the words she told him the night before he left for Afghanistan, the words she said when they talked about the danger of his mission, the very real possibility he would not return home. “When I heard her voice, it put a new dialogue in my head. I wasn’t going to die. I was going to fight,” he said. “I literally said to myself, ‘I’m going to fight until I’m out of this.’” As he rose to lead his platoon’s counterattack, an enemy sniper’s bullet missed his eye by two inches. Shea fired back. His shot didn’t miss. He rescued another member of his platoon who was pinned down in the same compound. “Hey, Chief, we’re dead. We’re surrounded,” the other soldier said. “We’re going to fight until nobody’s left,” Shea told him as they ran across the compound to the rest of the unit. “Leadership to me is leading by language. If I said we’re all going to die, that’s what would have happened.” After 45 minutes, the firefight was over, despite long odds. They were outnumbered 65 to 19, but Shea and his men had fought their way back. “As a leader, I’ve recognized whatever you say is going to happen,” said Shea, 7:46 PM who was awarded a Silver Star, the nation’s third-highest military decoration for valor, for his actions in the battle. “Your actions always parallel what you say about them.” Shea says what he learned about on the battlefield translates into other areas of life. “You don’t have to be shot at to learn to duck,” he said. Shea, who retired in January after 23 years as a Navy SEAL and now lives in Greenville, tells what he learned in the book “Unbreakable: A Navy SEAL’s Way of Life,” which will be officially released on May 26 and is already on Amazon’s best-seller list. Originally, the book was

“Leadership to me is leading by language. If I said we’re all going to die, that’s what would have happened.” Thom Shea (right)

meant to serve as a guidebook for Shea’s three children in case he didn’t return from combat, a way to share the lessons he wanted to share in case he didn’t make it back home. “Being ‘unbreakable’ is creating and finding a language in yourself that will give you access to your own possibilities,” he said. Too often, he said, when people attempt something difficult or new, they subconsciously talk themselves out of it. “People don’t even realize they’ve talked themselves out of it,” he said. “How many stories have you heard where somebody stops right before they’re successful? They’re two inches from the end and they convince themselves it’s not worth it any more. People don’t realize how that internal dialogue affects them.” Shea founded the Adamantine Alliance, a leadership and human performance coaching organization. Adamantine means unbreakable. Shea said the book’s original title was “Spartan Wife,” an acknowledgement of the importance of his wife, the woman who cared for and kept his family protected while he went off to fight. “Men are really driven by the connection they have with a woman,” Shea said. “The woman really makes the man.”

Shea said that when people hear negative internal dialogue, they eventually believe it. “Don’t talk yourself out of the impossible. Do talk yourself into the possible,” he said. “If you say something is impossible, it is.” It took Shea four tries to make it through training to become a Navy SEAL. The first time, he suffered a concussion during Hell Week and couldn’t complete the training. The second year, he dislocated his shoulder. “I learned that you have to overcome your own dialogue that stops you from being successful, he said. “My SEAL class had 112 students and only 12 graduated. Those are terrible odds. But I really learned the effects of language. You either give up or you don’t. I didn’t.”

“Don’t fear death. It makes you weak. We need you to fight your way back to us.”

“Don’t talk yourself out of the impossible. Do talk yourself into the possible. If you say something is impossible, it is.”

Stacy Shea

Thom Shea


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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

GHS to expand ambulatory services Health system aims to build facilities in Anderson, Spartanburg counties APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com Greenville Health System is making plans to build multispecialty ambulatory care centers in Anderson and Spartanburg counties following approval by the health system’s board of trustees this week. The two centers will “support the population health and specialty pro-

grams of the Greenville Health System” and cost approximately $40 million, according to the board resolution. Malcolm Isley, VP of strategic services, said GHS is studying what services will be offered, but they could include primary and specialty physicians, imaging and urgent care. When asked about a service overlap with AnMed Health or Spartanburg Regional Health System, Isley said, “We take care of a lot of patients in those areas,” and GHS believes there are gaps in services. “The Upstate is our market.” He estimated the centers, between 15,000 and 60,000 square feet in size, will be built within the next several years. AnMed Health released a statement

on GHS’s intent to expand, saying the nearby system was “not surprised” by the announcement. “Ultimately, we believe that given a choice people in Anderson will choose their local healthcare system and the local physicians, surgeons and specialists that live and contribute to this community,” said AnMed. GHS is in the process of applying for a Certificate of Need (CON) from the state. The CON program had been defunded by Gov. Nikki Haley in her 2013-2014 budget. The SC Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC) had stopped accepting applications until the state Supreme Court ruled in April that the agency had to administer the program. Isley said

that the GHS timeline includes delays caused by a potential backlog in the CON program. The AnMed statement also said that the CON program will “prevent an entity from arriving from outside of a community with the intent of cherrypicking only certain patients.” GHS board members also approved the build-out of the fourth floor of the Patewood Memorial Hospital to serve low-risk obstetric patients at an estimated cost of $19 million. The floor was vacant, and low-risk births will be added to current inpatient services in orthopedics and other short-stay procedures, said Isley. He estimates once completed, the hospital will handle 2,000 baby deliveries a year.

Up, up and away Aloft brings high flying fun to Simpsonville JEANNE PUTNAM | CONTRIBUTOR

jputnam@communityjournals.com Aloft kicks off this weekend for high-flying fun over and in Simpsonville’s Heritage Park. The event, which lasts through May 26, will feature a family fun zone with magic shows and other activities and live musical performances by Time Flies, Hot Chelle Rae, Ashley Monroe, Thompson Square, Spin Doctors, Blues Traveler, The Catalinas, Lionz of Zion, The Fantastic Shakers and others. There will also be patri-

otic demonstrations, carnival rides, a Gibbon Games Slackline and 70 hot air balloons competing against each other and offering private rides. Among the hot air balloon competi-

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tors will be husband-and-wife team Connie and Steve Lambert. The Lamberts, owners of the Upstate-based Skyscapes of America, have been participating in Aloft since 1991.

The Lamberts started their flying careers in 1989 when Steve Lambert was a supervisor at Lockheed Martin in the Kissimmee/Orlando, Fla., area. “He used to see balloons setting up on the side of Interstate 4 and thought it would be really cool to do,” said Connie Lambert. “He talked to a neighbor about getting into flying hot air balloons and they contacted a local pilot and got hooked on flying.” After he got involved with flying hot air balloons, his wife followed, and the two have been doing it ever since. In order to be a hot air balloon pilot, “you have to get with a commercial pilot and they can train a student pilot,” she said. Becoming a private pilot takes 10 hours of instruction, a test and a

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY check flight, in which an examiner travels with the pilot and gives an oral exam, she said. To become a commercial pilot who can take up passengers, it takes 30 hours of instruction, a test and a check flight. In addition to training, a hot air balloon pilot must deal with weather, learn navigational skills and know how to fly along the contour of the landscape. The Lamberts do not take off if they see a bad weather forecast, which is frequently why the balloons do not launch. Each year, the balloonists at Aloft compete in a race in which they are given baggies to release as they navigate to different targets during each launch. The pilot’s navigational skills determine how close the baggies get to the target. At the end of the event, the officials score the distance of the baggies from each target, and the pilot with the best score wins. Admission for Aloft is $20 before 4 p.m., $25 after 4 p.m. and $5 to park. The tickets also include admittance to the concerts. The Center for Developmental Services (CDS) is Aloft’s featured charity for this year

and visitors to the festival are encouraged to donate to CDS. For more information, visit aloft. org.

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LEGACY CHARTER SCHOOL

PARKER HIGH SCHOOL 1923

Dr. L.P. Hollis named superintendent of the newly formed Parker School District Parker High School Founded

90

th

Hom

Gra

May 17, 2014

Dr. Hollis honored as the only person in the southeast to be included in Look magazine’s 100 outstanding educators

Making Friends

1950s Parker becomes the largest high school in the state, enrolling more than 1,600 students

1960s

Preserving History State and City Proclamations for “Parker Legacy Celebration Day”

Ranked top 10 high school scholastically in America 1955, 1957, 1960, 1966, 1971—only high school in SC to achieve this status five times

Legacy Charter School is a free, public charter school open to all students in Greenville County. We are a Title I school with 1100 students in grades K5–12, located on two campuses in Greenville’s West End. The elementary campus serves K5–4th grades. On the site of the former Parker High School, our Parker Campus serves 5th–12th grades. Our success strategy is an education model built on academic excellence, nutrition, and fitness leading to college graduation.

Academics

1970s Parker Band and Chorus perform and compete nationally and in Canada

1985 Parker High School Closes

Nutrition Beloved Friends and Teachers

W W W. PA R K E R L E G A C Y F O U N D AT I O N . O R G 24 THE JOURNAL | MAY 23, 2014

d u at i o n

Thank You to Our Community Partners:

1,500 Alumni

Auditorium constructed by the Works Progress Administration

1940s

CLASS of 2014

ecoming

1930s

1

st

Rediscovering the campus

Fitness

• Dual-credit partnership with Greenville Technical College • Curriculum collaboration with Furman University, Clemson University, and Wofford College • E-Library, free KINDLE-FIRE for every high school student • Microsoft IT Academy school • Academic intervention program • Low student-teacher ratio • Strings, chorus, and percussion

Legacy Charter School’s First Graduating Class: Timilehin Adeoye, Tomiwa Adeoye, Alexus Anderson, Daejah Bourda (salutatorian), Marquashia Brown, Patience Byrd, Mekayle Chappell, Miquale Chappell, Gage Ellis, Jaylyn Finley, Jade-Briana Fuller, Camisha Johnson, Samantha Johnson, Shamar Jones, Francisco Ledesma Gutierrez, Rebekah Lee, Jordan McLeod, Alex Mills, Anthony Moses, Tiarra Owens, Timothy Owens, Regginecqwa Peterson, Dorian Pinson, Lamar Reid, Joseph Richey, Levi Robinson (valedictorian), Roddric Ross, Demetrius Sherman, Daniel Torrales Pajaro, Amber Wardlaw, Tyrell Washington, Ny’Quece Wharton-Harris, Braylin Wilson

• Healthy school menus with fresh fruits and vegetables and no fried foods • No vending machines on campus • Only school in SC to provide PE every day for every student • Athletic opportunities in basketball, soccer, track and field, cheerleading, and volleyball

Searching for an academic home?

Legacy Charter School

Open Enrollment Now K5–4th Grades 864-214-1600 5th–12th Grades 864-248-0646

W W W. L E G A C YC H A R T E R . O R G MAY 23, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 25


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

JOURNAL COMMUNITY

LEGACY CHARTER SCHOOL

PARKER HIGH SCHOOL 1923

Dr. L.P. Hollis named superintendent of the newly formed Parker School District Parker High School Founded

90

th

Hom

Gra

May 17, 2014

Dr. Hollis honored as the only person in the southeast to be included in Look magazine’s 100 outstanding educators

Making Friends

1950s Parker becomes the largest high school in the state, enrolling more than 1,600 students

1960s

Preserving History State and City Proclamations for “Parker Legacy Celebration Day”

Ranked top 10 high school scholastically in America 1955, 1957, 1960, 1966, 1971—only high school in SC to achieve this status five times

Legacy Charter School is a free, public charter school open to all students in Greenville County. We are a Title I school with 1100 students in grades K5–12, located on two campuses in Greenville’s West End. The elementary campus serves K5–4th grades. On the site of the former Parker High School, our Parker Campus serves 5th–12th grades. Our success strategy is an education model built on academic excellence, nutrition, and fitness leading to college graduation.

Academics

1970s Parker Band and Chorus perform and compete nationally and in Canada

1985 Parker High School Closes

Nutrition Beloved Friends and Teachers

W W W. PA R K E R L E G A C Y F O U N D AT I O N . O R G 24 THE JOURNAL | MAY 23, 2014

d u at i o n

Thank You to Our Community Partners:

1,500 Alumni

Auditorium constructed by the Works Progress Administration

1940s

CLASS of 2014

ecoming

1930s

1

st

Rediscovering the campus

Fitness

• Dual-credit partnership with Greenville Technical College • Curriculum collaboration with Furman University, Clemson University, and Wofford College • E-Library, free KINDLE-FIRE for every high school student • Microsoft IT Academy school • Academic intervention program • Low student-teacher ratio • Strings, chorus, and percussion

Legacy Charter School’s First Graduating Class: Timilehin Adeoye, Tomiwa Adeoye, Alexus Anderson, Daejah Bourda (salutatorian), Marquashia Brown, Patience Byrd, Mekayle Chappell, Miquale Chappell, Gage Ellis, Jaylyn Finley, Jade-Briana Fuller, Camisha Johnson, Samantha Johnson, Shamar Jones, Francisco Ledesma Gutierrez, Rebekah Lee, Jordan McLeod, Alex Mills, Anthony Moses, Tiarra Owens, Timothy Owens, Regginecqwa Peterson, Dorian Pinson, Lamar Reid, Joseph Richey, Levi Robinson (valedictorian), Roddric Ross, Demetrius Sherman, Daniel Torrales Pajaro, Amber Wardlaw, Tyrell Washington, Ny’Quece Wharton-Harris, Braylin Wilson

• Healthy school menus with fresh fruits and vegetables and no fried foods • No vending machines on campus • Only school in SC to provide PE every day for every student • Athletic opportunities in basketball, soccer, track and field, cheerleading, and volleyball

Searching for an academic home?

Legacy Charter School

Open Enrollment Now K5–4th Grades 864-214-1600 5th–12th Grades 864-248-0646

W W W. L E G A C YC H A R T E R . O R G MAY 23, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 25


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Great Scot! The Scottish Games are coming JEANNE PUTNAM | CONTRIBUTOR

jputnam@communityjournals.com JEREMY FLEMING / CONTRIBUTOR

The Gallabrae Highland Games come marching into Greenville May 23-24. The festivities kick off with the Great Scot! parade on May 23 in downtown Greenville and continue into May 24 with the Scottish Games at Furman University. Gallabrae includes an athletic competition based on the warrior traditions at ancient Scottish clan gatherings; the Highland Dancing competition; bagpiping; and crafts including tartan weaving. The games also include activities for children in the Wee Scotland section, a miniature Scottish village. Children will be able to create their own crafts and participate in athletic events and other activities. The weekend also includes a British car show, a bagpiping competition and a border collie competition, in which the dogs herd ducks through an obstacle course. Live music includes Cu Dubh with Petite Jamila, Cleghorn and Seven Nations, who will be performing throughout the weekend. There will also be demonstrators from the 71st Scottish Highland Regiment, European Medieval Arts of Arms, Flying Hawkes throwing competition, Scottish Tartan Museum, Clay Icard-Long Bow exhibit and demo, Scottish Terrier Rescue of the Southeast, Scottish Spinning & Weaving Society, Carl Rapp Celtic Fiddle, Tracie Brown Celtic Harp, Scottish Country Dancers, Faerie Gathering, and Ed Krech as the Shaemus McDuff character. For more information, visit gallabrae.com.

GALLABRAE HIGHLAND GAMES Great Scot! Parade .............May 23, 6 p.m. .........Main Street from North Street to Broad Street ...Free Bagpipe Challenge.............May 23, 7 p.m. .........The Phoenix Inn, 246 N. Pleasantburg Drive .....Free Great Scot! Ceilidh .............May 23, 7 p.m. .........TD Stage at the Peace Center Amphitheater ......$10/person Demonstrators ...................May 24, 8:30 a.m. ....Furman University. ............................................Free with admission Greenville Scottish Games..May 24, 8:30 a.m. ....Furman University.............................................$15/$5 for children under 13 British Car Show ................May 24, 9:30 a.m. ....Furman University.............................................Free with admission Raptors!.............................May 24, 9:30 a.m. ....Furman University.............................................Free with admission Opening Ceremonies .........May 24, 10:30 a.m. ..Furman University.............................................Free with admission Celtic Jam ..........................May 24, 6:30 p.m. ....Furman University.............................................$10/person

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Living United United Way Spirit Awards honor business, individual and nonprofit supporters On Thursday evening, United Way of Greenville County presented three United Way Spirit Awards to those who “have made extraordinary efforts to support United Way in its work to improve our community.” Michelin North America, Elizabeth “Ducky” Gower and Pendleton Place for Children and Families were honored for 2014. Michelin received the award for Corporate Leadership for generosity in volunteer time and financial resources, including the Michelin Challenge Education program, which encourages employees to mentor and tutor students in high-poverty elementary schools. The company’s local campaign raised more than $1.5 million last year, according to United Way. Elizabeth “Ducky” Gower, 90, was honored with the Community Leadership award. She worked as senior vice president for United Way and

One family

executive director of the Community Planning Council, in addition to volunteering with more than a dozen organizations. According to United Way, Gower’s leadership helped create agencies like Pendleton Place, Senior Action and Meals on Wheels. The Nonprofit Leadership award was presented to Pendleton Place for Children and Families. Pendleton Place is a United Way partner and was honored for achieving real, measurable results through its evolving programs that keep children safe and support families in crisis. The nonprofit recently launched The Family and Child Assessment Center, Family Bridges and John I. Smith Supportive Services programs for children, teens and families. “Each year, the United Way Spirit Awards honor companies, nonprofit organizations and community leaders in Greenville County who ‘Live United,’ working to strengthen of our community through an unwavering willingness to give, advocate and volunteer,” said Ted Hendry, president of United Way of Greenville County. “We are proud to recognize this year’s winners for all that they do to make Greenville County a better place to live and work for all of us.”

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How well do you know your water? The National Ground Water Association (NGWA) is offering two free webinars on water-well construction and water testing. On May 28 at 1 p.m. will be “Water Well Construction: What Do I Need to Know?” and on June 11 at 1 p.m. will be “Testing Your Well Water in Proximity to Hydraulic Fracturing.” Both webinars will be presented by Dr. Robert Puls, director of the Oklahoma Water Survey. To participate, register at wellowner.org.

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Challenge encourages families to get fit JEANNE PUTNAM | CONTRIBUTOR

jputnam@communityjournals.com Families throughout South Carolina are eligible to receive various rewards, including the chance for a family trip to Universal Studios Orlando, for choosing to be healthy and active this summer in the Fit Family Challenge. The challenge, which partners Coca-Cola with CVS/Pharmacy, Upstate Parent magazine, the Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC), the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) and the South Carolina Hospital Association (SCHA), goes on through July 10. According to Jennifer Minnich of Upstate Parent, families across the state can log onto fitfamilychallengesc.com and register all activity that each family member does and earn points. Participants can earn points for walking the dog, riding bikes, drinking water or attending special classes or events announced on the website. The challenge is taking place to help combat South Carolina’s ranking as the seventh most obese state in the country,

said Catherine Templeton, director of SC DHEC. According to Templeton, 25 percent of children ages 2-5 are obese, 30 percent of high school students are obese and two out of three adults in the state are clinically obese. DHEC’s involvement brings together more than 800 governmental, nongovernmental, public and private healthcare agencies statewide to address the obesity epidemic that could potentially cost the state $9 billion over the next 15

years, said Templeton. “Obesity kills the most South Carolinians,” she said. “It makes the most South Carolinians sick, more than cancer, and if prevented would save the state the most money in health care costs.” Additionally, the Kroc Center has sponsored two Upstate families, who will blog about their experiences during the challenge. The Finney/Rankin family is one of the two families participating and includes five kids, ages 10, 9, 8, 6 and 5.

“We love doing activities as a family,” said Harrison Finney. Finney said that his family is a blended family and he wants them to get off on the right foot by eating healthy. He hopes that through the challenge the family will learn healthier dieting tips. His fiancée Mary Brockman Rankin echoed his goals. “I want to expose the kids to new healthy foods,” said Rankin. “I also want them to see that fitness can be fun. We recently got to ride our bikes for the first time on the Swamp Rabbit Trail and plan to do it again.” Rankin said that the family is also looking forward to working with the Kroc Center as the summer goes along. Finney said that he hopes that the kids learn to not take an easy out with food by not eating fast food. He also hopes the Fit Family Challenge results in creating memories and helping each family member find a physical activity that he or she enjoys. Any family can participate in the Fit Family Challenge for free. For more information, visit fitfamilychallengesc. com.

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28 THE JOURNAL | MAY 23, 2014

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Trek of remembrance Local woman to participate in Ruck to Remember in honor of Capt. Kimberly Hampton This weekend, ceremonies to honor veterans will be held nationwide. And this weekend, Simpsonville resident Robin Darnell is filling her pack and traveling to Harpers Ferry, WV, to begin a foot trek to Washington, D.C., for the Ruck to Remember, a fundraiser for injured military personnel and their families. Walking to Arlington National Cemetery, a total of 60 miles, Darnell is trekking in honor of Upstate helicopter pilot Capt. Kimberly Hampton, who died when her helicopter was shot down near Fallujah, Iraq, in 2004.

Hampton was the first female pilot to be shot down and killed as the result of hostile fire and the first Iraq female combat casualty from South Carolina. Darnell will be trekking continuously between May 24 and 26 with minimal stops along the way. Team members will arrive in Washington, D.C., the morning of Memorial Day for a sunrise trek over Memorial Bridge into Arlington National Cemetery. “Kimberly was a true American hero and I chose to honor her along with my favorite Gold Star Mom, Ann Hampton, who has a special place in my heart,” Darnell said. The team of 50 participants is raising funds for the Semper Fi Fund, which offers assistance to injured or critically ill members of the U.S. Armed Forces and their families. Upstate residents can support Darnell at bit.ly/darnell-ruck.

There’s no debate Local students need help to get to nationals CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com There’s no debating the quality of high school speech and debate teams in Greenville County. Of the 24 high school students from South Carolina to qualify for the 2014 National Speech and Debate Tournament next month in Overland Park, Kan., 23 are from Greenville County. But now comes the hard part – coming up with the money to get there. Fourteen Riverside High students qualified for nationals this year through their performances at the South Carolina District Tournament. Usually, the team sends four to six students. Southside High will send eight students to the nationals, Bob Jones Academy one. The other student from South Carolina is from Anderson County. The success of the Riverside program has created a problem – albeit a good one. Team members and a parent booster club raise much of the money the team needs to compete in a school-year long season, and budgets to take up to six students to nationals each year. But the team must raise more money now. “We planned carefully, but never anticipated sending a team of 14 to nation-

als,” said David Dejesa, one of Riverside’s coaches. “We are not the victims of poor planning, but of unexpected successes.” Dejesa said the trip will cost between $15,000 and $19,000 for travel, lodging, meals and transportation of the team members, coaches and chaperones that will help competitors to get to one of the four competition sites in Overland Park during the week of competition. Speech and debate team members start practicing in the summer and, unlike many high school athletic teams, compete in a season that spans the entire school year with a couple of travel and local tournaments each month and practice all year long. Riverside has sold coupon books, held fruit sales and talent shows, and raised money through spirit nights at local restaurants where the team gets a percentage of the cost of all meals sold and bake sales. Other debate teams have washed cars, sold candy and held barbecues. They, too, have had to raise money to help pay for their competitions as well as get to the nationals. Dejesa said competing in speech and debate helps students develop public speaking skills and the ability to reason and analyze situations. “They are developing skills that will contribute to success over a lifetime,” he said. But for now, they’ll focus on getting to Kansas. For more information, visit bit.ly/ GJ-riverside.

JOURNAL COMMUNITY

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MAY 23, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 29


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OUR COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY NEWS, EVENTS AND HAPPENINGS

Greenville Middle Academy’s Blair Powers was recently named Greenville County Science Teacher of the Year. An eighth-grade science teacher, Powers was also recently named the South Carolina PTA Middle School Teacher of the Year and is one of the Top 10 Finalists for the 2014-2015 Greenville County School District Teacher of the Year. Also, Claire Berg and Sara Tuttle, sixth-grade science teachers, were selected to participate in Greenville County Schools’ STEAM Teacher Expert Professional Development initiative. The program seeks to develop teacher-leaders who are experts in STEAM Curriculum development and project-based teaching.

Southside High School Speech & Debate team members Branden Lindsay and Jarrett Williams advanced to the final round of duo interpretation and finished in fourth place at the 2014 National Individual Events Tournament of Champions (NIETOC) in Minnesota. Lindsay also advanced to the final round of dramatic interpretation, finishing as champion, and won the Demond Wilson Perfect Performance Award, the tournament’s award to the top performer. Erickson Bynum was also presented an award as coach of the dramatic interpretation champion. As a team, Southside won the overall first place sweepstakes in the Act I Category.

Washington Center recently held the annual Craft Day school-wide fundraiser. Students and teachers created a variety of items to sell to the public. In preparation for the sale, Saint Joseph’s Catholic School eighth-graders assisted students in making items. During the event, volunteers from Christ Church Episcopal School provided face painting and chalk drawing and accompanied their Washington Center friends. Proceeds from the sale benefitted classroom funds.

Twenty-eight public high school seniors were recognized for outstanding citizenship for the Ralph W. Drake Citizenship Awards Program sponsored by the Greenville Civitan Club. Each high school selects one male and one female student for the honor based on their demonstrated record of good citizenship. Greenville Civitan Club awards the students with a citizenship certificate and a Civitan citizenship pin. The Greenville Civitan $1,000 Debbie Pickens Hiller Scholarship was awarded to Gabrielle Alyse Pierce of Woodmont High School.

Washington Center student Justin Simmons (center) is accompanied by Christ Church Episcopal School volunteers during Washington Center’s annual Craft Day event.

The Furman University Board of Trustees approved promotions and/or tenure for 14 faculty members, and six new members will join the board this summer. New board members include John Donald Anderson of Charlotte, N.C.; Christopher R. Borch of Saratoga, Calif.; Sean P. Hartness of Greenville; Susan T. Shi of Greenville; William R. Timmons III of Greenville; and the Rev. Baxter M. Wynn of Greenville. Hartness, Timmons and Wynn have served previous terms on the board. Outgoing board members are Bob Buckman, Jordan Clark, Richard Cullen, Randy Eaddy, David Ellison, Kathy McKinney, Jim Ney, Todd Ruppert and Peace Sullivan.

Ellen Woodside Elementary School fourth- and fifth-grade students recently participated in Bike to School Day. They completed a bicycle safety obstacle course and received a bicycle license and T-shirt. Sam Couch organized and supervised the event.

Ashley Morris’ K4 class at St. Mary’s Catholic School took a walking field trip to downtown Greenville. They walked up and down Main Street finding all of the Mice on Main and ended with lunch in Falls Park to read the Mice on Main book. The Chandler School’s upper school “pirates” recently took a road trip to Boston. On the way, they stopped in Baltimore where they visited Alice’s Palace, home of Alice Ann Koontz, an acknowledged expert in dyslexic education. In Boston, students spent a day with the Carroll School, a prominent school for dyslexic students. Students also visited Minuteman Park, Lexington Green, the Boston Marathon finish line and Fenway Park.

Submit entries to community@communityjournals.com.

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OUR COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY NEWS, EVENTS AND HAPPENINGS

Greenville County Recreation will offer summer adult soccer, kickball, flag football and softball along with fall youth tackle football. In addition, Discovery Island, Otter Creek and 7th Inning Splash open on May 24. Season passes are available online and the parks are accepting birthday party reservations. The parks also offer swim lessons. For more information, visit greenvillerec.com. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 25 endangered and eight threatened species occurring in the Southeast and Puerto Rico. The public is invited to provide written information and comments concerning these species before May 27. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) are accurate. For more information, visit fws.gov. Book Your Lunch with Jon Sealy on May 27 at noon at Twigs Tempietto as he discusses his debut novel, “The Whiskey Baron.” Tickets are $35 or $52.56 per person and must be purchased in advance at bookyourlunch.com or by calling Fiction Addiction at 864-675-0540. The $35 ticket includes a $10 book voucher and the $52.56 ticket includes a book copy. Greenville County Square will host a Veterans Memorial Day Ceremony on May 26, 10 a.m., in front of the County Square monument. All are welcome to attend and refreshments will be served. For more information, call 864-467-7230. The Hurricane Collegiate Golf Tour will visit Greenville on June 3 for the Collegiate Amateur at Furman University. Registration is available until May 25, and is open to all golfers ages 17-23. The one-day, 36-hole event will begin with 18 holes, followed by lunch for all golfers, and finish up with the last 18 holes. Registration cost is $179 per person. Players can register at hurricanetour.com or at 904-379-2697. On May 24 at 9:30 a.m., there will be a SC Native Plant Society Field Trip to Ashmore and Eva Russell Chandler Heritage Preserves hosted by SCNPS president Dan Whitten. There will be an optional short but steep hike to more waterfalls. Email judy_seeley@hotmail.com to sign up and include number attending, mobile number, and if those attending are carpooling. For more information, visit scnps.org. Cowpens National Battlefield will hold several special events on Revolutionary War topics on May 24 and June 28. Visitors can also see 18th-century re-enactors and weapons demonstrations. On May 24, Lt. Col. (Ret.) John Moncure, author

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of the “Cowpens Staff Ride and Battlefield Tour,” will be on site at 12:30 p.m. Robert Dunkerly, author of “Women of the Revolution: Bravery and Sacrifice on the Southern Battlefields,” will be on site June 18, 10 a.m. On June 7-8 and on June 14, visitors can see an 18th-century military camp and firing demonstrations. All events are free and open to the public. For more information, call 864-461-2828 or visit nps.gov/cowp. Buncombe Street United Methodist Church, 200 Buncombe St., Greenville, will host a lunch and learn concerning medical and non-medical home care, hospice care and facility care levels on May 27, 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m. The event will feature Rhonda Moody, community advance team director at Interim Health Care. Lunch will be provided. To make reservations, call 864-232-7341. Registration for summer Appalachian Music Lessons is open through May 29. This program is for third-graders to adult and is designed to teach students to play acoustic instruments, including guitar, mandolin, fiddle and banjo. The six-week sessions will be held at: Easley First Baptist Church, Pickens Senior Center and St. Paul United Methodist Church, downtown Greenville. The cost is $60 per sixweek session, and instrument rental is available for $25 per session. To sign up, contact: Easley and Greenville: Susan Ware-Snow at 864-979-9188 or susu9196@ gmail.com; and Steve McGaha at 864-283-4871 or blindpunkin54@yahoo.com for Pickens. Project Host Inc., 525 S. Academy St., Greenville, is participating in a Summer Food Service Program. Meals will be provided to all children 18 years old or younger without charge. Meals will be provided at the following Greenville sites: Neighborhood Focus Ministry, Pleasant Valley Connection, St. Anthony of Padua Catholic School, Sterling Community Torch Teen Center and Sterling Community Torch Program. Tentative dates are June 9-Aug. 18. The Vietnam Veterans Memorial Foundation project “Faces Never Forgotten” is seeking 578 missing photos of Vietnam veterans from South Carolina killed in that war. These photos will help complete an electronic “Wall of Faces” in the new education center at the Vietnam Memorial Wall and online. The names of the 896 South Carolinians who were killed in the Vietnam War are engraved on the Memorial Wall in Washington, D.C. The Memorial Foundation is working to add faces to those names by collecting photographs of all who died fighting in the Vietnam War. Relatives and friends of veterans can add photos online or by mail. For details, visit vvmf.org/how-to-submit. The Greenville County Museum of Art will hold three-day camps for ages 5-13 in June and July, allowing students to explore various art forms with experienced art professionals. For more information, visit gcma.org.

Submit entries to community@communityjournals.com.

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The Carolina Youth Symphony is accepting audition applications for all three orchestras for the 2014-2015 season and will hold auditions May 24 and 31. For an audition application, visit carolinayouthsymphony.org, call 864 326-5490 or email Lee Elmore at elmogvl@aol.com.

MAY 23, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 31


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

THE GOOD

EVENTS THAT MAKE OUR COMMUNITY BETTER Residents and staff at The Woodlands at Furman will spend May working to assist water projects in third-world countries through the Walk to Wellness campaign, which focuses on getting participants to walk two laps around the campus at least five days a week during the month. The Shoeman Water Project collects shoes that are then exported to roadside vendors in third-world countries. The funds generated from exporting shoes are used to provide well-drilling rigs, water purification systems, repairs for hand pumps, and health and hygiene training. The Upstate community can support the campaign by bringing gently used shoes to the Woodlands’ Fitness Center. The goal is 2,000 shoes. The Greenville Literacy Association is seeking volunteers to help other adults improve their reading, writing, math or computer skills; or to teach English as a second language. No prior teaching experience is required. An Adult Basic Education Workshop on will be held on June 7. For more information, call 864-467-3456 or visit greenvilleliteracy.org.

Amy Curtis, Women Giving for Spartanburg grants chair, and Jeanie O’Shaughnessy, executive committee chair, holding a check presented to the 2014 grant recipients.

Women Giving for Spartanburg recently awarded its 2014 grants to local nonprofits. This year, WGFS chose to award projects in each indicator area as set by the Spartanburg Community Indicators Project. Grants awarded included: Project Learn & Grow (Bethlehem Center), Customized Supported Employment Center (Charles Lea Center Foundation), Expanding Support for Families In Crisis (Hope Center for Children), Family Health Clinic (Middle Tyger Community Center), Upstate Stand Down 2014 (Operation Restoration), Every Woman Screened (Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System Foundation), Early Childhood Learning Center (The Walker Foundation) and Child Advocacy Studies Training Center (USC Upstate Foundation).

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32 THE JOURNAL | MAY 23, 2014

Hospice of the Upstate is in need of volunteers to sit with patients in their homes while caregivers take a much-deserved break. Training is scheduled for June 2 and 4, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., with lunch provided. Those interested should contact Sunny Wells at 864-224-3358 ext. 3109. On May 31 at 8:05 a.m. in Iva, there will be a 25-mile, 42-mile or 65-mile metric century cycle ride through the rolling hills of southern Anderson County, all in support of Safe Harbor. All courses begin and end at the Iva Civic Center. Registration is $40 and includes event T-shirt, snacks, SAG, course map and lunch. For more information, visit safeharborsc.org/cycle-tour.

Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Carolinas recently held its One Night One Shirt fundraiser in support of families staying at the house. Companies and individuals wore their pre-purchased T-shirts in support of the fundraising effort. The Ronald McDonald House thanked Elliott Davis, The Grenville Drive, Bill Mason Enterprises, C. Edwards Group, GSA Co-Op, Lee & Associates, The Lowder Group, Marchant Company, The Palmetto Bank, Robert Half Technology/Office Team, Smith Moore Leatherwood, Southwest Airlines and UBS for their support.

2014

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The South Carolina Public Health Association (SCPHA) is collecting gently used shoe donations for distribution to developing countries. Their goal is 300 33-gallon bags (25 pairs each) by June 30. Those interested should visit scpha.com or email Lillie Hall, SCPHA past president, at halllm@hotmail.com or call 864-372-3189.

TD Bank and First Book, a nonprofit organization that provides new books to children in underserved communities, have partnered to provide children in kindergarten to second grade access to age-appropriate books at home and in their schools through Banking on Books. In the Greenville area, the program provided books for students at Legacy Charter School and Monaview Elementary. The Peoples Bank is launching the second year of an initiative to bring financial literacy education to students in Anderson by providing them with access to the EverFi Financial Literacy learning course. The Web-based programs use simulations, avatars, gaming and adaptive-pathing to bring complex financial concepts to life. Through the courses, students at Crescent, Westside, T.L. Hanna and Anderson Christian School will become certified in hundreds of topics in personal finance.

Send announcements to community@communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL CULTURE

GLT pulls out all the stops for

Photo Provided

‘LES MISERABLES’ Theater partnered with Flat Rock Playhouse for set for blockbuster musical CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com It’s not often that two community theaters in different states decide to split the cost of building the set for a production that is on both of their schedules. But the chance to stage “Les Miserables” doesn’t come around that often. Greenville Little Theatre, which is staging “Les Miserables” for four weeks beginning May 30, and Flat Rock Playhouse, which produced its version last summer, shared the cost of building the set for the blockbuster musical. “It’s very difficult to partner with other theaters because of logistics,” said Suzanne McCalla, GLT’s producing director. “But we were able to turn it into a win-win for both theaters.”

GLT is used to putting on big shows, but “Les Miz” is the most ambitious show in the McCallas’ 20 seasons at the helm, said Allen McCalla, the theater’s artistic director who is also directing the musical. “It takes a lot of money. It takes a lot of space. It takes a lot of time,” Allen

“It’s very difficult to partner with other theaters because of logistics,” Suzanne McCalla

McCalla said. “It’s a massive undertaking, but it is so worth it.” Rights for “Les Miz” were released for a year. GLT is one of the last theaters to stage the show, which is now back on Broadway. The partnership got its roots after Suzanne McCalla saw Flat Rock’s production of “39 Steps” and was struck by its beautiful lighting. Stephen Terry, who worked for the Santa Barbara Opera House, was Flat Rock’s guest lighting director for the show. He has since been hired as Flat Rock’s resident lighting designer. “I hounded him for a year via email,” she said. When he did reply, Suzanne McCalla found out he was going to be working again in Flat Rock on “Les Miserables.” LES MISERABLES continued on PAGE 34

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MAY 23, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 33


JOURNAL CULTURE

SPRING FORWARD!

MARTINA MCBRIDE EVERLASTING TOUR

With only one Upstate performance on tour, this Country superstar will shine on stage next month! Friday, June 13, 8:00 PM MartinaMcBride.com

COLIN MOCHRIE & BRAD SHERWOOD:

THE TWO MAN GROUP TOUR “Whose Line Is It Anyway?” stars present an evening of extraordinary improv comedy. Saturday, June 14, 8:00 PM ColinAndBradShow.com

COUNTING CROWS

WITH TOAD THE WET SPROCKET

Sunday, June 15, 7:30 PM CountingCrows.com

34 THE JOURNAL | MAY 23, 2014

Talk about a possible partnership between the two theaters started. “Flat Rock wanted to do this, but they needed the money,” she said. “By working together, we were able to get great design help, and it gave them the money they needed.” The partnership presented some challenges – Flat Rock’s stage is smaller and the theater doesn’t have a fly system. Flat Rock does have rolling tracks in the wings of its stage, something GLT doesn’t have. “It’s really a different space,” she said. “Flat Rock’s stage is like a cartoon strip. It’s long and short. But they have four times the wing space we have. For the first time in 21 years, we have to put scenery on the loading docks and cover with tarps so they don’t get wet because we don’t have enough room inside for all of the set pieces. We’re maxed out. It’s the most scenery we’ve ever used.” Knowing that some of the pieces would have to be retrofitted, GLT sent its Construction of the set of “Les Miserables” production crew and scenic artist Kim underway at Greenville Little Theater. Granner to Flat Rock during construcGREG BECKNER / STAFF tion so they would know how the pieces “There were no collections of costumes chain gang after stealing a loaf of bread were put together and what they’d need to do to retrofit them to GLT’s space. For to rent,” she said. “There are two or three and is now hunted by a policeman after he instance, GLT had to add 4 feet to a back out there but they were already rented. breaks parole. Valjean agrees to care for the wall and build an arch to make the piece ‘Romeo and Juliet’ is the only other show orphaned daughter of a factory worker. “‘Les Miz’ is one of the greatest mufit one of its wings. Texture and color we built from the ground up.” While there may have been a short- sicals ever written. There’s not an achad to match for it to look right. During the last performance at Flat age of available costumes, there was no tor you can find who doesn’t know this Rock, GLT’s crew packed up the set piec- shortage of available talent in the Up- story,” said Samuel Lloyd, who plays es as they were pulled off the stage. The state. A record 212 people auditioned – Marius in the production. “It’s one of pieces filled a 54-foot tractor-trailer and more than twice as many than any other those once-in-a-lifetime shows. We’ve GLT show – for 36 available parts in the been pinching ourselves throughout the a 24-foot rental truck. “And we didn’t take all the pieces,” Su- Tony Award-winning musical based on entire rehearsal process, saying, ‘Oh, my God. We’re doing ‘Les Miz.’” zanne McCalla said. “We took what they the 1862 novel by Victor Hugo. Lloyd said he believes “Les Miserables” “Les Miserables” tells the story of Jean did and added our touches to them. It was genius how it all worked out. Both of us got Valjean, a man who spent years on the has become one of the classics because audiences like stories what we wanted and both where characters deal with productions were different.” impossible circumstances. Working with Flat Rock “The problems in this allowed GLT to save monplay are pretty damn imey and, perhaps more impossible,” he said. portantly, time, Allen McAllen McCalla said the Calla said. story’s themes – forgive“We saved an awful lot of ness, hope, romance, tragtime,” he said. “That allowed edy and triumph – resous to not shortcut anything nate with everybody. in this production. On “It’s for every man every opening night, you want to day,” he said. be able to put the best work “LES MISERABLES” Spartanburg’s Matias possible up on stage. You Mariani plays Valjean. want your production of WHERE: Greenville Little Theatre, 444 College St., Greenville Woodmont High theater ‘Les Miz’ to be the best one WHEN: May 30-31, June 5-7, 12-14 and 19-21 at 8 p.m.; teacher Will Ragland, a fayou can put on, and we’ll be June 1, 8, 15 and 22, 3 p.m. miliar face on Greenville’s able to say that.” TICKETS: $35 for adults, $33 for seniors and $25 for students stages, will play inspector GLT began work on cosINFORMATION: 864-233-6238 or greenvillelittletheatre.org Javert, the cop. tumes last summer. Photo Provided

Known for hits such as “Mr. Jones” and “Long December,” relive the 90’s with Counting Crows!

LES MISERABLES continued from PAGE 33


A R T S CALENDAR

JOURNAL CULTURE

M AY 2 3 - 2 9 Fountain Inn Symphony Orchestra Earth, Wind & Fire May 23 ~ 409-1050 Main Street Friday True Blues May 23 ~ 232-2273 Peace Center The Phantom of the Opera Through May 25 ~ 467-3000 Furman Music by the Lake Sea Songs May 29 ~ 294-2086 Piedmont Natural Gas Downtown Alive The Sound Committee May 29 ~ 232-2273 Centre Stage A Few Good Men Through Jun. 7 ~ 233-6733 Upstate Shakespeare Festival The Two Gentlemen of Verona Through Jun. 15 ~ 235-6948 Metro. Arts Council at Centre Stage Works by Jim Gorman Through Jun. 16 ~ 233-6733 Metropolitan Arts Council One-Stop Open Studios Through Jun. 20 ~ 467-3132 Greenville County Museum of Art Sigmund Abeles: Pastels Through Jun. 15 ~ 271-7570 Michael Mathers: Photography Through Jun. 15 ~ 271-7570 Legacy of Impressionism: Languages of Light Through Sep. 21 ~ 271-7570 Andrew Wyeth: Selected Watercolors Continuing ~ 271-7570 Greenville Chamber of Commerce Works by Terry Davenport & John Roberts Through Jun. 30 ~ 242-1050 Main Street Real Estate Gallery Works by David McCurry Through Jun. 30 ~ 250-2850

MAY 23, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 35


JOURNAL CULTURE

WEDDINGS  ENGAGEMENTS  ANNIVERSARIES

LISTEN UP

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36 THE JOURNAL | MAY 23, 2014

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TAUK Heavy funk quartet. Call 864-235-5519 or visit reverbnation.com/venue/255976.


JOURNAL CULTURE

SOUND CHECK

WITH VINCENT HARRIS

Out on his own John Ginty steps out of the sideman role and takes his keyboard front and center Before 2013, keyboardist John Ginty’s most highprofile role was his stint with Robert Randolph and the Family Band, which he cofounded with Randolph in the early 2000s. Ginty’s meaty, soul-drenched Hammond B-3 organ served as both a vital part of the Family Band’s rhythm section and a foundation upon which Randolph could build his innovative and joyous pedal-steel playing to new heights. But Ginty’s behind-the-scenes credits are just as impressive. He’s either toured with or played on albums by some of the most noteworthy musicians of the last two decades, including the Dixie Chicks, WHO: John Ginty Allman Brothers guitarist Warren Haynes, Bad Religion, Matthew Sweet and Santana. WHERE: Gottrocks, 200 Eisenhower Dr. And after building an incredible career as a sideWHEN: Friday, May 23, 9 p.m. man and session pro, Ginty has also become a solo TICKETS: $5 artist, releasing his first album, “Bad News Travels,” last year. The album features appearances by INFO: 864-235-5519 or Haynes and the Dixie Chicks among many others, reverbnation.com/venue/255976 and ranges from down-home bluesy shuffles to laid-back jazz, all with Ginty’s powerful Hammond B-3 front and center. Ginty is touring behind “Bad News Travels,” and will play Gottrocks in Greenville on Friday, May 23. Were you conscious of showing different aspects of your playing on “Bad News Travels”? Definitely. I mean, my playing is really blues-rooted, but when I had the idea to get special guests on the record, I really tried to match up different songs with the special guests appropriately and take them out of their comfort zone a little bit. And that ended up changing the vibe of the record a little bit. Was becoming a solo artist something you’d been wanting to do? Not really. I’m 42 years old, and while I’ve dabbled in different things like songwriting, I’ve always been really happy just being a session man or being in other people’s bands. [Producer] Ben Elliott was the one who said, “We could really do this. We could make a great record; we just have to write some songs.” He really pushed me to do this, and I’m so happy he did, because I love the record. I love the way it came out and I’m proud of it. Was it an intimidating experience to make your own album? A little bit, but mostly it was just on the songwriting end. I was really hoping that I could put together 10 or 11 good songs, because I’ve played enough sessions to know it really is about the songs. It doesn’t matter how well I’m playing the organ; if the song is no good, then nobody’s going to want to hear it anyway. But as far as the guests, I wasn’t afraid to call Warren Haynes, and I wasn’t afraid to call the Dixie Chicks, because I’ve worked with them for a long time. Everyone on the record is someone I’ve worked with. They’re all friends, and they all jumped on it and said yes right away. That was flattering. What do you think the keys are for being a good session musician? It starts with the basics. You’ve got to be on time, you’ve got to know your parts. One of my music teachers told me that a professional musician is someone who gets paid to not make mistakes. And I always tell people that the reason I get work is because I have a good feel. If you can make something feel good, you can play any style of music. What did you learn from your time with Robert Randolph that’s stayed with you since leaving the band? I learned a lot of lessons from the Family Band about being an entertainer and putting on a good show. And Lord knows I learned a ton about gospel music from them, and that’s really become part of my sound. The gospel stuff is so much fun to play. I learned a ton from them, and I love those guys.

SCHOOL’S OUT

ART’S IN!

To learn more about summer art camps for kids ages 5 -13, visit gcma.org/learn.

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm

admission free south carolina children’s theatre™ TOTALLY PROFESSIONAL. DELIGHTFULLY IMMATURE.

2914 GCMA Journal School's Out.indd 1

5/12/14 3:07 PM

VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

MAY 23, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 37


JOURNAL CULTURE

SCENE. HERE.

THE WEEK IN THE LOCAL ARTS WORLD

Furman University’s Music by the Lake Summer Concert Series will begin May 29 at 7:30 p.m. in the university’s amphitheater with a performance by the Lakeside Concert Band. Celebrating the “Sounds of Summer,” the band and other ensembles and guests will present a concert every Thursday at 7:30 p.m. in the amphitheater (except where noted) through Aug. 7. The performances are free and open to the public and showcase a cross-section of big band, jazz, bluegrass, international, contemporary, marches and orchestral favorites. For more information, visit furmanmusic.org or call 864-294-2086.

Spartanburg Regional History Museum is showcasing a delicious display of Spartanburg’s food history through May 31 in “Peaches & Plates A’Plenty: Celebrating Spartanburg Food History.” The exhibit highlights the city’s rich agricultural history, the hotels and restaurants that fed Spartanburg in the 20th century, and the continuing legacy of farming and culinary arts within the county. The museum is open Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sunday, 1-5 p.m. Free. For more info, call 864-596-3501.

Spartanburg County School District 7 and Spartanburg High School will perform “Grease: The Musical” May 29-June 1 at Chapman Cultural Center’s theater. All showings are at 7 p.m., except for the Sunday performance, which will be at 3 p.m., and are suitable for all audiences. Tickets are $10-$15. For more information, call 864-542-ARTS.

Glow Lyric Theatre presents “Scenes de Carmen” (“Scenes of Carmen”) on June 5-7 at 7:30 p.m. and June 8 at 3 p.m. GLOW has taken the full three-hour long opera “Carmen” and condensed it to a one-act cabaret style performance. The performance will be held at the Younts Center for Performing Arts, 315 N. Main St., Fountain Inn. For more information, email civiccenter.boxoffice@fountaininn.org, visit yountscenter.org or call 864-409-1050.

Beneath the Oaks Music Academy will hold an open house on May 23, 4-7 p.m., at 17 E. Main Street, Taylors. Lynne Holcombe and Lou Buckingham are launching a new space in Greenville for kids to learn about and foster their love of music. There will be performances of kids’ music from Shufflebutton, group games, camp songs, a parachute, light refreshments and the chance to pre-register music classes for kids ages 18 months to 9 years. For more information, visit facebook.com/beneaththeoaksmusic or email beneaththeoaksmusic@gmail.com. A new Art Discussion Group will hold its third meeting on May 28, 2-4 p.m., at Les Beaux Arts Gallery, 1239 Pendleton St., Greenville. The group is open to artists working in all media as well as non-artist “art appreciators.” The event will include a discussion of art-related subjects and artists are encouraged to bring work for “show and tell.” A $2 fee is requested to cover the cost of using the gallery classroom. Email Birdie1345@aol.com for more information.

Generously sponsored by Greenville Health System and Dixon Hughes Goodman, LLP.

Carolina Foothills Artisan Center (CFAC) will open its newest satellite location in Landrum on May 30, 5-7:30 p.m., with a reception. Live music and refreshments will welcome new artists in the area to the gallery space, and the public is invited to join. The Landrum location will be in addition to the main CFAC site in Chesnee and the current satellite gallery in the Green Room at Chapman Cultural Center. The event is free to attend. For more information, call 864-461-3050. The SC Children’s Theatre will present “Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day” June 13-22 at the Peace Center Gunter Theatre. In addition, the theatre’s upcoming season will include: “The Wizard of Oz,” “The Best Christmas Pageant Ever,” “Fancy Nancy, The Musical,” “Dr. Seuss’ The Cat in the Hat” and “Sleeping Beauty.” For more information, visit scchildrenstheatre.org.

Send announcements to arts@communityjournals.com.

Meet the Authors! Stories and Sweets with Dorothea Benton Frank

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38 THE JOURNAL | MAY 23, 2014


JOURNAL HOMES

DETAILS

Featured Homes & Neighborhoods | Open Houses | Property Transfers

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED HOME

7 Anthony Place, Greenville Located in Augusta Circle School District!, this Eye catching brick beauty in Chanticleer features 9ft ceilings and hardwood floors.The timeless 5 bedroom, 3.5 bath home is the perfect opportunity for any buyer. Generous living space and open floor plan welcome you as you enter through the soaring 2 story foyer. Formal living and dining room with additional office/study on main level. Awesome kitchen with updated stainless appliances and breakfast area sit comfortably overlooking bright den. Upstairs features master bedroom with private full bath. Three additional bedrooms upstairs with full bathroom. Full finished basement offers kitchenette and spacious bonus room/rec room as well as bedroom and full bath, all with access to patio and backyard. A new roof and beautiful backyard complete this stunning property. Must see today!

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HOME INFO Price: $875,000 | MLS: #1279222 Bedrooms: 5 Baths: 3 full, 1 half Square Footage: 5000-5199 Schools: Augusta Circle Elementary | Hughes Middle Greenville High

Sharon Wilson, GRI, CRS, ABR 864.918.1140 | swilson@cbcaine.com To submit your Featured Home: homes@greenvillejournal.com

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SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

MAY 23, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 39


JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND

O P E N S U N D AY, M AY 2 5 F R O M 2 – 4 P M

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BONNIE VISTA

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109 ROBIN ROAD . $214,900 . MLS# 1278582

4BR/4BA Unbelievable updates! Zoned for Augusta Circle, on large lot, lower level rec room with 2nd full kitchen, 3 gas freplaces. Michaux to Left on Seven Oaks. Home is on left.

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3BR/2BA Dynamite home on 1/2 acre lot. Come see! Highway 14 towards Simpsonville to Right on Robin Road.

Contact: Jacob Mann | 325-6266 Coldwell Banker Caine

Contact: Jacob Mann | 325-6266 Coldwell Banker Caine

Contact: Pat Norwood | 420-1998 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

COUCH PLACE

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3BR/2BA New care-free patio home living in Easley. Hwy 123 Easley, Left on Powdersville Rd @ Jimmy’s Restaurant, Right on McAlister Rd, Left on Couch, Right into SD

4BR/2.5BA Stunning home. Open floor plan, hardwoods, granite countertops, fenced backyard. From Woodruff Rd go South on Hwy 14, Subdivision on Left at intersection of Hwy 14 & Harts Lane.

4BR/2.5BA Spacious home on large level lot with spacious rooms. Greenville: Laurens Road to Right on W. Butler Rd, Right at Mauldin Library on Laurel Meadows Pkwy, Home on Right.

Contact: Joanne Beresh/Bob Martin | 505-1646/979-9544 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Chris Toates | 360-6696 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

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SCOTTSWOOD TOWNHOMES

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40 WOOD POINTE #60 . $135,000 . MLS# 1279362

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3BR/3BA Immaculate updated home. Updated kitchen w/all stainless appliances to stay. From Haywood Rd left into Scottswood Rt on Wood Pointe, #60.

3BR/2BA Extremely well maintained inside and out in fantastic location. Harrison Bridge Rd, Right on N. Main, Left -Bryson Dr, Left -Howard Dr, Right -Goldsmith, Right -Ironwood, Home on Left

Contact: Erin Foster | 386-9749 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Beverly Little | 430-8409 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

40 THE JOURNAL | MAY 23, 2014

When you are done reading this paper, please recycle it. SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


JOURNAL HOMES

R E A L E S TAT E N E W S Forecast for Housing and the Economy Suggests Gradual Improvement through 2015

Housing activity was sub-par in the first quarter of this year, dampened in part by severe weather patterns, but an uptrend is expected with healthy underlying demand over the balance of the year and through 2015, according to presentations at a residential real estate forum here during the Realtor® Party Convention & Trade Expo. Jon Pickhardt, 2014 President of The Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® and Co-owner of Flagship Properties SC and the Office Centers, LLC in Greenville, SC, said the U.S. population has been growing steadily, but job creation has not. “When you look at the jobs-to-population ratio, the current period is weaker than it was from the late 1990s through 2007,” he said. “This explains why Main Street America does not fully feel the recovery.” Pickhardt said that growth in the Gross Domestic Product slowed in the first quarter, and possibly contracted. “There are no fresh signs of recession, and the second quarter could grow about 3 percent,” he added. Pickhardt said the home sales-to-population ratio also has been below normal since 2008. Despite a large pent-up demand from years of below-normal home sales, inventory constraints and tight credit conditions continue to impede the market, in combination with strongly rising home prices and higher mortgage interest rates. Although existing-home sales rose more than 9 percent to nearly 5.1 million in 2013, sales activity retrenched during the past six months. Even with gradual improvement moving forward, they are projected to decline about 3 percent for the year to just over 4.9 million, but should trend up to more than 5.2 million in 2015. Because of tight inventories and rising sales last year, the median existing-home price rose 11.5 percent to just over $197,000. Home price growth is likely to moderate from more new home construction, with the median price increasing about 6 percent in 2014 to $209,000 and reaching nearly $219,000 next year as market conditions begin to balance. An upside of rising prices is a recovery in home equity. “Based on our forecast for this year, the median home equity gain over three years is expected to be $40,000.00,” Pickhardt noted. “A gap between new and existing-home prices from rising construction costs shows that prices are well supported by fundamentals in most of the country.” He expects the Federal Reserve to end tapering of monetary policy by the end of the year and to hike the Fed funds rates in the first quarter of 2015. Although the pattern is uneven month-to-month, mortgage interest rates are forecast to gradually rise, with the 30-year fixed rate averaging 4.7 percent this year and 5.5 percent in 2015. “Inevitably, rising mortgage interest rates will hurt housing affordability,” Pickhardt said. Housing starts have stayed below 1 million a year

for the past six years, but need to reach the long-term average of 1.5 million to balance the market. “Because of the prolonged slowdown in construction, we now need 1.7 million housing starts per year to catch up,” Pickhardt said. While improving, housing construction is seen at nearly 1.1 million this year and approximately 1.4 million in 2015. The sluggish recovery in housing starts is impacted by construction costs rising faster than inflation, labor shortages in the building trades, and the difficulty for small local home builders to obtain construction loans. “Onerous financial regulations are preventing small banks from originating construction loans,” Pickhardt said. Job growth, which is the key to overall economic health, has essentially recovered all of the eight million jobs lost since the great recession. Employment is expected to improve, with job growth rising 1.6 percent in 2014 and 1.9 percent next year, after growing 1.7 percent in 2013; consumer confidence should gradually rise. The Gross Domestic Product should grow 2.2 percent this year and about 2.9 percent in 2015; GDP grew 1.9 percent in 2013. Inflation, as measured by the Consumer Price Index, was a tame 1.4 percent in 2013 but is projected to rise to 2.5 percent this year and 3.5 percent in 2015. Eric Belsky, managing director of the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University, agreed we’re unlikely to see a back-up in GDP. “Growth in the stock market and the recovery in housing along with pent-up demand are major factors driving the economy,” he said. “There are three federal surveys that measure household growth and that are inconsistent, but we had real growth in 2012 that fell back last year,” Belsky said. “Even the survey with the strongest household growth shows we’re a million below where we should be, but we’re probably two million below. We could see a notable uptick in household formation later this year.” Belsky noted there are nearly three million more young adults who lived with their parents in 2012 than in 2007, and the median incomes for all young adults have declined since the great recession. According to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, student loan default rates have soared from just over 6 percent in 2003 to nearly 12 percent last year. Student debt is hurting credit scores and hindering the ability of some young adults to qualify for a mortgage; it could be a problem for as many as one in 10 renters who are in their 20s. The Joint Center for Housing Studies projects household growth to rival or top the annual average pace from 1995 to 2000, and projects 76 percent of the growth over the next decade will be from minority households. The greatest increase is expected to be among households age 65 and

older. According to Fannie Mae, roughly nine out of 10 people under the age of 45 expect to buy a home in the future, but Belsky said mortgage underwriting standards are dramatically tighter, which disproportionately impacts minorities and those with lower incomes. Dennis McGill, director of research for Zelman & Associates in New York, also focused on trends in housing demand. “Our analysis of Census Data shows an average of only 720,000 housing starts annually from 2010 through 2013, but our projections over the next five years exceed an average of 1.9 million,” he said. “We won’t ramp up to that level right away, but if you average housing starts for the entire period from 2010 to 2019, it would be about 1.44 million,” McGill said. “There is a strong tailwind to housing starts. We’re starting to see capital come back to single family construction, which is very favorable.” The percentage of 24 to 34 year old married couples has risen since the last recession, but they are delaying a transition to homeownership. Zelman believes that the majority of this recent change has been due to recessionary impacts that should start to unwind. McGill said their analysis shows the existing-home inventory relative to the number of households in the first quarter of this year is 30 percent lower than the average of the past two decades. In addition, total sales closings in 2013 were 20 percent lower than the 25-year average. “If we don’t bring capacity back to the market, home prices will continue to rise strongly,” he said. A Zelman consumer survey shows most young adults believe a lack of savings for a downpayment is their biggest hurdle to obtaining a mortgage, but most of them think they need a much larger downpayment than is actually required. Even with the well-known debt issues, nearly onequarter of people under the age of 35 are debt free, which is better than the historic average. In addition, the Zelman survey shows that contrary to fears, there is no correlation between student loan debt and household formation. “A lot of this is a recessionary impact that we think is overlooked,” McGill said. The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing 1 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries. Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® represents over 1,800 members in all aspects of the real estate industry. Please visit the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® web site at www.ggar.com for real estate and consumer information. “Every market is different, call a REALTOR® today.”

Distinctive Homes To Fit Your Life.

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Expertize You Can Count On. MAY 23, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 41


JOURNAL HOMES

ON THE MARKET AUGUSTA ROAD

HOLLAND PLACE

PELZER AREA

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4BR/3BA Fabulous address in Augusta Rd.!! Lovely one story home on beautiful level fenced lot. This street has sidewalks and is a short walk or bike ride to GCC and shopping.

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Contact: Suzy Withington | 201-6001 BHHS

Contact: Mary Hartpence | 915-0111 JOY Real Estate

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Contact: Cameron Keegan | 238-7109 RE/MAX Moves

Contact: Mary Hartpence | 915-0111 JOY Real Estate

G R E E N V I L L E T R A N S AC T ION S A P R I L 21 - 2 5, 2 014 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$3,082,750 $2,200,000 THORNBLADE $1,030,000 $799,500 EAST PARK@PELHAM III $710,000 FOOTHILLS AERODROME $625,000 400 NORTH MAIN CONDOS $530,000 MAHAFFEY PLANTATION $500,000 HAMMETT CREEK $458,212 WEATHERSTONE $415,063 $390,000 $385,000 $376,500 ASHETON $367,000 CARILION $341,000 CATALINA ESTATES $340,000 $329,000 TOWNES@THORNBLADE $320,283 WATERSTONE COTTAGES $313,552 LAKE VIEW ESTATES $304,250 KANATENAH $303,000 HILLSIDE PLANTATION $295,000 HERITAGE POINT $289,084

BUYER

ADDRESS

BON SECOURS ST FRANCIS H WF-GCA INNOVATION LLC 11425 HORSEMAN’S TRAIL MARK III PROPERTIES INC J FOUR LOTS LLC PO BOX 170248 KNAUSE TERRY D CHENG ZJIHIA 112 ANTIGUA WAY CDM PROPERTIES LLC WOODRUFF ROAD STORAGE LL 1231 LADY ST 3RD FL EPSILON DELTA LLC T BISHOP PROPERTIES CORP 8 LAUREL BRANCH LN ELLENBERG JOHN D COLLINS ROBERT STEVEN 28 DEBONAIR WAY WALTERS PAMELA GAYLE TR MCCALLUM JAMES R (JTWROS 6232 ARNALL CT NW BOORTZ CATHERINE B GARNER LUDMILA 9 GRIFFITH CREEK DR D R HORTON INC KRUGLEWICZ SHAWN (SURV) 12 HIGHFIELD CT MUNGO HOMES INC DANDELSKE DONALD F (JTWR 112 BRANDAU LN ADAMS C DAN THOMPSON TREVOR (JTWROS) 1 PUTNEY BRIDGE LN CARRINGTON SAMUEL LINDSA HARDEN CAROLINE S 314 BYRD BLVD DIXON THERESA M JACKSON LINNIE 103 COOPER DR BARNECUT CHRISTINE F BARTHEL MARISA (JTWROS) 20820 WATERBEACH PL TRIPLE B COMPANY INC HITE REBECCA Y 34 PALLADIO DR JONES WARNER L ABERCROMBIE JAN K 14 DOLPHIN POND LN BROWNING LINDA D VERMILLION STEPHEN T (SU 66 ROCK CREEK DR TOWNES@THORNBLADE LLC KENNEDY MAUREEN B 105 MEADOW CLARY DR ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC CHARLTON CINDY (JTWROS) 328 OWASSO DR A2E ENTERPRISES LLC KRASTEL EILEEN L 2 TALAVERA LN SPRINGETT AMY ELIZABETH PERKINS LEANN 36 E FARIS RD FIRST COLONIAL PROPERTIE SHAFER KEVIN NEAL 2 BOLERO LN BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT MCINTYRE RYAN A PO BOX 1097

42 THE JOURNAL | MAY 23, 2014

SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

MORNING MIST $286,708 SHENANDOAH FARMS $280,000 MILESTONE OFFICE PARK $275,000 PLANTATION@HOLLY TREE $273,000 ROCKBROOKE NORTH $262,000 BUXTON $260,000 FAIRVIEW CHASE $260,000 PELHAM FALLS $258,000 NEELY FARM - HAWTHORNE RIDGE $252,450 MORNING MIST FARM $252,000 ROPER MEADOW $250,900 VICTORIA PARK $250,000 HUNTERS RIDGE $248,000 FOXCROFT $245,000 GREYSTONE@NEELY FARMS $242,500 GARDENS@ROSE RESERVE $238,730 $235,000 $233,000 HOLLY TREE PLANTATION $231,500 HUNTERS RIDGE $229,550 LANSFAIR @ ASHBY PARK $225,000 MORNING MIST $222,568 $220,000

BUYER

ADDRESS

S C PILLON HOMES INC GRANT CYNTHIA (JTWROS) 6 GORHAM CT BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT CHRISTMAN KIMBERLY T (JT 380 STRASBURG DR MILESTONE VENTURES LLC FRANCIS JAMILE J JR REVO 30 PATEWOOD DR STE 100 TEAL REAL ESTATE LLC BARRAS AMY B (JTWROS) 716 PLANTATION DR LARA OSCAR R REUSCH FRANK (JTWROS) 109 REDWATER WAY ARMSTRONG EUGENE S JR CLEVELAND PETER G (JTWRO 4 BROMSGROVE DR AHO HOMES LLC RREF RB-SC AHL LLC 730 NW 107TH AVE STE 400 CULBERTSON MARY C PEARSON VINCENC LLOYD (J 121 BRIARPARK DR GENT KEVIN P PRICE STACI W (JTWROS) 715 NEELY FARM DR REEL PROPERTIES GROUP CO PENCE WHITNEY B (JTWROS) 7 HUSHPAH CT GAMBINO SUZANNE GESSELL AMANDA W 228 ROPER MEADOW DR BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT BLACKMORE KEVIN G (JTWRO PO BOX 1039 BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT HANCOCK JAMES R (JTWROS) 1330 WENTWORTH AVE ROEBUCK ANNA M JAGOE PAUL D (JTWROS) 2 RUNNYMEDE RD BUTLER LAWRENCE B (JTWRO WALTZ ELIZABETH (JTWROS) 513 WORCHESTER PL ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC BRADSHAW SUZANNE 516 TINEKE WAY SPEES CHRIS J LAVETER MATHEW A 118 HICKORY DR MOSS AMBER H (JTWROS) FOGLEMAN KATHERINE STEWA 4 AUGUSTA CT BUSBY MARY GNAUCK HENDERSON ASHLEY T 207 OLD TOWN WAY BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT DAVIS BONNIE B (JTWROS) 137 GRAMERCY CT JOHNSON BRIAN SCOTT COWAN DARRYL L 6 TINSBERRY DR S C PILLON HOMES INC MOORE NATHAN REID (JTWRO 603 TULIP TREE LN TODD RHONDA S LANGLEY BRITTANY H 200 TOMASSEE AVE

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


JOURNAL CULTURE

Photography by carol boone stewart

As Seen In Behind the Counter 2014

GOLDEN STRIP GLASS, INC.

“We invite you to visit our showroom and see our full-size displays in person.” When Dominick Abbate started his glass company in 1991, he was working out of the back of a single truck in his driveway. As business began to build, he moved into a small office space. The new office was a major improvement but still required Dominick to punch a hole in the back wall of the building to allow him to fabricate the 24’ long extrusions for the commercial storefront windows. After six years of hard work and dedication, Dominick was able to move to the company’s current location, a 9,375 sq. ft. building which includes a showroom, offices, and warehouse space. Dominick, or Dom as he is known, has a concise recipe for his success: “Be your word.” And it’s just this ethic of integrity, hard work, and excellence that Dom passes on to his sons, Matthew, 28, and Michael, 30, as they take over the reigns of Golden Strip Glass. Today, Golden Strip Glass offers a full range of glass services for residential and commercial businesses, from shower enclosures to mirrors, table tops, cabinet glass, curved glass and window glass replacements, as well as aluminum commercial storefronts, doors, and curtain walls. Well-known to the retail and the construction industry, Golden Strip Glass provides residential glass services in the Upstate of South Carolina, and commercial services in South Carolina, Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee. Dom’s first extraordinary act upon his semi-retirement in 2012 was to hike 1600 miles of the Appalachian Trail. His goal? To get out of the way while his sons took over—and take over they did. The two-son team has just finished gutting the showroom, installing new lighting, new displays, stained concrete, and an impressive all-glass sliding door system for their custom picture framing business. They dropped some of their lines of business to concentrate on glass, and are reworking their marketing and logo. The back of the shop has been restructured with new cutting edge equipment to improve efficiency and safety.

“When we took over, the company had a solid foundation,” says Matt. “We only needed to make some minor tweaks to get the company moving into a newer age.” “I knew I had two qualified sons who could do it,” says Dom, who loved owning his own business, but is ready for an active retirement. His ability to know his own strengths—running operations in the field—and hire qualified employees to handle other required jobs is a talent his sons have inherited. “Our dad taught us to work smarter, not harder,” Mike says. “You can’t do it all yourself. We’ve got the right people in place, and experienced management.” Mike and Matt grew up around the store, and used to work on Saturdays cutting weather stripping. Mike started working at the shop right out of high school; Matt earned a degree in computer science. Although Dom spent a lot of time on jobs out of town, the boys remember camping trips in their motor home and traveling to New York for holidays. “We’ve always appreciated him,” says Mike. “We used to show up at his jobs and bring him dinner.” Now ready to bring in more volume to a ship-shape operation, the sons look forward to translating their strong partnership into success. Dom looks forward to traveling and hiking—and swooping in from time to time to check on his sons’ progress.

343 Miller Road, Mauldin www.goldenstripglass.com | 864.297.9989 Mon.-Fri. 7am-5pm

To reserve your space in the 2015 Behind the Counter, call 864.679.1223 MAY 23, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 43


JOURNAL CULTURE

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Monsignor Andrew K. Gwynn, Inc., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 762 Mauldin Rd., Greenville, S.C. 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than June 1, 2014. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Chipotle Mexican Grill of Colorado, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 4 Market Point Drive, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than May 25, 2014. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Frankies Pizza, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 101-B The Parkway, Greenville, SC 29615. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than June 1, 2014. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Red Lobster Restaurants, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1940 Wade Hampton Blvd, Greenville SC 29615. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than June 1, 2014. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that CT Hotels LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 4295 Augusta Road, Greenville, SC 29605. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than May 25, 2014. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Sully’s Bagel & Deli DBA Sully’s Steamers, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 6 E. Washington St., Greenville, SC, 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than June 8, 2014. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

COMPLAINT NOTICE A complaint has been brought before the Code Enforcement Division of a dangerous, insanitary and unsafe structure located at the following locations: 428 Old Georgia Road a.k.a. Lot 2 F.T. Epps Estate (C.S. Wellons Subdivision) a.k.a. Lot 1 of C.S. Wellons Subdivision, Greenville County Tax Map Number 612.3-1-13, Greenville County, SC. 132 Current Drive, Greenville County Tax Map Number 246.1-1-133, Greenville County, SC. Old Paris Mountain Road (Brutontown), Greenville County Tax Map Number 175-1-14, Greenville County, SC. 121 Stallings Road a.k.a. 9999 a.k.a. 3.67 acres – Stallings Road, Greenville County Tax Map Number 246-1-2, Greenville County, SC. 108 9th Street (Judson), Greenville County Tax Map Number 111-11-3, Greenville County, SC. Any persons having interest in these properties, or knowledge of the property owner should contact the Codes Enforcement Office at 864-467-7090 on or before May 29, 2014.

SHERIFF’S AUCTION NOTICE The Greenville County Sheriff’s Office is holding an auction to dispose of found and seized property. The Auction will be held at 657 Keith Drive June 7, 2014. The gate will open at 8:00am the auction will begin at 10:00. The previewing will be on Friday June 6, 2014 from 10:00am- 2:00pm The auction will consist of household items, jewelry (no guarantees), misc. electronics 9camersa, stereo equipment etc.) tools, windows, bicycles, and 1 dirt bike, a childs desk, and sports equipment. The cars are as follows: 1998 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX VIN 1G2WJ52K9WF342088, 1994 FORD EXPLORER VIN 1FMDU34X9RUD55054, 2000 FORD EXPLORER, VIN 1FMZU85P2YZB67897, 1992 FORD TAURUS 1FACP52U6NA143032, 1999 TOYATA AVALON VIN 4T1BF18B3XU352670, 1995 VOLVO 850GL VIN YV1LS5536S1252740, 2000 OLDSMOBILE ALERO VIN 1G3NL12T1YC306807, 1985 CHEVROLET S-10 VIN 1GCBS14E2F8267469, 1996 LINCOLN TOWNCAR VIN 1LNLM82W1TY27411, 1999 CHEVROLET TAHOE VIN 1GNEK13R3XJ496505, 1997 GMC SAFARI VIN 1GKDM19W4VB13092, 1999 MERCEDES E 320 VIN WDBJF65H9XA725930, 2002 VW JETTA VIN 3VWSK69M12M119006. If you have any questions please call Ellen Clark at 864- 467-5224.

SUMMONS NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT CA# 2013- DR-23-4492 October 8, 2013 Jefferson Neil Jones and Tia Cook Jones, Petitioners vs. Christopher Lindsey, Katie Massengale, and Lance Preston Wayne Cannady, minor under the age of fourteen (14) years, Respondents. TO THE RESPONDENT ABOVE NAMED, CHRISTOPHER LINDSEY: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Petition in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to the said Petition on the Petitioners or their Attorney, David W. Holmes, at his office, 712 North Main Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29609, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service; and if you fail to answer the Petition with the time aforesaid, Judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Petition. April 29, 2014 Greenville, South Carolina HOLMES LAW FIRM By: David W. Holmes SC Bar #2577 ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONERS (May 9, 16, and 23)

LEGAL NOTICES Only $.99 per line ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Only $145 tel 864.679.1205 • fax 864.679.1305 email aharley@communityjournals.com

Crossword puzzle: page 46

44 THE JOURNAL | MAY 23, 2014

SOLICITATIONS NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP# 69-06/06/14, Solid Waste Hauling Services – Roll-off Boxes, June 6, 2014, 3:30 P.M. A Pre-Proposal Meeting will be held THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014, 10:00 A.M., E.D.T. at Twin Chimneys Landfill, 11075 Augusta Road, Honea Path, SC 29657. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org/ Purchasing_Dept/RFP.asp or by calling (864) 467-7200.

SOLICITATIONS NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP# 68-06/06/14, Solid Waste Hauling Services – Trailers, June 6, 2014, 3:00 P.M. A Pre-Proposal Meeting will be held THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014, 10:00 A.M., E.D.T. at Twin Chimneys Landfill, 11075 Augusta Road, Honea Path, SC 29657. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org/ Purchasing_Dept/RFP.asp or by calling (864) 467-7200.

SOLICITATIONS NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: Carisbrooke Phase 3 Project in Greenville County on June 10, 2014, 3:00 P.M. A mandatory pre-bid meeting and site tour will be held at 9:00 A.M., EDT, May 29, 2014 at Greenville County Procurement Services Office, County Square, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601. Solicitations can be found at http://www.greenvillecounty. org/Purchasing_Dept/Bids.asp or by calling 864-467-7200.

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE There will be a PUBLIC HEARING before the GREENVILLE COUNTY BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS ON WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9, 2014 AT 3:00 P.M. in CONFERENCE ROOM –D at GREENVILLE COUNTY SQUARE, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, S.C., for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the petitions listed below. PERSONS HAVING AN INTEREST IN THESE PETITIONS MAY BECOME PARTIES OF RECORD BY FILING WITH THE BOARD, AT LEAST THREE (3) DAYS PRIOR TO THE SCHEDULED DATE SET FOR HEARING, BY WRITING THEIR ADDRESS, A STATEMENT OF THEIR POSITION AND THE REASONS WHY THE RELIEF SOUGHT WITH RESPECT TO SUCH PROPERTY SHOULD OR SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED. CB-14-17 APPLICANT: ST. JOSEPH’s HIGH SCHOOL PROPERTY: Tax Map #M011010100329; 100 St. Joseph’s Drive, Greenville SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception for Additional Parking and Construction of a Maintenance Shed. CB-14-19 APPLICANT: AT&T BELLSOUTH SUBSIDIARY PROPERTY: Tax Map #0596020102801; 500 Old Hundred Road, Pelzer SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception for new Generator/ Fuel tank location on site. CB-14-20 APPLICANT: UNITY CHURCH of GREENVILLE PROPERTY: Tax Map #P003000100111; 207 Belvue Road, Taylors SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception for new covered deck. CB-14-21 APPLICANT: MICHAEL ELLIOT, LAUREL GROVE LLC JOHN BAILEY, VIRANI CUSTOM HOMES PROPERTY: Tax Map #0549010102129 Lot 17 Laurel Grove, Simpsonville SC REQUEST: Variance from Front Setback Requirement.

Sudoku puzzle: page 46


JOURNAL CULTURE

THE WEEK IN PHOTOS

LOOK WHO’S IN THE JOURNAL THIS WEEK

GWINN DAVIS / CONTRIBUTING

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Max Homa wins the 2014 BMW Charity Pro-Am presented by SYNNEX Corporation shooting 20 under par.​

Former Chicago Bears quarterback Jim McMahon putts on number 17 at the Green Valley Country Club golf course during the BMW Pro-Am. McMahon was part of the 1985 Bears team that won the Super Bowl. The BMW Charity Pro-Am presented by SYNNEX Corporation is the only tournament on the Web.com Tour where amateurs and celebrities are grouped with Web.com Tour professionals in a four-day competition over three courses. Amateurs, celebrities and pros rotated between three courses on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, with the 10 lowest-scoring pro-amateur teams, six lowest-scoring pro-celebrity teams and the lowest 65 pros (and ties) advancing to play Sunday’s final round at Thornblade Club.

John Connor Douglass and DaJah Farrow, fifthgraders in George Koontz’s class, race in the Stone Academy Sports Field Day water relay.

F​ irestone Complete Auto Care on Antrim Drive gave generously to support Greenville Technical College’s effort to build a Habitat house with a $556 donation. Pictured are Firestone store manager Marie Dougherty with Greenville Technical College Building Construction Technology professor David Ackerman.

As Web.com Tour pros were preparing for the 2014 BMW Charity Pro-Am presented by SYNNEX Corporation tournament this week, some of their families were exploring Greenville. Wives and children visited Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Carolinas, one of the tournament’s benefitting charities, for lunch with Ronald McDonald and a tour of the house. The group then spent the afternoon at the Greenville Zoo.

A new Foothills Trail trailhead at Oconee State Park was dedicated last week. Improvements were also made to the parking lot and map kiosks. Volunteers from the Foothills Trail Conference spent two work sessions reworking and rerouting the first half-mile of the Foothills Trail. The area within and around the parking area was also landscaped using native plant materials donated by Head-Lee Nursery, Clemson Botanical Garden and others.

Finish What You Started. on campus -or- online

Finish faster while working or taking care of your family Enrolling now!

ACCEL at www.andersonuniversity.edu • 231-2020

MAY 23, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 45


JOURNAL CULTURE

FIGURE. THIS. OUT. INTEL INSIDE

ACROSS 1 “Holy smokes!” 4 Like bodyguards 9 Stinger 13 Dip 17 Japanese band 18 Dashboard array 20 Stars at the Forum? 22 “Oh dear” 23 “When it rains, it pours” brand 25 More distant

By C.C. Burnikel

26 Raised, in a way 27 Cold draft 28 Eye protector 29 1954 Kurosawa classic 32 Apples on a desk 34 Blows off steam 35 Battleground 36 “Enough already!” 39 Wide awake 41 Changes course 43 Only player to appear in both the Super Bowl

and World Series 46 Old 45 player 47 Org. for heavyweights 50 Muscat Daily reader 51 Bird feeder cakes 52 Game with many imitators 54 Golden Fleece source 55 Égoïste maker 57 Silver hair? 58 Issues for fashionable readers 59 Vice squad operation

60 With no break 62 Camp David Accords signer 63 Emmy-winning sportscaster Buck 65 Cecilia, to musicians 70 Lisbon’s land, to the IOC 71 Aquatic birds 73 Pink flowers in a Van Gogh still life 74 Base figures

76 Totally lost 77 “Forget it” 78 Attractive one 81 Athenian cross 84 Baseball closer’s nightmare 86 __ gun 87 French twist need 89 Envy, e.g. 90 “I’m Not There” actor 91 Investment firm founded in 1869 93 Like toads 95 Postgrad hurdles 96 Choice word 97 “SNL” alumna Cheri 99 “Hasta la vista” 101 Washington, for one 103 Classic sci-fi gesture 106 Way to stand 107 Lox stocker 111 On Vine St., say 112 Improves 113 Leafy course 116 Grant factor 117 Cabbage? 118 Pet on a wheel 119 39, for Derek Jeter 120 Celtic tongue 121 “I took the one __ traveled by”: Frost 122 Like cigar bars 123 Intel collector hidden in nine puzzle answers DOWN 1 Baby carrier? 2 High wind 3 Current carrier 4 Back in the day 5 Went around in circles? 6 __ video 7 “Great Scott!” 8 U.S. state with three counties 9 Release relatives 10 Way up 11 Tour of duty 12 When printing starts 13 Ring site 14 1987 kid’s best-seller 15 “That is ...” 16 Mass __ 19 Some GPS lines 21 1966 Sporting News College Coach of the Year Parseghian 24 Largest moon of Neptune 30 Tinker to __ to Chance:

classic double-play combo 31 “The Few. The Proud” group 33 “Friends” friend 36 Scent 37 Blood: Pref. 38 “The King and I” kingdom 39 Chick chaser? 40 Free 42 Tabloid subj. 44 Carne __: Mexican beef dish 45 One with a habit 46 Language that gives us “shampoo” 48 One way to play 49 Mgr.’s helper 52 Yemen’s capital 53 Waves-against-rocks sounds 56 Not square 57 Private eatery 59 Get more Money 61 Atlanta-to-Charleston dir. 63 “Once Upon a Time in China” star 64 1938 “The War of the Worlds” narrator 66 Treasure cache 67 Ring barrier 68 ___Sweet: sugar substitute

Medium

69 “No details, pls!” 71 Bar pickups 72 Spanish wine punch 75 Feed a friend’s feline, say 77 Nobody 79 Sports figures 80 Dundee topper 81 Virginia __ 82 “Off the Court” author 83 Cold War initials 85 Good to go 86 Event with mocking 88 Top-notch 91 Puts up a fuss 92 One who’s quick to pick up? 94 Where many quarters are used 95 Rexall Place team 97 Like merinos 98 Upright worker 100 Gym event 101 __ whale 102 Martial arts-based regimen 104 95-Down’s org. 105 Person, slangily 108 Dashing style 109 Gets behind 110 What’s on your mind 114 Hi-__ monitor 115 Underhand Crossword answers: page 44

Sudoku answers: page 44

SOMETHING BOLD IS ON THE WAY. SEE WHAT’S TAKING SHAPE AT GSP. This summer, expect to see some exciting changes in our baggage claim area. Courtesy of WINGSPAN, this new addition is only the beginning of our transformation. To learn more about the Terminal Improvement Program, visit elevatingtheupstate.com.

46 THE JOURNAL | MAY 23, 2014


JOURNAL CULTURE

JUST A THOUGHT

Honor our state’s fallen Vietnam heroes and help preserve their memories

WITH DIANE IRVING

Another decade gone As I approach my 30th birthday, I think about how crazy my 20s really were. The core of who I am has stayed the same since I was young, but I’m also completely different than I was in my early 20s. I take more risks now, I’m not afraid to speak my mind, I don’t feel the need to please everyone all the time, I’m smarter, more mature, I’ve conquered many of my fears, and I could go on and on. So, as I say goodbye to this decade, I am going to share some of my biggest life lessons during all of its ups and downs. Sometimes the scariest things we face are the most worthwhile. Leaving a long relationship is devastating, but in the end, will most likely be the best thing that has ever happened to you. I’d rather learn to be happy alone than fake it with the wrong person. It’s a great time to reinvent yourself, too. Don’t mix beer, wine and liquor all at once. You may end up singing “Happy Birthday” to yourself by yourself in front of an entire bar. It’s only by a divine miracle that this did not end up recorded and posted on YouTube. Stand up for yourself in a tactful way. No matter who betrays you or treats you badly, always be the better person. You can’t change someone’s bad behavior by mimicing their mistakes. However, you can point out that their offenses toward you did not go unnoticed. Travel, travel, travel while you can and have the money. The things you learn and the connections you make with people from different backgrounds are unforgettable. When I was in Turkey, an Arabic woman in a burqa told me I was beautiful, and I told her she was too. After that moment, I fell in love with travel. It expands your thoughts, ideas and mind beyond your normal paradigm. The only way to face your fears is to just do it. I never thought I would travel to big cities completely alone, but I gathered some courage and grew in ways I never thought possible. You can only gain confidence from these experiences, even if you were scared the whole time. Don’t ask a guy out at the oil-change place; it will only lead to sheer embarrassment. In no makeup, jeans and a Canadian T-shirt, I began to overanalyze a guy’s glances in my direction. For the first time in history, I decided to ask the guy for his number (very awkwardly, might I add). His response: “No thanks, I’m good.” Everyone experiences rejection and needs humbling. I just wish mine hadn’t happened in front of a lobby full of customers. (I give you permission to laugh.) Don’t be afraid to be yourself, even when you know others may not accept you. You will eventually find people you fit in with. No one is worth giving up your true self. Individualism is more important than conformity. Don’t ever joke with your parents about wanting a shake weight for Christmas. They won’t think it’s a joke and will buy you one. And worse, you will end up using it. No matter who you are, have goals and an eye for accomplishments. Everyone needs a purpose in life to feel happiness. Thinking of the future will guarantee a satisfying one. I have always felt like, as a female, I’ve been expected to want certain things in life by a certain age. Society puts pressure on people to get married and have children by the time you’re in your 30s. I’ve never put that pressure on myself because of my Peter Pan perspective. I let my life write itself and have found that my lack of plans has opened up the opportunity for everything to fall into place on its own. No stress, no pressure. It helps that my only plans revolve around a passion to cultivate my creativity. The most satifying thing up to this point has been to experience life on my own. Making mistakes, volunteering to prevent constant self-servitude, and most importantly surrounding myself with people who love me no matter what – these have all just been an added bonus. Of course, I have learned many more lessons then the ones listed, but I realize we don’t have all day. So, I hope you enjoyed reading and maybe even learned something from my list. Now, I’m off to my next adventure with a glass in hand and my toes in the sand. Diane Irving is a creative writer, holder of a Bachelor of Science degree in marketing, and a lover of the outdoors. Visit her website at dianeisms.blogspot.com.

Help collect photos of all S.C. soldiers killed in Vietnam The names of the 896 South Carolinians killed in the Vietnam War are engraved for history on the polished Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall in Washington, D.C. The Wall has helped heal the nation’s wounds and honor Vietnam veterans. The Vietnam Veterans Memorial Foundation is now working to add faces to those names by collecting photographs of all who died fighting in the Vietnam War. The “Faces Not Forgotten” project is collecting photos of the nearly 59,000 men and women who served our country and sacrificed their lives in Vietnam. Collected pictures will be displayed at The Wall’s Education Center and online at www.vvmf. org/Wall-of-Faces.

Help put a face with a name The “Faces Not Forgotten” project is missing 578 photos of S.C.’s fallen Vietnam soldiers, including the ones from our area listed below. SA SGT CPL SGT PFC SP4 SGT PVT PFC PFC SSGT SP4 SGT SP4 SP5 SGT

J B CATHEY DONALD C DAVES RALPH E BYRD JERRY W BYERS WILLIAM E BRUSTER GARY R BRYANT THOMAS D BROCK MATTHEW A BOWEN JOHN L BARNHART JAMES ARNOLD WILLIAM H HAWKINS BRUCE E HAZLE ARTHUR L JORDON JERALD L JONES FREDDIE L LAMKIN CHARLIE LYLES JR

GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE

NAVY ARMY ARMY ARMY ARMY ARMY ARMY ARMY ARMY ARMY MARINES ARMY ARMY ARMY ARMY ARMY

SP4 SGT SGT SGT PFC CPL PFC SGT SGT 1LT LCPL FSGT CPL SP4 SP4 SGT

JOHN W MASSEY JR JERRY S MCDONALD CLYDE E MORGAN JAMES C MULLINAX JR RONALD E PACE PHILLIP A PAGE SILAS E GIBSON JAMES B FOSTER JR BENNY H FERGUSON LEWIS C WUESTENBERG RONALD A WILLIAMS ROBERT L TURNER CHARLES H ROBINSON MELVIN ROBINSON KENNETH RHODES JOHN H PRIEST JR

GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE GREENVILLE

ARMY ARMY ARMY ARMY ARMY ARMY ARMY ARMY ARMY ARMY MARINES MARINES ARMY ARMY ARMY ARMY

TO ADD A PHOTO ONLINE OR BY MAIL, VISIT: WWW.VVMF.ORG/HOW-TO-SUBMIT This notice is sponsored by the Greenville Journal and the S.C. Press Association. MAY 23, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 47


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May 23, 2014 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals. (Without cover buster presentation.)