May 20, 2016 Greenville Journal

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GREENVILLE WOMEN GIVING celebrates 10 years, more than 530 members and $4.2 million in community support Photos by Chelsey Ashford Photography

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“This is the first time in many, many years that there were so many winners in the budget.” Crystal Ball O’Connor, Greenville County Schools trustee, on the proposed schools budget, which includes pay raises for bus drivers, more special education teachers and full-time athletic directors for high schools

“It’s been one of the most fun things I’ve ever done. Taking something from an idea to an organization is tremendously exciting, tremendously satisfying.”

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Sue Priester, co-chair of Greenville Women Giving, on the organization’s origins 10 years ago.

“So happy to hear Bun Bun is going home! All is right with the world.” Gay Lynn Olsen, Greenville resident, on the City of Greenville’s Facebook page, reacting to the news that the stuffed bunny found abandoned during the Artisphere festival had been claimed.

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4 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.20.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

SEC tournament pivots to Greenville in 2017

Flag removal topped off the “perfect recipe” that put city back on the table CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Bon Secours Wellness Arena general manager Beth Paul said it was a “perfect recipe” that landed Greenville the 2017 Southeastern Conference women’s basketball tournament. Greenville’s vibrant downtown, a renovated Bon Secours Wellness Arena and community support were key ingredients in the SEC officially awarding the tournament to the city on Monday morning, she said. “When you put that all together, you can’t say no,” Paul said. But it was something that happened 120 miles away in the state capital of Columbia – the removal of the Confederate flag from the Statehouse grounds last July – that allowed the tournament back for the first time since 2005.

“It just made it easy,” said SEC Commissioner Greg Sankey, who called the day significant for the conference and the state. Sankey said the conference was about to award the 2017 tournament to another city when the Confederate flag was removed. “We really had to pivot,” he said, “but we felt that this was the right place to locate the tournament. We think it’s a nod to the forward-looking change you engaged in as a state.” Although the University of South Carolina and Clemson University have held NCAA baseball tournament games since the NAACP flag boycott began, the 2017 tournament will be the first predetermined championship game in 12 years. “Thank you to the NCAA for opening the doors to South Carolina. Thank you to the SEC for having confidence in us,” said Gov.

Graduation

Nikki Haley, who successfully pushed for the flag to come down after the tragic shooting deaths of nine people in the historic Emanuel AME Church in Charleston last summer. She said the flag removal signaled the state’s “willingness to move forward.” Greenville Mayor Knox White said without Haley’s courage and vision, Monday’s announcement wouldn’t have happened and that he’s pleased Greenville will be “something of a footnote to that history.” The 2016 tournament was held in Jacksonville, Fla. The Dawn Staley-led University of South Carolina won its second straight championship. The Well is less than two hours away from USC’s home court

and a short drive from the University of Tennessee and the University of Georgia. The 2018 SEC women’s basketball tournament will be held in Nashville, Tenn.

“It just made it easy.” SEC Commissioner Greg Sankey on removal of the Confederate flag from the Statehouse dome that ended the NAACP boycott of South Carolina.

Mayor: Tournament bids play to Greenville’s natural strengths

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When the NCAA evaluates bids for future regional basketball tournaments, the criteria it will use plays to Greenville’s natural strengths, Greenville Mayor Knox White said. The Bon Secours Wellness Arena is within walking distance of downtown’s many hotels, restaurants and other attractions, something that would allow people to focus on the games and where they’ll spend their down time instead of how they’ll get from one place to another, White said. “Most cities have to work on that,” he said. “We don’t. Once people park at their hotel, they never have to touch their car until it’s time to go home.” Bon Secours Wellness Arena general manager Beth Paul was among a Greenville contingent that attended a preliminary informational session at NCAA headquarters in Indianapolis. Representatives from cities planning to bid for the NCAA basketball tournament attended the fact-finding symposium. Bids are due in late summer. “I think the same factors that attracted the SEC to Greenville should be attractive to the NCAA selection committee,” she said. “We have the core requirements, if not better, for the NCAA. I think we’re in a really good position.” Greenville last hosted the NCAA tournament in 2002 when Duke, Notre Dame, Oklahoma State and Alabama played at the arena, then called the BI-LO Center. The NCAA imposed a ban on postseason tournaments in South Carolina in support of the NAACP boycott over the Confederate flag flying on Statehouse grounds. Because the tournament had already been awarded prior to the ban, Greenville was still allowed to host. Greenville also hosted the Southeastern Conference women’s basketball tournament in 2005, an event that attracted about 40,000 attendees. Paul said the arena would work with community partners because attracting NCAA championships and conference tournaments is a “community-wide event that needs the support of corporations, basketball fans and fans of Greenville to fill the arena,” Paul said. The NCAA has awarded the Division I men’s Final Four through 2021. Those are typically held in bigger cities with larger arenas. It has named sites for the preliminary rounds through 2018. Greensboro, N.C., and Charlotte, N.C., will host first- and second-round games in 2017 and 2018, respectively.


FRIDAY, MAY 27TH

SATURDAY, MAY 28TH

• Great Scot! Parade - On Main Street in downtown Greenville at 6 pm

• Greenville Scottish Games at Furman University - all day • Heavy Athletics • Border Collies • Pipe & Drum Competitions • Military Tribute at 11:30 with massed bands! • Wee Scotland for the kids • Scottish Clans • British Car Show • Greatest Scottish Happy Hour in the World & Celtic Jam at 5:30pm


6 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.20.2016

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OPINION Views from your community

This month, may we consider foster care? IN MY OWN WORDS

By David White

May is a month to reflect, from celebrations of the mothers we love to graduation ceremonies for the children we cherish. Concepts of deep honor close out May as we reflect on those who have sacrificed themselves for our very freedom in our national day of remembrance called Memorial Day. May is a month for celebrating others who deserve our deepest respect. Of note, May is also foster care awareness month. Some will stop reading. Others will feel queasy, bored, overwhelmed or generally pained as we decide to read further. The phrase “foster care” is loaded and isn’t easily associated with warm emotions that touch all of our hearts. A reason for this disconnect is because we view it all wrong. Let’s begin with facts. South Carolina has 4,081 children in foster care and 2,401

foster homes. Each of the children entered abruptly because of abuse or neglect from their primary caregiver and an inadequate safety net, ready for action, from the larger family unit. Moms feeling immense shame, children confused and angry at toxic loss, relatives trying to restore the bond that has frayed. Everyone, from family to social services to school to faith groups to judges and volunteers, is trying to keep a child safe and cared for. This is foster care. See foster care in a fresh, new way in the month of May. Embrace the foster parent. Let go the idea of the mean-spirited parent who only does this for money. Honor the steady foster mom, with patience and empathy, striving to provide a stable environment. Consider the foster dad worrying for the child in his care every night, hoping the birth parent finds help, wanting the child to flourish. As we honor the foster caregiver, so we

Drawn Out Loud by Susanna McShea

Reader submission from Susanna McShea of Greenville, in response to an editorial cartoon by Kate Salley Palmer that ran in the May 13 Greenville Journal.

must honor the child. Yet, we label them “foster kids,” and so status quo remains impenetrable. We must stop using this derisive term. These are first and foremost children. These are 4,081 children in our state, each one beautifully and wonderfully made. Each child deserving to eventually walk across the threshold of graduation during a May celebration. Yet of those who leave care at 18, only 56 percent will take that important step, nationally. See each child anew with tremendous capacity. Believe in each child. Accept his or her anger and denial and sadness as symbols of what you would show if you had also lost your family, community and culture. See each child as having an innate value, remarkably resilient in the face of adversity, worthy of respect, by every adult in our great, rich nation. Celebrate foster care this month. Is your heart stirred for more? Consider dropping

the “round to it” and stand up for a child today. Become a foster parent this month. The need is great here and across our land. Enjoy the May flowers, late spring ball games, the surge of summer opportunity, the remembrance of those before us and those who have sacrificed for our very freedom. Reflect and begin to realize that sacrifice may be the key to a life fulfilled. Consider the children in need, and act as you know you must.

David White is founder and CEO of Fostering Great Ideas, a charity dedicated to improving the lives of children as they struggle in foster care.

Honor the steady foster mom, with patience and empathy, striving to provide a stable environment. Consider the foster dad worrying for the child in his care every night, hoping the birth parent finds help, wanting the child to flourish. Fostering Great Ideas was a 2015 recipient of the S.C. secretary of state’s “Angel Charities” award and can be found at fgionline.org and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/care2fostersc for a new look at foster care. Explore scfamilies.org to begin the foster care journey in S.C.

Speak your mind The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, factbased arguments.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact anaging Editor Jerry Salley at jsalley@communityjournals.com.


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OPINION

National spanking study sparks questions for parents IN MY OWN WORDS

Jeremy Byrd, M.D.

“Whoever spares the rod hates their children, but the one who loves their children is careful to discipline them.” A recent study released by the Journal of Family Psychology brings evidence in contrast to this age-old proverb so often quoted by parents in defense of corporal punishment, or spanking. Do modern-day parents really still spank their children? A study in 1999 revealed that 94 percent of American parents spanked their children by the time they were 3 or 4 years old. Should we throw out millennia of parenting practices? If not spanking, then what? Let’s start with the study, “Corporal Punishment by Parents and Associated Child Behaviors and Experiences: A Meta-Analytic and Theoretical Review.” What we find is a conglomerate of 88 different studies, collecting data from 161,000 children over the last 62 years. For purposes of explanation, a meta-analysis is a research study that pulls together data from several different studies to form its own statistical observations. The study’s author, Elizabeth Gershoff, failed to find “evidence that spanking is associated with improved child behavior.” This paper found that spanking was significantly associated with several undesirable effects such as increased aggression, increased antisocial behavior and mental health problems later in life. Perhaps most worrisome was a correlation between spanking and physical abuse.

Bear in mind that the study’s author also noted the everpresent limitation in every meta-analysis ever conducted, including this one: statistical correlation does not prove causation. In other words, just because the authors proved statistically that kids who were spanked were associated

assisting and guiding parents in the raising of their children, I think this study should give us all pause. With so many studies conducted, so many children studied and so many negative outcomes demonstrated, should we not wonder whether the practice should be continued? It is possible that spanking is ultimately hurting our children. Although we may get an immediate and apparent change in behavior, we must wonder about long-term effects. The word “discipline” has the word “disciple” contained within it. What lessons are we truly teaching our little disciples? As a parent I know that I want the same thing that all parents want – our children to ultimately succeed in making the right choices. One day they will mirror the behavior I display since children are the greatest imitators. We all love our children, and is not love the basis of the proverb above? Perhaps the discipline should come in a different form.

The word “discipline” has the word “disciple” contained within it. What lessons are we truly teaching our little disciples? with negative outcomes, this does not mean the spanking caused the negative effects. Why do parents still spank their children in this “modern” age? I found an interview online with the study’s author and she stated that she believed there were two primary reasons. First, parents think spanking works. If a child does something undesirable, spanking provokes an immediate apologetic response out of the child. Parents reason that this is, in effect, “teaching them a lesson.” Second, perhaps they were raised being spanked themselves so they feel it is an acceptable practice. As a pediatrician who has taken care of countless children,

Jeremy Byrd, M.D., is board certified in internal medicine and pediatrics. He is with Heritage Pediatrics & Internal Medicine-Simpsonville, part of Greenville Health System. He and his wife have four children.


8 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.20.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

A decade of philanthropy with Greenville Women Giving With 91 grants worth $4.2 million, the organization looks back on 10 years of community involvement LETY GOOD | STAFF

ganizations. “We want to look at the whole community holistically,” she said. Grantmaking and giving is no easy task. It all started with an idea that resonated with three Greenville women looking for a Through its education program, members way to address the needs of the area while are able to learn about community needs also giving form to their philanthropy. Co- and opportunities. The program offers at founder Harriet Goldsmith had read about least one educational event in each of the women’s philanthropic organizations and five grant areas throughout the year, Priescame upon an article about the Washington ter said. The number of grants awarded each year Women’s Foundation, the oldest women’s philanthropic organization in the national depends on how many members there are Women’s Collective Giving Grantmakers within the organization. Each member contributes $1,100 each year with a three-year Network. Her first step toward creating a women’s commitment. Of that, $100 goes towards philanthropic group in Greenville was to administrative expenses and the remaining meet with Bob Morris, president of the $1,000 goes into the grant pool for that year. Community Foundation. He gave his sup- “Our purpose is to do what very few of us port and suggested she speak with Frances could do on our own,” Priester said. The organization receives around 90 grant Ellison and Sue Priester. Greenville Women Giving operates as a special initiative of the applications annually and its grants review committee narrows the list down to 15 to 20 Community Foundation. In 2006, the three founding members of finalists through a vetting process. Members Greenville Women Giving began planning can then vote and rank the programs. Grants and establishing bylaws, modeling them- are made from the highest-ranked down unselves after other similar giving circles til the year’s entire grant pool has been alaround the country. As Goldsmith, Ellison located. But the grants process doesn’t stop with and Priester spread the word, the Community Foundation, which was celebrating its writing a check, Priester said. A member of the grants assessment committee partners 50th anniversary, offered with each granta challenge. If the group ee, acting as a licould recruit 50 members aison, to ensure in its first year, the founthe funds are dation would match those spent appropricontributions and donate ately and to pro$50,000. The group acvide additional cepted the challenge and help. surpassed it, bringing in The organi135 members. Sue Priester, zation has also Over the last decade, Greenville Women Giving co-chair been a recipient Greenville Women Givof grants from ing has awarded 91 grants other individuto Greenville County community organizations totaling $4.2 million and has brought als in the community, some of whom remore than 530 women into its philanthropic quest anonymity. “They really like our grant review process,” Priester said. “It’s such a circle. On May 16, the group presented its 2016 methodical process.”

lgood@communityjournals.com

“Our purpose is to do what very few of us could do on our own.”

grants, totaling $577,250, to selected Greenville County organizations for high-impact programs and celebrated 10 years of giving at its annual meeting. “It’s been one of the most fun things I’ve ever done,” said Priester, co-chair for the group. “Taking something from an idea to an organization is tremendously exciting, tremendously satisfying.”

GRANTING STRATEGICALLY

The organization awards grants ranging from $40,000 to $100,000 in five key areas: arts, education, environment, health and human services. Priester said the categories are standard across many funding or-

GIVING COLLECTIVELY

In 2013, Greenville County Schools Food and Nutrition Services received one of the first $100,000 grants to help fund ongoing culinary and nutrition training initiatives to support the Culinary Creations program. Through the program, a menu concept was created that emphasizes healthier cooking and promotes the consumption of whole grains and fruits and vegetables, according to Greenville County Schools. It also offered training

for food service employees throughout that summer. Now, four entrees are offered daily, with two as vegetarian choices. Each school has a vegetation station where students can choose items daily from the soup and salad bar. “The food is really good and is in all the schools now,” Priester said. “It was a tremendous grant.” Greenville Women Giving will soon begin its granting process for the year as more members come together to collectively give. “We’re starting the next 10 years,” Priester said. Plans for the future of the organization are “to keep it growing.” For more information, visit greenvillewomengiving.org.

Paul Mehaffey / contributing

From left: Frances Ellison, Sue Priester and Harriet Goldsmith formed the nucleus of Greenville Women Giving in 2006.

Photos by Chelsey Ashford Photography

Other giving circles in the Upstate: • Dining for Women • Women Giving for Spartanburg (The Spartanburg County Foundation) • The Emerald Circle (Girl Scouts of South Carolina Mountains to Midlands) • Circle 555 and The Loop (South Carolina Christian Foundation) • Palmetto Society (United Way of Greenville County)


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NEWS 2016 Grantees • Alliance for the Mentally Ill of Greenville - $44,240 • City of Greenville Police Department - $63,000 • Friends of the Reedy River - $40,000 • Greenville County Schools, Washington Center $35,450 • Greenville Free Medical Clinic - $64,000 • Greenville Literacy Association - $59,158 • Greenville Little Theatre - $42,208 • Meyer Center for Special Children - $56,292 • The Music Club of Greenville - $73,242 • TreesGreenville – $40,000 • The Turning Point of South Carolina - $52,450 • YMCA: LiveWell Greenville - $7,210

Health Events

TOTAL: $577,250 Photos by Chelsey Ashford Photography

TD Saturday Market Saturdays, May-October • 8 a.m.-noon • Downtown Greenville GHS is sponsoring the weekly farmers market and its Spuds & Sprouts program for children. Visit saturdaymarketlive.com. Meet the Midwives Tues., May 24 • 6 p.m. • Greenville Midwifery Care & Birth Center Learn about GHS’ nurse-midwifery program and how a midwife can enhance the birthing process. Free; registration required. Cancer Survivors Day Sun., June 5 • 2-4 p.m. • Embassy Suites Cancer survivors and their family are invited to attend a celebration of life. Visit cancersurvivorspark.org. Drive the Thrive Wed., June 15 • 6 p.m. • Fluor Field Attend the Greenville Drive game and enjoy pre- and in-game entertainment in celebration of cancer survivors. Visit cancersurvivorspark.org. You Go Girl Women’s Triathlon Sun., July 24 • 7 a.m. • GHS Life Center® Event includes a 250-yard swim, 10-mile bike ride and 2.5-mile run. Fee: $65. Visit setupevents.com. To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, please visit ghs.org/healthevents or call 1-877-GHS-INFO (447-4636).

ghs.org 16-0399GJ


10 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.20.2016

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NEWS

County Council approves $7.5M for expansion of Greer Middle College ANDREW MOORE | STAFF

amoore@communityjournals.com

Greer Middle College Charter High School plans to use a revenue bond to build a 46,000-squarefoot school building on the Greenville Technical College Benson campus. The two-story building will replace 29 portable classrooms that students have used since the charter school’s establishment in 2008.

Highlights Greer Middle College Charter High School houses more than 400 students in 29 portable classrooms. The school wants more for its students – an actual school building. It’s a dream that might just become a reality soon. Greenville County Council approved the charter school’s plan to use a tax-exempt revenue bond – issued by the South Carolina Jobs-Economic Development Authority – to build a 46,000-square-foot academic building on Greenville Technical College’s Benson campus. The project’s educational benefits and job creation contributed to the approval, said Butch Kirven, county council member and chair of the county’s finance committee. According to county documents, construction of the $7.5 million school building will create about 137 jobs. “We’re constantly looking at how our school can leave its footprint on the community,” said school board chairman Vernon Rutland. “This building is a symbol of that.” Since its creation, the funding plan has been approved not only by county council but also by the county’s finance committee, which approved the funding plan earlier this month. Now, the State Fiscal Accountability Authority, chaired by Gov. Nikki Haley, will conduct a final review of the plan and decide its fate on June 7.

• The Greer-based charter high school plans to use a tax-exempt revenue bond to aid its construction of a $7.5 million academic building. • The building will replace the school’s portable classrooms if Gov. Nikki Haley approves the school’s funding plan in June.

If approved, a bank will purchase the bond and the school will receive its funds on June 28, according to Rutland. Construction will begin early July and end in 2017. The school plans to use its state funding – $5,100 per student – to pay off the bonds. The public charter school gets per-pupil operational funding from the state through its sponsor, Greenville County Schools. However, charter schools get no money specifically for facilities and it cannot levy taxes to pay for construction. The expansion entails a two-story building that will house 26 classrooms, three science labs, two learning commons areas, a senior project room and a college seminar room, according to principal Jimmy Armstrong. “Students are about to get into projectbased learning and the commons areas allow groups to collaborate so that they can create those projects,” said Armstrong. “The expansion just allows us to expand our programs.”

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• have been taking metformin (at least 1000 mg/day) for at least 8 weeks. All images courtesy of Langley & Associates Architects

GROWING PAINS

The Greer Middle College Planning Commission established Greer Middle College Charter High School in 2008 after the success of its other schools – Greenville Tech Charter High School and Brashier Middle College Charter High School. However, because the state does not provide public charter schools funding for buildings, the school could not afford a building to house its first class of 100 freshmen students. Instead, portable classrooms were established on land behind Greenville Technical College’s Benson campus. The land was leased to the school by the college. Since then, students have braved the elements to get from class to class, science teachers have encountered scheduling conflicts over the school’s one science lab, and various maintenance issues such as loud window units and leaking ceilings have hindered classes, Armstrong said. The issues didn’t go unheard. In 2011, the school board began to explore its options. That’s when it found the economic development revenue bond in 2013. After applying for the bond, the school contacted Langley and Associates Architects of Greer to design a school building and gymnasium – a $10.9 million expansion project. The three academic buildings and gymnasium were planned to be located across from Greenville Technical College’s Benson campus on land leased through the college. But the plan crumbled. The charter school was informed that the state requires a long-term lease of 50 years to be in place for the bond to be issued. The school received the lease last summer and applied for the bond again.

“It was a big upset because we thought we had it figured out. But we had to jump through a lot of hoops to get the lease. That’s how government works,” Rutland said.

PLANNING AHEAD

As the expansion awaits the last signature, teachers and administrators are feeling bittersweet about the possibility of a new school building. Laura Sawicki, a biology teacher, said portables created a close community but that three science labs will offer her and students different lessons that can’t be done in a portable. Armstrong said the “open environment” of the portables has “embraced the school” but that “it will be nice to have a place that we can go to and be extremely proud of day in and day out.” While there is a chance the project won’t be approved, the school isn’t worried. In fact, it’s already started planning around the construction of the new building. “We feel quite sure we’re going to have her [Haley’s] support,” said Rutland. “We have to have this school. But we already have the support of several legislators in the area who believe in our concept of education. So we’re not going to stop if things fall through.” The bond, if approved, only funds about 80 percent of the expansion, according to Rutland. The school will use fundraising for remaining costs – technology, desks, books and other classroom essentials. The school’s five-year plan is to build a gymnasium, an addition the school could not afford this time around, for its sports teams that use local churches and other community spaces. “It would be nice to have our own place for them to practice,” said Rutland. “We’re going to grade the land for it.”

NEWS

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12 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.20.2016

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

No tax increase in proposed Greenville school budget

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CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

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Taxpayers won’t see a tax increase under a proposed Greenville County Schools budget, but employees and bus drivers will get pay increases, more special education teachers will be hired and high schools will get full-time athletic directors. Superintendent Dr. Burke Royster said increases in state funding – an additional $12 million, which returns to the level of state support the district received in 2008 – and increased revenue from property taxes on items other than homes would allow Greenville County Schools to forego a tax increase for the first time since 2010. The school board did not vote on the nearly $576 million budget that received reading at a meeting Wednesday morning. A public hearing on the budget is set for June 6 at 6 p.m. Second reading will follow. “This is the first time in many, many years that there were so many winners in the budget,” said trustee Crystal Ball O’Connor during Wednesday’s first reading of the budget proposal. The budget includes 189.9 new positions, most of them teachers, aides, guidance counselors, psychologists and therapists. “The budget reflects our student-centered culture,” Royster said. Of the 189.9 new positions, all but seven are at the school level. One hundred thirtytwo are instructing students and 51 are school clerical positions that will have contact daily with students. The budget includes 13.5 additional special education teachers needed because of the district’s enrollment growth and schools implementing more inclusive practices, allowing more students to receive special education services within the regular classroom setting. An additional 10 special education teachers and aides will be hired for new selfcontained classes. The classes will allow some students to receive services in schools closer to home, reducing the longest total daily bus time from 4 hours and 20 minutes to 2 hours and 50 minutes. The budget also calls for the hiring of an additional 10.4 teachers for students whose primary language is not English. The district has the largest population of English language learners in the state. In an effort to reduce the number of students in middle and high school each guidance counselors serves, Royster wants to hire an additional 9.5 counselors, bringing the student-counselor ratio down to 300 to 1, still more than the nationally recommended 250 to 1.

In addition, the budget calls for 33.5 elementary reading interventionists, positions required under the state’s Read to Succeed Act, which requires districts to provide intervention to students who are reading behind their grade level. The law threatens to hold back students not reading at grade level starting with the 2017-18 school year. Royster also wants to make high school athletic director a full-time position. Currently, athletic directors are considered teachers even though most don’t teach a full load of classes because of increasing athletic director responsibilities. Making the athletic director a full-time position would benefit academics, Royster said, because it would free up a teaching position. Nearly 90 percent of the schools Greenville County high schools compete with have full-time athletic directors, he said. Greenville County Schools has 448 athletic teams and 8,852 athletes. On average, each school hosts 132 home events. But athletics is not the only extracurricular activity getting more resources. The proposed budget includes a 5 percent increase in salary supplements for coaches and academic extracurricular activities. Supplements are proposed for FIRST Robotics teams, assistant athletic directors and assistant lacrosse and junior varsity coaches. With the three additional categories, the district pays supplements for 29 arts and academic groups and 45 athletic programs. The budget also includes additional money for extracurricular transportation, athletic field maintenance, gym floors and band uniforms. Finally, the budget includes $451,000 for programs that would put devices in the hands of all students. The program will cost $23,987,400 over three years. Royster expects to ask the board to allocate $12.25 million from the district’s reserves to help pay for the program. The rest of the money will come from state funds and money the district already budgets to update computers and other technology.

What’s new? 33.9 9.5 33.5 $15.19 5%

Teachers for special education and English Language Learners Additional guidance counselors Elementary reading interventionists Average bus driver salary after increase to bus driver salary schedule Salary increase for all district employees on a salary schedul


COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

NEWS

05.20.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 13

Village Wrench gears up for West Village opening CAROLINE HAFER | STAFF

chafer@communityjournals.com

The Village Wrench evolved out of the Village Church in West Greenville when Wes Whitesell began looking for a way to give back to his community. The original idea was a computer club in the West Greenville Community Center, but Whitesell quickly realized he needed another outlet to encourage students and volunteers to get involved. Whitesell started noticing a large number in his community walked as their only form of transportation and thought he could transform his computer club into a transportation solution. After its first year, he made the leap to create a bicycle repair service. Ever since, on the first Saturday of the month, the Village Wrench sets up in three to four locations in the neighborhood with toolboxes to provide free, regular bike maintenance to the community. The Village Wrench has grown from a monthly service and will soon have a home base where riders can come any day of the week for bike repairs. Whitesell wants to promote work ethic and community involvement through the Village Wrench. He focuses on kids in the community who might have a fair amount of challenges in their future and prepares them to excel. “We want them to be encouraged and put them on a more direct path to their personal success,” he said. The new retail space is set to open by the end of the month on Lois Avenue next to Mill Village Market. The intention is to have

individuals come by throughout the week to learn how to repair and tune their bikes. With the space, Whitesell eventually plans on creating a six-week mentor program for kids in the community to come learn all about bike repairs and acquire basic skills they can take into the workplace. “This will be the starting place of them then coming and getting a job here, then us helping them get a job at other shops or just other businesses in town,” Whitesell says regarding the vision of the program. The Village Wrench also takes part in a bike-earning program. Adults can earn a bike by volunteering eight hours of their time, and kids can earn a bike by volunteering four hours. In their process they learn how to service a bike. “By the time they get done with that, we think they’re more likely to care for their bike,” says Whitesell. You can volunteer by going to the Village Wrench’s website at villagewrench. org and letting them how you would like to get involved.

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14 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.20.2016

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

Once lost, now found “Bun Bun” reunited with family after getting lost at Artisphere

Stephanie Duvall Hedge called the reunion the day’s best news story. “So happy to hear Bun Bun is going home!” wrote Gay Lynn Olsen on Facebook. “All is right with the world.”

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

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It’s not unusual for people who go to Artisphere or any other downtown festival to lose things, but the City of Greenville events staff knew one item in this year’s lost and found was special. Amongst the usual sunglasses and assorted items was a stuffed gray bunny, so worn that the city events staff knew it would be missed. And, as anybody who has kids knows, the first few nights after a favorite blanket, bear or bunny goes MIA can be especially difficult – and sleepless. So the city posted something on its Facebook page Sunday afternoon. The post quickly became the most shared post ever on the City of Greenville’s Facebook page. Four hours later, the family to which Bun Bun belonged had claimed the wayward rabbit on Facebook. “We walked and walked looking for her today,” wrote Ellis Crigler, who said it was her daughter Reed’s favorite stuffed animal. While waiting for his family to pick him up from his great adventure, Bun Bun spent some time with Mayor Knox White in City Hall. “I love that you took the time to post that he was found and took such good care of this bunny,” Terri Jones wrote on Facebook. “Shows the love in #yeahTHATgreenville.”

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05.20.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 15

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

NEWS

Surf’s up at Carowinds Expanded water park – the largest in the Carolinas – opens this weekend SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com

Carolina Harbor, the largest water park expansion in Carowinds history, opens to the public this Saturday. Carowinds has doubled the size of the water park, which now has twice as many attractions. Carolina Harbor still features favorites from the previous water park, Boomerang Bay, adding new coastal themes and color schemes. The water park features more than 20 attractions, including a new flagship sixstory waterslide complex, Blackbeard’s Revenge; two new interactive family areas, Kiddy Hawk Cove and Myrtle Turtle Beach; and Seaside Splashworks, a multilevel play structure with more than 80 play elements and a giant 423-gallon tipping bucket that soaks everything in its path. And guests can catch some gnarly waves in the new

27,000-square-foot wave pool, Surf Club Harbor. More than 2,000 new lounge and pool side chairs have been added, along with more than 30 new cabanas (60 total), including two party cabanas which can hold up to 16 people. A new eatery called the Harbor House restaurant features two 2,400-square-foot outdoor patios. Guests can also relax by the poolside with an adult beverage from the new Schooners Beach Bar.

Animal Care’s

There’s also a new separately gated waterpark entrance. Entry to the waterpark is included with the price of Carowinds admission. The 27-acre Charlotte aquatic playground is the largest in the Carolinas and recognized as one of the 10 Best Waterparks to Visit in 2016 by Fodor’s Travel magazine. For more information, visit carowinds.com.

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Breaking News: I’m Going to Summer Camp!

School is almost out and I for one am so excited for summer camp! I can’t wait to play with all the human kids while they learn about how to properly care for animals and help make this world a better place for us. There are so many cool camps to choose from at Animal Care. I don’t know how the humans decide! In one camp, the kids will learn all about what it’s like to be a veterinarian. Some of the other camps will teach kids different ways to help pets like me find forever homes through artwork and other advocacy techniques. I just love knowing that these kids are here because they love animals. The first day of camp can’t come soon enough! You can register your human kid for camp online at GreenvillePets.org.

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05.20.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 17

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

NEWS

Greenville Zoo transfers leopard, continues conservation efforts amoore@communityjournals.com

“This is a very important move for the population, as it will introduce another bloodline into the North American population,” said zoo administrator Jeff Bullock. There are approximately 200 captive Amur leopards in the world, according to the Amur Leopard and Tiger Alliance. The incoming addition to the zoo’s big cat family is a part of its new mission. “The public will be hearing a lot more about the conservation efforts going on at the Greenville Zoo, as we have taken a long look inward to focus on why we’re here,” said Bullock. “From that, we have revisited and refocused the zoo’s vision, mission and values, and have developed principles that will guide us as we continue to move forward.”

CRIME

Students charged after videotaped sex assault A 14-year-old has been charged with second-degree criminal sexual conduct and four middle school girls have been charged with possession of child pornography after a sexual assault of a female student was recorded and shared, authorities said. An eighth-grade student was sexually assaulted at a house in Greenville County over the weekend and the assault was recorded on FaceTime, an iPhone video feature, according to Greer police. The Greenville County Sheriff ’s Office charged the 14-year-old, who is unnamed because of age, with second-degree criminal sexual conduct, according to Drew Pinciaro, Sheriff ’s Office spokesman. Police said the video was shown around school on Monday. Greer police have charged four Riverside Middle students with disturbing school and possession of child pornography. Those students have been suspended and will be recommended for expulsion. The investigation began after a student who saw the video told a guidance counselor. The investigation was continuing at press time.

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The Greenville Zoo transferred its 6-yearold Amur leopard, Emerald, to the Sedgwick Zoo in Wichita, Kansas, on Friday. The transfer is one of many conservation efforts made by the zoo to protect the endangered species. Since 2010, the zoo has donated to the Amur Leopard and Tiger Alliance through its “Quarters for Conservation” program. The zoo brought Emerald and her two female siblings – Clover and Jade – to Greenville in 2011. And in 2013, Clover was transferred to a North Dakota zoo. Jade is the last remaining leopard at the Greenville Zoo. But according to the zoo, it’s in the process of importing a 10-year-old male Amur leopard from Germany that was recommended for transfer to breed with Jade.

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18 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.20.2016

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

Park Hop kicks off This summer, visitors leap from park to park for scavenger hunts and prizes CAROLINE HAFER | STAFF

chafer@communityjournals.com

More than 1,100 attended LiveWell Greenville’s Park Hop kickoff celebration last Saturday at Sunset Park. The event was the start of the summer-long scavenger hunt that leads visitors through 19 Upstate parks. LiveWell partners with Greenville County’s parks every year to create the Park Hop. Each park comes up with a different scavenger hunt, and participants can submit the solutions through the Park Hop app or through a downloadable printable passport. LiveWell created Park Hop to get participants familiar with what our local parks have to offer and to get active. The scavenger hunts highlight new features in the park and require park interaction. For the third annual Park Hop, many of the kickoff attendees are return hunters. The scavenger hunts launched at the kickoff on Saturday will run through August 1 at midnight. Their closing celebration Tuesday, August 9, will include a drawing for more than 40 prize packages donated by organizations throughout the community. LiveWell says the Park Hop, which has 11 sponsors this year, is

UNIVERSITIES

Search narrowed for USC Upstate chancellor part of the organization’s goal to make Greenville the healthiest place to live in the nation. Not only is Park Hop inspiring kids to go out and be active but it also requires family time, encouraging parents to take their children to different parks to complete the scavenger hunts. After each Park Hop, parents complete an anonymous survey from the Park Hop experience. “What you are doing for the families of this community is beyond words,” read one survey last year. “You are opening existing Greenville families as well as new residents to all the parks and amenities this great city has to offer. Keep up the good job getting families more involved and outdoors.” Last year more than 600 families signed up for the Park Hop, and 300 participated in five scavenger hunts or more to receive prizes. Parks hosting s c a v enger hunts this year include Roper Mountain Science Center and Fluor Field. If participants complete 15 or more scavenger hunts, they receive a voucher to a Greenville Drive game that will highlight the scavenger hunt and feature special activities for the kids. For more details or for a printable passport, visit livewellgreenville.org/park-hop.

USC Upstate has narrowed its search for a new chancellor to three candidates. Dr. Jeff Elwell has served as professor and dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga since 2012. Professional theaters in Chicago, Los Angeles, Memphis, New Orleans and New York as well as Australia, Canada, Poland and Sweden have produced his plays. Dr. Matthew Liao-Troth is provost and vice president for academic affairs at Hawaii Pacific University where he supervises academic affairs and student affairs. Liao-Troth has previously served as interim provost and vice president for academic affairs at Georgia College & State University. He was recognized in Honolulu Business Magazine’s Black Book as one of the Education Executives to Know in Hawaii. Dr. Michael Tidwell is dean of the College of Business at Eastern Michigan University. Tidwell’s curr ent work involves the launch of a project called the Center for Advancing Social Enterprise. CASE was established in 2014 to be a catalyst for Michigan’s social entrepreneurship ecosystem. The finalist selected will be the fourth chancellor of USC Upstate and replace the outgoing chancellor, Tom Moore.


New iStent Treats Glaucoma Glaucoma has been called “the silent thief of sight” because it doesn’t have any overt symptoms until damage is done and vision is lost. It is the second leading cause of blindness in the United States, after cataracts. The only way to detect glaucoma is through an eye exam. Now, a tiny implant is giving glaucoma patients new hope. It is called the iStent – the smallest implant ever approved by the FDA. Clemson Eye, a leader in eye care innovation, was among the first practices in the area to offer this solution to its patients. The L-shaped iStent opens up a channel that drains fluid from the eye and reduces pressure. Glaucoma is caused when the network of tissue that drains fluid out of the space between the iris and cornea becomes blocked or drains too slowly. The resulting pressure can damage the optic nerve and cause vision loss or blindness. “Glaucoma has no cure,” says Dr. Joseph Parisi, Medical

Director and Chief Ophthalmologist at Clemson Eye. “Lowering the pressure in the eye is the only way to treat it. If we can reduce the pressure, then we can stop the disease’s progress.”

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The minimally invasive iStent helps improve the compliance rate by reducing or eliminating the glaucoma patient’s need for eye drops. It is covered by Medicare and many health plans. Currently, the iStent can only be inserted during cataract surgery. Roughly 20 percent of cataract patients also have glaucoma, says Dr. Parisi. The size of the tiny stent requires complex microscopes and mirrors to make sure the device is placed correctly, which adds roughly 15 minutes to cataract surgery.

A regime of eye drops is generally used to reduce The tiny L-shaped iStent measures just 1 x 1/3 mm. “So far, Clemson Eye cataract patients who received the eye pressure. the stent have maintained a reduction in eye pressure and Unfortunately, multiple eye drops and an inefficient drug seen the number of their eye drop medications cut in half,”1 delivery system (i.e., the drops often do not make it fully says Dr. Parisi. He adds that an eye exam is the best way to into the eye) are a challenge for glaucoma patients to be detect glaucoma and protect your vision. compliant in administering their medications. “Glaucoma 1. Clemson Eye iStent and cataract patient clinical results, 2015. drops are costly (about $1,200/year) and many patients struggle to administer them as prescribed,” says Dr. Parisi.

Cataract Patients Now Seeing Near To Far Cataracts, a clouding of the eye’s natural lens, affect about 22 million Americans over age 40. Left untreated, cataracts can lead to blindness. They are the leading cause of vision loss in the United States. Surgery is the only known treatment for cataracts. Two things happen during the surgery: Your clouded lens is removed and an artificial intraocular lens is implanted. The lens requires no care and simply becomes a permanent part of your eye. You don’t see or feel the lens implant. Cataract surgery is one of the safest and most commonly performed surgeries in the U.S.1 It is a 15-minute out-patient procedure. People with cataracts can opt for basic or laser cataract surgery.

It cannot correct astigmatism or poor reading vision. This manual, bladed surgical procedure is covered by Medicare and most health insurance plans. It is a safe, excellent option. However, if you wore eye glasses before your basic cataract surgery, you will most likely need them after it. Laser Surgery Laser cataract surgery involves using a laser and computer-guided software system to create incisions that are up to 10 times more precise than manual incisions. Here, patients have the option of advanced lenses that can correct astigmatism and provide a range of vision from near-to-far.

“Through laser cataract surgery with Vicky and Doug Kingsmore, advanced lenses, we can deliver the best Clemson Eye Cataract Patients. possible visual outcomes for our cataract patients, regardless of their age” says Dr. Joseph Parisi, Medical Director and Chief Ophthalmologist at Clemson Basic Surgery Eye. “Our laser cataract patients enjoy excellent restored Basic cataract surgery involves removing the diseased vision, whereby they are entirely free of or much less lens and implanting a monofocal lens. The monofocal dependent on eye glasses.”2 intraocular lens clears your vision at a single focal point.

A portion of the cost of laser cataract surgery and advanced lens implants is covered by Medicare and most health insurance plans. However, an additional payment is required. Clemson Eye patients have the option of 24-month, 0% payment plans. When they developed cataracts, Clemson University benefactors Vicky and Doug Kingsmore opted for laser cataract surgery at Clemson Eye. Mr. Kingsmore had an advanced multifocal lens implanted during his laser cataract surgery. “After my surgery, I could read the telephone book and newspaper. It helped me tremendously. But more than anything else, it improved my golf game! It has been the most wonderful thing to happen to me in my adult life,” he says. Mrs. Kingsmore had her laser cataract surgery a couple years after Doug’s, and she too opted for a multifocal lens. “It’s a different world,” she says. “It’s a much brighter world. And I don’t need to look for my glasses anymore, because I can read just about anything without them.” 1. http://www.aao.org/publications/eyenet/200609/pearls.cfm 2. Clemson Eye Laser Cataract with Advanced Intraocular Lens Replacement Results, 2015.


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NEWS CITY

Greenville not among Smart City finalists U.S. transportation secretary Anthony Foxx kicked off visits to the seven Smart City Challenge finalist cities on Monday. Greenville is not among them. Greenville was one of 78 metropolitan areas – and the only one in South Carolina – applying for the grant. Greenville’s grant focused on pilot programs for Main Street in downtown Greenville and Woodruff Road and automated transportation systems testing at the South Carolina Technology and Aviation Center. On Main Street, the pilot program would have featured driverless taxis that would pick up passengers and possess the ability to be aware of obstacles in the road such as bicyclists and pedestrians. The system on Woodruff Road would have included a new parking structure and shuttle service where shoppers could park and then be transported to stores and back. The shuttle could have operated on a rail system or as an automated driverless system using existing infrastructure. Finalists are Austin, Texas; Columbus, Ohio; Denver; Kansas City, Mo.; Pittsburgh; Portland, Ore.; and San Francisco. They all received $100,000 to develop a final proposal. The $50 million winner will be announced in June.

CRIME

Tip outs sex offender school chaperone A registered sex offender was chaperoning a Woodland Elementary fifth-grade field trip to Charleston before an anonymous tip alerted school district officials. School district spokeswoman Beth Brotherton said shortly after the buses arrived in Charleston, the school received a telephone tip that one of the chaperones was on the South Carolina sex offender registry. Registered sex offenders are not permitted to serve as volunteers or chaperones for Greenville County Schools, Brotherton said. The school principal immediately called law enforcement and checked the registry, which confirmed the tip. The chaperone, whom the school district declined to name, was pulled from the group, confronted in the presence of a Charleston city police officer and was removed from the trip, the district said. He was never alone with students, Brotherton said. Brotherton said the students were checked into their hotel rooms before the chaperone was approached so students were unaware of any disturbance. The students continued on their field trip. Brotherton said the district is investigating the failure to identify the chaperone’s status as a sex offender, and any error in following protocols will be corrected immediately.

05.20.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 21


22 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.20.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

COMMUNITY Happy camper

YMCA Camp Greenville welcomes new executive director and continues expansion LETY GOOD | STAFF

lgood@communityjournals.com

YMCA Camp Greenville’s new executive director, Cory Harrison, is not new to camping. Quickly stepping into the new role, he is determined to make big changes to the 104-year-old camp during its $14 million capital campaign. Harrison said he knew from an early age that he wanted to be a camp director. He spent 13 years at the same camp, eight as a camper and five as a part of the summer camp staff. “I was 15 years old and I remember exactly where I was standing when I said, ‘This is what I want to do,’” Harrison said. “I was a lifelong camper who made camp his life.” Growing up in northern Indiana, he spent

most of his education and experience working with The Salvation Army, attending SA training colleges in Atlanta and Chicago. “Until I came to the Y, [The Salvation Army] was all I had known,” he said. However, Harrison came to a point where he wanted a change. While working with The Salvation Army as a director, opening the Kroc Center of Philadelphia, he became interested in the YMCA. He read about the YMCA’s rebranding in 2010 and the three pillars of focus that included youth development, healthy living and social responsibility. “Those things are important to me, so I said, ‘I’m going to look for a job in the Y,’” Harrison said. One year later and Harrison had four job offers at four different YMCA camps. He picked Camp Benson in Illinois. Harrison said he chose to go there because he felt there was an opportunity to grow something very small into something very effective and successful. As executive director at Camp Benson, he tripled the number of participants, increased the annual support goal by 90 percent, helped build 14 new buildings and raised over $2.4 million in gifts. Now, five years later, Harrison is at Camp Greenville, using all the experience he’s gained and spearheading efforts to transform the 1,400-acre camp. “I didn’t know much about Greenville, but what I did know is that the Y of Green-

ville, within the YMCA organization, is held as a highly credible and highly effective organization,” Harrison said. “I chose YMCA of Greenville because of its reputation within our national movement. Because of

the amazing things it’s doing in community partnerships with places like GHS … I just believed this was the place where the biggest impact could be made. Where there was an organization that believed strongly in camping and put camping as one of its highest priorities.” Harrison’s main focus for the transition of Camp Greenville is to develop a culture to “take camp to that

next level” and give campers autonomy and choice, he said. “I want kids to experience everything, not just making them masters of some particular task.” With $5 to $6 million of the three-phase campaign raised so far, the building of the “heart of camp” is underway, which includes moving several facilities to the center of the camp for a “neighborhood feel.” Other phase one improvements that are in progress include the building of the new health center sponsored by the Greenville Health System (GHS) and redoing the entire septic system, among others. Camp Greenville welcomes campers from around the world and has a staff of 15 international members that add some “flavor,” Harrison said. YMCA Camp Greenville announced the $14 million capital campaign late last year that included plans to rebuild infrastructure and expand at its 1,200-acre location in northern Greenville County. Camp improvements are slated to be complete over the next five years.

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05.20.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 23

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COMMUNITY

How to shop at the farmers market

With Gregory McPhee, executive chef of Restaurant 17 CAROLINE HAFER | STAFF

chafer@communityjournals.com

The TD Saturday Market opened May 7, and it brought the crowds. With more than 78 vendors involved this year, shopping can get overwhelming. So we decided to go with the experts to see what they picked up. Last week we followed Gregory McPhee, the executive chef of Restaurant 17, to see what his top picks at the farmers market are. Gregory and his wife, Beth, go the farmers market every Saturday. Restaurant 17 receives between 16 and 18 food deliveries a week, but business is good, so sometimes their trips consist of picking up products that are low on stock for the restaurant. But today, they’re mostly just stocking up on their at-home meals for the week. They started their visit with a stop at the Bake Room for pastries and LaRue Fine Chocolates for their chocolate bars, which just became available. Their next stop is Three Grace Dairy for cow milk cheese, Tyger River Smart Farm for kale and basil and then Reedy River Farms to stock up on beets and carrots that are low on inventory for the restaurant. The farmers market is the perfect resource for local restaurants. It brings all of the vendors to one place

for pickup but also showcases the variety of vendors that Greenville and surrounding areas have to offer. Gregory said a lot of the vendors they use at Restaurant 17 are relationships made through the Saturday Market.

While the vendors are able to make a large profit through restaurants, their sustainable income comes from regular deliveries from farmers markets. The next vendor the McPhees go to is High Valley Farms, a trout farmer from

Pumpkintown. The farmer has a naturally occurring stream that forms a river on his property where he catches the trout. The farmer’s wife then cuts the trout, a skill she was taught by the crew at Restaurant 17, and they even sell a spread made by Restaurant 17 at the farmers market. Restaurant 17 was the first vendor that High Valley stocked, and Bacon Bros. Public House has also started purchasing their trout. The last two stops on their visit are Greenbrier Farms for their steak and Split Creek

Farms for goat milk yogurt, which Beth highly recommends to anyone who hasn’t tried it. You would think that restaurants like Husk coming to town would be competitors for Restaurant 17, but it’s actually a benefit for them. When new restaurants come to Greenville and start purchasing local inventory, it creates funds for farmers to produce more. The Saturday Market is a huge benefit to restaurants, vendors and the taste buds of Greenville alike.

TD Saturday Market When: S aturdays through Oct. 29

8 a.m.-noon

Where: Main Street at McBee Avenue Information: saturdaymarketlive.com

The Anderson University School of Nursing proudly announces the addition of

Master of Science in Nursing and Doctor of Nursing Practice *

*

For more information contact Jenni Knowles by email at jknowles@andersonuniversity.edu or by calling 864-231-5639.

www.andersonuniversity.edu/nursing/graduate

South Carolina

*Pending approval by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges, Anderson University has developed a Master of Science in Nursing and a Doctor of Nursing Practice with plans to launch these graduate degree programs in fall 2016. During the time pending review and approval by the Commission, the University can provide information on the programs and receive applications for admission. Currently offered in South Carolina and in the process to develop reciprocity with other states to meet SARA guidelines.


24 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.20.2016

Change is in the air…

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

COMMUNITY Game On

with Vincent Harris

Come try our new Spring Menu, farm fresh and locally sourced. There is no better time to get out and enjoy farm fresh, handcrafted food and cocktails.

Furman golf back on top, heads to national championship

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When Kelley Hester became the coach of the Furman University women’s golf team four years ago, the program was at a low point. A perennial powerhouse in the Southern Conference, Furman’s Lady Paladins won nearly 50 tournaments between 1972 and 2009, including 13 conference championships and one national championship. Furman produced some of the towering figures in LPGA history, including Betsy King, Dottie Pepper and Beth Daniel. But the team had fallen off considerably between 2009 and 2012, going three seasons without a single win. Hester, who previously coached at the University of Georgia, is blunt about where the program was when she arrived. “When I got here, that was kind of the bottom,” she says. “There had been so many high points in Furman’s golf history, but they were pretty much at an all-time low, meaning that they were ranking about 90th in the country, and hadn’t won a conference championship in three years. So I wasn’t really sure at what pace we’d be able to improve, but I did know that there was a lot of room for improvement.” Hester has used all that room and more. In her first two seasons with the team, they finished second in the Southern Conference, and they came all the way back in 2015 and 2016, winning back-to-back conference championships and multiple tournaments. And now, after an overall fourth-place finish at the NCAA regionals at the Traditions Golf Course in Texas, Furman is headed to the NCAA championship tournament. It was a good enough performance to win Hester the 2016 SoCon Coach of the Year award, but she sees the 2015–16 season as the culmination of a long journey.

“It’s been a pretty steady climb,” she says. “But these last two years we’ve won seven tournaments, two of which were conference championships. Had our first All-American player [junior Taylor Totland] since 2005, and made it to the NCAA regional. But more importantly to me, we were ranked highly enough that we would’ve made it even if we hadn’t won the conference. It’s been a nice progression. It’s been fun to see a steady improvement.” The Texas tournament was on a tough course, one of the toughest the Lady Paladins faced all year, and Hester says she learned lot about the team from how they dug in after a shaky start. “They were very consistent,” she says. “You don’t really know what a group or an individual or a team is made of until they have some adversity. And regionals are adversity. The top teams in the country don’t make it through regionals sometimes. They showed a lot of intestinal fortitude and grit. We made some mistakes, but we made a ton of birdies. That was really fun to see. They didn’t allow one or two bumps in the road to get them down. They rose above it.” That fortitude will come in handy at the championship tournament, which kicks off on May 20 at the Eugene Country Club in Oregon. “That course is quite challenging,” Hester says. “You’ll make some bogeys and even doublebogeys. And you just can’t let that ruin your day.” Vincent Harris covers music and sports for The Greenville Journal. Reach him at vharris@ communityjournals.com.


05.20.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 25

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

COMMUNITY Our Community

Community news, events and happenings

RECOGNITION

ing every third Friday of the month at 7:30 p.m. May through September. The brewery will also host $3 Beer Mondays until 8:00 p.m. Patrons will have the opportunity to experience and participate in home brewing classes, tastings, a sushi-making class and fundraiser this summer.

Veterans to be honored at annual race

For more information, call 898-2936 or visit visitpickenscounty.com/calendar.

CLASS

CDS presents summer financial series

For more information, email tim@thomascreekbeer.com, call 230-6651 or visit thomascreekbeer.com.

The fourth annual Take Flight 5K will take place Saturday, May 28, and will honor veterans with a folded flag ceremony performed by the Civil Air Patrol Greenville Composite Squadron. The Military History Center of the Carolinas will hold an open house and will have military vehicles, armaments, historical period attire, books and other military displays. Prior

The Good

to the start of the 5K, an American flag will be folded 13 times in memory of Frank Wallace of Greenville. Wallace will be honored for his service to the nation as a veteran of the U.S. Navy and as a Civil Air Patrol mission pilot for the Greenville Composite Squadron. Proceeds from the run will help complete the Runway Park at the Greenville Downtown Airport. Attendees can also win prizes. For more information and to register for the event, please visit book-events.com/takeflight5k.

BEER

Thomas Creek Brewery announces summer events Thomas Creek Brewery recently announced its free Friday Night Concert Series happen-

CELEBRATION

Hagood Mill hosts agriculture and military day celebration The Hagood Mill in Pickens is hosting an “Agriculture and Military Day” concert Saturday, May 21, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The free event will feature musical performances by Pretty Little Goat String Band and Dakota Waddell. This year’s celebration is co-sponsored by the Bart Garrison Agricultural Museum of South Carolina. Attendees may participate in activities such as hand grinding corn and operating an old-fashioned water pump, among others. Local farms will be selling live plants, vegetables, hand-cut herbs and more. The Military History Club of the Carolinas will have military vehicles, historians and re-enactors.

The Center for Developmental Services (CDS) will be hosting a free seven-week financial literacy course for staff, families and friends every Friday from June 24 through August 5. Each session will last from 4 to 5pm, and childcare will be provided. The classes will cover topics such as retirement planning, personal banking, debt management, estate planning and family budgeting. The family with the highest class attendance will win an iPad donated by Northwestern Mutual. For more information, contact Dana McConnell at 331-1307 or at dana.mcconnell@ cdservices.org.

Events that make our community better

DONATION

American Cancer Society receives donation

Hernandez family. Publix Super Market Charities pledged $4 million to fund construction of new homes in the Southeast, and Habitat for Humanity of Greenville County received part of the funding.

on staff and remembered one of their founders who passed away from the disease.

RECORD BREAKER

Local electric and security companies announce record amount raised Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative and Blue Ridge Security Solutions announced that their employee-organized fundraiser raised a record $201,000 to benefit local nonprofit organizations in Greenville, Anderson, Oconee and Pickens counties. The funds benefit numerous agencies in the Upstate area, including Cancer Association of Anderson, Collins Children’s Home & Ministries, Center for Developmental Services, Dot’s Kitchen, Emerson Rose Heart Foundation and more. Representatives from both Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative and Blue Ridge Security Solutions will host check presentations at the Blue Ridge Fest later this month for each nonprofit organization receiving funds.

This year, the Southern Connector “Took a Toll on Cancer” to benefit the American Cancer Society. Don Piccoli, operations manager, presented a $7,000 check to the American Cancer Society at the Greenville Relay For Life on April 29. The group also recognized cancer survivors

For more information about Blue Ridge Fest, visit blueridge.coop/blueridgefest or call 800240-3400.

FUNDRAISING

YMCA funds will serve local youth and families The YMCA of Greenville recently announced

New homeowner Simonita Hernandez completed 20 hours of classes preparing her for homeownership and performed more than 200 hours working on Habitat homes. She will pay an affordable mortgage for the home.

YMCA of Greenville supporter Steven Edgerton (left) and campaign chair Elizabeth Milhous (right) share the total of the YMCA of Greenville Annual campaign for 2016.

that Y members and community partners raised a record-setting $1,116,975 during a four-month campaign. The funds will ensure that no one with a demonstrated need is turned away from the Y because of the inability to pay. For more information about the YMCA of Greenville, visit ymcagreenville.org or call 412-0288.

RAISING WALLS

Habitat for Humanity raises walls on new home Habitat for Humanity of Greenville County and Upstate Publix associates recently came together to raise the walls on a home for the


26 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.20.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

LOOK

Art was here Artisphere welcomed some of the country’s most talented exhibiting artists to downtown Greenville. The three-day arts celebration colored the city's visual, culinary and performing arts palette.


05.20.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 27

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

LOOK

Photos by Will Crooks


28 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.20.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

LOOK

Bob Jones University held its 89th commencement exercises on Friday, May 6, in the Founder’s Memorial Amphitorium on campus. Nearly 700 students received degrees during the ceremony as 546 students received bachelor’s degrees, 61 students received master’s degrees and 58 students received associate degrees. Seven candidates received earned doctoral degrees.

Zanti Power Yoga hosts the Yoga in the Streets series in various locations in and around downtown Greenville. For more information, visit zantipoweryoga.com/ live-music-yoga.

Wofford College held its 2016 commencement ceremonies last Sunday on its Spartanburg campus. Paige West, a 1991 Wofford graduate and chair of the department of anthropology at Barnard College, was the featured speaker.

The Greenville Kennel Club contributed $5,500 to the Greenville County Sheriff’s Office to conduct a Tactical Deployment Workshop. Nearly 80 participants from eight states and more than 30 law enforcement agencies attended the four-day event. In addition to the trainers from the Greenville County Sheriff’s Office, 10 trainers from the North American Police Work Dog Association (NAPWDA) provided instruction.

The winners of this year’s Reedy River Duck Derby, Brandon and Gabrielle Koumos and their children, Elise and Gwendalyn, received groceries for a year from Publix Super Market. This was the first Duck Derby for the Koumos family, who moved to Greenville last year from Chicago. Rotarians Sandy Wright and Ed Irick, along with Publix assistant manager Niko Scahley, presented the prize at the Publix at McBee Station last Saturday.


05.20.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 29

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

COMMUNITY Activities, awards and accomplishments

Pictured left to right: Alston Lewis, Shelby Springer, Nan Wilson and Margaret Kirby at the Sears Rec Center.

CCES sophomore Nan Wilson is the first place winner of an essay contest sponsored by the Greenville Jewish Federation and graded by the humanities department at Furman University.

Washington Center students receiving homebound instruction received new technology donated through Donors Choose. Teacher Billy Chapman requested a laptop and new “switch toys,” which are toys that can be activated by the student using an assistive device. His request was granted, and the students received new items to help with instruction. The students have enjoyed interacting with the toys and having another way to be engaged with the laptop.

Hamza Ahmed, a senior at GSSM, was named a semifinalist in the U.S. Presidential Scholarship Program. Ahmed transferred to GSSM from Southside High School in Greenville. He is involved in the GSSM math team, student council and was the co-president of Youth in Government.

SHANNON FOREST CHRISTIAN SCHOOL

ST. MARY’S CATHOLIC SCHOOL

SFCS first grade students received Girl Scout Medal of Honor

Author Jonathan Rogers visits school

Tenn. The museum is located at the Lorraine Motel where Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated. Students were able to learn about the civil rights movement and also visited the Stones River Battlefield, which set them up for studying the Civil War next year.

WASHINGTON CENTER

Students receive new technology

OUR LADY OF THE ROSARY CATHOLIC SCHOOL

Three students place in annual oratorical contest Pictured: Penny Gill, community development manager; Ella Grace Belew; Dee Kivett, troop leader; and Babette Jones, Greenville regional vice president. Both Gill and Jones are from the South Carolina Girl Scouts Mountains to Midlands Council.

SFCS first grade student Ella Grace Belew received the Girl Scout Medal of Honor. This is the highest honor that a Girl Scout can achieve. Belew administered the Heimlich maneuver on her friend who was choking. She performed the Heimlich three times with successful results.

SC GOVERNOR’S SCHOOL FOR SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS Washington Center student Zyra Morris uses a switch button to operate an adapted toy.

The Chandler School students stand outside the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tenn.

GSSM senior named semifinalist in Presidential Scholarship Program

Rogers signs student Jacob Guirao’s copies of “Wilderking Trilogy.”

St. Mary’s School recently hosted Dr. Jonathan Rogers, author of the “Wilderking Trilogy.” Students had the opportunity to ask questions and then broke up by grade into the feechies and the civilizers groups to host a “Wilderking” feast and festivities for the author. Students also had the opportunity to have their copies of the “Wilderking Trilogy” books signed by Rogers.

THE CHANDLER SCHOOL

Students visit museums and battlefields in Tennessee Chandler School students recently visited the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis,

Pictured left to right: Eloi Cocard, Isaac Hines and Anna Nipert

OLR middle school students participated

«

Lower school students at Fort Moultrie

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Blue Ridge Fest 2016‌ a huge success, Thanks to our sponsors, entertainers, classic car enthusiasts, and all who came to enjoy the evening!


raising over $200,000 for local charities!

The 2016 Blue Ridge Fest selected charities are: Cancer Association of Anderson • Collins Children’s Home & Ministries Center for Developmental Services • Dot’s Kitchen of Westminster • Emerson Rose Heart Foundation Feed A Hungry Child • Foothills Alliance • North Greenville Food Crisis Ministry Rosa Clark Medical Center • Samaritan Health Center of Pickens County The Dream Center of Pickens County Wilderness Way Camp School


32 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.20.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

COMMUNITY Our Schools

«

Activities, awards and accomplishments

in the annual oratorical contest on May 11. This year’s theme was “I believe.” Anna Nipert won first place, Eloi Cocard won second place and Isaac Hines won third place.

Greenville native and author of a children’s book series.

bach, Felix Roeschert, Nicole Sanchez, Seth Snyder, Shelby Springer, Mia Wolfsdoerfer, Kelsey Wolin and Myka Young.

SOUTHSIDE CHRISTIAN SCHOOL

CHRIST CHURCH EPISCOPAL SCHOOL

Loper, Jack Smith, Noah Horton, Matthew Mendelsohn, Luke Horne and Bennie Loper, assistant coach.

SFCS varsity men’s track and field team recently won the SCISA 1A/2A Track & Field State Championship.

SHANNON FOREST CHRISTIAN SCHOOL

SFCS names class of 2016 top two

CCES middle school students end the school year with their production of “The Lion King Jr.”

SCS students show their college choices on senior signing day. CCES middle school chaplain, Joe Britt, retires after 30 years of service to CCES. He is pictured with the middle school vestry. CCES students Annabelle DeBrux and Grace had their drawings selected to appear in Jean Hunt’s coloring book to benefit the new Cancer Survivors Park. Hunt is a

SHANNON FOREST CHRISTIAN SCHOOL

SFCS varsity men’s track team wins championship CCES IB Class of 2018 includes 20 rising juniors who are committed to take on the IB Diploma Program at CCES. The students are Carolina Bellenhaus, Dani Boyett, Bailey Ernest, Halie Finotti, Cara Foster, Eva Fritsch, Celine Guecker, Margaret Kirby, Marius Kronzucker, Noah Matricciani, Nishant Parbhoo, Jana Rautenbach, Yannick Rauten-

Delayne Elizabeth Nickles and Lauren Elizabeth Alsborg SFCS varsity men’s track team: Bob Collins, head coach, Andrew Burnette, assistant coach, Thomas Gasque, Julius Peter, Tyron Leerdam, Braedan Loper, Noah Burress, Barton

SFCS named Delayne Elizabeth Nickles, from Greenville, as the class of 2016 valedictorian and Lauren Elizabeth Alsborg, from San Jose, Calif., as salutatorian.

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HOME

Featured Home

Greer

3559 Ballenger Road

Home Info Price: 875,000 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 4/1 Lot Size: 12.00 Acres

MLS#: 1287327 Sq. Ft: 5600-5799 Built: 2003

Schools: Skyland Elementary, Blue Ridge Middle, and Blue Ridge High Agent: Valerie S. Miller | 864.430.6602 vmiller@marchantcompany.com

Very private, elegant, European beauty located 8 minutes from Hwy 14 and Wade Hampton Blvd., minutes to restaurants and shopping. Only 17 minutes to the Greer Memorial Hospital, 23 minutes to the Pelham Medical Center. 26 minutes to the GSP International airport. This home is sited on 12 acres, 2 of the acres beautifully landscaped, fenced, with a very private, remote controlled gated entrance. The additional acreage provides the ultimate in privacy, a natural forest and creeks tucked in a rural countryside setting. Entering through the gates to the courtyard, you will be enchanted with the beauty of the architecture

accentuated with PastelCote brick, stone and concrete plank shakes, and the convenient 3 carriage style garages. Stone steps welcome you to the main front porch entrance with commanding custom arched mahogany and iron double doors. The foyer with barrel ceiling introduces you to the dining room, the living room with views of the fabulous flagstone surrounded pool into the large cook’s kitchen appointed with stone back splash, granite and top of the line stainless steel appliances. The breakfast room and kitchen flow into the beautifully appointed den with fireplace.

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HOME : On the market Parkins Mill · Open Sun. 2–4

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10 Parkins Pointe Way · $569,500 · MLS# 1311345

123 Grove Creek Drive · $475,000 · MLS# 1310696

803 River Walk Dr. · $460,000 · For Sale by Owner

12 Cedar Glenn Way · $339,900 · MLS# 1320166

4BR/4.5BA This 4 bedroom, 3.5 bath new construction! Covered wrap-around front porch. Great location in Parkins Mill on a quiet cul-de-sac.

5BR/4.5BA On 2.3 acres, master on main, bonus, koi pond, stainless steel appliances, storage, 2 car expanded garage.

4BR/3.5BA This is a MUST SEE HOUSE. Kitchen and Master bath updates galore. Master on Main. 3684 square ft.

4BR/3BA Gorgeous nearly full brick home on cul-de-sac with 2 bedrooms on the main level and fenced backyard! Visit GreenvilleMoves.com.

Contact: Sharon WIlson 918-1140 Wilson Associates Real Estate

Contact: Linda O’Brien 325-0495 Wilson Associates

Contact: Wanda Alexander 915-6182 For Sale by Owner

Contact: Cameron Keegan 238-7109 RE/MAX Moves

Shellbrook Plantation · Open Sun. 1 p.m.

Augusta Road/Gville CC area

Berkshire Park

Harrison Hills

10 Palm Springs Way · $319,900 · MLS# 1321286

19 Rock Creek Drive · $649,000 · MLS# 1319430

204 Beckworth Drive · $334,900 · MLS# 1318510

220 Ridge Way · $309,900 · MLS# 1321258

4BR/3BA This better than new 2013 home has everything you deserve and more! 4/3 two car garage. Five Forks.

4BR/2.5BA Charming home with 4 full bedrooms, 2 full and 2 half bathrooms, living room, dining room, bonus room, 2 master suites, screened porch and deck. Great schools & neighborhood.

5BR/3BA Full brick home with more than 3,200sf on .39 acres! Tons of hardwood floors, bedroom on main level. Less than 15 mins from downtown Greenville or TR! GreenvilleMoves.com for more.

3BR/2BA Country Living at its best.This 1 owner home is ready and waiting away from traffic. 5 acres mostly fenced. Horses are permitted and a separate riding arena. Split floor plan.

Contact: Kimber Roberts 525-1177 Allen Tate

Contact: Virginia Hayes 313-2986 Coldwell Banker Caine

Contact: Libby Wampole 313-3673 RE/MAX Moves

Contact: Linda Bobo 983-8322 Internet Computer Services

Real Estate News

Nicole Malik Joins Allen Tate Company

Wes Alexander Joins Allen Tate Company

Allen Tate Realtors® (www.allentate.com), the Carolinas’ leading real estate company, is proud to announce that Nicole Malik has joined the Simpsonville office. “We are delighted to Malik have agents of such high caliber as Nicole. Nicole exemplifies professionalism in every aspect of the real estate transaction. We are proud to attract such a talented professional and know that our clients will be served well,” said Jennifer Hicks, Broker-In-Charge and branch manager of Allen Tate Realtors Simponville office. Malik joins a staff of 16 licensed Realtors in the Simpsonville office and a large network of licensed Realtors throughout the Carolinas. Since 1957, Allen Tate Realtors has focused on the needs of consumers by providing one-stop shopping with choices in branches located in communities throughout the Carolinas.

Allen Tate Realtors® (www.allentate. com), the Carolinas’ leading real estate company, is proud to announce that Jenny Tesner has joined the Greenville-Woodruff Road office. “Wes has a fun-loving attitude and always keeps his client’s best interests at heart.” states Trina Montalbano, branch manager of Allen Tate Realtors Woodruff office. Wes joins a staff of 20 licensed Realtors in the Woodruff office and a large network of licensed Realtors throughout the Carolinas. Since 1957, Allen Tate Realtors has focused on the needs of consumers by providing one-stop shopping with choices in branches located in communities throughout the Carolinas.

Torsha Beeks Joins Allen Tate Company

sha Beeks has joined the Simpsonville office. “We are excited to have agents with such strong New Construction background as Torsha. Torsha’s knowledge of this Seller’s Market will bene- Beeks fit our Allen Tate Company for years to come.” says Jennifer Hicks, Broker-In-Charge and branch manager of Allen Tate Realtors Simponville office. Beeks joins a staff of 16 licensed Realtors in the Simpsonville office and a large network of licensed Realtors throughout the Carolinas. Since 1957, Allen Tate Realtors has focused on the needs of consumers by providing one-stop shopping with choices in branches located in communities throughout the Carolinas.

Bridgette White Joins The Marchant Company

The Marchant Company is pleased to announce that Bridgette White has joined the team as the Marketing Director. She is Allen Tate Realtors® (www.allentate. a graduate of North Greenville University com), the Carolinas’ leading real estate where she studied Marketing and Comcompany, is proud to announce that Tor- munication. Bridgette has a passion for

the ever-changing field of marketing and specifically social media marketing. She is a lifelong resident of Greenville and is proud to call it home. With local knowledge, marketing expertise, and the ability White to connect with others she is ready to further the growth and success of The Marchant Company.

Kevin Henson Joins The Marchant Company The Marchant Company is pleased to announce that Kevin Henson has joined the team as a licensed Realtor. He is a graduate of the Wyatt Institute of Real Estate, holds a Bachelor of Arts Henson in Business from Queens University in Charlotte, NC and has over 35 years of experience in management and sales in the Specialty Electrical industry. Kevin grew up in the West Gantt community of Greenville

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05.20.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 35

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HOME Featured Home

Montebello

2 Vicchio Drive, Greenville

Home Info Price: $849,900 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 3.5 Lot Size: 0.32 Acres

MLS#: 1317664 Sq. Ft: 4400+ Built: 2014

Schools: Summit Drive Elementary, Sevier Middle, and Wade Hampton High Agent: Miller McClintock | 864.270.6515 www.millermcclintock.com mmcclintock@cdanjoyner.com

Meticulous attention to design, construction, and detail create an elegantly cozy, comfortable, and efficient J. Francis built retreat. This less than 2 year old home, sitting on 2 lots, is in the gated Montebello community. With the exception of the foyer and elevator, where the owners installed unique mesquite wood flooring from their home state of Texas, beautiful 5” white oak hardwood flooring runs thorough the home. The first floor includes the master bedroom, a 2nd BR/BA, and half bath. A great room, gorgeous top of the line kitchen, executive office, large laundry room, and elevator round out this floor.

Upstairs, a second great room with fireplace and wet bar is complemented by two bedrooms that share a “Jack & Jill” bath, and a flex room perfect for recreation, exercise, or to accommodate a favorite hobby. Just off the three car garage is a climate controlled flex room that is suitable for a variety of purposes. The home’s lawn & landscape is maintained via the HOA fee, and is the ideal setting for the expansive screen porch, the patio, and a natural gas fire pit.

Real Estate News

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watching the sleepy mill town grow into Road office. “We are delighted to have talented profesthe vibrant community you see today. With his can do attitude Kevin is ready to help sionals such as TIffany, who are focused on our clients and their needs. We are pleased you list or buy a home. to attract such a dedicated professional and know that our clients will be served well,” states Trina Montalbano, branch manager of Allen Tate Realtors Woodruff office. Fralick joins a staff of 20 licensed Realtors in the Woodruff office and a large netAllen Tate Realtors® (www.allentate. work of licensed Realtors throughout the com), the Carolinas’ leading real estate Carolinas. Since 1957, Allen Tate Realtors has focompany, is proud to announce that Tiffany cused on the needs of consumers by proFralick has joined the Greenville-Woodruff

Tiffany Fralick Joins Allen Tate Company

Want to know the secret to selling your viding one-stop shopping with choices in branches located in communities through- home in minimum time at maximum value? While many factors influence the sale and out the Carolinas. price of a home, one that certainly contributes is exposure. By exposing your home to the largest number of potential buyers, the better your chance for great results. To do that, you need a real estate partner who can showcase your home to local, regional, national and even international buyers. In the May-June edition of CaroliExposure is key to selling quickly and nas Market Update, a bi-monthly real esgetting top dollar tate video series produced by the Allen Tate

Think Beyond Local Buyers When Selling Your Home

continued on PAGE 38


36 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.20.2016

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HOME See You in the Garden

with Kathy Slayter

Summer gardens can fill your table and your heart When I had been in Greenville for about three years, I was introduced to a group of folks who “liked” to run. Can you like running? Well, yes, you can, and running took me to multiple marathons around the world. Starting at what was then the Cleveland Street Y, we would follow a route to the park below, to the zoo and back up the hill of Woodland Way (for “hill training,” they told me) then through the neighborhoods around the McDaniel Road area and back to the Y. As the miles grew, we would also include downtown Greenville, before the bridge was there over the Reedy River, down to the BI-LO and back.

Perfect peonies: A running memory

One Saturday morning run in May, I ran down a side street off McDaniel. A border of peonies stopped me in my tracks. Their fragrance filled the corner lot, and they were at their peak of perfection. That house and garden are now gone, but not the memory of that bed of peonies. Peonies bloom within days of Mother’s Day here in Greenville. They are a perennial and return to your garden year after year, and are easily divided to make more. Like camellias, they need little care. Towering to mid-thigh height on most of us, these magnificent creatures make spectacular blooms for flower arranging. Peonies will remind me as long as I have a mind to remember of those morning runs from the Y. I don’t run anymore, but I still garden.

market, the Traveler’s Rest market with its own permanent home, The Taylors Mill Farmers Market on Thursdays (new guy on the block and not to be missed!), The State Farmers Market on Rutherford Road, The Hub City Farmer’s Market, the Hendersonville Tailgate Market behind the “Speckled Egg” in Flat Rock – and the list goes on and on.

Summer vegetable gardens: You’re running out of time I have most of my summer vegetable garden in place. If your garden isn’t pretty much done, you may be too late this year. As with all things, timing is everything. Especially when you garden. To plant now creates a lot of work for yourself, as things will start to heat up, and you will be fighting heat, bugs and perhaps a deepening drought. Heavily mulch what you have planted. I use grass clippings for mulch as long as grass is not treated with chemical fertilizer. Pole and bush beans, beets and summer squash (I have planted lemon squash, zucchini squash and straight neck yellow) should be up. Cucumbers are up now, if not already, again to avoid the “bug cycle.” I am ready for putting up bread-and-butter pickles and making relish. If you have a juicer, you can also juice cucumbers and enjoy a green juice that is wonderful for you. Be sure your trellis is in place for your vining plants. Well-mulched tomatoes are protected from the soil-borne viruses that are sure to come our way this summer. Onions, garlic, shallots (ready for harvest in June), potatoes (mine are now blooming and will be enjoyed slowly in June), corn (which I don’t grow due to squirrels), okra, watermelon, other melons, peppers, eggplant and carrots are all in place now. Basil and other summer herbs can still be planted as small

plants. I like to put my basil at the corners of my raised beds. Brushing by it as I water evokes the fragrance of the herb that I enjoy. What you don’t want to try now is “cool season” lettuce, brassicas (due to lots of marauding bugs that will eat the leaves), radish, cilantro, parsley or spinach.

Watering, feedings: Write them down to jog your memory One other thing to be aware of is the feeding schedule for your plants. I suggest you go ahead and put it on a calendar, either on your paper calendar or your phone, so you’ll remember when to fertilize. I suggest a light dosing of fish emulsion every three weeks. Develop a regular watering schedule if there is not adequate rainfall. Tomatoes especially need stable watering. Without it, they will swell, split or rot on the bottom. Watch your plants for bugs, and learn the difference between good bugs and bad bugs. Right now strawberries are abundant and so sweet, and I was fortunate to be able to take a morning recently and put up 14 pints of sugar-free strawberry jam.

Farmers markets: Run out – not just to buy, but to learn Farmers markets are all open now. Visit as many as you can, including the downtown

One thing that is so interesting about these markets is learning about what you can grow either now or next season in your own gardens. To bring these crops to market, the growers started months before with their plantings. Learn from them. Another learning opportunity is to visit the Heritage Garden at the Roper Mountain Science Center for the Second Saturday each month. Master gardeners host their heritage gardens, and you can learn how the beds are designed, turned, rotated and managed. There is an herb garden as well as a butterfly garden. Celebrate this glorious abundance that is all around us in this magnificent community. Use your time well, watch your garden grow and experience your own homegrown food. See you in the garden! We tag along with chef Gregory McPhee and learn how to shop the new TD Farmers Market. See page 23. Kathy Slayter is a Greenville Realtor and third-generation gardener who became a Clemsoncertified Master Gardener in 2007. She is passionate about growing, cooking and eating her homegrown food. Contact her at kathyslayter@gmail.com.

SUSAN REID 205 WOODGREEN WAY 2BR/2BA • $112,000

It’s easy living at Rolling Green Village with this comfortable open floor plan and wonderful sunroom. Monthly HOA fees include landscape maintenance, termite bond, garbage pick up and street lights.

611 LITTLE TEXAS 5BR/3BA • $539,000 Mountain views surround this 8.7 acre horse farm. All brick home has office, pole barn, riding ring, 2 corrals and a shed. The barn was constructed by Mennonites and has 2 finished stalls, tack room and capacity for 7 stalls.

864.616.3685

sreid@cbcaine.com

www.susanreidrealestate.com Because home is where your story begins.


05.20.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 37

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HOME Featured Builder

Galloway Custom Homes

Builder Info Phone: 864-289-9994 Website: GallowayCustomHomes.com Address: 129 Woodruff Place Circle, Suite C, Simpsonville

Galloway Custom Homes, LLC. is a second generation, locally owned and operated, custom residential builder that accepts nothing less than unparalleled craftsmanship coupled with customer satisfaction. Timeless architecture, unmatched quality and craftsmanship, along with open and honest communication are the cornerstone of which this company was founded. We understand the importance of integrity, commitment and personal communication – fundamental values built into every home built by Galloway Custom Homes.

COMING SOON…

Galloway Custom Homes is active in most of Greenville’s premier developments; Hollingsworth Park, Claremont, Southampton, Maxwell Farm and Chestnut Pond which will be opening up late summer of 2016. The home in the rendering above is for sale and currently under construction at 515 Chamblee Boulevard. For more information about the home call Galloway Custom homes today!

• Only 61 Lots Available • Gated Community in Five Forks PM , PD

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• Four Premier Custom Home Builders: Dunn Custom Builders, First Choice Custom Homes, Galloway Custom Homes, Woodland Builders

Woodruff Road/Five Forks, Simpsonville

|

R E S E R V I N G LO T S N O W !


38 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.20.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

HOME Real Estate News continued from PAGE 35

Companies, President and CEO Pat Riley talks about the importance of exposure. “As a regional real estate leader, Allen Tate showcases your home on allentate. com to thousands of buyers across the Carolinas. We partner with Realtor.com to expose your home to buyers nationally,” said Riley. “But we extend that reach even further, through our affiliation with Leading Real Estate Companies of the World®, the world’s largest network of more than 500 premier, independent real estate brokerages in 50 countries around the world.” Through LeadingRE, Allen Tate listings are shared via local websites of members around the globe. In today’s real estate environment, it’s very likely that the buyer for a home will come from another city or country – and not just across town, said Riley. Allen Tate also receives extensive referrals from other brokers in the LeadingRE network. In 2015, more than 35,000 referrals were sent through the network – in-

dersville office, recently earned Tate’s prestigious Master’s Designation. The Master’s Designation is awarded to associates who have furthered their professional real estate education through Napolitano a comprehensive program of specialized, in-house coursework. The Master’s curriculum includes specialist certification in technology, finance, new home construction, relocation, marketing and communication skills. Realtors who join Allen Tate with prior real estate experience must complete 48 credit hours, while those new to real estate must complete 60 credit hours to earn their Master’s Designation. Allen Tate Company developed the Master’s Designation program to keep its associates up to date on the real estate industry and market. For more than 50 years, Allen Tate Company has strived to integrate new services to meet the needs of a growing community. Allen Tate Realtors® (www.allentate. The Master’s Designation is just one more com) is proud to announce that Brandon way Allen Tate provides unparalleled cusNapolitano, a Realtor in the Easley/Pow- tomer service.

cluding nearly 2,400 received by Allen Tate that resulted in closings. “When you maximize your exposure, you maximize your return,” said Riley. “Make sure the real estate company you choose can offer your home the exposure you deserve.” Carolinas Market Update is targeted to consumers in the Charlotte, Triad, Research Triangle and Upstate S.C. regions. It is produced every other month by the Allen Tate Companies and features information, statistics, trends and predictions about the real estate market in North and South Carolina.

Brandon Napolitano Awarded Allen Tate Company Master’s Designation

Patty Cunningham Joins The Marchant Company With over 10 years of experience in real estate, Patty Cunningham joins the Marchant Company in May of 2016. Her degrees in French literature and computer programming have allowed Patty Cunningham to work in many fields, from retail, finance, document translation and personnel to managing an IT department at IBM. It became clear that customer support was her primary love and finding or selling homes for clients in the Upstate area is her passion. A top producer with numerous industry awards, Patty believes in education. She regularly takes classes and has been accredited as a buyers agent, sellers agent, Seniors Real Estate Specialist, and home stager, among others. She has extensive ex-

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Learn more about this Upstate business in

BEHIND THE COUNTER 2016

Maggie Aiken 745 N. Pleasantburg Dr., Greenville 864.616.4280 | maggieaiken.com

“It’s more than just a sale to me. I love the excitement of looking into someone’s eyes and knowing this is the perfect house for them and where they are going to raise their family. It is that moment that drives me and makes me tick.” To get a copy of BTC or feature your business, call 679-1205.

In Memory of Many, In Honor of All, Happy Memorial Day!

– Shelly

Advertise your home with us Contact:

Annie Langston 864-679-1224 alangston@communityjournals.com

864.607.2826

sdevreese@cbcaine.com

www.ShellyDeVreese.com


05.20.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 39

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HOME Featured Neighborhood

Providence Square Verona Circle, Simpsonville

Home Info Price: Low $200’s and up Bedrooms: 3-5 Bedrooms Sq. Ft: 2000 – 3000 Sq Ft Lot Size: Wooded & Basement Lots Available Schools: Rudolph Gordon Elementary, Bryson Middle, and Hillcrest High Agent: Terry Stoddard | 864.979.2448 terry@builderpeople.com

Take that short drive to the “Circle in the Square” – Verona Circle in Providence Square - a 38 home site community in Simpsonville off of Jonesville Road. Standard Upgrades Included in this Community: 9 foot ceilings, 12x12 patio, rounded corners, arched doorways, double sinks in master bedroom, cultured marble vanities, hardwoods in entry, fireplace with gas logs, fiber cement siding, upgraded paint package, fully sodded yard, and many more features that distinguish an SK Builders’ home. Who you choose to build your home can make all the difference.

SK Builders and McAlister Realty are focused on your complete home-building experience. Family owned and operated for over 25 years, our understanding of residential construction enables us to anticipate your home-building concerns at every point during the build. From the homes and locations offered, the quality of materials and workmanship, and the customer service you get along the way – we make the construction process a smooth and enjoyable process. SK Builders has been the largest local builder in the Upstate for over 20 years. See how we’re not just building home – We’re Building a Way of Life.

Real Estate News

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Katie joins Coldwell perience as a relocation specialist, has worked with USAA clients, VA loans and Banker Caine with real estate experience in Colhouses between $100,000 and $800,000. orado before returning to her hometown community in the Upstate. She further enhanced her customer service acumen Corley through her work with Southern Tide, the Greenville-founded clothing company. Katie is an active volunteer and has been Coldwell Banker Caine recently welinvolved in the Cucharas Ranch commucomed Katie Corley as a residential sales nity clean up during her time in Colorado, agent.

Katie Corley Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Greenville

as well as serving meals to soldiers’ families during the holiday season. In her free time, Katie enjoys staying fit as a yoga and kickboxing teacher, traveling, and exploring the outdoors. She particularly enjoys hiking with her two young sons (Liam, 5 and Connor, 3). “We are pleased to welcome Katie to our team,” said Stephen Edgerton, president and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “Her real estate background, customer service mentality, and fun personality make her a fantastic addition.”

Justin Ruzicka Joins The Marchant Company Justin Ruzicka joins The Marchant Company with 12 years of Real Estate expertise. Justin is a consistent top producing agent; you can put your trust in. He has extensive knowledge in sales and stays abreast of the market, representing both buyers and sellers. continued on PAGE 44


40 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.20.2016

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HOME Real Estate News

from Clemson Cooperative Extension

Groundcovers Groundcovers are low-growing plants that spread quickly to form a dense cover. They add beauty to the landscape, and they can also solve many planting problems in difficult sites. Grass is the best-known groundcover, but grass is not suited to all locations. Other groundcover plants should be used where grass is difficult to grow or maintain. Unlike grass, most groundcover plants cannot be walked on. Groundcovers are used most frequently for the following locations: • Erosion control on steep banks or slopes. Grass is often difficult to mow on steep slopes. • Shady areas under trees and shrubs. When planted under trees, groundcovers reduce mower damage to the base of the tree. Some groundcovers require less sunlight and less moisture and nutrients than grass. Therefore, they are in less competition with trees and shrubs. • Where tree roots grow close to the surface and prevent grass from growing. • Very wet or very dry locations. Selection of a suitable plant for groundcover depends on the area where it will be grown. Some groundcover plants prefer shade. Others thrive in full sun. Some prefer moist soil, while others need dry or well-drained soil. To work well as groundcovers, plants have to be tough, durable, and relatively fast growing but not invasive. Choose plants that are known to do well in the conditions found in your landscape and most importantly guard against plants known to become invasive. That means looking beyond the traditional ivy (Hedera species) and periwinkle (Vinca minor) that are both known to escape “captivity” and move into natural areas. Vining groundcovers should not be allowed to consume trees since they can choke out sunlight and weigh down

branches. For more information on invasive plants see the Invasive Plant Atlas of the United States invasiveplantatlas.org.

Soil Preparation Because groundcovers live for many years in the same spot, it is worth the effort to prepare the soil well before you plant them. This allows plants to establish good root systems. Perennial weed areas should be cleared before planting groundcovers, since most cannot compete against established weeds. Improper soil preparation is a frequent cause of groundcover failures. The soil should be worked to a depth of 8 to 10 inches. Incorporate a 2-inch layer of organic matter such as compost or wellrotted manure into the soil to improve drainage in clay soils or to improve the water-holding capacity of sandy soils. A soil test provides the best guidance for fertilizer usage. In the absence of a soil test, incorporate a complete fertilizer, such as 10-10-10. Mix the fertilizer into the soil to a depth of 6 to 8 inches.

Planting Most groundcovers can be planted at any time of the year. However, fall planting takes advantage of lower temperatures and natural rainfall. Watering is reduced and plants establish a stronger root system before summer. Summer planting requires adequate and frequent watering for survival and establishment. Space the plants according to their size, the immediate effect desired, and their rate of growth and habit. If the individual plants are spaced too far apart, weeding can be a problem and the time required for complete coverage can be quite long. On the other extreme, planting too closely together can be a needless waste of time, money and plant materials. In addition, there will be increased competition as the plants grow into

maturity. Usually, it is best to space the plants so the groundcover areas will, for the most part, be completely covered by the end of the third growing season. A staggered row-planting pattern usually will result in the quickest cover of the planting bed.

Care Weed control is a must until the groundcover is fully established. A 2-inch layer of mulch will help in the control of weeds. On slopes, coarse netting is also used to hold the slope until the groundcover is established. It may take up to two years to establish a groundcover area. Fertilizing and watering will probably be required during this period. Apply fertilizer based on how fast you want full coverage to occur. Begin fertilizing 4 to 6 weeks after planting, then make one application in the spring, another during summer, and a third in September. If rapid coverage is desired, make a fourth application during the summer months. A complete fertilizer such as 12-4-8 or 16-4-8 or a similar analysis applied at the rate of 1 pound of nitrogen per 1000 square feet is adequate. To determine how much fertilizer to apply per bed, measure the area of the bed in square feet (length x width). Then, use this equation: Area of bed divided by 1,000 square feet, divided by the percent of nitrogen in the bag, will give you the amount of fertilizer that needs to be applied to the bed. For example, if the bed measures 200 square feet (20 feet long and 10 feet wide), you can determine that 200/1,000 divided by 12 % (or .12) = 1.6. Therefore, 1.6 pounds of 12-4-8 will need to be applied to this 200-square-foot area. The next consideration is adequate and timely watering. Water requirements vary with different plants. Groundcover plants should not be allowed to wilt. Some groundcovers are improved by occasional shearing. Wintercreeper can be clipped at

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Over 9

a 4- to 6-inch height. Others, such as dwarf mondograss, can be clipped with hedge shears or mown when they appear shabby. Remove the old growth of mondograss because the leaves harbor fungi, which can disfigure and kill newly emerging leaves. To rejuvenate pachysandra and other herbaceous evergreen groundcovers that have suffered winter burn, use a rotary mower on its highest setting. Early spring is usually the best time to prune groundcovers because new growth will quickly cover the bare stubs. Cut out dead branches and remove winter-damaged branch tips to encourage dense new growth. Avoid severe pruning in late summer or fall since it can force tender growth that will not have time to harden off properly before winter. Horizontal junipers like ‘Blue Rug’, ‘Bar Harbor’, and ‘Prince of Wales’ tend to form new foliage on top of older foliage and become thick and dense once their canopies meet. Thinning improves air circulation between the plants and prevents insect and disease problems.

Problems Several fungi and bacteria may cause leaf spots. Infected leaves can be picked off and discarded. Root, stem and crown rots are fungal diseases that are more serious in poorly drained soils. Some groundcover plants, such as ajuga, are very susceptible to root-knot nematodes. Nematodes are microscopic worms that live in the soil and feed on plant roots. Infected plantings will thin out in spots and plants may die. This information is supplied with the understanding that no discrimination is intended and no endorsement by the Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service is implied. All recommendations are for South Carolina conditions and may not apply to other areas. Use pesticides only according to the directions on the label. All recommendations for pesticide use are for South Carolina only and were legal at the time of publication, but the status of registration and use patterns are subject to change by action of state and federal regulatory agencies. Follow all directions, precautions and restrictions that are listed.

s

ie Communit

in the Upstate!

NEW HOMES READY NOW NOW!


05.20.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 41

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HOME Featured Neighborhood

Tucker Branch

37 Donemere Way, Fountain Inn 29644

Home Info Price: Starting in the high $170’s Schools: Fountain Inn Elementary, Bryson Middle, and Hillcrest High Contact Info: Trey Boiter | 864.354.0622 treyboiter@greatsouthernhomes.com JoAnn Williams | 864-420-4019 joannwilliams@greatsouthernhomes.com

Buyer Great Southern Homes is excited to now be a part of the Greenville community, with one of their premier communities being Tucker Branch. Tucker Branch is an upscale community, conveniently located near downtown Fountain Inn and less than two miles from I-385. These Great Southern Homes have been tested by the Green Smart Homes program, to ensure maximum energy efficiency for optimal energy use. Honeywell’s Tuxedo Touch Home automation system is also a feature in the homes at Tucker

Branch, which allows you to control your homes lights and security while away, at no extra cost. For more information please visit our website at www.greatsouthernhomes.com.

Live Green. Live Smart. Live Efficiently.

In your new GreenSmart Home from Great Southern Homes. NOW BUILDING in Fountainbrook (Fountain Inn) with homes starting in the $150’s and Whispering Oaks (Mauldin) with homes starting in the $160’s. OUR AGENTS ARE READY TO ASSIST: TREY BOITER 864.354.0622 treyboiter@greatsouthernhomes.com

JOANN WILLIAMS 864.420.4019 joannwilliams@greatsouthernhomes.com

Building in the Southeast since 1993

GreatSouthernHomes.com


42 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.20.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

HOME

SOLD: Greenville Transactions For the week of April 18 – 22, 2016 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$2,500,000 $1,850,000 $1,786,226 $1,700,000 $1,500,000 THE ENCLAVE AT THORNBLADE $1,400,000 THE ENCLAVE AT THORNBLADE $1,000,000 $900,000 $812,500 $800,000 BUENA VISTA $800,000 TRAXLER PARK $650,000 CLIFF RIDGE COLONY $630,000 FOX CREEK FARM $629,800 $585,000 $550,000 $494,400 WEATHERSTONE $491,500 CRESCENT MOUNTAIN VINEYARDS $482,000 $474,000 HAMPTON’S GRANT $462,000 SILVER MEADOWS $449,500 $441,000 BERKSHIRE PARK $440,000 TUXEDO PARK $430,000 $419,000 COACHMAN PLANTATION $395,491 SHANNON FOREST $380,000 SUGAR CREEK $377,000 COLLINSBROOKE MILL $374,000 COTTAGE HILL $372,500 BELHAVEN VILLAGE @ HOLLINGSWORTH $372,162 CARILION $372,000 WINDWOOD COTTAGES $369,504 RIVER WALK $368,000 STONEHAVEN $365,000 RIVER OAKS $363,000 COURTYARDS ON W GEORGIA RD $355,000 CARRIAGE HILLS $343,470 GOWER ESTATES $339,900 WATERS RUN $336,250 WOODLAND CHASE $317,430 $310,000 $310,000 PELHAM FALLS $310,000 POINSETT CORNERS $305,000 HOLLY TREE PLANTATION $305,000 CYPRESS RUN $292,000 STONE LAKE HEIGHTS $290,000 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $288,625 TOWNES AT THORNBLADE $285,425 BELSHIRE $281,425 $280,000 CREEKWOOD $279,495 FAIRWAY VIEW $278,500 SHENANDOAH FARMS $278,000 FOREST HEIGHTS $268,000 BROWNSTONE CROSSING $267,000 MCBEE BOOKEND $265,000 SOUTHBROOK $264,500 $260,000 PEBBLECREEK $255,000

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BUYER

ADDRESS

SUBD.

BROADWAY MEDICAL ASSOCIA 1068 PARTNERS LLC FOR 8 CORPORATION INC VGAC LLC VGAC LLC POYCK KEVIN A (JTWROS) HAWKINS JOSEPH O CHESTNUT RIDGE FARM LLC PATEL MANISHA S (SURV) GENERAL SYNOD OF THE ASS FOUR SEASONS CAR WASH OF LAYNE THOMAS H III (JTWR BRADFIELD JULIE ELAINE ( STANTON JASON ROBERT (JT HECKER ANGELA VGAC LLC NJKJ LLC SWANSON BENJAMIN H (JTWR STEVENS CINDY (JTWROS) BENGARD DEBRA NICOLE CHARRON DONNA M (JTWROS) KINGERY GENA (JTWROS) CLOYS BETTY J NEWRUCK EVA S (JTWROS) RANKIN GRACE (JTWROS) RHOADS ELIZABETH L (JTWR DUGAS JARRETT K CALLIS JACQUELINE M (JTW MURPHY MARK C (JTWROS) WASSERMAN BEVERLY (JTWRO SELLARS ALFRED P JR (JTW NILES ASHLEY (JTWROS) BRYSON DAVID (JTWROS) CRETELLA COLLEEN BROWN SCOTT W GAGNON CLAIRE E (JTWROS) SCHLANSKER GARY E NEESE ANASTASIA MARIE (J HARPER CHRISTINA E (JTWR HUNT LAUREN KLAS MURUGESAN KANTHALEELA K MCCULLEY BLAIR (JTWROS) CONNOR AMY FORLOINES (JT PEROTTI MARK ANTHONY (SU STOLZ AMANDA G (JTWROS) EPPERSON WHITNEY S BRANK CHRISTIAN C (JTWRO BROUTHERS JUDITH DIANNA DAVIS ELIZABETH A (JTWRO WELLS DEBORAH L (JTWROS) BROWN JUDY A MISHRA KARUNA (JTWROS) ICENHOUR LESLIE (JTWROS) KELLEY AMANDA K (JTWROS) BAYUK CHRISTOPHER E (JTW ELLERBE DONALD L BANKS CALLAWAY PATTERSON POE CATHERINE E (JTWROS) YAP CHENG HAI CONWAY ERIC D SIGNATURE DEVELOPMENT LL BRYANT ROBERT O JR (JTWR

263 BOSTON POST RD 7C BRENDAN WAY 1777 N HWY 101 100 ANDREA CIR 101 E WASHINGTON ST STE 400 119 TUSCANY WAY 103 TUSCANY WAY 707 E STONE AVE 15 E EARLE ST 741 CLEVELAND ST 804 N MAIN ST 106 MOUNT VISTA AVE 1 PIEDMONT AVE 8 FOX HUNT LN 107 S WARWICK RD 101 E WASHINGTON ST STE 400 1708 AUGUSTA ST APT 303 101 WEATHERSTONE LN 26 RHONE VALLEY LN 216 WOODS RD 14 WISETON CT 316 BROWN FARM WAY 2117 BETHEL RD 42 DEVONHALL WAY 204 TUXEDO LN 105 ATWOOD ST 256 SCOTTS BLUFF DR 126 SHANNON LAKE CIR 209 SUN MEADOW RD 32 COLLINSBROOKE CT 8 MEETING PL 104 VERDIN RD 14 PLYLER DR 83 VINTON DR 102 RIVER WALK TER 3 SUNNING HILL RD 303 NEW TARLETON WAY 204 MALIBU LN 15 LAYKEN LN 124 BUCKINGHAM RD 428 FIELDSVIEW LN 204 ARBORWALK CT 101 LLOYD ST 621 SETTLEMENT RD 9 SHADETREE CT 101 W COURT ST UNIT 223 304 SAGRAMORE LN PO BOX 25609 69 LAKE FOREST DR 539 ASHLER DR 417 WELSH POPPY WAY 163 BELSHIRE DR 24 W MOUNTAINVIEW AVE 431 RIVER SUMMIT DR 108 GOLF VIEW LN 109 STRASBURG DR 461 LONGVIEW TER 101 UPPER MEADOW WAY 111 E MCBEE AVE UNIT 206 303 SELDEN WAY 7319 WINDALIERE DR 211 WHITTLIN WAY

$250,000 PELHAM FALLS $250,000 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $249,900 PINEHURST AT PEBBLE CREEK $249,500 HAMPTON FARMS $245,871 PARKVALE $245,000 FORRESTER FARMS $245,000 TWIN CREEKS $243,000 SUMMERFIELD $240,500 COTTAGES AT NEELY $239,599 TOWNHOMES AT PENDLETON WEST $238,000 RIVERSIDE COMMONS $237,500 THE LOFTS AT MILLS MILL $237,500 TIMBERLAND TRAIL $236,781 WARRENTON $235,000 PELHAM SPRINGS $235,000 HALF MILE LAKE $235,000 CAMELOT $229,900 ANSLEY CROSSING $228,000 FRED W SYMMES $220,000 ANSLEY CROSSING $220,000 MARTINDALE $219,900 AVALON ESTATES $215,500 WOODINGTON $215,000 GARDENS AT ROSE RESERVE $215,000 ONEAL VILLAGE $210,000 $210,000 BRADFORD NORTH $207,500 TOWNES SQUARE $204,900 MOUNTAINVIEW ACRES $200,000 VICTORIA PARK $200,000 LAKE FOREST $199,900 PARK RIDGE $197,000 $194,750 HUDDERS CREEK $194,108 LINKSIDE AT BONNIE BRAE $193,000 ORCHARD FARMS $190,000 CHARTWELL ESTATES $187,500 EDWARDS FOREST $186,000 SHELBURNE FARMS $185,000 DANBURY $183,000 NORTHGATE TRACE $177,500 BEAVER BROOK II $177,000 $175,000 LANSDOWNE AT REMINGTON $175,000 WILDFLOWER MEADOWS $175,000 CANEBRAKE $175,000 FOXWOOD $175,000 HERITAGE HILL $174,000 $172,000 ORCHARD FARMS $172,000 TOWNES AT CARDINAL CREEK $171,326 $171,000 BROOKDALE ESTATES $170,000 NELSON’S CREEK $170,000 POINSETTIA $169,900 $169,000 LORENA PARK $166,000 ENOREE HILLS $165,900 WHISPERING OAKS $165,585 PHEASANT RIDGE $160,500 $160,000

PRICE SELLER GENDLIN HOMES LLC SEARLE PROPERTIES LLC BOURGOIN TONI MONIQUE SROMEK RITA L SK BUILDERS INC LAUREL CREEK HOLDINGS LL LOCKWOOD DENNIS H SHOREY JOSHUA N HECKER ANGELA D R HORTON INC REIM KEVIN R J FOUR LLC MORGAN PRESTON S D R HORTON INC FOWLER VICTORIA R ELLIOTT MICHAEL L MCMULLEN REBECCA H CATER SUZANNE S D R HORTON INC THOMPSON LILA RENE D R HORTON INC JENNY LEE’S MANAGEMENT L MADIGAN RACHEL K GARRETT A D BELLER BRENDA J (JTWROS) ZBILUT BARBARA A CHILDERS BRENDA GAIL (L- BISHOP ANN P HERRICK KELSEY M LERNER DALIA MACDONALD GREGG DUNCAN JOELLA STEVENS DAVID (JTWROS) MPM CONSTRUCTION LLC MOREQUITY INC SOUTH STATE BANK FLASSING HEATHER R (JTWR ENDAYA ANA WARDLAW ANDREW M WADE DONNA C MURRAY LOUIE D JR THOMAS ASHLEY EDWARDS DAVID R JCI GROUP LLC BENEDETTO JILLIANE BROUGHMAN DONALD R MURPHY MARK C BEAGLE HEATHER RENE PEER GILLIS BARRY E VERVAET DONNA M LIVING T LSF9 MASTER PARTICIPATIO NVR INC GENDLIN HOMES LLC BEAVER ANNE SILVEY RUBY A WHITE BRIAN J FISH CREEK PROPERTIES LL ASPIRE ENTERPRISES LLC GARRICK CHRISTOPHER (JTW GREAT SOUTHERN HOMES INC SEIBERT FRANCES M FOSTER CALBRAITH PERRY

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NIERHOFF CARSTEN BYARS MATTHEW T (JTWROS) SIMONS SANDRA S LYNCH AMY W (JTWROS) SHADEED GERILYNNE I (JTW PHILLIPS CHRISTOPHER R ( KEATON JOSHUA L (JTWROS) WILLIAMSON MITCHELL CRAI MURPHY JAMIE L (SURV) FELIX-MORALES EILEEN E ( MORTON MARGARET ELIZABET NVR INC ARMADA ANALYTICS INC GALLINO ERIC M (JTWROS) FOWLER CLYDE DONALD JR HAMILTON GLENN L BRASWELL AMANDA H RICE KEITH A (JTWROS) WHITT SUZANNE L GENDLIN HOMES VIAMONTE OLGA KOMULA ANTHONY S (JTWROS BUTTERFIELD BENJAMIN RAY FARMER DAVID M BENTON MORGAN ADRIANNA ( STOUT MARCIE L (JTWROS) HAWKINS BILLY J (JTWROS) JORDAN MARTHA W BAUMMER JAMES RASOR LLC REED TABITHA AGUREN SUSAN CARROLL (JT AVILES LAURA A (JTWROS) BRAGG SABRINA S SUTTLE DANA WILKERSON (J FREEMAN STEPHANEIK C HOPKINS ANTHONY JOHN MCFADDEN APRIL MONET (JT MARTINEZ FERMIN M MORALE MANLA CYNTHIA J (JTWROS) ALEXANDER SHANNON (JTWRO KRAUT MARILYN ANN MCCLIMON BLAKE R CLANCY JOHN M SINDY AYAD M (JTWROS) SILL CLAYTON J BLUE SAPPHIRE LLC GILLESPIE CORINE A CHISHOLM SHAWNTEL (JTWRO LOVE SHERYL A (JTWROS) SISSON DAVID A RAVEN AMBER M STOKES KATIE R VEST CAROLYN A (JTWROS) SANGRET BRIAN J (JTWROS) SHAW DERRELL G (JTWROS) TEMPLE CAROLINE J CHAPMAN THERESA MARKS CHRISTOPHER MAJOR RESTERICK ROBERT C III ( MIGLIONICO ANTHONY E (SU GENDLIN HOMES LLC

23 BLAIR ST 323 PELHAM FALLS DR 608 CASTLESTONE DR 2 TEE TIME CT 309 STALLION RD 320 SUMMIT DR 202 BURNING BUSH RD 83 YOUNG HARRIS DR 27 CANSO ST 19 GLADES END LN 110 MALLARD ST 11 BRENDAN WAY STE 140 55 BEATTIE PL STE 1510 36 TRAILWOOD DR 524 MORNING CREEK PL 128 PELHAM SPRINGS PL 4 WIEUCA CT PO BOX 734 108 ANSLEY CROSSING CT 119 CLEVEIRVINE AVE 301 MARCHFIELD CT 210 DOUGLAS DR 15 BRECKENRIDGE CT 7 SOUTHFIELD DR 604 MOJAVE CT 214 MERITAGE ST 180 EMMA ST 103 REDSPIRE DR 24 TOWNES SQUARE LN 101 E WASHINGTON ST STE 400 2 DUNBROOK DR 102 OREGON ST 218 BRENLEIGH CT 3135 LAURENS DR 104 GRACLAN CT 213 SANDY LN 16 HALEHAVEN DR 12 CAPTAINS CT 103 CANNON LN 239 HIGHGATE CIR 105 CASTLEGATE CT 900 N MAIN ST UNIT 27 102 PEARLE BROOK LN 12 ESSEX CT 105 SHEFLEYS RD 204 ALLIUM WAY 2607 WOODRUFF RD STE E-541 1011 SPRING GLEN DR 721 RICHBOURG RD 403 WAYMON DR 18 DRUID HILL CT 463 CHRISTIANE WAY 29 E CIRCLE AVE 740 BROOKDALE DR 207 BARNYARD WAY 148 CAROLINA WAY 505 TUBBS MOUNTAIN RD 16 LORENA DR 209 ENOREE CIR 17 ENDEAVOR CIR 304 STONINGTON WAY 119 CLEVEIRVINE AVE


GR

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AN IDEAL LIFESTYLE IN A PERFECT SETTING Your new home awaits you at Charleston Walk.

Charleston Walk exemplifies community and is a perfect place for your family to live. Situated in one of the most desired locations on the Eastside, Charleston walk is an intimate community of 23 home sites. We are confident you will feel right at home and invite you to tour our move-in ready homes. From the moment you set foot on the covered porch, your eyes will be drawn to the fine craftsmanship and attention to detail. Our homes offer gorgeous lighting and detailed trim work along with breathtaking kitchens, large master suites, and exceptional features throughout. Our homes are exquisite and practical to include: Maintenance-Free yards, spacious bedrooms with private bathrooms, walk-in closets, mud-rooms, and oversized garages. Priced from the low $400,000’s. Visit our model at 200 Grandmont Court in Greer. Open Tuesday - Saturday 11am - 5pm and Sunday 1pm - 5pm. From Pelham Road, take Boiling Springs Road towards Greer. Travel approximately 2 miles. Charleston Walk will be on your right.

Contact the Charleston Walk Team at 864-416-4443


44 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.20.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

HOME Featured Neighborhood

Cottages at Riverbirch Elderberry Way, Seneca

Home Info Price: Starting in the low $400’s Sq. Ft: 2070, 2588, 2705 Sq Ft Lots: 31 wooded, waterfront homesites Schools: Keowee Elementary, Walhalla Middle, and Walhalla High Contact Info: Lake Keowee Real Estate | 864.886.0098 lakekeoweerealestate.com | lakekeoweeoffice@gmail.com

Buyers from all over the country have been asking for it, so Crescent Communities and Lake Keowee Real Estate are here to deliver! We are introducing a new cottage concept for Lake Keo wee Living called The Cottages at Riverbirch. This gated, planned community consists of 31 wooded, waterfront home sites in a low-maintenance community. Craftsman-style cottages with exposed beams and stone entry are now being offered in three attractive models, all with open floor plans and beautiful outdoor living spaces. Buyers have recently been saying that “less is

more” and so this community will offer floor plans of 2070, 2588 and 2705 finished square feet, rather than the traditional larger home sizes found in our lakefront communities. In order to make it easy for our buyers, lot surveys are already done, dock permits have been obtained, septic permits are on file with SC DHEC, and financial institutions are prepared to start lending money for this construction project. And if you aren’t ready to build yet, you can buy the lot now and build at a later date.

Real Estate News Spencer joins Coldwell closures while finishing college with a little over $10,000 in the bank. Today investors Banker Caine with experience in real estate with make up a large percentage of his client base. Justin is motivated by the another upstate firm, pursuit of excellence in all where he was recognized aspects of business and as Rookie of the Year life. His mission is to build and Regional Top Listing trust through transparAgent for 2015, as well as ency, teamwork, clear and numerous monthly Top Ashby concise communication – Performer accolades. He keeping the highest ethical has a strong background in sales and marRuzicka standards as his priority. keting through his role as Vice President of Coldwell Banker Caine recently welA unique and little known Sales and Marketing at the start up, Cartera fact about Justin, he started investing in fore- comed Spencer Ashby as a residential sales Commerce, and as an account executive with agent to its Greenville office. continued from PAGE 39

Spencer Ashby Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Greenville

Hearst Corporation and Promotion Pod. Spencer stays actively involved in his community as president of his neighborhood’s Homeowners’ Association. He also enjoys serving at his local soup kitchen. In his spare time, Spencer loves camping with his wife, Lisa, watching documentaries, and reading. “We are delighted to welcome Spencer to our Greenville team,” said Stephen Edgerton, president and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “His real estate and marketing background, joined with an unbridled entrepreneurial spirit, set him apart as a real estate professional in our community.”


05.20.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 45

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2 GUYS 20 CHARACTERS

CULTURE

Small-town satire ‘Greater Tuna’ is a ‘quick-change comedy’ CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Mill Town Players’ executive and artistic director Will Ragland compares “Greater Tuna” to the “Blue Collar Comedy Tour” featuring Jeff Foxworthy and three of his comedian friends and, more locally, the Café and Then Some. “It’s redneck humor and poking fun at ourselves,” Ragland said. “Greater Tuna” is a popular comedy about Texas’ third-smallest town where the Patsy Cline never dies and the Lions Club is too liberal. The Mill Town Players’ production of it opens Friday at the Pelzer Auditorium and runs through June 12.

Ragland said “Greater Tuna” is one of the most popular plays among community theaters because the characters are so relatable, especially to people who live in the South or grew up in a small town anywhere. “The characters will remind people of somebody they know,” Ragland said. Ragland and Shane Willimon are the only two actors in the production, and they play 10 parts each. Characters include the town snob, a politician, a tough sheriff, a town drunk, a reverend, a boy in reform school and a teenage girl. “It’s a quick-change comedy,” Ragland said.

That means there are lots of costume changes, so many that Mill Town Players had a rehearsal devoted solely to costume changes. “I’ve never been in a show that has had to devote a day of tech to costume changes,” he said. “Some of the changes have to occur in a matter of seconds.” The show’s designer, Ryan Bradburn, helped facilitate the switch by using magnets in the costumes instead of zippers or buttons. The play is a snapshot of the day in the lives of the citizens of Tuna, Texas, as the local radio station reports on the events of the day.

Ragland said “Greater Tuna” is a show with no teeth. “It’s silly entertainment with a very loose plot and ridiculous characters,” he said. “You’re not going to leave the theater thinking about issues. It’s a show just to have fun.”

Greater Tuna Who: Mill Town Players Where: P elzer Auditorium 214 Lebby St., Pelzer When: M ay 20, 21, 26, 27, 28 and June 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $ 10 regular admission $8 for seniors and military, $7 for students 18 and under Shane Willimon and Will Ragland are the cast of Mill Town Players’ production of “Greater Tuna.”

Information: milltownplayers.org


The Poetry ofnowPlace on view

Amid the cacophany of an election year, the exhibition The Poetry of Place offers a respite and reminder that our country, and particularly the South, is home. From the colorful streets of New Orleans to the misty swamps of Florida to the undulant Smoky Mountains, The Poetry of Place invites you to re-discover America, where a picture is worth a thousand words.

Rudolph Ingerle (1879-1950) Evening Sky, circa 1925

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm

GCMA Journal Ingerle.indd 1

admission free

3/25/16 10:55 AM


05.20.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 47

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CULTURE

Songs for swingin’ travelers better,” she says. “I can be so tired, and then when I come in here and listen to the music, I’m just a different person when I leave. And we just want to share this house with the folks of Travelers Rest and the folks that want to perform for others.”

䘀䤀刀䔀 吀栀攀愀琀爀攀 䌀漀⸀ 瀀爀攀猀攀渀琀猀

Gift shop in TR transforms into jazz club for Sinatra tribute VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

This Saturday night, My Sister’s Store in Travelers Rest will take a big step from being a book-and-gift shop with a cozy atmosphere to a music venue with a cozy atmosphere. Co-owners and siblings Pam Campbell and Phyllis Chandler will host a Frank Sinatra tribute show at their store, performed by a veteran jazz trio featuring Dr. John Valerio on piano, George Hoar on bass and Ron Schwartz on drums. “Ron came to us over a year and a half ago and said he liked our venue space and that he’d been looking for something like this for a while,” Campbell says. “We were thrilled, but Ron had some health problems and one thing led to another, but we’ve finally gotten it scheduled.” It’s their first stand-alone show, but for the last four years, My Sister’s Store has been hosting a weekly Open Mic Night on Tuesdays and a Bluegrass Jam on Fridays. “We happened upon the music because someone wanted to give lessons in our store,” Campbell says. “And once that started, we started having the Friday night jam so that people didn’t have to travel to other places just to get together and play. So that’s been over four and a half years ago that the core group started, and now we have people travelling from out of town to be here for the jam. I would say there’s around 100 people that come in the door every week because of music.” In Campbell’s view, this step forward for My Sister’s Store is just part of the cultural and business expansion that Travelers Rest has experienced in the last few years. “I grew

up here, and just to see the changes in the town has been phenomenal,” she says. “I see a wave of more performing arts hitting town, and the music scene is getting more popular.” As for the show itself, called “A Tribute To Sinatra: His History & His Music,” it’s the brainchild of Dr. Valerio. The trio has prepared instrumental versions of 16 of Sinatra’s classic hits, which will accompany a slide show about Sinatra’s life and his impact on the music world. So why arrange an instrumental salute to a legendary singer? “Sinatra was so influential not only as a singer, but as much an instrument player as anybody,” says Schwartz. “His development of phrasing, his style, his interpretation of the work, it’s made a huge impression upon music in general. He’s influenced many a horn player and many a pianist.” Each member of the trio has a long history in jazz music. Valerio has played with Lee Konitz and Stanley Clarke, among many others, and he’s written books on jazz piano. Hoar has released multiple solo and collaborative albums, and over a 45-year career, Schwartz has worked with artists such as Jose Feliciano, Kim Carnes and Larry Coryell. Campbell says she’s excited about the show not just because of the music but also for the opportunity to welcome people into her and her sister’s venue. “So many people in Travelers Rest have the God-given talent that they want to share, and music just makes everybody feel

Information: 915-3272

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When: Saturday, May 21, 7 p.m.

Tickets: $10

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A Tribute To Sinatra: His History & His Music Where: My Sister’s Store, 104 S. Poinsett Hwy., Travelers Rest

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48 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.20.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

LIVE MUSIC FOR ALL

CULTURE Sound Check Notes on the Music Scene with Vincent Harris

When doves cry

Their personal relationship ended, but for the duo of Mourning Dove, the musical bond remains Last fall, after three and a half years together, Niel Brooks and Lisa Stubbs ended their relationship. It was a painful enough experience, but their particular breakup presented a unique problem: They had a gig in 10 days.

SEA L AUGUS T 23

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Stubbs and Brooks had spent much of their time together performing as Mourning Dove, creating ethereal, haunting folk music that combined Stubbs’ impressionistic songwriting with Brooks’ production and arrangement skills. Their EP “Chrysalis” is a gorgeously melodic debut that surrounds Stubbs’ clear, powerful voice with a spare but haunting musical backdrop. It’s an amazing example of musical symbiosis. And having looked all of her life to find that kind of a connection, Stubbs was afraid it was gone. “I was really concerned about that,” she says. “But I’d had a conversation with him a couple of months before where I asked him if we ever broke up, would we keep the band going, because I couldn’t lose both.”

song or onstage. “I can’t speak for Lisa, but I don’t like people knowing my relationship stuff,” Brooks says. “Because it has nothing to do with me performing. It’s two different things. And the only reason I say that is because every single interview would turn into, ‘So how’s your relationship going?’ And it’s nobody’s damn business.” “I didn’t mind people knowing we were together, but I didn’t want it to be about that,” Stubbs adds.

So despite the pain of their breakup, the show had to go on, if only because the two people involved refused to let their band go. “I was very emotional. I didn’t know if I was going to be able to function onstage,” Stubbs says. “But that show went really well. I remember before it being really nervous, especially because I had written two new songs about how I was feeling before the show and I was playing one of them for the first time. I thought, ‘Oh God, are all these emotions going to come back and screw up this performance?’ But I made it through, and it was kind of cathartic, actually.”

In the end, despite the lingering awkwardness and heartbreak that comes with the end of any relationship, Stubbs says that Mourning Dove persevered because they can’t do with other musicians what they do together.

For his part, Brooks wasn’t as concerned about the show, but he was just as determined not to lose the band. “I think of both parts of what we do as intertwined,” he says. “I have to play parts based on what she’s singing. I don’t think of it as two separate things going on.”

Community Gardens May Concert, featuring Mourning Dove with Jeff Ridings

And as for that first show after the breakup? “I think it was within the first song that I thought, ‘Okay, this will work,’” Brooks says. “It was business as usual. We were playing music.” Perhaps one of the reasons that Mourning Dove, who will play at the Sans Souci Community Gardens this Sunday, was able to continue was that the duo had made it a point never to focus on their relationship, either in

“I’ve tried collaborating with a lot of people in the past, and I’ve looked for other people to play with, especially as far as recording,” she says. “And I can’t find anybody else that gets what I’m trying to do. Without both of us, Mourning Dove wouldn’t be Mourning Dove anymore.”

When: Sunday, May 22, 6:30 p.m. Where: Sans Souci Community Gardens 12 Ethelridge Drive Tickets: Free Info: 354-7060; sans-souci.org Vincent Harris covers music and sports for The Greenville Journal. Reach him at vharris@communityjournals.com.


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CULTURE Sound Bites

THE WORK Gottrocks, 200 Eisenhower Drive, Greenville Saturday, May 21, 10 p.m.

SOUL RIPPLE Rhythms on Trade, 213 Trade St., Greer Saturday, May 21, 8 p.m., Free

The Work is one of Greenville’s most enduring bands, and it’s a group that’s managed to stick together even after its members moved on to other projects. Singer/guitarist Charles Hedgepath has a busy career both solo and as part of the Bad Popes, singer/trumpet player Craig Sorrells leads his namesake Craig Sorrells Project, singer/bassist Mark Dye plays in various bands around the Upstate, and percussionist Jeff Holland has created drum4work, a percussion-based method of instruction that promotes team-building, education and cultural awareness. So with their busy schedules, what keeps The Work interested in getting back together every once in a while and reviving their infectious rock-soul-jam workouts? According to Hedgepath, there’s a feeling he gets from this group that’s truly unique. “It’s the X factor that a lot of people refer to when they talk about intangibles,” he says. “The combination of the company and years we’ve played together gives me something I can’t get anywhere else.”

Bassist and singer Joe Jones likes to refer to his band, Soul Ripple, as “old-school,” and there are few players in local music who have earned that description more than Jones. He’s been playing on the Upstate music scene for more than 20 years, but this is the first band that Jones has served in as both bassist and lead singer, and Soul Ripple’s mix of muscular rock, down-and-dirty blues and joyful funk is very much his vision. “People had asked me for a while about fronting something of my own,” Jones says, “but I love being a bass player and my main thing was always being tight with the drummer. But a guitar player named Matthew Kay called me up for a gig at Blues Boulevard and asked me how I felt about fronting a band. And out of the blue, the name Soul Ripple came into my head. And it started out stronger than I could’ve ever imagined.”

Simpsonville’s Best Kept Secret

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Even if you’re not a jam-band fan, it’s hard to not to like the expansive music of Greenville’s Four 14. Since forming in 2010, they’ve been a lot more concerned with danceable, percussion-spiked polyrhythms than noodly guitar solos. The band’s 2015 debut album, “Horace Grigsby,” is a chaotic, catchy collection of tunes, but making it took Four 14 off the road for a while, a situation they’re trying to correct now. “The cool thing we’ve been doing lately, which we kind of got away from, is that we’re trying to play more often in Greenville,” says singer/guitarist Kyle Rowland. “We wanted to get some shows under our belts with the new guys [guitarist Trevor MansfieldTand Johnson] H EE SSPLaddie R RIH EEN G S G Trevor’s S H drummer PT HIN GSPSinPRthe RI band. IN N G S been with us from the beginning, helping us out at shows, and I don’t think there’s another person who knows our music better than him. And Laddie is a rock-solid player. He brings an exploratory edge that we all needed.”

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50 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.20.2016

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CULTURE Must-See Movies By Eric Rogers

Binge-watching Bergman

3 essential films from the Swedish master filmmaker Every morning my arthritis tells me to stay in bed.

Fortunately, I’m in charge.

For more information: DHEC Arthritis Program www.scdhec.gov/arthritis 1-866-899-3663

CR-010695 4/2013

Physical Activity. The Arthritis Pain Reliever.

The next time you’re in the mood to bingewatch something, consider the films of Ingmar Bergman. The Greenville County Library has several available, as does Amazon. Bergman was a Swedish writer and director who worked consistently with the same crew, most notably his cinematographer, Sven Nykvist. Many of the films starred Max von Sydow, who may be better known to young moviegoers as Lor San Tekka in the recent “Star Wars” installment, “The Force Awakens.” Bergman utilized a small cast and crew, which enabled him to churn out new films very quickly. Some years he released as many as three. Because the films contained a small cast, they are often referred to as “chamber films,” taking from the idea of a chamber orchestra, which is generally comprised of a smaller group of musicians than a full orchestra. These three films are a good representation of his general style.

“THE SEVENTH SEAL” 1957 Bergman’s films were very philosophical, and this

allegorical film is a great example. The film opens showing a knight (played by von Sydow) who has just returned from the Crusades. The Angel of Death appears to him, so the knight challenges him to a game of chess, suggesting that if he wins he can be spared. Death agrees. The film then shows the knight and his squire returning home to find that their fight appears to have been meaningless, as people are now dying of the black plague.

“WINTER LIGHT” 1963 This film was one of Bergman’s “Silence of God” trilogies, along with “Through a Glass Darkly” and “The Silence.” It’s about a preacher who is struggling with his own doubts about his faith. Bergman was raised by a Lutheran minister but later became agnostic, so this film is somewhat autobiographical.

“WILD STRAWBERRIES” 1957 This was the first Bergman film I saw back in high school, and likely the first one many

people see, as it and “The Seventh Seal” seem to be his most well-known films. In one scene, the main character, the elderly Professor Isak Borg, is having a nightmare. As he walks around a deserted town he sees that there are no hands on the town clocks. He is then confronted by a coffin that has fallen from a hearse. When he opens it, he sees himself. The rest of the film is about his reflections on his life as he realizes it is fleeting. One note of warning: Bergman’s films are beautifully shot and powerful in their existential questioning. However, they aren’t feel-good movies. You might want to follow them up with the new season of “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt.” Eric Rogers has been teaching filmmaking at The Greenville Fine Arts Center since 1994.

Page Turners

Poetry that hits home Crossword puzzle: page 58

Woodson’s book of poems brings yesterday’s Greenville to life Maybe you’re like me, and you spend too much time on Twitter and Facebook. If so, you may know the hashtag #yeahTHATgreenville. But which Greenville are we talking about? Jacqueline Woodson, award-winning author of the young adult book “Brown Girl Dreaming,” drops us down in her childhood memories of the small Southern town that became the Greenville we know today.

Sudoku puzzle: page 58

Jacqueline Woodson moved to Greenville as a young girl in the early 1960s. She writes about learning a different way of life down here, one that was slower and

sweeter, but that had new rules. She remembers her mother wanting to protest in the civil rights demonstrations at the drugstores downtown, and, when the bathrooms became integrated, standing at bathroom doors and still being able to see “whites only” underneath the freshly applied paint. Woodson writes with hope about complicated themes that all kids experience but may still find strange: family changes, moving to new cities and discovering that not everybody thinks the same things as your family or yourself but that you can still stand confident

on your two feet. Now, I should warn you that this is a book of poetry, but it feels surprisingly like a novel. Poems aren’t scary. They’re just ideas in a different shape, and these are really straightforward. Maybe the next time you tag your family photo with #yeahTHATgreenville you’ll think about how many different #yeahTHATgreenville moments have happened here – not just in the era of Twitter and Facebook, but since people began calling it their home. Katie Womble is the curator of oral history for the Upcountry History Museum – Furman University and invites everyone to check out this book through the Greenville County Libraries.


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CULTURE Huangry Sensual and Not-So-Sensual Meals with Andrew Huang

Empanadas

GREENVILLEJOURNAL

The best hot pockets

I think that’s why comfort foods are so special to us. They are ingrained in our lives, and as a result, seem elemental, essential and simple, even though they’re anything but. Comfort foods are almost always time- and labor-intensive – an investment that’s unnecessary for the sole purpose of sustenance. It’s that commitment to all the additional complications that gives comfort foods their richness and soulfulness, and it’s something that’s almost impossible to fake. You’d never mistake microwaved Campbell’s chicken noodle soup for your mother’s recipe simmered for an entire afternoon. Dumplings are that way for me. I know – this column is supposed to be about empanadas. But before you crucify me for a bait-andswitch, let me explain. I’ve never made empanadas, and I didn’t grow up eating them. Empanadas aren’t really a part of my cultural heritage. That makes me a little underqualified to evaluate empanadas as a comfort food. But dumplings are a part of my cultural heritage, and I’ve spent many hours with my mother rolling out dough, mixing fillings together, folding morsels into dumplings and cooking batches of dumplings. As far as I’m concerned, empanadas are just a variation of dumpling: There’s a filling stuffed and folded inside a wrapper, and a ton of steps to get you to that point. For Tirado’s Puerto Rican turnovers (empanadillas, if we’re being technical), it starts with making sofrito, a rich, savory base whose main ingredients are cilantro and ají dulce peppers (both organically homegrown by the Tirado family). Think of it as a roux, or the Holy Trinity of Cajun cooking. Fillings are sautéed in the sofrito to add flavorful depth before being dropped into homemade pastry dough and folded into hand-sized half-moons. Only then are these turnovers fried into hot, savory pockets. It’s definitely not the most efficient way to make food, but how else do you propose getting flaky pastry dough and savory meats on a bed of

Photo by Andrew Huang

Have you ever given thought to how much effort is required to make a meal? It’s really not that much. Slap some bread and cheese together. Boil some pasta and toss it with butter and olive oil. Throw a bunch of stuff into a pot on high heat and hope for the best. I’m not saying the results are delicious, just that cooking can be pretty simple when it’s all said and done.

richness, all in one bite? Between the Caribbean chicken (shredded chicken, sofrito, potatoes and carrots) and the Tirado’s beef (ground beef, sofrito and potatoes) empanadas, there’s more brightness and pep to the chicken empanada, while the beef incarnation is a solid, soothing blanket on your tongue. They’re different characters for different moods, and luckily, Tirado’s has five other fillings for a fairly diverse selection of empanadas. Are Tirado’s empanadas as good as my mother’s? Probably not, because if you were paying attention, you’d know that my mother never really made empanadas. But that doesn’t mean I can’t appreciate the care that goes into each turnover. That’s the wonderful thing about comfort food – its soulful warmth is universal, even if the individual flavors aren’t.

AT READ ONLINE GREENV ILLE JOURNA L.COM

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Pros + When is comfort food unwelcome? + Flaky, crispy pastry dough pocket. This is a hot pocket done right.

Cons - It’s fried and it’s heavy, which means you should use discretion when pairing these with the summer heat.

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- Location is a bit out of the way. Tirado’s Empanadas and More 1316 Stallings Road, Greenville (864) 982-2419, tiradosempanadas.com Empanadas, $3.25 each, or three for $9

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Follow Andrew Huang’s food misadventures on Twitter and Instagram at @rooftoptales and #huangry.

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PREVIEW

CALENDAR

Writing what you know

Journalist turned preacher and homeless advocate Deb Richardson-Moore writes first book in mystery series CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

A homeless man once told Triune Mercy Center pastor Deb Richardson-Moore that the worst thing about being homeless wasn’t being cold, wet or hungry. It was being looked right through. That revelation was key in her debut mystery novel, “The Cantaloupe Thief.” “The idea of being looked right through stayed with me,” she said. “It got me thinking about what happens when you start looking right through people. Nobody suspects them for the murder. Nobody listens to them. What might they know that we don’t know they know?” The book is scheduled for a June 27 release by the fiction imprint of Lion Hudson, the publisher of Richardson-Moore’s first book, “Weight of Mercy,” which told the story of the pastor’s first three years at Triune Mercy Center ministering to the homeless. A book launch party is set for Tuesday, May 31, at the Café and Then Some on College Street in downtown Greenville. The protagonist in Richardson-Moore’s book is a newspaper reporter – not surprising since journalism was her career before going into the ministry. Richardson-Moore had worked for the Greenville News for 27 years. Her journey into the ministry started when the paper’s managing editor asked her to take the religion beat. RichardsonMoore agreed, but decided she needed to go to school to learn more about the different religions. Since Furman University and Clemson University did not offer comparative religion degrees, she enrolled in Erskine Seminary in Due West with no intentions of

Book Launch Party Who: Deb Richardson-Moore What: “The Cantaloupe Thief” When: Tuesday, May 31, 5:30-8 p.m. Where: Café and Then Some, 101 College St.

NOW THRU

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FAMILY

Story Time and More: Insect Investigations Sneak Peek

The Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. 10 and 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. | Free with admission The world around us is so amazing. Everywhere

being a minister. In “The Cantaloupe Thief,” the reporter, Branigan Powers, decided to investigate her fictional northeastern Georgia town’s only unsolved murder, the 10-year-old killing of wealthy matriarch Alberta Resnick. In the book, Powers knows that the homeless often have information but are rarely asked. The reporter contacts Liam, a pastor who runs a shelter. As they start asking questions, secrets start to surface and homeless people start dying. “I hope people will learn something about homelessness. There are as many types of homeless people as there are housed,” R i c h a r d s o n - Mo o r e said. “There’s a depth of character. When we are dismissing a group of people, we’re dismissing a valuable or rich part of our community. I’m hoping it shows both sides. Some of the things we believe about stereotypes are true, but some are not. Some are bad. Some are heroic.” Richardson-Moore said the novel was easier for her to write than “Weight of Mercy,” even though the mystery changed a lot in the 20-plus years she was writing it. “‘Weight of Mercy’ was so personal, and I was reliving all that,” she said. “This was kind of fun.” Richardson-Moore is already working on the sequel. we look we can find new and interesting things. If we look down we can see so many interesting insects. Join us as we read books about insects and make a beautiful bug project. tcmupstate.org

ARTS EVENT

“Kindred Spirits,” Exploring Abstract Expressionism Today

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St. FREE An exhibition of abstract painting by guest artists Steven Aimone, Katherine Aimone, Galen Cheney, Matthew Dibble, Margaret Glew and Jay Zerbe. 735-3948 | artcentergreenville.org info@artcentergreenville.org

FRI

20

CONCERT

Fountain Inn Natural Gas Friday Night Bandstand

Commerce Park | 200 Depot St., Fountain Inn 7-9 p.m. | Fridays thru Aug. 12 FREE Bring a chair and come hear some great

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FAMILY

music at the Farmers Market Pavilion at Commerce Park in Fountain Inn. Beer and wine available for purchase with ID; snacks and soft drinks also available. May 20: Mac Arnold and the Plate Full O’ Blues. Visit fountaininn.org for a complete schedule of performers. 409-1050 fountaininn.org cheryl.pelicano@fountaininn.org

and oobleck, and engage in other messy activities throughout the day. tcmupstate.org

HEALTH/FITNESS

Beloved Upstate jam-rock institution rises again. 235-5519 gottrocksgreenville.com

It is that time of year again, time to get messy. Our annual “MessFest” is a favorite day at TCMU. Our preschoolers will have fun making “fizzy art” using baking soda and vinegar. The results will have your child loving this fun art project. tcmupstate.org

EDUCATION

COMMUNITY MEETING

Train Day Celebration

Monthly breakfast meeting of the Greenville County Democratic Party

Give Blood and Honor Law Enforcement During National Police Week Spartanburg Library | 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 151 S. Church St., Spartanburg Simpsonville Wal-Mart - Bloodmobile 3950 Grandview Drive, Simpsonville | 11 a.m.-7 p.m.

CONCERT

The Work Gottrocks 200 Eisenhower Drive

Hub City Railroad Museum Magnolia Street RR Depot 298 Magnolia St., Spartanburg

Travelers Rest Police Department 6711 State Park Road, TR | 1-6 p.m.

10-4 p.m.

McCormick County Municipal Center 610 S. Mine St., McCormick | 3-7 p.m.

This celebration of railroads will feature the Hub City Railroad Museum and Caboose, an HO model railroad, an operating railroad motor car, performing artists singing railroad tunes, hot dogs and fixings for sale, a bounce house, rubber-tired train rides, a train watch on the NS main line and more. 504-5202 hubcityrrmuseum.org dwinans4739@charter.net

Free In honor of National Police Week, The Blood Connection joins law enforcement agencies to pay tribute to the courage of officers whose lives have been taken in the line of duty. thebloodconnection.org kim@km-pr.com

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THEATER PRODUCTION

Long Branch Baptist Church | 28 Bolt St. 8:30-10 p.m. | 4th Saturday of each month

Mess Fest The Children’s Museum of the Upstate | 300 College St.

FAMILY

Good News Spectacular TD Convention Center, Hall 1 1 Exponsition Drive

11 a.m.-4 p.m.

10 a.m.-3 p.m.

Free with admission

FREE

Join as for our annual Mess Fest event today. Children will have opportunities to play in a shaving cream room, paint with big tools, explore giant bubbles, investigate slime

The Good News Spectacular is a free, one-day community event filled with games, inflatables, popcorn, live interactive shows and more fun for ages 5 - 12 and their family. The Spectacular will be held in an indoor hall at the TD Convention Center. We want to share the Good News of Jesus Christ with the community. 292-5844 | cefgreenville.com/4376-2/ alicia@cefgreenville.com

Hyatt Regency Downtown 220 N. Main St.

6:30-9:30 p.m. $70 Join us for a very special Taste of the Upstate as we celebrate Loaves and Fishes’ 25th Anniversary. In addition to “tastes” from 10 of Greenville’s best chefs, our celebration bash will include a silent auctions, music from the Greenville Jazz Collective and a gourmet cake walk. 232-3595 | tessa@loavesandfishesgreenville.org loavesandfishesgreenville.com/taste-of-theupstate

Red Ribbon Party and Auction

Come and meet our democratic candidates for state and local offices. Find out how you can get involved in the Democratic Party. All are welcome. 232-5531 | greenvilledemocrats.com headquarters@greenvilledemocrats.com

Green Valley Country Club 225 Green Valley Drive

NOW THRU

THEATER PRODUCTION

FIRE Theatre Co. Presents Guys and Dolls

FAMILY

FAMILY

Taste of the Upstate

FREE

The season finale for FIRE Theatre Co. Friday and Saturday shows are at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday matinees are at 3 p.m. 409-1050 yountscenter.org cheryl.pelicano@fountaininn.org

EscobarPhotography

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FUNDRAISER

FUNDRAISER

$18/adults; $15/seniors; $10/students

$30, $25, $10

SUN

Donations for breakfast are welcomed.

7:30-10 p.m. | Friday & Saturday

8 p.m. Thursdays-Sundays

21

10 and 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. | Free with admission

Younts Center for Performing Arts 315 N. Main Street, Fountain Inn

Centre Stage 501 River St.

SAT

The Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St.

22

A Party to Murder

Six people come for a weekend mystery game, but it takes a sinister turn with unexpected and terrifying conclusions. 233-6733 centrestage.org information@centrestage.org

Story Time and More: Mess Fest

law-enforcement, firefighters and EMS personnel. 516-8100 | Cabelas.com

Off the Wall: Messy Art The Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. 2-4 p.m. | Free with admission Gear up for Mess Fest by creating messy art all week in Off the Wall. tcmupstate.org

FAMILY

Hometown Heroes Celebration Cabela’s | 1025 Woodruff Rd. Ste. H101 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

7-9 a.m. FREE Greenville Family Partnership and Chris & Kelly’s HOPE Foundation are hosting the “Red Ribbon VIP Party” 2016. There will be heavy hors d’oeuvres, a live auction and entertainment - all for a good cause. 467-4099 | karen@gfpdrugfree.org facebook.com/RedRibbonClassic gfpdrugfree.org

FUNDRAISER

Upstate Splash Freestyle Jam Gottrocks | 200 Eisenhower Drive 5:30-9:30 p.m. $25 Upstate Splash Freestyle Jam is a benefit concert to support Upstate Splash Charity, an organization dedicated to provide swim lessons to at-risk children. Come out and jam with us and help save some lives. Tickets include food, drinks and a good reason to boogie. Musicians include Col. Bruce Hampton, Reverend Jeff Mosier, Yonrico Scott, Jeff Sipe, Charles Hedgepath, Darby Wilcox, Sam Kruer and more. 349-7615 upstatesplash.org/freestyle-jam/ upstatesplash@gmail.com

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FUNDRAISER

Red Ribbon Classic Golf Tournament 2016

Green Valley Country Club | 225 Green Valley Dr. 7 a.m.-4 p.m.

FREE

FREE

Cabela’s is honoring our Hometown Heroes by offering a discount to active military, veterans,

Greenville Family Partnership and Chris and Kelly’s HOPE Foundation are sponsoring the 2016 Red Ribbon Classic Golf Tourna-

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WHAT’S HAPPENING

Greek Festival May 20-22 • 10:30 a.m.-10 p.m. • Saint George Greek Orthodox Cathedral • 406 N. Academy • $1 • greekforaday.com • stgeorgegreenville.org Greece is about 5,000 miles from Greenville. But you can experience Hellenic culture right outside the door at this iconic Upstate festival. Treat your taste buds to delicious native cuisines – gyros, pastichio, and calamari – and watch the intricate choreography of the Troupe Adelphia as they dance to traditional folk tunes. Inside the St. George Greek Orthodox Cathedral, take a closer look at the glistening mosaics that decorate the building’s interior and learn about religious symbolism. And once you step back outside, join a bustling marketplace that features soaps and other goodies for you take home.

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ment. Join us in the fight to end substance abuse in Greenville County through prevention, treatment and community support. 467-4099 | facebook.com/RedRibbonClassic redribbonclassic.com

TUE&WED

24&25

HEALTH/FITNESS

Pickleball

Taylors Rec Center Gymnasium | 200 W. Main St., Taylors Wednesdays | 9-11 a.m. Tuesdays | 6:30-8:30 p.m. FREE Pickleball is a paddle sport created for all ages and skill levels. The rules are simple and the game is easy for beginners to learn, but can develop into a quick, fast-paced, competitive game for experienced players. 292-4060 | darylh@taylorsfbc.org taylorsfbc.org/reach/taylors-rec/events/

TUE-SAT

24-28

FAMILY

Story Time and More: Animal Adventures Sneak Peek

The Children’s Museum of the Upstate

300 College St. 10 and 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. | Free with admission This week we will read “Harry the Dirty Dog” as we celebrate the four-legged friends in our lives. We will make a “Harry the Dirty Dog” puppet to take home. tcmupstate.org

TUE-SUN

24-29

FAMILY

Off the Wall: Game-Inspired Art

The Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. 2-4 p.m. | Free with admission Create game-inspired art in Off the Wall this week as we gear up for the opening of Fun and Games. tcmupstate.org

WED

25

FUNDRAISER

Tucanos Brazilian Grill Charity Night Celebration

Tucanos Brazilian Grill | 1025 Woodruff Road 5-9 p.m. | $25 per person

Join us for a special evening. Tucanos will host a special event to celebrate three local nonprofit organizations. You can vote for your favorite online: tucanos.com/charitycelebration. Join ClubTucanos and your vote counts twice, visit the restaurant and your vote counts triple. Reserve your preferred seat on May 25 from 5-9 at the charity event and your vote will count 10 times. Organizations are Make-A-Wish South Carolina, Pendleton Place and YMCA of Greenville.

benefit the Women and Children’s Refuge. 235-4803 | sawagreenville.org chelsia.spivey@uss.salvationarmy.org

288-2486 | tucanos.com/charitycelebration

FREE

THU

26

FUNDRAISER

Paint the Town Red Silent Auction

The Salvation Army Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Center | 424 Westfield St. 5-8 p.m. $10 Break out your resort casual attire and prepare to shop and shag on the boardwalk. This silent auction will feature over 100 items. The Auxiliary Attic Pop-Up Shop will also be open, featuring “Upscale Rescale” consignment clothing items. Guests will enjoy food, a free photo booth and beach tunes provided by Beach Bob Entertainment. This event is hosted by The Salvation Army Women’s Auxiliary, and all funds raised will

HEALTH/FITNESS

May Upstate Open Ears Meetup Davis Audiology | 4318 East North St. 2-4 p.m. A fun afternoon filled with games and education on hearing health: bingo, prizes, accessories and demos. 655-8300 | alexandra@davisaudiology.com meetup.com/Upstate-Open-Ears-Group/ events/229315933/

MON-AUG

26-4

CONCERT

Furman Presents Lakeside Concert Series Every Thursday at Amphitheater Furman University | Amphitheater 3300 Poinsett Hwy 7:30-9 p.m. | Thursdays Free Les Hicken and guests present outdoor

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05.20.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 55

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

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CALENDAR

concerts: May 26, How the West Was Won; June 2, Kings, Queens, and Royal Things; June 9, Music from Far and Away; June 16, Contemporary Jazz; June 23, Rhapsody in Blue (McAlister Auditorium); June 30, For Amber Waves of Grain; July 7, The West End Brass Quintet; July 14, Bluegrass Night; July 21, The Magic Kingdom; July 28, An Evening with Henry Mancini and Aug. 4, Greenville Jazz Collective. 294-2086 | FurmanMusic@furman.edu

242-2583 bluesboulevardjazzgreenville.com

news.furman.edu/2016/04/18/music-by-thelake-summer-concert-series/

Alt-rock singer/guitarist. 948-1661 reverbnation.com/venue/groundzero2

FRI

27

CONCERT

The Mavericks

CONCERT

Matthew Church w/ The Things They Carried Ground Zero 3052 Howard St., Spartanburg Tickets: $10

HEALTH/FITNESS

Solaire w/ Bobby Meader & Sweat Lodge Soundbox Tavern 507 W. Georgia Road, Simpsonville Raucous, fuzz-coated garage rock. 228-7763

CONCERT

Eric Weiler Band Smiley’s Acoustic Café 111 Augusta St., Greenville Free Dazzling blues guitarist leads a versatile combo. 282-8988 smileysacousticcafe.com

SAT

28

EDUCATION

Free Lowrance Sonar Class

Cabela’s | 1025 Woodruff Rd. Ste. H101 2-3 p.m. FREE Lowrance Pro Staff, Ken Sturdivant will teach a free sonar class. This class will walk you through the basic steps of setting up your device to navigating its features. Class is limited to the first 30 participants. Call to register. If this class is in high demand, another time slot will open. 516-8100 | cabelas.com

CONCERT

Soul Ripple Blues Boulevard (Greenville) 300 River St., Ste. 203 Tickets: $5 (plus $10 food/drink minimum) Veteran bassist leads versatile jazz-soul combo.

Les Liaisons Dangereuses 8 p.m. $30 general admission, $35 reserved

Tickets: $35-$50

CONCERT

THEATER PRODUCTION The Warehouse Theatre 37 Augusta St.

TD Stage | 300 S. Main St.

Beloved country band hits the Upstate, led by powerhouse vocalist Raul Malo. 467-3000 peacecenter.org/events/td-stage-summer-nights

of our lives,” says Leah Cabinum in speaking of her exhibition “eclipse 2.” “The works in this exhibition are intended to mimic life’s cyclical nature through an active exploitation of materials.” In “eclipse 2,” she is exploiting bicycle tire inner tube and repurposing them as if they are the elegant draping folds of fine fabric. 201-5683 gvltec.edu/dva fleming.markel@gvltec.edu

Take Flight 5k to raise money for Runway Park Grenville Downtown Airport Runway Park at GMU 21 Airport Road Ext. 8 a.m. Random “door” prizes. The 5k is at 8:30 a.m. with the kid’s run at 9:15 a.m. Run or walk down a Greenville Downtown Airport runway. Participants of all ages will taxi to the runway to be cleared for takeoff. Registration is $25 until May 26 ($30 after that); $20 for active military/ veteran (proof of service required at packet pick-up) and $10 for the kid’s run. book-events.com/takeflight5k/ LaraLKaufmann@gmail.com

SAT-SUN

28 & 29

FAMILY

Fun and Games Opens

The Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. Saturday, 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.; Sunday, 2 p.m. Free with admission Join us this weekend to play some childhood games with our TCMU programming team and explore our newest exhibit. tcmupstate.org

NOW THRU

29

ARTS EVENT

eclipse 2 sculpture by Leah Cabinum

Greenville Technical College Riverworks Gallery | 300 River St., Suite 202 1-5 p.m. | Wednesday-Sunday FREE The word eclipse references the lunar-solar cycles that through the calendar and clock, have come the universal measurement of the cycle

When two Parisian aristocrats grow bored with their days, they enter into a lethal game of seduction and betrayal. When the Marquise de Merteuil challenges her ex-lover Valmont to seduce an innocent convent girl, he develops a fascination with a virtuous married woman as well. As the pawns in their game engage, the consequences prove to be deadly. 235-6948 warehousetheatre.com jason@warehousetheatre.com

TUE

31

COMMUNITY MEETING

Forum: 2016 Primary Candidates for Greenville County Legislative Offices

Hughes Public Library 25 Heritage Green Place 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free The Greenville Branch of the NAACP, Freedom Fighters Upstate SC, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. Greenville(SC) Alumnae Chapter and the Greenville County League of Women Voters have partnered to hold a public forum for the 13 candidates running in the primary June 14 for the legislature for Greenville County. 354-2512 patrick.prince1971@gmail.com

JUNE THU

02

CONCERT

Home By Dark

behind the chart-topping hits. Founded and hosted by songwriter James Casto, Home By Dark pairs the best writers in the world with expert instrumentalists in this musical journey through multiple stylings and genres, proving once and for all that a song can truly change your life. Performing in the Peace Center concert will be Tony Arata, Michael Logen and Emily Shackelton. 467-3000 peacecenter.org boxoffice@peacecenter.org

CONCERT

Josh Roberts & The Hinges Downtown Alive Free NOMA Square, Main St Rising Americana rock band. bit.ly/downtown-alive

FRI

03

CONCERT

Nathan Angelo

Greenville Heritage FCU Main St. Fridays NOMA Square Free Singer/keyboardist creates infectiously melodic pop songs. bit.ly/greenville-main-street-fridays

THU-SEP

02-29

FAMILY

GHS Fountain Inn Farmers Market

Commerce Park 200 Depot St., Fountain Inn 4-8 p.m. | Thursdays FREE Greenville Hospital System Fountain Inn Farmers Market is a yearly event in downtown Fountain Inn. Thursday evenings, come buy some produce and see the vendors, then stop in at some of the shops on Main Street, or grab dinner at one of our great restaurants. There’s lots to see in Fountain Inn. 363-0345 | fountaininn.org market.manager@fountaininn.org

SAT

04

CONCERT

Archer Vs. Gunman w/ Pony League & Great Yankees

Peace Center, Gunter Theatre 300 S. Main St.

Radio Room 2845 N. Pleasantburg Drive

7:30 p.m.

Crunchy Upstate alt-rock quartet. 263-7868 radioroomgreenville.com

$35 Home By Dark takes a step back from the pop-mainstream to celebrate the songwriters

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56 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.20.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CALENDAR THU-AUG

04-27

CONCERT

Depot PickInn

Commerce Park 200 Depot St., Fountain Inn 7-9 p.m. | Saturdays FREE The only free weekly bluegrass festival in the Upstate. Bring a chair. Visit fountaininn.org for the full list of scheduled performers. 363-0345 fountaininn.org cheryl.pelicano@fountaininn.org

SUN

05

CONCERT

Dolly Parton Peace Center | 300 S. Main St.

7:30 p.m. $100-$500

« CONCERT

Harry Connick, Jr.

SALES Independent Public Ale House 110 Poinsett Hwy.

An internationally renowned superstar, the iconic and irrepressible Dolly Parton has contributed countless treasures to the world of entertainment. All-inclusive sales of singles, albums, hits collections, paid digital downloads and compilation usage during her illustrious career have topped a staggering 100 million records worldwide. 467-3000 peacecenter.org boxoffice@peacecenter.org

EDUCATION

Guitar rock-electronic music hybrid. 552-1265 | ipagreenville.com

Embassy Suites Ballroom 670 Verdae Blvd.

Legacy Charter School, Gymnasium 900 Woodside Ave.

2-4 p.m. Free

$90/student Boys and girls ages 7-14. Directors coach BJ Jackson and coach LaCheryl Smith will feature offensive fundamentals, shooting and passing, ball handling, defensive fundamentals, proper stance and footwork, rebounding and man-toman techniques. 248-0646 legacycharterschool.com/summer-camps.php bjackson@legacycharter.org

FAMILY

Frozen Flour

$8 Frozen Fluor is back for the second year in a row. Join the Greenville Drive and United Community Bank Ice on Main for a fun, frozen-filled night at the ballpark. There will be fun contests, giveaways and special appearances by mascots and ice princesses. For tickets, contact the Greenville Drive at 240-4528. 232-2302 facebook.com/events/1007704545981478/ anna@crawfordstrategy.com

JULY NOW THRU

15

EDUCATION

Registration Open for Executive Leadership Seminars at Furman University

Simpsonville 10 a.m.-4 p.m. | $10

8 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday, June 5, is National Cancer Survivors Day, a celebration for those who have survived, an inspiration for those recently diagnosed, a gathering of support for families, and an outreach to the community. Join CSPA and the Upstate Cancer Networks for the 26th annual celebration of survivors. Celebrate your survivorship with food, fun, friends and festivities.

organizations. A half-day orientation takes place Aug. 18. Two-day seminars are on campus Oct. 20-21, Jan. 19-20 and April 20-21. 294-3136 news.furman.edu/2016/05/06/registrationopen-for-liberal-arts-leadership/ brad.bechtold@furman.edu

NOW THRU

30

9 a.m.-4 p.m.

Furman University 3300 Poinsett Hwy.

Advance tickets can be purchased at Vaughn’s Seed and Feed at 109 Trade St. Simpsonville, or Martin Garden Center at 198 Martin Road, Mauldin. Day of tour tickets can be purchased at Garden House Inn at 302 S. Main St. Simpsonville or The Bragg Garden at 121 Fox Trace, Simpsonville. Exception one garden in Fountain Inn. 688-2356 | simpsonvillegardenclub.com jkm43066@yahoo.com

Youth Basketball Camp

7 p.m.

26th Annual Cancer Survivors Day Celebration

A Tour of Simpsonville Gardens featuring five beautiful gardens

CAMP

Greenville Drive Game | Flour Field 945 South Main St.

Tickets: $8-$10

FUNDRAISER

06-09

13

8 p.m. | $65-$105

CONCERT

MON-THU

MON

Peace Concert Hall | 300 S. Main St. Harry Connick, Jr. is a pianist, vocalist, composer, writer, band leader, actor, philanthropist and master of multiple music genres. With a daytime TV show on its way, multiple other television appearances, major movie roles and the release of his new album, “That Would Be Me,” it’s easy to see why Connick is ranked amongst the top male artists in the world. He’s won three Grammys, two Emmys, and has received two Tony Award nominations. 467-3000 | peacecenter.org boxoffice@peacecenter.org

Register at CancerSurvivorsPark.org/cancersurvivorsday. 255-5010 | cancersurvivorspark.org kay@cancersurvivorspark.org

$3,950 for orientation and three two-day sessions Furman University’s Center for Corporate and Professional Development has created a series of seminars which offer a unique approach to executive development. Taught by Furman faculty, Liberal Arts Leadership (LAL) draws insights from literary classics and feature films to understand the relationship between effective leadership and

THEATER PRODUCTION

TRUMPED: the Musical Cafe And Then Some 101 College St. Suite 1A

6:30-10:30 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday $20 TRUMPED: the Musical is a brand new, original musical comedy. Join our merry band of characters as they fret about the upcoming elections and poke fun at all the candidates. And one of them even decides to launch a campaign for public office. Starring Susan Smith, Maureen Abdalla, Traysie Amick, Jim Wilkins and Bill Smith. 232-2287 | CafeATS.com info@cafeats.com

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE? Complete our easy-to-use online form at www.bit.ly/GJCalendar by Monday at 5 p.m. to be considered for publication in that week’s Journal.

TICKET OFFICE – GOING ON SALE – MEGHAN TRAINOR Sept. 20; 7 p.m. Bon Secours Wellness Arena Cost: $62.95, $42.95, $32.95 On sale: May 20, 10 a.m. To purchase tickets: 800-745-3000; GSP Box Office at The Bon Secours Wellness Arena; ticketmaster.com Info: With special guests Hailee Steinfeld and Common Kings

PENTATONIX Nov. 15; 8 p.m. Bon Secours Wellness Arena Cost: $89, $72.50, $62.50, $52.50, $32.50 On sale: May 20, 10 a.m. To purchase tickets: 800-745-3000; GSP Box Office at The Bon Secours Wellness Arena; ticketmaster.com Info: With special guest Us The Duo. Submit your Last Minute Ticket Sales for Upstate Events at bit.ly/LastTicketsGville For Upcoming Ticket Sales, enter them at bit.ly/UpcomingTicketsGJ


THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA SHERRIFF’S AUCTION The Greenville County Sheriff’s Office is holding an auction to dispose of found and seized property. The auction will be held at 657 Keith Drive Greenville, SC. June 4,2016. The gate will open at 8:00am the auction will begin at 10:00am. The preview will be on Friday June 3rd 2016 from 10:00 to 4:00. The auction will consist of household items, some jewelry (no guarantees), tools, misc electronics, generators, game items, and some clothing. The cars are as follows: 1995 Ford Ranger VIN 1FTCR10X7STA57187, 2002 Dodge Ram VIN 3D7HAJ18N42G157105, 1999 Chevy Blazer VIN 1GNCS18W3XK190680, 1997 Mercury Grand Marquis VIN 2MELM75W9VX670029

COMPLAINT NOTICE A complaint has been brought before the Code Enforcement Division of a dangerous, insanitary and unsafe structure located at the following locations: 401 W Morgan Street, Greenville County Tax Map Number 0126.00-04-007.00, Greenville County, SC. 2524 Fork Shoals Road, Greenville County Tax Map Number 0583.02-01-030.00, Greenville County, SC. 100 Arbor Street , Greenville County Tax Map Number 0166.00-03-008.00, Greenville County, SC. 13 Blackwood Street, Greenville County Tax Map Number 0111.00-06-004.00, Greenville County, SC. 645 Tanner Road, Greenville County Tax Map Number T029.02-01-001.03, Greenville County, SC. Nandina Drive, Greenville County Tax Map Number 0222.04-01-042.00, Greenville County, SC. Any persons having interest in these properties, or knowledge of the property owner should contact the Codes Enforcement Office at 864-467-7090 on or before May 26, 2016.

GREENVILLE COUNTY ZONING AND PLANNING PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE There will be a public hearing before County Council on Monday, June 20, 2016 at 6:00 p.m. in County Council Chambers, County Square, for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the following items: DOCKET NUMBER: LDR-2016-03 CONTACT INFORMATION: hgamble@greenvillecounty.org or 864-467-4612 TEXT AMENDMENT: The proposed amendment will revise the Land Development Regulations. All persons interested in these proposed amendments to the Greenville County Land Development Regulations are invited to attend this meeting. At subsequent meetings, Greenville County Council may approve or deny the proposed amendments as requested or approve a different amendment than requested.

SUMMONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: Cremation Services, June 1, 2016, 5:00 P.M. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillevillecounty.org or by calling 864-467-7200.

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE There will be a PUBLIC HEARING before the GREENVILLE COUNTY BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS ON WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2016 AT 3:00 P.M. in CONFERENCE ROOM –D at GREENVILLE COUNTY SQUARE, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, S.C., for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the petitions listed below. PERSONS HAVING AN INTEREST IN THESE PETITIONS MAY BECOME PARTIES OF RECORD BY FILING WITH THE BOARD, AT LEAST THREE (3) DAYS PRIOR TO THE SCHEDULED DATE SET FOR HEARING, BY WRITING THEIR ADDRESS, A STATEMENT OF THEIR POSITION AND THE REASONS WHY THE RELIEF SOUGHT WITH RESPECT TO SUCH PROPERTY SHOULD OR SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED. CB-16-18 APPLICANT: GREENVILLE COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT TAX MAP#: 0428.00-01-002.00 LOCATION: 108 Scalybark Road, Greenville SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception for Expansion to the existing Enoree Career Center Campus CB-16-19 APPLICANT: PELHAM ROAD ALLIANCE CHURCH/JOHN D. GILLESPIE TAX MAP#: 0540.08-01083.00 LOCATION: 1311 Pelham Road, Greenville SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception to Build & Operate a Church on site CB-16-20 APPLICANT: MARIE R. FERGUSON TAX MAP#: P026.00-01003.00 LOCATION: 106 & 108 Williams Street, Taylors SC REQUEST: Variance from Setback requirements to subdivide parcel CB-16-21 APPLICANT: THOMAS CREEK BREWERY TAX MAP#: WG04.00-01007.00 LOCATION: 2054 Piedmont Hwy, Greenville SC REQUEST: Variance from Sign Ordinance requirements to allow a Larger sign CB-16-13 APPLICANT: CHRIS WAGNER TAX MAP#: 0156.00-04004.00 LOCATION: 7 Verdun Avenue, Greenville SC REQUEST: Variance of 3.69 feet from Right Side Setback for the Existing Residence on site. CB-16-15 APPLICANT: DEBRA R. & CHARLES R. McCOY TAX MAP#: P009.01-02012.02 LOCATION: 229 Pine Mountain Road, Greenville SC REQUEST: Variance of 12 feet from Front Setback for an addition to the Existing Residence.

PUBLIC NOTICE Southern Connection, PO Box 6562, Greenville, SC 29606, Contact number: 864-295-2011 is seeking Title to a mobile home through a Judicial Sale in the Magistrate Office of Powdersville-Piedmont, South Carolina. This mobile home is a 1987 Fleetwood mobile home, Model Vanity with serial number GAFLVN1AG410712576 and is located at 707 H I Taylor Rd., Lot 18, Williamston, SC 296979023. The owner of record at the SC DMV Office is Pamela D. Tate, 707 H I Taylor Rd., Lot 18, Williamston, SC 29697-9023. The lien holder of record at the SC DMV is Manh Financial Services, Inc., PO Box 24489, Winston Salem, NC 271144489. Southern Connection has attempted to contact both Josie Haney and Palmetto Federal Savings Bank by certified letters to inform them of this matter.

PUBLIC NOTICE THIS NOTICE IS PUBLISHED PURSUANT TO SECTION 6-11470 OF THE CODE OF LAWS OF SOUTH CAROLINA, 1976, AS AMENDED. ON TUESDAY, MAY 3, 2016, GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL ADOPTED A RESOLUTION, WHICH ENLARGED THE METROPOLITAN SEWER SUBDISTRICT TO INCLUDE: A. That certain real property owned by Foothills Presbytery located off of Rocky Creek Road and described as Greenville County Tax Map Numbers (TMS#) 0575.0301-005.05; B. That certain real property owned by Foothills Presbytery located off of West Georgia Road and described as TMS# 0575.03-01-004.12; THE PURPOSE FOR THE PROPOSED ENLARGEMENT IS TO PROVIDE FOR THE ORDERLY COLLECTION OF SEWAGE AND WASTE BY EXTENDING LATERAL AND COLLECTOR LINES FOR THE TRANSMISSION OF SEWAGE AND WASTE TO THE TRUNK AND TREATMENT FACILITIES OF REWA (Renewable Water Resources). THE RESULT OF THIS ACTION IS THE NEW BOUNDARY LINE WHICH WILL REFLECT THE AREA AND TAX MAP NUMBER LISTED ABOVE. MAP OF THE NEW BOUNDARY AND A LEGAL DESCRIPTION ARE AVAILABLE IN THE COUNTY COUNCIL OFFICE. NO ADDITIONAL BONDS WILL BE ISSUED BY THE SUBDISTRICT, NOR WILL THERE BE ANY CHANGES IN THE COMMISSION OR THE PERSONNEL OF THE PRESENT COMMISSION OF THE METROPOLITAN SEWER SUBDISTRICT AS ENLARGED. BOB TAYLOR, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, JUNE 7, 2016, AT 6:00 p.m. (or at such time thereafter as the hearing may be held), IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC 29601, FOR THE PURPOSE OF RECEIVING COMMENTS FROM THE PUBLIC CONCERNING THE TRANSFER OF A PORTION OF REAL PROPERTY ADJOINING WOODRUFF ROAD AT ITS INTERSECTION WITH SUNNYDALE DRIVE (TMS# 0531020102101), CONSISTING OF APPROXIMATELY 3,712 SQUARE FEET, TO THE SOUTH CAROLINA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (SCDOT); AND TO AUTHORIZE THE EXECUTION OF DEEDS AND OTHER APPROPRIATE DOCUMENTS AND AGREEMENTS. BOB TAYLOR, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

SUMMONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS CASE NO.: 2016-CP-2300799 CONELL BENARD TERRY, Plaintiff, v. WHITEY'S AUTO AUCTION, and BLACKS AUTO AND SHIRLEY DIANN BROCK AND WEST SPECIALTY PRODUCTS OF EASLEY SOUTH CAROLINA, Defendant. TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVENAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your answer to the said Complaint on the subscriber at his office at 112 Wakefield Street, P.O. Box 10496, Greenville, South Carolina 29601 within thirty days (30) after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service; and, if you fail to appear and defend by filing an answer to the Complaint within the time aforesaid, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Respectfully submitted, FLETCHER N. SMITH, JR., Attorney at Law 112 Wakefield Street (29601) Post Office Box 10496, F.S., Greenville, SC 29603

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that STBT Acquisition TGR, LLC /DBA The Green Room, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 116 N Main St., Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than May 22, 2016. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110 NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Bon Appetit Management Co., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 100 Stadium Drive, Greenville, SC 29613. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than May 22, 2016. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110 NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Bon Appetit Management Co., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 3300 Poinsett Hwy., Pearce Horton Football Complex, Greenville, SC 29613. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than May 22, 2016. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Vaccines, spay or neuter, testing & microchip included!

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that STBT Acquisition TGR, LLC /DBA Sip Tasting Room & Rooftop Lounge, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 103 N Main St., Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than May 22, 2016. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Bon Appetit Management Co., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 1 Dave Garrett Way, Greenville, SC 29613. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than May 22, 2016. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Bon Appetit Management Co., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 101 Cherrydale Road, Greenville, SC 29613. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than May 22, 2016. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Bon Appetit Management Co., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 400 N Hwy 25 Bypass, Greenville, SC 29613. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than May 22, 2016. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Bon Appetit Management Co., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 3300 Poinsett Hwy., Greenville, SC 29613. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than May 22, 2016. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Bon Appetit Management Co., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 100 N. Village Way, Bldg J 2854, Greenville, SC 29613. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than May 22, 2016. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that YB Supply Company/ DBA All About Spirits, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of LIQUOR at 1832-A Woodruff Road, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than May 29, 2016. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Bon Appetit Management Co., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1 Younts Way, Greenville, SC 29613. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than May 22, 2016. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110


58 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.20.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

Eight low notes ACROSS

1 Snakebite treaters 9 Roomy rides 15 Slowly, in music 20 Tie in a race 21 Actress Wilde of “House” 22 — now and then 23 Taft’s foreign policy 25 Jacket-and-tie affairs 26 Look from a villain 27 Word after lo or chow 28 Non-U.S. gas brand 30 Use a recliner, e.g. 31 Forward, as a message with a hashtag 34 Grand Prix racing 37 A doc prescribes it 40 Imbiber’s hwy. offense 41 Half-diameters 43 He voiced Carl in “Up” 44 Bachelor suitable for marriage, say 48 Licoricelike herbs 49 Novelist Ira 50 Margaret Mitchell’s plantation 51 African nation 53 — Trapp family 54 Three-card game 56 Some book blurbs 57 Apollo program org. 61 The girl 62 Elderly Smurf

63 Shifting of responsibility to another 66 Co. name abbr. 67 Golf rarity 68 PayPal funds, e.g. 70 Lead-in to skeleton 71 Egg mass 72 Edible soft-shell mollusk 75 Burning liquid 76 Bowl over 77 Hens and heifers 78 War group 79 Bakery treats 81 Mom’s treatment 82 Volkswagen family car 85 Moore or Lovato 86 Use profanity 88 Very strong 91 Late 19th-century political group 95 De-creasing workers 97 Gallery stand 98 Laugh half 99 Mao — -tung 100 Brand of flavored balms in tubes 102 Tower atop a mosque 105 Hack (off) 106 Kitchen lure 107 Actress Olin 108 Day of song 112 Beat poet Ginsberg 114 University SSE of Spokane

By Frank Longo 119 V-formation fliers 120 Medieval balladeer, maybe 121 French folk song 122 Snaky curves 123 Perplexes 124 Eellike fish DOWN

1 Tosses in 2 Sign light 3 Narration 4 Lazy type 5 Partook of 6 Always, to Donne 7 “Too cool!” 8 “Once upon — ...” 9 Gem in a ring 10 North Carolina university 11 Not so bright 12 Gardner of “Mogambo” 13 Less nasty 14 Bully’s words of authority 15 Block-filled theme park 16 Entertainer Gabor 17 Wrestling holds 18 New hire 19 Pearl makers 24 Eyes closely 29 African nation 32 Bath fixture 33 Wheaton of “Stand by Me” 34 Fruit that’s often dried

110 Really small 90 Overturns 35 Like OPEC nations 111 Uses eyes 92 Attention 36 Koreans and Laotians 113 Suffix with 29-Down 93 Part of a dance move 37 Ott of baseball 115 Actor/comic Gilliam 94 Prefix with plop or flop 38 High-school junior’s 116 “That guy!” 96 Glowers grade 117 Suffix with pay or plug 39 Person with an ex-spouse 101 Frank topper 118 Moniker, in France 103 Of birth 42 Crime scene material 104 Redcap at work, often 45 — mill (bar) Crossword answers: page 50 107 Speech therapy topic 46 Sicilian volcano 109 $20/day, say 47 “Star Wars” creature 52 Feature 54 Royal staff 55 “Faust” and others by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan 56 Greyhound transport 58 Signal to pilots 59 Treaded winter vehicles 60 1940s film critic James 61 Cobra sound 62 Actress Dawber 63 “Pow!” 64 Pivot point 65 Put turf over 68 Graceful street liner 69 Coral island 73 Some poplars 74 Cliff rock 75 Solo often in Italian 79 Slum abodes 80 Moseying 81 Old carrier 83 Tentacled reef dwellers 84 Fine violin 85 — Moines 86 Hits the gas 87 Dark loaf 88 Rob violently Sudoku answers: page 50 Hard 89 Twins’ rivals

Sudoku


05.20.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 59

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

BACK PAGE Community Voices

Where I’ve Been with Bill Koon

Join us as we learn how medications can cause hearing loss

Say uncle I have a mob of nieces and nephews. They are all good young people who have behaved and done well as far as I know. But they are unfortunate in one regard: They have only one uncle – yours truly.

Marcy W. Stowell MA, FAAA

Alisa S. McMahon

Licensed Audiologist

MA, FAAA

Licensed Audiologist

I am my brother’s only sibling, and his wife is an only child. Nothing but sad. I had a plethora (the word sounds like a disease) of uncles. My parents both had a number of brothers, and a generation further back there was a crowd of great uncles from the days of large families. All of these guys were fascinating characters in my eyes. My uncle Hal lived in the Upstate but visited us in Columbia when he was rambling around as a traveling salesman. He was a jovial, chubby guy who had an Oldsmobile Rocket 88 that he drove, astonishingly, at 60 miles per hour. He’d stop on his way to go fishing at Santee Cooper, and he’d stop on returning, typically with two or three big rock bass in his cooler. I begged to go with him on one of these trips, and finally he took me when I was “old enough.” We stayed in a little cabin at a fish camp, and I remember waking up in the night to find that Uncle Hal was no longer abed – and to realize that these trips were about more than fishing – and maybe that, really, I wasn’t quite “old enough” yet. My uncle Bob worked at the Charleston airport. He promised to arrange for me to go up in a Piper Cub, and he delivered. Up I went on my first flight, with a stranger at the stick, over the winding old Cooper River Bridge and the Atlantic Ocean with a few loops and twists, whereupon I learned my fear of flying – which lingers with me now. Uncle Bob, I noticed, stayed on the ground during this episode. My great uncle Miles was a squirrel hunter, and he’d take me along now and then to tramp the woods on the old family farm. He gave me his ancient singleshot 12-gauge shotgun when he figured he’d had enough squirrel stew. He smoked three stubby Camel cigarettes each day and would lay them out on the mantel before he went to bed. The next day he’d have a smoke after each of his meals, much undisturbed in his easy chair.

We will have Pharmacist Frank Woodruff speaking to us on this topic.

May 26 • 1:30-2:30 pm

Like us on

We offer financing thru Healthiplan and are accepting TruHearing clients. 12 Waite Street, Suite B-2, Greenville, SC 29607 • Phone 864-509-1152

864.509.1152 hearingsolutionsbymarcy.com

It’s GHFCU’s 75 Anniversary! HS-1-4p-ColorAd-Marcy/Alysa.indd 1

And We’re Celebrating with this . . .

Diamond of a Deal!*

My great-uncle Jeff refused to drive a car and was seen about town with my great-aunt at the wheel. In those days, letting a woman drive was considered wimpy. I mowed his grass; he liked it double cut, up and down and back and forth, with his push mower. He’d pay me a dime except when his pecan trees were bearing – then he’d pay me with a small bag of pecans that I picked up. Uncle Jim survived the Battle of the Bulge but with some frostbite. He played the violin and came home from the war with a lovely, dark Italian instrument. He could play a jig, but mainly he did sweet old hymns at church and at night on his screened porch there in Charleston. He never talked about the war. His brother, Uncle Jack, was a famous baseball player who, in a bout of homesickness, quit the Yankees after just a few days of his first spring training. He fled back to his small hometown, and I don’t think he ever left again. He lived across the street from the Lutheran church, and since he was always available, he was put in charge of the church bell. He’d ring the congregation in, go home and sit on his porch and then go back to ring them out. He never went to the services but was faithful about his bell-ringing. He let me pull the heavy, knotted rope once, and it lifted me off the floor. Two of my favorite uncles did not exist. My mother, a lady who believed in every virtue of the old South while denying Appomattox, claimed that she had two uncles, one named “North” and the other named “South.” I took it as a metaphor for families split by the Civil War, but she was sure the boys were real. Only she could imagine parents who could give infants such names long before there was a war. Which leads me to this conclusion: If my mother could invent uncles, maybe my nieces and nephews could do the same. They deserve more than one. Bill Koon lives in Greenville. He can be contacted at badk@clemson.edu.

8/21/13 11:28 AM

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We’re Shining Brighter

at Laurens Electric’s 2016

A Annual Meeting

Laurens Electric’s Main Office

Saturday, June 4

2254 Highway 14, Laurens, SC

Registration Gift

Registration & Voting for Board of Trustees 8:30 —10:30 A.M.

Each member who is present and registers at the Annual Meeting will wi receive a

$25 credit on his/her electric bill. elec

Entertainment 9—10 A.M.

(Limit on one $25 per registered member.)

Early Bird Prize Drawing 10 A.M.

Grand Prize H 2006 C Chevrolet Extended Pickup Truck Ext x ended Cab Pick xt

Business Meeting Begins ns 10:30 A.M.

Entertainment Entertai HONEY AND THE HOT HO RODS A Rockabilly l band that ly combines elements ele of old-school rock and country, bringing back the attitude and music of the th 1950s.

Prize drawing g will follow w the business ess session.

Early Bird Prize Drawing H iPad Mini Must be registered prior to 10 A.M.

Registration cards for the Annual Meeting will be mailed by May 20. You should receive one card and will be given one gift, even if you have multiple accounts. Only customers who register in person will receive a gift.

You cannot register or receive a gift for another member who does not attend.

www.laurenselectric.com

1-800-942-3141