Page 1

GREENVILLE GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, May 18, 2018 • Vol.20, No.20

FOR HOME DELIVERY CALL 864.679.1200 READ ONLINE AT GREENVILLE JOURNAL.COM

$1.00

BRINGING GREENVILLE TOGETHER

UNITY PARK P.

4

Rendering provided by MKSK


2 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.18.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

GREENVILLEJOURNAL LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1999 PUBLISHER | Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@communityjournals.com MANAGING EDITOR | Emily Pietras epietras@communityjournals.com ADMINISTRATIVE EDITOR | Heidi Coryell Williams hwilliams@communityjournals.com

Our low rate and longer term save you money.

STAFF WRITERS Cindy Landrum | clandrum@communityjournals.com Andrew Moore | amoore@communityjournals.com Sara Pearce | spearce@communityjournals.com Ariel Turner | aturner@communityjournals.com COPY EDITOR Rebecca Strelow ARTS & CULTURE WRITER Vince Harris | vharris@communityjournals.com EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Susan Schwartzkopf VICE PRESIDENT OPERATIONS Holly Hardin CLIENT SER VICES MANAGERS Anita Harley | Rosie Peck | Jane Rogers BILLING INQUIRIES Shannon Rochester DIRECTOR OF SALES Emily Yepes

VEHICLE LOAN AS LOW AS

2.74

%

APR*

60 MONTHS OFFER ENDS 7/31/18

MANAGER OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Donna Johnston MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Heather Propp | Meredith Rice Caroline Spivey | Liz Tew

Use this incredible 60-month rate when you finance your next vehicle.

VISUAL DIRECTOR Will Crooks LAYOUT Bo Leslie | Tammy Smith ADVERTISING DESIGN Kristy Adair | Michael Allen EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT | Kristi Fortner CHAIRMAN | Douglas J. Greenlaw

Greenville

3375 Pelham Road Greenville, SC 29615 864.371.6060

Greenville

1501 Wade Hampton Blvd. Greenville, SC 29609 864.235.6309

Greer

Get a vehicle loan rate as low as 2.74% APR for 60 months on new, pre-owned, and refinanced vehicles with less than 30,000 miles and less than two years old. This low 60-month rate will end July 31. Lower rates with shorter terms are also available, and don’t forget, we can beat other lenders’ rates by a quarter percent+. Ask us about refinancing your current vehicle loan. Better rates and terms can mean a better car with lower payments. What are you waiting for?

107 W. Church St. Greer, SC 29650 864.877.9089

publishers of

581 perry ave., greenville, sc 29611 phone: 864-679-1200 delivery inquiries: 864-679-1240 communityjournals.com

© 2015 published by community journals llc. all rights reserved. all property rights for the entire contents of this publication shall be the property of community journals. no part of this publication may be reproduced, scanned, stored, distributed or transmitted by any means – whether auditory, graphic, mechanical, or electronic – without written permission from the publisher.

Helping Hands When You Need Them

Apply online at www.greenvillefcu.com or visit any branch to get started.

Mauldin

142 Tanner Rd. Greenville, SC 29607 864.676.9066

Our community-based charter allows anyone who lives, works, worships or attends school in Greenville County to join.

800.336.6309 greenvillefcu.com

Your savings federally insured to at least $250,000 and backed by the full faith and credit of the United States Government

NCUA

National Credit Union Administration, a U.S. Government Agency

*Annual Percentage Rate is based on a 60-month term. Your loan rate and term amount may vary depending on individual credit history and underwriting factors. Minimum loan amount for this offer is $5,000. A 60-month loan with 2.74% APR would have monthly payments of $17.86 per thousand borrowed. +Excluding auto manufacturer and captive finance company 0% rate offers; rate floor is 1.74%, offer excludes current loans held by Greenville Federal Credit Union. Offer good from April 1 through July 31, 2018. ©2018, Greenville Federal Credit Union. All rights reserved. Member NCUA.

945 E. Main Street, Spartanburg, SC 29302

26 Rushmore Drive, Greenville, SC 29615

864-573-2353

864-268-8993

• Companion Care • Light Housekeeping • Personal Care • In-home Safety Solutions

GREENVILLE

SPARTANBURG

26 Rushmore Drive

945 E. Main Street

864-268-8993

864-573-2353

www.ComfortKeepers.com


05.18.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 3

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

PAGE 3

A NEW VIEW

120 feet Health Events Rendering provided by MKSK

The height of the proposed observation tower in Unity Park. Mayor Knox White says it will become Greenville’s next tourist attraction due to the expansive views of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Made of wood or steel, the tower will have a winding staircase and an open-air top.

THEY SAID IT

“The name says inclusiveness. We were separate then, but we’ve united it now.” Mary Duckett, a longtime resident of the Southernside neighborhood, on Unity Park, the chosen name for the new City Park. The name is a reference to when the area was home to two parks, one for blacks and the other for whites, and emphasizes the land is now a place for everyone. — p. 4

“Dancing penguins is hard to beat, so it’s going to be a lot of fun.” Betsy Bisson, artistic/education director at the South Carolina Children’s Theatre, on the theater’s Mainstage production of “Mr. Popper’s Penguins,” a musical adaptation of the classic children’s book. — p. 37

“To sell the amount of tickets we have before even kicking the ball at home has been unbelievable.” Lee Squires, head coach of Greenville FC, on the early community support for the team. — p. 16

Skin Cancer Screening Sat., May 19 • 9-11 a.m. • Patewood Medical Campus, Building A, 2nd Floor Take advantage of this free opportunity to be screened for skin cancer, presented by GHS and the Piedmont Dermatological Society. Participants should wear a bathing suit under loose clothing. Registration required. Meet the Midwives Tues., May 22 • 6-7 p.m. • Greenville Midwifery Care & Birth Center, 35 Medical Ridge Drive Interested in finding out more about GHS’ midwives and whether midwifery is the right decision for you? Check out this free meet-and-greet. Registration required. Cancer Survivors Day Sun., June 3 • 1-4 p.m. • Cancer Survivors Park, 21 Cleveland St. Visit the new Cancer Survivors Park and enjoy activities for all ages at this event that celebrates those who have battled cancer. Free water and snacks will be on hand. For more information, visit cancersurvivorspark.org. Prediabetes Class Mon., June 4 • 7-8 p.m. • GHS Life Center®, 875 W. Faris Road About 84 million U.S. adults have prediabetes—many don’t even know it! Learn what prediabetes is and how to avoid type 2 diabetes. Free; no registration needed. Call (864) 455-4003 for more information. Caregiving ABCs Tues./Thurs., June 14-28 • 3-5 p.m. • Center for Success in Aging, 255 Enterprise Blvd., Ste. 101 This five-session series provides education and support to those caring for a loved one with dementia or memory health condition. Free; registration required. Unless noted otherwise, registration is required for each event. To register, learn more or see a schedule of events, visit ghs.org/events.

ghs.org 18-0484GJ


4 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.18.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

FULL CIRCLE

Greenville’s newest park, once a place of division, will be a place of unity Words by Cindy Landrum | Renderings provided by MKSK

T

he land where Greenville will build its newest signature park was once a place of division. Now, it will be a place to unite. The new multimillion-dollar park west of downtown will be called Unity Park, a name that pays homage to the past when the area was home to two parks, one for blacks and the other for whites, and emphasizes the land is now a place for everyone. “The name says inclusiveness,” said Mary Duckett, a longtime resident of the Southernside neighborhood and president of its neighborhood association, Southernside Neighborhoods in Action. “We were separate then, but we’ve united it now.” The park is also the final piece in the city’s reclamation of the Reedy River, which has played a critical role in the resurrection of Greenville’s downtown. At one time, the river’s most visible section — the part that runs through Falls Park and behind the Peace Center — was virtually forgotten. The river was treated like the city’s sewer and changed colors based on the dye the textile plants were using that day. Now, improving the river’s health is one of the city’s top priorities in Unity Park, which Greenville officials say could be as transformative to that area as Falls Park was to the West End. “That will be one of the most dramatic aspects of the park,” Mayor Knox White said. That, along with features such as a tower, pedestrian bridge, destination playground, and sprayground water feature, will turn an area that has historically been treated as Greenville’s backyard into its front door, White said. “Unity Park will turn this part of Greenville into a gateway instead of a throwaway section,” he said. “It is Greenville’s next big thing.”

PART OF HISTORY The site of Unity Park, which straddles some of Greenville’s traditional African-American neighborhoods and downtown, wasn’t always a place the city wanted to show off.

After Greenville voters approved a $110,000 bond for park improvements in the 1920s, then-Park and Tree Commission head James McPherson urged the city to purchase 15 acres of marshy meadowland prone to flooding west of Hudson Street from Edwin Mayberry to create a park for “negro children.” “I grew up in a time when that was the only park we could go into,” Duckett said. In 1938, the City Council decided to give almost half of Mayberry Park’s land to Joseph Cambria in exchange for Cambria building a baseball park with bleachers and lights to be home for a minor league baseball stadium. When black residents protested, the mayor told them the city wasn’t taking anything away from them; they were giving them a baseball stadium. A black minister then pointed out that it was a stadium in which they could not sit in the stands. Duckett remembers Mamie Norris working the ticket window at the baseball stadium during minor league games. If a child retrieved a home-run ball that was hit out of the park, Norris would let them into the stadium. During the seventh-inning stretch of each game, they’d open the gates and let people in, she said. “That gave us a sense of self-worth,” she said. Nearby the stadium, at the intersection of Mayberry and Hudson streets, was a women’s stockade. Neighborhood children found it funny when the women housed there would hang their long johns out on Mondays, Duckett said. Later, the area became home to the city’s public works department, a department that was composed of mostly African-American workers. While Meadowbrook Park is gone, Mayberry Park still exists — and it will be incorporated into Unity Park. “One thing we said as a people, call the new park whatever you want, but do not destroy the identity of Mayberry Park, because it is an icon for us,” Duckett said. “Even though some of the history may not be the best of memories, it is still history.” Gone, too, is the public works department, which was relocated to make way for Unity Park.

For an interactive map of Unity Park and more renderings, visit greenvillejournal.com.


COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

GROWING GREENVILLE

The Great Lawn Unity Park will have a different feel than Greenville’s other signature parks — Cleveland Park and Falls Park. While Cleveland Park features the Greenville Zoo and Falls Park the Liberty Bridge and Reedy River Falls, Unity Park is much more natural. One of its largest features is the Great Lawn, a 6-acre, relatively flat green space.

05.18.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 5

Destination Playground The playground’s design is driven by the development of natural features and landscape with which children can engage. While there are slides and climbing opportunities, the playground is knitted into the general landscape of the park.


Decade Two of Racing Against Cancer

We Thank You!

Dragon Boat Upstate Festival Thanks to our supporters, the Dragon Boat Upstate Festival is helping medical research take the lead in the race against cancer right here in Greenville! Through the efforts of over 1,000 sponsors, donors, volunteers and paddlers, we raised more than $351,000! That amount brings the total raised in the past 12 years to over $3 million. These funds benefit the Cancer Institute of Greenville Health System as it helps people with cancer live longer and enjoy a better quality of life. To learn more, please visit DragonBoatUpstateSC.org.

ghs.org

Benefiting

Organizing Partners

Sponsors

18-0494


05.18.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 7

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

Pedestrian Bridge Whereas the Liberty Bridge in Falls Park is meant to be one of that park’s most stunning features, the pedestrian bridge in Unity Park is purposely understated. The bridge will be in the middle of the park and give access to the Swamp Rabbit Trail, which will be located on both sides of the river.

A METAMORPHOSIS The site of the new park has a history that is near and dear to various populations of the city, and people are naturally inclined to protect the part important to them, said the Rev. Stacey Mills, pastor of Mountain View Baptist Church, which overlooks the parkland, and a member of the park’s citizen advisory committee. But when Unity Park was suggested, the group was unified, he said. “What a message it sends to the rest of the country,” Mills said, “that we’re uniting diverse perspectives and cultures, and that’s the key to turning the pages of history and moving forward.” “We’re not denying history. We’re acknowledging what happened, and this is our answer to what happened in the past,” he said. “This is our future. It almost HAS to be named Unity Park for healing to take place and for everyone to have ownership in the park.” Mills said the park speaks to a generation of people who thought about what exercise, recreation, and gathering spaces would look like and that it would be OK to share that space. “I can’t wait for the first jazz concert at the gathering hall and to get a hot dog,” he said.


8 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.18.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Wetlands Boardwalks Boardwalks will meander through the park’s wetlands, which will play an important part in protecting and enhancing the Reedy River. Wetlands act as water filters and provide flood control.

“We’re not denying history. We’re acknowledging what happened, and this is our answer to what happened in the past. This is our future. It almost HAS to be named Unity Park for healing to take place and for everyone to have ownership in the park.” – The Rev. Stacey Mills

Gathering hall A city-owned building, with an Ambassador Hotel sign on its side, will be converted into a gathering hall and visitors center. The sign, which can be seen from the Swamp Rabbit Trail, was painted for “Leatherheads,” a movie starring George Clooney and Rene Zellweger that was partially filmed in Greenville.


— introducing —

DR. ADAM EASTERLING Dr. Adam Easterling has joined our team of doctors at Clemson Eye! He is a Board Certified Ophthalmologist, who has been caring for Upstate patients for the past 11 years. While playing varsity baseball for four years, he completed an engineering degree at Georgia Tech. Then, Dr. Easterling attended medical school at USC, and a residency in ophthalmology at Duke University. Specializing in medical and surgical eye care, he is excited about being able to offer the most advanced treatments to the patient community.

Dr. Easterling will accept referrals and see patients in our Greenville office until we find a new location for him in Simpsonville.

clemsoneye.com 864-268-1000


THERE IS A

TREASURE

IN YOUR BACK YARD*

* free and renewable supply of energy

REDUCE YOUR UTILITY BILL

AND YOUR CARBON FOOTPRINT

SAVE UP TO

CALL TODAY TO GO GEOTHERMAL!

on heating, cooling and hot water costs.

Save hundreds on utilities and thousands on taxes. Standard heat pumps become less efficient when you need them the most. Take advantage of the savings.

70% OFF plus 55% TAX CREDIT 25% State + 30% Federal

CarolinaHeating.com • Call for a free appointment 864.232.5684


COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

05.18.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 11

Observation tower An observation tower, a feature that Mayor Knox White called Greenville’s next tourist attraction, will offer a view of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Made of wood or steel, the tower will have a winding staircase and an open-air top. The tower will be 120 feet tall, 5 feet shorter than the Liberty Building in downtown and 35 feet taller than the Furman Bell Tower.

TIMETABLE The 60-acre park is a public-private partnership and estimated to cost $40 million, with half coming from the city and half coming from private and corporate fundraising. The first phase of the park is expected to open in 2020, White said. “One of the most important things you can do in a growing community is to provide green space,” White said. “This is our response to growth.” The park’s great lawn will offer 6 acres of relatively flat land, something that is missing from Falls Park because it is too narrow and is full of undulations. The park will have an observation tower, which White said would be Greenville’s next tourist attraction. The 120-foot tower will be illuminated at night. Other features include a gathering hall and visitors center, a destination playground, a public square, a pedestrian bridge, boardwalks, and a veterans memorial. The order in which the various parts will be built has not yet been determined. Hudson Street will become a tree-lined boulevard leading into the park, one of several connections to downtown, White said. Parking will be at the edges of the park, and the city will have a mobility plan so people can get to various parts of the park.

NOT A NEW IDEA Restoration of the Reedy River is a key aspect to the park. The plan is to create a more natural course for the river, which was straightened in the 1930s, by sculpting the bank. By doing so, floodwater will spread out and slow down. Riparian vegetation would serve as a natural filter, improving the quality of the water of the Reedy. “It’s the next step in reclaiming the river,” White said.

“Unity Park will turn this part of Greenville into a gateway instead of a throwaway section. It is Greenville’s next big thing.” Mayor Knox White The idea of focusing on the river and creating parks and green spaces along it is nothing new. In a 1907 master plan created for the Municipal League of Greenville, Boston’s Kelsey & Associates, one of America’s preeminent architectural firms at the time, recommended Greenville restore the river and develop several parks along it. “The Reedy River with its falls and gorge constitutes the most distinctive feature of the topography and landscape of Greenville. It is without doubt the most important single feature to be considered in the development and beatifying of the city,” the report said. “The splendid view of the gorge and falls below is an object of scenic beauty the likes of which few cities can boast.” One of the areas the architects suggested for a park became Cleveland Park. They also suggested a park further upstream on the area where Unity Park will go. “It took us 100 years to implement the plan,” White said. And it’s a park that can be enjoyed by everybody. “There’s something about parks that put everybody on an equal playing field,” Duckett said.

For an interactive map of Unity Park and more renderings, visit greenvillejournal.com.


12 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.18.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

HOW PRIVATE-PUBLIC PARTNERSHIPS SHAPE TODAY’S URBAN PARKS CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

As the functions of parks grow more complex, public-private partnerships have increased as a funding source. Greenville’s Unity Park is an example of many of the current trends in building urban parks — a greater reliance on public-private partnerships, the conversion of postindustrial sites into green space, the reclamation of rivers and waterfronts, and construction of facilities that accommodate fluctuation in water levels to help water quality and flooding issues. “Parks are no longer simply places for recreation. They’re more complex than they used to be. That’s why public-private partnerships are so important,” said Catherine Nagel, executive director of City Parks Alliance. “Really where public-private partnerships shine is that they bring in more resources and skills.” Mayor Knox White said Unity Park is the city’s first example of a true public-private partnership on a park. The city has earmarked $20 million in hospitality tax revenue for the new park over 10 years and wants private partners to contribute another $20 million, White said. Separate from the city’s fundraising efforts is one led by Community Journals’ chairman and co-founder Doug Greenlaw to raise money for a veterans memorial in the park. Greenlaw is a founder of the Upstate charter of the Military Order of the Purple Heart. “Public-private partnerships have become a critical funding tool in the toolbox,” said Kevin O’Hara, vice president of urban and government affairs for the National Recreation and Parks Association. “There are pluses and minuses, but overall, publicprivate partnerships are good for parks.” Chicago’s Millennium Park was a result of a public-private partnership. The original financing plan called for $120 million from parking revenue bonds and $30 million from private resources. By the time the park opened in 2004, plans for the park had changed drastically. A cycle center provides heated bicycle parking, showers, and lockers for commuters. The Cloud Gate Sculpture, nicknamed “The Bean,” was installed. There are outdoor art galleries and a promenade. There’s a garden, a plaza with an ice rink, and the Pritzker Pavilion that hosts the Grant Park

Musical Festival. Underneath the park is a 4,000 space parking garage. In all, the city provided $270 million in funding. Private donors added another $220 million. Last year, the park was the Midwest’s most popular tourist attraction. There’s a wide range of how park publicprivate partnerships are structured, Nagel said. Some focus on a single park. Others take over design and management. “There’s a real range of public-private partnership models to consider,” she said. “The key is to fit the model to your community. Some cities have a strong base of philanthropic organizations. Some don’t.”

“Parks are no longer simply places for recreation. They’re more complex than they used to be. That’s why public-private partnerships are so important. Really where public-private partnerships shine is that they bring in more resources and skills.” Catherine Nagel, executive director of City Parks Alliance

City Park would also mirror the trend in other cities where postindustrial sites are turned into parks and green space. Many times, those sites are on waterfronts and riverfronts, areas that some cities turned their backs on and became nasty places to which people didn’t want to go. In Brooklyn, a waterfront cargo yard was turned into one of New York’s signature parks. The city redirects real estate taxes from residential and commercial developments in the project zone, creating a self-sustaining revenue stream that is far less dependent on concessions and permits for special events than signature parks in other major cities. “Parks are helping to revitalize cities and put them on the map,” Nagel said. “It’s exciting that those projects are not just happening in the largest cities but in medium and small cities as well.”


05.18.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 13

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

Meadowbrook ballpark and the city stockade circa 1954. Photo provided by Greenville County Historical Society

The Roots of Unity Park 1907

In a report for the Municipal League of Greenville, Boston landscape architect firm Kelsey & Guild suggests Greenville restore the Reedy River and develop several parks along it, including the area where Unity Park is being built.

1920s

City built a convict labor camp at the corner of Mayberry and Hudson streets. It also created Mayberry Park for “negro children.”

1938

The city leased almost half of Mayberry Park to Joseph Cambria to build a minor league baseball stadium.

1949

Greenville’s Tree Park Commission installed a playground for black children near Meadowbrook Park. It was open six hours a day, five days a week.

2008

Landscape architect Tom Keith of Arbor Engineering’s renderings for the park contained a tower because he said a vertical element was needed.

2012

City buys 33 acres of land for $3.1 million on Fairforest Way next to the Duke Energy Operations Center for relocation of the public works department.

2013

Jay STINKS at Fishing.

City hires DP3 architects and Harper Bros. construction to come up with plans for relocating the public works complex from Hudson Street to Fairforest Way property.

September 2013

SeamonWhiteside produces a master plan for the park as part of the city’s “Connections for Sustainability” HUD grant.

February 2016

Ohio-based firm MKSK is hired to do a master plan for the park and the area surrounding it.

February 2017

City Council passes a resolution that commits up to $2 million a year in hospitality tax revenue for up to 20 years to pay for the park.

November 2017

Greenville moves its public works campus, paving the way for work to begin on Unity Park.

But when it comes to lending, Jay’s an Angler. Jay McDonald works with many top agents in Greenville and he is available seven days a week. Day or night, Jay always answers his phone and is ready to be your dedicated home loan professional. Whether you’re buying, refinancing, or renovating a home-Jay is ready to guide you.

May 2018

Unity Park is chosen as the name.

2020

Projected completion date for park’s first phase, which will include a tower and green space.

Jay McDonald, Production Manager | NMLS: 659243 864.915.3031 | jmcdonald@primelending.com 142 Milestone Way, Greenville, SC 29615 All loans subject to credit approval. Rates and fees subject to change. ©2018 PrimeLending, a PlainsCapital Company. (NMLS: 13649) Equal Housing Lender. PrimeLending is a wholly owned subsidiary of a state-chartered bank and is an exempt lender in SC. V010918


Serving the Greater Greenville Area with Local Expertise, Global Reach NG ISTIAY 2-4 L NEWSUND N OPE

116 West Faris Road Augusta Circle Area • $349,605 Donnald Dobbins 864.315.7345

DS, NITY! N O RTU OP TW OPPO NG AZI M A

134 Acres Chinquapin Road Travelers Rest • $3,700,690

NEW D N BRA

16 Cromwell Avenue Alta Vista • $699,605 Donnald Dobbins 864.315.7345

LAKE LOTS AVAILABLE 220 Deep Cove Point Reserve at Lake Keowee $549,685

T RAC T N O R C E DAY E D UN IN ON

G ISTIN L W NE

229 Werninger Court Greer • $244,650 Matt Crider 444.1689 & Leah Grabo 991.4949

! TATE S E E LAK G N I Z AMA

16 Sequoia Drive Chestnut Hills • $115,605 Caroline Turpin 864.704.4610

E LAK OME E RAR SEE H AS JOC

114 Keowee Club Road Lake Hartwell • $2,950,689

RK D PA N A L E CLEV O T K WAL

187 Fisher Knob Road Lake Jocassee • $1,945,676 Kim Crowe 864.888.7053

K TO WAL

403 McDaniel Avenue Alta Vista • $699,601 Liz Henry 571.228.8649

OWN T N DOW

205 Jones Avenue Alta Vista • $674,605 Liz Henry 571.228.8649

! OME H EW LY N L A U VIRT

E OM H OR ICE F F O

E RIC 2-4 P Y NEW UNDA S N OPE

100 Asheton Way Asheton • $799,681 Alexis Furman 630.3952 & Patrick Furman 283.4560

S VIEW S U ULO B A F

149 Duck Hawk Way Cliffs at Mountain Park • $1,400,661

K WAL

LE CIRC A T S UGU TO A

T OUR C S I ENN TE T A V I PR

Lot 81 Peninsula Pointe South Lake Keowee NEW PRICE $232,696

864.888.7053

17 Toy Street Pettigru Historic District • $549,601 Reid Hipp 449.1779 & Caroline Turpin 704.4610

864.297.3450

114 Stafford Green Way Stafford Green • $498,615 Alex Boyd 706.825.8975

www.jha-SothebysRealty.com

N BRA

6 Meyers Drive Augusta Circle • $659,605 Ragan Smith 843.437.6262

109 Vaughn Court Lake Keowee 2 Lot Combo $488,682

Kim Crowe – Luxury Lake Specialist

NEW

710 Brown Avenue Historic Belton • $489,627

I Y TH D A RE K TO L WA


Serving the Greater Greenville Area with Local Expertise, Global Reach

NEW

CE PRI

304 Stewart Street Augusta Road Area • $449,605 Caroline Turpin 864.704.4610

Y EAD R N VE I O M

502 Crescent Avenue Alta Vista • $1,049,601

NEW D N BRA

4 Cromwell Avenue Alta Vista • $649,605 Donnald Dobbins 864.315.7345

ER! LD! M M E U IS S OR FI H T LU DY REA K TO F L WA

5 Griffin Street Downtown • $414,601 Reid Hipp 864.449.1779

NEW

CE PRI

NEW

5 Cammer Avenue Augusta Road • $398,605 Caroline Turpin 864.704.4610

2.4

T E LO R C A

E ATIL S R VE

N PLA R O FLO

R ATE THE

! NITY U T R PPO O T A GRE

15 Isbell Lane Parkins Mill • $559,607 Jackson Herlong 864.313.2520

THE Y L B K TO L A W

28 Douglas Drive GCC/Augusta Road • $359,605 Donnald Dobbins 864.315.7345

E! STAT P U N ATE I T S E ST FINE

100 Chapman Place On Chanticleer Golf Course • $7,500,605

N OPE

105 Putney Bridge Lane Cobblestone • $799,681 Patrick Furman 864.283.4560

ATED V O N E ELY R T E L P COM

19 Woodvale Avenue Greenville Country Club Area • $599,605 Grace Loveless 864.238.5114

864.297.3450

205 Robin Lane Swansgate • $355,605 Caroline Turpin 864.704.4610

E HOM

5 Brick House Court Kilgore Plantation • $915,681 Patrick Furman 864.283.4560

CE PRI

109 Old Augusta Road Blythe Academy Area • $229,605 Donnald Dobbins 864.315.7345

www.jha-SothebysRealty.com

N PLA R O FLO

108 Augusta Court Augusta Circle • $719,605 Ragan Smith 843.437.6262

SUB

T E LO L B IDA -DIV

37 Rock Creek Drive GCC • $549,605 Katherine Hall 864.678.0820

NEW SUBDIVISION IN N. MAIN

TWO LOTS REMAINING! Located off W. Mountainview Avenue

• Lot 1 Henigan Lane $250,609 • Lot 5 Henigan Lane $249,605 Caroline Turpin 864.704.4610 EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED


16 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.18.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

GREENVILLE FC KICKS OFF A Q&A with head coach Lee Squires

WORDS BY ANDREW MOORE | PHOTOS BY WILL CROOKS

Lee Squires, Greenville FC head coach, is also the men’s soccer head coach at Lander University. The collegiate season runs from August to November, while Greenville FC’s season is from May to July.


05.18.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 17

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM Lee Squires has spent more than a de2018 Greenville FC Schedule cade on the soccer field as a player and coach, leading numerous teams across May 16 vs. Savannah Clovers the Southeast to winning seasons. May 19 at New Orleans Jesters Now the England native is bringing his love of the game to Greenville. May 24 vs. Emerald Force FC Last month, Greenville FC named May 26 vs. Georgia Revolution Squires as its inaugural head coach. The June 2 vs. Atlanta Silverbacks FC team launched in November as an afJune 9 vs. Chattanooga FC filiate of the National Premier Soccer League, which has nearly 100 teams that June 16 at Atlanta Silverbacks FC compete in four regions and 14 conferJune 20 at Emerald Force FC ences. June 23 at Asheville City SC “I’m very excited in being named the first head coach and being involved with June 27 vs. New Orleans Jesters the club in its first season,” Squires said. June 30 at Chattanooga FC “It’s an exciting project that has a lot of July 4 vs. Asheville City SC potential. Greenville is a thriving city July 7 at Inter Nashville FC that loves its soccer, so it’s great to be able to bring high-level soccer to the Note: All home games are played at Eugene Stone Soccer Stadium at Furman University and area. I have no doubt we can attract fans’ start at 7 p.m. support and put out a great product on the field.” Growing up in Sheffield, England, Squires discovered his love for soccer at an early age and later moved to the United States to play for Lees-McRae College in Banner Elk, N.C., where he had a standout career as a striker. After graduation, Squires was asked to return to Lees-McCrae and lead the school’s soccer team as head coach. Over the course of four seasons, Squires accomplished an impressive .578 winning percentage with an overall record of 40-29-7. Squires also previously served as the assistant coach for the North Carolina Olympic Development Program and was the head coach for the 2011 HSA Force ‘98 in Premier UK Soccer. In 2015, Squires was named head coach of the men’s soccer team at Lander University in Greenwood. The Bearcats have since accumulated a 41-11-6 overall record and made three appearances in the Peach Belt Conference Tournament championship and NCAA Division II national tournament. Squires will continue to coach the men’s soccer team at Lander. The collegiate season runs from August to November. The Greenville FC season runs from May to July. The team’s home games will be played at Eugene Stone Soccer Stadium at Furman University. The Greenville Journal recently sat down with Squires to discuss the upcoming season and his passion for soccer. (The following transcription has been edited for clarity and brevity.)

Why do you love soccer? Every game is different and exciting. You go into it and even if you’re a strong favorite, it doesn’t mean you’re going to win. It can literally go either way during that 90 minutes of play. And it’s not an individual sport. You rely on 10 other guys and the spirit you create as a team as your support system. It’s just a beautiful game.

How were you introduced to the game of soccer?

Greenville FC will play its home games at Eugene Stone Soccer Stadium at Furman University.

Why did you decide to join Greenville FC? I think Greenville, first and foremost, is a fantastic city. My wife and I enjoy making the trip from Greenwood to be in town and take advantage of downtown. But this is a new team in a competitive league. It’s a great opportunity for me to continue coaching through the summer because the college season is so short. Sometimes I go into the season with my college guys feeling a little rusty. Now I get to coach 15 to 16 competitive games with good players. And it’s a new challenge to put together a team in such a short space of time and formulate those guys into some sort of cohesive unit. I love the challenge.

You had to build the Greenville FC team from scratch. What was that process like? It was interesting, to say the least. We actually started recruiting just as everyone else was finishing, so we weren’t able to be as selective as we wanted to be. But we feel like we were able to secure a good team by utilizing the local guys and connections we have.

Your team lost its first game to the Georgia Revolution earlier this month. How are you feeling about how your team has performed so far? We’re coming together day by day. I told the guys early on that performance doesn’t matter too much. That will come with time. But we’ve got to start putting some points on the board. We made some errors early on during our first game that put us behind. It was just a tough start for us. But we were able to get a goal before the end of the game, which made the final score a little more respectable. We’ve just got to start the game on a better note, so that we can work our way in and get a better result.

What has community support been like for the team so far?

I was introduced to soccer at an early age through school and friends and started to take it seriously when I was 10 years old. When I was done with my schooling back home, I was trying to figure out how to continue playing at a higher level while getting an education, and the U.S. college system gave me that opportunity.

To sell the amount of tickets we have before even kicking the ball at home has been unbelievable. The merchandise has been flying off the shelves, so people are really buying in. We’re the first summer team in town, and people want to support it. I’m excited to see what it’ll look like once we start playing more games and word starts to spread. It should be a pretty special experience for everyone.

You received your first coaching job at the age of 23 with your alma mater, Lees-McCrae College. What was that transition from player to coach like?

What role does Greenville FC play in the growth of soccer here in the Southeast?

I learned a lot quickly through mistakes and experience. It helped that I knew a lot of the coaches and players. And I feel like I had a good understanding of the game. I just had to learn communication and how to get the best out of players. I’m still working to tune my craft and will continue to do that going forward.

It’s huge in promoting the grass-roots soccer movement and getting kids out at camps in the summer. This club is in a privileged position where people want to support it, so we’re going to throw support behind people who support us. For more information, visit gvlfc.com.


18 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.18.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEW! 13-Month Certificate Special Two Options to Maximize Your Investment!

2.00% APR

1.75% APR

Option 1

Earn 1.75% APR on a 13-Month Certificate with a minimum deposit of $5,000 in new money.

Option 2

Earn 2.00% APR on a 13-Month Certificate (same requirements as Option 1) when you add a loan of $5,000+ in new money.** Call 370.5670 to apply for your loan!

NOT A MEMBER? YOU CAN JOIN!

Anyone who lives, works, worships or attends school in Greenville County can join! Call 467.4160 or visit

www.ghfcu.org for information on how to join.

*Promotion dates: April 1 to May 31, 2018. APR is Annual Percentage Rate. Deposit and loan specials cannot be combined with any other promotion. **Refinance of a current GHFCU loan must include $5,000 in new money. Normal credit guidelines apply. DOWNTOWN 520 W. Washington St.

COUNTY SQUARE 301 University Ridge

SCTAC 240 Terminal Rd.

SIMPSONVILLE 350 Harrison Bridge Rd.

Epic PARTies Start Here @

the largest & fastest track in sc

Home of the Private Party Packages for Birthdays, Bachelor & Bachelorette Parties, Grads!

Ready to race?

COMMUNITY VOICES Making a positive impact By David Sawyer, president and managing partner, Cliffs Clubs & Bob Stegner, senior vice president, marketing, North America, SYNNEX Corporation

Once again, the 2018 BMW Charity Pro-Am presented by SYNNEX Corporation welcomes players, celebrities, and spectators to Greenville and offers an opportunity to show off the place we call home. From our thriving downtown to the breathtaking Blue Ridge Mountains, the tournament introduces visitors to the Upstate while reminding the rest of us that we live in a special place. Most importantly, tournament week represents a chance to make a positive impact in our community through several extraordinary nonprofits. For 2018, this includes helping children with life-debilitating conditions, providing homebound citizens with nutritious meals, and delivering opportunities to students around STEM. SYNNEX is humbled to have played a part in the $12.7 million dollars raised since the tournament’s inception. And The Cliffs is not only thrilled to have the tournament back at The Cliffs Valley but also to have The Cliffs Residents Outreach (CRO) as one of the beneficiaries. Members of The Cliffs’ six South Carolina communities have come together through CRO to help children succeed in Greenville, Pickens, and Oconee counties. CRO volunteers logged 18,000 hours last year and contributed $700,000 to help break the cycle of poverty by supporting students’ success in the classroom. Their efforts helped one Pickens County elementary school rise from the bottom 10 percent in South Carolina school performance to the top 10 percent. In Greenville County, they have provided academic enrichment opportunities for students, programs for at-risk youth, necessities for families in crisis, and tutoring and pantry items for students in poverty. For The Cliffs, the tournament also demonstrates that their communities are about more than golf. Cliffs members and residents come from all walks of life with passions for golf, wellness, cycling, and more, but one interest that unites them above all is their passion for giving back. Likewise, SYNNEX Corporation is about more than IT distribution. Its story is largely about getting involved in the communities its associates call home. And the tournament is just one of the many ways the more than 1,700 SYNNEX associates in Greenville and 125,000 worldwide can give back. Since 2011, SYNNEX has raised more than $8.5 million for Upstate children through its year-long charity initiative, SYNNEX Share the Magic. In addition, SYNNEX’s Community Involvement Committee organizes ways for associates to give back during the year through local food drives, silent auctions, and more. At SYNNEX, giving comes from the top down, and it’s contagious. The Cliffs, SYNNEX, and BMW share similar philosophies when it comes to the community. We know, like many other companies here, that helping others is also good for business. It builds camaraderie by challenging employees to see the bigger picture. It brings companies together despite competitive marketplaces. And it challenges leaders to share their resources and talents. We believe that together, everyone can make a difference. In addition to having a great time at this year’s tournament, we invite you to learn more about its philanthropic impact. Remember, it’s never too late to find a small way you can give back to Greenville or whatever community you call home. David Sawyer is the president and managing partner of the Cliffs Clubs. Bob Stegner is senior vice president, marketing, North America, of SYNNEX Corporation.

Exit 60 off I-85 961 Berry Shoals Rd., Duncan

go.racelmk.com/party 864-207-7440

David Sawyer

Bob Stegner by Todd Rosenberg Photography


COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

COMMUNITY VOICES

05.18.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 19

Control your anger before it controls you By Mary-Catherine McClain Riner, Ph.D., Ed.S., M.S., www.rinercounseling.com

Anger is a valid emotion signaling that something is wrong — such as feeling like you were being treated unfairly or experiencing goal interference. While anger is not a bad or wrong feeling, too much anger leads to negative consequences at work, within your family, and in personal relationships. It can also impair your physical health. It is important to use anger constructively and to express it in healthier, more adaptive ways. Equally important is achieving a sense of resolution and/ or acceptance.

Ineffective Anger Management — The Don’ts Stuffing and Bottling Emotions Inside: Individuals commonly attempt to hide anger, avoid expressing feelings, and sweep conflict under the rug. The problem with this strategy is that conflict only temporarily goes away, people walk away angry, and over time anger turns into resentment. Becoming Defensive: Reacting to anger too quickly can lead to defensiveness and hostile responses. Similarly, it can impede the development of relationships, result in a loss of opportunities, and prevent you from being able to learn and develop more appropriate forms of communication. It leads to feeling more anxious, sad, fearful, and/or regretful. Using Physical or Verbal Aggression: Research shows that lashing out leads to more negative outcomes. Compliance may be achieved in the short-term due to fear, but lasting change is extremely unlikely. This behavior may also teach violence to observers and does not target the root of the problem.

Effective Anger Management — The Do’s Slow Down: Check in with yourself in the morning, afternoon, and evening to assess your level of anger. For example, create an anger meter with “0” being no anger and “10” representing explosive and out-of-control anger. Self-monitoring can reduce the tendency to operate on autopilot and make you more aware of your true feelings before they get out of hand. If your meter becomes a “4” or “5,” consider how you might resolve this feeling or what you need to do to express and ultimately release it. Draw out an umbrella and visualize the feelings that your anger covers (e.g., rejection, hurt). Imagine holding the umbrella and asking yourself how you can handle the emotion or feeling appropriately without getting rained on. Express and Release It: If and when anger reaches a “6” or “7,” it is important to have a toolbox ready to extinguish your fire. Take control and responsibility of your emotions and don’t blame or attack someone else. Use “I” statements to convey your feelings, choose a time to talk with the person who is upsetting you, and maintain a calm voice while talking. Use deep breathing, count to 10, engage in exercise, write in a journal, visualize your anger leaving your body and floating down a stream, and use positive self-talk (e.g., This too shall pass; I can handle this without losing my temper). Consider using a timer in which you give yourself 20 minutes to be fully angry, and then practice letting the anger roll off your body. Another option is writing a letter but refrain from delivering

While anger is not a bad or wrong feeling, too much anger leads to negative consequences at work, within your family, and in personal relationships. It can also impair your physical health. It is important to use anger constructively and to express it in healthier, more adaptive ways. it until you have had a few hours to calm down and review it. Laugh off frustration, stretch away tension, talk anger out, and shed tears of irritation. The goal is not to suppress but rather express anger appropriately. Practice Conflict Resolution: If problems continue to reappear, consider deliberate communication and give yourself permission to be heard. Schedule a time to talk to the individual(s) involved, acknowledge the conflict, model using “I” statements, ask for questions/feedback, confirm and reassess each person’s understanding, consider a compromise, and follow-up after the conversation. Reflect back on what this process was like, what you learned, what was difficult, and what you would change in the future. As the saying goes, “When angry, count to 10 before you speak. If very angry, count to 100.” Anger can lead to serious consequences and have significant repercussions. When anger leaves you feeling out of control or is interfering with your ability to work or complete daily life functions, consider contacting a professional. Mary-Catherine Riner, Ph.D., Ed.S, M.S., is a licensed psychologist serving South Carolina and Georgia. She earned her doctorate in counseling psychology and school psychology at Florida State University in 2014, following her pre-doctoral internship at Johns Hopkins University, where she specialized in eating disorders and suicide risk assessment. Presently, she specializes in treating eating disorders, OCD, self-harm, and marital discord.

MOVING WATER ATTRACTS MORE BIRDS • Keeps Water Fresh • Hummingbirds Like Flying Through Mist

NECTAR RECIPE recommended by The Hummingbird Society of America

• One part sugar • Four parts hot water • NO ADDED COLOR • Cool, Serve and Enjoy the Entertainment

Open Mon. - Fri. 9:30-5:30 • Sat. 9-5

626 Congaree Road 864-234-2150 www.wbu.com/greenville


20 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.18.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Our Community

Community news, events, and happenings

ARTS

Second GCCA studio artist receives prestigious international art grant Danielle Fontaine has been awarded an Elizabeth Greenshields Foundation grant for emerging artists. Fontaine is the second studio artist from the Greenville Center for Creative Arts to receive this prestigious international grant. The first was Naomi Nakazato, an inaugural Brandon Fellow at GCCA and two-time recipient of the grant. The Elizabeth Greenshields Foundation is one of the longest-standing grant providers for emerging artists all over the world. It has provided financial assistance to more than 1,800 students and artists across 40 countries. The award is geared to students and artists in the early to developmental stages of their careers who work in a representational style of painting. Fontaine is originally from Quebec and has lived in Greenville for the past 19 years. In her artist statement, Fontaine says her encaustic work “considers the enduring question of what we elect to keep or preserve and the reasons why, and invites reflection on what, or whom, we discard along the way.” Fontaine is also a member of the urban panel of Greenville’s Design Review Board.  PHILANTHROPY

General Federated Women’s Club gives to Camperdown Academy The General Federated Women’s Club of Greenville President Alecia Elrod presented Camperdown Academy Headmaster Dan Blanch and Director of Development Allison Rogers with a check for $1,400 to fund a new program for their school called Read Naturally.

Junior League raises $15K for programs The Junior League of Greenville recently held its inaugural Shop for Greenville fundraiser, a 10-day discount shopping event in March featuring 78 retailers. The Junior League sold 325 Shop for Greenville discount cards that raised more than $15,000. All proceeds will support the JLG’s programs and partnering community agencies who work to improve the lives of women and children. Shoppers who purchased a discount card and guide book earned deals at local businesses during the event.

Partners in Agriculture to celebrate Greenville-Haiti partnership Greenville-based nonprofit Partners in Agriculture (PIA) is working to end malnutrition and hunger in Haiti’s central plateau through sustainable agriculture and education. Its school gardening program, Family Food Security program, and peanut production for Nourimanba (a highly nutritious food made from peanuts) have helped PIA treat more than 35,000 children. PIA also started The Haiti Project, an outreach program that has connected young Haitian musicians and students to professional musicians in Greenville.

The program was founded by South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts teacher Katy Dev and organist David Turner. The program includes intensive summer music camps along with the donation of hundreds of gently used musical instruments. The Greenville Symphony has donated instruments, and students at Greenville’s Augusta Circle Elementary School donate their used recorders. PIA will be holding an event on June 1 called In Harmony With Haiti to celebrate the partnership between Greenville and Haiti. The event will be at Wyche Pavilion with a farm-to-table dinner at 6:30 p.m., and music at the TD Stage from 7-10 p.m. by Donna Kay and the Carousers, S.C. Governor’s School for the Arts Jazz Ensemble, and Augusta Circle Parents/Pupils Recorder Ensemble.

Greenville Women Giving announces 2018 grant recipients Greenville Women Giving, a local nonprofit philanthropic organization that has more than 500 members, announced its 2018 grant recipients at its annual meeting this week. Since its founding in 2006, the organization has granted more than $5.4 million to 80 nonprofits in Greenville County in five categories: arts and culture, education, environment, health, and human services. This year, GWG awarded a total of $601,745 to the following grant awardees: FAVOR ($100,000 over two years), Gateway House ($100,000 over two years), Girl Scouts of SC - Mountains to Midlands ($88,540 over two years), Homes of Hope ($50,000 over two years), Jasmine Road ($100,000), Loaves & Fishes ($50,000), Mill Community Ministries ($37,976), and the Warehouse Theatre ($75,259).

YMCA of Greenville raises record-breaking $1.2M for annual scholarship campaign YMCA of Greenville announced that it has raised a record-breaking $1,205,982 for its annual scholarship campaign. This is the largest annual campaign to date of any YMCA in South Carolina. Over the past 10 years, the YMCA of Greenville has raised $8,864,239 for the annual campaign, putting 100 percent of those funds back into the community through scholarships so that anyone who wants to participate in the Y’s programs or services is able to, regardless of ability to pay. “We are so thankful for each and every donor,” said Scot Baddley, Greenville YMCA president and CEO. “Now, we are able to offer more children a safe and nurturing environment in after-school, day camp, and summer resident camps where they can learn skills and make new friends. More people suffering from Parkinson’s and hypertension can participate in our evidence-based wellness programs to gain health and quality of life back. And, more teens can participate in our statewide Youth in Government program to learn more about democracy, leadership, and civil discourse.” continued on PAGE 22

Contact us at (864) 231-5510 or visit AndersonUniversity.edu/flex


WWW.LEGACY.COM/OBITUARIES/GREENVILLEJOURNAL

OBITUARIES & MEMORIALS

Submit to: obits@communityjournals.com

Jamie Summers Howard

DEATH NOTICES FOR MAY 4-14 ROBERT ANTHONY HRUBALA, 80, of Greenville, passed away on May 4, 2018. The family is being assisted by Mackey Mortuary.

RODNEY “ROD” HAROLD MAYBIN, 67, of Simsponville, passed away May 11. The family is being assisted by Thomas McAfee, NW.

JAMES OLIN GREENE, 94, of Greenville, passed away May 8. Thomas McAfee, DT, is assisting the family.

NICK W. McCALL, 61, passed away May 11. The Wood Mortuary is assisting the family.

JOHN GRADY HINES, JR., 92, of Greenville, passed away on May 8 The family is being assisted by Mackey Funerals and Cremations. CHARLES ASHMORE, 85, of Greenville, passed away on May 9. The full obit for Mr. Ashmore may be read at dignitymemorial. com. Mackey Funerals and Cremations. LEONARD EUGENE OWENS, 81, of Greenville, passed away on May 11. Thomas McAfee Funeral Home, NW, is assisting the family.

THERON DOUGLAS “DOUG” WILSON, 79, of Greer, passed away May 12. The family is being assisted by The Wood Mortuary. EDORA FREEMAN, 99, of Greenville, passed away on May 13. Complete obituary and service details can be found on thomasmcafee.com CORA SEARCY BERRY, 105, of Spartanburg, passed away on May 14. The Wood Mortuary is assisting the family.

Michael A. Taras Clemson, SC

Michael A. Taras, 96, died peacefully Wednesday, May 9, 2018. Dr. Taras was the son of Andrew Taras and Catherine Bodnar of Olyphant, Pennsylvania. He attended Penn State University, receiving a B.S. degree in Forestry. He served in the U.S. Army Air Corps as a 1st Lt. twin engine pilot. He received a master of Forestry degree in Wood Utilization from Penn State University and a Doctor of Philosophy in Wood Science from North Carolina State University. Dr. Taras was employed as a Forest Products Technologist at the USDA, FS Forest Products Laboratory in Madison, Wisconsin. Mike continued his research at the Southeastern Forest Experiment Station in Asheville, NC, Raleigh, NC and Athens, Georgia, retiring in 1970. He joined the faculty at Clemson University as a Distinguished Professor and was appointed Head of the Clemson Department of Forestry, retiring in 1992. His joyful spirit and zest for life will be greatly missed. He lived life to the fullest to the end. Mike is survived by his loving wife of 70 years, Jean Moyer Taras and four sons, Michael (Liz), Kenneth (Kay), Christopher and Steven; seven grand children, Katie, Justin, Lindsay, Kelly, Emily, Michelle; three great grandsons, Austin, Alex and Wyatt. A memorial service was held on Monday, May 14, 2018 at the University Lutheran Church. Visitation was held one hour prior to service. Condolences to the family may be expressed at www.robinsonfunerahomes.com. Duckett-Robinson Funeral Home is assisting the family.

SIMPSONVILLE – Jamie Summers Howard, 46, of Simpsonville, SC passed away peacefully Tuesday May 8th after a short yet heroic battle with cancer. She is survived by her husband, Chip, two sons, Dylan (15) and Hunter (12), her mother Dolly Summers, Aunts and Uncles David and Linda Pike and Jimmy and Odeline McDaniel of Tennessee, brother Greg Cox of Daytona Beach, FL, and her shadow, yorkie-poo Daisy. She was preceded in death by her father Jim Summers, and brothers Tim and Jeff Cox.  Jamie was born in Chattanooga, TN, March 15th 1972 to Dolly and Jim Summers. She graduated from East Ridge High School in 1989, where she travelled the U.S. as part of dance troupes. She went on to receive a Bachelor’s degree from Florida State University, as a member of Delta Zeta sorority, serving as Rush Chairman. After graduation and an initial stop at the Breakers Resort where she worked in Activities, she met and travelled north to New England with the Halpern family, and became a live-in nanny for their young family outside Boston. Jamie soon joined a fresh class of twenty-something eager professionals at MEDITECH, where she met a special group of friends, including her husband, Chip. They married in Massachusetts October 15, 2000, spending time in Dedham, Dorchester, and Attleboro MA, before moving back below the Mason-Dixon line to Port Orange, Florida and finally residing in the Greenville, SC area for the past 10 years. Jamie’s zest for building relationships and straight-talk with

friends, co-workers, and her customers, catapulted her through various escalating project management, leadership, and executive roles over the next two decades, most recently as Chief Delivery Officer of Professional Services, MercuryGate International. She had a wonderlust for travel, taking personal and business trips to Mexico, Europe, Middle East, South America, and Asia. Her favorite place to be was with her family and (2) boys at their home away from home at Disney World strategizing the use of FastPasses to squeeze every ounce out of those Magical Days. Her tenacious, fierce, loyal, and loving spirit will be celebrated with a Visitation on Friday, May 18, 2018 from 6:30 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. and the Remembrance Service on Saturday, May 19th at 4:00 p.m., both at Thomas McAfee Funeral Homes Southeast Chapel at 1604 NE Main St. in Simpsonville, SC. In lieu of flowers, please consider contributing to her boys’ college fund at Future Scholar 529 College Savings Plan (http://bit.ly/HowardDonation) or by check at P.O. Box 8036, Boston, MA 02266-8036 *Notate the Occasion Code: SCfxRZA on the check; or donate to your preferred cancer charity. If you send a check, you will need to enclose the “Giving Coupon” (go online to Tomas McAfee to print the Coupon).

A Lasting Legacy | Submit to: obits@communityjournals.com Online obituaries and memorials will be shared on our website via a Legacy.com affiliation. Obituaries can be placed in person at our office located at 581 Perry Ave., Greenville; via email obits@communityjournals.com; or Service our website, Please joinat us for a Memorial Day GreenvilleJournal.com. Feel free to email or visit for more information about honoring the brave men and women who deadlines, space restraints, and editorial requirements.

defended our great nation

Please join us for a Memorial Day Service honoring the Sunday, May 28, 2017 brave men and women who defended our great nation 2:00pm in the Veterans Courtyard Woodlawn Memorial Park

Sunday, May 27, 2018 • 2:00pm in the Veterans Courtyard Woodlawn Memorial Park Woodlawn Memorial Park & Mackey Funerals and Cremations at WOODLAWN Woodlawn Memorial Park FUNERAL HOME AND MEMORIAL PARK 1 Pine Knoll Drive 1 Pine Knoll Drive Greenville, SC 29609 Greenville, SC 29609 864-244-0978 (864) 244-0978

WE HONOR VETERANS


22 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.18.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM NONPROFIT

Augustine Literacy Project seeks tutors The Augustine Literacy Project of the Upstate (ALP), a nonprofit organization, will host their annual training session July 9–18, 2018 (weekend excluded), 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. each day. This training will teach volunteer tutors a specialized approach to help at-risk children struggling with words to read. ALP volunteer tutors teach one-on-one with a child at his or her school twice a week during the school year at no charge to the child or the school. No previous teaching experience is required. ALP is dedicated to training and supporting volunteer literacy tutors for disadvantaged children and has already trained more than 100 tutors who have provided more than 6,000 hours of specialized literacy training in the Upstate. For more information, visit augustineproject-upstatesc.org or call 864-680-1533. The application deadline is June 15.

Loaves & Fishes holds Taste of the Upstate event

Check In and Registration: 9 am

5K Walk Start Time:10 am

Saturday, June 9th at Furman University’s Lakeside Amphitheater

To register, donate, and learn more about the 2018 Greenville NAMI Walk, visit us at

NAMIWalks.org/upstatesouthcarolina THANK YOU TO OUR 2018 SPONSORS:

Eight local chefs came together at Zen and faced off in a friendly competition at Loaves & Fishes’ 2018 Taste of the Upstate jazz and gospel brunch. Featured restaurants were Biscuit Head, Good Life Catering, Local Cue Game and Sports Bar, Moe’s Original Bar B Que, Roost, Smoke on the Water, Table 301 Catering & Kitchen, and Wild Ace Pizza & Pub. Roost took home awards for best presentation and best overall. Biscuit Head won the award for best New Orleans theme. Table 301 won for originality, and Moe’s Original Bar B Que won the people’s choice award. Greenville Jazz Collective and the St. Anthony of Padua Male Chorus provided live music, and local artist Dumah Morgan provided live painting. The $33,000 raised from ticket sales, a silent auction, raffle tickets, and donations will fund the local mission of Loaves & Fishes, which is to “rescue” surplus food and use it to feed the hungry in Greenville County. Submit community news items to www.greenvillejournal.com/submit.

FYI

Everything you want to know about Unity Park The Greenville Journal has it covered.

Interactive map of the plan – all 60 acres available ONLY AT

GreenvilleJournal.com Plus, follow us on social for our exclusive Q&A with Mayor Knox White White.


This Week

Bright ideas Trending light fixtures go big by Kathleen Nalley Some think of lighting as jewelry for your living space, meant to make a bold statement with colors, shapes, and textures. But we rely upon lighting as so much more: It illuminates the spaces in which we walk, cook, read, and otherwise live. In other words, the right lighting serves two purposes: to help jazz up your décor as well as to

Photo by Levi Monday

perform necessary tasks. When choosing the appropriate lighting for your most beloved spaces, it’s important to consider both design trends as well as function. While we often frame trends by year, most ebb and flow within a span of seven to 10 years, meaning that making an investment in vougish items typically will serve your home longer than anticipated. If you’re looking to make minor updates to your most-used spaces, switching out lamps,

sconces, pendants, and even chandeliers is one of the easiest (and least costly) ways to make a dramatic impact. Trending right now? Contemporary, mid-century-meetsmodern design. Understated with clean lines and curves and an emphasis on natural materials, this style is often sprinkled throughout rooms where other design styles already reside. Check out these lights, which prove a perfect medium for this form-follows-function attitude!


24 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.18.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

SPOT ON!

The geometric Cinq pendant makes a wow statement above a kitchen islands or in a powder room. This light incorporates a blend of contrasting clear glass and antique bronze.

Check out these light fixtures from Progress Lighting, a lighting line from Hubbell Inc., which is headquartered in Greenville.

This elliptical frame takes a cue from classic candelabras but looks less dated. The Evoke fixture’s antiqued bronze and champagne finish features six candles lights surrounded by glass shades.

Flaunt minimalist, mixedmaterials style with the Turnbury, costal-inspired pine and metal take on the candelabra.

Featuring a brushed bronze finish, the 12bulb incandescent Ion fuses mid-century modern into an eye-opening statement piece.

Three circular wooden bands wrap around a metal three-light base featuring Edison bulbs in the Gulliver, a semi-flush fixture, is perfect for rustic farmhouse style but equally applicable in contemporary settings.

W NE ING! T S I L

SIMPSONVILLE

PLANTATION ON PELHAM

WEATHERSTONE

COTTAGE HILL

FIVE ACRES W/BARN FOR HORSES, CUSTOM/UPDATED 4BR/4BA HOME, ~3800SF, TWO MASTERS, EXTRA GARAGE, 10 MIN TO SHOPPING! #1364794 • $449,900

CUSTOM 3BR TOWNHOME, GATED COMMUNITY NEAR DWNTWN GRVL, OFFICE, BONUS RM. #1346534 • $444,900

LOVELY 4BR/3BA W/BONUS ROOM, MASTER PLUS 1 ON MAIN, I/G POOL, 3-CAR GARAGE!. #1366230 • $434,900

4BR/3.5BA W/BONUS RM, CUSTOM BUILT, MASTER ON MAIN, LARGE CDS LOT, NEW FLOORS, OFF ROPER MTN! #1353591 • $404,900

Susan McMillen

864-238-5498 | Susan.McMillen@allentate.com


05.18.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 25

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

Featured Home

Greenville Country Club 4 Byrd Boulevard, Greenville, SC 29605

Home Info Price: $525,000 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 3 Lot Size: 1/2 Acre or Less

MLS#: 1363078 Sq. Ft: 2800-2999 Year Built: 1983

Schools: Blythe Elementary, Hughes Middle, and Greenville High Agent: Blair Miller | 864.430.7708 blair@wilsonassociates.net wilsonassociates.net

This exquisite all brick 4 bedroom, 3 bath home is a perfect blend of sophistication and elegance. Enter this immaculate home through a beautiful garden gate entrance and covered porch. Gorgeous hardwood flooring throughout both levels. The downstairs features a formal dining room with wet bar open to a large formal living area with fireplace and French doors leading to a large deck and gardens. Privacy in this back yard with mature trees and landscaping. The kitchen boasts granite countertops, stainless steel appliances, breakfast area and access to a private gated patio. The fourth bedroom on the main level has many options with access to a private bathroom, so it could

be converted into a master/guest suite on the main level or keep it as the current fabulous study. Upstairs you will find 2 large bedrooms each with double closets and a full bathroom. In addition, there is a spacious master bedroom suite with fireplace, double vanities, separate shower and tub/shower with walk in closet and ample storage. Special features include 2 fireplaces, skylights, beautiful custom built-in bookshelves, custom wood shutters and iron gates. The sellers have installed a brand new Goodman 14 seer HVAC unit. Plus a designated parking space for your golf cart. Don’t miss out on this charming home in the heart of the Augusta Road and Greenville Country Club area!


26 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.18.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

On the market Acadia • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Cobblestone • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Collins Creek • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Greenville Country Club • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

119 Riverlook Lane · $879,500 · MLS# 1361560

104 Putney Bridge · $799,900 · MLS# 1365129

14 Babbs Hollow · $649,000 · MLS# 1366828

23 Rock Creek Drive · $484,000 · MLS# 1361276

4BR/4f2hBA BEAUTIFUL custom built /private home with incredible details, guest apartment, gym, and wine cellar! Just 12 minutes from downtown Greenville! Left into Acadia, right on Riverlook Lane, home on left.

5BR/4.5BA Fabulous home located in the gated community of Cobblestone. Interior/Exterior has been freshly painted. Master on main. Perfect for entertaining! Roper Mountain Rd, rightBrixton Circle, right- Putney Bridge Lane.

4BR/2f2hBA Beautiful, traditional, all brick home situated on just under an acre in the established and coveted Collins Creek neighborhood. Left onto Collins Creek Road. Right onto Babbs Hollow.

4BR/2.5BA Rocking chair front porch. Awesome floor plan with master bedroom on main. 3 additional bedrooms and full bath upstairs. Augusta Street. Left on Byrd Blvd. Left on Rock Creek.

Contact: Anne Marchant 420-0009 The Marchant Company

Contact: Tony King 787-9493 Wilson Associates

Contact: Blair Miller 430-7708 Wilson Associates

Belmont Heights • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Mount Vernon Estates • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Grove Park

210 Sheffield Road · $350,000 · MLS# 1365360

164 Bellamy Close · $335,000 · MLS# 1366017

101 Old Province Way · $380,900 · MLS# 1367197

403 W Faris Rd · $270,000 · MLS# 1367533

3BR/3BA PRICE REDUCED $22,000! Unique custom built house with open floor plan. Spacious master suite includes trey ceiling and double vanity. North on Buncombe Rd. Right- Taylor Rd. Right- Sheffield Rd.

3BR/2BA Awesome classic brick ranch that has been completely RENOVATED in spring 2018 is waiting for you! Wade HamptonGreer. L- Mt Vernon Rd. R- Bellamy Close.

4BR/2.5BA Gorgeous brick home with private, fenced yard zoned for Riverside HS! Large open floor plan loaded with many upgrades. Location,Location, Location! This home has it all!

Contact: Susan Burch 346-3864 Wilson Associates

Contact: Pam McCartney 630-7844 BHHS C Dan Joyner Spaulding Group

3BR/2.5BA Beautiful/updated two-story. Newer construction in one of Greenville’s hottest areas! Kit. updated-granite countertops, white cabinets, new fixtures. Newer paint, new crown molding throughout downstairs, new privacy fence-fully fenced backyard.

Contact: Susan Burch 346-3864 Wilson Associates

Contact: Blair Miller 430-7708 Wilson Associates

Augusta Road Area

Contact: Maggie Aiken 616-4280 BHHS C Dan Joyner REALTORS

TRUE BLUE. Blue. It’s the official color of first place and the official color of winners. Blue is as limitless as the sky and as vast as the ocean. It’s about seeing endless possibilities where others see obstacles and embracing the future with open arms. It’s having the courage to dream big and the boldness to let nothing stand in your way. Blue is daring, determined and driven to succeed. Blue is the color of thinkers, doers, and deal makers – 182 agents strong spanning 4 counties across the Upstate. Blue is the official color of Coldwell Banker Caine, and it’s the truest color in all of real estate.

PANTONE 280 C

Discover how our blue makes us different. Visit us online at coldwellbankercaine.com

(864) 250-2850 | coldwellbankercaine.com


05.18.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 27

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

Featured Home

Roper Mountain Estates 514 Meadowsweet Lane, Greenville, SC 29615

Home Info Price: $399,900 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 3

MLS: 1367750 Sq. Ft: 3200-3399

Schools: Oakview Elementary, Beck Middle, and J. L. Mann High

This charming all brick home sits in a quiet cul-de-sac in the highly desirable upscale subdivision of Roper Mountain Estates. Space meets functionality in this unique OPEN floor plan. The first floor home office makes this home irresistible. As you open the front door, the beautiful foyer greets you with gracious hospitality and draws your attention to the elegant music room. Adjacent to the music room is the formal DINING ROOM. From the dining room you enter the kitchen and breakfast room to the beautiful stone FIREPLACE in the great room. The kitchen has granite counter tops, tile backsplash, hardwood floors, stainless

steel appliances, plentiful cabinet space, a large pantry and lots of counter space and a central island. From the great room you walk outside to the large deck that overlooks the private, fenced backyard. The MASTER SUITE features a trey ceiling, plush neutral carpet, and a walk in closet. Located off of Roper Mountain Rd. area, Roper Mountain Estates subdivision features a Family Center with a Club House, Swimming Pool, Basketball Court, Tennis Courts. This home offers an incredible amount of space in a spectacular location and is MOVE IN READY!

Agent: Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 Vmiller@MarchantCo.com

864.430.6602 “Valerie Miller Properties is proud to welcome Realtors Selena Riddle, Annie Langston, and Shauna Repetto to their growing and dynamic team. Valerie Miller Properties has been awarded “Signature” Team of the Year 2017 for adhering to the highest standards at The Marchant Company by practicing professionalism, honesty, and exceptional service to their clients. It is the team’s privilege and pleasure to be the trusted advisors for their wonderful clients.”

Unit Listing Team of the Year 2017 Volume Listing Team of the Year 2017 Unit Sales Team of the Year 2017 Volume Sales Team of the Year 2017 Highest Average Listing Price 2017 Highest Average Sales Price 2017 “Signature” Team of the Year 2017 Award Winning Agent 2007-2017


2018 Featuring

THE SPINNERS

Jim Quick & Coastline

MAGIC An Upstate Premier Variety Band


Over $225,000 Raised for Local Charities!

Thanks to our sponsors, entertainers, employees, classic car enthusiasts, and all who came to enjoy the evening!

2018 Blue Ridge Fest Sponsors Pinnacle Sponsors ($15,000 & Up) Allied Tree Service • Caldwell Landscaping & Clearing Chattooga Sounds Camp • Quality Inspection Services • Reliable Automatic Sprinkler Co., Inc. Premier Sponsor ($10.000) SEDC Platinum Sponsors ($7,500) Chick-fil-A of Seneca • Martin Printing Company Payne, McGinn & Cummins, Inc. • Sumter Utilities • WYFF-TV 4 Gold Sponsors ($5,000) Andrew Pickens Design • Integral Solutions Group • Pike Electric, LLC • Upstate Forestry Company Silver Sponsors ($3,000) Advanced Underground Specialists • CEE-US • Communication Service Center • Diamond T Promotional Gear • Oconee Fence • South State Bank • Tantalus • Trehel Corporation Bronze Sponsors ($1,500) 101.7 WGOG • Altec Industries • American Services • Arbor Works Tree Service, Inc. • Batteries Plus Bulbs • Blue Ridge Pure Water • Bountyland Petroleum, Inc. • Bowers Transportation Services • Carolina International Trucks • Case Interior Design Group • CINTAS • J. Davis Construction • Davis Electrical & Plumbing • Jimmy Lee & Helen Dodgens • Earth 103.3/95.9 WRTH • 94.5 The Answer • Rejoice! 96.9 • Fairway Outdoor Advertising • Foothills Motorsports • Interstate Tire Service • Land Planning Associates • Frank Jr. & Nancy Looper • McCall-Thomas Engineering Co. • McCulloch Utility Services • McNair, McLemore, Middlebrooks & Co. • Parkette Food Service • RSCT Architecture & Design • Solid Gold • Sunny 107.9 WFBS • TCI of Alabama • Tiencken Conway, LLC • TRC Engineers, Inc. • Kevin Whitaker Chevrolet, Inc. Patron Sponsors ($1,000) CLD Services, Inc. • GDS Associates/Hi-Line Engineering • Global Financial Services Group • Marion Davis • Norris Iron & Metal, Inc. • Mr. Dermot O’Leary • RenovoAdvantage.com • Southeastern WoodPole Inspectors, Inc. • Spirit Communications Friend Sponsors ($500) 183 Automotive, Inc. • Ace Pole Company • Action Automotive • Adkins Truck Equipment • Bearden Landscaping • Blue Ridge Tool & Machine Co., Inc. • Booth & Associates • Border States Electric • Community First Bank • Design South Professionals • Foster Used Cars • G & W Electric/Lekson Associates • Hart Fire & Safety • Hershberger Construction, Inc. • Representative Davey Hiott • MCG Mechanical • McKinney Dodge, Inc. • Milsoft Utility Solutions • Henry D. Nix • The Okonite Company • Reliant Earthworks, LLC • S&C Electric Company/Chapman Co. • Minor & Hal Shaw • Tri-County Technical College • Village Inn Restaurant • VOLTS Donor Sponsors ($250) Buddy’s Chain Saw Sales & Service • Durham’s Automotive • Greenville Office Supply • Moore & Balliew Oil Co., Inc. • Palmetto Truck Repair, Inc.

Annual 21st


30 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.18.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

SOLD: Greenville Transactions For the week of April 16 – 20 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$24,300,000 $22,000,000 $5,225,000 $3,831,832 THE POINT $1,912,700 $1,250,000 121 RHETT STREET $975,000 LAKE LANIER $895,000 D T SMITH EST $815,000 $815,000 $746,000 BARRINGTON PARK $647,000 CHANTICLEER $645,000 LEWIS PARK $625,000 CHESTNUT POND $615,000 CLIFFS AT GLASSY WEST $610,000 POINSETT CORNERS $589,000 PARK HILL $555,000 CLIFFS AT GLASSY $524,000 $500,000 RIDGEWATER $498,819 NORTHGATE $495,000 STONEWOOD MANOR $492,150 GLEN MEADOWS $480,000 RIVER WALK $480,000 KANATENAH $475,000 SADDLEHORN $467,518 GOWER ESTATES $440,500 $435,000 $435,000 SUGAR MILL $425,000 FIVE FORKS PLANTATION $420,000 CHATELAINE $420,000 $400,000 $385,000 BELMONT HGHTS $383,944 VALLEY VIEW $379,000 PARK HILL $375,000 KILGORE FARMS $371,000 CARILION $365,000 WEST FARM $340,000 FAIRVIEW WOODS $335,000 $334,000 KILGORE FARMS $330,900 $330,000 SILVERLEAF $325,500 $324,579 HOLLY TRACE $310,000 NORTH PARK $309,000 PELHAM FALLS $300,000 GARDENS AT ROSE RESERVE $297,500 HOLLY TRACE $293,000 WELLINGTON GREEN $292,900 $290,079 CREEKWOOD $285,000 MILLS MILL $285,000 FORRESTER WOODS $283,500 $280,000 CAROLINA SPRINGS $280,000 COTTAGES@HARRISON BRIDGE $278,900 ST MARK COTTAGES $275,000 SILVERLEAF $275,000 PILGRIMS POINT $270,000 HOLLINGSWORTH PARK@VERDAE MANOR $270,000

TSO BUTLER LP TOWERS EAST II L P LAND DEVELOPMENT INC GREENVILLE MIXED-USE PAR POINT DEVELOPMENT LLC LEN ZIMMERMAN LLC 121 RHETT STREET HOLDING MUNDRY UWE TRUSTEE GREER STEPHEN A AJH CUSTOM HOMES LLC JOHNSON STEPHANIE D SKROBOLA ANDREA L RIDGELL MARY H YELTON ERICA M MILESTONE CUSTOM PROPERT 38 SNAPDRAGON WAY LLC HEDRICK NANCY K TRUST SEVIER CREEK PROPERTIES FAIRMAN JANE T REVOCABLE ANTIOCH GROUP LLC MERITAGE HOMES OF SC INC SIMKINS ELIZABETH N MERITAGE HOMES OF S C IN HORVATH STEVE K (JTWROS) STEWART CAROL B DAVIS GLEN S JR REVOC TR SADDLE HORN LLC POPILLO RICHARD JAMES II CALDERWOOD STEPHEN D (JT BRADEN CONNIE YOUSTRA (J RUBY SCOTT ALAN SIMONTON KELLI D (JTWROS HALE SUZANNE E WRIGHT JOE JR MULLIKIN BRENDA ROSS OWENS EVELYN SMITH SORENSEN CLAYTON D LOVELACE BENJAMIN O LEFELD MICHELLE L (JTWRO HESTER JAMES R III (JTWR MM RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIE WADE JONATHAN SCOTT TAYLOR LAURA S HURLBUT CAROLYN HAYES THOMAS R ILLIAN KATHLEEN M BRASHIER THOMAS WALTER I PEERY KATHARINE V (JTWRO HOUSTON KATHERINE H DECABOOTER ANNE E CHOATE CHARLES E JR SHARP WILLIAM H IV BRAMHALL EVAN C (JTWROS) BOUTON MARY CAPERS KELLEY AMANDA K (JTWROS) GENDLIN HOMES LLC GAILLARD TYLER L RHYS CARLOS OKONEK GAIL MARIE LIVING DWELLING GROUP LLC COLLINS TONYA C POWERS RICHARD J GREENE JUSTIN E (JTWROS) VERDAE DEVELOPMENT INC

BUYER

ADDRESS

SUBD.

ET III GREENVILLE JEC LL TOWER EAST APARTMENTS LL GARLINGTON PARK LLC LEGACY HAYWOOD LLC CRP-GREP OVERTURE GREENV FELTON FAMILY PARTNERSHI ZIEGENFUS REVOCABLE TRUS FAERBER-HALL KAREN WALLS CHARLES GRADY (JTW LI JUN (JTWROS) SIMMONS DANIEL L BICKLEY NATALIE M (JTWRO MCCULLEN ASHLEY T (JTWRO BARR CATHERINE H (JTWROS JOHNSON ANNE (JTWROS) MCDONALD SHAWN M (JTWROS GALLAGHER JONA L (JTWROS COBDEN EARL RICHARD IV ( TABB GEORGE W (SURV) HENDERSON FRANK LAMAR CADENA JUDIT A REDING (J DINOLA JORDAN (JTWROS) BEAUFORT ANGELA W (JTWRO ULRICH KIRSTIN (JTWROS) WATSON AARON L (JTWROS) COWARD ZACHARY G NELSON ERIKA LEIGH (JTWR ROBINSON IAN (JTWROS) TUCCI AMANDA E (JTWROS) MCMAHON BRENDAN M CLEVELAND LAUREN G (JTWR POPILLO RICHARD JAMES II BUTLER ANNE W (JTWROS) 5TS PROPERTIES LLC MCKEE DANIELLE NICOLE (J IGNACIO EMMANUEL J (JTWR DUNNIGAN BONNIE C TERRY CAPITAL INVESTMENT CHABBA TIRU BROWN JAMES B JR (JTWROS ELLIS JACQUELINE B BEDFORD BRANDEE P BLANTON DAILIE LORENA LEO EDWARD E (JTWROS) NIEMITALO INC DASSEL ANGELA N (JTWROS) WESWAL LLC FRETWELL PEGGY LYNN GOATLEY KELLY (JTWROS) ROBERTS JENNIFER JORDAN PAYNE BRENDAN (JTWROS) GALLOWAY AARON M (JTWROS TROYER RYAN L (JTWROS) HOWE ELLE MISRA ANADI (JTWROS) HOPGOOD CHRISTINA M (JTW RINEHART JEFFREY N (JTWR WAITE MARIAKRISTINA (JTW HANSEN DONALD R (JTWROS) PLOWMAN ELLEN M FULCHER JAMES THOMAS SR GRUENEFELD KRISTIN HUGHEY ASHLEY GALLOWAY ( STONELEDGE PROPERTIES LL

8127 FORSYTH BLVD 3520 PIEDMONT RD NE STE 410 200 WINGO WAY STE 100 505 20TH ST N STE 1000 18 BROAD ST STE 300 259 BOBBY JONES EXPY 121 RHETT ST UNIT 601 811 BUTTER ST 111 MOUNT VISTA AVE 112 WESTMINSTER DR 121 TINDAL AVE 205 BELFREY DR 17 CHANTICLEER DR 14 HUNLEY LN 308 TANOAK CT 38 SNAP DRAGON WAY 101 W COURT ST UNIT 420C 116 SEVIER ST 265 MAY APPLE WAY 16 ANTIOCH DR 236 IVY WOODS CT 105 MORNINGDALE DR 300 COLERIDGE LN 509 WHETSTONE CT 108 MAPLE BROOK CT 118 OREGON ST 104 NOKOTA DR 466 PIMLICO RD 4026 PENNINGTON RD 15 HUNTERS LANDING DR 106 PLUM MILL CT 106 ELLICOTT HILL LN 231 CASTELLAN DR 904 N MAIN ST 17 HIGHLAND DR 257 SHEFFIELD RD 11 SILKVINE CT 236 RIVERSIDE DR 428 PLACID FOREST CT 318 RIDENOUR AVE 404 CHILLINGHAM CT 207 SHAGBARK CIR 2219 REEDY FORK RD 300 KILGORE FARMS CIR 190 COOPER EST 103 ANSLEY CT PO BOX 17859 230 HOLLY CREST CIR 9 W MOUNTAINVIEW AVE 100 BARLEY MILL DR 601 MOJAVE CT 102 HOLLY CREST CIR 302 KENILWORTH DR 505 WILTON ST 431 RIVER SUMMIT DR 8 MISSION ST 207 LOBLOLLY LN 19 BEECHWOOD AVE 1664 SCUFFLETOWN RD 3 CLOVERFIELD DR 201 ROCK SLIDE CT 203 FIRETHORNE DR 705 HUDSON RD PO BOX 26867

HARTWOOD LAKE $264,260 BROOKFIELD GARDENS $264,000 WILDAIRE ESTATES $259,900 PARTRIDGE RIDGE $258,475 WOODLAND CREEK $257,500 HOWARDS PARK $256,540 COUNTRY ESTATES $250,000 AMERICAN INDUSTRIAL PARK $250,000 $247,500 PLANTERS ROW $246,000 $245,000 MOSS CREEK $245,000 NEELY FARM - LAUREL BROOK $242,500 $240,619 GRIFFIN PARK $238,217 VICTORIA PARK $237,500 LANDING AT SAVANNAH POINTE $235,000 HAMPTON FARMS $230,000 HALF MILE LAKE $230,000 PEBBLE CREEK VILLAGE $230,000 SUMMERFIELD $227,950 ROBINSON LANDING $225,200 WATERTON $224,000 ANNANDALE ESTATES $221,260 MORNING MIST FARM $220,000 STILLWOOD@BELL’S CROSSING $220,000 SHARON RIDGE $219,900 INN VILLAGE $219,000 AVONDALE FOREST $219,000 THE PARK DOWNTOWN $212,000 SHADOW CREEK $210,000 HAMMETT GROVE $209,000 ORCHARD CREST $208,569 LAKEVIEW FARMS $208,500 MAPLESTEAD FARMS $206,580 FOWLER CHASE $206,250 CREEKLAND $200,325 $200,000 POINSETTIA $200,000 SHELBURNE FARMS $199,900 ANNANDALE ESTATES $195,480 FAIR HEIGHTS $195,000 ANNANDALE ESTATES $193,985 ANNANDALE ESTATES $193,760 ANNANDALE ESTATES $193,460 GRIFFIN PARK $193,180 GREENBRIER $193,000 COUNTRY CHASE $192,000 MAPLESTEAD FARMS $184,380 $184,000 MAPLESTEAD FARMS $182,975 MAPLESTEAD FARMS $178,900 STALLINGS HEIGHTS $178,000 FOREST HILLS $177,900 FAIRVIEW LAKE $176,000 BRECKENRIDGE $174,000 WEDGEWOOD PLACE $172,500 CEDAR GLEN $170,000 HILLCREST HEIGHTS $169,900 MARTINS GROVE $169,500 COUNTRY GARDENS $168,000 $168,000 EASTBROOKE VILLAS $166,000 MAPLESTEAD FARMS $165,460

PRICE SELLER D R HORTON-CROWN LLC DONAHOE JOSEPH W (JTWROS P & A LIVING TRUST ANDERSON JESSICA D STEIFLE ELIZABETH S D R HORTON-CROWN LLC CASTON S WAYNE GLOVER HERSHEY H LITTLEJOHN BENJAMIN LELA THOMPSON ALAN R GULLICK PROPERTIES LLC BELL CARLOTTA G COX RANDOLPH GERALD ALEXANDER RENTALS LLC EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL VICTORIA PROPERTIES LLC WEST TRAVIS AUSTIN THRIFT JAMES W III MCGUINN CHRISTOPHER K TUCCI AMANDA ELIN (JTWRO DI PARDO ANGELINA (JTWRO LYONS JULIA G (JTWROS) FOLGER ROBERT A NVR INC MARXEN JAMES F FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG TRADITIONAL HOMES CORPOR HENDRIX SUSAN M VINCENT CECELIA (JTWROS) HACKEL JESSICA LINDSEY ( BOZEMAN BETTY J (JTWROS) JUSTIN CHARLENE O (SURV) ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION L FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA NVR INC SK BUILDERS INC SK BUILDERS INC BAXTER EDGAR III (JTWROS MESSER MARILYN M DASSEL JOHN MICHAEL (JTW NVR INC HILLSIDE PROPERTY INVEST NVR INC NVR INC MARK III PROPERTIES INC EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL FOUNTAINHEAD 624 LLC COUNTRY CHASE LAND TRUST NVR INC ROE KRYSTAL M (JTWROS) NVR INC NVR INC INTENT ONE LLC BREW KAYLA B (JTWROS) DEVERICK LENNIE TIGERVILLE ROAD VENTURE DANSBY MELISSA JOHNSON ALIZABETH A RICE JOSHUA M HUGHEY ALISON P ESCOBAR RENSUM D (JTWROS MOUNTAIN CREEK REAL ESTA CAMPBELL ROBERT DOUGLAS MARK III PROPERTIES INC

BUYER

ADDRESS

CLAYTON DUSTIN W (JTWROS BROOME RAE ANN LITTLEJOHN BENJAMIN L (J DELDEVERT CHRISTELLE TOMPKINS JONATHAN E (JTW DOWNS MARUO D ATKINS RONALD CHARLES SR ANGHUBB PROPERTIES LLC BOYD TAYLOR A KNIBBE ANDREAS ANTHONY GRADY (JTWROS) LOBIKIS CYNTHIA S (JTWRO CHUNKO KERRY LYNNE PHOENIX DREAM HOMES LLC BEAUVAIS ERIK GREAT SOUTHERN HOMES INC TELLEY ROBIN WOODRUFF FRANK B STRUSS AMANDA (JTWROS) SEELIG RACHEL (JTWROS) KELLY COMPANY INC CURE CANDY (JTWROS) SMITH BROOKE K (JTWROS) HOSEK LINDA KIRKUS SANFORD C (JTWROS KATALINIC MARY DOLORES ( GARRETT KATHARINE MASSIE COX RAYMOND THOMAS (JTWR LUPO FRIEDA M DAVIS CELESTE M (JTWROS) OWENS MARZILLIA H (JTWRO SINGH JATINDER CAMILLERI CHESTER T (JTW BRICELAND CHERYL BROCK HUTCHINSON DAVID FLEMINGS BELINDA L ARGUELLO DANIEL A VELASQ HENDERSON GAP LLC FRANK ASHTIN SKYLER (JTW TORRES ROBERTO O WATSON LAURA G MALONEY TUCKER OTT CONNIE (JTWROS) ROSCHE KELLY NVR INC WARATUKE JEFFERY A RAWLS CHRISTOPHER S WEHUNT JOANN HOEY DANIEL HALLIDAY JOHN ROBERT WAL SALATINO ELIZABETH (JTWR DRUMMOND MARY FRANCIS RAIGOSA JAIME A GREEN STEPHANIE Q MAHRAN PATRICIA WINIFRED SK BUILDERS INC DEAL ADAM R CRINER JOHN (JTWROS) BUGNER DEVON M OZKAPTAN KENNETH H KELLET CRYSTAL (JTWROS) GARRISON BETHANY J (JTWR KERNS SANDRA (JTWROS) NVR INC

140 HARTWOOD LAKE LN 120 SUMMER OAK LN 14 RAMBLEWOOD LN 5 GROUSE RIDGE WAY 6 BAYTREE CT 504 GRACE HILL PL 1730 SCUFFLETOWN RD 4 HENSON PL # L 604 PARKINS MILL RD 25 GROVEVIEW TRL 213 AUGUSTA DR PO BOX 661 14 INDIAN LAUREL CT 217 E PARK AVE 2857 WESTPORT RD 90 N ROYAL TOWER DR 117 PAQCOLET DR 203 DOWNS RD 103 WOLF CREEK CT 74 MADELINE CIR 34 CANSO ST 2362 RICE POND RD 327 WATERTON WAY 200 FAIRMEADOW WAY 302 TULIP TREE LN 381 AMBERLEAF WAY 31 CAPERTON WAY 202 OAKLAND WAY 7 CRAFTON ST 4848 BETH LN 207 APPLEHILL WAY 458 WOODBARK CT 1479 MOUNT LEBANON RD 5 LAKE FARM CT 9 MAPLESTEAD FARMS CT 12 IVYBERRY RD 109 CREEKLAND WAY 1312 DEVENGER RD 107 GATEWOOD AVE 114 STOCKBRIDGE DR 504 HARWOOD CT 107 LANDWOOD AVE 102 FAIRMEADOW WAY 114 FAIRMEADOW WAY 651 BROOKFIELD PKWY STE 200 102 ELLIS MILL ST 119 FAIRLANE DR 308 CATTERICK WAY 23 MAPLESTEAD FARMS CT 16 WOODVILLE AVE 19 MAPLESTEAD FARMS CT 11 MAPLESTEAD FARMS CT 58 PEGGY CT 205 TANNER RD 618 FAIRVIEW LAKE WAY 955 W WADE HAMPTON BLVD STE 7 108 KESTREL CT 404 BARN SWALLOW DR 300 HILLCREST DR 17 TILDEN CT 5 CROCUS CT 101 ARTILLERY RD 234 RUSTY BROOK RD 651 BROOKFIELD PKWY STE 200

Now with two locations to serve our clients! Simpsonville/Five Forks 100 Batesville Road Simpsonville, SC 29681 864.520.1000

Downtown Greer 116 Trade Street Greer, SC 29651 864.520.1001

GREENVILLEMOVES.COM


05.18.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 31

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

Featured Property

Cedar Mountain, NC

500 Cedar Lane, Cedar Mountain, NC 28718

Home Info Price: $1,950,000 MLS#: 20193248 Bedrooms: 6+ Baths: 5.5+ Sq. Ft: 5,000 Lot Size: 64 Acres Schools: Brevard Elementary, Brevard Middle, and Brevard High Agent: James McKissick| 864.751.1000 james@convergentpg.com Convergent Property Group

Nestled among the Blue Ridge mountains and close to the continental divide sits a 64-acre mountain compound awaiting a new steward. Owned by one family for decades, this property boasts two houses, a 4-stall barn, pond and stream amid 64 rolling acres of undeveloped pasture and woods. The highest elevation knoll offers breathtaking views of the North Carolina mountains. Located half way between Caesars head, SC and Brevard, NC this mountain oasis is the perfect retreat for a discerning, conservation minded family. Both the log cabin and the guest house feature screen porches providing the perfect perch overlooking the tranquil pond ripe

with wildlife. The cabin, built with 200 year old timbers, is an open floor plan and has hardwoods throughout and both homes have stone fire hearths for chilly nights. If you ever decide to venture off the compound the area has plenty to offer. Quaint shops and fabulous restaurants are only 9 miles away in Brevard, and for the avid hiker, DuPont State Forest is an adventurer’s dream. This tranquil retreat is a rare opportunity to experience the unspoiled magnificence of the mountains. Don’t let this true slice of heaven pass you by.

Real Estate News

Blackstream Christie’s welcomes Heidi Anderson Blackstream Christie’s is proud to welcome Heidi Anderson to our team. Heidi’s philosophy is that clients always come first. Having spent over twenty years in non-profit administration, Heidi strongly believes that her job has always been to empower her clients to help take control of their lives. She is a super connector, and her thought process is always to make the connection between who she knows, what she sees, and what her Anderson clients need. Every house Heidi sees is run through her database of buyers, and finding the perfect owner for every listing she takes is what inspires her. Assisting buyers and sellers to push their goals forward, and counseling clients when the process gets rough are key components in Heidi’s mission. Heidi takes the search for the perfect home very seriously, but she also wants her

clients to have fun looking at houses! The client’s house is their “charging station,” and she wants them to LOVE where they live. We are proud to have Heidi as part of the Blackstream Christie’s family.

Blackstream Christie’s welcomes Lydia Calder

Calder

Blackstream Christie’s is proud to welcome Lydia Calder to our team. Compassionate, altruistic loyal, and honest, Lydia brings all these qualities to her love of real estate. Her long connection to Greenville has given Lydia a deep love for not only the city, but the people within the community. Having worked in customer service over the years, her determination, people skills, and problem solving are central to the goals she has for her clients. continued on PAGE 32


32 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.18.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Featured Property

Clemson

681 Campbell Bridge Road, Seneca, SC 29678

Home Info Price: $1,250,000 Bedrooms: 3 Baths: 2.5 Lot Size: 179.24 Acres

MLS#: 20193248 Sq. Ft: 2544 Year Built: 1996

Schools: Blue Ridge Elementary, Seneca Middle, and Seneca High Agent: John Stillwell | 864.414.1879 john@jirland.com Jenks Inc. Realty

Woodwinds Farm is a showcase South Carolina Foothills farm in a premium location just 15 minutes from Clemson University. It features fenced pasture, a 3 bedroom brick home, barns, a metal workshop, creeks and 3 ponds, mature hardwoods and frontage on Coneross Creek. This family-owned farm has been a working cattle farm for several decades, and there are +/- 58 acres of pasture that are fenced and cross fenced, all with access to water. The rest of the acreage features lots of mature hardwoods including red and white oaks, poplar, and hickory. There are 3 ponds on the farm, including two half-acre fish ponds. Recreational opportunities abound! There are hunting

opportunities for deer, wild turkey, small game and you could easily plant a dove field. There are two public boat ramps close to the farm offering access to watersports and world class fishing on Lake Hartwell! Hiking trails, camping and waterfalls in the Blue Ridge mountains, as well as Lakes Keowee and Jocassee, are just a short drive away. This farm is ready to go for you and your family to operate as a livestock farm, residential estate, or a secluded family gathering spot for Clemson football weekends! Downtown Seneca is 5 minutes away, Clemson University is 15 minutes, and Anderson is a 40 minute drive. Contact us for a tour of this beautiful property!

Real Estate News cont. Lydia is a member of the Community Service Workgroup with the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS, and she is a member of the Home Builders Association. When not working, Lydia enjoys spending time downtown or at the park with her daughter and dog, volunteering at the animal care clinic, and visiting her alma mater Converse College. We are proud to have Lydia as part of the Blackstream Christie’s family.

Integrated Media Publishing Names Berkshire Hathaway Homeservices C. Dan Joyner, Realtors A 2018 South Carolina Top Workplace Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS has been awarded a 2018 Top Workplaces honor by Integrated Media Publishing. The list is based solely on employee feedback gathered through a third-party survey administered by research partner Energage, LLC (formerly WorkplaceDynamics), a leading provider of technologybased employee engagement tools. The anonymous survey measures several aspects of

workplace culture, including alignment, execution, and connection, just to name a few. “Top Workplaces is more than just recognition,” said Doug Claffey, CEO of Energage. “Our research shows organizations that earn the award attract better talent, experience lower turnover, and are better equipped to deliver bottom-line results. Their leaders prioritize and carefully craft a healthy workplace culture that supports employee engagement.” C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS ranked second in the state in the large company category and also received special recognition in the Managers metric. “This award means so much to me personally, as it reflects our mission to remain the family-oriented company my father started 54 years ago,” commented Danny Joyner, president and CEO. “Our culture simply can’t be replicated at another firm in the Upstate,” Joyner continued. “Becoming a Top Workplace isn’t something organizations can buy,” Claffey said. “It’s an achievement organizations have worked for and a distinction that gives them a competitive advantage. It’s a big deal.”


ARTS & CULTURE THE PASTA ADDICT’S HOME COOKING page

Spaghetti aglio olio e peperoncino Will Crooks/ Greenville Journal COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

BACKSTAGE: A Q&A WITH JESSICA ECKENROD page

34

42

THE FOLK-POP OF APRICOT BLUSH page

40 05.18.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 33


34 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.18.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

BACKSTAGE A Q&A with production manager Jessica Eckenrod WORDS BY SARA PEARCE PHOTO BY WILL CROOKS


05.18.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 35

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM Jessica Eckenrod has had a love for theater and the arts since a young age and knew in college that she wanted to pursue it as her full-time career. Eckenrod puts emphasis on learning as she encounters new roles and challenges. She initially started in the arts as a young singer/songwriter then took on acting along with production management. She is in her second season of being production manager for Centre Stage and is currently working on “Red Herring,” which opened May 10. The play is her directorial debut with a mainstage production at Centre Stage.

When did you first become involved in production management and directing, and when did you know this is something you wanted to do long-term? At 15, I began working on stage crews in a small community theater in my hometown of Morristown, Tenn. I was always ready to learn anything and everything, so I kept “graduating” into the next level of crew life and given more responsibilities. College came, and when I wasn’t able to do theater full time with my current major, I just switched. Scenic design, lighting design, script analysis, and character work were a part of my everyday life, and I’d be fine if the remainder of my days were like this. I started writing and directing original works in college, alongside some classics here and there. Whenever I began composing, the game changed once again to musicals all day every day. My focus shifted to directing song cycles and original works. And thus, musical theater won me over completely. Production management didn’t quite fall into my life, but it wasn’t something I’d “considered” heavily. I’d done all of the aspects but never managed them all. I’m heading into my second full season as PM with Centre Stage, and once again, it’s been a journey that has helped me grow, learn, and improve myself as both a performer and a professional in the business of theater. 

What has been your most challenging play to direct and why? I have a deep, deep love for musical theater. Classics, modern, abstract — it doesn’t matter. There’s something about the process of creating a musical that fascinates me. That’s why directing “Red Herring” at Centre Stage was such a challenge for me. A nonmusical on a very large scale with over a dozen locations and a script that mirrors a screenplay was incredibly intimidating. An ensemble of six actors took on 18 different roles, and each had character work to undergo, costumes to quickly change into, and about a billion props to carry on and off. There were zero lyrics to hide the quiet moments, no choreography to fill in the breaks. There was just — the stage. Hardest show to date and I can’t wait for the next one.

Which actors/directors/designers inspire you?

“Production management didn’t quite fall into my life, but it wasn’t something I’d ‘considered’ heavily. I’d done all of the aspects but never managed them all.”

What has been your most enjoyable play to direct and why? Eesh! That’s a toss-up. First place is [a] tie between two original works: “Story” and “Letters from the Public.” My first crack at directing a fullscale musical, “Story”  was an incredibly lengthy process that taught me a lot about theatrical aspects that I never considered as an actor. As an original musical, it was my first opportunity (and a very rewarding one) to hear things that had been living in my brain for years finally take the stage. I co-produced “Letters from the Public” two years ago in downtown Greenville alongside my wonderful boyfriend, partner, choreographer — the talented Michael Cherry. This was an unforgettable experience due to us working with an ENTIRE “community” to bring it to life. We collected letters from around the Upstate, and some from states away, that touched on personal moments or memories. Anonymous or not, the letters were adapted into their own respective song and performed by local Upstate vocalists and musicians. Many authors of the letters were in attendance, and to see the effect on them, as well as the audience, was MIND-BLOWING.

Actor(s) – Is it appropriate to say Meryl [Streep]? Because… it’s Meryl. Among a LONG list of others. Director — Rachel Chavkin and Christopher Rose (local) Designers – Ming Cho Lee (set design) and Miranda DeBusk (lighting/local)

What do you most enjoy about Greenville’s theater scene? Top two: the talent and the people! When I first moved to South Carolina, I was incredibly impressed with the actor/actress scene. Singers and dancers alike on a Broadway level, and some of them having even been on Broadway! There is a wide range of talent in this ever-growing city, and I feel that theatergoers have truly only seen the tip of the iceberg. Now that I’ve been a part of the production world a bit longer, I have seen the work and creativity it takes to put up these amazing productions the Upstate theater community continues to offer. I have formed friendships with hardworking artists who inspire me to improve myself and who get meaningful work with a fulltime job. Greenville is incredibly lucky to have so many brilliant minds operating in the creative department!

How has Greenville’s theater scene changed since you first became involved? So much growth. When I first moved to Greenville five years ago, I knew of a few staple theaters in the area that had been established for at least 15 years or more. By year two, a new theater was over here. Year three, two more theaters had risen up, each location holding a different niche than the other! With more opportunity to perform came larger pools of PHENOMENAL actors/dancers/singers. I’ve had the opportunity to see more modern works in the area and still have a place to go see my favorite classics!

What is your hope for the future of theater in Greenville? Collaboration.

What’s your favorite play? I have to say it. “The Crucible.” I’ll shout it from the rooftops. “THE CRUCIBLE”. It needs to be done, so I can play John Proctor. Bottom line. I read “The Crucible” initially while a high schooler and have continued to read it for leisure when there’s a moment to spare. The message of how far faith in the unseen can go and what belief in ourselves can accomplish — or not accomplish — resonates all day, every day.

Backstage is a recurring series that appears in the Greenville Journal’s culture section that is designed to bring the theater community and the community at-large closer together through Q&As with local actors, directors, and designers who are instrumental in shaping our performing arts scene.


36 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.18.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Dylan Scott’s style of country music reflects multiple influences VINCENT HARRIS | ARTS & CULTURE WRITER

vharris@communityjournals.com

In the “About” section of country singer Dylan Scott’s website, after a brief biography, he speaks of the aspirations he has for his 2016 self-titled debut album. "It would be nice to have a No. 1 come out of this," he says. "But I'd love to make some noise and build the fan base level by level, just like we made this album.” Well, there’s nothing like achieving your goal. Last year, a single off of the album, “My Girl,” took it’s mix of rock guitars, country twang, and pop hooks to the top of the Billboard Country Airplay charts, and it was actually the third Top 40 hit Scott had off the album. “It’s crazy, to be honest with you,” Scott says. “It’s what I dreamed about. It’s what I always wanted to do. We’ve had a lot of work to get where we’re at, and it feels rewarding to be able to do it. But it’s still a little crazy to know that we’re able to do this for a living, people are coming out to see us, and they’re singing our songs back to us. It’s fun.” Scott has the music business, and particularly Music City, in his blood. His father was a Nashville guitar ace who toured with old-school country acts like Freddie Fender, which began Scott’s lifelong love affair with classic and contemporary country. “I heard a lot of old-school country music, and I loved guys like Keith Whitley, George Strait, and Tim McGraw,” he says. “That’s what I listened to as a kid.” But country wasn’t the only thing Scott was into, as a quick spin through his album will illustrate. He has a good ear for polished, pop-friendly choruses, and he even slips an occasional rap into his verses. “As I got older, I started listening to a little hip-hop, like Lil Wayne, and a little pop,” he says, “and guys like Maroon 5 and Kings of Leon. Even today, I listen to everything and try to take a little bit from it all and put it into my own music.” And as it happens, Scott thinks that wide-ranging musical curiosity is what’s attracting fans, who have put his album into the top five on the Billboard chart and streamed his songs a stunning 330 million times. “I just think that’s where music is these days,” he says. “My crowd is basically my age demographic, and we kind

Dylan Scott. Photo by Joseph Llanes

of grew up the same way. We’d listen to a country station and then flip it over to a pop station. So, I kind of know my crowd. I know what they like, which is the same thing I like.” Scott split the songs on his album between tunes he wrote himself and songs by outside writers, but he says his goal is the same for both. “Whether I’m writing a song or looking at someone else’s, the main question is, ‘Can I see myself performing this song onstage?’” he says. “That’s the biggest thing; can I see people relating to it as I sing it? That’s what I look for the most. It’s about a good song and how it translates to people.” In fact, Scott, who will perform at the Blind Horse Saloon in Greenville on Friday, had so many good songs stocked up for his debut album that he had to leave some off, including a sweeping, emotional ballad called “Sleep-

ing Beauty.” Luckily, he was able to revisit the album last year and issue a 16-track deluxe version. “That was really cool because there were songs that didn’t make it onto the album, songs like ‘Sleeping Beauty’ and ‘Can’t Take Her Anywhere,’” he says. “They didn’t quite fit, so when we got the chance to do a deluxe version, it was perfect. It worked because I got the music out there that I wanted to put out there, and the fans loved it.”

DYLAN SCOTT W/ JOHN MIRENDA WHEN Friday, May 18, 8 p.m. WHERE Blind Horse Saloon, 1035 Lowndes Hill Road TICKETS $17 adv, $20 door INFO 864-233-1381, www.blind-horse.com/index.html

Greenville County Schools

Celebrates CLASS ACTS Each year, hundreds of Greenville County Schools students, teams, and staff use their skills and talents to achieve state and national recognition. Class Acts shares many of these exciting accomplishments with the greater community.

Check out the NEW CLASS ACTS on GreenvilleJournal.com/greenville-county-schools


05.18.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 37

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE SCCT’s 2018-19 season lineup appeals to a broad audience, from toddlers to retirees EMILY PIETRAS | MANAGING EDITOR

epietras@communityjournals.com

When it’s time to put together a new season lineup, each year the South Carolina Children’s Theatre faces a familiar challenge: selecting an array of shows that appeal to a broad demographic. With audiences that range from toddlers to retirees, to everyone else in between, SCCT hopes each season to offer shows that are accessible and enjoyable for all, says Artistic/Education Director Betsy Bisson. The 2018-2019 Mainstage season’s offerings include old favorites and new delights, from a heartwarming tale about friendship between a frog and a toad to a laugh-out-loud musical based on a popular animated film.

bill,” Bisson says. “It’s Oscar-winning and Tony Award-winning, so it has that cred behind it. The characters are entertaining, and it runs the broad spectrum of the audience. Little kids will enjoy it, and so will adults because there’s jokes for them as well.” Manny Houston, a former SCCT student and recent College of Charleston graduate, will be playing the talkative, happy-go-lucky Donkey. “We’re excited to have him back with us,” Bisson says.

“The Best Christmas Pageant Ever” Dec. 1-9 | Last produced in 2014 What it’s about: The six Herdman children — Imogen, Claude, Ralph, Leroy, Ollie, and Gladys — are not well behaved. In fact, some may call them “the worst kids in the history of the world.” The kids’ offenses range from cursing, smoking, and bullying to setting an abandoned toolshed on fire. When the kids decide to attend Sunday school one week (only because

“Mr. Popper’s Penguins” Jan. 26-Feb. 3, 2019 | New to SCCT What it’s about: Mr. Popper, a poor house painter living in Minnesota, enjoys daydreaming of faraway places and reading about famous explorers. Mr. Popper had previously sent fan mail to an admiral, who is now exploring the polar regions. As a thank you, the admiral sends Mr. Popper a present — an adult male penguin. The penguin lives in Mr. Popper’s icebox, but when he becomes unhappy, Mr. Popper asks the local aquarium for guidance. The aquarium sends over a female penguin, and soon the pair has several babies. Now living in a house full of penguins, Mr. Popper decides to make the best of a hectic situation and train them to form a traveling circus act. Why it was chosen: “It’s based on the book, not the Jim Carrey movie,” Bisson says. “The 1930 version of the book is quite charming. … Dancing penguins is hard to beat, so it’s going to be a lot of fun.”

“Elephant & Piggie’s We Are In a Play” June 15-22, 2019 | New to SCCT What it’s about: “Elephant & Piggie’s We Are In a Play” is based on the popular “Elephant and Piggie” early reader series by Mo Willems. The comic-book-style books follow Gerald, an elephant, and Piggie, a pig, and the lessons they learn about being good friends to each other and others. The musical adaptation of this series follows Gerald and Piggie on an exciting day as they use their imagination and get ready to attend a party hosted by the funloving singing squirrel trio, the Squirrelles. Why it was chosen: “People that don’t have children may not be familiar with Mo Willems, rock star of the Pre-K crowd,” Bisson says. “He has a series of ‘Elephant and Piggie’ books, so this is a compilation of them. And we have The Squirrelles — like The Shirelles — singing narrative behind.”

2nd Stage Shows

“Shrek The Musical” Sept. 8-23 | New to SCCT What it’s about: Based on the hit 2001 animated movie “Shrek,” this musical follows an alienated ogre, Shrek, who must reluctantly travel to the Kingdom of Duloc when a group of fairytale creatures descends on his isolated swamp property after being banished from the kingdom by the wicked Lord Farquaad. Along the way, Shrek is accompanied by a gregarious donkey named Donkey. Upon his arrival, Lord Farquuad tells Shrek that he can have his swampland back — if he rescues Princess Fiona, who is trapped in a castle guarded by a fire-breathing dragon, for him. Why it was chosen: “It’s a fun show. We haven’t done it before, and we like to pick something big-ish for our season opener, and this one seems to fit that

“A Year With Frog & Toad”

they hear about the free snacks), they become participants in the church’s annual Christmas pageant, taking the roles of Mary, Joseph, the three Wise Men, and the Angel of the Lord. The children, who have never before heard the birth story of Jesus, soon add their own interpretations and spin to the pageant, resulting in chaos and hilarity. Why it was chosen: “This is my seventh or eighth time directing it, and I’m super excited about it,” Bisson says. “It’s a great redemption story. The Herdmans tug at my heart.”

March 30-April 7, 2019 | Last produced in 2006 What it’s about: Based on the classic “Frog and Toad” illustrated children’s series, this musical adaptation chronicles the friendship of the happy and relaxed Frog and his more serious counterpart, Toad, and the fun adventures they have with each other and their fellow woodland creatures over the course of a year. Why it was chosen: “It’s been nominated for Tony awards. This is a reduced version of it, so it’s about an hour-long show. It has a sort of jazzy score. … It’s very popular with the kids,” Bisson says. “Matt Giles from Seattle Rep is going to direct that show, so it should be a big romp, a lot of fun.”

This year, SCCT is partnering with the Kroc Center, which will host three of the four 2nd Stage productions. “2nd Stage is a great way to test a child that hasn’t been to theater,” Bisson says. For example, “Teddy Bears’ Picnic” encourages audience movement and participation, which is helpful for young children. “It’s a great way to introduce kids to theater,” Bisson says. “The Teddy Bears’ Picnic: A Play With Me Play” Aug. 25-Nov. 20 At 1200 Pendleton St. “Click, Black, Boo! A Tricky Treat” Oct. 13-27 At the Kroc Center “The Littlest Angel” Dec. 14 & 15 At the Kroc Center “Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse” Feb. 15-23, 2019 At the Kroc Center


38 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.18.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

GREENVILLE CHORALE ANNOUNCES 2018-19 SEASON rest, Alf Houkom, Eric Whitacre, and Paul Hindemith. Especially entertaining selections include “Animal Crackers,” a set of poems by Ogden Nash, set to music by Eric Whitacre; "Three riddles," a Swingle Singers arrangement of Bach; and a version of “William Tell Overture” for voices. Vick says he tries to choose a wide range of repertoire for the chamber ensemble that includes tight jazz harmonies and pieces that are fun and challenging. “I ask a lot of the chamber ensemble,” he says. “The Chorale Sings What Orchestras Play”

The Greenville Chorale will perform five concerts this upcoming season, which range from a bluegrass mass to a patriotic-themed concert. Photo provided ARIEL TURNER | STAFF

love this. If you like big band, you’re going to love it. If you like good choral music, you’re going love it,” Vick says.

aturner@communityjournals.com

The Greenville Chorale has announced its 58th concert season for 2018-2019, which includes a wide variety of genres and styles to appeal to a broad base of musical tastes. Bingham Vick Jr., the Chorale’s artistic director and conductor, says he selected programming that the Chorale will enjoy performing as much as he hopes the audience will enjoy listening. For him, that means choosing material that is accessible for the entire choir and then narrowing down the hundreds of options for the five concerts throughout the season. “Picking repertoire for the Chorale is on one level very difficult and on the other hand, is very easy,” Vick says. “Chorale Sings Bluegrass and Big Band Music” The fall concert on Oct. 20, 8 p.m., at the Peace Center will feature two diverse selections in collaboration with two instrumental ensembles. First, the Chorale will perform “Come Away to the Skies – a high, lonesome mass,” a bluegrass mass, accompanied by

“Chorale Sings Messiah”

The Chuck Nation Bluegrass Band will perform with the Chorale during the fall concert. Photo provided

the Chuck Nation Bluegrass Band from Gainesville, Ga. The bluegrass mass is based on old, Southern hymn tunes “Do Lord,” “Brethren We Have Met To Worship,” and “What Wondrous Love Is This.” Vick says that these standard tunes in the hymnody are woven into movements in a remarkable way. The second half of the program will feature three “Sacred Concerts” by Duke Ellington, combining big-band jazz sounds with sacred texts. The Chorale will be joined by the Greenville Jazz Collective Big Band. “If you like bluegrass, you’re going to

The Chorale’s 35th annual family Christmas concert on Dec. 18, 7:30 p.m., at McAlister Auditorium will feature a performance of G.F.Handel’s well-known “Messiah.” The Chorale will be joined by the Chorale Orchestra, area professionals who also perform regularly with the Greenville Symphony Orchestra and the Hendersonville Symphony Orchestra. The Chorale most recently performed “Messiah” in 2008. Members of the Chorale will perform as the soloists. “The Nature of Things” The Herring Chamber Ensemble, composed of 24 professional vocalists who are also members of the Chorale, will perform its 22nd annual winter concert on Feb. 17, 2019, 2 p.m., at Charles E. Daniel Chapel, Furman University, and again on Feb. 24, 2019, 4 p.m., at Church of Our Saviour, Johns Island, S.C. Selections include composers Jake Runestad, Kim André Arnesen, Dan For-

The Chorale’s spring concert on April 12, 2019, 8 p.m., at First Baptist Church, will feature the Chorale singing music composed originally for instrumental ensembles. These include well-known works “Largo” from Dvorak’s “New World Symphony,” “Nimrod” from Edward Elgar’s “Enigma Variations,” and “Adagio for Strings” by Samuel Barber. Patricia Hunt Fisher, who outbid many others for the chance to guest conduct the Chorale at their annual fundraiser auction, will lead the Chorale for one number. She is a longtime choral singer and was the choral director at Travelers Rest High School for more than 30 years. The program will also include some “choral humor” by various composers, including Franz Josef Haydn and P.D.Q. Bach, the fictitious “son” of J.S. Bach. Continuing the Greenville Chorale’s tradition of recognizing one of the area’s premier high school choirs, the program will include a set of selections performed by a choir that will be selected over the summer. 15th Annual Lakeside Patriotic Concert Rounding out the season, the Chorale joins the Furman Lakeside Band on June 27, 2019, for the annual free concert in the Furman Amphitheater. The concert, which always opens with “America the Beautiful,” will feature light classics, traditional standards, and Broadway show tunes. “It’s fun for the crowd to let their hair down and relax,” Vick says. Tickets for shows are available through the Peace Center Box Office (300 S. Main St.), by phone (864-4673000), or at the door.


The Garden Party AT C A N C E R S U R V I V O R S PA R K P R E S E NT E D BY

June 2, 2018  6-9 p.m.  52 Cleveland Street

Gather your friends for an enchanting evening of morsels, music and meandering. Come celebrate the opening of Greenville’s newest park designed to spark the spirit and soothe the soul. Limited tickets can be purchased for $125 each at CancerSurvivorsPark.org/the-garden-party.php Garden Party Attire. Jacket Optional. SPONSORED BY: Michelin

Millenium Private Wealth

Infinity Marketing

Gossett Concrete Pipe Company, Inc.

McKinney Dodge

Flourish

Joan Herlong & Associates Sotheby’s International Realty

Community Journals

Mark Susko Visual Design

WYCHE, P.A.

For more information, call 864-255-5010 or email RSVP@CancerSurvivorsPark.org


40 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.18.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

MUSIC NOTES

SPOTLIGHT: APRICOT BLUSH WORDS BY VINCENT HARRIS | PHOTO BY WILL CROOKS

Band Name: Apricot Blush Formed: 2016 From: Greenville Members: Jackson Wise (vocals, guitar, multiple other instruments) and a shifting collective that often includes Jonah Terry (bass, banjo), Sydnee Albertson (singing saw), Brandon Gallagher (drums), Dan Fetterolf (violin), and Wesley Heaton and Marissa Splendore (trumpets) What They Sound Like: Emotional but immaculately played folk-pop with near-orchestral arrangements; think The Decemberists or Microphones’ Phil Elvrum Who They Like: Hugger Mugger, Wallpaper

Apricot Blush wasn’t actually a band until after their first self-titled album. Jackson Wise essentially wrote and recorded all 10 songs himself. The follow-up, “Where Blew A Flower, May A Flower No More,” expands the lineup to 10 players, and it’s in every sense a step forward for Wise. The music is more cinematic and dynamic, moving from spare, acoustic-guitar interludes to haunting full-ensemble moments that weave acoustic instruments and vocal harmonies around one another, with Albertson’s haunting, fluttering singing saw hovering over the songs like a ghost. This new, bigger version of Apricot Blush came from the unexpected strong response Wise got to his first collection of songs, which then created a need to play them live. “The response blew out what I expected it to be,” Wise says. “I expected like 10 of my friends to listen to it and say, ‘Good job, buddy.’ But that wasn’t the case, which was great. But I still didn’t feel comfortable playing live; I didn’t know how I could do that. I recorded it largely by myself, so I didn’t know how we could transpose it, but Jonah [Terry] inspired me to start doing that. And now I love it. I love the theatrical aspect that we can provide live.” Both of Wise’s albums as Apricot Blush have revolved around concepts that might seem odd for a 21-year-old to be concerning himself with. The first album was an often-painful attempt by Wise to deal with having been sexually assaulted and how that assault both affected his view of sex and relationships and spurred a descent into substance abuse. The new album blends two themes: The Inuit leg-

end of Sedna, the vengeful goddess of the sea who must be worshipped in exchange for releasing sea animals for hunters to capture, and Wise’s own urge to placate the demons in his life before moving onward. Deep ideas, to be sure, and Wise says that those concepts come from his time in recovery. “I got sober at age 16, and that’s a big part of my life,” he says. “I learned introspection early on because of that process. I started thinking more analytically, and college really pushed the limits of my thinking. I learned about Sedna in a Native American Religion and Culture class, and the more I learned about it, the more interesting it was. I didn’t expect it to resonate, but it was a beautiful story and I really liked it.” Whatever resonance Wise felt with that legend was intertwined with an urge to go further creatively on Apricot Blush’s second album. “I wanted to push myself,” he says. “This one isn’t as precise or intense as the last one; it’s very wideranging. The last album was made to help me cope; this one was to push myself as far as being a writer.” Having recently graduated college, Wise is preparing for grad school and hoping to become a counselor for those in recovery from their own addictions. That means that, after their upcoming album-release show at The Ninjaplex in Greenville on Saturday and a brief East Coast tour, there might not be many more Apricot Blush shows in the near future. “I’m not really sure what the future holds,” he says, “I don’t really have a choice but to write, but the shows might simmer down a little bit. We’ll put a question mark on that one.” Jackson Wise of Apricot Blush


MAKE GCCA YOUR FIRST STOP, FIRST FRIDAYS.

FRIday, JUN 01 6–9pm EXHIBIT OPENING

AT GREENVILLE CENTER FOR CREATIVE ARTS SPONSORED BY

UPCOMING EVENTS Drawing Marathon Fri., June 1, 10am–9pm & Sat., June 2, 10am–4pm $20 / $10 members ARTalk Tue., June 12, 6–7pm Persistence of the Figure 2018/19 Brandon Fellowship Application Open June 1–July 13 Member Show Deadline to RSVP July 19

Village of West Greenville 25 Draper Street 864.735.3948 artcentergreenville.org

MAIN GALLERY: The Persistence of the Figure (June 1–July 25) Featuring the work of Gill Alexander, Lucy Bailey, Michael Benevenia, Colleen Critcher, and Brandi Reed

REGISTER FOR SUMMER SESSIONS June 4–July 22 (Session I) July 23–September 2 (Session II)

FRIday, AUG 03 6–9pm EXHIBIT OPENING MAIN GALLERY: GCCA Annual Showcase Including: Member Show, 2017–2018 Brandon Fellows Final Show, and Summer Art Camp Showcase (Aug. 3–Sept. 26, 2018)

REGISTER FOR FALL SESSIONS September 10–October 21 (Session I) October 29–December 9 (Session II)


feast

CARBS DONE RIGHT WORDS BY ARIEL TURNER PHOTOS BY WILL CROOKS

Paccheri with fresh pomodoro

The Pasta Addict wants to bring fresh pasta served in a casual atmosphere to Greenville Sunday suppers with his Italian-American family in New York City were an important tradition for Anthony Pepe. His paternal grandmother, Rosie, would host until she passed away, and for her, the more mouths to feed, the better. “Come over with your friends,” Pepe recalls she would say. “Before you know it, in 20 minutes you have a spread out, like literally the last supper. The sauce, and the meatballs, and the red sauce, pastas.” Pepe took that culinary influence, and, through working with and studying a se-

ries of well-known Italian chefs while he worked as a bartender and beverage director in New York, he’s developed his own style under the name The Pasta Addict that if all goes well will have a brick-andmortar location in the Greenville area within the year. His concept is to serve approachable, quick, fresh pasta in a casual, trendy environment. He’ll make all of his pasta by hand, and all sauces will be made inhouse. “Those Sunday mornings, you smell meat frying in the red sauce. I love that, but I also love that true Italian, real-deal Italian,” he says. Pepe and his wife, Jennifer, and their two young children, Anthony, 7, and Adrienne, 4, moved to Simpsonville in August 2017 from Long Island. Jennifer Pepe’s parents had moved to the area 12 years ago, and when her mother died suddenly a year ago, the Pepes decided to move clos-

er to her father. The timing worked out with Anthony’s job with a restaurant group ending, and he and Jennifer were looking for a change of pace. “We were busting our butts up there,” Jennifer says, explaining that they both took different trains into the city for work and rarely spent time together with their children. After moving, Anthony landed a job bartending at Jianna, and Jennifer does in-home child care, allowing her to stay home. But on Monday nights — Anthony’s night off — when the two would want to go out for dinner and get some good Italian, they discovered most of the local options were closed. He had started perfecting his own classic Italian dishes at home for the last few years, so instead of eating out, he ramped up his in-home cooking, getting the kids involved in rolling out the pasta dough,

and Jennifer started photographing the finished products and posting them on Instagram under the handle @ThePastaAddict. After enough positive feedback and serious discussion, they decided to start looking at bringing the concept to the general public. Sweet Sippin’ in Simpsonville recently hosted The Pasta Addict pop-up, which was the Pepes’ first foray into cooking for a crowd. They’re also tweaking a business plan and looking for a permanent location near downtown Greenville. “There’s a void here for fresh pasta,” he says, adding that a casual and accessible atmosphere are key differences from most Italian restaurants that serve fresh pasta locally. Anthony Pepe’s inspiration to rethink the version of Italian cooking he grew up with came from first tasting the veal ragu served at Bar Italia, which was run by Denis Franceschini, the former executive

42 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.18.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM


small plates FOOD NEWS & EVENTS BY ARIEL TURNER

feast Caterers are da real MVP Events season is in full swing, and that means many catering companies are booked solid every weekend for the next three to four months. Serving 40-200-plus people at a time is no small feat. Imagine the stress of making that much food taste exactly right, at the exact desired temperature, all at the exact same moment. You get the idea. It’s a tough job, and one that doesn’t get the same recognition chefs at higher-profile restaurants often do. For instance, last weekend Uptown Company, who catered the Artisphere VIP tent experience, had to plan for roughly 250 guests, which translated to approximately 8,000 individual dishes for the weekend since 90 percent of the food was plated in individual portions. That’s extreme. So at the next gala or wedding you hit, give some props, or even better, slip some cash to those working behind the scenes. They deserve it.

MAIN STAGE SHOW PRESENTED BY

Crazy for Cocobowlz Food trucks are all the rage right now, and I don’t know anyone who’s mad about it, especially with the variety we have in Greenville. One of the newest, Cocobowlz, serving up healthy food-truck fare, has been hot on social media for the last few weeks, and it’s no wonder since the smoothies and bowls they make are total eye candy. If you haven’t seen a photo of a purple acai bowl or hot pink pitaya bowl with the Liberty Bridge and falls as the backdrop, then you must be one of the few people who’s managed to limit your social media intake. Acai and pitaya (dragon fruit) have become increasingly popular as superfoods, packed with antioxidants and vitamins, and Cocobowlz makes them even tastier topped with granola, coconut milk whip, almond butter, all the seeds you could want, and loads of fresh fruit. They also serve smoothies, fresh-pressed juices, and nitro-brewed coffee. So basically, they got you for breakfast, lunch, and midday snack. Check them out on Instagram to see where they’re parking next.

ICYMI from UBJ The proposed shipping container food hall Gather GVL is getting closer and closer to being fully leased. The developer hopes to break ground in July and be open by late fall. So far, they’re up to eight out of 13 signed tenants, and there isn’t a miss in the mix. The next concepts that are enticing for so many reasons were just announced by the owners of Hendersonville, N.C.’s HenDough. First, an authentic-style Mexican restaurant called Mercado Cantina that will serve on a rotating basis mole as a sauce for enchiladas or chilaquiles, tacos, elotes, house-made chips, guacamole, salsas, seafood, ceviche, and aguachile. If that’s not enough, the full-service bar will have a wide selection of mezcal and tequila. Next up is KO Burger, which will be serving burgers styled after Shake Shack’s thin, crispy, griddled patties. If you’ve never had a Shake Shack burger, just wait. (And FYI, Husk’s burger is very similar, so if waiting isn’t your thing, you can snag one of those for lunch or brunch now in the West End). The third is a Roman-style pizza kitchen named Al Taglio. Get ready for focaccia-style pizza by the slice. And good news for those of us with food allergies or limitations: Each of the concepts will have a selection of vegetarian, vegan, and gluten-free options. Also, Murasaki owner Cheng Yap has signed on for a poke bowl concept called Saki Saki, and Rocky Moo from Spartanburg will be keeping it cool with its second location of the new ice cream sandwich concept. corporate chef for the Cipriani Group in New York. “When I first had his ragu, I was mind blown,” he says. “What is this? What am I eating right now? That’s where I always say the addiction started.” Other inspiration came from chefs Scott Conant, seen on the TV show “Chopped,” and Mark Ladner, Mario Batali’s executive chef. What Anthony learned through trial and error at home was the “montecare” method, which Italian cooks use to emulsify the fat in starchy dishes. “Starch in the pasta water is the most important thing. It’s liquid gold,” he says. And to counter a popular misunderstanding about Italian cooking, Anthony says true Italian cooking is simple and fresh, and it doesn’t have to be smothered and overwhelmingly heavy. He uses an Italian cocktail to make his point. “Let’s take the negroni for example. The cocktail. Three ingredients: gin, Campari, sweet vermouth,” he says. COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

MAY 10 - 26 By Michael Hollinger

Thursday - Sunday

FRINGE SERIES

MAY 15, 16, 22, 23 (2018)

Anthony and Jennifer Pepe hope to bring their Italian cooking to a brick-andmortar location in Greenville within the next year.

He compares that to traditional spaghetti pomodoro, which is garlic, basil, tomato, and olive oil. The trick, he says, is allowing the pasta water to reduce and emulsify with the fat to create that addictive creaminess.

“That’s the whole thing. It’s really the technique,” Anthony says. Follow @ThePastaAddict to view their tasty dishes and progress, and for future pop-up information.

GET TICKETS 864.233.6733 CENTRESTAGE.ORG

501 River Street, Greenville SC 29601 info@centrestage.org 05.18.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 43


44 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.18.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

A Tribute to Sharon Jones

CONCERT

MAY 18

featuring Shannon Hoover, Darby Wilcox, Monte Butler, Kelly Jo, Audrey Hamilton, Evan Jacobi, Peter Dimery, Troy House, Matt Dingledine, Jeff Holland, and Tez Sherard Gottrocks, 200 Eisenhower Drive | 9:30 p.m. | $12

Last year, bassist Shannon Hoover from the Greenville Jazz Collective organized a large ensemble to pay tribute to the late soul singer Sharon Jones, who took the country by storm earlier in the decade with her band, The DapKings. A fan for years, Hoover discovered just how tight the group was while he was arranging the charts for his tribute band. “I really loved her music because it had a lot of the same sensibilities as James Brown,” Hoover says. “Her horns followed that pattern of old soul stuff. But as I started putting everything together, I learned about the way they presented her music and how all the parts worked together. It was cool to hear how intricate the background singers, guitar, percussion, drums, and guitar parts could be, even on funk or soul tunes.” As for the musicians Hoover selected, including four vocalists who will each get four-song solo spots, Hoover says it was an easy process. “I knew they were fans, and I love all the things the four vocalists do with their own groups,” he says. “I just picked out tunes they could shine on.” –Vincent Harris FRI

18

PERFORMING ARTS

“James & the Giant Peach Jr.”

Mauldin Youth Theatre Mauldin Cultural Center | 101 East Butler Road $6-$10 See the Mauldin Youth Theatre’s production of Roald Dahl’s “James and the Giant Peach Jr.,” a musical the whole family can enjoy. Featuring a wickedly tuneful score and a curiously quirky script. 864-335-4862 | events@mauldinculturalcenter.org www.bit.ly/JamesAndGiantPeachJrMauldin MUSIC

Beachin’ Fridays

Mauldin Cultural Center | 101 East Butler Road 7-9 p.m. | Fridays | FREE We’re bringing the beach music scene to Mauldin with Beachin’ Fridays. People come from all over the Upstate to converge on the Mauldin Cultural Center’s outdoor amphitheater for evenings of shag dancing, food trucks, and craft beverages. This week features Jim Quick & Coastline. 864-335-4862 www.mauldinculturalcenter.org/beachin-fridays/ events@mauldinculturalcenter.org COMMUNITY

Fresh Fridays on the Grand Lawn

Hartness | 3500 South Highway 14 6-8 p.m. | FREE Fresh Fridays on the Grand Lawn will bring local farmers and artisans to the property to display and sell an assortment of products. The event is open to the public at no charge and will feature family-friendly live entertainment, food, free yoga, cornhole, and more. www.hartnessliving.com/fresh/ FOOD & DRINK

Hot Air Balloon at Greer City Park

Greer Commission of Public Works Greer City Park | 301 E. Poinsett St. 5-8 p.m. | FREE Join Greer CPW, SC811, and the City of Greer in conjunction with the Food Truck Rollout to learn more about calling 8-1-1 to have your underground utility lines marked. A hot air balloon promoting the message will be set up at Greer

City Park. Due to the large crowds anticipated for this event, no tethered rides will be offered, but adults and children are welcome to take photos standing next to the basket and ask the pilot questions. www.greercpw.com THRU SAT

19

SPORTS

Mountains to Main Race Festival Registration

From Seneca to the Peace Center $199-$450 The Upstate’s only race festival to feature a triathlon, half marathon, 5K, and 1K, 2018 Mountains to Main Race Festival, has opened registration. The event will be held May 19. The triathlon starts in Seneca and features a picturesque swim, a challenging rolling bike course, and a net downhill run. The distance running races will occur along the scenic Greenville Health System’s Swamp Rabbit Trail and finish at the Peace Center downtown. mountainstomainstreet.org SAT

19

FAMILY & EDUCATION

Train Day at the Depot

Hub City Railroad Museum 298 Magnolia St., Spartanburg 10 a.m.-3 p.m. | FREE Fun for train lovers of all ages. Trackless train ride, bounce house, 50-foot crawl through inflatable, Lionel Thomas & Friends layout, Hub City Kids Booth, live music, book authors, food available, and more. The museum and the restored Southern Rwy Caboose will be open. View the Norfolk Southern mainline trains from the caboose viewing deck. www.hubcityrrmuseum.org CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

Upstate SC Promise Walk for Preeclampsia

Preeclampsia Foundation Legacy Park | 336 Rocky Slope Road 9:30 a.m.-noon | FREE The Promise Walk for Preeclampsia is the signature awareness and fundraising event of the Preeclampsia Foundation and will take place in cities across the US during the months of May and June. The Upstate SC Promise Walk will

include a walk, an educational program, familyfriendly activities, and a silent auction. www.promisewalk.org/greenville greenville@preeclampsia.org SUN

20

VISUAL ARTS

Sundays at 2: Gallery TalkThe Work of Carl Blair

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College St. 2-3 p.m. | FREE Join us for a celebration of the career and impact of artist, educator, and inspiration Carl Blair on the last day of his exhibition. All Sundays at 2 are free and sponsored by Duke Energy. www.gcma.org TUE

22

CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

The Transformation Breakfast

The Family Effect TD Convention Center | 1 Exposition Drive 7:30-9 a.m. | FREE The Transformation Breakfast is the largest child-advocacy event in South Carolina and raises funds to support The Family Effect. Each year, the Upstate’s most influential leaders come together in support of a common goal to reduce addiction as a leading cause of family collapse and harm to children. We invite you to join more than 1,000 community leaders sponsoring this year’s event. Learn more about the important work being done for local children in crisis and hear firsthand about the collateral effects of substance use disorders. 864-467-3704 | www.familyeffect.org agallagher@thefamilyeffect.org THRU WED

23

VISUAL ARTS

Material Transformation

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper St. A group exhibition of artists George Bedell, Donte Hayes, James Lynch, Rob Millard-Mendez, and Kathy Moore. www.artcentergreenville.org/maingallery WED

23

LECTURE

Peace Voices Community Poetry Reading

Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre 300 S. Main St. | 5:30 p.m. | FREE Celebrate the hard work and creativity of Peace Voices participants. Twenty-five teens and adults – selected from the season’s past workshops – will read their creations publicly for the first time. Come listen to poems made within the Peace Voices program at this free community event. 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768 www.peacecenter.org THRU THU

24

LESSONS & TRAINING

Learn to Play Appalachian Instrument Registration

Preserving Our Southern Appalachian Music Church of the Redeemer | 120 Mauldin Road 6:30-8 p.m. | $60 Registration begins May 10 for lessons learning to play banjo, guitar, fiddle, or mandolin. These lessons are open to children and adults (children must be at least 9 years old). The classes are grouped by skill level and will begin on May 24. Beginners are welcome. Also, rental instruments are available and can be reserved if needed. www.yamupstate.com | susu9196@gmail.com


05.18.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 45

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

MAY 19

James Taylor & His All-Star Band

Bon Secours Wellness Arena | 650 N. Academy St. | 7:30 p.m. | $75, $111

CONCERT

It’s hard to overestimate the effect that James Taylor’s nakedly vulnerable confessional folk songs had on the music scene of the early 1970s. His delivery and instrumentation were so placid and understated that it was sometimes easy to miss the disturbing tales of drug abuse, mental instability, and self-doubt within immortal songs like “Something in the Way She Moves” and “Fire & Rain.” As Taylor matured (and became healthier), he continued to score multiplatinum hits like “How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved by You),” “Shower the People,” “Her Town, Too,” and “Copperline,” and he’s one of the few artists who’s been able to continually sell albums into the 21st century. In a sense, Taylor’s audience has grown up with him, and they’ve shared the experience of becoming parents and moving through middle age through his personal, often autobiographical songs. There will no doubt be a lot of nostalgic classics in his set at Bon Secours Wellness Arena, along with a sprinkling of songs from his most recent album, “Before This World,” which topped the Billboard charts in 2015. –Vincent Harris THU

24

BUSINESS/PROFESSIONAL

10 Questions with Don Koonce

Engenius Warehouse Theater | 37 Augusta St. 8-9 a.m. | $5 Join us for our 10 Questions Networking Event where Engenius co-founder and CEO Chris Manley will interview Don Koonce, award-winning historian and president at Ferncreek Creative, Inc. Don will field questions about the impact of the Greenville Scottish Games on our city, how

important our cultural heritage is to understanding the current dynamics of Greenville, and recount the “Remember Old Hickory” campaign by discussing the economic effects of having thousands of troops in Greenville during WWI. We will also have the pleasure of being joined by the Royal Highland Fusilier Honor Guard. Before the discussion, enjoy coffee and pastries while you network with other Upstate professionals. Advance registration is requested. 864-977-1767 | www.bit.ly/10QuestionsKoonce

ade r a P cot! S t a 25th y a Gre y, M Street a d i Fr ain M ille v m n p e Gre at 6 n w nto Dow

gallabrae.com

THU-SUN

24-17

PERFORMING ARTS

The Winter’s Tale

The Upstate Shakespeare Festival Falls Park | 601 S. Main St. | 7 p.m. | FREE The 24th Season of the Upstate Shakespeare Festival opens with Shakespeare’s “The Winter’s Tale.” The play is suitable for all ages. Donations are appreciate. www.warehousetheatre.com THU-AUG

24-02

Yikes!CALL IKE’S

MUSIC

Furman Music by the Lake Summer Concert Series Celebrates 50 Years

Furman University Amphitheater 3300 Poinsett Hwy. | 7:30 p.m. | Thursdays | FREE A Greenville tradition since 1968, Furman University’s Music by the Lake Summer Concert Series celebrates its 50th anniversary. Opening the 11-concert series for this golden anniversary is “The Kings of Swing” performed by the Lakeside Concert Band. Each Thursday during the series, a concert picnic basket filled with treats will be given away to a lucky concertgoer. 864-294-2086 | www.bit.ly/2FenOc6 furmanmusic@furman.edu FRI

25

MUSIC

Corona Concert Series

Peace Center TD Stage | 300 S. Main St. | 8 p.m. The Peace Center’s outdoor concert series, now called Corona Concert Series, will bring an exciting lineup to the TD Stage. Available again this year is the Genevieve’s package, which includes a show ticket and offers entry to Genevieve’s Theatre Lounge. The package includes exclusive access to the balcony overlooking the Reedy River and the TD Stage, a

We’re here to handle your smallest or biggest problems. 864-232-9015 ikescarpet.com 128 Poinsett Hwy., Greenville

CARPET • RUG UPHOLSTERY CLEANING —— RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL ——

Military Tribute Massed Bands Wee Scotland for the kids Pipe & Drum Competitions Heavy Athletics Celtic Music British Car Show Glasgow Green Cultural Center Gallabrae Scottish Ale Great Food


46 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.18.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

MAY 19

Paleface

The Velo Fellow | 1 Augusta St. | 9:30 p.m. | Free

CONCERT

It’s hard to believe that it’s been about seven years since Paleface, a sort of anti-folk singer who mixes his tuneful acoustic musings with psychedelic production flourishes and a deliberately lo-fi aesthetic, has put out an album. After all, between 1991 and 2011, he put out 15 releases, and that’s not counting his numerous guest spots and collaborations. And during that seven years, he’s made some changes to his music, though one is more of a formality: His longtime girlfriend and drummer Mo Samalot is officially part of the band now, and he’s experimenting with loops and effects pedals for the first time. “Mo and I have played together for so long that everyone referred to us and ‘PF and Mo,’” he says. “But the looping and pedals have changed our sound quite a bit. All we had before was an acoustic guitar and a drum, but I heard so much more in the music and had so many musical ideas.” –Vincent Harris complimentary small bites spread, a full cash bar, the air-conditioned lounge and Genevieve’s restrooms. The package also gives access to lawn seating. May 25 will feature Judah & the Lion. Admission is $35 for lawn seating and $65 for the Genevieve’s package. 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768 www.peacecenter.org FRI-SAT

25-26

CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

Hard Hitter GORUCK & Ride

Starts and finishes at Carolina Triathlon | 123 Welborn St #102 Three bike rides, two GoRUCKs, one awesome event. Join us for a new and special way to honor

those who have sacrificed everything to keep us safe. All proceeds benefit the Green Beret Foundation and their casualty and family support programs. Bike rides of varying distances will kick off Saturday morning, with a GORUCK Tough Friday night/Saturday morning and a GORUCK Light Saturday afternoon. https://goruckandride.com COMMUNITY

Braves Country Road Trip

The Braves Country Road Trip is officially coming to Greenville. On Friday, there will be a youth baseball clinic at a local little league park with Braves alumni. Check the web to sign up

for the Greenville Youth Braves Baseball Clinic with some of your favorite Braves Alumni. On Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., at NOMA Square there will be whiffle ball, cornhole, prize wheel, ‘guess the tomahawks’ game, SunTrust Park virtual reality, photo opportunities: replica SunTrust Park dugout and outfield wall, ‘Chop On’ letters, and giant bobbleheads, and freebies: free promotional items, ticket giveaways, free waffles from Waffle House, and the ‘Taste of SunTrust Park’ food trailer with ballpark food to sample. The alumni present will include Leo Mazzone and Jose Alvarez www.bit.ly/BravesRoadtripGville2018 FRI-SUN

25-03

PERFORMING ARTS

Proud Mary Theatre Presents Two World Premieres: ‘Movement’ and ‘The Kiss’ Proud Mary Theatre Company USC Upstate Studio Theatre 800 University Way | Thursdays - Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 3 p.m. $10/$5 for students In celebration of Gay Pride Month, Proud Mary Theatre Company presents a double world premiere in our first-ever Southern Fried Pride Play Fest. The debut Festival features the original devised theatre piece “Movement: A Gay Pride Fantasia” written by the cast and creative team that reimagines and re-examines the myths, heroes and struggles of the gay rights movie throughout history and pop culture. Opening the show is the one-act play about male intimacy, “The Kiss.” 864-580-8385 | www.proudmarytheatre.com

THRU SAT

VISUAL ARTS

26

Yuri Tsuzuki: “Forest Meditation”

SAT

CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

Hampton III Gallery 3110 Wade Hampton Blvd. Suite 10, Taylors 1-5 p.m. | FREE Exhibition of paintings and sculptures by Greenville artist Yuri Tsuzuki. 864-268-2771 | www.hamptoniiigallery.com sandy@hamptoniiigallery.com

26

6th Annual Take Flight 5K

Greenville Downtown Airport Runway Cafe | 21 Airport Road Ext. 8:30 a.m. | $27.20/5k; $22/military; $11.60/kid’s run Register today for the 6th Annual Take Flight 5k to raise money for the local aviation-themed community park. Run or walk down a Greenville Downtown Airport runway. www.book-events.com/takeflight5k/ COMMUNITY

Remembrance Day

American Legion Post 115 / American Legion Auxiliary Unit 115 Victor Veterans’ Park | 50 17th St., Greer 10 a.m.-6 p.m. | FREE The public is invited to this family-friendly event to honor our nation’s fallen heroes. Special guests at the event will include the Spartanburg rifle and drill team and the Honorable Rick Danner, mayor of Greer. There will be a special display of military vehicles by the SC National Guard and food vendors and music. The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 115 will have handmade poppies to hand out in honor of National Poppy Day.


05.18.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 47

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM SAT-JUL

26-22

VISUAL ARTS

Anna Heyward Taylor: GCMA Collection

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College St. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. | FREE “Anna Heyward Taylor: GCMA Collection” opens in the Level 1 Gallery. This exhibition highlights the work of one of the most modern pioneers of the Charleston Renaissance, including Taylor’s colorful watercolors, woodblock, and linoleum prints. www.gcma.org MON-AUG

28-13

CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

Bachelor Nation Nights

Courtyard by Marriott Greenville Downtown | 50 W. Broad St. 7-9 p.m. | Mondays | FREE The Courtyard Greenville Downtown will play host to a viewing party for ABC’s “The Bachelorette” every Monday night. The show will be broadcasted in the Courtyard’s newly renovated lobby. Each Monday a different non-profit organization will feature guest bartenders to raise awareness for their mission. In addition, we’ll have guest speakers prior to the show to discuss a range of topics, with a focus on dating tips, love language, and style advice. Lite fare will be available for purchase from a variety of your favorite caterers to include food truck pop-ups. www.facebook.com/pg/CourtyardGville/events/ TUE

29

MUSIC

Corona Concert Series

Peace Center | TD Stage | 300 S Main St.

8 p.m. The Peace Center’s outdoor concert series, now called Corona Concert Series, will bring an exciting lineup to the TD Stage. Available again this year is the Genevieve’s package, which includes a show ticket and offers entry to Genevieve’s Theatre Lounge. The package includes exclusive access to the balcony overlooking the Reedy River and the TD Stage, a complimentary small bites spread, a full cash bar, the air-conditioned lounge and Genevieve’s restrooms. The package also gives access to lawn seating. May 29 will feature Ricky Skaggs and Kentucky Thunder. Admission is $35 for lawn seating and $65 for the Genevieve’s package. 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768 www.peacecenter.org WED

30

MUSIC

Ledisi with special guests Melanie Fiona and Tweet

The Peace Center | 300 S Main St. 7:30 p.m. | $35-$55 Ledisi will bring her Let Love Rule Tour to Greenville with special guests Melanie Fiona and Tweet. 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768 www.peacecenter.org THU

31

BUSINESS/PROFESSIONAL

Happiness Hat-Titude

Generation Be Now ALOFT Hotel | 5 N. Laurens St. 5:30-9 p.m. | $25-$45 Happiness Hat-Titude is an interactive dialogue on the culture of productivity. During the evening, you’ll have a chance to meet our beneficiary nonprofit: AHAM. This evening is provided through Generation Be Now, which is a productivity coaching firm that creates possibilities for organizations and individuals through multidisciplinary consulting. ww.eventbrite.com/e/happiness-hat-titudegreenville-sc-tickets-42900057226

JUN

VISUAL ARTS

THRU FRI

One-Stop Open Studios Retrospective Exhibit

01

Metropolitan Arts Council 16 Augusta St. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. | FREE One-Stop Open Studios is an exhibit featuring the works of over 95 local artists who have participated in the fall Greenville Open Studios event between 2002 and 2017. Each artist is invited to submit a 12-by-12 (by-12)- inch piece to the exhibit. 864-467-3132 mac@greenvillearts.com www.greenvillearts.com/art-scene/macfeatured-galleries/ FRI

01

Congratulations! Look who won a Yeti Cooler from Mast General

Tom Piper

CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

In Harmony With Haiti

Partners In Agriculture Wyche Pavilion/TD Stage Peace Center 300 Main St. 6-10 p.m. $75/farm-to-table dinner & $10 for music/ entertainment Join us for a fun-filled evening in downtown Greenville for our In Harmony With Haiti Festival celebrating the Power of FOOD to change the world. The evening will begin with a catered farm-to-table dinner in the Wyche Pavilion followed by music, dancing, and entertainment on the TD Stage at the Peace Center. Dance to the tunes of Donna Kay and the Carousers - “Hot Licks for Cool Cats,” and kick back and groove to the tunes of the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts Jazz Ensemble. Additional entertainment will be provided by the Augusta Circle Parents/Pupils Recorder Ensemble. www.partnersinag.org Eventbrite keyword:In Harmony

North Greenville Rotary Club

E L F F A R R E P 2018 SU P U R C H A S E YO U R T I C K E T AT

www.RotaryRaffle.org

.

Experienced and Compassionate Care for Women at Every Stage of Life.

CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

11th Annual Caribbean Crush

South Carolina Children’s Theatre ZEN | 924 South Main St. 7-10:30 p.m. Slip on your flip flops and join us for a casual, Caribbean evening with delicious food and drinks, amazing auction, and music of the islands. www.scchildrenstheatre.org FRI-SUN

01-24

PERFORMING ARTS

Beauty and the Beast

Greenville Little Theatre 444 College St. | Thursdays-Sundays $35/adults, $33/seniors, $25/juniors Greenville Little Theatre presents a tale as old as time, Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast.” Get swept away and into the enchanted world of “Beauty and the Beast,” where Belle feels trapped in a provincial town and a prince is trapped in the body of a hideous beast. If the beast can learn to love and be loved, the spell will be broken and he will be transformed to his former princely self. If not, he and his household will be doomed for all time. This magical tale comes to life with unforgettable characters, astonishing sets and costumes, and a stunning score including, “Be Our Guest,” “Gaston,” “Human Again,” and the Academy Award-winning title song, “Beauty and the Beast.” www.greenvillelittletheatre.org

Dr. Kimberly Holloway, Dr. Tamela Keller, Dr. Elizabeth Haswell, Dr. Denise Broderick

Call today for more info and appointment 864.720.1299 • vidagyn.com 274-A Commonwealth Drive • Menopause and Hormone Management • Adolescent Care • Abnormal Bleeding Treatment • In-House Ultrasound And Procedures


48 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.18.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

National Salvation Army Week May 14-20

SAT

CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

Garden Party: Cancer 02 The Survivors Park Grand Opening Gala

Cancer Survivors Park Alliance Cancer Survivors Park 52 Cleveland St. 6-9 p.m. $125-$500 Come celebrate the opening of Greenville’s newest park designed to spark the spirit and soothe the soul. The evening will include local artists and live music representing the healing arts, and interactive stations to explore the healing experience of The Cancer Survivors Park. The event is rain or shine. Guests must be 21 and over. If you would like to volunteer at the event, email lc@cancersurvivorspark.org. 864-255-5010 www.bit.ly/2rsZxLg RSVP@cancersurvivorspark.org PERFORMING ARTS

“Once Upon A Time”

Bon Secours Wellness Arena 650 N. Academy St. 1-3 p.m. $17+fees Dance Arts Greenville presents “Once Upon A Time.” www.bonsecoursarena.com

Thank you for Doing the Most Good!

Graduation Gift Ideas

CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

Miracle Hill in Motion

Miracle Hill Ministries 7 a.m.-2 p.m. | $5 - $35 depending on event Miracle Hill Ministries will host Miracle Hill in Motion, a multi-county fundraising event featuring cycling, 5K walks, and a kids’ ninja warrior course. Participants will engage in fun, challenging activities while raising awareness about the needs of the homeless and support for Miracle Hill’s shelters and programs. Choose your location, choose your event. Kids give back through KidRaiser. Event info: Ninja Warrior Course for kids (age 4 - 10): at Miracle Hill Children’s Home; cycling: 31, 44, 69, or 80 miles - new routes through the rolling hills of the Upstate and western NC; 5K walk (for all ages): starting at The Hangar in downtown Spartanburg; and 5K walk (for all ages): starting at Limestone College in Gaffney. 864-631-0137 ctuten@miraclehill.org www.bit.ly/MiracleHillInMotion2018

THRU SUN

03

VISUAL ARTS

“Superheroes and Superstars: The Works of Alex Ross”

Upcountry History Museum 540 Buncombe St. “Superheroes and Superstars” includes over 100 pieces of original artwork; including paintings, sketches, and models created by Alex Ross, one of the greatest artists in the field of comic books. www.upcountryhistory.org SUN

03

VISUAL ARTS

Sunday at 2: Family Art Adventure

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College St. 2-3:15 p.m. | FREE Get ready for summer vacation with a fun print-making activity that celebrates everything we love about going to the beach. Guests of all ages are welcome. All Sundays at 2 are free and sponsored by Duke Energy. www.gcma.org MON-MON

04-25

LESSONS & TRAINING

Fiction 102

Joe’s Place | 2 Williams St. 5:30-7 p.m. | Mondays $40/class, $20 discount if paid in advance for 4 classes Fiction writing class with Carol Baldwin. www.carolbaldwinblog.blogspot.com cbaldwin6@me.com THU

07

MUSIC

Corona Concert Series

Peace Center | TD Stage | 300 S Main St. 8 p.m. The Peace Center’s outdoor concert series, now called Corona Concert Series, will bring an exciting lineup to the TD Stage. Available again this year is the Genevieve’s package, which includes a show ticket and offers entry to Genevieve’s Theatre Lounge. The package includes exclusive access to the balcony overlooking the Reedy River and the TD Stage, a complimentary small bites spread, a full cash bar, the air-conditioned lounge and Genevieve’s restrooms. The package also gives access to lawn seating. June 7 will feature Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real, with special guest Particle Kid. Admission is $35 for lawn seating and $65 for the Genevieve’s package. 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768 www.peacecenter.org

~ Your neighborhood pharmacy and soda fountain ~ 3219 Augusta St., Greenville | 864-277-4180 | ThePickwick.net | M-F 9-6; Sat. 9-3

Crossword puzzle: page 52

Sudoku puzzle: page 52


05.18.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 49

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM FRI

08

PERFORMING & VISUAL ARTS

MAConnect Mod Fête

FRI-SUN

08-17

FAMILY & EDUCATION

Day Out With Thomas at Tweetsie Railroad

Metropolitan Arts Council’s MAConnect ArtUp Studios at Hampton Station 1320 Hampton Ave. 7-10 p.m. MAConnect membership - $75 per person/year Calling all art enthusiasts, artists, or any Greenvillian in their 20s to 40s. The first annual MAConnect Mod Fête will feature demonstrations by the ArtUp studio artists as well as music from The Note Ropers and food and beverage from Reeves Catering. To attend the Mod Fête, membership in MAConnect is required ($75 per person yearly). A raffle for $500 towards the purchase of artwork from ArtUp Studios will take place at 7:30 p.m. (must be MAConnect member and be present at the time of the drawing to win). www.greenvillearts.com/maconnectmodfete/

Tweetsie Railroad 300 Tweetsie Railroad Lane, Blowing Rock, NC Free for children under 2, $30/child age 3-12, and $45/13 and older Toot! Toot! Experience Day Out With Thomas like never before at Tweetsie Railroad. Ride the train behind Thomas the Tank Engine, meet Sir Topham Hat, play in Imagination Station, and enjoy storytelling and live music. Plus have a full day at Tweetsie Railroad with amusement rides, deer park zoo, panning for gold, live entertainment, and more. Tickets include one ride with Thomas the Tank Engine, Thomas & Friends themed activities, and admission to the theme park. https://tweetsie.com/special-events/day-outwith-thomas/

COMMUNITY

FRI-SAT

TR Town + Art Crawl

Main Street, Travelers Rest 6-8 p.m. | FREE The TR Town & Art Crawl is a grass-roots event series highlighting the Southern charm of Travelers Rest and bringing together our local business and arts community. We will meet on Main Street in downtown Travelers Rest. We’ll have local artists, live music performed at The Grove at Upcountry, and a Kids Crawl area with art activities and games just for them. www.travelersresthere.com/town-art-crawl/ EDUCATION

Project-Based Learning (PBL) Convocation

Furman University Younts Conference Center 3300 Poinsett Hwy. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $40, includes lunch Furman University’s Project-Based Learning (PBL) Convocation is hosted by Furman Graduate Studies and the Riley Institute at Furman. The PBL Convocation features opening plenary speaker, Rich Lehrer, innovation coordinator for the Brookwood School in Manchester, Mass. Also participating in the program are teachers from Greenville County Schools, Greenwood District 50, Pickens County School District, and Spartanburg School District 6. 864-294-2213 | www.bit.ly/2Ku4J9R irene.hucul@furman.edu FRI-SUN

08-10

COMMUNITY

Young Aviators Fly-In

Triple Tree Aerodrome 330 Mary Hanna Road, Woodruff | FREE The private Triple Tree Aerodrome will be opened up to the public to celebrate the future of aviation and to encourage students to pursue an aviation career. With this program we hope to ignite a passion for aviation within these young students. Throughout the weekend various aviation colleges, employers, and vendors will be on site. This free event includes free camping, fishing, and swimming in the lakes and streams on the Triple Tree grounds. Remote Control airplane demonstrations, nighttime airshows, and full-scale formation flights will also take place throughout the weekend. The only cost to attendees will be comprised of meal tickets, raffle tickets, and Tshirts if the attendee chooses to buy those items. www.tripletreeaerodrome.com

08-30

PERFORMING ARTS

“Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson”

The Warehouse Theatre | 37 Augusta St. Most Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights and Sunday matinees $40 general admission, $45 reserved, $65 premium seats This irreverent, funny, broad rock and roll musical satire of America’s seventh president, Andrew Jackson, follows him from the campaign trail all the way through the White House. Jackson captures the presidency as a born and bred American with a message that resonates with the common people, as opposed to the ruling class that preceded him. Ascending from his Tennessee upbringing, he finds himself in the Oval Office and discovers that campaigning is easy, but governing is hard. This musical explores how our great democratic experiment works and helps us realize how the more things change, the more they stay the same. www.warehousetheatre.com SAT

09

LECTURE

Peace Voices Poetry Slam

Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre 300 S. Main St. 1 p.m. | FREE The page meets the stage in this all out battle of the words. High school poets from around the Upstate will compete in a public poetry slam where the audience members have become the judges. At the crossroads of written word perfection and dynamic hip-hop performance, young people will make their voices heard. 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768 peacecenter.org SUN

10

MUSIC

Harry Connick Jr.

Peace Center | 101 W. Broad St. 7 p.m. | $55-$115 Harry Connick Jr. will bring his A New Orleans Tricentennial Celebration tour to the Peace Center. The foundation of Harry Connick Jr.’s art is the music of his native New Orleans, where he began performing as a pianist and vocalist at the age 5. Over the past three decades, he has established himself as a musician, singer, and composer par excellence, a legendary live performer, and a best-selling artist with millions of CDs sold around the world. 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768 www.peacecenter.org


50 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.18.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM THRU SUN

10

A R T S C A LE N DA R MAY 18 -24

Main Street Friday

Zataban May 18 ~ 232-2273 Greenville Concert Band

Memorials: Lest We Forget May 18 & 20 ~ 214-5807 SC Governor’s School

Spring Dance Performance May 19-20 ~ 467-3000 Greenville County Museum of Art

Carl Blair: GCMA Collection Through May 20 ~ 271-7570 Centre Stage

God of Carnage Through May 23 ~ 233-6733 Greenville Center for Creative Arts

Material Transformation Through May 23 ~ 735-3948 Carolina Music Museum

The Callisto Quarter May 24 ~ 520-8807 Downtown Alive

Urban Soil May 24 ~ 232-2273 Furman Music by the Lake

The Kings of Swing May 24 ~ 294-2086 Centre Stage

Red Herring Through May 26 ~ 233-6733 Riverworks Galley

Works by Alice Ballard Through May 26 ~ 271-0679 Younts Center for Performing Arts

Nunsense Through May 26 ~ 409-1050 WXYZ @ Aloft Hotel

Works by Marian & Melanie Pouch Through May 31 ~ 313-5708 Greenville Chamber of Commerce

Works by Sylvie Bucher & Lindsay Louise McPhail Through Jun. 1 ~ 242-1050 Metropolitan Arts Council

One-Stop Open Studios Exhibit Through Jun. 1 ~ 467-3132 Metro. Arts Council @ Centre Stage

Ephemeral Story: Works by Suzanne Woolf Through June 10 ~ 233-6733

Keeping our ARTbeat strong w w w.greenvillearts.com

16 Augusta Street

864. 467.3132

VISUAL ARTS

e.phem.er.al. sto.ry1 Works by Suzanne Woolf Exhibit

Metropolitan Arts Council Centre Stage | 501 River St. 2-6 p.m. | Tuesday through Friday | FREE The pieces for this show were inspired by a woman’s scrapbook collection of cards she received from two suitors during the late 1940s. What is their story? This is the question I attempt to answer; each piece representing a moment in this relationship triangle; their ephemeral story. www.greenvillearts.com/art-scene/macfeatured-galleries/ mac@greenvillearts.com MON-JUL

11-18

SUMMER CAMPS

2018 Science Camps at Clemson University

Clemson University | Jordan Hall | $110-$950 This summer can be fun — and educational. Join in for hands-on, action-packed, thoughtprovoking science camps for rising fifththrough 12th-graders on the Clemson University campus. Choose from residential camps or day camps. Camps will include Crime Scene Investigation: Clemson; Potions 101; Engineering and Design Adventures; Biotechnology, Health and Society; and Public Health: Outbreak. www.clemson.edu/culsoc MON-AUG

11-10

SUMMER CAMP

Summer Art Camp

Greenville Center for Creative Arts 25 Draper Street Ste. A 9 a.m.-noon | $205/week, $185/member Start planning a summer full of creativity for your little artists with Summer Art Camps at GCCA. Instructors facilitate immersive experiences in visual art, for children ages 5 -8 and 9 -12. Sessions are designed to explore diverse materials, mediums, and themes, making each day of Summer Art Camp a new and exciting creative adventure. 864-735-3948 | www.artcentergreenville.org TUE

12

MUSIC

Truck Inn Tuesday

Swamp Rabbit Inn | 1 Logan St. 6-9 p.m. | second Tuesday of each month, May - August | FREE Swamp Rabbit Inn and Properties kicks off its fourth Truck Inn Tuesday season. The monthly local block party will feature local musicians performing their original work and covers. There will be food trucks, craft beer and wine, our signature Froze’, and local vendors and makers set up at the events. The event is kidand pet-friendly, and the perfect way to spend a Tuesday evening in downtown Greenville. www.swamprabbitinn.com TUE-SUN

12-17

THEATER

“Love Never Dies”

Peace Center | 101 W. Broad St. starting at $35 The ultimate love story continues in “Love Never Dies,” Andrew Lloyd Webber’s spellbinding sequel to “The Phantom of the Opera.” 864-467-3000 peacecenter.org THU

14

FAMILY & EDUCATION

ADHD Workshop

RTD Educational Consulting Hilton Garden Inn | 108 Carolina Point Parkway 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. | $299 Students with ADHD have difficulty focusing

for extended periods. Are we allowing our students to fall through the cracks? Know the symptoms of students with ADHD and learn the strategies to support the instructional process. This session will teach you strategies on how to support and manage students with ADHD and will dispel myths, misconceptions, and stereotypes about ADHD. 803-410-2944 www.bit.ly/ADHDJune14 rtd.edconsultants@gmail.com THRU FRI

15

VISUAL ARTS

Art by U.S. Army Combat Veteran Brad Carraway

Furman University Thompson Art Gallery, Roe Art Building 3300 Poinsett Hwy. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. | Monday-Friday | FREE Furman Department of Art presents the work of U.S. Army combat veteran Brad Carraway in “Surviving War is Hell: Healing the Emotional Traumas of War Through Art.” Carraway’s work is inspired by his struggle with combat-related Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and his desire to help others who are wrestling with the condition. The goal of the exhibition is to immerse the audience in a visual narrative of internal conflict and to engage and educate the community about the effects of PTSD. Reception with artist: Friday, May 18, 6-7:30 p.m. 864-294-2995 www.bit.ly/2JH9QCd Marta.lanier@furman.edu FRI-SUN

15-24

PERFORMING ARTS

Chautauqua History Alive Festival - Courage

Greenville Chautauqua 7:30-9 p.m. | FREE A 10-day-two-weekend festival of nonstop live history and fun for the whole family. A different show outdoors each night and more indoors during the day. Five different shows performed by nationally acclaimed historical interpreters. And the audience is always a part of the show. Shows in Greater Greenville, Spartanburg, and Asheville. There is a nominal charge of $5 for Asheville shows. Other shows are free. Five courageous leaders tell their stories in their own words. You’ll laugh–you’ll cry–you’ll have lots of questions. And they’ll be answered. Bring your stories. Share your experiences. Get inspired. Because it’s not just history– it’s personal. For a complete listing of shows, visit the website. www.greenvilleCHAUTAUQUA.org caroline@greenvilleCHAUTAUQUA.org THRU SAT

16

VISUAL ARTS

The Southerner Abroad

West Main Artists Co-op 578 West Main St., Spartanburg Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.- 4 p.m. | FREE Spartanburg artist Elizabeth Bagwell will exhibit her latest collection of work, “The Southerner Abroad: A Modern Lifestyle Installation.” This new collection is a vibrant mix of 40 plus paintings on canvas, paper, and metal based on the energy and movement drawn from vintage photographs of Paris, France, from the late ’30s to early ’40s. 864-804-6501 www.WestMainArtists.org

SAT-SUN

16-24

PERFORMING ARTS

“Madagascar”

South Carolina Children’s Theatre Peace Center Gunter Theater 300 S. Main St. $18/child, $27/adult Based on the DreamWorks animated motion picture, this musical magic hits the stage and crawls with animals and excitement for the whole family. 864-235-2885 www.scchildrenstheatre.org michelle@scchildrenstheatre.org THU

28

LECTURE

Poetry with Pride: Celebrating Pride Month

Huguenot Mill | 101 W. Broad St. 6:30 p.m. | FREE The Peace Center’s 2017-2018 Peace Voices program presents Poetry with Pride: Celebrating Pride Month, featuring Andrea Gibson and Danez Smith. Andrea Gibson and Danez Smith take the stage to confront some of the issues faced by the LGBTQ community. Gibson balances themes of love, gender, politics, sexuality, illness, and forgiveness. A 2017 National Endowment of the Arts Fellow, Smith is a black, queer writer and performer whose work has been featured on Buzzfeed, “PBS NewsHour” and “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert.” 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768 peacecenter.org LECTURE

Peace Center’s 2017-2018 Master Classes Ramsaur Studio at Huguenot Mill 101 W. Broad St. 4:30 p.m. | FREE Master Classes give teens from the workshop series an opportunity to dig deeper into the nuts and bolts of the poetic process. Visiting poets will share pieces, dissect their own work, and hold an open forum. Participants are encouraged to ask questions about their own poems. Master classes are held in Ramsaur Studio and the public is invited to observe. This class features Andrea Gibson and Danez Smith. 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768 peacecenter.org FRI

29

MUSIC

Corona Concert Series

Peace Center TD Stage 300 S Main St. 8 p.m. The Peace Center’s outdoor concert series, now called Corona Concert Series, will bring an exciting lineup to the TD Stage. Available again this year is the Genevieve’s package, which includes a show ticket and offers entry to Genevieve’s Theatre Lounge. The package includes exclusive access to the balcony overlooking the Reedy River and the TD Stage, a complimentary small bites spread, a full cash bar, the air-conditioned lounge and Genevieve’s restrooms. The package also gives access to lawn seating. June 29 will feature Maxi Priest. Admission is $35 for lawn seating and $65 for the Genevieve’s package. 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768 www.peacecenter.org


05.18.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 51

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

JUL THU-SUN

05-29

PERFORMING ARTS

“The Taming of the Shrew”

The Upstate Shakespeare Festival Falls Park | 601 S Main St. 7 p.m. | FREE The 2018 Upstate Shakespeare Festival continues its 24th Season with the boisterous “The Taming of the Shrew.” This energetic comedy is suitable for all ages. Bring a picnic, lawn chair, and/or blanket. Donations are appreciated. www.warehousetheatre.com SAT-SUN

14-15

FOOD & DRINK

Greenville Charcuterie Intensive

Swamp Rabbit Café and Grocery 205 Cedar Lane Road | $350 In this two-day intensive, learn to confidently cure meats via salting, dehydration, smoking, and fermentation. We will begin with a half hog, and spend two days turning every scrap of it into charcuterie, from fresh sausages to smoked hams, pates, and hard salamis. In addition to learning salumi craft, we will discuss sustainable farming, mindful slaughter, artisan butchery, and inspired cookery. You’ll get to taste your creations at a culminating class feast, and you’ll get to take projects home to finish on your own. Best of all, you’ll join a growing cohort of ethical meat practitioners in touch via social media, direct email, and community gatherings. Class includes copies of “The Ethical Meat Handbook and Pure Charcuterie.” www.mereleighfood.com mereleighfood@gmail.com THU

19

MUSIC

Home Free

Peace Concert Hall The Peace Center 300 S. Main St. 7:30 p.m. $35-$55 A cappella country group Home Free returns to the Peace Center. Home Free is bringing Nashville country standards and country-dipped pop hits to Greenville on the heels of their most recent full-length album release, “Timeless.” VIP ticket packages are available. 864-467-3000 800-888-7768 www.peacecenter.org

AUG FRI

03

MUSIC

Corona Concert Series

Peace Center TD Stage | 300 S Main St. 8 p.m. The Peace Center’s outdoor concert series, now called Corona Concert Series, will bring an exciting lineup to the TD Stage. Available again this year is the Genevieve’s package, which includes a show ticket and offers entry to Genevieve’s Theatre Lounge. The package includes exclusive access to the balcony overlooking the Reedy River and the TD Stage, a complimentary small bites spread, a full cash bar, the air-conditioned lounge and Genevieve’s restrooms. The package also gives access to lawn seating. Aug. 3 will feature Sister Hazel. Admission is $35 for lawn seating and $65 for the Genevieve’s package. 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768 www.peacecenter.org WED-SUN

08-12

PERFORMING ARTS

Cirque du Soleil’s “Crystal”

Bon Secours Wellness Arena Cirque du Soleil’s “Crystal” explores the artistic limits of ice for the first time in the company’s 34-year history. This unique production pushes boundaries of performance by combining stunning skating and acrobatic feats that defy the imagination. 800-745-3000 | www.ticketmaster.com FRI

10

CAUSES & FUNDRAISING

Greenville Business Networking Casino Night Benefiting A Child’s Haven

Armada Analytics, Inc. Old Cigar Warehouse | 912 S. Main St. 7-11 p.m. | $110 Armada Analytics would like to invite you for a night of fun at our Casino Business Networking Event benefiting A Child’s Haven. Tickets are limited, so please purchase them as soon as possible. 864-751-9074 http://fnd.us/a1LCU6?ref=sh_37Cy18

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE? Enter your event information at www.bit.ly/ GreenvilleJournalCalendarOfEvents by Wednesday at 5 p.m. to be considered for publication in the following week’s Journal.

ECO FRIENDLY

REMOVAL 1-888-576-JUNK greenville.junkrecyclers.net

WHERE GIVING BACK DOESN’T COST A DIME. Partnering with The Blood Connection to host a blood drive is a great way to: Rally your company or school around a cause that saves millions of lives each year. Demonstrate leadership. Promote teamwork. Engage employees. Encourage students. Fulfill a civic responsibility. And it won’t cost you anything, except time. #idonateblood #isavelives #givelife

“We remove ANYTHING” Sharing Life, Saving Lives | 864.255.5000 | TheBloodConnection.org


52 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 05.18.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

Hart-Healthy Verse ACROSS 1 Pasture 6 Boots out 12 Part of a picket fence 16 Driver’s navig. aid 19 Lauder of perfumery 20 “Chicago” actress Henshall 21 At this point 22 50 Cent’s genre 23 Start of a riddle 26 L.A.-to-Denver dir. 27 “Was — das?” (German question) 28 Close by 29 Sports deal 31 Author — de Cervantes 35 Poker payoff 36 Riddle, part 2 39 “Raging Bull” director Martin 41 German for “eight” 43 Dresser sections 44 Riddle, part 3 47 “Our Town” actor Erwin 48 Phnom — (capital of Cambodia) 49 “Dies —” (Mass hymn) 50 Halt 51 Soap star Emma 56 Ukrainian capital 58 Hidden stash 62 Follows 64 Riddle, part 4 71 Clears of stuffiness

73 Stood for 74 Mesa’s kin 75 Riddle, part 5 78 Morsels 79 “— mind?!” (“Excuse me?!”) 80 Roll spread 82 Belief 83 Alphabet opening 86 “I’ve had — to here!” 90 “Big Love” actress Mireille — 92 Paella veggie 93 Riddle, part 6 102 Slayer of Medusa 104 Monetary unit of Iran 105 Dumbfound 106 End of the riddle 108 Baseball two-bagger: Abbr. 110 Slushy frozen drink 111 “8 Simple Rules” actress Katey 112 “— Fideles” 114 “Gloria in excelsis —” 115 Labor org. for dockworkers 116 Riddle’s answer 124 Actor Cruise 125 Tuning knob 126 Cheapest in a line of products 127 Delay leaving 128 Ending for Japan 129 Alluring

By Frank Longo

130 Gossipy meddlers 131 In reserve DOWN 1 Hardly any 2 Suffix with book 3 Plane landing guess 4 Suffix with book 5 Most moist, as a lawn at dawn 6 Lead-in to “while” 7 Bulge (out) 8 People: Prefix 9 Spotted cat 10 Fey of “Mean Girls” 11 Person on a quest 12 Hebrew underworld 13 Zodiac cat 14 Bark noise 15 Salver for serving Earl Grey, say 16 Most terrific 17 Gratify in a servile way 18 Goes faster 24 Napping 25 Volcano in E. Sicily 30 Uncooked 31 AOL rival 32 Here, to Henri 33 Weed B — (Ortho product) 34 Suffix with press 35 Tip of an ink-filled implement 37 End of a college URL

every saturday May - October from 8:00 am - 12:00 pm

main street

between Court Street & Washington Street

www.saturdaymarketlive.com

w accee pt

EBT

38 “It’s so cold!” 40 Look for 42 Roman 201 45 Heat: Prefix 46 Part of MIT: Abbr. 50 Sofa variety 51 Rough guess 52 Soul singer India.— 53 Artist Chagall 54 Make sum mistakes? 55 Replay effect, in brief 57 Prospect 59 PC program 60 Filly’s sibling 61 Beating organ 63 Chop — (Chinesestyle dish) 65 Bronze-hued 66 Data, in brief 67 Taken illicitly 68 Move away from nursing 69 Really dislike 70 Make leave 72 Certain boxing win, for short 76 Opposite of “day,” in French 77 Leased car, e.g. 81 Partners of aahs 83 Highly pertinent 84 Cow-bison hybrids 85 Poker or canasta 87 Long, angry speech 88 As a joined group 89 Gp. with putters 91 Fixed charge 93 Little tykes, to Scots 94 Czech sci-fi play of 1921 95 Belief 96 Historic section of

a city 97 Blue Jays’ city 98 Go — tear 99 Die dot 100 WWW access enabler 101 Comrade of Fidel 103 Salty body 107 At dawn, e.g. 109 Artist’s cap 113 Sour plum

Sudoku

Hard

114 Video store offerings 117 Whopper 118 Send via a phone line 119 Genetic helix 120 007 creator Fleming 121 — Lankan 122 Hobbit foe 123 Bill the “Science Guy” Crossword answers: page 48

by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan

Sudoku answers: page 48


THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS 2018-CP-23-01864 Thomas A. Hipp, Jr., Plaintiff, Vs. Julia Ann Keith aka Julia Ann Yates, Valdon Scott Keith, Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for the registered holders of GSRPM Trust 2006-2, Mortgage PassThrough Certificates, Series 2006-2, and “John Doe”, a class made up of all unknown parties who may have some right, title, or interest in the property) having Tax Map #T007.00-010163.00, Defendants YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you and to serve a copy of your Answer to this Complaint upon subscriber at 11 Whitsett Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the date of such service. If you shall fail to answer the Complaint within that time, the Plaintiffs shall proceed in default proceedings against you and shall apply for the Court the relief demanded in the Complaint. TO: INFANT(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (AN IMPRISONED PERSON) YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a Guardian ad Litem to represent you in this action within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. TO: INFANTS(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE

(INCOMPETENT OR INSANE) AND TO, (GENERAL TESTAMENTARY GUARDIAN)(COMMITTEE) WITH WHOM S(HE) RESIDE(S): YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad Litem to represent said infant(s) under fourteen years of age (said incompetent or insane person) within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. LIS PENDENS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an action has been commenced in the Court upon complaint of Plaintiff against Defendants regarding quieting title to property located in Greenville County. The subject property is described as follows: ALL that certain piece, parcel or lot of land, with all improvements thereon, situate, lying and being in the County of Greenville, State of South Carolina, being known and designated as Lot No. 62, Section 1 of a Subdivision for Burlington Industries, Inc., as shown on the plat thereof prepared by Piedmont Engineers & Architects, dated October 1964 and recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds for Greenville County, S. C. in Plat Book JJJ at Page 10, reference being hereby made to said plat of survey for a complete metes and bounds description of the property. Tax Map # T007.00-01-063.00 C. Richard Stewart Attorney for Plaintiff 11 Whitsett Street Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 235-2019 SC Bar No: 5346 dstewart@ attorneyrichardstewart.com

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Harimukti , LLC / DBA Energy Market intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 3226 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors, SC 296872804. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than May 20, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL;P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT (NON-JURY) STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS 2018-CP-23-00676 James White Enterprises LLC, Plaintiff, Vs. Kimberly M. Davis, Beula Anderson aka Beulah Anderson, The South Carolina Department of Revenue, “John Doe” a class made up of all unknown parties who may have some right, title, or interest in the property having Tax Map #0123.00-03-007.06 (hereafter, the subject property), and “Richard Roe”, a class made up of unknown infants and other unknown disabled persons who may have some right, title or interest in the subject property, Defendants YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you and to serve a copy of your Answer to this Complaint upon subscriber at 11 Whitsett Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the date of such service. If you shall fail to answer the Complaint within that time, the Plaintiffs shall proceed in default proceedings against you and shall apply for the Court the relief demanded in the Complaint. TO: INFANT(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (AN IMPRISONED PERSON) YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a Guardian ad Litem to represent you in this action within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application

for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. TO: INFANTS(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE (INCOMPETENT OR INSANE) AND TO, (GENERAL TESTAMENTARY GUARDIAN) (COMMITTEE) WITH WHOM S(HE) RESIDE(S): YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad Litem to represent said infant(s) under fourteen years of age (said incompetent or insane person) within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. LIS PENDENS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an action has been commenced in the Court upon complaint of Plaintiff against Defendants to quiet title on property located in Greenville County. The subject property is described as follows: All that piece, parcel or lot of land lying and being in the State of South Carolina, County of Greenville, designated as Lot Nos. 41, 42 and 43 and part of Lot Nos. 8, 9 and 40 on plat of Norwood Heights Subdivision Block B as shown in Plat Book E, page 217 recorded in the Register of Deeds Office for Greenville County. Reference is made to said plat for a more detailed description. Less however any portion previously conveyed and subject to restrictions of record. Tax Map#0123.00.03-007.06 C. Richard Stewart, SC Bar #5346 Attorney for Plaintiff 11 Whitsett Street Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 235-2019 dstewart@ attorneyrichardstewart.com

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that KPE & SGE, LLC dba The Unleashed Dog Bar intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 69 Rocky Slope Rd, Greenville, SC, 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than May 21, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL;P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

SERVICE OF SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF SPARTANBURG IN THE FAMILY COURT DOCKET NO. 2017-DR42-1733 WESLEY J. BARNARD v. VIOLET S. BROWN, Defendant. TO THE ABOVE-NAMED VIOLET ARE

S. HEREBY

DEFENDANT, BROWN.

YOU

SUMMONED

and required to answer the Complaint in this action of which a copy is herewith served upon you and to serve a copy of your Answer to the said Complaint on the subscriber at 324 New York Ave, Spartanburg, SC 29306 within thirty (30) days from the date of service hereof, exclusive of the date of such service; and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the Summons and Complaint, Family

Court

Coversheet,

and Certificate of Exemption in the above-entitled action were filed in the Spartanburg County Clerk of Court’s Office, Spartanburg, South

Carolina

on June 16, 2017. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that if you fail to answer the Summons and Complaint within the time aforesaid, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in said Complaint. Wesley J. Barnard, 324 New York Ave., Spartanburg, SC 29306. 317-370-8719

SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING OF AMENDED COMPLAINT (NON-JURY DECLARATORY JUDGMENT/QUIET TITLE ACTION) STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS C/A NO: 2018-CP-23-00758 Deutsche Bank National Trust Company as Trustee for GSAMP 2002-HE2, Mortgage Pass Through Certificates, Series 2002-HE2, PLAINTIFF, vs. Consolidated Mortgage and Financial Services Corporation, DEFENDANT. TO THE DEFENDANT ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Amended Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, or otherwise appear and defend, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Amended Complaint upon the subscriber at his office, Hutchens Law Firm; P.O. Box 8237; Columbia, SC 29202, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, except as to the United States of America, which shall have sixty (60) days, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Amended Complaint within the time aforesaid, or otherwise appear and defend, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein, and judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Amended Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master In Equity which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master In Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that S.B.H. BBQ CO, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 5021 Pelham Road, Greenville, SC 29615 To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than May 27, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. TO MINOR(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE, AND/OR TO MINOR(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THE PERSON WITH WHOM THE MINOR(S) RESIDES, AND/OR TO PERSONS UNDER SOME LEGAL DISABILITY: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff immediately and separately and such application will be deemed absolute and total in the absence of your application for such an appointment within thirty (30) days after the service of the Summons and Amended Complaint upon you. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master In Equity in this County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master In Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. NOTICE OF FILING OF SUMMONS AND AMENDED COMPLAINT TO THE DEFENDANT ABOVE NAMED: YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing Amended Summons and Amended Complaint were filed in said Clerk’s office on April 3, 2018. s/John B. Kelchner April 11, 2018 John B. Kelchner (S.C. Bar #13589) Hutchens Law Firm P.O. Box 8237 Columbia, SC 29202 (803) 726-2700 John.kelchner@ hutchenslawfirm.com THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY.

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for: Auctioneer Services, RFP #82-06/04/18, until 3:00 PM, EDT, Monday, June 4, 2018. Solicitations may be found at http://www.greenvillecounty. org/procurement/ or by calling (864) 467-7200.

409 N.Main Street #37 Simpsonville, SC 29681 To: Ken Brais 821 Bayview Hills Drive PO Box 1850 Chesapeake Beach, Md. 20732 This is to inform you. Unless you notify us immediately we will be making arrangements for your mobile home. The rent is past

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP#81-06/05/18 – Sports Field Lighting Lakeside Park, June 5, 2018 3:30 P.M., E.D.T. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org or by calling (864) 467-7200.

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP#80-06/01/18 – Sale of Real Property, June 1, 2018 3:00 P.M., E.D.T. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org or by calling (864) 467-7200.

due for March. We need you to take care of this. If we do not hear from you we will be taking action. You can reach us at 864-967-4072. We have made many efforts to reach you but get recordings. Sincerely, Joe Loe

NOTICE Mountain

Springs

Holdings,

LLC, PO Box 6562, Greenville, SC 29606, contact number: 864-295-2011 is seeking Title to a mobile home through a Judicial Sale in Magistrate Court in Greenville, South Carolina. This mobile home is a 1978, 12' X 60', Fair Moore Mobile Home. The serial number is: FMCFA12X60182884.

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP#76-06/05/18 – Foreclosure Advertisement for Master in Equity, June 5, 2018 3:00 P.M., E.D.T. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org or by calling (864) 467-7200.

This

mobile home is located at 5221 N. Highway 101, Taylors, SC 29687. The South Carolina Department of Motor Vehicles shows that Ella Mae Plumley, Rt. 1, Taylors, SC 29687 as the owner of this home. We have notified Ms. Plumley by regular and certified mail to inform her of this matter.

Notice of Public Hearing Proposed FY 2018-2019 Operating Budget Lake Cunningham Fire District, Greer, South Carolina The Lake Cunningham Fire District hereby gives notice of a public hearing to be held on its proposed operating budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2018 and ending June 30, 2019. The public hearing shall be held on Thursday, June 14, 2018. Location of meeting: Lake Cunningham Fire Department, 2802 N McElhaney Rd, Greer, at 7:00 p.m. REVENUES Current FY-17/18 2,402,700 EXPENDITURES Current FY-17/18 2,402,700

REVENUES Proposed FY-18/19 2,501,540 EXPENDITURES Proposed FY-18/19 2,501,540

% Change

NOTICE OF SERVICE OF PROCESS BY PUBLICATION STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA, COLUMBUS COUNTY IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE, SUPERIOR COURT DIVISION BAYVIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLC, Plaintiff v. AUSTIN GIBSON MURRAY, JR., Heir to the Estate of Bessie Murray a/k/a Bessie W. Murray a/k/a Bessie Wooten Williamson Murray a/k/a Bessie W. Murray Williamson; JOSEPH A. MEMORY IV and wife, ELIZABETH MURRAY MEMORY a/k/a GREY MURRAY MEMORY, Heir to the Estate of Bessie Murray a/k/a Bessie W. Murray a/k/a Bessie Wooten Williamson Murray a/k/a Bessie W. Murray Williamson; DAVID JAMES BATTEN, JR. and wife, TIFFANY MURRAY BATTEN a/k/a TIFFA MURRAY BATTEN, Heir to the Estate of Bessie Murray a/k/a Bessie W. Murray a/k/a Bessie Wooten Williamson Murray a/k/a Bessie W. Murray Williamson; and UNKNOWN HEIR(S) OR DEVISEE(S) to the Estate of Bessie Murray a/k/a Bessie W. Murray a/k/a Bessie Wooten Williamson Murray a/k/a Bessie W. Murray Williamson, Defendants Columbus County File Number: 18 CVS 211 To: AUSTIN GIBSON MURRAY, JR., Heir to the Estate of Bessie Murray a/k/a Bessie W. Murray a/k/a Bessie Wooten Williamson Murray a/k/a Bessie W. Murray Williamson: Take notice that a pleading seeking relief against you has been filed in the abovereferenced action. The nature of the relief being sought is as follows: Reformation of Deed of Trust, Equitable Lien, and Unjust Enrichment regarding the real property located at: 415 S. Franklin St., Whiteville, Columbus County, North Carolina 28472. You are required to make defense to such pleading not later than June 27, 2018 and upon your failure to do so the party seeking service against you will apply to the court for the relief sought. This the 18th of May, 2018 Christopher M. Theriault, Esq. Attorney for Plaintiff 720 North 3rd Street, Suite 502 Wilmington, NC 28401 (910) 769-6304

4% % Change 4%

The Mileage for the current Fiscal Year is 32.3 Mills the proposed FY 18-19 is 32.3 Mills. Anyone wishing to be placed on the agenda for public comment should sign up at the LCFD Headquarters five days prior to the meeting. Comments will be limited to 5 (five) minutes per person.

LEGAL NOTICE RATES

ABC Notices $165

NOTICE Coachwood Colony

| Summons, Notices, Foreclosures, etc. $1.20 per line

864.679.1205 | email: aharley@communityjournals.com

When you finish reading this paper, please recycle it.


TEEING OFF MAY 17–20 SCHEDULE OF EVENTS THURSDAY, MAY 17 › BMW Charity Pro-Am presented by SYNNEX Corporation Round One (Thornblade Club, Cliffs Valley, Furman University) › Celebrity Softball Game at Fluor Field, 7:30PM

FRIDAY, MAY 18 › BMW Charity Pro-Am presented by SYNNEX Corporation Round Two (Thornblade Club, Cliffs Valley, Furman University) › Downtown Concert presented by Gestamp, featuring Phil Vassar at the Peace Center TD Stage

SATURDAY, MAY 19 › BMW Charity Pro-Am presented by SYNNEX Corporation Round Three (Thornblade Club, Cliffs Valley, Furman University) › Pink on the Links presented by Greenville Health Systems

SUNDAY, MAY 20 › BMW Charity Pro-Am presented by SYNNEX Corporation Final Round (Thornblade Club)

PURCHASE TICKETS AT BUYBMWTICKETS.COM


Trust. Innovation. Community. 2017 Laurens Electric’s 2018 Annual Meeting ...join us at

Laurens Electric’s Main Office

Saturday, June 2

2254 Highway 14, Laurens, SC 29360

Registration Gift

Each member who is present and registers at the Annual Meeting will receive a

Registration & Voting for Board of Trustees 8:30 —10:30 A.M.

$25 credit on his/her electric bill. (Limit one $25 per registered member.)

Entertainment 9 —10 A.M.

Grand Prize H 2005 Chevrolet

Early Bird Prize Drawing 10 A.M. Business Meeting Begins 10:30 A.M.

30”x16”x17”

Single Cab 1500 Shortbed with Toolbox

Entertainment

Prize drawing will follow the business session.

THE MIGHTY KICKS The band has performed worldwide playing a mix of Motown and Top 40 Dance Songs combined with high-energy choreography!

Early Bird Prize Drawing H YETI® Tundra 65 Cooler 30”x16”x17” cooler that holds 39 cans Must be registered prior to 10 A.M.

Registration cards for the Annual Meeting will be mailed by May 18. You should receive one card and will be given one gift, even if you have multiple accounts. Only customers who register in person will receive a gift.

You cannot register or receive a gift for another member who does not attend.

www.laurenselectric.com

1-800-942-3141

May 18, 2018 GJ  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

May 18, 2018 GJ  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.