Page 1

Smolla stepping down at Furman

911 services branch out

Putting the ‘art’ in ‘smartphone’

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INSIDE UBJ:

BIG TIRE, BIG RESULTS

GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, May 10, 2013 • Vol.15, No.19

G R E E N L A N D

S E A

Dettifoss

Hots Spots

Kárahnjúkar Dam

Hofsjökull Glacier

Langjökull Glacier Glymurfoss

Vatnajökull Glacier

Geysir

Reykjavik ★

Blue Lagoon

Mt Hekla Volcano Seljalandsfoss

Lakagígar Volcano

Icelands Highest Peak

★ Eyjafjallajökull Volcano

★ Skógafoss ★

N O R T H

A T L A N T I C

O C E A N

Sarah & M

ark Ellis

155 MILES IN ICELAND An Upstate couple heads north for an ultramarathon for a good cause

Park closer. Check-in faster. SEE PAGE 8

PHOTO OF COUPLE BY GREG BECKNER / STAFF; ILLUSTRATION BY KRISTY ADAIR; RACECOURSE PHOTOS PROVIDED

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JOURNAL NEWS

WORTH REPEATING THEY SAID IT

1,250

“A lot of the process with the iPhone art for me is learning what the app does and learning a way to subvert that.”

Miles run by Mark and Sarah Ellis in training for a 155-mile ultramarathon in Iceland this August.

Printmaker and Clemson graduate student David Gerhard on using an iPhone as an art studio.

85%

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

“We heard from a lot of restaurants saying, ‘We like food trucks.’” Greenville City Manager John Castile, on revisions to an ordinance that proposed strict limits on food trucks downtown.

“I will go to Iceland, but there’s no way you can run and I don’t run.” Sarah Ellis, on first hearing about her husband Mark’s desire to compete in RacingThePlanet’s 155-mile roving race across Iceland.

Percentage of Clemson’s Class of 2013 who will wear caps and gowns made from recycled materials in this weekend’s graduation ceremony.

13

Artists from Greenville County chosen for booths in this weekend’s Artisphere – a record for this juried festival. Applications came from 854 artists in 41 states for the 120 spots.

Erica McCleskey, program director for Building Opportunities in Out of School Time (BOOST).

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MAY 10, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 3


journal news

Smolla to step down as Furman president Board already has chosen an interim By Cindy Landrum | staff

The March of Dimes would like to sincerely thank event chairmen, Dixon Harrill and Bob Stegner for their leadership and passion.

4 THE Journal | MAY 10, 2013

When Carl Kohrt attended Furman University, he and his wife, Lynne, lived in a two-room, third-floor flat off Augusta Road. Fifty years later, they’ve come full circle, living in student housing at Furman as Kohrt prepares to serve as Furman’s interim president beginning July 1. Current Furman University President Rod Smolla will step down as president on June 30 for personal reasons. Smolla said in a phone interview that he reached his decision a few months ago but it wasn’t announced until after graduation and the completion of the school’s academic year. Smolla said he would take the summer off and then become a visiting professor of law at the Duke University Law School. He said his plans after that are “a work in progress.” Furman Board Chairman Richard Cullen said he would gather all of Furman’s former board chairs within the next week and begin talking about the process of searching for Furman’s next president. He said he expects a national search that will attract an outstanding group of applicants. Smolla, a constitutional law expert, was named Furman’s 11th president in July 2010. His tenure at Furman has been marked by changes, including a move to a more holistic approach to determining students’ admissibility that included a greater emphasis on qualities such as leadership, service, resilience, persistence and drive. The change sparked controversy on campus as some faculty members feared the academic qualifications and performance of subsequent freshman classes had declined and tarnished Furman’s academic reputation to some degree. During Smolla’s three years at the helm, applications for admission increased by 30 percent, the enrollment of freshman minority students doubled and freshman international students grew from one student to 29. “We tried some experiments to extend the reach beyond Furman’s traditional reach and to entice students who consid-

ered other universities to attend Furman,” said Kohrt, who is also a member of the Furman board of trustees. “We learned some things. The incoming class is superb. I think we’ve found Smolla our sweet spot.” Smolla was instrumental in securing a $5 million pledge, one of the largest individual commitments in Furman’s history, to the “Because Furman Matters” capital campaign. The capital campaign recorded nearly $100 million in gifts and commitments since 2010 and now stands at $382 million toward the $400 million goal. Smolla showed a commitment to intercollegiate athletics, adding men’s and women’s lacrosse. Several new coaches have been hired and renovation and new construction for competition and practice facilities are underway, all funded with private donations. “I have enjoyed my tenure at Furman, which is truly one of the gems in American higher education, and I am confident that the institution will continue to grow in influence and reputation,” he said. “The decision to resign was reached only after long and thoughtful deliberation, and in the end I felt that the needs of my family must be first among my priorities.” Smolla said he’s proud of several of the achievements the university has made over the past three years, including strengthening the link between Furman and the community that was built through initiatives such as the Poinsett Corridor improvement project and the university assuming operations of the Upcountry History Museum. He pointed to the university’s ongoing joint working group that includes top administrators, board members and faculty members designed to address quality and affordability. “I am confident it will put Furman in a very strong position going forward,” he said. Kohrt, a successful businessman with educational experience, said he hasn’t been asked if he’d take the presidency permanently, but said he wouldn’t rule out the possibility. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.


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JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

It’s time for Artisphere In its nine years of existence, Artisphere has become pivotal in placing Greenville on the national map as an arts destination – most recently, with yet another Top 10 ranking in Greg Lawler’s annual “Art Fair Sourcebook.” Dubbed the “definitive guide to the 600 best juried art and craft fairs in the United States,” the sourcebook is considered the go-to national manual for visual artists in choosing which shows to apply to participate in each year. It’s the second time in four years the festival has landed a spot in Lawler’s top 10; the sixth time in the top 50. Artisphere has been climbing steadily in the sourcebook’s subcategory rankings as well, achieving seventh nationwide in the fine arts category and 10th in fine craft. And once again, it’s made the Southeast Tourism Society’s list of Top 20 Events not be missed this spring. All are a recognition not only of the quality of Greenville’s premier arts festival, but of the key role a lively arts community plays in making any community a healthy, vibrant and dynamic place. One of the surest signs of a vital community is a visible and vigorous commitment to the arts – not just to creating art, but to a community-wide understanding of what art does for the hearts, minds and souls of all those blessed to live in such places. These places don’t just happen. They’re the deliberate creation of the communities themselves – a conscious decision of the people who live there to make art a central element of daily life, available to everyone. That commitment is evident in the enduring support of business partners like TD Bank – Artisphere’s presenting sponsor for the ninth consecutive year – and the 70-plus other area businesses lending their financial and promotional backing this year. Artisphere organizers also deserve credit for making the event fresh year after year, an obvious factor in its growing reach and acclaim. In addition to the 120 top visual artists chosen for booths this year – including 13 from Greenville County, a record number for this juried festival – visitors will have the chance to try their own hands at painting, printmaking and other creative arts at the new Demo/DIY (Do It Yourself) stage. The festival will offer commemorative wine at a wine tasting tent – a first this year – and, as always, feature talented musicians and bands, good eats, and the return of favorites like painter extraordinaire Brian Olsen and his whirling dervish performance on the Art in Action stage. Artisphere’s importance to Greenville’s economic climate cannot be overstated. Beyond the impact for participating artists – which is considerable – the festival’s national draw benefits local hotels, merchants and restaurants for an economic impact organizers estimate this year at $1.9 million. The 120 artists who exhibited at Artisphere last spring reported a record $5,865 in average sales over the three-day event – a 16 percent increase over the 2011 average, explaining why 854 artists applied from 41 states for the chance to put up a 2013 booth. The only possible spoiler is rain – so here’s hoping the thunder holds and the sun shines for another don’t-miss Artisphere in Greenville.

What nurses do During National Nurses’ Week, I am reminded of a poem called “Maybe God Made Nurses.” It begins with “Maybe God made nurses, ones like you, ones like me, to be his earthly angels, so that everyone could see. How we care for every ill patient who comes our way, with a tender touch, and a warm and compassionate smile, a heart full of kindness, these are just a few things we do each day.” Those simple acts of kindness we perform daily are part of our jobs. As nurses, we work in emergency rooms, schools, homeless shelters and businesses. We have many roles – from staff nurse to educator to nurse researcher – all serving the profession with passion and commitment. That commitment is why we celebrate National Nurses Week every year from May 6 – National Nurses Day – through May 12, the birthday of Florence Nightingale, founder of modern nursing. Cindy Scott is my Florence Nightingale and the reason I am a nurse today. As a child, I watched my Aunt Cindy diligently studying for her nursing classes, even during holidays, weekends and summer lake trips. The workload looked hard and the hours were long, but it paid off as she walked across the stage to receive her degree. That moment is forever etched in my mind and embedded a sense of pride and ambition I still carry with me today. I knew then, at 15, that I would become a nurse someday. I attended Tri-County Tech for my associate degree in general science and then furthered my education at the University of South Carolina to obtain my bachelor’s degree in nursing. I also have the pleasure of working with my role model, Aunt Cindy, at Bon Secours St. Francis Health System. This is my fourth year in nursing and last year, I had the honor of being selected as the Bon Secours St. Francis Nurse of the Year, receiv-

IN MY OWN WORDS by AMY M. WILSON, BSN, RN

ing the Willie B. Johnson award. It is an honor I am very proud of because the nomination came from my colleagues and reinforces that I am strengthening health care and being good help to my patients. I started on the Cardiovascular Step-Down unit as an RN in April 2009 shortly after receiving my nursing license. Our team works on projects to make our patients’ lives better with more efficient care. Our research efforts have garnered state and local attention in the area of evidence-based projects. Now more than ever, RNs are positioned to assume leadership roles in health care, provide primary care services to meet increased demand, implement strategies to improve the quality of care, and play a key role in innovative, patient-centered care delivery models. The nursing profession plays an essential role in improving patient outcomes, increasing access, coordinating care and reducing health care costs. Nursing is the largest of all health care professions, and continues to excel with more job growth projected in nursing than in any other occupation between 2008 and 2018. I am proud to be among that growing number of God’s angels helping people when they need it most. Amy M. Wilson is an RN with Bon Secours St. Francis Health System. She was raised in Starr and has lived in both Anderson and Greenville. Wilson volunteers with the Relay for Life of Abbeville County and the Greenville March of Dimes organizations.

IN MY OWN WORDS FEATURES ESSAYS BY RESIDENTS WITH PARTICULAR EXPERTISE WHO WANT TO TELL READERS ABOUT ISSUES IMPORTANT TO THEM. THE JOURNAL ALSO WELCOMES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR (MAXIMUM LENGTH OF 200 WORDS). PLEASE INCLUDE ADDRESS AND DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER. ALL LETTERS WILL BE CONFIRMED BEFORE PUBLICATION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT ALL LETTERS FOR LENGTH. PLEASE CONTACT EXECUTIVE EDITOR SUSAN SIMMONS AT SSIMMONS@GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM.

6 THE JOURNAL | MAY 10, 2013


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Happy Mother’s Day

FURNITURE

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MAY 10, 2013 | the Journal 7


JOURNAL NEWS WHY RUN AN ULTRAMARATHON? This is the first race for the Ellises, but Upstate resident Mike Pastore has been running ultramarathons for a dozen years. He’s competed in the 54mile Comrades race in South Africa nine times, three times in the Western States 100-mile endurance run and seven times in the 100-mile Umstead 100. He recently talked about why people would participate in such events.

“It’s a challenge to put yourself through something like that. There are other people out there, but it’s really you versus the distance and the trail,” he said. In addition to committing to go the distance, you have to dedicate yourself to a training regimen that takes up much of your life, he said. During the race, “there’s no logical reason to do it,” he said. “You can quit at the next step and you’ve got to push past that.”

Upstate couple to compete in 155-mile ultramarathon and raise funds for local nonprofit By APRIL A. MORRIS | staff

Just south of the Arctic Circle, Iceland is an island of active volcanoes, fjords and glaciers. And for seven days this August, it will also be home to Mark and Sarah Ellis, an Upstate couple who will participate for the first time in an ultramarathon. Dr. Mark Ellis, 34, an emergency room physician with Spartanburg Regional Hospital and Village Hospital, has worked on the RacingThePlanet medical team since 2010 and this year is going to join the race. RacingThePlanet is a global pioneer in the development of off-trail, endurance foot racing. Its rough country races take place over seven days and 250 kilometers (155 miles) in “remote and culturally rich locations around the world,” according to the organization’s website. Runners are provided with water, medical support and tent space every night, but are required to carry all their own equipment and food. A traditional marathon is 26.2 miles; any race beyond that is defined as an ultramarathon. The Ellises are headed for a 250-kilometer roving race over Iceland’s rugged and beautiful terrain. They’re challenging themselves, but they’re also challenging their supporters to help them in a quest to raise $20,000 for Safe Families for Children, a nonprofit that provides a safe home for children whose families are in crisis. Mark Ellis said that soon after he began working on the RacingThePlanet medical team, organizers predicted that he would soon be participating. With four desert races on offer, he knew he wasn’t

ready to run in the sun. Then, while ministering to damaged feet and dehydrated competitors in China’s Gobi Desert race last year, the 2013 Iceland roving race was announced. RacingThePlanet’s four desert races always occur in the same spots – Atacama in Chile, Gobin in China, the Sahara in Egypt, and Antarctica – but the roving race changes locations every year. “I called Sarah from China and told her about the [Iceland] race,” Ellis said. Sarah, 31, said it didn’t cross her mind again, but her husband kept “telling me gently that he wanted to talk about something. I thought he was going to ask me to move.” When she learned that he wanted to run in the Iceland race and he wanted her to join the volunteers, she said, “I will go to Iceland, but there’s no way you can run and I don’t run.” In high school, Sarah was the runner and even surreptitiously signed Mark up for a marathon after only four months of marriage. For this race, however, the tables have turned. Where she used to be “the leader in running, now he’s dragging me out,” she said. Since July 2012, the couple has been slowly adding miles to their workouts and weight to their backpacks, which they will have to carry throughout the race across the Icelandic countryside. As of early May, the two have been running their neighborhood with packs, in addition to completing out-and-backs on the Swamp Rabbit Trail – from the Greenville Zoo to downtown

IMAGES PROVIDED

While everyone has a different reason for running these rugged races, whether it be experiencing the natural world or proving they can finish, Pastore said for him, it’s the trial aspect.

Icelandic Ultra

Dr. Mark Ellis, upper left, works on a participant’s feet during a 2010 race in Australia.

ARE THEY SAFE?

According to a study published in the Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise journal in December 2011 that followed 396 runners in the RacingThePlanet 4 Desert race series from 2005 to 2006, injuries were typically minor.

95% 74.3% 18.2% 7.5% Minor in nature

Skin-related disorders

According to the study, a 10-year increase in age resulted in 0.5 fewer injuries/illnesses. Dr. Mark Ellis said while working on the medical staff for ultramarathon races, he has seen many foot issues, dehydration and hyponatremia, a condition that happens when someone drinks too much water, resulting in diluting of sodium in the body.

Travelers Rest and back. “We don’t have all of our equipment yet, so I’ve been filling my backpack with things like towels and packs of baby wipes,” Sarah Ellis said. While most runners stay indoors when the weather is foul, they have no excuse because the Iceland race is going on no matter what. “I thought, okay, it’s raining – it’s just extra practice,” she said

Musculoskeletal injuries

Medical illnesses

He has also seen altitude sickness during the race in Chile. Though running an ultramarathon in a remote area is not without risk, four runners experienced bad burns after being trapped in a gorge by a brush fire and having to run through it during an event in Western Australia’s Kimberley region in 2011.

about the 18 miles they ran in the rain this past November. The couple must work their training around four other schedules: Mark’s hospital roster and the individual needs of their three kids, ages 4, 3 and 16 months. Sarah’s parents, who just moved to the Upstate, have been helping out immensely, she said. RacingThePlanet’s roving race

ELEVATION CHANGE FOR THE 2013 RACECOURE IN ICELAND

ELEVATION (METERS) 1000 800 600 400

8 THE JOURNAL | MAY 10, 2013

0

STAGE 6: 10 km (6.2 mi)

STAGE 5: 67 km (41.6 mi)

STAGE 4: 40 km (24.8 mi)

STAGE 3: 41 km (25.5 mi)

STAGE 2: 46 km (28.5 mi)

STAGE 1: 46 km (28.5 mi)

200


JOURNAL NEWS

ULTRA RACES AT A GLANCE Triathlon: Swim, bike, run. Triathlon has several racing distances, from the youth events all the way up to double and triple ultra-distance events. Duathlon: Run-bike-run combination. Sometimes confused with biathlon, the official term for the Olympic sport of skiing and shooting. Aquathlon: Combines running and swimming, typically a run-swim-run combination; however, there are also two-stage, swim-run combos. Off-Road: For mountain bikers, trail runners or for those with an adventurous side who don’t mind getting a little dirty.

Winter Triathlon: Involves running, mountain biking and cross-country skiing – all performed on snow.

Aquabike: A swim-bike combination that has become a favorite of injured athletes who can no longer run.

Double Ironman: A 4.8-mile swim, 224-mile bike ride and 52.4-mile run.

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Obstacle Mud Run: Peppered with obstacles and mud pits.

Extreme can refer not only to distance, but also to the course itself, which may be laid in desert, arctic or changing altitudes. Source: USA Triathlon

courses are all set up with similar stage distances and water stations every 10 kilometers, Mark Ellis said. There’s a campsite at the end of each stage where competitors bed down and can plug into the cybertent to update their blogs and upload photos. Each tent sleeps about a dozen people who end up bonding, said Sarah. “It sort of ends up being a camp family.” During training, the Ellises have supported one another mentally and expect the same to happen during the race days. “Mark motivates me; I could go only about 10 miles on my own,” said Sarah, while her husband recounted a time when he was running with a virus and “she just pulled me along.” In addition to training for the northern trek, the couple also wants to raise $20,000 to support Safe Families for Children, which offers temporary shelter for children whose families are experiencing financial crisis, unemployment or homelessness. Based in Chicago, the nonprofit recently established a local chapter. The Ellises met two host families through their church and wanted to learn how they could help. Mark is a former youth leader and Sarah said they were searching for a way to serve since the arrival of their children. “We came from strong families and we are more thankful for that as we have gotten older,” Sarah Ellis said. The couple hopes to eventually become a host family, too. Until then, they’ll be running the neighborhood late at night, outfitted with headlamps and backpacks, or hitting the Swamp Rabbit Trail at 5 a.m. to get in a little training before breakfast.

Follow the Ellises’ progress at 4deserts.com/ beyond/iceland/blogs-A-C. Donate at ministrysync.com/event/website/?m=1367369. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

TRAINING ROUTINE WITH MARK AND SARAH ELLIS Mark and Sarah Ellis are training for their ultramarathon by running 35-45 miles per week – wearing 20- to 22-pound packs. They vary the distance of their runs between short: approximately six miles at a faster pace; mid-length: approximately 10 miles; and long: up to 32 miles. They run the distances back-to-back in an attempt to “get our legs used to running tired,” said Mark Ellis. By early May, the couple had run more than 1,250 miles prepping for the race. They hope to increase the weekly distance as the August race approaches, he said. WEEK MID SHORT LONG 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

8 10 8 8 10 8 8 10 8 10 8 10 8 8 10 10

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 4 6 6 6 6 6

20 10 22 26 12 26 28 12 28 14 32 12 28 28 12 16

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Sponsored by Bon Secours St. Francis Health System and Greenville Area Dermatologists Educational materials provided by American Cancer Society

MAY 10, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 9


JOURNAL NEWS

Long SC drought now officially over

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The State Drought Response Committee voted recently to downgrade South Carolina’s drought status from “moderate” to “no drought” in 22 counties and “incipient” to “no drought” in the rest. Duke Energy, however, isn’t convinced. The utility took issue with the state Drought Response Committee’s finding that the drought is over, a conclusion the committee based on a variety of indicators set by state law. “We recognize the drought response committee’s decision may reflect overall conditions statewide; however, Duke Energy is most focused on the river basins where we operate reservoirs, and those local conditions can vary,” said Duke spokesman Ryan Mosier. About 4.5 inches of rain fell during the weekend, according to the U.S. Geologic Survey monitoring station on the Chattooga River at Burrells Ford. As of Monday, the river was still in flood stage with a flow of more than 1,000 cubic feet per second (cfs). The median flow for this

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time of year is 350 cfs. Stream and river flooding was widespread in North and South Carolina in the area of Duke Lakes at Jocassee and Keowee. “In addition to our recommendations at the meeting, we discussed our perspective that a statewide decision removing drought might be confusing to water users in the Upper Savannah where local conditions still meet Stage 2,” Mosier said. “Neighbors on Lake Keowee are still limited to irrigating lawns on Tuesdays and Saturdays, and Lake Jocassee has improved from recent rainfall but is still 14 feet below full pond.” Drought Committee member Dennis Chastain said the April 24 vote was a nobrainer for board members. “All of the indexes showed the drought is over. Even the deep well in Oconee County (listed at more than 400 feet deep) showed water levels had risen into the middle range. “That means water levels have recharged from the surface to very deep; the well is the deepest indicator of normal conditions so far as rainfall is concerned. We would lose all credibility with the public at large were we [on the

drought committee] to cater to Duke’s position on the drought,” he said. According to state climatologist Hope Mizzell, “Most stations across the state reported 100 percent to 225 percent of normal rainfall over the past 60 days. The most important factor ending the drought, however, has been the state’s adequate rainfall for an extended fivemonth period, which coincided with the hydrologic recharge season.” Mosier said on the Upper Savannah, “the interim drought plan that Greenville Water, Seneca Light & Water and Duke Energy voluntarily implemented in January 2012 is in Stage 2. Because of this collaboration, we have been able to conserve more than 7 million gallons a day in Lake Keowee that otherwise would have been used.” The Drought Monitor shows no part of the state in drought and only a small section of Edgefield and Aiken counties were listed as abnormally dry in the Savannah Basin. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@communityjournals.com.

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journal news

Green grads Clemson graduates try out recyclable caps and gowns By CYNTHIA PARTRIDGE | contributor

This spring, Clemson University joined the ranks of colleges and universities offering a new graduation garb option: GreenWeaver recyclable caps and gowns. These sustainable caps and gowns are created with an average of 23 plastic bottles per set, university officials say. The recycled (and recyclable) caps and gowns are made from 100 percent post-consumer plastic bottles and go through a process in which plastic is turned into yarn, then woven into the caps and gowns. The university paired with GreenWeaver and the Division of Student Affairs to bring this greener solution onto campus. Giving students a choice between the traditional caps and gowns and the recycled versions was a good way to determine if the greener option would be successful, said Vice President of Student Affairs Steve Robbins. Caps and gowns sold for the graduating class totaled 2,071, and of those, 1,763 were the recycled GreenWeaver products, Robbins said. “Working with the vendor allowed us to continue to offer the more traditional cap and gown, made of polyester, and also introduce this GreenWeaver product,” he said. The school plans to continue giving graduating students a choice between the traditional and recycled caps and gowns. Though the greener product costs $3 more than the polyester version, graduates may feel better about shelling out a few more dollars because the extra money goes into a Clemson sustainability fund that will promote other environmental

A cap and gown made from recycled plastic bottles on display at the Clemson University Bookstore.

projects. The manufacturer of GreenWeaver, Oak Hall Cap and Gown, has also agreed to donate 25 cents from each sale to the Clemson sustainability fund. Robbins said a total of $5,000 will be contributed to the Clemson sustainability fund. And with more than 85 percent of the graduating class choosing the recycled option, he said 40,500 plastic bottles were recycled.

BY THE NUMBERS GreenWeaver sets are made from 100% post-consumer plastic bottles

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85% of the graduating class choose GreenWeaver sets

40,500 plastic bottles were recycled

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MAY 10, 2013 | the Journal 11


journal news

HOG heaven at Lake Conestee More than 550 volunteers, out of more than 7,000 in the Greenville area, fanned out across Lake Conestee Nature Park for HOG Day (Hands on Greenville) last weekend. Cool temperatures plagued the 19th annual event, but that didn’t stifle the enthusiasm, event organizers said. Overall the 7,000 volunteers took on more than 230 projects and donated 28,000 hours of service.

e u q i n u f Tons o r u o y r o f gifts nd i k a f o one

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John Korsedal of GE cuts support timbers for the Lake Conestee Nature Park Birding Observatory.

(Above and below) Construction of the Lake Conestee Nature Park Birding Observatory.

CCJR

charles sowell / Staff

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A special project at Conestee, an elevated birding tower located just off the Swamp Rabbit Trail, took more time and labor than could be squeezed into one day. That project was about 90 percent complete by the end of HOG Day, said Dave Hargett, executive director at the park. Workers also largely completed a new handicapped-accessible observation deck and boardwalk on the South Bay.

GE volunteers cut planks for a new boardwalk at Lake Conestee Nature Park.

PERSONAL PHILANTHROPY FOR PRESERVING SPECIAL PLACES From Falls Park to Mountain Bridge, Judy Cromwell’s gifts from her Community Foundation fund make it possible to keep the green in Greenville. We make it easy to give back to the place we all love to call home. www.cfgreenville.org 12 THE Journal | MAY 10, 2013


JOURNAL NEWS

Toys R Us, Babies R Us moving Toys R Us and Babies R Us will relocate from their former locations on Woods Crossing Road and Haywood Road to open at Magnolia Park at 1025 Woodruff Road in Greenville in a 58,000-squarefoot location. The store will celebrate its grand opening weekend with special promotions including savings, giveaways, kid-friendly activities and visits from popular costumed characters May 24-26, the company announced. In addition, the Toys R Us Children’s Fund has awarded a $10,000 grant to Make-A-Wish South Carolina. The new combined store will bring nearly 60 employees from the old locations while adding approximately 40 additional full- and part-time employees. The new Greenville location was built with a state-of-the-art energy management system, LED signage, custom daylight harvesting system and white reflective roof to increase energy efficiency; automatic faucets and flush valves and low-flow urinals and water closets to conserve water; highefficiency automatic hand dryers and cardboard baler to reduce the impact on landfills and facilitate recycling; and low-volatile organic compound paint and floor adhesive and vestibule entryway system to increase indoor air quality, all with the goal of making the store more energy-efficient.

Relay for Life Enhancer The City of Fountain Inn is teaming up this year with the Mauldin and Simpsonville Chambers of Commerce to host the Second Annual Golden Strip Relay for Life Enhancer on Aug. 9, 5-11 p.m. There will be live music, food, fun and most importantly, survivors. Teams for the relay event can be a group of five to 100. Each participant will raise and donate funds to the team. For additional information, contact Susan Ruffner, community development director, at susan.ruffner@fountaininn.org, 864862-0042 x302 or 864-871-0387.

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JOURNAL NEWS

Plan takes shape for proposed downtown park Great lawn, shift of Swamp Rabbit Trail among features revealed by designers By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

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A new park the city of Greenville wants to build along the banks of the Reedy River where its public works facility now sprawls could have a great lawn where people could listen to concerts and throw a football with their kids. The park plan taking shape could also shift the popular Swamp Rabbit Trail to the north side of the Reedy River, separating park activities from the bicyclists who use the trail. A meandering path on the south side of the river would allow park users to enjoy the Reedy. Other possibilities include a small community garden, a destination playground and a re-oriented baseball field that could also be used for softball and soccer. The proposed park probably won’t have a lake, a zip line or a skate park if the major components of a plan presented by consultants Monday evening

at a public meeting at the Kroc Center remain. “We expect this design to change,” said Bill Eubanks, creative director of Urban Eye Studio in Mount Pleasant, one of the consultants working on the project. At Monday’s meeting, attendees were asked to identify which of many styles of picnic shelters, benches and even trash receptacles they preferred by placing red stickers near their favorites. The consultants said the plan revealed Monday took into consideration the 22 acres’ flood zones and high areas. A cost estimate wasn’t calculated for the plan, but consultants said they will have estimated costs and suggested ways to build the park in phases. The city has not set aside any money for the park. The city’s public works facility would have to be moved from Hudson Street for the park to be built. The city has purchased 33 acres on Fairforest Way for its relocation. A timetable for the move hasn’t been released. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com. S E E PA G E 1 5 F O R T H E P L A N

‘Twice-Told Tales of the Dark Corner’ Dean Stuart Campbell will present “Twice-Told Tales of the Dark Corner” at the Greenville County Historical Society’s spring meeting on May 19 at 3 p.m. at the Kroc Center, 424 Westfield St., Greenville. For more information, call 864-233-4103.

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journal news

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journal news

Paris Mt. rezoning request withdrawn

Greenville developer Eric Kaufmann withdrew a rezoning application for a Flexible Review District (FRD) to construct a condo complex on Paris Mountain just short of the application’s consideration by Greenville County Council’s Planning and Development Committee on Monday. Kaufmann and Greenfields Consortium had requested rezoning in the Environmentally Sensitive District-Paris Mountain (ESD-PM) to an FRD to build a 74-unit condo complex on approximately five of 45 acres. The condo plan also included a boathouse, spa, arts and crafts barn and nature center. Kaufmann won preliminary approval in 2012 to build 74 single-family houses

The county Planning Commission considered Kaufmann’s request on April 24 and recommended denial of the rezoning. The county’s planning staff also recommended denial. Wastewater treatment is a key remaining issue for Kaufmann to address for whatever he builds on the site. He proposes using an on-site, self-contained system rather than septic tanks, which most Paris Mountain homes use. While the single-family development has preliminary approval, final plat authorization depends on approval of the waste system by ReWa, the SC Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) and the Appalachian Council of Governments (ACOG). In a recent letter, ReWa said it had entered into an agreement with Kaufmann based on the original single-family development plan, not the plan that included a condo complex. According to the agreement, the onsite treatment facility is considered temporary, and the developer should have

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a surety bond and later connect to a regional sewer system. According to an April 15 memo from ReWa director Ray Orvin to the ReWa board, Kaufmann was not complying with the terms of their original agreement with the application for a condo complex. Orvin’s memo also notes that his review of cost estimates for connecting to the nearest sewer line versus the quote for an on-site system “leaves little deviation in cost between them.” Estimated cost to connect to a sewer line, including right-of-way and pump station purchases would be $1.9 million, according to the letter. The on-site system is estimated to cost $1.7 million, not including a pump station and effluent distribution system. County spokesperson Bob Mihalic said Kaufmann would have to wait at least six months to reapply for rezoning. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

Feed Your Inner Food Enthusiast

By april a. morris | staff

at the same location. He has said the single-family homes would require roughly 25 acres, and he intended to move forward on that development if his rezoning request Kaufmann failed. Kaufmann could not be reached for additional comment before press time. Since its announcement, Kaufmann’s condo complex plan has faced staunch opposition from Paris Mountain residents who voiced concerns about increased traffic, wastewater treatment and the aesthetics of a multi-story complex. Kaufmann offered to meet with residents, even proposing at a Planning Commission meeting last month that they serve on advisory committees for the development. He reported that none of the neighbors wanted to speak with him as long as he pursued the FRD zoning.

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JOURNAL NEWS

GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL FROM THE MAY 7 MEETING

Greenville County Council is scheduled to meet again on May 21 at 6 p.m. at County Square, 301 University Ridge, Greenville. Contact Jeanne Putnam at jputnam@communityjournals.com.

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Lt. Cmdr. Scott “Yogi” Beare, U.S. Navy (retired), former pilot for the Blue Angels and author of two books, will be a keynote speaker for the Southeast Aviation Expo on Sept. 27-28 at the Greenville Downtown Airport (GMU). Spending his last 20 years in the military as a naval aviator, Beare flew a variety of aircraft, including the F/A-18 Hornet and F-5 Tiger II, accumulating more than 6,000 flight hours in high-performance fighters. He is a graduate of the famed Naval Fighter Weapons School “TOPGUN,” as well as a combat decorated veteran of Desert Storm. Beare’s aviation career reached new heights in 1995 when he was personally selected for the rare opportunity to fly with the U.S. Navy’s world-renowned flight demonstration team, the Blue Angels. For more information, visit greenvilledowntownairport.com.

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Greenville County Council voted Tuesday night to send the ordinance establishing a permanent Greenville County Disabilities and Special Needs Board (GCDSNB) back to committee for revision. The ordinance would establish a Board of Directors of the GCDSNB; define membership, terms and appointment of board members; update the duties of the GCDSNB Agency and Board; and provide for the dissolution of the interim board of directors. Councilman Joe Dill moved to hold the ordinance based on its conflict of interest clause, which currently stipulates that “employees of the GCDSNB or other individuals providing services in exchange for payment from the GCDSNB are not eligible to serve on the Board of Directors of the GCDSNB. Furthermore, individuals with an immediate family member(s) who are employed by or perform services in exchange for payment from the GCDSNB are not eligible to serve on the Board.” Dill’s issue is that this ordinance would apply different recusal rules for the GCDSNB than other county boards – an issue the council recently addressed in an ordinance also finalized Tuesday night – and he feels the same guidelines should apply to all. The new recusal rules for other boards and committees allow members to opt out of voting (rather than resign) to avoid a conflict in interest. Councilwoman Lottie Gibson said she agreed with Dill “that they should be able to opt out of voting.” In addition, Gibson felt that they “should not exclude family members if GCDSNB is to operate like any other board.” The council adopted the new Board and Commission Member/Recusal Ordinance on third reading in a 7-5 vote. The ordinance provides for written disclosure, recusal, and reporting of conflicts involving economic interest for county board and commission members and removal of members for violations. The council also voted in other business to approve the Langston Charter Middle School/JEDA Bonds. This resolution supported the issuing of the South Carolina Jobs-Economic Development Authority’s Economic Development Revenue Bonds in the aggregate principal amount of not exceeding $6,550,000 to Langston Charter Middle School. Councilman Joe Baldwin also announced a scam he was made aware of where people have paid $82 for deeds to be mailed to them, when they can download those same documents from the county website for free.

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MAY 10, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 17


JOURNAL NEWS

Food trucks could find place downtown By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

Wedding & Shower Gifts FOR WINE

& CHEESE LOVERS

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

It appears there’s a place for food trucks in downtown Greenville after all. A revised city food truck ordinance proposal would allow food trucks to park on private property closer than 250 feet away from an open restaurant if the restaurant doesn’t object. Food truck operators said the 250foot requirement would have made it nearly impossible for them to park downtown. “We heard from a lot of restaurants saying, ‘We like food trucks,’” City Manager John Castile told the City Council at a work session. The initial draft food truck ordinance sparked controversy because the city task force assigned to study the issue and draft recommendations contained restaurant owners but no food truck operators. “We cast a wider net” this time around, Castile said. Angie Prosser, the city’s director of public information and special events, said food truck operators had input into and supported the revised ordinance. The amended regulations would allow food trucks on streets and public property if approved by the city as part of a permitted special event. Food trucks would also be allowed to contract with the city’s parks and recreation department or park in a city-designated

The Neue Southern food truck serves customers in a parking lot on Wade Hampton Boulevard.

food truck parking space within assigned dates and times. Food truck operators would be required to pay $500 for a mobile food vendor decal and be permitted to locate in areas of the city that are not zoned residential. Prosser said the permits would be valid for the year even if a new restaurant opens within 250 feet. There are two food trucks operating in Greenville now. Councilwoman Amy Ryberg Doyle said she hoped Greenville could eventually hold an event such as North Charleston’s Food Truck Tuesdays. “Thank you for making (the regulations) simpler and more inviting,” Mayor Knox White said. The proposed rules could go to the City Council for initial consideration next week. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

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18 THE JOURNAL | MAY 10, 2013

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Greenville residents won’t pay higher taxes under a proposed 2013-14 budget, but they will pay more for wastewater and stormwater collection and to visit the zoo. The Greenville City Council got its first look at the budget at a work session Monday night. It is the 18th straight year the city has not raised property taxes. The $131.6 million budget includes a proposed 5 percent rate increase in wastewater fees, a 2.1 percent hike for stormwater fees and a dollar increase for adult admissions to the Greenville Zoo. The budget includes nearly $3.4 million for vehicle and equipment replacement and purchase, $410,000 for tech-

nology improvements that will allow citizens to do more government business online and increase efficiency of city departments, and $231,250 for the “Yeah, THAT Greenville” campaign designed to promote Greenville to visitors. The budget also includes money to refresh landscaping on Interstate 385 coming into Greenville. A Clemson shuttle and the six positions needed to run it are also included. A public hearing and first reading of the budget is set for May 20. Second reading of the budget and the city’s Capital Improvement Program is set for June 10. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Text 9-1-1

Sergeant Laura Weymouth with Greenville County Emergency Medical Services at work in the county EMS Dispatch center.

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Greenville County on cusp of accepting emergency calls by text message By CHARLES SOWELL | staff

Greenville County is on the cusp of a revolution in 911 technology, with the ability to receive text messages for help starting to come online this year in some areas

and nearly everywhere by 2014, said Rick Blackwell, county director of 911 services. “This is going to be huge, both for the citizens and for us at 911,” he said. “I’m not sure of all the details yet, but I do know four of the major cell carriers are working on a system that will enable those seeking

help to send a text message when they are unable to speak or hear.” The current system is a cumbersome one for the hearing-impaired, said Laura Weymouth, a shift supervisor for Greenville County EMS dispatch. Under the current system, the computer

recognizes when a call comes in but no one talks, said Weymouth. “It automatically notifies us and we switch the call to an oldfashioned Teletype machine. We can receive what the Teletype gets on our computer screens and dispatch aid as needed. TEXT 911 continued on PAGE 20

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY TEXT 911 continued from PAGE 19

“The system isn’t used much by us,” she said. County police dispatchers use their system more often, said Blackwell, and test the system three or four times a month. More frequently, a service operator places 911 calls involving the hearingimpaired through a special service for the hearing-impaired. “For us that gets to be quite an complex,” Weymouth said. “You have a 911 operator talking to the service operator, who is talking to the hearing-impaired victim. Then the 911 operator relays pertinent information to the EMS crew as they roll on the location of the hearing-impaired caller.” The Federal Communications Commission has wanted texting ability for 911 systems for a few years now. In a 2010 press release, the agency said the shootings at Virginia Tech, where 33 people were killed, were the reason for going to a texting 911 system.  “During the 2007 Virginia Tech campus shooting, students and witnesses desperately tried to send texts to 911 that local dispatchers never received,” the release said. “If these messages had

gone through, first responders may have arrived on the scene faster with firsthand intelligence about the lifethreatening situation that was unfolding.” AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile and Verizon will launch the service in some parts of the U.S. in 2013, the FCC said. The wireless carriers have signed an agreement to make emergency texting available to more than 90 percent of American cellphone users by May 15, 2014. The service should be a boon to people in situations where calling might be dangerous, and to people with speech and hearing disabilities, the FCC said in a release.  Before the service is fully deployed, the FCC plans to set up a “bounce back” message so people who text 911 in areas where the service isn’t ready will know their text didn’t go through. The bounce back message, which will instruct people to make a voice call to 911, should be ready nationwide by June 30. The technical hurdles in bringing a text system for 911 online are daunting,

Under the current system, the computer recognizes when a call comes in but no one talks…

“It automatically notifies us and we switch the call to an old-fashioned Teletype machine. We can receive what the Teletype gets on our computer screens and dispatch aid as needed.” – Laura Weymouth Weymouth, a shift supervisor for Greenville County EMS dispatch

Blackwell said. “There are problems to be solved with sharing messages with other agencies” – all municipal police forces, the sheriff ’s office and EMS are located in separate locations – “and with recording text messages as they come in,” he said. “It is going to require some education

with the public and will likely be expensive for 911 centers to implement. We want to be on the cutting edge, but not the bleeding edge on implementing this technology. We want to be sure the system works. We owe the citizens that much before we go with it.” Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@communityjournals.com.

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journal community

Moms rally for gun laws By Jeanne putnam | contributor

Greg Beckner / Staff

Around 10 men and women representing Moms Demand Action gathered outside of Sen. Tim Scott’s office and then walked down to Sen. Lindsey Graham’s office on a rainy May 2 to protest both representatives’ vote on the Manchin-Toomey Background Check Amendment. The bill, which failed 54-46, proposed expanded background checks for gun buyers and placed a ban on assault weapons and high-capacity gun magazines. The protestors’ “Stroller Jam” was organized to show the representatives that members of Moms Demand Action were disappointed in how they voted, said Erin Dando, leader of the South Carolina chapter of Moms Demand Action. The group pushed strollers and held signs touting statistics such as: “SC ranks as the 7th worst state overall for the rate of firearm homicides in 2010.” “I have never been an advocate before, but this issue was just too important to remain silent,” Dando said. “I became involved because I was heartbroken after Newtown and realized how easily that could have been my children’s elementary school. I immediately started researching gun violence and gun laws in South Carolina and what I found alarmed me.” Through the statistics she found, Dando discovered Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America on Facebook and “liked their nonpartisan grassroots approach and that they are single-focused like Mothers Against Drunk Drivers (MADD).” Dando also acknowledged that in today’s culture, it is “taboo to even talk about gun violence, which means no one is even talking about gun safety either. After Newtown, at least five children have been shot by a gun; four of those have died.”

HIGH STANDARDS. Not High Prices.

Members of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America protest at Sen. Tim Scott’s Greenville office at the intersection of South Main and West Broad streets.

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Two men joined the mothers and grandmothers in protest, including Terry Taylor, the Greenville county coordinator of MADD. “I like that the organization has a common-sense approach like MADD and this issue has no gender boundary,” said Taylor. “It affects us all.” Like Taylor, the group’s other male, 24-year-old Hayden Haskins, said he feels this issue affects everyone. “I just think it’s time to take common-sense steps against gun violence,” he said. Haskins said he knows his views aren’t popular with his friends, but he has seen that countries like Australia, which have stricter gun laws, have seen a drop in gun-related deaths. However, Dando said while Moms Demand Action is demanding stricter gun laws, the group is not advocating getting rid of guns. “It is about acting responsibly at all levels to protect our children and enacting common-sense legislation to ensure dangerous people do not have access to weapons.” For more information about Moms Demand Action, visit momsdemandaction.org.

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1:00 | 4:00 | 7:00 | 9:35

In Digital

PRESENTED IN DIGITAL PROJECTION: THE GREAT GATSBY (PG13) 1:15 | 4:15 | 5:00 | 7:00 | 8:00 | 9:40 THE GREAT GATSBY 3D (PG13) 2:00 | 9:50 PEEPLES (PG13) 1:00 | 3:10 | 5:20 | 7:30 | 9:40 IRON MAN 3 (PG13) 12:30 | 3:00 | 5:20 | 7:30 | 9:40 IRON MAN 3 3D (PG13) 4:45 | 7:20 42 (PG13) 4:15 | 7:00 PAIN AND GAIN (R) 1:30 | 9:30 THE CROODS (PG) 12:30 | 2:45

M53A

IN BIG THEATER

MAY 10, 2013 | The Journal 21


journal community

Tour BOOSTs students’ future goals By Jeanne putnam | contributor

A group of eight Tanglewood Middle School students got to smell the future at their Merus Refreshments tour on May 2. The tour was set up as a partnership between Merus Refreshments and Building Opportunities in Out of School Time, or BOOST. BOOST serves students participating in Green-

ville’s Communities in Schools program, which offers afterschool and summer programs, as well as opportunities to hear from different speakers such as former Gamecock turned 49er Marcus Lattimore. During last week’s tour, the students got to see the many working parts of a small business like Merus Refreshments and learn how different levels of education can open up a world of opportunities.

BELK DILLARD’S JC PENNEY MACY’S SEARS ANN TAYLOR APPLE BANANA REPUBLIC BARE ESCENTUALS COACH COLDWATER CREEK FRANCESCA’S COLLECTION J. CREW L’OCCITANE PANDORA POTTERY BARN SEPHORA THE WALKING COMPANY WILLIAMS-SONOMA

EXIT 39 AT THE INTERSECTION OF I 385 & HAYWOOD ROAD. SHOPPING LINE® 864-288-0511

Merus Refreshments co-owner Steve Bailey discussed how important it was for the students to finish high school and consider college. Bailey, who is not a college graduate, said, “Just because you don’t go to college doesn’t mean you can’t be super successful, but post-high school education is important.” In Bailey’s case, he had “great soft skills, but not having a college degree made it harder for me to be promoted,”

he said. “To get far in life, it’s about character, having a good work ethic, and integrity,” said Erica McCleskey, BOOST program director. “If school gets tough, don’t throw in the towel. Stick with it and graduate.” McCleskey and Bailey said they hoped to see the tour open the students’ eyes to career possibilities that they had not considered before. From student

Please join us for the

Joyful Garden Tour Art Show/Auction Monday – Friday, May 13 – 17 from 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM and

Artists’ Reception

Sunday, May 19 from 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM Enjoy scenes from the Garden Tour created by local artists. Silent auction bids can be made during the show. All bidding closes at 1:00 PM, Sunday, May 19. Also up for Auction! 4 course dinner for 6 with Erika Cannon and John & Amy Malik, best known for their restaurant 33 Liberty.

Many Thanks to our Talented Artists Laura Aiken Paige Arrington Anne Barry Katie Bolt Barbara Bowman Beverly Ray Cannon Ginger Cebe McKinley Copenhaver Judy Cromwell Jane Doyle Tricia Earle

Tom Forrester Karen France Shirley Fulmer Linda Furman Tim Greaves William Grosskopf Nita Hamilton Edith Hardaway Anne Hassold Bryan Hiott Ida Hudson

Ann Jennings Hilary Jernigan Nancy Magee Dabney Mahanes Henry Marion Garland Mattox Cannon McCreary Shannon McGee Vicky Moseley Stephanie Norris Sue Norris

Anna Onufer Dettie Piper Gerry Poster Cindy Roddey Lea Rohrbaugh Grace Scherer Stephanie Shuptrine Michael Stokes Myron Stokes Cathy Tate Majane Tatum

10 N. Church Street ˙ Downtown Greenville ˙ 864.271.8773 ˙ www.ccgsc.org

22 THE Journal | MAY 10, 2013


journal community

Green Your Grass, Not Your Lakes Steve Bailey, co-owner of Merus Refreshments, leads a group of BOOST students on a tour.

response, the two got their wish. “The tour opened my eyes to different possibilities,” said Asad Clark, a seventh-grader at Tanglewood Middle. While he is not interested in making a career out of the jobs he saw at Merus Refreshments, he found it “interesting that there was more to the company than just coffee.” In contrast, seventh-grader Bryana Smith said, “I would like to go into delivery driving, because the drivers get to travel.” She also found it interesting that

Merus Refreshments started out with one location and now is about to open its fourth location. The visit to Merus Refreshments was the second tour that BOOST has done with the company. McCleskey and Bailey both hope that other businesses will open their doors to the tour. For more information about BOOST, visit greenvilleafterschool.org. Contact Jeanne Putnam at jputnam@communityjournals.com.

YARD SAVVY: Lawn fertilizers are a big source of nitrogen and phosphorus pollution. Get to know your lawn’s needs by soil testing before fertilizing, or check your N-P-K ratio.

Learn more at

www.BeFreshWaterFriendly.org 912 Laurens Rd., Greenville | 864.271.9131 awardsthatwork.com FACEBOOK: Cowart Awards Inc.

What is your company’s Mission Statement? Cowart Awards, Inc. is dedicated to being a leader in the Awards and Recognition industry by having a staff of Recognition Specialists who are honest, friendly and understand the value of awards and the impact they have on peoples lives. We have a commitment to service, quality and a superior knowledge of the Awards and Recognition industry. We will stay up to date with current technology and continuously improve our processes so that we can ensure we understand and meet our customers needs.

Learn more about this and other Upstate businesses in the 2013 edition of

Remember: Your local spending supports local jobs and businesses. Sales taxes support local schools...our future.

To feature your business, call 679-1200.

MAY 10, 2013 | The Journal 23


journal community

our community

community news, events and happenings

EHE International, a nationally recognized leader in preventive medicine and annual physical exams, recently announced that Greenville Medical Associates has been named an EHE-certified preventive care center. Through Greenville Medical Associates, EHE members in the region now have greater access to its preventive care program. Kid Support, a six-week peer support group for children ages 7-12 who have a family member with cancer, starts May 14, 5:30-7:30 p.m., at the Greenville Health System Cancer Institute. Dinner will be included. Parent orientation is May 13. To register, call 864-455-5809. Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative has announced that the 16th annual Blue Ridge Fest will take place May 10 at 734 W. Main St., Pickens, 6-10:30 p.m. The festival boasts the largest classic car cruise-in event in the Upstate, along with a Beach Night show and dance. Special entertainment will feature The Drifters with Charlie Thomas, Maurice Williams and The Zodiacs, The Clovers and The Party Prophets Band. Admission is $15 in advance or $20 at the gate. Children ages 7–12 are admitted for $8 in advance or $10 at the gate, while children 6 and under get in for free. For more information, visit blueridge.coop/blueridgefest or call 800-2403400.

6th Annual

FRIDAY, MAY 17  7PM Zen, Downtown Greenville

Join us for a casual evening! OPEN BAR

STEEL DRUMS BY PANTASIA

DELICIOUS FOOD FABULOUS SILENT AUCTION

$50 PER PERSON OR $150 TO BECOME A PATRON

Food & Beverages Provided By: Camille's Sidewalk Café • Compadres Mex Mex Grill Duke Sandwich Company • Firefly Distillery Gretchen’s ABS Cakes & Café • Henry’s Smokehouse Key West Connection • Larkin’s on the River Moe’s Southwest Grill • New York Butcher Shoppe Pepsi Cola of Greenville • Stax’s Original Restaurant The Bohemian •The Local Taco • The Velo Fellow Thomas Creek Brewery Floral arrangements provided by Roots Entertainment made possible by Venture Aviation Event design by Stephan McLean Island Jam Sponsor

Tiki Hut Sponsors

Please visit www.scchildrenstheatre.org/events/caribbeancrush or call 864.235.2885 x10 to purchase tickets*, to become an event patron or to make a tax-deductible contribution. *Must be 21 or older to attend

24 THE Journal | MAY 10, 2013

The City of Greenville and Shred-it will sponsor a free shredding event on May 11, 9 a.m. to noon, at TD Convention Center. Businesses and individuals are welcome. All paper must be bagged or boxed and each person is limited to three large trash bags or three small boxes of paper. Bags and boxes must be intact, with no rips or tears. Reusable bags, boxes or containers will be returned. Attendees can also support Safe Harbor, which will be on site accepting donations during the event. For more information about recycling in the city of Greenville, visit recycle. greenvillesc.gov. The Farmers Market at the Anglican Church of St. George the Martyr, 427 Batesville Road, Simpsonville, starts May 11, 8 a.m.-noon, and will run Saturdays through August. They will have at least six vendors, offering jams, jellies, eggs and fresh fruits and vegetables in season. Bring your preschool children to Fiction Addiction for a storytime reading of the picture book “Llama Llama Home with Mama” by Anna Dewdney on May 16 at 10:30 a.m. For more information, call 864-675-0540. On May 17-19, Camp Greenville’s Women’s Weekend gives women an opportunity to take a break from the hectic daily routine and relax in a gorgeous mountain setting, just an hour north of Greenville at YMCA Camp Greenville. Participants in the retreat can choose from a large number of activities or choose to do nothing but relax. Lodging and meals are included in the $170 price or $150 for members; an additional fee is charged for massage. Registration is open now, but space is limited. For more information, call 864-836-3291, ext. 108, or register online at campgreenville.org. The 13th Annual Greenville Armed Forces Day Parade and Celebration will be held on May 18, starting at 5 p.m. The purpose of the event is to honor active, retired and deceased men and women of the U.S. armed forces. Veterans and members of the military are encouraged to contact organizers to learn how they can participate. Groups interested in taking part in the parade can visit greenvillearmedforcesday.com. Aloft presented by GHS will be hosting three hot air balloon camps to teach children the basics of balloon flight and what makes ballooning fun. Programs will be held on May 11, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., at the Roper Mountain Science Center’s Second Saturday Program and May 17, 8:30 a.m., at McLee’s Academy of Leadership, 4900 Dobbins Bridge Road, Anderson.


journal community

our community

community news, events and happenings

Douglas B. Stokes, a member of Troop 11 at First Presbyterian Church, received his Eagle Scout award on May 5. He is the third generation of his family to become an Eagle Scout. Pictured with Stokes are his father, Douglas W. Stokes Jr., who received his Eagle Scout award in 1979, and his grandfather, Douglas W. Stokes, who received his Eagle Scout award in 1947.

The Greenville Zoo will treat moms to a special day this Mother’s Day with free admission on May 12 when accompanied by one or more children paying full-price admission. In addition, the zoo will pay tribute to its resident orangutan mother, Chelsea, on May 11, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., at the zoo’s annual Missing Orangutan Mothers (M.O.M.) Day. The special event is held each year to create awareness of the large number of orangutan mothers who are killed in Indonesia due to deforestation practices and high consumer demands for palm oil. For more information, visit greenvillezoo.com. Officials from the BMW Charity Pro-Am presented by SYNNEX Corporation recently announced new celebrity commitments for the May 16-19 tournament, including actors Greg Ellis and Ryan Merriman, along with Carolina Hurricanes hockey coach Kirk Muller. Actor Lucas Black is returning for the fifth time, and actor Grant Show is returning for his second appearance. George Lopez and Wyatt Russell have withdrawn due to schedule conflicts. The total celebrity count is now 27. For tickets and information, visit bmwcharitygolf.com. High Cotton will sponsor a farm-to-table dinner on May 22 at 6:30 p.m. Executive chef Greg McPhee is partnering with Steve Ellis of Bethel Trails Farm for a dinner that will feature local products and quality wines. High Cotton receives eggs each week from Bethel Trails Farm as well as pork, charcuterie meats, lamb and the occasional duck eggs. The dinner is $65 per person plus tax and gratuity. Reservations are required and can be made by calling 864-335-4200. For more information, visit mavericksouthernkitchens.com. The Bon Secours St. Francis Joint Camp program officially became certified by the Joint Commission for total knee replacement and total hip replacement surgery this month. The program met all of Joint Commission’s DSC (disease specific certification) requirements. Residents can learn more about Joint Camp at a free Hip and Knee Pain Seminar on May 21 at St. Francis Eastside. Patients will also be able to sign up to see an orthopedic physician if they need an appointment. Physical therapist Scott Carley will be the event speaker. To register, call Amy Malcomb at 864-213-4958. Learn about Greenville Health System’s nurse-midwifery program and how a midwife can enhance the birthing process at the Meet the Midwives event on May 21, 6-8 p.m., at Greenville Midwifery Care. The event is free, but registration is required. To register, call 1-877-447-4636 or visit ghs.org/healthevents. Send announcements to community@communityjournals.com.

MAY 10, 2013 | The Journal 25


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OUR SCHOOLS

ACTIVITIES, AWARDS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Send announcements to community@communityjournals.com.

The public is invited to Washington Center’s annual Craft Day Sale on May 10, 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m., on the school’s main campus, 2 Betty Spencer Drive. Items available for purchase include notecards, T-shirts, picture frames, stepping stones, magnets, yard signs, jewelry, sun-catchers, coasters, door hangers, herb boxes, gift baskets and more. Food and flowers will also be available for purchase. For additional information, call 355-0250. At the National History Day-South Carolina competition held recently in Lake City, five of Martha Bohnenberger’s seventh-grade social studies students at Sterling School qualified for the national NHD competition in June. The students are: McKinley Riddle and Grace Mills, first place, Junior Group Exhibit: “Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire”; Paul Windsor and Vignesh Rajmahon, second place, Junior Group Exhibit: “The Sky’s the Limit – The Wright Brothers”; and Shona Fitzer, second place, Junior Individual Documentary: “Surrealism.” In addition, Joseph Boen’s Junior Historical Paper, “The Russo-Japanese War,” won third place and a special award as Outstanding Entry on World History.

Legacy Charter School has received the HealthierUS School Challenge gold award from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Legacy Charter is the only school in South Carolina to achieve the gold rating and only one of two schools in South Carolina to win the award. The HUSSC is a voluntary certification initiative established in 2004 to recognize schools participating in the National School Lunch Program that have created healthier school environments through promotion of nutrition and physical activity. Southside High School’s Air Force JROTC drill team won the South Carolina High School State All Services Drill Championship – Governor’s Trophy as well as the Air Force State Championship. The Drilling Tigers bested the top 15 schools in the state representing all the military branches. The team placed in eight out of nine events. The following cadets were commended: Bria McCullough, Brendan Williams, Kanisha Jackson, Nykila Norman and Jaelyn Neely. Special commendations went to the drill team coaches: Maj. (retired) Joseph Windley, Master Sgt. (retired) Kenneth Gause and Senior Master Sgt. (retired) Kathy Hodge. The Exchange Club of Greenville is donating a Freedom Shrine to Langston Charter Middle School in a ceremony to be held on May 15. The Freedom Shrine contains copies of such things as the Constitution, the Bill of Rights and famous American speeches. Maj. Gen. Lawrence W. Brock III, commander of the 355th Signal Command, will be the keynote speaker. For more information, contact Kelly Weekes at 864-286-9700.

St. Joseph’s Catholic School ninth-graders Jackie Curry (SJCS) and David Lewis (St. Mary’s) were recently selected as the recipients of the St. Joseph’s Scholar Award. This scholarship, awarded annually Lewis to two incoming freshmen, Curry recognizes academic excellence. Curry is the daughter of Carol and Daniel Curry of Easley. Lewis is the son of Thomas and Kathy Lewis of Greer. Furman University psychology professor Gilles Einstein has been chosen to receive the South Carolina Governor’s Award for Excellence in Science at a Predominantly Undergraduate Institution. A Furman faculty member for 36 years, Einstein’s research in “prospective memory” has received international acclaim. Prospective memory is memory for performing tasks

in the future, such as remembering to take medicine at the appropriate time or remembering to pick up a loaf of bread at the store. Einstein is the William M. Kenan Jr. Professor of Psychology and serves as chair of the department. He has published six books and 98 chapters and articles, and has collaborated with scientists nationwide and abroad who study memory. Sterling School students recently entered the Chemists Celebrate Earth Day 2013 illustrated poetry contest. Three of Sterling’s students received awards for the Western Carolinas local section: Sabrina Manji, second place, and Arnav Lal, first place for From left, Arnav Lal, Sabrina Manji and the sixth-eighth grade divi- Job Tan sion, and Job Tan, first place for the third-fifth grade division. These students’ poems were submitted to the National CCED 2013 contest. Arnav Lal was the secondplace winner for his division in the national contest. Greer Middle College Charter High School recently welcomed United States legislators into their classroom. Teacher Nathan Gallion and his U.S. History class hosted a Skype visit with Sen. Tim Scott and Rep. Trey Gowdy. The legislators shared their backgrounds and paths into Congress and answered questions from students.  

Furman University faculty members Anne Culberson and Mark Kilstofte have been awarded Fulbright Scholar research grants for the 2013-2014 academic year. Culberson is a visiting lecturer in modern languages and literatures and Kilstofte is a professor of music. Culberson will attend the two-week Baden-Württemberg Seminar for American Faculty in German and German Studies. Kilstofte’s ninemonth grant will take him to Norway, where he will be a research scholar at the University of Oslo’s Centre for Ibsen Studies. The Citadel recently announced the promotion list for the coming semester. Local promotions include: Mason Lee Ackerman of Greenville, commander of Alpha Company; Eric Matthew Benfield of Greenville, commander of Delta Company; Samuel Lee Huntington of Greenville, Band Company first sergeant; Khalil Paul Khoury of Spartanburg, commander of Kilo Company; Carson Alexander Smith of Simpsonville, Fifth Battalion sergeant major; James Adam Stone of Simpsonville, commander of November Company; and  Zachary Evan Taylor of Greenville, Third Battalion sergeant major. Olivia Baddley of Simpsonville, a senior at Mauldin High School, recently received recognition as one of South Carolina’s top two youth volunteers for 2013 in The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards program. Baddley was honored for organizing a three-day camp in the mountains for foster children and their parents. As a State Honoree, she received $1,000 and an all-expense-paid trip to Washington, D.C.

Charlotte Heron pets Caelan, handled by Laura Harris.

In recognition of Autism Awareness Month, Ted Thern with Dogs for Autism brought handler Laura Harris and service dog Caelan to the Montessori School of Greenville. The children learned about autism and the important role these specially trained dogs play in keeping autistic children safe and helping their families.

WHERE WE LIVE IS BECOMING THE ENVY OF AMERICA. A LOT LIKE OUR HEALTH SYSTEM.

It’s no wonder Greenville Health System (GHS) is the envy of the country. With physicians like Dr. Scott Porter, the region’s only orthopaedic oncologist—and one of 60 leading cancer specialists at the GHS Cancer Institute—providing new and innovative cancer therapies at 10 convenient locations, we’re helping to lead the nation in the fight against cancer, right here in the Upstate. Learn more at ghs.org/modelofchange. 130276

26 THE JOURNAL | MAY 10, 2013

MAY 10, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 27


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OUR SCHOOLS

ACTIVITIES, AWARDS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Send announcements to community@communityjournals.com.

The public is invited to Washington Center’s annual Craft Day Sale on May 10, 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m., on the school’s main campus, 2 Betty Spencer Drive. Items available for purchase include notecards, T-shirts, picture frames, stepping stones, magnets, yard signs, jewelry, sun-catchers, coasters, door hangers, herb boxes, gift baskets and more. Food and flowers will also be available for purchase. For additional information, call 355-0250. At the National History Day-South Carolina competition held recently in Lake City, five of Martha Bohnenberger’s seventh-grade social studies students at Sterling School qualified for the national NHD competition in June. The students are: McKinley Riddle and Grace Mills, first place, Junior Group Exhibit: “Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire”; Paul Windsor and Vignesh Rajmahon, second place, Junior Group Exhibit: “The Sky’s the Limit – The Wright Brothers”; and Shona Fitzer, second place, Junior Individual Documentary: “Surrealism.” In addition, Joseph Boen’s Junior Historical Paper, “The Russo-Japanese War,” won third place and a special award as Outstanding Entry on World History.

Legacy Charter School has received the HealthierUS School Challenge gold award from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Legacy Charter is the only school in South Carolina to achieve the gold rating and only one of two schools in South Carolina to win the award. The HUSSC is a voluntary certification initiative established in 2004 to recognize schools participating in the National School Lunch Program that have created healthier school environments through promotion of nutrition and physical activity. Southside High School’s Air Force JROTC drill team won the South Carolina High School State All Services Drill Championship – Governor’s Trophy as well as the Air Force State Championship. The Drilling Tigers bested the top 15 schools in the state representing all the military branches. The team placed in eight out of nine events. The following cadets were commended: Bria McCullough, Brendan Williams, Kanisha Jackson, Nykila Norman and Jaelyn Neely. Special commendations went to the drill team coaches: Maj. (retired) Joseph Windley, Master Sgt. (retired) Kenneth Gause and Senior Master Sgt. (retired) Kathy Hodge. The Exchange Club of Greenville is donating a Freedom Shrine to Langston Charter Middle School in a ceremony to be held on May 15. The Freedom Shrine contains copies of such things as the Constitution, the Bill of Rights and famous American speeches. Maj. Gen. Lawrence W. Brock III, commander of the 355th Signal Command, will be the keynote speaker. For more information, contact Kelly Weekes at 864-286-9700.

St. Joseph’s Catholic School ninth-graders Jackie Curry (SJCS) and David Lewis (St. Mary’s) were recently selected as the recipients of the St. Joseph’s Scholar Award. This scholarship, awarded annually Lewis to two incoming freshmen, Curry recognizes academic excellence. Curry is the daughter of Carol and Daniel Curry of Easley. Lewis is the son of Thomas and Kathy Lewis of Greer. Furman University psychology professor Gilles Einstein has been chosen to receive the South Carolina Governor’s Award for Excellence in Science at a Predominantly Undergraduate Institution. A Furman faculty member for 36 years, Einstein’s research in “prospective memory” has received international acclaim. Prospective memory is memory for performing tasks

in the future, such as remembering to take medicine at the appropriate time or remembering to pick up a loaf of bread at the store. Einstein is the William M. Kenan Jr. Professor of Psychology and serves as chair of the department. He has published six books and 98 chapters and articles, and has collaborated with scientists nationwide and abroad who study memory. Sterling School students recently entered the Chemists Celebrate Earth Day 2013 illustrated poetry contest. Three of Sterling’s students received awards for the Western Carolinas local section: Sabrina Manji, second place, and Arnav Lal, first place for From left, Arnav Lal, Sabrina Manji and the sixth-eighth grade divi- Job Tan sion, and Job Tan, first place for the third-fifth grade division. These students’ poems were submitted to the National CCED 2013 contest. Arnav Lal was the secondplace winner for his division in the national contest. Greer Middle College Charter High School recently welcomed United States legislators into their classroom. Teacher Nathan Gallion and his U.S. History class hosted a Skype visit with Sen. Tim Scott and Rep. Trey Gowdy. The legislators shared their backgrounds and paths into Congress and answered questions from students.  

Furman University faculty members Anne Culberson and Mark Kilstofte have been awarded Fulbright Scholar research grants for the 2013-2014 academic year. Culberson is a visiting lecturer in modern languages and literatures and Kilstofte is a professor of music. Culberson will attend the two-week Baden-Württemberg Seminar for American Faculty in German and German Studies. Kilstofte’s ninemonth grant will take him to Norway, where he will be a research scholar at the University of Oslo’s Centre for Ibsen Studies. The Citadel recently announced the promotion list for the coming semester. Local promotions include: Mason Lee Ackerman of Greenville, commander of Alpha Company; Eric Matthew Benfield of Greenville, commander of Delta Company; Samuel Lee Huntington of Greenville, Band Company first sergeant; Khalil Paul Khoury of Spartanburg, commander of Kilo Company; Carson Alexander Smith of Simpsonville, Fifth Battalion sergeant major; James Adam Stone of Simpsonville, commander of November Company; and  Zachary Evan Taylor of Greenville, Third Battalion sergeant major. Olivia Baddley of Simpsonville, a senior at Mauldin High School, recently received recognition as one of South Carolina’s top two youth volunteers for 2013 in The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards program. Baddley was honored for organizing a three-day camp in the mountains for foster children and their parents. As a State Honoree, she received $1,000 and an all-expense-paid trip to Washington, D.C.

Charlotte Heron pets Caelan, handled by Laura Harris.

In recognition of Autism Awareness Month, Ted Thern with Dogs for Autism brought handler Laura Harris and service dog Caelan to the Montessori School of Greenville. The children learned about autism and the important role these specially trained dogs play in keeping autistic children safe and helping their families.

WHERE WE LIVE IS BECOMING THE ENVY OF AMERICA. A LOT LIKE OUR HEALTH SYSTEM.

It’s no wonder Greenville Health System (GHS) is the envy of the country. With physicians like Dr. Scott Porter, the region’s only orthopaedic oncologist—and one of 60 leading cancer specialists at the GHS Cancer Institute—providing new and innovative cancer therapies at 10 convenient locations, we’re helping to lead the nation in the fight against cancer, right here in the Upstate. Learn more at ghs.org/modelofchange. 130276

26 THE JOURNAL | MAY 10, 2013

MAY 10, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 27


journal community

the good

events that make our community better

Six-time Stellar Award-winner and Grammy Award-nominated gospel recording artist VaShawn Mitchell recently performed at Spartanburg’s Spring Fling. Mitchell is an ambassador for the Big Brothers Big Sisters’ Mentoring Brothers in Action initiative and donated a portion of the proceeds from the sale of his latest CD, “Created for This,” to Big Brothers Big Sister of the Upstate. Local uniform and apparel-maker OOBE is supporting the upcoming 2013 BMW Charity Pro-Am presented by SYNNEX Corporation golf tournament by offering its employees a paid day off to volunteer for the tournament. Volunteer opportunities are still available to the public, and anyone interested can visit bmwcharitygolf.com for online volunteer registration or to download a paper application.

Free gift wrap

Bon Secours Health System has been selected as this year’s winner of Practice Greenhealth’s System for Change Award. The award is given to health systems that have proven success in improving environmental performance and demonstrated dedication to a higher standard of sustainability. In addition to receiving this award, all Bon Secours facilities also received: eight Partner for Distinction awards; six Partner for Change awards; one DEHP Free award, and two Environmental Leadership awards. During the recent United Way Hands on Greenville Day (HOG), a record 7,017 volunteers completed 230 service projects throughout Greenville County. Teams from area companies, organizations and church groups, along with individuals worked on projects benefiting area nonprofits, schools, parks and other community organizations. This 19th annual event collectively generated more than 28,000 hours of volunteer service and an estimated $621,000 given back to the local community.

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For complete information call 864-679-1205 or e-mail aharley@communityjournals.com 28 THE Journal | MAY 10, 2013

C53R

Mon.-Fri. 9:30-5:30 · Sat. 9:00-5:00 626 Congaree Road · 864.234.2150 www.wbu.com/greenville

Dining for Women recently announced that its grant program for the remainder of 2013 will award more than $325,000 to organizations worldwide that will directly benefit women and girls. Featured programs include One Heart WorldWide, StoveTeam International, Foundation Rwanda, The Unforgotten Fund, ASSET and Smiles on Wings. For more information, visit diningforwomen.org or call 864-335-8401. Keller Williams associates recently took the day off on May 9, but it was hardly a day of rest. Associates with Keller Williams Realty of Greenville have chosen to “Give Where They Live” as part of RED Day, one of the biggest events in the real estate industry. Short for “Renew, Energize and Donate,” RED Day was created to unite Keller Williams Realty offices and associates in an international day of service. Local associates spent the day volunteering at The Generous Garden Project, a local nonprofit organization that grows fresh produce and donates it to local food banks and shelters. For more information about RED Day, visit kw.com/redday. Safe Harbor’s 8th Annual Cycle Tour in Iva will be held on June 1 at 8:15 a.m. The ride benefits Safe Harbor, a nonprofit organization serving victims of domestic violence and their children in Anderson, Greenville, Pickens and Oconee counties. Riders can choose among three courses: 25, 42 or 65 miles. The $40 registration fee includes a T-shirt, lunch, snacks, SAG and course map, or register for $110 for an event jersey. All proceeds from this event will benefit Safe Harbor. Register online at safeharborcycletour.org. The Rose Ball recently announced which charities will receive funds from the Sept. 20, 2013, fundraiser event. The beneficiaries include: A Child’s Ha-


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

THE GOOD

EVENTS THAT MAKE OUR COMMUNITY BETTER

ven, Cancer Society of Greenville County, Center for Developmental Services, Clement’s Kindness, Greenville Free Medical Clinic Inc., GHS Medical Experience Academy, Greenville Literary Association Inc., Harvest Hope Food Bank, Meyer Center for Special Children, Project Host Inc., Ronald McDonald House Charities, Triune Mercy Center, YMCA, Judson Community Center and St. Francis Hospital. For more information, visit theroseball.com Matt Malloy and Shaun Dillavou of the local Walgreens district leadership have signed on as co-chairs of the American Diabetes Association’s Upstate Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes, which will take place Sept. 21, 2013, at the CU-ICAR/ Millennium Campus in Greenville. Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes is the signature one-day fundraising and awareness walk benefiting the American Diabetes Association. For more information, visit diabetes.org/stepoutgreenville or call 1-888-DIABETES, ext. 3298 or 864-609-5054, ext. 3298.

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For over 20 years, Cothran Properties has been building homes in some of the most desirable areas of Greenville County. They are committed to delivering homes of exceptional style, quality and value. Own your piece of the Upstate by choosing a Cothran Properties home.

in Po

Clemson University received more than $1 million from an anonymous benefactor to establish two endowments. The endowments are named in memory of Clemson alumnus Samuel Lewis Bell. Half of the money will establish the Samuel Lewis Bell and Lucia Beason Bell Memorial Scholarship Endowment, which will award scholarships to undergraduate students from the Chester area. This gift is part of the university’s “The Will to Lead” capital campaign to raise $1 billion to support students and faculty with scholarships, professorships, facilities, technology and enhanced opportunities for learning and research. The other half of the money will create the Samuel Lewis Bell Distinguished Professorship, which will support an endowed position in the Holcombe Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

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30 THE Journal | MAY 10, 2013


JOURNAL CULTURE

‘SCREEN’ PRINTING

Artist David Gerhard GREG BECKNER / STAFF

David Gerhard demonstrates his smartphone art at Artisphere By APRIL A. MORRIS | staff

In the world of traditional printmaking, ruled by heavy presses and large studios, printmaker and Clemson graduate student David Gerhard is creating his work in the smallest of studios: an iPhone. Since 2009, Gerhard has been using his smartphone as a studio, creating work with up to 20 image applications. “There are so many things you can do because there are so many apps out there,” he said. He first started manipulating the images on his phone while

working as a graphic designer and smartphone application reviewer in California. Gerhard primarily works directly on his phone and also uses a stylus to “get my hand in there even more.”

ARTISPHERE WHEN: Fri., May 10, noon-8 pm Sat., May 11, 10 am-8 pm Sun., May 12, 11 am-6 pm INFO: artisphere.us, Free MORE: David Gerhard on the Do It Yourself Stage •Smartphone Art – Sat. 3 pm • Kitchen Printmaking – Sun. 1 pm

“A lot of the process with the iPhone art for me is learning what the app does and learning a way to subvert that,” he said. One recent piece used a 3-D, interactive panorama app to create “We Sit Separately Together” on a commuter train. Using an app designed to produce one complete photo, he forced it to generate a fragmented image. The moveable piece, exhibited on an iPhone in a gallery and online, illustrates how “in that moment I felt instantly connected with everybody through this association and also completely separated,” he said. “That mode of presentation also presents that separation and connection at the same time.” GERHARD continued on PAGE 32

MAY 10, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 31


JOURNAL CULTURE

WORKS BY DAVID GERHARD

“Pregnancy,” a screen print and graphite on rag paper GERHARD continued from PAGE 31

Using the smartphone initially afforded him time, Gerhard said. “I worked 50-plus hours a week and didn’t have time to go to my art studio. So I made my lunch break and any other break I had my art time.” A long piece on the phone could take two to three hours; however, a large studio piece could take up to 50 hours, he said.

“Searching... ,” stone lithography and wood relief

The nature of working on his phone has also connected him to other people. “I can make the art on the go, but also it’s a networking device so I can actually connect with people who are also doing that,” he said. Gerhard has created pieces about people he’s contacted through Instagram or Twitter, using their submitted photos. This weekend, Gerhard is showcasing his technique alongside several other Clemson

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“Protection,” iPhone art

“I can make the art on the go, but also it’s a networking device so I can actually connect with people who are also doing that.” University printmakers at Artisphere, Greenville’s annual downtown art festival. One challenge is demonstrating a digital medium outdoors during the day, so he’s creating a series of posters of the process rather than projecting images on a monitor or screen. Afterwards, he plans to post them online as part of a smartphone art tutorial. Gerhard says smartphone art is something anyone with a phone can do, as is Gerhard’s other demonstration on Kitchen Printmaking. Traditional printmaking uses a large press, mineral spirits and sometimes toxic chemicals, he said, but he plans to show how aspiring printmakers can use water-based relief inks, wood carvings and the back of a wooden spoon (with the user as the press) to make prints at home or a smaller space.

“Perspectives of War,” mixed media

The demonstration includes “a little bit of tradition and my take on it – a little bit of freedom with how I use the technique,” he said. This freedom results in unique monoprints, he said. Gerhard’s demonstrations are two of 17 on the Do It Yourself Stage, part of the annual festival that features 120 jury-selected artists on Artists Row, showcasing painting, photography, sculpture, jewelry, prints and more. Artisphere will also feature live performances from musicians, including blues from The Mobros, jazz from the Wade Baker Trio and Americana from local favorite Noah Guthrie. Other live performances include dance, theatre and art in action from Brian Olsen along with demonstrations of metalworking, glassblowing and woodworking. Kidsphere offers the young ones a chance to experiment with fine art and craft techniques. The festival officially kicks off at noon on Friday, May 10, with opening ceremonies at the intersection of Broad and Main streets. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL CULTURE

That’s right. The Scots have always been first to the party. So come celebrate with us at Gallabrae, Greenville’s best Scottish Games ever. Scot or not, you won’t want to miss four days of outrageous Scottish fun, with plenty of parading, piping, caber tossing, haggis-eating, boulder throwing, Celtic rocking, and plaid-wearing for your whole clan.

MAY 23 - 25 gallabrae.com Downtown Greenville

Furman University - tickets available at the gate

Thurs, May 23 - Piedmont Natural Gas Downtown Alive!

Sat, May 25 - Greenville Scottish Games

Fri, May 24 - Great Scot! Parade | Ceilidh

British Car Show | Celtic Jam MAY 10, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 33


JOURNAL CULTURE

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journal culture

sound check with vincent harris

Howlin’ Brothers’ debut channels raw live sound

The Howlin’ Brothers, a Nashville-by-way-of-New-York trio, is one of a growing number of bands that are looking back past rock ’n’ roll and drawing their influences from acoustic roots music. The band, which consists of multi-instrumentalists Jared Green, Ian Craft and Ben Plasse, combines bluegrass, folk, gospel, country, ragtime jazz and even vaudeville-style novelty numbers into a rollicking-but-rocksolid revue. The band formed at Ithaca College in 2005, drawn together by a love of what Plasse laughingly calls “the American roots experience, whatever that means.” The three “were music students at Ithaca, and we all sort of got interested in acoustic music at the same time,” he says. “We sat around a lot of campfires, just pickin’ and grinnin’.” Plasse’s music-student sensibility Who: The Howlin’ Brothers meshed well with the artistry of one Where: Horizon Records, 2-A W. Stone Ave., Greenville legend in particular. “I really got into Doc Watson When: Saturday, May 11, 3 p.m. around that time,” he says. “Coming admission: free from a classical music background, I really related to his performance. His cadence and his delivery have almost a classical feel to them. And he was such an amazing finger-picker that I immediately tried to pick up on that. And listening to him is what led me into those other older forms of music.” The band’s love of the different classic American music styles comes through in Plasse’s conversation. “Those melodies are just timeless,” he says. “The fact that people are still playing them just shows how strong they are. It’s so great to see it coming back around again.” The band has just released its debut album, aptly titled “Howl,” which was produced by Brendan Benson (formerly of The Raconteurs). The band’s instrumental prowess drew Benson’s attention at a jam session. “Brendan heard us jamming at a party, Plasse says. “At the time, he was producing Cory Chisel’s album and said he needed a couple of guys who could play a lot of instruments. Buddy recommended Ian and Jared and they went in for a month. By the end of it, Brendan was saying he wanted to do a Howlin’ Brothers record next. We all thought he was kidding, but he was serious. He’s been a real blessing for us. He’s helped us launch to a new level.” Plasse says that Benson’s experience in the studio helped the band balance its raw live sound with the urge to experiment. “He just wanted to get great recordings of the songs,” Plasse says. “He was totally down with having a drum kit or a horn section or whatever it might be. But we tried to keep it within reason, because we don’t want to get up and play the song and have it sound nothing like the record. Hopefully, we walked that line pretty well.” Ultimately, the Howlin’ Brothers are much like the troubadours they emulate; they feel that the journey is its own reward. “We really just want to reach as many people as we can and share this music,” Plasse said. “We love what we do. It’s just so much fun being on the road and meeting people and getting feedback from an audience. We’re really lucky to do this. If we can keep making records and keep touring, that would be the greatest thing ever.” Contact Vincent Harris at vharris@communityjournals.com.

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JOURNAL CULTURE

Big plays, talent mark Warehouse Theatre’s 40th season By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

The phrase “go big or go home” should have special meaning to the Warehouse Theatre this year. Under the leadership of executive and artistic director Paul Savas, the Warehouse has dug itself out of a financial hole that had some community members thinking the theater would have to “go home.” It’s not. In fact, it’s just the opposite as the Warehouse’s 2013-14 season is its 40th and the theatre is going big to mark the occasion. “We’re going to stack the casts as much as we can with the best Greenville has to offer,” Savas said. And, as usual, the Warehouse will tackle some touchy issues in its productions. “We don’t shy away from creating robust conversations around religion, politics and sex,” Savas said. “I think it’s our job to provide a positive environment to discuss those things you’re told not to discuss at Thanksgiving.” The 2013-14 Main Stage season opens with Neil Simon’s “Laughter on the 23rd

Season tickets for the Warehouse Theatre’s 201314 Main Stage season are on sale now on the theater’s website, warehousetheatre.com.

Floor.” Kerrie Seymour, who Savas calls arguably among the finest actresses in the Upstate, will direct the production. Shakespeare’s “Tempest” is next. “It’s not our intention to scroll through the canons of his plays. That’s the Upstate Shakespeare Festival’s job,” Savas said. “But ‘Tempest’ is a great play for innovative production elements. The set is simple, but the sound and light projection is heavy.” “Avenue Q,” a coming-of-age musical comedy noted for the use of puppets alongside human actors, will run in December. Shannon Robert will direct the production, while Kim Granner, who wrote

and designed the puppets for a recent South Carolina Children’s Theater’s Second Stage production called “Glow Tales,” will design and build the puppets. “It’s exactly the kind of musical our people want to do,” Savas said. “August, Osage County,” a play by Tracy Letts, answers the question of what if George and Martha from “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf ” had kids, Savas said. Fine Arts Center director Roy Fluhrer will direct the play, while Mimi Wyche will play the matriarch, a character Savas calls the most play’s most difficult role. Others in the play will be Anne Tromsness, Savas, Brock Koonce and Mary Freeman. “The cast is a who’s who of Greenville theater,” Savas said. “Thus far it’s an alllocal cast. We have the talent here.” The only role that may have an out-of-Greenville actor is the part of the girl who is molested by the creepy uncle, Savas said. “4,000 Miles” is up for April 2014. The contemporary play was a finalist for the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for drama and tells the story of 21-year-old Leo who seeks solace from his feisty 91-year-old grand-

mother after he suffers a major loss while on a cross-country bike trip. Shirley Sarlin will play the grandmother. “Angels in America 1 & 2” caps off the season. Tony Kushner’s two-part historical drama has characters such as HIV-positive Prior; Joe, a closeted-gay Mormon; his valium-addicted wife Harper; and Roy Cohn, a notorious lawyer from the McCarthy hearings who is dying of AIDs. The Warehouse will present both parts in rep, allowing audience members to see both parts on the same day. Jayce Tromsness will direct, while Anne Tromsness, Savas and Matt Recce will be among the cast members. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

2013-14 Main Stage Schedule “Laughter on the 23rd Floor” Aug. 23 - Sept. 14 “Tempest” mid-October - early Nov. “Avenue Q” December “August, Osage County” Feb. 7 - March 1 “4000 Miles” April 4 - April 26 “Angels in America 1 & 2” May 30 - June 28

In cooperation with Rolling Green Village

EXHIBIT HOURS:

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

NOON-5 PM

10 AM-8 PM

SUNDAY MAY 10 MAY 11 MAY 12 Artists of the Upstate Juried Exhibition is located in the Founder’s Room above Larkin’s on the River Restaurant.

MAY 16 - JUN 8 THU-SUN

Produced by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc. Originally produced at Signature Theatre, Arlington, VA, October 2010 Eric Schaeffer, Artistic Director Maggie Boland, Managing Director

www.centrestage.org • 36 THE JOURNAL | MAY 10, 2013

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journal culture

scene. here.

the week in the local arts world

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The Pickens County Cultural Commission recently announced winners of the 34th Annual Juried South Carolina Artist’s Exhibition, which will be on display until June 13. The winners of the competition are: first place, (1) “Chui” by Larry Seymour; second place, (2) “Hanging Temple, China” by Sam Wang; and third place, (3) “The Tree of Completion” by

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Kathy Hendricks-Dublin. Juror’s Choice Awards included Rhea A. Fletcher’s “After Tea” and Kathy Moore’s “19 Oak Tree Lane – Junk Drawer Series.” In addition, Honorable Mention Awards were presented to Bryan Hiott’s “Untitled Tintype #2,” Cindy Landrum’s “Life Without Television,” Amanda Long’s “The First One,” Ernie Norun-

3-D artist and architect Claudia McAninch and oil painter Garry Turpin present their art at The West Main Artists Co-Op in Spartanburg. McAninch’s show, “Tector: Crafted Sculptures,” showcases McAninch ‘s “Wave” architectural sculptures constructed of paper, cardboard, felt, fiber and wood. Turpin’s show, “The Circle of Life,” is a chronology of his art from the 1970s until the present day. The exhibition will run from May 16-June 15 with an opening reception on May 16, 5-9 p.m., during Spartanburg’s Art Walk. The exhibition may also be seen during WMAC’s regular hours: Thursdays and Fridays, 3-6 p.m. and Saturdays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., or by appointment. West Main Artists Co-op is located at 578 W. Main St., Spartanburg. For more information, call 864-804-6501 or visit westmainartists.org. One-Stop Open Studios 2013 is on display at the Metropolitan Arts Council of Greenville until June

The public is invited to an exhibition of Science Fair projects from the Boys & Girls Clubs of Mary Wright, Cleveland and Chapman Elementary Schools beginning on May 17 in the Spartanburg Science Center at Chapman Cultural Center. For more information, call 542-ARTS.

5

golo’s “Broken Ribs” and Pat Owens’s “For All Your Photography Needs Kudzu Cultivator.” Lucy Nordlinger’s (4) “Self Portrait on St. Valentine’s Day” won the 2013 Director’s Choice Award and the Cultural Commission’s Purchase Award was presented to Beth Munnings for (5) “The Watcher in the Woods?”

4. This exhibit is a retrospective of Open Studios artists’ exhibits from 2002-2012 that are displayed every spring in conjunction with Artisphere. The opening reception is May 11, 7-10 p.m., at 16 Augusta St., Greenville. Greenville blues legend Mac Arnold returns to the Mauldin Cultural Center for a free concert on May 17 at 7:30 p.m. with his band, Plate Full O’ Blues. Riding on the heels of a sold-out performance last year, Arnold and his band will be part of the Mauldin Cultural Center’s Railroad Concert Series. The concert will be in the Mauldin Cultural Center’s Outdoor Amphitheater at 101 East Butler Road. The public is invited to bring their lawn chairs, blankets, picnic baskets (no alcohol) and a small donation to support the cultural center. Rain location: MCC Auditorium. All donations received from the concert will be shared between the Mauldin Cultural Center and the St. Joseph’s Catholic School’s Fine Arts Department in an effort to support the arts in local classrooms. For more information, visit mauldinculturalcenter.org or call 864-335-4862.

Reedy River Brass will perform at Music Sandwiched In on May 22. The free lunchtime concert series is held in Spartanburg’s downtown library from 12:15-1 p.m., presented by the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra. Attendees can bring your lunch or buy one there. For more information, call 543-ARTS. Spartanburg High School and Spartanburg School District 7 present the Disney version of the classic “Beauty and the Beast,” May 23-26, at Chapman Cultural Center. Tickets can be ordered online at chapmanculturalcenter.org. For more information, call 542-ARTS. "Coming Up For Air" by Pat Cato. Mixed media on canvas, 36x36. Can be viewed at Artists Guild Gallery of Greenville, 200 N. Main St. Want to see your artwork here? Send a high res image to greenvillearts@greenvillejournal.com.

American Idol finalist Casey Abrams will perform at the Fountain Inn Center for Visual and Performing Arts on Sept. 14 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $20 and $25 and are now available due to popular demand. For more information, visit ftinnarts.org or call 864-409-1050. Send announcements to arts@communityjournals.com.

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MAY 10, 2013 | The Journal 37


JOURNAL CULTURE

Arts Calendar

May 10 – 16, 2013

Artisphere 2013 May 10-12 ~ 271-9355

Downtown Alive Lyric, May 16– 232-2273

Fountain Inn Arts Center Oliver! May 10-11 ~ 409-1050

Peace Center Los Lobos & Los Lonely Boys May 16 ~ 467-3000

Greenville County Youth Orchestra Shoulder to Shoulder Concert May 11 ~ 467-3000

Centre Stage The Fox on the Fairway May 16-Jun. 8 ~ 233-6733

Metropolitan Arts Council One-Stop Open Studios May 11-Jun. 4 ~ 467-3132

Greenville County Museum of Art Southbound Through May 19 ~ 271-7570 Sarah Lamb Through Jun. 2 ~ 271-7570

Carolina Ballet Theatre We the People May 12 ~ 421-0940 Furman University Carolina Youth Symphony Concert May 12 ~ 232-3963 Peace Center Blue Man Group Through May 12 ~ 467-3000

Metro. Arts Council @ Centre Stage Photography by Tom Ebetino Through Jun. 14 ~ 233-6733 Greenville County Museum of Art William H. Johnson: Native Son Through Sep. 29 ~ 271-7570

Greenville Chautauqua Society Malcolm X Discussion May 14 ~ 244-1499

Make Make MOTHeR’S MOTHeR’S DaY.. DaY Visit the GCMA A and enjoy art for GCMA traditional and modern moms.

Greenville County

Museum of Art 420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1pm - 5 pm free admission

38 THE JOURNAL | MAY 10, 2013


JOURNAL HOMES

Featured Homes & Neighborhoods | Open Houses | Property Transfers

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HOME INFO Price: $590,000 | MLS: #1257947 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 3.5 Square Footage: 3600-3799 Schools: Oakview Elementary Beck Middle | JL Mann High Contact: Clay Hooper | 864.905.9990 Carol Pyfrom Realty To submit your Open House: homes@greenvillejournal.com

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TAYLORS

14 Rising Meadow Lane 4BR/2.5BA • 1/2 acre lot • Mtn views MLS#1251726 • $217,900

107 South Warwick Road, Greenville 4 Bedroom, 3.5 Bath, Custom Home on Over 1.5 Acres. Perfect Open Floor-plan. Huge Kitchen with Granite Countertops, Custom Cabinets, Stainless Appliances, and Pantry opens onto the Dining Area and Large Living Space. Hardwood Flooring Throughout Main Level. Perfect Master Suite with Walk-in Closet, His and Her’s Vanities, Jetted Tub and Separate Shower and Water Closet. Nice Size Bonus Room with Custom Built-in Cabinets and Walk in Attic Storage. Downstairs you will Find a Cool Space with Living Space, Bedroom, and Massive Flex Space that is Pre-wired and Plumbed for a Kitchenette. Wrap-Around Porch with Outdoor Fireplace Overlooking the Professionally Landscaped Yard. 2 Car Garage Access on the Main Level and a 1 Car Garage with Workshop on the Lower Level.

HOME INFO Price: $510,000 | MLS: #1258409 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 3.5 Square Footage: 4600-4799

GREENVILLE

115 Beaumont Creek Lane Bonus rm • Near Paris Mtn • Unfin bsmnt MLS#1250030 • $299,900

SIMPSONVILLE

100 Moorgate Drive 4BR/3BA • Bonus rm • Corner lot MLS#1247608 • $349,900

Schools: Duncan Chapel Elementary Berea Middle | Travelers Rest High Nick Carlson | 864.386.7704 | ncarlson@cbcaine.com Coldwell Banker Caine To submit your Featured Home: homes@greenvillejournal.com

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

BuilderPeople.com | 864.292.0400 MAY 10, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 41


JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND

O P E N S U N D AY, M AY 12 F R O M 2 – 4 P M

KINGSBRIDGE

WEATHERSTONE

20 HEMINGFORD CIRCLE . $590,000 . MLS#1257947 4BR/3.5BA Quality abounds throughout this beautiful home. Walk through the front door into the dramatic two story foyer. Spacious Formal Dining Room with coiffured ceiling, glass transom, and side lights. Contact: Clay Hooper 864-905-9990 Carol Pyfrom Realty

CARISBROOKE

116 BENTWATER TRAIL . $415,000 . MLS#1238536 4BR/3.5BA If every home is a castle, then this is a Royal Castle. Built by noted custom home builder, MG Profitt. Come visit during our Open House or schedule a private showing to see for yourself. Contact: Kenny Reid (864) 293-9090 Coldwell Banker Caine

TUCKER BRANCH

POINSETTIA

304 ROSEBUD LANE . $379,000 . MLS#1253870

33 DONEMERE WAY . $199,900 . MLS#1249245

515 HILLPINE DR . $189,900 . MLS#1257194

3BR/2.5BA Exquisite brick ranch on culdesac. Pelham Rd to Hudson, Right into SD, Left to end of street, Right on Rosebud. Home on Left.

3BR/2.5BA Craftsman style, Energy Star home. Upgrades & advanced technology. 385 S to Exit 23, Hwy 418. Go apprx. 1/2 mile and turn Left. Turn Right at light on S. Main, Go 1/2 mile & turn Left into SD

4BR/3BA Well maintained. Beautiful yard, ingrnd pool, gazebo,scrnd porch. Lg Mstr BR. 385 to Simpsonville, exit Fairview Rd, Left over bridge, L on Main St, R on W. Fernwood, R on S. Almond, L on Hillpine

Contact: Wanda Reed 270-4078 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Kate Anderson/Kristin Brady 363-3634/908-7200 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Olivia Grube 385-9087 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

42 THE JOURNAL | MAY 10, 2013

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JOURNAL HOMES

ON THE MARKET KELLETT PARK

F O R I N F O R M AT I O N C O N TA C T L I S T I N G A G E N T RIVERVIEW

PELHAM FALLS

217 ROCK ROAD . $269,900 . MLS#1258609 4BR/2.5BA Newly renovated!! This is a very spacious home that is move in ready! Some of the features include a 2 story foyer, gleaming hardwoods, arched column detail to entry of dining room. Don’t wait! Contact: Hilary Hurst (864) 313-6077 Coldwell Banker Caine

FOUNTAIN INN

200 KELLETT PARK DRIVE . $557,000 .

102 RAPID RIVER TRAIL . $429,500 . MLS#1252814

313 JENKINS BRIDGE ROAD . $259,900 . MLS#1250471

5BR/3.5BA PRESTIGIOUS KELLETT PARK. Custom home w/ pool. Impeccably maintained w/ many newer upgrades in private, upscale neighborhood. Offered by owner below appraised value for immediate sale. Appt only.

4BR/3BA Custom Home. Great Schools and convenient location. Open Floorplan for easy entertaining. Lots of storage space!

3BR/3BA A beautiful farm house located on a corner lot with tons of yard space for gardening, pets and children to run & play! The updates include: stainless appliances in 2010, roof in ‘02, HVAC 5 ton in ‘09

Contact: Owner (864) 288-8463

Contact: John Moore 270-0769 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Hilary Hurst (864) 313-6077 Coldwell Banker Caine

WOODRUFF LAKE

COUNTRY WALK

WEATHERSTONE

102 WOODRUFF LAKE WAY . $184,900 . MLS#1257820

2 LONG ACRE LANE . $65,000 . MLS#1255092

113 EBENWAY LANE . $64,500 . MLS#1249801

3BR/2.5BA Beautiful 3/2.5 home which offers many features including a 2 story foyer, chair rail molding, open kitchen to the large great room and level fenced yard! Convenient to I-85, 1-385, shops and more!

3BR/2BA A tranquil neighborhood located just off Fork Shoals Rd. This cozy split floor plan sits on a large 1.32 acre, level lot that is perfect for a game of football or pets to run about! Must See!

1/3 to 1/2 Acre Lots Weatherstone has released a limited number of builder ready lots- Ranging from 1/3- 1/2 acre & Priced in the mid to upper $60s. www.WeatherstoneHomes.com

Contact: Hilary Hurst (864) 313-6077 Coldwell Banker Caine

Contact: Hilary Hurst (864) 313-6077 Coldwell Banker Caine

Contact: Kenny Reid (864) 293-9090 Coldwell Banker Caine

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

MAY 10, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 43


JOURNAL HOMES

HH B

Helen Hagood Selling Greenville for over 28 years. Ranked #4 out of 100 Agents.

864.419.2889 | See my listings: cbcaine.com/agents/HelenHagood

SEARCH THE HOTTEST NEIGHBORHOODS.

R E A L E S TAT E N E W S GGAR Market Overview: A healthy economy is strongly supported by an active housing market.

May, 2013 – According to the March 2013 Economic Impact of Real Estate Activity from the National Association of REALTORS®, the real estate industry accounted for over 14 percent of South Carolina’s Gross State Product in 2011. Estimates say that number could reach as high as 17 percent in 2013 as housing markets improve across our state. The South Carolina REALTORS® March report found that prices increased nearly �ive percent, pending sales rose over eight percent, and inventory levels dropped over 10 percent.

Greenville is one of the fastest growing cities in the U.S. Our population grew nearly 33 percent between 2000 and 2010. (Population: 400,492, U.S. Census) As the destination for many global companies, Greenville has developed a uniquely friendly cosmopolitan identity. Southern Living magazine recently recognized Greenville as one of the “10 Tastiest Towns in the South.”

The Upstate also boasts one of the healthiest housing markets in the state. Greater Greenville sold nearly 20 percent more homes in March 2013 than the year before. Median home prices rose a modest 1.4 percent, from $145,000 to $147,075. As of April 10th, inventories were down over four percent from 2012, while the average days on market dropped nearly 18 percent.

Translation? We’re now in a seller’s market, with the number of homes in undersupply for the �irst time in years. Some homes are receiving multiple offers and selling within days of being listed for sale.

Buyers are paying attention to equity homes and no longer as interested in distressed homes, which typically require more repairs and take weeks or months longer for lenders to close. As prices rise, distressed home sellers are able to sell their homes without taking losses, get out from under higher interest rates. They can repurchase at lower interest rates, effectively getting more house for less cost. It’s a great time to be a seller, but it’s also a great time to be a buyer. Home prices are within only a few thousand dollars of where they were in 2008.

For Greater Greenville, the housing market appears to be well on its way to recovery. Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® represents over 1,600 members in all aspects of the real estate industry. Please visit the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® web site at www.ggar.com for real estate and consumer information. “Every market is different, call a REALTOR® today.”

JournalHOMES.com 44 THE JOURNAL | MAY 10, 2013

Submit your Real Estate Relate News to: homes@greenvillejournal.com

FOR MORE INFORMATION

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NEIGHBORHOOD PROFILE

PEOPLE, AWARDS , HONORS Carol Pyfrom Receives New “Certified Negotiation Expert (CNE®)” Designation GREENVILLE, S.C. – Professional negotiation skills are a must for all real estate agents helping home buyers and sellers, especially in the current market.

Pyfrom

Carol has been awarded the Certified Negotiation Expert (CNE®) designation by the Real Estate Negotiation Institute (RENI). The CNE® is earned by real estate professionals after successfully completing formal negotiation training from. Agents who receive this certification are in the top 1% of all agents nationally.

The Manor at Hollingsworth Park, Greenville, SC Reminiscent of historic districts throughout the South, The Manor at Hollingsworth Park is designed to make history all its own. Luxurious architectural structures built on large estate lots are giving residents brand new homes with the elegant charm of yesterday. This 54-lot neighborhood has been carved out of an extremely beautiful piece of property within the Hollingsworth Park community; featuring rolling hills, mature trees and a heavily wooded backdrop. A premium location for estate living, many visitors are surprised to discover this secluded property—ready for new construction—in the heart of the city of Greenville. Please stop by the Verdae Sales Office, located at 3 Legacy Park Road, for more information about this exquisite neighborhood. Sales Office Open Daily (864) 329-8383, www.verdae.com

NEIGHBORHOOD INFO Estate Living from the mid $700s Schools: Pelham Road Elementary Beck Academy JL Mann High School

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

Amenities: 20-Acre Park Walking/Biking Paths Verdae YMCA Legacy Square

With professional negotiation skills, agents are able to help clients obtain better results in the sale or purchase of their home. CNE® agents have a powerful competitive edge because of their ability to 1) communicate effectively to uncover more information, 2) help clients understand their options, 3) work collaboratively with others, and 4) resolve deadlocks. CNE® agents have a thorough understanding of how to negotiate effectively to help achieve their client’s goals. The Real Estate Negotiation Institute is the leading negotiation training and coaching company in the real estate industry. Tom Hayman, the CEO and Co-Founder of RENI, is a professional negotiator with 35+ years of negotiation experience. Hayman asserts “Any Buyer or Seller who hires CNE® agent can feel confident they have one of the best trained negotiators in real estate. They should achieve superior results and have better resolution of all issues when represented by a CNE® agent.”

MAY 10, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 45


JOURNAL HOMES

G R E E N V I L L E T R A N S AC T ION S A P R I L 14 - 19, 2 013

SUBD.

QUAIL HILL ESTATES DEERFIELD RIDGELAND AT THE PARK COBBLESTONE FIVE FORKS PLANTATION THE LOFTS AT MILLS MILL HAMMETT’S GLEN CEDARHURST MCRAE PARK MELVILLE WESTERVELT OAK CREST FIVE FORKS PLANTATION BENNETTS GROVE FOXCROFT CHANDLER LAKE GROVE PARK NORTH HILLS CANTERBURY CLIFFS VALLEY RIVER DOWNS THE VALLEY AT TANNER ESTATES BOXWOOD CAROLINA OAKS CREEKWOOD CARILION CASTLE ROCK SUMMIT AT PELHAM SPRINGS THE OVERLOOK AT BELL’S CREEK SILVER RIDGE BOTANY WOODS OAKS AT GILDER CREEK FARM CROSSGATE AT REMINGTON RESERVE AT PLANTATION GREENE MERRIFIELD PARK RESERVE AT PLANTATION GREENE GRESHAM PARK ROCKWOOD PARK THE VALLEY @ GILDER CREEK FARM EMERALD OAKS TWIN CREEKS MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS CROSSGATE AT REMINGTON HERITAGE CREEK WESTCLIFFE MALLARD CREEK HOLLY TREE PLANTATION MELROSE FOXGLOVE BRENTMOOR VIEW POINT ACRES FOXGLOVE MULBERRY AT PINCKNEY PLANTERS ROW CHEROKEE PARK MOUNT VERNON ESTATES FAIR HEIGHTS ST JAMES PLACE REMINGTON FOREST PARK PARKER’S PLACE WASHINGTON PARK EAST

PRICE

SELLER

BUYER

$1,657,500 $1,624,216 $890,000 $800,000 $764,900 $650,000 $623,500 $529,585 $460,000 $450,000 $438,243 $415,242 $400,000 $394,000 $388,840 $372,000 $355,000 $317,305 $316,000 $309,500 $305,000 $295,000 $292,500 $291,500 $290,000 $290,000 $275,000 $275,000 $267,000 $265,000 $259,000 $258,422 $255,000 $255,000 $248,000 $247,000 $245,000 $244,267 $241,900 $236,500 $235,900 $233,077 $229,500 $227,000 $226,000 $224,000 $223,000 $221,885 $221,870 $220,000 $215,000 $215,000 $210,000 $209,000 $199,612 $196,000 $191,000 $189,000 $187,500 $184,900 $180,000 $180,000 $177,000 $176,108 $175,000 $173,000 $172,225

COCHRAN THERON G INLAND AMERICAN ST PORTF MATTHEWS EDWARD R SR KEHL ELIZABETH A BANK OF AMERICA N A MALINOWSKI ALANE M REVO BAILEY JANET NVR INC KERNOHAN WINIFRED FRANCIS JACKIE S TRUSTEE MCCULLOUGH PAGE HARRIS BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT COX KEVIN PARKER BRADLEY J (JTWROS NVR INC YARBOROUGH JOHN SCOTT LONDON JULIEANNE BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT HOVIS BRETT POOLE NELLE ANNE TEMPLES JAMISON INDYMAC INDX MORTG TRUST COCHRAN THERON G CHAMBERS JAMES M SPARKS ETHEL L MMB DEVELOPMENT NINE L P WALKER WESLEY M III FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA MCCLAIN LESTER K JR (JTW BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT LENAR ANTHONY J SK BUILDERS INC ARK SERRUS LLC WATSON MOLLY W MOSLEY MARVIN CHICKEN BOG BUDDIES LLC REES KIRK E D R HORTON INC GREENE VILLAS LLC KING BLAIR M (JTWROS) GREENE VILLAS LLC EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL ARMSTRONG FRASER A TRUST DIETZ ROBERT R JOHNSTON JOANN BARBERY ELLA DIVONA JOYCE W LIVING TR D R HORTON INC S C PILLON HOMES INC HAMILTON BARBARA B DARNELL DALLAS (JTWROS) EMDE WALTER C JR ELLIS ROSS F (JTWROS) JACKSON RANDALL L D R HORTON INC GREGORY RICKY FERNANDEZ EMILIO HIGHLAND HOMES L L C BALLENTINE MICHAEL JOHN HEAD MICHAEL W HODGENS JOYCE EVELYN WEALTH BUILDERS INC KOCIS JEAN C D R HORTON INC WALDREP REBECCA S PETTIT MANDI M YACOBI STEPHEN A

WASHINGTON STREET REAL E 138 SUN MEADOW RD ARC SBTVRSC001 LLC 106 YORK RD WESS KATHRYN K (JTWROS) 25 QUAIL HILL DR HUNGERFORD MARGARET C 112 CRESCENT AVE KELLY ERICA ELIZABETH 6 SABLE GLEN DR STOKES WILLIAM MICHAEL 176 RIDGELAND DR UNIT 301 YARBOROUGH JOHN SCOTT (J 301 PORTABELLO WAY MEAGHER ALISON 512 PAWLEYS DR JOHNSON RICHARD W JR 400 MILLS AVE UNIT 228 MOBLEY NELL T (JTWROS) 309 HAMMETTS GLEN WAY LUANN TIMBER SC LLC 157 WILSON RD VAN DE VELDE LUCIA (JTWR 31 MCRAE PL CAMERON ANNA BLAIR D 33 MELVILLE AVE WHITE ASHLEA M 36 OAK CREST CT MYERS BRETT T 707 PAWLEYS DR HANKWITZ JAMES F II (JTW 112 HYDRANGEA WAY JACKSON KACIE P (SURV) 331 CONTINENTAL DR CULBREATH CURTIS JR 112 LACEBARK CT LATRICK MARY ALBERT HUTT 3 ASHWORTH LN CHAPMAN KIRK (JTWROS) 300 MCDONALD ST TAYLOR GROUP PROPERTIES 8005 AUGUSTA RD BROWN JESSICA 122 RIDGERUNNER WAY WASHINGTON STREET REAL E 138 SUN MEADOW RD LYDIC JENNIFER 102 W HACKNEY RD RODWELL ANNE CAREY (JTWR 12 OTTAWAY DR BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT PO BOX 1039 DOMONOSKE ALLISON M (JTW 17 BEN ST SCHELL MARIA L 401 IRON BRIDGE WAY JACKSON JENNIFER L (JTWR 112 CREST HILL DR LACKEY QUINCEY H 429 RIVER SUMMIT DR GUPTILL ANN M (SURV) 3 MAITLAND DR BORRONI BRUNO G (JTWROS) 213 CASTLE CREEK DR THOMA SHARON PO BOX 80877 JOHNSON KRYSTAL L (JTWRO 213 BERGEN LN THORNTON STANLEY T (JTWR 201 N SILVER BEECH LN GREENE AUSTIN HEARD 304 ARUNDEL RD MOSS BYRON (JTWROS) 316 STAYMAN CT BARTH MATTHEW 110 KINGS HEATH LN RICHTER NEIL C (JTWROS) 52 BARNWOOD CIR REESE WHITNEY 9 PARLIAMENT RD NICOLOPULOS GINA M 44 BARNWOOD CIR LANDMANN DONNA M 9929 REAVIS RD POLSON SARAH S 8 ROCKWOOD DR MAGGIO DOLORES (JTWROS) 103 GRIMES DR GRIMES CHAD A 116 EMERALD WAY JARVIS JOSHUA S (JTWROS) 24 MERCER DR BARHAM ALEXANDRA L (JTWR 43 CHATTAHOOCHEE ST CHAGOYA JORGE ALBERTO (S 108 KINGS HEATH LN KAY ALTON J 264 OAK BRANCH DR MCWHORTER JOE R (JTWROS) 1616 E SALUDA LAKE RD STINNETT ELIZABETH L (JT 203 BIRCHLEAF LN LEONARD DONALD E 205 CAMELOT DR SHELBAYA AHMAD A (JTWROS 2 ROSEBANK WAY GLASS LAUREN H (JTWROS) 419 ROBERTS RD HARDY JOANNE 112 MACINTYRE ST PRUITT RICO B 117 NANCY DR AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR 23815 STUART RANCH RD MANNING MARGARET (JTWROS 300 PINCKNEY ST WRIGHT CYNTHIA C (JTWROS 4 WOODVINE WAY LOVE WHITNEY A 117 GROVE RD ELLIS JENNIFER M (JTWROS 351 PINE DR CORNERSTONE NATIONAL BAN PO BOX 428 THOMAS JUDITH M 303 SUTTON PL EDDINS JOHN W II 9 PHAETON AVE MATTHEWS RICHARD A 123 WILBON CIR AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR 23815 STUART RANCH RD VERNEREY MAXIME JOHN 1200 E WASHINGTON ST APT 6

ADDRESS

SUBD. LISMORE PARK STONELEDGES SAVANNAH POINTE PLANTERS ROW BUTLER STATION HEARTHSTONE AT RIVER SHOALS RIVER RUN HERITAGE CLUB VILLAS CLIFFS VALLEY-PANTHER MTN PARK TIMBERLAND TRAIL LAUREL OAKS

PRICE

$171,500 $170,000 $167,165 $167,000 $165,000 $164,626 $163,165 $163,000 $163,000 $162,595 $162,000 $161,932 THE RESERVE AT RIVERSIDE $160,000 FIELD HAVEN $160,000 UNIVERSITY PLACE $160,000 $160,000 QUAIL RUN $160,000 TOWNES AT FOWLER $159,900 HUNTERS WOODS $156,000 BRUTON WOODS $155,000 WOODLANDS AT WALNUT COVE $153,900 MORNINGSIDE $153,000 TOWNES AT BROOKWOOD $152,325 MONTROYAL HILLS $152,250 TOWNES AT PINE GROVE $152,000 MORNING MIST FARM $150,000 THE GROVE $150,000 CHATHAM WOODS $150,000 FORRESTER CHASE $150,000 $149,900 WOODLANDS AT WALNUT COVE $148,900 PACKRIDGE $148,500 FAIRVIEW CHASE $147,183 BALDWIN FOREST $142,900 DEVENGER PLACE $141,860 SPARROWS POINT $141,000 WHISPERING OAKS $140,000 CREEK BANK COMMONS $139,900 $139,900 NORTHSIDE GARDENS $139,000 WESTMINSTER VILLAGE $137,000 TOWNES AT CARDINAL CREEK $135,900 WINDSOR OAKS $135,000 KNOLLWOOD HEIGHTS $135,000 AUTUMN HILLS $135,000 CARDINAL CREEK $131,101 MAPLE GROVE $130,000 $130,000 ST MARKS POINTE $130,000 RIVERSIDE CHASE $130,000 GREYWOOD AT HAMMETT $130,000 CANTERBURY HILLS $129,500 MAYS MEADOW $128,500 BURDETT ESTATES $126,900 WEST FARM $126,000 CHARTWELL ESTATES $125,500 CARDINAL POINTE $125,000 $125,000 WINDSOR OAKS $125,000 $125,000 MONTEBELLO $123,750 HAMPTON RIDGE $122,380 DUNWOODY OAKS $122,000 $118,350 SPRING HAVEN $110,000 PROVIDENCE $110,000 FOXDALE $110,000

SELLER

BUYER

SOSA RAYDEL SPENCER KENNETH J (JTWRO ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC FORD JAMES D HARRISON PAUL J NVR INC BRUSTER EASTER A KIRKWEG BARBARA DALL’OLMO CARLO A D R HORTON INC FORD MICHAEL R ROJAS LUIS J BATMAN ANDREW K LEMONS RICHARD JR WHITE ROBERT LOUIS BAYNE MAXINE A MILAM HEATHER H NVR INC MEECE BARRY D HOMEEQUITY TRUST 2006-4 SK BUILDERS INC HICKS THOMAS A JR BROOKWOOD TOWNES LLC GRANGER GREGORY C GREENE AUSTIN HEARD SMITH DONNA L COWART JODI (JTWROS) STREBLOW STEVEN LEE WASATONIC MATTHEW R FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG DUNSTER CHRISTOPHER C RIVERA GABRIEL J MUNGO HOMES INC HAMMONS HAROLD DAVID CASEY AMY C BEARD DAVID N STEVENS ALLEN R A & D HOMES LLC CRUMLEY EVELYN P COLEMAN ERNEST ROBERT JR RECK JAHNNA K NVR INC BRYAN CHRISTOPHER B SCOGGINS VIRGINIA SERRA LEONILDO TRUSTEE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND GIRALDO JORGE MARIO STRANGE TRAVIS DIOUF PAPA M HATHCOCK BETTY JO ROCHESTER DONALD RAY (JT HANDI-HELPERS LLC CRESPIN MARSHALL SALAM BRAHIM HOWARD DRIVE PROPERTIES QUALITY PROPERTIES ASSET JOHNSON JEREMIAH J PUTMAN & PUTMAN LLC MULL WILLIAM MICHAEL (JT HARMON BIRDIE P CONITS ROCHELLE ROBINSON TABITHA ANN JOHNSON KIMBERLY A WHITESIDES JAMES C VINCENT JASON COWAN DEVELOPMENT INC JAMES JILL H

NGUYEN BAONGOC 23 DERRY LN FOWLER ASHLEY C 25 BERRY PINE CT SMITH DIANNE C 104 RARITAN CT WIGGANS DALE L (JTWROS) 311 MARSH CREEK DR COX MADELEINE (JTWROS) 7 HYDE PARK LN POOLE BENNY L JR 433 RIO GRANDE PL PNC BANK NATIONAL ASSOCI 3232 NEWMARK DR CRUMLEY EVELYN P 105 TINSLEY CT WELLS FARGO BANK N A 8480 STAGECOACH CIR BERGIN CATHERINE T 709 AZALEA HILL DR AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR 23815 STUART RANCH RD BANK OF AMERICA N A 7105 CORPORATE DR BALDRIDGE BENJAMIN D (JT 5 SCOFIELD CT PECK NICHOLAS A REVOC TR 12 SAWROCK WAY MOULTON MATTHEW B 104 FAIRWOOD DR MANN GORDON E 2424 OLD BUNCOMBE RD STOCKTON LISA MACE (JTWR 205 QUAIL RUN CIR ROBINSON CAROL A 331 STATION RD LUKER PAMELA N (JTWROS) 202 FOXHOUND RD LYONS JAMIE GAIL 1521 MATOR DR ORTIZ CAMILO E (JTWROS) 113 WATERCOURSE WAY GORDAY SARAH CORRINE 315 RICHBOURG RD COLE JUSTIN BARNES (JTWR 48 BAY SPRINGS DR MOORE JUSTIN LEE 5 PEMBERTON CT HARE ELEANOR (JTWROS) 122 PINE WALK DR FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG PO BOX 650043 AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR 23815 STUART RANCH RD STE 302 RODEWALD DUANE A (JTWROS 206 FUGATE DR BROOKING HUNTER WOODSON 209 PINK BLOSSOM CT TERRY JOSHUA 138 KEITH DR BLACK CAROLINE E 15 FLOWERWOOD DR BROWN KARI (JTWROS) 309 PACKRIDGE WINFREY DWIGHT A 15 HEATHERFIELD DR WHITWORTH ALICIA S (JTWR 2 SAWTOOTH CT CASEY AMY C 201 WINDWARD WAY DUAN MINGMING 219 STOCKBRIDGE DR WATSON BETTY J 104 SARAHS LN NAYLOR JOHN THOMAS 12 RUSTY CT DARNELL DALLAS (JTWROS) 4150 SANDY FLAT RD NEAL CATHERINE D 137 BATESVIEW DR HARMON JONATHAN L 21 PADDOCK LN MALLAK KATIE L 317 CHRISTIANE WAY UNIT 200D BLANTON MELISSA D (JTWRO 117 BUCKINGHAM WAY MAIO RUSSELL 110 MUIRWOOD DR GRASTY-KOCH JANICE P (JT 113 COTTON HILL LN DONAHOE DAVID W 14 WHITETHORN LN GIRALDO JUAN 7 ORIENT DR MAINE DEBBIE 114 HILLSIDE CHURCH RD SMITH SAMANTHA (JTWROS) 12 STURGEON BAY DR MCDOWELL GUY ROBERT 2 LITTLE FOX CT DUNN CUSTOM BUILDERS LLC 102 COMMONS BLVD BROWN TAMMARA R (JTWROS) 5 CAMELBACK RD NORRIS TIFFANY D 26 COLE CREEK CT BRIDGES THERESA M 114 HEATHER LN MUNGO HOMES INC 441 WESTERN LN KOSHY AMALA (JTWROS) 20 LENNOX PL GRANGER BRANDON V (JTWRO 15 RED CARDINAL CT NATURALAND TRUST PO BOX 728 TURSCAK DANA PATRICK (JT 108 BUCKINGHAM WAY NOCKS ELAINE C 31 CLARENDON AVE CANTY KATRINA L 10 BROADSTONE CT SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND 5350 77 CENTER DR STE 200 WILSON ROY ROGER 501 DUNWOODY DR CWABS INC ABC SERIES 200 PO BOX 9000 AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR 23815 STUART RANCH RD STE 302 OUTBACK PROPERTIES LLC 5 LOWTHER HALL LN FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG 14221 DALLAS PKWY STE 100

ADDRESS

Custom Build – Renovations – Design

TURNING DREAMS I N T O R E A L I T Y 46 THE JOURNAL | MAY 10, 2013

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C111R

highlandhomessc.com – 864.233.4175

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JOURNAL CULTURE

2nd

NCAA DiviSioN ii

3rd

CouNCil of ChriStiAN CollegeS & uNiverSitieS

4th

South CAroliNA

A Distinctive Academic Community Worth Discovering for Nearly 175 Years. Erskine feels like a second home to generations of graduates who’ve experienced it. As South Carolina’s first private Christian college, Erskine equips students to flourish through academic excellence and a family-like learning environment. It’s a rare college experience. But since it’s in the Upstate, going away to college doesn’t have to mean going far. So while Erskine may be a little harder to find, you’ll always know where you belong.

KNOW. BE KNOWN. visit.erskine.edu Due West, South Carolina From Forbes, August © 2012 Forbes. All rights reserved. Used by permission and protected by the Copyright Laws of the United States. The printing, copying, redistribution, or retransmission of this Content without express written permission is prohibited.

MAY 10, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 47


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look who’s in the journal this week

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA SUMMONS AND NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE FAMILY COURT C. A. NO.: 2013-DR-23-1739 Chad Edward McCoy and Rebecca Lynn McCoy, Plaintiffs, vs. Tamera Passwaters, Katherine Taylor And John Doe, a minor under the age of fourteen (14) years, Defendants. To: The Defendant(s) abovenamed: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to the said Complaint on the undersigned at her office, Richmond Callaway Law Firm, LLC, Woodruff Road Corporate Center, 112 Lovett Drive, Greenville, South Carolina, 29607 within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service. If you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Amy Richmond Callaway, Esq. #12582 Richmond Callaway Law Firm, LLC Attorney for Plaintiffs Woodruff Road Corporate Center 112 Lovett Drive Greenville, South Carolina 29607 (864) 234-7304 Dated: April 24, 2013

SUMMONS AND NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA IN THE FAMILY COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COUNTY OF CLARENDON South Carolina Department of Social Services, Plaintiff, vs. James Walls, Kathy Tutein, AND: Malachi Walls DOB: 02/02/96 Defendants. Docket No.: 2013-DR-14-18 TO: THE DEFENDANT KATHY TUTEIN: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, the original of which has been filed in the Office of the Clerk of Court for Clarendon County, on the 18th day of January, 2013, a copy of which will be delivered to you upon request; and to serve a copy of your Answer to the said Complaint upon the undersigned, Attorney for the Plaintiff, at Post Office Box 186, Darlington, SC 29540, within thirty (30) days following the date of service upon you, exclusive of the day of such service; and if you fail to answer the said Complaint within the time stated, Plaintiff will apply for Judgment by Default against said Defendant for the relief demanded in the Complaint. The Final Hearing in this matter is scheduled for APRIL 1, 2013 AT 9:30 A.M. NEWTON I. HOWLE, JR. Attorney for Plaintiff S. C. Bar No. 2729 100 St. Johns St. Post Office Box 186 Darlington, SC 29540 Telephone: 843-395-1519 March 21, 2013 Telefax: 843-393-0342

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: Medical Supplies and Pharmaceuticals for the Greenville County EMS Division, IFB #48-05/29/13, 3:30 P.M. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org or by calling (864) 467-7200.

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP# 46-05/30/13 Printing, Insertion, and Mailing Services, May 30, 2013, 3:00 P.M. RFP# 44-05/24/13 Arbitrage Rebate Calculations Services, May 24, 2013, 3:00 P.M. RFP# 45-05/29/13 Title Search Services, May 29, 2013, 3:00 P.M. RFP# 47-05/31/13 Grant Research and Application Services, May 31, 2013, 3:00 P.M. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org or by calling (864) 467-7200.

SHERIFF'S AUCTION NOTICE The Greenville County Sheriff’s Office is holding an auction to dispose of found and seized property. The auction will be held at 657 Keith Drive June 8th 2013 The gate will open at 8:00 am the auction will begin at 10:00 am. The pre-viewing will be Friday June 7th from 9am -3:00pm. The auction will consist of Misc household items, jewelry (no guarantees), misc electronics, (cameras, stereo equipment etc), tools (new and used), lawn mower, weed eater. The cars are as follows: 1995 OLDS CUTLASS 1GWH52M35D300661; 1999 AUDI A4 WAUCB28D5XA213313; 1994 FORD TEMPO 1FAPP36X7RK227435; 2008 SAMSUNG MOTORCYCLE L8YTCKPD38Y041021; 1993 TOYOTA CAMRY 4T1SK12EXPU264892; 2001 FORD RANGER 1FTYR14E71TA74231; 1992 NISSAN JN1FU21PDNX890345. If you have any questions please call Ellen M. Clark Monday- Friday 864-467-5224.

NOTICE OF A PUBLIC HEARING Hearing of the Commission to enlarge the boundaries of the Greater Greenville Sanitation District to include certain properties located on Stallings Road off Rutherford Road and to provide public notice thereof. PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that on May 28, at 5:30 p.m. in the Commission room of the Greater Greenville Sanitation District Headquarters located at 1600 West Washington Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, a public hearing will be held for the consideration of enlarging the boundaries of the Greater Greenville Sanitation District to include certain properties located on Stallings Road off Rutherford Road. Anyone wishing to be placed on the Agenda for Public Comment is asked to call Greater Greenville Sanitation at 2326721 extension 214 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Monday thru Thursday. Public comments will be limited based on the number of persons addressing the Commission. Public comment can also be posted on the website. www.GGSC.gov

GREENVILLE COUNTY PUBLIC HEARING LOWERY DRIVE ROAD NAME CHANGE There will be a public hearing before the Greenville County Planning Commission on Wednesday, May 22, 2012 at 4:00 PM in Conference Room D, County Square, for the purpose of hearing comments from those persons interested in the following road name change: APPLICANT: David Wilkerson PROPERTY LOCATION: From 1 Lowery Drive off White Horse Road to 20 Lowery Drive next door to rail yard; just off White Horse Rd and near 85/ White Horse Road interchange EXISTING NAME: Lowery Drive REQUESTED NAME: Locomotive Way, Motive Power Way, Green Engine Way Please advertise no later than May 10, 2013 and send bill to Greenville County’s Planning Department

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Chuy’s Opco, Inc., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1034B Woodruff Road, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than May 26, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Stallings Food Mart, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 1320 Stallings Road, Greenville, SC 29609. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than May 19, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Summit Hotel TRS 105, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 108 Carolina Point Parkway, Greenville, SC 29605. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than May 26, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Crescent Mountain Vineyards, LP D/b/a Hotel Domestique | Restaurant 17, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 10 Road of Vines, Travelers Rest, SC 29690. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than May 26, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

48 THE Journal | MAY 10, 2013

The first-place Titan Challenge Eastside team.

Junior Achievement of Upstate SC’s Business Simulation Competition took place at Clemson at the Falls. The JA Titan program introduced high school students to critical economics and management decisions through an online interactive simulation. Students in teams made key decisions while operating their own virtual business. The top three winning teams received college scholarships.

Wade Hampton High School students work on the simulation.

Carolina High School students concentrating.

Carolina High School students with Junior Achievement mentor Joe Hoerl.

Greenvillians gathered to "Party Down for the Playground," enjoying music, food and drinks in an aircraft hangar while helping raise money to add playground equipment to the new park at the Greenville Downtown Airport.

Crossword puzzle: page 50

Sudoku puzzle: page 50


journal culture

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week Lucian Stevens, 6, makes his mark in downtown Greer at the annual Greer Family Fest.

Erwin-Penland’s United Way HOG Day Team.

festival photos by Gerry pate / contributing

Ian Clutter, 3, in full "Incredible Hulk" face paint, at the Greer Family Fest.

Laylah Bryant, 2, flees from mime Erin Schmidt, who breaks from tradition to coax her back, at last weekend's Greer Family Fest.

Metlife’s HOG Day Team.

Thousands of community volunteers completed 230 service projects during the annual United Way Hands On Greenville (HOG) Day. A record total of 7,017 volunteers donned green HOG Day T-shirts around 8 a.m. and worked through the morning to complete a wide range of projects across Greenville County. Teams comprised of representatives from area companies, organizations and church groups, as well as individuals and families, donated their time to work on projects benefiting area nonprofits, schools, parks and other community organizations. Projects included everything from landscaping and painting to neighborhood clean-ups.

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MAY 10, 2013 | THE Journal 49


journal culture

figure. this. out.

50 THE Journal | MAY 10, 2013

BehindTheCounterONLINE.com

Shop Local. It Matters.

Neon lightness

Across 1 Show appreciation, in a way 5 Slanted column 9 Show biz type 14 Greeting not needing a stamp 19 Inaugural ritual 20 Links shirt 21 “Wouldn’t It Be Loverly?” singer 22 Leafy recess 23 1847 novel with the chapter “Life at Loohooloo” 24 Hgt. 25 Like some suspicious contracts 26 Is knocked for a loop 27 Moniker on a box of pasta? 29 Gala for players of small pianos? 31 Carafe kin 32 Material that might need waterproofing 33 Track 34 Picked up 37 Strange duck 39 Bench conference 43 Alter ego? 44 Hard stuff 45 Attack word 46 GPS option 47 Time-consuming 48 Kangaroo from a lab? 52 Big name in shipping 53 Suffix with polymer 54 Ear-splitting

55 Notable time 56 Stomach creation 58 Film with stage scenes 60 ___ clock 63 Cantina condiments 64 Trike rider 65 IQ psychologist in the crib? 68 Court tactic 69 True __: exactly as expected 72 Weathering the storm 73 Barricade 77 Iago kills her in Act V 78 Poem of praise 79 Darts 80 “The Matrix” hero 81 Mind reader? 82 Player asleep on the sidelines? 87 Do-others link 88 “That’s awful!” 89 Common refund source: Abbr. 90 Eccentric 91 Had leftovers, say 92 Inventor’s safeguards 95 Ravel work originally composed as a ballet 97 Transcript letters 98 Museum funder: Abbr. 99 Modern communicators 100 Former Mideast despot 101 Dollhouse wicker chair craftsman? 104 Reality show judge in a pouch?

By Gail Grabowski

109 Did a car wash job 110 Cold explosion? 111 Heaps 112 1968 self-titled folk album 113 Flawless 114 “Idol” judge replaced by Ellen 115 Plant anchor 116 Passion 117 Rock or metal 118 Studied, with “over” 119 Forfeited wheels 120 Nod off, with “out”

Down 1 Fowl house 2 Chanteuse’s fabric 3 Heaps 4 Series of misses 5 Bet first 6 Extremely cold 7 Pre-jr. high 8 One seeking justice for the peace? 9 Harshly rebuked 10 Took off to team up 11 Important drive in Freudian theory 12 Newsweek Global, e.g. 13 Commanded 14 Hearing aid of a sort 15 Get started 16 Biblical shepherd 17 Tape unit 18 Their offices often have small rms. 28 Members of the flock

30 Bench press beneficiary 32 Petite, say 34 Emmy-winning legal drama 35 Brief concession 36 Cops’ disagreement? 37 Logs

Easy

38 It’s quite a stretch 39 Drink daintily 40 “No military bigwigs allowed”? 41 Sunlit courts 42 Curbs, with “in” 44 Straightforward 45 Curiosity’s milieu

48 One of two N.T. books 49 Surround 50 Round gasket 51 Bailiwicks 54 Activate without restraint 57 Sit heavily 59 Level or bevel 60 Battery end 61 Competitive by nature 62 “Madama Butterfly” accessory 66 Desktop array 67 Humdrum 69 Start a round 70 Movado competitor 71 __ status 74 Wild way to go? 75 Do over, as a bow 76 Popeye and Porky, e.g. 79 Round number? 83 Work areas with long tables, briefly 84 Where to see rows of booths 85 Color chart components 86 Copier tray abbr. 87 Hoops franchise born in New Orleans 91 Inland Asian sea 93 Make beloved 94 You might get stuck with it 95 Heston title role 96 Chant in a ring 97 Depressed area 99 Butter-yielding bean 100 One poking around 101 Cooked up 102 Pullers of heavy loads 103 Yokum drawer 104 Catherine who outlived Henry VIII 105 Soap additive 106 Snack brand with a 2012 centennial 107 Joie de vivre 108 Potato salad ingredient, perhaps 109 Bogus locks

Crossword answers: page 48

Sudoku answers: page 48


journal culture

The Symptoms By ashley holt

Prattle of the network stars As much as it will pain me, I may have to defriend Kalamity Kate. I know the accepted term on Facebook is “unfriend,” but seeing as the age of texting has abolished the rules of grammar, I feel I should be able to deinvent the language to my own satisfactioning. I also think wine and tubs should be decorked and declogged respectively, in case you were wondering. But I ungress. Kalamity Kate was the local TV kiddie show host when I was growing up. She was the kindly soul who brought us Woody Woodpecker cartoons and episodes of Ultraman, the woman who conducted my one and only television interview at the age of five (the scandalous tell-all in which I revealed the name of my dog and confessed to enjoying birthday cake). Ms. Kate holds a special place in my heart, and I was thrilled to count her among my social network connections. Unfortunately, Facebook’s sponsored ads have revealed her true colors. The ads pop up without my invitation, announcing my childhood hero’s various online activities. “Kalamity Kate likes Pol Pot,” the ads will say, or “Kalamity Kate likes Sending Orphans to Death Camps.” (It’s possible I’m misremembering the actual ads.) It’s disconcerting, to say the least, but this revelation about Kate’s personal ideology is something I can’t ignore. Uncovering ugly truths about a formerly loved celebrity is nothing out of the ordinary, of course. We Westerners anticipate the shocking revelation of a movie star’s secret Taliban ties as eagerly as we once championed their fabulous Oscar Night gowns or cooed over their newborn triplets (Cody, Venus and Denim). We often seem disappointed, in fact, if yesterday’s box office draw isn’t tomorrow’s disgraced confession to Oprah. We’re thrilled when our Hollywood royalty turn out to be closet homophobes or Illuminati high priests. We knew all along that demons lurked beneath that cinematic luster. Because let’s face it, my fellow rummagers of celebrity refuse, we don’t really care about a celebrity’s actual career in show business. All we really care about are the addictions, the on-set meltdowns, and the eventual crack whoredom of these

Tinseltown turds. We hate celebrities. We hate them worse than our parents and the Teletubbies combined. Don’t believe me? Then consider practically any retelling of a peon’s encounter with a notable celebrity. (And here, in keeping with the tone of this family publication, I am forced to use a ridiculous euphemism for a much uglier word.) It goes like this: “I met Chuck Woolery at BI-LO. (Wait for it.) “He was an ASH HOLT!” Yes, the film star or rock drummer confronted in the real world is an Ash Holt, almost invariably. Donny Most, discovered shopping at Safeway, is an Ash Holt. Mary-Kate Olsen in the free clinic waiting room is an Ash Holt. The guy who played Screech shampooing your carpets is an Ash Holt. How could it be otherwise? Short of handing every pedestrian a hundred dollar bill or resuscitating choking grandmas, celebrities encountered outside their natural habitat of awards ceremonies and massage parlors could never hope to overcome the inherent contempt we all hold for them and their undeserved stardom. And the local celebrities have it even worse, vulnerable as they are attending the same church book burnings and AA meetings as we lesser mortals. These low-calorie weathergirls

and morning DJs were flunking Mr. Allred’s geometry class right along with the rest of us just a few years earlier. What gives them the right to strut and preen on our TV sets while we have to work at Applebee’s? At least our direct access to a guy who lives next door to the local sportscaster’s mother provides ample gossip about the local TV star’s cross-dressing and his glue-addicted children. Anything to take these junior Philbins down a peg. But this was not the case with my beloved Kalamity Kate. Dear Katie, who cheerfully delivered cartoon wonderment and wisecracking puppets every afternoon, how I wanted her to remain pure. I thought surely nothing could tarnish her stardom, no porn theater raid or drunken tirade of holocaust denial to make her seem distastefully human. She was, by all accounts, perfectly lovely in person, as I can attest from my own ex-

perience. Alas, she has the voting record of a Klansman, or at the very least, a Koch brother. To me this is akin to discovering Mr. Rogers hung out with the Manson Family, or that Howdy Doody ratted out commies to HUAC (poor Clarabell). I’m going to have to defriend the last untainted celebrity. A friend recently informed me that old episodes of the Kalamity Kate Show are now available to view on YouTube. But I don’t have the heart to watch, knowing what I now know. In fact, it hurts so much, I may have to leave the computer deplugged. Ashley Holt is a writer and illustrator living in Spartanburg. His neurotic quirks and extreme sensitivity to broad social trends are chronicled in The Symptoms, an illustrated blog. Check out his website at ashleyholt.com.

THE MOST RECOGNIZED, NATIONALLY AWARD WINNING, LOCALLY FOCUSED, HOME MAGAZINE IN THE UPSTATE.

e me athomatehomatho SUMMER 2012

SPRING 2013

FALL/WINTER 2012

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– At Home in the Upstate

SUMMER AT HOME

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May 10, 2013 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals

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