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GREENVILLEJOURNAL

City Council may hike property taxes

Friday, May 9, 2014 • Vol.16, No.18 • GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

PAGE 16

SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

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sjackson@communityjournals.com

– Greer City Limits in 2000 – Greer City Limits in 2014

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As the Upstate continues to be a desirable place to live, communities here continue to grow and urban sprawl continues to form. How do residents of these densely populated urban areas acquire the urban services they need? In most states, from the entity best suited to provide them: cities. But South Carolina’s annexation laws are among the strictest in the country, making it difficult to grow cities beyond their current borders. Cities exist because people living in close proximity need a higher level of police and fire protection, planning and zoning, building code enforcement, solid waste collection and the like, than is typically required by people . LVD who live in more rural, unincorporated areas. W. P NB OIN PTO M SET Elsewhere across the nation, state laws allow cities A H T ST DE A . W to automatically annex any adjacent property that W. meets an “urban density standard,” typically of at least 60 percent developed land and a popula. tion of at least 2.3 people per acre. RD K However, in South Carolina, the initiaE RE tive must come from the outside in. Here, says YC H US Mauldin City Administrator Trey Eubanks, propBR erty owners must spearhead the annexation and the city merely acts as a resource to the citizens so they can make an informed decision. “Someone has got to champion the cause and pursue it – to get the signatures on the petition and get it back to the city,” he said. Which is why the annexation successes of cities like Greer 5 – now casting covetous eyes on the newly announced Bass Pro TE 8 STA R E Shops site – gain the attention they do. INT

Symphony, Chorale make a heavenly marriage PAGE 35

Artisphere: Meet the locals on Artist Row

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ANNEXATION CONTINUED ON PAGE 8

Growing a city

Profit and passion in the drive to make Greenville an arts destination

WE HAVE EXCITING NEWS AT GSP.

Cities like Greer and Mauldin have seen significant gains through annexation – and other communities in theTAKING UpstateSHAPE are paying attention SEE WHAT’S AT GSP.

FOR HOME DELIVERY CALL 864.679.1200 READ ONLINE AT GREENVILLE JOURNAL.COM

WE HAVE EXCITING NEWS AT GSP. $1.00

SEE WHAT’S TAKING SHAPE AT GSP.

WE HAVE EXCITING NEWS AT GSP. WE HAVE EXCITING NEWS AT GSP. SEE WHAT’S TAKING SHAPE AT GSP.

SEE WHAT’S TAKING SHAPE AT GSP. To learn more about the Terminal Improvement Program, visit elevatingtheupstate.com. To learn more about the Terminal Improvement Program, visit elevatingtheupstate.com. To learn more about the Terminal Improvement Program, visit elevatingtheupstate.com.


JOURNAL NEWS

GREENVILLE JOURNAL

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COMMUNITY JOURNALS PUBLISHING GROUP publishers of greenville journal, upstate business journal, town magazine, & at home magazine. po box 2266, greenville, sc 29602 phone: 864-679-1200 communityjournals.com © 2014 published by community journals llc. all rights reserved. all property rights for the entire contents of this publication shall be the property of community journals. no part of this publication may be reproduced, scanned, stored, distributed or transmitted by any means – whether auditory, graphic, mechanical, or electronic – without written permission from the publisher.

2 THE JOURNAL | MAY 9, 2014

Greenville

3375 Pelham Road Greenville, SC 29615 864.371.6060

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JOURNAL NEWS

WORTH REPEATING THEY SAID IT

“For each item, I asked myself ‘Does this thing add to my life?’ I got rid of 90 percent of my stuff. I started feeling lighter, happier.”

1

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

Number of indoor tanning sessions that will increase your risk of developing melanoma by 20 percent, according to Dr. Anglea Hutcheson of Carolina Dermatology.

8 to 3

Josh Millburn, author of “Everything That Remains,” on paring down his possessions to discover what’s important. COURTESY OF TREA PATTON AND NBC

“Do we have confidence as citizens of Greenville to elect our future city leaders based on the person, not the party? We do.” Greenville City Councilwoman Amy Ryberg Doyle, on her support for switching to nonpartisan municipal elections.

“There is a myth that annexation will double your taxes. That is not true. Never has been. Never will be.”  Greer City Administrator Ed Driggers.

“A football helmet really is packaging for the most delicate object you have – your head.” Elizabeth Cates, vice president of research and development for Innegra Technologies, which is researching how its high-performance fibers may make football helmets safer.

“I am going to continue to pursue my dreams and I would love for you all to continue to be right by my side as I do so.” Fine Arts Center graduate Delvin Choice, in an Instagram message to his fans, after his Tuesday night elimination from the NBC television show “The Voice.”

Vote by County Council that approved the first reading of an ordinance to put a 1 percent local option sales tax referendum on the ballot in November.

15

Local artists featured on Artist Row in this weekend’s Artisphere – a festival record.

4,265

Acres annexed by Greer from 2000-2013.

WELCOME TO THE FAMILY! Julie Kinsman, MD Terrell Leeke, MD FAIRVIEW FAMILY PRACTICE 864-967-4982 MAY 9, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 3


JOURNAL NEWS

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Frederick faces Ballard in County Council runoff District 26 voters to cast ballot May 13 On May 13, Greenville County Council residents in District 26 will decide which Republican candidate – Todd Frederick or Lynn W. Ballard – will face off against Democrat Windell Rodgers in a special Frederick election on June 17 to fill the unexpired term of deceased Councilman Dan Rawls. On April 29, Ballard, a retired chemical industry manager and rural mail car- Ballard rier, garnered 304 votes in the special primary election to fill the unexpired term, but fell short of the required 50 percent-plus-one vote to eliminate a runoff. One vote separated his closest opponents after two challenged votes were counted and the results were certified: Piedmont business owner Frederick captured 121 votes, while

D I S T. 2 6 U N E X P I R E D TERM SPECIAL ELECTION (THROUGH DEC. 31, 2014)

May 13 – runoff between Todd Frederick and Lynn W. Ballard June 17 – Special election for unexpired term, Republican nominee vs. Democrat Windell Rodgers D I S T. 2 6 N E W T E R M (2015-2018)

June 10 – Republican primary for new four-year term June 24 – Runoff for Republican primary for new four-year term, if needed Nov. 4 – Election for new term

Piedmont Public Service Commissioner Poore received 120 votes. Businessman Clifton (Buddy) Dyer received 79 votes. As Rawls’ unexpired term ends in December, District 26 voters must go to the polls again. The Nov. 4 election will decide who represents the district for a new four-year term that begins Jan. 1. The same candidates – four Republicans and one Democrat – have entered that race. The Republican primary for the Nov. 4 election is June 10 and the runoff, if necessary, will be held on June 24.

A toast to Six & Twenty May 20, 2014, 10am | Palmetto Home & Garden

Beth Satterfield of Designs From Beth’s House and Gerald Hawk, representing Tailor-Made Lampshades, will demonstrate how to fit your lamp with a new lampshade. One lucky person will receive 25% off the lampshade of their choice. All attendees will receive 10% off lamp shades. Special gifts will go to three lucky attendees.

Six & Twenty Distillery was honored twice at the American Distillers Institute Conference held in Seattle, Wash., with medals for each of its premium whiskies. Six & Twenty Distillery was awarded a silver medal in the “Clear Whiskey” category for its Six & Twenty Virgin Wheat Whiskey. In addition to the silver medal, Six & Twenty Distillery won a bronze medal in the “Other Whiskey (Under 2 yrs.)” category with their Six & Twenty Blue.

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Kumon Math & Reading Center of Greenville - Woods Crossing 838 Woods Crossing Rd. Greenville, SC 29607 ©2014 Kumon North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

864.607.9400 kumon.com/ greenville-woods-crossing


JOURNAL NEWS

An Evening of Beach Music & Classic Cars May 16, 2014 • 6-10:30 pm featuring the legendary Lloyd

Price

‘Stagger Lee’ ‘Lawdy Miss Clawdy’ ‘Personality’

also

The Tams and Jim Quick & Coastline Annual 17th

Largest Cruise-In in the Upstate, with over 500 Classic Cars! For more information, call 1-800-240-3400 or visit online at blueridgefest.com. Proceeds benefit Upstate charitable organizations. Event is held at Blue Ridge Electric Co-op, 734 West Main Street, Pickens, SC. MAY 9, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 5


JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

Progress requires hard choices

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

Come on downtown It’s time for another don’t-miss Artisphere in Greenville. In its 10 years of existence, Artisphere has become pivotal in putting Greenville on the national map. It’s the second straight year the festival has landed a Top 10 spot in Greg Lawler’s annual “Art Fair Sourcebook” – the go-to national manual for visual artists – and the seventh time in the top 50. And once again, Artisphere made the Southeast Tourism Society’s list of Top 20 Events not to be missed this spring. All combine to recognize not just the quality of Greenville’s premier arts festival, but of the key role the arts play in making Greenville a vibrant and dynamic place. One of the surest signs of a vital community is a vigorous commitment to the arts. Such places don’t just happen; they’re the deliberate creation of the communities themselves – a conscious decision of the people who live there to make art available to everyone. That commitment was evident a decade ago when Henry Horowitz, then chairman of the board at the Metropolitan Arts Council, gathered community leaders to start something “high quality and different” – a street festival that was “well underwritten and well visioned,” as he told Journal writer Cindy Landrum last month. It’s still evident in the enduring support of business partners like TD Bank – Artisphere’s presenting sponsor for the 10th consecutive year – and the 70-plus other area businesses lending their financial and promotional backing again this year. Artisphere organizers also deserve credit for making the event fresh every year. This year will launch Artisphere After Hours, when the booths close and the musical artists take over. Ten of Greenville’s favorite restaurants will offer a new Culinary Arts Café. Look for wine and craft beer, street muralists, and a new Bike Valet for those who ride in on two wheels. But as always, the visual artists are the soul of Artisphere. After record-breaking submissions, the festival’s juried Artists Row will feature 125 artists from across the nation – the most ever – and 15 from the Upstate, another record. And beyond the impact for participating artists, Artisphere benefits local hotels, merchants and restaurants for an economic impact organizers tallied at $5.5 million last year. The 120 artists who exhibited last spring reported a record $6,200 in average sales – a 10 percent increase over the 2012 average, which explains why 934 artists vied from across the nation for the chance to put up a 2014 booth. So here’s hoping the thunder holds and the sun shines this weekend for another don’t-miss Artisphere in Greenville.

SPEAK YOUR MIND The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters

6 THE JOURNAL | MAY 9, 2014

should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short

“If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” has been an argument against changing the process for nominating the city of Greenville’s elected officials. It is our responsibility to plan for the future when things are working smoothly, not when a crisis arrives. Greenville City Council’s decision to take on this difficult issue now is another example that our local government is proactive. Through civil discussion – and disagreement – we are able to make hard but necessary decisions to improve the quality of life for our community. Council work requires research, discussion, compromise and leadership. A good example of this is our reform of the Greenlink bus system, which provided transportation services to just under 1 million customers last year. This success came after five years of hard work by many stakeholders. The Greenlink issue was controversial. But doing nothing would have been a mistake and our vastly improved bus system is the dividend of that political courage. What about the curfew downtown? The need to keep students and teenagers safe was becoming a critical issue in Falls Park. While the 4-3 vote was controversial, there has been a vast improvement of younger teens off the street in late night downtown. Political parties are vital in a national election; we do not know the candidate, so the party vets the candidate. Locally, we vet our elected officials. We need good business leaders, community volunteers and successful directors of social service agencies to run for office. Does it matter what party they are if they are willing to lead? Why should the council address the issue of non-party elections now? We must plan and work now to encourage greater participation and leadership for the city’s future. According the National League of Cities, over 70 percent of cities nominate and elect local officials in nonpartisan elections. We want to follow best practices from cities like Austin or Boston, or even in South Carolina, where more than 270 cities elect their council members with nonpartisan processes. (nlc.org) The growth of younger voters registering with a particular party is diminishing. According to a 2013 Gallup poll, the number of people who identify themselves as independents is the highest in 25 years. (bit.ly/independentvoters) Citizens interested in running for office may still choose to campaign with a party

bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, fact-based arguments.

IN MY OWN WORDS by AMY RYBERG DOYLE

label. Organized parties should support the best candidate for the job. It is the responsibility of the candidates to campaign with a vision, motivate their supporters, know the neighborhoods and educate voters. How do we address the concerns raised from the minority community? As city leaders, we must continue to encourage the growth of a diverse community. A letter dated March 3, 2014, to City Council from Allison Riggs, attorney for the Southern Coalition for Social Justice, stated: “According to the 2010 Census, the City of Greenville is 30.9 percent African-American (Any Part Black) in total population. More recent census data from the American Community Survey (2008-2012 data set) indicates that the African-American percentage in Greenville has risen to 31.7 percent.” This is encouraging, as growth within a segment of the population will increase levels of activism, leadership and representation within local government. Both the local Republican and Democrat party spokespeople are against this change. Why stifle local competition when the process is improved by more quality candidates in the race? We do not need candidates riding to victory by stepping aboard the coattails of a national party’s identity. Why do we want to allow for “the subtle bigotry of low expectations” to require such little effort to winning? An “R” or a “D” following a name should not be the only reason one is elected to serve on City Council or the Greenville Water System board. We need individual citizens of Greenville who know the neighborhoods to participate in the election process through the free expression of their ideas, experience, policies and values. We need the voters to become energized by the choices, knowledgeable of the issues and engaged in the process. Do we have confidence as citizens of Greenville to elect our future city leaders based on the person, not the party? We do. Amy Ryberg Doyle is a member of Greenville City Council.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of

organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Executive Editor Susan Clary Simmons at ssimmons@ communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

76 new pharmacists A report released this February by the S.C. Office for HealthCare Workforce predicts that the need for new pharmacists will dramatically increase over the next 20 years as the state’s population ages and requires higher prescription volume. On Saturday, May 10, Presbyterian College will recognize the 76 young men and women who comprise the inaugural graduating class of PC’s School of Pharmacy (PCSP). Presbyterian College is one of only three colleges in the state accepting students pursuing a degree in pharmacy. This graduation ceremony will mark the first of many as PC implements plans to enhance and enlarge our health science programs to address the growing need for health care professionals in South Carolina. Our focus on the pharmacy school and additional health science programs is also a result of the expanded role of pharmacists in the health care field. Their responsibilities have grown from mostly dispensing medications to working directly with physicians to manage chronic illnesses. Pharmacists now determine effective pharmaceutical treatments and ensure that patients avoid potentially harmful drug interactions. PCSP has remained on the cusp of pharmacy curriculum, tailoring programs to train students in the skills most needed by modern pharmacists. This inaugural 2014 PCSP graduating class has made many impressive accomplishments during their time at PC. I believe their success can be attributed to rigorous academic standards, a dedicated faculty and staff, and an enriching environment that fosters intellectual growth. We have established an atmosphere where the college’s founding principles of honor, integrity and academic excellence are maintained to the highest degree. Over three-fourths of these 2014 graduates have received at least one job

IN MY OWN WORDS by DR. CLAUDE LILLY

offer, and 68 percent of our future pharmacists plan to accept full-time positions in the Upstate. Throughout their time at PC, these graduates have demonstrated a strong commitment to their community. Most participated in service projects in nearby neighborhoods, like spending time at Camp Porcupine where they taught diabetic children how to better manage their condition. These efforts reflect the overarching culture of volunteerism in PC’s pharmacy program that encourages the utilization of their skills and knowledge to help those in need. PCSP is in the process of gaining full accreditation status from the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE). Finalizing the accreditation process will be a huge milestone in the history of the pharmacy program, and once it is achieved, we will begin planning new health science programs that will broaden the scope of our health care offerings. Building upon the success of the pharmacy program, we are considering both a physician assistant program and a physical therapy program. These would foster a strong inter-professional educational network in the Upstate of South Carolina, and support the growing need for health care professionals in the state. As we look to the future, we are excited to see the impact that the inaugural PCSP graduating class will have on the field of pharmacy, while they serve not only citizens of the Upstate, but people across the nation.

Dr. Claude Lilly is president of Presbyterian College.

Dear Editor: I just wanted to share my opinion on Greenville Country road conditions. I must tell you that I would vote against any referendum on a tax increase if it includes improving the Woodruff Road corridor since this is a result of extremely poor planning by the county and city. Any cost to improve the congestion needs to involve the retail shop owners there who are the real benefactors. We have too many other priorities for road improvements in the county and I am not against a tax increase to improve these roads that we all know are in decay.  Ron Margadonna, Simpsonville

Health Events Struggling with Weight? Wed. & Thurs., May 14 & 15 • Times vary • Anderson and Greenwood Find out how GHS’ dedicated professionals can help you achieve long-term weight loss through surgery. Free; registration required. Call 226-2290 (Anderson) or 227-8932 (Greenwood). Skin Cancer Screening Sat., May 17 • 9-11 a.m. • Patewood Medical Campus This screening is hosted by GHS and the Piedmont Dermatological Society. Space is limited. Free; registration required. Prostate Health Video Conference Sat., May 17 • 10 a.m.-noon • Greenville Memorial Hospital This video conference will cover screening guidelines, diagnosis and treatment, clinical trials and more. To register, call 616-0923. Stroke Prevention & Recognition: Saving Your Brain! Tues., May 20 • Noon-1 p.m. • GHS Life Center® GHS neurologist Rodney Leacock, MD, will share tips on how to prevent and recognize a stroke. Free; registration required. Incontinence: Information Every Woman Should Know Fri., May 30 • Noon-1 p.m. • Spartanburg Marriott Join GHS’ Jeffrey Garris, MD, MS, a pelvic medicine specialist, to learn about bladder control issues. Free; registration required. Vet Talk Fri., May 30 • Noon-1 p.m. • Centre Stage Be part of the discussion on how to care for veterans in the Upstate. Free; registration required. To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, please visit ghs.org/healthevents or call 1-877-GHS-INFO (447-4636).

ghs.org 14-21377573GJ

MAY 9, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 7


JOURNAL NEWS GREENVILLE COUNTY SPECIAL PURPOSE DISTRICTS (from the 2012 Biennial Directory of Special Purpose Districts by Secretary of State Mark Hammond) Belmont Fire and Sanitation District

SPD #9

Berea Public Service District

SPD #12

Boiling Springs Fire District

SPD #318

Canebrake Fire District

SPD #205

Donaldson Center Fire Service Area

SPD #227

Duncan Chapel Fire District

SPD #230

Dunklin Fire District

SPD #409

Foothills Fire Service Area

SPD #410

Gantt Fire, Sewer and Police District

SPD #56

Glassy Mountain Fire / Safety Service Area

SPD #243

Gowensville Fire Department

SPD #73

Greater Greenville Sanitation Commission

SPD #75

Greenville Airport Commission

SPD #76

Greenville Arena District

SPD #78

Greenville County Recreation District

SPD #77

Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport District

SPD #245

Greenville Transit Authority

SPD #79

Lake Cunningham Fire Department

SPD #99

Marietta Water, Fire. Sanitation and Sewer District

SPD #418

Metropolitan Sewer Sub-district

SPD #1l7

North Greenville Fire District

SPD #274

Parker Sewer and Fire Sub-District

SPD #129

Pelham - Batesville Fire District

SPD #501

Piedmont Park Fire District

SPD #133

Piedmont Public Service District

SPD #422

Rabon Creek Watershed Conservation District SPD #424 Renewable Water Resources

SPD #176

Slater-Marietta Fire District

SPD #150

Slater Water, Sewer and Light District

SPD #149

South Greenville Area Fire District

SPD #151

South Tyger Watershed District

SPD #429

Taylors Fire and Sewer District

SPD #l63

Wade Hampton Fire and Sewer District

SPD #172

ANNEXATION continued from COVER

CONCENTRATION ON INFILL From 2000-2013, Greer has annexed 206 parcels, totaling about 4,265 acres, including Lake Robinson and Cunningham. Compare that to the city of Greenville, which has annexed approximately 110 parcels totaling 2,112 acres in the past 10 years. Greer has an annexation strategy that emphasizes and concentrates on infill development, said Greer City Administrator Ed Driggers. “We are not willing to extend our limits beyond what is practical and feasible to do,” he said. Consequently, Greer sometimes turns down annexation requests. Growth has “primarily been to the northwest in the Lake Robinson area and to the southeast along Brockman-McClimon Road,” says city spokesman Steve Owens. “One of the biggest misconceptions about annexation is the cost,” Driggers said. “There is a myth that annexation will double your taxes. That is not true. Never has been. Never will be.”  While it’s true city residents and business owners pay taxes in addition to what is paid to the county, “many will actually pay less overall when they utilize the city services rather than paying for those services through a private contractor,” Driggers said. “Examples include garbage pickup, curbside debris removal, leaf pickup, street cleaning, etc. Additionally, we offer protection to property owners through zoning and land-use planning. Many see value to quicker police and fire response times.” Eubanks agreed, noting property owners in unincorporated areas have to pay for garbage collection and tree and limb pickup on their own. “The city of Mauldin has one of the lowest millage rates of any municipality in Greenville County, so it’s generally a wash,” he said. Mauldin is “more active with com-

MAULDIN ANNEXATIONS SINCE 2004 03/15/04 Commercial East Butler Rd.

1.3 acres

07/21/04 Residential

Apple Blossom Rd.

1.53 acres

11/15/04 Residential

Green Lake Rd.

55 acres – 3.2 units per acre

12/19/05 Residential

Holland and Bridges Rd.

3.51 acres

01/23/06 Residential

East Butler Rd.

28.63 acres

03/13/06 Commercial West Butler and Rose Cir.

8 acres

04/17/06 Residential

Miller and Hamby (Plantation) 33.4 acres

04/17/06 Residential

782 E. Butler (Brookfield)

50.13 acres

10/23/06 Residential

Butler Station

216 units

12/18/06 Commercial IH Services- Tanner Rd.

3.5 acres

12/18/06 Commercial Capital Bank- Woodruff Rd.

0.93 acres

02/26/07 Residential

Bethel Green- Bethel Rd.

25 acres, 54 units

04/26/07 Residential

Ashmore Bridge Rd.

3 properties – 2.6, 1.3, 1.4 acres

06/18/07 Residential

Oak Forest/Pine Forest

347 parcels

09/17/07 Commercial Bridges Land Co

6.8 acres

09/25/07 Commercial Butler and 385, Bridges Rd.

70.5, 3.71, 27 acres

12/17/07 Residential

Miller Rd.

0.74 acres

09/15/08 Residential Miller Rd.

1.34 acres

02/16/09 Residential

4.3 acres

Knollwood Dr.

06/21/10 Commercial Miller Rd.

5 properties – 21.1 acres

09/07/10 Commercial Grace Covenant (Neely Ferry)

0.85 acres

11/15/10 Commercial Knollwood and 276

2.3 acres

08/22/11 Commercial Old Stage Rd.

3.2 acres

03/19/12 Residential

450 – 1.3 acres, 370 1.4 acres

Forrester Dr.

04/16/12 Commercial East Butler Dollar General

1.26 acres

06/18/12 Commercial Woodruff Road

3 properties, multiple

08/20/12 Commercial Scrubs- Miller Rd.

.014 acres

10/21/13 Commercial 23 Old Mill Rd.

1.48 acres

mercial properties than residential,” Eubanks said. Commercial properties tend to want the more rapid response for permits and inspections to develop or upfit improvements to the properties that the city provides, he said. Mauldin has completed 28 annexations, totaling more than 1,000 acres since 2004, with

14 of those commercial.

CONSENSUS IS CRITICAL South Carolina law provides three routes for annexation of privately held property. When all the property owners

PLANNED GIVING FOR PAYING IT FORWARD From the Kroc Center to Greenville Forward, Jean Harris Knight’s legacy gift to the Community Foundation helped establish programs dedicated to improving Greenville’s future. We make it easy to give back to the place we all love to call home. www.cfgreenville.org 8 THE JOURNAL | MAY 9, 2014


JOURNAL NEWS agree to the move, the 100 percent freeholder petition and ordinance method is used, according to the Municipal Association of South Carolina handbook on annexation. When multiple property owners are involved, annexation can still go forward if at least 75 percent agree to the change. The 25 percent elector petition and election method is used when property owner consensus is a problem. Should three of four property owners want to annex and the fourth refuses, for example, annexation is still possible as long as all four properties are contiguous and the concurring property owners own at least 75 percent of the assessed value of the property. The 25 percent method also allows a group of 25 percent of resident voters – even if they are not the property owners – to petition a city to annex property. The city must hold a special election. If a majority of voters approve, the property can be annexed without the consent of all the property owners. Special purpose districts further complicate annexation issues. Rooted in the Palmetto State’s rural history, SPDs were formed as needed to provide single services such as fire, water, recreation and sewer. They served a vital function in rural areas – but now South Carolina has more than 500 such districts, with their own elected boards and power bases. “Special purpose districts are little units of government in and of themselves and usually offer only one or two services,” said Scott Slatton of the Municipal Association of South Carolina. “They can’t take advantages of the economies of scale that the cities can.” Special purpose districts and the state’s restrictive annexation rules have combined to create “enclaves or donut holes” – pieces of unincorporated property completely surrounded by a city, Slatton said. “This can make service more inefficient. The city has to avoid picking up garbage [in those pockets] and fire and emergency personnel have to drive through the area without providing service. Cities and residents would very much benefit if we didn’t have enclaves within the state.”

“One of the biggest misconceptions about annexation is the cost. There is a myth that annexation will double your taxes. That is not true. Never has been. Never will be.” Greer City Administrator Ed Driggers

LOOKING FOR A WIN-WIN However, cities can work mutually beneficial agreements with special purpose districts, Slatton said, which is exactly what the city of Greenville did with the Wade Hampton Fire District in 2010. The two entities had clashed every time a city of Greenville annexation threatened the fire district’s tax base and revenue stream. The result was a fight over every annexation request, no matter how logical the change. They struck a deal: Retroactive to Jan. 1, 2009, Wade Hampton would provide fire protection to any properties within the district’s boundaries that chose to become part of the city of Greenville. It was a win-win: The city could grow its population, and the fire district could preserve its tax base. Mayor Knox White called it “the most important intergovernmental agreement the city has ever reached.” Even with the tough laws, Upstate cities continue to annex property, slowly marching towards their priority goals of population growth and the economic development it attracts. Even now, Mauldin is in talks with the Meadowbrook subdivision and another off Tanner Road about coming into the city. And Greer hopes to “have the opportunity in the near future” to talk to Bass Pro Shops about the multiple benefits of annexation.

Fashion with Comfort

What’s Right in Health Care Greenville Memorial Recognized for Stroke Care Greenville Memorial Hospital (GMH) has received the Gold Plus Achievement Award from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Get With the Guidelines program. GMH earned the award by meeting specific quality achievement measures for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke patients at a set level for a designated period. GMH also received the association’s Target: Stroke Honor Roll for meeting quality measures that reduce the time between hospital arrival and treatment with the clot-buster tPA, the only drug approved by the FDA to treat ischemic stroke. Honor Flight Upstate Six GHS employees volunteered on Honor Flight Upstate’s 12th day trip to Washington, D.C. The flight included more than 90 World War II and Korean War veterans, who visited memorials in their honor. GHS employees assisted in ensuring they had a safe trip. Right Care, Right Time, Right Place GHS has four MD360® locations to meet your non-emergent medical needs during the day, at night and on weekends. Sites are staffed by boardcertified doctors committed to delivering the highest quality of medical care. Visit ghsMD360.org to find the location nearest you. Did You Know? Did you know that blood pressure guidelines for those age 60 and older have changed? Visit blog.ghs.org to learn more and to find out how these guidelines affect you.

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MAY 9, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 9


JOURNAL NEWS

Photography by carol boone stewart

As Seen In Behind the Counter 2014

GREENVILLE CARPET ONE FLOOR & HOME We’re your family-owned, neighborhood flooring experts.

Michael Wilson is a committed kind of guy. After all, he has been with the same bird for more than 30 years. So when he tells you that he won’t rest until you have the right carpet in your home, you can believe him. “My motto is, if it’s not good enough to go in my house it’s not going in yours – and I’m pretty picky,” Michael says. You can find Michael and his beloved blue-and-gold macaw, Belue, at Greenville Carpet One, just off Pelham Road. Michael will be the one in the orange and purple tiger-striped office, a tribute to his also beloved Clemson Tigers. Michael got Clemson in his blood early in his career. He grew up in Anderson County, and started cleaning carpets in high school. After graduation he moved to Clemson and together with his brothers opened a small store selling carpet, paint and wallpaper. As this business grew they took on the Clemson athletic facilities as a customer and Michael got to know many of the players and coaches. After opening a second location in Greenville in the 1980s, Michael moved on from the family business and started his own commercial flooring business – Michael and Company Interiors. Several years ago he saw an opportunity to branch out into the residential market through Carpet One and he continues to run both businesses today.

Another thing Michael is committed to, is working with only reliable, experienced installers. Carpet One prides itself on offering some of the most comprehensive training in the flooring industry, which is why they are able to offer unparalleled warranties on their products and installation. And speaking of products, the Greenville Carpet One showroom is something you must see to believe – two full floors of samples and displays to select from. Designers on staff can assist you with everything from floors to backsplashes. Whether you need to choose carpet for a single room or flooring throughout the house, Greenville Carpet One can meet all your needs.

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To reserve your space in the 2015 Behind the Counter, call 864.679.1223 10 THE JOURNAL | MAY 9, 2014


JOURNAL NEWS

Former Congressman Butler Derrick dies Southern gentleman was last Democrat to represent 3rd district CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Butler Derrick was a Southern gentleman with a penchant for bow ties, a man who doggedly fought in the 1980s to save a dying textile industry. Derrick, who represented South Carolina’s 3rd District in the U.S. Congress for two decades, died Monday at the age of 77 after a months-long battle with cancer. “He was a kind man with a desire to better South Carolina and help those who called it home,” said Sen. James Clyburn in a statement. “He loved this state and devoted his life to making it a better place for its citizens.” Derrick was in the wave of Democrats elected to office after Watergate, the political scandal that led to President Richard M. Nixon’s resignation in August 1974. Derrick surprised everyone in 1994 when he decided not to seek re-election. By that time, Derrick had risen to chief deputy whip of the House – the legislative body’s fifth ranking leadership position – and was a ranking member on the House Rules Committee. Lindsey Graham, now South Carolina’s senior senator, won the seat in November 1994 – the first time the seat had been held by a Republican since Reconstruction. It has not been out of GOP hands since. “In Washington, Butler Derrick rose through the ranks of Democratic politics

to become a strong voice for his party in the U.S. House of Representatives. Closer to home, he was known for a very caring and effective constituent service operaDerrick tion which put the needs of his constituents first,” Graham said in a statement. “Butler was a good man and I will always be grateful for the assistance he provided to me in my transition to the U.S. House of Representatives.” U.S. Rep. Jeff Duncan, R-Laurens, who was elected to represent the 3rd District in 2010, said, “To this day, I still hear stories throughout the 3rd District about how Butler impacted someone’s life in a positive way.” In the 1980s, Derrick made headlines in his fight to save the state’s textile industry. He introduced “Madein-America” legislation in 1985 that required the country of origin be included on apparels labels, hoping it would prompt Americans to buy domestic-produced clothes. In the 1990s, he fought the North American Free Trade Agreement. According to his biography in the University of South Carolina’s Political Collections, “Derrick worked diligently to prevent South Carolina from becoming the dumping ground for the nation’s nuclear wastes, while at the same time fighting to keep the Savannah River site viable.” After leaving Washington, Derrick returned to South Carolina to practice law. PHOTO COURTESY OF BUTLER C. DERRICK PAPERS, SOUTH CAROLINA POLITICAL COLLECTIONS, UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA

Mauldin bond rating upgraded SHERRY JACKSON | STAFF

sjackson@communityjournals.com Standard & Poor has upgraded the city of Mauldin’s general obligation bond rating from AA to AA+. Standard & Poor cited a strong economy, very strong budgetary performance and flexibility, and very strong liquidity and debt profile as reasons for the upgrade. The report cites very strong fiscal management with practices that are “comprehensive, well embedded, and likely sustainable.”

“Previous mayors and councils have focused on being fiscally conservative,” said Mayor Dennis Raines. “This council has a strong commitment to effective fiscal management and I commend our staff for their performance in this area and adhering to this philosophy. I am very pleased with this illustration of our strong economy and good fiscal performance.” “We will continue working to further improve our financial condition and be good stewards of our taxpayers’ dollars,” said City Administrator Trey Eubanks.

Physician News GHS welcomes these new doctors & sites! Family Medicine Telicia Allen, MD Keystone Family Medicine Simpsonville, 454-5000

Plastic Surgery J. Wesley Culpepper Jr., MD Plastic Surgery & Aesthetics Greenville, 454-4570

Philip Way, MD Riverside Family Medicine–Eastside Greenville, 454-2700

NEW OFFICE SITES Gastroenterology 890 W. Faris Rd., Ste. 100 Greenville, 455-2888

Hand Surgery Timothy Brown, MD Timothy Dew, MD S. John Millon, MD M. Jason Palmer, MD L. Edwin Rudisill, MD John Sanders, MD The Hand Center Greenville, 242-HAND (4263) Infectious Disease Prerana Roth, MD Greenville, 455-9033 Neurosurgery Sharon Webb, MD Southeastern Neurosurgical & Spine Institute Greenville, 797-7150

General Surgery 333 S. Pine St. Spartanburg, 591-1664 Pediatric Endocrinology 2000 E. Greenville St., Ste. 3500 Anderson, 716-6490 Pediatric Surgery 105 Vinecrest Ct., Ste. 500 Greenwood, 797-7400 Vascular Health Alliance 340 Medical Pkwy., Ste. 200 Greer, 797-9400 PRACTICE NAME CHANGE GHS Outpatient Radiology Greenville Radiology at 1210 W. Faris Rd. is now called GHS Outpatient Radiology.

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MAY 9, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 11


JOURNAL NEWS

Arrivederci, Piazza Bergamo – hello, One City Plaza Developer Bob Hughes makes a few remarks during the ribboncutting. Hughes’ Project ONE anchors one side of the plaza.

PHOTOS BY GREG BECKNER / STAFF

With a dedication and ribbon-cutting Tuesday morning, it’s official: The former Piazza Bergamo off Main Street in downtown Greenville is now One City Plaza. Mayor Knox White joined other officials in the opening of the public space adjacent to Project ONE. The ribbon-cutting marked the end of a $4 million, 31-month construction remodeling.

Officials cut the ribbon of One City Plaza marking the official dedication of the public space.​ Greenville Mayor Knox White addresses the crowd gathered at One City Plaza for the official ribbon-cutting and dedication of the $4 million project. The public space was completely remodeled, taking 31 months from the first public meeting through design and construction.

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JOURNAL NEWS

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JOURNAL NEWS

County roads sales tax referendum moves forward Council gives initial approval to adding improvements to November ballot APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com A divided Greenville County Council took the first step Tuesday toward adding a 1 percent local option sales tax referendum to the November ballot. Voting 8-3 as a committee of the whole, the council gave first reading approval to an ordinance to put the proposed tax to a public vote. Two more readings are required at subsequent council meetings before the ordinance is final. Council members Willis Meadows, Sid Cates and Joe Dill voted against sending the ordinance forward, while Jim Burns, Bob Taylor, Xanthene Norris, Liz Seman, Lottie Gibson, H.G. “Butch” Kirven, Joe Baldwin and Fred Payne voted in favor. A referendum would give voters a

straight “yes” or “no” vote on whether they support a countywide 1 percent sales tax devoted to transportation improvements within Greenville County. The referendum would list specific funding amounts to be used in four areas: road improvements, bridge improvements, pedestrian-related improvements and resurfacing projects. Council Chairman Bob Taylor said the ordinance could be amended to allow voters to indicate whether they support each of the four areas individually. As approved on Tuesday, the ordinance outlines $297.8 million for road improvements, $27.8 million for bridgework, $47.6 million for pedestrian-related improvements and $300 million for repaving projects. The list was compiled by a citizens’ advisory committee appointed by the council last year to recommend a project priority list after soliciting public input. The recommended top road improvement project is a Woodruff Road parallel route at an estimated $30 million cost; the top bridge project is the McKelvey Road replacement, estimated at $1 million; the top pedestrian amenity project

How they voted FIRST READING BY COUNTY COUNCIL OF AN ORDINANCE TO PUT A 1 PERCENT LOCAL OPTION SALES TAX REFERENDUM ON THE NOVEMBER BALLOT

C C D D C C

D C

JOE BALDWIN

WILLIS MEADOWS

JIM BURNS

XANTHENE NORRIS

SID CATES

FRED PAYNE

JOE DILL

LIZ SEMAN

LOTTIE GIBSON BUTCH KIRVEN

is sidewalks along Poinsett Highway in Travelers Rest, estimated at $2 million; and the top resurfacing project is Neely Ferry Road, estimated at $140,000. The county staff estimates a 1 percent countywide sales tax would generate $65 million annually. By law, the tax would be limited to eight years or until the target funding amount is raised, said County Administrator Joe Kernell. If consumer purchases increase over the years, the tax could end earlier, he said.

C C C

BOB TAYLOR

The 19-member Greenville County Citizen Roads Commission urged council to pursue a dedicated funding solution for addressing the county’s crumbling roads and bridges when it presented its recommendations in April. Councilman Joe Dill asked his colleagues Tuesday how the county would administer such a massive number of transportation projects and the funds collected, saying he would propose an amendment to spell that out in the ordinance.

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JOURNAL NEWS

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“It’s got some good stuff in it, but it’s not clear,” he said. “If we’re concerned about getting this approved by the public, then we need to cut out any perception that we don’t know what we’re doing or that anything can happen and blow the whole thing up.” Kernell said the county is capable of managing the project list, but would need to hire more staff to administer projects that equate to approximately one third of the county’s total budget. The funding distribution percentages would be maintained among the four project areas each year, he said. Councilman Willis Meadows said administering the projects created the most issues for other counties that have a local option sales tax, including Florence, Richland and York. “We have to administer this efficiently so the public sees progress on this,” he said. Councilwoman Liz Seman said “infrastructure is our big issue,” noting that many rezoning requests are rejected due to a lack of infrastructure. If not addressed, infrastructure issues could affect economic development opportunities, she said. Members of the audience on Tuesday wore dueling stickers proclaiming “My Roads, My Vote” or “No Tax Hike.” Thirteen residents spoke, nearly evenly divided between opponents and supporters of the referendum. Supporters commended council for allowing voters to decide and using local funds to fix a local problem. Opponents said they could not bear another tax increase, citing the burden of school board millage increases. Speakers suggested everything from making the referendum apply to only voters in the I-85 and I-385 corridor to adding a 1 percent tax decrease to the ballot. Mercedes McClain said she supported the referendum and that her family chose to live in the North Main area because they could walk to school and other locations. “We walk to our place to vote. Please give us an opportunity to vote on this issue,” she said. Joshua Cook, chairman of the Republican Liberty Caucus and organizer of No Tax Hike SC, said that council should “put on the brakes” when it comes to a referendum and cited a 1,200-signature petition opposing the local option tax. He added that the state gas tax and annual $15 county vehicle fee are designed to pay for road maintenance. “The problem is bigger than Greenville. It’s our broken political system in Columbia,” he said. The referendum ordinance discussion continues in two weeks with a second reading and a public hearing is scheduled for June 3. Greenville County Council is scheduled to meet again on May 20, 6 p.m., at County Square.

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JOURNAL NEWS

City manager requests first tax hike in 20 years JOE TOPPE | STAFF

jtoppe@communityjournals.com Greenville City Manager John Castile on Monday asked City Council for a four-mill property tax increase – Greenville’s first in 20 years – for the next fiscal year to meet the service demands created by the city’s “unprecedented growth.” Castile also proposed an increase to several city fees in the 2014-2015 operating budget he presented to council Monday night. The rate adjustments to wastewater, stormwater, building permit and plan review fees – combined with the tax increase – would add $6.9 million in new revenues to the 20142015 general fund, he told the council. The owner of a $200,000 home could expect to pay roughly $32 more a year if the tax hike is approved, said Kai Nelson, director of the office of management and budget. An additional $6 per year on sewer and 62 cents per year on stormwater would raise the total taxes and fees to “$38.62 more than last year,” Nelson said. The additional revenue would bring

16 THE JOURNAL | MAY 9, 2014

the general fund – which accounts for municipal services such as parks and recreation, development, city personnel, police and fire – to $74,609,477 as of July 1, a 10.2 percent increase over last year, city officials said. Castile told the council the increased millage “will provide a path forward for the city and its residents to address the urgent fire protection needs on the east side of Greenville,” as well as improve the city’s public safety efforts. “Public safety is always priority number one,” he said. As a new budget objective, Castile also recommended the council reserve financial capacity for long-identified signature projects such as relocating the city’s public works facility and a new regional park on the Westside. This will allow the city to move forward once the required data and analysis is in hand, he said. Castile noted that City Council identified a need for an Eastside fire station in 2008 to support the residential and commercial growth in the Verdae and Woodruff Road areas. “The additional revenue will be used

to support the construction of the station, the staffing of 12 firefighters and the purchase of fire apparatus, and to begin reinvesting the city’s fire stations,” he said. City officials project the new $1.3 million station will require $1 million per year to operate. Nelson said an additional $2 million would focus on improvements to existing fire stations throughout the city. With an average age of 42 years, each of Greenville’s six fire stations contains deferred maintenance, he said. The fire protection improvements will account for $3.3 million of the $6.9 million in new revenue, he said. Castile also proposed a $1.5 million increase in the city’s annual payroll, with $600,000 of that total set aside for 30 new positions and the remaining $900,000 for merit compensation adjustments. The proposed operating budget’s general fund would include $1.1 million in purchases of police vehicles and equipment, and $950,000 for a quintuple combination pumper (known as a “quint”) for the fire department. The quint combines pump, water tank, fire

hose, aerial device and ground ladders in one vehicle. Capital equipment purchases are also expected to account for some of the $6.9 million, as well as an additional $690,000 in capital improvement projects, Nelson said. The capital investments would include projects involving streets and sidewalks, improvements to the Village of West Greenville, neighborhood parks, and the commercial corridors, he said. The 2014-2015 general fund expenditures will incorporate 27 percent for police, 21 percent for fire, 11.7 percent for public works, 11 percent for nondepartment/transfer/debt service, 10.1 percent for parks and recreation, 6.4 percent for OMB, 5.3 percent for legislative and administration, 3.7 percent for economic and commercial development, 2 percent for HR, and 1.3 percent for public information, city officials said. The council will hold a second work session on the budget May 12, followed by a public hearing and first reading on May 19, and a second and final reading on June 9.


JOURNAL NEWS

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JOURNAL NEWS

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY New research could lead to safer football helmets Local company’s product used in other sports equipment CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Today’s football players are bigger, faster and stronger – but, except for some changes in padding and shape, the helmets protecting their heads haven’t changed much since the 1970s. Innegra Technologies, a Greenville advanced materials company, is teaming up with Clemson University’s Bioengineering and Food, Nutrition and Packaging Science departments and B&W Fiber Glass of Shelby, N.C., to research how its high-performance fibers may strengthen football helmets and make them safer. “A football helmet really is packaging for the most delicate object you have – your head,” said Elizabeth Cates, Innegra’s vice president of research and development. Concerns about the long-term effects of concussions have mounted in recent years, from former National Football League players who sued the league, to parents who say they’d rather have their children play another sport. Just this week, seven former NFL “A football players filed a motion in U.S. District helmet really Court in Philadelphia to intervene in is packaging the NFL lawsuit. They claim a proposed $765 million settlement – one for the most that a federal judge rejected in Janudelicate ary because it might not be sufficient to cover payouts and medical tests – object you is inadequate. have – your According to the Brain Injury Founhead.” dation, at least 3.8 million sports- and Elizabeth Cates

HELMETS continued on PAGE 20

Clemson M.S. bioengineering student Natalie Patzin tests a Clemson football helmet.

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY HELMETS continued from PAGE 19

recreation-related concussions occur each year. New research suggests that repeated small hits – those not severe enough for a concussion diagnosis – can also be harmful. Concern has spread to other sports as well, including soccer and hockey. Most of the improvements in head protection for football players have focused on the padding inside or the shape of the helmet, not the materials used in its hard plastic outer shell, said Mark Smith, Innegra Technologies’ CEO. Innegra Technologies, which has 10 employees, develops high-performance fibers. Its yarns have been shown to significantly increase the impact resistance of fiber-reinforced composites. They are used in high-impact sporting equipment such as hockey sticks, whitewater kayaks and tennis rackets. A tennis racket manufacturer found that rackets with yarn made by Innegra absorbed 17 percent more vibration than those without. Football, obviously, is a high-impact sport.

〉〉〉 BY THE NUMBERS

$765 million

proposed settlement amount, between former National Football League players who sued the league for concerns about the long-term effects of concussions, that was rejected by a federal judge in January because it might not be sufficient to cover payouts and medical tests.

3.8 million

approximate number of sports- and recreationrelated concussions that occur each year

1,800

Photo Provided

Clemson M.S. bioengineering student Natalie Patzin, right, and Clemson B.S. mechanical engineering student Nathan Walters test a Clemson football helmet.

pounds of potential force in a head-on collision between two football players running at each other at full speed (at 20 mph)

Cates said when fiber is incorporated into the shell, the energy of a collision travels along the fibers rather than through the shell, dissipating energy that could cause injury to the brain. “Imagine the force generated in a collision between two Jadeveon Clowneys [the University of South Carolina defensive player expected to be a firstround pick in the NFL draft that begins Thursday] running into each other,” Smith said. The research is designed to understand the role of the fiber in the helmet shell, Cates said. Researchers will study different fiber combinations and measure how much energy is absorbed and how much vibration occurs. A prototype helmet could be ready for testing in the fall.

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“Our fibers are very tough. They are damage-resistant and very lightweight,” Cates said. “Those two attributes are very useful.” Players wouldn’t have to be professionals or college-level competitors to benefit from the research, either. Smith said the product could be used in youth baseball and softball batting helmets, for instance.

“The problem with kids’ helmets is that they are heavy. Youth football helmets are almost as heavy as adult helmets,” Cates said. The lightweight durability and strength of the Innegra fibers could be “very useful” in youth sporting equipment, he said. Smith said he expects the Clemson research to take about a year. Where the project goes after that depends on the results, he said. “Imagine the Smith said his company’s products force generated are applicable in other industries concerned with safety and impact in a collision as well, including the automotive between two industry. The company’s yarns have Jadeveon been used in Formula 1 and NASClowneys running CAR. The product would be useful in the aerospace and ballistics indusinto each other.” tries and are future targets for the company, he said. Mark Smith

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Greetings, graduates Alumni connections, university jets can help land commencement speakers CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com May 7, 2011

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Two years ago, University of South Carolina graduates blasted the school for its selection of commencement speakers after nearby Columbia College landed a former president and the state’s flagship university had a lineup some called lackluster. This year, USC landed Vice President Joe Biden. Outrage still followed. The outrage wasn’t because the speaker lacked named recognition. Instead, it was Biden’s high profile and USC’s decision to initially limit each graduate to four guest tickets that caused the backlash. An online petition signed by 1,500 graduates even called for the school to “politely uninvite” the vice president. USC subsequently increased the ticket limit to six. So it goes for those responsible for choosing speakers to deliver words of wisdom to the thousands of graduates at area colleges and universities. The competition to land a big-name commencement speaker can be fierce. Some schools across the country turn to speaker’s bureaus to land a big name. Others turn to alumni and private or university jets. Still others forego the competition altogether and turn to their own president or members of the graduating class to give the commencement address. Wofford College used to invite outsiders to give the commencement address, said Laura Corbin, Wofford’s director of news services. More than a decade ago, the school’s graduating class requested then-President Joe Lesesne speak at graduation. It has turned into a longstanding tradition that will be continued this year by Wofford President Dr. Nayef H. Samhat. “It allows the emphasis to be on the graduates rather than a guest speaker,” Corbin said. Furman has had outside speakers – President George W. Bush spoke in 2008 – and student speakers over the years. This year, they’ll have both. Seniors apply and must submit their speech. They are judged on the quality of their message and their ability to deliver it, said John Beckford, the school’s vice president of academic affairs and dean. This year’s “outside” speaker is Furman Interim President Carl Kohrt. Going forward, Beckford said he ex-

AREA COLLEGE COMMENCEMENTS BOB JONES UNIVERSITY May 9, 2 p.m. Founder’s Memorial Amphitorium Speaker: Individual student testimonies CLEMSON UNIVERSITY May 9 Littlejohn Coliseum, 9:30 a.m., 2:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Speaker: New Clemson President James P. Clements will deliver his inaugural address in three segments, one at each graduation ceremony. CONVERSE COLLEGE May 17, 9:30 a.m. Twichell Auditorium Speaker: Vicki Cox, an alumna who led the transformation of the nation’s air traffic control system as the Federal Aviation Administration’s Assistant Administrator for NextGen. FURMAN UNIVERSITY June 10, 7:30 p.m. Paladin Stadium Speaker: Interim President Carl Kohrt GREENVILLE TECH May 13, 6 p.m. Bon Secours Wellness Arena Speaker: Greenville Tech President Dr. Keith Miller NORTH GREENVILLE UNIVERSITY May 8 Younts Football Stadium Speaker: Evangelist Clayton King, founder of Clayton King Ministries UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA May 9-10 Colonial Center Speakers: Vice President Joe Biden; Boeing Company chairman, president and CEO W. James McNerney Jr., and former astronaut and current administrator of NASA Charles F. Bolden Jr. USC UPSTATE May 6 On the Quad Speaker: Dr. Julian C. Josey Jr. WOFFORD COLLEGE May 18, 9:30 a.m. Lawn of Main Building Speaker: Wofford President Dr. Nayef H. Samhat

pects the school to have both an outside commencement speaker and a student speaker. He said distinguished Furman alumni would be the first choice. “It’s important for our students to


see what is possible with a Furman diploma,” he said. He said the school likely would not go the celebrity route. “Unless you have a connection and are relatively sure about the quality of the message, it can be a big expense and cost to the institution’s reputation,” he said. Beckford said he remembers only a handful of commencement speeches given during his 38 years at the school. He said he remembers the speeches by President Bush, author Pat Conroy, Atlanta Symphony Orchestra director Robert Shaw and Furman graduate and conductor of the Boston Pops Keith Lockhart. He remembers one other speech as well, but didn’t disclose who delivered it. “It was particularly bad,” he said. Clemson University is taking a unique route for its commencement speeches this year. New President James Clements will be officially installed as president that day and will deliver his inaugural address in segments at each of the school’s three graduation ceremonies Friday. He’ll receive the Clemson presidential

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chain, seal and robe at the 9:30 a.m. ceremony, a framed copy of the will of university founder Thomas Green Clemson at the 2:30 p.m. ceremony and the state’s Act of Acceptance at the 6:30 p.m. ceremony. “We’ve never done anything like this before,” said Robin Denny, school spokeswoman. “It’s unusual for us and it’s unusual for schools anywhere. We’re not sure it’s been done anywhere before.” Area schools don’t typically pay speaker fees for people to deliver commencement addresses, although they will sometimes pay expenses. Sometimes speakers have to back out, although typically that happens far enough in advance for schools to find somebody else. Beckford said Furman hasn’t had a speaker not make it to graduation. “We haven’t given it much thought, so much so that there’s no written policy in place,” he said. “If there’s time, we’d ask somebody else. If not, we’d just go without. After all, commencement is so much more than the commencement speech. The speech’s message is dwarfed by the lessons students have learned during their four years at Furman.”

Food for All This week, Publix Super Markets donated approximately 24 tons of non-perishable food along with a $30,000 monetary donation to Loaves and Fishes in Greenville as part of the Food for All program. Loaves and Fishes rescues perishable food from local restaurants, supermarkets and others to distribute to those in need locally. Publix conducts Food for All, a hungerfighting program that encourages customers to donate food, twice each year. The donation will be able to feed 61,000 hungry people. Other agencies that received food during the one-day distribution included Woodmont United Care, Greer Relief, Golden Strip Emergency Relief, Triune Mercy Center, the Storehouse and United Ministries. Pictured from left are Kris Jonczyk, Publix district manager; Matt Helcamp, Publix store manager; Tyson Smoak, Loaves & Fishes board chair; and Paulette Dunn, Loaves & Fishes executive director.

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Less stuff, more happiness “The Minimalists” live life with less CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com Josh Millburn was living the American dream. He had a big house with more bedrooms than occupants, a new car, and a six-figure salary. “I had all the stuff that was supposed to make me a success,” he said. But he was miserable. During the same month in 2008, his mother died and his marriage ended, the victim of the stress and neglect of 80-hour workweeks. “There was a void in my life and I tried to fill that void with stuff. The problem was, the more stuff I had, the further away from happiness I got,” Millburn said. “I wasn’t content. I wasn’t in control of my time or my finances. I made really good money, but I spent even better money.” He was surfing the Internet when he came across a thing called mini-

24 THE JOURNAL | MAY 9, 2014

malism – people of all walks of life who kept the fewest number of possessions possible while pursuing their passions, even when they had family obligations. “There’s nothing wrong with possessions,” he said. “The problem was I put the possessions first for a long time and I lost sight of my priorities, what was really important in my life.” He spent the next eight months paring his possessions down. “For each item, I asked myself ‘Does this thing add to my life?’” Millburn said during a telephone interview. “I got rid of 90 percent of my stuff. I started feeling lighter, happier.” When his longtime friend Ryan Nicodemus – Millburn said the two now 30-somethings have been friends since they were “fat fifth-graders” – was laid off, he adopted the minimalist lifestyle after he packed all of his belongings in boxes like he was moving and had taken out only about 20 percent of it several weeks later. The two started a blog, theminimalists.com, that now has more than 2 million readers.

Josh Millburn (left) and Ryan Nicodemus, a.k.a. The Minimalists.

They will be in Greenville on Thursday, May 15, as a part of a 100-city tour for their new book, “Everything That Remains.” A feature-length film about them will be released in 2015. Millburn said being a minimalist doesn’t mean sitting on the floor in a starkly empty apartment. “Minimalism isn’t deprivation,” he said. “I have a kitchen table and dinnerware for six. Minimalism is about getting rid of the extraneous stuff in favor of what’s important.”

SO YOU KNOW

WHAT: “Everything That Remains” WHO: Talk and book signing by Joshua Fields Millburn and Ryan Nicodemus, a.k.a. The Minimalists WHEN: May 15, 7 p.m. WHERE: Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5, Greenville COST: Free INFORMATION: fiction-addiction.com or 864-675-0540


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Safe sun Skin cancer screening scheduled for May 17 APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

Carpet · Hardwood · Area Rugs · Tile & Stone · Laminate

amorris@communityjournals.com

Dr. Angela Hutcheson with Carolina Dermatology examines patient Whitney Bearfoot’s skin during a recent appointment.

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Hours in the Southern sun and painful, peeling beach sunburns were part of growing up for many Upstate residents. This exposure during formative years, however, can make a big difference later in life. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, one blistering sunburn in childhood or adolescence can more than double a person’s chance of developing melanoma (a form of skin cancer) later in life. May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month and Greenville Health System (GHS) and the Piedmont Dermatological Society are hosting a free skin cancer screening later this month to raise awareness about one of the most common forms of cancer. Skin cancer wasn’t on Jonathan Haines’ mind when he was growing up near Palm Beach, Fla., spending countless hours in the pool and playing outdoor sports, he said. “I never remember being told to put on sunscreen or using it myself,” said the Pickens resident. However, the subject came front and center when he was 36 years old and his wife, Jessica, noticed a spot on the back of his neck that had changed shape. After a visit to the dermatologist and testing, Haines was diagnosed with melanoma and the spot was removed, he said. Following the initial treatment in 2008, he had to return to the dermatologist every three months for a skin check for cancer cells. Now he goes back every year. “I think it goes back to that sun exposure when I was younger,” he said. “I can remember being burned so bad that sheets of skin peeled off.” Haines and his wife have five-yearold twins and are much more conscious about sun exposure, he said, having them wear sunscreen and hats. “It starts with the parents. If I wear my hat, my son will wear his, too,” he said. Early exposure does make a difference.

According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, melanoma is the most common form of cancer for ages 25-29 years and the second most common form of cancer for young people 15-29 years old. The good news is skin cancer is among the most curable cancers if caught early, according to Dr. Angela Hutcheson of Carolina Dermatology. She recommends regular skin cancer surveillance, including yearly visits to the dermatologist. “Greenville area dermatologists will be participating in this year’s skin cancer screening,” she said. “We do this because we are passionate about reducing the number of deaths from skin cancer in the Upstate, and hope that by educating the public about skin cancer risk and providing skin cancer screenings, we can help to catch skin cancer in its earliest, most treatable stages.” Just before the Haines family headed off to a Disney World vacation, Jonathan Haines said he was picking up some new sunscreen.

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TIPS FOR REDUCING EXPOSURE Seek shade as much as possible during peak-UV hours, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Apply broad-spectrum sunscreen every two hours Wear sun-protective clothing, hats and sunglasses Avoid indoor tanning Regularly check your skin for changing lesions, which could be cancerous or precancerous

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AVERT YOUR EYES IN HIGH WINDS. The Scottish invasion is coming.

The Scots are back complete with their bagpipes, independence and fierce fighting spirits, as well as with their robust sense of humor. Gallabrae is two full days of outrageous fun, bands, a parade, and the Scottish Games. There will also be collies, Wee Scotland for the wee ones, and interactive heritage-themed activities. So bring the whole clan out to Gallabrae for some epic fun.

Friday, May 23rd

Saturday, May 24th

The Bagpipe Challenge! Great Scot! Parade | The Ceilidh!

The Greenville Scottish Games

26 THE JOURNAL | MAY 9, 2014

The British Car Show | Celtic Jam

A Southern Celebration of Scottish Heritage.

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Choice is not ‘The Voice’ Greenville man ousted from TV show CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Choice

COURTESY OF TREA PATTON AND NBC

Greenville’s Delvin Choice won’t earn the title of “The Voice” on the NBC television show. But that doesn’t mean Choice, a graduate of the Fine Arts Center and Wade Hampton High, isn’t a winner. Choice was eliminated Tuesday night, one night after his stunning performance of R. Kelly’s “I Believe I Can Fly.” In a prerecorded rehearsal segment aired during Monday’s show, Choice broke down and cried, telling his coach, Maroon 5’s Adam Levine, that he had come to believe in himself. But his stellar performance that drew raves from the show’s coaches – Levine, Blake Shelton, Shakira and Usher – didn’t get him into the top four based on votes from viewers and iTunes song purchases. That meant he and three other contestants had to sing to be saved by Twitter users. Choice sang Bruno Mars’ “Young Girls.” After his performance, Levine said Choice deserved to be saved, saying no one “on this planet, in this solar system” has a voice like him. “He does not deserve to be in the bottom four,” Levine said.

But after the Twitter votes were calculated, it was rocker Kat Perkins, one of Choice’s teammates, who was saved. Choice hugged Perkins after her name was announced. After the show, Choice took to social media himself. “Thank you to everybody for all of your love and support that you’ve shown to me. I am going to continue to pursue my dreams and I would love for you all to continue to be right by my side as I do so. I love you all from the bottom of my heart,” he said in an Instagram message that also appeared on Twitter.

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Furman partners with WFU JOE TOPPE | STAFF

jtoppe@communityjournals.com Furman University students interested in pursuing a managerial career can now take advantage of a partnership with the Wake Forest School of Business. For Paladin students who meet specific criteria, the Wake Forest-Furman Honors Program will provide them with up to $20,000 in scholarship funds and guaranteed admission into the Master of Arts in Management program at Wake Forest’s School of Business. Dr. John Barker, Furman’s director of career services, said the program between the two universities is the first agreement of its kind at Furman. “This alliance is another example of the reputation that Furman has among top graduate programs,” Barker said. The program is specifically designed for graduates with science, humanities and liberal arts majors. A streamlined

application process and additional scholarships based on demonstrated leadership ability, internships, extracurricular activities and other evidence indicative of academic success are available to Furman graduates applying to Wake Forest’s M.A. Management program. Alumni of Furman University have distinguished themselves at Wake Forest both academically and as leaders of character while continuing to represent both organizations as young business professionals, said Derrick Boone, associate dean of the M.A. in Management program at Wake Forest. “Our goal is to seamlessly integrate the outstanding liberal arts undergraduate education provided by Furman with the equally outstanding graduate business education provided by Wake Forest,” he said. Wake Forest is a private university located in Winston-Salem, N.C., with 2,600 students attending the university’s graduate and professional schools.

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MAY 9, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 27


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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Bon Secours St. Francis has been named one of Healthgrades America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Cardiac Care in 2014. TM

Bon Secours St. Francis ranked among the top 5% in the nation for Cardiology Services in 2014.

UPCOMING EVENTS Artisphere MAY 9-11 | FREE

Take Flight 5K MAY 24 | 8:30AM | $25

Phantom of the Opera MAY 14-25 | $50-95

Greenville Drive Baseball APRIL - SEPTEMBER

Downtown Greenville Enjoy three days of arts, crafts, wine tastings, live music, local food and craft beer. For more information and schedule of events visit artisphere.us.

Greenville Downtown Airport Join Bon Secours St. Francis and fellow runners in helping raise money to complete the aviation themed community park at the airport!

Peace Center The beloved story and thrilling score is performed by a cast and orchestra of 52, making this PHANTOM one of the largest productions now on tour.

Fluor Field, Downtown Greenville The Greenville Drive are back in action with astellar lineup for the 2014 season. Single-game tickets and ticket plans ranging from 15 games to the entire season are available.

WELCOME TO THE BSMG FAMILY!

There was no heart damage. IF YOU THINK YOU ARE HAVING A HEART ATTACK, DIAL 9-1-1 IMMEDIATELY & ASK TO GO TO ST. FRANCIS

28 THE JOURNAL | MAY 9, 2014

At 32 years old, Trey woke up thinking he had just slept on his arm wrong. When he told his wife about his symptoms, she thought he was having a heart attack and rushed him to St. Francis. She made the right choice. St. Francis has the first Cath Lab in the U.S. Accredited for Cardiovascular Excellence. Because St. Francis treats heart attacks 3x faster than the national standard of 90 minutes, Trey did not suffer any heart damage.

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Julie G. Stephens, MD

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Learn more about Trey’s story and symptoms of a heart attack at stfrancishealth.org/hearthelp

MAY 9, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 29


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Bon Secours St. Francis has been named one of Healthgrades America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Cardiac Care in 2014. TM

Bon Secours St. Francis ranked among the top 5% in the nation for Cardiology Services in 2014.

UPCOMING EVENTS Artisphere MAY 9-11 | FREE

Take Flight 5K MAY 24 | 8:30AM | $25

Phantom of the Opera MAY 14-25 | $50-95

Greenville Drive Baseball APRIL - SEPTEMBER

Downtown Greenville Enjoy three days of arts, crafts, wine tastings, live music, local food and craft beer. For more information and schedule of events visit artisphere.us.

Greenville Downtown Airport Join Bon Secours St. Francis and fellow runners in helping raise money to complete the aviation themed community park at the airport!

Peace Center The beloved story and thrilling score is performed by a cast and orchestra of 52, making this PHANTOM one of the largest productions now on tour.

Fluor Field, Downtown Greenville The Greenville Drive are back in action with astellar lineup for the 2014 season. Single-game tickets and ticket plans ranging from 15 games to the entire season are available.

WELCOME TO THE BSMG FAMILY!

There was no heart damage. IF YOU THINK YOU ARE HAVING A HEART ATTACK, DIAL 9-1-1 IMMEDIATELY & ASK TO GO TO ST. FRANCIS

28 THE JOURNAL | MAY 9, 2014

At 32 years old, Trey woke up thinking he had just slept on his arm wrong. When he told his wife about his symptoms, she thought he was having a heart attack and rushed him to St. Francis. She made the right choice. St. Francis has the first Cath Lab in the U.S. Accredited for Cardiovascular Excellence. Because St. Francis treats heart attacks 3x faster than the national standard of 90 minutes, Trey did not suffer any heart damage.

Stephanie E. Phillips, MD

Julie G. Stephens, MD

WELLSPRING PRIMARY CARE 864-365-0255

WELLSPRING PRIMARY CARE 864-365-0255

Julie Kinsman, MD

Terrell Leeke, MD

FAIRVIEW FAMILY PRACTICE 864-967-4982

FAIRVIEW FAMILY PRACTICE 864-967-4982

Learn more about Trey’s story and symptoms of a heart attack at stfrancishealth.org/hearthelp

MAY 9, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 29


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A Distinctive Academic Community Worth Discovering for Nearly 175 Years. Erskine feels like a second home to generations of graduates who’ve experienced it. As South Carolina’s first private Christian college, Erskine equips students to flourish through academic excellence and a family-like learning environment. It’s a rare college experience. But since it’s in the Upstate, going away to college doesn’t have to mean going far. So while Erskine may be a little harder to find, you’ll always know where you belong.

KNOW. BE KNOWN. Due West, South Carolina

30 THE JOURNAL | MAY 9, 2014

erskine.edu


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OUR SCHOOLS

ACTIVITIES, AWARDS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Spartanburg Methodist College is registering students for its Evening Paralegal Certificate Program’s Spring II term and will be offering a course designed to bridge the gap between law and business by providing legal professionals the knowledge and skills necessary to represent clients effectively in a business environment. Courses include Financial Documents and Accounting for Legal Professionals and Introduction to Paralegal Studies. For more information, visit smcsc. edu/paralegal, call 864-266-7409 or email harpery@smcsc.edu.

development and employment opportunities. Grant funds created a partnership of educators called SC ACCELERATE with members including Greenville Tech and Spartanburg Community College, Technical College of the Lowcountry, TriCounty Technical College, Trident Technical College, York Technical College, and Clemson University’s Center for Workforce Development. The APTC is located at McAlister Square, suite C-16, and is open Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m.-noon and 2-4 p.m. For more information, call 864-467-8863.

Shannon Forest Christian School is sending multiple delegates to Palmetto Girls’ and Boys’ State and a weeklong program June 8-14 at Presbyterian College and Anderson University. The delegates, who are rising seniors, were selected for the program based on the leadership skills and involvement they have shown in their respective schools From left: Katelyn Pittman, Ian Mendelsohn, Rebecca and communities. Welch, Drake Young and Morgan Goldman.

The Southside High School AFJROTC recently won the South Carolina High School State All Services Drill Championship Governor’s Trophy and Air Force State Championship at McEntire Joint National Guard Base. The Tigers bested the top 15 schools in the state representing all the military branches. The team placed in eight out of nine events. The following cadets commanded: Bria McCullough, Brendan Williams, Kanisha Jackson, Nykila Norman and Jaelyn Neely. The drill team coaches included Maj. (retired) Joseph Windley, Master Sgt. (retired) Kenneth Gause and Senior Master Sgt. (retired) Kathy Hodge.

Sterling School/Charles Townes Center students recently made downtown Greenville their classroom during DownTOWNES. The middle school students visited museums, hotels, businesses and other spots for hands-on learning. The three-day series culminated in a Greenville Drive game. The National Merit Scholarship Corporation recently released the names of the first group of winners in the 59th annual National Merit Scholarship Program. Approximately 1,000 high school seniors have won corporate-sponsored National Merit Scholarship awards financed by 200 corporations, company foundations, and other business organizations. The Upstate winners are: Nishesh Chaubey of Southside High School, Nikita G. Deshpande of Mauldin High School, Alexander Koo of Riverside High School and Johanna M. Swab, homeschool student. Seven Southside Christian School (SCS) students instructed by Idell Koury recently traveled to Georgetown University to participate in the National Model Arab League (MAL) Conference. More than 150 students from 15 high schools attended the conference. The delegates represented the country of Comoros and served on the Joint Defense Council, the Social Affairs Council or the Environmental Affairs Council. All seven SCS students received award certificates; five received Outstanding Delegate honors. Students also received one of two Outstanding Delegation Certificates. Receiving Outstanding Delegate recognition se were Sarah HouKathleen n e Survance, Carson Polk, Lucie Sikes, Mary Katherine Linn and Sowder. p O 7 Jacob Day. Receiving Honorable Mention certificates were Joseph Franks Nov. and

The Riverside Middle School Library celebrated National Poetry Month throughout April. English Language Arts teachers were provided with a poem each day to share with their classes if those chose to do so. Students were encouraged to “make their poetry pretty” by using scrapbooking supplies to decorate their poems to display throughout the school. Students created book spine poetry and took “shelfies” with their creations. Poem in Your Pocket Day was celebrated by students who carried copies of their favorite poems in their pockets and shared them with everyone they met. Submit entries to community@communityjournals.com. Don’t see your school’s news in the Greenville Journal this week? Visit greenvillejournal.com/life-culture/education for more education happenings.

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OUR COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY NEWS, EVENTS AND HAPPENINGS

The Greer Heritage Museum will unveil its new Native American artifact collection at a May 10 program with the Foothills Archaeological Chapter of the Archaeological Society of S.C. The program entitled “Artifacts From our Prehistoric History” will open the day’s activities with a short presentation at 10:30 a.m. by Lamar Nelson, an avocational archaeologist. From 10 a.m.-2 p.m., chapter members will be available to answer questions and identify artifacts for the public. Nelson and Bob Hanselman will demonstrate flintnapping, and Roger Lindsey, an expert on atlatl darts and points, will exhibit and answer questions. There is no charge for the program at 106 S. Main St., Greer. For more information, call 864-877-4626. Joshua Fields Millburn and Ryan Nicodemus, also known as The Minimalists, will be discussing their new book, “Everything That Remains,” at Fiction Addiction on May 15, 7 p.m. This event is free and open to the public, but RSVPs are requested. Visit fiction-addiction.com for more information. Slow Food Upstate will host a Pub Trivia night on May 14 at Nose Dive. Teams can sign up at brownpapertickets.com/event/628838. In addition, the Earth Market will open on May 21, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. For more information, visit slowfoodupstate.com. The seventh annual Back to the Cat Dive Hot Dog Lunch will be held on May 10, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., in the fellowship hall of St. Paul’s Church, 304 E. Camperdown Way, Greenville. Rick Lowe, retired owner of The Fall Street Café AKA The Cat Dive, will be preparing the hot dogs. Donations will be accepted. For more information, call 864-242-4598. Leadership Greenville is celebrating its 41st year and is taking applications through May 16. The program requires a 10-month commitment and begins with a two-day retreat. Participants then attend one-day sessions for nine months. Class members are selected through an application process based upon their past involvement in the community and their ability to set and achieve high personal goals. For more information,

visit greenvillechamber.org/class-41.php or contact tmiller@greenvillechamber.org. The Greenville Health System Life Center will host Salt Sense on May 12 at 7:30 a.m., 9:30 a.m. or 12:30 p.m. Attendees will learn guidelines for eating less sodium, which can help manage congestive heart failure and hypertension. The session is free to attend, but registration is required. To register, call 864-455-4010. Children’s Book Week, May 12-18, is the annual celebration of books for young people and the joy of reading. This year, Fiction Addiction will host free official Children’s Book Week events. On May 16, 4-6 p.m., Greenville author Melinda Long will be signing copies of her best-selling picture books, “How I Became a Pirate” and “Pirates Don’t Change Diapers.” For more information, call 864-675-0540 or email info@fictionaddiction.com. Attorney Anna Maria Darwin will be the guest speaker at the May 12 meeting of Democratic Women of Greenville County. Darwin is an attorney at Protection and Advocacy for People with Disabilities Inc., a private nonprofit corporation dedicated to the protection of the legal civil and human rights of people with disabilities in South Carolina. The meeting starts at 12:15 p.m. at Ryan’s Family Restaurant, 2426 Laurens Road, Greenville. Reservations are required for lunch and may be made by calling 864-232-5531 or emailing headquarters@greenvilledemocrats.com. Fox News contributor Todd Starnes will host a signing for his new book, “God Less America: Real Stories From the Front Lines of the Attack on Traditional Value,” on May 10, 1 p.m., at Christian Supply Inc., 1600 John B. White Sr. Blvd., Spartanburg. The City of Greenville’s Fidelity Investments Moonlight Movies continue in Falls Park Wednesday evenings in May. The free film series features “Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein,” “The Sandlot” and a special Viewer’s Choice. The films begin at

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OUR COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY NEWS, EVENTS AND HAPPENINGS

sundown (approximately 8:30 p.m.), but moviegoers are invited to come early and bring lawn chairs, blankets and a picnic. Food vendor Poppington’s Popcorn will be on site throughout the season and food trucks ThoroughFare and The Chuck Truck will be at the event on May 21. For more information, visit events.greenvillesc.gov. Roper Mountain Science Center will host Space Day, an award-winning educational initiative that seeks to advance science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Space Day 2014 celebration will be on May 10, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Featured guest speaker Alan Rich, Solar System Ambassador, will conduct four presentations. Rich is currently based in Charlotte, N.C., with the NASA-JPL Solar System Ambassador Program, operated by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. Admission is $5-$6. All events are included in general admission. For more information, visit ropermountain.org. Greenville Health System’s Greenville Memorial Hospital has received the Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Gold-Plus Quality Achievement Award for implementing specific quality improvement measures outlined by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association for the treatment of stroke patients. Greenville Memorial earned the award by meeting specific quality achievement measures for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke patients at a set level for a designated period. Duke Energy customers who recycle outdated refrigerators or freezers will receive an increased $50 incentive through the Duke Energy appliance recycling program. The program encourages customers to have inefficient refrigerators and freezers picked up at their homes free of charge. To participate, call 855-398-6200 or visit duke-energy.com/recycle to schedule a time for a free home pickup. A maximum of two units per household per calendar year will be accepted.

Submit entries to community@communityjournals.com.

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MAY 9, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 33


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

THE GOOD

EVENTS THAT MAKE OUR COMMUNITY BETTER

Les Gardner, Greenville Tech Foundation, receives the gift from CBL Foundation CEO Thomas Johnson. Included in the presentation are CBL Foundation board members, from left to right, Ralph W. Johnson Jr., Benjamin B. Waters III, Laurens I. James Jr. and Steve Hand, GTC Quick Jobs director. Other CBL board members are Hayne P. Griffin Jr., W. Terry Dobson and Paul J. Rogers

For the third consecutive year, the Citizens Building and Loan Foundation has supported the Quick Jobs with a Future program at Greenville Technical College. The gift of $5,000 will provide tuition assistance to Greer-area residents participating in the training program that gives people skills to enter career fields with current openings in the Upstate.

The Greenville Zoo invites Greenville Women Giving, a local women’s zoo-goers to tap into the wild philanthropic organization, presented grants at the fifth annual Brew in the totaling $500,255 to selected community nonZoo presented by RJ Rockers profit organizations at its eighth annual meeting on May 30, 6:30-9 p.m. The on May 7, putting its eight-year total of awards event provides adults with the given at $3.07 million. For the third year, the opportunity to sample an asgroup presented a $100,000 grant, awarded this sortment of beers and enjoy year to The Family Effect toward the construclive music, all while exploring tion of a new therapeutic treatment building for the zoo during its after hours. the children of families served by The Phoenix The event will also feature live Center and Serenity Place. The other charities musical entertainment from receiving grants were: Big Brothers/Big Sisters Benton Blount and a variety of the Upstate, $40,000; Faces and Voices of Reof food. Admission is $35 in covery (FAVOR), $60,000; Greer Community advance and can be purchased Ministries, $81,219; Meals on Wheels Greenville, online at greenvillezoo.com or $45,000; Metropolitan Arts Council, $63,400; at the zoo ticket booth. Tickets and Meyer Center for Special Children, $50,552. can also be purchased for $45 the day of the event. Designated driver tickets are also available for $15. Brew in the Zoo will take place rain or shine. Spartanburg Methodist College recently donated proceeds from its November SMC Quack Pack 5K and 1-mile fun run to the Gibbs Cancer Center and Research Institute. This continued a time-honored tradition of giving back to the community by designating proceeds from their Nov. 9, 2013, SMC Quack Pack 5K and 1 Mile Fun Run/Walk to the Gibbs Cancer Center and Research Institute. SMC chose to present their $1,065 donation in May during Skin Cancer Awareness Month, to raise awareness for students and especially athletes of outdoor sports.

The annual Wheels for Meals cycling event recently broke records for funds raised – enough to provide 32,000 meals – and number of participants – with more than 400 riders. Among the hundreds gathered at Furman University for each of the four signature rides was one of the world’s most recognized cyclists, George Hincapie, who rode the 62-mile route. For more information, call 864233-6565 or visit mealsonwheelsgreenville.org. As part of their annual conference, Sandlapper Securities will host a concert on May 14 to benefit the Center for Developmental Services. The concert will feature John Cafferty & The Beaver Brown Band on the TD Stage. The event is open to the public and tickets are $12 and $10 of each ticket will go to benefit CDS. A portion of all concession sales will also go towards CDS. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit peacecenter.org/shows/2014/caff. Military veterans with entrepreneurial dreams are invited to compete for start-up money to open their own business in the Signal 88 Security contest Operation American Dream. Through May 15, Army and Air Force veterans are invited to submit a video explaining why they want to open their own business. Submissions will be accepted online at signal88.com/operationamericandream. The winning submission will be decided through a public vote on Signal 88 Security’s Facebook page on May 22. The contestant with the most votes will receive $5,000 to start his or her own business, or $10,000 if he or she chooses to open a Signal 88 Security franchise. The Greenville Chorale will be holding its second annual Huge Yard Sale on May 17, 7 a.m.-1 p.m., at Augusta Heights Baptist Church, 3018 Augusta St., Greenville. All proceeds benefit the Greenville Chorale. Items will include clothing, furniture, housewares, baby and children’s items, jewelry, books, golf items, electronics and toys. For more information, call 864-235-1101. During Project Rx: A River Remedy’s recent drug take-back event, the two sites collected 1,052 pounds of unused or unwanted medications. The event was held in partnership with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), offering additional collection sites across the Upstate.

34 THE JOURNAL | MAY 9, 2014

May is Teacher Appreciation Month in South Carolina and Bojangles’ recently hosted a Teacher Appreciation Breakfast for the state’s 82 District Teachers of the Year. May 19-June 1, Bojangles’ customers can honor teachers who have made a difference in their lives by purchasing a symbolic apple, $1 for red or $5 for green. Customers may write the name of the teacher on each apple, which will be on display in the restaurant. All funds raised will support public education through the work of South Carolina Future Minds, a nonprofit dedicated to serving the needs of students, teachers and schools in the state’s public education system. Customers can also nominate a teacher at scfutureminds.org to receive a free cruise. Kathleen and Robert Basmadjian, residents at The Reserve at Lake Keowee, recently established the Inspiring the American Dream Foundation to encourage and prepare children and young adults to become independent, prosperous and productive members of society. The foundation will bring its new Opportunity to Succeed program to A.R. Lewis Elementary School in Pickens. Sexton Griffith Custom Builders also contributed $1,000 toward the launch of the pilot program at A.R. Lewis. The program’s goal is to improve third-grade reading proficiency, while instilling virtues, such as courage, perseverance, humility and compassion. Roost recently held a mini-Taste of the Upstate for local children to shine a light on childhood hunger in the community – and see if they could please discerning child guests. The event was in advance of Loaves & Fishes’ annual Taste of the Upstate, where each participating restaurant is challenged by other competitors and judged by a panel of IFSEA judges. Taste of the Upstate will be June 1 at the Embassy Suites Verdae. Tickets are $65 and are available at loavesandfishesgreenville.org or 864-232-3595. Renewable Water Resources (ReWa) facilities received the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) facility excellence awards for calendar year 2013. The South Carolina Environmental Excellence Program (SCEEP) is a voluntary program for companies committed to continuous environmental improvement in order to protect and preserve South Carolina’s environment. All eight ReWa facilities were presented the award: Piedmont Regional, Lower Reedy, Pelham, Mauldin Road, Georges Creek, Marietta, Durbin Creek and Gilder Creek.

Send announcements to community@communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL CULTURE

SPRING LOADED!

Symphony, Chorale ‘a perfect marriage’

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A film by Bobby Boemans When Anna’s cellphone mysteriously downloads a new app and it begins controlling her life in fearful ways, she’ll set in motion a fatal series of events in order to remove it. Tomorrow Saturday, May 10th, 6:30PM Appdefilm.nl

EDWIN MCCAIN BAND With Mark Bryan Greenville’s own kicks off our 2014 Summer Nights concerts on the TD Stage at the Peace Center! Friday, May 30, 2014 www.Edwin.com Photo Provided

Two Greenville arts organizations collaborate in season-ending concert CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com For centuries, the greats have turned to choruses to help perform their most important musical compositions. It’s no surprise, then, that the Greenville Symphony Orchestra is partnering with the Greenville Chorale in its Masterworks Series season finale, “Music from the Heavens,” on Saturday and Sunday. “It’s a perfect marriage,” said Bing Vick, director of the Greenville Chorale. “And we’re not going to divorce,” said Maestro Edvard Tchivzhel, the symphony’s music director and conductor. The season finale will feature works by Giuseppe Verdi, the great Italian

composer born 200 years ago. “The two greatest masters are Verdi and [Richard] Wagner,” said Tchivzhel. The GSO featured Wagner in the first Masterworks concert of the season. “Music from the Heavens” will also include works by Francis Poulenc and Pietro Mascagni. Vick said most symphonies have their own choruses or reach out to colleges. But Greenville is fortunate to have two world-class arts organizations that work well together to bring together instrument and voice. “Both organizations are really topnotch performance ensembles in and of themselves,” Vick said. “The Greenville Symphony is one of the best anywhere

and the Greenville Chorale is as fine a symphonic chorus you’ll find in any city. When you put the two together, it affords an unusual opportunity for outstanding performances. Instrumental and vocal sounds create the ultimate palette.” Tchivzhel said the first concert he conducted in Greenville, even before he was appointed conductor for the GSO, included the Greenville Chorale, and he was impressed. “It was one of the most attractive things to me, to be able to work with the Greenville Chorale and Dr. Vick,” he said. Vick said the Chorale, which has 160 members and 140 to 150 performing at

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MAY 9, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 35


JOURNAL CULTURE CONCERT continued from PAGE 35

each of its concerts, and the GSO feed off each other. “When you combine two quality organizations, when you combine instrumental and vocal sounds of that high a quality, it creates the ultimate palette,” Vick said. “There are so many great pieces for choruses and orchestras and both organizations are committed to doing them at the highest level.” The concert opens with Poulenc’s “Gloria,” a work commissioned by the Koussevitzky Foundation in honor of Sergei Koussevitzky, the longtime music director of the Boston Symphony, and his wife, Natalia. The Boston Symphony premiered the work in 1961. “It’s a fantastic piece,” Vick said, “It’s dance-y. It’s playful. It’s jazzy. It’s fun. It’s like you’re outside in the sunshine frolicking through a meadow.” Soprano Christina Major returns as guest soloist for the number. “Easter Hymn” from Mascagni’s “Cavalleria Rusticana” rounds out the first

Photos Provided

SOPRANO CHRISTINA MAJOR

half of the concert. The second half is dedicated to Verdi, beginning with the Overture to “La Forza del Destino.” “La Forza del Destino,” or “The Power of Fate,” is an Italian opera based on the Spanish drama, “Don Alvaro o la fuerza del sino.” The Overture is one of the most popular pieces performed by orchestras throughout the world. Next are two works from Verdi’s “Four Sacred Pieces.” “Quattro Pezzi Sacri” is composed of four individual choral works that were written separately during the last

decades of Verdi’s life. “Te Deum” was Verdi’s favorite and he reputedly wanted to be buried to that particular score. “This was Verdi’s end-of-life statement about faith,” Vick said. “Most composers wanted to make a significant musical statement of their beliefs. Most were not church-going, but they were spiritual. These are profound pieces.” The concert concludes with the Triumphal March and Ballet Music from Verdi’s opera, “Aida.” Concertgoers are urged to arrive early because parking could be tricky with Artisphere, Greenville’s downtown arts

festival, occurring at the same time.

SO YOU KNOW: WHAT: “Music from the Heavens” WHO: Greenville Symphony Orchestra, Greenville Chorale and soprano Christina Major WHEN: May 10, 8 p.m.; and May 11, 3 p.m. WHERE: Peace Center Concert Hall TICKETS: $16 to $57 INFORMATION: peacecenter.org or 864-467-3000

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36 THE JOURNAL | MAY 9, 2014

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JOURNAL CULTURE

Rooms with a view CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

“It really grounds the contemporary collection,” Laughton said. “We like playing traditional against modern.” Smith’s condo features a lot of color, from the tile backsplash behind the stovetop to the bar stools to the lighting fixtures in the main living space. “It’s highly influenced by the river,” Laughton said. Artwork from a mix of artists, including local artists and one of Smith’s sons, adorns the walls. Pillows serve as art in Smith’s master

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

“All it took was one look out the window” to sell Melinda Smith on her Riverplace condo. Smith was the last person to buy at 154 Riverplace in 2005 and the first person to move in to the development that offers spectacular views of the Reedy River, the Wyche Pavilion, the Peace Center and Main Street. Her condo is one of five featured in The Guild of the Greenville Symphony’s Condo Rondo on Saturday. A “rondo” is a musical composition built around a recurring theme. Condo Rondo’s theme is condos with access to downtown restaurants, events and Falls Park. Although each of the five condos showcased in this year’s event are within walking distance, all show the owner’s distinctive style and interest in art, antiques and collectibles. This Riverplace condominium is one of the unique The condos on the tour indowntown condominiums on the Downtown Condo clude a two-story condo with a Rondo tour, a fundraiser to benefit the Greenville collection of chandeliers, mir- Symphony Orchestra. rors and large-scale artwork, a condo with an open floor plan, one built bedroom, which features a set of pilin what once was the attic of a hardware lows on the bed, as the wall space there store built more than 150 years ago and is too small to hang any art of signifianother with vibrant colors and ultra- cance. Only 10 yards of the fabric used modern furniture. in those pillows exist anywhere in the The Guild is a support organization world, Laughton said, and the pillows for the Greenville Symphony Orchestra. take up two of them. All of the furniture Smith had when Each pedal of the flower contains more she moved from the “suburbs” near than 1,000 hand stitches, he said. “The Chanticleer was traditional and didn’t fabric is exquisitely made. There’s so much really fit in her new digs. detail. The fabric itself is a work of art.” “I wanted something very contemAnd then there’s the view. porary, very clean, very modern,” she said. “In Greenville, modern is not the norm. It’s difficult finding pieces and decorators who understand it.” WHAT: Downtown Condo Rondo After Smith decided to buy, she had two WHO: The Guild of the Greenville Symphony days to pick out everything – paint, tile, WHEN: Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. countertops, flooring. She worked with a part-time designer, but really didn’t WHERE: Five condominiums within walking concentrate on her décor until about 18 distance of each other in the Main Street months ago, when she started working area of downtown Greenville. with Bud Laughton of JKL Design. TICKETS: $20 in advance, $25 on the day They kept the two very best pieces of of event Smith’s traditional furniture – a BomINFO: guildGSO.org or 864-370-0965 bay chest and a rice bed.

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JOURNAL CULTURE

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CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Kent Ambler discovered he had an innate feel for printmaking and creating woodcuts while a student at Ball State University in Indiana. His surroundings – eight acres on Paris Mountain – offer endless subject matter. Mark-making is the main focus in Ambler’s woodcut prints, while surface and paint application are the main focus in his paintings.

Need to f people? F sandwich dessert tr covered.

While Artist Row in this weekend’s Artisphere will have artists from all across the country, it will also be a disNeed to feed a large group of play of the quality of local artists. people? From boxed lunches to A record 15 artists from Greenville sandwich platters and amazing County – a little fewer than half of the dessert trays, we’ve got you t o f eed large gro local artists who applied – werea selected covered. le ? Frthrough om boxed lun a blind jury process to display wich platters and am and sell their work on Main Street on ert tra y s, w e’ve got atlantabread.com red. Friday, Saturday and Sunday. More than 900 artists applied for the 125 atlantabread.com spots on Artist Row. Beth Andrews was introduced to “That shows the quality of the artists sewing as a child, beginning with spewe have here in Greenville,” said Alan cial dresses made by her mother and Ethridge, executive director of the Metatlantabread.com grandmother – and a quilt made just ropolitan Arts Council. for her from the scraps of all those In addition to those on Artist Row, special dresses. Andrews is now a fiber 4100 Pelham Road the Artists of the Upstate juried exhibiartist and a member of the Southern tion in the Founder’s Room above Lar5 Greenville, SC 29615 Highlands Craft Guild. kin’s on the River features 77 works by atlantabread.com 864-627-4300 local artists as well. atlantabread

convenience

lham Road nience 401 Pelham Road

ville, SC 29615 Greenville, 27-4300

SC 29615 864-627-4300

BETH ANDREWS

Road SC 29615 300

JOSEPH BRADLEY

This weekend? Enjoy

ARTISPHERE. ART IS HERE. And the rest of the year, remember

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1pm - 5 pm admission free

38 THE JOURNAL | MAY 9, 2014

Joseph Bradley credits his decision to become an artist to being held up in a bank robbery during college. He evaluated what energized him about that experience and turned his scattered ambitions into being a visual artist. His paintings are now shown all over the country.

JANINA ELLIS Janina Ellis is the third generation in a family of artists. Her grandmother was an oil painter and her mother is one of the top U.S. scrimshanders, or maritime engravers. Ellis is a painter who now concentrates on figurative work. Her style, which combines the lighting techniques found in realism with bold painting-knife strokes of impressionism, has been described as “peaceful, yet still subtly invigorating.”


JOURNAL CULTURE

CHRIS BRUNER

Chris Bruner has been an avid photographer since the 1970s, when he would document his family’s vacations with any type of point-and-shoot camera he could get his hands on. Although he has taken a few photography classes, Bruner is essentially a self-taught artist.

LYNN GREER

MARIE GRUBER

Lynn Greer is a regular participant in Artisphere. She loves the watercolor medium for its fluidity and unlimited ability to surprise. Greer, a graduate of the University of Georgia, says she is exhilarated by the process as well as product, whether she’s painting a floral, portrait or cityscape.

Black-and-white fine art photography has always been one of Marie Gruber’s favorite forms of artistic expression. Gruber studied fine art at the University of Georgia and at Clemson University. Her images are from her local surroundings and from her travels in the United States, British Columbia, France, Spain, China, Costa Rica and Italy.

SIGNE AND GENNA GRUSHOVENKO

DANIELLE MILLER-GILLIAM

Signe and Genna Grushovenko are partners in life as well as art. Genna begins their process by applying rich layers of patterns and tone. Signe then selects an inspiration image from their extensive collection of vintage found photos, and draws with oil pastel atop the underlayer using the photo for reference. The image is completed with blocky “panes” of oil color.

Jeweler and precious metal artist Danielle Miller-Gilliam grew up in a steel mill town in western Pennsylvania. Miller-Gilliam, who was five years old when she told her parents she was going to be an artist, discovered her passion for working with metal while making a large-scale welded steel sculpture. Her present work has a kinetic element that relies on the action of the wearer for motion. ARTISPHERE continued on PAGE 40

MAY 9, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 39


JOURNAL CULTURE

ARTISPHERE continued from PAGE 39

RAY MOSTELLER Photographer Ray Mosteller focuses on “storytelling” scenes in his photography. That can be landscape and nature photography as well as life photography, Mosteller photographed for a hobby for many years before becoming a full-time fine art photographer seven years ago. He specializes in large-scale photography and some of his pieces are 16 feet long.

r harbo e f a s ts presen

R U O T CYC L E A S AT U R D

31 Y, m a y

. i va , s o u t h . 8:15 AM

’s

2014

STEPHANIE SHUPTRINE carolin

a

many thanks to our event sponsors:

YOU NEED YOUR HEARING CHECKED Greer Audiology is now Davis Audiology • New patient appointments within 1 week • Extended hours Tuesday evenings until 8pm • Saturday office hours by appointment

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Stephanie Shuptrine is the daughter of renowned watercolor painter Hubert Shuptrine. She initially wanted to pursue a career as a cartoonist and illustrator. A few months before her father died from cancer she took over his studio and finished several of his paintings. She now paints people and animals with a spiritual approach while utilizing a technique similar to her father’s.

JUDY VERHOEVEN Mixed-media artist Judy Verhoeven made her first collage with gum wrappers she collected from family and friends. She’s still collecting paper and turning it into works of art. Verhoeven’s papers of choice these days are pages from discarded books and magazines, photocopies of her original art, doodles and photography and handmade art papers. She said the effects she gets painting, wadding, folding, ripping and cutting those papers are limitless.

KATIE WALKER Kristin Davis, Au.D. Doctor of Audiology Premier Lyric Hearing Professional

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Katie Walker, one of the festival’s emerging artists, has worked out of Art Bomb for more than a decade. Her work is a calculatory process where one calculation leads to the next and so on, until the dialectic, the energy and the opposing forces are interesting and complete to her. She works primarily with acrylic, on canvas, paper and wood.


JOURNAL CULTURE

LLYN STRONG

At first, Llyn Strong thought she would be a painter or a graphic designer. She didn’t make her first piece of jewelry until 1972. Now, she’s the owner of a downtown store that features her own original jewelry designs as well as that of other jewelry and glass artists. Strong says art, no matter what its medium, should do more than present a beautiful façade.

JARYD WALLEY

Jaryd Walley is a former Hollywood prop maker. His scenery and props were used in the television shows “In Living Color” and “Beverly Hills 90210” and movies such as “Independence Day” and “Titanic.” He now uses his talents to create authentic farm tables and furniture using 200-year-old antique heart pine reclaimed just miles from his studio.

SO YOU KNOW WHAT: Artisphere WHO: Visual and performing artists WHEN: May 9-11 WHERE: Downtown Greenville INFORMATION: artisphere.us

MAY 9, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 41


JOURNAL CULTURE

A R T S CALENDAR M AY 9 - 1 5 Main Street Friday The Rock Doctors May 9 ~ 232-2273 TD Bank presents Artisphere 2014 May 9-11 ~ 271-9398

5/9, HORIZON RECORDS/ THE BOHEMIAN CAFÉ

Metropolitan Arts Council One-Stop Open Studios Through Jun. 20 ~ 467-3132 Piedmont Natural Gas Downtown Alive Benton Blount May 15 ~ 232-2273

• Paper towels • Cleaning rags & household wipes

• Diapers

• Dental floss

• Cat Litter

• Q-Tips

5/9, GOTTROCKS

Peace Center APP – Thriller Film May 10 ~ 467-3000

Peace Center The Phantom of the Opera May 14-25 ~ 467-3000

• Medical bandages

5 / 9 , C H A R T E R A M P H I T H E AT R E

Willie Nelson/Alison Krauss & Union Station featuring Jerry Douglas Once-in-a-lifetime co-bill of country icons. Tickets: $15-$79.50. Call 864-241-3800 or visit charteramphitheatre.com.

Fountain Inn Chorale International Passport May 10 ~ 409-1050

Metro. Arts Council at Centre Stage Paintings by Tami Cardnella Through May 12 ~ 233-6733

• Feminine hygiene products

BEST BETS FOR LOCAL LIVE MUSIC

Annabelle’s Curse Haunting acoustic Americana. Call 864-235-5519 or visit reverbnation.com/venue/255976.

Greenville Symphony Orchestra Music from the Heavens May 10-11 ~ 467-3000

• “Flushable” wipes

LISTEN UP

Greenville County Museum of Art Sigmund Abeles: Pastels Through Jun. 15 ~ 271-7570 Michael Mathers: Photography Through Jun. 15 ~ 271-7570 Legacy of Impressionism: Languages of Light Through Sep. 21 ~ 271-7570 Andrew Wyeth: Selected Watercolors Continuing ~ 271-7570 Greenville Chamber of Commerce Works by Terry Davenport & John Roberts Through Jun. 30 ~ 242-1050 Main Street Real Estate Gallery Works by David McCurry Through Jun. 30 ~ 250-2850

Jerry Douglas Dobro master does rare in-store show. Call 864-235-7922 or visit blog.horizonrecords.net. 5 / 9 , B L U E S B O U L E VA R D (GREENVILLE)

Jen St. Stjarna Experimental singer/songwriter/pianist. Tickets: $5. Call 864-242-2583 or visit bluesboulevardjazzgreenville.com. 5/9, INDEPENDENT PUBLIC ALE HOUSE

Four 14 Progressive psychedelic rock. Call 864-552-1565 or visit facebook.com/ipagreenville. 5/10, RADIO ROOM

Strange Planet Atmospheric, melodic rock. Call 864-263-7868 or visit wpbrradioroom.com. 5/10, BON SECOURS WELLNESS ARENA

Brantley Gilbert Red-hot country star. Tickets: $24.75-$37. Call 1-800-745-3000 or visit bonsecoursarena.com. 5 / 1 0 , B L U E S B O U L E VA R D ( S PA R TA N B U R G )

The Wade Baker Jazz Group Eclectic jazz, hip-hop and funk fusion. Tickets: $5. Call 864-573-9742 or visit bluesboulevardjazz.com/Spartanburg.

42 THE JOURNAL | MAY 9, 2014


JOURNAL CULTURE

SOUND CHECK

WITH VINCENT HARRIS

‘No craziness in the camp’ For legendary Dobro player Jerry Douglas, his current gig with Alison Krauss feels like home Quite simply, Dobro player extraordinaire Jerry “Flux” Douglas is one of the most accomplished, acclaimed musicians of the last three decades. In addition to spending the last 14 years as part of Alison Krauss’ Union Station group, which has sold millions of albums and won multiple awards, Douglas is a solo artist, session musician and producer without peer. He’s won 13 Grammys, three CMA Musician of the Year awards and 18 IBMA awards. He’s released 13 solo albums, produced nearly 100 albums and served as a session man on nearly 70. His resume is a staggering testament to his multiple talents. Douglas will be playing two shows in the Upstate this Friday: one with Krauss, Union Station WHO: Jerry Douglas and Willie Nelson at the Charter AmphitheWHEN: Friday, May 9 atre in Simpsonville, and one in-store perWHERE: Horizon Records/The Bohemian Café formance at Horizon Records at 1 p.m. (solo show), 2 W. Stone Ave., 1 p.m., Just looking over your credits, I have 864-235-7922 or blog.horizonrecords.net to ask: Are you ever not working? It doesn’t seem like it [laughs]. I haven’t Charter Amphitheatre slowed down for a long time. But I’ve been (with Alison Krauss & Union Station), fortunate. I mean, I could be wondering 861 SE Main St., Simpsonville, 7 p.m. 864-241-3800 or charteramphitheatre.com where my next gig’s going to be. Other than the Union Station albums, and your own work, how do you choose what artists to produce? I look for an overall vibe from the band or the artist I’m working with. I try to find that and tap into it and wear that out. And I’ll turn over every rock to see if an idea is good and pursue it to the very end. The artist is the boss, but my job is to get the best performance, and to bring out the best that they can do at that time in their career. Have you begun thinking about a follow-up to “Traveler” [Douglas’ most recent solo album]? I’m on it. I’ve got two albums in the pipeline right now. When I get finished with this tour, I want to do a duets record with a lot of high-profile artists. Not just duets with two people singing or playing, but just having one other person on the track with me, and we play everything. There’s another project I’m working on called The Earl of Lester, which will be Flatt & Scruggs songs, but as an exact Flatt & Scruggs band. The arrangements are exactly the same. It’s not acting, it’s guys who grew up with Flatt & Scruggs and have that music at their core, the same as I do. Oh, and I’ve got another record that I did with [Blue Highway Dobro player] Rob Ickes and Mike Aldridge [who passed away in 2012]. Your songs with Krauss and Union Station seem tightly arranged. Is there room for improvisation? Definitely. There are things you must do, so people will know what song they’re about to hear, but there are things we do that leave room for improvisation. There are certain nights that I’ll try not to play any solo that’s on the albums. And the other guys in the band started doing that as well. The vocal parts don’t really change, but the instrumental parts are fair game [laughs]. I don’t like to play the same thing the same way twice. With all your other available creative outlets, what do you get from playing with Union Station that you can’t get elsewhere? That band just has a sound. And it doesn’t matter how long it’s been since we last played together, that sound comes back. It’s alchemy. I don’t know how to explain it any other way. I’ve never been in a band that does that; that you could count on being that consistent. We can even play different instruments other than our own, and we’ll still get that same sound. I don’t completely understand it. But we’ve found something really good. And we all get along; there’s no craziness in the camp. It’s a nice comfortable place; it’s home.

Thank you

to our sponsors Platinum Sponsor:

Gold Sponsor:

Bronze Sponsors: Enterprise Holdings Foundation Publix Super Markets Charities Southern First Patron Sponsors: BNC Bank Meredith Corporation Foundation Milestone Custom Homes South Carolina Bank and Trust Yeargin Potter Shackelford Construction

We appreciate your support!

VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

MAY 9, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 43


JOURNAL CULTURE

SCENE. HERE.

THE WEEK IN THE LOCAL ARTS WORLD The iconic and incomparable Art Garfunkel is making his highly anticipated comeback to the stage in 2014 with a select number of live performances, including a stop at Chapman Cultural Center on June 5, 8 p.m., for an intimate stage show. His other shows in South Carolina will be in Columbia and Charleston the following two days. Tickets to the Spartanburg concert will sell for $65 each and can be purchased online at ticketfly.com (search “Garfunkel”). For more information on the center, visit chapmanculturalcenter.org.

A Village Market in the Village of West Greenville will be held every Saturday May 10-Sept. 27, 9 a.m.-1pm. The market is on the grassy area adjoining the parking lot directly across from Village Studios at 1278 Pendleton St. American Callboard Theatrical, the resident theatre company at the Mauldin Cultural Center, will open their second production, “Songs for a New World,” May 15-17, 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $10-15 and available for purchase at maudlinculturalcenter.org. Contains some adult language. Acoustic guitarist and flautist duo Not Even Brothers will perform live in a free concert at Chapman Cultural Center on May 11, 2-4 p.m. The performance is for all ages. For more information, call 864-542-ARTS. On May 10, the Peace Center will feature a 6:30 p.m. showing of the 2013 Dutch movie thriller “App.” Prior to the screening, moviegoers will be encouraged to download a free app to their smartphone (Android and iPhone) that will allow them to enhance the plot during the screening. Spoken in Dutch with English subtitles, “App” tells the fictional story of a college co-ed named Anna

44 THE JOURNAL | MAY 9, 2014

who, after a night of partying, wakes up groggy and hung over only to find that a new app has been added to her smartphone. Initially helpful and clever, IRIS soon begins behaving in cruel, mysterious ways. Tickets are $10 and may be purchased at peacecenter.org, Peace Center Box Office and at 864-467-3000 or 800-888-7768.  The Film House in collaboration with The Arthaus will present “Pivot,” an experimental film exhibition, May 9-11, 11 a.m.-midnight, at Artisan Traders in the Village of West Greenville Arts District, 1274 Pendleton St. The two are forging a pivotal path in the creation of Greenville’s new art scene with the experimental film exhibit “Pivot: Embrace the Unconventional.” Pivot will feature unique works by Andy Warhol, Marcel Duchamp, director Bruce McDonald, and a film featuring “Game of Thrones” actor Aidan Gillen. Other films will include those by Greenville’s own Elizabeth Stehling, Cameron Cooke, Gene Ellenberg, Harlan Lovestone, Susan Molnar and Alex Wroten. Each day of the event will feature a different theme with a different set of films. Tickets are $5 per day or $12 for a three-day weekend pass. Tickets can be purchased at greenvillefilmhouse.com/pivot. The South Carolina Theatre Association is hosting its first annual gala, A Red Carpet Affair, to celebrate and honor theatre in South Carolina. The event is open to the public and will be an evening of dinner, dancing, entertainment, awards presentations and networking. Local honorees include Dr. Virginia Uldrick, former president of the SC Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities, with the Lifetime Service Award; and Jayce Tromsness, drama faculty member of the SC Governor’s School, with the Outstanding Theatre Educator Award. The event will be held on May 17 at the Columbia Marriott, 1200 Hampton Street, Columbia. The cost is $50 per person. Tickets can be purchased at southcarolinatheatre.com.��

Send announcements to arts@communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL HOMES

DETAILS

Featured Homes & Neighborhoods | Open Houses | Property Transfers

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED HOME

HOME INFO

5 Tantallon Ct., Simpsonville Great floor plan on wooded cul-de-sac lot in Knight’s Bridge in Simpsonville.  Custom upgrades starting in the family room with a stone faced gas log fireplace flanked by gracious built-in cabinets with bead board backing and home theatre system speakers and wiring.  The kitchen showcases granite countertops, tiled back splash and a high-end collection of Stainless appliances. Lots of cabinet storage, enormous walk-in pantry!  There is a Formal living room/office with a vaulted ceiling and well-appointed dining room.  Home offers a guest bedroom and full bathroom on the main level, and mudroom at the garage entry.  Upstairs you’ll be blown away by the owner’s retreat with a sitting area, fireplace, luxurious master bath with tiled flooring, shower, and tub surround and TWO HUGE walk-in closets.  Upstairs there are 3 more bedrooms and 2 baths. Covered outdoor patio overlooking the fully fenced and wooded backyard.  Community has a robust amenity package including a pool, sidewalks, lighting and an active HOA. 

Price: $344,900 | MLS: #1273265 Bedrooms: 5 Baths: 4 full | Square Footage: 4200 Schools: Simpsonville Elementary Hillcrest Middle | Hillcrest High Melissa Morrell | 864.918.1734 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner REALTORS To submit your Featured Home: homes@greenvillejournal.com

Custom Build – Renovations – Design

TURNING DREAMS I N T O R E A L I T Y SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

C111R

highlandhomessc.com – 864.233.4175

MAY 9, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 45


JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND AUGUSTA ROAD AREA

O P E N S U N D AY, M AY 11 F R O M 2 – 4 P M

FAIRWAY VIEW @ PEBBLE CREEK

AUTUMN TRACE

409 BROOKWOOD DR . $372,500 . MLS# 1277678

9 GOLF VIEW LANE . $243,000 . MLS# 1278214

4 PLUM ORCHARD CT . $209,000 . MLS# 1275549

4BR/2BA Great opportunity! All that’s left to complete are final touches. Augusta Rd to Phillips Lane. Home is on the Left.

3BR/2.5BA Fabulous move-in ready newer home. Bonus, screen porch and more! Rutherford Rd to Left on Stallings. Right on Mountain Creek Church. Right on Golf View Lane. Home on Left.

4BR/2.5BA Beautiful home. Home has been well maintained. Spacious fenced backyard. Hwy 14, Right on Pollard, Left into 1st entrance of SD, Right-Saybrook; LeftFarm Brook, Right-Plum Orchard. Home on Right.

Contact: Charee McConchie | 419-4554 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Jane Ellefson | 979-4415 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Jeffrey Meister | 979-4633 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

PELZER AREA

PE OPLE , AWARDS , HONORS Fred Blevins Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Greenville Coldwell Banker Caine recently welcomed Fred Blevins as a residential sales agent to its Greenville office. Prior to joining Coldwell Banker Caine, Blevins worked as a Project and Account Manager for Southeastern Products. He received his Bachelor of Arts in Business Economics from Wofford. In his free time, Blevins enjoys golf, college football, the outdoors and spending time with family at Falls Park. He and his wife, Rebecca, have a three-year-old daughter named Miller and an eight-monthold son named Bo. They reside in Greenville, S.C. “We are proud to welcome Fred to our Greenville family,” said Stephen Edgerton, President and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “He will be a wonderful new addition to our growing team and will have a successful career at Coldwell Banker Caine.”

9431 AUGUSTA RD . $179,999 . MLS# 1275941 2BR/2BA Stone and brick bungalow on 5 level acres. Take Highway Augusta Road/25 South. The property is located on the left before the 418 Intersection. Contact: Edward Risavich | 608-4655 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner Co.

Allen Tate Company Names Lindsie Sink Sales Manager of Greenville-Midtown Office  Allen Tate Company (www.allentate.com), the Carolinas’ leading real estate company, has named Lindsie Sink as sales manager of the company’s Greenville-Midtown office at 88 Villa Road in Greenville, South Carolina.  In her new role, Sink will help manage the day-to-day operations of the Greenville-Midtown office, a branch of more than 40 Allen Tate agents. She will also be responsible for coaching agents in building their business and train- C O N T I N U E D… PA G E 47 †

Distinctive Homes To Fit Your Life.

Projects Spanning All Sizes. 46 THE JOURNAL | MAY 9, 2014

Blevins

IBI Builders | Greenville | www.ibibuilders.com | 864.414.6658

Innovation To Fit Your Needs.

Expertize You Can Count On. SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


JOURNAL HOMES

F E AT U R E D H OM E

PEOPLE, AWARDS , HONORS ing agents, both in real estate techniques and technical tools. Sink has worked as an award-winning Realtor® since 2005 and joined Allen Tate in 2008, when the company entered the Upstate market. Sink Prior to her real estate career, she worked as special education and substitute teacher and in several business management positions. Sink holds a bachelor of science degree in communication disorders and a certification in special education from the Pennsylvania State University. “Lindsie will be a great addition to the Upstate leadership team. Her experience in real estate, teaching and business, along with her passion and commitment to continuous learning, will be a great asset to our agents and clients alike,” said  Pat Riley, Allen Tate Company President and COO. Sink has lived in the Upstate since 2004 and currently resides in Simpsonville.  She enjoys exercise, hiking, traveling and cooking.

39 Harvest Court, Greenville Live in the highly sought after Augusta Road community! Only steps away from Cleveland Park and Swamp Rabbit Trail, this distinctive home boasts sophistication creating the perfect combination of convenience and elegance. Open the double doors to a large 2 story foyer and step across hardwoods into the spacious interiors of the main level. Sunlight overflows the open kitchen offering stainless steel appliances and cozy breakfast area. Entertain guests in the great room complete with full service wet bar. Spotless master bedroom has French doors leading to backyard oasis. Two bedrooms are upstairs with an additional flex room or fourth bedroom. Spectacular Exterior features covered back porch and sparkling pool. Call today for a private tour of this first class property!

See all my listings at sharonwilson.net

HOME INFO Price: $635,000 | MLS: #1277454 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 3 full/1 half Square Footage: 3400–3599 Schools: Augusta Circle Elementary Hughes Middle | Greenville High

Sharon Wilson, GRI, CRS, ABR 864.918.1140 | swilson@cbcaine.com To submit your Featured Home: homes@greenvillejournal.com

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

Bargar Named Broker-In-Charge Of Berkshire Hathaway C. Dan Joyner, Realtors’ Pelham Road Office Bargar brings 12 years of experience to lead one of the largest real estate offices in the Upstate B e r k s h i r e H a t h a w a y HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS is Bargar pleased to announce that Duane Bargar will serve as the Brokerin-Charge of the company’s Pelham Road office. Bargar has 12 years of real estate experience, including working as a C. Dan Joyner agent in the Pleasantburg office and, most recently, being Broker/Owner of his own brokerage company, which consistently ranked as a top-producer in the Upstate. “We are so excited to have Duane back on the C. Dan Joyner team,” said Danny Joyner, CEO, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS. “He is a wellrespected and knowledgeable real estate professional and will be a great asset to our Pelham Rd. office as we continue to grow our family of agents to serve the needs of home buyers and sellers throughout the Upstate.”

C O N T I N U E D… PA G E 4 9

†

MAY 9, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 47


JOURNAL HOMES

ON THE MARKET MONTEBELLO

712 VILLAGGIO DR. . $574,900 . MLS# 1277092 4BR/3.5BA Tuscan charm in the heart of Greenville. Four large bedrooms, upstairs rec room with outdoor terrace overlooking the city and Blue Ridge mountains with breathtaking sunsets.

HOLLAND PLACE

HIGHLAND CREEK

11 AMSTERDAM LANE . $342,000 . MLS# 1274744

203 DRAYMOOR LANE . $320,000 . MLS# 1274861

4BR/2.5BA Light, Bright, Open, 4 BR, 2.5 BA . Spacious 4BR/3BA Fabulous 4 BR, 3 BA. Approx 3000 sq ft. Master on main. Fantastic Kitchen. Expansive, level yard Gourmet Kitchen, Island, Butlers Pantry, 2 story Great w/deck, patio, water feature/fire pit. 2900 +/- Sq ft. Home Room, Double sided Fireplace, Screened Porch w/Vaulted Warranty. Pool Membership. Ceiling, Deck and large, landscaped yard.

Contact: Nancy McCrory | 864.505.8367 The Marchant Company

Contact: Mary Hartpence | 864.915.0111 JOY Real Estate

STILLWOOD @ BELLS CROSSINGS

TWIN CREEKS

300 AMBERLEAF WAY . $257,000 . MLS# 1278798

126 YOUNG HARRIS DRIVE . $214,900 . MLS# 1278890

4BR/3.5BA Fabulous Five Forks. Three Story Traditional, yet very modern, 2809 square feet. Amazing Gourmet Kitchen, Morning Room, Fireplace, Office w/ French Doors, Large Master Suite, O’sized Deck, Large Level Yard.

3BR/2.5BA Only 6 months young, with all the latest features, and Energy Star Certified. Large loft area, level backyard, granite counters, and more! Visit GreenvilleMoves.com for even more!

Contact: Mary Hartpence | 864.915.0111 JOY Real Estate

Contact: Cameron Keegan | 864.238.7109 RE/MAX Moves

48 THE JOURNAL | MAY 9, 2014

LAURENS $295,000 MLS#1274390 4BR/2.5BA 1925 Colonial landmark with detached building used as a shop and 3.06 acres in Chestnut Ridge. Several tasteful updates!

LAURENS 210 Hillbrook Road $230,000 Beautiful 2800 +/- square foot home on 1.9 acres is nestled in exquisite privacy and has so much to offer and all on one level.

GRAY COURT $335,000 MLS#1272490 3BR/3BA. Beautiful custom home on 2.43 acres nestled in the quiet countryside. Many upgraded features. Short drive from Greenville.

MAIN ST., LAURENS $400,000 MLS#1270944 4BR/4BA. Historic elegance in this 1892 Victorian home, immaculately maintained on a 2.57 acre lot in downtown Laurens. A must see!

Contact: Mary Hartpence | 864.915.0111 JOY Real Estate

When you are done reading this paper, please recycle it. Jake Dickens 864.616.6005 jdickens@cbcaine.com www.cbcaine.com SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


JOURNAL HOMES

Welcome Home to

F E AT U R E D N E I G H B O R H O O D NEIGHBORHOOD INFO Directions: From I-85 or I-385 travel East on Woodruff Road (SC 146) for approximately 5 miles. Five Forks Plantation is on the left (Pawleys Drive). Turn left onto Clifton Grove Way. Model Home is on the right just before the Clubhouse.

Boulder Creek

363 Mellow Way | $349,900

4 BR/3 BA | 0.58 Acres | MLS 1275709

Schools: Monarch Elementary Beck Academy | JL Mann Academy Contact: Ryan Homes | 864.234.1497

140 Fox Farm Way | $349,900 3 BR/2 BA | 0.72 Acres | MLS 1276651

Five Forks Plantation, Simpsonville, SC Five Forks Plantation offers all brick, side entry garage homes in the prestigious Five Forks area from the mid $300s to the $600s. You’ll enjoy the country club-style amenities that include a large clubhouse with full kitchen and wrap-around porch, a junior Olympic size pool, lighted tennis courts, athletic field and a 1.3 acre scenic pond. Ryan Homes offers the quality and features you would expect in a custom home but at a much better price. Plus, every new Ryan Home is Independently Inspected to be ENERGY STAR® Certified saving over 30% on your utility costs versus standard new homes! It’s no wonder why more homeowners have trusted Ryan Homes with their largest investment than any other builder in the Upstate. Visit the decorated Brookmere model today!

Chris Stroble

REALTOR®, ABR Office: 864-416-3152 Mobile: 864-320-4062 Email: Chris.Stroble@allentate.com

PEOPLE, AWARDS , HONORS Angela Wilson Joins Berkshire Hathaway C. Dan Joyner Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS®  is pleased to announce that Angela M. Wilson joined the company and serves as a Sales Associate   at the Pleasantburg office. Wilson Wilson is a graduate of College of Charleston with a degree in Sociology.   Her fresh enthusiasm and organizational skills are extraordinary. “We are very excited that Angela has joined our family of Realtors,” said Fritzi Barbour, Broker-in-Charge.  “We look forward to working with her.” Wilson currently lives in Greenville with her children, Holden, Cate and Carolyne.  In her free time, she enjoys volunteering, cycling, reading, college football, gardening and travel.

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

MAY 9, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 49


JOURNAL HOMES

F E AT U R E D N E I G H B OR H O OD Fox Trace, Simpsonville Fox Trace is located on Neely Ferry Rd less than 2 miles from the Fairview Rd shopping area and I-385 featuring easy access to all that Greenville and Spartanburg have to offer. Adams Homes at Fox Trace offer all brick craftsman styled ranch and patio homes as well as two-story designs. We have 2 Inventory homes that are now under construction and will be ready in June/July for you to move into. Hurry in before they are gone! The 1668 plan • Stylish 3 bedroom, 2 bath ranch design features kitchen breakfast bar and dining area, large Master Suite, Master Bath with dual vanity and separate garden tub and shower.  Covered front porch and sizable covered back porch add to this plans desirability. The 1531 plan • One of Adams Homes’ most popular 3 bedroom, 2 bath ranch design boasts large laundry/mud room, kitchen breakfast bar and dining.  Large Master suite with walk in closet, double vanity, separate garden tub and shower in Master Bath.  Covered back porch.   At Adams Homes we believe the customer always comes first! We deliver real value to our customers with solid and sustainable brick construction. We are proud of our reputation for Quality, Ingenuity, and Dependability. We have found a way to design homes that live, look and feel far above their price range here in Fox Trace.

NEIGHBORHOOD INFO Pricing: from the $150’s Model Home: 101 Scottish Ave., Simpsonville, SC 29680 adamshomes.com/south-carolina/spartanburg/fox-trace Sales Associate: Marie Zoltun Model Phone: 864.963.2908 After Hours Phone: 864.386.2179 Model Hours: 11-6 Tuesday through Saturday and 1-6 Sunday and Monday To submit your Featured Home: homes@greenvillejournal.com

G R E E N V I L L E T R A N S AC T ION S A P R I L 14 - 18, 2 014 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$3,600,000 $1,675,000 $1,250,000 $1,100,000 $995,646 HUNTINGTON $790,000 $786,652 $750,000 $705,000 CLIFF RIDGE COLONY $675,000 DEERLAND PLANTATION $669,000 TUXEDO PARK $645,000 VININGS@BROOKFIELD $634,500 STONEBROOK FARMS $620,000 CLIFFS VALLEY HIGH VISTA $588,000 $563,000 PELHAM COMMONS SHOPPING CENTER $550,000

50 THE JOURNAL | MAY 9, 2014

BUYER

ADDRESS

JE PROPERTIES LLC 233 GREENVILLE LLC 4530 PARK RD STE 300 T BISHOP PROPERTIES INC CAROLINA PARTNERS LLC 800 S MAIN ST B-12 MCBEE PLAZA ASSOC A SC P GOOD WALL PROPERTIES LLC 35 BRENDAN WAY L AND B INVESTMENT PROPE SHAW RESOURCES INC PO BOX 5835 TYLAN PLANTATION PROPERT BITE ME LLC 104 N MAIN ST HUNT JULIAN C JR MOLLOY JEANNE M REVOC TR 517 HUNTINGTON RD CTC LAND HOLDINGS LLC ARTHUR STATE BANK PO BOX 2408 JACK IN THE BOX EASTERN MADECKAS PROPERTIES LLC 2 MILLBROOKE CT PURTLE HEATHER K MCKILLOP CAROLINE C (JTW 611 MCDANIEL AVE HOUSE HUDSON LEE STEPHEN E 320 CLIFF RIDGE DR VARIEUR GINA MARIE REVOC BLASENAK JASON H 2391 ROPER MOUNTAIN RD BYRNE DEBORAH C SCHULER SARA (JTWROS) 325 TUXEDO LN EJTJ LLC A SC LMTD LIAB OMS-BJ MAULDIN LLC PO BOX 24169 NEMR DANA J NANCE JOHN (JTWROS) 5 STONEBROOK FARM WAY VOLT NPL IX ASSET HOLDIN STOREN MARK P (JTWROS) 7133 KENNESAW CIR WOODSIDE JAMES ELLIS JR SCROGGINS JANA (JTWROS) 25 FONTAINE RD WASH ME AUTO WASH LLC WASH ME PELHAM LLC 105 CANNON LN

SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

OAKS@ROPER MOUNTAIN $534,900 MCRAE PARK $511,355 COLUMNS @ ROPER MTN $506,000 CLUB FOREST $497,000 HAMPTON’S GRANT $495,000 HAMMETT’S GLEN $495,000 RIVER WALK $489,000 WEATHERSTONE $485,000 CHEROKEE PARK $480,000 BARRINGTON PARK $475,000 $472,500 $470,000 BROOKSIDE FOREST FIVE FORKS PLANTATION $460,250 $440,000 WEATHERSTONE $440,000 MOUNTAIN MEADOWS $410,000 $400,000

BUYER

ADDRESS

FIRST CHOICE CUSTOM HOME CARR DEBORAH ANN (JTWROS 128 CHARLESTON OAK LN BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT CONKLIN MIRLA R (JTWROS) 101 MCRAE PL KYZER KEVIN G BOGLE KRISTIN 21 GINGER GOLD DR SCHULER SARA (JTWROS) PATEL CHETAN A (JTWROS) 215 MICHAUX DR HAMMOND LEE L ZEH JAMES B 782 E BUTLER RD APT 1403 CHAMBERS CATHERINE G BYRNE DEBORAH C (JTWROS) 502 WOODSTRACE CT O’CONNOR JAMES O DONAHUE JOHN J 4 OAK KNOB CT DE GROOT CHENEY T (JTWRO RANDOLPH MARK S (SURV) 213 BRANDAU LN CUNNINGHAM TODD M MOSS AMBER H (JTWROS) 27 KEOWEE AVE ELLENBOGEN DAVID J ELLSWORTH LYNNE D & BRYC 6 SUSSEX PL EDGEHILL LLC MCMANUS DANIEL PATRICK ( 17 BILTMORE DR ALLEN LINDA M RANDALL PATRICIA A (JTWR 114 MARSHALL BRIDGE DR NVR INC JAMMULA HARISH (JTWROS) 5 KINLAW CT ATCHLEY MICHAEL C RATYCZ ISIDORE I (JTWROS 15 GRAYWOOD CT HOWARD GERALD K HIPP THOMAS A JR 210 SWEETBRIAR RD SPENCE EDWARD D BARNETT RANDALL J 118 RUBIWOOD CIR WALKER WESLEY M JR TIMBERLAND CAPITAL INVES 301 CALVIN ST

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


JOURNAL HOMES

R E A L E S TAT E N E W S Pending Home Sales Increase in March

– After months of stagnant activity, pending home sales rose in March, marking the first gain in the past nine months, according to the National Association of Realtors®. The Pending Home Sales Index,* a forward-looking indicator based on contract signings, rose 3.4 percent to 97.4 from an upwardly revised 94.2 in February, but is 7.9 percent below March 2013 when it was 105.7. Jon Pickhardt, 2014 President of The Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® and Co-Owner of Flagship Properties and The Office Centers LLC in Greenville, SC, said a gain was inevitable. “After a dismal winter, more buyers got an opportunity to look at homes last month and are beginning to make contract offers,” he said. “Sales activity is expected to steadily pick up as more inventory reaches the market, and from ongoing job creation in the economy.” The PHSI in the Northeast increased 1.4 percent to 78.8 in March, but is 5.9 percent below a year ago. In the Midwest the index slipped 0.8 percent to 94.5 in March, and is 10.1 percent below March 2013. Pending home sales in the South rose 5.6 percent to an index of 112.7 in March, but are 5.3 percent below a year ago. The index in the West increased 5.7 percent in March to 91.0, but is 11.1 percent below March 2013. Although home sales are expected to trend up over the course of the year and into 2015, this year began on a weak note and total sales are unlikely to match the 2013 level. Existing-home sales are expected to total just over 4.9 million this year, below the nearly 5.1 million in 2013. However, with ongoing inventory shortages in much of the U.S., the national median existing-home price is expected to grow between 6 and 7 percent in 2014. The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing 1 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries. Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® represents over 1,800 members in all aspects of the real estate industry. Please visit the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® web site at www.ggar.com for real estate and consumer information. “Every market is different, call a REALTOR® today.” *The Pending Home Sales Index is a leading indicator for the housing sector, based on pending sales of existing homes. A sale is listed as pending when the contract has been signed but the transaction has not closed, though the sale usually is finalized within one or two months of signing. The index is based on a large national sample, typically representing about 20 percent of transactions for existing-home sales. In developing the model for the index, it was demonstrated that the level of monthly sales-contract activity parallels the level of closed existing-home sales in the following two months. An index of 100 is equal to the average level of contract activity during 2001, which was the first year to be examined. By coincidence, the volume of existing-home sales in 2001 fell within the range of 5.0 to 5.5 million, which is considered normal for the current U.S. population. SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

VALLEY VIEW “GOLF COMMUNITY” $395,000 CLEAR SPRINGS $385,000 CLEAR SPRINGS $378,779 COURTYARDS@W GEORGIA RD $374,775 LAKE BOLING ESTATES $354,500 CLEAR SPRINGS $348,745 VILLAS@THORNBLADE $341,500 KILGORE FARMS $332,270 BOTANY WOODS $324,900 $320,000 CARILION $320,000 $319,900 RAVINES@SPRING MILL $315,548 SHENANDOAH FARMS $309,483 WHITEHALL PLANTATION $308,000 WATERSTONE COTTAGES $305,696 COLONY SUBDIVISION $302,000 GREEN VALLEY ESTATES $302,000 JENKINS ESTATES $300,000 BOTANY WOODS $300,000 $299,900 TRAXLER PARK $298,000 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $297,363 SILVER RIDGE $295,000 VALLEY@TANNER ESTATES $294,000 WINDSOR CREEK $291,730 CROFTSTONE ACRES $286,000 $285,000 KENWOOD $282,620 WOODLAND CREEK $279,115 HEARTHSTONE@RIVER SHOALS $276,919 WEST FARM $276,442 MILL POND@RIVER SHOALS $275,777 REDFEARN $275,000 AIRPORT OFFICE PARK $275,000 VERDMONT $270,000 STONE LAKE HEIGHTS $263,000 SILVERLEAF $258,568 THE ARBORS $257,500 PELHAM FALLS $252,000 $250,000 VICTORIA PARK $249,900 BALDWIN COMMONS $247,500 ACADIA $245,000 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $244,290

BUYER

ADDRESS

KEEW AUREL PEARSON JEFFREY D 19 LAURELCREST LN BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT THOMPSON BRIAN F 104 ANGEL FALLS DR BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT FORTENBERRY ASHLEY S (JT 2 FALL BROOK CT VIRANI LLC GILLESPIE TAMMY RANAE 313 LAGUNA LN MCDANIEL KEITH L SLOAN JAMES P 120 LAKE POINT DR BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT HAWKINS MARK (JTWROS) PO BOX 1039 LONG JEAN V (L-EST) BOUKNIGHT CLARA P 1400 THORNBLADE BLVD UNIT 29 BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT WHITE GAVIN C (JTWROS) 201 CARTERS CREEK CT STONER WILLIAM H TERRY JASON C (JTWROS) 1 BOTANY RD O’NEAL VILLAGE LLC O’NEAL CDSF LLC 607 PENDLETON ST STE 200 COX DEA P BOYER JAMES GREGORY SR ( 2 RIDENOUR AVE KAPLAN JEFF PROFFER PHYLLIS J 402 OVERBROOK RD RAVINES@SPRING MILL L JOHANSEN BETTY K (JTWROS 138 GRINDERS CIR BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT ZYCHIEWICZ JASON A (JTWR 384 STRASBURG DR CLEAR GLASS MANAGEMENT L MOR GIANPAOLO 306 WINDING RIVER LN ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC SMITH DONALD D (JTWROS) 204 BRALEY CT MELTON EMILY J HOLLIDAY DERRICK W (JTWR 102 COLONY RD MILLS CHRISTOPHER A CICONE ANTHONY FRANCES T 510 FOOTHILLS RD BOX RAYMOND H NICOL ANN 239 BORDEAUX DR RMPM LLC REID CHARLOTTE JEAN (JTW 112 CHANTILLY DR GEISMAR ELIZABETH ANN WA BOLIN AMY (JTWROS) 30 BYRD BLVD TRAIL MARIAN GRACE HUTMAKER CODY A (JTWROS) 36 FRONTUS ST ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC BEAVER GARY L (JTWROS) 818 SHANDWICK DR ASHWOOD TIMOTHY C BOWEN JOHN A JR 127 N SILVER BEECH LN FLOYD PHILIP R COOPER DAVID RYAN (JTWRO 508 ABBY CIR EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL SISLER CHARLES W 332 WILLIAM SETH CT FALLAT MICHAEL A RADCLIFF CHARLES A (JTWR 107 WEDGEWOOD DR HARRISON KATHRYN V FALLAT MICHAEL A (JTWROS 208 W POINSETT ST MURFIN DEIREDRE STODDARD JAMES A (SURV) 211 BERINGER CT NVR INC TATE MILLS B (JTWROS) 208 HEDGE ROSE CT S C PILLON HOMES INC EVANS ANDREA L (JTWROS) 6 ALCOVY CT MUNGO HOMES INC ZILZ LINDA 505 CHILLINGHAM CT NVR INC GONZALEZ EVELYN JULIA ZA 212 RIO GRANDE PL SIMPSON RONNIE L JR BRADLEY ALICIA MCLEOD 1 CHESSINGTON LN TARPON LANDINGS LLC GREATER GREENVILLE ASSOC N/O/D SHADWELL PROPERTIES LLC LAIRD ANGELA C 29 CACHET CT FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG PRIESHOFF HEATHER N 132 LAKE FOREST DR MORAN IRMA C CITIMORTGAGE INC 1111 NORTHPOINT DR BLDG 4 #100 BREWER CHARLES H JR HINKLER ANNE MARIE (JTWR 12 GERMANDER CT GOFORTH AUSTIN J BLECHAR CHRISTOPHER M (J 212 ROCK RD SPINKS INVESTMENTS INC S KEOWEE VILLAGE LLC PO BOX 1929 HAYDEN SIGNATURE HOMES L DAYMON JOHN DAVID (JTWRO 2 DUNSBOROUGH DR GARRARD EDMOND B AUTEN KAREN S (JTWROS) 126 BALDWIN CREEK WAY ACADIA LLC ACADIA TOWNHOMES LLC PO BOX 8580 ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC ALLRED JERRY ANNE 603 CASTLESTONE DR

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

More home sweet homes. For more than 80 years. For more than 80 years, Caine has been the first name in Upstate real estate. Although quite a bit has changed in those eight decades, some things haven’t: like the personal service people expect from our agents. Learn more at cbcaine.com.

cbcaine.com

MAY 9, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 51


JOURNAL CULTURE

THE WEEK IN PHOTOS

LOOK WHO’S IN THE JOURNAL THIS WEEK

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Whiskey Comedy Club, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1314 Cedar Lane Road, Greenville, SC 29617. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than May 11, 2014. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Chipotle Mexican Grill of Colorado, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 4 Market Point Drive, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than May 25, 2014. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Red Lobster Restaurants, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 4295 Augusta Road, Greenville, SC 29615. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than May 25, 2014. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that CT Hotels LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 4295 Augusta Road, Greenville, SC 29605. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than May 25, 2014. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

SOLICITATIONS NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: Piney Mountain Baseball Field Renovations in Greenville County by May 29, 2014, 3:00 P.M. A pre-bid meeting and site tour will be held at 9:00 A.M., EDT, May 15, 2014 at Greenville County Procurement Services Office, County Square, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601. Solicitations can be found at http://www.greenvillecounty. org/Purchasing_Dept/Bids.asp or by calling 864-467-7200.

LEGAL NOTICES Only $.99 per line ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Only $145 tel 864.679.1205 fax 864.679.1305 email: aharley@ communityjournals.com

SUMMONS NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT CA# 2013- DR-23-4492 October 8, 2013 Jefferson Neil Jones and Tia Cook Jones, Petitioners vs. Christopher Lindsey, Katie Massengale, and Lance Preston Wayne Cannady, minor under the age of fourteen (14) years, Respondents. TO THE RESPONDENT ABOVE NAMED, CHRISTOPHER LINDSEY: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Petition in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to the said Petition on the Petitioners or their Attorney, David W. Holmes, at his office, 712 North Main Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29609, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service; and if you fail to answer the Petition with the time aforesaid, Judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Petition. April 29, 2014 Greenville, South Carolina HOLMES LAW FIRM By: David W. Holmes SC Bar #2577 ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONERS (May 9, 16, and 23)

A record 7,151 community volunteers completed more than 200 projects Saturday morning during the annual United Way Hands On Greenville (HOG) Day. Here,  employees with Fluor Corporation and O’Neal Inc. work on projects at A.J. Whittenberg Elementary School. This year, more than 200 teams comprised of representatives from area companies, organizations and church groups, as well as individuals and families, donated their time to work on projects benefiting area nonprofits, schools, parks and other community organizations. Projects included everything from landscaping and painting to neighborhood cleanups and home construction. The 20th annual event serves as the largest single day of volunteer service in the Upstate, collectively generating 28,854 hours of volunteer service.

SOLICITATIONS NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: IFB# 61-06/02/14, Huntcrest Court Circle Drainage Improvement Project, June 2, 2014, 3:00 P.M. A pre-bid meeting and site tour will be held at 9:00 A.M., EDT, May 19, 2014 at Greenville County Procurement Services Office, County Square, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org/ Purchasing_Dept/Bids.asp or by calling 864-467-7200. RFP #59-5/27/14, Westside Park Fencing Renovations for Fields #1 and #2, May 27, 2014, 3:30 P.M. A mandatory pre-proposal meeting and site tour will be held Wednesday, May 14, 2014, 10:00 A.M., E.D.T. at Greenville County Procurement Services Division, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601. RFP# 58-05/28/14, Chiller Inspections & Services, May 28, 2014, 3:00 P.M. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org/ Purchasing_Dept/RFP.asp or by calling 864- 467-7200.

Crossword puzzle: page 54

52 THE JOURNAL | MAY 9, 2014

Sudoku puzzle: page 54


JOURNAL CULTURE

THE WEEK IN PHOTOS

LOOK WHO’S IN THE JOURNAL THIS WEEK Kathy and John Jeter welcomed guests to a special farewell show at the Handlebar Listening Room, Pub & Cafe on Stone Avenue in Greenville. GWINN DAVIS / CONTRIBUTING

High school students across the Upstate competed for scholarship money and bragging rights in the Junior Achievement Titan Business Challenge recently at the Clemson University MBA Campus located in downtown Greenville. The students acted as business partners in a one-day strategy tournament using an online, real-world, interactive business simulation. The top three teams walked away with money for college or additional training after they graduate from high school.​Here, the eventual winning team, Echo Enterprises, from Landrum High School, at work during the challenge. ​ embers of a variety of faith M traditions congregated to pray for peace and justice and celebrate the diversity of our community at an interfaith gathering for the National Day of Prayer. The event, hosted by the Year of Altruism, Interfaith Forum of Upstate SC and Bon Secours St. Francis Health System, was held May 1 at the Salvation Army Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Center of Greenville.

Sam Couch teaches students about bicycle safety during a Bicycle Skills Clinic at Ellen Woodside Elementary School. A bicycle trailer was donated by Safe Kids Upstate to teach fourth- and fifthgrade students bicycle safety for the month of May.​

Stone Academy’s North Main Community Mural Project began on April 28 at Rite Aid at North Main Street and Stone Avenue. The painting will be based on Georges-Pierre Seurat’s pointillism painting “A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte.” Stone Academy visual art instructor and artist Eric Benjamin directs fifth-grade students in George Koontz’ class on how to begin painting the mural. The Crosswell Elementary S.T.E.M. Club visited Sealevel Systems Inc. recently for their monthly After School Outing. The After School Outing is an ongoing program throughout the school year and provides STEM Club students in grades three through five the opportunity to focus on the areas of teamwork, robotics, public professionalism, research and developing solutions to real-world problems.

MAY 9, 2014 | THE JOURNAL 53


JOURNAL CULTURE

FIGURE. THIS. OUT. BODY LANGUAGE

By Robin Stears

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ACROSS 1 Cold mold 6 Remove pieces from? 11 Stay-at-home ones, perhaps 15 Disappearing slope apparatus 19 Isabella, por ejemplo 20 Largest of the Cyclades 21 Peace Nobelist Wiesel 22 Poker chip collector 23 Bit of roomy footwear? 25 Fresh, in a way 26 Tiger’s ex 27 Puts away, as a dagger 28 Iron Man’s coat? 30 Escalator feature 31 Sour notes 32 “The Racer’s Edge” 35 Phoenix team, on scoreboards 36 Home to 1 billion 38 One vis-à-vis three, at times 42 Shrill morning awakener? 45 Ring of Fire danger 46 Divvy up 47 Jack up 48 Got ready to drive 49 45, e.g. 50 Dole (out) 51 Bits of holly 53 Influence unfairly

54 THE JOURNAL | MAY 9, 2014 amRAMP_CJ_RMP.indd 1

3/20/14 11:04 AM

54 Opposite of ecto55 Boat-steering tool 56 Wood stove, for one 58 Grade school quintet 59 AutoZone inventory? 65 Hawaii museum section? 67 Say “y’all,” say 68 Acapulco beaches 70 Charlottesville sch. 71 Gym series 72 Instrument played with a mallet 73 Follow orders 76 Quipsters 80 Brown, in old ads 81 1998 N.L. MVP 82 Paroxysm 83 Pago Pago’s nation 84 Airport arrival 86 Clothing store shoplifters? 89 Spotted 90 Least significant 91 Fed. auditing agency 92 Talk trash to 93 Deportment 95 Connection 97 The old one-two? 100 It joined the Union in 1876 103 Jamaican tangelo 104 Sliding __ 105 Put down a high school subject? 108 Bed board 109 Oscar winner Hathaway

110 Spanish bar servings 111 Chew the scenery 112 Now Look dolls, e.g. 113 Drain cleaners 114 Oodles 115 Less cracked? DOWN 1 Chihuahua greeting 2 Seven __ 3 Essence 4 Map of Hawaii, often 5 Falls 6 Release 7 Au naturel 8 Line in math class 9 Burgundy of film 10 Controversial flavor enhancer 11 Lifting device 12 Smith graduate 13 Got a C-plus, say 14 Sibyls 15 High-level disloyalty 16 2008 Asian Beach Games host 17 Similar (to) 18 “Seasons of Love” musical 24 Cheri of “SNL” 28 “... a grin without a cat!” thinker 29 Self-important 31 Stick with a net 32 Annoying messages 33 Domino, for one 34 Pound repeatedly

36 Berry rich in antioxidants 37 Capricious 39 Country by the River Shribble 40 Caveat __ 41 Curl around the hole’s edge without

Hard

going in, in golf lingo 43 School of the future? 44 “Stay off my turf!” 45 Sad 48 Bit of ticket info 51 Pouch 52 Ask for a hand? 53 A/C unit

54 Neurofeedback readout 55 Sugar suffix 57 Pigeonholes 58 Gasteyer of “Suburgatory” 59 Wade through 60 Hebrew leaders? 61 Turns to confetti 62 Some ESPN highlights 63 It parallels the radius 64 Unlikely derby winner 66 Wrigley Field feature 69 Increasingly sore 72 Cherished prize 74 More than half 75 Memento from a billsigning ceremony 76 “Do __ Diddy Diddy’’: 1964 hit 77 Pinged, in a way 78 Famous Amos 79 Get smart with 81 Shade of gray 82 “Presumed Innocent” author 83 Calamity causes 85 Choice morsels 86 Men of La Mancha 87 Eternal 88 Phylum or genus, e.g. 90 Sam who worked with Coach and Woody 94 Key material 95 Itinerant 96 Hayek of “Frida” 97 Evenfall 98 Look like a wolf? 99 __ Bator 100 Corrida cloak 101 “Runaround Sue” singer 102 Prefix meaning “bone” 105 Bernard and Bonaventure: Abbr. 106 Varnish ingredient 107 “__ Town Too”: 1981 hit Crossword answers: page 52

Sudoku answers: page 52


JOURNAL CULTURE

THE SYMPTOMS BY ASHLEY HOLT

The worth of the cool Over the years, with my knee-jerk rebellion in full jerk, I’ve resisted adopting any overarching philosophy of life. I don’t think the Golden Rule applies in every situation, I don’t 12-step my way towards anything and I don’t believe that the world is divided into two kinds of people. I don’t make lemonade out of life’s lemons, I don’t stop to smell the flowers and I don’t hang in there, baby. In fact, I’ve found just about any advice on how to live one’s life usually turns out to be garbage. Playing hard to get doesn’t work, and neither does taking it one day at a time. I’ve been faking it until I make it for decades, and not only did I never make it, but felt like a phony in the process. Looking back, I find there’s really only one methodology that I’ve been able to effectively apply to life’s many hassles, and that is to Be Cool. I don’t know about you, but Be Cool was the foundation of my upbringing. As a child, when tempted to run at the mouth about Batman for an hour, hack at the linoleum with a claw hammer, or set fire to the garage, my parents reminded me that Coolness was the preferable state of being. All children are taught some variation of the Be Cool philosophy: “Stop crying,” “Share your toys,” “Stop slouching,” “Don’t talk with your mouth full,” “Don’t pee your pants” and practically any other parental corrections are all part of the same admonishment: “Do not embarrass yourself or your tribe.” Be Cool. There are times when a child engages in sugar-fueled spasmastics that don’t really have a name, like rubbing Legos in her hair while bouncing on one foot and yelling, “Snoopy Poop!” over and over. A

parent faced with this kind of stupidity on aisle seven doesn’t have time to diagnose a bad behavior and suggest a more pleasant alternative. Mom just wants you to shut yer yap. Be Cool. Ironically, young people who learn to stifle such outrageous emotional displays will sometimes embrace Coolness to cartoonish extremes. After all, achieving the passionless disconnect of Optimum Cool is a waste of time if no one notices. American popular culture reflects the ridiculous stereotypes of Cool that result from this desperation; Brando in “The Wild One,” Henry Winkler on “Happy Days,” and my personal favorite, Stallone in “Cobra” (an eight-year old boy’s idea of a “cool guy” if there ever was one). The connection between these profiles in Cool is obvious, but inexplicable: leather jackets. As a young teen looking for a shortcut to Coolville, this iconography wasn’t lost on me. The one and only time in my life that shopping for clothes seemed exciting was when my father agreed to purchase a leather jacket for me. And let me tell you, the mystique of the leather jacket may have no logical explanation, but it works. I went from friendless nerd to intriguing rock star overnight with the simple application of black leather (I didn’t even need a rhinestone skull or airbrushed Iron Maiden logo on the back). Mind you, girls still avoided me, but now it was out of genuine fear rather than simple revulsion. And being feared is always cooler than being popular. A persona fueled by quiet brooding is essential to Coolness. Funny people are almost never Cool. And if they are,

they’re probably not very funny. Cool is about calm. Calm like Jesus or Gandhi or Sugar Bear. Comedy generally involves flailing and emoting, with pants around the ankles and Slim Whitman impressions. Your Cool Count plunges the instant you decide a random object might make a funny hat. Dweebs like me have developed comical personas as something to fall back on when our attempts at Cool invariably fail. This is how humorists are made. Gallagher is not Christ-like. And as we all know, the jokes Jesus included in the Sermon on the Mount totally bomb to this day. When Funny fails, Cool will likely never be regained. Your Chewbacca dance may not be worth it. And whatever you do, never play the spoons. Americans have particular difficulty in understanding Cool because Being Cool requires being unimpressed. And while the French, for example, remain unimpressed to the point of narcolepsy, Americans get excited about anything that seems somewhat larger than normal. “Shooey! Them fighter jets is LOUD!” and so on. Being continuously impressed means we spend most of our time in a state of manic desire, desperately chasing fashion trends, diet plans, lotto payoffs and careers in reality television. When it comes to popular culture, we relate best to cathartic meltdowns – screaming fits with thrown punches, personal grudges carried out in mud wrestling, or “this time it’s personal” motorcycle chases on exploding aircraft carriers. We’re tense and we’re addicted to tension. And so, forgetting what our parents taught us, we embarrass ourselves. Our

high-octane culture has us in a Red Bull tizzy, desperate for distraction from the ugly truth that we have become the Uncool. The Uncool, who are downloading Farmville apps, supersizing their Value Meals, and listening to Barenaked Ladies on Spotify. The Uncool, who are parading in public in their Crocs and jammie pants, their hair neatly gelled into fauxhawk. The Uncool, who are shouting “Family Guy” quotes into our cellphones, gunning our SUVs, and screeching at our widescreen plasma televisions when the Packers fumble. We’ve strayed far from the path of Cool, and now we’re lost in the desert with a head full of aspartame. Corrective action is required. But a nation that doesn’t know what it means to Be Cool must embark on a reeducation program. We will first do what Americans do best: We will make purchases, acquiring the talismans of Cool. We will buy the leather jackets. We will buy Miles Davis CDs. We will take up smoking, or if that doesn’t work, heroin. We will lean against brick walls, staring into the infinite void and looking sleepy. We will do what it takes to reacquaint ourselves with what it means to Be Cool. After all, I’ve always believed you got to fake it ‘til you make it. Ashley Holt is a writer and illustrator living in Spartanburg. His neurotic quirks and extreme sensitivity to broad social trends are chronicled in The Symptoms, an illustrated blog. Check out his website at ashleyholt.com.

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