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Greenville, S.C. • Friday, May 4, 2012 • Vol.14, No.18

GO-HUNT-SCAN 100 DAYS. 100 LOCATIONS.

Join us for an adventure 100 years in the making.

Your Official Guide to May 4 - August 11, 2012


DON’T MISS YOUR CHANCE TO WIN DURING A COMMUNITY-WIDE DIGITAL HUNT CELEBRATING GREENVILLE HOSPITAL SYSTEM’S CENTENNIAL. For 100 days, May 4-August 11, our QR codes will be hidden at 100 locations throughout Greenville County. Players will scan the codes, uncover GHS’ story and even win some great prizes. The more you scan, the better your chances of winning a two-year Chevy® Sonic lease from Bradshaw in Greer! Visit gohuntscan.com to sign up, view game rules and see the listings of locations.

STARTING MAY 4, SCAN YOUR WAY TO FUN AND PRIZES IN A 100-DAY DIGITAL HUNT ACROSS GREENVILLE COUNTY.

1 GO HUNT 2 SCAN 3

First, register at gohuntscan.com. Then go to as many locations as possible. Each location you visit has a special connection to the GHS story. The more locations you go to, the better your chances are to win.

Hunt each location to find the hidden QR code. Once you scan the QR code, you’ll be given a piece of our story.

After you scan the QR code, you’ll not only uncover the incredible story of GHS, but you’ll also be automatically entered to win great prizes!

SIMPLY SCAN QR CODES located on buildings and landmarks around Greenville. Each site represents a different aspect of GHS’ 100-year story – and enters you to win great prizes such as a two-year lease on this Chevy Sonic (provided by Bradshaw in Greer).

CHEVY SONIC Courtesy of Bradshaw in Greer, our grand prize is a two-year lease on a Chevy Sonic! The Chevy Sonic offers EPA-estimated 40 MPG highway, an ECOTEC 1.4L turbocharged engine, and a sleek, sophisticated appearance. The more sites you scan, the better your chances of driving away in a Chevy Sonic! HTC TABLET If your smartphone is drained from scanning so many QR codes, you could be the lucky winner who walks away with a brand new HTC tablet. Not only will you have everything you need within reach, but HTC’s quality is unmatched. So scan away and you could win a new HTC tablet! ZIKE Scan and you could win our Zike prize. The first of its kind, this hybrid scooter has seven speeds to take you all over. Explore the sights and sounds of the Upstate along the GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail—a perfect trail to test out a brand new zike!

SE E GAME DE TAILS AND PRIZES ON THE NEX T PAGE OF THIS GUIDE


DON’T MISS YOUR CHANCE TO WIN DURING A COMMUNITY-WIDE DIGITAL HUNT CELEBRATING GREENVILLE HOSPITAL SYSTEM’S CENTENNIAL. For 100 days, May 4-August 11, our QR codes will be hidden at 100 locations throughout Greenville County. Players will scan the codes, uncover GHS’ story and even win some great prizes. The more you scan, the better your chances of winning a two-year Chevy® Sonic lease from Bradshaw in Greer! Visit gohuntscan.com to sign up, view game rules and see the listings of locations.

STARTING MAY 4, SCAN YOUR WAY TO FUN AND PRIZES IN A 100-DAY DIGITAL HUNT ACROSS GREENVILLE COUNTY.

1 GO HUNT 2 SCAN 3

First, register at gohuntscan.com. Then go to as many locations as possible. Each location you visit has a special connection to the GHS story. The more locations you go to, the better your chances are to win.

Hunt each location to find the hidden QR code. Once you scan the QR code, you’ll be given a piece of our story.

After you scan the QR code, you’ll not only uncover the incredible story of GHS, but you’ll also be automatically entered to win great prizes!

SIMPLY SCAN QR CODES located on buildings and landmarks around Greenville. Each site represents a different aspect of GHS’ 100-year story – and enters you to win great prizes such as a two-year lease on this Chevy Sonic (provided by Bradshaw in Greer).

CHEVY SONIC Courtesy of Bradshaw in Greer, our grand prize is a two-year lease on a Chevy Sonic! The Chevy Sonic offers EPA-estimated 40 MPG highway, an ECOTEC 1.4L turbocharged engine, and a sleek, sophisticated appearance. The more sites you scan, the better your chances of driving away in a Chevy Sonic! HTC TABLET If your smartphone is drained from scanning so many QR codes, you could be the lucky winner who walks away with a brand new HTC tablet. Not only will you have everything you need within reach, but HTC’s quality is unmatched. So scan away and you could win a new HTC tablet! ZIKE Scan and you could win our Zike prize. The first of its kind, this hybrid scooter has seven speeds to take you all over. Explore the sights and sounds of the Upstate along the GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail—a perfect trail to test out a brand new zike!

SE E GAME DE TAILS AND PRIZES ON THE NEX T PAGE OF THIS GUIDE


celebrating 100 years of Greenville Hospital System Over the past century, GHS has been defined by stories of healing compassionately, teaching innovatively and improving constantly. And with help from the families and individuals in the upstate community, our stories are finally being brought to life. Your story is our story, so let’s tell it together. We can’t tell our story without you, so share your GHS story at ghs.org/100years.

Want to learn more about our centennial stories?

Habitat for Humanity

Look for our book, Transformation: The Story of Greenville

of our Habitat for Humanity home. Thanks to our many

Hospital System University Medical Center. Written by Dave

volunteers and donated materials, the new home is

Partridge and Fay Towell, Transformation tells the story

being constructed for a family in Taylors. As the largest

of the people and progress, changes and challenges that

healthcare system in the state, we’re committed to

shaped both GHS and the communities it served for 100

building a better life for the Upstate. To learn how

years—and will continue to serve for the next century. Pick

you can contribute your time, talent or treasure to

up your copy at any GHS Hospitality Shop, Upcountry History

GHS’ Centennial Habitat for Humanity Project, visit

Museum or any Greenville County Library System branch.

ghsgiving.org/habitat.php.

Witness our story unfold this June with the dedication

120129


This Furman program is helping high schoolers turn their college dreams into reality. PAGE 8

GREENVILLEJOURNAL Greenville, S.C. • Friday, May 4, 2012 • Vol.14, No.18

CHURCHILL, JUNG AND LAFAYETTE ARE COMING TO TOWN... FOR THE CHAUTAUQUA FESTIVAL, THAT IS. PAGE 34

THE LAST LEG Greenville says goodbye to the USA Cycling Championships after a seven-year run. PAGE 19

Urban farming and garden tours: the next big thing PAGE 10

Senators DeMint and Graham vote ‘No’ on the Violence Against Women Act.

a

New provisions to the “well-intentioned” act violate states’ rights, DeMint says. PAGE 20

Will penguins fall backwards if they look up?

Zoo Camp 2012

S R E T S U B Y TH TRUTH OR MYTH ANIMAL M

Children ages 3 to 14 are invited to join us at the zoo as we learn animal truths or myths! Camps begin June 11, 2012. For more info, call 864-467-4850 or visit us online at www.greenvillezoo.com.


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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

WORTH REPEATING THEY SAID IT

“It was always meant to be a two-year commitment, but it lasted seven years.” Chris Aronhalt, managing partner at Medalist Sports, on May 2012 being USA Cycling Professional Championships’ last race in Greenville.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“He thought vegan was a planet.” Server Conor Gaffney, on Frank Ferrante’s (star of the documentary “May I be Frank”) first reaction to the vegan restaurant Café Gratitude. The film will be shown at Unity Church of Greenville in Taylors. See page 38 for a list of showtimes.

50,000 Number of people the annual USA Cycling Professional Championships has drawn.The event features time trial and road races that weave through downtown Greenville and have featured hometown pro George Hincapie and multiple wins by Dave Zabriskie.

1879

Frank Ferrante before (left) and after getting healthy on a vegan diet.

Year the Cannon family began its funeral home business. After selling their business to a Louisiana company several years ago, the Cannons are returning to the industry with Simpsonville’s Heritage Funeral Home.

43

“We’ve got to use them. You’ve got to get out of your house. You need to come down and try out the cars.” Bradford Swann, General Electric government relations specialist, on Greenville’s new electric vehicle (EV) car-sharing program.

“Violence against women is intolerable and victims deserve help, (but) these needs are best met at the state and local level.”

Number of artists whose works will be on display at Centre Stage in Artisphere’s Artists of the Upstate exhibit until June 19. Artists were required to live within a 35-mile radius of Greenville to submit work.

Sen. Jim DeMint, explaining his “no” vote on the Violence Against Women Act.

“Things haven’t been easy, but I don’t look at things I’ve gone through as obstacles. They’re life lessons. I’m looking to the future. The only thing dwelling on the past will do is keep you from moving forward.” Berea High senior Norsaahad Dillard, on the obstacles she overcame to be able to attend college this fall.

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MAY 4, 2012 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL 3


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OPINION

VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

Haley may have to pout and bear it When a politician says he’s acting to “keep politics out” of something, it’s a clear signal politics are heavily involved. So it was with the amended House bill the state Senate approved last week to allow candidates for governor to pick their running mates, doing away with separate tickets for governor and lieutenant governor. The House has proposed this constitutional amendment for years, only to see the bill die in the Senate. Nikki Haley made the reform a priority last year in her first legislative session as governor. This may explain her vocal displeasure when the Senate finally passed the bill 34-1 – effective at the 2018 election. The amendment (one of two) to H. 3152 was the work of Sen. Jake Knotts, who vowed to filibuster the bill if anyone deleted his change. He told The State newspaper he wanted to “take politics out of it” by removing Haley from the equation and allowing people to vote “based on what’s good for the state of South Carolina” rather than a specific governor. This from a man who called Haley – an Indian-American – a “raghead” during the 2010 campaign. (He later apologized for his “joke.”) Haley raced to her Facebook page to blast senators for adopting a reform they knew was her top priority “only to say, ‘oh, no, we don’t want the girl to have it. We want to wait until 2018.’” This from a woman who traveled the state last fall distributing graded report cards for every member of the General Assembly, calling out individual lawmakers for their performance on her goals, not their own. Oh yes, politics were heavily involved in that Senate vote. Even so, Haley’s response serves Knott’s case more than her own. Rather than rejoice that the Senate has finally embraced a reform decades overdue, she rages that she won’t get to use it. She has a point, but it’s a petty one. What’s important is the chance this gives voters – if the House goes along with the Senate’s changes – to enact a reform with the potential to make the lieutenant governor more than a powerless placeholder, and thus less likely to behave in ways embarrassing to the state. Consider the examples set by our last two powerless placeholders. First we suffered eight years of Andre Bauer, who scattered speeding tickets like gum wrappers, frightened a police officer into drawing a gun at a traffic stop and famously equated giving free school meals to poor children with feeding stray animals. Then, in 2010, came Ken Ard, who resigned the same day he was indicted for misusing campaign funds and inventing fake campaign donors to imply widespread support. The consequence of that debacle – the forced elevation of former Senate Pro Tempore Glenn McConnell to Ard’s vacated post – prompted the second Senate amendment to H. 3152: should the office become vacant, the governor would appoint a lieutenant governor with the Senate’s consent. The House should be able to live with those changes, if it means finally giving voters the chance to elect the governor and lieutenant governor as a team. Teammates work together toward common goals. And gubernatorial candidates are bound to choose better running mates than those who self-select for a job that has no history of being a springboard to the governor’s mansion. If waiting until 2018 is the price to get this overdue reform on the ballot, then Haley will just have to pout and bear it.

Connecting the Christian community Many churches are too internally focused. Each of these churches does good work, but the fruits of their labor are limited because their resources are limited and their vision of “the kingdom work” is too small. Most business leaders spend a lifetime chasing success, but never give equal time to achieving significance. The goal of fiscal success is their only mission. Nonprofit ministries struggle with fundraising, while the community’s limited awareness prohibits their ability to reach their potential in actually being able to serve many and spread the gospel. This is where Greenville Connect comes in. Greenville Connect brings together Christian business leaders, Christian church leaders and Christian nonprofit ministries so each of us can see where Christ is working in our community and join him. Greenville Connect challenges churches to partner with other churches, business leaders to evangelize and non-profit ministries to widen their awareness to make a bigger difference in our community. So churches get outside those church walls, business people get out from behind their desks and nonprofits wake up to a network for greater good. And that is what Christ implores us to do. He is quite specific in his teaching to us and what his demands are for us as Christians. In Matthew 25, he compares us to his sheep and wants us to store our treasures in heaven by feeding the poor, clothing the naked, visiting the prisoners, taking care of the widows. In other words, we are to look after the least in our community. It is time that Christians in Greenville start living that challenge. Let our hearts be broken by the things that break God’s heart. Noted American evangelical Christian minister and author Rick Warren said that “the First

IN MY OWN WORDS by TIM BRETT

Reformation was about creeds; this one’s going to be about our deeds. The first one divided the church; this time it will unify the church.” Greenville Connect is about helping as well as leading in that regard. Every November, we coordinate the Boxes of Love project, which provides all the trimmings of a complete holiday meal for a family of six to more than 6,000 Upstate residents. Each organization, or distributing entity, offers its neediest area residents flyers that can be redeemed for a box of food at that church or agency. Because the meal offers only temporary sustenance, the ultimate goal of Boxes of Love is to provide recipients the opportunity to talk with leaders at the distributing entity and thus potentially build long-term relationships with them through love, faith and sharing. That ties back into what Greenville Connect is about. We want to be the group that is bringing people together. We want to lead by Christ’s example. Every third Tuesday of the each month, Greenville Connect participants share lunch, meet new friends and listen to program speakers talk about what they are doing. You may participate by simply registering via email at info@greenvilleconnect.org and reserving a seat. Your first lunch is on me. Learn more about Greenville Connect and these luncheons by going to www.greenvilleconnect.org. Tim Brett is the chairman of the board of directors for Greenville Connect and chief executive officer of Complete Public Relations.

IN MY OWN WORDS FEATURES ESSAYS BY RESIDENTS WITH PARTICULAR EXPERTISE WHO WANT TO TELL READERS ABOUT ISSUES IMPORTANT TO THEM. THE JOURNAL ALSO WELCOMES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR (MAXIMUM LENGTH OF 200 WORDS). PLEASE INCLUDE ADDRESS AND DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER. ALL LETTERS WILL BE CONFIRMED BEFORE PUBLICATION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT ALL LETTERS FOR LENGTH. PLEASE CONTACT SUSAN SIMMONS AT SSIMMONS@GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM.

4 GREENVILLE JOURNAL | MAY 4, 2012


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opinion voices from your community, heard here

Artisphere promises art, food, music and fun Continually lauded by attendees and national arts publications alike, Artisphere has solidified its position as one of the top fine arts shows in the country and has become a highly anticipated cultural celebration for our community. Once again, this year’s event will attract tens of thousands of people who are eager to spend a weekend immersed in spectacular visual arts, mesmerizing musical performances and the liveliness of one of the “Best Main Streets in America.” Artisphere prides itself on contributing to the already thriving arts community in Greenville, which would not be possible without a strong base of donors and sponsors alike, such as our festival’s presenting sponsor, TD Bank. Likewise, the festival would not come off so successfully were it not for our Arts Partners – the 600-plus volunteers from local arts nonprofit organizations who work behind the scenes to pull off the event and enhance the patron experience. At the festival, Arts Partners manage a variety of vital tasks, including sales, concierge services and “booth sitting” for artists when they need a break. In recognition of their hard work, Artisphere has annually donated a portion of event proceeds to their respective organizations. Since the inception of the Arts Partner program in 2006, Artisphere has contributed more than $100,000 to these volunteer organizations. This year’s festival, which will take place May 11-13, will expand upon Artisphere’s always diverse programming and continue the festival’s tradition of providing a colorful, exciting weekend. In addition to Artisphere’s core attraction, Artists Row, activities include performance stages featuring regional and local performing arts groups, the Kidsphere craft activity station, two indoor exhibits spotlighting local artists and some of the region’s

GYN Surgery at the Speed of Life.

in my own words by scott mcmillan

top galleries, and a culinary arts café that highlights some of Greenville’s favorite restaurants. Several new attractions will be added this year, including a wine tasting, an art auction gallery and art classes for kids and adults. We invite you to take part in this year’s event as many people and organizations have worked zealously to create an action-packed arts weekend for the city we all want to see prosper. Although last year’s festival was a very memorable show, Artisphere 2012 will include new elements to stimulate the senses and capture the imagination. The presence of a strong arts scene has a huge impact on the community and its ability to attract tourists. Artisphere has successfully driven tourism since its beginning and every year it has grown, increasing both its size and the diversity of its arts offerings. This year, the festival will feature 120 artists from 26 states nationwide, as well as one international artist. However, Artisphere strives to be more than just a successful event – it strives to have a positive impact on our local community by enhancing our quality of life and helping to promote economic prosperity. I hope you will join me in supporting this year’s event and celebrating the many cultural offerings Greenville has to offer its residents and visitors. Scott McMillan is a principal at Design Strategies and president of the board of directors of Artisphere. He also serves on the board of directors for Michael’s Way, the Cancer Society of Greenville County and Camperdown Academy.

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Graduates at one college in Columbia will get their commencement words of wisdom from a Clinton. But it’s not the college you would think. Former President Bill Clinton will deliver the commencement address at Columbia College Saturday, while students at the University of South Carolina will hear National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration administrator Jane Lubchenco, JPMorgan Chase Midwest Chairman Glenn Tilton, U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission and former South Carolina Superintendent of Education Inez Tenenbaum and South Carolina historian Walter Edgar. USC tried to get U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates but they did not accept invitations this year, USC Student Body President Kenny Tracy told The State newspaper. “You shouldn’t just settle because you couldn’t get a Clinton,” said an editorial in the Daily Gamecock, USC’s student newspaper.

BOB JONES UNIVERSITY May 4 Founder’s Memorial Amphitorium Speaker: individual student testimonies

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USC commencement speakers have included former NBC News anchor Tom Brokaw and U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor. The school also had President Bush in 2003. USC alumnus Andrew Card was Bush’s chief of staff. “They’re all extremely interesting and exciting,” said the board’s secretary Amy Stone, who is in charge of bringing in the speakers for the first time, told the Daily Gamecock. “I hope students and others will hold further comments until they hear their address. Give a little time, do a little listening, do a little research.” Competition to land big names is fierce. Some schools turn to speaker’s bureaus to land a prominent speaker. Others turn to alumni and private jets. And other schools forego the competition altogether and turn to their own president or members of the graduating class to give the commencement address. Wofford College used to invite outsiders to address the graduates, but then one of its graduating classes requested that then-President Joe Lesesne speak at graduation. The school’s president has done so ever since. “We want commencement to be more about the students rather than a celebrity,” said Wofford spokeswoman Laura Corbin. Wofford’s president, Dr. Bernie Dunlap, is sought after as a speaker by groups nationwide. Since 2003, Furman has only had one outside speaker, President Bush in 2008. In other years, the school has selected

a student to give the address. The student is chosen from among about 20 seniors who apply for the honor. They must submit a speech and are judged on its appropriateness, poise and delivery style. “In the past when we had outside speakers, we had some that were really good and some that were not so good,” said Furman spokesman Jim Stewart. “Some of the students felt disconnected from the speakers.” This year, though, former U.S. Secretary of Education and South Carolina Governor Dick Riley will give the commencement address. A student will also give a speech, he said. Riley, called one of Furman’s most distinguished alumni, is also the school’s outgoing board president. “We want to recognize his service and what he’s done for Furman,” Stewart said. Converse College asks for input from alumnae and the senior class before its senior administration issues an invitation to a speaker. This year’s speaker is Molly Barker, founder of the Girls on the Run program that now has chapters in more than 190 cities. Barker is a four-time Hawaii Ironman triathlete who used her background in social work, counseling and teaching, along with research on adolescent issues, to develop the program geared toward developing self-esteem in girls. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@greenvillejournal.com.

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Alumni connections, university jets help land speakers at some colleges; others turn to their own for words of wisdom

CLEMSON UNIVERSITY May 11 Littlejohn Coliseum Speaker: Greenville businesswoman Minor Mickel Shaw CONVERSE COLLEGE May 19 Twichell Auditorium Speaker: Girls on the Run founder Molly Barker

FURMAN UNIVERSITY May 5 Paladin Stadium Speaker: Dick Riley, former South Carolina governor and U.S. secretary of education and current chairman of the Furman board of trustees GREENVILLE TECH May 8 Bi-Lo Center Speaker: Greenville Tech President Dr. Keith Miller

NORTH GREENVILLE UNIVERSITY May 3 Turner Chapel Speaker: Henry T. Blackaby, founder of Blackaby Ministries International SPARTANBURG COMMUNITY COLLEGE May 5 Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium Speaker: U.S. Rep. Trey Gowdy

SPARTANBURG METHODIST COLLEGE May 4 Bridges Arena Speaker: Dr. James Ron Faulkenberry, dean of the School of Education at Francis Marion University UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA May 3-4 Colonial Life Center Speakers: Former South Carolina Superintendent of Education Inez Tenenbaum, Administrator of the National Oceanic

and Atmospheric Administration Jane Lubchenco, Chairman of JP Morgan Chase Midwest Glenn Tilton and South Carolina historian Walter Edgar USC UPSTATE May 1 On the Quad Speaker: U.S.C. Board Chairman Emeritus Herb Adams WOFFORD COLLEGE May 20 Front lawn of Main Building Speaker: Wofford President Benjamin Dunlap


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Furman program helps high school students turn college dreams into reality By Cindy Landrum | staff

Desiree LaFreniere knew college was a possibility. She just didn’t think it was a possibility for her. Money was – and still is – a problem for her family. Her mother struggled with job stability. When she could, she worked multiple jobs to put food on the table for Desiree and her two brothers and sisters. The family moved 12 times in eight years and was homeless the summer before Desiree’s freshman year of high school. That summer, Desiree LaFreniere, a high school student she worked the helped by Bridges to fields with mi- a Brighter Future. grant workers She will attend picking toma- Winthrop in the fall. toes, green peppers and squash. “Finishing high school was a joke at that time,” she said. “There was so much I wanted to do but I knew I wouldn’t get there because of where I was.” But LaFreniere will graduate from high school later this month and will attend Winthrop University in the fall, thanks to Bridges to a Brighter Future, a comprehensive college access program at Furman University for high school students whose “potential outdistances their cir-

8 Greenville Journal | MAY 4, 2012

cumstances,” said Tobi Swartz, director of the program. Bridges is one of 10 college access programs cited in a national independent study, “A Blueprint for Success: Case Studies of Successful Pre-College Outreach Programs.” Bridges to a Brighter Future

students’ lives,” Swartz said. It doesn’t end when summer’s over. Bridges staffers visit students at their high schools during the school year. Students also attend a monthly Saturday College, where they are tutored, receive college-planning help and network with other pro-

“We keep track of them. It’s the idea that there’s one person out there who cares about them and wants them to succeed.” Tobi Swartz, right, director of the Bridges to a Brighter Future program

began in 1997 after a Greenville woman read a news magazine article about a program that helped close the gap between college dreams and reality for economically or culturally challenged students and gave an anonymous donation to start the program at Furman. Each year about two dozen high school freshmen are chosen for the program. They must have 3.0 grade point averages or better, come from low-income families and have clean disciplinary records. For the next three summers, the students are invited to spend four weeks at Furman, where they experience a taste of campus life, take academic enrichment classes, go on field trips and visit colleges. “I know it really sounds cliché, but it’s a program that literally changes

gram participants. “We keep track of them,” said Swartz. “It’s the idea that there’s one person out there who cares about them and wants them to succeed.” Students must maintain their grades and clean disciplinary record to stay in the program. Swartz credits Bridges’ success – 100 percent of students who stay in the program earn a diploma and 95 percent enroll in college or join the military – to its unique culture and family atmosphere. “The students are committed to and connected with the program. It’s not just something they go to during the summer,” she said. “It becomes a part of their family, a part of their lives.” Many of the students don’t think they’ll be able to go to col-

lege, Swartz said, believing that the circumstances of their lives would prohibit that. The obstacles they have to overcome can seem huge. One student who went through the program had to work to support his entire family. Another student, whose mother was a drug addict and jailed, lived in a house that rarely had food and often no electricity. Before they got into the program, many thought of attending college as something other people did. Casey Crisp – now assistant director over Crossing the Bridge, which provides support to Bridges’ students during college – went through the program herself. Crisp lived with her dad, who owned his own business in Greenville. A car accident left him with severe back injuries that prevented him from working. Crisp graduated from Furman before taking the Bridges job. Norsaahad Dillard, a senior at Berea High, always told people she was going to college. But she never believed it. “I thought college was for rich people,” said Dillard, who was taken into Department of Social Services custody when she was six and lived in foster care for three years before moving in with her mother. Dillard – who left home at 4 a.m. one Saturday to walk to

Tobi Swartz, right, director of the Bridges to a Brighter Future program, with Norsaahad Dillard, one of the students who participated in the program. Dillard – who left home at 4 a.m. one Saturday to walk to Greenville Tech to take the ACT college entrance exam – will attend Berea College in Kentucky in the fall.

Greenville Tech to take the ACT college entrance exam – will attend Berea College in Kentucky in the fall. She wants to major in social work and communication. “Things haven’t been easy, but I don’t look at things I’ve gone through as obstacles. They’re life lessons,” she said. “I’m looking to the future. The only thing dwelling on the past will do is keep you from moving forward.” Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@greenvillejournal.com.


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Saluda Mountains Passage opens to the public By CHARLES SOWELL | staff

The Saluda Gap is surprisingly narrow where Joel Poinsett’s famous road from Columbia to the North Carolina state line crosses the Saluda Mountains. Hidden from public view since the Greenville Water System created the watershed surrounding Poinsett Reservoir, it is now easily accessible on the Saluda Mountain Passage of the Palmetto Trail system, which was opened to the public on the last Saturday in April. If the gap itself is unimpressively narrow, the trail more than makes up for that with photographic delights at almost every bend – if the hiker is willing to go slow enough to notice things like the frosty litter of dropped blossoms beneath the holly trees making ready for this winter’s crop of scarlet berries. Pink lady slipper orchids dot the edges of the trail leading to the 2,400-foot ridge that makes up the summit of Vance Mountain. The higher you go, the more diverse the blossoms.

May 4

Solomon’s seal and the last of this year’s crop of Catesby’s trillium wink and nod at the traveler along the high dry mountain’s peak. “That gap is where all accounts say Joel Poinsett ended the South Carolina portion of the road from Columbia,” said Mann Batson, a Travelers Rest historian. “It was the best gap (along the Blue Ridge Escarpment) and had been heavily used prior to European settlement by the Cherokee.” The Saluda Mountains Passage is the second part of the Poinsett Reservoir Passage and continues the trail system that starts at Nature Conservancy property at the foot of Hogback Mountain and hugs the North and South Carolina state line along the border with the Poinsett Watershed. The 9.1-mile section has trailheads at Talisman Camp in Zirconia, N.C., and Orchard Lake Campground in Saluda, N.C. The trailhead at Orchard Lake will directly connect the new section to the Poinsett Reservoir Passage. The new section is available to the public as of Saturday, April 28. For safety and property maintenance, hikers are asked to park

only in designated lots. Poinsett Watershed covers 19,000 acres and is considered one of the most significant tracts of wilderness in the state. Clemson botanist Patrick McMillian has recorded dozens of rare and endangered species within the watershed’s boundaries. From Orchard Lake Campground, the trail heads west along Orchard Lake, Mine Mountain and Mountain Page roads for 2.8 miles to a trail kiosk at the state line. The trail turns north and enters the forest for 1.6 miles. It climbs 500 feet up a ridgeline through a series of switchbacks and stairs. From there, it merges with the unpaved Heatherly Heights Road and travels southwest for .9 miles before re-entering the forest. For the next 3.5 miles the trail follows the ridges southwest through the Saluda Mountains along the state line until it reaches Old US Highway 25. The Talisman Camp parking area is a .4-mile walk along Gap Creek and Anders Roads. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@greenvillejournal.com.

Stone stairs form part of the newly opened Saluda Mountain Passage.

PH YSICIAN UPDATE

GHS welcomes these new physicians! Geriatrics Neerja Arya, M.D. Laurie Theriot Roley, M.D. Center for Success in Aging 255 Enterprise Drive, Ste. 101 Greenville, 454-8120

Internal Medicine Diane Eugenio, M.D. Daniel Smith, M.D. Cypress IM–Greer 325 Medical Pkwy., Ste. 200 Greer, 797-9550 S. Meg Carter, M.D. Cypress IM–Maxwell Pointe 3907 S. Highway 14 Greenville, 675-1491

Joint Replacement Brandon Broome, M.D. Steadman Hawkins Clinic of the Carolinas 200 Patewood Dr., Ste. C100 Greenville, 454-SHCC (7422)

Neurology Kathleen McConnell, M.D. Neuroscience Associates 200 Patewood Dr., Ste. B350 Greenville, 454-4500

Pediatrics Beverly Ellington, M.D. Pediatric Associates–Easley 800 N. A St. Easley, 855-0001 Jane Gwinn, M.D. Pediatric Pulmonology 200 Patewood Dr., Ste. A300 Greenville, 454-5530

Manisha Patel, M.D. Pediatric Cardiology 200 Patewood Dr., Ste. A200 Greenville, 454-5120

Physical Medicine Leland Berkwits, M.D. Upstate Medical Rehabilitation 111 Doctors Drive Greenville, 797-7100

Surgery Anita Patt, M.D. UMG Breast Health Center 200 Patewood Dr., Ste. A14 Greenville, 454-2224

Urology Kelly Maloney, M.D. Charles Marguet, M.D. UMG Regional Urology– Cross Creek 11 Park Creek Dr. Greenville, 797-7450 Note: This new office combines the Memorial Court and Medical Ridge practices, which are now closed; the Easley and Parkway offices remain open.

ghs.org

John Siddens, D.O. UMG Plastic Surgery & Aesthetics 200 Patewood Dr., Ste. B480 Greenville, 454-4570

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MAY 4, 2012 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL 9


journal community

Greenville Urban Farm Tour grows in second year

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Thanks to a burgeoning national urban farming movement and interest in safe, sustainable and organic food, more city residents are taking up hoe and trowel to grow their own food. Any urban farmer wannabees – or those who just want a few tips on cultivation – have 31 chances to see how it’s done on the second annual Greenville Urban Farm Tour coming up Saturday, May 12. Hosted by the Greenville Organic Foods Organization (GOFO), the tour features 31 sites where city residents are growing their own vegetables and fruit, catching rainwater for watering and raising chickens – and all are willing to share how they did it. At one of the new stops on this year’s tour, Pat and Shirley Connelly have integrated beautiful landscaping with an ever-expanding vegetable and fruit garden. The couple moved to Greenville in 2011 from Beaver Creek, Ohio, and quickly began to cultivate their urban growing space on Paris Mountain. “We’ve always liked to garden and grow our own food,” Shirley Connelly said. The couple took the tour last year and gained inspiration from the places they stopped, she said, finding valuable information for gardeners and farmers of all levels from people willing to share successes and failures.

Greenville gardener Oliver Earle smells a horseradish plant from his garden. Earle’s Sullivan Street garden is part of GOFO’s second annual Urban Farm Tour. This year, 31 sites are included in the self-guided tour on Saturday, May 12.

Standing among the asparagus, cabbage, onion, lettuce, kale, carrots, cantaloupe, watermelon and more, husband Pat said they wanted to experiment with augmenting the terraced landscape on their steep lot. With the addition of a retaining wall, there’s now a spacious vegetable garden at the side of the house and fruit trees and plants in the backyard and perimeter. Pat Connelly said he wants tour-goers to realize that it is possible to combine the two types of landscaping. “Some people think they’re incompatible, but I want people to think, ‘Gee, this blends in nicely with the landscaping.’ You

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GREG BECKNER / STAFF

can have both and you can do it any way you want.” At another stop, Richey Lancianese, who has been gardening most of his life, will be talking about the birds and the bees. A beekeeper for 10 years, he will show off his four beehives, talk about beekeeping and demonstrate how the honey is gathered. Lancianese will also talk about keeping chickens and how the birds complement an urban garden: his produce fertilizer and three to four eggs a day. Lancianese has what he calls a “utilitarian” coop that he fills with leaves, grass clippings and food scraps, allowing the chickens to serve as composters. When he turns the rich soil inside the coop, the clucking hens dive to scoop up grubs and earthworms. Lancianese also has raised beds where he’s growing 350 hardneck garlic bulbs along with Swiss chard and lettuce. The shady yard also had fig and plum trees and blueberry bushes. He says he is happy to share his knowledge with those on the tour. “People are concerned about where their food comes from and the rising cost of food,” he said. And just off Augusta Road is what Oliver Earle calls his “farm.” Raised on a

from vermicomposting and green home building to beekeeping and raw foods. For those who really want to reduce their carbon footprints, this year’s tour offers bicycle tours led by Bikeville volunteers. The two-hour tours will visit up to six urban farm sites, traveling on bikefriendly streets and greenways. Tourists who want to meet more urban farmers and help GOFO raise funds can attend the pre-event gala and concert featuring food, drink and music by The Hoodoo Hounds at Zen on Thursday, May 10.

Earle has a well-established garden with sections for vegetables, flowers and a variety of unusual plants. Earle also has a large number of plants and trees in containers he sells.

large farm in Seneca, Earle has lived in Florida and California and has been in Greenville for the past 15 years. Earle’s farm, just a year old since he relocated, is filled with vegetables, herbs and flowers. Earle’s specialty is propagation. Pots are scattered throughout the yard and resting on tables. Transplanted from his former space are collard trees: towering plants with collard-like leaves that are popular in California, he says. In addition, he has

a variety of unusual plants like comfrey, wormwood, rue, apple mint, strawberry popcorn and kohlrabi. Earle has worked as a cement finisher, landscaper and nursery worker, and now spends his days working at his farm. “You’ve gotta love this. You don’t make any money doing it,” he said. In between stops, tourists can visit the GOFO headquarters on Washington Street for 16 workshops on everything

Contact April A. Morris at amorris@greenvillejournal.com.

SO YOU KNOW What: Second Annual Greenville Urban Farm Tour When: Saturday, May 12, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tickets: $8 for adults, $7 for groups of 5 or more, free for children 12 and under. Available online or at GOFO offices, 1040 W. Washington St., Greenville. Advance registration required for bike tours. Visit www.greenvilleUFT.com for more information.

N E W S T H AT Y O U C A N U S E

GHS Swamp Rabbit 5K

Membership Special

Fri., May 4 • 6:30 p.m. • Gateway Park This run/walk starts and ends in Travelers Rest. On-site registration begins at 11 a.m. Fee: $11 (includes free T-shirt and block party). For more information, visit ghs.org/swamprabbit5k.

Join the GHS Life Center or PATH (Life Center and 4 YMCAs) with no initiation fee May 1-31. To learn more, visit ghs.org/path.

Skin Cancer Screening Sat., May 19 • 9-11 a.m. • Patewood Medical Campus Protect your skin by taking part in this screening. Please wear a bathing suit under loose clothes. Free; registration required. Call 1-877-GHS-INFO (447-4636) or visit ghs.org/360healthed.

Stars and Stripes Challenge Mon., May 28 • 7:30 a.m. • Downtown Greenville Bike the same course as the USA Cycling Pro Championships or enjoy a leisurely ride on the GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail while raising funds for cancer research. To register, visit p3ride.org.

Special Delivery With Greenville Midwifery Care Bring your baby into the world in the way that’s right for you and safe for your baby. At Greenville Midwifery Care, our certified nurse-midwives will give you hands-on support throughout labor and a healthy delivery. Call 455-1600 or visit greenvillemidwiferycare.com.

ghs.org

Go.Hunt.Scan This community digital scavenger hunt kicks off May 4 and takes place over 100 days at 100 sites. Grand prize is a two-year lease on a Chevy® Sonic from Bradshaw in Greer! Find out more at gohuntscan.com. 120350

MAY 4, 2012 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL 11


journal community

‘A Real Mountaintop Experience’ Y Camp Greenville’s centennial year stirs memories of its small beginnings Y Camp Greenville celebrates its 100th birthday this year. The overnight camp began with a two-week session on August 1-15, 1912, with about 30 boys in tents on the bend of the West Saluda River near Blythe Shoals, S.C. The YMCA, the Boy Scouts and the Greenville Rotary all had a role in founding the camp. Camp leaders professed the hope “that each boy will have a real ‘mountaintop experience’ in each realm of living – spiritual, mental and physical.” Since 1926, the camp, which is part of the YMCA of Greenville, has been located “high atop the Blue Ridge” on Standingstone Mountain, at the border between North and South Carolina, on land “with a commanding view of the valley, an elevation of 3,300 feet, a beautiful 150-foot falls, a place for lake of pure spring water, space for an athletic field, tennis courts and all other camp purposes,” as J. Harvey Cleveland described it. Starting with 29 acres donated by Cleveland (which included the site of Symmes Chapel, also known as Pretty Place), Camp Greenville grew to approximately 1,450 acres in upper Greenville County. It is among the highest in altitude and largest in acreage of summer camps in the nation. It has been co-ed since 1984 and is now a year-round venue for school, company and family programs for all ages. “Y Camp Greenville is one of the treasures of the Upstate,” said Camp Greenville’s Dusty Deming, “and one that has had a far-reaching impact on our community and beyond.”

12 Greenville Journal | MAY 4, 2012

Participants in a 1960s-era father-son camp listen to Sunday speaker at the Pretty Place service. Campers gather around a campfire circle at Camp Greenville in the 1930s. The campfire circle was used to educate campers in American Indian lore. Camper Mercer Burns with Camp Director Monk Mulligan proudly display bass caught in Lake Rotary at Camp Greenville. Monk was a legendary YMCA director and Y Camp Greenville director. The beachfront at Lake Rotary, showing Rotary Lodge, and diving and sliding towers, taken during the 1970s.

Summer campers at Camp Greenville make model airplanes in the 1950s.

A cabin group in front of early “hut” used in the 1920s-30s. Huts were named for the men who were early contributors and leaders at the Camp.


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

May 4

360 º H e a lt H e d u c at i o n

It’s National Blood Pressure Education Month!

Prepping for Pregnancy

Tues., May 8 • Noon-1 p.m. • Caine Halter YMCA Learn the importance of blood pressure control and how it affects your well-being. Lunch provided. Free; registration required.

Tues., May 22 • 6:30 p.m. Patewood Memorial Hospital GHS gynecologists from Piedmont OB/GYN will discuss being in the best health possible before pregnancy and ways to reduce complications and prevent birth defects. Free; registration required.

Stroke Awareness Forum Sat., May 12 • Noon-2 p.m. • Kroc Center Clinicians will discuss signs and risk factors for stroke, as well as getting treated quickly to reduce disability. Lunch provided. Free; registration required.

Don’t Have a Stroke Thurs., May 17 • Noon-1 p.m. • Sara Dobey Jones Library (Berea) Join GHS’ Gregory Gardziola, M.D., to learn signs and risk factors for stroke, along with the latest treatment options. Lunch provided. Free; registration required.

Guyology: Just the Facts

Meet the Midwife Thurs., May 24 • Noon-1 p.m. • Patewood Memorial Hospital Learn about GHS’ nurse-midwifery program and how a midwife can enhance the birthing process. Light refreshments provided. Free; registration required. To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, visit ghs.org/360healthed or call 1-877-GHS-INFO (447-4636).

Sun., May 20 • 3-4:30 p.m. • Patewood Medical Campus This program for boys in 5th and 6th grade helps ease the transition into puberty through open discussion about growth and development. Fee: $50/parent and son. To register, visit the events page at girlology.com. (note name) 120350

MAY 4, 2012 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL 13


Turn a Negative into a Positive In the business world, clients come and go. All businesses strive for perfect retention, but some things are beyond our control. Some clients go out of business, others change ownership LEE YARBOROUGH and some just don’t see the value of your service or products.

Pat Summit, who has won more college basketball games than any coach, has said, “To improve, you must make your weaknesses your strengths.” Apply this wisdom to client terminations to make negative situations, an opportunity to grow.

Jenn Webb is challenging incumbent Bob Taylor By april a. morris | staff

Greenville County residents will be casting their vote in the June primary election, choosing candidates for five County Council seats. The field of 10 candidates includes five incumbents. Among those is District 22’s current representative Bob Taylor, who will face challenger and fellow Republican Jenn Webb. Bob Taylor, elected in 2000, is currently vice chair and serves as chairman of the Finance Committee. Taylor says the most important issues facing Greenville County Taylor are planning, business

recruitment and preserving the county’s AAA bond rating. He says government transparency has been improved by a new council vote-recording rule. On recruiting business, Taylor says, “Government cannot create jobs, but it can make an area the kind of place that business wants to come to and expand in. As a member of council and the GADC [Greenville Area Development Corporation] board, I have helped to make Greenville County that kind of place.” Taylor said as chairman of the finance committee, he is “sensitive to the need to continue to provide service without tax increases, to keep government small and use sound business principles to keep our bond rating.” Unique issues facing District 22 have been largely addressed, he said, citing improvements in road repaving and flooding problems. He said the county needs to continue funding paving projects. Taylor said his knowledge of the issues, experience, education and response

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to residents qualify him for the seat. He came to Greenville in 1958 as a Bob Jones University student and stayed. He has a Ph.D. in mathematics from Clemson University and a master’s of business administration from USC. Taylor has served on the SC Reinsurance Facility Board of Governors, the Tri-County Technical College Advisory Committee, the Greenville County Election Commission, the Greenville Memorial Auditorium Board and the Greenville City Zoning Board of Appeals. Taylor will retire as dean of the College of Arts and Science at Bob Jones in May. He is married, has three children and 12 grandchildren and is a member of Hampton Park Baptist Church. Jenn Webb is a businesswoman who works with Lockheed Martin. She said she would serve as a fresh voice for her district if elected, offering new ideas on the council. Her first order of business would be to survey the entire district, asking residents for their top five

ou H en

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When your company loses a profitable client, it is a blow to all employees and it can really shake morale. How you handle it as a leader determines how your employees will view this change. There are several things you can do to turn this into an opportunity instead a failure. • Own up to your mistakes. If a client or situation was handled poorly, take ownership in the problem. Address it with the departing client and learn from it. Do not blame specific employees. Implement changes and processes to make sure that this does not happen again. • End the client relationship with dignity and ethics. Apply the golden rule and treat the old client as you would want to be treated. • Communicate. Most employees don’t understand the financial impact of a lost client. Explain what it means to your bottom line. If employees understand the effect, they can help by reducing expenses and increasing sales. Every employee has a role in the profitability of your company. • Be a strong and positive leader. Employees will look to you and feed off your reactions. If you are angry and nervous about the future, their attitudes will mimic yours. Instead, be honest but positive. • Look on the bright side. We all have clients that are good financially but may not be good for the overall wellbeing of our businesses. Although the financial aspect is felt immediately, the time saved after the termination may allow your company to grow more profitably.

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issues of concern and using the answers as a “work list.” Webb said challenges facing Greenville County include recruiting company headquarters, job cre- Webb ation, providing safe communities and government transparency. Public officials should back efforts to support entrepreneurship and support quality education, she said. Through her community connections and involvement in economic development, Webb said she “can be a voice to encourage positive growth, not just for my district, but for all of Greenville County.” Webb said she will focus on bringing new business to the county, along with encouraging entrepreneurship. “Greenville County needs to be a place that is continually focused on nurturing big ideas for bringing new business to the area as well as the growth and development of small to midsize businesses to stimulate our economy and create jobs.” Supporting police and fire departments will help to ensure safe communities, she said. She intends to be a “neighborhood voice” who will communicate with residents about such issues as rezoning, safety and others raised by constituents. Her community involvement, work experience, belief in job creation, strong family values and work ethic qualify her to represent her district, she said. Webb, her husband and two children have lived in Greenville for more than 14 years. She works with Lockheed Martin’s Field Team Operations group and maintains a Department of Defense Secret Clearance. She is a graduate of Leadership Greenville and has also served on the Commerce Club Board of Governors and Safe Harbor Board of Governors. Webb is a volunteer with the American Cancer Society and Carolina Ballet Theatre. Webb and her family are members of Brushy Creek Baptist Church. Primary elections are scheduled for Tuesday, June 12. District 22 encompasses parts of downtown Greenville and Taylors, areas along North Pleasantburg Drive and Wade Hampton Boulevard and along I-385. For a complete map of current county council districts, visit www.greenvillecounty. org/county_council. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@greenvillejournal.com.

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Greenville Family Partnership to expand Hispanic Outreach Program ship. “The child may say, ‘It’s okay for me to go to a club.’ Even though they are 16.” Because many parents do not drive unless they have to, the Greenville Family Partnership brings the workshops to them through Ana Neves, bilingual educator, and programs at Café Cultura based at the Center for Community Services. Barton said 20 to 30 parents participate on average each week. Hispanic parents typically bring their families to the workshops. While Neves works with the parents, the children get help with their homework. Neves said she talks with parents about simple steps to keep kids from drinking: not keeping alcohol in the refrigerator, not drinking in front of children and checking on their teenagers after they’ve been out with friends. Neves said the workshops have a ripple effect, and in one recent case, benefitted the entire family. One woman began to share what she learned with her husband. He later realized he was drinking too much due to depression.

By april a. morris | staff

Thanks to a recent grant, the Hispanic Outreach Program conducted by longtime anti-drug organization Greenville Family Partnership will be reaching more young people and their parents in Greenville County. Just over a year old, the program works to help Hispanic parents raising children in the United States. The program goes beyond breaching the language barrier and takes into account cultural differences pertaining to alcohol and drugs, including differing laws applying to youth. For example, the legal drinking age in Mexico, Guatemala and many Central and South American countries is 18. It’s important to have a staff member fluent in Spanish because the children often are translators for the parents and messages may not always get through, said Judy Barton, Drug-Free Communities and grants manager with Greenville Family Partner-

He came to see Neves and she offered advice on spending more time with his family, reducing his drinking and getting treatment for depression. “One beautiful thing about Latino culture is that they’re very involved in their children’s lives,” Barton said. “They drink in information and they want that information so much that it’s refreshing working with these parents. They are so engaged. They want what is best for their children, just like most parents, and they don’t hide it.” In addition to resources for parents, classes offer the children a chance to gain life skills, educational and economic training, and strategies to avoid domestic violence and substance abuse, Barton said. The next step is adding more sessions in the Berea and Greer areas, she said. The funds from the TD Charitable Foundation grant can help that to happen. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@greenvillejournal.com.

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Doug Webster, Chair of the Green Ribbon Advisory Committee, speaks at the press conference announcing the WeCar program. Behind Webster is one of the cars in the program, a Chevy Volt.

Plug in, turn on and drive out ‘Greening of Greenville’ continues with new electric car-sharing program By jerry salley | staff

Except for the bright green arrows painted on the sides, the two new cars sitting parked in the bottom of the Poinsett Parking Garage downtown seem pretty normal. Driving by, you might not even notice that they’re plugged into outlets on the wall. And for a little more than ten bucks, one of them can be yours for an hour. The electric vehicles (EVs) – a Nissan

Leaf and a Chevy Volt – are the beginning of South Carolina’s first EV carsharing program. The WeCar program, run by Enterprise Rent-a-Car, allows members to rent cars by the hour or by the day. Members can reserve the car online, then tap a membership card over a sensor in the windshield to access it. The idea, masterminded by the public-private partnership behind the Greening of Greenville initiative, is to give downtown office tenants, residents and hotel guests an alternative means of getting around the city, said Mayor Pro Tem David Sudduth at the program’s official launch last Friday. “This exciting new program not only utilizes cutting-edge technology,” Sudduth said, “but we feel it’s the right thing to do.” The initiative is also a low-risk way

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Greg Beckner / Staff

to test-drive an EV, both for individuals looking for a new car and for businesses wanting to expand their fleets. “It’s a great opportunity for businesses to understand what these cars offer without the capital investment that’s required,” noted Greenville Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Ben Haskew. EV car-sharing programs already exist in some European cities, including Paris and Amsterdam, and are in place or under development in Chicago, San Diego and other U.S. cities. “The idea of car sharing is not a new idea, but to have the first EV car sharing program in South Carolina is very exciting. It shows how we lead in the region,” Haskew said. Enterprise also plans to have another pod of WeCar EVs in place at GreenvilleSpartanburg International Airport by June, says Cheryl Rothenberger, director of business rental with Enterprise. “We’ve already had people sign up for the program with very little marketing,” said Rothenberger. “I’m excited with the response we’ve gotten from the general public and from businesses.” Enterprise, working with the Greening of Greenville partnership, has already made EVs available for regular rentals at the airport and at their Buncombe Street location downtown. The partnership, led by General Electric and including the city and county, Enterprise, GSP and Duke Energy, launched the Greening of Greenville initiative last July. One of the initiative’s goals was the creation of the world’s first EV ecosystem. An EV ecosystem is “simple math,” said Bradford Swann, who is part of General Electric’s government relations team. “Take an EV. Take an EV charger. Add them together, multiply them on a large scale, and you have an EV ecosystem.” Swann, who spoke on the EV ecosystem model at the TEDx Greenville conference in March, said the partnership faced a “chicken or the egg” dilemma: Should they install chargers first and then bring in the vehicles, or the other way around? They ultimately decided to introduce the chargers and the EVs at the same time, realizing “you have to have both to make this thing work,” he said. With the help of local businesses and property owners, the partnership installed new EV charging stations throughout the city and county. There are now more than 40 charging stations countywide. A number of companies have also committed to using

An electric-powered Nissan Leaf, part of the WeCar program, arrives on West Court Street for the press conference announcing the electric car rental program.

EVs in their fleets for six months. The EV ecosystem model is “sustainable, scalable and replicable,” said Swann, adding that Greenville has “developed a model that the rest of the country can look to to develop their own EV ecosystems.” Greening of Greenville launched in July 2011 with the stated mission to “reduce Greenville’s carbon footprint, gas dependence and CO2 emissions.” Along with the EV ecosystem project, another visible portion of the Greening of Greenville initiative is the installation of LED streetlights on the stretch of North Main St. in front of the Hyatt. A third project is the “SmartBuilding Advantage” effort to retrofit downtown buildings to maximize energy efficiency. One of Greenville’s new WeCar fleet, the Nissan Leaf, is a zero-emissions vehicle that can run an estimated 100 miles per charge. The Chevy Volt can run gas-free for about 35 miles before a gas-powered generator kicks in to recharge the battery; a full tank will carry it about 375 miles. The Environmental Protection Agency rated the Volt as the most fuel-efficient compact car with a gasoline engine sold in the U.S. Now that the EVs are here, “we’ve got to use them,” said Swann. “You’ve got to get out of your house. You need to come down and try out the cars.” For more information on the EV ecosystem, the Greening of Greenville initiative or the WeCar program, visit www.greeningofgreenville.com. Contact Jerry Salley at jsalley@greenvillejournal.com.

USA Cycling Championships moving on By april a. morris | staff

After seven years in the Upstate, the USA Cycling Professional Championships are pedaling off to another city. Officials announced this week that this is the last year that Greenville will host the event. The annual event has drawn 50,000 spectators to the time trial and road races that weave through downtown Greenville and have featured hometown pro George Hincapie and multiple wins by Dave Zabriskie, along with several races for amateurs and families. The move to another state is not due to negative factors, said Chris Aronhalt, managing partner at Medalist Sports, the company that managed the event in Greenville. The length of time that Greenville has hosted the event is unusual, he said. “That’s a very long time for the event to be in one location. The idea was to move it to different cities throughout the country.” Greenville Mayor Knox White said hosting the championships was a positive experience and said the event allowed the area to be showcased for economic purposes. “We’ve increasingly realized what an opportunity it was to bring prospects to Greenville during that weekend,” he said. “It was also just a great reason for people to come to Greenville, not just for business purposes.” In addition to the economic impact,

the event’s charity rides, the Stars and Stripes Challenge and Challenge to Conquer Cancer, raised more than $500,000 for Greenville Hospital’s Cancer Center, said Aronhalt. “There was a lot of interest to keep the event in Greenville, but also a lot of interest to bring the 2014 World Para-Cycling Championships here,” said Aronhalt. In January, officials announced that the UCI Para-Cycling Road World Championships would be hosted in Greenville, returning to the United States for the first time in 16 years. White added that the city is excited about hosting the para-cycling event and that hosting the USA cycling championships has boosted the city’s opportunities. “It also puts us in the big leagues in terms of national and international events,” he said. In a statement, USA Cycling President and CEO Steve Johnson said, “Greenville has been a remarkable host of this prestigious event for seven years, and we would like to thank the Upstate community, along with Medalist Sports and the event’s many partners, who’ve helped raise this event to new heights.” “It was always meant to be a two-year commitment, but it lasted seven years,” said Aronhalt. The 2012 championships will be held for the last time in Greenville on May 26 and 28. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@greenvillejournal.com.

MAY 4, 2012 | Greenville Journal 19


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SC Sens. vote ‘no’ on domestic violence act

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When the bill to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) came up for a vote in the U.S. Senate last week, it passed handily, 68 to 31. The “yea” votes were bipartisan, but all of the “nay” votes came from Republicans, including both senators from South Carolina, Jim DeMint and Lindsey Graham. Last Thursday was the first time VAWA, first passed in 1994, had faced any opposition in the Senate. The act, which provides grant funding to local domestic violence prevention organizations like Greenville’s Safe Harbor, was expanded this year by Senate Democrats to include provisions that many Republicans disagreed with. One new provision would add gays, lesbians and transgendered people to the list of those protected under the law. Another provision asks for an increase in visas provided to illegal immigrants who are victims of domestic violence, and a third expands protection to Native American women. While some Democrats interpret the Republicans’ opposition to VAWA as another salvo in the GOP “war on women,” DeMint and others attribute their “nay” votes to concerns over states’ rights and constitutional limits. “Violence against women is intolerable and victims deserve help, and these needs are best met at the state and local level,” said DeMint in a statement Thursday. “This well-intentioned bill goes beyond constitutional limits, forces states to surrender their ability to help

in specialized, individual ways, and fails to stop duplication and inefficiencies at federal agencies.” At press time, Graham had no statement on VAWA. Safe Harbor is grateful that the bill made it through the Senate successfully, said Julie Dunson Meredith, director of volunteers and communication. VAWA “provides vital funding for Safe Harbor’s services for victims of domestic violence as well as for other programs throughout our state and nation providing services to victims of domestic violence and sexual assault,” she said. “We … find it unacceptable that the U.S. Senators who represent South Carolina would vote against this important act.” Greenville County reported 4,179 domestic violence victims in 2009, the most among South Carolina counties, according to a study from the South Carolina Department of Public Safety. That amount includes seven domestic violence homicides, 155 victims of domestic sexual violence and 2,828 incidences of simple domestic assault. More than 36,000 victims annually report a domestic violence incident to law enforcement agencies around the state, according to the South Carolina Attorney General’s office. The office’s S.T.O.P. Violence Against Women program, established in 1996 with grant monies provided by VAWA, reports that 44 people were murdered by a household member in South Carolina in 2010. The House is expected to vote on its version of VAWA in mid-May. Contact Jerry Salley at jsalley@greenvillejournal.com.


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A registered sex offender was arrested on Sunday, April 29, after two 7-year-old girls were found in his apartment wearing wigs and makeup. At approximately 4:28 p.m., Greenville Police responded to the Mallard Cove Apartments on Villa Road, where they met the mother of one of the victims. The mother told officers that when she couldn’t find her daughter in front of their apartment, she had a “gut feeling” that the girl was inside the apartment of Clayton Thomas Jones, who was convicted in North Carolina in 2009 for taking in- Jones decent liberties with a minor. The mother knocked on the subject’s door; he answered, and when asked, denied seeing her daughter or knowing where she was. A few moments later, the mother saw her daughter and her 7-year-old friend walk from the bathroom wearing blond wigs and makeup. The mother took the two children out of the apartment and called police. Neither child was injured. Jones was arrested and charged with kidnapping.

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A shooting in the parking lot of Dollar Bill’s at 330 White Horse Road early Saturday morning left one victim with minor injuries. According to incident reports, the suspect fired a handgun while standing in the parking lot of the bar. One victim, who was also standing in the parking lot at the time, received minor gunshot injuries, while a second victim, who was sitting inside a vehicle when the suspect opened fire on it, escaped unharmed. The suspect fled the scene, but Offering the Following was later apprehended by sheriff ’s deputies at the Shemwood Cross- Jackson Services & More! ing Apartments on Shemwood Lane. Joshua Pernell Jackson, 25, of Greenville, was arrested and charged with two counts of attempted murder, and one Offering the Following Following count each of discharging a firearm into a vehicle, unlawful carry of a handgun and Services & More! More! possession of a weapon during the commission of a violent crime. He is currently being held at the Greenville County Detention Center without bond.

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Pharmacy employee robbed at gunpoint

At approximately 8 p.m. on Wednesday, April 25, an employee of the CVS Pharmacy at 3218 W. Blue Ridge Drive was the victim of an armed robbery. Greenville County Sheriff ’s Office officials say a white male suspect wearing a black baseball cap and gray hooded sweatshirt entered the store, gave a note to the employee and threatened the employee with a gun. After obtaining a quantity of prescription narcotics, including morphine and oxycodone, the suspect fled the scene. Anyone with information regarding this incident is encouraged to contact the sheriff ’s office at 23-CRIME.

Teen arrested for Woodmont bomb threat

Sheriff ’s deputies arrested a 13-year-old female student at Woodmont Middle School on Thursday, April 26, in connection with a bomb threat made at the school earlier that day. Officials with the Greenville County School district confirm that the girl admitted writing the threat, which was found in a school restroom. The student was charged with making a bomb threat and disturbing a school, and was released to her parents to await trial. Deputies do not believe that this student was responsible for a bomb threat made on Tuesday, April 24, which prompted school officials to send the students home early. A thorough search of the school by deputies and the fire department found no bomb.

$65,000 backhoe heisted

The construction crew building a new fire station in Piedmont was missing an expensive piece of equipment last Thursday morning. On April 26, J.C.W. Construction reported the theft of a Caterpillar backhoe valued at $65,000. The backhoe was parked near the intersection of Grove Reserve Parkway and Old Grove Road in Piedmont, where crews were using it to construct a new fire station. The backhoe was taken overnight, according to the report. The sheriff ’s office described the backhoe as a yellow CAT 420 rubber-tire model, with a quick-release bucket system. Anyone with information regarding this incident is encouraged to contact the sheriff ’s office at 23-CRIME.

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MAY 4, 2012 | Greenville Journal 21


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COUNTY COUNCIL

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During the regular meeting of Greenville County Council on May 1, the council approved the cooperative agreement for the Greenville County Redevelopment Authority, which provides housing renovations and infrastructure renewal and new affordable housing, along with building improvements such as façade renovations in urban areas. The agreement includes the Greenville County Redevelopment Authority, Greenville County and the jurisdictions of Fountain Inn, Greer, Mauldin, Simpsonville and Travelers Rest. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) requires the renewal in order for the GCRA to receive grant funding, including Community Development Block Grants, HOME and Emergency Solutions Grants for homeless assistance. During the council’s Finance Committee meeting, GCRA presented its action plan and budget of $4.3 million for fiscal year 2012. Council also approved a resolution to hold a special election on a referendum to establish a City View special tax district. Pending pre-clearance by the Justice Department, the election is scheduled for July 24, 2012. Approval of the referendum would provide street lighting within the district and include a maximum property tax levy of 20 mills. In other action, the council moved closer to an amendment to the Hospitality Tax ordinance. This amendment would appropriate $1 million in additional funds for tourist-related projects. The funds would come from additional hospitality tax revenue and would help make up for lost revenue when the USA Cycling Professional Championships moves out of Greenville in 2013. Councilor Joe Dill requested to allow amendments during third reading and the motion to allow amendments was approved. The motion to move the amendment to a third reading was approved. County Council is scheduled to meet again on May 15 at 6 p.m. at University Square, Greenville.

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Eleven events and organizations that will bring visitors to Greenville will be getting a helping hand from tourists who have already stayed in the city if the recommendations made by the city’s Accommodations Tax Advisory Committee stand. Sixteen organizations and events requested $872,000 to help promote their events and organizations. The advisory committee had $578,750 to allocate for the city’s 2012-13 fiscal year. The money comes from a tax levied on hotel rooms in the city. Under the advisory committee’s recommendation revealed at a Greenville City Council work session Monday night, three organizations – the Black Expo, Notus Sports and the Transportation Museum of the World – will get accommodations tax money for the first time. Four organizations that made accommodations tax requests – the Children’s Museum of the Upstate marketing program, InnoMobility, Medalist Sports and Upstate Visual Arts – will get no money under the committee’s recommendation. “Everybody’s worthy and there’s never enough money,” said Greenville City Manager John Castile after the committee’s presentation. Michael Bonasia, a member of the committee, said the committee focused on organizations and events that get people who live more than 50 miles away from Greenville to stay in the city for multiple nights. The committee recommended that the Black Expo, which was held in Greenville for the first time last summer, receive $5,000 of the $20,000 it requested because it was viewed as a drive-in event rather than one that got people to stay overnight. Council member Lillian Brock Flemming and Jil Littlejohn told Bonasia that at least four other events, such as fraternity and sorority conventions, were held in Greenville because of the Black Expo. Bonasia said he thought the committee’s recommendation would have been different if it had known. Notus Sports, the organization that is bringing the 2014 Para-Cycling Road World Championships to Greenville, will receive $10,000 in A-tax money under the recommendation, while the Transportation Museum of the World, which will feature the nation’s largest HO scale model railroad, will get $10,000, one-sixth of what it had requested. The committee’s other recommendations are Artisphere, $25,000; BMW Charity Pro-Am, $10,000; city guides and signage, $10,000; Euphoria, $25,000; Chautauqua Society, $5,000; Greenville Convention and Visitor’s Bureau, $268,750; Metropolitan Arts Council, $200,000; and the Scottish Games, $10,000. The committee also recommended $50,000 for the city to hold in reserve for events that come up during the year. In addition, the city’s sustainability advisory committee presented its proposed sustainability and climate action plan. The plan includes such projects as implementing the city’s bike master plan, encouraging bicycle and pedestrian-friendly development, expanding the use of alternative-fuel and low-emissions vehicles, creating incentives for developers to follow green building standards and promoting eco-tourism. The next regular meeting of the Greenville City Council is May 14 at 5:30 p.m. in Council chambers on the 10th floor of Greenville City Hall.

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MAY 4, 2012 | Greenville Journal 23


journal community

McAfee Funeral Homes expands By Dick Hughes | contributor

Old Cars Great Music Join Us for the Largest Cruise-In in the Upstate and RYDELL, JIMMY CLANTON CLANTON, music featuring BOBBY RYDELL Jim Quick & Coastline…

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Come in a classic car (1979 or older) and $25 admits a carload of four! Line-up begins at noon. Gates open at 2 pm for classic cars. Dash plaques are available for the first 400 cars.

Thomas McAfee Funeral Homes is holding an open house Sunday for a new chapel in the Golden Strip. The new full-service funeral home at 1604 NE Main St., Simpsonville, is the McAfee family’s third in Greenville County. The public is invited to the open house to view the new facility 2 p.m.-4 p.m. Sunday. Thomas F. McAfee IV said the new funeral home will serve families who “have ties to Greenville but live in Simpsonville and Mauldin, and this location is an effort to make it more convenient for families that actually use us already.” He said rapid population growth in the suburbs, along with the aging population, is creating increasing demand for funeral services. At a little more than 16,000 square feet, the Mauldin-Simpsonville location “is new from the ground up” and has a chapel that seats 250. In addition to visitation rooms, it has “places to have a family meal after the service” and rooms where McAfee’s continuing care coordinator can bring

caregivers and families together to “talk about grief and funeral traditions,” McAfee said. “A lot of things go on in the funeral home other than just funerals. It’s kind of a continuum of care.” The new location will have four to six full-time employees with personnel from the other chapels filling in as needed, he said. Next year, the McAfee family will celebrate 100 years in the funeral business in Greenville. McAfee Funeral Home first opened on South Main Street in 1913 and has been in its current downtown location on North Main since 1952. The family opened a second chapel in 1992 on White Horse Lane and added a cremation center in 2001. “We are of the firm belief that one of the reasons for our level of service is what has been handed down through the family,” said McAfee, the third generation funeral director. His son John, also a licensed funeral director, manages the Northwest chapel on White Horse Lane. Contact Dick Hughes at dhughes@greenvillejournal.com.

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journal community

the news in brief The Metropolitan Arts Council will expand its SmartARTS program thanks to a National Endowment for the Arts grant. MAC was awarded a $23,000 Arts Education: Art Works grant for its SmartARTS Target program for the 2012-13 school year. The money will be used to deepen the arts integration program in four of Greenville County’s public schools. SmartARTS Target will provide expanded training and mentoring of teachers in advanced arts integration techniques over the course of one year. Students in these schools will experience standards-based arts learning that will culminate in a public exhibit of artworks created by students with related onsite educational programming at The Children’s Museum of the Upstate. SmartARTS was founded in 2002 with three federal Department of Education grants totaling $2.1 million. The program uses arts integration in classrooms to show the natural connections between academics and the arts. Since federal funding for the program ended in 2007, SmartARTs has been paid for through local and state grants and donations. More than $900,000 has been raised locally to continue and expand the program. Fifty schools are expected to be involved in the SmartARTS program during the 2012-13 academic year.

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May 7–12

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MAY 4, 2012 | Greenville Journal 25


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Who’s your doctor? If you have a pediatrician you like, tell someone you know. If you don’t have a doctor, ask someone you trust for a recommendation. Studies show having a close relationship with a doctor is one of the best ways to stay healthy. So it’s no surprise that upstate parents trust Greenville Hospital System University Medical Group for dedicated pediatric care. As part of the region’s most comprehensive community of care, our board certified pediatricians aren’t just capable – they’re committed to making your child’s health a top priority. And when you find a pediatrician you trust while your child is well, getting seen quickly when sick is just a phone call away. Schedule an introductory appointment with one of our pediatricians by calling a practice listed here, or visit whosyourdoctor.org to learn more.

Carolina Pediatrics of Greenville 454-2670 Center for Pediatric Medicine Greenville 220-7270 • Travelers Rest 455-9261 The Children’s Clinic Greenville 271-1450 • Greer 797-9300 Simpsonville 454-6520 Christie Pediatric Group 9 Mills Ave. 242-4840 • Hwy. 14 297-8890 Simpsonville 454-5062 Heritage Pediatrics & Internal Medicine 454-6440 Pediatric Associates Easley 855-0001 • Greer 879-3883 Spartanburg 582-8135 Pediatric Rapid Access 220-7270

whosyourdoctor.org 120215dJRNL

26 GREENVILLE JOURNAL | MAY 4, 2012


the good

journal community

events that make our community better

Speak for Animals’ eighth Annual Spa for Spays will be held Saturday, May 5, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Marriott at One Parkway East. The $40 Spa Service ticket includes a 20-minute spa service, appetizers, wine, group classes and a silent auction. A $15 event access ticket includes everything except the spa service. Proceeds raised at Spa for Spays help fund the low-cost spay neuter program for animals in need. Service appointments must be made in advance with Jennifer at 864-467-0495. For more information, visit http://spaforspays2012.eventbrite.com. On June 2 at 8:15 a.m., the seventh edition of the Safe Harbor Cycle Tour will roll out from the Civic Center in Iva. The ride benefits Safe Harbor, a nonprofit organization serving victims of domestic violence and their children in Anderson, Greenville, Pickens and Oconee counties. The Cycle Tour starts in Iva and then rolls into northern Abbeville County through hills that form the banks of the Savannah River, Lake Russell and Lake Secession. Then the course heads back into southern Anderson County where the terrain levels. After the Cycle Tour, lunch awaits under the outdoor canopy beside the Civic Center. Riders can choose between a 25-mile or 65-mile course. The $40 registration fee includes a T-shirt, lunch, snacks, SAG, and course map. Or, register for $110 for an event jersey as well! All proceeds from this event will benefit Safe Harbor. Register online at www.safeharborcycletour.org. NAMI Greenville (National Alliance on Mental Illness) is hosting the NAMIGreenville 5K Walk on Saturday, June 2, as part of their Strike Out Stigma campaign to help raise donations for the nonprofit, as well as raise awareness of mental illness in the Greenville community. Registration for the walk will be at 8 a.m. and the walk will begin at 9 a.m. at Fluor Field. There is no fee to walk as entry is by donation. The NAMI-Greenville 5K Walk will begin on the field and will tour around the streets of the city and the Swamp Rabbit Trail before ending at Fluor Field. After the walk, activities will include music and comedy shows. In addition, there will be booths with mental and general health information. Chick-filA will be offering breakfast and lunch items for sale with a portion of the sales going to NAMI. For information, visit www.strikeoutstigma.com. Participants in the walk earn a chance to be entered into a contest for an eight-day cruise for every $50 of online donations. Generations Group Homes will host its annual Luncheon for Second Chances on May 16 at the TD Convention Center. The event will provide attendees with an opportunity to learn more about Generations’ programs and its mission to stop and prevent the cycle of sexual abuse among adolescent boys. As a nationally accredited nonprofit organization that works with at-risk boys ages 10-19, Generations offers structured, specialized programs that give its residents both a place to heal and the

opportunity for a second chance. To date, the nonprofit has graduated over 800 boys from its programs with a 98 percent success rate of them never being incarcerated for the same offense again. Individuals interested in learning more about Generations’ Luncheon for Second Chances, or who would like to attend the event as a guest, are welcome to visit www.generationsgrouphome.com, or contact Roseanne Brown at Roseanne@generationsgroup.com. Furman University will host the first annual Joseph Vaughn Memorial Scholarship Golf Tournament Saturday, May 26, at 9 a.m. at the Furman Golf Course. Deadline for entry is Friday, May 4. The cost for participating in the tournament is $75 for individuals and $280 for a team of four. Hole sponsorships are available. Lunch and gift bags are included in the entry fee. Prizes are awarded for first, second and third place, longest drive and closest to the pin. For more information, contact Idella Glenn in Multicultural Affairs at 864294-3104 or idella.glenn@furman.edu. Freeman & Major Architects has completed a project for Greenville-based non-profit organization Homes of Hope, developing prototype low-income housing for the Homes of Hope LoCAL Program. The LoCAL program’s goal is to produce housing that is long-term, compact, affordable and LEED™ Certified. Homes of Hope seeks to offer three solutions through its LoCal program. It offers affordable housing for poverty-level families that is energy efficient; affordable housing for poverty level families that builds assets through appreciation; and better jobs through job training and the opportunity to become a LEED™ Green Associate through a training provided by the United States Green Building Council South Carolina Chapter for the men participating in Homes of Hope’s discipleship and recovery program. The prototype house design is a compact 864 square feet that includes a great room, kitchen, two bedrooms, one bath, a laundry area and a study nook. Each home features a generous front porch to extend living space to the outdoors. Freeman & Major also produced several customization features for the prototype, including: two expansion options, which either adds an additional bedroom and bath, or a room that can be used as a dining or sunroom; and six exterior designs that allow for flexibility in a planned neighborhood. Send us your announcement. E-mail: greenvillecommunity@greenvillejournal.com

Enabling Dreams. Earning Trust. Exceeding Expectations. greenvillefirst.com

Fred Gilmer, III, Terry Gambrell, Robert Thompson and Rob Reeves

Verdae • The Parkway Woodruff Rd • Augusta Rd

Member FDIC

MAY 4, 2012 | Greenville Journal 27


journal community

our community

The Greenville Council of Garden Clubs’ annual spring garden tour, “Open the Gate to Springtime Treasures,” features seven private gardens located off Augusta Road, and five acres of gardens on the Kilgore-Lewis grounds at 560 N. Academy St. The event will be held on May 4 and 5, from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. An English High Tea will be served at the Kilgore-Lewis House from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. both afternoons. Advance tickets are $18; tickets the day of the tour are $20. Afternoon tea tickets are $12. Call 232-3020 or go to www.kilgore-lewis.org.

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community news, events and happenings

Greenville Hospital System is holding the following events. • Fat Counts: Find out how to choose low-fat, low-cholesterol foods on Monday, May 7, 8:30 a.m. or 9:30 a.m., or May 14 at 12:30 p.m., at the Greenville Hospital System Life Center. Free; registration required. To register, call 455-4010. • Stress Management: Learn how to control stress so it doesn’t control you on Monday, May 7, 6:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m., at the Greenville Hospital System Life Center. Fee: $20. To register, call 455-4001.

May Special! Buy a bottle of wine to enjoy on our patio or dinning room between 4-7PM & receive a complimentary cheese plate.

Fresh food...fast!

The Greenville Hospital System has organized an event to celebrate their centennial anniversary. Starting May 4, participants can visit up to 100 locations around Greenville, scan QR codes and win prizes. Visit www.gohuntscan.com for more details.

Visit both our locations:

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Two Chefs Deli & Market 104 South Main St. • 864.370.9336 Two Chefs To Go Pelham Rd./Hwy. 14 • 864.284.9970 www.TwoChefsDeli.com

The Houseplant The Art of the Garden

Blooming Love!

Greenville Forward, a nonprofit organization, announces the event, Refresh 2012, to take place on Monday, May 14, at the Peace Center’s Gunter Theater from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Refresh 2012 will be a presentation by Greenville Forward on the progress of Vision 2025, a comprehensive plan that is designed to enhance Greenville County and the lives of its citizens by the year 2025. Minor Shaw, president of the MICCO Corporation, recent inductee to the South Carolina Business Hall of Fame, and one of the original Vision 2025 designers, will deliver a keynote address. Light refreshments and beverages will be provided. The event is free; however, guests must RSVP to the event by visiting www. visionupdate/eventbrite.com, mailing a request to info@greenvilleforward.com or by calling 864-233-8443. “Moonlight and Magnolias: A Garden Gala” will be held May 19 at 6 p.m. in the S.C. Botanical Garden at Clemson University. The gala includes a silent auction to benefit the National Heritage Garden, as well as live entertainment, dinner, cocktails and the opportunity to learn about new Botanical Garden projects. Participating artists at the gala include Tricia Grant, pastels and digital photography; Del Kimbler, digital photography; Jan Galusza, watercolors; and Deana Baker, photography. The gala will be held at the Fran Hanson Visitor Center, the former Southern Living Showcase Home in the Garden. Attire is elegant casual. Tickets are $75 each, with options for whole-table reservations and seats with local celebrities. For more information or to purchase tickets, call 864-656-3405 or email scbg@clemson.edu.

Make it a day to remember with a lasting gift from 1322 East Washington St. Greenville • 864.242.1589 28 Greenville Journal | MAY 4, 2012

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The Houseplant

Democratic Women of Greenville County will host a candidate forum at their May 14 meeting. The meeting will be held at Runway Café beginning at 5:30 p.m. All Democratic candidates in Greenville County who met the recent filing deadline have been asked to attend and will be given an opportunity to speak about their respective races and candidacies. A buffet dinner will be available at a cost of

State Forester Jimmy Walters gives his program, “Gifts We Get from Trees.”

The City of Greenville’s Annual Arbor Day Celebration was held at the Kilgore-Lewis House April 19. Special guests of honor were local third graders and their families who participated in the Arbor Day poster, poetry, essay and song competition of this year’s Urban Forestry Program, sponsored by the Greenville Council of Garden Clubs. TreesGreenville donated heritage trees to each school whose students participated in the program. $15 each. Reservations for dinner are requested by noon on Thursday, May 10, at 232-5531 or headquarters@greenvilledemocrats.com. Bon Secours St. Francis Health System will host the following events. • Just Walk!: May 12 at 9 a.m. Join cardiologist Barbara MoranFaille with Upstate Cardiology for this free event. Includes hearthealthy snacks, free T-shirt and pedometer. Location: St. Francis millennium, 2 Innovation Drive. Fee: free; registration not required. • Line Dancing: Location: Temple of Israel, 400 Spring Forest Road. Fee: free; registration not required. • Beginner: Tuesdays from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. For those new to line dancing who want to learn the basic steps and easy dances or need a refresher course. • Intermediate: Tuesdays from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. This class is for those with a strong grasp of basic line-dancing steps and with line-dancing experience. Jim Drake, author and current president of the Georgia Botanical Society, will present the program “Gentians of the Mountains and Piedmont” at the May meeting of the SC Native Plant Society. The meeting is Tuesday, May 15, 7:00 pm, Founders Hall in Dining Commons, Southern Wesleyan University, Central. The public is invited. For more information, visit www.scnps.org. The South Carolina Native Plant Society (www.scnps.org) is a nonprofit organization committed to the preservation and protection of native plant communities in South Carolina. Meetings of the Upstate Chapter alternate between Greenville and Central. If you are sponsoring a community event, we want to share your news. Submit entries to e-mail: greenvillecommunity@greenvillejoural.com.


JOURNAL BUSINESS

T.B.A.

THE FINE PRINT • NEW ASSIGNMENTS AT BMW • FIRST FEDERAL BANK ARRIVES IN THE UPSTATE

‘We are the Cannons’

The special preview event for the Greenville Literacy Association’s Really Good Really Big Really Cheap Book Sale is coming up August 17. Look for a call for book donations to go out soon …

Simpsonville’s Heritage Funeral Home marks Cannon family’s return to the funeral business By DICK HUGHES | contributor

CANNON continued on PAGE 30

Very few employees have moved into the TD Bank campus off of Interstate 85, but word on the street is that call centers for the site are on the way… A rooftop event venue has been proposed for Main and Coffee streets overlooking Piazza Bergamo …

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

The Heritage Funeral Home being built in Simpsonville links a rare startup in the death industry with the eagerness of the Cannon family to reclaim identification with a business it owned in the Golden Strip through multiple generations. Even if a Louisiana corporation, Stewart Enterprises, owns the old family business – and the Cannon Funeral Home name – in Fountain Inn and Simpsonville as a competitor, the Cannon family, along with a family friend, is intent on making it clear that when it comes to funeral services, “We are the Cannons.” James Cannon, the 83-year-old family patriarch, says that in hindsight he regrets selling the family business several years ago. Even so, he is “excited about our group returning to the business that has been our family’s calling since 1879.” The new Heritage Funeral Home “will enable us to provide the level of care and respect my grandfather, my own father and I worked hard to ensure for many, many years,” he said. The new 24,000-square-foot funeral home, built in the totally gutted and rehabbed Builder’s First building on Simpsonville’s Main Street, is scheduled to open late spring or early summer. It has a 280-seat chapel.

Members of the management team of the Heritage Funeral Home in Simpsonville are, from left to right, Carol Cannon Hopkins, James Cannon and Andy Byrd.

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JOURNAL BUSINESS CANNON continued from PAGE 29

The Cannon partner is Andy Byrd, who worked for 13 years in financial services with Al Cannon, James Cannon’s son, who did not follow family tradition into the funeral business. Yet Al Cannon was the connection that brought Byrd into a mid-life calling to funeral service and, consequently, the return of the Cannon family to the business. Byrd and Al Cannon worked together for 13 years, first in Spartanburg with the Smith Barney brokerage company, then in Greenville with Smith Barney and finally, tiring of Wall Street firms, with the independent Nachman, Norwood and Parrott in Greenville. For Byrd, something was missing in his life. As Byrd tells it, he was returning on a flight to Greenville “after a being in New York for a week, sitting there looking out the window thinking, ‘Is this it? Is this what I want? What impact am I having on other people, what difference am I making and what does this mean for my family long-term?’” While he and his wife Tyree did a lot of praying and soul-searching, Byrd “was in conversations with the Cannons about the fact they had sold the Cannon Funeral Home. Looking back on it, if they had

an option like they have now, they never would have sold it.” Byrd and the Cannons spent months creating a plan for Heritage Funeral Home that would capitalize on Cannon’s long community and professional relationships, even though the name they operated under for six decades no longer belonged to them. While the Stewart funeral home can market itself under the Cannon name, said Byrd, it will be clear to the public that “we are the Cannons” with James Cannon as funeral director and Carol Cannon Hopkins, his daughter, as dually licensed funeral director and embalmer. To complete his career change, Byrd will apprentice for two years under Cannon to become licensed as a funeral director. Byrd, 46, said “for someone to just start up a new funeral home would be unusual,” but he “is going into a business that is a requirement for life with a family that has a 132-year reputation in the community. Show me a better business plan than that.” Sentiment aside, he said, the population explosion in Greenville County and the Golden Strip in particular creates a demand for funeral services that “makes me feel it is a business of the future, a

business that is growing stronger.” The partnership is “pretty strong financially” and is funding the startup with its own money so it can be debt free, Byrd said. In addition, he said, “we also have the backing of other senior wealthy folks in the community … if we need it.” Finding a suitable location was difficult. They tried to buy Cannon Funeral Home back from Stewart Enterprises, the Jefferson, La., corporation that owns it, but “we were not able to get together on what they wanted for it versus what we were willing to pay for it,” said Byrd. The Cannons did not sell the family business to Stewart. When Al Cannon decided “he didn’t want to go into the business,” James Cannon sold to Fletcher Kirkland at Mackie Mortuary. Three years after that, Stewart bought Mackie and with it Cannon Funerals and the Cannon Memorial Park cemetery. Had James Cannon known it was going to be sold to Stewart, “he never would have sold it. He has said that emphatically several times,” Byrd said. When they tried to buy the stately white house in Fountain Inn that had been the Cannon Funeral Home for many years

and which Stewart sold when it built a new mortuary at Memorial Park, they were thwarted by a deed restriction Stewart placed on the property preventing its use as a funeral home. Byrd said the Builders First building In Simpsonville had always been their “first choice,” but Ralph Hendricks, the 95-year-old owner of the city block it sits on, declined to subdivide, and that was “more space than we needed.” When Byrd and the Cannons were in the midst of a deal for Sea Coast Church on Highway 14, Hendricks “came back to us and said he was willing to subdivide.” Heritage bought the building and 2.5 acres from the Ralph and Virginia Hendricks Foundation. For Byrd, going into Heritage Funeral Home “is a wise business decision” but that in itself is not reason to do it. To him, it is the promise of the epiphany he had on that flight out of New York. “You have to have sincere passion and compassion to serve other people. If you don’t, that shows through.” Contact Dick Hughes at dhughes@ greenvillejournal.com.

THE FINE PRINT BY DICK HUGHES

Recall of Bus Tires

Michelin has recalled 77,000 urban bus tires produced at its Spartanburg County plant for possible sidewall defects that could cause the tires to lose air after put in use as retreads. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said Michelin volunteered to recall the tires produced from 2005 to fall 2011 at the Spartanburg radial truck tire plant. The affected tires are the XZU2, XZU3 and XM505 tires. Michelin will replace the tires, said Brian Remsberg,

spokesman for Michelin North America in Greenville. “We had one minor injury claim to date, but that’s one too many. It was determined that this product did not meet the Michelin standard,” he said. Michelin said it began investigating for a potential flaw after complaints that the tires lost air rapidly during use as retreads.

Still Red, but Less So

Palmetto Bank recorded a loss of $587,000 in the first quarter of 2012, down from $2.3 million in the prior quarter and a 90 percent improvement from first quarter a year ago.

The bank said the losses in the last two quarters were related primarily to continuing erosion of real estate values, although those depressed values declined to $4.4 million from $5.9 million in the last quarter of 2011. The bank also said the bottom line was affected by expenses of $328,000 and $343,000 respectively in the two quarters for one-time charges incurred in selling and consolidating four branches. Palmetto is expected to close on the sale of branches in Rock Hill and Blacksburg to Carolina Premier

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Spartanburg Regional • 101 East Wood St. • Spartanburg SC 29303 • 1.877.455.7747 • gibbscancercenter.com 30 GREENVILLE JOURNAL | MAY 4, 2012


Schylver “Sky” Foster, new manager of corporate communications

Max Metcalf, new manager for government and community relations

BMW in Spartanburg has named Schylver “Sky” Foster as manager of corporate communications and Max Metcalf as manager for government and community relations. Foster, who has been manager of compensation, working structures, benefits and HR planning, succeeds Metcalf, who has held the position since Bobby Hitt was named secretary of commerce by Gov. Nikki Haley. Foster began her career with BMW Manufacturing in 1993 and has been involved with the South Carolina operation since its beginning, the company said. She holds an undergraduate degree from South Carolina State University and a master’s from North Carolina Central University. Metcalf holds a degree in economics from Clemson University.

Bank of Charlotte, N.C., in the current quarter. Sam Erwin, chief executive officer, said first quarter results “are indicative of the intense focus we have been placing on reducing problem assets” and in lowering operating expenses. The bulk of the expense savings will begin to show this quarter and “contribute to improved financial performance over the remainder of 2012,” he said. For the first quarter, Palmetto said non-credit expenses declined $993,000 from the prior quarter. Based in Greenville, Palmetto had assets of $1.2 billion at the end of March. Once it completes the sale of two branches and the consolidation of one in Laurens and one in Greenwood, it will have 25 locations in the Upstate.

[

Stop in for Lunch or Dinner and bring the family. All kids' meals are $5 and include a drink.

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Come enjoy a game of billiards after hours during the week, relax with some local entertainment on the weekends, or just come take in some of our fresh, all-natural delicious food. Our goal is to make you, our customers and local families, happy.

1178 Woodruff Rd. (at Miller Road) | 864.288.1898

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New assignments announced at BMW

JOURNAL BUSINESS

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NEW - VANISHING INITIATION PROGRAM! Call 864.967.9510 for details about this unique program.

Affordable Membership Packages for All Ages: • Regular Membership: Age 40+ • Junior Membership: Ages 30-39 • Young Adult Membership: Ages 21-29

Teeing Off for Charity

The 29th annual Bi-Lo Charity Classic Golf Tournament will be played at 11 golf courses in the Upstate and Western North Carolina on Monday, June 4. It is the largest one-day golf event in the nation, though it kicks off with an invitationonly President’s Party on Saturday. A pairings party and silent auction is held Sunday. Last year, the tournament raised $4.9 million for 350 charities across the Southeast. In the 28 years of its existence, the event has raised $58 million. This is the first year of the Charity Classic since the purchase by Bi-Lo of Winn-Dixie Supermarkets. The headquarters of the merged company will be in Jacksonville, Fla., where Winn-Dixie is based. The combined company has said the Bi-Lo Charity Classic and other Bi-Lo charity events will not be affected.

New Name With Latin Meaning

GOLF • TENNIS • SWIMMING • DINING • PRIVATE PARTIES EASTSIDE LOCATION, CONVENIENT TO GREENVILLE/SIMPSONVILLE Contact Barbara in Membership 864.967.9510 or bkalchbrenner.htcc@gmail.com Visit our website at www.hollytreecountryclub.com

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Agnew-Rincon Architects has renamed itself Adeptus Architecture. “Our new name, Adeptus Architecture, better exemplifies the full range of services we provide to our diverse clientele,” said W. Barry Agnew, president, referring to the Latin meaning, “specialized expertise in a discipline.” The Greenville firm said that in its 25 years in existence it has grown from a small operation in the Upstate to a national practice with clientele in more than 15 states.

MAY 4, 2012 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL 31


JOURNAL BUSINESS

Innoventure turns to Web to discover, develop new business opportunities By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

Taylors First Baptist Church is a place where people can connect — to God, to one another, and to the Greenville and Greer communities. Join us for worship on Sunday: 8:30 am Traditional 9:50 am Contemporary 11:11 am Modern

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JOIN US FOR

MOTHER’S DAY BRUNCH SUNDAY, MAY 13 FROM 11AM TO 3PM POINSETT BALLROOM

When InnoVenture was founded in 2004, the goal was to link good ideas with customers, capital, talent and technology. For the past nine years, the Greenville company has held conferences where entrepreneurs, major corporations and research universities come together to find and develop business opportunities and the region’s economy. “It’s all about connections,” said John Warner, InnoVenture’s founder. Now those connections can occur online and year-round, thanks to InnoVenture.com, a new Web platform that allows a person to upload a presentation of a business opportunity and share it with colleagues, with the hope that those watching may discover they have services or information he needs. “The conferences were a way of generating and aggregating opportunity in the Southeast,” Warner said. “But we can work globally.” Warner said he believes InnoVenture.com has the potential of another social business network, LinkedIn. About 150 million people have posted profiles on LinkedIn, making it the world’s largest online professional network, which is used by individuals to network with other professionals as well as businesses to recruit employees and customers. “LinkedIn shows what you’ve done in the past,” Warner said. “Your Inno-

Venture profile tells what you’re seeking in future endeavors.” InnoVenture.com allows people to create a free profile online, detailing what they are seeking for their business and what resources they offer. “People need to share enough to intrigue somebody,” Warner said. Opportunities posted on the website, which launched on May 2, include viaCycle, a company that offers technology for bike-sharing programs, and Camber Ridge, a company that offers a new way to test tires. Individuals can also subscribe to dashboards that filter searches of the proposals posted by entrepreneurs by their fields of interest. And companies and universities can subscribe to a service that aggregates opportunities as well, Warner said. But while InnoVenture has launched an online opportunity platform, conferences will still continue. The 2012 InnoVenture conference will be held May 8 and 9 at the TD Convention Center. Jack Nobles, principal investigator and design engineer with Boeing’s research and development division, is one of the keynote speakers. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@greenvillejournal.com.

Live Piano Music with Donald Shabkie Attended Child Station with Buffet and Crafts $28.50 for Adults/$24.50 for Seniors $13.50 for Children 7-12/Free for Children 6 and under* Make your reservation by calling 864-421-9700

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First Federal Bank arrives in the Upstate The takeover of the failed Plantation Federal Bank by First Federal Bank gives the Charleston company its first hold on the rich but crowded Greenville banking market with acquisition of Plantation’s three small First Saver branches. The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency on Friday closed Plantation of Pawleys Island, appointed the FDIC as receiver and turned over its assets to First Federal. The FDIC insurance fund and First Federal will share the estimated $221.7 million in losses on bad loans. Typically, the FDIC eats the larger share, 70 to 80 percent. The Plantation offices, including the three First Saver Bank branches in Greenville, reopened on Monday as First Federal Bank. Plantation had three branches operating as Plantation Federal along the South Carolina coast. “This is strategically beneficial to First Federal as we enter the Greenville market and expand our current presence in the Grand Strand market, which includes Pawleys Island, Murrells Inlet and Myrtle Beach,” said R. Wayne Hall, president and chief executive officer of First Federal.

The company said Greenville has a “demographically attractive” market. Greenville consistently leads the state in total bank deposits. It also is the most competitive. As of the FDIC’s June 31 deposit report, Greenville had 34 banks holding $10.8 billion in deposits, about 16 percent of the state total. The Plantation board said it “worked tirelessly over the last two years” to save the bank by cutting expenses, reducing workforce, selling assets, closing branches and trying to find new sources of capital and buyers for its troubled loan portfolio. The board said many of its customers were unable to meet their loan obligations and “alternative sources of collateral proved insufficient to make up the shortfall. The losses created by these situations used up so much of our capital that we fell below regulatory capital thresholds, and we were no longer permitted by regulators to operate independently.” First Savers was created in 1996 as a part of Plantation Financial. In addition to the three full-service branches in Greenville, it had operated a mortgage office. It had assets of around $190 million in the three branches, according to its website. First Federal, which opened its first of-

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fice in Charleston in 1934, reported assets of $3.1 billion as of Dec. 31 and lays claim to being the third largest South Carolina-based bank in terms of assets. It acquired $486 million in assets in the Plantation acquisition. On April 23, in a conventional transaction, it completed acquisition of $115.6 million in assets of five Liberty Savings Bank branches in Hilton Head. The Plantation takeover is First Federal’s second FDIC-assisted transaction. In 2009, it acquired the failed Cape Fear Bank in Wilmington, N.C. First Federal reported net losses for two consecutive fiscal years: $45 million in 2011 and $40.6 million in 2010. It reported net income of $26 million in 2009. On Monday, it reported net income of $1.7 million for the quarter ended March 31. In the quarter ended Dec. 31 it had $15.6 million net income. In February, the company converted from a federal savings and loan association to a commercial bank under a South Carolina charter. It also registered with the Federal Reserve as a holding company. Contact Dick Hughes at dhughes@greenvillejournal.com.

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MAY 4, 2012 | Greenville Journal 33


Journal Sketchbook Chautauqua performers: One part actor, one part scholar Class to teach techniques used by historic interpreters By Cindy Landrum | staff

AVAILABLE MAY 1ST

Larry Bounds as Winston Churchill

A successful Chautauqua performer is one part actor and one part scholar. The actor part comes from Chautauqua’s making the people of history come alive through a monologue performed in costume. The scholar part comes from knowing the historic figure being portrayed well enough to answer the audience’s questions while remaining authentic to that character. “Acting is simply somebody playing a role in a script,” said Larry Bounds, a high school English teacher who is trained in theater as well. “We have studied this person for at least a year and know what this person said, what they wrote and what they thought. We’re scholars who know what this person would say and how they would say it.”

Initiative wants residents ‘thinking like a river’ Wofford program seeks to create culture of watershed appreciation, protection By Cindy Landrum | staff

AVAILABLE MAY 1ST

34 Greenville Journal | MAY 4, 2012

To know a river is to love it. And to love it is to protect it. That’s the thought behind the three-year Wofford College initiative, “Thinking Like a River.” Wofford’s environmental studies program has received a $383,000 grant from the Margaret A. Cargill Foundation for the initiative that will integrate the natural sciences, social sciences, humanities and the arts to connect with, protect and reflect on rivers. “Rivers in the South have always worked hard for a living,” said John Lane, associate professor of environmental studies and English and director of Wofford’s

Goodall Environmental Studies Center. The “Thinking Like a River” initiative will try to raise the watershed consciousness of the community through a three-pronged effort: a floating seminar series, a curriculum designed to encourage and engage visitors at the Goodall Center and a Fellows program. The Goodall Center is located on the Lawson’s Fork Creek portion of the Pacolet River and in the historic textile mill town of Glendale. Through the floating seminar series, Wofford students and faculty, Spartanburg-area teachers and the initiative’s Fellows will engage in river exploration and investigation. The river experiences will incorpo-

rate readings, discussion, interviews with watershed residents and stakeholders, journaling and site analysis. The series will include one- and twoday float trips during regular semester courses and three- to five-day float trips during the summer. Interim term experiences during January, which will be funded separately from the grant, will use longer trips. To create a culture of watershed appreciation and protection, community leaders must know about what threatens the health of rivers and why people love them, said Dr. Kaye Savage, director of Wofford’s environmental studies program. She said the Fellows program would River continued on page 35


In June, coinciding with this year’s Greenville Chautauqua Festival, “They Came to America,” some experienced Chautauqua performers who live in the Upstate will conduct a Chautauqua Performer Training Institute, believed to be one of the first such schools in the region and maybe the country. Registration deadline for the training, which Bounds said would be appropriate for potential Chautauqua performers as well as teachers, church workers and volunteers with museums and other history-based nonprofit organizations, is May 15. Students in the training will get a chance to watch seasoned Chautauqua performers in the festival as well as make a cameo appearance at the festival during the institute’s last night. Characters portrayed in this year’s festival are Winston Churchill, Carl Jung, Golda Meir, Lafayette and Denmark Vesey, leader of the Charleston slave rebellion. Performances will be held throughout Greenville County and in Spartanburg. Specific times and locations are listed on the Chautauqua website, www.greenvillechautauqua.org. Chautauqua has been described as “history that can’t stay in a book.” “If you can’t say history is fun, you haven’t had history,” said George Frein,

SO YOU KNOW What: Greenville Chautauqua Performer Training Institute Who: Greenville Chautauqua When: June 15-20 Where: The Phoenix, Greenville’s Inn, 246 N. Pleasantburg Dr., Greenville Registration deadline: May 15 Information: greenvillechautauqua.org or 244-1499

Greenville Chautauqua’s artistic director. “History is not just dates and movements. By turning history into what it really is, and that’s biography, people can relate to it better.” An actor performs a monologue based on the writings of and about the character. Then, the floor is opened to audience questions. The first Chautauqua started as an adult education program for Sunday school teachers at a campsite on Chautauqua Lake in upstate New York. Tent Chautauquas toured America, including one that regularly stopped in Greenville. But Chautauqua came to an end during the Great Depression. It was revived in the 1970s as a way to promote humanities education. “This is not a fine art,” Frein said. “This is a liberal art.” Greenville’s Chautauqua started in 1999 when Frein, who is a founding member of the National Chautauqua Tour, moved to Greenville. The institute will cover research, stage presence, costuming, storytelling and Q&A. “There are only two filters in Chautauqua. The first is the character itself and the second is the audience,” said Carolyn McIntyre, who started as a volunteer at a Chautauqua festival and who now portrays Rachel Carson, Mary Ingles and Frances Perkins. “Historical interpretation is all about how do you know enough to answer the questions without making it up or just saying, ‘I don’t know,’’’ she said. Inevitably, one audience member will ask a question she’s never heard before. When she was portraying

Francis Perkins, a former secretary of labor, she was asked if she knew Amelia Earhart. McIntyre talked about how important Earhart was. Afterward, she went home and looked it up. Another time an audience member asked about Huey Long. She later found out Long filibustered for 19 hours after the Social Security bill was passed so the program received no money. Perkins was responsible for keeping the program going for the first year without funding. “You’ve got to validate people’s questions,” she said. “History is not something that’s true or false.” Bounds said it’s important Chautauqua performers stay academically true to their character. “Sometimes we forget that people make history,” Frein said. “Real history is interesting and memorable.” Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@greenvillejournal.com. George Frein as Carl Jung and Larry Bounds as Winston Churchill

JOURNAL SKETCHBOOK

Dr. Kaye Savage, director of environmental studies program, with Wofford students. RIVER continued from PAGE 34

invite business leaders, governmental representatives, nonprofit representatives, Wofford alumni and other citizens to spend a year participating in the floating seminars and other events. The Fellows will also develop projects to improve awareness of rivers and water quality, she said. “Although the ‘Thinking Like a River’ initiative is a three-year effort, the work that we do will have lasting impact through the development of leadership and education at all levels,” she said. She said new curriculum materials and resources such as a stream gauge, weather station, herbarium and a “dam cam” will remain in use for years to come. The project will develop educational activities for adults as well as students from kindergarten through college. The plan also includes hiring an outreach coordinator. This is not the first time the MAC Foundation has supported environmental education at Wofford. Funding from the foundation has been used to implement a weeklong environmental science workshop for middle school teachers and an environmental writing workshop for students, teachers and community members. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@thespartanburgjournal.com.

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Local artists take spotlight in upcoming Artisphere exhibit Artisphere attracts artists from all across the United States and overseas, but the talents of local artists are in the spotlight in the festival’s fifth annual Artists of the Upstate exhibition. Work from 43 artists who live within a 35-mile radius of Greenville is featured in the exhibition at Centre Stage, 501 River St. in Greenville. Artists of the Upstate is on display through June 19.

SO YOU KNOW What: Artisphere’s Artists of the Upstate Exhibition Who: 43 artists who live within a 35-mile radius of Greenville When: through June 19, Tuesdays through Fridays, 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. and during Artisphere May 11-13, Friday from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Where: Centre Stage

The exhibit is open on Tuesdays through Fridays from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. and during Artisphere, May 11 through 13. Exhibition hours during the festival are Friday, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. “This year’s exhibit will be a highlight of the Artisphere festival and an opportunity for the community to see the amazing talent that Greenville artists have to offer,” said Alan Ethridge, executive director of the Metropolitan Arts Council. Artists of the Upstate is sponsored by the Greenville Journal, the Hampton Inn & Suites and the Courtyard by Marriot. The exhibition is also funded by a grant from MAC. Seventy-seven artists submitted 146 works for consideration by juror Wim Roefs, owner of if ART Gallery in Columbia and an independent curator, art consultant and exhibition designer. Judy Verhoeven won Best of Show for her 2-D mixed media piece titled

Judy Verhoeven won Best of Show for her 2-D mixed media piece titled “My Friend Vanetta.”

“My Friend Vanetta.” Steven Chapp, printmaking, won second place, while Tom Flowers won third place for his acrylic painting. Honorable mentions were given to Dabney Mahanes and Victoria Blaker. In eight years, Artisphere has become one of the top arts festivals in the country.

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One of the condos featured on the tour.

Condo tour reflects diversity in downtown living By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

The places people live downtown are as varied as the people who live in them. The Greenville Symphony Guild’s second Condo Rondo tour will give those who don’t live in downtown Greenville an idea of what’s out there and why downtown living has become so popular. “It’s an opportunity to see what downtown living is like,” said Nancy Ladner, co-chair of the event. A “rondo” is a musical composition built around a recurring theme. The recurring theme for Condo Rondo is, as the name suggests, condos with access to downtown restaurants, events and Falls Park. And although each of the six condos showcased in this year’s tour are within walking distance of Main Street, all reflect their owners’ distinctive styles and interests in art, antiques and collectibles. The Guild is a support organization for the Greenville Symphony Orchestra. It has held a homes tour each year for the past three decades and held the first Condo Rondo two years ago in conjunction with Artisphere. The home tour is held in the fall over multiple days. The Condo Rondo is designed as a shorter, walking experience to capitalize on what downtown Greenville has to offer, Ladner said. One of the condos on the tour has a definite antebellum feel and is accented with references to 19th century Greenville. The entrance features an oil reproduction of a work by John Singer Sargent. High ceilings allow an abundance of artworks, both original oils and museum reproductions by the owner’s artist daughter.

Another reflects the owner’s love of big game trophy hunting and features extensive travel mementos. A third represents “the best of both worlds.” The owner can enjoy the hustle and bustle of Main Street activities or retreat to the seventh-floor abode. The study and exercise room changes into sleeping space for guests or grandchildren when a Murphy bed is revealed. Proximity to Fluor Field is a plus for this homeowner, who enjoys sports. A fourth condo on the tour reflects the owner’s love of Italy and time spent there with its Venetian glass, paintings, mirrors and an altar candle from a 17th-century church in Tuscany. The owners say the Reedy River, sidewalk cafes, culture, art and music makes living in downtown Greenville very similar to living in Italy. A love of Asian-inspired art and a portrait collection of another downtown condo couple’s pets create another unique home. And, finally, a retired business executive’s condo is decorated with artwork from the man’s world travels, finds from Greenville’s Artisphere and a piece done by his father. But while the art is great, the condo’s biggest asset, according to its owner, is the view – which includes the Greenville skyline, church steeples and the Blue Ridge Mountains. The condo tour will take place May 12, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tickets are $18 in advance or $20 the day of the event. For ticket outlets, go to www.guildgso.org. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@greenvillejournal.com.

Join us!

Sip & Stroll Friday, May 11 6 - 8 PM Complimentary Wine Tasting and Entertainment!

Begin your tour in downtown Fountain Inn at Sweet Catherine’s Restaurant.

Friday, May 4th

Summer INN the City! Fridays by the Fountain Fridays by the Fountain June 1 - August 10

Celebrate Cinco de Mayo with us! Celebrate Cinco de Mayo with us! Alma de Candela Saturday, May 5th 7:30 PM Tickets $10/$7/$5

Free Live Music Friday 7pm-9 pm The Grounds at City Hall 200 N. Main Street Bring lawn chairs or blankets.

Down by the Depot Down by the Depot May 19 - September 1 Live Bluegrass Music Satuday 7 pm - 9 pm The Farmers Market Pavilion 102 Depot Street Bring lawn chairs or blankets.

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June 2 - September 29 Fresh Local Produce Saturday from 8 AM til 12 noon Pavilion at Commerce Park 102 Depot Street

MAY 4, 2012 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL 37


JOURNAL SKETCHBOOK

‘May I Be Frank’ tells story of transformation and healing By APRIL A. MORRIS | staff

Frank Ferrante’s fantastic journey began on a rainy day in San Francisco when he stopped into a raw, organic and vegan café. Ferrante, a 54-year-old from Brooklyn living in San Francisco, was an obese, pre-diabetic, single, deeply depressed drug addict, but also a lover of good food and a good laugh. When he began to frequent Café Gratitude because of the welcome he received, Ferrante encountered some unlikely friends, including Conor Gaffney, then a server. “He thought vegan was a planet,” says Gaffney. As Gaffney tells the story, one day Ferrante decided to answer the café “ques-

tion of the day” posed by Gaffney’s fellow server, Ryland Englehart. The question, designed to inspire a grateful mindset, was as follows: “What is the one thing you want to do before you die?” Ferrante answered, “I want to fall in love one more time, but no one will love me looking the way I do.” Englehart and Gaffney decided that didn’t have to be an impossible dream. The two teamed up with Cary Mosier and developed a plan to help Ferrante lose weight and become healthy: he would eat at the restaurant, practice self-affirmation, keep a personal workbook, attend workshops, exercise and undergo colon hydrotherapy once a week. “Ryland just saw this amazing oppor-

SO YOU KNOW What: “May I Be Frank” Where: Unity Church of Greenville, 207 E. Belvue Road, Taylors When: Friday, May 18, 7 p.m. and Saturday, May 19, 3 p.m. Tickets: $12 mayibefrankmovie.com a better person,” Gaffney said. Now Ferrante is coming to the Upstate, for a screening of “May I Be Frank” on May 18 and 19 at Unity Church of Greenville in Taylors. Ferrante will be available for a live Q&A after the film. And if viewers can’t make it, Gaffney says they recently announced a PlayItFWD.org option where people can purchase a rental of the film for others and send a link for viewing. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@greenvillejournal.com.

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Frank Ferrante before (left) and after regaining his health with the help of the staff of a vegan café.

tunity and challenged Ferrante on the spot,” said Gaffney. Surprisingly, Ferrante agreed and the trio became his “transformational cheerleaders.” “We would be his life coaches,” Gaffney said. The untrained filmmakers began to document Ferrante’s journey over 42 days. “We really just sort of took off blind,” Gaffney said. The result is “May I Be Frank,” a documentary about Ferrante’s physical and spiritual transformation. The group began filming on Valentine’s Day, 2006, and recorded about 100 hours of the highs and lows of Ferrante’s journey over the 42 days. Faced with the mammoth task of editing, the filmmakers let the film sit in a shoebox on a shelf for several months, Gaffney said. Then Gregg Marks, a filmmaker from New York, met the group and, after watching part of the footage, agreed to edit it into a cohesive work. Ferrante, who had gone his own way and actually reverted to some of his old behaviors, heard about the release of the film and wanted to be involved, Gaffney said. The film’s release was the impetus Ferrante needed: he has now shed more than 100 pounds, is eating well and working out, “and we couldn’t have cast

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MEET THE REAL PLAYERS IN TOWN A CELEBRATION IN THE HEART OF GREENVILLE

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• Support and celebrate the downtown business community • Network with downtown business associates • Entertain clients and prospects • Enjoy special post-game networking event at downtown restaurants

Game starts at 2pm. For tickets and sponsorship information call the Greenville Drive at 240-4525.

MAY 4, 2012 | Greenville Journal 39

T:5.445”

Join us for one of the most unique networking opportunities of the year, as business and baseball come together at the Greenville Drive Game at Fluor Field.


journal sketchbook

Arts Calendar

May 4-10, 2012

Fountain Inn Chorale Spring Choral Concert May 4 ~ 409-1050

The Warehouse Theatre The 39 Steps Through May 12 ~ 235-6948

Various Greenville galleries First Friday May 4 ~ 553-6053

Greenville Symphony Orchestra Beethoven’s Ninth May 5-6 ~ 467-3000

Greenville County Museum of Art Julyan Davis: Dark Corners May 5-Jul. 1 ~ 271-7570 Lowcountry Through Sep. 9 ~ 271-7570 Portrait of Greenville Through Sep. 30 ~ 271-7570 Andrew Wyeth: The Greenville Collection Ongoing ~ 271-7570

South Carolina Children’s Theatre Go, Dog. Go! Through May 6 ~ 467-3000

Metropolitan Arts Council One-Stop Open Studios Exhibit Through May 14 ~ 467-3132

Greenville Chautauqua Society Denmark Vesey, a Discussion May 8 ~ 244-2499

Artisphere at Centre Stage Artists of the Upstate Exhibit Through Jun. 19 ~271-9355

Peace Center Downtown Films PINA May 8 ~ 467-3000

Main Street Real Estate Gallery Works by Carole Tinsley Through Jun. 30 ~ 250-4177

Fountain Inn Arts Center Alma de Candela May 5 ~ 409-1050

Carolina Bronze Spring Concert May 10 ~ 238-4639 Downtown Alive Okra May 10 ~ 232-2273

Give Mom a Special Treat on Her Day. It’s Everybody’s Business

They’re always there for us – tell her how much you appreciate it with relaxing visit to Carolina Aesthetics. In MAY, treat her to a Lavender Microdermabrasion Facial for just $99. Her skin will be refreshed and renourished. Gift cards available.

ALSO DURING MAY: LASER HAIR REDUCTION - Treat the bikini area and receive underarm treatment at no additional cost! All other areas 10% off. PERMANENT MAKEUP - $100 OFF full eyes, full lips or eyebrows or $250 OFF for two treatments.

POOP ETIQUETTE: Picking up pet waste isn’t fun, but it will save your lawn, your shoes and your local water bodies from phosphorus,

Greenville’s only Dermatologist-run Medspa 920 Woodruff Rd. | www.carolinaaesthetics.com | 864.233.8088 40 Greenville Journal | MAY 4, 2012

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scene. here.

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Book Your Lunch is hosting Appalachian author and poet Jim Minick on Friday, May 11, from noon-2 pm at Thornblade Club in Greer. Minick celebrates the paperback release of his memoir, “The Blueberry Years,” where he writes about his and his wife’s experiences as organic blueberry farmers — the story of one couple, one farm and 1,000 blueberry bushes. Tickets are $25 each and must be purchased in advance at www.bookyourlunch.com or by calling Fiction Addiction at 675-0540. The Fountain Inn Center for Visual and Performing Arts presents a Cinco de Mayo celebration on May 5 at 7:30 p.m. with Alma de Candela (Soul of Fire), a Latin music ensemble that features rhythmic sounds, percussion and dancing. Their songbook is steeped in traditional Cuban folk music, 70s Nuyorican salsa, Latin jazz, bachata, merengue, Latin soul and modern salsa. Tickets are $10 for adults, $7 for senior citizens and $5 for students. Call 409-1050 or visit www.ftinnarts.org for more information.

Send us your arts announcement. E-mail: greenvillearts@greenvillejournal.com

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Maestro Edvard Tchivzhel will lead the Greenville Symphony Orchestra in Beethoven’s Ninth, the final concert of the 2011-2012 Masterworks Series, at The Peace Center on Saturday, May 5, at 8 p.m. and Sunday, May 6, at 3 p.m. Symphony No. 9, Op. 124 in D Minor is one of Beethoven’s best-known and most often performed symphonic pieces. The orchestra will be joined by The Greenville Chorale, under the direction of Dr. Bing Vick, and feature Christina Major, soprano, Stacey Rishoi, mezzo soprano, Vale Rideout, tenor, and Lester Lynch, bass. For those who would like to learn more about the concert program, Active Listening players are available for concert-goers in the balcony section and speaker Paul Hyde will lead a free Pre-Concert Talk one hour prior to both performances. Talks are free and open to the public. Tickets range from $15-$49 and can be purchased through The Peace Center at 467-3000 or online at www.greenvillesymphony.org.

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JOURNAL SKETCHBOOK

OUR SCHOOLS

ACTIVITIES, AWARDS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Greenville business leader Minor Mickel Shaw will receive an Honorary Doctorate of Humanities during Clemson University’s commencement exercises on Friday, May 11, in Littlejohn Coliseum. Shaw is president of the private investment company Micco LLC. Shaw has been recognized as one of the Top 25 Most Influential People in Greenville. She serves on the Clemson University President’s Advisory Board and also is a past chairwoman of the Independent Colleges and Universities of South Carolina, the Governor’s School for the Arts Foundation, the Roper Mountain Science Center Association, the University of North Carolina Arts & Humanities

OPEN HOUSE age 18 months – gr ade 12

Foundation and the Wofford College board of trustees. Registration is currently underway for two science camps at Langston Charter Middle School this summer. Both are open to all area rising fourth through ninth graders. Gross and Messy and Paper Rollercoasters will both be offered June 4- 7 and July 11-14. Contact Linda Melcher at lmelcher@langstoncharter.org or 864-286-9700 for more information or to register. The American Legion’s Palmetto Boys and Girls State

Friday, May 4 at 9:00 a.m.

Jasmine Turner and Emily Infante were crowned The Spring Carnival Princesses for Cherrydale Elementary School.

for mother’s day in n honor of the women, our mothers and others, who have given us shelter and strength, and taught us grace and goodness, we present fairly traded gifts that shine with the spirit of empowerment.

Tree of Life Abalone Pin, $24 hAnDCrAfTeD in MexiCo

2 West Lewis Plaza on Augusta road Greenville, SC 29605 Mon–Sat 10–5:30 864-239-4120 greenville.tenthousandvillages.com find ind us on facebook and Twitter

Use this logo for reductions only, do not print magenta. Do not reduce this logo more than 35%. Magenta indicates the clear area, nothing should print in this space. You may reduce the logo to 30% without the tag and strap lines. Color of Wood Block Motif critical match to Pantone 1805. Letters print Pantone Process Black.

May is gifts, gifts, gifts Academic Excellence. Biblical Truth. s o u t h s i d ec h r i s t i a n . o r g

42 GREENVILLE JOURNAL | MAY 4, 2012

2211 Woodruff Road, Simpsonville • (864) 234-7595

our staff is ready with warm, personalized service and unique gift suggestions for Mother’s Day, grads and teachers. our volunteers will share artisan stories and wrap your gift selections.


journal sketchbook is a program designed to help rising high school seniors learn about the American system of government. Representing J.L. Mann at Boys State 2012 are Lewis Bailey Gilpin, Judson Holcombe, Mason Rubenstein. For Palmetto Girls State 2012, J.L. Mann rising seniors Jessia Meggs, Elizabeth Foley, Francis Minor, Laura Woodside and Meredith Wingate. Delegates are selected for the program based on the leadership skills and involvement they have shown in their respective schools and communities. Blue Ridge Middle School invites the community to celebrate its 25th anniversary at an event on May 31, 2-3 p.m. at the school. Guests are invited to bring any mementos they have and can share with the group. Guests should RSVP by May 10 by calling 355-1901.

Dr. Robin Johnson, Dean and Professor of the College of Education at North Greenville University, was one of the recipients chosen for the 2012 South Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities, Inc. (SCICU) Excellence in Teaching Award. Dr. Johnson, from Travelers Rest, has completed her 10th year of teaching education at NGU. Ms. Henri Baskins (left), Chair of SCICU Board of Trustees, presents the award to Dr. Robin Johnson (center) with Dr. Randall Pannell (right), NGU Vice President for Academics.

The J.L. Mann Patriots boys tennis team went undefeated in the regular season with a record of 14-0 including a non-region win over perennial powerhouse CCES who are the defending A/AA state champions. Parks Schoen, #1 singles, and Will Thomas, #2 singles, were undefeated in region play, and the pair was also undefeated at #1 doubles. Wallace Hendricks, #4 singles, was also undefeated in region play. Coach Cameron Blackwell is expecting the team to do well in the upcoming playoffs.



Carolina High School was the winner of “Best Overall” in the “Are You Above the Influence? Show Me ... “ contest held on April 19 at the Greenville Memorial Hospital. They received a standing ovation for “Rise Above,” a song they wrote and performed live. Five student groups participated in the contest sponsored by Greenville Safe Communities Coalition, Enforcing Underage Drinking Laws (EUDL), Get Buckled Committee, Greenville Hospital System, Greenville Family Partnership, and The Phoenix Center. The students represented League Academy (two groups), Tanglewood Middle School, Carolina High School and The Greenville County Youth Board.

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Submit entries to: Greenville Journal, Our Schools, 148 River Street, Ste. 120, Greenville, SC 29601 or e-mail: greenvillecommunity@greenvillejournal.com

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MAY 4, 2012 | Greenville Journal 43


journal sketchbook

How it was

AQUOS BOARD

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American Bank

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Photos available from Greenville County Historical Society - 233-4103 The West End acquired its own bank when Walter L. Gassaway, Henry Briggs and R.E. Allen organized the American Bank in 1890 and occupied a existing building on a triangular lot at the intersection of Augusta and Pendleton streets that had once housed a drug store. Seen in this photo from 1895, the intersection in front of the bank served as a cotton market, with scales on Pendleton street and a cotton gin and oil mill up Augusta Street not far from the bank. Farmers would bring their freshly ginned cotton to the scales and buyers would make an offer on the spot.

From “Remembering Greenville: Photographs from the Coxe Collection,” by Jeffrey R. Willis

How it is

South Carolina Legal Services

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Exit 39 at the intersection of I 385 & Haywood Road Shopping Line® 864.288.0511 *while supplies last

44 Greenville Journal | MAY 4, 2012

MALL NAME HERE *while supplies last

Greg Beckner / Staff

Makeovers, Entertainment, Fashion Tips, Food Sampling, Makeovers, Entertainment, Fashion Tips, Sampling, *, Prizes andFood More! Cocktails, Goody Bags Makeovers, Entertainment, Fashion Tips, Food Sampling, * Cocktails, Goody Bags*, Prizes and More! Cocktails, Goody Bags, Prizes and More!

The building as seen today was constructed by the bank about 1905 on the same site in the Beaux Arts/neoclassical style. In 1920 the bank reorganized itself as the American Building and Loan Association with Bennette E. Greer, president of Judson Mill, as its president. Although the institution survived the first onslaught of the Depression, its name was changed in 1936 to Fidelity Federal Savings and Loan. In 1939 the renamed institution abandoned its West End location. Today, the building is home to South Carolina Legal Services.


JOURNAL HOMES F E AT U R E D H O M E S & N E I G H B O R H O O D S | O P E N H O U S E S | P R O P E R T Y T R A N S F E R S

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For more info or a private showing call 864.345.7124 141 Notting Hill Lane, Briar Creek, Greer, SC 29651 Come and explore this charming Arts and Crafts style 4 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath bungalow home. This brand new home has all the warmth and character of yesteryear while offering the benefits of modern design and energy efficiency. Stone and shake accents and the inviting, covered front porch welcome one into this beautiful home. Gleaming, site finished hardwoods flow throughout the main level in the Foyer, Dining Room, Kitchen, Breakfast Room and Great Room. The bright, open Great Room with vaulted ceiling and stone fireplace opens onto the

deck and into the Breakfast Room, and stunning Kitchen which has granite countertops and Stainless Steel appliances. Main level Master Suite includes a large bath with spa tub, separate shower, dual sinks, and large walkin closet. Also on the main floor are a 2nd bedroom or office, large laundry room, and half bath. The 2nd floor offers 2 additional bedrooms and hall bathroom. Briar Creek is a quaint community of new homes which is conveniently located in Greer, about half way between Greenville and Spartanburg. Just minutes to I-85, The Village of Pelham Hospital and BMW.

More photos, info and over 1,900 neighborhoods online at

HOME INFO Price: $240,000 | MLS#1227515 4 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths, 2200-2399 SF Daniel Hamilton 864.527.7685 info@mygreenvillehome.com Hamilton & Co. | mygreenvillehome.com Keller Williams Realty Send us your Featured Home for consideration. homes@greenvillejournal.com

BRIAR CREEK is a growing community with several recently completed and sold homes. Just a few lots remain available, call 864.345.7124 today!

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MAY 4, 2012 | G R E E N V I L L E J O U R N A L 45


F E A T U R E D OPEN

S U N D AY,

O P E N MAY

6

FROM

H O U S E 2–4PM

1 8 H y d r a n g e a W a y, B e n n e t t ’s G r o v e , G r e e n v i l l e Just what you have been looking for...This “Better Than New” 4 bedroom Open Floor Plan Home with bonus room & home office is situated on a large .83 acre lot that backs to trees and borders a creek. This pristine home offers a large kitchen with granite counter tops, gas cook top and double wall ovens and opens to a lovely family room with tall ceilings and a gas log fireplace which would be perfect for entertaining. This lovely home also offers a sun room that overlooks a large 2 level deck that spans the back of home. Upstairs you will find a bonus room, laundry room, master suite and 3 other large bedrooms. The divine master suite offers privacy with its own sitting room and luxurious bath. The sitting room off the master would be perfect as a nursery, home office, or exercise space. The 20W X 26L oversized 2 car garage HOME INFO with 11” ceiling provides lots of space for storage. If you are Price: $339,900 | MLS#1235617 needing storage space, you 4 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths, 3600-3799SF will find it here because this Sunroom, Two Level Deck and home has a Tall Walk-In Crawl Oversized 2 Car Garage Space complete with full size door & cement slab. Come see Oakview Elementary School this full package home today Beck Academy that you will not have to wait JL Mann High School to have built and is already Contact: complete with designer paint Tim Toates 864.360.6600 colors! This is truly a turn key Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. home!

O P E N THE

UPSTATE’S

PRIMARY

SOURCE

7 MAJESTIC OAK COURT - $334,000 4BR/2.5BA. Beautiful home set on large private lot in Richland Creek, 5-yr old home is still in brand-new condition. Take N. Main, right on Rutherford Rd, enter gate on right, and take immediate left. FSBO www.7majestic.com, (864) 525-6350

303 MELVILLE AVE - $320,000 3BR/2BA. Newly renovated and turn-key. New MBR, kit cabs, granite counters, ss appl, island & much more. .Augusta Rd to Melville, Follow Melville, Hm on L prior to reaching Faris. Park in alley behind house. Julie Jensen, 483-8222 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1240028

253 PROVIDENCE SQUARE - $287,000 335 VERDANA COURT - $257,500 5BR/3BA. All brick ranch w/daylight base5BR/4BA. Lovely immaculate home with ment. 2 car garage, large private lot, great bright open floorplan ready to move in. Eastside location. 385 to Haywood Rd, R on Located on a quiet cul-de-sac in popular Pelham, L. on Hudson, L on Providence Sq, Boiling Springs neighborhood within minutes Hm on R. Ginny Wylie, 270-1305 Prudential of I-85, this home offers a large, convenient K C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1240003 peggy romine, 864) 580-9429 MLS#201969

ORCHARD FARMS

MEADOW WOODS

ORCHARD FARMS

SHARON PLACE

IVYBROOKE

109 MEADOW WOOD CT - $215,000 5BR/2.5BA. Charming home, Forest Acres School District. In-law Suite w/ full BA. Large fenced lot. I-85 to Exit 40, L @ GM Dealership, L on Sheffield, L @ 4-way on Crestview, R on Meadow Ridge, R on Meadow Woods Linda Ballard, 449-6302 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1238839

46 G R E E N V I L L E J O U R N A L | MAY 4, 2012

SUN 2-4PM (5/6)

HOUSES

18 HYDRANGEA WAY - $339,900 4BR/2.5BA. Better than new. Over 3600SF. Office. .83 acre lot & much more. Most see. DIR: Woodruff Rd to L on Hwy 296, go 1.5 miles to R into SD. Tim Toates,, 360-6600 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1235617

SUN 2-4PM (5/6)

AUGUSTA ROAD AREA

OPEN

164 RIDGELAND DRIVE - $539,000 2BR/3BA. Wonderful open floor plans, 10’ clngs, granite countertops, stainless appliances, 10x12 covered patios & much more. McDaniel Avenue from Augusta Rd. Left on Ridgeland, follow signs to Sales Center Beth Crigler, 678-5263 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1222397

10 W. GLOHAVEN PLACE - $222,500 4BR/2.5BA. Brick front culdesac home. Move-in ready. Granite kitchen. 2 story GR, screened porch & private backyard. Roper Mtn to L. on Fortuna, L on Glohaven, Hm on R. Valorie Cardell, 979-2913 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1235540

SUN 1-4PM (5/6)

FOR

BENNETTS GROVE

SUN 2-4PM (5/6)

RICHLAND CREEK

W E E K E N D

RIDGELAND AT THE PARK SAT-SUN 1:30-5PM

SUN 2-4PM (5/6)

SUN 2-4PM (5/6)

T H I S

SUN 2-4PM (5/6)

PELHAM ESTATES

SUN 2-4PM (5/6)

SUN 2-4PM (5/6)

123 N. ORCHARD FARMS AVE - $206,000 202 KINCADE DR - $184,900 688 IVYBROOK AVE - $172,000 5BR/3.5BA. Great value. Updated and move- 3BR/2.5BA. Move-in ready ranch hm in great 3BR/2.5BA. Maintenance free townhome w/ in ready. DIR: Roper Mtn cross Hwy 14, L on SD. DIR: Woodruff Rd to Tanner Rd, L into master on main, open floor plan, DR, sunBatesville, R into SD, L on N. Orchard Farms, SD on Burdock, 1st R on Pike Ct, 1st L on room. 85 N to Pelham Rd, exit R off ramp, Hm on L. Lisa Norton, 414-3477 Prudential Pike St, @ stop turn L on Kincade, Hm on turn on Garlington Rd, R into SD, To enter C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1239082 R. Christine Kurta, 346-7200 Prudential C. gate code 243-1271. L on Ivybrooke Ave, Hm Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1239719 on L Bobbie Schultz,, 243-1271 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1235141

STERLING ESTATES

REVIS FALLS

SUN 2-4PM (5/6)

SUN 2-4PM (5/6)

2 REVIS CREEK COURT - $167,500 3BR/2.5BA. Absolutely beautiful home in great location. Move-in ready. Open floor plan. Master on main. DIR: Woodruff Rd towards Five Forks, approx 5 miles, R into SD, 1 st hm on R. Tim Keagy, 905-3304 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1236573

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


OPEN HOUSES MAY

6,

SCOTTSWOOD

2-4

E US2-4pm O H , N ay 6 E OPday M Sun

Sat OP urd EN ay & S H OU un SE day 2-5 

PM

SUN 2-4PM (5/6)

Lake Lanier

40 WOOD POINTE DR, #39 - $135,000 3BR/2BA. Pristine, spacious end unit. Abundant storage, superior quality. 385 S. to Haywood Rd, L over bridge, cross Pelham, SD on L. Wanda Reed, 270-4078 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1233388

FOUNTAIN BROOK

Highgrove $387,900 • MLS 1237109

SUN 2-4PM (5/6)

986 E. Lakeshore Drive • Landrum, SC

Pebble Creek $249,900 • MLS 1238812

MOUNTAIN LAKE HOME with DEEP WATER DOCK in place with 224 feet on the water. BEAUTIFUL LAKE HOME! Completed in 2004 with separate living areas for friends, family, or rental income. Upstairs has 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, kitchen, large living area with hardwoods, 1778 sq ft, and private deck overlooking lake. Downstairs has 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, private kitchen, large living area with hardwoods, 1778 sq ft, and private deck overlooking the lake.

702 FOUNTAINBROOK LANE - $121,900 3BR/2BA. New construction. Great home. Quality craftmanship. Community pool & playground. 385 South to Exit 23 Hwy 418, L on 418, cross over Main St, slight R on Durbin Rd, R into SD on Fountainbrook Dean Rogers, 923-5059 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1229516

W

NE

Last listed at $647,000 – PRICE NOW $449,900

R E A L

E S T A T E PEOPLE,

AWARDS,

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For more information, contact: Thomco Properties 864.505.6361

D I G E S T

Summerwalk $198,900 • MLS 1240002

HONORS

C o l d w e l l B a n k e r C a i n e N a m e s U p s t a t e ’s To p P r o d u c e r s f r o m M a r c h , 2 0 1 2 April 17, 2012 – Coldwell Banker Caine recently recognized its top producing agents in property sales and listings from each of its five offices – Easley, Greenville, Greer, Seneca and Spartanburg – for the month of March. The top producing agents from each office are ranked by the total volume of business closed last month and include: · Easley: Heather Parlier, Melissa Hall, Susan McCoy

· Greenville: John Stephenson, Debi Garrison, Kathy Harris · Greer: Susan Wagner, Charlene Panek, Shelbie Dunn · Seneca: Pat Loftis, Dottie Shuman, Wendy Brown · Spartanburg: Beth Beach, Lori Thompson, Rhonda Porter Top listing agents in each office are recognized for listing the highest total volume of residential properties last

G

IN

T LIS

month and include: · Easley: Susan McCoy, Heather Parlier, Carol Walsh · Greenville: Sharon Wilson, Jacob Mann, Susan Reid · Greer: David Glenn, Charlene Panek, Alicia Waynick · Seneca: Pat Loftis, Jere duBois, Reg Tatum and Barry Voeltz · Spartanburg: Andrew Little, Francie Little, Annette Starnes

Helen Hagood

Selling Greenville for 28 Years! Mobile: 864-419-2889 hhagood@cbcaine.com

C. Dan Joyner Pleasantburg Office Receives Award by Prudential Real Estate

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

Brookfield Residential Property Services. The Round Table Award honors the top three offices from each U.S. region and the top office in Canada and Mexico, ranked among offices of similar size. C. Dan Joyner’s Pleasantburg Office was recognized during special ceremonies at the Prudential Real Estate Sales Convention in Orlando, Fla., in March. The office held a breakfast ceremony this

week to celebrate the prestigious award, as well as individual agent awards. “We are pleased to be recognized as a top-producing office in the Prudential Real Estate Network.,” said Teresa Cox, Broker in Charge of the Pleasantburg Office. “Customers are our No. 1 priority and we go great lengths to ensure their complete satisfaction.”

See these homes and more at cbcaine.com/agents/HelenHagood

C52R

April 23, 2012 – Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. REALTORS Pleasantburg Office received Prudential Real Estate’s prestigious Round Table Award for residential GCI and residential units in 2011 Teresa Cox for the U.S. South Region. Prudential Real Estate is a company of

MAY 4, 2012 | G R E E N V I L L E J O U R N A L 47


N E I G H B O R H O O D SYCAMORE

Celebrating the

P R O F I L E

RIDGE

success

of our agents...

Maggie Worsham

Top Relocation Agent, 2011 lifestyle. Take advantage of the privacy Sycamore Ridge offers by enjoying a stroll along the shaded sidewalks at your leisure. Minutes from downtown Simpsonville with easy and convenient access to schools, shopping, restaurants, golf and community events.

NEIGHBORHOOD INFO

$4

$2

00

00

00

,00

0

,00

0

,00

0 0 20

07

20

08

20

09

20

10

$306,590

Bryson Elementary Bryson Middle School Hillcrest High School

$6

$365,917

Amenities: Clubhouse, Sidewalks, Swimming Pool, Tennis Courts

HISTORIC HOME SALES

$445,350

12 Month Average Home Price: $439,862

$430,233

... a success we owe to the support of the Upstate community.

Sycamore Ridge, Simpsonville, SC The quiet neighborhood of Sycamore Ridge is the perfect location for your family. Sycamore Ridge features stately homes on large, private, well-tended lots. With a clubhouse, junior Olympic swimming pool, and tennis courts, there are many outlets to accommodate an active

$471,455

Coldwell Banker Caine congratulates Maggie Worsham, Top Relocation Agent for the second year in a row.

20

11

Over 1,900 neighborhoods online at 48 G R E E N V I L L E J O U R N A L | MAY 4, 2012

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


APRIL SUBD. KINGSBRIDGE BARRINGTON PARK ABNORWOOD

PRICE $1,135,000 $675,000 $600,000 $580,000 SPAULDING FARMS $575,000 GARDENS AT THORNBLADE $560,000 $559,500 GOWER ESTATES $520,000 PARK HILLS $515,000 THE OAKS AT ROPER MOUNTAIN $482,900 AUGUSTA CIRCLE $424,250 AUGUSTA HEIGHTS $385,000 RIVER WALK $370,000 WOODLANDS $344,400 TUSCAN WOODS $339,000 KNOLLWOOD $325,000 ROPER MOUNTAIN ESTATES $320,000 KILGORE FARMS $310,000 MONTEBELLO $300,000 SUGAR CREEK $297,500 CREEKWOOD $296,745 SOUTHBROOK $293,506 $279,000 $272,500 TAR ACRES $270,000 ROCKBROOKE NORTH $263,500 $260,000 WASSON WAY $260,000 $260,000 PELHAM ESTATES $257,000 WOODSTONE COTTAGES $255,028 THE TOWNES AT HIGHGROVE $250,025 $250,000 WOODSTONE COTTAGES PH.II $249,000 HOLLY TRACE $246,900 SOUTHSIDE ESTATES $244,900 SUGAR CREEK $237,500 CYPRESS RUN $232,500 BRUSHY MEADOWS $225,000 GLENS @ LEXINGTON PLACE $220,000 $220,000 LAKE FOREST HEIGHTS $219,900 BRIDGEWATER $209,820 THE FARM @ SANDY SPRINGS $206,115 $200,000 $200,000 CARRINGTON GREEN $195,750 SQUIRES CREEK $195,000 THE MEADOWS AT GILDER CREEK FARM $192,000 BOTANY WOODS $187,000 HAWK POINTE PH.1 $185,000 MILLCREEK ESTATES $185,000 RIVER MIST $184,000 LAKE FOREST $180,000 $175,000 TWIN CREEKS $174,890 FLAGSTONE VILLAGE $169,900 MT LEBANON HEIGHTS $165,000 SHOALS CROSSING $160,000 KALEDON ACRES $159,000 HALF MILE LAKE $159,000 COPPER CREEK $158,900 BROWNSTONE CROSSING $155,000 $154,000 HAMMETT CROSSING $153,000 THE RESERVE AT RIVERSIDE $150,000 $150,000 FOXGLOVE $148,100 RICELAN SPRINGS $148,000 WHITE OAK HILLS $145,000 SHELBURNE FARMS $142,900 PHEASANT RIDGE $142,000 OAK PARK $140,000 $140,000 DEER CREEK $138,000 SHEFFIELD FOREST $138,000 SHEFFIELD FOREST $138,000 BONNIE VISTA $135,000 MCCULLOUGH HEIGHTS $135,000 HOLLY SPRINGS $134,000 $130,343 $130,000 SPARROWS POINT $130,000 RIVER RIDGE $129,000 WILDFLOWER MEADOWS $128,000 SUGAR CREEK VILLAS $125,500 $118,000

16-20,

SELLER LEDER CHERYL LOIS SANTORO ELLEN J MITTELSTAEDT MARGO A MUSGNUG DAISY A HANNA JEFFREY W SCOTT DEBORAH J TRUSTEE WALKER WESLEY M III TRUS JARRETT ELIZABETH S OREGON REFLECTIONS LLC DUNN CUSTOM BUILDERS LLC WILSON EMILY SMITH BROADBENT JOHN H NEAR KELLY C SAVOIE SCOTT A DAVIS JOAN R TRUSTEE SOUTHERN FIRST BANK N A BREWER WALTER LEE JR HOGAN PROPERTIES HOLDING RIDGE CREST HOMES INC SPAULDING RICHARD A BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT NVR INC L & N PROPERTIES MANAGEM ARMSTRONG KEITH F FRITZ MARY C HILMAN MICHELLE BURDETTE ENTERPRISES INC PRESSLEY JAMES L DONLAN BRIAN M CLARKE ELIZABETH H ROSEWOOD OF THE PIEDMONT NVR INC SAREAULT PROPERTIES ROSEWOOD OF THE PIEDMONT BELVIN EVERETT LEE II UPSTATE GOLDEN PROPERTIE SUCH ROBERT BRIAN PATTON WILLIAM KENNETH SHUFELT ERIC F (JTWROS) DISHER BRIAN L DYER PATSY H BENNETT GRANT W BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT D R HORTON INC MCCUEN WILLIAM G SR CULBRETH CHRISTOPHER COSBY JANET S MCKALE DONALD BROKER MICHAEL J SEEAR CHRISTIE MULLINAX DISTINGUISHED DESIGN LLC BROWN SHIRLEY G (LIFE ES LERSCH CARRIE L BAGHEROF DAVOOD JOPE INC NVR INC ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION L ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION L KB&D SERVICES LLC SK BUILDERS INC LEE LYNN ALLISON MUNGO HOMES INC SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND CURRY E CHRISTOPHER CHRISTOFFERSON KATIE L OWENBY JENNIFER C WALKER CLYDE E FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTG A STRYKER PETER B JOHNSTON THOMAS E DOLAN ANNETTE S SCHAUDER ANDREW GEORGE J GULFMAN APRIL H FBSA 1 LLC SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND CANTRELL MILDRED BURGESS CAO PHUONG LAN THI WAGGONER DEBORAH S DGR LLC HUNTLEY PAMELA H HINSON JOE VISION 3 LLC ALLEN ERIC SCOTT SMITH LAWRENCE E SALDANA NEPTHALI F DUMIT RUBY E WEST MARGARET HOWARD

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

2012

BUYER TEMPLE SCOTT W (JTWROS) NEWELL JANEL SIMMONS JAMES R HATTEN STEPHEN P (JTWROS SALIH GERBURG M (JTWROS) MUSGNUG DAISY A WILSON ROBERT REED (JTWR KNIGHT JENNIFER BELL (JT DONLAN BRIAN M (JTWROS) HARTMAN ROGER J (JTWROS) JOHNSON JEFFREY (JTWROS) WHITAKER PAUL BRYAN JR(J FARMER GEORGE H (JTWROS) MARTIN MICHAEL (JTWROS) ST CLAIR HUGH E III SUSTAKOVITCH CHRISTINE K SPIZZIRRI PETER JR (JTWR STEPHAN JOSEPH E (JTWROS INDEPENDENCE NATIONAL BA FARMER STUART S HOLSCHER THOMAS C CURESKY EDWARD J FRIDAY CAROL WHITSON SCOTT (JTWROS) NOYES DAVID L (SURV) DENISON RICHARD D (JTWRO BURDETTE CONSTRUCTION GRIFFIN JOHN A (JTWROS) COREY JAMES H HAIRSTON BERRON C (JTWRO THACKSTON CLEATIS K CLAPS LILING H HEAVENLY CARE SERVICES I DENNY RAY (JTWROS) ALBERS CREIGHTON E (JTWR ADAMS ROBERT L III WEAVER KEVIN B (SURV) LEACRAFT WILLIE JOYCE KING RICHARD W (JTWROS) TURNER RYNE T (JTWROS) RODRIGUEZ ELENA NELSON SCOTT E (JTWROS) STURGEON KATHLEEN L KASIANOWICZ KEVIN L (JTW HOMES OF HOPE INC WOLTERS FAMILY DECLARATI CG OF GREENVILLE LLC STANCIL EMILY ANNE WELCH KAYLA POULOS KYRIAKOS K (JTWRO TRAVAGLINI JO ANNA (JTWR LUKAS MARY BETH (SURV) MINOR CHRISTOPHER H (JTW BURCH ERICA A WATSON COMPANY LLC THE WILLIAMS JAMES T (JTWROS CANFIELD EDNA E (JTWROS) KAISER CONRAD (JTWROS) DAVIS CARSON A HENDERSON DONNA J OSBORNE RANDY L (JTWROS) MERCIER ANDREA J (JTWROS LAUX JOHN REEVES KACIE N WILSON CALLEIGH A (JTWRO FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG GESCHWINDNER DAVID CARTER MORGAN LEIGH REO SOLUTIONS LLC STEWART JEFFREY SCOTT DASSEL JOHN MICHAEL (JTW RUDD DAVID M LOY JEFFREY D (JTWROS) V GO HOLDINGS LLC BROWNING PHILLIP L CAO PHUONG LAN THI CAO PHUONG LAN THI (JTWR MEDLIN SHEILA W BOSWELL HOLDINGS LLC WHEELER MICHAEL (JTWROS) ABUNIJEM NIDAL PALMETTO SUNSHINE HOMES DORFF CASEY (JTWROS) COMPTON SHEILA G (JTWROS CLAY RAINA R SUCH ANGELA DUNCAN DAVID V II REVOC

ADDRESS 108 TURNER FOREST LN 6 SAINT HELAINE PL 3 NORTH BROOKWOOD DR 101 STRATHMORE DR 19 CHURCHILL DOWNS 43 LATOUR WAY 233 CAMILLE AVE 1123 PARKINS MILL RD 110 ABERDEEN DR 131 CHARLESTON OAK LN 101 WACCAMAW AVENUE 9 WAVERLY CT 203 RIVER WALK DR 106 FABLING CT 137 APPLEWOOD DRIVE 204 SUNSET DR 5 FOXGLOVE CT 307 CARTERS CREEK CT 500 E WASHINGTON ST 108 WOODY CREEK RD 159 CREEK SHOALS DR 300 SELDEN WAY 10 MATTESON BROOK 419 PHILLIPS LN 310 TAR BLVD 10 SUNAPEE CT 1300 EDWARDS RD 230 WOODSIDE RD 13 ARTHUR AVE 21 JAMESTOWN DR 27 LITTEN WAY 2 DILLWORTH CT PO BOX 8122 319 BROWNSTONE CIR 4 CIRCLE SLOPE CT 19 GEORGIANNA LN 107 SWEETWATER CT 105 AUDREY LN 200 MEADOW LAKE TRAIL 207 BELMONT STAKES WAY 3706 E NORTH ST APT R3 9 DREXEL AVENUE 319 BRIDGE CROSSING DR 180 PENDOCK LN 3 DUNEAN ST 45 WINSTON CHASE CT 2 STRATTON PL 209 SQUIRES CREEK RD 7 RED JONATHAN COURT 108 ROLLINGREEN RD 210 JEWELL CT 4 HACKAMORE TR 130 WILD DOGWOOD WAY 109 SHANNON DR 10 LEDBURY LN 50 YOUNG HARRIS DR 26 LEBANON CT 20 MOUNTAIN HEIGHT RD 507 NORWELL LN 26 SUMMERDALE DR 207 BECKENHAM LN 206 PILGER PL 108 UPPER MEADOW WAY 103 MIDLAND ST 25 WOOLRIDGE WAY PO BOX 650043 17 GREEN GATE RD 417 ROBERTS RD PO BOX 25309 1228 GREEN FERN DR 114 STOCKBRIDGE DR 3 BOYSENBERRY DR 110 SYLVAN OAK WAY 501 MOSSY LEDGE LN 31 BUCK TR 16 VAILLE DR 16 VAILLE DR 108 COXTON MILL COURT 900 OLD WILLIAMSTON RD 612 E BUTLER RD 12 STATEN LN 15 SHORE AVE 200 ASHRIDGE WAY 22 TRUMPETER LN 102 ALLIUM WAY 402 SPARROW HAWK CT 110 PINE ST EXT

T Y EA NIT GR RTU PO OP

$759,000 AUGUSTA ROAD

Augusta Road home on kid-filled street has been renovated and expanded to include new everything (minus some exterior walls and foundation). Kitchen includes GE Profile SS appl’s, custom cabinets, center island. Den for great entertaining. Main Level guest suite with own private BA and Master on Main. Screened porch w/ vaulted ceilings. MLS#1239919 Tom Marchant 894.449.1658

W NE ICE R P

$549,000 CLUB FOREST

Updated 4BR, 3.5 BA home in Club Forest section of Chanticleer priced to sell! Upgrades and renovations: granite c’tops in kitchen, new powder room and walk-in laundry room. Master on main with hdwds added in 2009. New architectural shingle roof replaced in 2010. Quiet, low traffic, cul-de-sac street located at front of Chanticleer. MLS#1240240 Heidi Putnam 864.380.6747

ED UC D RE

$749,000 MONTEBELLO

Just reduced - priced to sell! Quality built custom home w/ 5BR, 4 full BA, 2 1/2 BA, approx. 5600SF. Great room w/ large gas fpl, surround has built-in corner cabinets. Gourmet kitchen with custom cabinetry, large center island, granite c’tops, tile back splash, large walk-in pantry and SS top of the line appl’s. MLS#1239457 Nancy McCrory 864.505.8367 or Karen Turpin 864.230.5176

N VE HA E ON ST

$439,900 STONEHAVEN

Gorgeous inside & out! 5 BR, 4.5 BA home on aprox. 1/3 ac. Gleaming hdwds throughout w/ ceramic in sunroom. Kitchen has granite counters andSS appl’s with double oven. 3 car gar for additional storage AND 800 sqft in attic for more rooms. In law suite on main. MBA on the 2nd lvl. Some outdoor furniture and yard pieces available for purchase. MLS#1238690 Joye Lanahan 864.404.5372

Immaculate golf course, 5BR, 4.5BA brick home in A++ condition! 0.75 acre, fully sprinklered, lush lot backs up to golf course. Approx 4390SF, Updated kitchen and bathrooms. Home is move in ready. Pebble Creek golf memberships are available. Tennis and swimming, also available at the Club. MLS#1239427 Valerie Miller 864.430.6602

R VE RI ALK W

$394,900 RIVER WALK Beautiful

tradition home w/4BR, 2.5BA has large walk in foyer and bonus room. Designer kitchen just renovated in 2011. Gorgeous granite c’tops and fresh paint. Gleaming hdwds. Beautifully landscaped yard and large screened in porch. Award winning schools. Amenities: clubhouse, pool, workout area, playground, tennis courts and a 4 mile walking trail. MLS#1236057 Joye Lanahan 864.404.5372

ST JU TED S LI

T EA E! R U G L VA

$219,500 BROOKFIELD WEST

LF E! GO RS U CO

$435,000 LINKSIDE

$257,900 NEELY FARM

Incredible Family Home! Popular open floor plan includes Great room PLUS Keeping room with fireplace / open to kitchen. 4 bedrooms plus 4 full baths! Office downstairs has closet and can be converted into a 5th bedroom if needed. Beautifully landscaped yard gives added curb appeal. Very functional, comfortable home! Take a look today! MLS#1240097 Barb Riggs 864.423.2783

! ED C DU RE

$189,500 NORTHWOOD HILLS

Brick Ranch many updates 3 BR, 2 1/2 BA. Large den/LR with built-ins. Large DR, nice kitchen with solid counter tops, pass through into living area and breakfast area. Large patio, fenced yard, 2 car gar attached with extra storage, single detached gar with 220 power. Attached lawn mower shed in back yard. New heating and AC in Feb. 2012. MLS#1238744 Nellie Wagoner 864.423.3939

ST JU TED LIS

$149,900 TOWNES@PINE GROVE

Beautiful 3 BR/2.5 BA townhome is only 6 years old, has approx. 1400 SF and looks brand new. MBR on main. Gas fpl, fully fenced bkyd with patio. All appl’s included, plus refrigerator with acceptable offer. Sprinkler system (entire yard) and alarm system. Wonderful neighborhood with great schools. MLS#1239243 Anne Marchant 864.420.0009 or Brian Marchant 864.631.5858

Incredible value and convenient! Extremely clean 4BR/2.5BA home has been lovingly cared for and recently updated with new paint and light fixtures. Kitchen opens to breakfast area and large den with separate DR and lLR nearby. 4 bedrooms including large master with huge walk-in closet and master bath upstairs. Fantastic (+/- half acre) yard. MLS#1237079 Tom Marchant 864.449.1658

E OV M

! IN

$168,000 FARM@SANDY SPRINGS

Move in ready only 9 months old! 1/2 ac lot, split floor plan ranch has all 3 BR on 1 level. Beautiful open floorplan with upgrades: kitchen faucet, SS appl’s including refrigerator and double ovens. French doors added to create home office, hdwds. Amenities include: pool and club house. 100% financing available. Call for details. MLS#1239881 Valerie Miller 864.430.6602

D CE U D RE

$79,000 JAMESTOWNE

Nice 2 bedroom 1 1/2 bath quiet location, new carpet, paint, dishwasher and disposal. Lots of storage, maser bedroom with large closets, screened porch with storage room. Approximately 1150 sq.ft. Great Location. Well maintained complex on the Eastside. MLS#1238405 Nellie Wagoner 864.423.3939

Weekend Agent on Duty: Joye Lanahan 864.404.5372 C52R

R EA L E STAT E T R A N SAC T I O N S

For more listings, more photos, more details...

www.marchantco.com | 864.467.0085 MAY 4, 2012 | G R E E N V I L L E J O U R N A L 49


Want more choices? 1 Check out the open houses posted every Tuesday for the upcoming weekend 2 Thinking about building a new home? Do a search for only Lots and Land 3 See homes that are new to the market— be the first to know

Visit www.cdanjoyner.com

Agents on call this weekend

MARK KING 979-3552 PELHAM RD.

ANGELIKA SCHMIDT 430-1671 SIMPSONVILLE

PHIL ROMBA 349-7607 WOODRUFF RD.

R E A L

RICK WORKMAN 879-4239 GREER

RON MCDANIEL 979-6633 PLEASANTBURG

E S T A T E APRIL

SUBD. WESTWOOD HAMMETT CREEK PEPPERTREE HOLLINGTON HOLLINGTON DREXEL TERRACE CARMAN GLEN FOREST CREEK WATERMILL PH.2 FOREST HILLS STONEWOOD SADDLER’S RIDGE DEL NORTE ESTATES OAK FOREST HOLLINGSWORTH PARK AT VERDAE

PRICE $117,633 $115,000 $114,000 $114,000 $114,000 $112,900 $112,000 $110,000 $108,000 $108,000 $107,900 $106,000 $105,000 $104,000 $102,000 $100,000 $97,500

SELLER SMITH ZACHARY A MARLIN GROUP INC THE CRIBBS KEVIN E BK RESIDENTIAL VENTURES BK RESIDENTIAL VENTURES WELLS FARGO SERIES 2007ARANGO ALEYDA SCIABICA BRUCE EDWARD MARK III PROPERTIES INC FOR 8 CORPORATION INC JPMORGAN CHASE BANK N A GSAMP TRUST 2006-HE4 KNUDSON ANTHONY LEE RACHEL ANN KISEL LEONID GREENE BEATRICE M VERDAE DEVELOPMENT LLC

BUYER FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG RUSSELL RICHARD R (JTWRO DECROOCK DARREN M BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT LEE RACHEL ANN BLAIS MARIA ANGELICA HERSHBERGER MELISSA L EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL MCCORMICK TYLER D (JTWRO COOPER STEPHEN S ZELENKO VASILIY PUGH MATTHEW D COUNTY OF GREENVILLE THE TETOR JUSTIN M JOHNSON STEPHEN M JR VERDAE DEVELOPMENT INC

50 G R E E N V I L L E J O U R N A L | MAY 4, 2012

LINDA BALLARD 449-6302 EASLEY/ POWDERSVILLE

VIRGINIA HAYES 313-2986 AUGUSTA RD.

Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at

cdanjoyner.com.

T R A N S A C T I O N S 16-20,

ADDRESS 7105 CORPORATION DR 16 BELFREY DR 1025 SUNDOWN CIR 1155 HAMMOND PL STE E-5050 1155 HAMMOND PL STE E-5050 3 CUNNINGHAM RD 148 KINGSCREEK DRIVE 6 LAWRENCE WARD CT 2857 WESTPORT RD 107 SHANE DR 600 N MAIN ST 104 BROOKLAWN DR 309 WINDY MEADOW WAY 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE STE 200 239 FLORENCE ST 201 SYPRESS RIDGE 124 VERDAE BLVD

2012

SUBD. STANDING SPRINGS ESTATES HUNTERS VALLEY RIVERSIDE TOWNES OAK KNOLL CHURCHILL FALLS BRUTON TOWN COUNTRY CLUB ESTATES POINSETTIA BRIDGEWATER BELLWOOD ESTATES BRIARCREEK SHELLBROOK PLANTATION CEDAR LANE GARDENS TOWNES AT CHERRYDALE

PRICE $96,000 $94,000 $94,000 $91,000 $90,000 $90,000 $90,000 $85,000 $82,000 $80,000 $78,750 $72,166 $72,166 $72,000 $71,000 $70,000 $67,500

SELLER HATCH LAUREN NEAL CRYSTAL V JONES MELISSA L VISION 3 LLC SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND MANZI PATRICK GREENVILLE COUNTY REDEV FULGHUM KASPER F III GRIFFIN DANIELLE L DAVENPORT GEORGIA C C & A PROPERTY HOLDINGS MCCAULEY DAVID HENRY MCCAULEY FAMILY TRUST LL BROWN BETTY B MARK III PROPERTIES INC BURGER W L JOHNSON JEFFERY S

BUYER SMITH CANDIS B MILLS JAMES B CHAMPION LISA S MY PALMETTO HOME LLC STIER DONALD C (JTWROS) MANZI DIANE M (SURV) HERRERA ALVARO JR BAKER BYOD O (JTWROS) COMMERCIAL MORTGAGE LLC DILLON’S CONSTRUCTION CO BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT MCCAULEY FAMILY TRUST LL MCCAULEY FAMILY TRUST LL REITER HEATHER A BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT RAINEY ELIZABETH BELL RANDY LEO (JTWROS)

ADDRESS 108 W LONGCREEK CT 710 HAYDEN CT 20 BAILESS CT 15 SHORE AVE 501 TANACROSS WAY 105 SEATTLE SLEW LN 105 OLD PARIS MOUNTAIN RD 203 WAVERLY HALL LN PO BOX 566 PO BOX 1331 1155 HAMMOND PL STE E-5050 706 WHITE HORSE RD EXT 706 WHITE HORSE RD EXT 104 BRIARVIEW CIR 1155 HAMMOND PL STE E-5050 201 GARDENIA DR 201 ASHBY DR

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


journal sketchbook

CAT SPECIALS FOR MAY NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Falls Park Eatery, LLC DBA Overlook Grill, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON AND OFF premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 601 South Main Street, Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than May 20, 2012. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 898-5899 NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that T-P Greenville, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1034 Woodruff Road, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than May 13, 2012. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 898-5899

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that CEG Woodruff Road, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1117 A Woodruff Road, Greenville SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than May 20, 2012. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 898-5899

NOTICE OF ACTION STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE FAMILY COURT THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT C/A No. 2012-DR-23-1470 Briana Nadine Smith, Plaintiff, vs. Derrick R.Q. Smith, Defendant. YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the original Summons and Complaint in the above entitled action were filed in the Office of the Clerk of Court in the Family Court of Greenville County, South Carolina, the object of the prayer is to obtain a divorce from Derrick R.Q. Smith. Contact: The Carruthers Law Firm 111 Toy Street Greenville, SC 29601

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that CES Woodruff Road, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1145 Woodruff Road, Greenville SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than May 20, 2012. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 898-5899

S

Furman Hall Road Behind Cherrydale Shopping Center Now !

Now N

864-467-3950 Ope n 864-467-SPAY O

Open

M81A

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

Spay-Neuter

$25 Spay/Neuter for Kittens or Cats $25 Adult Cat Adoption Fees at reduced prices!

www.greenvillecounty.org/acs

MAY 4, 2012 | Greenville Journal 51


journal sketchbook

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week

Walkers pass by the blue and white balloons decorating Falls Park for the sixth annual National Walk at Lunch Day celebration. The event was held to remind people of the importance of regular exercise to maintain good health. Participants walked an average of 30 minutes during their lunch break. People taking part in the sixth annual National Walk at Lunch Day celebration walk in Falls Park during the event.

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Dr. Johnathan Dabney with The Joint… The Chiropractic Place, makes adjustments to Jason Hagman of Greenville at the National Walk at Lunch Day celebration in Falls Park. Dr. Dabney was one of the vendors offering free services to walkers.

Jay Holloway with Blue Cross Blue Shield of South Carolina, left, gives Addie Clay of Greenville an “I Walked at Lunch” sticker near the entrance to Falls Park. Walkers also received free tote bags and T-shirts. 

100 East Main Street, Suite R3 Spartanburg 864.582.0850

Learn more about this Upstate business at

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52 Greenville Journal | MAY 4, 2012

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Photos by Greg Beckner / Staff

Right: "Pazzo" plays with his owner Deana Palmier at Falls Park in Greenville. Palmier with Upstate Cardiology and Piedmont Orthopedics brought Pazzo with her to the 8bWYam[bb"m^eijWoief[d\ehZemdjemd[l[dji National Walk at Lunch Day celebration and WdZikffehjiY^Wh_jWXb[[l[djim_j^beWdie\ entertained the dog by throwing the disc Ybej^_d]ehZedWj_edi$>[h\hedjm_dZemii[[d[m Z_ifbWoi[l[hom[[a"m^_Y^i^[YekdjiWifWhje\ between inquires from walkers about the ^[hikYY[ii$Æ?X[b_[l[_dZemdjemd"Çi^[iWoi$Æ? service offered by the health care compaWdj_Y_fWj[Wdej^[h]hemj^ifkhj$Ç nies. Above: Palmier embraces Pazzo. 8kjceijbo"_jÉi8bWYam[bbÉidWjkhWb[njhel[hi_ed


JOURNAL SKETCHBOOK

THE WEEK IN PHOTOS

LOOK WHO’S IN THE JOURNAL THIS WEEK

PHOTOS BY JEREMY FLEMING / CONTRIBUTING

2 Days

A Week! 2 Good To

Former Mexican President Vicente Fox spoke about “Bringing Peace to Mexico” at McAlister Auditorium during a recent visit to Furman University. Prior to his speech the former president spoke to Furman University students at a reception in his honor. Fox served as president of Mexico from 2000 to 2006 and currently serves as co-president of the Centrist Democrat International, an international organization of Christian democratic political parties. Since leaving the presidency, he has been involved in public speaking and the construction of the Vicente Fox Center of Studies, Library and Museum.

Be True!

PHOTOS BY JEREMY FLEMING / CONTRIBUTING

Cherrydale Elementary School tied for third place at the District Battle of the Books competition. Pictured are Quanderious Duckett, Isaiah Philson, Clifton Black, Odilie Lugo, Maria Francisco and Omar Salazar.

Sudoku puzzle: page 54

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Washington Center student Serenity Watson receives instruction in writing her name using a stencil with the assistance of her classroom teacher, Erin Sosebee. Occupational therapy is an integral part of the Washington Center educational curriculum. Students benefit from activities such as practicing a fine motor grip with other activities before starting a writing task, or engaging in sensory motor activities.

Full glasses of champagne await the traditional congratulatory toast at the Furman University Senior Send-Off. The event is held as a celebration of the upcoming commencement and the Furman seniors make their toast led by Furman President Rod Smolla departure of the senior class. during the annual Senior Send-Off.

LAMPS • MIRRORS • ACCENT FURNITURE • FLORAL • & MORE!

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June 19

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journal sketchbook

figure. this. out. H-Hour

By Patti Varol

U P S T A T E

DINING

See what you’ve been missing

HEADING OUT TO EAT THIS WEEKEND? NEED SOME suggestions? Adams Bistro American Grocery Arizona’s Blockhouse Blue Ridge Brewing Company The Bohemian Brick Street Café The Brown Street Club Cafe at Williams Hardware Chophouse ‘47 CityRange Davani’s Devereaux’s Fonda Rosalinda’s Ford’s Oyster House The Galley Restaurant The Green Room Handi Indian Cuisine Hans & Franz Biergarten Harry & Jean’s John Paul Armadillo Oil Company The Lazy Goat Liberty Tap Room & Grill Mary Beth’s The Mellow Mushroom Midtown Deli Nami Asian Bistro Nantucket Seafood Grill Northampton Wine Café Nose Dive On The Border Open Hearth Steak House P. Simpson’s The Plaid Pelican Portofino’s Italian Restaurant Rick Erwin’s West End Grille Ristorante Bergamo Roman’s Macaroni Grill Runway Café Ruth’s Chris Steak House Saffron’s West End Café Sassafras Southern Bistro Smoke on the Water Soby’s New South Cuisine Stax Billy D’s Stax Omega Diner Stella’s Southern Bistro Stellar Restaurant & Wine Bar Thaicoon Ricefire &Sushi Bar The Trappe Door Travinia Italian Kitchen Trio A Brick Oven Café Yia Yia’s

Upstate UpstateFoodie .com Feed Your Inner Food Enthusiast

54 Greenville Journal | MAY 4, 2012

Across 1 Memorable touchdown maker, briefly 4 Girl having a ball? 7 “Arabian Nights” woodcutter 14 Moral climate 19 Tchotchke holder 21 CPU jointly developed by Apple, IBM and Motorola 22 Cook just below a boil 23 Intrinsically 24 First woman on the Supreme Court 25 Sleeper’s difficulty 26 Presidential stylists? 28 Apt. feature, in ads 30 “Criminy!” 31 Plant deeply 32 Banned pesticide 34 “Martin Chuzzlewit” novelist 36 Blond shade 39 Bk. read at Purim 40 Holdup 42 __ beer: low-alcohol beverage 43 Snowman’s eyes 45 Helipad fee? 48 Humanities degs. 51 Perry of fashion 52 Narrow waterway 53 Filing aids 54 Like aged cheddar 56 Kewpie, e.g. 57 Still going 60 Canapé spread

62 Enjoying a lot 63 Viscounts’ superiors 65 “I’m hunting wabbits” speaker 67 Live-in helper 69 Gift holder 71 Fireside deity? 75 Trick 76 Bird of prey 78 Dalmatian, for one 79 Hasidic teacher 81 Company that makes the Ektorp sofa 82 “GWTW” plantation 84 Church ceremony 87 Yemen neighbor 90 Gives in 92 Bits of wordplay 94 Down for the count 95 Gun-shy 96 Nav. rank 97 Punching range? 101 Palmer of the links 102 572-year-old school 104 Sets, as a trap 105 Neurol. readouts 107 Ink spots, briefly? 108 Hollies hit featuring a shared umbrella 111 NYC subway org. 112 Longtime “Sexually Speaking” host 114 View from Neuchâtel, to locals 115 Courtroom VIPs 117 Furs worn in a spring parade? 122 Cal __ 124 It’s based on past

legal decisions 126 “If you ask me ...” 127 Like Samuel Beckett 128 Off the charts 129 Geico spokespeople with a short-lived sitcom 130 Puts on cargo 131 Has a conniption 132 Nor. neighbor 133 “Doctor Who” creatures

Down 1 Sister of Rachel 2 Jazz legend James 3 Half a food fish 4 “Children of a Lesser God” subject 5 Box score statistic 6 Affiance 7 Yeats’s “__ to His Beloved” 8 Bonkers 9 “Hmm, maybe ...” 10 Eggs __: brunch fare 11 Prince Valiant’s son 12 Fraternal org. 13 Nose-burning 14 Org. concerned with climate change 15 Sunflower State capital 16 Closet consultant’s concern? 17 Main 18 Roe sources 20 “Brooklyn’s Finest” co-star 27 Partner in crime

29 January honoree 33 Like some road sign symbols 35 Ho-hum grades 36 Solved with ease 37 Chorister’s big moment 38 What the winner of a

catered wedding gets? 40 Likely consequence of kicking dirt at the ump 41 Knight wear 44 Philanthropist Wallace 46 Sundial number 47 Trio before U 49 Clarinetist Shaw

50 Good-time Charlie 55 Fanny pack spot 57 All eyes and ears 58 “GWTW” side 59 “Pomp and Circumstance” composer 61 Gallery stand 64 P-like letter 66 What bored people may go through, with “the” 68 iMac-to-iPhone connector 69 Grease, as it were 70 Like bourbon barrels 72 “Keep on Truckin’” cartoonist 73 Classic muscle car 74 Division of time 77 Wee bit 80 Dutch South African 83 When some Tauruses are born: Abbr. 85 Jerk 86 Vocalizes 88 Operatic 37-Down 89 Kremlin vote 91 Bar order 93 Leaves no footprints, in a way 95 Checkmate, e.g. 98 “And giving __, up the chimney ...” 99 Web merchant 100 Derring-do 103 Dangerous fly 106 Hearty chuckle 108 Spaghetti sauce herb 109 Violet opening 110 Tries to walk off nerves 112 Like morning grass 113 Hound’s prey 116 __-Altenburg: old German duchy 118 Helen Mirren’s title 119 “I, Claudius” setting 120 Popular tech review site 121 Coop crowd 123 Quizzical sounds 125 Canonized Fr. woman

Crossword answers: page 18

Sudoku answers: page 53


JOURNAL SKETCHBOOK

WHERE I’VE BEEN

Come

Glad to see baseball back in town. I almost said that I was glad to see The Drive crank up, but when we first named the team I swore I’d avoid all the obvious puns – I’m not going to say that the team is headed for the checkered flag or that it has driven over a cliff or that we are driving Miss Daisy to a Drive game. I don’t stoop to that kind of cleverness. I’m no good with statistics. Some of my friends know batting averages, standings and errors. I just like to see the game played. It is graceful and languorous with its occasional moments of drama, the smooth double play or a mangling collision at home plate or a nice “say hey” over-the-shoulder catch in center field. There is time to chat with pals and get some peanuts and a libation or two from the courteous Fluor Field crew. The sport is in my blood. According to family history, my great-grandfather, who may have preceded Abner Doubleday, liked the game as much as I do. Fortunately, he had enough children to field his own team, with him as pitcher. What’s more, he had his own field, which he dredged out of a pasture. I suspect this independent old character was his own umpire as well. My uncle Al was a famous catcher in the Dutch Fork area above Columbia, where he grew up, lived and died. He was plenty good and signed with the Yankees, who sent him to a foreign land – Florida – for spring training. He was homesick before he got there and my father, Al’s older brother and a pretty good catcher himself, had to go down to retrieve him. My own older brother, Frank, played an impenetrable third base and could hit the long ball. We grew up in a house next to a vacant lot, which we managed into a distorted diamond. Right field ran off into Florence Street, and the fielder had to check for traffic before going after a fly ball. Left field collided with our house. And the asbestos siding looked like it had been fired on by Sherman before we were old enough for Little League at the city park. From Little League, we went on to Pony League and then to the high school

team. I remember that our high school field was primitive – not a blade of grass on it, no fence around it, just a hard flat surface scattered with a good portion of small rocks. Truth be told, it was the parking lot for the football stadium that served the city’s high schools. Our coach was an ex-Marine and an ex-South Carolina football player. I don’t know which came first, but he was a sadist whom we feared and loved. He’d stand near the first-base line with a fungo bat and drill us infielders with the sharpest kind of ground balls. He’d never heard of a high bouncer. And by way of coaching, he’d shout, “Get in front of the ball.” When high school let out, we played American Legion ball. This wasn’t bad baseball since it drew its players from a number of different schools into one team. A strange thing: our home field belonged to the Veteran’s Hospital, just outside of Columbia, not far off of the Sumter Highway. It was beautifully grassed and maintained. We played several games every week before a faithful gallery of patients – some of them ambulatory, others in wheelchairs – who turned out in their bathrobes to cheer us and boo the visitors. I wish I had a picture of all that. In a rare away game, we played the Central Corrections Institute team there behind the gas works in Columbia. I think this was scheduled to remind us to behave ourselves lest we end up a short stop with a locker on death row. “The Caged Tigers,” as they called themselves, came hard into second base, believe me. All of their games were home games, and the primary ground rule was that we were not to go after any ball, fair or foul, that sailed over the accordion barbed wire. I’m glad I don’t have a picture of that. More baseball lore later. I need to stop now and get down to Fluor Field. I may run the bases after tonight’s game. Bill Koon lives in Greenville. He can be contacted at badk@ clemson.edu.

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Mother’s Day Brunch Sunday, May 13, 2012 Omelet and Waffle Station Chef prepared Omelets & Malted Waffles with Warm Maple Syrup, Apple Smoked Bacon, Maple Link Sausage, Southern Cheese Grits, Biscuits & Sausage Gravy and Cheese Blintz Salad Station Chopped Iceberg Salad with Tomato, Smoked Bacon, Crumbled Blue Cheese, Ranch & Raspberry Balsamic Vinaigrette, Classic Caesar Salad, Waldorf Salad, Country Style Potato Salad, Fresh Mozzarella & Grape Tomato Salad with Pesto Vinaigrette, Green Bean & Cranberry Salad with Champagne Vina, Tomato Basil Bisque International & Domestic Cheese Display with Fresh Fruits and Berries Fresh Seasonal Vegetable Crudités with Ranch & Blue Cheese Dipping Sauce Seafood Extravaganza Jumbo Shrimp Cocktail, Marinated Jumbo Mussels, Warm Crab Dip, Served with Assorted Savory Sauces and Traditional Accompaniment

Carving Stations Slow Roasted Brown Sugar Brined Pork Loin Grilled Pineapple Relish, Pan Dripping Char Grilled Spiced Rubbed Turkey Breast Fresh Corn & Black Bean Relish, Herb Jus Spring Herb & Horseradish Crusted Baron of Beef Dijon Sauce & Merlot Wild Mushroom Gravy Entrée’s Shrimp & Tortellini tossed in a Wild Mushroom & Spinach Cream, Baked Tilapia in a Saffron & Crab Gratin, Three Grain Pilaf, Creamy Chive Mashed Potatoes, Potato Gnocchi with Fresh Herbs Spring Squash Sauté, Roasted Cauliflower Au Gratin Green Bean Almandine, Wildflower Honey Glazed Carrots with Green Onion, Freshly Baked Breads Special Children’s Station Assorted Mini Pizza’s, Chicken Tenders & French Fries with BBQ and Honey Mustard Sauces and Carrot & Celery Sticks with Ranch Dipping Sauce Dessert Station Cherrie’s Jubilee Action Station with Vanilla Ice Cream, Assorted Mini Pastries, Cakes and Brownies A variety of Locally Made Cake, Pies and Cookies

For a Complete Menu & Reservations, Call 864.232.4747

J42

BY BILL KOON

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MAY 4, 2012 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL 55


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May 4, 2012 Greenville Journal