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Sterling renews from the inside out

The cancer battle: Now, it gets personal

A (real) Appalachian Trail love story

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GREENVILLEJOURNAL ID G E BLUE R

THE CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF THE

INNOVENTURE’S 10TH YEAR

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM Friday, May 3, 2013 Vol.15, No.18

T A IN S

UPSTATE

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INSIDE UBJ:

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” n o i t a c y a t S “ in

U O S

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falls parkdy at the ree river

VI L GREEN

L E CO U

R KS A P R E AT NTY W

SW AM EXPLORE OUR HISTORY

GREENVILLE DRIVE BASEBALL

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PHOTOS BY GREG BECKNER; ILLUSTRATION BY KRISTY ADAIR

Children ages 3-14 are invited to join us for all kinds of fun as they learn about animals! We have several different themes this year so your child can experience more! *An extended stay and play option is available! Camps begin on June 10, 2013. For more information call 864-467-4850 or visit us at www.greenvillezoo.com


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greenville Journal locally owned and operated since 1999 For delivery requests, call 679-1240 Publisher

Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@communityjournals.com Executive Editor

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Cindy Landrum clandrum@communityjournals.com April A. Morris amorris@communityjournals.com Charles Sowell csowell@communityjournals.com

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Greg Beckner gbeckner@communityjournals.com

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Our community-based charter allows anyone who lives, works, worships or attends school in Greenville County to join.

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Alan P. Martin amartin@communityjournals.com

www.greenvillefcu.com 800.336.6309 *Annual Percentage Rate is based on a 36-month term. Your loan rate and term amount may vary depending on individual credit history and underwriting factors. A 36-month loan with 2.49% APR would have monthly payments of $28.86 per thousand borrowed. All credit union rates, fees, terms, and conditions are subject to change at any time without notice. +Rate floor is 1.99%, offer excludes current loans held by Greenville Federal Credit Union. **Receive a $50 gift card when you finance your vehicle loan with the credit union, loans below $5000 are not eligible for gift card, good from April 1 through June 30th, 2013. ©2013, Greenville Federal Credit Union. All rights reserved. Member NCUA.

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53˚ We can expect another wet, breezy, “very cool weekend… but this storm

WYFF News 4 Chief Meteorologist

John Cessarich

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Mostly to partly cloudy

2 THE Journal | may 3, 2013

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system is fairly weak.

FRIDAY

Few showers around

Scattered showers

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journal news

Worth Repeating

n tio c e l Se y! w eekl e N W

They Said It

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Quote of the week

Geoff Gallante

Don Scott, president of the Greenville Concert Band, on Hughes Academy band students’ reaction to 12-year-old trumpet soloist Geoff Gallante, who has played at the Kennedy Center and White House.

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“He’s their age. This guy’s got some chops, as they say.”

ORDER EARLY FOR MOTHER’S DAY!

Sterling Neighborhood Association president Dot Russell, on fundraising for the Sterling Land Trust’s Plush Mill Revitalization Project.

“Keep focused on each day, each hour, each step and enjoy all of it. Happiness is a journey, not a destination.” Advice Greenville EMS technician Michelle Pugh’s mother gave her about hiking the Appalachian Trail.

“The only thing I could do for her was talk to her. I knew it would help her.” Kitzi Craig, on reading to her premature daughter in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

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Tom Dillard of The Cottage Group/A Dillard-Jones Co., on the challenges of building a house with as many American-made materials as possible.

may 3, 2013 | the Journal 3


We put the fun in fundraising! journal news

Poll shows strong GOP support for immigration reform A national poll in late April shows overwhelming Republican support for comprehensive immigration reform, according to GOP strategists The Felkel Group. “The numbers in this poll show a huge switch in opinion over a short amount of time,” said Shell Suber, Felkel’s vice president of public affairs and business development. “This is quite unusual. I know a lot of

people say this is politically driven, but we think it has more to do with conservative voters starting to listen to business, agriculture and chambers of commerce. Even pastors are weighing in as they start to see more immigrants show up in their congregations.” The poll, sponsored by the Partnership for a New American Economy, Grover Norquist of Americans for Tax Reform and Ali Noorani of the National Immi-

OPEN HOUSE

OPEN HOUSE age 18 months – gr ade 12

age 18 months – grade 12

gration Forum, found that fewer than one in four Republicans think immigration is a bad thing. The poll was conducted by the Winston Group through telephone interviews of 800 voters, including an oversample of 400 Republicans on April 22, 23. An overwhelming majority – 82 percent of Republicans and 74 percent of all voters – said they think the immigration system is broken.

Broad reforms in the immigration system have the support of 72 percent of Republican voters and 68 percent of all voters. The data also showed overwhelming support for the U.S. Senate “Gang of 8” reform bill, with 67 percent of Republicans backing it and 74 percent of the overall population also supporting the measure. – Charles Sowell

April 13 and 27

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4 THE Journal | may 3, 2013

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A ‘One Night’ sneak taste of euphoria 2013 By VINCENT HARRIS | contributor

2 Days A Week, 2 Good To Be True!

Attendees enjoy the Taste of the South event at euphoria 2012.

feel of euphoria before September.” “One Night Only” will feature performances by Southeastern favorites The Blue Dogs and rising country star Rachel Farley, who has recently toured with Jason Aldean and scored a radio hit with “Ain’t Easy.” Before the concert, Upstate restaurants including Devereaux’s, The Lazy Goat, The Green Room, and newcomers Bacon Bros. and Passerelle will host a VIP party on the lawn, serving bite-sized culinary creations. Liquid Catering will also be on hand, making custom margaritas as part of the open bar for VIP

O OLIVE live M OM YOu

Stop in today for great gift ideas for Mom including gift baskets and summer recipes!

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Contact Vincent Harris at vharris@communityjournals.com.

Give Her a Special Day

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R FO AY! T EC D RF R’S PE THE MO

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Greenville’s euphoria festival, a threeday celebration of the Upstate’s culinary and cultural arts communities, doesn’t take place until September, but foodies and music fans alike will get a taste of what’s in store this Sunday, May 5, at an event called “One Night Only.” The euphoria festival was founded in 2006 by singer/songwriter Edwin McCain and restaurant owner Carl Sobocinski, and brings together the finest restaurateurs and musicians in the Upstate to celebrate the best of what Southern culture has to offer. One Night Only will allow people first crack at tickets for the full festival in September, all while taking in some great music, food and drink. Scheduled to begin at 5:30 p.m. at the Greenville Little Theatre on College Street, “One Night Only” is “the kickoff concert to start the euphoria festival season,” says euphoria’s event manager Gillian Trimboli. “We just wanted the opportunity to celebrate the start of ticket sales and to help people start to get the

ticket holders. The full event-and-music schedule for euphoria 2013, which takes place Sept. 26-29, will be unveiled as well. VIP tickets are $100 for the full day’s events, and general admission tickets for the concert alone are $25. Trimoni says euphoria organizers are always careful to include both musical and culinary arts in their planning. “The thing that makes the festival really special is the integration of music, food and drink,” she says. “We have this wonderful culinary scene in Greenville, but we try to create an experience that focuses on the entire Greenville community, and how invested the people here are in the cultural and culinary arts communities. We’re creating an opportunity for people to learn, be engaged and celebrate in the beautiful space we have downtown. It’s really about finding people who are artists, whether that’s in the kitchen or the recording studio.” Tickets for “One Night Only” can be purchased at euphoriagreenville.com.

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MAY 3, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 5


JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

Tax-free no more Tax-free online shopping will be one step closer to gone if the U.S. Senate votes as expected next week on the Marketplace Fairness Act – so dubbed because it will force online retailers to collect state sales taxes on purchases just as their brick and mortar rivals have long done. In a Congress best known for division, this bill has impressive bipartisan support. The Senate voted 63-30 to end debate two weeks ago, setting up a final vote May 6 that will need only a simple majority to pass – meaning 14 backers will have to peel away to stop it. So far, South Carolina’s senators have split both ways; Lindsey Graham in favor, Tim Scott against. Not surprisingly, his support has earned Graham brickbats from the anti-RINO (Republicans in Name Only) crowd. But the issues here are neither as simplistic nor as partisan as the anti-tax activists like to proclaim. For starters, this is no tax grab. The sales taxes are already due; what the bill does is give states a way to ensure they are collected. The rate that shoppers would pay would depend on where their purchases are shipped. A 1992 U.S. Supreme Court ruling currently allows online retailers to sell goods tax-free in any state where they have no physical presence – but their customers are expected to pay up when they file state tax returns. In South Carolina, the number who do so equals about one-half of one percent of all tax filers, according to the Associated Press – translating to about $124 million in lost revenue last year. The total nationwide is about $23 billion, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. This is money states use for schools, police, parks and roads. Money brick-and-mortar retailers collect every day – at a distinct price handicap to online retailers who don’t. Opponents claim the Marketplace Fairness Act will cripple small business owners who can’t afford the phalanx of accountants they insist will be needed to deal with 9,000+ state and local taxing authorities nationwide. Software exists to calculate the distinctions, but software isn’t cheap and is unlikely to capture every miniscule rule difference nationwide. These are reasonable concerns. Consider, for example, that New York and New Jersey both tax “candy” – but a Twix bar is “candy” in New York and a “nontaxable baked good” in New Jersey, according to e21, a nonpartisan think tank devoted to economic research and public policy. Such distinctions would matter greatly for online retailers; for a brick-and-mortar candy store in Mauldin, not so much. This would be a problem if the Marketplace Fairness Act ignored such challenges. It does not. The new law would require states that use it to simplify their sales tax systems (including standardizing “candy”) and provide online retailers with free software to calculate the tax. Businesses with less than $1 million in online, out-of-state sales would be exempt altogether. This is reasonable reform the Senate should pass next week and the House follow suit posthaste. It’s past time we leveled the playing field for brick-and-mortar retailers who have suffered long enough from price wars and showrooming shoppers who try out products in the store and buy online. Internet sales climbed 16 percent last year to $226 billion nationwide. They will only go higher. Short of supporting tax evasion, there’s no logical reason to oppose making online shoppers pay states the taxes they owe. For more discussion on the Marketplace Fairness Act, go to goo.gl/X0wg3.

Learning versus making Learning is a basic instinct; it’s part of IN MY OWN WORDS by being human. Education is something ELIZABETH CREWS that is acquired. Learning is adapting and adopting; education is imparting. Learning implies self-motivation; education is with Fresh Start SC to provide training so externally imposed. Learning happens that children can learn computer coding, anywhere and everywhere; education using the Raspberry Pi computer. Learning for You will launch its first Raspberry happens within a classroom or a lab. They both have their place. But the Pi experience for campers this summer popularity of current online learning in the Kaleidoscope camps. Children will platforms – Pinterest boards, Wikipedia, learn how to connect to the Internet with Khan Academy, TED talks – demon- their home TVs and use the Raspberry Pi strates that people are rediscovering cu- to design and make their own games, media centers and interfaces. riosity. And they like it. According to Malinda McAleer PenThe maker culture is a natural outgrowth. Experiential learning allows nington of Fresh Start SC, “This revolupeople to tap into their own creativity to tionary learning tool gives kids the power make and do and envision. Burned out to program an endless variety of physical devices, including 3D on passivity, people are printers, drones, applirealizing the power of ances and pretty much their own imaginations anything you can imagto improve products, exine!” periment with solutions It’s by engaging active and orient themselves to minds, fostering outlets objects as creators, rather for creativity, building than curators or consumvenues for social collaboers. ration, and democratizing As self-education and information that educathe maker culture entional institutions can gage in symbiotic play, continue to engage learneducational institutions In this summer's Kaleidoscope ers for a lifetime. By fostake note. Recently at the camps, children will use the tering a culture of learners “Redesigning Education” Raspberry Pi computer. and makers – rather than TEDxFurman conference, speaker Alan Webb noted that one consumers – educational institutions will of the values that educational institutions facilitate innovation in manufacturing provide is that of fostering a sense of and industry, in the arts, in medicine. community among learners. While Mas- Then, education will find that it has redesive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) signed itself. provide accessibility to knowledge, they Elizabeth Crews is have a 92 percent dropout rate because director of Learning for they do not provide a community context You at Furman Universiin which learning can flourish. For over 50 years, Furman University ty’s Division of Continuing Education. She has has sponsored community learning opa M.Ed. from Clemson portunities through Learning for You, University, and is a member of the Naa division of Continuing Education. tional Society of Experiential Educators. Classes are open to Upstate residents of all ages and provide the opportunity for self-directed learning, social interaction, LEARNING FOR YOU quality instruction and individualized atCLASS SCHEDULE tention. furman.edu/learningforyou Recently, Learning for You partnered

IN MY OWN WORDS FEATURES ESSAYS BY RESIDENTS WITH PARTICULAR EXPERTISE WHO WANT TO TELL READERS ABOUT ISSUES IMPORTANT TO THEM. THE JOURNAL ALSO WELCOMES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR (MAXIMUM LENGTH OF 200 WORDS). PLEASE INCLUDE ADDRESS AND DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER. ALL LETTERS WILL BE CONFIRMED BEFORE PUBLICATION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT ALL LETTERS FOR LENGTH. PLEASE CONTACT EXECUTIVE EDITOR SUSAN SIMMONS AT SSIMMONS@GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM.

6 THE JOURNAL | MAY 3, 2013


journal news

opinion letters to the editor

Good government can protect Paris Mt. Government-bashing in general seems to have become a favorite topic of the national media, numerous political groups, as well as talk around the water cooler or backyard. The truth is that we all need government and, in fact, we ourselves are the “government.” The rezoning issue involving the Altera condo project is a perfect example. This is not your typical “not in my backyard issue.” Paris Mountain and Paris Mountain State Park are Upstate jewels that contribute much to the quality of life in the entire Upstate community. This is “our backyard.” Greenville city and county are blessed with good government leadership that has made countless decisions over the years. Many of the most important decisions have taken place with strong community involvement. The result of good government is that we have an award-winning Upstate community recognized for its good stewardship of public land and a wonderful place to live and do business. The protection of the Poinsett and Table Rock watersheds, our terrific county parks and recreation system, the Swamp Rabbit Trail, and our incredible “so livable” downtown are just a few examples. The Altera project was carefully reviewed by the staff of the Planning Commission, which recommended denial of rezoning. The Planning Commission listened to the hopes and plans of a developer with some good ideas as well as the concerns of staff and the local residents and the community as to the negative impact on the mountain. Renewable Water Resources provided important information to the Planning Commission as to serious wastewater treatment issues. The Planning Commission listened and voted to recommend denial of the rezoning request. This is how good government works. Good government recognized the value and importance of Paris Mountain when they created Paris Mountain State Park over 50 years ago. This incredible resource is located only minutes away from downtown Greenville and provides hiking, biking, solitude and family recreation for hundreds of thousands of visitors. Good government zoned the residential area of the mountain as an Environmentally Sensitive District years ago, resulting in residential development consistent with the special environmental qualities of the mountain. Maintaining good government is hard work. The ultimate decision made by Greenville County Council will be much easier due to the efforts of the staffs, commissions and concerned citizens. All they need to do is to listen carefully. Dennis Chamberlain, Greenville, S.C. Dennis Chamberlain is a Greenville attorney who has represented the Sierra Club and other environmental organizations in the Upstate for more than 25 years.

Adults $20 • Children $10 (Discounted tickets purchased in advance: Adults $15 • Children $8) Come in a classic car (1979 or older) and $25 admits a carload of four! Line-up begins at noon. Gates open at 2 pm for classic cars. Dash plaques are available for the first 400 cars.

Events will take place at Blue Ridge Electric, 734 West Main Street, Pickens, South Carolina 1-800-240-3400 • blueridgefest.com Proceeds benefit Upstate charitable organizations

may 3, 2013 | the Journal 7


journal news

Greetings from Greenville Local destinations bring vacation fun without the hassle By LEIGH SAVAGE | contributor

My husband and I were considering anniversary trip destinations that would only take a weekend. What were hotel rates in Charleston, where could we have dinner in Asheville, how bad would traffic be heading into Atlanta? Then it hit us: We could eradicate travel time, stress and expenses by heading 20 minutes up 385 to downtown Greenville. From Main Street Friday to dinner at the Lazy Goat to the TD Saturday Market and brunch at Mary Beth’s, we were finally able to enjoy all of the things we knew were happening downtown but rarely took the time to experience. “Staycations” became popular during the economic recession as people sought ways to cut spending, with vacation expenses often among the first to be slashed. In 2009 – the same year “staycation” was added to Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary – a survey by marketing and research firm Harrison Group found that 30 percent of travel-

ers stayed close to home to save money. By 2012, as the economy began to rebound, the number dipped to 25 percent – but many are continuing to keep their vacation dollars local, and area insiders say there is no better place to do it than downtown Greenville. “It’s so easy to have a great experience without heading far out of town,” said Gina Boulware, marketing director at Table 301, the restaurant group that includes Soby’s New South Cuisine, Devereaux’s and Nose Dive. Greenville’s worldclass food, boutique shopping, entertainment and museums are just a few reasons why staying home makes sense, she said.

In our own backyard

Mayor Knox White has overseen Greenville’s transformation since he was elected in 1995, and he is glad to see visitors from any part of the world taking advantage of the offerings that recently have landed Greenville on the pages of Southern Living, the Boston Globe and Esquire, to name a few. White recently met a man who went on and on about how wonderful downtown Greenville was, telling White how he and his wife stay at the Hyatt for a weekend every couple of months to enjoy the local restaurants and activities. White finally asked the man where he was from, to which the man

Greg Beckner / Staff

Cyclists hit the trail from the Swamp Rabbit Cafe & Grocery.

replied, “Travelers Rest.” “That’s when I began to realize, my goodness, someone from Travelers Rest stays for the weekend to enjoy downtown,” he said. “It’s a great way for residents to get reacquainted with the wonderful downtown that people from all over the country are discovering.” Mike DeMaine, general manager of the Greenville Drive, said the number of staycationers is part of the reason his team promotes a Playcation package each summer. In the package, families of four can get tickets to a game (this year on June 12) along with

passes to attractions such as Greenville Recreation District’s water parks, the Children’s Museum of the Upstate, the Greenville Zoo and Paris Mountain State Park. “It’s been very popular,” said DeMaine. “This is our fourth year, and the response has been tremendous. People are looking for value, and we set out to package what is great about Greenville.” Carl Sobocinski, partner at Table 301, is on the executive board at VisitGreenvilleSC (formerly the Convention and Visitors Bureau). He and his staff put together itineraries, posted

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8 THE Journal | may 3, 2013


JOURNAL NEWS

Hall or on the group’s website. It features museums, tours, outdoor recreation ideas, shopping and festivals, among other offerings.

BIG BUSINESS

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

The Children’s Museum of the Upstate boasts a multi-story climbing area.

at visitgreenvillesc.com, that help steer locals or visitors to top attractions and eateries. His suggestions include a stroll through Fall’s Park, or renting a bike for a ride down the Swamp Rabbit Trail with a stop by the Swamp Rabbit Cafe & Grocery or The Cafe @ Williams Hardware for a meal or snack. For those with kids, Sobocinski recommends a visit to the Children’s Museum of the Upstate or the Greenville Zoo, followed by one of Greenville’s numerous outdoor activities: Moonlight Movies on Wednesdays in May, Downtown Alive on Thursdays, or, if the team is in town, a Drive game. Jennifer Stilwell, chief marketing officer at VisitGreenvilleSC, said people interested in planning downtown activities can pick up a copy of the organization’s 104-page vacation guide, available at the Visitor’s Center in City

Stilwell’s organization focuses on driving economic growth through overnight visitors, which she says generate more than $982 million in annual direct spending in the community and $55 million in state and local taxes. The “staycation” idea extends beyond those traveling in from Travelers Rest and Simpsonville to include people from Atlanta, Charlotte and other nearby cities that choose to spend their vacation time here. “Our neighboring state markets are definitely taking notice,” Stilwell said. “And they are coming and will continue to come in growing numbers. Our job as a community will be to welcome them with open arms.” Part of that welcome is letting visitors know about “THAT” favorite thing to do, which goes along with the new tagline VisitGreenville SC unveiled in March: “Yeah, THAT Greenville.” “As residents, we are inclined to take advantage of what is in front of us on a daily basis,” Stilwell said. “We have such a beautiful blend of urban and natural assets.” As director of greenways, natural and historic resources for the Greenville County Recreation District, Ty Houck is very familiar with the area’s assets, and has many suggestions for locals looking to try something new. He suggests camping on the backside of Paris Mountain State Park, “where you feel miles away, without city lights, overlooking Glassy Mountain Lake.” An idea kids love is getting on the Swamp Rabbit Trail at Furman, riding bikes downhill to Greenville with a stop at the A.J. Whittenberg playground, and then catching a Route 3 bus back to Furman, he said. “There is a wealth of experiences to be had right here at home,” Stilwell said. “The residents of Greenville are the benefactors of all the carefully considered planning we continue to see.... We are a community that thoroughly enjoys and embraces this destination that was built for us.”

30% OFF

Health Events GHS Swamp Rabbit 5K Fri., May 3 • 6:30 p.m. • Gateway Park This Travelers Rest run/walk costs $11. Includes a free T-shirt and block party. Race-day registration begins at 11. Visit ghs.org/swamprabbit5k. Parkinson’s Disease Summit Sat., May 4 • 9 a.m.-noon • Hilton Greenville This event offers education and support for those living with Parkinson’s disease and their caregivers. Free; registration required. Don’t Have a Stroke Tues., May 7 • Noon-1 p.m. • Caine Halter Y Find out who is at risk for stroke as well as signs and treatments from GHS neurologist Gregory Gardziola, DO. Lunch provided. Free; registration required. Your Questions About Infertility Answered Thurs., May 16 • 6-7 p.m. • City Range Join GHS fertility experts Paul Miller, MD, and Bruce Lessey, MD, PhD, over hors d’oeuvres for an informal conversation about infertility. Free; registration required.

Contact Leigh Savage at lsavage@communityjournals.com.

Facts on Skin Cancer Tues., June 18 • Noon-1 p.m. • Verdae Y Get the facts on skin cancer from GHS dermatologists Harriet Van Hale, MD, and Angela Hutcheson, MD. Lunch provided. Free; registration required.

SELECT BRANDS

Detect and Prevent Lung Cancer Tues., June 18 • 12:15-1:15 p.m. • GHS Life Center® Join GHS thoracic surgeon William Bolton, MD, to learn symptoms and treatment of lung cancer. Lunch provided. Free; registration required.

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To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, please visit ghs.org/healthevents or call 1-877-GHS-INFO (447-4636).

ghs.org 130362GJ

MAY 3, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 9


journal news

Disabilities Board receives donations, introduces director By april a. morris | staff

Y A D 1

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The Greenville County Disabilities and Special Needs Board’s new executive director began his first board meeting with good news. John Cocciolone reported that the agency received the donation of a lift van from the Iacovelli Charitable Foundation and a work van from Hersberger’s Plumbing Company. Cocciolone began his tenure in early April and reported to the interim board this week on his first 17 days on the job. Moving from Connecticut, Cocciolone came most recently from consulting and also from 26 years with Easter Seals in Michigan. He said he has met with the FANS (Families Advocating, Networking and Supporting) group and was similarly meeting as many staff and consumers as possible. He noted he has been happy to see so many longtime employees have stayed on, despite budget woes and controversies that led to County Council’s decision to dissolve the previous board of directors last year.

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These longtime employees will be instrumental in the future, he said. “I’ve done a lot of turnaround work and there’s nothing worse than trying to turn around an organization without institutional memory.” Cocciolone said the disabilities agency “has been through a lot … and I am pleasantly and shockingly surprised at what you’ve done to turn it around so far.” The job description for a new finance director has been completed and posted, Cocciolone reported. Interim finance director Robert Decker, on loan from Spartanburg’s Charles Lea Center, has offered to help train the new staff member, he said. In March, Greenville County assistant county administrator for community planning, development and public works Paula Gucker outlined a list of improvements at the Patrick Center that county staff could address at no cost. These included new automatic door openers, signage refreshing and replacement, painting, landscaping and repairs. The only work that GCDSNB would have to pay for would be materials cost for

repaving the parking lot and striping, estimated at $100,500, said Gucker. As of the April meeting, most of the work had been done, said board chairman Alex McNair. McNair added that the board will begin working with Cocciolone to establish priorities and then do strategic planning. An ordinance to establish a permanent board could be coming to County Council for a vote this summer, said McNair. He has been working with the county attorney and council on a draft ordinance. Several interim board members have expressed interest in serving on the permanent board if appointed, said McNair. “We’re excited about the progress being made and we’re not anxious to go anywhere.” The Greenville County Disabilities and Special Needs Board’s interim board of directors is scheduled to meet again on May 23, 6 p.m., at the Patrick Center Annex, 1700 Ridge Road. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

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Gallabrae brings in Great Scots The Greenville Scottish Games and Gallabrae are bringing Scotland to the Upstate on May 23-25. The weekend event opens with live music on Thursday at Downtown Alive with Smash the Radio, City of Greenville Pipe and Drums and Cleghorn, a Celtic rock band. On Friday, The Great Scot! Parade features the pomp and tradition of pipe and drum bands, the honorary chief of the games, and clans making their way from East North and Main streets down to the Peace Center. Following the parade, there will be much merriment with The Great Scot! Ceilidh, a live concert with Cleghorn and Albannach filling the evening with live music. The Scottish Games will be held at Furman University throughout the day on Saturday. From heavy athletics and highland dancing to Wee Scotland and a British car show, there is something for all ages. The games conclude on Saturday evening with a Celtic Jam at Furman with Cleghorn, Seven Handle Circus, Rathkeltair and Albannach. For more information, visit gallabrae. com. Visit peacecenter.org to purchase tickets online.

JOURNAL NEWS

GALLABRAE AND SCOTTISH GAMES May 23 5:30-8:30 p.m. music at Downtown Alive, NOMA Square, free May 24 6 p.m. The Great Scot! Parade, East North and Main streets, free 7:30 p.m. The Great Scot! Ceilidh, TD Stage, Peace Center, $10 May 25 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. The Greenville Scottish Games, Furman University, $15 6:30 p.m. The Celtic Jam, Furman University, $10

What’s Right in Health Care $1 Million Donation to Fund Medical Student Scholarships The USC School of Medicine Greenville received a $1 million donation from upstate businessman James T. Pearce Sr. that will be used to establish an endowment fund for medical student scholarships. GHS Doctor to Lead State Medical Association Bruce Snyder, MD, a GHS vascular surgeon and former president of the Greenville County Medical Society, has been named president of the 6,000-member South Carolina Medical Association. He was installed as the association’s 152nd president April 27.

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Townes Award for Innovation The S.C. Governor’s School of Science and Mathematics presented the USC School of Medicine Greenville with the Townes Award. This award is presented annually to a business, institution or individual who takes innovation to a higher level in the areas of research, development, technology and business. Conservation Champion Award GHS was one of six conservation champions honored by Upstate Forever this year. GHS received the Sustainable Communities Champion Award for its efforts to make active living opportunities more accessible and affordable, namely through initiatives such as the GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail and Greenville B-cycle bike share program. Gold Star Award GHS’ employee tobacco cessation program received a Gold Star from the S.C. Hospital Association and N.C. Prevention Partners. The program offers coaching for employees and spouses and insurance rebates for nontobacco users. GHS also maintains a tobacco-free policy on all five of its medical campuses.

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United Way to distribute $6.6M to local programs By april a. morris | staff

United Way of Greenville County funding

After a record campaign in 2012, the United Way of Greenville County announced last week that it was distributing $13.3 million to local programs, community initiatives and donor-designated programs. The organization is funding 106 programs administered by 69 agencies for the 2013-2016 cycle. To help address priority issues, the United Way distributed $6.6 mil- Robinson lion to programs, said United Way board chair Ann Robinson. The funding allocations are a move toward implementation of roadmaps focusing on school readiness, high school graduation and financial stability. The new roadmaps are scheduled for formal introduction in June, said Robinson.

School readiness...................... $1.51 million High school graduation............ $1.52 million Financial stability..................... $1.22 million Health..................................... $1.27 million Crisis....................................... $1.07 million Community initiatives & services ............................................... $4.08 million Donor-designated funds.......... $2.72 million

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families to become strong,” she said. How programs and providers are chosen has evolved over the past decade, said Robinson. “We are constantly looking at national best practices and constantly looking at the capabilities of the agencies we have to work with.” In June, recipients will be invited to meetings focused on their issue areas so they can also collaborate at that time, she said. The United Way carefully reviews the impact of funded programs and how the programs work together. “We know we can’t fund our way to success. We have limited dollars – $13 million is a lot of money to allocate, but

Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

Film highlights voting machine problems Documentary filmmaker Jason Smith will be in Greenville on Tuesday, May 7, for a free screening and discussion on his new documentary “I Voted.” The film is a nonpartisan examination of the use of voting machines across the country; it begins by focus-

JOURNAL NEWS

it can only make a dent in the needs of this community,” Robinson said. In addition to the organizations and programs, United Way distributed $4.08 million to community initiatives like Child Care Resource and Referral, BOOST (Building Opportunities in Out of School Time) and Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA), to name a few. This year, there were also $2.72 million in donor-designated contributions, Robinson said at the event.

ing on Alvin Greene’s surprise victory over Vic Rawls in the 2010 state Democratic primary and traces problems with the devices across the nation. The event will be held at Coffee Underground in downtown Greenville from 6:30 until 8:30 p.m.

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Physician News GHS welcomes these new doctors & sites! Family Medicine Sean Bryan, MD Center for Family Medicine Greenville, 455-7800

Angela Young, MD Pediatric Rapid Access 57 Cross Park Ct. Greenville, 220-7270

Midwifery (New Site & Staff) Barbara Davenport, CNM Greenville Midwifery Care 35 Medical Ridge Dr. Greenville, 455-1600

NEW OFFICE SITES GHS Premier Surgical Services This Greenwood practice at 105 Vinecrest Ct. houses these offices: • Bariatric Surgery, 227-8932 • Breast Health, 227-8932 • Endovascular/Vascular Surgery, 227-8932

Orthopaedic Surgery C. Curtis Elliott, MD Steadman Hawkins Clinic of the Carolinas–Medical Center Powdersville Greenville, 631-2799 (in collaboration with Baptist Easley)

Pediatrics Robert Saul, MD Center for Pediatric Medicine Greenville, 220-7270 Alison Smith, MD Pediatric Ophthalmology 200A Patewood Dr. (New Site) Greenville, 454-5540

GHS Surgical Specialists– Anderson This practice at 105 Broadbent Way houses these offices: • Bariatric Surgery, 226-2290 • Colon & Rectal Surgery, 226-2290 Hand Surgery Steadman Hawkins Clinic of the Carolinas 6 Doctors Dr. Greenville, 797-7300 Pediatric Gastroenterology Pediatric Sleep Medicine 1650 Skylyn Dr., Ste. 240 Spartanburg, 573-8732

ghs.org 130362GJ

MAY 3, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 13


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2 hearts, 1 CAUSE Women to raise money to buy books that bond By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

Kitzi Craig felt helpless as she watched her tiny daughter, Kathryn, struggling for life in the neonatal intensive care unit. 2 HEARTS continued on PAGE 16

FROM LEFT: Malinda Craig, Kitzi Craig and Kathryn Martin with some of the art that can be acquired at the upcoming fundraiser.

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY 2 HEARTS continued from PAGE 15

At one pound, five ounces, Kathryn was the sickest among the triplets Craig delivered at 27 weeks and the only one who survived more than a week. Craig wasn’t allowed to take Kathryn into her arms for a month. “As a mother, I wanted to do something for her,” Craig said. A nurse suggested she read to her daughter, so Craig began reading a fairytale book. As she did, Kathryn’s breathing became less labored, her blood pressure more stable. When Malinda Craig was born two years later, Kitzi Craig continued the tradition of reading to her new daughter. The mother-daughters trio formed the Two Hearts One Cause foundation earlier this year. Annually, the women will pick one cause for which to raise money. Their inaugural charity is Family Connection, a statewide nonprofit organization that provides support to parents with a child or family member with a special health care need such as developmental delays, premature birth or physical limitations. Two Hearts is named after the two triplets who didn’t survive: Aubrey, who lived for a day, and Beth, who lived for a week.

Kathryn at 2 months.

SO YOU KNOW WHAT: Two Hearts One Cause Art Auction WHEN: May 16, 5-8 p.m. WHERE: City Lights and Art & Light, 2 & 4 Aberdeen Dr., Greenville PHOTO PROVIDED

An art auction will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. May 16 at Craig’s business, City Lights, and the neighboring business, Art & Light, to raise money to buy 500 fairytale books for children in the NICU. More than 20 local artists have donated original pieces for the silent auction. All of the money raised will go toward the books. “We want every parent to have a book to read while they’re there and to en-

courage reading to their child after they leave,” Craig said. Hearing their parents’ voices is important to babies in NICU, Craig said. Craig remembers after giving birth to her triplets that she was wheeled in to see her babies. When she was near Beth’s bed, she said something and Beth immediately turned her head. So when the nurse suggested she read to Kathryn, she knew her tiny baby

would respond. “My voice was so important to her growth and her healing,” she said. “The only thing I could do for her was talk to her. I knew it would help her.” It helped so much that nurses recorded Craig reading those fairy tales so Kathryn could hear her voice even when she wasn’t there. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

That’s right. The Scots have always been first to the party. So come celebrate with us at Gallabrae, Greenville’s best Scottish Games ever. Scot or not, you won’t want to miss four days of outrageous Scottish fun, with plenty of parading, piping, caber tossing, haggis-eating, boulder throwing, Celtic rocking, and plaid-wearing for your whole clan. For more info visit gallabrae.com

MAY 23 - 25 Downtown Greenville Thur, May 23 - Piedmont Natural Gas Downtown Alive! Fri, May 24 - Great Scot! Parade | Ceilidh 16 THE JOURNAL | MAY 3, 2013

Furman University - tickets available at the gate Sat, May 25 - Greenville Scottish Games British Car Show | Celtic Jam


journal community

Renewal from the inside out THE HAVEN

Sterling seeks funds for June 1 deadline

IN THE

VILLAGE AT CHANTICLEER

Lunch & Learn

Sterling Land Trust Board Chairwoman Dot Russell inside Plush Mill.

S

pick produce whenever they need it. “If you’re walking down the street and you’re hungry and there’s a cucumber over there, you go pick it and eat it,” she said. “Nobody is going to ask you for your Social Security number or ask how many people in your house or ‘Can you really afford a cucumber?’ – none of that.” The garden attracted more volunteers the second year because they could see the concrete results of the vision that everyone was talking about, she said. For another organic endeavor, Sterling Pride Farm, the trust is in negotiations for owning a piece of land for the farm, she said. Another land trust goal is to mitigate the tide of gentrification by purchasing housing and offering leases at affordable rates, Russell said. If land is donated to the trust, the trust doesn’t own a home on it, but there is a requirement that if the property is sold, it must be sold to someone in a similar income bracket, said Russell. Another project in the works is the preservation of The Huddle soda shop, which served as a gathering place for students. The structure can be preserved, and the land trust plans to use the upper floor for education activities. “The problem is learning how to take my gift and make it work for me where it becomes my financial stability,” Russell said. Organizers also want to preserve the Simpson House, where Sterling High teachers lived. The Sterling Land Trust needs the immediate support of the larger community in order to help its neighbors, Russell said. “I personally believe that Greenville has never been a place where there was a need that the need was overlooked or people turned their backs. Greenville has always been a place of love and comfort.” Donations can be made at sterlinglandtrust.com or crowdrise.com/SterlingLandTrust/fundraiser/jacquelynclement.

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One Greenville neighborhood that has suffered from economic hardship and the loss of its centerpiece school is looking to its own residents to help bring about renewal. The Sterling Community, once a vibrant area surrounding Sterling High School, has suffered from decades of economic decline and the loss of its school to a suspicious fire in 1967. Over the past few years, however, a movement to revitalize the area from the inside out has gained momentum. The Sterling Land Trust, a nonprofit formed in 2010 to purchase property and receive land donations to support the community, has a holistic approach to development and preservation, said board president Dot Russell, also Sterling Neighborhood Association president. “We have a blend of stakeholders and opportunities,” Russell said. “The land trust has entrepreneurship ideas, housing approaches, land preservation, community development all rolled into one.” This month, the Sterling Land Trust is close to purchasing approximately three acres along Academy Street, currently occupied by a vacant, dilapidated structure, for The Plush Mill Revitalization Project. This project would take advantage of a new market tax credit and clean up a site that has been abandoned for more than 20 years. All the pieces are in place and the organization is seeking an additional $450,000 to make the project happen. The Plush Mill project will help the land trust become self-sustaining, with businesses leasing space and the trust using space for education and other activities, Russell said. “We’re at the point of saying we need help, we need help fast, we need help bad. We need that strong shoulder to lean on that Greenville has,” Russell said. With the purchase of the site, “that whole area is going to look a lot better and attract retail and businesses,” said Jacquelyn Clement, incoming land trust board member. “I hope and pray every night that someone will see the vision as we see it.” In addition to the Plush Mill project, the land trust has been working on a community garden on Odessa Street. Russell said some were skeptical about the open garden where residents can

Greg Beckner / Staff

By april a. morris | staff

may 3, 2013 | The Journal 17


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Film, organization puts a face on recovery Documentary “The Anonymous People” is being screened at the Peace Center By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

For years, the stigma of alcoholism and drug addiction kept hidden the faces of those in recovery. But now a local group and the producer of the documentary “The Anonymous People” are teaming up to change that. Faces and Voices of Recovery (FAVOR) Greenville, a nonprofit group that promotes long-term recovery from substance abuse disorders through education, advocacy and recovery support services, is sponsoring a showing of “The Anonymous People” Friday night at 7 p.m. the Gunter Theatre at the Peace Center. “We’re trying to put a face on recovery,” said Gene Conroy, executive director of FAVOR Greenville, who has been in re-

W8 2 TXT Campaign against distracted driving is a hit By CASEY DARGAN | contributor

The South Carolina Department of Public Safety recently partnered with Subway to promote the W8 2 TXT campaign in support of National Distracted

18 THE JOURNAL | MAY 3, 2013

covery for 25 years. In the past, many people recovering from addictions tried to remain anonymous, fearful that they could lose their jobs or be ostracized if their struggles with addiction got out. Others get their ideas about addiction from reality television shows “Intervention” and “Celebrity Rehab” or by following the latest celebrity scandal. “Recovery, like addiction, has existed too long in the shadows,” said Greg Williams, creator of “The Anonymous People” and the Kickstarter campaign that raised more than $70,000 for the project. Kickstarter is an online communityfunding platform for creative projects. There are about 23.5 million Americans living in longterm recovery from alcoholism or drug addiction. “We’re beginning to tell our stories,” Conroy said. “We’re showing people that we are living and enjoying life today – and we’re their neighbors, friends, broth-

ers and sisters and community leaders.” Williams is a recovering drug addict. “Most people do not realize how much addiction affects the individual and the entire community,” he said in a press release. “This film will open their eyes and help them understand how important it is for communities to create a support system for those seeking recovery.” The film is told through the faces and voices of people in recovery and seeks to promote an open dialogue about addiction recovery and a movement towards lasting solutions for those afflicted by substance abuse.

Driving Awareness Month. The campaign aims to strengthen awareness regarding the dangers of distracted driving, specifically texting and driving. High school students were the campaign’s primary focus, with local schools competing for the highest participation. Greenwood Christian High School had 100 percent participation, followed closely by Chapman High School with 80 percent. I had the chance to attend one of the four W8 2 TXT demonstrations at the Subway at Verdae Village in Greenville and try my hand at texting and driving.

Before participating, I spoke with Bill Rhyne, spokesman for the SC Highway Patrol, and learned that writing the average short text message while driving at a speed of 55 miles per hour distracts a driver for the length of a football field, leaving them completely blind for this distance. Accounting for perception reaction, this distance is even longer. With drivers’ attentions diverted, accidents are more likely to occur. In fact, people who text and drive are 23 times more likely to crash. Teens are especially susceptible: 11 teenagers are killed every day from texting and driving. Although the campaign is aimed toward high school students, the demonstration was open to everyone with a valid driver’s license and cellphone. I lined up with a group of willing participants while the officer leading the demonstration set up a cone course. We were all asked to follow the cone course in a golf cart while the officer rode with us. The course was short, but the challenge was receiving, reading and responding to a text message while driving. The officer maintained steady conversation to add to the distraction. Everyone laughed and joked as our fellow participants failed to follow, and some-

The movie features author William White, Miss USA 2006 Tara Conner, actress Kristen Johnston, former NBA player Chris Herren, former U.S. Congressman Patrick Kennedy and executive Don Fertman.

SO YOU KNOW WHAT: “The Anonymous People” WHO: Viewing sponsored by Faces and Voices of Recovery (FAVOR) Greenville WHEN: Friday, May 3, 7 p.m. WHERE: Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre TICKETS: Free, but must be reserved at favorscreening.eventbrite.com

“Understandably, some people in recovery are reluctant to go public. But when someone does put a face and voice on recovery with his or her personal story, the general public can finally access the powerful message of hope that has resonated for years in underground recovery communities,” Williams wrote on the Kickstarter page. Williams received the 2012 Bob Savage Recovery Advocate of the Year Award and has been featured in news stories in the national television media, newspapers and magazines. Tickets to the showing are free but must be reserved at favorscreening. eventbrite.com. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com. times even finish, the course. When my turn came, I knew it wouldn’t end well. Talking and texting are hard enough, but doing so while trying to weave between cones was impossible. While simply trying to send the message, “I’ll be home in 15 minutes,” I managed to run off course numerous times, taking some cones with me. Luckily, the first 25 participants were rewarded with free 6-inch subs, making the embarrassment more tolerable. I watched 15 other participants attempt the course and not a single person was able to finish without stopping, slowing down significantly or driving off course. Though the W8 2 TXT campaign focused on young people, the message is universal and affects all ages. With steadily progressing technology and constant communication at our fingertips, we are expected to be in continual contact with our family, friends, work and school through email, text and phone calls. We are all guilty of texting and driving, perhaps even Facebooking or tweeting and driving, but this campaign reminds us all to prioritize safety over communication. Contact Casey Dargan at cdargan@communityjournals.com.


journal community

Selah, GHS expand personalized medicine

Keeping You in Sight

Brings Bladeless Cataract Surgery to Spartanburg!

By april a. morris | staff

photo courtesy of greenville health system

Tapping into the genetic code – of a patient or a tumor – is a rapidly growing focus in cancer treatment. With genetic data, doctors can use a more targeted approach to battling cancer and selecting drugs that have been shown to be most effective on cancers with a certain genetic signature. A local company, Selah Genomics, has partnered with oncologists to use a new gene-based diagnostic test, PrecisionPath, to obtain genetic data about patients and tumors. Last year, Selah Genomics established a lab at the Greenville Health System’s Institute for Translational Oncology Research (ITOR) to implement this advanced test in a clinical setting – a first for South Carolina. Michael Bolick, CEO of Selah Genomics, said the biggest advantage of this new technology is that it yields data that is clinically relevant now. Treatment of cancer is moving away from classification by the site of origin, like lung, breast or colon, toward the genetic mutation of that person’s cancer, he said. Bolick explained that the potential of genetic-based cancer treatments began with the way HIV treatment developed, when physicians and scientists began to study how the HIV virus mutated after being treated with certain drugs. They determined a series of treatments to “put in the path” of the HIV virus’ mutations, he said. “They’ve built out a set of drugs that you give [a patient] in sequence used to inhibit the growth of the virus. And I think that’s exactly where cancer treatment is going with this information,” said Bolick. Over the last 50 years, oncologists have discovered the mechanics of drugs; now the new question is finding out if a given patient has the right target for a brand-new, precise drug, said Dr. Jeffery Edenfield, co-director of ITOR. The collaboration is about routinely collecting genomic information on cancer cells. “It’s going to be no different than an X-ray or a blood test,” said Edenfield. “It’s going to be a standard part of the evaluation.” Instead of getting genetic results in about three weeks, this new technology allows oncologists to have the information in about seven days, said Edenfield. This information will help to get

The surgeons of Palmetto Eye & Laser Center are excited to introduce the state-ofthe-art, FDA approved, LenSX laser to Spartanburg for precise, customized, and BLADELESS cataract surgery. If you have cataracts, now is the best time in history to have them removed. We offer premium, customized and LASER OPTIMIZED cataract procedures for our patients including the latest in lens implant technology. With these enhanced procedures many patients experience the best vision of their lives following cataract surgery. If you are ready to put your cataracts behind you, now is the time to see one of our highly skilled surgeons to discuss BLADELESS LASER OPTIMIZED CATARACT SURGERY. Don’t Let Cataracts Slow You Down! Call today for an appointment. Billy J. Haguewood, Jr., MD Brice B. Dille, MD K. Leanne Wickliffe, MD

Laboratory scientist Shawna Fulcher loads a sample onto a “chip” used in the genomic sequencer at the Greenville Health System’s ITOR lab.

patients into the most appropriate drug trials very quickly, said ITOR director Dr. Joe Stephenson. Giving doctors the information to target therapy also can help reduce the toxic effects of chemotherapy. Chemotherapy targets all growing cells, not just the cancer cells, said Bolick. “What we’re doing now is that instead of killing everything … we’re going to look at the specific genetic mutations in the cells that are growing, and we’re going to put the drug in the pathway in that growth. It’s the difference between carpet bombing and precision-guided missiles,” he said. The technology makes extracting genetic information viable on a local level, “and that’s where most cancer patients are treated – in their community,” he said. PrecisionPath has been used on six cancers: breast, colon, ovarian, pancreatic, melanoma and non-small-cell lung cancer. “I’m excited that this will eventually become the first line of therapy, not something that happens at the back end,” Bolick said. Stephenson said the genomic information now helps physicians choose the best treatment or clinical trial. And in the future, he said, as researchers learn more about the complete cancer genome, they can “set up the tool chest” to bring new discoveries in treatment to a local level. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

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268-8993 Spartanburg 573-2353 may 3, 2013 | The Journal 19


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the gist of it

Wasted food nation Jonathan Bloom explains why America’s eyes are bigger than its stomach EVENT: Lecture sponsored by Furman University’s Shi Center for Sustainability, Edible Upcountry Magazine and Greenville Forward LECTURE TITLE: “Why We Waste Food, Why It Matters, and What We Can Do About It”

Jonathan Bloom

PRESENTER: Jonathan Bloom, freelance journalist and food waste expert PLACE: Furman University DATE: March 27, 2013

Jonathan Bloom is the author of “American Wasteland: How America Throws Away Nearly Half of Its Food (and What We Can Do About It).” His talk at Furman focused on the amount of food that is wasted in America today and how to deal with that problem. Bloom is a freelance journalist whose work has appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, Boston Globe and Newsweek, among others. A Boston native, he lives in Durham, N.C., with his family. His blog, “Wasted Food,” is available at wastedfood.com.

How much food do we waste? America wastes 40 percent of the food grown or raised domestically. That adds up to 160 billion pounds and comes at a cost of about $240 billion. Closer to home, we don’t use 25 percent of the food we buy. I just threw a bunch of numbers at you there, but what does that actually look like? Here’s a visual for you: Every day, America wastes enough food to fill the Rose Bowl, that 90,000seat stadium in Southern California. Where does all of this waste come from? Everywhere. We are wasting at all steps of the food chain. It starts at the production level, where some foods never leave the farm because they don’t look perfect or because the price of a good may not justify its harvest. It continues at the wholesale and retail level, where date labels lead to perfectly edible food being tossed, as do picky shoppers. And the waste continues at the restaurant or (college) cafeteria level, where we often end up with way too much food on our plates. Finally, households are the site of much food waste. Many of us fill our refrigerators to the point that we couldn’t possibly use up all of that fresh food before it goes bad. Why do we waste so much food? There are three main reasons: abundance, beauty and cost. Vintage and antique treasures reimagined for today! $29–$58

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20 THE Journal | may 3, 2013


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the gist of it

Book Your Lunch

What is the solution? There is no magic solution to avoid waste, but there are steps that we as indiRKET SQ take. For viduals, cities and states Acould M individuals, shopping smarter is the key, as we usually fill our refrigerators to the point that we couldn’t possibly use all of EASLEY it before it goes bad. On a larger scale, banning food from landfills, as Massachusetts and Vermont will soon do, would dramatically impact how -we ap-Shoes SAS proach food at all steps of the food chain. $12.00 OFF For many, many more ideas on what(Women’s) we $16.00 OFF can do and to share your thoughts, please (Men’s) visit my website: wastedfood.com

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Tickets are $55 for one person, $80 for two people, include 1 copy of the new book, and must be purchased in advance by calling 675-0540 or online at www.bookyourlunch.com This is a great Mother’s Day gift idea! Visit us behind Haywood Mall at 1175 Woods Crossing Road

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Why food waste matters America’s food waste habit has harmful ethical, environmental and economic consequences. Ethics: To not use 40 percent of our food while more than 50 million Americans are food insecure is morally callous. In addition to the traditional caloric hunger that persists, there’s a growing nutrient hunger among Americans. Many of those without means aren’t eating the right kinds of foods, as available time and access to fresh foods dwindle. Meanwhile, countless amounts of healthy pro-

duce and protein are squandered at some point from farm to fork. Environment: When we waste food, we squander the abundant natural resources used in its creation. Petroleum is used at every step of the food chain, to the point that 10 percent of all U.S. energy usage goes to agriculture. Accordingly, 4 percent of our annual energy is embedded in the food we discard. Agriculture is a real water hog, consuming 80 percent of fresh water usage. As a result, we squander the volume of the Great Salt Lake through the food we waste. Soil fertility is another concern, as we are farming an excessive amount of land only to waste a good portion of what we’ve grown. Economics: From a dollars and cents standpoint, food waste makes no sense. It represents squandered financial and human resources. Nationally, food waste represents about $240 billion of waste, and the average family of four throws away more than $2,000 of food annually. We’ll never completely eliminate waste, but there’s no reason we can’t cut it in half.

OLD

Abundance: We produce about twice the amount of calories we need per person per year (this also speaks to obesity). Food is everywhere we look, whether it’s piled high at supermarkets, at gas stations or even big box retailers. And the amount of food served at restaurants is another indication of excess (that also leads to waste and obesity). Given that there’s always so much food available and in sight, we aren’t careful with our food. Beauty: We’ve reached the point where appearance trumps taste with our food. We expect our food to look perfect, and anything that’s blemished in any way tends to be thrown away. We also want our food to be homogenous. Anything that’s not – whether it’s the wrong shape, size or color – is likely to be cast aside at some point of the food chain. Farmers and retailers say they are responding to consumer behavior on this point. Cost: Despite rising food prices, food is still tremendously cheap. The percentage of our household budget we spend on food is near an all-time low and no other nation spends as little on food as we do. This impacts how we conceptualize food. Quite simply: We don’t value what we don’t spend much on.

NEW FOR SPRING

By Jonathan Bloom for Furman University

MADISON HILL

Mall-Wide Event 5:00-8:00pm Thursday, May 9th

Makeovers, Entertainment, Fashion Tips, Food Sampling, Cocktails, Goody Bags*, Prizes and More!

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may 3, 2013 | The Journal 21

SOUTHERN TIDE


journal community

Greg Beckner / Staff

Exterior of the All-American Cottage in Hollingsworth Park.

Made in the USA www.PalmettoHG.com • 2422 Laurens Rd • 864.234.4960

Builder says homegrown materials can have major impact By leigh savage | contributor

JOIN US FOR

MOTHER’S DAY BRUNCH SUNDAY, MAY 13 FROM 11AM TO 3PM POINSETT BALLROOM Live Piano Music with Donald Shabkie Attended Child Station with Buffet and Crafts $29.95 for Adults/$25.50 for Seniors $14.95 for Children 7-12/Free for Children 6 and under* Make your reservation by calling 864-421-9700

*PLUS TAX AND GRATUITY

22 THE Journal | may 3, 2013

While building a home with as many American-made materials as possible, Tom Dillard of The Cottage Group/A Dillard-Jones Co. said finding flooring, cabinets and appliances was not so difficult. Then he started looking for lumber. “Lumber is primarily made in Canada,” Dillard said during a tour of the All-American Cottage, a 2,900-square-foot home at Ruskin Square in Hollingsworth Park. “Buying lumber here was more difficult, so that was a surprise.” He ran into similar problems with vent covers, hardware on shutters, and even nails. “A lot of little things that you don’t even think about are made in China,” he said. In attempting to find American-made versions, he ended up having The Heirloom Companies of Campobello – who also created the staircase – handcraft many pieces. He also had to spend an extra $600 to get nails that were made domestically. It created challenges, raised costs by about 2-4 percent and limited choices in some areas, but Dillard said the benefit of using American-made materials more than outweighed the costs.

He cited studies showing that if American builders increased their use of domestic products by 5 percent, it would create more than 220,000 jobs and have an economic impact of $10 billion. “If you assume the average house is 50 percent [American-made], and that’s probably pretty close, then if you can increase that to 55 percent, we could put a lot of people back to work,” Dillard said. The cottage is a collaboration between Southern Living magazine and This Old House magazine and PBS television series, along with Dillard-Jones, and will be open for public tours Thursdays through Sundays May 2-19. While Dillard and his team came close to a true all-American cottage, he said certain aspects were impossible to source domestically and he ended up using about 97 percent American-made materials. “Some things we literally could not do,” he said. “We could not find any ceiling fans made in the U.S. that were appropriate for this house.” He did find shutters from Southern Traditions Window Fashions, granite countertops from Georgia, decking by Trex and hand-scraped hardwood flooring by Anderson. Richard Bernath of Southern Traditions, located in Greenville, said this was his company’s fifth collaboration on a Southern Living home, and his team had no problem heeding the all-American directive. “Everything we do is custom-


journal community made, so having that as locally as possible makes everything easier,” he said. For the window treatments, they worked with a company that sources American-milled fabrics. In addition to boosting interest in American-made materials, Dillard said the cottage also serves as the launch of The Cottage Group, which was formed to meet the growing demand for “smart-sized” homes that

Greg Beckner / Staff

offer the quality of larger homes but with more efficiency and reduced maintenance. While many showcase homes have prices over $1 million, the cottage was priced in the mid $400,000s. “This is something a lot of people could obtain in their lifetime,” he said. Interior designer Sandy Hankins of SH Designs also focused on accessibility, using found objects picked up at estate sales, along with framed maps and local art. The bed in the master suite and the coffee table were made by The Heirloom Companies using wood from abandoned mills. She also found an artist in Pickens who creates bird designs connected to old bedsprings. “This cottage needed a combination of old and new for a comfortable, warm look,” she said. “It gives it some character. I love that a normal person without a lot of money can go garage sales, T.J. Maxx, and mix old things and new things, and not spend a lot yet make it look great.” While admission to the cottage is free, the participating businesses are accepting donations to benefit the Child Life Program at the Children’s Hospital of Greenville Health System. Dillard hopes to collect bins full of

(Above and left) Interior of the All-American Cottage.

iTunes gift cards, puzzles, bubbles or cash donations that will be taken to the Children’s Hospital. Gina Blohm, director of philanthropy at GHS, said $10,000 donated by Dillard-Jones last year allowed the organization to buy iPads that make preparing for surgery or other treatments easier. “The child life specialists can help prepare a child and family for something

that’s always very scary,” Blohm said. “Child Life is not reimbursable by insurance companies, so it’s completely supported philanthropically.” For more information about the tours and donation suggestions, visit thecottagegroupllc.com. Contact Leigh Savage at lsavage@communityjournals.com. 234 Westfield St., Greenville 864.271.4377 poshpawsgreenville.com

Why should people do business with you? Posh Paws is a professional, full service grooming salon and spa. We specialize in grooming your feline and/or canine companions, as well as canine massage. Grooming one pet at a time limits the distress that some pets experience during the grooming process, this is why at Posh Paws we will only groom one pet at a time. Premium products, soothing music, clean environment, aromatherapy are but some of the other attributes you and your pets will appreciate.

Learn more about this and other Upstate businesses in the 2013 edition of

Remember: Your local spending supports local jobs and businesses. Sales taxes support local schools...our future.

To feature your business, call 679-1200.

may 3, 2013 | The Journal 23


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OUR COMMUNITY

All your cleaning needs

COMMUNITY NEWS, EVENTS AND HAPPENINGS

The public is invited to Y Camp Greenville on May 5 for Camp Greenville Day. The day starts with a chapel service at Pretty Place and a family-style fried chicken lunch. The afternoon will also feature reminiscing on a century of camp history and the dedication of the Centennial Garden with the burial of a 100-year time capsule. Lunch is $7 per person and participants should register at campgreenville.org/cgday.php.

✔ Tablecloths & Napkins ✔ Shoe Service ✔ Shirt Service ✔ Suede and Leather ✔ Wash-Dry-Fold

Political cartoonist and author Kate Salley Palmer will be the guest speaker at the May 13 meeting of Democratic Women of Greenville County at Runway Café, 21 Airport Road, Greenville, at 5:30 p.m. Palmer’s topic will be “A Political Cartoonist Revisits the Past and Examines the Present in Cartoons.” Reservations are required for dinner and can be made by calling 864-232-5531 or headquarters@greenvilledemocrats.com. The cost of the buffet dinner is $15 and guests are welcome.

✔ Expert Alterations ✔ Button Replacement ✔ Wedding Gowns & Storage ✔ Adjust-a-Drape ✔ Blankets & Comforters

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24 THE JOURNAL | MAY 3, 2013

M72A

Main Store and Production Facility 448 Marion Ave., Spartanburg • 864-583-8668 Branch Location 1752 E Main St., Spartanburg • 864-573-6649

South Carolina has received 1.2 million adult doses of potassium iodide (KI) for distribution to residents living within the 10-mile Emergency Planning Zone of five nuclear power plants in or adjacent to the state. Supplies of these potassium iodide tablets (KI tablets) are being distributed to the Oconee County Health Department and the Pickens County Health Department. Tablets can be picked up, but participation by the public is voluntary. For additional information, call 864-8822245, 864-898-5968, or 1-800-476-9677 or visit scdhec.gov/ environment/lwm/html/nuclear_power.htm.

Chick-fil-A recently announced it will cover 50 percent of registration fees for first-time WinShape campers who sign up for the one- or two-week camp using the gift code CFAGIFT when registering winshapecamps.org. MARYS Closet, a “divine resale store,” will hold its semi-annual bag sale on May 4, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at Geer Memorial Baptist Church, 911 S. 5th St., Easley. All proceeds from the sale will support MARYS House, a faith-based nonprofit providing emergency shelter, services and spiritual guidance to victims of domestic violence. For more information, visit maryshouse. com or call 864-855-1708 or 864-306-2777. The Better Business Bureau of the Upstate will hold its 17th annual golf event May 7 at Pebble Creek Country Club, Linkside course, in Taylors. Fees are $600 for a foursome or $100 per individual player, which includes 18 holes of golf, complimentary food and beverages and admission to the awards dinner. For more information or to register, call 864-242-5052 or email info@upstatesc.bbb.org. Ivy Salon will host the Second Annual Momover Contest, a Mother’s Day giveaway, through May 4. The contest recognizes one local, deserving mother with a self-pampering package valued at more than $600, including a hair and makeup consultation and makeover by Ivy Salon, jeans courtesy of Beija Flor Denim Salon, accessories by Mariani’s Boutique, and dinner for two at a Table 301 restaurant. To enter, download a nomination form on ivysalons.com.


journal community

our community

It’s our 5th birthday & you get the gifts!

community news, events and happenings

Book Your Lunch with North Carolina author and journalist Denise Kiernan on May 10 at City Range. Kiernan explores the mysteries and inner workings of the Manhattan Project through the experiences young women who worked at Oak Ridge, Tenn. in her new book, “The Girls of Atomic City: The Untold Story of the Women Who Helped Win World War II.” Tickets are $25 per person and must be purchased in advance at bookyourlunch.com or by calling Fiction Addiction at 864-675-0540.

5

Join us for fun, food & fashion

Friday 5/10 - Saturday 5/11 discounts, giveaways & doorprizes!

A global Chick-fil-A Leadercast event will be held May 10, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at Buncombe Street United Methodist Church. The program features leaders including Jack Welch, Andy Stanley, Mike Krzyzewski, John C. Maxwell and Condoleezza Rice. The cost is $49, including lunch and refreshments. Tickets must be purchased electronically and in advance. For more information and to register, visit bsumc. com or chick-fil-aleadercast.com.

cocobella boutique

21-C Augusta Street, Greenville | 864.283.0989 is

First Monday is a Republican forum on May 6, noon-1 p.m., at the Poinsett Club in Greenville. Cost is $20 per person. The speaker is Majority Leader Bruce W. Bannister regarding current legislation in Columbia. For more information and to register, visit firstmondaygreenville.com.

M Su othe nd r’s ay , M Day ay 12

GIF T CA RD

Broadway Comes to Kilgore-Lewis, a standard flower show, will be open to the public on May 7, 3-5 p.m. at the Kilgore-Lewis House, 560 N. Academy St. Sponsored by the Greenville Council of Garden Clubs Inc., this event will be open to those interested in flower arranging and horticulture. For more information, call 864-232-3020.

GIF T CA RD

GIF T CA RD is SuMnother ’s d

ay , M Day ay 12

RECYCLE

Send announcements to community@communityjournals.com.

Upcoming Recycling Events: SHREDDING EVENT Saturday, May 11 from 9 AM – 12 PM TD Convention Center Electronics & Fluorescent Bulb Recycling Event Saturday, May 18 from 11 AM – 2 PM 360 S. Hudson St

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It’s all about Mom!

may 3, 2013 | The Journal 25


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NORTHAMPTON WINES & Wine Café South Carolina’s Premier

Wine Retailer Wine Bar State’s Finest Wines & Fine Dining Nightly Two Blocks from Main St

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our schools

activities, awards and accomplishments

Long-time El Salvador peace activist Sister Peggy O’Neill will serve as commencement speaker when Furman University holds its graduation exercises May 4 at 7:30 p.m. in Eugene Stone Soccer Stadium. The public is invited to attend. In case of rain, the ceremony will be moved to Timmons Arena and admittance will be by ticket only. The Administration and Athletic Department of Shannon Forest Christian School recently announced the appointment of Derrick Sullivan as the new Crusader football head coach.  Sullivan played a key role in the inaugural season as assistant coach of the program. Sullivan provided leadership and instruction as Sullivan a varsity football coach for the Greenville County School District and is currently program director for Big Brothers, Big Sisters of the Upstate. There will be a football parent/player meeting for rising sixth-10th grade boys on May 7 at 5:30 p.m. about plans for the upcoming season.   St. Joseph’s Catholic School senior Andrew Grant has been appointed to the United States Naval Academy Class of 2017. Grant was one of 17,649 students from throughout the nation who applied for one of 1,200 appointments to the Naval Academy’s Class of 2017. Grant

Dinner & Tastings up to 40

May 9 is Chick-fil-A Spirit Night at the Woodruff Road location. When you place an order from 5-8 p.m. and mention the Mt. Zion Christian School fundraiser, a portion of your purchase will go to our school. Classes will compete to see which class will win a brownie party. Garrett Steck, a fifth-grader at Blythe Academy International School of Languages, was the school-wide spelling bee winner and went on to compete at the South Carolina state level at the 2013 National Geographic Bee. Jakob Su’a-filo, a Blue Ridge High School student, has been selected to represent South Carolina as a National Youth Delegate to the 2013 Washington Youth Summit on the Environment at George Mason University. Su’a-filo joins a group of 250 students from across the country to participate in an intensive study of leadership in environmental science and conservation this June. The National Merit Scholarship Corporation recently announced 2013 recipients. This year, there were approximately 1,000 high school seniors who won the corporate-sponsored scholarship. Five recipients were South Carolina students. The Upstate winners were: Christopher Bresett of Eastside High School, Kathleen L. Cole of Mauldin High School and Victoria E. Ledford of Dorman High School.

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Tawfik Natsheh, master glass blower, creates a work of art using a time-honored tradition. Photo: © Ryan Rodrick Beiler/MCC

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26 THE Journal | may 3, 2013

2 west Lewis Plaza, Augusta Road Greenville, sC 29605 Mon–sat 10–5:30 Color of Wood Block Motif critical match to Pantone 1805. Letters print Pantone Process Black. 864-239-4120 greenville.tenthousandvillages.com Visit us on Facebook, Pinterest and Twitter!

Use this logo for reductions only, do not print magenta. Do not reduce this logo more than 35%. Magenta indicates the clear area, nothing should print in this space. You may reduce the logo to 30% without the tag and strap lines.


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our schools

activities, awards and accomplishments

The Shannon Forest Concert Choir recently competed at the Worldstrides Heritage Music Festival in Myrtle Beach and returned with a gold medal. Eighteen choral and instrumental ensembles from around the country competed in the event. Members of the choir include Russell Wellons, Audra Holt, Jackie Perez, Carrington Porter, Rebecca Welch, Agustin Auffarth, Adam Long, Cameron Massey, Christa Bolton, Alice Bristol, and Lucia Koh. Accompanists for the group were students Skyler Goff and Adam Long. Ellen Woodside Elementary’s Battle of the Books team members recently competed at Pelham Road Elementary in a district competition. Members from Ellen Woodside are: Clarissa Woody (captain), Haileah Wilson, Adriana Castro-Gonzales, CeCe Taylor, Madison Dytman, Quinton Blackmon (alternate) and Sam Evans (alternate).

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Furman University political science professor Jim Guth has been awarded a 2013 Excellence in Teaching Award from the South Carolina Independent Colleges & Universities organization. SCICU annually recognizes one faculty member from each of its 20 member schools with the teaching awards. Recipients were honored at a special dinner and each was awarded a $3,000 professional development grant. Guth is the William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Political Science at Furman, where he has taught since 1973.

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

THE GOOD

EVENTS THAT MAKE OUR COMMUNITY BETTER

Generations Group Homes will host its annual Luncheon for Second Chances on May 8 at the TD Convention Center. The event will provide 500 attendees with an opportunity to learn more about how Generations is solving the puzzle to stop and prevent the cycle of sexual abuse among adolescent boys. As a nationally accredited nonprofit organization that works with at-risk boys ages 10-19, Generations offers structured, specialized programs that give its residents hope, healing and the life skills needed to be successful. For more information, visit generationsgroup.com. To attend the luncheon, contact Roseanne Brown at roseanne@generationsgroup. com or 864-679-8490. The Peter and Karen Iacovelli Charitable Foundation recently donated a Ford E-350 wheelchairlift van to the Greenville County Disabilities and Special Needs Board for use in transporting people with disabilities. In addition, GCDSNB’s new executive director John Cocciolone and nearly two dozen consumers and staff were The Greenville County Disabilities and Special Needs treated to lunch by the Iacovellis. Board received a wheelchair-lift van from the Peter and GCDSNB also received a Ford van Karen Iacovelli Charitable Foundation. from Hershberger’s Plumbing LLC for the maintenance department to use for facility and residential repairs. GCDSNB serves more than 2,000 Greenville County residents with severe, lifelong disabilities such as autism, intellectual disabilities and traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries.

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28 THE JOURNAL | MAY 3, 2013

From left: Scot Baddley, president and CEO of the YMCA of Greenville; Jared Fogle, spokesperson for Subway and president of Jared’s Foundation; Stephen Edgerton, chairman of the 2013 Open Doors Campaign; Brian Rogers, chairman of the YMCA of Greenville board of directors

The YMCA of Greenville annually raises funds for those in the community who need help to pay for Y memberships or programs. The goal this year was $836,000 and the final tally for the campaign was a record $866,744. Some of the programs that benefit from these funds are afterschool care, day camp, swim lessons, sports, Judson Community Center preschool, Y Camp Greenville, membership and wellness.

Spartanburg’s Hub City Cooperative’s owners recently committed over $125,000 in an investment campaign, Invest and Grow. These investments were made through the purchase of preferred shares and loan offerings. The campaign is expected to generate a million dollars and will be used to renovate the Coop’s site in downtown Spartanburg. Additional development costs will be raised from outside lenders and community supporters. To learn more about Hub City Cooperative, visit hubcitycoop.org. The TD Charitable Foundation, the charitable giving arm of TD Bank, recently surpassed the milestone of $100 million in donations to nonprofit organizations since the foundation’s inception in 2002. Originally funded by TD Bank’s predecessors, Banknorth and Commerce Bancorp, the TD Charitable Foundation has awarded more than 10,800 grants to organizations for various programs, projects and initiatives throughout the bank’s footprint from Maine to Florida. To apply for a TD Charitable Foundation grant, find more information about signature programs or to learn about eligibility requirements, visit TDBank.com./community/ our_community.html. Send announcements to community@communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL CULTURE UNEXPECTED

DETOURS

Appalachian Trail hike showed author life doesn’t always go as planned By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

Michelle Pugh admits she’s stubborn to a fault. But it was that trait that allowed her to hike the entire Appalachian Trail despite an agonizingly painful foot injury that forced her off the trail for nearly a year – plus mononucleosis, a bout of hypothermia and a bad stomach virus that put the achievement of her childhood dream in jeopardy just 120 miles from the finish. “It taught me that sometimes the path may not be what we think it will be,” said Pugh, a Furman University graduate from Massachusetts who now lives in Simpsonville and is an emergency medical technician in Greenville County. “Things don’t always go as planned.” So true. After all, Pugh didn’t plan on getting plantar fasciitis or mono or getting married halfway into her 2,200mile journey. Hiking the Appalachian Trial “showed me that you can end up at your goal or some place better,” she said. Pugh has chronicled her journey in a book, “Love at First Hike,” that was published in March. Pugh decided she was going to hike the AT after a chance encounter at age 12 with a hiker who accomplished the feat. Pugh and some other Girl Scouts were on an overnight trip, hiking to a primitive campsite carrying their big Coleman sleeping bags stuffed in black trash bags. TRAIL continued on PAGE 30

Michelle “Brownie” Pugh takes in one of the many outstanding views along the Appalachian Trail.

PHOTO PROVIDED

MAY 3, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 29


journal culture Michelle Pugh earned the nickname “Brownie” while hiking the Appalachian Trail. (Far right) Pugh rests at one of the shelters on the Appalachian Trail. (Far left) The white paint blazes seen on the dead tree trunk and on the rock in front of her are used to mark the trail.

HEADSHOT BY GREG BECKNER / STAFF; OTHER PHOTOS PROVIDED

TRAIL continued from page 29

“When he said he hiked from Georgia to Maine, I remembered traveling from Massachusetts to Georgia with my family and thinking the drive took forever,” she said. “It took two days.” When she got home from Girl Scout camp, she told her parents she was going to hike the Appalachian Trail from start to finish. They smiled, no doubt thinking the idea would soon be forgotten. It wasn’t. Pugh graduated from Furman early so she could begin her hike in March 2005. She started hiking alone, although six people she had met through a website agreed to start from Amicacola Falls State Park on the same day. “There were no commitments beyond that first day,” she said. Pugh occasionally saw members of her starting group at night camps or shelters. At each stop, she’d read a letter of encouragement from somebody back

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home. “Keep focused on each day, each hour, each step and enjoy all of it. Happiness is a journey, not a destination,” her mother wrote. “Always keep your goal in mind, but take time to enjoy the unexpected pleasures along the way … Remember that things may not always go as planned and sometimes that’s not a bad thing.” One of those unexpected pleasures was a developing relationship with “Souleman,” one of the members of her starting group. About halfway through her 2,200-mile trip, Pugh couldn’t ignore the pain in her feet any longer. “The hardest part about the foot injury is there was nothing I could do for it except stop hiking,” she said. She and Souleman decided to abandon the hike – together. She wondered what being off the trail would do to their relationship. When an ear problem that developed on the trail continued to linger, the still-

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exhausted Pugh decided to go to the doctor. She was eventually diagnosed with mono, and found out she contracted the illness while still on the trail. “I just thought [the fatigue] was because I was walking 20 miles a day carrying onethird of my weight on my back,” she said. “I figured everybody was tired.” The doctor told her that she could have ruptured her spleen. “In a weird way, my feet hurting was a blessing,” she said. Being off the trail wasn’t all bad. She and Souleman were engaged that September and married on June 10, 2006. A week later, they started hiking the second half of the AT. Sitting at a picnic table at Pine Grove Furnace State Park, Souleman called Pugh by her trail name and said, “I told you Maine would wait.” It was then she realized they were no longer thru-hikers. That first night, they slept with only mesh separating them from the sky.

They were 114.5 miles from the end when a bad stomach virus struck. It took eight days for Pugh to recover. Finally, they tackled the Hundred Mile Wilderness, the wildest section of the AT. On Sept. 28, 2006, the pair climbed Katahdin. When they reached the summit, it was fogged in. They spent only a few minutes celebrating their accomplishment. Pugh said one of the things she learned during the journey was there are still good, big-hearted people in the world. “We’re taught so much to be wary of strangers, but time after time they made it possible for me to do this,” she said. Pugh’s marriage to Souleman didn’t last, but she said she wouldn’t have hiked the entire AT without him. Pugh said it’s only a matter of time before she does another long-distance hike. Climbing Mount Kilimanjaro is one of the possibilities. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.


JOURNAL CULTURE

A preteen trumpeter with serious chops By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

If the Hughes Academy band students playing in Friday night’s Greenville Concert Band Arts of a Lifetime XVI concert want to know how far music can take them, all they have to do is look at Geoff Gallante. Gallante, who is the concert’s guest artist, has performed in 32 states, played at the White House when he was 6 years old, appeared on “The Tonight Show,” NBC’s “Today,” and the “CBS Early show,” and has performed the National Anthem in seven Major League Baseball stadiums, eight National Basketball Association arenas and at one National Hockey League rink. And, at 12 years old, Gallante is around their age. The Arts of a Lifetime XVI concert is at 8 p.m. in the Greenville High School Auditorium. “The idea behind Arts of a Lifetime is that a lot of people play in music groups while they are in school, but do nothing with music after they get out of school,” said Don Scott, president of the Greenville Concert Band. “We hope the concert creates memories for students that will carry into adulthood so they’ll want to continue to pursue music.” The series is supported by a Metropolitan Arts Council grant and through a MAC partnership with BMW. Scott said he hopes that the Hughes students will be able to relate to Gallante in a way that adults can’t. “He’s their age,” he said. “This guy’s got some chops, as they say.”

Gallante, who plays the cornet, trumpet and flugelhorn, started playing music after he found his older brother’s trumpet when he was 4. By the time he was 6, he had played guest soloist gigs with the Louisville Orchestra, the Duke Ellington Orchestra Geoff Gallante and the Philadelphia Brass. Gallante plays all styles of jazz, from traditional New Orleans-style to small group straight-ahead jazz to classic big band and swing. He has shared the stage with Maynard Ferguson, Chris Botti and Dick Hyman. The Hughes band and the Greenville Concert Band will back up Gallante on some numbers, Scott said.

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SO YOU KNOW WHAT: Arts for a Lifetime XVI concert WHO: Greenville Concert Band, members of the Hughes Academy Band and guest artist, 12-year-old trumpet soloist Geoff Gallante WHEN: Friday, 8 p.m. WHERE: Greenville High School auditorium 1 Vardry St., Greenville ADMISSION: Free, donations accepted

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MAY 3, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 31


journal culture

The ‘Banshee’ screams on an Upstate highway listen up

best bets for local live music

By Jeanne putnam | contributor

fred norris / cinemax

Throughout the years, South Carolina has had a little bit of Hollywood come through it or has seen stars rise. From “Leatherheads” to Anderson native Chadwick Boseman starring as Jackie Robinson in “42,” the Upstate has been developing ties to the silver screen. Most recently, Cinemax’s television show “Banshee” paid the Upstate a visit when the production crew shut down Interstate 185 (a.k.a. The Southern Connector) for three days last month to film a car chase. The show is about an ex-convict and master thief who becomes sheriff of Banshee, Pa., but still lives a life of crime. While the show is filmed in and around Charlotte, executive producer and writer Jonathan Tropper said that they occasionally have to look outside the area to film certain scenes. While this is the show’s first trip to the Upstate, the crew did film the show’s maximum-security prison scene at Broad River Correctional Institution in Columbia, said Rabia Ahmad of HBO media relations.

Antony Starr, star of "Banshee" and recent I-185 motorist

For the second season of “Banshee,” Tropper wrote an epic car chase/heist, which called for a 16-mile highway to be used. “We looked at the map and were attracted to I-185 because of its size,” he said. “The chase is a robbery that takes place at 70 miles per hour and I cannot think of another television show that has filmed a scene like this on a television budget.” The scene features show leads Antony Starr, Banshee’s sheriff; Ivana Milicevic; and Hoon Lee. The three-day filming brought in 50-75 members of both cast and crew, who all stayed in hotels around Greenville, used

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local caterers Bagatelle Catering and Francois, explored downtown Greenville and ate at local favorite eateries such as Soby’s. Tropper said he is open to coming back to the Upstate should the need arise. In a television series, every episode lends the possibility to expand the world of the show, he said. However, he acknowledged the show’s budget precludes traveling outside of Charlotte very often. While the Southern Connector did receive $60,000 for the closing of I-185, the reactions of the toll road’s users have been mixed, said Peter Femia, executive vice president and general manager of the Southern Connector. “For the most part people have been excited, but a couple of our customers have been upset about the closing,” Femia said. “Having the filming on I-185 is terrific for our state, as well as Greenville.” Femia said that he is “open to closing the Southern Connector down again for filming – but not in the immediate future.”

Richard A. Williamson, DMA, Professor of Music, Director of Choral Activities and Coordinator of Music Theory at Anderson University, has been awarded a Fulbright Scholar grant to teach in Peru during the 2013-2014 academic year. Williamson will teach at the National Conservatory of Music in Lima, Peru. He will work with faculty to develop a master’s degree in choral conducting and also work to assist Peruvian composers in gaining publishing connections in the U.S. In addition, The American Society of Interior Designers has named Anderson University’s Anne Martin as the national faculty advisor of the year. Martin will be honored at the national ASID conference in Los Angeles in June.

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Southern Crescent Oldies & beach specialists. 5:30 p.m. Admission is free. 5/9, Downtown Alive

Old You Quartet combines soul, jazz, acid rock. 5:30 p.m. Show is free. 5 / 1 0 , M a i n S t r e e t F r i d ay s

Green Vegas Upstate’s own rockers. 5:30 p.m. Admission is free 5/10, The Handlebar

Black Francis Former Pixies frontman makes his Handlebar debut. Tickets: $17. Call 864-233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com. 5/11, The Showroom

Peter Cooper & Eric Brace CD release show. Call 864-582-0056 or visit hub-bub.com. 5/11, The Handlebar

Tinsley Ellis Blazing blues guitarist. Tickets: $17. Call 864-233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com. 5 / 1 6 . BI - LO C e n t e r

Jason Aldean Red-hot new country superstar. Tickets are $28.75 & $54.75. Call 864-241-3800 or visit bilocenter.com. 5/16, Downtown Alive

Lyric Pop/soul trio. 5:30 p.m. Show is free. 5/16, Peace Center

Los Lobos & Los Lonely Boys Once-in-a-lifetime meeting of bands. Tickets: $40-$55. Call 864-467-3000 or visit peacecenter.org. 5 / 1 7 , M a i n S t r e e t F r i d ay s

Jamie Wright Experience Soulful R&B singer. 5:30 p.m. Admission is free.


JOURNAL CULTURE

SOUND CHECK WITH VINCENT HARRIS

Stopping time Fans never stopped loving legendary George Jones

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It is a song that seems to stop time. A shattered, indescribably sad voice opens the song as alone as the listener feels: “He said, ‘I’ll love you ’til I die.’ She told him, ‘You’ll forget in time.’” The singer continues on, with a resigned despair that tells us he knows that this wretched man will do no such thing. As the instruments slowly join the singer at their own deliberate pace, the story goes inside the man’s home, painting a portrait of pure heartbreak that isn’t really country, pop, blues or soul. It simply IS. “He Stopped Loving Her Today” will always be the late George Jones’ most affecting, most chilling, and most wellknown song. It is an impossibly melodramatic song that somehow doesn’t seem overstated. It is drenched in cascading strings, yet never seems overarranged. It is as slick as the shallowest pop song, but never feels contrived. There is never a question that the man singing this song is as caught up as the listener; he feels this song down in his bones. What’s stunning is how often George Jones, who passed away on April 26 at 81, was able to conjure up this kind of seemingly once-in-a-lifetime performance. A cursory listen to his other landmark recordings – among them “The Grand Tour,” “A Good Year For The Roses,” and the immortal “She Thinks I Still Care” – reveals an interpreter who, at his best, was among the best to ever step up to a microphone. At his peak, Jones’ emotional investment in the lyrics to his songs rivals that of Billie Holiday and Frank Sinatra. Much like Holiday and Sinatra, Jones’ private life once he began charting hit singles in 1959 was rarely private. He had more brushes with the law and with marriage than most men could survive, forming a short-lived union with the Queen of Country, Tammy Wynette, and famously resorting to a riding mower when Wynette hid his keys in a futile effort to curb his search for alcohol. At his most dissolute, in the late 1970s and early ’80s, he missed so many concerts that his nickname, originally “The Possum” due to his curiously upturned nose, became “No-Show Jones.” Perversely, or perhaps fittingly, it was during that time that Jones produced the majority of his most lasting, heartbreaking work, including “He Stopped Loving Her Today” in 1980. Jones married Nancy Sepulvado in 1983, and through changing musical tastes and health scares and relapses, she managed to keep him (mostly) on the straightand-narrow path for the remainder of Jones’ life. He settled into legendary status in country music, inspiring countless vocalists and gaining lyrical shout-outs from Waylon Jennings and Alan Jackson, among others. It was the older, wiser, and steadier Jones who was scheduled to perform at Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium on May 18 as part of what he said would be his final tour. He doubtless would’ve included “He Stopped Loving Her Today” on the set list, and I can’t help but wish I’d seen him stop time and let us all feel that exquisite sadness one last time. Contact Vincent Harris at vharris@communityjournals.com.

MAY 3, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 33


JOURNAL CULTURE

Coloring Greenville blue

By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

Categorizing the Blue Man Group is nearly impossible. The Blue Men are actors. They’re painters. They’re skilled percussionists. Performance artists. Mimes. Social commentators. And they’re coming to Greenville for eight performances May 7 through May 12. “It’s what we call alt-Broadway,” said Chris Smith, one of the Blue Men. “You get the big spectacle of a Broadway or Las Vegas-type show with kind of the smaller, more intimate moments you might find off-Broadway in a smaller theater.” Founded by Chris Wink, Phil Stanton and Matt Goldman in New York in 1987, Blue Man Group is known for its groundbreaking theatrical shows that combine music, comedy and multimedia elements to produce an ever-changing form of entertainment.

The Blue Men are painted blue and dressed in black. The cobalt blue color is copyrighted, Smith said. Smith is an actor and juggler by trade who said he auditioned for Blue Smith Man thinking there was no way he’d ever get the role. Smith has performed as a physical actor with Cirque du Soleil, worked as a professional juggler, written and directed two feature films as well as co-created, directed and starred in the Hulu web series “Dorm Life,” but he didn’t know how to play drums. “I auditioned as an experiment. I wanted to get out of my comfort zone,” he said. “They really were looking for people who can look into someone’s eyes and be OK with not saying anything. They gave me a basic drum test which I faked my way through and passed, barely I’m sure.” Blue Man Group had Smith take drum lessons two times a week for six months and then sent him to its New York training facility for a month of intensive training. “It’s the best job I never knew I wanted,” he said.

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34 THE JOURNAL | MAY 3, 2013

“I feel like a hypocrite. It’s kind of gross how attached I am to Facebook, Twitter and texting,” Smith said. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

SO YOU KNOW WHAT: Blue Man Group WHERE: Peace Center WHEN: May 7, 8 and 9 at 7:30 p.m.; May 10 and 11, 8 p.m.; May 11, 2 p.m.; May 12, 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. TICKETS: $45, $55, $65 and $75 INFORMATION: 864-467-3000

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It takes Smith about 45 minutes to don the bald cap and greasepaint that transforms him into the ego-less character. “That’s the job part of the job,” he said. Smith likes that Blue Man Group connects with the audience in ways most productions don’t. “People normally go to theater to see people performing on stage without being acknowledged. With our shows, you’re not watching a play as an outsider looking in. There is no fourth wall,” he said. The production coming to Greenville touches on the subject of new media and devices such as iPhones and other smartphones, raising the question of whether such technology brings people closer together or drives them further apart.

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JOURNAL CULTURE

SCENE. HERE.

THE WEEK IN THE LOCAL ARTS WORLD

The Emrys Foundation will hold a release party to celebrate the 2013 Emrys Journal at The Loft at Falls Park at 7 p.m. on May 9. The evening will include desserts, readings by contributors and an opportunity to buy the Emrys Journal for $10 (free for Emrys members) and have it signed.  All are welcome to this free event. The Emrys Journal has been published annually by Greenville’s Emrys Foundation since 1984. For more information, visit emrys.org. The Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra will perform Stravinsky’s classic “The Rite of Spring” symphony on May 4. In preparation of this 100-year celebration, Spartanburg students have produced visual artwork based on the music. That exhibit is free for public viewing at Chapman Cultural Center daily, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and 1 to 5 p.m. on Sundays. The exhibit closes on May 10. Additionally, Ian Bracchitta will perform jazz selections at Music Sandwiched In, May 8. The free lunchtime concert series is held in Spartanburg’s downtown library, 12:15-1 p.m., presented by Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra. Bring your lunch or buy one there. For more information, visit chapmanculturalcenter.org or call 542-ARTS. Gallery Seventeen presents the oil on aluminum paintings of Scott Harris during May and June with an opening reception on May 3, 6-9 p.m. The gallery is located at 17 West North Street, Greenville. For more information, visit galleryseventeen.com. The Spartanburg Little Theatre’s season will wrap up with the Tennessee Williams drama “A Streetcar Named Desire.” On stage for six performances from May 3 through 12 at the Chapman Cultural Center, “A Streetcar Named Desire” is a true American classic. Directed by veteran director Dan Harvey, these performances will feature a cast of Upstate actors led by Lee Neibert as Stanley Kowalski, Alaina Steading as Blanche Dubois and Harmonie Skipper as Stella Kowalski. Tickets can be purchased by calling the Chapman Cultural Center box office at 864-5422787 or online at chapmanculturalcenter.org.

Join us on Saturday, May 25th for…

The Hughes Main Library in Greenville will host “LOOK!,” an exhibit featuring children with special healthcare needs through May 25. The exhibit is sponsored by Family Connection, which connects families of children with special healthcare needs. For more information, visit familyconnectionsc.org. Virginia artist Sarah Lamb’s artwork will be on display at Greenville County Museum of Art through June 2. Her skilled treatment of reflective objects, such as bottles, shells and copper pots, provides a bright counterpoint to earthy tabletop surfaces and humble subject matter. For more information, visit gcma.org or call 864-271-7570. Send us your arts announcement. Email: arts@communityjournals.com

Run or walk where no race was held before... down a Greenville Downtown Airport runway! Help raise money to add playground equipment to the new community aviation themed park at the airport. Details and registration information can be found at: http://book-events.com/takeflight5k/

Crossword puzzle: page 46

Sudoku puzzle: page 46

MAY 3, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 35


JOURNAL CULTURE

Arts Calendar May 3-9

Artists Guild Gallery Opening Reception for Laura Nance & Gary Roderer Exhibit May 3 ~ 239-3882 Chicora Voices Spring Concert May 3 ~ 255-9596 Fountain Inn Arts Center Fountain Inn Symphony Orchestra “Grand Finale” May 3 ~ 409-1050 Greenville Concert Band Arts for a Lifetime XVI May 3 ~ 268-7274 Various Greenville galleries First Friday May 3 ~ 325-4445 Greenville Chamber of Commerce Photographs by William Abbott and Lynn Pilewski Through May 3 ~ 242-1050 Greenville Symphony Orchestra Tcheers for Tchaikovsky May 4-5 ~ 467-3000 Carolina Bronze Handbell Ensemble Spring Concert May 7 ~ 238-4639 Peace Center Blue Man Group May 7-12 ~ 467-3000 Downtown Alive Old You May 9 – 232-2273 Metro. Arts Council @ Centre Stage Photography by Tom Ebetino Through Jun. 14 ~ 233-6733 Greenville County Museum of Art Southbound Through May 19 ~ 271-7570 Sarah Lamb Through Jun. 2 ~ 271-7570 William H. Johnson: Native Son Through Sep. 29 ~ 271-7570

36 THE JOURNAL | MAY 3, 2013


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THIS WEEK’S FEATURED HOME

HOME INFO

Historic James Street, Greenville Don’t miss this fabulous 3/2/2 open floorplan with modern technology features on Historic James St. The home constructed by Highland Homes has Craftsman Architecture throughout. Features include a large family room, dining room and keeping room off the kitchen that exits to a walk out patio and screened porch. Large master suite has a sitting area, and His/ Her walk-in closets. 2 BRs with a bonus room between upstairs. Detached garage has 588 SF apt. with kitchen, living, and a bed and bath area. Special features: 2x6 Construction with Double Insulation Spray Foam and Exterior Landscape LED programmable lighting, a Nuvo Stereo system, Nest-Internet thermostat programmable controls and security system, Central Vac.

Price: $589,000 | MLS: #1252439 Bedrooms: 3 Baths: 2 full, 2 half Square Footage: 4000-4199 Schools: Stone Elementary | League Middle Greenville High Patrick Franzen 864.250.1234 | patrickfranzen@msn.com Highland Homes 864.233.4175 | highlandhomessc.com To submit your Featured Home: homes@greenvillejournal.com

Agents on call this weekend

PATRICK TOATES 360-0170 PELHAM RD.

SANDRA PALMER 313-7193 SIMPSONVILLE

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

BOB MOFFATT 483-8400 WOODRUFF RD.

SHIRLEE ROLLINS 879-4239 GREER

RON REGINA SMALLEY MCDANIEL 979-9646 979-6633 EASLEY/ PLEASANTBURG POWDERSVILLE

GINGER SHERMAN 313-8638 AUGUSTA RD.

Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at

cdanjoyner.com.

MAY 3, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 37


JOURNAL HOMES

athome

OPEN THIS WEEKEND

O P E N S U N D AY, M AY 5 F R O M 2 – 4 P M

UMMER 2012 SUMMER S

athome FALL/WINTER

2012

athome G 2013 PRING SPRIN S

THE MOST RECOGNIZED, NATIONALLY AWARD WINNING, LOCALLY FOCUSED, HOME MAGAZINE IN THE UPSTATE. GREENVILLE Barnes & Noble - 735 Haywood Rd. Barnes & Noble - 1125 Woodruff Rd. Community Journals - 148 River St.

SPARTANBURG Barnes & Noble - 1489 W. O. Ezell Blvd. The Book Shelf - 90 Pacolet St., Tryon, NC

5 Somerleaf Way, Somerleaf Full Brick with 4BRs/4.5BAs, and an open floor plan with great entertainment flow. Hardwood and tile flooring throughout. Separate Teen/In-Law Suite. Formal Living Room with gas fireplace, Formal Dining Room opens to Kitchen, Keeping Room, Gourmet Kitchen with stainless steel appliances and granite countertops, breakfast area, office, laundry room, oversized screened porch with brick flooring and more on private, landscaped fenced lot! Master bedroom has an updated, lux bath, his/her closets, and access to screened porch. Lots of storage space in the large attic, and a 2 car, side entry garage.

HOME INFO Price: $529,900 | MLS: #1255785 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 4.5 Square Footage: 3800-3999 Schools: Monarch Elementary Mauldin Middle | Mauldin High Contact: Ronda Holder | 864.430.0242 Prudential C. Dan Joyner, Co. To submit your Open House: homes@greenvillejournal.com

CHARLESTON Indigo Books - 427 Fresh Fields Dr., Johns Island, SC

SUBSCRIPTIONS At Home publishes 3 times a year (Spring, Summer, and Fall/Winter). A 1-year subscription is $20, 2-years is $35. Contact us at 864-679-1200.

– At Home in the Upstate

38 THE JOURNAL | MAY 3, 2013

FOR MORE INFORMATION

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Let me help you today!

FEATURED NEIGHBORHOOD

311 Philips Road | $999,000

Fabulous 6BR/4.5BA home, pool, cabana, pool house, tennis & basketball court on 6.2 acres in Greer. MLS#1251924

Linden Park, Simpsonville Linden Park is a 44 lot subdivision of custom homes built by local builders. Our neighborhood is within the city limits of Simpsonville with local dining and shopping a short stroll away. The homes feature custom moldings, granite countertops, 9â&#x20AC;&#x2122; ceilings, master baths with double vanities and ceramic showers, and hardwood floors that are sanded and stained on site. The houses are built on crawl spaces with exteriors of either brick, stone, or hardiplank and most feature covered front and rear porches. Double garages are accessed by rear alleys and we have sidewalks throughout the neighborhood that connect to the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sidewalks.

Paddington Ave. #26 | $70,000

Paddington Ave at Hindman Dr in Avondale West Subdivision in beautiful North Main Area! MLS#1258614

HOME INFO Schools: Simpsonville Elementary Hillcrest Middle | Hillcrest High Contact: Providence Realty & Marketing 864.676.1719 | www.LindenParksc.com To submit your Featured Neighborhood: homes@greenvillejournal.com

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

140 Mount Vista | $365,000

3BR/2.5BA home in Greenville Country Club area with fenced yard and large back deck. MLS#1257380

SUSAN REID 864.616.3685 sreid@cbcaine.com

C53R

Directions: I-385 exit Hwy 417 (Main Street Simpsonville) towards Simpsonville. Left on Hwy 14. Right on Stokes Rd. Linden Park is 100 yards on the right.

MAY 3, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 39


JOURNAL HOMES

JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND

O P E N S U N D AY, M AY 5 F R O M 2 – 4 P M

CLAREMONT

MAHAFFEY PLANTATION

6 SABLE GLEN . $699,900 . MLS#1255400 4BR/4BA Absolutely gorgeous home built by Woodland Builders in the exclusive gated Claremont community. Exquisite crown moldings throughout will leave you stunned at this price point. Contact: Charlotte Sarvis 864-346-9943 Carol Pyfrom Realty

AUGUSTA ROAD AREA

225 W. FARIS RD . $535,000 . MLS#1244962 5BR/3.5BA Old-style elegance, fully renovated! Two Master suites - one up and one down. Upscale Kitchen. Detached Bonus Room with Bath and Loft. GREAT NEW PRICE! Augusta Rd to W Faris, L on Argonne.

201 RIVERSTONE WAY . $579,900 . MLS#1236658 5BR/5BA What an incredible Dillard Jones home, perfect for that large family. Gorgeous basement brick 3 story home featuring bedrooms galore, 5 to be exact and 5 full bathrooms, lots of living space, too. Contact: Charlotte Sarvis 864-346-9943 Carol Pyfrom Realty

Contact: Joe Stall 864-630-6464 Coldwell Banker Caine

SOMERLEAF

WEATHERSTONE

SYCAMORE RIDGE

5 SOMERLEAF WAY . $529,900 . MLS#1255785

108 BENTWATER TRAIL . $439,900 . MLS#1256398

43 SYCAMORE RIDGE DR . $435,000 . MLS#1254377

4BR/4.5BA Full Brick with 4BRs/4.5BAs.. Frml LR & DR, Keeping Rm, Gourmet Kit w/stainless appli, breakfast area, office, laundry rm, screened porch & more on fenced lot! Master has lux bath and his/her closets

4BR/3BA This home is truly amazing! It is a wonderful home built in 2011 and wonderful location…. The location is awesome – just minutes away from shopping and restaurants – plus 385 and Laurens County.

4BR/3.5BA Absolutely beautiful home in wonderful nhood. Open floorplan. 2 story Den. Frml LR & DR. Spacious kitchen. Main St Simpsonville, Left on Curtis St @ Clock Tower, Right on Hunter, Right into SD.

Contact: Ronda Holder 864/430-0242 PRUDENTIAL

Contact: Carol Pyfrom 864-608-3312 Carol Pyfrom Realty

Contact: Tim Keagy 905-3304 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

40 THE JOURNAL | MAY 3, 2013

FOR MORE INFORMATION

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JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND WOODLAND HILLS

O P E N S U N D AY, M AY 5 F R O M 2 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4 P M SUGAR CREEK

PELHAM CREEK

2 ROSEFIELD COURT . $324,500 . MLS#1252908

115 WOODY CREEK ROAD . $319,900 . MLS#0

102 SMITH HOLLOW DR . $279,000 . MLS#1257956

.63 acres Relaxation and peacefullness await you on this back deck! Wonderful home with a great floor plan--master bedroom and guest bedroom on main. 2 other nice bedrooms and a huge bonus upstairs REDUCED

5BR/3BA Spacious brick ranch w/ bonus in walk out basement. Updated kit, flooring, paint, fixtures, deck, and more! Dir: Pelham to Boiling Springs TR on Sugar Creek Rd TL on Woody Creek RD. #115 on left.

3BR/2.5BA Beautiful home! Bonus room,master on main, fenced yard and more! Pelham Rd to Riley Smith Rd at the Library, Left into Pelham Creek, Right on Smith Hollow

Contact: Patty Pfister, GRI, ABR (864) 630-0410 Keller Williams Main/THE LAWTON TEAM

Contact: JJ Bowers 483-6172 RE/MAX Realty Professionals

Contact: Margaret Marcum 420-3125 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

PEBBLE VALLEY

ASHBY PARK

TUCKER BRANCH

14 BERNWOOD DRIVE . $274,900 . MLS#1257133

9 TINSBERRY DR . $224,500 . MLS#1255338

33 DONEMERE WAY . $199,900 . MLS#1249245

3BR/2.5BA This custom, all-brick home is located in the Pebble Creek area in the Pebble Valley subdivision. The main level features hardwood floors, a built-in bookshelf in the foyer and a beautiful fireplace.

3BR/2BA Brick patio home, private fenced backyard, covered patio. Butler Rd off Woodruff, go past Tanner Rd @ CVS, SD will be on the Left, Take 1st Right on Tinsberry

3BR/2.5BA Craftsman style, Energy Star home. Upgrades & advanced technology. 385 S to Exit 23, Hwy 418. Go apprx. 1/2 mile and turn Left. Turn Right at light on S. Main, Go 1/2 mile & turn Left into SD

Contact: Mikel-Ann Scott 864-630-2474 Carol Pyfrom Realty

Contact: Dana Mathewes 270-4722 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Kate Anderson/Kristin Brady 363-3634/908-7200 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

WATERTON

RUSSTON PLACE

INGLEWOOD

20 HEATHER STONE CT . $177,500 . MLS#1258188

321 ANGIE DRIVE . $115,900 . MLS#1256508

124 INGLEWOOD WAY . $106,000 . MLS#1257936

4BR/2.5BA Great home in great location. Master on 2nd level. Quiet culdesac location. Great amenities. 385 South to Exit 26, Right off ramp, Left into SD @ light, Right on Heatherstone.

2BR/2.5BA Condo on the lake. Beautiful private home, Many updates, fireplace, deck on lake. Brushy Creek @ Brushy Creek Elementary, turn on Andie Dr, follow to culdesac, home on Left

2BR/2.5BA Great location close to town. This 2 BR 21/2 bath end unit features slate in the foyer, hardwood floors in the Hall, Great Room and Formal Dining Room. Tile in the Kitchen and Breakfast area.

Contact: Tim Keagy 905-3304 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Dana Mathewes 270-4277 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Clay Hooper 864-905-9990 Carol Pyfrom Realty

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

MAY 3, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 41


JOURNAL HOMES

ON THE MARKET THORNBLADE

F O R I N F O R M AT I O N C O N TA C T L I S T I N G A G E N T KELLETT PARK

RIVERVIEW

200 KELLETT PARK DRIVE . $557,000 . 5BR/3.5BA PRESTIGIOUS KELLETT PARK. Custom home w/ pool. Impeccably maintained w/ many newer upgrades in private, upscale neighborhood. Offered by owner below appraised value for immediate sale. Appt only. Contact: Owner (864) 288-8463

FOUNTAIN INN

112 ANTIGUA WAY . $1,275,000 . MLS#1252801

313 JENKINS BRIDGE ROAD . $259,900 . MLS#1250471

102 RAPID RIVER TRAIL . $429,500 . MLS#1252814

4BR/3.5BA Unique elegant simplicity abounds in this home overlooking the 13th fairway of Thornblade CC. You must see to appreciate, the efficiency of the floorplan and the incredible storage space

3BR/3BA A beautiful farm house located on a corner lot with tons of yard space for gardening, pets and children to run & play! The updates include: stainless appliances in 2010, roof in ‘02, HVAC 5 ton in ‘09

4BR/3BA Custom Home. Great Schools and convenient location. Open Floorplan for easy entertaining. Lots of storage space!

Contact: John Moore 270-0769 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Hilary Hurst (864) 313-6077 Coldwell Banker Caine

Contact: Tim Keagy 270-0769 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

WOODRUFF LAKE

COUNTRY WALK

102 WOODRUFF LAKE WAY . $184,900 . MLS#1257820

2 LONG ACRE LANE . $65,000 . MLS#1255092

3BR/2.5BA Beautiful 3/2.5 home which offers many features including a 2 story foyer, chair rail molding, open kitchen to the large great room and level fenced yard! Convenient to I-85, 1-385, shops and more!

3BR/2BA A tranquil neighborhood located just off Fork Shoals Rd. This cozy split floor plan sits on a large 1.32 acre, level lot that is perfect for a game of football or pets to run about! Must See!

Contact: Hilary Hurst (864) 313-6077 Coldwell Banker Caine

Contact: Hilary Hurst (864) 313-6077 Coldwell Banker Caine

42 THE JOURNAL | MAY 3, 2013

SEARCH THE HOTTEST NEIGHBORHOODS.

JournalHOMES.com FOR MORE INFORMATION

JournalHOMES.com


re atu n g Si

d aR ust a g Au Are

re atu n g Si

3080 Earls Bridge Rd. - Easley

3 Andy Ct. - On Lake Robinson

305 Jones Ave. #3 - Alta Vista

$499,900 • 1237373 • 4 BR/3.5 BA

$405,000 • 1250243 • 3 BR/3 BA

$395,000 • 1257507 • 3 BR/3.5 BA

Mini Estate, 3500 sf w/two MBR suites on 2.20 ac, 3 lvl4600 sf barn. Great Features with many updates. Anne Marchant 864.420.0009 | Jolene Wimberly 864. 414.1688

Arrowhead, 5 car garage, workshop and pool. Spectacular lake view. Updates: hdwds, windows and neutral paint. Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 | Chuck Miller 864.293.4778

L ent FUL asem B ed ish Fin

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Sought after location, walking distance to downtown. Great living space, lots of storage, Low maint. yd. Move in ready. Tom Marchant 864.449.1658

100 Kettle Oak Way - Simpsonville

107 Winding River Ln. - Whitehall Plntn

7 Treecrest - Neely Farm

$390,000 • 1253406 • 4 BR/3.5 BA

$344,000 • 1255696 • 4 BR / 4.5 BA

$277,900 • 1257748 • 4 BR/3.5 BA

Craftsman-Style custom home, hdwds, granite, ss appliances, scrn porch, 3700+ SF. Tom Marchant 864.449.1658

Open 5000+ sf home w/finished walk out basement & gourmet Kitchen. Backs up to protected nature preserve. Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 | Chuck Miller 864.293.4778

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On cul-de-sac w/finished basement incls - kitchenette, gas fpl, office, BA and storage New roof, and interior paint. Barb Riggs 864.423.2783

le ab d sir hoo De hbor ig Ne

3 Sayebrook Rd. - Autumn Trace

25 Spring Park Rd - Mtn Lake Colony

204 Rainwood Dr. - Poinsettia

$217,000 • 1253691 • 4 BR/2.5 BA + Bonus

$204,000 • 1257652 • 3 BR/2BA

$189,921 • 1228853 • 5 BR/3 BA

Spacious, decorator colors inspired home. Fenced yd w/ irr. sys. Upds = hdwd floors & antique vanities in BAs. Barb Riggs 864.423.2783

ced du e R

Historic mtn comm. 30 mins from Dwntwn. Heart pine flrs, lrg scr porch, ss appli., 2-C carport. Amenities. Tom Marchant 864.449.1658 | Gordon D. Seay 864.444.4359

Remarkable home offering 5” wd plank frs, lrg backyard & 1 BR downstairs on corner lot in est. neigborhood. Joan Rapp 864.901.3839

llo be e t n Mo

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101 Ramblewood Ave. - Wildaire $182,500 • 1250944 • 3 BR/2 BA

1903 Spring Wood Ct. - Summer Woods $64,900 • 1253360 • 2 BR/ 1.5 BA

Custom Homesites - Montebello Starting at $69,000

Mary Praytor 864.593.0366

James Akers 864.325.8413

Nancy McCrory 864.505.8367 | Karen Turpin 864.230.5176

Cul-de-sac lot, hardwood floors & built-ins, beautiful garden, convenient location

Large downstairs living area, fenced patio, minutes to I-385/I-85

Private gated community, amenities, Spectacular mountain and city views.

FANNIE MAE OWNED 206 Wilton St

$158,500 MLS 1253402

204 Woodlawn Dr

$64,900

MLS 1255286

124 Goldfinch Ct

$56,500

MLS 1257665

204 Rainbow Dr

$52,000

MLS 1258230

6 Cambridge Dr

$22,900

MLS 1256822

www.Homepath.com Kathy Slayter • 864.982.7772

RENTAL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE • Marchantpm.com

www.marchantco.com

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

|

864.467.0085 | AGENT ON DUTY: Valerie Miller 864.430.6602

J43

Decades of Trust. Confidence in the Future. MAY 3, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 43


JOURNAL HOMES

Trust the Upstate’s Market Leader in Real Estate

25%

20%

19.31%

With over 250 local agents and 8 convenient real estate offices serving all of Upstate, South Carolina, Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. is the area's premier real estate company.

15%

10.23% 10%

7.46% 5.57%

5%

0%

1

2

3

4

2012 Market Share: January – December

1

Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS®

2

Coldwell Banker Caine

3

Keller Williams Realty-A

4

RE/MAX Realty Professionals

All information provided from Greater Greenville Multiple Listing Services, deemed reliable but not guaranteed. Figures based on total volume January-December 2012 (2/3/13 data). KW firms are separate business entities.

C23R

Visit www.cdanjoyner.com R E A L E S TAT E N E W S March Pending Home Sales Improve but Overall Pace Leveling

April 29, 2013 - Pending home sales increased in March and remain above year-ago levels, but contract activity in recent months shows only modest movement, according to the National Association of Realtors®.

The Pending Home Sales Index,* a forward-looking indicator based on contract signings, rose 1.5 percent to 105.7 in March from a downwardly revised 104.1 in February, and is 7.0 percent above March 2012 when it was 98.8. Pending sales have been above year-ago levels for the past 23 months; the data re�lect contracts but not closings. Bill Lawton, 2013 President of the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® and Broker-In-Charge of Keller Williams Realty in Greenville, SC, said the market appears to be leveling off. “Contract activity has been in a narrow range in recent months, not from a pause in demand but because of limited supply. Little movement is expected in near-term sales closings, but they should edge up modestly as the year progresses,” he said. “Job additions and rising household wealth will continue to support housing demand.”

The PHSI in the Northeast was unchanged at 82.8 in March and is 6.3 percent higher than March 2012. In the Midwest the index increased 0.3 percent to 103.8 in March and is 13.7 percent above a year ago. Pending home sales in the South rose 2.7 percent to an index of 120.0 in March and is 10.4 percent higher than March 2012. In the West the index increased 1.5 percent in March to 102.9 but is 4.3 percent below a year ago.

44 THE JOURNAL | MAY 3, 2013

Total existing-home sales are projected to increase 6.5 to 7 percent over 2012 to nearly 5 million sales this year, while the national median existing-home price is forecast to rise about 7.5 percent. The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing 1 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries. Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® represents over 1,600 members in all aspects of the real estate industry. Please visit the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® web site at www.ggar.com for real estate and consumer information. “Every market is different, call a REALTOR® today.”

For additional commentary and consumer information, visit www.houselogic.com and http://retradio.com.

* The Pending Home Sales Index is a leading indicator for the housing sector, based on pending sales of existing homes. A sale is listed as pending when the contract has been signed but the transaction has not closed, though the sale usually is �inalized within one or two months of signing. The index is based on a large national sample, typically representing about 20 percent of transactions for existing-home sales. In developing the model for the index, it was demonstrated that the level of monthly sales-contract activity parallels the level of closed existing-home sales in the following two months.

An index of 100 is equal to the average level of contract activity during 2001, which was the �irst year to be examined. By coincidence, the volume of existing-home sales in 2001 fell within the range of 5.0 to 5.5 million, which is considered normal for the current U.S. population.

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G R E E N V I L L E T R A N S AC T ION S

JOURNAL HOMES

A P R I L 8 - 12 , 2 013 SUBD. CANTERBURY BARKSDALE SCHWIERS AT CLEVELAND CUSTOM HOUSE CLUB FOREST RIVER HOUSE CONDOS ELLINGTON PARK CLIFFS AT GLASSY EAST

CHANDLER LAKE HOLLINGSWORTH PARK AT VERDAE ROPER MOUNTAIN ESTATES PARIS GLEN BRADFORD GROVE CHATELAINE ELLINGTON PARK BRADFORD GROVE RIVER WALK JENKINS FARM SADDLEHORN BENNINGTON KANATENAH CHEROKEE PARK PELHAM FALLS CHARLOTTE’S WOODS THE RESERVES AT RAVENWOOD NORTHWOOD LINDEN PARK

KANATENAH FAIRVIEW WOODS STONE CREEK STONE LAKE HEIGHTS RESERVE AT PLANTATION GREENE GLENBROOKE TOWNHOUSES BELLE TERRACE ACRES BROOKFIELD WEST HERITAGE POINT OFFICES AT PELHAM COMMONS BROOKFIELD WEST GREYTHORNE COUNTRY CLUB ESTATES SHADOW MOSS CARLYLE POINTE POPLAR FOREST HERITAGE POINT THE FARM @ SANDY SPRINGS ORCHARD FOXGLOVE WARRENTON AVALON ESTATES WAGON CREEK THE MEADOWS AT GILDER CREEK FARM RAVINES AT CREEKSIDE MAGGIE VALLEY MULBERRY AT PINCKNEY MORNING MIST FARM WATERTON THE LOFTS AT MILLS MILL HAMMETT GROVE SUMMERFIELD TOWNES AT PINE GROVE

MONTROYAL HILLS NORTHWOOD HILLS BRADFORD NORTH MEADOWBROOKE WOODALL ALEXANDER FARMS LONG CREEK PLANTATION WOODCREEK FOX TRACE TOWNES AT CARDINAL CREEK SHOALS CROSSING LONG CREEK PLANTATION CHATHAM WOODS BEAVER CROSSING PARTRIDGE RIDGE THE MEADOW@BLUE RIDGE PLANTATION VICTORIA PARK VINEYARD AT PLANTERS ROW LINKSIDE AT BONNIE BRAE RIDGECREEK ESTATES HAMPTON FARMS FAIRVIEW LAKE CLUB POINTE HALF MILE LAKE

PRICE

SELLER

$2,500,000 $995,000 $550,000 $526,000 $525,000 $475,000 $473,500 $430,412 $425,000 $400,000 $371,599 $362,500 $359,615 $350,300 $341,500 $334,900 $325,000 $325,000 $324,688 $320,000 $312,900 $300,001 $298,900 $280,000 $277,000 $265,000 $263,856 $262,000 $258,000 $250,401 $250,000 $249,900 $246,399 $245,000 $243,500 $240,000 $240,000 $239,000 $238,000 $232,000 $231,900 $230,000 $230,000 $228,000 $225,000 $225,000 $218,000 $217,780 $216,000 $212,500 $212,000 $212,000 $211,500 $209,000 $207,631 $205,000 $200,000 $199,000 $198,400 $198,000 $195,000 $190,000 $187,500 $183,000 $180,500 $177,000 $176,000 $175,000 $175,000 $174,000 $170,000 $169,000 $169,000 $168,000 $166,400 $165,000 $165,000 $165,000 $163,000 $162,000 $161,900 $160,705 $160,500 $159,631 $159,000 $159,000 $158,000 $157,000 $157,000 $156,134 $156,000 $155,500 $154,000 $153,000 $153,000 $152,500 $150,000 $150,000

PELHAM OAKS LLC PELHAM OAKS PLAZA LLC CB MART INC A SC CORPORA 7-ELEVEN INC WYLIE MARY ANNE J CARRINGTON JENNIE JOHNSO BUCCI DEBORAH J DIAMOND ROBERT W J AND E HOLDINGS LLC KNOBLAUCH SCOTT M BOLAND BRIAN N OYER CRISTINE GOODE CURTIS L JR JONES J PAUL (JTWROS) BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT SMALLIDGE STEVEN M E* TRADE BANK LIGHTFOOT JASON 2007-9T1 TRUST CWALT INC ALTERNATE LOAN HARBORVIEW 2006-5 TRUST CURBISHLEY DEAN ROBERT HIPP CHARLES W LOWERY MICHAEL R (JTWROS BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT CONNELLY JAMES LS RESIDENTIAL LLC BREWER ELLIS C BROWN JASON P WILLIAMS ANTHONY E (SURV WADE JANE E BEEZLEY JOHN M & JOAN E BRADLEY CHARLES B NATIONAL RESIDENTIAL NOM KIRKLAND KAREN PURDY AKER JAMES A BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT AVILES FLORISEL NATIONAL RESIDENTIAL NOM BROWN LAURIE L FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA SMITH BETTY J WHITE HOUSE CONSTRUCTION ORIOLE PROPERTIES LLC SADDLE HORN LLC KISER DEANDRA A JACKSON DAVID S BARRINGTON ANNE E (JTWRO BARHAM ALEXANDRA L WRIGHT JON S S TEAM PROPERTIES LLC FULLER ANNE N (JTWROS) BANK OF TRAVELERS REST HENDERSON J LYNNE BENFIELD ERIN M POE STEPHEN L SCHAEFFER PROPERTIES LLC CARROLL RODNEY M D R HORTON INC DAVILA HECTOR T (JTWROS) MILLS PAMELA J BLISS DONALD (JTWROS) CLIFF HAWK PROPERTIES L OWENS DONOVAN A MANTEKAS PETER JIMMY FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG CAROLLA RENEE R ROBARDS ANNE E (JTWROS) WILSON DAVID ALLEN JR BUTLER DORAN KEITH (JTWR PHILLIPS ERIN N (JTWROS) GABBARD JOHNATHAN G MURPHY ERNEST G STORY EMERY GRANT MY PALMETTO HOME LLC COX CHRISTOPHER PAUL JAEGER WILLIAM F AIKEN CHRISTOPHER W (JTW GOMPPER CHRISTOPHER MAR ALEXANDER B GREENE VILLAS LLC WEHLE RICHARD W (JTWROS) LEAGUE ORA G TOTTEN EDWARD MONTAGUE BUSH MATTHEW A BOLEN CHARLES S (JTWROS) MCDOW BENJAMIN C TALBERT JANE B (JTWROS) KING BONITA G LILLEY MICHAEL (JTWROS) PINNACLE INVESTMENTS LLC ARTHURS CHRISTOPHER D CANNON JAMES F HUGHES DUSTIN J (JTWROS) S C PILLON HOMES INC WALTERS MEISHA MORGAN CHRISTOPHER FOGG CRAIG D RINTOUL DAVID A CALABRIA RAYMOND L LIN LINDA CHUN YI MCLEOD JOHN D YOUNG INVESTMENT LLC DOMINGUEZ RAUL TRIPLE B COMPANY INC GATLIN CYNTHIA L ORIOLE PROPERTIES LLC MEEGAN DEBORAH A D R HORTON INC DICK JOHN CASEY FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG SANDS CELESTE KING FINOLA MARY HYDER LARRY S JR PRASAD NEELESH AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR HOOVER-DEMPSEY JOSHUA DELUCA JAMES R (JTWROS) RABIDEAU CAREY R BURKE DEBORAH WILSON STATE WESLEY B (JTWROS) AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR PARKER JOAN P COPELAND DONNA P (JTWROS AMBRIA PROPERTIES LLC FINKE TERESA B (JTWROS) STRONG PHILIP M MACPHERSON JOHN A JR (JT COOPER KRISTAN C AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR COOPER JAMES Z HOWELL TIMOTHY BRADEN CAMERON J PRICE III PORRELLO COURTNEY J & A UPSTATE PROPERTIES AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR RAO ARTHI V KORSEDAL JOHN R IV (JTWR MORTON JOSHUA C STRANGE THOMAS R III 23 GLENN STREET LAND TRU MALDONADO DIEGO CONITS VANGELIA TSIMORTO STARNES HOLLIE L REVOCAB BERRYHILL DEBRA A SKYBERG CAROL L S CUNNINGHAM WILLIAM H WILKINSON GEORGE R III TRAYNHAM DANIEL KEITH FRALICK PATRICIA FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTG BELLE ADAM BRANNON ROBERT W ADAMS DANIEL MARTIN (JTW ALEXANDER FARMS DEVELOPM BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT MECAGNI ALISSA S AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR RETHERFORD DUSTIN M HOLLIS NEELY M III ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC KIRKLAND JAMES W (JTWROS NVR INC DILLS ROBERT B COMFORT OAKS LLC SMITH ALLISON B REVOCABL EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL CAVANAUGH NANCY SAXTON ARCH T TINSLEY JANE C LIVING TR HUGHES DUSTIN MOORE PENNY D KELLER LINDA K SAPP DEBORAH A (JTWROS) COOLEY KIM TURNER TAYLOR KRISTEN S SK BUILDERS INC AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR MUNGO HOMES INC SAINT-PAUL BAPTISTE J ALLEN AMY B AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR SCHMIDT MARK W AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR LOGE DAWN H COWART CANDICE C BAILEY JOY R PETERSON MARINA H (JTWRO EAST HAMPTON PROPERTIES ALBERT ASHLEY L FOX KAREN H WRIGHT TREVOR D BAGWELL JOHN E BAGWELL RHODES M ORIOLE PROPERTIES LLC WILSON MICHAEL B (SURV)

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

BUYER

ADDRESS 10110 WHIPPOORWILL LN 1722 ROUTH ST STE 1000 11 WINDMONT DR 828 CRESCENT AVE 820 S MAIN ST UNIT 204 21 CLUB FOREST LN 4 DOLPHINE LN 211 ELLINGTON CREEK LN 875 WHITE HORSE ROAD EXT 7105 CORPORATE DR 750 CIRCLE DR 235 CURETON ST 100 TEA OLIVE PL 107 KIMBOROUGH ST 305 MEADOWSWEET LN 136 PARIS GLEN WAY 1201 BRADFORD CREEK LN 66 CASTELLAN DR 205 ELLINGTON CREEK LN 1201 BRADFORD CREEK LN 118 PARKSIDE DR PO BOX 4068 409 SADDLEBRED DR 104 CAEDMON CT 113 OREGON ST 101 THORNBLADE BLVD 3000 FREEDOM DR 16 WOODWAY DR 70 WILLIAM OWENS WAY 67 COPPERDALE DR 26 WOODBINE RD 113 WORTHINGTON CT PO BOX 650043 1740 E SALUDA LAKE RD 322 LYONS DR 314 STEWART ST 102 SHAGBARK CIR 9 HAMILTON AVE 104 LEDGEWOOD WAY 11 LOTUS CT 51 BARNWOOD CIR 236 GLENBROOKE WAY 412 LAKE EL JEMA DR 10 COBBLESTONE RD 220 HERITAGE POINT DR PO BOX 25008 5 BRITON CT 252 DAIRWOOD DR 34 DOUGLAS DR 124 WILD THORN LN 220 SANDY RUN DR 10 FALCON CREST DR 302 SUMMITBLUFF DR 26 HERITAGE POINT DR 208 MAREHAVEN CT 5104 OLD AUGUSTA RD 223 AMBERJACK CT 23815 STUART RANCH RD STE 302 19 LEATHERTON WAY 502 WAGONCREEK DR 23815 STUART RANCH RD STE 302 68 FUDORA CIR 111 MAGGIE VALLEY CT 308 MULBERRY ST 23815 STUART RANCH RD 119 WATERTON WAY 400 MILLS AVE UNIT 424 23815 STUART RANCH RD STE 302 108 SHAIRPIN LN 416 CEDAR PINES DR 1406-A E LEE RD 500 CRESTWOOD DR 12 PEMBERTON DR 412 TRINITY WAY N/O/D 308 HEDGEROW DR 404 CAMELOT DR PO BOX 1039 23815 STUART RANCH RD STE 302 101 WOOD CREEK RD 205 SCOTTISH AVE 210 DILLARD DR 26 STEADMAN WAY 501 NORWELL LN 3110 GARDEN DISTRICT DR 4 ANSLEY CT 15 PADDLE POND PL 21 GROUSE RIDGE WAY 23815 STUART RANCH RD STE 302 300 STONEBURY DR 23815 STUART RANCH RD STE 302 23815 STUART RANCH RD STE 302 76 STALLINGS RD 605 NICHOLE PL 2 SUMMERGRASS DR 9 SUMMERLIN PL 108 CLUB HOUSE CT 102 HALF MILE PL

Welcoming the Cheves Mussman Ouzts Group to Coldwell Banker Caine. Coldwell Banker Caine proudly welcomes Jamie Ouzts, Steve Mussman and Thomas Cheves to its growing team of real estate professionals. Visit cbcaine.com to learn more about this incredible group.

MAY 3, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 45


journal culture

figure. this. out. Hacker

By Jean O’Conor

HOME FURNISHINGS · ACCESSORIES

875 NE Main Street, Simpsonville | 864.228.1619 Check for new items daily at CarolinaConsignmentLLC.com

 WEDDINGS  ENGAGEMENTS  ANNIVERSARIES Make your announcement to the Greater Greenville Area

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1/4 page - $174, Word Count 140 3/8 page - $245, Word Count 140

ENGAGEMENTS

3/16 page - $85, Word Count 90 For complete information call 864-679-1205 or e-mail aharley@ communityjournals.com 46 THE Journal | may 3, 2013

Across 1 Roasting aid 7 Monopoly token introduced in 2013 10 Preserve, in a way 14 Hardly eye-catching 18 Fifth-century plunderer 19 Woodcutter Baba 20 Venice’s La Fenice, for one 23 Oatmeal? 25 Smooth con man’s tool? 26 Bridge 27 Building sites 28 Roman statesman 29 Refer (to) 30 Bit of climbing gear 32 Words before DVD 33 Celebrity entourages 34 Victoria’s Secret ad? 38 People at the supermarket counter? 39 Fifth of a century 40 Fictional barber Sweeney 41 Leeds leave-taking 46 “Don’t reckon so” 47 New member of the faith shaking things up? 52 Pisa’s river 54 Exhilarating 55 Makes better 56 “You’re looking at her” 57 Queen dowager of Jordan 59 Unstable particle

60 Felicity 61 Soup kitchen scene? 68 Jordan’s only port 69 Award-winning 2012 film thriller 70 Token replaced by 7-Across 71 Hill of “Psych” 72 Tickle 74 One to ten, say 77 German one 81 Skewed priority? 84 Soft slip-on 85 Bee student 86 Wave to from the curb, maybe 87 Courtmate of Elena and Ruth 89 Drying-out problem 90 Foot pain location? 94 Café 98 Orly arrival 99 Subject of the 2008 biography “The Man Who Made Lists” 100 Kutcher of “No Strings Attached” 101 Marathon prep run 102 “Wuthering Heights” setting 104 Befuddled 107 Edam? 109 Tired of watching “Downton Abbey”? 111 Good thinking 112 Diplomatic VIP 113 “Katie” host 114 Diamond datum 115 Stag, e.g.

116 Spot markers? 117 Collectible Fords Down 1 Cries from Emeril 2 On 3 Attach to the luggage rack, say 4 Less resonant 5 Hillary Clinton, e.g. 6 Dwindled alarmingly 7 Cook, for one: Abbr. 8 “Ah, me!” 9 Handicapper’s help 10 Beethoven’s “Pathétique,” e.g. 11 “Bridesmaids” coproducer Judd 12 Show you know 13 1989-’90 Broadway one-man show 14 American Girl collection 15 Chaka Khan’s original band 16 Remark to the audience 17 Nice infants 21 Wyoming natives 22 Chlorine or fluorine 24 Used up 28 Like cottage cheese 31 III, in modern Rome 32 “You’d never guess, but ...” 34 Pres. Carter’s alma mater 35 Cape Fear’s st. 36 Congratulatory con-

traction 37 Place for a hog? 38 Mid-century year 42 Archfiend 43 Send in 44 Gaeilge, to its speakers 45 Baseball’s Mel and Ed

Hard

47 Bok __ 48 Flying prefix 49 Clunk cousin 50 The “I” in I.M. Pei 51 “Pleeease?” 53 Seaman’s 12:30 58 “Chopsticks __ fork?” 59 Phone button letters 60 Fella

61 Provide with gear 62 Triple-meter dance, in Dijon 63 Suffix with 48-Down 64 Language that gave us “clan” 65 Like much wine and cheese 66 Houseplant spot 67 Raised on a farm 68 Totals 72 Flammable solvents 73 Bar in a brown wrapper 74 Snowboarding gold-medalist White 75 Bit of change 76 Word sung after midnight 78 “Can’t really say” 79 “The Third Man” genre 80 Digitize, in a way 82 Antique grayishpink shade 83 Trembled 87 Part of a line: Abbr. 88 Father of the river gods 90 Reluctant 91 Lookalike 92 Enterprise counselor 93 Ancient odist 94 Baroque musical dynasty 95 Has sex appeal 96 He-Man’s twin sister 97 Statistical tool first used to monitor the quality of stout 98 Hum __ 102 Cultural idea that may go viral 103 Round bodies 105 First Best Actor Oscar winner Jannings 106 Basics 108 Soil holder 109 Adderley’s instrument 110 City close to BenGurion Airport Crossword answers: page 35

Sudoku answers: page 35


journal culture

60 & Beyond with peggy henderson

It won’t happen to me One day not too long ago, I actually did the math (can’t deny cold-hearted numbers). I struggled with the concept that, at best and Lord willing, I have maybe 20 years left to place my footprints on this planet. Now that I finally “get it,” my lesson here is to share a top priority for all who are over 65 and your adult children: Write and contract a legal and living will and place them in your bank’s safety deposit box. Now, before you sit down to that Thanksgiving dinner. And getting back to Obamacare, given the precious privilege of being a U.S. citizen, we do have choices as how and where we take our last breaths. I humbly embrace and receive enormous solace knowing this to be true. According to the Health Care Financing Administration (2009), “The last 60 days of our life, in terms of medical costs, tend to be the most expensive. Most Americans who die beyond age 65 die in hospitals. Another quarter die in nursing homes and the remaining quarter die at home or elsewhere.” Acceptance versus denial. Peace versus fear. Rich humor versus Calvinist austerity. Lighten up and plan ahead. Yes, death will happen to me. Of course my farewell wishes are to die peacefully in my sleep; I choose yellow roses for my silver casket and a string quartet playing at my graveside service. And above all, as I was taught as a child, “If I die before I wake, I pray dear Lord my soul to take.” Peggy Henderson is a 60 & Beyond former freelance writer turned newspaper columnist. Besides appearing in the Greenville Journal, her column is syndicated with Senior Wire News Services. In addition, she���s a staff writer for the website Go60.us. Contact her at peg4745@aol.com

Nature Discovery at Hagood Mill The public is invited to join in a day of Nature Discovery at Hagood Mill, 138 Hagood Mill Road, Pickens, on May 4, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., with a host of experts on hand to answer questions, provide hand-outs and make a variety of presentations. Visitors can sign up for nature, fungus, herbs and wildflower walks, which will be limited in size to 20 participants and last about 30 minutes. For more information, contact the Pickens County Museum at 864-898-5963.

! s r o Don

OUlers & Y ! K d d D a N E ,P A s S r I H o A T r Spons R 0 u 0 o o 0 T , 0 30 $ R E V O www.DragonBoatUpstateSC.org BENEFITING:

2013 SPONSORS:

ORGANIZING PARTNERS:

GREENVILLE COUNTY ZONING AND PLANNING PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE There will be a public hearing before County Council on Monday, May 20, 2013 at 6:00 p.m. in County Council Chambers, County Square, for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the following items:

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: Food Products for Greenville County, IFB# 43-05/20/13, 3:00 P.M. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org or by calling (864) 467-7200.

LEGAL NOTICES Only $.79 per line ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Only $145 tel 864.679.1205 fax 864.679.1305 email aharley@communityjournals.com

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Stallings Food Mart, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 1320 Stallings Road, Greenville, SC 29609. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than May 19, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2013-20 APPLICANT: Barbara Morris CONTACT INFORMATION: barbara@perfectbalancenaturalhealth.com or 648-2598 PROPERTY LOCATION: 2802 E. North Street PIN: 0279000101200 and 0279000101300 EXISTING ZONING: R-M20, Multifamily Residential REQUESTED ZONING: C-1, Commercial ACREAGE: 2.1 COUNTY COUNCIL: 22 - Taylor DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2013-21 APPLICANT: William C. Hammond CONTACT INFORMATION: bill.hammond@jacobs.com or 676-4734 PROPERTY LOCATION: 1939 Woodruff Road PIN: 0539010100907 EXISTING ZONING: C-1, Commercial REQUESTED ZONING: C-3, Commercial ACREAGE: 3.42 COUNTY COUNCIL: 21 - Burns

Spay-Neuter at reduced prices! Furman Hall Road Now Open!

Behind Cherrydale Shopping Center 864-467-3950

www.greenvillecounty.org/acs

DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2013-18 APPLICANT: Brad Doyle CONTACT INFORMATION: brad@kdsproperties.com or 242-4200 PROPERTY LOCATION: Easley Bridge Road PIN: 0113000100101 EXISTING ZONING: C-3, Commercial and R-M20, Multifamily Residential REQUESTED ZONING: O-D, Office District ACREAGE: 2.89 COUNTY COUNCIL: 23 - Norris DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2013-19 APPLICANT: Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough, LLP CONTACT INFORMATION: sean.faulkner@nelsonmullins.com or 250-2346 PROPERTY LOCATION: NW corner of N. Pleasantburg Drive & Furman Hall Road Intersection PINS: 0174010102900, 0174020600500 (portion), 0174010101100, 0174010101000, 0174010101101, 0174010101102, 0174010101300, 0174010101400, 0174010101500, 0174010101600, 0174010101700, 0174010101800, 0174010101900, 0174010102000, 0174010102100, 0174010102500, 0174010102800, 0174010103101, and 0174010101200 EXISTING ZONING: S-1, Services, R-12, Single-Family Residential, and C-2, Commercial REQUESTED ZONING: C-3, Commercial ACREAGE: 14.5 COUNTY COUNCIL: 23 - Norris

M81A

No one wants to think that he or she is in denial about anything that is super important in one’s life. The term itself holds negative connotations, like alcohol or drug addiction, a marriage in jeopardy, a rationalization that a size 14 is still acceptable if a long jacket or oversized shirt is paired with black, skinny pants. It’s almost impossible to read a newspaper, Internet post or listen to the news without Obamacare being discussed, debated or rebuked. It’s our choice to be engaged or disengaged, proactive or reactive when it comes to political issues that concern our family relationships and us as individuals. So check this headline out: “Acceptance of death increases with age.” What caught my eye was the first sentence of the story that followed: “It’s hardly their monopoly, but death comes most often to the old.” It is such a profound and irreverent statement that it made me stop and think about it. First of all, no one wants to contemplate one’s death, much less discuss it with one’s family. The subject too often gets stored away in the pantry like a quart of pickled okra for next year’s Thanksgiving. My parents, as I write this, are both the same age, 93. They have been ensconced in an incredible Senior Retirement Center in Florida and still attend symphony concerts at the local university. I realize that this is an exceptional case. I also realize that time is of the essence and our beloved phone chats should never be taken for granted. The caveat of the matter is when they die, I’ll be the oldest living generation in my family. Hello. How can one remain in denial about mortality when friends’ photos are on the obituary page more frequently than not and high school reunions are best avoided?

All persons interested in these proposed amendments to the Greenville County Zoning Ordinance and Map are invited to attend this meeting. At subsequent meetings, Greenville County Council may approve or deny the proposed amendments as requested or approve a different zoning classification than requested.

may 3, 2013 | THE Journal 47


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May 3, 2013 Greenville Journal