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GREENVILLEJOURNAL Friday, April 19, 2013 • Vol.15, No.16 • GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

IN MEMORY OF THOSE LOST ON 4/15/2013

HELPING OUT AT THE FINISH LINE In the wake of the bombings at the Boston Marathon on Monday, reports are that three died in the attack and more than 170 were injured. All of the runners, family and friends from the Upstate who attended the race are reported safe. Here’s how you can still help: • Anyone who has information, visuals or details regarding the explosions should call the FBI at 1-800-CALL-FBI (800-225-5324), prompt #3. The FBI says no detail is too small. Investigators are particularly interested in videos or photos of Boylston Street during the marathon. • Donate to the Red Cross by calling 1-800-RED CROSS or visit redcrossblood.org. • Donate to the Salvation Army (which deployed volunteers and mobile feeding kitchens to the site) at donate.salvationarmyusa.org. • The Kraft family, owners of the New England Patriots, announced plans to match $100,000 in donations to support bombing victims. Donate at patriots.com/donate.

Down the

GARDEN PATH

Love of beauty –natural and man-made – is in bloom during the Joyful Garden Tour PAGE 8

• Betsy Franck & the Bareknuckle Band, a blues/rock band from Athens, Ga., is turning a previously scheduled free concert at the Mauldin Cultural Center into a benefit for bombing victims. All donations will go to the American Red Cross of Eastern Massachusetts and the Boston Athletic Association (operators of the Boston Marathon). To make a contribution in advance, or for more information, visit mauldinculturalcenter.org or call 864-335-4862. • Be on the watch for scammers. The Better Business Bureau (BBB) Wise Giving Alliance said at least one poorly conceived charity scam emerged within hours of the attack. BBB urges everyone to check out the charity first to avoid wasting your generosity by donating to a questionable or poorly managed effort. Be proactive and find trusted charities that are providing genuine assistance.

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The Journal locally owned and operated since 1999 For delivery requests, call 679-1240 Publisher

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Susan Clary Simmons ssimmons@communityjournals.com

Don’t wait to drive down your loan rate.

MANAGING editor

Jerry Salley jsalley@communityjournals.com staff writers

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Cindy Landrum clandrum@communityjournals.com April A. Morris amorris@communityjournals.com Charles Sowell csowell@communityjournals.com

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*Annual Percentage Rate is based on a 36-month term. Your loan rate and term amount may vary depending on individual credit history and underwriting factors. A 36-month loan with 2.49% APR would have monthly payments of $28.86 per thousand borrowed. All credit union rates, fees, terms, and conditions are subject to change at any time without notice. +Rate floor is 1.99%, offer excludes current loans held by Greenville Federal Credit Union. **Receive a $50 gift card when you finance your vehicle loan with the credit union, loans below $5000 are not eligible for gift card, good from April 1 through June 30th, 2013. ©2013, Greenville Federal Credit Union. All rights reserved. Member NCUA.

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Worth Repeating They Said It

“So I said, ‘What if we started a school?’” Zach Eikenberry, planning coordinator for NEXT High School, on the conversation between CEOs that launched the new charter school in partnership with the Greenville Chamber’s NEXT economic development initiative. Quote of the week

“It’s like the world’s best tomato sandwich.” Heidi Trull, co-owner of Grits and Groceries, on the restaurant’s signature (and much praised) tomato pie.

250

Volunteers needed to put together the second annual Joyful Garden Tour

“You can do a lot when the only other choice is death.” Veteran hiker Odell Suttle, on hiking out of the Jocassee Gorges with a broken leg.

“We know that there is no replacing Jim Barker, only succeeding him.” David Wilkins, chairman of the Clemson Board of Trustees, on Barker’s announced retirement.

“We’re the only creatures who write. Cows don’t write. Birds don’t write.” Natalie Goldberg, author of “The True Secret of Writing.”

“We’re competing for talent with the private sector, and we’re competing with other government opportunities. Our demographic has changed. This is the reality of where we are with women in the service.” Lt. Gen. Dana K. Chipman, Judge Advocate General of the U.S. Army, speaking at Furman University

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Greer couple sentenced to federal prison for filing false tax returns By CHarles Sowell | staff

A Greer couple was sentenced in Asheville federal court last week for filing false tax returns, said Anne M. Tompkins, U.S. Attorney for the Western District of North Carolina in a written statement. U.S. District Court Judge Mary G. Lewis sentenced Julie Greene Tucker, 52, of Greer, to 33 months in prison, followed by three years of supervised release, Tompkins said. Tucker’s husband, James Dean Tucker, 54, also of Greer, was sentenced to eight months of house arrest and five years of probation. The Tuckers were ordered to pay $191,049 restitution to the IRS. Mrs. Tucker was ordered to pay an additional $590,128 as restitution to her former employer, Trendset Inc., a freight audit business located in Greenville. “For approximately 15 months the Tuckers used stolen money to fund a luxurious lifestyle way above their means,” Tompkins said. “The Tuckers funded their lavish lifestyle of luxury cars and expensive vacations with embezzled money,” said David Thomas, special agent in charge of the FBI Columbia Division, who assisted in the investigation. “The FBI and our law enforcement partners remain committed to holding those accountable who abuse their positions for their own personal profit.” In November 2012, the Tuckers pleaded guilty to two counts of filing false tax returns. In addition, Julie Tucker plead-

ed guilty to one count of wire fraud. According to court documents, Julie Tucker was employed at Trendset from 1996 through July 2011. Her last position at Trendset was director of administration, which allowed her access to Trendset bank accounts, court records show. “ F o r a p p r o x i m at e ly 1 5 months the Tuckers used stolen money to fund a luxurious l i f e s t y l e w ay a b o v e their means.”

Anne M. Tompkins, U.S. Attorney for the Western District of N.C.

The U.S. Attorney’s office said from 2010 and continuing until her resignation in July 2011, Julie Tucker embezzled money from Trendset bank accounts. James Tucker was employed with the Department of Homeland Security and stationed in Greenville from April 1986 through July 2012. Court records indicate James Tucker lied to co-workers when he was asked about the couple’s lifestyle improvements and spending. Julie Tucker was ordered to self-report to the Federal Bureau of Prisons upon designation of a federal facility. Federal sentences are served without the possibility of parole. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@communityjournals.com.

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JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

SC’s disabled lose a champion Tributes, no matter how heartfelt, can seem a paltry thank-you compared to the impact of the achievements that earned them. Such is the case with Barbara Stone, the quiet champion of the weakest and most voiceless among us: disabled children and adults. From golf greats to former governors, the tributes that followed her death last week at the age of 79 testified to the magnitude of what one person with determination can accomplish. Stone first shouldered the role of pioneer out of personal need: She had a son with severe autism and there were no services to help him – or his family – cope with the challenges he faced. In South Carolina in the 1950s, institutionalization was the only choice for parents who couldn’t care for their disabled children at home. So Stone and her husband took their nonverbal son to Whitten Village in Clinton when he was nine years old – and Stone’s life mission began when they drove away. According to the Barbara Stone Foundation website, their son moved into Greenville County’s first group home for the disabled eight years later. Stone was just getting started. She called a state legislator she knew – a former Greenville High classmate named Dick Riley – and convinced him to introduce a bill creating the Greenville County Commission on Mental Retardation. “Then every other county in the state followed suit,” Riley told The Greenville News. That progression led to the creation of what is now the state Department of Disabilities and Special Needs. Stone “is fully responsible for all that happening,” the former governor said. There were still many needs, and Stone was still just getting started. She became the first executive director of the Greenville County Association for the Retarded, now known as the Disabilities and Special Needs Board. Her leadership led to daycare options for disabled children, day programs and sheltered workshops for disabled adults, and the Greenville summer camp now known as Camp Spearhead. Through her advocacy, state services were expanded to include residential homes and service coordination, and the definition of “disabled” extended beyond just intellectual disabilities to developmental disabilities and spinal cord injuries. Since 1991, the Barbara Stone Foundation has raised money to improve the lives of the disabled and their families. Her dedication inspired pro golfer Bill Haas to pledge $100 for every eagle and $25 for every birdie he makes during tournament play to a fund he calls “Birdies for Barbara.” Stone never sought the limelight, though it certainly came her way. Her awards include WYFF-TV’s Jefferson Award, the Order of the Jasmine and the state’s highest award, the Order of the Palmetto. But as Stone knew better than most, the disabled face challenges that will never go away, no matter the condition of the national economy or the state budget. The Great Recession has led to drastic budget cuts in state disability services, and the waiting list is more than 5,000 strong. Families justifiably fear losing many of the services Stone fought so hard to put in place. The disabled still need a champion. For the person wondering right now if he or she can make a difference, just look to Barbara Stone. Her greatest legacy is the example she set of what can happen when one person recognizes a need and resolves to meet it, one step at a time.

Keep meds out of waterways As an organization that strives to engage individuals to take greater responsibility in improving our community’s environment, Keep Greenville County Beautiful (KGCB) is continually looking to partner with local, civic, private and public organizations that share our passion to promote the reduction of litter, encourage recycling, and engage in beautification of Greenville County. After learning about Project Rx: A River Remedy and its mission to keep medications out of our waterways and promote proper disposal, we are proud to call ourselves their newest supporter. Many households contain a medicine cabinet or drawer. After several years, these cabinets may fill up with numerous bottles of old medications that are no longer needed or have expired. Their clutter can lead to quick disposal through flushing or pouring them down the drain. What people do not realize, however, is that this common and simple act of disposal allows the medication to make its way through our sewage treatment process and into our waterways. Traces of medications in water sources have proven to cause adverse effects on aquatic wildlife and have the potential to be of long-term harm for humans. In 2010, the City of Greenville recognized this problem and through an unprecedented collaboration among local organizations in the Upstate, the first Project Rx: A River Remedy drug take-back event was held in November. Since then, there have been five take-back events, with the sixth on Saturday, April 27. These events have collected and properly disposed of over 6,700 pounds of medication in an effort to protect our environment and our community. The benefits from Project Rx are numerous. Apart from the environmental benefit, the program builds awareness about proper medication responsibility and helps prevent prescription drug abuse. The abuse of cough syrups and painkillers has become an unsettling trend among adolescents. In 2010, the National Institute on Drug Abuse reported that one in 12 high school seniors reported nonmedical use of prescription drugs, with 70 percent reporting these medications were obtained from a relative or friend. Project Rx helps to curb this trend by de-cluttering medicine cabinets

IN MY OWN WORDS by DAN POWELL

and promoting responsible medication use. You may think that the medications in question are strictly prescription drugs or those in pill form, but in fact, any medication – including over-the-counter drugs, supplements, topical creams, syrups, liquids, inhalants – contain chemicals that can harm our environment when discarded improperly. People throw away medications for various reasons: a change in prescription, improvement in one’s health, discontinuation or an excess supply. However, the methods of disposal are not the most ideal. Children or pets can easily find medications tossed in the trash. Thousands of children are treated each year for ingestion and accidental poisoning from pharmaceuticals, according to the Poison Control Center. So what is the most environmentally sound way to discard these medications? Incineration has been found to be safer than other disposal methods. It is highly regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and handled in a way that minimizes contamination of the air. After Project Rx volunteers collect the unwanted medications, the medications are sorted and placed in bins that are picked up and delivered to a plant for incineration, thereby destroying them permanently. We ask that you help keep our community safe by collecting your old or unwanted medications and bringing them to the next Project Rx event on Saturday, April 27, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. at our McAlister Square (225 South Pleasantburg Drive) or St. Francis Millennium (2 Innovation Drive) locations. Additionally, there are more than 20 other drop-off sites available throughout the 11-county DEA district. For more information or location details, please visit ariverremedy.org. Dan Powell serves as volunteer coordinator for Keep Greenville County Beautiful and as planner for the Greenville County Planning Department.

IN MY OWN WORDS FEATURES ESSAYS BY RESIDENTS WITH PARTICULAR EXPERTISE WHO WANT TO TELL READERS ABOUT ISSUES IMPORTANT TO THEM. THE JOURNAL ALSO WELCOMES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR (MAXIMUM LENGTH OF 200 WORDS). PLEASE INCLUDE ADDRESS AND DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER. ALL LETTERS WILL BE CONFIRMED BEFORE PUBLICATION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT ALL LETTERS FOR LENGTH. PLEASE CONTACT EXECUTIVE EDITOR SUSAN SIMMONS AT SSIMMONS@GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM.

6 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 19, 2013


JOURNAL NEWS

Breathing easy Monitoring ozone helps Upstate stay healthy By APRIL A. MORRIS | staff

Temperatures are climbing and South Carolina is bracing for another warmer than normal summer, according to the National Weather Service. For years, SC’s Department of Health and Environmental Control has been issuing daily forecasts for ground-level ozone, but what does that forecast mean and how does it affect the state’s population? Beyond offering a venue for data collection, the daily forecasts serve as a gauge for people with respiratory conditions like asthma, chronic bronchitis, emphysema or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Experts say ozone in the upper atmosphere is beneficial, but when it is close to the ground where it can be breathed, that’s when problems occur. Ground-level ozone is created by mobile vehicles like cars and lawnmowers and industry along with ultraviolet radiation from sunlight. Levels are especially high on days when there is more sun and higher temperatures. The daily forecasts use a color-coded system, with green being no health effects, orange as unhealthy for sensitive groups and red as unhealthy for everyone. Last summer, several days were rated orange in the Upstate, according to the Air NOW air quality-reporting service. On one day in June, the Upstate had an orange rating and areas around Charlotte, into Rock Hill and as far south as Columbia experienced unhealthy ground-level ozone (red). This coincided

with the state’s temperature reaching a record-setting 113 degrees at the University of South Carolina on June 29, according to the SC State Climatology Office. Just as ozone is created by sunlight in some instances, breathing ground-level ozone creates other reactions in the lungs, said Dr. Michael Fuller, pulmonary critical care physician at Greenville Health System’s lung center. Symptoms are essentially irritating in nature, he said, including cough, chest pain, shortness of breath and wheezing along with the potential exacerbation of asthma symptoms – all of which can land asthma sufferers in the hospital. If the forecast calls for an orange rating or higher, Fuller said sensitive residents should stay indoors, especially in late afternoon and early evening, when the day’s heat and sun are most intense. The levels of ozone affect people acutely, he said. If sensitive people have activities that they cannot avoid, like students playing organized sports in the late afternoon, doctors can try to address their symptoms with medication. “You want people to have good quality of life,” he said. To help specifically reduce ground-level ozone, residents can cut down on the use of vehicles, reduce idling time, combine trips or avoid driving altogether by telecommuting, biking or walking. Consumers can also use low-VOC (volatile organic compound) paints and solvents. Visit scdhec.gov/ozone for more information or subscribe to the ozone forecast via email, text or Twitter through the EPA’s EnviroFlash: enviroflash.info or 1-866-238-4973. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

Air Quality Index (AQI) colors AQI COLOR AND VALUE RANGE

Health Events Para-cycling Open Sat.-Sun., April 20 & 21 • CU-ICAR Cheer on the world’s top paracyclists as they experience the 2014 Para-cycling Road World Championships course. For details, visit greenvillesc2013.com. March for Babies Walk Sat., April 27 • 9 a.m. • Greenville Tech Help prevent infant mortality, birth defects and premature birth by taking part in this March of Dimes walk. To register, visit marchforbabies.org. GHS Swamp Rabbit 5K Fri., May 3 • 6:30 p.m. • Gateway Park This run/walk starts and ends in Travelers Rest. Register online by April 25 and pay just $6 ($11 after April 25). Includes a free T-shirt and block party! To register, visit ghs.org/swamprabbit5k. Parkinson’s Disease Summit Sat., May 4 • 9 a.m.-noon • Hilton Greenville This event offers education and support for those living with Parkinson’s disease and their caregivers. Free; registration required. Don’t Have a Stroke Tues., May 7 • 12-1 p.m. • Caine Halter Y Find out who is at risk for stroke as well as signs and treatments from GHS neurologist Gregory Gardziola, DO. Lunch provided. Free; registration required.

Good (0-50)

No health effects are expected.

Moderate (51-100)

Unusually sensitive people should consider limiting prolonged outdoor exertion.

Detect and Prevent Lung Cancer Tues., June 18 • 12:15-1:15 p.m. • GHS Life Center® Join GHS thoracic surgeon William Bolton, MD, to learn symptoms and treatment of lung cancer. Lunch provided. Free; registration required.

Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups (101-150)

Active children and adults, and people with respiratory disease, such as asthma, should limit prolonged outdoor exertion.

To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, please visit ghs.org/healthevents or call 1-877-GHS-INFO (447-4636).

Unhealthy (151-200)

Active children and adults, and people with respiratory disease, such as asthma, should avoid prolonged outdoor exertion; everyone else, especially children, should limit prolonged outdoor exertion.

Very Unhealthy (200+)

Active children and adults, and people with respiratory disease, such as asthma, should avoid all outdoor exertion; everyone else, especially children, should limit outdoor exertion.

CAUTION

ghs.org 130266GJ

APRIL 19, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 7


JOURNAL NEWS

Garden tour showcases joy of city cultivation, artistic inspiration Event benefits grounds restoration at historic church By APRIL A. MORRIS | staff

Though the spring was reluctant to come, gardeners have been busy preparing for the bursting buds and verdant plantings. On April 26-27, gardeners and art lovers alike can gain inspiration during the second annual Joyful Garden Tour. Featuring five downtown Greenville gardens and the on-site creation of artwork by local artists, the self-paced tour benefits the revitalization efforts at Christ Church Episcopal’s historic grounds. The church dates back to 1825, when it was one of four churches established downtown with land grants from Greenville businessman and philanthropist Vardry McBee. The current

building was dedicated in 1854. In the featured gardens, more than 40 artists will be creating work in rotating three-hour shifts, said tour committee member Elsie Roane. Many of the artists are parishioners, but more than 20 are from outside the church, she said. The number of participating artists has nearly doubled and all have offered their work for a silent auction in May to benefit the church. Roane said the addition of the visual artists lends additional depth to the traditional garden tour. “The subject matter is abundant. They draw folks in who might just do a precursory walk around. When you see somebody sitting there and concentrating on a

JOYFUL GARDEN TOUR

particular scene, it draws you in and you pay a little more attention. It just makes the tour come alive to me.” The completed artworks will be on display in the church’s Parish House May 13-17 and available for purchase during a silent auction and artists reception on May 19. Featured gardens include those along McDaniel Avenue, Crescent Avenue, McIver Street and Belmont Avenue. They range from a shady space that was totally revamped after the 2005 ice storm to gardens that lovingly incorporate original plantings and designs dating back to the 1930s. In addition to walking among the blooms, participants may hear live music concerts in the church sanctuary, enjoy a tea and a luncheon and shop the plant sale. Visitors may also stroll through the church’s green space, which is the final resting place of many noted South Carolinians and Greenvillians. The tour will benefit

April 26-27, 10am-5pm $20-$25 | Concerts both days Afternoon tea party – Friday, 3 & 4 p.m., $17.50 Lunch on the lawn – Sat., 11:30am & 12:45pm, $20 Art auction and artist reception – May 19, 11am-1pm INFO: ccgsc.org/gardentour

a multi-phase grounds plan to beautify the space and feature plantings that are indigenous and evocative of those seen by the original founders of Greenville, said committee member Kay Roper. “Tour proceeds will provide essential financial support for historic grounds restoration, ensuring continued enjoyment by our Greenville community of the grounds’ history, Gothic Revival architecture and beauty,” said Roper. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

FEATURED GARDENS

• 425 Crescent Ave.: Situated around a home constructed in 1932, the garden space has changed in the 33 years since the family has

cultivated there. The multiple gardens include a front garden featuring a century-old lamppost, zoysia yard with grassy area and patio, circle garden with fountain and original pond, and new garden with black walnut and gingko trees. • 402 McIver St.: Once dominated by water oaks around a 1939 home, much of the area was cleared after the 2005 ice storm damaged the large trees. The revamped space includes sun-loving perennials, roses and native plants.

We are...

The garden also features a two-tiered lawn and a space dubbed Kate’s Garden. • 245 McDaniel Ave.: Current owners purchased this 1937 home in 1989 and inherited the original landscaping plans for the property. Original boxwoods are included in the garden’s newest life and also features ivy, magnolia, water oak, a salt-water pool, outdoor fireplace, fishpond, fountain and other focal points.

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8 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 19, 2013

• 10 N. Church St.: Christ Church Episcopal’s grounds

Let us help you plan your party.

• Fellows of the American Academy of Audiology. • Doctors of Audiology. • Angie Gerbasi, Courtney Russo, Susan Valenti & Lisa Ramos.

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• 306 Crescent Ave.: This garden has been a work in progress for nearly 20 years and is bordered by boxwood, offering a touch of formality. Within are two “rooms” with a fountain and koi pond in the center. Tea olives flank a sunroom, and the garden includes hollies, azaleas and hydrangeas along with a life-sized Eve sculpture and family heirloom birdbath.

Need a last minute location for a party? Two locations to choose from. Office luncheon delivered? Send a client lunch or a gift basket? Call our catering department.

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• 415 Belmont Ave.: This garden evolved around a new construction, preserving one crepe myrtle salvaged on the otherwise cleared lot. Now the space includes a low-maintenance knot garden, three water fountains, bronze sculpture, courtyard and wooden arbors and gates crafted by the owner.


BI-LO Center seeking new naming sponsor Entertainment venue gears up for busy 2014 By APRIL A. MORRIS | staff

Downtown Greenville’s concert arena, the BI-LO Center, is looking for a new name. The venue is seeking a naming sponsor for the next fiscal year, according to the Greenville Arena District board, which oversees the center. The supermarket chain has opted not to renew naming rights, which expire in September of this year, said general manager Roger Newton. When the entertainment venue was built in 1998, the supermarket chain bought the naming rights for 15 years, said Newton. The arena has hired a sales consultant to help secure a new sponsor, hopefully by early 2014, he said. District members discussed the naming rights along with the 2014 fiscal year budget at a finance committee meeting this week. Staff has planned for the possibility that a naming sponsor will not step forward right away and if one is not snagged by 2014, the venue will only take a $38,000 hit in the 2014 budget, said Beth Paul, director of finance for the Arena District. Approximately $175,000 was projected for naming rights revenue in 2014 if there is a $350,000 agreement beginning in January 2014, according to Paul. The final cost of naming rights would be negotiable with a new sponsor, but a valuation study by C.H. Johnson Consulting Company stated that naming rights would be valued at $300,000$550,000 annually for a minimum of 10 years, according to Newton. Members of the arena district board reviewed the income possibilities as part of a preliminary presentation on the 2014 budget. Newton said creating the budget was different from past years due to the anticipated impact of naming rights, usage fees and planned capital improvements. Portions of the arena have not been updated or improved since the facility was built, he said. Each year, the arena’s budget hinges on not only predicting the number of events each year, but also on how well-attended the events will be, he added.

Revenue for the center is projected to increase due to additional events, Paul told the committee. There will be 16 concerts in 2013 and 20 planned for 2014. New activities include additional family events, the U.S. National Karate Tournament, a potential professional bull riding event and a Wildfire Weekend for Men in June with Tim Tebow and members of the “Duck Dynasty” family – not to mention a Keith Urban show. After weathering difficulty paying bonds through revenue several years ago, the Arena District entered an intergovernmental agreement late last year with Greenville County and the City of Greenville to refinance its debt and retain accommodations tax funds that are normally refunded to the governments to pay for capital improvements. The BI-LO Center receives 2.3 percent of the accommodations tax from the city and county to help pay for one set of bonds. In years past, the center had struggled with paying debt service out of revenue, especially in 2006 when the local hockey team folded. Beginning July 1, the venue aims to collect an additional $1 per paid ticket in user fees to create a reserve fund, Paul said. The fee currently ranges from 25 cents to $1, with the majority being $1. This reserve fund will be used for capital improvements and debt service, Newton said. Attendance at the BI-LO Center is expected to increase roughly 11 percent in the coming year and reach approximately 440,000, said Paul. Board chairman Jeff Gilstrap said despite continuing dire economic predictions, more performers seem to be touring and more residents are opting to spend their money on shows. The Greenville Arena District is set to consider the budget during its May meeting. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

JOURNAL NEWS

What’s Right in Health Care New Horizon Breaks Ground on New Facility New Horizon Family Health Services broke ground on a new facility that will house an urgent care unit, pharmacy and clinical exam space. The facility will be located at the corner of Faris and Grove roads on land donated by Greenville Health System. It is expected to serve 10,000 lowincome and medically underserved patients. South Carolina Safe Care Commitment GHS and six other hospitals in the state have launched this three-year commitment. Through this initiative, participating hospitals will learn about and apply high-reliability practices to ensure every patient receives safe, high-quality care every time. Visit scha.org to learn more. GHS Partners with MinuteClinic GHS and MinuteClinic, the retail healthcare division of CVS Caremark, have entered into a clinical affiliation to enhance access to high-quality, affordable healthcare services. GHS and MinuteClinic will work together to coordinate care for patients, and GHS will provide physician supervision for nurse practitioners at all 11 Upstate MinuteClinic sites. Economic Development Impact Award GHS received the McNair Economic Development Impact Award at this year’s Ecoplosion. This award showcases an individual or team with demonstrated leadership, ingenuity and diligence in promoting economic development in South Carolina. The health system was honored for addressing the state’s physician shortage by helping establish the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville.

ghs.org 130266GJ

APRIL 19, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 9


JOURNAL NEWS

ENVISION SC PRESENTS: BRAD WYCHE ABOUT BRAD WYCHE

“We have a treasure of natural resources in our state.” – Brad Wyche

HOMETOWN: Greenville

There aren’t many people who would leave a thriving, family-owned law practice to become a leading conservationist in their home state. But Brad Wyche is not most people. After years of practicing law in South Carolina, Brad Wyche decided it was time to trade the courtroom for South Carolina’s vast array of marshlands, swamps, rivers, gorges and mountains. As a result, Wyche has become a prominent fixture of South Carolina’s environmental and conservation efforts and along the way has founded Upstate Forever, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the preservation and protection of land and natural resources in Upstate South Carolina. For his efforts, Wyche has been recognized with numerous awards and has served on a variety of environmentally friendly boards and committees. Still it’s quite clear from a brief conversation with him that he’s not concerned with accolades or recognition but is steadfastly dedicated to the protection of South Carolina’s future. NOBLE: What makes us any different from North Carolina, Georgia, Oregon or any other state for that matter, when it comes

EDUCATION: B.S. geology and environmental science, Princeton University; M.A. natural resource management, Yale University; J.D., University of Virginia OCCUPATION: executive director, Upstate Forever OTHER NOTABLES: Named one of Greenville’s 50 Most Influential Persons; recipient of the 1997 Environmental Awareness Award from the South Carolina General Assembly; 2001 Southern Environmental Leadership Award from the Southern Environmental Law Center; co-author of the South Carolina Bar Association’s “Environmental Law in South Carolina”; 2006 honorary doctorate in humanities from Furman University WEBSITE/LINKS: upstateforever.org • Moore School Study on The Economic Impact of South Carolian’s Natural Resources: dnr.sc.gov/green/greenreport.pdf RECOMMENDED READING: “Last Child In The Woods,” Richard Louv

10 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 19, 2013

to our natural resources? WYCHE: We have almost a third of the salt marsh acreage on the East Coast. The Blue Ridge Escarpment is globally significant because of the rapid Wyche change in topography and the diversity of plant life there. We’ve got these great black rivers, the Edisto River. What an incredible river. It’s one of the longest blackwater rivers in the world. We just have a ton of great natural resources here. I would put South Carolina up against any other state or any other country in terms of natural resources. How does South Carolina compare in terms of us being good stewards of our abundance of natural resources? We have some great conservation success stories in the state that have been primarily driven by the private sector. For example, there’s the work that my father did in the mountains; and really he was the catalyst for that. And he’d be the first to tell you that he couldn’t have done it without the state’s Department of Natural Resources and Parks, Recreation, and Tourism,

and the Department of Interior. They were very supportive. But he really led the effort. And then down the coast the great conservation success story with the ACE Basin. That was really an effort led by the private sector. The effort in saving the Congaree Swamp was a grassroots effort by our citizens. So a lot of the conservation success that we have here is due to private, grassroots efforts with the state coming in, sort of later in the game and being very supportive. I think it’s unfortunate in South Carolina that we do not devote a substantial amount of state funding to the protection of our natural resources. These natural resources can be a huge boost to our economy. Is there a way that we can leverage our natural resources into other “worldclass” attainments, growth, expansion and consciousness? How do we use these resources to ratchet up other parts of the state that need a lot of help? There’s a growing industry of eco-tourism. More and more people are enjoying getting outdoors and they’re taking trips that are sort of adventure based. I think we could really tap into that growing industry of eco-tour-


JOURNAL NEWS ism. For example, National Geographic named the Jocassee Gorges in northern Pickens County as one of the 50 great places in the world. It’s a spectacular place where very few people in South Carolina, very few people in Pickens County, have ever visited. Not to pick on Pickens, but they’re trying to revitalize their city, revitalize their downtown. They have one of the world’s greatest places right there in their backyard. That ought to be the focus of economic development. You have this phenomenal place 10 minutes away from downtown Pickens. You believe we can leverage those resources without adversely affecting the environment? I do. As more and more people come to enjoy the resources and spend money and provide jobs, we have to make sure that the use of those natural resources is properly managed. It’d be a nice problem to have in managing those folks. The way that we market and publicize our natural resources here in the state is pretty pitiful. What are the barriers that you see to our being able to leverage our natural resources to help the state reach this “world-class” level? I think one of the barriers as I see it is convincing our elected officials how important these natural resources are. I think it

would be useful to actually get them out in the field to see them. We can send letters and photographs and PowerPoint presentations all we want, but we really need to get them out there. To walk through Jocassee Gorge or take a raft trip down the Chattooga River. To take the Jones Gap Trail. I think more of that would help them to really appreciate what we have. We need to do a better job of showing the link between these natural resources and economic prosperity, quantifying eco-tourism in South Carolina and how it can lead to jobs. We can use the USC Moore School study about the value of our natural resources. That is a great study with a lot of good research. With solid findings and really big numbers in there. I think we all need to keep that study on our desk and look at it a lot. Phil Noble lives in Charleston and is president of a global technology firm. He has launched several innovative non-profit initiatives, including Envision SC, which he co-founded with College of Charleston President George Benson. phil@philnoble.com

Physician News GHS welcomes these new doctors & sites! Family Medicine Sean Bryan, MD Center for Family Medicine Greenville, 455-7800

Alison Smith, MD Pediatric Ophthalmology 200A Patewood Dr. (New Site) Greenville, 454-5540

Midwifery (New Site & Staff) Barbara Davenport, CNM Greenville Midwifery Care 35 Medical Ridge Dr. Greenville, 455-1600

NEW OFFICE SITES GHS Premier Surgical Services This Greenwood practice at 105 Vinecrest Ct. houses these offices: • Bariatric Surgery, 227-8932 • Breast Health, 227-8932 • Endovascular/Vascular Surgery, 227-8932

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Pediatrics Robert Saul, MD Center for Pediatric Medicine Greenville, 220-7270 K. Ford Shippey III, MD, MS Sleep Medicine/Center for Pediatric Sleep Disorders Greenville, 454-5660

GHS Surgical Specialists– Anderson This practice at 105 Broadbent Way houses these offices: • Bariatric Surgery, 226-2290 • Colon & Rectal Surgery, 226-2290 Hand Surgery Steadman Hawkins Clinic of the Carolinas 6 Doctors Dr. Greenville, 797-7300 Pediatric Gastroenterology Pediatric Sleep Medicine 1650 Skylyn Dr., Ste. 240 Spartanburg, 573-8732

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APRIL 19, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 11


JOURNAL NEWS

Clemson president retires Details of search process for replacement to be determined By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

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Likening it to a college student changing majors, James Barker announced Monday he will retire as Clemson University president and return to the classroom as an arBarker chitecture professor. Barker’s decision to step down comes months after he had emergency heart surgery, but he said in a video streamed on campus that he is in good health and has a high energy level. “I used the time that I had during my medical leave to think carefully about what such a transition would mean, how it should happen and at what time it should happen,” he said. “I’ve concluded that now is the right time to do that, even though it means I must stop doing what I consider to be the best time in the world.” A national search for Clemson’s 15th president will be conducted, but details of the search process have not yet been decided. Barker will remain as president until his successor is chosen. “We know that there is no replacing Jim Barker, only succeeding him,” said David Wilkins, chairman of the Clemson Board of Trustees. Barker said there’s never a perfect time for this transition, but he did say it is a good time for it to take place “because the university is in such good shape.”

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Barker said there is a “high demand for everything about Clemson. We are financially healthy; in fact, we are in better shape financially than we were before the Great Recession.” Barker, a 1970 Clemson graduate, was named president in 1999 with a mandate to lead Clemson into the top ranks of American universities. Clemson ranks among the nation’s top 25 public universities in the US News and World Report guide to America’s best colleges and has been recognized for value, affordability and return on investment by Kiplinger’s, Smart Money and Bloomberg Businessweek magazines. During Barker’s presidency, Clemson has added more than 48,000 alumni, set records for student SAT scores, retention and graduation rates, launched the Academic Success Center and raised more than $1 billion in private funding. Research expenditures surpassed the $100 million a year mark and more than 1.4 million square feet of space has been constructed or renovated. The Clemson University International Center for Automotive Research was built during Barker’s presidency. Barker led Clemson through a period of deep state funding cuts, reducing administrative and staff positions by nearly 12 percent without layoffs. A native of Kingsport, Tenn., Barker received his bachelor’s degree from Clemson and his Master of Architecture and Urban Design degree in 1973 from Washington University in St. Louis. “Clemson is on an upward path,” Barker said in the video. “Momentum is very important – it’s a precious commodity, and it’s something we want to make sure we keep it continuing.” Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

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www.PalmettoHG.com • 2422 Laurens Rd • 864.234.4960 12 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 19, 2013


journal news

Rec District could become county department Change may mean higher taxes for some city residents By april a. morris | staff

A change allowing the Greenville Recreation District (a special purpose district created on the state level) to become a Greenville County department moved closer to approval in the SC House this week. As of press time, the bill had passed in the Senate and was scheduled to move forward in the House for third reading, most likely this week, according to the clerk’s office. What the change would mean is that county recreation would be funded by all Greenville County residents, including those living in municipalities, instead of just unincorporated areas, said Greenville Rec District spokesperson Mike Teachey. Over the years, cities have annexed land that later becomes developed and the district has lost out on that tax base, forcing district officials to defer maintenance at existing parks. He cited the Shops at Greenridge, which was once land in the district’s tax base, but is now part of the City of Greenville. “As time goes on, it’s not sustainable for our agency,” said Teachey. “The whole move is trying to think 15 to 20 years out.” Municipalities duplicate many recreational services such as sports and parks, but the Greenville Rec District also offers unique attractions like ice-skating, Special Olympics, Camp Spearhead and water parks, Teachey said. The demand is still there for growth in trails and other areas. “With

ball fields, we are barely keeping up with demand including the municipalities,” he said. Residents of Travelers Rest and Fountain Inn pay taxes to fund the recreation district, but residents of Simpsonville, the City of Greenville, Mauldin and Greer do not. At this point, county officials do not know what the exact tax impact would be for municipal residents, said Bob Mihalic, county spokesperson, but the funds would be collected as part of general county operations. The change could mean that city residents pay an estimated additional $20 per year on a $200,000 home, said Mihalic. The district often partners with municipalities on projects like the Swamp Rabbit Trail and Conestee Park. Currently, the district charges out-of-district-fees for some city residents who use facilities like Camp Spearhead, said Teachey. With the new legislation, the fees, up to a 20 percent markup, would go away. The recreation district attempted a similar move in 2008 and had been discussing it for years, Teachey said, but a sunset clause in the legislation expired before the plan could be implemented. According to the amendment, in order to move forward with the district becoming a county department, a public hearing must be held and the special district would have to be dissolved through a supermajority vote of its commissioners. It would then have to be accepted by County Council with a supermajority vote. The county would set the millage rate for the new department. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

Sometimes you just know

David McGee

Funeral Director

David McGee knew, at a very young age, what career path to follow – indeed, he was only six years old when he discovered his heart’s calling. A death in the family exposed him to grief but also to the soothing comfort of sincere compassion. Thus he determined to one day help others, too. As a child, David served as unofficial caretaker to the local historical cemetery, tending flowers, tidying gravestones, learning the tales of his hometown’s forefathers. He often re-imagined his Matchbox cars as hearses in peaceful funeral processions. “I felt drawn to tradition,” David recalls. “I had a respect for reverence.” The Tennessee native graduated from David Lipscomb University in Nashville before heading to Atlanta’s Gupton-Jones College of Funeral Service, where he was a member of Pi Sigma Eta. David has dedicated the past 30 years to re-gifting the compassion he received as a child. He is committed to helping families celebrate and remember the ones they love most. “No detail is too small,” says David, a member of St. Paul UMC. “I am so grateful to have this as my life’s work.”

Mackey Mortuary. We are here for you … since 1872.

Friends book sale scheduled for April 26 Friends of the Greenville County Library System will hold a used book sale in the Merovan Center. A members-only sale will occur on April 26, 3-8 p.m. Membership is available at the door: $15 for individuals, $25 for families and $5 for students and seniors. The sale will be open to the public on April 27, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and on April 28, 1-5 p.m. For more information, call 864-527-9291 or visit greenvillelibrary.org. ©2013 STEI

MackeyMortuary.com

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APRIL 19, 2013 | the Journal 13


JOURNAL NEWS

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Mauldin City Council hears good economic news Mauldin City Council heard some good news on the economic front Monday night when city staff said the town may be on the way to a good year, so far as residential building permits and commercial activity are concerned. City Administrator Trey Eubanks said the data is preliminary and officials won’t know for sure for some time. However, housing starts stood at 59 for the month of March alone, or more than 14 starts higher than the city saw in all of 2008 at the start of the recession, city data shows. Those 59 starts, combined with 25 permits for a variety of commercial activities from remodeling to rezoning, are also a good indicator for the city so far this year, staff said. Eubanks said the city would have a better idea how good the year may be once they have time for a detailed study. In other action, city council approved changes to the zoning law that would

cut the time required for notice of hearing postings and setting standards for commercial fencing at final reading. At first reading, council approved a mutual aid agreement with the Myrtle Beach Police and a swap with the state Department of Transportation that would see the state take over maintenance on Bridges Road while the city takes on maintaining Hyde Circle. Council put off action on new lighting for parks that would replace the current wooden poles for metal ones. They also delayed action on putting a new roof on the city cultural center, opting to see how the money flow goes before committing to the two large projects. Mauldin City Council’s next regular meeting will be held on May 20 at 7 p.m. in the municipal courtroom at City Hall. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@communityjournal.com.

You are invited. Duke Energy Community Open House

Tuesday, Apr. 23 from 4-7 p.m. Hughes Main Greenville County Library 25 Heritage Green Place | Greenville, SC 29601

Thursday, Apr. 25 from 4-7 p.m. USC Upstate’s George Dean Johnson, Jr. College of Business and Economics 160 East St. John Street | Spartanburg, SC 29306 Company representatives will provide residents with an opportunity to connect with members of the South Carolina Duke Energy team and answer any questions they might have on everything from billing and lighting, to tree trimming and energy efficiency.

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JOURNAL NEWS

16 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 19, 2013


JOURNAL COMMUNITY Something

TO PROVE

Sometimes you do something just to see if you still can. Odell Suttle, 67, climbed Table Rock seven months after undergoing a desperate, life-saving heart surgery and five months after suffering from a stroke related to his operation, Suttle said. The Fountain Inn man is a veteran hiker, tough and stubborn. “The doctor told my wife that part of the reasons I survived the surgery was due to my hiking,” he said. “If there is anything you can do to encourage [Suttle] to keep him on the mountain, do it,” the surgeon, Douglas Appleby, told Suttle’s wife, Sadie.

Suttle had an aneurysm on the descending aorta to his heart. An aneurysm is a localized, bloodfilled bulge in the wall of a blood vessel. When the aneurysm becomes large enough there is a significant risk of rupture, which can kill the victim. “It was 6.5 centimeters long,” Suttle said. “The doctor said going in that 93 percent of the folks who have this particular operation don’t make it. Afterward he told my wife that his goals were that I survive the surgery, that I make it through the next two days and that I make it for two weeks. ‘If he does that, there’s nothing he can’t do,’ Appleby said.” HIKING continued on PAGE 18

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Veteran hiker takes on Table Rock 7 months after life-saving heart surgery

By CHARLES SOWELL | staff

APRIL 19, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 17


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“I was at home when I got the call from Odell,” said Dennis Chastain, who has become something of a trail guru to Suttle. “‘I made it, I’m on top of Table Rock,’ ” Suttle told Chastain on April 1, April Fool’s Day. “I was amazed. That’s one tough rascal,” Chastain said. Appleby asked Suttle what his goals were after recovering from his surgery. “I told him I wanted to climb Table Rock again,” Suttle said. But he wasn’t sure he would be healthy enough to do it. “I think of it as sort of like an athlete who has had a severe injury,” he said. “The doctors and the experts tell him he’ll be able to do it, but you never really know until you do.” Suttle’s trail life wasn’t without trauma, he said. “I broke my leg while hiking from Laurel Creek Falls to the ranger station in Jocassee Gorges,” he said. “I was alone and hadn’t seen another person all day. I knew I had to get out or die there. I didn’t have a walking stick.” He lurched from tree to tree for miles until he got to help near the parking area for the trail.

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Odell Suttle summiting Table Rock.

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“You can do a lot when the only other choice is death,” he said. He wasn’t alone on his trek to the top of Table Rock. “My niece, Kathy Cunningham, was in the room when I told the doctor I was gonna climb Table Rock,” Suttle said. “She said, ‘I’m going with him’ and she did – every step of the way.” On another trip to the Foothills Trail in May 2011, Suttle suffered from heatstroke, he said. Daytime temperatures were in the 90s that month. “My wife [a nurse] bought me a portable blood pressure cuff,” he said. “I pulled it out and my blood pressure was 90/63 and my heart was pounding at 137 beats a minute. That’s like a trip-hammer.” He slowed down and cooled off as he worked his way off the mountain. “I was probably closer to death that day than at any other time on the trail,” he said. Suttle, who is a retired machinist, works part-time covering local sports for Gannett. “I love to stay busy,” he said. “That’s part of the reason I started hiking.” He also served one tour in Vietnam from 1967 to 1968. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@communityjournals.com.

“I think of it as sort of like an athlete who has had a severe injury...The doctors and the experts tell him he’ll be able to do it, but you never really know until you do.”

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18 THE Journal | APRIL 19, 2013

kathy cunningham / contributor

Odell Suttle, veteran hiker and heart surgery survivor, speaking of his drive to get back on the trail.


Enhanced seedlings may enhance profits Ridgeville-based ArborGen, a genetics research and development company, produced their 100 millionth specialized Mass Control Pollinated loblolly pine seedling, the company announced recently. With a potential to increase landowner profits by more than 100 percent, the hybrid seedlings have tremendous advantages over open pollinated seedlings that are naturally produced. “Advanced genetic products such as MCP seedlings are transforming forestry in the 21st century in the same way they transformed agriculture in the last one,” said John Pait, vice president of sales, marketing and product development. “This recent milestone makes clear this transformation is well underway, and ArborGen is proud to be the leader bringing this technology to our forestry customers.” To produce MCP seedlings, elite parents are selected by ArborGen’s tree breeders based on key productivity traits such as growth, form, branching and resistance to disease, stress and in-

journal community

sects, the company said in a release.  “We are proud of this accomplishment and of the economic value MCP seedlings can bring to our customers, providing the technology to increase the volume and quality of wood on their timberlands,” said Pait. “We have dedicated years to genetic research to select, breed, test and validate these high-performing MCP seedlings, which can be purchased today to give our customers higher returns on their forestry assets. Growing our 100 millionth seedling demonstrates that our customers recognize the value of elite genetics while underscoring how our work is transforming forestry productivity.” To put this milestone into perspective, the planting of 100 million seedlings, at 500 trees per acre, would cover 312 square miles, the company said. That would be slightly larger than the entire area of New York City. ArborGen is currently the only significant supplier of MCP seedlings in the United States.  – Charles Sowell

APRIL 19, 2013 | The Journal 19


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Dr. Jacques Kongawi, ALM representative for the Democratic Republic of the Congo, brings food and supplies to Leopold, a man severely deformed by leprosy.

Greenville agency works to end ancient disease By shelby livingston | contributor

20 THE Journal | APRIL 19, 2013

For most, leprosy is an ancient disease familiar only from Biblical scripture – an unthinkable, almost mythical affliction that few have learned about and fewer still have witnessed. The word itself evokes images of deformed limbs and rotting skin, of medieval leper colonies inhabited by shunned victims. In fact, it is widely thought that leprosy no longer exists. However, the lore surrounding leprosy is typically misinformed. Far from eradicated, 250,000 new cases of the chronic, infectious disease are diagnosed each year in 130 countries around the world, including the U.S. An estimated 3 to 4 million of the world’s inhabitants are permanently disabled due to leprosy, which affects the skin, nerves, limbs and eyes, often leaving victims numb and blind. American Leprosy Missions (ALM), located in Greenville, is one of the most formidable contenders in the fight to end leprosy. Founded in 1906, it is the oldest and largest nonprofit organization working to cure leprosy and the related Buruli ulcer around the world. Administering to 15 of the hardesthit countries in the Americas, Africa and Asia, ALM is distinguished from other aid groups because it provides more than just medical help: ALM takes a holistic approach, curing the disease while helping to rehabilitate victims and reintegrate them into their communities. Bill Simmons, president and CEO,

said ALM’s work falls into three categories: cure, care and end. “We try to find new cases [of leprosy] and try to get the medicine to people in time. If it’s caught early enough, leprosy doesn’t present any problems for people. But if it lingers untreated, it can affect people for their whole lives. And because it does create disability, we work to relieve and care for those disabilities.” Leprosy is caused by bacteria called Mycobacterium leprae, which attacks nerve endings, leaving victims unable to feel pain caused by injury. Injuries become infected, tissue is lost, and fingers and toes become deformed as a result. Leprosy is cured through a multidrug therapy taken over a period of six months to a year. However, the powerful stigma that accompanies leprosy will linger indefinitely. According to the World Health Organization, concepts of the disease as being incurable, highly contagious and irreversibly disfiguring have endured since ancient times. Furthermore, most cultures attach a religious or spiritual significance to the disease, believing leprosy to be an act of the gods or a curse from an evil spirit. “That’s the cruel reality of working with leprosy,” said Simmons. “It’s not as simple as just finding the disease and treating it. It’s a disease that no one wants to have because of the stigma that surrounds it.” The stigma from leprosy isolates victims from their families and communities. Victims are shunned and unable


to find jobs. To combat the stigma, ALM encourages victims to form selfhelp groups in which members encourage each other to stay aware of and care for injuries. Eventually, they begin to save money that they can use to make loans or start small businesses. “When people begin to be movers and shakers in their own community and the rest of their community sees that, stigma does begin to melt away,” said Jim Oehrig, ALM’s chief program officer. “Does it happen quickly? Sometimes not. Does it happen completely? Sometimes not. But it does make a measurable difference.” ALM establishes partnerships with local organizations in affected countries. Ten highly technical staff members train local staff, monitor work, and troubleshoot cases in the field. ALM also educates community members about early detection signs. “Ultimately, a big thing we care about is sustainability – that it’s not dependent on us or our funding that people end up being able to address the problems long term,” Simmons said. “We do it by hiring really great people at the top of their game. They oversee training and the development of projects and programs that we fund, but ultimately, the goal is

to see those sustain themselves.” In January, the Infectious Disease Research Institute (IDRI) in Seattle announced a new rapid diagnostic test for leprosy that detects the disease before symptoms develop. ALM was the primary and majority funder, contributing nearly four million dollars over the last decade to the vaccine development project. “With the test, you can diagnose far away from a clinic or a hospital,” Simmons said. “It relieves the burden of having an expert out in the field to accurately diagnose leprosy.” The diagnostic test will help reduce the number of wrongly diagnosed cases, and hopefully prevent more victims from becoming permanently disabled. Still, the ultimate goal is a vaccine. “We are in trials right now for a vaccine, but science moves very slowly,” Oehrig said. “Each phase and development of a new vaccine takes multiple months or years. We are hoping that as science progresses and testing is done and clinical trials are carried out, we’ll have a vaccine in at least five years.” Contact Shelby Livingston at slivingston@communityjournals.com.

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Bottoms up Third Annual Great Cloth Diaper Change seeks to break world records and encourage parents to ‘make the change’ By Jeanne putnam | contributor

In today’s society, recycling and saving money are two goals that are on most people’s minds. The Third Annual Great Cloth Diaper Change will give Upstate parents the chance to learn how to do both. Hosted by I Love Natural Baby, The Diaper Queen in the Upstate and the Real Diaper Association, the April 20 event is designed to raise awareness about the benefits of cloth diapering – as well as challenge Greenville parents to help break the world record for the most cloth diapers changed at one time. “I took part last year but couldn’t help

coordinate because my son was only 2 weeks old at the time of the event,” said Kristin Harling of The Diaper Queen. “I’m pretty sure he was the youngest baby changed at the Greenville event last year.” Last year’s Great Cloth Diaper Change concluded with 8,251 babies changed to cloth diapers at 189 locations in 11 countries, setting a Guinness World Record. At this point, 225 locations in 15 countries are participating. Jessica Mullins Mitchell of I Love Natural Baby and Kristin Harling of The Diaper Queen are heading up the

Upstate event, which has 33 babies signed up – and counting. Upstate parents are invited to sign up, diaper their babies and help set another record. The event begins at 10:30 a.m. April 20 at I Love Natural Baby on

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY College Street – and organizers say to come early. To meet Guinness requirements, each baby must be changed from a cloth or disposable diaper into a reusable cloth diaper that can be purchased online or in a retail store – homemade diapers won’t count, according to the I Love Natural Baby eventbrite ticket site. Aside from world records, a major goal of the diaper-changing event is to encourage parents to make the change to cloth permanent. Cloth diaper user Erin Arnold says she “came to the decision to cloth-diaper when I was preparing for the birth of my first daughter.” Arnold purchased “a sweet little box of newborn diapers and put them in her soon-to-be room. A few days later on the news, I saw those same diapers being recalled for harsh chemical burns on newborns. I promptly returned my package and began stocking up on cloth diapers that are the same material clothes are made of.” In addition to going green, cloth diapers save money in the long run, supporters say. According to iheartbudgets.

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net, the estimated two-year cost of disposable diapers is $1,230, compared to $390-$720 for cloth diapers and products to clean and maintain them. The website also says children who are in cloth diapers generally potty train sooner. Like disposables, cloth diapers come in many varieties, said the Diaper Queen’s Harling. “Also, different kinds have different lifespans. I would say some will last through two kids, some through three. … If you are willing to wash two to three times per week and you get the ones that adjust to different sizes, then 24 diapers should last you two years.” Contact Jeanne Putnam at jputnam@communityjournals.com.

THE GREAT DIAPER CHANGE April 20, 10:30 a.m. I Love Natural Baby 11 College St., Greenville 864-631-1500 or 864-201-5176 Reserve your free tickets via Eventbrite: ilovenaturalbaby2013.eventbrite.com

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Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@greenvillejournal.com.

Elementary music teacher at Mitchell Road Elementary with 15 years teaching experience.

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Ten teachers – from a first-grade teacher with three years experience to a dance instructor who has been in the classroom for 24 years – have been named finalists for the 201314 Greenville County Teacher of the Year Award. The finalists were chosen from among the Teachers of the Year at each of the school district’s schools and centers. Top teachers at each school were chosen by their peers. Five judges reviewed the applications from all of the Teachers of the Year from Greenville County Schools that included educational history and professional development, a professional biography, community involvement, philosophy of teaching, education issues and trends and a personal message to educators and the general public The judges will observe the finalists in the classroom and will interview them individually before the end of the school year. The winner of the district’s Teacher of the Year Award will be named in August and compete for the state Teacher of the Year Award.

Greer High’s business education teacher. He has six years teaching experience.

FRIDAY, APRIL 26 at the TD Stage at the Peace Center Tickets are $60 per adult ($65 at the door) $30 per person for students (21 and older); seniors (60 and over); and military* * IDs will be checked at the door. Each ticket includes appetizers, food & wine tastings, dessert tasting (from 6-8 pm), and live jazz (from 6:30-10 pm). After 8 pm, a cash bar and cash food concessions will be open. Ticket locations: The Ronald McDonald House, Horizon Records and Divine Desserts by Andrea.

Seventh-grade science teacher at Bryson Middle. He has six years teaching experience.

Nine-year educator who is a seventh-grade social studies teacher at Northwest Middle.

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By Cindy Landrum | staff

Forensics and physical science teacher at J.L. Mann High Academy with 7.5 years of teaching experience.

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10 teachers vie for district’s top award

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JAZZ& WINE

Leadership Greenville, the Chamber’s leadership development program, is now taking applications for Class 40. The 10-month program is designed to help develop informed, committed and qualified leaders for Greenville County. Participants take an intensive look into issues affecting the area and each class selects a project to meet a need. Class members are selected based on essay responses, professional resume and community involvement. The application deadline is May 1. For more information, contact Tami Miller at tmiller@ greenvillechamber.org or 864-239-3743.

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Teacher of the Year finalists named

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Mauldin High anatomy, physiology and biology teacher. She has six years experience.

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26 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 19, 2013

By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

A group of Upstate CEOs and community leaders think public education isn’t broken – they think it’s outdated. And that’s especially true when it comes to high school, said Zach Eikenberry, planning coordinator for NEXT High School, a charter high school preparing for a 2014 opening. “We want to prepare students for life after school,” he said. The NEXT Education Summit planned for April 22 will roll out plans for the free public high school being created in partnership with the Greenville Chamber’s NEXT economic development initiative. If approved, the school, which will be free and open to all students in South Carolina, will offer project-based, technology-focused curriculum. The idea for the school stemmed from a gathering of NEXT CEOs who were looking to get involved in education, said Eikenberry, a philosophy major who taught school before becoming an entrepreneur. One of the group commented that they were missing the mark by just talking about getting involved at the programmatic level, he said. “So I said, ‘What if we started a school?’” Eikenberry said the school is modeled after CART, or the Center for Advanced Research and Technology near Fresno, Calif., that uses a project-based curriculum to teach academics as well as technical, design, process, entrepreneurial and critical thinking skills, all things students will need in life after school. While the school will have a yet-to-be determined brick-and-mortar location in Greenville, it will also have a strong online component, he said. The school will have industry partners, Eikenberry said. “Our mission is to prepare young people for life after school.” NEXT High will have a strong entrepreneurial component and will have clusters in engineering, automotive, technology and life sciences. Traditional schools were originally designed to prepare students for life in an industrialized world, but the world is now drastically different and the knowledge economy is supplanting the industrial economy, Eikenberry said. The world economy demands people know not only the right answers, but also how

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to ask the right questions, he said. “They must be able to think critically, anticipate and absorb change, solve problems and achieve their full potential by investing their lives at the exact intersection of their passions, talents and market opportunities,” according to an executive overview of the school posted on the Innoventure.com website. “All young people are capable of becoming economic contributors, not simply economic consumers,” the overview said. Eikenberry said the school will be designed to maximize student collaboration and schedules will allow an elevated level of flexibility. “The school day will be focused more like a work day,” he said. He anticipates the school will have about 200 to 300 students in each grade. He said he remembers a conversation he had with a BWM executive he talked to two years ago. “I told him I wanted to graduate students who could work in his plant. He said ‘no.’ He said we needed to graduate students who thought they could build a better car than BMW.” The school’s application with the South Carolina Public Charter School District is due in May. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com. Read our in-depth interview with Zach Eikenberry in this week’s Upstate Business Journal.


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the gist of it

Combat boots and benefits The Army’s senior uniformed attorney on women, gays and big bushy beards in the military EVENT: Lecture sponsored by Riley Institute at Furman University LECTURE TITLE: “Combat Boots and Benefits: Lt. Gen. Dana K. Equality in an Chipman Era of Change” PRESENTER: Lt. Gen. Dana K. Chipman, The Judge Advocate General of the U.S. Army DATE: March 20, 2013

As The Judge Advocate General of the U.S. Army, Lt. Gen. Dana K. Chipman is the senior uniformed attorney in the Army. His lecture at Furman focused on how the military is on the front lines of social change as it begins to allow women in combat, provide equal benefits for gay Americans, allow religious exceptions to grooming requirements, and seek an environment free from sexual harassment. Chipman, whose family lived in Greenville for a year in the early 1970s, is a 1980 graduate of West Point, and earned a Juris Doctor degree from Stanford Law School. He assumed his duties as The Judge Advocate General on Oct. 1, 2009. His talk was sponsored by the Richard W. Riley Institute at Furman, which offers a broad array of programs designed to engage students and citizens across South Carolina in the arenas of politics, public policy and public leadership. It is named for Furman graduate and former South Carolina Governor and U.S. Secretary of Education Richard W. Riley. INTRODUCTION “In 1970, I came [to Greenville] as a 12-year-old and lived right across the street from Furman University, across Duncan Chapel Road. I was a seventh-grader at Duncan Chapel Elementary School, and was coming from Orange County, California, to a desegregating environment here in Greenville. We had the first through fifth grades and seventh grade at Duncan Chapel, but the sixth grade was bussed elsewhere. My sister was a fresh-

man in high school and she was bussed to a different school. I walked past orange groves en route to my elementary school in California, but I saw a little bit of a different environment in Greenville as it was going through the challenges of racial desegregation. That was my first foray into issues of interest in the discrimination rule.” WOMEN IN COMBAT “The first issue I want to talk about is [former] Secretary [of Defense] [Leon] Panetta’s opening of combat roles to women. Do you think we did this just out of pure, altruistic goodness and idealistic reason? No? I don’t think so, either. This is really about maximizing talent. By expanding opportunities for military service for women, you can complement these skills in a broad range of different areas. This is really about how we retain our share of talent in the global marketplace. We’re competing for talent with the private sector, and we’re competing with other government opportunities. Our demographic has changed. This is the reality of where we are with women in the service.”

different uniforms. The idea that you could serve as a Sikh and honor your faith by wearing a turban was denied. In 2001 we started Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan. I deployed with special operators. And what’s the first thing that every one of those guys did? They grew a big bushy beard. And I said, ‘Wait a minute. I thought we got away from beards.’ But the special operators said, ‘Look, we’ve got to blend in. We need to have these beards so that we can better serve our force protection and get more credibility with the Afghans with whom we’re dealing,’ and so men wore beards. It’s been an interesting thing to see the way we’re going to deal with these requests for religious accommodation regarding grooming and apparel. That remains as the last frontier.” SEXUAL HARRASSMENT “We are seeing a number of sexual assaults across the force that I think are inconsistent with

the idea that we have truly made the integration of women our end state. The fundamental issue is this: If we’re going to achieve full equality for women in our armed forces across the ranks, it’s going to be because we have opened up all of our assignments to women, we have set the conditions for them to serve in every capability, and we have ended the restrictions on sexual orientation as anything to do with your capability to serve professionally. Also, we will have set the conditions to end sexual harassment in the ranks. Because we think that sexual harassment is often a precursor to sexual assault, we will then have adequately made a culture that deters sexual assault. When we’ve done those four things, then I think we will have achieved an environment where all of us can serve equally in the Armed Forces.” By Scott McPherson, project coordinator at the Riley Institute at Furman University

SAME-SEX BENEFITS “I look at how this issue is playing out now in Washington, and I think it’s showing me what’s going to happen. You know we had the repeal of ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,’ back in the fall of 2011, and it was pretty much a non-event. People said ‘Oh, this is really going to be a cathartic change, it’s going to be significant, an upheaval of massive social proportion,’ but it’s been a non-event. And many of us kind of knew that. We knew the generation that you [the students] are largely representing have understood for a long time that it’s not about who you’re with; it’s just about the quality of the person you are. The Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) really is the obstacle that remains for the full integration of samesex couples across the armed forces. So I see the effort ahead and I don’t know where the (U.S.) Supreme Court will head, but if I’m a betting man I fully expect that DOMA will be struck down.” GROOMING ISSUES “In the late 1970s and early ’80s, it was decided that we’re no longer going to allow people to have different grooming standards, different apparel,

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Greenville just got voted as one of the South’s Tastiest Towns in Southern Living magazine – and now another local gastronomic destination has made the national scene. Grits and Groceries, the country culinary hotspot cultivated by chefs Heidi and Joe Trull, was tapped as one of America’s 100 Best Places to Eat Like a Local in the April issue of Travel and Leisure magazine – the only South Carolina location on the list. Heidi Trull, who owned Elizabeth’s restaurant in New Orleans, and Joe Trull, who worked in Emeril Lagasse’s Nola, founded the restaurant after moving from New Orleans just one month before Hurricane Katrina arrived. For the past eight years, the couple has been serving up what they call “real food, done real good,” melding traditional Southern, Cajun and Creole with a helping of locally grown produce.

The big chicken in front is a sign you've made it to Grits and Groceries in Belton.

Situated at Saylors Crossroads in Belton (which some say is the middle of nowhere but Heidi Trull calls “actually the center of the universe”), the intimate restaurant was once a country store, post office and radio station. The inclusion on Travel and

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Leisure’s list had callers from as far away as California, Hawaii and Alaska phoning to ask what a tomato pie was, said Trull. Hattie Mae’s Tomato Pie – in-season tomatoes baked up with mayonnaise and cheese in a muffin-sized piecrust – is one of the restaurant’s specialties, she said. “It’s like the world’s best tomato sandwich.” Demand for the Trulls’ recipes has also been high, she said. “We shipped out 150 cookbooks in the last week.” The Trulls also recently spent a Saturday hosting a film crew from the

HLN network for a segment that aired this week. Heidi Trull said she knew some of the crew members, having met them during her time feeding broadcast workers at the Superdome in New Orleans. “We’re excited to be on the list,” she said, but added that she didn’t think the traditional Southern fare was the reason why they were listed. “I think it’s because we welcome everyone and have such a diverse group of clientele, from factory workers to CEOs,” she said. “We try to make t everyone feel like they’re GREENVILLE x eating at my grandma’s Hwy. 20 kitchen table.”

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our community

community news, events and happenings

Brings Bladeless Cataract Surgery to Spartanburg! The surgeons of Palmetto Eye & Laser Center are excited to introduce the state-ofthe-art, FDA approved, LenSX laser to Spartanburg for precise, customized, and BLADELESS cataract surgery. If you have cataracts, now is the best time in history to have them removed. We offer premium, customized and LASER OPTIMIZED cataract procedures for our patients including the latest in lens implant technology. With these enhanced procedures many patients experience the best vision of their lives following cataract surgery. If you are ready to put your cataracts behind you, now is the time to see one of our highly skilled surgeons to discuss BLADELESS LASER OPTIMIZED CATARACT SURGERY. Don’t Let Cataracts Slow You Down! Call today for an appointment.

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The All-American Cottage, a 2,400-square-foot classic-style home by The Cottage Group/A Dillard-Jones Co., recently opened for public tours at Ruskin Square in Hollingsworth Park. The All-American Cottage is open to the public through May 5. Tour hours are Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; and Sundays, 1-6 p.m. For admission, donations of items or cash will be accepted to benefit the Child Life Program of The Children’s Hospital of Greenville Health System. For more information, call 864-640-0111 or visit thecottagegroupllc.com. On April 23, 6-7:30 p.m., the Memory Health Program Center for Success in Aging will present “The Unspoken Changes in Communication,” a discussion on how to manage their safety and your sanity when a loved one has memory problems or dementia. The event will be held at 255 Enterprise Blvd., Greenville. For more information, call 864-454-8120 or email memoryhealth@ghs.org. To register, call 1-877-GHS-INFO or register online at ghs.org/360healthed. The U.S. military’s CH-47F next-generation multi-mission helicopter made a recent visit to Honeywell’s Greer Engine Manufacturing and Repair and Overhaul Facilities. The helicopter stopped over at Honeywell’s manufacturing facilities to underscore the role that Honeywell plays in providing propulsion systems for Army aviation programs. Honeywell’s Greer facility produces more than 800 SKU airfoils, disc and nozzles for propulsion engines and components serving commercial and military customers. Honeywell overhauls the T55-GA-714A engine for the CH-47 program at the company’s Greer Engine Services Center. Greenville Ear, Nose and Throat will host a head and neck cancer screening on April 19, 1-4 p.m., at Greenville Health System’s Patewood Medical Campus. The screening is free, but registration is required. To register, call 864-454-4368. The Greenville Para-Cycling Open showcases the world’s top athletes in a fast and furious competition April 20-21 at Millennium Campus. The two-day time trials and road race events feature male and female athletes competing in categories related to defined disabilities. Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI), the world governing body of professional cycling, selected Greenville to host the Greenville Para-Cycling Open and UCI Para-Cycling Road World Championships in September 2014. For more information, visit greenvillesc2014.com. Furman University will host a free Earth Day Festival April 20, 1-6 p.m., on campus. The festivities will include live music, earth-friendly foods, children’s activities, tours of Furman landmark buildings, a “Water Walk,” and opportunities to chat with experts about sustainable living. Furman Soccer will also host a Soccer Extravaganza on April 19, noon-4 p.m., to help promote the festival. The soccer event also includes live music and local vendors. The family-friendly Simpsonville Mud Mania event will take place April 20 at Heritage Park, Simpsonville, and feature a 5K course with obstacles in and out of the mud. The fee is $80 per team. To register, visit ghs.org/mudmania.

Greenville: 27 S. Pleasantburg | Forest Park Shopping Center 864.242.4856 | Hours: Mon-Sat 9-9, Sun 11-7 Columbia: Trenholm Plaza next to Starbucks | 803.454.7700

30 THE Journal | APRIL 19, 2013

The Greenbrier Farms’ Annual Organic Plant Sale will take place April 20-21 from 9 a.m.-1 p.m., rain or shine at 772 Hester Store Road, Easley. The sale is open to the public. For more information, call 864-855-9782 or visit greenbrierfarms.com. The Upcountry History Museum presents “19th Century Photography: Wet


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OUR COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY NEWS, EVENTS AND HAPPENINGS

Plate Collodion” on April 20, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Guests can learn how tintypes and ambrotypes from the Civil War era and later were created using the wet plate collodion process. Local photographer Bryan Hyott will discuss the history of this type of photography and its resurgence. Afterward, watch live demonstrations of this antique process. The program is free with museum admission. For more information, visit upcountryhistory.org. Kid Support starts April 23, 5:30-7:30 p.m., at the Greenville Health System Cancer Institute. Kid Support is a six-week peer support group for children, ages 7 to 12, who have a family member with cancer. Dinner is included. To register, call 864-455-5809.

Windstream began placing conduit/fiber optic cable under sidewalks on Main Street between Elford Street and Court Street on April 15. According to the City of Greenville, this project will last several weeks and work locations will change daily with work being performed both day and night. For more information, contact Thomas Crowson at 336255-5194.

South Carolina author Ken Burger will sign copies of the third book in his Swallow Savannah series, “Salkehatchie Soup,” at Fiction Addiction on April 20, 1-3 p.m. If you cannot make the signing, reserve a personalized copy by contacting Fiction Addiction in advance at 864-675-0540 or at info@fiction-addiction.com. Meet three regional mystery authors, Greenville author Susan M. Boyer and North Carolina authors Vicki Lane and Lee Mims, as they talk about their latest books at Fiction Addiction on April 25 at 5:30 p.m. Advance tickets are $10 each. Each ticket can be redeemed toward purchase of featured books prior to or at the event, and includes one admission pass to the event. Tickets purchased at the door will be $15 each. In addition, Book Your Lunch will host Therese Fowler on April 23 at Twigs Tempietto. Tickets are $25 per person and must be purchased in advance at bookyourlunch.com or by calling 864-675-0540. The Clemson Women’s Alumni Council will host the 15th annual Bring Your Daughter to Clemson weekend, May 17-19. Girls ages 6 to 18 and their adult chaperones will experience campus life activities: staying in a dorm, eating in a dining hall, touring campus facilities and engaging in activities hosted by professors and graduate students. Registration is available at clemsonwomen.org and will close on April 26 or when 200 participants have registered. The event is $150 per person for both Friday and Saturday nights and $110 per person for Saturday night only. On April 23, 6-7 p.m., the following Verizon Wireless stores will offer a free class entitled Android: Getting Started: 469 Congaree Road, Greenville; 4 Market Point Drive, Greenville; and 6031 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors. The 365 Harrison Bridge Road location in Simpsonville will offer the same class 9-10 a.m. On April 27, 8-9 a.m., the same class will be held at 119 E. Blackstock Road, Spartanburg and 2399 E Main St, Spartanburg. Registration for classes is required at verizonwireless. com/workshops.

We deliver miracles

On April 23, 6-7 p.m., consultants working on a proposed Greenville city park will host a public meeting at the Kroc Center to display their work to-date and to solicit input regarding the overall vision of the project. This meeting will represent a second round of public input for the project. The first set yielded three preliminary designs for the site and this meeting will highlight key features of the site plan, which is still a work in progress. Renewable Water Resources recently announced that Danny K. Holliday has joined their board of commissioners. Holliday is a Project Manager at Holliday Utility Services, a general and utility contractor specializing in the water and wastewater industry. Send us your announcement. Email: community@communityjournals.com.

APRIL 19, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 31


journal community

our schools

activities, awards and accomplishments

The Greer High Virtual Enterprise program recently earned first place in three events, second place in two events and third place in one event at the state competition. The team of Richard Handler, Jackson Tipton and Dylan Long won first place in salesmanship, Crystal Helton won in advertisement, while Taylor Sanchez won in website design.

ate art history students’ research on works of art or artists from The Mint Museum’s collections. Davenport’s research focused on “The Puerto Rican Female Artist: Cristina Cordόva and Preludios y Partidas Contextualized.”

Front row: Chanie Robinson-Cain, Crystal Helton and Meghan Rood; back row: Dylan Long, Taylor Sanchez, Richard Handler, Jackson Tipton (absent from picture: Mason Bruce)

St. Mary’s Middle School students were recently honored at the 2013 Greenville County and South Carolina Regional Science and Engineering Fair: Emma Parker (third place in Behavioral & Social Science), Carly Lyvers (honorable mention in Biology), Ariana Hippensteal (fourth place in Engineering and U.S. Navy Certificate), Zoe Dick (honorable mention in Physics), Olivia Kilton (Greenville Soil & Water Conservation District Award), and Gracie Schirle (Roper Mountain Science Center Astronomers Award). In addition, fifth-grader Joshua Barrow won first place in the South Carolina Scholastic Chess Championship.

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Philip Davenport, a senior at the University of South Carolina Upstate, was one of only seven undergraduate art history students in the Carolinas selected to present a paper at The Mint Museum of Art’s 23rd Annual Regional Collegiate Art History Symposium in Charlotte, N.C., recently. The symposium showcases undergradu-

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The David E. Shi Center for Sustainability at Furman University has completed a campus-wide sustainability analysis and greenhouse gas report that has resulted in a silver The Chandler School uses multirating for the university. The Sustainsensory lessons in everything from ability Tracking, Assessment & Rating math to science to handwriting. WritSystem and greenhouse gas report are ing in whipped cream makes learning the standard tools colleges and unicursive a lot more fun. versities. Furman improved its overall performance over past years and scored better than average in three out of five major reporting categories, a 17 percent improvement over its performance in 2011. Shannon Forest sixth-grader Madeline Makowski of Greenville won second place in biology at the recent Greenville County Science Fair with her project entitled “Fingerprint Inheritance.” Students presented their projects to groups of judges and answered questions about their entries. Award winners were recognized with awards and cash prizes.  St. Joseph’s Catholic School sophomore Katrina Konopka, a member of the Middle Tyger YMCA Swim Team, set a new national record at the YMCA Short Course Nationals. Konopka’s winning time of 22.55 in the women’s 50-yard freestyle event broke the old record of 22.68. Her record is not only the top time in YMCA competition, but also the top time in the country amongst her age group this season. Greenville Middle Academy students Benjamin Finkelstein and Rebekah Matthews will be recognized at the State PTA Reflections Ceremony in Charleston on May 4. Finkelstein placed second in the film production middle school division; Matthews’s entry was awarded first place and Outstanding Interpretation of Theme in the literature middle school division. To raise money and gather supSt. Mary’s School plies for the Crestview Elemenfifth-grader Joshua tary Backpack Buddies program, Barrow recently Crestview Elementary is holding its won first place in Second Annual Pack the Pantry 5K the South Carolina Fun Run on April 27 at Greer MidScholastic Chess dle School.  The entry fee is $15, Championship. which includes a T-shirt and an Barrow after-race massage from employees of Healthsource Chiropractic.  The Backpack Buddies program feeds needy families at Crestview. Registration begins at 8 a.m. The 5K will follow at 9 a.m. For more information or to register, call 864-355-2600 or visit the Crestview office. Send us your announcement. Email: community@communityjournals.com.


journal community

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APRIL 19, 2013 | The Journal 33


journal community

the good

events that make our community better

Members of Greenville’s First Presbyterian Church recently coordinated with Feed My Starving Children for the Grains of Grace event. The volunteers packed life-saving “Manna Pack” meals for malnourished and starving children worldwide. Manna Packs are scientifically designed to serve six people with a nutritious meal. For more information, visit firstpresgreenville.org. High Cotton, partnered with Communities In Schools, will hold its fifth annual three-course lunch in honor of Administrative Professionals Day on April 24 at High Cotton. All proceeds will go to Communities In Schools, a nonprofit organization aimed at preventing students from dropping out of school. The cost is $25 per person with reservations available from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Reservations are required and can be made by calling 864-335-4200 or visiting highcottongreenville.com The Duke Energy Foundation recently donated $15,000 to Chapman Cultural Center to support arts and science education. The Chapman Cultural Center serves nearly 48,000 students and teachers in Spartanburg County with award-winning educational programs, serving students in all seven districts Roper Mountain Holiday Lights has recently been organized as a nonprofit corporation and has announced a new board of directors. These members include board chair Terry Weaver, Bob Atkinson, Judith Prince, Elizabeth Lyon, Nancy Eichstadt, Ralph Williams, Hurschell Mathews, Kim Mazur, Mike Sease, Dick Kosa, Joey Sullivan, Larry Rinne and Stefan Voss. For more information, visit ropermountainholidaylights.com. The 4th Annual Reedy River Jazz and Wine Festival will be held on April 26, 6 p.m., in support of The Ronald McDonald House. The festival, on the TD Stage at the Peace Center, will feature live jazz, wine from around the world, food from Larkin’s on the River and Divine Desserts by Andrea. The musical line-up includes the Anderson University Jazz Ensemble, Keith Davis Trio, Carol  Ingbretson and Con Clave. VIP tickets are available. To attend the event, contact Emily Muserallo at emuserallo@ rmhcarolinas.com or visit reedyriverjazzandwinefestival.org.   The Third Annual Greenville NF Walk will be held on May 4 at Conestee Park to raise money for neurofibromatosis research aimed at finding the cure to the disabling genetic disorder. Registration for the half-mile walk begins at 9 a.m. and the walk begins at 9:30 p.m. For more information, visit ctf.org. To register, visit nfwalk.org/greenville2013. The Kids Classic Golf Tournament will be held on May 1 at Green Valley Country Club and Furman University Golf Course. This event has been held annually since 1989, raising money for the Meyer Center for disabled children. Last year’s event had over 200 players and raised $300,000. Players will be treated to an action packed day on the greens followed by an awards banquet and dinner. Players and sponsors are invited to a VIP Pre-Party at Larkin’s Sawmill at North Main on April 30 with live entertainment, delicious food, cocktails, and a fabulous live and silent auction. Tickets and sponsorship opportunities are available by contacting the Meyer Center at 864-250-0005, ext. 207, or visiting meyercenter.org.

Duke Energy Foundation awarded The Upstate South Carolina Educational Foundation a grant of $82,500 over four years. This grant will allow the Upstate SC Alliance to purchase a subscription to Economic Modeling Specialists International. In 2012, the region’s local economic developers expressed an urgent need for updated labor market information for the region. In response, the Upstate SC Alliance has been working to identify a solution for both present and future data needs. Safe Harbor recently announced its 2013 board of directors. Executive members include: Elisabeth Gadd, Tri-County Technical College, president; Paul Ledford, Glen Raven Custum Fabrics, vice president; Julia Hoyle, The Arts Company, secretary; Deb Merrill, Delta Apparel, treasurer; Andrea Hopkins, Rosenfeld Einstein Insurance, 2014 president-elect; Hillary Andren-Wise, MacMillan Pazdan Smith Architecture, 2012 past president; and Becky Callaham, Safe Harbor, executive director. At-large members include: Ann Bible Batson, Josef and Stephen Salon & Day Spa; Lori Coon, Integrated Media Publishing; Renee Dunlap, NAI Earle Furman; Brian Hobbs, Tectronic Industries; Stacy Kuper, Acumen IT; Stephanie Page, House & Home, Seneca; Monica Rockwell, Cox, Cauley & Rockwell, PA; Ryan Rosenfeld, Tara Trantham, World Acceptance Corporation; Sherry Watts, Fabri-Kal Corp.; and Vanessa Woods, TD Bank, Seneca. USC alumnus and retired Greenville wholesale food and beverage distributor James T. Pearce Sr. donated $1 million to create a $50 million endowment to fund scholarships to help gifted students pay for their medical education at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine-Greenville. Tuition is about $35,000 a year and it is anticipated that the earnings off the $1 million gift is enough to provide a full four-year scholarship to one student. Pearce made the donation in honor of the physicians who have cared for his family: Dr. C. Wallace Harper, Dr. W. Wallace Fridy, Jr. and Dr. Spence M. Taylor. The Friends of the Greenville Zoo have added two new board members who will serve as co-treasurers. The new members are Matt Madden and Phillip Cox; both will serve three-year terms. Cox is a senior vice president with Grand Bridge Real Estate Capital and Madden is a senior tax manager with Elliott Davis. Learn more at greenvillezoo.com/friends. Greenville Family Partnership was awarded a $7,500 grant from AFL through its Community Outreach Program. This grant will support the GFP Youth Internship Program and the Red Ribbon Golf Classic. Greenville Family Partnership is a nonprofit that aims to keep kids off tobacco, alcohol and other drugs by educating and partnering with families and the community. For more information, call 864-4674099 or visit greenvillefamilypartnership.org. Renewable Water Resources’ (ReWa) Operations Challenge Team, the Blackwater Bruisers, competed in the State Operations Challenge Competition at the South Carolina Environmental Conference. The team finished first place at the state level overall by taking first place in the safety, process control, maintenance, lab and collections categories. Team members are Larry Camp, Russ Moore, Adam Harvey, Cain Massey and Joe Ortiz.

The Two Hearts One Cause foundation, partnering with the Family Connection of South Carolina, will hold an art auction fundraiser on May 16, 5 to 8 p.m., at City Lights and Art & Light. The event will include live music, a silent local art auction, and food. More than 20 local artists have donated original pieces for this event. All proceeds will go to providing books for NICU families as reading out loud can improve a baby’s health. OnPoint CFO & Controller Services will donate $100 to local nonprofits for every home run hit and $500 for every grand slam by a Greenville Drive player at Fluor Field. Benefiting nonprofits include the Mauldin Miracle League, the South Carolina Children’s Theatre and Safe Harbor. OnPoint allows individuals, groups and companies to “Join the Challenge” by pledging donations of any size and amount. Pledges can be made on a per-home run basis or as a one-time gift. For more information, call Polly Griffin at 864-232-9840 or visit onpointcfo.com.

Hendrix

Bryce

Krulac

Webb

Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Carolinas has added four new board members and appointed a new board chair. The current board chair, Jim Hendrix, is joined by members Colletta Bryce, Katherine Hoover, Rob Krulac and Larry Webb. Send us your announcement. Email: community@communityjournals.com.

34 THE Journal | APRIL 19, 2013


JOURNAL CULTURE

Not your ordinary camp WAR HORSE Oct. 17-20, 2013

Frankie Camp helps “Jersey Boys” find performers to portray musical’s lead character By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

BROADWAY

HITS just keep coming

PHOTO COURTESY OF PEACE CENTER

Revivals, recent blockbusters comprise Peace Center’s 2013-2014 Broadway season By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

In 2010, the Peace Center’s Broadway series was “Wicked.” The Disney blockbuster musical “The Lion King” headlined the 2011 season. This year’s season finale is “Jersey Boys,” currently the 18th-longest-running show in

Broadway history. So how does the Peace Center continue to top the previous years’ Broadway seasons? With seven shows in 2013. Among them: the return of “Phantom of the Opera” and “Evita,” recent blockbuster “War Horse,” the family-friendly classic “Wizard of Oz” and a Greenville native’s return home in “Porgy

and Bess” and the role that earned him a Tony Award nomination. “‘Exceptional’ is the single best word I can use to describe this season’s Broadway Series,” said Peace Center President Megan Riegel. “Our community has proven to have an insatiable appetite for Broadway, and we wanted to deliver in a most dynamic way.” All of the shows are South Carolina premieres.

BROADWAY continued on PAGE 36

Oh, what a task. Finding a guy to play the role of Frankie Valli in the hit musical “Jersey Boys” is not easy. The person who plays the part needs to be under 5 foot 9, sing falsetto, look like he hails from the Mediterranean (sometimes with the help of hair dye), and be able to age from 14 to 70 in a couple of hours convincingly. Now imagine finding four Frankies for each of the eight companies performing “Jersey Boys” across the globe. Four of those companies perform in the United States – one on Broadway, another in Las Vegas and two tours, including the one that will end the Peace Center’s 2012-13 Broadway series over a two-week span in July. “We spend a lot of time looking for Frankies,” said Richard Hester, production supervisor for “Jersey Boys.” “Jersey Boys” tells the story of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons, a story of four blue-collar kids from – you guessed it – New Jersey who became one of the greatest successes in pop music history. “It’s like an everyman’s story,” said Joseph Leo Bwarie, who has played Frankie on the tour since 2007 and who was in Greenville last week to CAMP continued on PAGE 36

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journal culture BROADWAY continued from page 35

“War Horse,”

Oct. 17 through Oct. 20 “War Horse” is the story of young Albert’s horse, Joey, which was enlisted to fight for the English in World War I. The horse is caught in enemy crossfire and ends up serving both sides of the war. Albert, too young to enlist, embarks on a mission to find his horse and bring him home. “War Horse” won five Tony Awards in 2011. Life-sized horse puppets are at the heart of the production. The Joey puppet weighs 120 pounds and is handmade by 14 people. Its frame is mostly cane, soaked, bent and stained. An aluminum frame along the spine – lined partly by leather for comfort – allows the horse to be ridden. The puppet has about 20 major joints. Vertical levers curl the knees and lift the hooves. The neck is made of carbon fiberglass. Levers allow the tail to move up and down, left to right and in a spiral. Three puppeteers work Joey: one at the head controlling the ears and head, another in the mid-section controlling breathing and the front legs, and the third in the hind end controlling the tail and back legs.

“ANYTHING GOES,”

Nov. 12 through Nov. 17 “Anything Goes,” which won the 2011 Tony Award for Best Revival of a Musical, is a 1934 musical comedy about lovers, liars and clowns on a transatlantic cruise.

As the S.S. American heads out to sea, etiquette and convention head out the porthole windows as two unlikely pairs set off on the course to true love. It features the music of Cole Porter, including “You’re the Top,” “Friendship,” “I Get a Kick Out of You,” “It’s De-Lovely,” “Blow, Gabriel, Blow” and the title song, “Anything Goes.”

“THE WIZARD OF OZ,”

Dec. 31, 2013 through Jan. 5, 2014 The stage version of “The Wizard of Oz” is given a new twist by Andrew Lloyd Webber. The production, based on the classic MGM film, features Dorothy and Toto, the Scarecrow, Tin Man and the Lion, and all of the songs from the Oscar-winning movie score. It also features some new songs by Webber and Tim Rice. The family favorite plays during another family favorite – winter break.

“THE GERSHWINS’ PORGY AND BESS,”

Jan. 28 through Feb. 2, 2014 Greenville native and original Broadway cast member Phillip Boykin will reprise his Tony, Drama Desk and Outer Critic Circle Award-nominated role as Crown in the national tour of “The Gershwins’ Porgy and Bess.” Boykin received his early training as an actor and singer at the Phillis Wheatley Repertory Theatre, the Greenville County Schools’ Fine Arts Center and the summer program of the Governor’s School for the

ville for two weeks next May is part of a brand new U.S. national tour. The production has a new design, new costumes, new staging and new choreography. “Phantom” is the most successful musical of all time. Based on the classic novel “Le Fantome de L’Opera” by Gaston Leroux, it tells the story of a masked figure who lurks beneath the catacombs of the Paris Opera House, exercising a reign of terror over all who inhabit it. He falls madly in love with an innocent young soprano, Christine, and devotes himself to creating a new star by nurturing her extraordinary talents and by employing all of the devious methods at his command.

Arts and Humanities. The national tour begins in fall 2013 and will include two other original Broadway cast members: Nathaniel Stampley as Porgy and Alicia Hall Moran as Bess. “Porgy and Bess” is set in Charleston’s fabled Catfish Row, where Bess struggles to break free from her scandalous past and the only one who can rescue her is the courageous Porgy.

“FLASHDANCE – THE MUSICAL,”

April 22 through April 27, 2014 It’s been 30 years since the movie “Flashdance” became a smash hit and pop culture phenomenon. The musical version will begin performing on Broadway in August 2013 and another company will tour the U.S. “Flashdance” tells the story of Alex Owens, a Pittsburgh steel welder by day and a bar dancer by night with dreams of becoming a professional performer. The musical features a score that includes the hit songs on the movie, including “Flashdance – What a Feeling,” “Maniac,” “Gloria,” “I Love Rock & Roll” and “Manhunt.”

“EVITA,”

June 24 through June 29, 2014 The 2013-14 season is brought to an end by a new staging of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s “Evita.” “Evita” tells the story of Eva Peron, a woman who used her beauty and charisma to rise meteorically from the slums of Argentina to the presidential mansion as First Lady. The people of Argentina adored Peron, called a champion for the poor, who became one of the most powerful women in the world. Her greed, outsized ambition and fragile health also made her one of the most tragic. “Evita” features “Don’t Cry for Me Argentina,” “Another Suitcase in Another Hall” and “High Flying, Adored.”

“THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA,”

May 14 through May 25, 2014 Before the recent run of Broadway blockbusters, “Phantom” had been the Peace Center’s top draw. “Phantom” packed the Peace Center for a four-week run in 2003. But the “Phantom” that will be in Green-

Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

CAMP continued from page 35

36 THE Journal | APRIL 19, 2013

Photo by Joan Marcus

take part in the Peace Center’s 2013-14 season announcement. “It is a true, true, true story. It’s a slice of life.” Two or three times a year, “Jersey Boys” holds auditions with about 100 guys who are physically right for the part. Since 2007, the top 10 go to Frankie Camp, an intensive week of training that includes sessions with vocal coach Katie Agresta, associate choreographer Danny Austin and Hester. “It’s a little bit like boot camp,” Hester said. When the show has From left, Wes Hart, Brad Weinstock, Brent DiRoma and the company of “Jersey Boys.” openings, the top two Greg Beckner / Staff way for the show’s creative team to ensure or three will audi- the Frankie role over time, he said. Joseph Leo Bwarie All the Four Seasons’ hits featured Valli’s a performer is deserving of an epic role. tion for the show’s portrays Frankie Valli “It’s a special role,” he said. “Frankie director and creative high falsetto – songs such as “Sherry,” “Big of the Four Seasons. Valli is iconic.” team. Valli himself Girls Don’t Cry” and “Dawn (Go Away).” A “Jersey Boys” Frankie does something “The real difficult one is ‘Walk Like a and another one of the Four Seasons, Bob Gaudio, the group’s principal songwriter, Man,’” Hester says. “The riff at the begin- that Frankie Valli himself hasn’t done ning is very specific. It’s the hardest to pull throughout his decades-long career – sing also have casting approval, Hester said. all of the hits night after night after night. Sometimes, performers who show off because it’s the most exposed.’’ “It’s not ‘Can you hit the high notes?’” Bwarie, who attended Frankie Camp promise for the Frankie role are cast as a member of the Four Seasons and work on during its first year, said Frankie Camp is a Bwarie said. “It’s ‘Can you sign the notes

six nights a week, two and a half hours a night?’ Very few do. Frankie doesn’t, and he’ll tell you he doesn’t.” Bwarie started performing in childhood. When he was 8, he played a caroler on a Christmas episode of Michael Landon’s TV series “Highway to Heaven.” “I’ve been singing falsetto my entire life,” he said. “You’re either born to sing the notes or not.” Bwarie, who released an album in 2011 and will release another this fall, said playing the role of Frankie is a true commitment. “You’ve got to take care of yourself. You’ve got to take care of your voice, your health, your weight and your addictions,” he said. “You’ve got to remember the reason you’re in Greenville, Rochester or wherever. You’re there to do the show. You’re there on business.” Hester said although “Jersey Boys” has a beloved song catalog, the script is so powerful that it could stand alone with the music. “That’s incredibly rare in musical theater,” he said. “The story is one that anyone can make it, that with luck and tenacity, you can achieve your dreams.” Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.


journal culture ANYTHING GOES Nov. 12-17, 2013

THE GERSHWINS’ PORGY AND BESS

THE WIZARD OF OZ Dec. 31, 2013-Jan. 5, 2014

FLASHDANCE – THE MUSICAL April 22-27, 2014

Jan. 28-Feb. 2, 2014

EVITA

June 24-29, 2014

THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA May 14-25, 2014

PhotoS COURTESY OF PEACE CENTER

APRIL 19, 2013 | The Journal 37


journal culture

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The Bard visits Greer with a modern twist By Jeanne putnam | contributor

Shakespeare meets “Saturday Night Live” in the Greer Children’s Theater production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream – The Musical.” The production is “a modern-language retelling of Shakespeare’s original story that has been updated and made even more fun for kids and adults,” said Mike Sokol of the Greer Arts Council. “We chose this show because besides being a great deal of fun to produce (and, we hope, to watch), it allows kids to perform ‘Shakespeare’ without having to perform ‘Shakespeare’... if that makes sense.” In the Greer Children’s Theater show, the traditionally male role of Puck is played by “an 11-year-old Elise Garnett, who drinks Starbucks and is full of wisecracks,” said Sokol. “The original troupe of actors has been replaced by a wannabe Boy Band and there is a special visit from Shakespeare himself to the stage.” However, the original Shakespearian plot remains the same, with mismatched lovers, dueling fairies and

Raising funds for Boston

donkey-headed Bottom. According to Sokol, the updated production allows for music in the tradition of “Saturday Night Live” and performances of songs reminiscent of Monty Python, such as “Why Do I Have to Sing It,” a complaint about musicals in general. The play is the first main stage production of the Greer Children’s Theatre in the Cannon Centre, which last year was re-opened following a $1 million-plus renovation. The historic building was once known as the Greer Armory and now serves as an addition to the Greer City Park complex, and the new home of the Greer Cultural Arts Council. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream – The Musical” has shows at 7 p.m. on April 19-20 and 26-27 with matinees on April 21 and 28 at 2 p.m. at the Cannon Centre at 204 Cannon St. in Greer. Tickets are $15 for adults, $12 for seniors and students, and $7 for children five and under. They are available in advance online at greerculturalarts.com or at the door. Contact Jeanne Putnam at jputnam@communityjournals.com.

Betsy Franck & the BareKnuckle Band, a blues/rock band from Athens, opens a series of outdoor concerts at the Mauldin Cultural Center on April 19 at 7:30 p.m. The concert will be in the Mauldin Cultural Center’s Outdoor Amphitheater, 101 East Butler Road. The public is invited to bring lawn chairs, blankets and picnic baskets (no alcohol). The rain location is MCC Auditorium. For more information, visit mauldinculturalcenter.org or call 864-335-4862. Admission is free, but donations are encouraged and will go to the American Red Cross of Eastern Massachusetts and the Boston Athletic Association (operators of the Boston Marathon) to support their efforts in wake of the bombings during the Boston Marathon.

38 THE Journal | APRIL 19, 2013


JOURNAL CULTURE

APRIL 19, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 39


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By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

Sometimes Natalie Goldberg is still amazed her book “Writing Down the Bones” sparked a revolution in the craft of writing. Up until then, Goldberg had never taken a writing class. Her only published work had been a thin volume of poetry published by Holy Cow Press, a small press in Minnesota. “I often kid people, ‘Why did you listen to me?” said Goldberg, whose book has sold more than a million copies and was one of the first to link Zen insights with writing techniques. “But I was backed by 2,000 years of following the mind.” Goldberg was in Greenville 25 years ago, conducting one of the first of her workshops teaching writing as a practice, as part of the celebration of Emrys’ 5th anniversary. She returns to Greenville on April 25, again thanks to the nonprofit literary organization based in Greenville. The April 25 event is not a workshop; instead, it is a talk by Goldberg about her latest book, “The True Secret of Writing.” Goldberg’s talk will be at the Upstate

History Museum at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10 for Emrys members and $15 for non-members and are available at www.emrys.org. Books will also be available for Goldberg purchase and signing. Goldberg said she considers “The True Secret of Writing” as her legacy book. “It completes what began with ‘Writing Down the Bones.’” Goldberg said writing is natural for human beings. “We’re the only creatures who write. Cows don’t write. Birds don’t write.” The only tools of writing are pen, paper, computer and the human mind, she said. “That’s where sentences come from,” she said. “The better you understand it, the better you can use it.” Writing as a practice allows people to have a deeper relationship with their own minds, Goldberg said. “Usually, our minds are filled with discursive thinking – we have to do this, we have to do that. Writing allows us to drop below that. It allows us to have a deeper relationship with who we are.”

SO YOU KNOW WHO: Natalie Goldberg WHAT: Talk about her new book, “The True Secret of Writing” WHEN: April 25, 7 p.m. WHERE: Upcountry History Museum 540 Buncombe St., Greenville SPONSOR: Emrys, a nonprofit literary organization TICKETS: $10 for Emrys members, $15 for non-members, $50 ticket includes a copy of the book

Goldberg said her own writing has become more serious, concise, structured and experienced in the years since “Writing Down the Bones.” She said she shares the true secret to writing at the end of the book. “The one secret I’ve told everyone over and over again is very simple, very austere: ‘Shut up and write.’” Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

YOU’VE YOU’VE SEEN IT, SEEN IT, RIGHT? RIGHT?

Jamie Wyeth, Rockwell Kent and Monhegan open through Sunday, April 21

Greenville County

Museum of Art 420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864-271-7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1pm - 5 pm free admission

40 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 19, 2013


JOURNAL CULTURE

SCENE. HERE.

THE WEEK IN THE LOCAL ARTS WORLD

The Artists Guild Gallery of Greenville features Sandra Roper through April 30. The Artists Guild Gallery is located in the historic Ivey Square Building at 200 North Main St., Greenville. Subscriptions for the Greenville Little Theatre’s 2013-14 season are now available. Offerings include “The Marvelous Wonderettes,” “Walking Across Egypt,” “Agatha Christie’s Spider’s Web,” “Don’t Dress For Dinner” and “Les Miserables.” The theatre will also offer four special events this season: “Shake, Rattle, & Roll,” “It’s A Wonderful Life,” “Emile Pandolfi in Concert” and “The Return – A Spectacular Beatles Tribute!” For more information, call 864-233-6238 or visit the box office Monday through Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. at 444 College St., Greenville, or visit greenvillelittletheatre.org. Dawnyelle Moore’s exhibit, “ReAdolescence,” recently opened at The Brooks Center for the Performing Arts in Clemson. For more information, visit facebook.com/freckleddaisycreations. Art by 13 Furman University seniors will be on display now through May 4 in the Thompson Gallery on campus. Seniors displaying art include Sophie Amberkar, Robert Bradford, Arden Fuller, Haley Gray, Katie Guptill, True Harrigan, Anna Hicken, Sean McCain, Kendall Milano, Hannah Robinson, Erin Turner, Sidney Vlass and Kate Worthen. Thompson Gallery hours are 9 a.m.–5 p.m., Monday through Friday. For more information, call 864-294-2074. Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra presents free and live lunchtime concerts at the Spartanburg library downtown. On April 24, the featured artist will be pianist Anaallsa Monticelli, who will present The Spanish Heritage of the Piano. The music starts at 12:15 p.m. Bring your lunch or buy one there. For more information, call 948-9020. The Swamp Rabbit Cafe and Grocery will hold its Spring Flea on April 20 from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. in its outdoor lot. The event will feature local art, handmade treats and repurposed vintage goods. If the event is rained out, it will be held April 27. For more information, call 864-255-3385 or visit swamprabbitcafe.com. The Curtis R. Harley Art Gallery at the University of South Carolina Upstate will host an exhibit that highlights the works of the university’s faculty from the visual arts. Featuring a wide variety of media, the 2013 Faculty Biennial show will be on display through April 26 in the Humanities and Performing Arts Center. Faculty members in the exhibition are Lisa Anderson, Judith Battaglia, Michael Dickins, Henry Fagen, Mary Lou Hightower, Bryan Hiott, Alicia Mack, Rich Mack, Alicekay McMillan, Jane Allen Nodine, Lauren Pakradooni, Mark Rice and Lee Simmons. For more information, contact Michael Dickins, gallery manager, at 864-503-5848 or mdickins@uscupstate.edu.

The Greenville Chorale presents “We Have Song” on April 28 at 3 p.m. at First Baptist Church, Greenville. For more information, visit greenvillechorale.com/index.html or call 864-467-3000. April 27 is international Slow Art Day and patrons are invited to look very slowly at the exhibits at Spartanburg Art Museum at Chapman Cultural Center, giving each picture five to 10 minutes of contemplation, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. From 1-2 p.m., patrons can enjoy a catered lunch and have in-depth discussions about the art. To register, call 582-7616. Spartanburg Regional History Museum will present “Gen. Daniel Morgan In Person – Sort Of ” at its monthly Lunch & Learn at Chapman Cultural Center on April 26, 12:30 p.m. Dr. George Fields will present himself as Gen. Morgan from the Revolutionary War and hero of the Battle of Cowpens. The cost is $5. For more information, call 864-596-3501. The Fine Arts Center Dance Concert will be performed April 26 at 7 p.m. in the theatre at Wade Hampton High School, adjacent to the Fine Arts Center. The repertory will include choreography by Tim Glenn, Sara Procopio, Tyler Gilstrap, Andrew Kuharsky and Rebecca Lee. For more information, contact Jan Woodward at 864-355-2572 or jwoodwar@ greenville.k12.sc.us, or visit fineartscenter.net. On April 26 at 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m., and noon, more than 3,000 third-, fourth- and fifth-graders from Spartanburg County elementary schools will be both audience and performers in three concerts at Twichell Auditorium on the campus of Converse College. Since the beginning of the school year, these students have studied the orchestra and its instruments, as well as how to read and play music on the recorder using the Link-Up program, a free educational outreach program brought to area public schools through a partnership with the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra. Frame Designs is currently having an exhibition of 3 Upstate artists—Phil Garrett, Patty Brady and Mike Williams. 1322 E. Washington St, Suite B1, Greenville SC, 864.242.2255. For more information: www.framedesignedhouse.com. The Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg will host “Variety, Visions and Values” by artists Tom Rickis and Roy McBee Smith Jr. during the month of May. The exhibit runs from May 1-28 and is open to the public at no charge Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sunday, 1-5 p.m. An opening reception will be held on May 3 in the Guild Gallery, 6-8 p.m., with an artist talk scheduled for 7 p.m. There will be an encore reception during ArtWalk on May 16, from 6-8 with another artist talk to occur at 7 p.m. Foothills Chorale will present its spring concert on May 5 at 3 p.m. in the Newton Hobson Chapel and Fine Arts Center at Southern Wesleyan University in Central. The theme is “With a Song in My Heart.” Tickets are $18 for adults, $6 for students and are available at the door; by telephone 864-287-2236, 864944-6565, or 864-221-7630, and through foothillschorale.org. Send your arts announcement to arts@communityjournals.com.

APRIL 19, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 41


JOURNAL CULTURE

LISTEN UP

BEST BETS FOR LOCAL LIVE MUSIC 4/20, GOTTROCKS

JoJo Taterhead Revival Greenville’s own ska party band. Call 864-235-5519. 4/23, THE HANDLEBAR

Gwar Legendary costumed metal gods. Tickets: $22 in advance, $24 day of show. Call 864-233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com. 4 / 2 4 , S PA R TA N B U R G MEMORIAL AUDITORIUM

Experience The Beatles with RAIN Tribute act re-creates the Fab Four. Tickets: $38-$58. Call 864-582-8107 or visit crowdpleaser.com. 4/25, DOWNTOWN ALIVE ( H YAT T P L A Z A )

Brave Baby Atmospheric modern rock. 5:30 p.m. Show is free. 4 / 2 5 , B L U E S B O U L E VA R D

Marcus King Blues guitar phenom. Call 864-242-2583 or visit bluesboulevardjazzgreenville.com. 4/26, THE HANDLEBAR

Victor Wooten Band Bela Fleck’s virtuoso bassist. Tickets: $20. Call 864-233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com. 4 / 2 6 , M A I N S T R E E T F R I D AY S ( H YAT T P L A Z A )

Wanda Johnson Upstate’s own scorching blues singer. 5:30 p.m. Admission is free. 4/27, THE HANDLEBAR

Mac Arnold’s 7th Annual Cornbread & Collard Greens Festival Iconic bluesman headlines multi-act bluesfest. Call 864-233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com. 4/27, THE SHOWROOM

Johnny C. Weaver & The Sapient Soul Experience Double-CD release party. Tickets: $5. Call 864-582-0056 or visit hub-bub.com.

42 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 19, 2013


JOURNAL CULTURE

SOUND CHECK WITH VINCENT HARRIS

A rockin’ Record Store Day In the 38 years that Greenville’s Horizon Records has been open, owner Gene Berger has seen a lot of good times and bad times in the music industry. So perhaps it’s not surprising that in 2008, when he received an email about an event called “Record Store Day,” it didn’t initially make that much of an impact. Record Store Day was conceived by independent record store employee Chris Brown in 2007, and officially founded by a small group of record label and music retail veterans, most notably Eric Levin, owner of Atlanta’s Criminal Records. The concept was deceptively simple: It was a day designed to honor the local independent record stores across the country, and to celebrate how important those stores were to their respective communities. “I got this email, and I thought, ‘Record Store Day. What is this?’” Berger says. “And it fell on the same day as our Annual Yard Sale, so I thought, ‘Well, what the hell, we can do this.’ So I participated. I thought it was a good idea, but I didn’t know if it was going to go anywhere.” Where it’s gone has doubtless caught Berger and his counterparts nationwide by surprise. Bands from Metallica to Wilco immediately jumped on board with Record Store Day, releasing limited-edition material, doing in-store autograph signings and performances, and singing the praises of the non-chain music store. More and more stores started signing up to be on RecordStoreDay.com’s list of participants, and this year’s version, which takes place this Saturday, April 20, promises to be the biggest yet. “I have to give heartfelt props to the people that started this thing,” Berger says, “because they have managed to organize it and make it viable and inclusive, and it’s grown exponentially.” Last spring’s 2012 Record Store Day produced a staggering turnout at Horizon. “Last year’s Record Store Day was the biggest day in our 38-year history by 20 percent,” Berger says. “It seems to have been the right idea at the right time, and it captured the right feelings out there in the marketplace. With downloading and MP3s, things had gotten so cynical and so technological. And here was this completely independent movement of box-sized retailers all banding together, and it just caught people’s attention.” Berger says that the recent resurgence of vinyl record sales came at just the right time for Record Store Day. In addition to hundreds of limited-edition releases on vinyl and otherwise, Horizon is presenting three bands throughout the day. Bloodshot Records’ artists The Deadstring Brothers, whose ragged rock is a dead ringer for the early-’70s Stones, kick things off at noon. Then at 2 p.m., former DriveBy Truckers bassist and singer Shonna Tucker will play with her new band Eye Candy. And at 3 p.m., Alive Records artist Lee Bains III will play with his band, The Glory Fires. “They’re on Alive Records, the label owned by the guys from the Black Keys,” Berger says. “He did an in-store show in February, and right after the show I told him I wanted him back for Record Store Day.” Though the financial benefits are obvious, when Berger talks about Record Store Day, it occurs to me that the best aspect might be more personal. “These are challenging times,” Berger says. “The landscape of retail is shifting seismically. And for people to come in and say ‘Thanks for being here’ is so gratifying. It’s overwhelming in such a positive way.” Horizon Records will celebrate Record Store Day on Saturday, April 20, starting at 8 a.m. The store is at 2 W. Stone Ave. For more information, call Horizon at 864235-7922. Contact Vincent Harris at vharris@communityjournals.com.

APRIL 19, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 43


journal culture

Arts Calendar April 19+25 Fountain Inn Arts Center Gypsy Apr. 19-28 ~ 409-1050 SC Children’s Theatre Rapunzel! Rapunzel! Apr. 19-28 ~ 467-3000 Peace Center Bill Cosby Apr. 20 ~ 467-3000 Furman University Theatre The Winter’s Tale Through Apr. 20 ~ 294-2125 Greenville Little Theatre Elvis Has Left the Building Through Apr. 20 ~ 233-6238

1 Pine Forest Drive

North Greenville University Commedia Tonight! Through Apr. 20 ~ 977-7085

106 Powers Garden

European Style home in the sought after McDaniel Ave area! Built in 2004 this house has all the extras. High ceilings, spacious sized rooms, exceptional trim, hdwd floors, gourmet kitchen opens to family living space, outdoor living space includes outdoor fireplace, 2 patio areas and a screened porch. In law or Nanny suite has kitchenette, small living space and BR and full BA. Over 5000 SF with 5 BR and 5 1/2 BA in walking distance of Swamp Rabbit Trail, YMCA and downtown.

For those who have earned the right to enjoy the Best ! This handsome brick home is located in one of Greenville’s most desirable gated neighborhoods. High ceilings, exquisite trim , rounded sheetrock corners, silent floor system and two fireplaces. Welcoming floor plan that has the kitchen as the heart of the home. Great for entertaining! Beautifully landscaped lot.

MLS #1256488

MLS #1257560

$899,000

$785,900

Centre Stage A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum Through Apr. 21 ~ 233-6733 Greenville County Museum of Art Jamie Wyeth, Rockwell Kent and Monhegan Through Apr. 21 ~ 271-7570 Greenville County Youth Orchestra Spring Orchestras Concert Apr. 23 ~ 467-3000 Downtown Alive Brave Baby Apr. 25 – 232-2273

243 Pine Forest Drive

16 East Prentiss

Crescent Ave Area, 4 Beds/4 Full Baths, 3 Half Baths

MLS #1251418

$939,000

10 Hidden Hills Drive

Augusta Circle School Dist, 3 Beds/2 Full and 1 Half Baths

MLS #1256806

$549,900

4 Beds/4 Full and 1 Half Baths, Chanticleer Golf Course

MLS #1257569

$450,000

Greenville County Museum of Art William H. Johnson: Native Son Through Sep. 29 ~ 271-7570 Jackson Marketing Vision Gallery Works by Carole Tinsley Through Apr. 27 ~ 272-3000 Metro. Arts Council @ Centre Stage Works by Kim Hassold Through Apr. 29 ~ 233-6733

The Terraces at Riverplace, Unit 707

108 Lowood Lane

623 North Main Unit 6

Downtown Greenville, 2 Beds/2 Full, 1 Half Bath, Furnished

Chanticleer, 5 Beds/5 Baths

Downtown Greenville, 3 Beds/3 Full Baths, 1 Half Bath

MLS #1257666

$575,000

MLS #1254439

$630,000

MLS #1255418

Sharon Sharon WilsonSharon WilsonABR Wilson,CRS, ABR ABR ,CRS, GRI,CRS, GRI GRI

111 Williams 111 Williams 111 Street Williams Street Greenville Street Greenville SC Greenville 29601 SC 29601 SC 29601 sharonwilson.net•swilson@cbcaine.com•864.918.1140 sharonwilson.net•swilson@cbcaine.com•864.918.1140 sharonwilson.net•swilson@cbcaine.com•864.918.1140

44 THE Journal | APRIL 19, 2013

$579,000

Greenville Chamber of Commerce Photographs by William Abbott and Lynn Pilewski Through May 3 ~ 242-1050


JOURNAL HOMES

DETAILS

Featured Homes & Neighborhoods | Open Houses | Property Transfers

McBee Avenue, Greenville

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED HOME

McBee Park is an urban gem…the perfect opportunity to enjoy a new home within walking distance of the heart of Downtown Greenville…shopping, entertainment, fine dining, parks and so much more! McBee Park offers eight single-family lots, each with private garden areas, but open to generous green spaces. Entertain with ease in an open floor plan specifically designed to fit your lifestyle. The two and a half story homes, complete with two car garages and elevators, will feature brick exteriors complimentary to the architecture of the neighborhood. Interior features include high ceilings, rich mouldings, large windows and doors, hardwoods, custom cabinetry, granite countertops and Wolfe and Sub Zero appliance packages. Don’t miss the chance to be this close to downtown in your very own newly constructed home in the sought after McBee/McDaniel area…a brief walk to everything Downtown!

HOME INFO Price: $600s to $800s Square Footage: 2500-3000 Open Floor Plans, Quality Finishes, Elevators, Two Car Garages, Private Patios, Green Spaces Schools: Sara Collins Elementary Hughes Middle | Greenville High Contact: Patrick Franzen | 864.250.1234 patrickfranzen@msn.com Highland Homes | 864.233.4175 www.highlandhomessc.com To submit your Featured Home: homes@greenvillejournal.com

W NE

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OPEN HOUSE 4/21, 2-4pm

HIGHGROVE ESTATES

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14 Ganibrille Court MLS#1256672 • $449,000

28 Quail Hill Drive MLS#1253667 • $995,000

1140 Parkins Mill MLS# 1251004 • $875,000

40 Club Forest Lane MLS#1253827 • $605,000

3 Claymore Court MLS#1257061 • $564,900

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

Selling Greenville for over 28 years. Ranked #4 out of 100 Agents. 864.419.2889 | See my listings: cbcaine.com/agents/HelenHagood

C43R

Helen Hagood

APRIL 19, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 45


JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND

O P E N S U N D AY, A P R I L 21 F R O M 2 – 4 P M

NEW LISTING!

1 CHESSINGTON CT, SIMPSONVILLE $324,900 • MLS 1255922 Wonderful 3BR/3.5BA Craftsman style home, it was originally the builder’s personal home. The quality of this home is outstanding! Lower level has a cozy media room with bar (media projector and screen stays). Extra long adjoining garage. Great open kitchen /dining/ butler area, well suited for entertaining. The second level is a full master suite with a very generous master BR with large bathroom en suite. The office loft just outside the master doors has built in bookcases. This wonderful home is located in a small subdivision, convenient to everything you need. Seller is supplying One Year Home Trust Warranty.

www.allentate.com/cynthiaserra Cynthia.Serra@allentate.com

J43

Cynthia Serra 864.304.3372

PE OPL E, AWA RD S, HONOR S 23 Deer Track Road, River Walk Lydia Johnson Joins Carol Pyfrom Realty Greenville, SC – Carol Pyfrom Realty is pleased to announce that Lydia Johnson has joined the team as a licensed REALTOR.

Stunning 4 bedroom, 3 bathroom brick home on cul-de-sac street, backs to the walking trail. 3 car garage with additional storage. Large living room, dining room, and great room with gas log fireplace. Beautiful kitchen with cherry cabinets and breakfast room. Large master suite with huge walk in closet, master bath with jetted tub, double sinks and separate shower. Large sunroom with sunken hot tub. Beautifully landscaped yard with stone walls and patio Neighborhood amenities include: clubhouse, pool, swimteam, tennis courts, playground and walking trails. Hwy 14 to Five Forks Road, turn on Parkside Drive, Left on River Walk Drive, Left on Rockberry Terrace, Right on Deer Track.

HOME INFO Price: $485,000 | MLS: #1251171 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 3 Square Footage: 3800-3999 Schools: Monarch Elementary Mauldin Middle | Mauldin High Contact: Liliana DeAngeli | 864.616.5368 Prudential C. Dan Joyner, Co. To submit your Open House: homes@greenvillejournal.com

Lydia is a 16year resident of Johnson Greenville. With a degree in Broadcast Journalism and Mass Media, she spent most of her working career with The Greenville News. She is a proud member of the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS, the SC Association of REALTORS and the National Association of REALTORS.

46 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 19, 2013

FOR MORE INFORMATION

JournalHOMES.com


re atu n g Si

re atu n g Si

re atu n g Si

117 James St. - Downtown

720 Villaggio Dr. - Montebello

100 W. Court St. - Downtown

$580,000 • Non-MLS • 5 BR/3 BA

$569,900 • 1254535 • 3 BR/3.5 BA

$525,000 • 1236926 • 3 BR/3 BA

Historic Willie Ward home. Col Elias Earle Historic District Tom Marchant 864.449.1658

e tur na g i S

3080 Earls Bridge Rd. - Easley $499,900 • 1237373 • 4 BR/ 3.5 BA Mini Estate, lake views, 3500 sf w/2 MBR suites on 2.20 ac, 3 lvl-4600 sf barn. Anne Marchant 864.420.0009 Jolene Wimberly 864. 414.1688

d. a Rn t s gu io Au ocat L

Gourmet Kitchen, stainless steel appliances, hardwoods, granite, loggia with fireplace, amenities. Nancy McCrory 864.505.8367 | Karen Turpin 864.230.5176

e tur na g i S

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701 Montebello Dr. Unit 104 - Montebello $479,000 • 1235566 • 3 BR/3.5 BA 1 Level, open corner unit condo. ≈3000 sf, guest wing, covered terrace & balcony. Nancy McCrory 864.505.8367 Karen Turpin 864.230.5176

t LL n FU d Bsm e ish Fin

Anne Marchant 864.420.0009 Jolene Wimberly 864. 414.1688

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25 Spring Park Dr. - Mtn Lake Colonies $204,000 • 1257652 • 3 BR/2BA Historic lake comm. 30 mins from Downtown. Heart pine floors. 2 stone fireplaces. 2 car carport. Screened porch.

ed ish ent n i F em s Ba

305 Jones Ave. #3 - Alta Vista $395,000 • 1257507 • 3 BR/3.5 BA Sought after location, walking distance to downtown. Great living space, lots of storage, Low maint. yd. Move in ready.

res Ac 6 +

7 Treecrest - Neely Farm $277,900 • 1257748 • 4 BR/3.5 BA

g itn Lis

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Tom Marchant 864.449.1658

225 Meyers Dr. - Sunset Hills $337,500 • 1255804 • 3 BR/3 BA

Sought after street, Lrg 0.42 ac. lot w/mature trees & 1990 sf, hdwds, updated kitchen ‘08

New price - Award winning 3400 sf d’town condo. Sleek European design, spacious rooms, upscale appliances Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 | Chuck Miller 864.293.4778

107 Winding River Ln. - Whitehall Plntn $344,000 • 1255696 • 4 BR / 4.5 BA Open 5000+ sf home w/finished walk out basement & gourmet Kitchen. Backs up to protected nature preserve.

Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 | Chuck Miller 864.293.4778

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On cul-de-sac w/finished basement incds – kitchenette, gas fpl, office, BA and storage. New roof, and interior paint.

6343 Highway 418 - Fountain Inn $249,921 • 1252537 • 4 BR/3 BA

Spacious BRs, hdwd floors, Florida Rm and In-law Suite. Property has lrg wkhop w/ rollup garage drs & cooled in summer.

112 Whiffletree - Neely Farm $209,000 • 1257735 • 4 BR/2.5 BA + Bonus

Barb Riggs 864.423.2783

Joan Rapp 864.901.3839

Barb Riggs 864.423.2783

ced du e R

ced du e R

101 Ramblewood Ave. - Wildaire $182,500 • 1250944 • 3 BR/2 BA

ced du e R

206 Wilton St. - North Main, D’Town $158,500 • 1253402 • 3 BR / 1 BA

Cul-de-sac lot, hardwood floors & built-ins, beautiful garden, convenient location

Historic craftsman bungalow w/stone exterior. Deep Lot can add detached garage. Commercial overlay. Fannie Mae.

Mary Praytor 864.593.0366

Tom Marchant 864.449.1658 Gordon D. Seay 864.444.4359

Quite street, Screen porch, ss appliance. Updates – New hardwoods all downstairs, carpet & roof

1903 Spring Wood Ct. - Summer Woods $64,900 • 1253360 • 2 BR/ 1.5 BA Large downstairs living area, fenced patio, minutes to I-385/I-85 James Akers 864.325.8413

Kathy Slayter 864.982.7772

RENTAL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE • Marchantpm.com

www.marchantco.com

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864.467.0085 | AGENT ON DUTY: JeanE Bartlett 864. 506.4093

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Celebrating 20 years of Service in the Upstate APRIL 19, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 47


JOURNAL HOMES

JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND CLAREMONT

O P E N S U N D AY, A P R I L 21 F R O M 2 – 4 P M WILLOW CREEK

RIVER WALK

523 CHAMBLEE BLVD . $769,000 . MLS#1252608

129 TUPELO DRIVE . $495,000 . MLS#1256695

23 DEER TRACK RD . $485,000 . MLS#1251171

4BR/4BA Beautiful home under construction in gated community. MBR and 2nd BR + Study on main. Upstairs2BR/2BA + Bonus. 385 S to Roper Mtn exit, L off ramp, go 5 miles to Right into SD on Chamblee Blvd.

4BR/3.5BA Love coming home!! On the 3rd green and almost right on the pond, this 4 bedroom plus bonus home is ready for you to enjoy! Screen porch and huge deck to savor the view. Upgrades galore!

5BR/3BA Stunning brick home w/3 car garage. Beautiful kit w/cherry cabs. Lg sunroom w/sunken hot tub. Hwy 14 to Five Forks Rd, turn on Parkside Dr, L on River Walk Dr, L on Rockberry Terrace, R on Deer Track.

Contact: Margaret Marcum/Leigh Irwin 420-3125/380-7755 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Patty Pfister (864) 630-0410 Keller Williams Main

Contact: Liliana DeAngeli 616-5368 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

WILLOW CREEK

WOODLAND HILLS

382 CREPE MYRTLE DRIVE . $479,000 . MLS#1257679 3BR/3.5BA One of the best golf course views in Willow Creek!! Exquisite home perfect for entertaining--huge kitchen, lovely great room, decking galore. Come and see this perfect home! Contact: Patty Pfister (864) 630-0410 Keller Williams Main

FORRESTER WOODS

111 NIGHTINGALE LANE . $357,500 . MLS#1255725 5BR/4BA Great home in great location. Lots of green space for everyone. Large lot. Wonderful neighborhood. Woodruff Rd to Miller Rd, Left into SD, Left on Nightingale, Home on Left Contact: Tim Keagy 905-3304 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

48 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 19, 2013

2 ROSEFIELD COURT . $329,500 . MLS#1252908 .63 acres Relaxation and peacefullness await you on this back deck! Wonderful home with a great floor plan--master bedroom and guest bedroom on main. 2 other nice bedrooms and a huge bonus upstairs COME & SEE Contact: Patty Pfister (864) 630-0410 Keller Williams Main

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JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND THE ARBORS

O P E N S U N D AY, A P R I L 21 F R O M 2 – 4 P M ASHBY PARK

GILDER CREEK FARM

9 TINSBERRY DR . $224,500 . MLS#1255338

5 RED JONATHAN CT . $209,500 . MLS#1257008

3BR/2BA Brick patio home, private fenced yard, covered patio. Butler Rd off Woodruff, go past Tanner Rd @ CVS, SD will be on the Left, Take 1st Right on Tinsberry

4BR/3.5BA 1 story, move-in ready. GR with fireplace, granite, ss appliances. sun room, covered patio, irrigation, 2 car garage. Woodruff Rd past Five Forks Area, 2nd entrance into SD, Right on Red Jonathan

Contact: Dana Mathewes 240-4722 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

DEER RUN

Contact: Pat Norwood 420-1998 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

TUCKER BRANCH

208 GREEN ARBOR LANE . $317,900 . MLS#1248777

33 DONEMERE WAY . $199,900 . MLS#1249245

3BR/2.5BA New granite, new light fixtures, new paint!! Come and see this fabulous home. Cul de sac, mst on main, landscaped beautifully with a large patio to enjoy it all. You will love this one!!!

3BR/2.5BA Craftsman style, Energy Star home. Upgrades & advanced technology. 385 S to Exit 23, Hwy 418. Go apprx. 1/2 mile and turn Left. Turn Right at light on S. Main, Go 1/2 mile & turn Left into SD

Contact: Patty Pfister (864) 630-0410 Keller Williams Main

Contact: Kate Anderson/Kristin Brady 363-3634/908-7200 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

SHEFFIELD STATION

SIMPSONVILLE

1359 BRUHY CREEK RD . $105,000 . MLS#1254579

102 PARTRIDGEBERRY WAY . $205,000 . MLS#1257066

172 WASSON WAY . $79,000 . MLS#1255808

3BR/2BA Fenced yard, storage building, Forest Acres School, great location. Buit in 1999. Laminate floors. From Hwy. 123 in Easley, turn on Brushy Creek Rd. Go straight & pass Smithfields CC, Home on Left.

4BR/2.5BA Wonderful traditional ranch with mature landscaping in a nice country setting. Lots of updates throughout including freshly painted kitchen cabinets with custom mosaic tile back splash.

3BR/2BA Mobile home on 2 acres, formal DR, woodburning fp Minutes to shopping. 385 S to Exit 27, Right on Fairview Rd, Go 5.4 miles to Right on Woodside Rd, 0.9 miles to Left on Wasson Way, Home on Right.

Contact: Carol Houston 346-7289 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Janet Sandifer 864-979-6713 Carol Pyfrom Realty

Contact: Linda Brown 884-0966 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

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APRIL 19, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 49


JOURNAL HOMES

R E A L E S TAT E N E W S URBAN GOES UPSCALE: New pocket neighborhood offers high-end homes in ideal city setting

80 years of masterpiece artwork on the refrigerator. The real estate professionals of the Caine Companies have always known real estate is about more than buying, selling or leasing houses and buildings. It’s about helping people come home—which we’ve been doing for the past 80 years. Let us help you find your dream home—visit cbcaine.com

He acquired a prime piece of downtown property �ive years ago, and Tom Croft has been visualizing the ideal project to put there ever since. A local developer with an af�inity for in�ill and a passion for downtown – he has 400 North Main, Park View and Field House Flats to his credit – Croft considered condos, townhomes, perhaps even apartments for his land at the intersection of McDaniel and McBee avenues. Then he partnered with his son, architect Thomas Croft, and Zeno Hawkins of Highland Homes, who owned an adjacent plot, and together they drew – and re-drew – multiple plans for each scenario. “We looked at every single thing we could do with the (combined) property,” Hawkins says, “and ultimately we determined THIS is what Greenville needs: upscale single-family homes in an ideal urban setting.” Thus Croft and Hawkins are preparing to break ground on McBee Park, a pocket neighborhood of eight high-end homes with private garden areas and plenty of common greenspace. “This is such a perfect location,” Croft says, and the partners intend to �ill it with premium homes designed and built to the highest standards, then �illed with the �inest �inishes. Each 2- or 2.5-story plan – complete with a 2-car garage and elevator – features a brick exterior and luxurious interior accents such as high ceilings, crown moldings, custom cabinetry and granite countertops along with Wolfe and SubZero appliances. Construction will incorporate environmentally sensitive materials as well as energy-saving products and building techniques. “These details are what our clients have told us they want – it’s what realtors have told us their clients are asking for,” Hawkins says, explaining the in-depth research that’s gone into determining what, exactly, potential downtown-dwellers are seeking. “We know what these high-end clients want in a home.” They also know where. Research indicates increasing preference for urban living -indeed, a 2011 consumer survey by the National Association of Realtors shows some 58 percent of respondents want to live in “a neighborhood with a mix of houses and stores and other businesses within an easy walk.” “We’re hearing people say, ‘I love the idea of being downtown, but maybe not right on Main Street,’” Croft says, because while many an urbanite wants a loft or condo, others still prefer a single-family home – albeit without a time-consuming lawn. “McBee Park really is the best of both worlds: an individual structure with all the privacy that affords, but no more huge yard to keep up,” Hawkins says, noting the majority of the neighborhood’s generous greenspace will be commons area maintained by an HOA. “You get all the bene�its of mature landscaping but you aren’t the one who has to get out there on a Saturday to cut the grass or rake the leaves.” A pioneer in local urban in�ill, the Croft Co. Inc. has been developing downtown projects for more than 20 years while Highland Homes has focused its efforts on in-city custom builds since 2002. “There’s a growing demand for luxury homes downtown,” Hawkins says. “The City of Greenville has done so many things to make this an attractive place to live … and that’s our amenities package: McBee Park has the Zoo, the Peace Center, the Poinsett Club, Fluor Field. It has Main Street.” Just a few short blocks from all Greenville’s award-winning downtown has to offer, McBee Park boasts pedestrian access to shopping, entertainment, recreation, �ine dining and more. “McBee Park is such a rare and special opportunity if you want to live downtown,” Hawkins says. “This really is the ideal address.” Construction at McBee Park is slated to begin in late May. Pre-sales are under way now. For more information, visit www.McBeePark.com or call Patrick Franzen at 864.250.1234.

50 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 19, 2013

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ON THE MARKET FOUNTAIN INN

PARKINS MILL

112 Woodland Lane | Oak Meadows | $519,900

5 BARKSDALE RD . $722,500 .

313 JENKINS BRIDGE RD . $259,900 . MLS#1250471

4BR/5.5BA Gracious Family Home in best location in town. 5500 sq ft Private landscaped .7 ac. Pool & hot tub. Finished walk out bsmnt. w/ bath & kitchen. Tons of storage and extras. Don’t miss this one!

3BR/3BA A beautiful farm house located on a corner lot with tons of yard space for gardening, pets and children to run & play! The updates include: stainless appliances in 2010, roof in ‘02, HVAC 5 ton in ‘09

Contact: SP McNamara (864) 918-9963

Contact: Hilary Hurst (864) 313-6077 Coldwell Banker Caine

MCSWAIN GARDENS

COUNTRY WALK

Unbelievable MINI ESTATE on 5 + Private Level Ac. with 2 story Barn-Work Shop plus a 3 stall Horse Barn. Main house - Custom Brick Ranch - features 3100 + SF, 4BD, 3.5 BA, Florida Room, Home Of�ice that could be 5th BD, Large Den, Formal Dining Room, Master Suite with His & Her walk-in closets & large Master Spa bath with oversized jetted tub & separate shower. Kitchen just remodeled with newly re�inished cabinets, stainless steel appliances & granite tops plus all baths updated with granite. 1 BR & BA has separate entrance that could be in-law suite. Relax & enjoy the peaceful tranquility on your brick patio area. Call for your private showing today. MLS# 1243361

MARCIA HANCOCK

ARB, CRS, GRI 864.270.1878 • MHANCOCK@CBCAINE.COM

PE OPL E , AWA R D S , H ON OR S 216 MCSWAIN DR . $139,900 . MLS#1257211

2 LONG ACRE LN . $65,000 . MLS#1255092

3BR/2BA. Brick ranch in established neighborhood close to Haywood Rd. Home is very well built -has great bones. Home sold “as-is”.

3BR/2BA A tranquil neighborhood located just off Fork Shoals Rd. This cozy split floor plan sits on a large 1.32 acre, level lot that is perfect for a game of football or pets to run about! Must See!

Contact: Ginger Sherman, 313-8638 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Hilary Hurst (864) 313-6077 Coldwell Banker Caine

SEARCH THE HOTTEST NEIGHBORHOODS.

The Marchant Company Recognizes Agents for Excellent Performance in March 2013 April 11, 2013 – The Marchant Company is known as the Upstate’s local “Signature Agency” in Real Estate, representing buyers and sellers of residential, land, and commercial properties. Seabrook Marchant, Broker-in-Charge, recently recognized several agents for their outstanding performance during the month of March. Kathy Slayter was recognized as Unit Listing and Sales Units & Sales Volume

JournalHOMES.com SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

Slayter

T. Marchant

Agent of the month. Tom Marchant was recognized as Volume Listing Agent of the month. “March to SOLD” team, Anne Marchant, Jolene Wimberly and Brian Marchant were recognized as Sales Team of the month. All of the agents at The Marchant Company are dedicated to providing unsurpassed service and are committed to meeting clients’ needs. The Marchant Company proudly serves Greenville as The Name You Know and The People You Trust in Real Estate.

A. Marchant

Wimberly

B. Marchant

APRIL 19, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 51


JOURNAL HOMES

Welcome to the Team! Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS is proud to announce new sales associates have joined the company.

REGINA SALLEY

VIVIAN GORSKI

LINDA BROWN

JAMES MOSER

Easley Cell 864-979-9646 rsalley@cdanjoyner.com

Simpsonville Cell 864-349-6090 vgorski@cdanjoyner.com

Simpsonville Cell 864-884-0966 lbrown@cdanjoyner.com

Simpsonville Cell 864-752-5862 jmoser@cdanjoyner.com

a t homat ehome e m o h t a G 2013 PRING SPRIN S

FALL/WINTER

2012

UMMER 2012 SUMMER S

THE MOST RECOGNIZED, NATIONALLY AWARD WINNING, LOCALLY FOCUSED, HOME MAGAZINE IN THE UPSTATE. GREENVILLE

CHARLESTON

Barnes & Noble - 735 Haywood Rd. Barnes & Noble - 1125 Woodruff Rd. Community Journals - 148 River St.

Indigo Books - 427 Fresh Fields Dr., Johns Island, SC

SPARTANBURG

At Home publishes 3 times a year (Spring, Summer, and Fall/Winter). A 1-year subscription is $20, 2-years is $35. Contact us at 864-679-1200.

SUBSCRIPTIONS

Barnes & Noble - 1489 W. O. Ezell Blvd. The Book Shelf - 90 Pacolet St., Tryon, NC Find us on

Agents on call this weekend

DANA MATHEWES 270-4722 PELHAM RD.

LINDA BOBO 982-8322 SIMPSONVILLE

52 THE JOURNAL | APRIL 19, 2013

JANIE GIBBS 901-3403 WOODRUFF RD.

JESSE CHILDRESS 879-4239 GREER

ASHLEY MARY LOU BARNHARDT BEHLKE 293-4814 915-0253 EASLEY/ PLEASANTBURG POWDERSVILLE

ANNA HILL 787-7653 AUGUSTA RD.

– At Home in the Upstate

Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at

cdanjoyner.com.

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G R E E N V I L L E T R A N S AC T ION S M A R C H 2 5 - 2 9, 2 013 SUBD. HALTON GREEN

WELLINGTON COBBLESTONE SUNRISE GRIFFITH FARM KINGSBRIDGE FIVE FORKS PLANTATION BOTANY WOODS WOODLANDS SOUTHCHASE STONEHAVEN VILLAGGIO DI MONTEBELLO IVY GROVE WEATHERSTONE CHANDLER LAKE VALLEY VILLAS NORTHGATE

PLANTATION GREENE CLEAR SPRINGS PHILLIPS MEADOWS LINDEN PARK SUGAR CREEK CHANDLER LAKE CARILION GREYTHORNE HERITAGE POINT PENNINGTON PARK WEST FARM WARRENTON RAVENWOOD KELSEY GLEN RICHLAND CREEK @ NORTH MAIN ROCKWOOD THE TOWNES AT HIGHGROVE HIGHLAND CREEK THE LOFTS AT MILLS MILL D C & D L JONES THE TOWNES AT HIGHGROVE VICTORIA PARK BROWNSTONE CROSSING COPPER CREEK THE LOFTS AT MILLS MILL THE EDGE ON NORTH MAIN MALLARD CREEK GARDENS AT BRIDGES CROSSING REEDY SPRINGS CREEKWOOD NEELY FARM - HAWTHORNE RIDGE GREYTHORNE THE BRIO POINSETTIA CASTLE ROCK FOXGLOVE THE COVE AT SAVANNAH POINTE BEAUMONT FAIRVIEW POINTE GILDER CHASE POINSETTIA COPPER CREEK FLAGSTONE VILLAGE OAK POINTE THE RESERVES AT RAVENWOOD QUAIL RUN HAWK POINTE LONG CREEK PLANTATION HALF MILE LAKE PARK HILL SEVEN OAKS@BLUE RIDGE PLANTATION FOX TRACE GWINN MEADOWS BEECHWOOD PLACE UNIVERSITY PLACE CARDINAL CREEK TOWNES AT PINE GROVE RIVER BIRCH VILLAS FAIRVIEW CHASE STONEBRIDGE STONEBRIDGE FAIRVIEW POINTE MORNING MIST FARM BAILEY MILL FARM

PRICE

SELLER

$2,000,000 $1,862,500 $1,500,000 $1,210,000 $910,000 $776,350 $695,000 $554,886 $530,000 $515,000 $509,500 $487,785 $471,010 $455,000 $455,000 $442,000 $435,000 $414,000 $405,000 $401,000 $400,000 $395,000 $352,500 $352,500 $339,900 $333,102 $318,000 $315,000 $300,000 $298,895 $278,000 $274,020 $273,000 $268,000 $267,500 $260,916 $260,000 $259,100 $256,000 $251,639 $251,000 $250,000 $248,000 $241,887 $241,000 $238,500 $236,000 $231,570 $228,000 $227,000 $225,629 $225,000 $220,000 $207,500 $205,000 $204,000 $201,406 $201,000 $200,000 $198,101 $193,200 $193,000 $190,975 $190,000 $188,459 $186,176 $186,000 $185,000 $182,500 $180,200 $179,900 $179,000 $177,922 $175,000 $174,000 $172,000 $171,000 $170,000 $167,000 $165,000 $164,500 $164,000 $163,000 $162,500 $162,000 $160,000 $158,100 $157,900 $155,000 $153,366 $152,750 $152,750 $152,500 $151,500 $149,000

ENIGMA CORPORATION SPINKS INVESTMENTS INC 1414 E WASHINGTON ST STE N WOODVAN LLC WHITFIELD COMPANY LLC TH 6518 DORCHESTER RD CLIFFS AT GLASSY INC THE CORNERSTONE NATIONAL BAN PO BOX 428 CARPENTER INVESTORS LLC INDEPENDENCE NATIONAL BA 500 E WASHINGTON ST WELLINGTON SUBDIVISION L D R HORTON INC 8200 ROBERTS DR STE 100 STONELEDGE PROPERTIES LL WATTENBERG SCOTT R (JTWR 18 COBBLER LN HIGHLAND HOMES LLC SMITH STEVEN CRANDALL (J 4 SUNSET DR JG BUILDERS INC FORD ROBERT (JTWROS) 10 GRIFFITH KNOLL WAY WOODRUFF PROPERTIES GEN THREE GIRLEE GIRLZ LLC 430 WOODRUFF RD SLAUGHTER LAUREN K CHAPMAN VIRGINIA M (JTWR 12 KINGS RESERVE CIR CHAPMAN KIRK CLARK CAROLINE DUNN 4 W TALLULAH DR NVR INC RINGENBERG KATHLEEN 14 STRATTON CHAPEL CT BANC OF AMERICA MORTG SE HIPP CHARLES W JR 235 CURETON ST REEL PROPERTIES GROUP CO PARKER PATTI 10 WOOD FORD CT BROOKS ELEANOR H AMERICAN STARLINGER-SAHM 180 COMMERCE CENTER SUHS JULYNN PICHAI SHARON GRAF (JTWR 720 CARRIAGE HILL RD EATON JOANNE A DUPUTEL DUNCAN DONN E 601 VILLAGGIO DR BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT HENSON JEFFREY C (JTWROS 24 GROVE VALLEY WAY VIRANI LLC PITTS JAMES WADE JR (JTW 225 BRANDAU LN BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT BARKLEY JERRY G (JTWROS) 2 TEA OLIVE PL ORIOLE PROPERTIES LLC MANNING TOM (JTWROS) 115 ADIRONDACK DR HELLER TRUDE S GILLIS CHRISTOPHER (JTWR 36 PINEHURST DR JESUS EL RAY ASAMBLEA DE JESUS EL RAY ASAMBLEA DE 2499 E NORTH ST WENTWORTH KIMBERLY J FORD TARA MARTIN (SURV) 2036 CLEVELAND STREET EXT LS RESIDENTIAL LLC LYNAM DANIEL 7 FIRNSTONE CT BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT FLAIG LANCE M 2 ANGEL FALLS DR VANDERWEST RYAN MCCULLOUGH TAMARA 30 PHILLIPS MEADOW WAY ALEXANDER SUSIE H SCARPETTA JOSEPH 204 WEDDINGTON LN HOFFMAN STEVEN O KAMLET JASON E (JTWROS) 32 OAK CREST CT BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT HALL CARMEN M 9 TEA OLIVE PLACE KENNA COURTNEY A SCHNEIDER DEBORAH L 203 CARILION LN S C PILLON HOMES INC NELSON JEFFREY D 1 DAWN MEADOW CT BOMAR JACQUELINE M SEEHAFER JASON P 300 RAVEN ROCK LN APT 405 SMITH ORLANDO AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR 23815 STUART RANCH RD STE 302 WILLIAMS APRIL L PAYNE JIMMY G (JTWROS) 233 COUNTRY MIST DR MUNGO HOMES INC UZARRAGA ESTEBAN ALONSO 609 CHILLINGHAM CT HAYS KAY K KRISHNAKUMAR POORNATHRES 511 SUMMERGREEN WAY RELIANT SC LLC SCHMARDER MICHAEL 120 RAVAN FALLS LN JO-MAC INVESTMENTS LLC BOSSHARDT GLENN R (JTWRO 283 RIDGE WAY NVR INC CHANDLER CONNIE ANN 315 KELSEY GLEN LN FOLDI LASLO PRICE JORDAN H 6 CREEKSTONE CT FOSTER THOMAS H MARCHANT A SONJA 2408 ROYAL OAK DR COOK JO W ELLIS JOSEPH D (JTWROS) 111 HICKORY DR NVR INC BANE DARREN H (JTWROS) 224 BICKLEIGH CT YOUNG JULIAN WHITE JOSEPH H (JTWROS) 3 KILLEAN CT GRAYSON-MILLS TERRY KEE HELEN R 400 MILLS AVE UNIT 207 JONES DAVID C EDWARDS ERIC T 3710 BALLENGER RD NVR INC BUFFALO JENNIFER B 30 PATEWOOD DR STE 257 VICTORIA PROPERTIES LLC SK BUILDERS INC 52 SAINT MARKS RD ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC GUINAN SHARON R (JTWROS) 104 UPPER MEADOW WAY MUNGO HOMES INC DESROSIERS JASON (JTWROS 116 MOORGATE DR RAGSDALE MARCUM K KLINEDINST JOHN S 400 MILLS AVE #215 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GATEWOOD AVE SK BUILDERS INC FULLER BENJAMIN K (JTWRO 137 DAMASCUS DR ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION L LEONELLI JOSEPH (JTWROS) 20 LEBANON CT RINKER JAMES L JR GILLIG JEANIE KATHRYN 502 FIELDING WAY D R HORTON INC MISTRULLI ANGELA MARIE 42 COPPERDALE DR AMBASSADOR MEDIA CORP 427 WADE HAMPTON LLC PO BOX 25817 GIRARD GREGORY D OLSON SCOTT M 311 QUAIL RUN CIR LACROIX CONEY R PATRICK JASON WAYNE 109 GAIL DR BAYLIS JAMES R (JTWROS) BAYLIS JAMES R (JTWROS) 140 HAWKCREST CT DOTTERER DENNIS KOMENKO MANDY A 10 BITTERCREST CT BOHLANDER DIANE S TRUSTE PITTS CURTIS A (JTWROS) 801 HALF MILE WAY BROOKWOOD VENTURES LLC JOHNSON DANIEL 2537 ELLIS RD GREER STATE BANK HOFFNER CHARLENE 2 MOSSYCUP RD BALLARD MAX E HOWELL GORDON F (JTWROS) 130 SCOTTISH AVE HILLER DEBRA PICKENS HILLER ROBERT E 21 CROFT ST GWINN MEADOWS LLC POUND DONALD B 114 GWINN ST BOETTCHER EMILY HOWARD HENRY F (JTWROS) 104 BRANDI STARR CT CARTER SHERRY W WALTZ BRANDON COREY (JTW 301 FAIRWOOD DR MULLEN CARLIE GREY KEIGLEY BARBARA G 8 WHITETHORN LN NVR INC BAKER DANIEL W 351 JUNIPER BEND CIR MONTAGNA CHARLES E DOYLE ROGER M (JTWROS) 26 RIVER BIRCH WAY MUNGO HOMES INC NELSON LISA KATHLEEN 305 RIVERS EDGE CIR DAY JAMES L CARTUS FINANCIAL CORPORA 16 BUCKHEAD LN CARTUS FINANCIAL CORPORA AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR 16 BUCKHEAD LN SECRETARY OF VETERANS AF POTTMEYER JOY (JTWROS) 9 ROSE PETAL CT BOLT CHARLES M COLEMAN ALAN G (SURV) 1 ROSEMOSS CT KYKER JAMES V CHADWELL JOSEPH B (JTWRO 240 AUGUSTINE DR

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

BUYER

ADDRESS

JOURNAL HOMES

R E A L E S TAT E N E W S NAR Tech Edge Gives Realtors® Tools to Enhance Their Business

Technology has transformed the way Realtors® do business, and the National Association of Realtors® is helping members keep up with the latest trends that can enhance business and client relations. NAR Tech Edge, a one-day technology conference hosted by NAR, will give attendees the chance to learn about cutting-edge technologies that are changing the real estate industry.

“Technology continues to change the way that Realtors® and the real estate business operate,” said 2013 President of the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® Bill Lawton, broker-in-charge of Keller Williams Realty in Greenville, SC. “Keeping abreast of the latest tech trends helps Realtors® enhance their business processes and pro�itability and better connect with all parties in the real estate transaction. NAR Tech Edge is a great opportunity for Realtors® to further expand and build upon the techniques and tools they’ve already successfully incorporated into their business.”

According to the 2012 NAR Member Pro�ile, technology tools are integral to Realtors®’ business. Nearly all NAR members reported using e-mail daily, and nearly eight out of 10 reported daily use of smartphones with wireless e-mail and Internet capabilities. More than half of all Realtors® reported having their own website, as well as using social media tools regularly.

NAR Tech Edge will take place in several locations across the U.S. starting this spring. NAR speakers and local technology experts will present sessions on topics including mobile marketing, online reputation management, Google and cloud computing, content strategy, social media, the importance of photo and video, and much more. Realtor® Bill Lublin, CEO of the Social Media Marketing Institute and Century 21 Advantage Gold, will be one of the presenters and emcees for NAR Tech Edge’s 2013 tour. Lublin has been recognized as a thought leader for his insights regarding social media and its use in the real estate business. NAR Director of Digital Engagement Nobu Hata will also emcee and present at NAR Tech Edge events. Hata is an industry veteran and an expert in marketing and communications trends, social media, and technology in the real estate industry. Realtor® Amy Chorew, Vice President of Platform Development at Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate, will also be an emcee and presenter. Chorew is a national instructor experienced in helping managers and agents maximize the opportunities that technology offers them. NAR Tech Edge Gives Realtors® Tech Tools to Enhance Their Business

NAR Tech Edge will take place in Fairfax, Va., on April 12; Bullhead City, Ariz., on April 19; San Francisco on July 24; Boca Raton, Fla., on August 7; Columbus, Ohio on September 7; Parsippany, N.J., on September 23; Chicago on October 9; and Spring�ield, Mass., on October 18. For more information and how to register visit www.epronar.com/nar_tech_edge.cfm. Media and non-NAR members are welcome to attend.

The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing 1 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries. Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® represents over 1,600 members in all aspects of the real estate industry. Please visit the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® web site at www.ggar.com for real estate and consumer information. “Every market is different, call a REALTOR® today.”

APRIL 19, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 53


journal culture

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week Washington Center student Ezra Reese is pictured during a Special Olympics competition at Furman University.

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE There will be a PUBLIC HEARING before the GREENVILLE COUNTY BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS ON WEDNESDAY, MAY 8, 2013 AT 3:00 P.M. in CONFERENCE ROOM –D at GREENVILLE COUNTY SQUARE, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, S.C., for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the petitions listed below. PERSONS HAVING AN INTEREST IN THESE PETITIONS MAY BECOME PARTIES OF RECORD BY FILING WITH THE BOARD, AT LEAST THREE (3) DAYS PRIOR TO THE SCHEDULED DATE SET FOR HEARING, BY WRITING THEIR ADDRESS, A STATEMENT OF THEIR POSITION AND THE REASONS WHY THE RELIEF SOUGHT WITH RESPECT TO SUCH PROPERTY SHOULD OR SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED. CB-13-22 APPLICANT: SHERYL STAUFFER PROPERTY: Tax Map #278-1-14; 412 ROCKMONT ROAD, GREENVILLE SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception to allow a Home Bakery As a Home Occupation CB-13-23 APPLICANT: SCI TOWERS/ Eastminister Presbyterian Church PROPERTY: Tax Map #539.3-118.1; 2240 WOODRUFF ROAD, SIMPSONVILLE SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception to allow installation of A 150-foot monopole communications tower CB-13-24 APPLICANT: FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH PROPERTY: Tax Map #P015.13-22.1; 500 W. LEE ROAD, TAYLORS SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception to allow use of old parsonage for transitional home for women. CB-13-25 APPLICANT: BILLY B. HUSKEY PROPERTY: Tax Map #WG4-1-7; 2054 PIEDMONT HWY, GREENVILLE SC REQUEST: VARIANCE from Right Side Setback. CB-13-26 APPLICANT HEELS PROPERTIES, LLC PROPERTY: Tax Map #538.2-12.3; 4812 OLD SPARTANBURG RD, TAYLORS SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception for Expansion of a Legal Nonconforming Use & Structure.

SUMMONS NOTICE IN THE FAMILY COURT OF THE THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE 2013-DR-23-0928 Dorothy Lynn Foxx, Plaintiff, vs. JohnDoe, Defendant. ORDER FOR PUBLICATION Upon showing to my satisfaction of due diligence as required by S.C. Code Ann. § 15-9-710 (1976 and Supp. 2001), I hereby order that the Defendant in this matter, John Doe, be served by publication of the Summons in the following newspaper which is most likely to give notice to the Defendant: the Greenville Journal. Such publication should take place one per week for three weeks, pursuant to the S.C. Ann. § 15-9-740 (1976 and Supp. 2001). IT IS SO ORDERED. March 20, 2013 SUMMONS TO THE DEFENDANT ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in the above entitled action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you (and which has been filed in the Office of the Clerk of Court) and serve a copy of your Answer upon the attorney for the Plaintiff, at her office located at Post Office Box 10184, Greenville, SC, 29603, within thirty (30) days after the date of such service, exclusive of the day of service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within that time, judgment by default will be rendered against you for that relief demanded in the Complaint. Margaret A. Chamberlain CHAMBERLAIN LAW FIRM South Carolina Bar #015226 Post Office Box 10184 Greenville, SC 29603 Telephone (864)250-0505 Facsimile (864)271-8097 ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF

FORFEITED LAND COMMISSION SALE The Forfeited Land Commission (FLC) of Greenville County will begin selling assignments on properties not sold at the Greenville County Delinquent Tax Sale. This sale will begin April 30, 2013 at 1:00 p.m. in the Greenville County Treasurer’s office, 301 University Ridge, Suite 600. Random numbers will be drawn to establish place in line at 1:00 p.m. The FLC will accept offers-to-purchase equal to the published price for each property. Offers-to-purchase will be considered in the order submitted. The FLC reserves the right to reject any offer-topurchase that does not meet these published requirements. Payment will only be accepted in the form of cash, cashier’s check or money order from a recognized financial institution and must be received at the time the sale is made. Property is sold “as is”. Tax accounts of buyers must be in good standing with the Greenville County Tax Collector. A list of the properties as well as an offer form can be obtained in the Forfeited Land Commission section of the Greenville County Treasurer’s web page –http://www. greenvillecounty.org/County_ Treasurer/ or in the Greenville County Treasurer’s Office.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Aramark Educational Services, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at Trone Student Center, 3300 Poinsett Highway, Greenville SC 29613. To object to the issuance of this license/ permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than April 28, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

LEGAL NOTICES Only $.79 per line ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Only $145

Presbyterian College’s Eta Xi chapter of Alpha Delta Pi presented a donation of $25,000 to the Ronald McDonald House of Charities of the Carolinas Friday, April 5, 2013. The chapter stopped by with goodies from their wish list, a tour of the house and a check presentation. The Ronald McDonald House is grateful for Alpha Delta Pi’s continued support.

tel 864.679.1205 fax 864.679.1305

Hughes Academy’s Battle of the Brains Team finished the season in the Final Four, losing to St. Paul’s of Spartanburg, 76-75, in the semifinals. They will travel to New Orleans at the National Academic Competition.

email aharley@communityjournals.com

WYFF-TV anchor and author Michael Cogdill visited the Christ Church Episcopal School Lower School on April 9, reading from his children’s book, “Cracker the Crab and the Sideways Afternoon.”

54 THE Journal | APRIL 19, 2013


journal culture

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week

Crossword puzzle: page 56

Upstate UpstateFoodie .com Feed Your Inner Food Enthusiast

®

Gerry pate / contributing

Josiah Gouge mows his neighbor's grass.

Gerry pate / contributing

Gerry pate / contributing

Ray Price gets in some springtime yard work.

Sammy the poodle keeps an eye on his owner’s house while he walks.

Sudoku puzzle: page 56

Erin Couchell

Spartanburg Office

Maria Ahn-Wilson Greenville Office

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APRIL 19, 2013 | THE Journal 55


journal culture

Rosé 2013 By: Richard deBondt

figure. this. out. Herbal tease

By Robin Stears

It is HOT! Time for Rosé. The traditional summertime table wine of Europe is ideal for our Carolina summers. Great for picnics and light snacks, it also serves well with red meat dishes that might cry out for big red wine in cooler times. Who needs high-alcohol heavyweights when you break into a sweat just walking across the patio? Rosé is the thing. Just about every traditional red wine region has its Rosés. Bordeaux, the Rhone, Rioja, and even Burgundy all have important Rosé products. Producers can’t help themselves wanting to make Rosé. Winemakers’ get hot and thirsty too! A similar situation exists in California, Oregon, and Washington. Even wineries famous for expensive red wine occasionally release rosés from every grape imaginable. Provence, in the South of France, is legendary for Rosé. Estate grown Provence Rosé can be $50. Don’t be shocked at the price, these wines are classic, dry, elegant and worthy of special attention. However, if your backyard barbeque has less royal standards, good, dry Provence can be under $15. For all but the elite, youth is a virtue. Drink the youngest Rosé available. Throughout the rest of Europe Rosé is common. The best examples tend to mention a region rather than a grape. Look for Bordeaux, Tavel, Lirac, Rioja, or Navarra; not for Merlot, Cabernet, Grenache, or Syrah. There are even classic European districts famous for slightly sweet fresh Rosé, notably Anjou in the Loire valley. Don’t overlook the U.S.A as a source for premium Rosé. “White Zinfandel” (Rosé really) still tops the sales charts but there are many fine dry alternatives. Pinot Noir producers often make “Vin Gris”. Since we do not have a region devoted to the style bottles will often bear the name of the principle grape used. Any top producer is likely to make good Rosé. Again, look for recent vintages, and chill!

Northampton Wines www.northamptonwines.com 211-A East Broad Street • 271-3919 56 THE Journal | APRIL 19, 2013

Across 1 Pricey sweaters 8 They remove bad marks 15 Vertebral bones 20 “__ Flame”: Bangles ballad 21 One in the running 22 Blood of the gods 23 Observation about sprouting aromatic plants? 26 Elementary fivesome 27 Roo’s refuge 28 Soul-searching events? 29 XIII x IV 31 __-mo replay 32 “Washboard” muscles 35 __ y Plata: Montana motto 36 “Yes, I’m positive this seed is in fivespice powder”? 43 Period relative 44 Trifle 45 Ultimate goal 46 Easy target 48 Where It.’s at 49 Alphabet trio 51 Chinese tea 52 “Sideways” co-star Paul 55 “We should whip up some pickle flavoring”? 60 Proceed (from)

61 Mythical sea nymphs 62 Yield to gravity 64 2005 Nobel-winning dramatist 65 Tears down, in Dover 68 Broadband letters 69 Hägar creator Browne 71 Can’t forgo 72 Bear witness 74 “My country, __ ...” 76 Every garçon has one 78 Pasture critters 80 Like something even better than a pungent herb? 85 Black-and-tan terrier 87 Center of gravity? 88 “__ rang?” 89 Aladdin’s monkey 90 California’s Big __ 91 Patio-brewed beverage 93 Many IRA payees 95 Stimpy’s sidekick 96 Incense hung in two places? 103 Sushi tuna 104 Part of MYOB 105 “Nerts!” 106 Poetry Out Loud org. 107 Working like a dog 111 Prevent 113 Razzle-dazzle 117 Getting by with a loaner herb? 122 __ acid

123 Groundbreaking Reagan appointee 124 Showed disdain 125 Forms 126 Positively charged particles 127 Leather treaters Down 1 Cactus League spring training city 2 Native Oklahoman 3 Half up front? 4 Biological ring 5 Goes with one’s gut 6 “Yay, team!” 7 Maidenform buy 8 Swamp 9 The “R” in Edward R. Murrow 10 Eastern nursemaid 11 McCartney title 12 San Diego-to-Albuquerque dir. 13 “What’s the Frequency, Kenneth?” band 14 Jorge’s half-dozen 15 Bollywood strings 16 Urgent come-on 17 Prefix with -aholic 18 Boxer’s attire 19 Olympian warrior 24 Always butting in 25 Old electronic display source 30 Weatherman’s line 32 They’re history 33 Murphy __

34 Blast furnace refuse 36 Honest 37 “The Wizard of Id” co-creator Johnny 38 Tossed in, as a losing poker hand 39 Radar’s soda brand 40 Byron’s words

Easy

before “’Tis but the truth in masquerade” 41 Probate concern 42 Snitched 43 Flotsam or Jetsam in “The Little Mermaid” 47 Beach resort strolling spots

50 Jefferson, for one 51 MP3 holders 53 As a rule 54 Temper 56 Earn a blessing? 57 __ around: wasted time 58 Wing it 59 Weighed down 63 Euphoric 65 Music for 15-Down 66 Lobby brightener 67 Characterized by twinkling 70 Put the __ on: quash 73 Criticizing harshly 75 U.K.’s longest river 76 Country singer David Allan __ 77 Polo VIP 79 Gentrification target 81 “You betcha!” 82 Viscount’s superior 83 Third man? 84 Kicks 86 Warrior companion of 19-Down 92 Credit checker Experian, pre-1996 94 Equal-ize? 97 Gorge 98 Safari sights 99 Moon of Uranus 100 Pyle portrayer 101 Leave out of the freezer 102 City SW of Essen 107 Bridge feat 108 Chauffeured car 109 Voracious 110 Gunk 111 Villain on Crab Key 112 Symbol on a staff 114 Ancient harplike instrument 115 AKC part: Abbr. 116 Nugent and Turner 118 ATM maker 119 Heckle 120 Fort Erie’s prov. 121 Letters from your parents? Crossword answers: page 55

Sudoku answers: page 55


WITH BILL KOON

In search of a balanced retirement I have time on my hands here in retirement. Things have to be done now and then, but there’s none of the urgency about projects and responsibilities that I had during my working life. I’m learning that I no longer have to set an alarm clock, that I don’t have to leap out of the shower quite so fast any more, that I do have time to floss my teeth, that I don’t have to jump into my clothes while glancing around to see where I left my coffee cup. Even so, I like to have a little structure, to wake up knowing that there is something to be done that day – something to occupy me a bit and allow me some small sense of accomplishment. And I have developed a plan that works well for me. It is based on the model of a vitamin pill called “One-A-Day.” I try to have one specific item in mind for my day. And I try to avoid confusion by keeping it to one item only. For example, the activity for a day might be getting a haircut. I plan carefully. I have just a few “windows of opportunity,” as we say. My good barber doesn’t work on Sunday and Monday, and I like to give him Tuesday to get warmed up and back in the swing of things for the week ahead. The end of the week is out since people with professional obligations and social calendars seem to crowd in on Friday and Saturday. So, in reality, I have only Wednesday and Thursday to work with. I’m an early riser and like to get obligations behind me in the mornings. I know, though, just how awful morning and lunchtime traffic can be, so I have to get my hair trimmed somewhere between 9:30 and 11:30, on Wednesday or Thursday (I’m flexible). The other consideration is that I try to remember to wear a gray sweatshirt or T-shirt and not a black one. Gray hair trimmings show up distinctly on black. With any luck, I can get my hair cut and get home by mid/late morning, thereby leaving myself time to read one of my newspapers before rustling up some lunch before restoring myself with

a nap. Another day’s project might be buying gas. I don’t drive a lot, but I like to keep the tank full. This is one of the few occasions when I use a debit card, which allows me to get the tank really topped off without running back and forth into the station to plop down cash. I like the convenience, but I still don’t like sticking my plastic into a pump that might give some foreign oil company access to my Social Security check and my IRA. I combat my fear in several ways. One is that I always go to the same pump (unless, of course, I’m out on the highway), a pump that has proven trustworthy. I do this on a regular schedule, trusting that the bank would take note of an unusual pump or an unusual amount of gas. Is it too much to imagine that a banker might call to ask if I have changed pumps, been driving excessively, or had a nice vacation trip? I hope not. On top of these sensible precautions, I layer this: as soon as I finish pumping, I shoot home and pull up my bank account on the Internet – just to be sure that the right amount is being deducted by the right people. The point is that, with some thought and careful planning, I can turn the simple business of getting a haircut or buying gas into a “One-A-Day” event. I have similar programs for car washing, filling prescriptions and other necessities like checking my P.O. box. And I keep a few fairly lengthy periods of time open for unforeseen events – a dental emergency, say, or an auto repair. I have to stay on my toes for such challenges since many of them come around no more than once or twice a year. I work for balance. I want to keep it simple, but at the same time I know that an idle mind is the devil’s workshop – which is why I try to stay busy while offering myself some small yet satisfying sense of accomplishment.

Upcoming Recycling Events: Earth Day Celebration & Phone Book Drive Monday, April 22 10 AM – 2 PM N. Greenville Recycling & Education Center Shredding Event Saturday, May 11 9 AM – 12 PM TD Convention Center

RECYCLE

WHERE I’VE BEEN

JOURNAL CULTURE

Electronics & Fluorescent Bulb Recycling Event Saturday, May 18 11 AM – 2 PM 360 S. Hudson St

For more info, call 467-8300 or visit recycle.greenvillesc.gov.

Bill Koon lives in Greenville. He can be contacted at badk@clemson.edu.

APRIL 19, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 57


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April 19, 2013 Greenville Journal